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Sample records for hypersensitive response reveals

  1. Hypersensitive response-related death.

    PubMed

    Heath, M C

    2000-10-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR) of plants resistant to microbial pathogens involves a complex form of programmed cell death (PCD) that differs from developmental PCD in its consistent association with the induction of local and systemic defence responses. Hypersensitive cell death is commonly controlled by direct or indirect interactions between pathogen avirulence gene products and those of plant resistance genes and it can be the result of multiple signalling pathways. Ion fluxes and the generation of reactive oxygen species commonly precede cell death, but a direct involvement of the latter seems to vary with the plant-pathogen combination. Protein synthesis, an intact actin cytoskeleton and salicylic acid also seem necessary for cell death induction. Cytological studies suggest that the actual mode and sequence of dismantling the cell contents varies among plant-parasite systems although there may be a universal involvement of cysteine proteases. It seems likely that cell death within the HR acts more as a signal to the rest of the plant rather than as a direct defence mechanism. PMID:11199391

  2. Hypersensitive response - A biophysical phenomenon of producers.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Zoobia; Ahmad, Aqeel; Shafique, Sobiya; Anjum, Tehmina; Shafique, Shazia; Akram, Waheed

    2013-06-01

    Hypersensitive response/reaction is a form of the cellular demise frequently linked alongside plant resistance against pathogen infection. Main transducers for this reaction are the intermediates of reactive oxygen and ion fluxes which are plausibly needed for hypersensitive response (Hpr Sen Rsp). An immediate and enormous energy production and its intra-cellular biochemical conduction are imperative for an Hpr Sen Rsp to be occurred. A number of studies proved that there are such diverse types of factors involved in triggering of Hpr Sen Rsp that morphologies of dead cells have become a vast topic of study. Hpr Sen Rsp could play a frolic role in plants as certain programmed cellular disintegrations in other organisms, to restrict pathogen growth. In fact, Hpr Sen Rsp can be involved in all types of tissues and most of the developmental stages. PMID:24265926

  3. Hypersensitive response – A biophysical phenomenon of producers

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Zoobia; Shafique, Sobiya; Anjum, Tehmina; Shafique, Shazia; Akram, Waheed

    2013-01-01

    Hypersensitive response/reaction is a form of the cellular demise frequently linked alongside plant resistance against pathogen infection. Main transducers for this reaction are the intermediates of reactive oxygen and ion fluxes which are plausibly needed for hypersensitive response (Hpr Sen Rsp). An immediate and enormous energy production and its intra-cellular biochemical conduction are imperative for an Hpr Sen Rsp to be occurred. A number of studies proved that there are such diverse types of factors involved in triggering of Hpr Sen Rsp that morphologies of dead cells have become a vast topic of study. Hpr Sen Rsp could play a frolic role in plants as certain programmed cellular disintegrations in other organisms, to restrict pathogen growth. In fact, Hpr Sen Rsp can be involved in all types of tissues and most of the developmental stages. PMID:24265926

  4. Revealing the importance of meristems and roots for the development of hypersensitive responses and full foliar resistance to Phytophthora infestans in the resistant potato cultivar Sarpo Mira

    PubMed Central

    Or?owska, El?bieta; Llorente, Briardo

    2012-01-01

    The defence responses of potato against Phytophthora infestans were studied using the highly resistant Sarpo Mira cultivar. The effects of plant integrity, meristems, and roots on the hypersensitive response (HR), plant resistance, and the regulation of PR genes were analysed. Sarpo Mira shoots and roots grafted with the susceptible Bintje cultivar as well as non-grafted different parts of Sarpo Mira plants were inoculated with P. infestans. The progress of the infection and the number of HR lesions were monitored, and the regulation of PR genes was compared in detached and attached leaves. Additionally, the antimicrobial activity of plant extracts was assessed. The presented data show that roots are needed to achieve full pathogen resistance, that the removal of meristems in detached leaves inhibits the formation of HR lesions, that PR genes are differentially regulated in detached leaves compared with leaves of whole plants, and that antimicrobial compounds accumulate in leaves and roots of Sarpo Mira plants challenged with P. infestans. While meristems are necessary for the formation of HR lesions, the roots of Sarpo Mira plants participate in the production of defence-associated compounds that increase systemic resistance. Based on the literature and on the presented results, a model is proposed for mechanisms involved in Sarpo Mira resistance that may apply to other resistant potato cultivars. PMID:22844094

  5. Contact hypersensitivity response to isophorone diisocyanate in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, M.L.; Brown, T.A.; Brown, R.D.; Munson, A.E. )

    1989-09-01

    Isophorone diisocyanate was evaluated for its potential as a sensitizing agent for allergic contact hypersensitivity in mice. Female B6C3F1 mice were sensitized with 0.1, 0.3, and 1.0% isophorone diisocyanate and challenged with 3.0% isophorone diisocyanate. Doses of isophorone diisocyanate were selected from assays for primary irritancy. Mice received 20 microliters by direct dermal application, for 5 days, to sites prepared by shaving, dermabrading and, in some mice, with intra dermal injection of complete Freund's adjuvant. The rest period was 7 days. Measurement of the contact hypersensitivity response in mice was by radioisotopic assay two days after challenge and mouse ear swelling one and two days after challenge. Mice demonstrated statistically significant dose-dependent contact hypersensitivity responses to isophorone diisocyanate with or without adjuvant pretreatment.

  6. Hypersensitivity Responses in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Khorooshi, Reza; Asgari, Nasrin; Mørch, Marlene Thorsen; Berg, Carsten Tue; Owens, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    Immune-mediated tissue damage or hypersensitivity can be mediated by autospecific IgG antibodies. Pathology results from activation of complement, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, mediated by inflammatory effector leukocytes include macrophages, natural killer cells, and granulocytes. Antibodies and complement have been associated to demyelinating pathology in multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions, where macrophages predominate among infiltrating myeloid cells. Serum-derived autoantibodies with predominant specificity for the astrocyte water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) are implicated as inducers of pathology in neuromyelitis optica (NMO), a central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disease where activated neutrophils infiltrate, unlike in MS. The most widely used model for MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, is an autoantigen-immunized disease that can be transferred to naive animals with CD4+ T cells, but not with antibodies. By contrast, NMO-like astrocyte and myelin pathology can be transferred to mice with AQP4–IgG from NMO patients. This is dependent on complement, and does not require T cells. Consistent with clinical observations that interferon-beta is ineffective as a therapy for NMO, NMO-like pathology is significantly reduced in mice lacking the Type I IFN receptor. In MS, there is evidence for intrathecal synthesis of antibodies as well as blood–brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, whereas in NMO, IgG accesses the CNS from blood. Transfer models involve either direct injection of antibody and complement to the CNS, or experimental manipulations to induce BBB breakdown. We here review studies in MS and NMO that elucidate roles for IgG and complement in the induction of BBB breakdown, astrocytopathy, and demyelinating pathology. These studies point to significance of T-independent effector mechanisms in neuroinflammation. PMID:26500654

  7. Two factors responsible for the development of denervation hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Rosemary; Vrbová, Gerta

    1974-01-01

    1. Innervated adult skeletal muscle is sensitive to acetylcholine at the end-plate region only. After denervation the entire muscle membrane becomes chemosensitive. The period of greatest increase in sensitivity in rat soleus muscles following section of the sciatic nerve in the thigh is between 48 and 72 hr post-operatively. 2. Direct electrical stimulation was found to prevent the onset of the development of denervation hypersensitivity during the first 2-3 days after nerve section. Thereafter, electrical stimulation only reduced the sensitivity of denervated muscles to acetylcholine (ACh). 3. The period of greatest increase in sensitivity follows loss of transmission and degeneration of the nerve terminals. Once this degeneration is under way, electrical stimulation is no longer as effective in preventing the development of denervation hypersensitivity. 4. Hypersensitivity is also seen in muscles on which a small piece of thread or degenerating nerve has been placed. Hypersensitivity following these procedures declines within a few days, unlike denervation hypersensitivity which persists until innervation is restored. 5. The present results suggest that activity alone cannot prevent the development of hypersensitivity in the presence of degenerating nerve fibres, or muscle damage. Activity does however counteract increased sensitivity. It is suggested that two factors interact to produce denervation hypersensitivity; the presence of degenerating nerve tissue and concomitant cellular changes bring about changes in the muscle fibre membrane causing it to become hypersensitive; and the loss of muscle activity, resulting in the persistence of hypersensitivity until innervation is restored. ImagesPlate 1 PMID:4822574

  8. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

    PubMed Central

    Kaltreider, H B

    1993-01-01

    Although the cause and development of most inflammatory and fibrotic interstitial lung diseases are unknown, both the antigenic stimuli and the immunopathogenic mechanisms that produce the syndrome of hypersensitivity pneumonitis have been well described. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis is a group of related inflammatory and fibrotic interstitial lung diseases that result from hypersensitivity immune reactions to the repeated inhalation of antigens derived from fungal, bacterial, animal protein, and reactive chemical sources. Immune complex-induced inflammatory reactions initiate acute lung injury; T cell-mediated hypersensitivity reactions perpetuate it and induce chronic inflammatory, granulomatous, and fibrotic responses in the interstitium of the lungs. Because the natural history of many interstitial lung diseases of unknown causes involves the progressive evolution through these same phases, knowledge about immune pathogenesis gained from studies of hypersensitivity pneumonitis may provide a way to understand the causes and development of other interstitial lung diseases. Images PMID:8279154

  9. Hypersensitive response of beans to Apion godmani (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Garza, R; Vera, J; Cardona, C; Barcenas, N; Singh, S P

    2001-08-01

    High levels of resistance to Apion godinani Wagner have been reported in bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L., landraces from Mexico. We report on the role of hypersensitivity to A. godmani in five resistant and three susceptible bean genotypes. In susceptible genotypes (cultivars 'Canario 107','Jamapa', and 'Zacatecas 45'), the eggs and first instars of A. godmani were embedded in the pod mesocarp and usually were surrounded by healthy tissue. In contrast, in resistant landraces ('Amarillo 154', 'Amarillo 155', 'J-117', 'Puebla 36', and 'Pinto 168'), necrotic tissues developed concentrically around the oviposition site, encapsulating eggs and dead larvae. An inverse relationship between percentage egg and larval encapsulation at the early immature pod stages and percentage of damaged seeds at harvest was found. Results indicate that hypersensitivity in developing pods plays an important role in antibiosis to A. godmani in beans. This information will facilitate future genetic and biochemical research and provide much needed information concerning the phenotypic basis of resistance to A. godmani in bean. PMID:11561858

  10. Light-dependent hypersensitive response and resistance signaling against Turnip Crinkle Virus in Arabidopsis

    E-print Network

    Kachroo, Pradeep

    Light-dependent hypersensitive response and resistance signaling against Turnip Crinkle Virus.edu). Summary Resistance to Turnip Crinkle Virus (TCV) in Arabidopsis ecotype Dijon (Di)-17 is conferred: Turnip Crinkle Virus, salicylic acid, defense, Arabidopsis, signaling, ssi2, light. Introduction Plants

  11. USE OF THE RIBONUCLEASE PROTECTION ASSAY FOR IDENTIFYING CHEMICALS WHICH ELLICIT HYPERSENSITIVITY RESPONSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of the Ribonuclease Protection Assay (RPA) for Identifying Chemicals that Elicit Hypersensitivity Responses. L.M. Plitnick, 1, D.M. Sailstad, 2, and R.J. Smialowicz, 2 1UNC, Curriculum in Toxicology, Chapel Hill, NC and 2USEPA, NHEERL, RTP, NC.

    The incidence of aller...

  12. Tissue-specific expression of a soybean hypersensitive-induced response (HIR) protein gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Koellhoffer, Jessica P; Xing, Aiqiu; Moon, Bryan P; Li, Zhongsen

    2015-02-01

    A Glycine max gene encoding a putative protein similar to hypersensitive-induced response proteins (HIR) was identified as a gene with preferred expressions in flowers and developing seeds by whole transcriptome gene expression profiling. Its promoter gm-hir1 was cloned and revealed to strongly express a fluorescence reporter gene primarily in integuments, anther tapetum, and seed coat with unique tissue-specificity. Expression in the inner integument was apparent prior to pollination, while expression in the outer integument started to develop from the micropylar end outward as the embryo matured. A 5'-deletion study showed that the promoter can be truncated to 600 bp long relative to the translation start site without affecting expression. A positive regulatory element was identified between 600 and 481 bp that controls expression in the inner integument, with no noticeable effect on expression in the outer integument or tapetum. Additionally, removal of the 5'UTR intron had no effect on levels or location of gm-hir1 expression while truncation to 370 bp resulted in a complete loss of expression suggesting that elements controlling both the outer integument and tapetum expression are located within the 481-370 bp region. PMID:25501569

  13. Sphingolipids as New Biomarkers for Assessment of Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity and Response to Triptolide

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Feng; Wu, Cai-Sheng; Hou, Jin-Feng; Jin, Ying; Zhang, Jin-Lan

    2012-01-01

    Background Hypersensitivity diseases are associated with many severe human illnesses, including leprosy and tuberculosis. Emerging evidence suggests that the pathogenesis and pathological mechanisms of treating these diseases may be attributable to sphingolipid metabolism. Methods High performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was employed to target and measure 43 core sphingolipids in the plasma, kidneys, livers and spleens of BALB/c mice from four experimental groups: control, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) model, DTH+triptolide, and control+triptolide. Orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) was used to identify potential biomarkers associated with variance between groups. Relationships between the identified biomarkers and disease markers were evaluated by Spearman correlation. Results As a treatment to hypersensitivity disease, triptolide significantly inhibit the ear swelling and recover the reduction of splenic index caused by DTH. The sphingolipidomic result revealed marked alterations in sphingolipid levels between groups that were associated with the effects of the disease and triptolide treatment. Based on this data, 23 potential biomarkers were identified by OPLS-DA, and seven of these biomarkers correlated markedly with the disease markers (p<0.05) by Spearman correlation. Conclusions These data indicate that differences in sphingolipid levels in plasma and tissues are related to DTH and treatment with triptolide. Restoration of proper sphingolipid levels may attribute to the therapeutic effect of triptolide treatment. Furthermore, these findings demonstrate that targeted sphingolipidomic analysis followed by multivariate analysis presents a novel strategy for the identification of biomarkers in biological samples. PMID:23300675

  14. Enhanced responses of the anterior cingulate cortex neurones to colonic distension in viscerally hypersensitive rats

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun; Wu, Xiaoyin; Owyang, Chung; Li, Ying

    2006-01-01

    The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is critically involved in processing the affective component of pain sensation. Visceral hypersensitivity is a characteristic of irritable bowel syndrome. Electrophysiological activity of the ACC with regard to visceral sensitization has not been characterized. Single ACC neuronal activities in response to colorectal distension (CRD) were recorded in control, sham-treated rats and viscerally hypersensitive (EA) rats (induced by chicken egg albumin injection, i.p). The ACC neurones of controls failed to respond to 10 or 30 mmHg CRD; only 22% were activated by 50 mmHg CRD. Among the latter, 16.4% exhibited an excitatory response to CRD and were labelled ‘CRD-excited’ neurones. In contrast, CRD (10, 30 and 50 mmHg) markedly increased ACC neuronal responses of EA rats (10%, 28% and 47%, respectively). CRD produced greater pressure-dependent increases in ACC spike firing rates in EA rats compared with controls. Splanchnicectomy combined with pelvic nerve section abolished ACC responses to CRD in EA rats. Spontaneous activity in CRD-excited ACC neurones was significantly higher in EA rats than in controls. CRD-excited ACC neurones in control and EA rats (7 of 16 (42%) and 8 of 20 (40%), respectively) were activated by transcutaneous electrical and thermal stimuli. However, ACC neuronal activity evoked by noxious cutaneous stimuli did not change significantly in EA rats. This study identifies CRD-responsive neurones in the ACC and establishes for the first time that persistence of a heightened visceral afferent nociceptive input to the ACC induces ACC sensitization, characterized by increased spontaneous activity of CRD-excited neurones, decreased CRD pressure threshold, and increased response magnitude. Enhanced ACC nociceptive transmission in viscerally hypersensitive rats is restricted to visceral afferent input. PMID:16239277

  15. DWD HYPERSENSITIVE TO UV-B 1 is negatively involved in UV-B mediated cellular responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Hani; Seo, Kyoung-In; Kim, Soon-Hee; Chung, Sunglan; Huang, Xi; Yang, Panyu; Deng, Xing Wang; Lee, Jae-Hoon

    2014-12-01

    Among T-DNA insertion mutants of various cullin4-RING ubiquitin E3 ligase (CRL4) substrate receptors, one mutant that exhibits enhanced sensitivity in response to ultraviolet-B (UV-B) illumination has been isolated and its corresponding gene has been named DWD HYPERSENSITIVE TO UV-B 1 (DHU1) in Arabidopsis. dhu1 lines showed much shorter hypocotyls than those in wild type under low doses of UV-B. Other light did not alter hypocotyl growth patterns in dhu1, indicating the hypersensitivity of dhu1 is restricted to UV-B. DHU1 was upregulated by more than two times in response to UV-B application of 1.5 ?mol m(-2) s(-1), implying its possible involvement in UV-B signaling. DHU1 is able to bind to DDB1, an adaptor of CRL4; accordingly, DHU1 is thought to act as a substrate receptor of CRL4. Microarray data generated from wild-type and dhu1 under low doses of UV-B revealed that 209 or 124 genes were upregulated or downregulated by more than two times in dhu1 relative to wild type, respectively. About 23.4 % of the total upregulated genes in dhu1 were upregulated by more than five times in response to UV-B based on the AtGenExpress Visualization Tool data, while only about 1.4 % were downregulated to the same degree by UV-B, indicating that loss of DHU1 led to the overall enhancement of the upregulation of UV-B inducible genes. dhu1 also showed altered responsiveness under high doses of UV-B. Taken together, these findings indicate that DHU1 is a potent CRL4 substrate receptor that may function as a negative regulator of UV-B response in Arabidopsis. PMID:25193399

  16. Transcriptomic Analysis of Prunus domestica Undergoing Hypersensitive Response to Plum Pox Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rodamilans, Bernardo; San León, David; Mühlberger, Louisa; Candresse, Thierry; Neumüller, Michael; Oliveros, Juan Carlos; García, Juan Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) infects Prunus trees around the globe, posing serious fruit production problems and causing severe economic losses. One variety of Prunus domestica, named ‘Jojo’, develops a hypersensitive response to viral infection. Here we compared infected and non-infected samples using next-generation RNA sequencing to characterize the genetic complexity of the viral population in infected samples and to identify genes involved in development of the resistance response. Analysis of viral reads from the infected samples allowed reconstruction of a PPV-D consensus sequence. De novo reconstruction showed a second viral isolate of the PPV-Rec strain. RNA-seq analysis of PPV-infected ‘Jojo’ trees identified 2,234 and 786 unigenes that were significantly up- or downregulated, respectively (false discovery rate; FDR?0.01). Expression of genes associated with defense was generally enhanced, while expression of those related to photosynthesis was repressed. Of the total of 3,020 differentially expressed unigenes, 154 were characterized as potential resistance genes, 10 of which were included in the NBS-LRR type. Given their possible role in plant defense, we selected 75 additional unigenes as candidates for further study. The combination of next-generation sequencing and a Prunus variety that develops a hypersensitive response to PPV infection provided an opportunity to study the factors involved in this plant defense mechanism. Transcriptomic analysis presented an overview of the changes that occur during PPV infection as a whole, and identified candidates suitable for further functional characterization. PMID:24959894

  17. ROLE FOR MIP-2, MIP-1 AND IL-1 IN DELAYED TYPE HYPERSENSITIVITY RESPONSE TO VIRAL ANTIGEN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Balb/c mice sensitized to HSV-1 develop a vigorous delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) response upon intradermal virus antigen challenge. Although CD4+ T cells are a key mediator of this response, neutrophils are the most abundant cells at the antigen challenge site both initially and at the peak o...

  18. The Active Oxygen Response of Cell Suspensions to Incompatible Bacteria Is Not Sufficient to Cause Hypersensitive Cell Death.

    PubMed Central

    Glazener, J. A.; Orlandi, E. W.; Baker, C. J.

    1996-01-01

    The inoculation of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) suspension cells with bacterial pathogens that elicit the hypersensitive response (HR) in leaves has been shown to elicit production of active oxygen. This response occurs in two phases, the second of which occurs 1 to 3 h after bacterial addition and is unique to HR-causing interactions. The relationship between the phase II active oxygen response and the HR was characterized using Pseudomonas syringae pv syringae and P. fluorescens (pHIR11), which contains a cosmid clone of the hrp/hrm region from P. syringae pv syringae. TnphoA mutations in complementation groups II through XIII of the hrp cluster blocked the phase II active oxygen response, whereas mutations in the group I hrmA locus did not affect phase II. Despite the normal active oxygen response, bacteria with mutations in the hrmA region did not cause the HR in intact tobacco leaves nor did they induce hypersensitive cell death in cell suspensions. The data indicate that the bacteria do not require the hrmA region to elicit active oxygen production, but a full and intact hrp/hrm region is required to elicit hypersensitive cell death. Therefore, the phase II active oxygen response does not directly cause hypersensitive cell death nor is the response itself sufficient to trigger the HR. PMID:12226215

  19. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Mushroom picker's disease; Humidifier or air-conditioner lung; Bird breeder's or bird fancier's lung ... to hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Examples of hypersensitivity pneumonitis include: Bird fancier's lung: This is the most common type ...

  20. Interleukin-12 reverses the inhibitory impact of photodynamic therapy (PDT) on the murine contact hypersensitivity response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simkin, Guillermo O.; Levy, Julia G.; Hunt, David W. C.

    1998-05-01

    Treatment of mice with certain photosensitizers combined with exposure to visible light limits the development of the immunologically-mediated contact hypersensitivity (CHS) response against topically-applied chemical haptens. Understanding of the inhibitory action of photosensitizers upon the CHS response is incomplete. Benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD-MA, verteporfin), a photosensitizer with immunomodulatory activity, strongly depressed CHS responses to the hapten dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB). However, if mice were administered 1 (mu) g of a recombinant preparation of the pro- inflammatory cytokine interleukin-12 (rIL-12), full-fledged CHS responses to DNFB ensued in animals treated with BPD-MA and light. In contrast, when rIL-12 was given in combination with an anti-IL-12 antibody the restorative effect of rIL-12 on the CHS response of PDT-treated mice was blocked. Evaluation of the cytokine status of spleen and draining lymph node cells showed for DNFB painted animals, that the release of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 was increased by PDT and rIL-12 counter-acted the increase in IL-10 liberation associated with PDT. These studies indicate that IL-10 formation is upregulated and the availability of IL-12 may be limited in mice treated with PDT. These features may contribute to deficient CHS responses observed with PDT.

  1. A connected set of genes associated with programmed cell death implicated in controlling the hypersensitive response in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rp1-D21 is a maize auto-active resistance gene that confers a spontaneous hypersensitive response (HR). Depending on the genetic background in which it operates; variable levels of HR are observed. This offers a convenient system to identify alleles that modulate HR and genes involved in disease res...

  2. Cytoplasmic and nuclear localizations are important for the hypersensitive response conferred by maize autoactive Rp1-D21 protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease resistance (R-) genes have been isolated from many plant species. Most encode nucleotide binding leucine-rich-repeat (NLR) proteins that trigger a rapid localized programmed cell death termed the hypersensitive response (HR) upon pathogen recognition. Despite their structural similarities, d...

  3. Reduced sleep, stress responsivity, and female sex contribute to persistent inflammation-induced mechanical hypersensitivity in rats.

    PubMed

    Page, Gayle G; Opp, Mark R; Kozachik, Sharon L

    2014-08-01

    Studies in humans suggest that female sex, reduced sleep opportunities and biological stress responsivity increase risk for developing persistent pain conditions. To investigate the relative contribution of these three factors to persistent pain, we employed the Sciatic Inflammatory Neuritis (SIN) model of repeated left sciatic perineurial exposures to zymosan, an inflammatory stimulus, to determine their impact upon the development of persistent mechanical hypersensitivity. Following an initial moderate insult, a very low zymosan dose was infused daily for eight days to model a sub-threshold inflammatory perturbation to which only susceptible animals would manifest or maintain mechanical hypersensitivity. Using Sprague Dawley rats, maintaining wakefulness throughout the first one-half of the 12-h light phase resulted in a bilateral reduction in paw withdrawal thresholds (PWTs); zymosan infusion reduced ipsilateral PWTs in all animals and contralateral PWTs only in females. This sex difference was validated in Fischer 344, Lewis and Sprague Dawley rats, suggesting that females are the more susceptible phenotype for both local and centrally driven responses to repeated low-level inflammatory perturbations. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyporesponsive Lewis rats exhibited the most robust development of mechanical hypersensitivity and HPA axis hyperresponsive Fischer 344 rats matched the Lewis rats' mechanical hypersensitivity throughout the latter four days of the protocol. If HPA axis phenotype does indeed influence these findings, the more balanced responsivity of Sprague Dawley rats would seem to promote resilience in this paradigm. Taken together, these findings are consistent with what is known regarding persistent pain development in humans. PMID:24594386

  4. Putative Serine Protease Effectors of Clavibacter michiganensis Induce a Hypersensitive Response in the Apoplast of Nicotiana Species.

    PubMed

    Lu, You; Hatsugai, Noriyuki; Katagiri, Fumiaki; Ishimaru, Carol A; Glazebrook, Jane

    2015-11-01

    Clavibacter michiganensis subspp. michiganensis and sepedonicus cause diseases on solanaceous crops. The genomes of both subspecies encode members of the pat-1 family of putative serine proteases known to function in virulence on host plants and induction of hypersensitive responses (HR) on nonhosts. One gene of this family in C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus, chp-7, is required for triggering HR in Nicotiana tabacum. Here, further investigation revealed that mutation of the putative catalytic serine residue at position 232 to threonine abolished the HR induction activity of Chp-7, suggesting that enzymatic activity is required. Purified Chp-7 triggered an HR in N. tabacum leaves in the absence of the pathogen, indicating Chp-7 itself is the HR elicitor from C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus. Ectopic expression of chp-7 constructs in N. tabacum leaves revealed that Chp-7 targeted to the apoplast triggered an HR while cytoplasmic Chp-7 did not, indicating that Chp-7 induces the HR in the apoplast of N. tabacum leaves. Chp-7 also induced HR in N. sylvestris, a progenitor of N. tabacum, but not in other Nicotiana species tested. ChpG, a related protein from C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, also triggered HR in N. tabacum and N. sylvestris. Unlike Chp-7, ChpG triggered HR in N. clevelandii and N. glutinosa. PMID:26075829

  5. System-Wide Hypersensitive Response-Associated Transcriptome and Metabolome Reprogramming in Tomato1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Etalo, Desalegn W.; Stulemeijer, Iris J.E.; Peter van Esse, H.; de Vos, Ric C.H.; Bouwmeester, Harro J.; Joosten, Matthieu H.A.J.

    2013-01-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR) is considered to be the hallmark of the resistance response of plants to pathogens. To study HR-associated transcriptome and metabolome reprogramming in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), we used plants that express both a resistance gene to Cladosporium fulvum and the matching avirulence gene of this pathogen. In these plants, massive reprogramming occurred, and we found that the HR and associated processes are highly energy demanding. Ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation, hydrolysis of sugars, and lipid catabolism are used as alternative sources of amino acids, energy, and carbon skeletons, respectively. We observed strong accumulation of secondary metabolites, such as hydroxycinnamic acid amides. Coregulated expression of WRKY transcription factors and genes known to be involved in the HR, in addition to a strong enrichment of the W-box WRKY-binding motif in the promoter sequences of the coregulated genes, point to WRKYs as the most prominent orchestrators of the HR. Our study has revealed several novel HR-related genes, and reverse genetics tools will allow us to understand the role of each individual component in the HR. PMID:23719893

  6. PhyloChip microarray analysis reveals altered gastrointestinal microbial communities in a rat model of colonic hypersensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, T.A.; Holmes, S.; Alekseyenko, A.V.; Shenoy, M.; DeSantis, T.; Wu, C.H.; Andersen, G.L.; Winston, J.; Sonnenburg, J.; Pasricha, P.J.; Spormann, A.

    2010-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic, episodic gastrointestinal disorder that is prevalent in a significant fraction of western human populations; and changes in the microbiota of the large bowel have been implicated in the pathology of the disease. Using a novel comprehensive, high-density DNA microarray (PhyloChip) we performed a phylogenetic analysis of the microbial community of the large bowel in a rat model in which intracolonic acetic acid in neonates was used to induce long lasting colonic hypersensitivity and decreased stool water content and frequency, representing the equivalent of human constipation-predominant IBS. Our results revealed a significantly increased compositional difference in the microbial communities in rats with neonatal irritation as compared with controls. Even more striking was the dramatic change in the ratio of Firmicutes relative to Bacteroidetes, where neonatally irritated rats were enriched more with Bacteroidetes and also contained a different composition of species within this phylum. Our study also revealed differences at the level of bacterial families and species. The PhyloChip is a useful and convenient method to study enteric microflora. Further, this rat model system may be a useful experimental platform to study the causes and consequences of changes in microbial community composition associated with IBS.

  7. A quick and robust method for quantification of the hypersensitive response in plants

    PubMed Central

    Gustavsson, Mikael B.; Backhaus, Thomas; Andersson, Mats X.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most studied defense reactions of plants against microbial pathogens is the hypersensitive response (HR). The HR is a complex multicellular process that involves programmed cell death at the site of infection. A standard method to quantify plant defense and the HR is to measure the release of cellular electrolytes into water after infiltration with pathogenic bacteria. In this type of experiment, the bacteria are typically delivered into the plant tissue through syringe infiltration. Here we report the development of a vacuum infiltration protocol that allows multiple plant lines to be infiltrated simultaneously and assayed for defense responses. Vacuum infiltration did not induce more wounding response in Arabidopsis leaf tissue than syringe inoculation, whereas throughput and reproducibility were improved. The method was used to study HR-induced electrolyte loss after treatment with the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 harboring the effector AvrRpm1, AvrRpt2 or AvrRps4. Specifically, the influence of bacterial titer on AvrRpm1-induced HR was investigated. Not only the amplitude, but also the timing of the maximum rate of the HR reaction was found to be dose-dependent. Finally, using vacuum infiltration, we were able quantify induction of phospholipase D activity after AvrRpm1 recognition in leaves labeled with 33PO4.

  8. Pathogen-induced elicitin production in transgenic tobacco generates a hypersensitive response and nonspecific disease resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Keller, H; Pamboukdjian, N; Ponchet, M; Poupet, A; Delon, R; Verrier, J L; Roby, D; Ricci, P

    1999-01-01

    The rapid and effective activation of disease resistance responses is essential for plant defense against pathogen attack. These responses are initiated when pathogen-derived molecules (elicitors) are recognized by the host. We have developed a strategy for creating novel disease resistance traits whereby transgenic plants respond to infection by a virulent pathogen with the production of an elicitor. To this end, we generated transgenic tobacco plants harboring a fusion between the pathogen-inducible tobacco hsr 203J gene promoter and a Phytophthora cryptogea gene encoding the highly active elicitor cryptogein. Under noninduced conditions, the transgene was silent, and no cryptogein could be detected in the transgenic plants. In contrast, infection by the virulent fungus P. parasitica var nicotianae stimulated cryptogein production that coincided with the fast induction of several defense genes at and around the infection sites. Induced elicitor production resulted in a localized necrosis that resembled a P. cryptogea-induced hypersensitive response and that restricted further growth of the pathogen. The transgenic plants displayed enhanced resistance to fungal pathogens that were unrelated to Phytophthora species, such as Thielaviopsis basicola, Erysiphe cichoracearum, and Botrytis cinerea. Thus, broad-spectrum disease resistance of a plant can be generated without the constitutive synthesis of a transgene product. PMID:9927640

  9. Structural basis of metal hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Metal hypersensitivity is a common immune disorder. Human immune systems mount the allergic attacks on metal ions through skin contacts, lung inhalation and metal-containing artificial body implants. The consequences can be simple annoyances to life-threatening systemic illness. Allergic hyper-reactivities to nickel (Ni) and beryllium (Be) are the best-studied human metal hypersensitivities. Ni-contact dermatitis affects 10 % of the human population, whereas Be compounds are the culprits of chronic Be disease (CBD). ?? T cells (T cells) play a crucial role in these hypersensitivity reactions. Metal ions work as haptens and bind to the surface of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and peptide complex. This modifies the binding surface of MHC and triggers the immune response of T cells. Metal-specific ?? T cell receptors (TCRs) are usually MHC restricted, especially MHC class II (MHCII) restricted. Numerous models have been proposed, yet the mechanisms and molecular basis of metal hypersensitivity remain elusive. Recently, we determined the crystal structures of the Ni and Be presenting human MHCII molecules, HLA-DR52c (DRA*0101, DRB3*0301) and HLA-DP2 (DPA1*0103, DPB1*0201). These structures revealed unusual features of MHCII molecules and shed light on how metal ions are recognized by T cells. PMID:22983897

  10. Resolvin E1 inhibits dendritic cell migration in the skin and attenuates contact hypersensitivity responses.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Yu; Honda, Tetsuya; Hanakawa, Sho; Nakamizo, Satoshi; Murata, Teruasa; Ueharaguchi-Tanada, Yuri; Ono, Sachiko; Amano, Wataru; Nakajima, Saeko; Egawa, Gyohei; Tanizaki, Hideaki; Otsuka, Atsushi; Kitoh, Akihiko; Dainichi, Teruki; Ogawa, Narihito; Kobayashi, Yuichi; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Arita, Makoto; Nakamura, Motonobu; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Kabashima, Kenji

    2015-10-19

    Resolvin E1 (RvE1) is a lipid mediator derived from ?3 polyunsaturated fatty acids that exerts potent antiinflammatory roles in several murine models. The antiinflammatory mechanism of RvE1 in acquired immune responses has been attributed to attenuation of cytokine production by dendritic cells (DCs). In this study, we newly investigated the effect of RvE1 on DC motility using two-photon microscopy in a contact hypersensitivity (CHS) model and found that RvE1 impaired DC motility in the skin. In addition, RvE1 attenuated T cell priming in the draining lymph nodes and effector T cell activation in the skin, which led to the reduced skin inflammation in CHS. In contrast, leukotriene B4 (LTB4) induced actin filament reorganization in DCs and increased DC motility by activating Cdc42 and Rac1 via BLT1, which was abrogated by RvE1. Collectively, our results suggest that RvE1 attenuates cutaneous acquired immune responses by inhibiting cutaneous DC motility, possibly through LTB4-BLT1 signaling blockade. PMID:26438363

  11. Molecular characterization of Pvr9 that confers a hypersensitive response to Pepper mottle virus (a potyvirus) in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phu-Tri; Choi, Hoseong; Choi, Doil; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2015-07-01

    There are some R genes against potyviruses which were mapped in pepper. However, none of them has been characterized at the molecular level. In this study, we characterized Pvr9 which is an Rpi-blb2 ortholog from pepper and confers a hypersensitive response to Pepper mottle virus (PepMoV) in a transient expression system in Nicotiana benthamiana. This gene putatively encoded for 1298 amino acids and is located on pepper chromosome 6. PepMoV NIb was the elicitor of the Pvr9-mediated hypersensitive response. NIb from several other potyviruses also elicited the hypersensitive response. Inoculation of pepper with PepMoV resulted in a minor increase in Pvr9 transcription in the resistant cultivar CM334 and a slight down-regulation in the susceptible cultivar Floral Gem. The 5' upstream region of Pvr9 from cultivar CM334 had higher transcription activity than the region from cultivar Floral Gem. The cultivars CM334 and Floral Gem had non-functional Pvr9 homologs with loss-of-function mutations. PMID:25776758

  12. Glutathione and tryptophan metabolism are required for Arabidopsis immunity during the hypersensitive response to hemibiotrophs.

    PubMed

    Hiruma, Kei; Fukunaga, Satoshi; Bednarek, Pawel; Pislewska-Bednarek, Mariola; Watanabe, Satoshi; Narusaka, Yoshihiro; Shirasu, Ken; Takano, Yoshitaka

    2013-06-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR) is a type of strong immune response found in plants that is accompanied by localized cell death. However, it is unclear how HR can block a broad range of pathogens with different infective modes. In this study, we report that ?-glutamylcysteine synthetase GSH1, which is critical for glutathione biosynthesis, and tryptophan (Trp) metabolism contribute to HR and block development of fungal pathogens with hemibiotrophic infective modes. We found that GSH1 is involved in the penetration2 (PEN2)-based entry control of the nonadapted hemibiotroph Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. However, Arabidopsis mutants specifically defective in entry control terminated further growth of the pathogen in the presence of HR cell death, whereas gsh1 mutants supported pathogen invasive growth in planta, demonstrating the requirement of GSH1 for postinvasive nonhost resistance. Remarkably, on the basis of the phenotypic and metabolic analysis of Arabidopsis mutants defective in Trp metabolism, we showed that biosynthesis of Trp-derived phytochemicals is also essential for resistance to C. gloeosporioides during postinvasive HR. By contrast, GSH1 and these metabolites are likely to be dispensable for the induction of cell death during postinvasive HR. Furthermore, the resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum 1/resistance to Pseudomonas syringae 4 dual Resistance gene-dependent immunity of Arabidopsis to the adapted hemibiotroph shared GSH1 and cytochromes P450 CYP79B2/CYP79B3 with postinvasive nonhost resistance, whereas resistance to P. syringae pv. maculicola 1 and resistance to P. syringae 2-based Resistance gene resistance against bacterial pathogens did not. These data suggest that the synthesis of glutathione and Trp-derived metabolites during HR play crucial roles in terminating the invasive growth of both nonadapted and adapted hemibiotrophs. PMID:23696664

  13. Hypersensitive Response-Like Reaction Is Associated with Hybrid Necrosis in Interspecific Crosses between Tetraploid Wheat and Aegilops tauschii Coss

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Nobuyuki; Hosogi, Naoki; Park, Pyoyun; Takumi, Shigeo

    2010-01-01

    Background Hybrid speciation is classified into homoploid and polyploid based on ploidy level. Common wheat is an allohexaploid species that originated from a naturally occurring interploidy cross between tetraploid wheat and diploid wild wheat Aegilops tauschii Coss. Aegilops tauschii provides wide naturally occurring genetic variation. Sometimes its triploid hybrids with tetraploid wheat show the following four types of hybrid growth abnormalities: types II and III hybrid necrosis, hybrid chlorosis, and severe growth abortion. The growth abnormalities in the triploid hybrids could act as postzygotic hybridization barriers to prevent formation of hexaploid wheat. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we report on the geographical and phylogenetic distribution of Ae. tauschii accessions inducing the hybrid growth abnormalities and showed that they are widely distributed across growth habitats in Ae. tauschii. Molecular and cytological characterization of the type III necrosis phenotype was performed. The hybrid abnormality causing accessions were widely distributed across growth habitats in Ae. tauschii. Transcriptome analysis showed that a number of defense-related genes such as pathogenesis-related genes were highly up-regulated in the type III necrosis lines. Transmission electron microscope observation revealed that cell death occurred accompanied by generation of reactive oxygen species in leaves undergoing type III necrosis. The reduction of photosynthetic activity occurred prior to the appearance of necrotic symptoms on the leaves exhibiting hybrid necrosis. Conclusions/Significance Taking these results together strongly suggests that an autoimmune response might be triggered by intergenomic incompatibility between the tetraploid wheat and Ae. tauschii genomes in type III necrosis, and that genetically programmed cell death could be regarded as a hypersensitive response-like cell death similar to that observed in Arabidopsis intraspecific and Nicotiana interspecific hybrids. Only Ae. tauschii accessions without such inhibiting factors could be candidates for the D-genome donor for the present hexaploid wheat. PMID:20593003

  14. Nitric Oxide Interacts with Salicylate to Regulate Biphasic Ethylene Production during the Hypersensitive Response1[W

    PubMed Central

    Mur, Luis A.J.; Laarhoven, Lucas J.J.; Harren, Frans J.M.; Hall, Michael A.; Smith, Aileen R.

    2008-01-01

    C2H4 is associated with plant defense, but its role during the hypersensitive response (HR) remains largely uncharacterized. C2H4 production in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) following inoculation with HR-eliciting Pseudomonas syringae pathovars measured by laser photoacoustic detection was biphasic. A first transient rise (C2H4-I) occurred 1 to 4 h following inoculation with HR-eliciting, disease-forming, and nonpathogenic strains and also with flagellin (flg22). A second (avirulence-dependent) rise, at approximately 6 h (C2H4-II), was only seen with HR-eliciting strains. Tobacco leaves treated with the C2H4 biosynthesis inhibitor, aminoethoxyvinylglycine, suggested that C2H4 influenced the kinetics of a HR. Challenging salicylate hydroxylase-expressing tobacco lines and tissues exhibiting systemic acquired resistance suggested that C2H4 production was influenced by salicylic acid (SA). Disrupted expression of a C2H4 biosynthesis gene in salicylate hydroxylase tobacco plants implicated transcriptional control as a mechanism through which SA regulates C2H4 production. Treating leaves to increase oxidative stress or injecting with SA initiated monophasic C2H4 generation, but the nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside initiated biphasic rises. To test whether NO influenced biphasic C2H4 production during the HR, the NO synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester was coinoculated with the avirulent strain of P. syringae pv phaseolicola into tobacco leaves. The first transient C2H4 rise appeared to be unaffected by NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, but the second rise was reduced. These data suggest that NO and SA are required to generate the biphasic pattern of C2H4 production during the HR and may influence the kinetics of HR formation. PMID:18799663

  15. Nitric oxide interacts with salicylate to regulate biphasic ethylene production during the hypersensitive response.

    PubMed

    Mur, Luis A J; Laarhoven, Lucas J J; Harren, Frans J M; Hall, Michael A; Smith, Aileen R

    2008-11-01

    C(2)H(4) is associated with plant defense, but its role during the hypersensitive response (HR) remains largely uncharacterized. C(2)H(4) production in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) following inoculation with HR-eliciting Pseudomonas syringae pathovars measured by laser photoacoustic detection was biphasic. A first transient rise (C(2)H(4)-I) occurred 1 to 4 h following inoculation with HR-eliciting, disease-forming, and nonpathogenic strains and also with flagellin (flg22). A second (avirulence-dependent) rise, at approximately 6 h (C(2)H(4)-II), was only seen with HR-eliciting strains. Tobacco leaves treated with the C(2)H(4) biosynthesis inhibitor, aminoethoxyvinylglycine, suggested that C(2)H(4) influenced the kinetics of a HR. Challenging salicylate hydroxylase-expressing tobacco lines and tissues exhibiting systemic acquired resistance suggested that C(2)H(4) production was influenced by salicylic acid (SA). Disrupted expression of a C(2)H(4) biosynthesis gene in salicylate hydroxylase tobacco plants implicated transcriptional control as a mechanism through which SA regulates C(2)H(4) production. Treating leaves to increase oxidative stress or injecting with SA initiated monophasic C(2)H(4) generation, but the nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside initiated biphasic rises. To test whether NO influenced biphasic C(2)H(4) production during the HR, the NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester was coinoculated with the avirulent strain of P. syringae pv phaseolicola into tobacco leaves. The first transient C(2)H(4) rise appeared to be unaffected by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, but the second rise was reduced. These data suggest that NO and SA are required to generate the biphasic pattern of C(2)H(4) production during the HR and may influence the kinetics of HR formation. PMID:18799663

  16. Context of action of Proline Dehydrogenase (ProDH) in the Hypersensitive Response of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Proline (Pro) dehydrogenase (ProDH) potentiates the oxidative burst and cell death of the plant Hypersensitive Response (HR) by mechanisms not yet elucidated. ProDH converts Pro into ?1 pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) and can act together with P5C dehydrogenase (P5CDH) to produce Glu, or with P5C reductase (P5CR) to regenerate Pro and thus stimulate the Pro/P5C cycle. To better understand the effects of ProDH in HR, we studied the enzyme at three stages of the defense response differing in their ROS and cell death levels. In addition, we tested if ProDH requires P5CDH to potentiate HR. Results Control and infected leaves of wild type and p5cdh plants were used to monitor ProDH activity, in vivo Pro catabolism, amino acid content, and gene expression. Wild type plants activated ProDH at all HR stages. They did not consume Pro during maximal ROS accumulation, and maintained almost basal P5C levels at all conditions. p5cdh mutants activated ProDH as wild type plants. They achieved maximum oxidative burst and cell death levels producing normal HR lesions, but evidenced premature defense activation. Conclusion ProDH activation has different effects on HR. Before the oxidative burst it leads to Pro consumption involving the action of P5CDH. During the oxidative burst, ProDH becomes functionally uncoupled to P5CDH and apparently works with P5CR. The absence of P5CDH does not reduce ROS, cell death, or pathogen resistance, indicating this enzyme is not accompanying ProDH in the potentiation of these defense responses. In contrast, p5cdh infected plants displayed increased ROS burst and earlier initiation of HR cell death. In turn, our results suggest that ProDH may sustain HR by participating in the Pro/P5C cycle, whose action on HR must be formally evaluated in a future. PMID:24410747

  17. Laryngeal hypersensitivity in chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Hull, J H; Menon, A

    2015-12-01

    Patients with chronic cough often report symptoms arising in the throat, in response to non-specific stimuli. Accordingly, the concept of a 'hypersensitivity' of the larynx in chronic cough has evolved over the past ten years. Patients with cough and laryngeal hypersensitivity frequently report features that overlap other laryngeal dysfunction syndromes, including a tendency for the vocal cords to inappropriately adduct. The mechanisms underlying laryngeal hypersensitivity in chronic cough are currently unclear, however recent studies provide new clinical and physiological techniques to aid detection and monitoring of laryngeal hypersensitivity. This review provides an overview of the current state of knowledge in this field. PMID:26325433

  18. Purification and Characterization of a Novel Hypersensitive Response-Inducing Elicitor from Magnaporthe oryzae that Triggers Defense Response in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingjia; Zeng, Hongmei; Qiu, Dewen; Guo, Lihua; Yang, Xiufen; Shi, Huaixing; Zhou, Tingting; Zhao, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Background Magnaporthe oryzae, the rice blast fungus, might secrete certain proteins related to plant-fungal pathogen interactions. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we report the purification, characterization, and gene cloning of a novel hypersensitive response-inducing protein elicitor (MoHrip1) secreted by M. oryzae. The protein fraction was purified and identified by de novo sequencing, and the sequence matched the genomic sequence of a putative protein from M. oryzae strain 70-15 (GenBank accession No. XP_366602.1). The elicitor-encoding gene mohrip1 was isolated; it consisted of a 429 bp cDNA, which encodes a polypeptide of 142 amino acids with a molecular weight of 14.322 kDa and a pI of 4.53. The deduced protein, MoHrip1, was expressed in E. coli. And the expression protein collected from bacterium also forms necrotic lesions in tobacco. MoHrip1 could induce the early events of the defense response, including hydrogen peroxide production, callose deposition, and alkalization of the extracellular medium, in tobacco. Moreover, MoHrip1-treated rice seedlings possessed significantly enhanced systemic resistance to M. oryzae compared to the control seedlings. The real-time PCR results indicated that the expression of some pathogenesis-related genes and genes involved in signal transduction could also be induced by MoHrip1. Conclusion/Significance The results demonstrate that MoHrip1 triggers defense responses in rice and could be used for controlling rice blast disease. PMID:22624059

  19. Delayed-type hypersensitivity in response to L-asparaginase in a case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Narazaki, Hidehiko; Kaizu, Kiyohiko; Miyatake, Chiharu; Koizumi, Shinya; Asano, Takeshi; Fujino, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    L-asparaginase (L-Asp) is an important reagent for acute lymphoblastic leukemia because asparagine is required for the malignant growth of tumor cells, especially lymphoblastic leukemia cells. An allergic response to L-Asp is not unusual because L-Asp is derived from Escherichia coli and is often recognized as a foreign protein. The hypersensitivity induced by L-Asp is of the immediate type in most cases. We report on a 5-year-old girl who was hospitalized for precursor T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia. She was treated according to a Tokyo Children's Cancer Study Group protocol (TCCSG ALL L09-1603 HEX/BFM). During the intensification phase, blisters with erythema developed on the arm proximal to the catheter insertion site owing to a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction caused by intravenous L-Asp administration. She was treated with additional methylprednisolone, tapered dexamethasone, and an antihistamine for the allergic reaction. No asparaginases other than E. coli L-Asp have been approved for use in Japan. Other asparaginases, such as polyethylene glycol L-Asp and Erwinia L-Asp should be quickly approved for use as alternative chemotherapy reagents in Japan. PMID:23291850

  20. Drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bircher, Andreas J

    2014-01-01

    Before the arrival of modern pharmacotherapy, drug hypersensitivity reactions were virtually unknown. Toxicity from the many plant-, animal- and inorganic material-derived remedies must have been much more common. One famous example is the intoxications from mercury, which has been used in many ailments, but particularly for the treatment of syphilis. It was only in the 19th century when more and more active principles from e.g. plants were identified, and when the observations of skin reactions became more prevalent. In 1877, Heinrich Köbner used for the first time the term 'drug exanthema' (Arznei-Exanthem). Since then, many different types of exanthemas from the mild macular-papular forms to the severe life-threatening bullous exanthemas such as toxic epidermal necrolysis have been observed from numerous drugs. The systematic investigation of severe drug reactions has only started in the second half of the 20th century, parallel to the increasing knowledge in immunology. Drug hypersensitivity reactions still remain one of the most challenging problems in allergology due to their manifold clinical manifestations and their very diverse pathophysiology. The introduction of new drugs and in turn the emergence of new hypersensitivity reactions will remain a challenge in the future. PMID:24925392

  1. Use of Mutant-Assisted Gene Identification and Characterization (MAGIC) to identify novel genetic loci that modify the maize hypersensitive response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The partially-dominant, autoactive maize disease resistance gene Rp1-D21 causes hypersensitive response (HR) lesions to form spontaneously on the leaves and stem in the absence of pathogen recognition. The maize nested association mapping (NAM) population consists of 25 200-line subpopulations each...

  2. If photoinhibition of soybean photosystem II enhances the hypersensitive response, it is not solely due to blockage of electron transfer flow at D1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have suggested that photoinhibition, through inactivation of photosystem II (PSII), could be beneficial to plants during defense to pathogens through enhanced reactive oxygen (ROS), especially during the hypersensitive response (HR). In this study, we addressed this question by focu...

  3. Delayed hypersensitivity responses to human IgG and methylated bovine serum albumin are regulated by different mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, C; Dalmasso, A P

    1982-01-01

    We found marked differences in in vitro and in vivo delayed hypersensitivity (DH) responses to human IgG (human gamma-globulin, HGG) and methylated bovine serum albumin (MeBSA). Lymph node cells (LNC) from cyclophosphamide (CY) pretreated, antigen-adjuvant immunized mice exhibited increased HGG-induced and decreased MeBSA-induced proliferative responses in vitro compared with LNC from similarly immunized but non-CY-pretreated animals. These effects were antigen-specific. Further, treatment of CY-HGG-adjuvant immunized mice with aqueous (aq) HGG either before or after immunization markedly suppressed HGG-specific in vitro proliferation and in vivo DH responses. Therefore, induction of suppression by aqHGG did not appear to depend on CY-sensitive cells either as a possible source of suppressor cell precursors or as participants in the regulatory events. In contrast, in vivo DH reactivity to MeBSA was unaffected by administration of aqMeBSA either before or after mice were immunized with CY-MeBSA-adjuvant. Our results suggest that DH responses to HGG and MeBSA are regulated by distinct mechanisms which influence the induction and the development of sensitivity. PMID:7118159

  4. Adducts of Oxylipin Electrophiles to Glutathione Reflect a 13 Specificity of the Downstream Lipoxygenase Pathway in the Tobacco Hypersensitive Response

    PubMed Central

    Davoine, Céline; Falletti, Olivier; Douki, Thierry; Iacazio, Gilles; Ennar, Najla; Montillet, Jean-Luc; Triantaphylidès, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The response to reactive electrophile species (RES) is now considered as part of the plant response to pathogen and insect attacks. Thanks to a previously established high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry methodology, we have investigated the production of oxylipin RES adducts to glutathione (GSH) during the hypersensitive response (HR) of plants. We have observed that RES conjugation to GSH in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves is facile and nonspecific. In cryptogein-elicited tobacco leaves, we show that the oxylipin RES adducts to GSH are produced in correlation with GSH consumption, increase in glutathione S-transferase activity, and the appearance of the cell death symptoms. In this model, the adducts arise mainly from the downstream 13 lipoxygenase (LOX) metabolism, although the induced 9 LOX pathway leads massively to the accumulation of upstream metabolites. The main adducts were obtained from 2-hexenal and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid. They accumulate transiently as 1-hexanol-3-GSH, a reduced adduct, and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid-GSH, respectively. RES conjugation does not initiate cell death but explains part of the GSH depletion that accompanies HR cell death. The nature of these GSH conjugates shows the key role played by the 13 LOX pathway in RES signaling in the tobacco HR. PMID:16500992

  5. The Xanthomonas effector XopJ triggers a conditional hypersensitive response upon treatment of N. benthamiana leaves with salicylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Üstün, Suayib; Bartetzko, Verena; Börnke, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    XopJ is a Xanthomonas type III effector protein that promotes bacterial virulence on susceptible pepper plants through the inhibition of the host cell proteasome and a resultant suppression of salicylic acid (SA) – dependent defense responses. We show here that Nicotiana benthamiana leaves transiently expressing XopJ display hypersensitive response (HR) –like symptoms when exogenously treated with SA. This apparent avirulence function of XopJ was further dependent on effector myristoylation as well as on an intact catalytic triad, suggesting a requirement of its enzymatic activity for HR-like symptom elicitation. The ability of XopJ to cause a HR-like symptom development upon SA treatment was lost upon silencing of SGT1 and NDR1, respectively, but was independent of EDS1 silencing, suggesting that XopJ is recognized by an R protein of the CC-NBS-LRR class. Furthermore, silencing of NPR1 abolished the elicitation of HR-like symptoms in XopJ expressing leaves after SA application. Measurement of the proteasome activity indicated that proteasome inhibition by XopJ was alleviated in the presence of SA, an effect that was not observed in NPR1 silenced plants. Our results suggest that XopJ – triggered HR-like symptoms are closely related to the virulence function of the effector and that XopJ follows a two-signal model in order to elicit a response in the non-host plant N. benthamiana. PMID:26284106

  6. Hypersensitive response and acyl-homoserine lactone production of the fire blight antagonists Erwinia tasmaniensis and Erwinia billingiae.

    PubMed

    Jakovljevic, Vladimir; Jock, Susanne; Du, Zhiqiang; Geider, Klaus

    2008-09-01

    Fire blight caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora can be controlled by antagonistic microorganisms. We characterized epiphytic bacteria isolated from healthy apple and pear trees in Australia, named Erwinia tasmaniensis, and the epiphytic bacterium Erwinia billingiae from England for physiological properties, interaction with plants and interference with growth of E. amylovora. They reduced symptom formation by the fire blight pathogen on immature pears and the colonization of apple flowers. In contrast to E. billingiae, E. tasmaniensis strains induced a hypersensitive response in tobacco leaves and synthesized levan in the presence of sucrose. With consensus primers deduced from lsc as well as hrpL, hrcC and hrcR of the hrp region of E. amylovora and of related bacteria, these genes were successfully amplified from E. tasmaniensis DNA and alignment of the encoded proteins to other Erwinia species supported a role for environmental fitness of the epiphytic bacterium. Unlike E. tasmaniensis, the epiphytic bacterium E. billingiae produced an acyl-homoserine lactone for bacterial cell-to-cell communication. Their competition with the growth of E. amylovora may be involved in controlling fire blight. PMID:21261861

  7. Genetics of resistance to the geminivirus, Bean dwarf mosaic virus, and the role of the hypersensitive response in common bean.

    PubMed

    Seo, Y-S; Gepts, P; Gilbertson, R L

    2004-03-01

    Bean dwarf mosaic virus (BDMV) is a single-stranded DNA virus (genus: Begomovirus, family: Geminiviridae) that infects common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and causes stunted plant growth, and mosaic and mottle symptoms in leaves. BDMV shows differential pathogenicity in common bean, infecting germplasm of the Andean gene pool (e.g., the snap bean cultivar Topcrop), but not that of the Middle American gene pool (e.g., the pinto bean cultivar Othello). Resistance to BDMV in Othello is associated with development of a hypersensitive response (HR) in vascular (phloem) tissues. In this study, Middle American germplasm representing the four recognized races (i.e., Durango, Guatemala, Jalisco, and Mesoamerica) and the parents of Othello were inoculated with BDMV and a BDMV-green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter. All genotypes showed partial or complete resistance to BDMV and BDMV-GFP, indicating the widespread distribution of resistance in the Middle American gene pool. A number of BDMV-resistant germplasm did not show the HR, indicating it is not correlated with resistance. In the F(1), F(2), and F(3) of reciprocal crosses between Othello and Topcrop, a single dominant allele, Bdm, conferred BDMV resistance. PMID:14625673

  8. Whiplash-like facet joint loading initiates glutamatergic responses in the DRG and spinal cord associated with behavioral hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ling; Quindlen, Julia C.; Lipschutz, Daniel E.; Winkelstein, Beth A.

    2012-01-01

    The cervical facet joint and its capsule are a common source of neck pain from whiplash. Mechanical hyperalgesia elicited by painful facet joint distraction is associated with spinal neuronal hyperexcitability that can be induced by transmitter/receptor systems that potentiate the synaptic activation of neurons. This study investigated the temporal response of a glutamate receptor and transporters in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cord. Bilateral C6/C7 facet joint distractions were imposed in the rat either to produce behavioral sensitivity or without inducing any sensitivity. Neuronal metabotropic glutamate receptor-5 (mGluR5) and protein kinase C-epsilon (PKC?) expression in the DRG and spinal cord were evaluated on days 1 and 7. Spinal expression of a glutamate transporter, excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAC1), was also quantified at both time points. Painful distraction produced immediate behavioral hypersensitivity that was sustained for 7 days. Increased expression of mGluR5 and PKC? in the DRG was not evident until day 7 and only following painful distraction; this increase was observed in small-diameter neurons. Only painful facet joint distraction produced a significant increase (p<0.001) in neuronal mGluR5 over time, and this increase also was significantly elevated (p ? 0.05) over responses in the other groups at day 7. However, there were no differences in spinal PKC? expression on either day or between groups. Spinal EAAC1 expression was significantly increased (p<0.03) only in the nonpainful groups on day 7. Results from this study suggest spinal glutamatergic plasticity is selectively modulated in association with facet-mediated pain. PMID:22578356

  9. PS3, a semisynthetic beta-1,3-glucan sulfate, diminishes contact hypersensitivity responses through inhibition of L- and P-selectin functions.

    PubMed

    Alban, Susanne; Ludwig, Ralf J; Bendas, Gerd; Schön, Michael P; Oostingh, Gertie J; Radeke, Heinfried H; Fritzsche, Juliane; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Kaufmann, Roland; Boehncke, Wolf-Henning

    2009-05-01

    Leukocyte extravasation is initiated by an interaction of selectin adhesion molecules and appropriate carbohydrate ligands. Targeting those interactions seems a promising approach to treat chronic inflammation. We developed a beta-1, 3-glucan sulfate (PS3) with inhibitory activity toward L and P-selectins under static conditions. Here, detailed investigation showed inhibition of P- and L-selectins, but not E-selectin under flow conditions (relative reduction of interaction with appropriate ligands to 34.4+/-16.6, 8.5+/-3.6, or 99.5+/-9.9%, respectively, by PS3 for P-, L- or E-selectin). Intravital microscopy revealed reduction of leukocyte rolling in skin microvasculature from 22.7+/-5.0 to 12.6+/-4.0% after injection of PS3. In the next experiments, mice were sensitized with 2,4,-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB), and lymphocytes were transferred into syngeneic recipients, which were challenged by DNFB. Inflammatory responses were reduced when immunity was generated in mice treated with PS3 or in L-selectin-deficient mice. No effect was observed when L-selectin-deficient donor mice were treated with PS3, further suggesting that PS3 acted primarily through inhibition of L-selectin. Elicitation of a contact hypersensitivity response was reduced in P-selectin-deficient and in PS3-treated mice. Again, PS3 had no effect in P-selectin-deficient mice. PS3 is a potent P- and L-selectin inhibitor that may add to the therapy of inflammatory diseases. PMID:19052560

  10. Coronatine inhibits stomatal closure and delays hypersensitive response cell death induced by nonhost bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seonghee; Ishiga, Yasuhiro; Clermont, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae is the most widespread bacterial pathogen in plants. Several strains of P. syringae produce a phytotoxin, coronatine (COR), which acts as a jasmonic acid mimic and inhibits plant defense responses and contributes to disease symptom development. In this study, we found that COR inhibits early defense responses during nonhost disease resistance. Stomatal closure induced by a nonhost pathogen, P. syringae pv. tabaci, was disrupted by COR in tomato epidermal peels. In addition, nonhost HR cell death triggered by P. syringae pv. tabaci on tomato was remarkably delayed when COR was supplemented along with P. syringae pv. tabaci inoculation. Using isochorismate synthase (ICS)-silenced tomato plants and transcript profiles of genes in SA- and JA-related defense pathways, we show that COR suppresses SA-mediated defense during nonhost resistance. PMID:23638370

  11. Glycerol monomycolate, a latent tuberculosis-associated mycobacterial lipid, induces eosinophilic hypersensitivity responses in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yuki; Matsunaga, Isamu; Komori, Takaya; Urakawa, Tetsuo; Nakamura, Takashi; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Hiromatsu, Kenji; Harashima, Hideyoshi; Sugita, Masahiko

    2011-06-01

    Dynamic changes in the lipid composition of the cell wall occur in pathogenic mycobacteria that are often intended for adaptation to the host environment. Dormant mycobacteria should have evolved efficient maneuvers for cohabitation, allowing the microbes to persist for years within the host. Glycerol monomycolate (GroMM) has been implicated as a specific immune target in human individuals with latent, but not active, tuberculosis, but the in vivo response to GroMM and the relevance of it to latent infection remain poorly understood. Here, we immunized guinea pigs with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) expressing high levels of GroMM and then, monitored skin reactions at the site of challenge with GroMM-containing liposome. We found that BCG-immunized guinea pigs mounted enhanced skin reactions to GroMM with prominent local infiltration by eosinophils. Consistent with this, GroMM-stimulated lymph node cells upregulated the expression of T helper (Th)2-type cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-10, that could potentially counteract the microbe-eliminating Th1-type cytokine response. On the basis of these observations, we predict that the host response to GroMM produced by dormant mycobacteria would contribute to their long-term survival in the host. PMID:21575604

  12. Pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity in chronic pain: prevalence and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Curatolo, Michele; Müller, Monika; Ashraf, Aroosiah; Neziri, Alban Y; Streitberger, Konrad; Andersen, Ole K; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-11-01

    Hypersensitivity of pain pathways is considered a relevant determinant of symptoms in chronic pain patients, but data on its prevalence are very limited. To our knowledge, no data on the prevalence of spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity are available. We studied the prevalence of pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity in 961 consecutive patients with various chronic pain conditions. Pain threshold and nociceptive withdrawal reflex threshold to electrical stimulation were used to assess pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity, respectively. Using 10th percentile cutoff of previously determined reference values, the prevalence of pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity (95% confidence interval) was 71.2 (68.3-74.0) and 80.0 (77.0-82.6), respectively. As a secondary aim, we analyzed demographic, psychosocial, and clinical characteristics as factors potentially associated with pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity using logistic regression models. Both hypersensitivity parameters were unaffected by most factors analyzed. Depression, catastrophizing, pain-related sleep interference, and average pain intensity were significantly associated with hypersensitivity. However, none of them was significant for both unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Furthermore, the odds ratios were very low, indicating modest quantitative impact. To our knowledge, this is the largest prevalence study on central hypersensitivity and the first one on the prevalence of spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity in chronic pain patients. The results revealed an impressively high prevalence, supporting a high clinical relevance of this phenomenon. Electrical pain thresholds and nociceptive withdrawal reflex explore aspects of pain processing that are mostly independent of sociodemographic, psychological, and clinical pain-related characteristics. PMID:26172555

  13. Chlamydial disease pathogenesis. The 57-kD chlamydial hypersensitivity antigen is a stress response protein.

    PubMed

    Morrison, R P; Belland, R J; Lyng, K; Caldwell, H D

    1989-10-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis infection of humans is commonly a localized inflammation that can result in infertility, blindness, and perhaps arthritis. The pathogenic process(es) that cause these sequelae are thought to be immunological. A 57-kD protein that is common among Chlamydia elicits ocular inflammation when introduced onto the conjunctivae of guinea pigs or nonhuman primates previously sensitized by chlamydial infection. This protein is thought to mediate the immunopathology that follows chlamydial infection. To more thoroughly characterize this chlamydial component, we cloned its gene from a C. psittaci strain and identified a particular recombinant that produced the 57-kD polypeptide. The recombinant gene product was immunoreactive with a monospecific anti-57-kD serum, and elicited an ocular inflammation similar to that produced by the 57-kD antigen isolated from chlamydiae. Sequencing identified two ORFs that encode polypeptides of 11.2 and 58.1 kD and are co-transcribed. These two polypeptides show homology with Escherichia coli groE and Coxiella burnetii htp heat-shock proteins. Striking homology (greater than 50%) was found between the 57-kD protein and the HtpB, GroEL, 65-k Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Hsp60 proteins. Thus, the 57-kD chlamydial protein, previously implicated as mediating a deleterious immunologic response to chlamydial infections, is a stress-induced protein similar to those that occur universally in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. PMID:2571668

  14. Chlamydial disease pathogenesis. The 57-kD chlamydial hypersensitivity antigen is a stress response protein

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis infection of humans is commonly a localized inflammation that can result in infertility, blindness, and perhaps arthritis. The pathogenic process(es) that cause these sequelae are thought to be immunological. A 57-kD protein that is common among Chlamydia elicits ocular inflammation when introduced onto the conjunctivae of guinea pigs or nonhuman primates previously sensitized by chlamydial infection. This protein is thought to mediate the immunopathology that follows chlamydial infection. To more thoroughly characterize this chlamydial component, we cloned its gene from a C. psittaci strain and identified a particular recombinant that produced the 57-kD polypeptide. The recombinant gene product was immunoreactive with a monospecific anti-57-kD serum, and elicited an ocular inflammation similar to that produced by the 57-kD antigen isolated from chlamydiae. Sequencing identified two ORFs that encode polypeptides of 11.2 and 58.1 kD and are co-transcribed. These two polypeptides show homology with Escherichia coli groE and Coxiella burnetii htp heat-shock proteins. Striking homology (greater than 50%) was found between the 57-kD protein and the HtpB, GroEL, 65-k Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Hsp60 proteins. Thus, the 57-kD chlamydial protein, previously implicated as mediating a deleterious immunologic response to chlamydial infections, is a stress-induced protein similar to those that occur universally in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. PMID:2571668

  15. Detection of reactive oxygen species can be used to distinguish ToxA-induced cell death from the hypersensitive response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unlike the situation of resistance (R) gene mediated cell death, the biochemical mechanism for the fungal toxin ToxA-caused cell death is not well-defined. Resistance associated with the gene-for-gene interaction is usually manifested in a form of programmed cell death termed the hypersensitive resp...

  16. Reduced expression of the tomato ethylene receptor gene LeETR4 enhances the hypersensitive response to Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria.

    PubMed

    Ciardi, J A; Tieman, D M; Jones, J B; Klee, H J

    2001-04-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR) involves rapid death of cells at the site of pathogen infection and is thought to limit pathogen growth through the plant. Ethylene regulates senescence and developmental programmed cell death, but its role in hypersensitive cell death is less clear. Expression of two ethylene receptor genes, NR and LeETR4, is induced in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cv. Mill) leaves during an HR to Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria, with the greatest increase observed in LeETR4. LeETR4 antisense plants previously were shown to exhibit increased sensitivity to ethylene. These plants also exhibit greatly reduced induction of LeETR4 expression during infection and an accelerated HR at inoculum concentrations ranging from 10(5) to 10(7) CFU/ml. Increases in ethylene synthesis and pathogenesis-related gene expression are greater and more rapid in infected LeETR4 antisense plants, indicating an enhanced defense response. Populations of avirulent X. campestris pv. vesicatoria decrease more quickly and to a lower level in the transgenic plants, indicating a greater resistance to this pathogen. Because the ethylene action inhibitor 1-methylcyclopropene alleviates the enhanced HR phenotype in LeETR4 antisense plants, these changes in pathogen response are a result of increased ethylene sensitivity. PMID:11310736

  17. Relationship between delayed hypersensitivity response and acquired cell-mediated immunity in C57BL/6J mice infected with Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, J R; Herman, R

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between the development of acquired cell-mediated immunity and the concomitant level of specific delayed hypersensitivity (DH) in C57BL/6J mice infected with the intracellular protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani was studied. It was determined that the intradermal injection of Leishmania antigen (heat- or phenol-killed flagellated forms of L. donovani) could elicit a DH response as early as day 10 and as late as day 120 postinfection in mice infected by the intravenous route. Dose-response studies showed that there is an inverse relationship between the size of the infecting dose of parasites and the magnitude of the DH response. Thus, increasing the degree of infection depressed the DH response. This depression, however, could be abrogated by treatment of mice with cyclophosphamide (201 mg/kg) before intradermal injection of antigen. PMID:4018876

  18. Mutational analysis of the Verticillium dahliae protein elicitor PevD1 identifies distinctive regions responsible for hypersensitive response and systemic acquired resistance in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenxian; Zeng, Hongmei; Liu, Zhipeng; Yang, Xiufen; Guo, Lihua; Qiu, Dewen

    2014-01-01

    In our previous study, PevD1 was characterized as a novel protein elicitor produced by Verticillium dahliae inducing hypersensitive response (HR) and systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in tobacco plants; however, the detailed mechanisms of PevD1's elicitor activity remain unclear. In this study, five mutant fragments of PevD1 were generated by polymerase chain reaction-based mutagenesis and the truncated proteins expressed in Escherichia coli were used to test their elicitor activities. Biological activity analysis showed that the N-terminal and C-terminal of PevD1 had distinct influence on HR and SAR elicitation. Fragment PevD1?N98, which spans the C-terminal 57 amino acids of PevD1, was critical for the induction of HR in tobacco plants. In contrast, fragment PevD1?C57, the N-terminal of 98 amino acids of PevD1, retained the ability to induce SAR against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) but not induction of HR, suggesting that the induction of HR is not essential for SAR mediated by PevD1. Our results indicated that fragment PevD1?C57 could be a candidate peptide for plant protection against pathogens without causing negative effects. PMID:24080193

  19. The prevalence of dentine hypersensitivity in Chinese adults.

    PubMed

    Ye, W; Feng, X-P; Li, R

    2012-03-01

    Dentine hypersensitivity is a common oral problem. This study investigated the prevalence of dentine hypersensitivity in the adult population of Shanghai, China. A multi-stage, stratified, random sampling method was used to investigate the study population. A total of 2120 subjects were examined at 10 investigation points in Shanghai City. Subjects were divided into age groups (10 years per age group) and included the same number of male and female subjects in each group. Participants completed a dentine hypersensitivity questionnaire and underwent clinical examination. The diagnosis of dentine hypersensitivity was confirmed clinically as a sharp well-localised pain in response to administration of a blast of cold air from a triple syringe. Gingival recession of sensitive teeth was measured by a Williams periodontal probe. Among 2120 participants, 723 were diagnosed as having dentine hypersensitivity, indicating a prevalence of 34·1%. The male to female ratio of dentine hypersensitivity was 1:1·5. The prevalence of dentine hypersensitivity was highest in the 40- to 49-year age group at 43·9%. The number of teeth with dentine hypersensitivity was 3·2 per patient. Dentine hypersensitivity occurred predominantly in the premolars (49·6%), followed by the anterior teeth (30·5%). A total of 84·3% of dentine hypersensitive patients had gingival recession. The prevalence of dentine hypersensitivity in Shanghai adults was 34·1%, indicating that it is a common condition. Therefore, public education about the condition and effective treatment of dentine hypersensitivity are required. PMID:21902706

  20. Gut pain & visceral hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Qasim

    2013-01-01

    Visceral pain is a highly complex entity whose experience is variable in health and disease. It can occur in patients with organic disease and also in those without any readily identifiable structural or biochemical abnormality such as in the functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID). Despite considerable progress in our understanding of the culpable underlying mechanisms significant knowledge gaps remain, representing a significant unmet need in gastroenterology. A key, but not universal, pathological feature is that patients with FGID often display heightened sensitivity to experimental gut stimulation, termed visceral hypersensitivity. A plethora of factors have been proposed to account for this epiphenomenon including peripheral sensitization, central sensitization, aberrant central processing, genetic, psychological and abnormalities within the stress responsive systems. Further research is needed, bringing together complementary research themes from a diverse array of academic disciplines ranging from gastroenterology to nociceptive physiology to functional neuro-imaging, to address this unmet need. PMID:26516496

  1. SUPERNATANTS FROM THE ULTRAVIOLET-IRRADIATED KERATINOCYTES DECREASE THE RESISTANCE AND DELAYED-TYPE HYPERSENSITIVITY RESPONSE TO MYCOBACTERIUM BOVIS BACILLUS CALMETTE-GUERIN IN MICE AND IMPAIR THE PHAGOCYTIC ABILITY OF MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, we demonstrated that exposure of mice to a single high does or to multiple smaller doses of ultraviolet (UV) radiation decreased the induction of the delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to Mycobacterium bovis-BCG injected into unexposed sites. In view of the li...

  2. Contaminant-related suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity and antibody responses in harbor seals fed herring from the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, P S; De Swart, R L; Reijnders, P J; Van Loveren, H; Vos, J G; Osterhaus, A D

    1995-01-01

    Recent mass mortalities among several marine mammal populations have led to speculation about increased susceptibility to viral infections as a result of contaminant-induced immunosuppression. In a 2.5-year study, we fed herring from either the relatively uncontaminated Atlantic Ocean or the contaminated Baltic Sea to two groups of captive harbor seals and monitored immune function in the seals. Seals fed the contaminated fish were less able to mount a specific immunological response to ovalbumin, as measured by in vivo delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions and antibody responses. The skin reaction to this protein antigen was characterized by the appearance of mononuclear cells which peaked at 24 hr after intradermal administration, characteristic of DTH reactions in other animals studied. These DTH responses correlated well with in vitro tests of T-lymphocyte function, implicating this cell type in the reaction. Aryl-hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor-dependent toxic equivalent (TEQ) profiles in blubber biopsies taken from the seals implicated polychlorinated biphenyls rather than dioxins or furans in the observed immunosuppression. Marine mammal populations currently inhabiting polluted coastal environments in Europe and North America may therefore have an increased susceptibility to infections, and pollution may have played a role in recent virus-induced mass mortalities. Images p162-a Figure 1. Figure 2. A Figure 2. B Figure 2. C Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:7737064

  3. Elicitin-like proteins Oli-D1 and Oli-D2 from Pythium oligandrum trigger hypersensitive response in Nicotiana benthamiana and induce resistance against Botrytis cinerea in tomato.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Zhigang; Li, Xiaohui; Huang, Lei; Hong, Yongbo; Zhang, Yafen; Zhang, Huijuan; Li, Dayong; Song, Fengming

    2015-04-01

    The biocontrol agent Pythium oligandrum and its elicitin-like proteins oligandrins have been shown to induce disease resistance in a range of plants. In the present study, the ability of two oligandrins, Oli-D1 and Oli-D2, to induce an immune response and the possible molecular mechanism regulating the defence responses in Nicotiana benthamiana and tomato were investigated. Infiltration of recombinant Oli-D1 and Oli-D2 proteins induced a typical immune response in N.?benthamiana including the induction of a hypersensitive response (HR), accumulation of reactive oxygen species and production of autofluorescence. Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression assays revealed that full-length Oli-D1 and Oli-D2 were required for full HR-inducing activity in N.?benthamiana, and virus-induced gene silencing-mediated knockdown of some of the signalling regulatory genes demonstrated that NbSGT1 and NbNPR1 were required for Oli-D1 and Oli-D2 to induce HR in N.?benthamiana. Subcellular localization analyses indicated that both Oli-D1 and Oli-D2 were targeted to the plasma membrane of N.?benthamiana. When infiltrated or transiently expressed in leaves, Oli-D1 and Oli-D2 induced resistance against Botrytis cinerea in tomato and activated the expression of a set of genes involved in the jasmonic acid/ethylene (JA/ET)-mediated signalling pathway. Our results demonstrate that Oli-D1 and Oli-D2 are effective elicitors capable of inducing immune responses in plants, probably through the JA/ET-mediated signalling pathway, and that both Oli-D1 and Oli-D2 have potential for the development of bioactive formulae for crop disease control in practice. PMID:25047132

  4. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis from ordinary residential exposures.

    PubMed Central

    Apostolakos, M J; Rossmoore, H; Beckett, W S

    2001-01-01

    A previously healthy woman developed hypersensitivity pneumonitis of such severity that she required chronic systemic corticosteroid therapy for symptom control. Detailed investigation of her workplace and home environments revealed fungi in her typical suburban home, to which she had specific serum precipitating antibodies. Efforts to remove mold from the home were unsuccessful in relieving symptoms, and moving to another residence was the only intervention that allowed her to be withdrawn from corticosteroid therapy. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis is commonly associated with occupational or avocational exposures, such as moldy hay in farmers or bird antigen in bird breeders. We propose that hypersensitivity pneumonitis may occur in North America, as it does in Japan, from domestic exposures alone. PMID:11673130

  5. DNaseI Hypersensitivity and Ultraconservation Reveal Novel, Interdependent Long-Range Enhancers at the Complex Pax6 Cis-Regulatory Region

    PubMed Central

    McBride, David J.; Buckle, Adam; van Heyningen, Veronica; Kleinjan, Dirk A.

    2011-01-01

    The PAX6 gene plays a crucial role in development of the eye, brain, olfactory system and endocrine pancreas. Consistent with its pleiotropic role the gene exhibits a complex developmental expression pattern which is subject to strict spatial, temporal and quantitative regulation. Control of expression depends on a large array of cis-elements residing in an extended genomic domain around the coding region of the gene. The minimal essential region required for proper regulation of this complex locus has been defined through analysis of human aniridia-associated breakpoints and YAC transgenic rescue studies of the mouse smalleye mutant. We have carried out a systematic DNase I hypersensitive site (HS) analysis across 200 kb of this critical region of mouse chromosome 2E3 to identify putative regulatory elements. Mapping the identified HSs onto a percent identity plot (PIP) shows many HSs correspond to recognisable genomic features such as evolutionarily conserved sequences, CpG islands and retrotransposon derived repeats. We then focussed on a region previously shown to contain essential long range cis-regulatory information, the Pax6 downstream regulatory region (DRR), allowing comparison of mouse HS data with previous human HS data for this region. Reporter transgenic mice for two of the HS sites, HS5 and HS6, show that they function as tissue specific regulatory elements. In addition we have characterised enhancer activity of an ultra-conserved cis-regulatory region located near Pax6, termed E60. All three cis-elements exhibit multiple spatio-temporal activities in the embryo that overlap between themselves and other elements in the locus. Using a deletion set of YAC reporter transgenic mice we demonstrate functional interdependence of the elements. Finally, we use the HS6 enhancer as a marker for the migration of precerebellar neuro-epithelium cells to the hindbrain precerebellar nuclei along the posterior and anterior extramural streams allowing visualisation of migratory defects in both pathways in Pax6Sey/Sey mice. PMID:22220192

  6. Ornithine-delta-aminotransferase and proline dehydrogenase genes play a role in non-host disease resistance by regulating pyrroline-5-carboxylate metabolism-induced hypersensitive response.

    PubMed

    Senthil-Kumar, Muthappa; Mysore, Kirankumar S

    2012-07-01

    Non-host disease resistance involves the production of hypersensitive response (HR), a programmed cell death (PCD) that occurs at the site of pathogen infection. Plant mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and red-ox changes play a major role in regulating such cell death. Proline catabolism reactions, especially pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) accumulation, are known to produce ROS and contribute to cell death. Here we studied important genes related to proline synthesis and catabolism in the defence against host and non-host strains of Pseudomonas syringae in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis. Our results show that ornithine delta-aminotransferase (?OAT) and proline dehydrogenases (ProDH1 and ProDH2) are involved in the defence against non-host pathogens. Silencing of these genes in N. benthamiana delayed occurrence of HR and favoured non-host pathogen growth. Arabidopsis mutants for these genes compromised non-host resistance and showed a decrease in non-host pathogen-induced ROS. Some of the genes involved in proline metabolism were also induced by a pathogen-carrying avirulence gene, indicating that proline metabolism is influenced during effector-triggered immunity (ETI). Our results demonstrate that ?OAT and ProDH enzyme-mediated steps produce ROS in mitochondria and regulate non-host HR, thus contributing to non-host resistance in plants. PMID:22321246

  7. Hall viscosity revealed via density response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Biao

    2015-06-01

    Quantum Hall systems have recently been shown to possess a quantity sensitive to the spatial geometry and topology of the system, dubbed the Hall viscosity ?H. Despite the extensive theoretical discussions on its properties, the question of how to measure ?H still poses a challenge. In this paper, we present a general relation between Hall viscosity and susceptibility for systems with Galilean invariance. Thus, it allows for determination of ?H through density response signatures. The relations are verified in the integer quantum Hall example and are further illustrated in an effective hydrodynamic analysis. Since the derivation is based on Kubo formulas and assumes no more than conservation laws and translational symmetry, the results are applicable to a wide range of systems.

  8. Cognitive and physiological responses in humans exposed to a TETRA base station signal in relation to perceived electromagnetic hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Denise; Eltiti, Stacy; Ridgewell, Anna; Garner, Kelly; Russo, Riccardo; Sepulveda, Francisco; Walker, Stuart; Quinlan, Terence; Dudley, Sandra; Maung, Sithu; Deeble, Roger; Fox, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    Terrestrial Trunked Radio (TETRA) technology ("Airwave") has led to public concern because of its potential interference with electrical activity in the brain. The present study is the first to examine whether acute exposure to a TETRA base station signal has an impact on cognitive functioning and physiological responses. Participants were exposed to a 420?MHz TETRA signal at a power flux density of 10?mW/m(2) as well as sham (no signal) under double-blind conditions. Fifty-one people who reported a perceived sensitivity to electromagnetic fields as well as 132 controls participated in a double-blind provocation study. Forty-eight sensitive and 132 control participants completed all three sessions. Measures of short-term memory, working memory, and attention were administered while physiological responses (blood volume pulse, heart rate, skin conductance) were monitored. After applying exclusion criteria based on task performance for each aforementioned cognitive measure, data were analyzed for 36, 43, and 48 sensitive participants for these respective tasks and, likewise, 107,125, and 129 controls. We observed no differences in cognitive performance between sham and TETRA exposure in either group; physiological response also did not differ between the exposure conditions. These findings are similar to previous double-blind studies with other mobile phone signals (900-2100?MHz), which could not establish any clear evidence that mobile phone signals affect health or cognitive function. PMID:21647932

  9. A duplicated pair of Arabidopsis RING-finger E3 ligases contribute to the RPM1- and RPS2-mediated hypersensitive response.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Tsutomu; Nam, Jaesung; Boyes, Douglas C; Holt, Ben F; Hubert, David A; Wiig, Aaron; Dangl, Jeffery L

    2005-10-01

    The Arabidopsis RPM1 protein confers resistance to disease caused by Pseudomonas syringae strains delivering either the AvrRpm1 or AvrB type III effector proteins into host cells. We characterized two closely related RPM1-interacting proteins, RIN2 and RIN3. RIN2 and RIN3 encode RING-finger type ubiquitin ligases with six apparent transmembrane domains and an ubiquitin-binding CUE domain. RIN2 and RIN3 are orthologs of the mammalian autocrine motility factor receptor, a cytokine receptor localized in both plasma membrane caveolae and the endoplasmic reticulum. RIN2 is predominantly localized to the plasma membrane, as are RPM1 and RPS2. The C-terminal regions of RIN2 and RIN3, including the CUE domain, interact strongly with an RPM1 N-terminal fragment and weakly with a similar domain from the Arabidopsis RPS2 protein. RIN2 and RIN3 can dimerize through their C-terminal regions. The RING-finger domains of RIN2 and RIN3 encode ubiquitin ligases. Inoculation with P. syringae DC3000(avrRpm1) or P. syringae DC3000(avrRpt2) induces differential decreases of RIN2 mobility in SDS-PAGE and disappearance of the majority of RIN2. A rin2 rin3 double mutant expresses diminished RPM1- and RPS2-dependent hypersensitive response (HR), but no alteration of pathogen growth. Thus, the RIN2/RIN3 RING E3 ligases apparently act on a substrate that regulates RPM1- and RPS2-dependent HR. PMID:16212605

  10. Pharmacogenetics of drug hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Elizabeth J; Mallal, Simon A

    2010-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions and severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions, such as Stevens–Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis, are examples of serious adverse drug reactions mediated through a combination of metabolic and immunological mechanisms that could traditionally not have been predicted based on the pharmacological characteristics of the drug alone. The discovery of new associations between these syndromes and specific HLA has created the promise that risk for these reactions could be predicted through pharmacogenetic screening, thereby avoiding serious morbidity and mortality associated with these types of drug reactions. Despite this, several hurdles exist in the translation of these associations into pharmacogenetic tests that could be routinely used in the clinical setting. HLA-B*5701 screening to prevent abacavir hypersensitivity syndrome is an example of a test now in widespread routine clinical use in the developed world. PMID:20602616

  11. Valproic acid hypersensitivity and desensitization.

    PubMed

    Toker, Ori; Tal, Yuval; Horev, Liran; Shmoeli, Dorit; Gilboa, Tal

    2015-11-01

    Rash, a hypersensitivity reaction, is a common cause of withdrawal from an effective antiepileptic drug (AED) in patients with epilepsy. We present a case of successful desensitization to valproic acid in a 12-year-old male with childhood absence epilepsy and a hypersensitivity reaction, whose epilepsy did not respond to other AEDs. Desensitization is a practical therapeutic solution for patients who develop a non-life-threatening hypersensitivity reaction to an AED for which there may be no substitute. PMID:26096509

  12. Targeting a Cross-Reactive Gly m 5 Soy Peptide as Responsible for Hypersensitivity Reactions in a Milk Allergy Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Curciarello, Renata; Smaldini, Paola L.; Candreva, Angela M.; González, Virginia; Parisi, Gustavo; Cauerhff, Ana; Barrios, Ivana; Blanch, Luis Bruno; Fossati, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cross-reactivity between soybean allergens and bovine caseins has been previously reported. In this study we aimed to map epitopes of the major soybean allergen Gly m 5 that are co-recognized by casein specific antibodies, and to identify a peptide responsible for the cross-reactivity. Methods Cow's milk protein (CMP)-specific antibodies were used in different immunoassays (immunoblotting, ELISA, ELISA inhibition test) to evaluate the in vitro recognition of soybean proteins (SP). Recombinant Gly m 5 (?), a truncated fragment containing the C-terminal domain (?-T) and peptides of ?-T were obtained and epitope mapping was performed with an overlapping peptide assay. Bioinformatics tools were used for epitope prediction by sequence alignment, and for modelling the cross-recognized soy proteins and peptides. The binding of SP to a monoclonal antibody was studied by surface Plasmon resonance (SPR). Finally, the in vivo cross-recognition of SP was assessed in a mouse model of milk allergy. Results Both ? and ?-T reacted with the different CMP-specific antibodies. ?-T contains IgG and IgE epitopes in several peptides, particularly in the peptide named PA. Besides, we found similar values of association and dissociation constants between the ?-casein specific mAb and the different milk and soy components. The food allergy mouse model showed that SP and PA contain the cross-reactive B and T epitopes, which triggered hypersensitivity reactions and a Th2-mediated response on CMP-sensitized mice. Conclusions Gly m 5 is a cross-reactive soy allergen and the ?-T portion of the molecule contains IgG and IgE immunodominant epitopes, confined to PA, a region with enough conformation to be bound by antibodies. These findings contribute to explain the intolerance to SP observed in IgE-mediated CMA patients, primarily not sensitised to SP, as well as it sets the basis to propose a mucosal immunotherapy for milk allergy using this soy peptide. PMID:24416141

  13. Immediate-type hypersensitivity drug reactions

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Shelley F; Phillips, Elizabeth J; Wiese, Michael D; Heddle, Robert J; Brown, Simon G A

    2014-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions including anaphylaxis have been reported for nearly all classes of therapeutic reagents and these reactions can occur within minutes to hours of exposure. These reactions are unpredictable, not directly related to dose or the pharmacological action of the drug and have a relatively high mortality risk. This review will focus on the clinical presentation, immune mechanisms, diagnosis and prevention of the most serious form of immediate onset drug hypersensitivity reaction, anaphylaxis. The incidence of drug-induced anaphylaxis deaths appears to be increasing and our understanding of the multiple and complex reasons for the unpredictable nature of anaphylaxis to drugs is also expanding. This review highlights the importance of enhancing our understanding of the biology of the patient (i.e. immune response, genetics) as well as the pharmacology and chemistry of the drug when investigating, diagnosing and treating drug hypersensitivity. Misdiagnosis of drug hypersensitivity leads to substantial patient risk and cost. Although oral provocation is often considered the gold standard of diagnosis, it can pose a potential risk to the patient. There is an urgent need to improve and standardize diagnostic testing and desensitization protocols as other diagnostic tests currently available for assessment of immediate drug allergy are not highly predictive. PMID:24286446

  14. A ChIP–chip approach reveals a novel role for transcription factor IRF1 in the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Frontini, Mattia; Vijayakumar, Meeraa; Garvin, Alexander; Clarke, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    IRF1 is a transcription factor that regulates key processes in the immune system and in tumour suppression. To gain further insight into IRF1's role in these processes, we searched for new target genes by performing chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to a CpG island microarray (ChIP–chip). Using this approach we identified 202 new IRF1-binding sites with high confidence. Functional categorization of the target genes revealed a surprising cadre of new roles that can be linked to IRF1. One of the major functional categories was the DNA damage response pathway. In order to further validate our findings, we show that IRF1 can regulate the mRNA expression of a number of the DNA damage response genes in our list. In particular, we demonstrate that the mRNA and protein levels of the DNA repair protein BRIP1 [Fanconi anemia gene J (FANC J)] are upregulated after IRF1 over-expression. We also demonstrate that knockdown of IRF1 by siRNA results in loss of BRIP1 expression, abrogation of BRIP1 foci after DNA interstrand crosslink (ICL) damage and hypersensitivity to the DNA crosslinking agent, melphalan; a characteristic phenotype of FANC J cells. Taken together, our data provides a more complete understanding of the regulatory networks controlled by IRF1 and reveals a novel role for IRF1 in regulating the ICL DNA damage response. PMID:19129219

  15. Chromatin studies reveal that an ERE is located far upstream of a vitellogenin gene and that a distal tissue-specific hypersensitive site is conserved for two coordinately regulated vitellogenin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Burch, J B; Fischer, A H

    1990-01-01

    Estrogen induces the expression of three vitellogenin genes in chicken hepatocytes. To survey the vitellogenin III (VTGIII) gene region for possible distal regulatory sequences, we identified tissue-specific hypersensitive (HS) sites within a 45 kb chromatin region spanning this gene. Five constitutive HS sites were found to mark the VTGIII gene region in hormone-naive hepatocytes. Strikingly, the constitutive HS site located 5.5 kb upstream of the VTGIII gene and a previously identified HS site located within the coordinately regulated VTGII gene mapped to nearly identical copies of a 72 bp sequence. Moreover, it would appear that there has been evolutionary pressure to retain specifically this 72 bp of VTGII-like sequence near the VTGIII gene subsequent to the VTGIII and VTGII genes becoming unlinked approximately 16 Myr ago. Two additional sets of HS sites were induced in the VTGIII gene region in response to estrogen. One set mapped immediately upstream of the gene in the vicinity of what we show to be a functional estrogen response element (ERE). The other induced HS site mapped 7.5 kb upstream of the gene. This far-upstream region was sequenced and was found to contain two imperfect ERE consensus sequences spaced 88 bp apart. In transient expression assays neither of these individual imperfect ERE sequences was functional, but a fragment spanning both sequences behaved as a strong ERE. In contrast to this synergism between imperfect ERE sequences, the presence of an NF-1 binding site 23 bp away from the more distal imperfect ERE sequence was not sufficient to render the latter a functional ERE in our assays. Images PMID:2377458

  16. Role of "lymphotoxin" in the local anti-tumour action associated with inflammation caused by delayed hypersensitivity responses or intralesional BCG. I. Variations in response of different syngeneic mouse tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Parr, I. B.; Jackson, L. E.; Alexander, P.

    1983-01-01

    The anti-tumour effect induced by a delayed hypersensitivity response (DHSR) unrelated to the tumour or by intra-tumoural inoculation of BCG was studied with 6 syngeneic mouse tumours. The growth of the tumours was followed i.p. or s.c. in suitably sensitized animals either in the presence or absence of the specific antigen required to elicit a DHSR. In a Winn-type assay the growth of tumour cells admixed with sensitized lymphocytes was also determined with and without the eliciting antigens. In addition, the effect of admixing different amounts of BCG with the tumour cells was studied on the growth of the tumours in vivo. The different tumours varied widely in their susceptibility to growth inhibition by a DHSR reaction and by BCG but their order of sensitivity was the same in all of the tests. Analysis of the effector population in the Winn test coupled with the inability to observe an anti-tumour action in mice with defective T-cell function showed that the effector mechanism involved allergized T-cells or more probably products released when these were confronted with the specific antigen. In vitro the relative susceptibility of the different tumour cells to killing by activated macrophages and by NK cells was quite different to that found for in vivo growth inhibition but the in vitro response to lymphotoxin of the different tumours paralleled that produced by inflammation in vivo. PMID:6604535

  17. An unexpected positive hypersensitive reaction to eugenol

    PubMed Central

    Tammannavar, Praveen; C, Pushpalatha; Jain, Shrenik; SV, Sowmya

    2013-01-01

    Eugenol is an active, principal aromatic liquid responsible for several pharmacological activities. It is widely used in dental practice to relieve pain arising from various sources, such as pulpitis and dentinal hypersensitivity. As a primary irritant and sensitiser, it is known to cause contact urticaria as well as chronic urticaria. However, eugenol causes allergic contact dermatitis, possibly because it can react directly with proteins to form conjugate and reactive haptens. It is found that eugenol in various dental preparations-especially in the case of some zinc oxide–contains preparations such as periodontal dressings and root canal cements. This can cause hypersensitivity when it comes in contact with gingiva or teeth. This article presents a case of immediate allergic contact urticaria to eugenol during dental treatment. PMID:24049087

  18. Planarian Phototactic Assay Reveals Differential Behavioral Responses Based on Wavelength

    PubMed Central

    Paskin, Taylor R.; Jellies, John; Bacher, Jessica; Beane, Wendy S.

    2014-01-01

    Planarians are free-living aquatic flatworms that possess a well-documented photophobic response to light. With a true central nervous system and simple cerebral eyes (ocelli), planarians are an emerging model for regenerative eye research. However, comparatively little is known about the physiology of their photoreception or how their behavior is affected by various wavelengths. Most phototactic studies have examined planarian behavior using white light. Here, we describe a novel planarian behavioral assay to test responses to small ranges of visible wavelengths (red, blue, green), as well as ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) which have not previously been examined. Our data show that planarians display behavioral responses across a range of wavelengths. These responses occur in a hierarchy, with the shortest wavelengths (UV) causing the most intense photophobic responses while longer wavelengths produce no effect (red) or an apparent attraction (IR). In addition, our data reveals that planarian photophobia is comprised of both a general photophobic response (that drives planarians to escape the light source regardless of wavelength) and wavelength-specific responses that encompass specific behavioral reactions to individual wavelengths. Our results serve to improve the understanding of planarian phototaxis and suggest that behavioral studies performed with white light mask a complex behavioral interaction with the environment. PMID:25493551

  19. Planarian Phototactic Assay Reveals Differential Behavioral Responses Based on Wavelength.

    PubMed

    Paskin, Taylor R; Jellies, John; Bacher, Jessica; Beane, Wendy S

    2014-01-01

    Planarians are free-living aquatic flatworms that possess a well-documented photophobic response to light. With a true central nervous system and simple cerebral eyes (ocelli), planarians are an emerging model for regenerative eye research. However, comparatively little is known about the physiology of their photoreception or how their behavior is affected by various wavelengths. Most phototactic studies have examined planarian behavior using white light. Here, we describe a novel planarian behavioral assay to test responses to small ranges of visible wavelengths (red, blue, green), as well as ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) which have not previously been examined. Our data show that planarians display behavioral responses across a range of wavelengths. These responses occur in a hierarchy, with the shortest wavelengths (UV) causing the most intense photophobic responses while longer wavelengths produce no effect (red) or an apparent attraction (IR). In addition, our data reveals that planarian photophobia is comprised of both a general photophobic response (that drives planarians to escape the light source regardless of wavelength) and wavelength-specific responses that encompass specific behavioral reactions to individual wavelengths. Our results serve to improve the understanding of planarian phototaxis and suggest that behavioral studies performed with white light mask a complex behavioral interaction with the environment. PMID:25493551

  20. Isolation of ABA hypersensitive mutants in allhexaploid breadwheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) stimulates seed dormancy during embryo maturation, inhibits germination of mature seed, and stimulates stress responses such as stomatal closure in response to drought stress. Arabidopsis mutants isolated for ABA hypersensitive (ABH) seed germination showed incr...

  1. Metabolomics reveals insect metabolic responses associated with fungal infection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong-Jiang; Luo, Feifei; Gao, Qiang; Shang, Yanfang; Wang, Chengshu

    2015-06-01

    The interactions between insects and pathogenic fungi are complex. We employed metabolomic techniques to profile insect metabolic dynamics upon infection by the pathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana. Silkworm larvae were infected with fungal spores and microscopic observations demonstrated that the exhaustion of insect hemocytes was coupled with fungal propagation in the insect body cavity. Metabolomic analyses revealed that fungal infection could significantly alter insect energy and nutrient metabolisms as well as the immune defense responses, including the upregulation of carbohydrates, amino acids, fatty acids, and lipids, but the downregulation of eicosanoids and amines. The insect antifeedant effect of the fungal infection was evident with the reduced level of maclurin (a component of mulberry leaves) in infected insects but elevated accumulations in control insects. Insecticidal and cytotoxic mycotoxins like oosporein and beauveriolides were also detected in insects at the later stages of infection. Taken together, the metabolomics data suggest that insect immune responses are energy-cost reactions and the strategies of nutrient deprivation, inhibition of host immune responses, and toxin production would be jointly employed by the fungus to kill insects. The data obtained in this study will facilitate future functional studies of genes and pathways associated with insect-fungus interactions. PMID:25895944

  2. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis induced by Shiitake mushroom spores.

    PubMed

    Ampere, Alexandre; Delhaes, Laurence; Soots, Jacques; Bart, Frederic; Wallaert, Benoit

    2012-08-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is a pulmonary granulomatosis involving an immunoallergic mechanism caused by chronic inhalation of antigens, most frequently organic substances, as well as chemicals. We report the first European case of hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to the inhalation of Shiitake mushroom spores. A 37-year-old French Caucasian man with a one-month history of persistent dry cough, shortness of breath and loss of weight was admitted to our hospital on December 2010. Anamnesis showed he was involved in mushroom production beginning in the summer of 2010. His temperature on admission was 36.6°C and he had a normal blood pressure (135/90 mmHg). Bilateral fine crackles were audible in the base of both lungs. Pulmonary function tests showed a mild restrictive pattern with decreased DLco and a PaO(2) of 65 mmHg, Chest CT scan revealed reticulo-nodular shadows, slight ground glass opacities, liner atelectasis, and subpleural opacities in both lung fields. Bronchoscopy was normal but cytological examination of BAL revealed a predominant lymphocytosis (55%). Serum precipitins to the Shiitake mushroom spores were positive (3 precipitins arcs with high intensity) and as a result we advised the patient to cease his mushroom production activities. The diagnosis of hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to inhalation of Shiitake mushroom spores was established as a result of the improvement of all of his clinical symptoms, i.e., cough, weight loss, bilateral fine crackles, mild restrictive pattern of pulmonary function, and reticulo-nodular shadows on chest CT, once exposure was eliminated. Recent interest in exotic mushrooms varieties, e.g., Shiitake, in developed countries because of their possible medicinal properties might increase the potential risk of HP among mushrooms workers. Therefore, healthcare professionals have to take this new potential respiratory disease into account. PMID:22329454

  3. TRIMELLITIC ANHYDRIDE (TMA) HYPERSENSITIVITY IN MICE AFTER DERMAL AND INTRATRACHAEL (IT) EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT for 2001 DMS213

    TRIMELLITIC ANHYDRIDE (TMA) HYPERSENSITIVITY IN
    MICE AFTER DERMAL AND INTRATRACHEAL (IT) EXPOSURES. E Boykin, M Ward, MJ Selgrade, and D Sailstad. NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.
    TMA causes respiratory hypersensitivity (RH) responses. W...

  4. TRIMELLITIC ANHYDRIDE (TMA) HYPERSENSITIVITY IN MICE AFTER MULTIPLE INTRATRACHAEL (IT) EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    SOT 2001 DMS214

    TRIMELLITIC ANHYDRIDE (TMA) HYPERSENSITIVITY IN
    MICE AFTER MULTIPLE INTRATRACHEAL (IT) EXPOSURES. D Sailstad, E Boykin, M Ward, and MJ Selgrade. NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.
    TMA causes Th2 related respiratory hypersensitivity (RH) responses. W...

  5. Emotional face discrimination as revealed by electrophysiological periodic visual responses.

    PubMed

    Dzhelyova, Milena; Rossion, Bruno

    2015-09-01

    Being able to read social information is vital for an individual. A wealth of social cues is provided by the face, in particular emotional expressions. To address the question of how the brain discriminates emotional faces, we recorded electroencephalogram from 18 participants during a fast periodic oddball paradigm, which provides an objective, implicit and robust quantifiable measure of visual discrimination. The same face with a neutral expression was presented at a rate of 5.88 Hz during an 80 sec sequence. Every five faces, the same face displaying an emotional expression of fear, disgust or happiness (in different sequences), was presented, thus resulting in a sequence NNNNFNNNNFNNNNF (e.g., neutral-fear oddball sequence). The oddball 1.18Hz (5.88Hz/5) response and its harmonics (e.g., 2f = 2.36 Hz) were used to measure emotional face discrimination. This emotional face discrimination response was observed bilaterally at occipito-temporal sites. Furthermore, inverting the faces significantly reduced the brain response over the occipito-temporal regions for the oddball frequency, suggesting that it reflected high level processes related to the emotional faces. The response to happy faces was characterised with more dorsal distribution than angry and disgusted faces. The latter face type was characterised with more anterior scalp topography than the angry faces. An additional analysis confirmed the topographical differences and hinted at partly distinct neural generators. A complementary time domain analysis revealed several components discriminating neutral from emotional faces and an additional experiment comparing the mode of stimulus presentation - sine vs. square wave - suggested that these 3 components peaked at 120 ms (positive); 170 ms (negative) and 250 ms (positive) after stimulus onset. These observations provide new insights into the temporal dynamics of facial expression processing and show that the fast periodic oddball paradigm can be successfully employed to address processes underlying social perception. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326379

  6. Phenological sequences reveal aggregate life history response to climatic warming.

    PubMed

    Post, Eric S; Pedersen, Christian; Wilmers, Christopher C; Forchhammer, Mads C

    2008-02-01

    Climatic warming is associated with organisms breeding earlier in the season than is typical for their species. In some species, however, response to warming is more complex than a simple advance in the timing of all life history events preceding reproduction. Disparities in the extent to which different components of the reproductive phenology of organisms vary with climatic warming indicate that not all life history events are equally responsive to environmental variation. Here, we propose that our understanding of phenological response to climate change can be improved by considering entire sequences of events comprising the aggregate life histories of organisms preceding reproduction. We present results of a two-year warming experiment conducted on 33 individuals of three plant species inhabiting a low-arctic site. Analysis of phenological sequences of three key events for each species revealed how the aggregate life histories preceding reproduction responded to warming, and which individual events exerted the greatest influence on aggregate life history variation. For alpine chickweed (Cerastium alpinum), warming elicited a shortening of the duration of the emergence stage by 2.5 days on average, but the aggregate life history did not differ between warmed and ambient plots. For gray willow (Salix glauca), however, all phenological events monitored occurred earlier on warmed than on ambient plots, and warming reduced the aggregate life history of this species by 22 days on average. Similarly, in dwarf birch (Betula nana), warming advanced flower bud set, blooming, and fruit set and reduced the aggregate life history by 27 days on average. Our approach provides important insight into life history responses of many organisms to climate change and other forms of environmental variation. Such insight may be compromised by considering changes in individual phenological events in isolation. PMID:18409426

  7. Common garden experiments reveal uncommon responses across temperatures, locations, and species of ants

    E-print Network

    Sanders, Nathan J.

    pressures and therefore may be differentially responsive to environmental change. Asystematic responses and spatial variation in responses to warming. Such experiments are useful for deter- mining if geographicallyCommon garden experiments reveal uncommon responses across temperatures, locations, and species

  8. Metabolic Phenotyping Reveals a Lipid Mediator Response to Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation has dramatically increased in modern society, raising serious health concerns. The molecular response to ionizing radiation, however, is still not completely understood. Here, we screened mouse serum for metabolic alterations following an acute exposure to ? radiation using a multiplatform mass-spectrometry-based strategy. A global, molecular profiling revealed that mouse serum undergoes a series of significant molecular alterations following radiation exposure. We identified and quantified bioactive metabolites belonging to key biochemical pathways and low-abundance, oxygenated, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in the two groups of animals. Exposure to ? radiation induced a significant increase in the serum levels of ether phosphatidylcholines (PCs) while decreasing the levels of diacyl PCs carrying PUFAs. In exposed mice, levels of pro-inflammatory, oxygenated metabolites of arachidonic acid increased, whereas levels of anti-inflammatory metabolites of omega-3 PUFAs decreased. Our results indicate a specific serum lipidomic biosignature that could be utilized as an indicator of radiation exposure and as novel target for therapeutic intervention. Monitoring such a molecular response to radiation exposure might have implications not only for radiation pathology but also for countermeasures and personalized medicine. PMID:25126707

  9. Avoiding Reflex Responses: Strategies for Revealing Students' Conceptual Understanding in Biology

    E-print Network

    Klymkowsky, Mike

    Avoiding Reflex Responses: Strategies for Revealing Students' Conceptual Understanding in Biology and strategies we use to create questions that better probe student understanding. Keywords: reflexive responses

  10. New insight into the inhibition of the inflammatory response to experimental delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions in mice by scropolioside A.

    PubMed

    Bas, Esperanza; Recio, M Carmen; Máñez, Salvador; Giner, Rosa M; Escandell, José M; López-Ginés, Concha; Ríos, José-Luis

    2007-01-26

    Scropolioside A, an iridoid isolated from Scrophularia auriculata ssp. pseudoauriculata, showed anti-inflammatory properties against different experimental models of delayed-type hypersensitivity. This iridoid reduced the oedema induced by oxazolone by 79% (72 h) at 0.5 mg/ear while reducing that induced by sheep red blood cells by 47% (18 h), 45% (24 h) and 36% (48 h) at 10 mg/kg. In vivo it reduced both oedema formation and cell infiltration whereas in vitro it reduced the proliferation of activated T-lymphocytes (IC50 of 67.74 microM). Treatment with scropolioside A (100 microM) 18 and 24 h after phytohemagglutinin stimulation increased the number of cells arrested in the subG(0) phase whereas treatment 3 h after stimulation clearly increased the number of cells that passed to the S phase. Scropolioside A also inhibited the production of prostaglandin E2, leukotriene B4, nitric oxide, interleukin-1beta, interleukin-2, interleukin-4, tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma, but had no effect on the production of interleukin-10. Moreover, it modified the expression of both nitric oxide synthase-2 and cyclooxygenase-2, as well as the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB in RAW 264.7 macrophages. PMID:17113578

  11. Hypersensitivity to thrombin of platelets from hypercholesterolemic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Winocour, P.D.; Rand, M.L.; Kinlough-Rathbone, R.L.; Mustard, J.F.

    1986-03-01

    Hypersensitivity of platelets to thrombin has been associated with hypercholesterolemia. The authors have examined the mechanisms involved in this hypersensitivity. Rats were given diets rich in milk fat and containing added cholesterol and taurocholate to produce hypercholesterolemia (HC) (262 +/- 25 mg%) or added sitosterol as a normocholesterolemic control (NC) (89 +/- 6 mg%). Washed platelets were prelabelled with /sup 14/C-serotonin. In the presence of acetylsalicyclic acid (ASA) (to inhibit thromboxane A/sub 2/ (TXA/sub 2/) formation) and creatine phosphate/creatine phosphokinase (CP/CPK) (to remove released ADP), HC platelets aggregated more (26 +/- 1%) and released more /sup 14/C (9.1 +/- 2.0%) than NC platelets (aggregation: 0%, p < 0.001; /sup 14/C release: 1.5 +/- 0.5%, p < 0.002) in response to thrombin (0.075 U/ml). Thus, a pathway independent of released ADP or TXA/sub 2/ formation is involved in the hypersensitivity of HC platelets to thrombin. Total binding of /sup 125/I-thrombin to HC platelets was less than that to NC platelets but HC platelets were smaller and had less protein than NC platelets; the thrombin binding per mg platelet protein was the same for HC and NC platelets, indicating that hypersensitivity to thrombin of HC platelets does not result from increased thrombin binding. Thus, hypersensitivity of HC platelets to thrombin is not due to TXA/sub 2/ formation, the action of released ADP or increased thrombin binding.

  12. CD11b+Ly6G- myeloid cells mediate mechanical inflammatory pain hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ghasemlou, Nader; Chiu, Isaac M; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Woolf, Clifford J

    2015-12-01

    Pain hypersensitivity at the site of inflammation as a result of chronic immune diseases, pathogenic infection, and tissue injury is a common medical condition. However, the specific contributions of the innate and adaptive immune system to the generation of pain during inflammation have not been systematically elucidated. We therefore set out to characterize the cellular and molecular immune response in two widely used preclinical models of inflammatory pain: (i) intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) as a model of adjuvant- and pathogen-based inflammation and (ii) a plantar incisional wound as a model of tissue injury-based inflammation. Our findings reveal differences in temporal patterns of immune cell recruitment and activation states, cytokine production, and pain in these two models, with CFA causing a nonresolving granulomatous inflammatory response whereas tissue incision induced resolving immune and pain responses. These findings highlight the significant differences and potential clinical relevance of the incisional wound model compared with the CFA model. By using various cell-depletion strategies, we find that, whereas lymphocyte antigen 6 complex locus G (Ly)6G(+)CD11b(+) neutrophils and T-cell receptor (TCR) ?(+) T cells do not contribute to the development of thermal or mechanical pain hypersensitivity in either model, proliferating CD11b(+)Ly6G(-) myeloid cells were necessary for mechanical hypersensitivity during incisional pain, and, to a lesser extent, CFA-induced inflammation. However, inflammatory (CCR2(+)Ly6C(hi)) monocytes were not responsible for these effects. The finding that a population of proliferating CD11b(+)Ly6G(-) myeloid cells contribute to mechanical inflammatory pain provides a potential cellular target for its treatment in wound inflammation. PMID:26598697

  13. Antibody and delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to Ochrobactrum anthropi cytosolic and outer membrane antigens in infections by smooth and rough Brucella spp.

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, J; Díaz, R; Grilló, M J; Barberán, M; Marín, C; Blasco, J M; Moriyón, I

    1997-01-01

    Immunological cross-reactions between Brucella spp. and Ochrobactrum anthropi were investigated in animals and humans naturally infected by Brucella spp. and in experimentally infected rams (Brucella ovis infected), rabbits (Brucella melitensis infected), and mice (B. melitensis and Brucella abortus infected). In the animals tested, O. anthropi cytosolic proteins evoked a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction of a frequency and intensity similar to that observed with B. melitensis brucellin. O. anthropi cytosolic proteins also reacted in gel precipitation tests with antibodies in sera from Brucella natural hosts with a frequency similar to that observed with B. melitensis proteins, and absorption experiments and immunoblotting showed antibodies to both Brucella-specific proteins and proteins common to Brucella and O. anthropi. No antibodies to O. anthropi cytosolic proteins were detected in the sera of Brucella-free hosts. Immunoblotting with sera of Brucella-infected sheep and goats showed immunoglobulin G (IgG) to Brucella group 3 outer membrane proteins and to O. anthropi proteins of similar molecular weight. No IgG to the O-specific polysaccharide of O. anthropi lipopolysaccharide was detected in the sera of Brucella-infected hosts. The sera of sheep, goats, and rabbits infected with B. melitensis contained IgG to O. anthropi rough lipopolysaccharide and lipid A, and B. ovis and O. anthropi rough lipopolysaccharides showed equal reactivities with IgG in the sera of B. ovis-infected rams. The findings show that the immunoresponse of Brucella-infected hosts to protein antigens is not necessarily specific for brucellae and suggest that the presence of O. anthropi or some related bacteria explains the previously described reactivities to Brucella rough lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane proteins in healthy animals. PMID:9144364

  14. The Multi-Resistant Reaction of Drought-Tolerant Coffee 'Conilon Clone 14' to Meloidogyne spp. and Late Hypersensitive-Like Response in Coffea canephora.

    PubMed

    Lima, Edriana A; Furlanetto, Cleber; Nicole, Michel; Gomes, Ana C M M; Almeida, Maria R A; Jorge-Júnior, Aldemiro; Correa, Valdir R; Salgado, Sônia Maria; Ferrão, Maria A G; Carneiro, Regina M D G

    2015-06-01

    Root-knot nematodes (RKN), Meloidogyne spp., have major economic impact on coffee production in Central and South America. Genetic control of RKN constitutes an essential part for integrated pest management strategy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the resistance of Coffea canephora genotypes (clones) to Meloidogyne spp. Sensitive and drought-tolerant coffee genotypes were used to infer their resistance using nematode reproduction factor and histopathology. Eight clonal genotypes were highly resistant to M. paranaensis. 'Clone 14' (drought-tolerant) and 'ESN2010-04' were the only genotypes highly resistant and moderately resistant, respectively, to both M. incognita races 3 and 1. Several clones were highly resistant to both avirulent and virulent M. exigua. Clone 14 and ESN2010-04 showed multiple resistance to major RKNs tested. Roots of 'clone 14' (resistant) and 'clone 22' (susceptible) were histologically studied against infection by M. incognita race 3 and M. paranaensis. Reduction of juvenile (J2) penetration in clone 14 was first seen at 2 to 6 days after inoculation (DAI). Apparent early hypersensitive reaction (HR) was seen in root cortex between 4 and 6 DAI, which led to cell death and prevention of some nematode development. At 12 to 20 DAI, giant cells formed in the vascular cylinder, besides normal development into J3/J4. From 32 to 45 DAI, giant cells were completely degenerated. Late, intense HR and cell death were frequently observed around young females and giant cells reported for the first time in coffee pathosystem. These results provide rational bases for future studies, including prospection, characterization, and expression profiling of genomic loci involved in both drought tolerance and resistance to multiple RKN species. PMID:25738554

  15. Modulation of Th1/Th2 Immune Responses by Killed Propionibacterium acnes and Its Soluble Polysaccharide Fraction in a Type I Hypersensitivity Murine Model: Induction of Different Activation Status of Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mussalem, Juliana Sekeres; Ishimura, Mayari Eika; Longo-Maugéri, Ieda Maria

    2015-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) is a gram-positive anaerobic bacillus present in normal human skin microbiota, which exerts important immunomodulatory effects, when used as heat- or phenol-killed suspensions. We previously demonstrated that heat-killed P. acnes or its soluble polysaccharide (PS), extracted from the bacterium cell wall, suppressed or potentiated the Th2 response to ovalbumin (OVA) in an immediate hypersensitivity model, depending on the treatment protocol. Herein, we investigated the mechanisms responsible for these effects, using the same model and focusing on the activation status of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). We verified that higher numbers of APCs expressing costimulatory molecules and higher expression levels of these molecules are probably related to potentiation of the Th2 response to OVA induced by P. acnes or PS, while higher expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs) seems to be related to Th2 suppression. In vitro cytokines production in cocultures of dendritic cells and T lymphocytes indicated that P. acnes and PS seem to perform their effects by acting directly on APCs. Our data suggest that P. acnes and PS directly act on APCs, modulating the expression of costimulatory molecules and TLRs, and these differently activated APCs drive distinct T helper patterns to OVA in our model. PMID:25973430

  16. Modulation of Th1/Th2 immune responses by killed Propionibacterium acnes and its soluble polysaccharide fraction in a type I hypersensitivity murine model: induction of different activation status of antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Squaiella-Baptistão, Carla Cristina; Teixeira, Daniela; Mussalem, Juliana Sekeres; Ishimura, Mayari Eika; Longo-Maugéri, Ieda Maria

    2015-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) is a gram-positive anaerobic bacillus present in normal human skin microbiota, which exerts important immunomodulatory effects, when used as heat- or phenol-killed suspensions. We previously demonstrated that heat-killed P. acnes or its soluble polysaccharide (PS), extracted from the bacterium cell wall, suppressed or potentiated the Th2 response to ovalbumin (OVA) in an immediate hypersensitivity model, depending on the treatment protocol. Herein, we investigated the mechanisms responsible for these effects, using the same model and focusing on the activation status of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). We verified that higher numbers of APCs expressing costimulatory molecules and higher expression levels of these molecules are probably related to potentiation of the Th2 response to OVA induced by P. acnes or PS, while higher expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs) seems to be related to Th2 suppression. In vitro cytokines production in cocultures of dendritic cells and T lymphocytes indicated that P. acnes and PS seem to perform their effects by acting directly on APCs. Our data suggest that P. acnes and PS directly act on APCs, modulating the expression of costimulatory molecules and TLRs, and these differently activated APCs drive distinct T helper patterns to OVA in our model. PMID:25973430

  17. Relation of coronary hypersensitivity to serotonin in cardiac transplant recipients to vessel wall morphology and effect of vitamin C.

    PubMed

    Berkenboom, Guy; Preumont, Nicolas; Pradier, Olivier; Goldman, Michel; Carpentier, Yvon; Vachiery, Jean-Luc; Antoine, Martine

    2006-02-15

    Coronary hypersensitivity to serotonin promotes platelet aggregation, entailing the progression of the atherosclerotic process. This abnormality is a common finding in cardiac transplant recipients and may be triggered by reactive oxygen species, which plays a main role in the inflammatory process. Hence, this study aimed to determine the influence of intimal hyperplasia on this abnormality and its reversibility after acute supplementation with the superoxide anion scavenger vitamin C. Therefore, intracoronary injections of serotonin (3 microg), bradykinin (600 ng), and nitroglycerin (isosorbide dinitrate 200 microg) were administered to 21 cardiac transplant recipients (1 year after transplantation) with normal coronary angiographic results; the serotonin injections were repeated after intracoronary vitamin C supplementation (40 mg/min for 14 minutes). In the segments in which serotonin effects were the most pronounced, the diameter changes were measured by quantitative angiography, and vessel wall morphology was studied by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). The IVUS examination revealed moderate to severe intimal thickening (total area - luminal area/total area) in 9 patients (group 1) of 25 +/- 2%, compatible with the early stage of graft vasculopathy. In this group, hypersensitivity to serotonin remained unchanged after intracoronary vitamin C supplementation, from -21 +/- 3% (percentage from baseline) to -25 +/- 3%, whereas in the other 12 patients with mild intimal thickening (9 +/- 1%; group 2), hypersensitivity to serotonin was attenuated from -20 +/- 5% to -4 +/- 6% (p <0.01). In contrast, the responses to bradykinin and isosorbide dinitrate were similar in the 2 groups. In group 1, plasma levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6 and -8) were significantly enhanced. For all the patients studied, the effect of vitamin C on the response to serotonin was significantly correlated with the intimal thickening. In conclusion, at 1 year after transplantation, morphologic changes compatible with the early stage of the graft vasculopathy are accompanied by hypersensitivity to serotonin unresponsive to vitamin C, despite a relatively preserved endothelial function (unaltered response to bradykinin). PMID:16461057

  18. Flower Development under Drought Stress: Morphological and Transcriptomic Analyses Reveal Acute Responses and Long-Term Acclimation in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhao; Ma, Xuan; Guo, Huihong; Sukiran, Noor Liyana; Guo, Bin; Assmann, Sarah M.; Ma, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Drought dramatically affects plant growth and crop yield, but previous studies primarily examined responses to drought during vegetative development. Here, to study responses to drought during reproductive development, we grew Arabidopsis thaliana plants with limited water, under conditions that allowed the plants to initiate and complete reproduction. Drought treatment from just after the onset of flowering to seed maturation caused an early arrest of floral development and sterility. After acclimation, plants showed reduced fertility that persisted throughout reproductive development. Floral defects included abnormal anther development, lower pollen viability, reduced filament elongation, ovule abortion, and failure of flowers to open. Drought also caused differential expression of 4153 genes, including flowering time genes FLOWERING LOCUS T, SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CO1, and LEAFY, genes regulating anther and pistil development, and stress-related transcription factors. Mutant phenotypes of hypersensitivity to drought and fewer differentially expressed genes suggest that DEHYDRATION RESPONSE ELEMENT B1A may have an important function in drought response in flowers. A more severe filament elongation defect under drought in myb21 plants demonstrated that appropriate stamen development requires MYB DOMAIN PROTEIN 21 under drought conditions. Our study reveals a regulatory cascade in reproductive responses and acclimation under drought. PMID:24179129

  19. Regulation of delayed-type hypersensitivity-like responses in the mouse lung, determined with histological procedures: serotonin, T-cell suppressor-inducer factor and high antigen dose tolerance regulate the magnitude of T-cell dependent inflammatory reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Garssen, J; Nijkamp, F P; Wagenaar, S S; Zwart, A; Askenase, P W; Van Loveren, H

    1989-01-01

    We have studied delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses to picryl chloride (PCl) in the lungs of mice. Intranasal challenge with 0.6% picryl sulphonic acid (PSA), a water soluble form of PCl, of BALB/c mice, sensitized with PCl epicutaneously 1 week earlier, induced an accumulation of mononuclear inflammatory cells around bronchioli and blood vessels. Maximal inflammatory responses were seen 48 hr after challenge. These responses were antigen-specific, and also T-cell dependent, since athymic nude mice failed to show this reaction. A role for mast cells in the responses was studied using two strains of mast cell-deficient mice. In one of these (W/Wv) lung DTH responses to PCl were reduced severely. In the other strain (S1/S1d) the responses around vessels were decreased slightly, whereas the responses in the interstitial tissue and around bronchioli were similar to those in +/+ littermate controls. Involvement of serotonin was investigated using two serotonin receptor antagonists, i.e. methysergide and ketanserin. Treatment of mice with either of the antagonists prevented occurrence of the DTH-like reaction in the lung after intranasal antigen challenge. In the lungs of sensitized mice, significantly increased permeability was established 2 hr after antigen challenge. It was concluded that release of serotonin in the lung may provide an environment that comprises local vascular permeability and that facilitates the local recruitment and possibly the activation of DTH effector T cells, leading to subsequent attraction of mononuclear leucocytes into the lung. Immunological regulation of the DTH-like reactions in the lung was similar to that of contact sensitivity in the skin, since intravenous injection of an antigen-specific T-cell suppressor inducer factor prior to sensitization or pretreatment with a high dose of picryl sulphonic acid intravenously both resulted in reduction of the DTH-like lung histological response to picryl sulphonic acid. From these findings it was concluded that DTH-like lung responses are similar to DTH responses in the skin. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:2807371

  20. Biomaterial Hypersensitivity: Is It Real? Supportive Evidence and Approach Considerations for Metal Allergic Patients following Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mihalko, William M.; Grupp, Thomas M.; Manning, Blaine T.; Dennis, Douglas A.; Goodman, Stuart B.; Saleh, Khaled J.

    2015-01-01

    The prospect of biomaterial hypersensitivity developing in response to joint implant materials was first presented more than 30 years ago. Many studies have established probable causation between first-generation metal-on-metal hip implants and hypersensitivity reactions. In a limited patient population, implant failure may ultimately be related to metal hypersensitivity. The examination of hypersensitivity reactions in current-generation metal-on-metal knee implants is comparatively limited. The purpose of this study is to summarize all available literature regarding biomaterial hypersensitivity after total knee arthroplasty, elucidate overall trends about this topic in the current literature, and provide a foundation for clinical approach considerations when biomaterial hypersensitivity is suspected. PMID:25883940

  1. Ny-1 and Ny-2 genes conferring hypersensitive response to potato virus Y (PVY) in cultivated potatoes: mapping and marker-assisted selection validation for PVY resistance in potato breeding.

    PubMed

    Szajko, Katarzyna; Strzelczyk-?yta, Danuta; Marczewski, Waldemar

    2014-01-01

    Potato virus Y (PVY) is one of the most important viruses affecting potato (Solanum tuberosum) production. In this study, a novel hypersensitive response (HR) gene, Ny-2, conferring resistance to PVY was mapped on potato chromosome XI in cultivar Romula. In cultivars Albatros and Sekwana, the Ny-1 gene was mapped on chromosome IX. In cv. Romula, the local lesions appeared in leaves inoculated with the PVY(N-Wi) isolate at 20 and 28 °C; PVY systemic infections were only occasionally observed at the higher temperature. In cvs. Albatros and Sekwana, expression of the necrotic reaction to virus infection was temperature-dependent. PVY(N-Wi) was localized at 20 °C; at 28 °C, the systemic, symptomless infection was observed. We developed the B11.61600 marker co-segregating with Ny-2 and the S1d11 marker specific for the Ny-1 gene. Fifty potato cultivars were tested with markers B11.6 and S1d11 and marker SC895 linked to the Ny-1 gene in cv. Rywal. These results indicated the utility of these markers for marker-assisted selection of HR-like PVY resistance in potato breeding programs. PMID:24860254

  2. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis in a high school teacher.

    PubMed

    Moniodis, A; Hamilton, T; Racila, E; Cockrill, B; McCunney, R

    2015-10-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is an inflammatory lung disease mediated by an immunological response to an inhaled antigen. Outbreaks of HP have been reported in industrial settings where manufacturing workers are exposed to water-based metalworking fluids (MWFs). Water-based MWFs promote growth of microorganisms and can be easily aerosolized and are thus potential aetiological agents of HP. We present a case of HP caused by exposure to water-based MWF in a vocational high school teacher. Culture of MWF used at his school grew Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes. This is the first known report of MWF-induced HP outside an industrial setting. The growth of Pseudomonas spp in this case recalls the earliest reports of the microbiology of MWF-induced HP and suggests that routine bacterial culture may be useful in the diagnosis of HP in workplaces without standard cleaning and biocide regulations. PMID:26136595

  3. Desensitizing Agent Reduces Dentin Hypersensitivity During Ultrasonic Scaling: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Suda, Tomonari; Akiyama, Toshiharu; Takano, Takuya; Gokyu, Misa; Sudo, Takeaki; Khemwong, Thatawee; Izumi, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Background Dentin hypersensitivity can interfere with optimal periodontal care by dentists and patients. The pain associated with dentin hypersensitivity during ultrasonic scaling is intolerable for patient and interferes with the procedure, particularly during supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) for patients with gingival recession. Aim This study proposed to evaluate the desensitizing effect of the oxalic acid agent on pain caused by dentin hypersensitivity during ultrasonic scaling. Materials and Methods This study involved 12 patients who were incorporated in SPT program and complained of dentin hypersensitivity during ultrasonic scaling. We examined the availability of the oxalic acid agent to compare the degree of pain during ultrasonic scaling with or without the application of the dentin hypersensitivity agent. Evaluation of effects on dentin hypersensitivity was determined by a questionnaire and visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores after ultrasonic scaling. The statistical analysis was performed using the paired Student t-test and Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Results The desensitizing agent reduced the mean VAS pain score from 69.33 ± 16.02 at baseline to 26.08 ± 27.99 after application. The questionnaire revealed that >80% patients were satisfied and requested the application of the desensitizing agent for future ultrasonic scaling sessions. Conclusion This study shows that the application of the oxalic acid agent considerably reduces pain associated with dentin hypersensitivity experienced during ultrasonic scaling. This pain control treatment may improve patient participation and treatment efficiency. PMID:26501012

  4. Proteomic analysis of rice plasma membrane reveals proteins involved in early defense response to bacterial blight.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang; Yuan, Yuexing; Li, Qun; He, Zuhua

    2007-05-01

    Plant plasma membrane (PM) proteins play important roles in signal transduction during defense response to an attacking pathogen. By using an improved method of PM protein preparation and PM-bound green fluorescent protein fusion protein as a visible marker, we conducted PM proteomic analysis of the rice suspension cells expressing the disease resistance gene Xa21, to identify PM components involved in the early defense response to bacterial blight (Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae). A total of 20 regulated protein spots were observed on 2-D gels of PM fractions at 12 and 24 h after pathogen inoculation, of which some were differentially regulated between the incompatible and compatible interactions mediated by Xa21, with good correlation between biological repeats. Eleven protein spots with predicted functions in plant defense were identified by MS/MS, including nine putative PM-associated proteins H+-ATPase, protein phosphatase, hypersensitive-induced response protein (OsHIR1), prohibitin (OsPHB2), zinc finger and C2 domain protein, universal stress protein (USP), and heat shock protein. OsHIR1 was modified by the microbial challenge, leading to two differentially accumulated protein spots. Transcript analysis showed that most of the genes were also regulated at transcriptional levels. Our study would provide a starting point for functionality of PM proteins in the rice defense. PMID:17407182

  5. Cutting Edge: Redox Signaling Hypersensitivity Distinguishes Human Germinal Center B Cells.

    PubMed

    Polikowsky, Hannah G; Wogsland, Cara E; Diggins, Kirsten E; Huse, Kanutte; Irish, Jonathan M

    2015-08-15

    Differences in the quality of BCR signaling control key steps of B cell maturation and differentiation. Endogenously produced H2O2 is thought to fine tune the level of BCR signaling by reversibly inhibiting phosphatases. However, relatively little is known about how B cells at different stages sense and respond to such redox cues. In this study, we used phospho-specific flow cytometry and high-dimensional mass cytometry (CyTOF) to compare BCR signaling responses in mature human tonsillar B cells undergoing germinal center (GC) reactions. GC B cells, in contrast to mature naive B cells, memory B cells, and plasmablasts, were hypersensitive to a range of H2O2 concentrations and responded by phosphorylating SYK and other membrane-proximal BCR effectors in the absence of BCR engagement. These findings reveal that stage-specific redox responses distinguish human GC B cells. PMID:26157177

  6. Pharmacometabolomics reveals that serotonin is implicated in aspirin response variability.

    PubMed

    Ellero-Simatos, S; Lewis, J P; Georgiades, A; Yerges-Armstrong, L M; Beitelshees, A L; Horenstein, R B; Dane, A; Harms, A C; Ramaker, R; Vreeken, R J; Perry, C G; Zhu, H; Sànchez, C L; Kuhn, C; Ortel, T L; Shuldiner, A R; Hankemeier, T; Kaddurah-Daouk, R

    2014-01-01

    While aspirin is generally effective for prevention of cardiovascular disease, considerable variation in drug response exists, resulting in some individuals displaying high on-treatment platelet reactivity. We used pharmacometabolomics to define pathways implicated in variation of response to treatment. We profiled serum samples from healthy subjects pre- and postaspirin (14 days, 81?mg/day) using mass spectrometry. We established a strong signature of aspirin exposure independent of response (15/34 metabolites changed). In our discovery (N = 80) and replication (N = 125) cohorts, higher serotonin levels pre- and postaspirin correlated with high, postaspirin, collagen-induced platelet aggregation. In a third cohort, platelets from subjects with the highest levels of serotonin preaspirin retained higher reactivity after incubation with aspirin than platelets from subjects with the lowest serotonin levels preaspirin (72?±?8 vs. 61?±?11%, P = 0.02, N = 20). Finally, ex vivo, serotonin strongly increased platelet reactivity after platelet incubation with aspirin (+20%, P = 4.9?×?10(-4), N = 12). These results suggest that serotonin is implicated in aspirin response variability. PMID:25029353

  7. Pharmacometabolomics Reveals That Serotonin Is Implicated in Aspirin Response Variability

    PubMed Central

    Ellero-Simatos, S; Lewis, J P; Georgiades, A; Yerges-Armstrong, L M; Beitelshees, A L; Horenstein, R B; Dane, A; Harms, A C; Ramaker, R; Vreeken, R J; Perry, C G; Zhu, H; Sànchez, C L; Kuhn, C; Ortel, T L; Shuldiner, A R; Hankemeier, T; Kaddurah-Daouk, R

    2014-01-01

    While aspirin is generally effective for prevention of cardiovascular disease, considerable variation in drug response exists, resulting in some individuals displaying high on-treatment platelet reactivity. We used pharmacometabolomics to define pathways implicated in variation of response to treatment. We profiled serum samples from healthy subjects pre- and postaspirin (14 days, 81?mg/day) using mass spectrometry. We established a strong signature of aspirin exposure independent of response (15/34 metabolites changed). In our discovery (N = 80) and replication (N = 125) cohorts, higher serotonin levels pre- and postaspirin correlated with high, postaspirin, collagen-induced platelet aggregation. In a third cohort, platelets from subjects with the highest levels of serotonin preaspirin retained higher reactivity after incubation with aspirin than platelets from subjects with the lowest serotonin levels preaspirin (72?±?8 vs. 61?±?11%, P = 0.02, N = 20). Finally, ex vivo, serotonin strongly increased platelet reactivity after platelet incubation with aspirin (+20%, P = 4.9?×?10?4, N = 12). These results suggest that serotonin is implicated in aspirin response variability. PMID:25029353

  8. Electrocorticography Reveals Enhanced Visual Cortex Responses to Visual Speech.

    PubMed

    Schepers, Inga M; Yoshor, Daniel; Beauchamp, Michael S

    2015-11-01

    Human speech contains both auditory and visual components, processed by their respective sensory cortices. We test a simple model in which task-relevant speech information is enhanced during cortical processing. Visual speech is most important when the auditory component is uninformative. Therefore, the model predicts that visual cortex responses should be enhanced to visual-only (V) speech compared with audiovisual (AV) speech. We recorded neuronal activity as patients perceived auditory-only (A), V, and AV speech. Visual cortex showed strong increases in high-gamma band power and strong decreases in alpha-band power to V and AV speech. Consistent with the model prediction, gamma-band increases and alpha-band decreases were stronger for V speech. The model predicts that the uninformative nature of the auditory component (not simply its absence) is the critical factor, a prediction we tested in a second experiment in which visual speech was paired with auditory white noise. As predicted, visual speech with auditory noise showed enhanced visual cortex responses relative to AV speech. An examination of the anatomical locus of the effects showed that all visual areas, including primary visual cortex, showed enhanced responses. Visual cortex responses to speech are enhanced under circumstances when visual information is most important for comprehension. PMID:24904069

  9. Development and validation of the Newcastle laryngeal hypersensitivity questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Laryngeal hypersensitivity may be an important component of the common disorders of laryngeal motor dysfunction including chronic refractory cough, pdoxical vocal fold movement (vocal cord dysfunction), muscle tension dysphonia, and globus pharyngeus. Patients with these conditions frequently report sensory disturbances, and an emerging concept of the ‘irritable larynx’ suggests common features of a sensory neuropathic dysfunction as a part of these disorders. The aim of this study was to develop a Laryngeal Hypersensitivity Questionnaire for patients with laryngeal dysfunction syndromes in order to measure the laryngeal sensory disturbance occurring in these conditions. Methods The 97 participants included 82 patients referred to speech pathology for behavioural management of laryngeal dysfunction and 15 healthy controls. The participants completed a 21 item self administered questionnaire regarding symptoms of abnormal laryngeal sensation. Factor analysis was conducted to examine correlations between items. Discriminant analysis and responsiveness to change were evaluated. Results The final questionnaire comprised 14 items across three domains: obstruction, pain/thermal, and irritation. The questionnaire demonstrated significant discriminant validity with a mean difference between the patients with laryngeal disorders and healthy controls of 5.5. The clinical groups with laryngeal hypersensitivity had similar abnormal scores. Furthermore the Newcastle Laryngeal Hypersensitivity Questionnaire (LHQ) showed improvement following behavioural speech pathology intervention with a mean reduction in LHQ score of 2.3. Conclusion The Newcastle Laryngeal Hypersensitivity Questionnaire is a simple, non-invasive tool to measure laryngeal pesthesia in patients with laryngeal conditions such as chronic cough, pdoxical vocal fold movement (vocal cord dysfunction), muscle tension dysphonia, and globus pharyngeus. It can successfully differentiate patients from healthy controls and measure change following intervention. It is a promising tool for use in clinical research and practice. PMID:24552215

  10. Proteomic investigations reveal a role for RNA processing factor THRAP3 in the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Beli, Petra; Lukashchuk, Natalia; Wagner, Sebastian A.; Weinert, Brian T.; Olsen, Jesper V.; Baskcomb, Linda; Mann, Matthias; Jackson, Stephen P.; Choudhary, Chunaram

    2013-01-01

    Summary The regulatory networks of the DNA damage response (DDR) encompass many proteins and posttranslational modifications. Here, we use mass spectrometry-based proteomics to analyze the systems-wide response to DNA damage by parallel quantification of the DDR-regulated phosphoproteome, acetylome and proteome. We show that phosphorylation-dependent signaling networks are regulated more strongly compared to acetylation. Among the phosphorylated proteins identified are many putative substrates of DNA-PK, ATM and ATR kinases, but a majority of phosphorylated proteins do not share the ATM/ATR/DNA-PK target consensus, suggesting an important role of downstream kinases in amplifying DDR signals. We show that the splicing-regulator phosphatase PPM1G is recruited to sites of DNA damage, while the splicing-associated protein THRAP3 is excluded from these regions. Moreover, THRAP3 depletion causes cellular hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents, thus suggesting an important link between RNA metabolism and DNA repair. Our results broaden the knowledge of DNA damage signaling networks and identify novel components of the DDR. PMID:22424773

  11. Grass Conjuvac. II. Pro-inflammatory activity and potential for inducing hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Taylor, W A; Cane, A K; Hammond, M D

    1984-01-01

    Treatment of rats with Conjuvac induced no anti-pollen extract (PE) IgE and no sensitization, whereas alum-adsorbed pollen extract induced IgE antibody and marked sensitivity. Conjuvac induced anti-PE IgE in rats treated with Bordetella pertussis organisms but the antibody concentrations were less than those induced by PE with B. pertussis. There was no indication, either in rats injected with B. pertussis and Conjuvac or alginate (ALG), of sensitization to ALG. In guinea pigs, Conjuvac induced immediate hypersensitivity to PE but there was no delayed hypersensitivity. Furthermore, no immediate hypersensitivity and little or no delayed hypersensitivity to ALG was detected in guinea pigs injected with conjuvac or ALG. Histological studies at Conjuvac injection sites in rabbits revealed inflammatory reactions less intense than those produced by aluminium hydroxide. PMID:6693179

  12. Cervical dentin hypersensitivity: a cross-sectional investigation in Athens, Greece.

    PubMed

    Rahiotis, C; Polychronopoulou, A; Tsiklakis, K; Kakaboura, A

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of cervical dentin hypersensitivity in a cross-sectional investigation of Greek adults. Seven hundred and sixty-seven subjects were examined. Participants were patients processed for first examination in the Clinic of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology at the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Athens. The evaluation of hypersensitivity was performed using two methods: for each tooth, the response to a) tactile stimulus and b) air-blast stimulus was measured. Additional factors such as smoking habits, oral health behaviour, consumption of acidic foods, type of toothbrush, daily use of fluoride solution and of desensitising toothpaste, gingival recession and non-carious cervical lesions were recorded and evaluated as causative factors. Descriptive statistics on the demographics of the study sample, of oral health behaviour characteristics and of oral examination findings were performed. Comparisons of these characteristics in the presence or absence of hypersensitivity were conducted with the chi-square test. Data were further analysed using multiple logistic regression modelling. Among study participants, 21·3% had at least one cervical dentin hypersensitivity reaction to the tactile stimulus, and 38·6%, to the air-blast stimulus. Multivariate analysis detected association of the hypersensitivity in tactile or air-blast stimulus with the non-carious lesions and with the gingival recessions. Additionally, a relation between hypersensitivity and air-blast stimulus with gender (female) was found. There was no association between the hypersensitivity in both of the stimuli and the level of education, smoking, consumption of acidic foods, type of toothbrush and daily use of fluoride solution or desensitising toothpaste. The overall prevalence of cervical dentin hypersensitivity in the adult population in Athens ranged from 21·3% to 38·6% depending on the type of stimuli. Cervical non-carious lesions and gingival recessions were determined as significant predictors of dentin hypersensitivity. PMID:24180256

  13. Mediated amperometry reveals different modes of yeast responses to sugars.

    PubMed

    Garjonyte, Rasa; Melvydas, Vytautas; Malinauskas, Albertas

    2016-02-01

    Menadione-mediated amperometry at carbon paste electrodes modified with various yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida pulcherrima, Pichia guilliermondii and Debaryomyces hansenii) was employed to monitor redox activity inside the yeast cells induced by glucose, fructose, sucrose, maltose or galactose. Continuous measurements revealed distinct modes (transient or gradually increasing) of the current development during the first 2 to 3min after subjection to glucose, fructose and sucrose at electrodes containing S. cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces strains. Different modes (increasing or decreasing) of the current development after yeast subjection to galactose at electrodes with S. cerevisiae or D. hansenii and at electrodes with C. pulcherrima and P. guilliermondii suggested different mechanisms of galactose assimilation. PMID:26523505

  14. Severe type IV hypersensitivity to 'black henna' tattoo.

    PubMed

    Vasilakis, Vasileios; Knight, Bernice; Lidder, Satnam; Frankton, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    A 16-year-old Bangladeshi girl presented with a 9-day history of an extensive pruritic, erythematous, papulovesicular skin eruption to both forearms. Appearance was 5 days following application of a home-made henna preparation. Examination revealed ulceration and scabbing along the whole henna pattern and early keloid formation. A diagnosis of type IV delayed hypersensitivity reaction superimposed by infection was initially made. As in this case, home-made henna preparations commonly combine commercial henna with black hair dye, paraphenylenediamine (PPD). PPD, widely known as 'black henna', darkens the pigment and precipitates the drying process. PPD is a potent contact allergen associated with a high incidence of hypersensitivity reactions. Despite treatment the patient was left with extensive keloid scarring in the pattern of the henna tattoo. PMID:22778139

  15. Pharmacometabolomics Reveals Racial Differences in Response to Atenolol Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wikoff, William R.; Frye, Reginald F.; Zhu, Hongjie; Gong, Yan; Boyle, Stephen; Churchill, Erik; Cooper-Dehoff, Rhonda M.; Beitelshees, Amber L.; Chapman, Arlene B.; Fiehn, Oliver; Johnson, Julie A.; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima

    2013-01-01

    Antihypertensive drugs are among the most commonly prescribed drugs for chronic disease worldwide. The response to antihypertensive drugs varies substantially between individuals and important factors such as race that contribute to this heterogeneity are poorly understood. In this study we use metabolomics, a global biochemical approach to investigate biochemical changes induced by the beta-adrenergic receptor blocker atenolol in Caucasians and African Americans. Plasma from individuals treated with atenolol was collected at baseline (untreated) and after a 9 week treatment period and analyzed using a GC-TOF metabolomics platform. The metabolomic signature of atenolol exposure included saturated (palmitic), monounsaturated (oleic, palmitoleic) and polyunsaturated (arachidonic, linoleic) free fatty acids, which decreased in Caucasians after treatment but were not different in African Americans (p<0.0005, q<0.03). Similarly, the ketone body 3-hydroxybutyrate was significantly decreased in Caucasians by 33% (p<0.0001, q<0.0001) but was unchanged in African Americans. The contribution of genetic variation in genes that encode lipases to the racial differences in atenolol-induced changes in fatty acids was examined. SNP rs9652472 in LIPC was found to be associated with the change in oleic acid in Caucasians (p<0.0005) but not African Americans, whereas the PLA2G4C SNP rs7250148 associated with oleic acid change in African Americans (p<0.0001) but not Caucasians. Together, these data indicate that atenolol-induced changes in the metabolome are dependent on race and genotype. This study represents a first step of a pharmacometabolomic approach to phenotype patients with hypertension and gain mechanistic insights into racial variability in changes that occur with atenolol treatment, which may influence response to the drug. PMID:23536766

  16. Correlation between the Constitution of Sasang and Sexual Difference in the Hypersensitive Reaction of Sweet Bee Venom

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwangho

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between the constitution of Sasang and the bee venom hypersensitive reaction, as well as the hypersensitive reaction occurrence ratio between males and females, for patients treated with sweet bee venom (SBV) and who had undergone an examination of the constitution of the Sasang. Methods: All 81 patients enrolled in the study were treated with SBV and underwent an examination of the constitution of Sasang from January 2010 to July 2012. We divided them into two groups for the hypersensitive reaction and no response and compared the distributions of the Sasang-constitution types for the two groups as well as the hypersensitive reaction occurrence ratio between males and females. Results: No significant differences were found between the hypersensitive-reaction group and the no-response group (p= 0.390), but the hypersensitive-reaction occurrence ratio was statistically higher in females than in males (p= 0.001). Conclusions: Hypersensitive reactions do not seem to be related to the Sasang-constitution types, but the possibility of hypersensitive reactions among females seems to be higher than it is among males. PMID:25780647

  17. Extreme warfarin hypersensitivity after oophorectomy.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Verena; Thachil, Jecko; Bolton-Maggs, Paula H B; Shearer, Martin J

    2015-12-01

    We report the case of a woman who developed unexplained warfarin hypersensitivity after undergoing surgery to remove her ovaries. Presurgery, the patient's international normalised ratios (INR) control was stable and uneventful but 11 days after her operation she presented with extremely high (frequently ?10) INR. Warfarin was discontinued on day 24 postoperation but 11 days later the plasma warfarin concentration was high at 4.8?mg/l (therapeutic range 0.7-2.3?mg/l). After cessation of warfarin, she required frequent doses of oral and intravenous vitamin K1 (totalling 48?mg) as well as two doses of prothrombin complex concentrate to normalise the INR. The patient was switched from warfarin to heparin, then to dabigatran with no further thrombosis or bleeding. While on heparin, the kinetics of warfarin elimination and vitamin K status were found to be normal and the reason for the onset of the extreme sensitivity to warfarin remains unknown. PMID:26203765

  18. Summer-type hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Ando, M; Suga, M; Nishiura, Y; Miyajima, M

    1995-08-01

    Summer-type hypersensitivity pneumonitis (SHP), the most prevalent type of HP in Japan, is caused by seasonal mold contamination in the home environment. The causative agent of the disease is Trichosporon cutaneum. The fungus grows in warm, moldy, decaying organic matter, and scatters in the air from the colonizing places. The inhaled fungi sensitize susceptible patients intratracheally and induce the disease. Glucuronoxylomannan of the fungus has a potent antigenicity that causes granulomatous alveolitis. Assay of anti-T. cutaneum antibody is very useful to establish the diagnosis of the disease because the antibody activity is virtually positive in all cases of the disease. Elimination of T. cutaneum from the colonizing places prevents recrudescence. SHP, a new form of HP, had been considered to be peculiar to Japan, but the first case of SHP outside Japan was identified in Korea last year. Soon it will be recognized in many countries of temperate and tropical clime. PMID:8563107

  19. Environmental Hypersensitivity Disorder, Total Allergy and 20th Century Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    Environmental hypersensitivity disorder is reputed to cause multiple allergic responses in susceptible people after exposure to common substances in the environment. The seriously afflicted, who believe themselves to be unable to live in the modern world, often become severely disabled. After a careful search of the literature, I am unable to find any scientific evidence for the validity of the theories, testing methods, or treatments given to these patients by clinical ecologists. This paper critically examines the concepts of environmental hypersensitivity and reviews scientific studies on this subject. It concludes that these patients are a heterogeneous group, and that many of them suffer from treatable psychiatric disorders. Guidelines are given for their management. PMID:21263833

  20. Where Asthma and Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis Meet and Differ

    PubMed Central

    Bogaert, Pieter; Tournoy, Kurt G.; Naessens, Thomas; Grooten, Johan

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is a type-I allergic airway disease characterized by Th2 cells and IgE. Episodes of bronchial inflammation, eosinophilic in nature and promoting bronchoconstriction, may become chronic and lead to persistent respiratory symptoms and irreversible structural airway changes. Representative mostly of mild to moderate asthma, this clinical definition fails to account for the atypical and often more severe phenotype found in a considerable proportion of asthmatics who have increased neutrophil cell counts in the airways as a distinguishing trait. Neutrophilic inflammation is a hallmark of another type of allergic airway pathology, hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Considered as an immune counterpart of asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis is a prototypical type-III allergic inflammatory reaction involving the alveoli and lung interstitium, steered by Th1 cells and IgG and, in its chronic form, accompanied by fibrosis. Although pathologically very different and commonly approached as separate disorders, as discussed in this review, clinical studies as well as data from animal models reveal undeniable parallels between both airway diseases. Danger signaling elicited by the allergenic agent or by accompanying microbial patterns emerges as critical in enabling immune sensitization and in determining the type of sensitization and ensuing allergic disease. On this basis, we propose that asthma allergens cause severe noneosinophilic asthma because of sensitization in the presence of hypersensitivity pneumonitis-promoting danger signaling. PMID:19074616

  1. Hazards of the 'hard cash': hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Kupeli, Elif; Karnak, Demet; Sak, Serpil Dizbay; Kayacan, Oya

    2010-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is a nonimmunoglobulin E-related immune-mediated parenchymal lung disease. A 45-year-old woman who was a lifelong nonsmoker with a six-month history of frequent episodes of cough and dyspnea was admitted to hospital. She had been working as a money counter for 20 years at a central bank. Bibasilar crackles on lung auscultation, ground-glass opacities and a mosaic pattern on high-resolution computed tomography, restrictive abnormality on pulmonary function tests and mild hypoxemia were the prominent findings. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid analysis revealed a predominance of CD4-positive T cells, and she tested positive on her natural challenge test. She was diagnosed with subacute HP based on established criteria. She was advised to discontinue counting fresh banknotes. Prednisolone was commenced, then tapered to discontinue in the ensuing six months. Clinical and radiological improvement was achieved within two months. To the authors' knowledge, the present report is the first to describe 'hard cash HP', possibly caused by chipping dust or printing dye. PMID:21038004

  2. Hazards of the ‘hard cash’: Hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Kupeli, Elif; Karnak, Demet; Sak, Serpil Dizbay; Kayacan, Oya

    2010-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is a nonimmunoglobulin E-related immune-mediated parenchymal lung disease. A 45-year-old woman who was a lifelong nonsmoker with a six-month history of frequent episodes of cough and dyspnea was admitted to hospital. She had been working as a money counter for 20 years at a central bank. Bibasilar crackles on lung auscultation, ground-glass opacities and a mosaic pattern on high-resolution computed tomography, restrictive abnormality on pulmonary function tests and mild hypoxemia were the prominent findings. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid analysis revealed a predominance of CD4-positive T cells, and she tested positive on her natural challenge test. She was diagnosed with subacute HP based on established criteria. She was advised to discontinue counting fresh banknotes. Prednisolone was commenced, then tapered to discontinue in the ensuing six months. Clinical and radiological improvement was achieved within two months. To the authors’ knowledge, the present report is the first to describe ‘hard cash HP’, possibly caused by chipping dust or printing dye. PMID:21038004

  3. Sympathoinhibition and hypotension in carotid sinus hypersensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. L.; Ellenbogen, K. A.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    Carotid sinus reflex hypersensitivity is a known cause of syncope in humans. The condition is characterized by cardioinhibition and vasodepression, each to varying degrees. The extent and importance of sympathoinhibition has not been determined in patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity. This study reports on the extent of sympathoinhibition measured directly directly during carotid massage with and without atrioventricular sequential pacing, in a patient with symptomatic carotid sinus reflex hypersensitivity. Carotid massage elicited asystole, hypotension and complete inhibition of muscle sympathetic nerve activity. Carotid massage during atrioventricular pacing produced similar sympathoinhibition, but with minimal hypotension. Therefore, sympathoinhibition did not contribute importantly to the hypotension during carotid massage in the supine position in this patient. Further investigations are required to elucidate the relation of sympathoinhibition to hypotension in patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity in the upright position.

  4. Sympathoinhibition and hypotension in carotid sinus hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Smith, M L; Ellenbogen, K A; Eckberg, D L

    1992-12-01

    Carotid sinus reflex hypersensitivity is a known cause of syncope in humans. The condition is characterized by cardioinhibition and vasodepression, each to varying degrees. The extent and importance of sympathoinhibition has not been determined in patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity. This study reports on the extent of sympathoinhibition measured directly directly during carotid massage with and without atrioventricular sequential pacing, in a patient with symptomatic carotid sinus reflex hypersensitivity. Carotid massage elicited asystole, hypotension and complete inhibition of muscle sympathetic nerve activity. Carotid massage during atrioventricular pacing produced similar sympathoinhibition, but with minimal hypotension. Therefore, sympathoinhibition did not contribute importantly to the hypotension during carotid massage in the supine position in this patient. Further investigations are required to elucidate the relation of sympathoinhibition to hypotension in patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity in the upright position. PMID:1290922

  5. Genome-wide analysis links NFATC2 with asparaginase hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Christian A; Smith, Colton; Yang, Wenjian; Mullighan, Charles G; Qu, Chunxu; Larsen, Eric; Bowman, W Paul; Liu, Chengcheng; Ramsey, Laura B; Chang, Tamara; Karol, Seth E; Loh, Mignon L; Raetz, Elizabeth A; Winick, Naomi J; Hunger, Stephen P; Carroll, William L; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E; Devidas, Meenakshi; Relling, Mary V

    2015-07-01

    Asparaginase is used to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL); however, hypersensitivity reactions can lead to suboptimal asparaginase exposure. Our objective was to use a genome-wide approach to identify loci associated with asparaginase hypersensitivity in children with ALL enrolled on St. Jude Children's Research Hospital (SJCRH) protocols Total XIIIA (n = 154), Total XV (n = 498), and Total XVI (n = 271), or Children's Oncology Group protocols POG 9906 (n = 222) and AALL0232 (n = 2163). Germline DNA was genotyped using the Affymetrix 500K, Affymetrix 6.0, or the Illumina Exome BeadChip array. In multivariate logistic regression, the intronic rs6021191 variant in nuclear factor of activated T cells 2 (NFATC2) had the strongest association with hypersensitivity (P = 4.1 × 10(-8); odds ratio [OR] = 3.11). RNA-seq data available from 65 SJCRH ALL tumor samples and 52 Yoruba HapMap samples showed that samples carrying the rs6021191 variant had higher NFATC2 expression compared with noncarriers (P = 1.1 × 10(-3) and 0.03, respectively). The top ranked nonsynonymous polymorphism was rs17885382 in HLA-DRB1 (P = 3.2 × 10(-6); OR = 1.63), which is in near complete linkage disequilibrium with the HLA-DRB1*07:01 allele we previously observed in a candidate gene study. The strongest risk factors for asparaginase allergy are variants within genes regulating the immune response. PMID:25987655

  6. Structure of p53 binding to the BAX response element reveals DNA unwinding and compression

    E-print Network

    Rohs, Remo

    Structure of p53 binding to the BAX response element reveals DNA unwinding and compression ABSTRACT The p53 core domain binds to response elements (REs) that contain two continuous half-sites as a co- operative tetramer, but how p53 recognizes discon- tinuous REs is not well understood. Here we

  7. Involvement of protein kinase ? in the maintenance of hippocampal long-term potentiation in rats with chronic visceral hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aiqin; Bao, Chengjia; Tang, Ying; Luo, Xiaoqing; Guo, Lixia; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) was implicated in the formation of visceral hypersensitivity in rats with irritable bowel syndrome in our previous study. Recent studies have shown that protein kinase M ? (PKM?) may be responsible for the maintenance of LTP in memory formation. However, it remains unclear whether PKM? is involved in the visceral hypersensitivity. In this study, a rat model of visceral hypersensitivity was generated by neonatal maternal separation (NMS). The visceral hypersensitivity was assessed by recording responses of the external oblique abdominal muscle to colorectal distension. Our results demonstrated that hippocampal LTP and visceral hypersensitivity were enhanced significantly in rats of NMS. ?-Pseudosubstrate inhibitory peptide (ZIP) could dose dependently inhibit the maintenance of Cornu Ammonis area 1 LTP in rats of NMS. Furthermore, Western blot data showed that the expression of hippocampal phosphorylated PKM? (p-PKM?) significantly increased in rats of NMS. In addition, bilateral intrahippocampal injections of ZIP attenuated the visceral hypersensitivity dose dependently in rats of NMS. The maximal inhibition was observed at 30 min, and significant inhibition lasted for 1.5–2 h after ZIP application. Besides, data from the open-field test and Morris water maze showed that ZIP did not influence the movement and spatial procedural memory in rats of NMS. In conclusion, p-PKM? might be a critical protein in the maintenance of hippocampal LTP, which could result in visceral hypersensitivity. PMID:25761958

  8. Involvement of protein kinase ? in the maintenance of hippocampal long-term potentiation in rats with chronic visceral hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Aiqin; Bao, Chengjia; Tang, Ying; Luo, Xiaoqing; Guo, Lixia; Liu, Bin; Lin, Chun

    2015-05-01

    The hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) was implicated in the formation of visceral hypersensitivity in rats with irritable bowel syndrome in our previous study. Recent studies have shown that protein kinase M ? (PKM?) may be responsible for the maintenance of LTP in memory formation. However, it remains unclear whether PKM? is involved in the visceral hypersensitivity. In this study, a rat model of visceral hypersensitivity was generated by neonatal maternal separation (NMS). The visceral hypersensitivity was assessed by recording responses of the external oblique abdominal muscle to colorectal distension. Our results demonstrated that hippocampal LTP and visceral hypersensitivity were enhanced significantly in rats of NMS. ?-Pseudosubstrate inhibitory peptide (ZIP) could dose dependently inhibit the maintenance of Cornu Ammonis area 1 LTP in rats of NMS. Furthermore, Western blot data showed that the expression of hippocampal phosphorylated PKM? (p-PKM?) significantly increased in rats of NMS. In addition, bilateral intrahippocampal injections of ZIP attenuated the visceral hypersensitivity dose dependently in rats of NMS. The maximal inhibition was observed at 30 min, and significant inhibition lasted for 1.5-2 h after ZIP application. Besides, data from the open-field test and Morris water maze showed that ZIP did not influence the movement and spatial procedural memory in rats of NMS. In conclusion, p-PKM? might be a critical protein in the maintenance of hippocampal LTP, which could result in visceral hypersensitivity. PMID:25761958

  9. PERSISTENT SUPPRESSION OF CONTACT HYPERSENSITIVITY, AND ALTERED T-CELL PARAMETERS IN F344 RATS EXPOSED PERINATALLY TO 2,3,7,8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN (TCDD)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    The outcome of perinatal low-level TCDD exposure on the T cell-mediated contact hypersensitivity response (CHS) in adult F344 rats was investigated. Suppression of the 2,4- dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB)-specific contact hypersensitivity reponse occurred in mature off...

  10. Heat-rekindling in UVB-irradiated skin above NGF-sensitized muscle: experimental models of prolonged mechanical hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Silvia Lo; Finocchietti, Sara; Gazerani, Parisa; Petersen, Lars J; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Experimental models of prolonged pain hypersensitivity in humans are desirable for screening novel analgesic compounds. In this study, heat stimuli were applied in ultraviolet-B (UVB)-irradiated skin and in the UVB-irradiated skin combined with nerve growth factor (NGF)-injected muscle to investigate 1) whether the evoked mechanical hypersensitivity by UVB irradiation would be prolonged or enhanced following heat rekindling, and 2) whether the combination between cutaneous and muscle hypersensitivity may influence the rekindling effects. Skin sensitization was induced in 25 volunteers by UVB irradiation in areas above the upper-trapezius muscle, low-back or forearm. Muscle sensitization was induced in the low back by bilateral injections of NGF. The area of cutaneous hyperalgesia was evaluated 3 days after the irradiation by mechanical pin-prick stimulation whereas the areas of allodynia were evaluated 1, 2 and 3 days after irradiation by von Frey hair assessments. Cutaneous heat stimulation (40°C for 5 min) was performed on the 3(rd) day to investigate its effect on the areas of cutaneous allodynia and hyperalgesia. Findings revealed that 1) allodynia and hyperalgesia developed following UVB irradiation, 2) heat stimulation of the UVB-irradiated skin enlarged both hyperalgesic and allodynic areas (P < 0.01), and 3) muscle sensitization did not influence the effect of UVB on allodynia or the response to heat rekindling. These data suggest that heat rekindling applied to an UVB-sensitized skin can maintain or facilitate allodynia and hyperalgesia for a longer period offering a suitable model for testing analgesic compounds when sufficient duration of time is needed for investigation of drug efficacy. PMID:25349637

  11. Unusual formaldehyde-induced hypersensitivity in two schoolgirls

    SciTech Connect

    Gammage, R.B. ); Hanna, W.T.; Painter, P.B. )

    1990-01-01

    Two schoolgirls developed a syndrome resembling Henoch-Schonlein purpura while attending a recently opened school insulated with urea-formaldehyde foam (UFFI). Skin rashes and swellings were accompanied by bizarre, blue-green discoloration of the skin. Subsequent investigations by county, state and federal authorities, and low measured concentrations of formaldehyde, prompted initial conclusions that in-school formaldehyde exposures were not responsible for the girls' problems. Subsequent controlled exposures to UFFI and formaldehyde while in hospital elicited the whole cascade of symptoms. The chronology of the onset and amplification of systems make it probable that the formaldehyde exposures precipitating the girls' hypersensitivity, occurred in the school. 3 refs.

  12. Adult-onset temporal lobe epilepsy, cognitive decline, multi-antiepileptic drug hypersensitivity, and Hashimoto's encephalopathy: Two case studies?

    PubMed Central

    Sadan, Ofer; Seyman, Estelle; Ash, Elissa L.; Kipervasser, Svetlana; Neufeld, Miri Y.

    2013-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is defined by the coexistence of encephalopathy and antithyroid antibodies. We report two cases of adult-onset temporal lobe epilepsy with subacute cognitive decline, high titers of antithyroid antibodies, multi-antiepileptic drug hypersensitivity, and good response to immunomodulatory treatment. The relevance of multidrug hypersensitivity in the setting of adult-onset epilepsy and the importance of searching for autoimmune causes for epilepsy are discussed. PMID:25667846

  13. Bcl-3 puts the brakes on contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Weighardt, Heike; Förster, Irmgard

    2015-04-01

    B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-3 is a nonclassical member of the I?B protein family known to interact with transcriptionally inactive NF-?B1 and NF-?B2 homodimers to modulate gene expression. Besides its action as an oncoprotein, Bcl-3 has been shown to have both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory functions depending on the cell-type affected. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Tassi et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: 1059-1068] report that Bcl-3 inhibits the production of the proinflammatory chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 in keratinocytes, thereby restricting the influx of CD8(+) effector T cells in a mouse model of allergic contact dermatitis. In addition, mice with a global deficiency of Bcl-3 show enhanced ear swelling responses in the late phase of contact hypersensitivity responses. Besides keratinocytes, other radioresistant cell types appear to also utilize Bcl-3 to dampen the inflammatory response. This Commentary will discuss the evidence supporting Bcl-3 as a critical player in limiting inflammation during the later stages of contact hypersensitivity. PMID:25707546

  14. Optically Trapped Bacteria Pairs Reveal Discrete Motile Response to Control Aggregation upon CellCell Approach

    E-print Network

    Optically Trapped Bacteria Pairs Reveal Discrete Motile Response to Control Aggregation upon Cell with open access at Springerlink.com Abstract Aggregation of bacteria plays a key role in the formation of many biofilms. The critical first step is cell­ cell approach, and yet the ability of bacteria

  15. Spatial Organization of Embryonic Stem Cell Responsiveness to Autocrine Gp130 Ligands Reveals an Autoregulatory Stem

    E-print Network

    Zandstra, Peter W.

    Spatial Organization of Embryonic Stem Cell Responsiveness to Autocrine Gp130 Ligands Reveals an Autoregulatory Stem Cell Niche RYAN E. DAVEY,a PETER W. ZANDSTRA a,b a Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical, Ontario, Canada Key Words. Autocrine signaling · Embryonic stem cell · Niche · Self-renewal · Stem cell

  16. Common and unique components of response inhibition revealed by fMRI

    E-print Network

    Jonides, John

    Common and unique components of response inhibition revealed by fMRI Tor D. Wager(a,T Ching-Yune C. Sylvester(b Steven C. Lacey(b Derek Evan Nee(b Michael Franklin( and John Jonidesb a Department in each task. Principal components analysis showed a coherent pattern of individual diffe- rences

  17. A case of chlorpheniramine maleate-induced hypersensitivity with aspirin intolerance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Hye; Lee, Sang-Min; Lee, So-Hee; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Cho, Sang-Heon; Min, Kyung-Up; Kim, You-Young; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2011-01-01

    Antihistamines are commonly used to treat allergic disease, such as allergic rhinitis, urticaria, and angioedema. Although several previous reports describe hypersensitivity to antihistamines such as cetirizine and hydroxyzine, documented cases of chlorpheniramine hypersensitivity are extremely rare. Here, we report the case of a 45-year-old Korean woman who presented with urticaria after ingesting a cold medication. Over the previous 5 years, she had also experienced a food allergy to crab and shrimp, allergic rhinitis, and repeated urticaria after ingesting cold medication. Provocation with aspirin elicited generalized urticaria. Intravenous chlorpheniramine and methylprednisolone was injected for symptom control, but in fact appeared to aggravate urticaria. A second round of skin and provocation tests for chlorpheniramine and methylprednisolone showed positive results only for chlorpheniramine. She was diagnosed with aspirin intolerance and chlorpheniramine hypersensitivity, and was instructed to avoid these drugs. To date, this is the second of only two cases of chlorpheniramine-induced type I hypersensitivity with aspirin intolerance. Although the relationship between aspirin intolerance and chlorpheniramine-induced type I hypersensitivity is unclear, physicians should be aware of the possibility of urticaria or other allergic reactions in response to antihistamines. PMID:21217928

  18. Evaluation of Dentifrice Containing Nano-hydroxyapatite for Dentinal Hypersensitivity: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, Nithin Manchery; John, Joseph; Nagappan, N; Prabhu, S; Kumar, E Senthil

    2015-01-01

    Background: This randomized, double-blind, parallel arm study was carried out to evaluate and compare the effectiveness between nano-hydroxyapatite (HAP) and a benchmark dentifrice in reducing dentin hypersensitivity. Materials and Methods: About 36 patients were selected, randomly divided into two groups and was evaluated clinically using three different stimuli, i.e., tactile, air blast, and cold water test. The patient’s responses to various stimuli were recorded using a visual analog scale at baseline and after 4 weeks. Results: Statistical analysis was done using unpaired and paired t-tests. It was seen that patients treated in both groups showed significant reductions scores across all sensitivity measures at the end of 4 weeks. Conclusion: The HAP containing toothpaste was effective in reducing dentin hypersensitivity with pre-existing benchmark toothpaste tested and hence can be advocated in the management of hypersensitivity. PMID:26464553

  19. Delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction against Nexplanon®.

    PubMed

    Serati, Maurizio; Bogani, Giorgio; Kumar, Sanjeev; Cromi, Antonella; Ghezzi, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Nexplanon® is an etonogestrel implant with a long-acting contraceptive effect. Although several studies underlined its safety profile, its implant can rarely lead to moderate or severe adverse event. Here, we presented a case of delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction against Nexplanon® that resolved after its removal. PMID:25284356

  20. Dissecting a Role for Melanopsin in Behavioural Light Aversion Reveals a Response Independent of Conventional Photoreception

    PubMed Central

    Semo, Ma'ayan; Gias, Carlos; Ahmado, Ahmad; Sugano, Eriko; Allen, Annette E.; Lawrence, Jean M.; Tomita, Hiroshi; Coffey, Peter J.; Vugler, Anthony A.

    2010-01-01

    Melanopsin photoreception plays a vital role in irradiance detection for non-image forming responses to light. However, little is known about the involvement of melanopsin in emotional processing of luminance. When confronted with a gradient in light, organisms exhibit spatial movements relative to this stimulus. In rodents, behavioural light aversion (BLA) is a well-documented but poorly understood phenomenon during which animals attribute salience to light and remove themselves from it. Here, using genetically modified mice and an open field behavioural paradigm, we investigate the role of melanopsin in BLA. While wildtype (WT), melanopsin knockout (Opn4?/?) and rd/rd cl (melanopsin only (MO)) mice all exhibit BLA, our novel methodology reveals that isolated melanopsin photoreception produces a slow, potentiating response to light. In order to control for the involvement of pupillary constriction in BLA we eliminated this variable with topical atropine application. This manipulation enhanced BLA in WT and MO mice, but most remarkably, revealed light aversion in triple knockout (TKO) mice, lacking three elements deemed essential for conventional photoreception (Opn4?/? Gnat1?/? Cnga3?/?). Using a number of complementary strategies, we determined this response to be generated at the level of the retina. Our findings have significant implications for the understanding of how melanopsin signalling may modulate aversive responses to light in mice and humans. In addition, we also reveal a clear potential for light perception in TKO mice. PMID:21124784

  1. Treatments for hypersensitive noncarious cervical lesions

    PubMed Central

    Veitz-Keenan, Analia; Barna, Julie Ann; Strober, Brad; Matthews, Abigail G.; Collie, Damon; Vena, Donald; Curro, Frederick A.; Thompson, Van P.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Practitioners Engaged in Applied Research and Learning (PEARL) Network conducted a three-armed randomized clinical study to determine the comparative effectiveness of three treatments for hypersensitive noncarious cervical lesions (NCCLs): use of a potassium nitrate dentifrice for treatment of hypersensitivity, placement of a resin-based composite restoration and placement of a sealant. Methods Seventeen trained practitioner-investigators (P-Is) in the PEARL Network enrolled participants (N = 304) with hypersensitive posterior NCCLs who met enrollment criteria. Participants were assigned to treatments randomly. Evaluations were conducted at baseline and at one, three and six months thereafter. Primary outcomes were the reduction or elimination of hypersensitivity as measured clinically and by means of patient-reported outcomes. Results Lesion depth and pretreatment sensitivity (mean, 5.3 on a 0- to 10-point scale) were balanced across treatments, as was sleep bruxism (present in 42.2 percent of participants). The six-month participant recall rate was 99 percent. Treatments significantly reduced mean sensitivity (P < .01), with the sealant and restoration groups displaying a significantly higher reduction (P < .01) than did the dentifrice group. The dentifrice group’s mean (standard deviation) sensitivity at six months was 2.1 (2.1); those of the sealant and restoration groups were 1.0 (1.6) and 0.8 (1.4), respectively. Patient-reported sensitivity (to cold being most pronounced) paralleled clinical measurements at each evaluation. Conclusions Sealing and restoration treatments were effective overall in reducing NCCL hypersensitivity. The potassium nitrate dentifrice reduced sensitivity with increasing effectiveness through six months but not to the degree offered by the other treatments. Practical Implications Sealant or restoration placement is an effective method of immediately reducing NCCL sensitivity. Although a potassium nitrate dentifrice did reduce sensitivity slowly across six months, at no time was the reduction commensurate with that of sealants or restorations. PMID:23633698

  2. Stable DNA Unwinding, not "Breathing," Accounts for Single-Strand-Specific Nuclease Hypersensitivity of Specific A + T-Rich Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, David; Natale, Darren A.; Eddy, Martha J.

    1988-12-01

    A long A+T-rich sequence in supercoiled pBR322 DNA is hypersensitive to single-strand-specific nucleases at 37 degrees C but not at reduced temperature. The basis for the nuclease hypersensitivity is stable DNA unwinding as revealed by (i) the same temperature dependence for hypersensitivity and for stable unwinding of plasmid topoisomers after two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, (ii) preferential nuclease digestion of stably unwound topoisomers, and (iii) quantitative nicking of stably unwound topoisomers in the A+T-rich region. Nuclease hypersensitivity of A+T-rich sequences is hierarchical, and either deletion of the primary site or a sufficient increase in the free energy of supercoiling leads to enhanced nicking at an alternative A+T-rich site. The hierarchy of nuclease hypersensitivity reflects a hierarchy in the free energy required for unwinding naturally occurring sequences in supercoiled DNA. This finding, along with the known hypersensitivity of replication origins and transcriptional regulatory regions, has important implications for using single-strand-specific nucleases in DNA structure-function studies.

  3. Airway Inflammation and Hypersensitivity Induced by Chronic Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Yu Ru; Kwong, Kevin; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Airway hypersensitivity, characterized by enhanced excitability of airway sensory nerves, is a prominent pathophysiological feature in patients with airway inflammatory diseases. Although the underlying pathogenic mechanism is not fully understood, chronic airway inflammation is believed to be primarily responsible. Cigarette smoking is known to cause chronic airway inflammation, accompanied by airway hyperresponsiveness. Experimental evidence indicates that enhanced excitability of vagal bronchopulmonary sensory nerves and increased tachykinin synthesis in these nerves resulting from chronic inflammation are important contributing factors to the airway hyperresponsiveness. Multiple inflammatory mediators released from various types of structural and inflammatory cells are involved in the smoking-induced airway inflammation, which is mainly regulated by redox-sensitive signaling pathways and transcription factors. Furthermore, recent studies have reported potent sensitizing and stimulatory effects of these inflammatory mediators such as prostanoids and reactive oxygen species on these sensory nerves. In summary, these studies using cigarette smoking as an experimental approach have identified certain potentially important cell signaling pathways and underlying mechanisms of the airway hypersensitivity induced by chronic airway inflammation. PMID:21397052

  4. Condition-specific role of colonic inflammatory molecules in persistent functional colorectal hypersensitivity in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    La, Jun-Ho; Gebhart, G. F.

    2014-01-01

    Background A low-level inflammation has been hypothesized to mediate visceral hypersensitivity in functional bowel disorders that persist after or even in the absence of gut inflammation. We aimed to test the efficacy of a steroidal anti-inflammatory treatment, and identify local inflammatory molecules mediating post- and non-inflammatory colorectal hypersensitivity using two mouse models. Methods Visceromotor responses to colorectal distension were quantified as a measure of colorectal sensitivity. On day 1, mice received intracolonic saline (control), trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (post-inflammatory on day 15), or acidified hypertonic saline (non-inflammatory). Colorectal sensitivity before (day 10) and after (day 15) four-day dexamethasone treatment was compared, and colonic gene expression of inflammatory molecules was quantified. Results Dexamethasone effectively inhibited gene expression of inflammatory molecules such as interleukin (IL)-1? and mast cell protease-1 in the colon, but did not attenuate colorectal hypersensitivity in either model. Gene expression of inflammatory molecules in the colon did not differ between control and the non-inflammatory model, but the post-inflammatory model showed increased IL-10 and tight junction protein 2, and decreased IL-6, transforming growth factor (TGF)-?, a precursor of ?-endorphin, occludin, and mucin 2. While no common molecule explained colorectal hypersensitivity in these models, hypersensitivity was positively correlated with TGF-?2 mRNA in control, and with IL-1?, inhibin ?A and prostaglandin E2 synthase in the dexamethasone-treated post-inflammatory model. In the non-inflammatory model, cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA was negatively correlated with colorectal sensitivity. Conclusion These results suggest that persistent functional colorectal hypersensitivity is mediated by condition-specific mediators whose gene expression in the colon is not inevitably sensitive to steroidal anti-inflammatory treatment. PMID:25307695

  5. Integrative analysis of breast cancer reveals prognostic haematopoietic activity and patient-specific immune response profiles.

    PubMed

    Varn, Frederick S; Andrews, Erik H; Mullins, David W; Cheng, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional programmes active in haematopoietic cells enable a variety of functions including dedifferentiation, innate immunity and adaptive immunity. Understanding how these programmes function in the context of cancer can provide valuable insights into host immune response, cancer severity and potential therapy response. Here we present a method that uses the transcriptomes of over 200 murine haematopoietic cells, to infer the lineage-specific haematopoietic activity present in human breast tumours. Correlating this activity with patient survival and tumour purity reveals that the transcriptional programmes of many cell types influence patient prognosis and are found in environments of high lymphocytic infiltration. Collectively, these results allow for a detailed and personalized assessment of the patient immune response to a tumour. When combined with routinely collected patient biopsy genomic data, this method can enable a richer understanding of the complex interplay between the host immune system and cancer. PMID:26725977

  6. Cortical Mechanisms of Smooth Eye Movements Revealed by Dynamic Covariations of Neural and Behavioral Responses

    PubMed Central

    Schoppik, David; Nagel, Katherine I.; Lisberger, Stephen G.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Neural activity in the frontal eye fields controls smooth pursuit eye movements, but the relationship between single neuron responses, cortical population responses, and eye movements is not well understood. We describe an approach to dynamically link trial-to-trial fluctuations in neural responses to parallel variations in pursuit and demonstrate that individual neurons predict eye velocity fluctuations at particular moments during the course of behavior, while the population of neurons collectively tiles the entire duration of the movement. The analysis also reveals the strength of correlations in the eye movement predictions derived from pairs of simultaneously recorded neurons and suggests a simple model of cortical processing. These findings constrain the primate cortical code for movement, suggesting that either a few neurons are sufficient to drive pursuit at any given time or that many neurons operate collectively at each moment with remarkably little variation added to motor command signals downstream from the cortex. PMID:18439409

  7. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis associated with environmental mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Beckett, William; Kallay, Michael; Sood, Akshay; Zuo, Zhengfa; Milton, Donald

    2005-06-01

    A previously healthy man working as a machine operator in an automotive factory developed respiratory symptoms. Medical evaluation showed abnormal pulmonary function tests, a lung biopsy showed hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and his illness was traced to his work environment. His physician asked the employer to remove him from exposure to metalworking fluids. Symptoms reoccurred when he was later reexposed to metalworking fluids, and further permanent decrement in his lung function occurred. Investigation of his workplace showed that five of six large reservoirs of metalworking fluids (cutting oils) grew Mycobacterium chelonae (or Mycobacterium immunogenum), an organism previously associated with outbreaks of hypersensitivity pneumonitis in automaking factories. His lung function remained stable after complete removal from exposure. The employer, metalworking fluid supplier, union, and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health were notified of this sentinel health event. No further cases have been documented in this workplace. PMID:15929902

  8. Time-Course Proteome Analysis Reveals the Dynamic Response of Cryptococcus gattii Cells to Fluconazole

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Hin Siong; Campbell, Leona; Padula, Matthew P.; Hill, Cameron; Harry, Elizabeth; Li, Simone S.; Wilkins, Marc R.; Herbert, Ben; Carter, Dee

    2012-01-01

    Cryptococcus gattii is an encapsulated fungus capable of causing fatal disease in immunocompetent humans and animals. As current antifungal therapies are few and limited in efficacy, and resistance is an emerging issue, the development of new treatment strategies is urgently required. The current study undertook a time-course analysis of the proteome of C. gattii during treatment with fluconazole (FLC), which is used widely in prophylactic and maintenance therapies. The aims were to analyze the overall cellular response to FLC, and to find fungal proteins involved in this response that might be useful targets in therapies that augment the antifungal activity of FLC. During FLC treatment, an increase in stress response, ATP synthesis and mitochondrial respiratory chain proteins, and a decrease in most ribosomal proteins was observed, suggesting that ATP-dependent efflux pumps had been initiated for survival and that the maintenance of ribosome synthesis was differentially expressed. Two proteins involved in fungal specific pathways were responsive to FLC. An integrative network analysis revealed co-ordinated processes involved in drug response, and highlighted hubs in the network representing essential proteins that are required for cell viability. This work demonstrates the dynamic cellular response of a typical susceptible isolate of C. gattii to FLC, and identified a number of proteins and pathways that could be targeted to augment the activity of FLC. PMID:22880118

  9. Phenytoin-induced acute hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Periwal, Pallavi; Joshi, Sharad; Gothi, Rajesh; Talwar, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Lungs are target organs for toxic effects of various drugs due to many reasons. Diphenylhydantoin (DPH) is reported to have many extrapulmonary side effects. We are presenting a case of acute hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) secondary to DPH, presenting with respiratory failure. Acute HP with respiratory failure is an uncommon drug side effect of the DPH therapy and is a diagnosis of exclusion. It requires detailed workup and exclusion of other causes along with evidence of improvement in the patient's condition after withholding DPH.

  10. Inhibition of expression of delayed hypersensitivity by neutralizing monoclonal anti-T-cell fibronectin antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Mandy, S; Feng, Z; Canfield, L S; Mandy, K; Quan, X; Rowehl, R A; Khan, M Y; Akiyama, S K; Godfrey, H P

    1994-01-01

    T-cell fibronectin (FN) is a unique cellular FN that is rapidly synthesized by memory T cells in response to antigen. Monoclonal anti-T-cell FN antibodies have been used to clarify the role of T-cell FN in the in vivo expression of delayed hypersensitivity. IgGl(kappa) mouse anti-human T-cell FN monoclonal antibodies 231 and 248 recognized epitopes on the FN cell-binding domain, were cross-reactive with plasma FN, and neutralized human and guinea-pig T-cell FN monocyte agglutinating activity. When injected intradermally together with tuberculin or 30 min before topical application of reactive sensitizer, antibody 231 significantly decreased macroscopic expression of guinea-pig delayed hypersensitivity at 24 hr in a dose-dependent manner. Similar doses of antibody 248 caused a slight statistically non-significant enhancement of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) expression. Inhibition of visible skin responses was not associated with qualitative or quantitative changes in cellular infiltrates at the reaction site. Antibody 231 modulated expression of delayed hypersensitivity in a qualitatively and quantitatively similar manner to the FN-binding mycobacterial antigen 85 proteins. This is consistent with anti-T-cell FN and antigen 85 acting on the same molecule in vivo. Images Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7875739

  11. Drug Hypersensitivity: Pharmacogenetics and Clinical Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Elizabeth J.; Chung, Wen-Hung; Mockenhaupt, Maja; Roujeau, Jean-Claude; Mallal, Simon A.

    2011-01-01

    Severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs) include syndromes such as drug reaction, eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN). An important advance has been the discovery of associations between HLA alleles and many of these syndromes including abacavir hypersensitivity reaction, allopurinol DRESS/DIHS and SJS/TEN and SJS/TEN associated with aromatic amine anticonvulsants. These HLA associations have created the promise for prevention through screening and have additionally shed further light on the immunopathogenesis of SCARs. The roll-out of HLA-B*5701 into routine clinical practice as a genetic screening test to prevent abacavir hypersensitivity provides a translational roadmap for other drugs. Numerous hurdles exist in the widespread translation of several other drugs such as carbamazepine where the positive predictive value of HLA-B*1502 is low and the negative predictive value of HLA-B*1502 for SJS/TEN may not be 100% in all ethnic groups. International collaborative consortia have been formed with the goal of developing phenotype standardization and undertaking HLA and genome-wide analyses in diverse populations with these syndromes. PMID:21354501

  12. Stent hypersensitivity and infection in sinus cavities

    PubMed Central

    Soufras, George D.; Hahalis, George

    2013-01-01

    Persistent mucosal inflammation, granulation tissue formation, hypersensitivity, and multifactorial infection are newly described complications of retained drug-eluting stents from endoscopic sinus surgery for refractory rhinosinusitis. In an important report published in Allergy and Rhinology, a 45-year-old male patient suffering from recalcitrant chronic rhinosinusitis underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery and was found, for the first time, to have steroid-eluting catheters that were inadvertently left in the ethmoid and frontal sinuses. The retained catheters had caused persistent mucosal inflammation and formation of granulation tissue denoting hypersensitivity reaction. These consequences had induced perpetuation of symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis. Meticulous removal of the retained stents with the nitinol wings from inflamed tissues of the frontal, ethmoidal, and sphenoethmoidal recesses in which they were completely imbedded was successfully performed without polypoid regrowth. Cultures of specimens taken from both left and right stents showed heavy growth of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and moderate growth of Klebsiella oxytoca, coagulase negative Staphylococcus, and beta-hemolytic Streptococcus anginosus. Fungal infection was not detected. The current knowledge and experience regarding stent hypersensitivity and infection in relation with the use of stents in sinus cavities is reviewed. PMID:24498522

  13. Presence of corrosion products and hypersensitivity-associated reactions in periprosthetic tissue after aseptic loosening of total hip replacements with metal bearing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Huber, Monika; Reinisch, Georg; Trettenhahn, Günter; Zweymüller, Karl; Lintner, Felix

    2009-01-01

    Aseptic loosening of articular implants is frequently associated with tissue reactions to wear particles. Some patients, who had received metal-on-metal articulations, present early symptoms including persistent pain and implant failure. These symptoms raise the suspicion about the development of an immunological response. Furthermore, the generation of rare corrosion products in association with metallic implants has been observed. Corrosion products are known to enhance third-body wear and contribute to the loss of the implant. The purpose of this study was to investigate periprosthetic tissue containing solid corrosion products after aseptic loosening of second-generation metal-on-metal total hip replacements made of low-carbon cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy for the presence of immunologically determined tissue changes. Periprosthetic tissue of 11 cases containing uncommon solid deposits was investigated by light microscopy. In order to confirm the presence of corrosion products, additional methods including scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigation, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR) analysis were used. All investigated cases revealed solid chromium orthophosphate corrosion products as well as metallic wear particles to a various extent. Moreover, various intense tissue reactions characteristic of immune response were observed in all cases. The simultaneous presence of corrosion products and hypersensitivity-associated tissue reaction indicates that a relationship between corrosion development and implant-related hypersensitivity may exist. PMID:18725188

  14. Natural grouping of neural responses reveals spatially segregated clusters in prearcuate cortex.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Roozbeh; Cueva, Christopher J; Reppas, John B; Peixoto, Diogo; Ryu, Stephen I; Newsome, William T

    2015-03-18

    A fundamental challenge in studying the frontal lobe is to parcellate this cortex into "natural" functional modules despite the absence of topographic maps, which are so helpful in primary sensory areas. Here we show that unsupervised clustering algorithms, applied to 96-channel array recordings from prearcuate gyrus, reveal spatially segregated subnetworks that remain stable across behavioral contexts. Looking for natural groupings of neurons based on response similarities, we discovered that the recorded area includes at least two spatially segregated subnetworks that differentially represent behavioral choice and reaction time. Importantly, these subnetworks are detectable during different behavioral states and, surprisingly, are defined better by "common noise" than task-evoked responses. Our parcellation process works well on "spontaneous" neural activity, and thus bears strong resemblance to the identification of "resting-state" networks in fMRI data sets. Our results demonstrate a powerful new tool for identifying cortical subnetworks by objective classification of simultaneously recorded electrophysiological activity. PMID:25728571

  15. Etiology and management of whitening-induced tooth hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Hewlett, Edmond R

    2007-07-01

    Tooth hypersensitivity has long been, and continues to be, the most commonly reported adverse effect of vital tooth whitening with peroxide gels. The complex etiology of whitening-induced tooth hypersensitivity has been a major obstacle in developing a definitive strategy for its prevention. This article reviews the multiple etiologic factors implicated in whitening-induced tooth hypersensitivity and the evidence for efficacy of various strategies for its management. PMID:17915592

  16. Global Analysis of Neutrophil Responses to Neisseria gonorrhoeae Reveals a Self-Propagating Inflammatory Program

    PubMed Central

    Sintsova, Anna; Sarantis, Helen; Islam, Epshita A.; Sun, Chun Xiang; Amin, Mohsen; Chan, Carlos H. F.; Stanners, Clifford P.; Glogauer, Michael; Gray-Owen, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    An overwhelming neutrophil-driven response causes both acute symptoms and the lasting sequelae that result from infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Neutrophils undergo an aggressive opsonin-independent response to N. gonorrhoeae, driven by the innate decoy receptor CEACAM3. CEACAM3 is exclusively expressed by human neutrophils, and drives a potent binding, phagocytic engulfment and oxidative killing of Opa-expressing bacteria. In this study, we sought to explore the contribution of neutrophils to the pathogenic inflammatory process that typifies gonorrhea. Genome-wide microarray and biochemical profiling of gonococcal-infected neutrophils revealed that CEACAM3 engagement triggers a Syk-, PKC?- and Tak1-dependent signaling cascade that results in the activation of an NF-?B-dependent transcriptional response, with consequent production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Using an in vivo model of N. gonorrhoeae infection, we show that human CEACAM-expressing neutrophils have heightened migration toward the site of the infection where they may be further activated upon Opa-dependent binding. Together, this study establishes that the role of CEACAM3 is not restricted to the direct opsonin-independent killing by neutrophils, since it also drives the vigorous inflammatory response that typifies gonorrhea. By carrying the potential to mobilize increasing numbers of neutrophils, CEACAM3 thereby represents the tipping point between protective and pathogenic outcomes of N. gonorrhoeae infection. PMID:25188454

  17. NMR metabolomic profiling reveals new roles of SUMOylation in DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Cano, Kristin E; Li, Yi-Jia; Chen, Yuan

    2010-10-01

    Post-translational modifications by the Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) family of proteins have been established as critical events in the cellular response to a wide range of DNA damaging reagents and radiation; however, the detailed mechanism of SUMOylation in DNA damage response is not well understood. In this study, we used a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy-based metabolomics approach to examine the effect of an inhibitor of SUMO-mediated protein-protein interactions on MCF7 breast cancer cell response to radiation. Metabolomics is sensitive to changes in cellular functions and thus provides complementary information to other biological studies. The peptide inhibitor (SUMO interaction motif mimic, SIM) and a control peptide were stably expressed in MCF-7 cell line. Metabolite profiles of the cell lines before and after radiation were analyzed using solution NMR methods. Various statistical methods were used to isolate significant changes. Differences in the amounts of glutamine, aspartate, malate, alanine, glutamate and NADH between the SIM-expressing and control cells suggest a role for SUMOylation in regulating mitochondrial function. This is also further verified following the metabolism of (13)C-labeled glutamine. The inability of the cells expressing the SIM peptide to increase production of the antioxidants carnosine and glutathione after radiation damage suggests an important role of SUMOylation in regulating the levels of antioxidants that protect cells from free radicals and reactive oxygen species generated by radiation. This study reveals previously unknown roles of SUMOylation in DNA damage response. PMID:20695451

  18. Predicting invasive species impacts: a community module functional response approach reveals context dependencies

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Rachel A; Dick, Jaimie T A; Pritchard, Daniel W; Ennis, Marilyn; Hatcher, Melanie J; Dunn, Alison M

    2015-01-01

    Summary Predatory functional responses play integral roles in predator–prey dynamics, and their assessment promises greater understanding and prediction of the predatory impacts of invasive species. Other interspecific interactions, however, such as parasitism and higher-order predation, have the potential to modify predator–prey interactions and thus the predictive capability of the comparative functional response approach. We used a four-species community module (higher-order predator; focal native or invasive predators; parasites of focal predators; native prey) to compare the predatory functional responses of native Gammarus duebeni celticus and invasive Gammarus pulex amphipods towards three invertebrate prey species (Asellus aquaticus, Simulium spp., Baetis rhodani), thus, quantifying the context dependencies of parasitism and a higher-order fish predator on these functional responses. Our functional response experiments demonstrated that the invasive amphipod had a higher predatory impact (lower handling time) on two of three prey species, which reflects patterns of impact observed in the field. The community module also revealed that parasitism had context-dependent influences, for one prey species, with the potential to further reduce the predatory impact of the invasive amphipod or increase the predatory impact of the native amphipod in the presence of a higher-order fish predator. Partial consumption of prey was similar for both predators and occurred increasingly in the order A. aquaticus, Simulium spp. and B. rhodani. This was associated with increasing prey densities, but showed no context dependencies with parasitism or higher-order fish predator. This study supports the applicability of comparative functional responses as a tool to predict and assess invasive species impacts incorporating multiple context dependencies. PMID:25265905

  19. Analysis of gene expression during parabolic flights reveals distinct early gravity responses in Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed

    Aubry-Hivet, D; Nziengui, H; Rapp, K; Oliveira, O; Paponov, I A; Li, Y; Hauslage, J; Vagt, N; Braun, M; Ditengou, F A; Dovzhenko, A; Palme, K

    2014-01-01

    Plant roots are among most intensively studied biological systems in gravity research. Altered gravity induces asymmetric cell growth leading to root bending. Differential distribution of the phytohormone auxin underlies root responses to gravity, being coordinated by auxin efflux transporters from the PIN family. The objective of this study was to compare early transcriptomic changes in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana wild type, and pin2 and pin3 mutants under parabolic flight conditions and to correlate these changes to auxin distribution. Parabolic flights allow comparison of transient 1-g, hypergravity and microgravity effects in living organisms in parallel. We found common and mutation-related genes differentially expressed in response to transient microgravity phases. Gene ontology analysis of common genes revealed lipid metabolism, response to stress factors and light categories as primarily involved in response to transient microgravity phases, suggesting that fundamental reorganisation of metabolic pathways functions upstream of a further signal mediating hormonal network. Gene expression changes in roots lacking the columella-located PIN3 were stronger than in those deprived of the epidermis and cortex cell-specific PIN2. Moreover, repetitive exposure to microgravity/hypergravity and gravity/hypergravity flight phases induced an up-regulation of auxin responsive genes in wild type and pin2 roots, but not in pin3 roots, suggesting a critical function of PIN3 in mediating auxin fluxes in response to transient microgravity phases. Our study provides important insights towards understanding signal transduction processes in transient microgravity conditions by combining for the first time the parabolic flight platform with the transcriptome analysis of different genetic mutants in the model plant, Arabidopsis. PMID:24373012

  20. Upregulation of Ih expressed in IB4-negative A? nociceptive DRG neurons contributes to mechanical hypersensitivity associated with cervical radiculopathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Da-Lu; Lu, Na; Han, Wen-Juan; Chen, Rong-Gui; Cong, Rui; Xie, Rou-Gang; Zhang, Yu-Fei; Kong, Wei-Wei; Hu, San-Jue; Luo, Ceng

    2015-01-01

    Cervical radiculopathy represents aberrant mechanical hypersensitivity. Primary sensory neuron’s ability to sense mechanical force forms mechanotransduction. However, whether this property undergoes activity-dependent plastic changes and underlies mechanical hypersensitivity associated with cervical radiculopathic pain (CRP) is not clear. Here we show a new CRP model producing stable mechanical compression of dorsal root ganglion (DRG), which induces dramatic behavioral mechanical hypersensitivity. Amongst nociceptive DRG neurons, a mechanically sensitive neuron, isolectin B4 negative A?-type (IB4? A?) DRG neuron displays spontaneous activity with hyperexcitability after chronic compression of cervical DRGs. Focal mechanical stimulation on somata of IB4- A? neuron induces abnormal hypersensitivity. Upregulated HCN1 and HCN3 channels and increased Ih current on this subset of primary nociceptors underlies the spontaneous activity together with neuronal mechanical hypersensitivity, which further contributes to the behavioral mechanical hypersensitivity associated with CRP. This study sheds new light on the functional plasticity of a specific subset of nociceptive DRG neurons to mechanical stimulation and reveals a novel mechanism that could underlie the mechanical hypersensitivity associated with cervical radiculopathy. PMID:26577374

  1. Upregulation of Ih expressed in IB4-negative A? nociceptive DRG neurons contributes to mechanical hypersensitivity associated with cervical radiculopathic pain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Da-Lu; Lu, Na; Han, Wen-Juan; Chen, Rong-Gui; Cong, Rui; Xie, Rou-Gang; Zhang, Yu-Fei; Kong, Wei-Wei; Hu, San-Jue; Luo, Ceng

    2015-01-01

    Cervical radiculopathy represents aberrant mechanical hypersensitivity. Primary sensory neuron's ability to sense mechanical force forms mechanotransduction. However, whether this property undergoes activity-dependent plastic changes and underlies mechanical hypersensitivity associated with cervical radiculopathic pain (CRP) is not clear. Here we show a new CRP model producing stable mechanical compression of dorsal root ganglion (DRG), which induces dramatic behavioral mechanical hypersensitivity. Amongst nociceptive DRG neurons, a mechanically sensitive neuron, isolectin B4 negative A?-type (IB4(-) A?) DRG neuron displays spontaneous activity with hyperexcitability after chronic compression of cervical DRGs. Focal mechanical stimulation on somata of IB4(-) A? neuron induces abnormal hypersensitivity. Upregulated HCN1 and HCN3 channels and increased Ih current on this subset of primary nociceptors underlies the spontaneous activity together with neuronal mechanical hypersensitivity, which further contributes to the behavioral mechanical hypersensitivity associated with CRP. This study sheds new light on the functional plasticity of a specific subset of nociceptive DRG neurons to mechanical stimulation and reveals a novel mechanism that could underlie the mechanical hypersensitivity associated with cervical radiculopathy. PMID:26577374

  2. Leucocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 is an inhibitory regulator of contact hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Omiya, Ryusuke; Tsushima, Fumihiko; Narazaki, Hidehiko; Sakoda, Yukimi; Kuramasu, Atsuo; Kim, Youn; Xu, Haiying; Tamura, Hideto; Zhu, Gefeng; Chen, Lieping; Tamada, Koji

    2009-01-01

    Leucocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 (LAIR-1) is a membrane receptor of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily that is expressed on most types of haematopoietic cells, and delivers inhibitory signals through interacting with collagens. In order to elucidate the immunological functions of LAIR-1 in vivo, we established transgenic mice expressing a chimeric protein composed of the extracellular domain of LAIR-1 fused with an Ig tag (LAIR-1–Ig), which acts as a decoy by competing with endogenous LAIR-1. The transgenic mice showed an increased susceptibility for development of contact hypersensitivity (CHS), an experimental model of allergic contact dermatitis, in association with enhanced hapten-specific T-cell responses. When T cells from the hapten-sensitized donor mice were transferred into non-sensitized recipients, treatment of either donor mice or recipient mice with LAIR-1–Ig protein accelerated CHS, suggesting a potentially negative role of LAIR-1 in both the sensitization and the elicitation of hapten-reactive T cells. In vitro assays revealed that LAIR-1 decreased the production of interleukin-6 and interleukin-12 in dendritic cells, and inhibited the proliferation and cytokine production of naïve and memory T cells along with G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Collectively, our findings suggest that LAIR-1 plays a crucial inhibitory role in CHS by regulating antigen-presenting cell and T-cell functions. PMID:19930044

  3. Leucocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 is an inhibitory regulator of contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Omiya, Ryusuke; Tsushima, Fumihiko; Narazaki, Hidehiko; Sakoda, Yukimi; Kuramasu, Atsuo; Kim, Youn; Xu, Haiying; Tamura, Hideto; Zhu, Gefeng; Chen, Lieping; Tamada, Koji

    2009-12-01

    Leucocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 (LAIR-1) is a membrane receptor of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily that is expressed on most types of haematopoietic cells, and delivers inhibitory signals through interacting with collagens. In order to elucidate the immunological functions of LAIR-1 in vivo, we established transgenic mice expressing a chimeric protein composed of the extracellular domain of LAIR-1 fused with an Ig tag (LAIR-1-Ig), which acts as a decoy by competing with endogenous LAIR-1. The transgenic mice showed an increased susceptibility for development of contact hypersensitivity (CHS), an experimental model of allergic contact dermatitis, in association with enhanced hapten-specific T-cell responses. When T cells from the hapten-sensitized donor mice were transferred into non-sensitized recipients, treatment of either donor mice or recipient mice with LAIR-1-Ig protein accelerated CHS, suggesting a potentially negative role of LAIR-1 in both the sensitization and the elicitation of hapten-reactive T cells. In vitro assays revealed that LAIR-1 decreased the production of interleukin-6 and interleukin-12 in dendritic cells, and inhibited the proliferation and cytokine production of naïve and memory T cells along with G(0)/G(1) cell cycle arrest. Collectively, our findings suggest that LAIR-1 plays a crucial inhibitory role in CHS by regulating antigen-presenting cell and T-cell functions. PMID:19930044

  4. Glycerol hypersensitivity in a Drosophila model for glycerol kinase deficiency is affected by mutations in eye pigmentation genes.

    PubMed

    Wightman, Patrick J; Jackson, George R; Dipple, Katrina M

    2012-01-01

    Glycerol kinase plays a critical role in metabolism by converting glycerol to glycerol 3-phosphate in an ATP dependent reaction. In humans, glycerol kinase deficiency results in a wide range of phenotypic variability; patients can have severe metabolic and CNS abnormalities, while others possess hyperglycerolemia and glyceroluria with no other apparent phenotype. In an effort to help understand the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the phenotypic variation, we have created a Drosophila model for glycerol kinase deficiency by RNAi targeting of dGyk (CG18374) and dGK (CG7995). As expected, RNAi flies have reduced glycerol kinase RNA expression, reduced phosphorylation activity and elevated glycerol levels. Further investigation revealed these flies to be hypersensitive to fly food supplemented with glycerol. Due to the hygroscopic nature of glycerol, we predict glycerol hypersensitivity is a result of greater susceptibility to desiccation, suggesting glycerol kinase to play an important role in desiccation resistance in insects. To evaluate a role for genetic modifier loci in determining severity of the glycerol hypersensitivity observed in knockdown flies, we performed a preliminary screen of lethal transposon insertion mutant flies using a glycerol hypersensitive survivorship assay. We demonstrate that this type of screen can identify both enhancer and suppressor genetic loci of glycerol hypersensitivity. Furthermore, we found that the glycerol hypersensitivity phenotype can be enhanced or suppressed by null mutations in eye pigmentation genes. Taken together, our data suggest proteins encoded by eye pigmentation genes play an important role in desiccation resistance and that eye pigmentation genes are strong modifiers of the glycerol hypersensitive phenotype identified in our Drosophila model for glycerol kinase deficiency. PMID:22427807

  5. Pb exposure attenuates hypersensitivity in vivo by increasing regulatory T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Liang; Zhao, Fang; Shen, Xuefeng; Ouyang, Weiming; Liu, Xinqin; Xu, Yan; Yu, Tao; Jin, Boquan; Chen, Jingyuan; Luo, Wenjing

    2012-12-01

    Pb is a common environmental pollutant affecting various organs. Exposure of the immune system to Pb leads to immunosuppression or immunodysregulation. Although previous studies showed that Pb exposure can modulate the function of helper T cells, Pb immunotoxicity remains incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of Pb exposure on T cell development, and the underlying mechanism of Pb-induced suppression of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response in vivo. Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to 300 ppm Pb-acetate solution via the drinking water for six weeks, and we found that Pb exposure significantly increased Pb concentrations in the blood by 4.2-fold (p < 0.05) as compared to those in the control rats. In Pb-exposed rats, the amount of thymic CD4{sup +}CD8{sup ?} and peripheral CD4{sup +} T cells was significantly reduced, whereas, CD8{sup +} population was not affected. In contrast to conventional CD4{sup +} T cells, Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs) were increased in both the thymus and peripheral lymphoid organs of Pb-exposed rats. In line with the increase of Tregs, the DTH response of Pb-exposed rats was markedly suppressed. Depletion of Tregs reversed the suppression of DTH response by Pb-exposed CD4{sup +} T cells in an adoptive transfer model, suggesting a critical role of the increased Tregs in suppressing the DTH response. Collectively, this study revealed that Pb-exposure may upregulate Tregs, thereby leading to immunosuppression. -- Highlights: ? Pb exposure impaired CD4{sup +} thymic T cell development. ? Peripheral T lymphocytes were reduced following Pb exposure. ? Pb exposure increases thymic and peripheral Treg cells in rats. ? Tregs played a critical role in Pb-exposure-induced immune suppression.

  6. Transgenic Zebrafish Reveal Tissue-Specific Differences in Estrogen Signaling in Response to Environmental Water Samples

    PubMed Central

    Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Hung, Alice L.; Blazer, Vicki S.; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs) are exogenous chemicals that mimic endogenous hormones such as estrogens. Previous studies using a zebrafish transgenic reporter demonstrated that the EEDs bisphenol A and genistein preferentially activate estrogen receptors (ERs) in the larval heart compared with the liver. However, it was not known whether the transgenic zebrafish reporter was sensitive enough to detect estrogens from environmental samples, whether environmental estrogens would exhibit tissue-specific effects similar to those of BPA and genistein, or why some compounds preferentially target receptors in the heart. Methods: We tested surface water samples using a transgenic zebrafish reporter with tandem estrogen response elements driving green fluorescent protein expression (5xERE:GFP). Reporter activation was colocalized with tissue-specific expression of ER genes by RNA in situ hybridization. Results: We observed selective patterns of ER activation in transgenic fish exposed to river water samples from the Mid-Atlantic United States, with several samples preferentially activating receptors in embryonic and larval heart valves. We discovered that tissue specificity in ER activation was due to differences in the expression of ER subtypes. ER? was expressed in developing heart valves but not in the liver, whereas ER?2 had the opposite profile. Accordingly, subtype-specific ER agonists activated the reporter in either the heart valves or the liver. Conclusion: The use of 5xERE:GFP transgenic zebrafish revealed an unexpected tissue-specific difference in the response to environmentally relevant estrogenic compounds. Exposure to estrogenic EEDs in utero was associated with adverse health effects, with the potentially unanticipated consequence of targeting developing heart valves. Citation: Gorelick DA, Iwanowicz LR, Hung AL, Blazer VS, Halpern ME. 2014. Transgenic zebrafish reveal tissue-specific differences in estrogen signaling in response to environmental water samples. Environ Health Perspect 122:356–362;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307329 PMID:24425189

  7. Differential Gene Expression Reveals Candidate Genes for Drought Stress Response in Abies alba (Pinaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Ziegenhagen, Birgit; Liepelt, Sascha

    2015-01-01

    Increasing drought periods as a result of global climate change pose a threat to many tree species by possibly outpacing their adaptive capabilities. Revealing the genetic basis of drought stress response is therefore implemental for future conservation strategies and risk assessment. Access to informative genomic regions is however challenging, especially for conifers, partially due to their large genomes, which puts constraints on the feasibility of whole genome scans. Candidate genes offer a valuable tool to reduce the complexity of the analysis and the amount of sequencing work and costs. For this study we combined an improved drought stress phenotyping of needles via a novel terahertz water monitoring technique with Massive Analysis of cDNA Ends to identify candidate genes for drought stress response in European silver fir (Abies alba Mill.). A pooled cDNA library was constructed from the cotyledons of six drought stressed and six well-watered silver fir seedlings, respectively. Differential expression analyses of these libraries revealed 296 candidate genes for drought stress response in silver fir (247 up- and 49 down-regulated) of which a subset was validated by RT-qPCR of the twelve individual cotyledons. A majority of these genes code for currently uncharacterized proteins and hint on new genomic resources to be explored in conifers. Furthermore, we could show that some traditional reference genes from model plant species (GAPDH and eIF4A2) are not suitable for differential analysis and we propose a new reference gene, TPC1, for drought stress expression profiling in needles of conifer seedlings. PMID:25924061

  8. Gastroenterology case report of mesalazine-induced cardiopulmonary hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ferrusquía, José; Pérez-Martínez, Isabel; Gómez de la Torre, Ricardo; Fernández-Almira, María Luisa; de Francisco, Ruth; Rodrigo, Luis; Riestra, Sabino

    2015-01-01

    Mesalazine is a 5-aminosalicylic acid derivative that has been widely used to treat patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Accumulating evidence indicates that mesalazine has a very low rate of adverse drug reactions and is well tolerated by patients. However, a few cases of pulmonary and cardiac disease related to mesalazine have been reported in the past, though infrequently, preventing clinicians from diagnosing the conditions early. We describe the case of a 32-year-old man with ulcerative colitis who was admitted with a two-month history of persistent fever following mesalazine treatment initiated 14 mo earlier. At the time of admission, mesalazine dose was increased from 1.5 to 3.0 g/d, and antibiotic therapy was started with no improvement. Three weeks after admission, the patient developed dyspnea, non-productive cough, and chest pain. Severe eosinophilia was detected in laboratory tests, and a computed tomography scan revealed interstitial infiltrates in both lungs, as well as a large pericardial effusion. The bronchoalveolar lavage reported a CD4/CD8 ratio of 0.5, and an increased eosinophil count. Transbronchial biopsy examination showed a severe eosinophilic infiltrate of the lung tissue. Mesalazine-induced cardiopulmonary hypersensitivity was suspected after excluding other possible etiologies. Consequently, mesalazine treatment was suspended, and corticosteroid therapy was initiated, resulting in resolution of symptoms and radiologic abnormalities. We conclude that mesalazine-induced pulmonary and cardiac hypersensitivity should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained cardiopulmonary symptoms and radiographic abnormalities in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25852295

  9. Metabolite profiling and network analysis reveal coordinated changes in grapevine water stress response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Grapevine metabolism in response to water deficit was studied in two cultivars, Shiraz and Cabernet Sauvignon, which were shown to have different hydraulic behaviors (Hochberg et al. Physiol. Plant. 147:443–453, 2012). Results Progressive water deficit was found to effect changes in leaf water potentials accompanied by metabolic changes. In both cultivars, but more intensively in Shiraz than Cabernet Sauvignon, water deficit caused a shift to higher osmolality and lower C/N ratios, the latter of which was also reflected in marked increases in amino acids, e.g., Pro, Val, Leu, Thr and Trp, reductions of most organic acids, and changes in the phenylpropanoid pathway. PCA analysis showed that changes in primary metabolism were mostly associated with water stress, while diversification of specialized metabolism was mostly linked to the cultivars. In the phloem sap, drought was characterized by higher ABA concentration and major changes in benzoate levels coinciding with lower stomatal conductance and suberinization of vascular bundles. Enhanced suberin biosynthesis in Shiraz was reflected by the higher abundance of sap hydroxybenzoate derivatives. Correlation-based network analysis revealed that compared to Cabernet Sauvignon, Shiraz had considerably larger and highly coordinated stress-related changes, reflected in its increased metabolic network connectivity under stress. Network analysis also highlighted the structural role of major stress related metabolites, e.g., Pro, quercetin and ascorbate, which drastically altered their connectedness in the Shiraz network under water deficit. Conclusions Taken together, the results showed that Vitis vinifera cultivars possess a common metabolic response to water deficit. Central metabolism, and specifically N metabolism, plays a significant role in stress response in vine. At the cultivar level, Cabernet Sauvignon was characterized by milder metabolic perturbations, likely due to a tighter regulation of stomata upon stress induction. Network analysis was successfully implemented to characterize plant stress molecular response and to identify metabolites with a significant structural and biological role in vine stress response. PMID:24256338

  10. Dissection of Ire1 functions reveals stress response mechanisms uniquely evolved in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Taiga; Nakayama, Hironobu; Nagayoshi, Yohsuke; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    Proper protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is vital in all eukaryotes. When misfolded proteins accumulate in the ER lumen, the transmembrane kinase/endoribonuclease Ire1 initiates splicing of HAC1 mRNA to generate the bZIP transcription factor Hac1, which subsequently activates its target genes to increase the protein-folding capacity of the ER. This cellular machinery, called the unfolded protein response (UPR), is believed to be an evolutionarily conserved mechanism in eukaryotes. In this study, we comprehensively characterized mutant phenotypes of IRE1 and other related genes in the human fungal pathogen Candida glabrata. Unexpectedly, Ire1 was required for the ER stress response independently of Hac1 in this fungus. C. glabrata Ire1 did not cleave mRNAs encoding Hac1 and other bZIP transcription factors identified in the C. glabrata genome. Microarray analysis revealed that the transcriptional response to ER stress is not mediated by Ire1, but instead is dependent largely on calcineurin signaling and partially on the Slt2 MAPK pathway. The loss of Ire1 alone did not confer increased antifungal susceptibility in C. glabrata contrary to UPR-defective mutants in other fungi. Taken together, our results suggest that the canonical Ire1-Hac1 UPR is not conserved in C. glabrata. It is known in metazoans that active Ire1 nonspecifically cleaves and degrades a subset of ER-localized mRNAs to reduce the ER load. Intriguingly, this cellular response could occur in an Ire1 nuclease-dependent fashion in C. glabrata. We also uncovered the attenuated virulence of the C. glabrata ?ire1 mutant in a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis. This study has unveiled the unique evolution of ER stress response mechanisms in C. glabrata. PMID:23382685

  11. BCL-2 family genetic profiling reveals microenvironment-specific determinants of chemotherapeutic response

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Justin R.; Gilbert, Luke A.; Meacham, Corbin E.; Ricks, Jennifer L.; Jiang, Hai; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Hemann, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    The Bcl-2 family encompasses a diverse set of apoptotic regulators that are dynamically activated in response various cell intrinsic and extrinsic stimuli. An extensive variety of cell culture experiments have identified effects of growth factors, cytokines and drugs on BCL-2 family functions, but in vivo studies have tended to focus on role of one or two particular members in development and organ homeostasis. Thus, the ability of physiologically relevant contexts to modulate canonical dependencies that are likely to be more complex has yet to be investigated systematically. In this study, we report findings derived from a pool-based shRNA assay that systematically and comprehensively interrogated the functional dependence of leukemia and lymphoma cells upon various BCL-2 family members across many diverse in vitro and in vivo settings. This approach permitted us to report the first in vivo loss of function screen for modifiers of the response to a frontline chemotherapeutic agent. Notably, our results reveal an unexpected role for the extrinsic death pathway as a tissue-specific modifier of therapeutic response. In particular, our findings demonstrate that particular tissue sites of tumor dissemination play critical roles in demarcating the nature and extent of cancer cell vulnerabilities and mechanisms of chemoresistance. PMID:21784872

  12. Bcl-2 family genetic profiling reveals microenvironment-specific determinants of chemotherapeutic response.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Justin R; Gilbert, Luke A; Meacham, Corbin E; Ricks, Jennifer L; Jiang, Hai; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Hemann, Michael T

    2011-09-01

    The Bcl-2 family encompasses a diverse set of apoptotic regulators that are dynamically activated in response to various cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic stimuli. An extensive variety of cell culture experiments have identified effects of growth factors, cytokines, and drugs on Bcl-2 family functions, but in vivo studies have tended to focus on the role of one or two particular members in development and organ homeostasis. Thus, the ability of physiologically relevant contexts to modulate canonical dependencies that are likely to be more complex has yet to be investigated systematically. In this study, we report findings derived from a pool-based shRNA assay that systematically and comprehensively interrogated the functional dependence of leukemia and lymphoma cells upon various Bcl-2 family members across many diverse in vitro and in vivo settings. This approach permitted us to report the first in vivo loss of function screen for modifiers of the response to a front-line chemotherapeutic agent. Notably, our results reveal an unexpected role for the extrinsic death pathway as a tissue-specific modifier of therapeutic response. In particular, our findings show that particular tissue sites of tumor dissemination play critical roles in demarcating the nature and extent of cancer cell vulnerabilities and mechanisms of chemoresistance. PMID:21784872

  13. The Transcriptome and Proteome of the Diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana Reveal a Diverse Phosphorus Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Dyhrman, Sonya T.; Mercier, Melissa L.; Alexander, Harriet; Whitney, LeAnn P.; Drzewianowski, Andrea; Bulygin, Vladimir V.; Bertrand, Erin M.; Wu, Zhijin; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia; Heithoff, Abigail

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is a critical driver of phytoplankton growth and ecosystem function in the ocean. Diatoms are an abundant class of marine phytoplankton that are responsible for significant amounts of primary production. With the control they exert on the oceanic carbon cycle, there have been a number of studies focused on how diatoms respond to limiting macro and micronutrients such as iron and nitrogen. However, diatom physiological responses to P deficiency are poorly understood. Here, we couple deep sequencing of transcript tags and quantitative proteomics to analyze the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana grown under P-replete and P-deficient conditions. A total of 318 transcripts were differentially regulated with a false discovery rate of <0.05, and a total of 136 proteins were differentially abundant (p<0.05). Significant changes in the abundance of transcripts and proteins were observed and coordinated for multiple biochemical pathways, including glycolysis and translation. Patterns in transcript and protein abundance were also linked to physiological changes in cellular P distributions, and enzyme activities. These data demonstrate that diatom P deficiency results in changes in cellular P allocation through polyphosphate production, increased P transport, a switch to utilization of dissolved organic P through increased production of metalloenzymes, and a remodeling of the cell surface through production of sulfolipids. Together, these findings reveal that T. pseudonana has evolved a sophisticated response to P deficiency involving multiple biochemical strategies that are likely critical to its ability to respond to variations in environmental P availability. PMID:22479440

  14. Learning Theories Reveal Loss of Pancreatic Electrical Connectivity in Diabetes as an Adaptive Response

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Pranay; Mehta, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Cells of almost all solid tissues are connected with gap junctions which permit the direct transfer of ions and small molecules, integral to regulating coordinated function in the tissue. The pancreatic islets of Langerhans are responsible for secreting the hormone insulin in response to glucose stimulation. Gap junctions are the only electrical contacts between the beta-cells in the tissue of these excitable islets. It is generally believed that they are responsible for synchrony of the membrane voltage oscillations among beta-cells, and thereby pulsatility of insulin secretion. Most attempts to understand connectivity in islets are often interpreted, bottom-up, in terms of measurements of gap junctional conductance. This does not, however, explain systematic changes, such as a diminished junctional conductance in type 2 diabetes. We attempt to address this deficit via the model presented here, which is a learning theory of gap junctional adaptation derived with analogy to neural systems. Here, gap junctions are modelled as bonds in a beta-cell network, that are altered according to homeostatic rules of plasticity. Our analysis reveals that it is nearly impossible to view gap junctions as homogeneous across a tissue. A modified view that accommodates heterogeneity of junction strengths in the islet can explain why, for example, a loss of gap junction conductance in diabetes is necessary for an increase in plasma insulin levels following hyperglycemia. PMID:23936417

  15. Transcriptional profiling of Petunia seedlings reveals candidate regulators of the cold stress response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bei; Ning, Luyun; Zhang, Junwei; Bao, Manzhu; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Petunias are important ornamentals with the capacity for cold acclimation. So far, there is limited information concerning gene regulation and signaling pathways associated with the cold stress response in petunias. A custom-designed petunia microarray representing 24816 genes was used to perform transcriptome profiling in petunia seedlings subjected to cold at 2°C for 0.5 h, 2 h, 24 h, and 5 d. A total of 2071 transcripts displayed differential expression patterns under cold stress, of which 1149 were up-regulated and 922 were down-regulated. Gene ontology enrichment analysis demarcated related biological processes, suggesting a possible link between flavonoid metabolism and plant adaptation to low temperatures. Many novel stress-responsive regulators were revealed, suggesting that diverse regulatory pathways may exist in petunias in addition to the well-characterized CBF pathway. The expression changes of selected genes under cold and other abiotic stress conditions were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR. Furthermore, weighted gene co-expression network analysis divided the petunia genes on the array into 65 modules that showed high co-expression and identified stress-specific hub genes with high connectivity. Our identification of these transcriptional responses and groups of differentially expressed regulators will facilitate the functional dissection of the molecular mechanism in petunias responding to environment stresses and extend our ability to improve cold tolerance in plants. PMID:25784921

  16. Influence of PUVA and UVB radiation on delayed hypersensitivity in the guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Morison, W.L.; Parrish, J.A.; Woehler, M.E.; Krugler, J.I.; Bloch, K.J.

    1981-06-01

    Exposure of guinea pigs to UVA (320--400 nm) radiation following administration of 8-methoxypsoralen by gavage (referred to by the acronym, PUVA) or exposure to UVB (290--320 nm) radiation, produced suppression of the cutaneous delayed hypersensitivity reaction at the site of exposure to radiation and at distant nonexposed sites. In these experiments, the animals were immunized by injection of dinitrophenyl-bovine gamma-globulin (DNP-BGG) in complete Freund's adjuvant and delayed hypersensitivity responses were provoked by intradermal injections of DNP-BGG, DNP and BGG on the flanks. Exposure to erythemogenic doses of either PUVA or UVB radiation for 7 days prior to immunization and for the 7 days between immunization and challenge (total period of radiation: 14 days) produced inhibiton of responses to each of the test substances. In addition, treatment with erythemogenic doses of PUVA either for 7 days prior to immunization or during the interval between immunization and challenge with DNP-BGG, inhibited the delayed hypersensitivity responses at the site of irradiation and at a nonexposed site. These findings suggest that in vivo exposure to nonionizing radiation leads to both local and systemic alteration of certain immune responses.

  17. The role of TRPA1 in muscle pain and mechanical hypersensitivity under inflammatory conditions in rats.

    PubMed

    Asgar, J; Zhang, Y; Saloman, J L; Wang, S; Chung, M-K; Ro, J Y

    2015-12-01

    Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) is expressed in muscle afferents and direct activation of these receptors induces acute mechanical hypersensitivity. However, the functional role of TRPA1 under pathological muscle pain conditions and mechanisms by which TRPA1 mediate muscle pain and hyperalgesia are not clearly understood. Two rodent behavioral models validated to assess craniofacial muscle pain conditions were used to study ATP- and N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-induced acute mechanical hypersensitivity and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced persistent mechanical hypersensitivity. The rat grimace scale (RGS) was utilized to assess inflammation-induced spontaneous muscle pain. Behavioral pharmacology experiments were performed to assess the effects of AP18, a selective TRPA1 antagonist under these conditions. TRPA1 expression levels in trigeminal ganglia (TG) were examined before and after CFA treatment in the rat masseter muscle. Pre-treatment of the muscle with AP18 dose-dependently blocked the development of acute mechanical hypersensitivity induced by NMDA and ?,?-methylene adenosine triphosphate (??meATP), a specific agonist for NMDA and P2X3 receptor, respectively. CFA-induced mechanical hypersensitivity and spontaneous muscle pain responses were significantly reversed by post-treatment of the muscle with AP18 when CFA effects were most prominent. CFA-induced myositis was accompanied by significant up-regulation of TRPA1 expression in TG. Our findings showed that TRPA1 in muscle afferents plays an important role in the development of acute mechanical hypersensitivity and in the maintenance of persistent muscle pain and hypersensitivity. Our data suggested that TRPA1 may serve as a downstream target of pro-nociceptive ion channels, such as P2X3 and NMDA receptors in masseter afferents, and that increased TRPA1 expression under inflammatory conditions may contribute to the maintenance of persistent muscle pain and mechanical hyperalgesia. Mechanistic studies elucidating transcriptional or post-translational regulation of TRPA1 expression under pathological pain conditions should provide important basic information to further advance the treatment of craniofacial muscle pain conditions. PMID:26393428

  18. Fasting mitigates immediate hypersensitivity: a pivotal role of endogenous D-beta-hydroxybutyrate

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fasting is a rigorous type of dietary restriction that is associate with a number of health benefits. During fasting, ketone bodies significantly increase in blood and become major body fuels, thereby sparing glucose. In the present study, we investigated effects of fasting on hypersensitivity. In addition, we also investigated the possible role of D-beta-hydroxybutyrate provoked by fasting in the attenuation of immediate hypersensitivity by fasting. Methods Effects of fasting on systemic anaphylaxis were examined using rat model of toluene 2, 4-diisocyanate induced nasal allergy. In addition to food restriction, a ketogenic high-fat and low-carbohydrate diet that accelerates fatty acid oxidation and systemic instillation of D-beta-hydroxybutyrate were employed to elevate internal D-beta-hydroxybutyrate concentration. We assessed relationship between degranulation of rat peritoneal mast cells and internal D-beta-hydroxybutyrate concentration in each treatment. Changes in [Ca2+]i responses to compound 48/80 were analyzed in fura 2-loaded rat peritoneal mast cells derived from the ketogenic diet and fasting. Results Immediate hypersensitivity reaction was significantly suppressed by fasting. A significant reduction in mast cells degranulation, induced by mast cell activator compound 48/80, was observed in rat peritoneal mast cells delivered from the 24 hours fasting treatment. In addition, mast cells delivered from a ketogenic diet and D-beta-hydroxybutyrate infusion treatment also had reduced mast cell degranulation and systemic D-beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were elevated to similar extent as the fasting state. The peak increase in [Ca2+]i was significantly lower in the ketogenic diet and fasting group than that in the control diet group. Conclusions The results of the present study demonstrates that fasting suppress hypersensitivity reaction, and indicate that increased level of D-beta-hydroxybutyrate by fasting plays an important role, via the stabilization of mast cells, in suppression of hypersensitivity reaction. PMID:25302070

  19. Intracranial recordings reveal transient response dynamics during information maintenance in human cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Noy, Niv; Bickel, Stephan; Zion-Golumbic, Elana; Harel, Michal; Golan, Tal; Davidesco, Ido; Schevon, Catherine A; McKhann, Guy M; Goodman, Robert R; Schroeder, Charles E; Mehta, Ashesh D; Malach, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    Despite an extensive body of work, it is still not clear how short term maintenance of information is implemented in the human brain. Most prior research has focused on "working memory"-typically involving the storage of a number of items, requiring the use of a phonological loop and focused attention during the delay period between encoding and retrieval. These studies largely support a model of enhanced activity in the delay interval as the central mechanism underlying working memory. However, multi-item working memory constitutes only a subset of storage phenomena that may occur during daily life. A common task in naturalistic situations is short term memory of a single item-for example, blindly reaching to a previously placed cup of coffee. Little is known about such single-item, effortless, storage in the human brain. Here, we examined the dynamics of brain responses during a single-item maintenance task, using intracranial recordings implanted for clinical purpose in patients (ECoG). Our results reveal that active electrodes were dominated by transient short latency visual and motor responses, reflected in broadband high frequency power increases in occipito-temporal, frontal, and parietal cortex. Only a very small set of electrodes showed activity during the early part of the delay period. Interestingly, no cortical site displayed a significant activation lasting to the response time. These results suggest that single item encoding is characterized by transient high frequency ECoG responses, while the maintenance of information during the delay period may be mediated by mechanisms necessitating only low-levels of neuronal activations. Hum Brain Mapp 36:3988-4003, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26147431

  20. Global Phosphoproteome Profiling Reveals Unanticipated Networks Responsive to Cisplatin Treatment of Embryonic Stem Cells ? †

    PubMed Central

    Pines, Alex; Kelstrup, Christian D.; Vrouwe, Mischa G.; Puigvert, Jordi C.; Typas, Dimitris; Misovic, Branislav; de Groot, Anton; von Stechow, Louise; van de Water, Bob; Danen, Erik H. J.; Vrieling, Harry; Mullenders, Leon H. F.; Olsen, Jesper V.

    2011-01-01

    Cellular responses to DNA-damaging agents involve the activation of various DNA damage signaling and transduction pathways. Using quantitative and high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry, we determined global changes in protein level and phosphorylation site profiles following treatment of SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture)-labeled murine embryonic stem cells with the anticancer drug cisplatin. Network and pathway analyses indicated that processes related to the DNA damage response and cytoskeleton organization were significantly affected. Although the ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (ATM and Rad3-related) consensus sequence (S/T-Q motif) was significantly overrepresented among hyperphosphorylated peptides, about half of the >2-fold-upregulated phosphorylation sites based on the consensus sequence were not direct substrates of ATM and ATR. Eleven protein kinases mainly belonging to the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family were identified as being regulated in their kinase domain activation loop. The biological importance of three of these kinases (cyclin-dependent kinase 7 [CDK7], Plk1, and KPCD1) in the protection against cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity was demonstrated by small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown. Our results indicate that the cellular response to cisplatin involves a variety of kinases and phosphatases not only acting in the nucleus but also regulating cytoplasmic targets, resulting in extensive cytoskeletal rearrangements. Integration of transcriptomic and proteomic data revealed a poor correlation between changes in the relative levels of transcripts and their corresponding proteins, but a large overlap in affected pathways at the levels of mRNA, protein, and phosphoprotein. This study provides an integrated view of pathways activated by genotoxic stress and deciphers kinases that play a pivotal role in regulating cellular processes other than the DNA damage response. PMID:22006019

  1. Comparative Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Similarities and Dissimilarities in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Wine Strains Response to Nitrogen Availability

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Catarina; García-Martínez, José; Pérez-Ortín, José E.; Mendes-Ferreira, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen levels in grape-juices are of major importance in winemaking ensuring adequate yeast growth and fermentation performance. Here we used a comparative transcriptome analysis to uncover wine yeasts responses to nitrogen availability during fermentation. Gene expression was assessed in three genetically and phenotypically divergent commercial wine strains (CEG, VL1 and QA23), under low (67 mg/L) and high nitrogen (670 mg/L) regimes, at three time points during fermentation (12h, 24h and 96h). Two-way ANOVA analysis of each fermentation condition led to the identification of genes whose expression was dependent on strain, fermentation stage and on the interaction of both factors. The high fermenter yeast strain QA23 was more clearly distinct from the other two strains, by differential expression of genes involved in flocculation, mitochondrial functions, energy generation and protein folding and stabilization. For all strains, higher transcriptional variability due to fermentation stage was seen in the high nitrogen fermentations. A positive correlation between maximum fermentation rate and the expression of genes involved in stress response was observed. The finding of common genes correlated with both fermentation activity and nitrogen up-take underlies the role of nitrogen on yeast fermentative fitness. The comparative analysis of genes differentially expressed between both fermentation conditions at 12h, where the main difference was the level of nitrogen available, showed the highest variability amongst strains revealing strain-specific responses. Nevertheless, we were able to identify a small set of genes whose expression profiles can quantitatively assess the common response of the yeast strains to varying nitrogen conditions. The use of three contrasting yeast strains in gene expression analysis prompts the identification of more reliable, accurate and reproducible biomarkers that will facilitate the diagnosis of deficiency of this nutrient in the grape-musts and the development of strategies to optimize yeast performance in industrial fermentations. PMID:25884705

  2. Transcriptome analysis reveals strong and complex antiviral response in a mollusc.

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Jouaux, Aude; Ford, Susan E; Lelong, Christophe; Sourdaine, Pascal; Mathieu, Michel; Guo, Ximing

    2015-09-01

    Viruses are highly abundant in the oceans, and how filter-feeding molluscs without adaptive immunity defend themselves against viruses is not well understood. We studied the response of a mollusc Crassostrea gigas to Ostreid herpesvirus 1 µVar (OsHV-1?Var) infections using transcriptome sequencing. OsHV-1?Var can replicate extremely rapidly after challenge of C. gigas as evidenced by explosive viral transcription and DNA synthesis, which peaked at 24 and 48 h post-inoculation, respectively, accompanied by heavy oyster mortalities. At 120 h post-injection, however, viral gene transcription and DNA load, and oyster mortality, were greatly reduced indicating an end of active infections and effective control of viral replication in surviving oysters. Transcriptome analysis of the host revealed strong and complex responses involving the activation of all major innate immune pathways that are equipped with expanded and often novel receptors and adaptors. Novel Toll-like receptor (TLR) and MyD88-like genes lacking essential domains were highly up-regulated in the oyster, possibly interfering with TLR signal transduction. RIG-1/MDA5 receptors for viral RNA, interferon-regulatory factors, tissue necrosis factors and interleukin-17 were highly activated and likely central to the oyster's antiviral response. Genes related to anti-apoptosis, oxidation, RNA and protein destruction were also highly up-regulated, while genes related to anti-oxidation were down-regulated. The oxidative burst induced by the up-regulation of oxidases and severe down-regulation of anti-oxidant genes may be important for the destruction of viral components, but may also exacerbate oyster mortality. This study provides unprecedented insights into antiviral response in a mollusc. The mobilization and complex regulation of expanded innate immune-gene families highlights the oyster genome's adaptation to a virus-rich marine environment. PMID:26004318

  3. Response features across the auditory midbrain reveal an organization consistent with a dual lemniscal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Samuel; Lim, Hubert H.

    2014-01-01

    The central auditory system has traditionally been divided into lemniscal and nonlemniscal pathways leading from the midbrain through the thalamus to the cortex. This view has served as an organizing principle for studying, modeling, and understanding the encoding of sound within the brain. However, there is evidence that the lemniscal pathway could be further divided into at least two subpathways, each potentially coding for sound in different ways. We investigated whether such an interpretation is supported by the spatial distribution of response features in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC), the part of the auditory midbrain assigned to the lemniscal pathway. We recorded responses to pure tone stimuli in the ICC of ketamine-xylazine-anesthetized guinea pigs and used three-dimensional brain reconstruction techniques to map the location of the recording sites. Compared with neurons in caudal-and-medial regions within an isofrequency lamina of the ICC, neurons in rostral-and-lateral regions responded with shorter first-spike latencies with less spiking jitter, shorter durations of spiking responses, a higher proportion of spikes occurring near the onset of the stimulus, lower thresholds, and larger local field potentials with shorter latencies. Further analysis revealed two distinct clusters of response features located in either the caudal-and-medial or the rostral-and-lateral parts of the isofrequency laminae of the ICC. Thus we report substantial differences in coding properties in two regions of the ICC that are consistent with the hypothesis that the lemniscal pathway is made up of at least two distinct subpathways from the midbrain up to the cortex. PMID:25128560

  4. HDAC4 is required for inflammation-associated thermal hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Crow, Megan; Khovanov, Nikita; Kelleher, Jayne H.; Sharma, Simone; Grant, Andrew D.; Bogdanov, Yury; Wood, John N.; McMahon, Stephen B.; Denk, Franziska

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional alterations are characteristic of persistent pain states, but the key regulators remain elusive. HDAC4 is a transcriptional corepressor that has been linked to synaptic plasticity and neuronal excitability, mechanisms that may be involved in peripheral and central sensitization. Using a conditional knockout (cKO) strategy in mice, we sought to determine whether the loss of HDAC4 would have implications for sensory neuron transcription and nociception. HDAC4 was found to be largely unnecessary for transcriptional regulation of naïve sensory neurons but was essential for appropriate transcriptional responses after injury, with Calca and Trpv1 expression consistently down-regulated in HDAC4 cKO compared to levels in the littermate controls (0.2–0.44-fold change, n = 4 in 2 separate experiments). This down-regulation corresponded to reduced sensitivity to 100 nM capsaicin in vitro (IC50 = 230 ± 20 nM, 76 ± 4.4% wild-type capsaicin responders vs. 56.9 ± 4.7% HDAC4 cKO responders) and to reduced thermal hypersensitivity in the complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) model of inflammatory pain (1.3–1.4-fold improvement over wild-type controls; n = 5–12, in 2 separate experiments). These data indicate that HDAC4 is a novel inflammatory pain mediator and may be a good therapeutic target, capable of orchestrating the regulation of multiple downstream effectors.—Crow, M., Khovanov, N., Kelleher, J. H., Sharma, S., Grant, A. D., Bogdanov, Y., Wood, J. N., McMahon, S. B., Denk, F. HDAC4 is required for inflammation-associated thermal hypersensitivity. PMID:25903105

  5. A microfluidic platform reveals differential response of regulatory T cells to micropatterned costimulation arrays.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joung-Hyun; Dustin, Michael L; Kam, Lance C

    2015-11-01

    T cells are key mediators of adaptive immunity. However, the overall immune response is often directed by minor subpopulations of this heterogeneous family of cells, owing to specificity of activation and amplification of functional response. Knowledge of differences in signaling and function between T cell subtypes is far from complete, but is clearly needed for understanding and ultimately leveraging this branch of the adaptive immune response. This report investigates differences in cell response to micropatterned surfaces by conventional and regulatory T cells. Specifically, the ability of cells to respond to the microscale geometry of TCR/CD3 and CD28 engagement is made possible using a magnetic-microfluidic device that overcomes limitations in imaging efficiency associated with conventional microscopy equipment. This device can be readily assembled onto micropatterned surfaces while maintaining the activity of proteins and other biomolecules necessary for such studies. In operation, a target population of cells is tagged using paramagnetic beads, and then trapped in a divergent magnetic field within the chamber. Following washing, the target cells are released to interact with a designated surface. Characterization of this system with mouse CD4(+) T cells demonstrated a 50-fold increase in target-to-background cell purity, with an 80% collection efficiency. Applying this approach to CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, it is then demonstrated that these rare cells respond less selectively to micro-scale features of anti-CD3 antibodies than CD4(+)CD25(-) conventional T cells, revealing a difference in balance between TCR/CD3 and LFA-1-based adhesion. PKC-? localized to the distal pole of regulatory T cells, away from the cell-substrate interface, suggests a mechanism for differential regulation of TCR/LFA-1-based adhesion. Moreover, specificity of cell adhesion to anti-CD3 features was dependent on the relative position of anti-CD28 signaling within the cell-substrate interface, revealing an important role for coincidence of TCR and costimulatory pathway in triggering regulatory T cell function. PMID:26400012

  6. Lymphatic Function Regulates Contact Hypersensitivity Dermatitis in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Savetsky, Ira L; Albano, Nicholas J; Cuzzone, Daniel A; Gardenier, Jason C; Torrisi, Jeremy S; García Nores, Gabriela D; Nitti, Matthew D; Hespe, Geoffrey E; Nelson, Tyler S; Kataru, Raghu P; Dixon, J Brandon; Mehrara, Babak J

    2015-11-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for inflammatory dermatologic diseases, including atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. In addition, recent studies have shown that obesity impairs lymphatic function. As the lymphatic system is a critical regulator of inflammatory reactions, we tested the hypothesis that obesity-induced lymphatic dysfunction is a key regulator of cutaneous hypersensitivity reactions in obese mice. We found that obese mice have impaired lymphatic function, characterized by leaky capillary lymphatics and decreased collecting vessel pumping capacity. In addition, obese mice displayed heightened dermatitis responses to inflammatory skin stimuli, resulting in both higher peak inflammation and a delayed clearance of inflammatory responses. Injection of recombinant vascular endothelial growth factor-C remarkably increased lymphangiogenesis, lymphatic function, and lymphatic endothelial cell expression of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 21, while decreasing inflammation and expression of inducible nitrous oxide synthase. These changes resulted in considerably decreased dermatitis responses in both lean and obese mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that obesity-induced changes in the lymphatic system result in an amplified and a prolonged inflammatory response. PMID:26176761

  7. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis and metalworking fluids contaminated by mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Tillie-Leblond, I; Grenouillet, F; Reboux, G; Roussel, S; Chouraki, B; Lorthois, C; Dalphin, J-C; Wallaert, B; Millon, L

    2011-03-01

    Metalworking fluids (MWF) are responsible for hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP). The aim of the present study was to identify the antigen (Ag) responsible for MWF-associated HP, and to optimise serological diagnosis by definition of a threshold allowing discrimination between HP patients and asymptomatic exposed workers. 13 patients, who were workers at a car engine manufacturing plant, were suspected of MWF-associated HP. Microbial analysis of 83 used MWFs was carried out. Sera from 13 MWF-associated HP patients, 12 asymptomatic exposed workers and 18 healthy unexposed controls were tested to determine their immunological responses to three Ags, including Mycobacterium immunogenum. M. immunogenum was identified in 40% of used fluids by culture and confirmed by DNA sequencing. The threshold for differentiating MWF-associated HP patients from asymptomatic exposed workers was five arcs of precipitation (sensitivity 77% and specificity 92%), as determined by electrosyneresis (ES). Using ELISA methods with protein extract from M. immunogenum, a threshold leading to 92% sensitivity and 100% specificity was established. The detection of specific antibodies against M. immunogenum Ag at high levels in case sera suggests that M. immunogenum-contaminated MWF is responsible for MWF-associated HP. To discriminate MWF-associated HP patients from asymptomatic exposed workers, we suggest a five-arc threshold for ES and a 1.6-AU threshold for ELISA methods. PMID:20693254

  8. Transcriptome signatures of class I and III stress response deregulation in Lactobacillus plantarum reveal pleiotropic adaptation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To cope with environmental challenges bacteria possess sophisticated defense mechanisms that involve stress-induced adaptive responses. The canonical stress regulators CtsR and HrcA play a central role in the adaptations to a plethora of stresses in a variety of organisms. Here, we determined the CtsR and HrcA regulons of the lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 grown under reference (28°C) and elevated (40°C) temperatures, using ctsR, hrcA, and ctsR-hrcA deletion mutants. Results While the maximum specific growth rates of the mutants and the parental strain were similar at both temperatures (0.33?±?0.02 h-1 and 0.34?±?0.03 h-1, respectively), DNA microarray analyses revealed that the CtsR or HrcA deficient strains displayed altered transcription patterns of genes encoding functions involved in transport and binding of sugars and other compounds, primary metabolism, transcription regulation, capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis, as well as fatty acid metabolism. These transcriptional signatures enabled the refinement of the gene repertoire that is directly or indirectly controlled by CtsR and HrcA of L. plantarum. Deletion of both regulators, elicited transcriptional changes of a large variety of additional genes in a temperature-dependent manner, including genes encoding functions involved in cell-envelope remodeling. Moreover, phenotypic assays revealed that both transcription regulators contribute to regulation of resistance to hydrogen peroxide stress. The integration of these results allowed the reconstruction of CtsR and HrcA regulatory networks in L. plantarum, highlighting the significant intertwinement of class I and III stress regulons. Conclusions Taken together, our results enabled the refinement of the CtsR and HrcA regulatory networks in L. plantarum, illustrating the complex nature of adaptive stress responses in this bacterium. PMID:24238744

  9. Excess fertilizer responsive miRNAs revealed in Linum usitatissimum L.

    PubMed

    Melnikova, Nataliya V; Dmitriev, Alexey A; Belenikin, Maxim S; Speranskaya, Anna S; Krinitsina, Anastasia A; Rachinskaia, Olga A; Lakunina, Valentina A; Krasnov, George S; Snezhkina, Anastasiya V; Sadritdinova, Asiya F; Uroshlev, Leonid A; Koroban, Nadezda V; Samatadze, Tatiana E; Amosova, Alexandra V; Zelenin, Alexander V; Muravenko, Olga V; Bolsheva, Nadezhda L; Kudryavtseva, Anna V

    2015-02-01

    Effective fertilizer application is necessary to increase crop yields and reduce risk of plant overdosing. It is known that expression level of microRNAs (miRNAs) alters in plants under different nutrient concentrations in soil. The aim of our study was to identify and characterize miRNAs with expression alterations under excessive fertilizer in agriculturally important crop - flax (Linum usitatissimum L.). We have sequenced small RNAs in flax grown under normal and excessive fertilizer using Illumina GAIIx. Over 14 million raw reads was obtained for two small RNA libraries. 84 conserved miRNAs from 20 families were identified. Differential expression was revealed for several flax miRNAs under excessive fertilizer according to high-throughput sequencing data. For 6 miRNA families (miR395, miR169, miR408, miR399, miR398 and miR168) expression level alterations were evaluated on the extended sampling using qPCR. Statistically significant up-regulation was revealed for miR395 under excessive fertilizer. It is known that target genes of miR395 are involved in sulfate uptake and assimilation. However, according to our data alterations of the expression level of miR395 could be associated not only with excess sulfur application, but also with redundancy of other macro- and micronutrients. Furthermore expression level was evaluated for miRNAs and their predicted targets. The negative correlation between miR399 expression and expression of its predicted target ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 gene was shown in flax for the first time. So we suggested miR399 involvement in phosphate regulation in L. usitatissimum. Revealed in our study expression alterations contribute to miRNA role in flax response to excessive fertilizer. PMID:25483925

  10. Transcriptome Analysis of Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) Genotypes That Are Susceptible, Resistant, and Hypersensitive to Reniform Nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruijuan; Rashotte, Aaron M.; Singh, Narendra K.; Lawrence, Kathy S.; Weaver, David B.; Locy, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Reniform nematode is a semi-endoparasitic nematode species causing significant yield loss in numerous crops, including cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). An RNA-sequencing analysis was conducted to measure transcript abundance in reniform nematode susceptible (DP90 & SG747), resistant (BARBREN-713), and hypersensitive (LONREN-1) genotypes of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) with and without reniform nematode infestation. Over 90 million trimmed high quality reads were assembled into 84,711 and 80, 353 transcripts using the G. arboreum and the G. raimondii genomes as references. Many transcripts were significantly differentially expressed between the three different genotypes both prior to and during nematode pathogenesis, including transcripts corresponding to the gene ontology categories of cell wall, hormone metabolism and signaling, redox reactions, secondary metabolism, transcriptional regulation, stress responses, and signaling. Further analysis revealed that a number of these differentially expressed transcripts mapped to the G. raimondii and/or the G. arboreum genomes within 1 megabase of quantitative trait loci that had previously been linked to reniform nematode resistance. Several resistance genes encoding proteins known to be strongly linked to pathogen perception and resistance, including LRR-like and NBS-LRR domain-containing proteins, were among the differentially expressed transcripts mapping near these quantitative trait loci. Further investigation is required to confirm a role for these transcripts in reniform nematode susceptibility, hypersensitivity, and/or resistance. This study presents the first systemic investigation of reniform nematode resistance-associated genes using different genotypes of cotton. The candidate reniform nematode resistance-associated genes identified in this study can serve as the basis for further functional analysis and aid in further development of reniform a nematode resistant cotton germplasm. PMID:26571375

  11. Comprehensive DNA Adduct Analysis Reveals Pulmonary Inflammatory Response Contributes to Genotoxic Action of Magnetite Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ishino, Kousuke; Kato, Tatsuya; Kato, Mamoru; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Wakabayashi, Keiji; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Totsuka, Yukari

    2015-01-01

    Nanosized-magnetite (MGT) is widely utilized in medicinal and industrial fields; however, its toxicological properties are not well documented. In our previous report, MGT showed genotoxicity in both in vitro and in vivo assay systems, and it was suggested that inflammatory responses exist behind the genotoxicity. To further clarify mechanisms underlying the genotoxicity, a comprehensive DNA adduct (DNA adductome) analysis was conducted using DNA samples derived from the lungs of mice exposed to MGT. In total, 30 and 42 types of DNA adducts were detected in the vehicle control and MGT-treated groups, respectively. Principal component analysis (PCA) against a subset of DNA adducts was applied and several adducts, which are deduced to be formed by inflammation or oxidative stress, as the case of etheno-deoxycytidine (?dC), revealed higher contributions to MGT exposure. By quantitative-LC-MS/MS analysis, ?dC levels were significantly higher in MGT-treated mice than those of the vehicle control. Taken together with our previous data, it is suggested that inflammatory responses might be involved in the genotoxicity induced by MGT in the lungs of mice. PMID:25658799

  12. Capturing Arabidopsis root architecture dynamics with ROOT-FIT reveals diversity in responses to salinity.

    PubMed

    Julkowska, Magdalena M; Hoefsloot, Huub C J; Mol, Selena; Feron, Richard; de Boer, Gert-Jan; Haring, Michel A; Testerink, Christa

    2014-11-01

    The plant root is the first organ to encounter salinity stress, but the effect of salinity on root system architecture (RSA) remains elusive. Both the reduction in main root (MR) elongation and the redistribution of the root mass between MRs and lateral roots (LRs) are likely to play crucial roles in water extraction efficiency and ion exclusion. To establish which RSA parameters are responsive to salt stress, we performed a detailed time course experiment in which Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings were grown on agar plates under different salt stress conditions. We captured RSA dynamics with quadratic growth functions (root-fit) and summarized the salt-induced differences in RSA dynamics in three growth parameters: MR elongation, average LR elongation, and increase in number of LRs. In the ecotype Columbia-0 accession of Arabidopsis, salt stress affected MR elongation more severely than LR elongation and an increase in LRs, leading to a significantly altered RSA. By quantifying RSA dynamics of 31 different Arabidopsis accessions in control and mild salt stress conditions, different strategies for regulation of MR and LR meristems and root branching were revealed. Different RSA strategies partially correlated with natural variation in abscisic acid sensitivity and different Na(+)/K(+) ratios in shoots of seedlings grown under mild salt stress. Applying root-fit to describe the dynamics of RSA allowed us to uncover the natural diversity in root morphology and cluster it into four response types that otherwise would have been overlooked. PMID:25271266

  13. DNA barcodes reveal microevolutionary signals in fire response trait in two legume genera.

    PubMed

    Bello, Abubakar; Daru, Barnabas H; Stirton, Charles H; Chimphango, Samson B M; van der Bank, Michelle; Maurin, Olivier; Muasya, A Muthama

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale DNA barcoding provides a new technique for species identification and evaluation of relationships across various levels (populations and species) and may reveal fundamental processes in recently diverged species. Here, we analysed DNA sequence variation in the recently diverged legumes from the Psoraleeae (Fabaceae) occurring in the Cape Floristic Region (CFR) of southern Africa to test the utility of DNA barcodes in species identification and discrimination. We further explored the phylogenetic signal on fire response trait (reseeding and resprouting) at species and generic levels. We showed that Psoraleoid legumes of the CFR exhibit a barcoding gap yielding the combination of matK and rbcLa (matK + rbcLa) data set as a better barcode than single regions. We found a high score (100 %) of correct identification of individuals to their respective genera but a very low score (<50 %) in identifying them to species. We found a considerable match (54 %) between genetic species and morphologically delimited species. We also found that different lineages showed a weak but significant phylogenetic conservatism in their response to fire as reseeders or resprouters, with more clustering of resprouters than would be expected by chance. These novel microevolutionary patterns might be acting continuously over time to produce multi-scale regularities of biodiversity. This study provides the first insight into the DNA barcoding campaign of land plants in species identification and detection of the phylogenetic signal in recently diverged lineages of the CFR. PMID:26507570

  14. In vivo gene manipulation reveals the impact of stress-responsive MAPK pathways on tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Kamiyama, Miki; Naguro, Isao; Ichijo, Hidenori

    2015-01-01

    It has been widely accepted that tumor cells and normal stromal cells in the host environment coordinately modulate tumor progression. Mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways are the representative stress-responsive cascades that exert proper cellular responses to divergent environmental stimuli. Genetically engineered mouse models and chemically induced tumorigenesis models have revealed that components of the MAPK pathway not only regulate the behavior of tumor cells themselves but also that of surrounding normal stromal cells in the host environment during cancer pathogenesis. The individual functions of MAPK pathway components in tumor initiation and progression vary depending on the stimuli and the stromal cell types involved in tumor progression, in addition to the molecular isoforms of the components and the origins of the tumor. Recent studies have indicated that MAPK pathway components synergize with environmental factors (e.g. tobacco smoke and diet) to affect tumor initiation and progression. Moreover, some components play distinct roles in the course of tumor progression, such as before and after the establishment of tumors. Hence, a comprehensive understanding of the multifaceted functions of MAPK pathway components in tumor initiation and progression is essential for the improvement of cancer therapy. In this review, we focus on the reports that utilized knockout, conditional knockout, and transgenic mice of MAPK pathway components to investigate the effects of MAPK pathway components on tumor initiation and progression in the host environment. PMID:25880821

  15. DNA barcodes reveal microevolutionary signals in fire response trait in two legume genera

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Abubakar; Daru, Barnabas H.; Stirton, Charles H.; Chimphango, Samson B. M.; van der Bank, Michelle; Maurin, Olivier; Muasya, A. Muthama

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale DNA barcoding provides a new technique for species identification and evaluation of relationships across various levels (populations and species) and may reveal fundamental processes in recently diverged species. Here, we analysed DNA sequence variation in the recently diverged legumes from the Psoraleeae (Fabaceae) occurring in the Cape Floristic Region (CFR) of southern Africa to test the utility of DNA barcodes in species identification and discrimination. We further explored the phylogenetic signal on fire response trait (reseeding and resprouting) at species and generic levels. We showed that Psoraleoid legumes of the CFR exhibit a barcoding gap yielding the combination of matK and rbcLa (matK + rbcLa) data set as a better barcode than single regions. We found a high score (100 %) of correct identification of individuals to their respective genera but a very low score (<50 %) in identifying them to species. We found a considerable match (54 %) between genetic species and morphologically delimited species. We also found that different lineages showed a weak but significant phylogenetic conservatism in their response to fire as reseeders or resprouters, with more clustering of resprouters than would be expected by chance. These novel microevolutionary patterns might be acting continuously over time to produce multi-scale regularities of biodiversity. This study provides the first insight into the DNA barcoding campaign of land plants in species identification and detection of the phylogenetic signal in recently diverged lineages of the CFR. PMID:26507570

  16. Yeast Transcriptome and In Vivo Hypoxia Detection Reveals Histoplasma capsulatum Response to Low Oxygen Tension.

    PubMed

    DuBois, Juwen C; Pasula, Rajamouli; Dade, Jessica E; Smulian, A George

    2016-01-01

    Although there is growing understanding of the microenvironmental conditions fungal pathogens encounter as they colonize their host, nothing is known about Histoplasma capsulatum's response to hypoxia. Here we characterized hypoxia during murine histoplasmosis using an in vivo hypoxia detection agent, Hypoxyprobe-2 (HP-2); and analyzed H. capsulatum's transcriptional profile in response to in vitro hypoxia. Immunohistopathology and flow cytometry analyses revealed distinct regions of hypoxia during infection. Granuloma cells, enriched with macrophages and T-cells isolated from infected livers were 66-76% positive for HP-2, of which, 95% of macrophages and 55% of T-cells were hypoxic. Although inhibited, H. capsulatum was able to survive under in vitro hypoxic conditions (<1% O2), and restored growth when replaced in normoxia. Next-generation sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis after 24 hours of hypoxia demonstrated a significant increase in NIT50 (swirm domain DNA binding protein), a predicted ABC transporter (ABC), NADPH oxidoreductase (NADP/FAD), and guanine nucleotide exchange factor (RSP/GEF); and other genes with no known designated function. Computational transcription factor binding site analysis predicted human sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) binding sites upstream of NIT50, ABC, NADP/FAD and RSP/GEF. Hypoxia resulted in a time-dependent increase in the H. capsulatum homolog of SREBP, here named Srb1. Srb1 peaked at 8 hours and returned to basal levels by 24 hours. Our findings demonstrate that H. capsulatum encounters and survives severe hypoxia during infection. Additionally, the hypoxic response may be regulated at the level of transcription, and these studies contribute to the understanding of hypoxic regulation and adaptation in H. capsulatum. PMID:26483436

  17. Brightness induction reveals changes in neural response time to changes in stimulus contrast.

    PubMed

    Gunther, Karen; Owens, Jacob

    2015-09-01

    We explore whether brightness induction can be used to reveal changes in neural response time to changes in stimulus contrast. Brightness induction is a phenomenon in which the brightness of a stimulus is influenced by its surrounding context (e.g., Chevreul, 1839/1987; Shevell, Holliday & Whittle, 1992). For example, a red dot surrounded by the color black appears brighter than a red dot surrounded by the color white when both red dots are the same intensity. Neurophysiological studies (e.g., Shapley & Victor, 1978; Solomon & Lennie, 2005) have shown that as the contrast of a stimulus decreases, the neuronal response time increases. Subjects performed a brightness induction heterochromatic flicker photometry task (HFP, 5Hz; Gunther & Dobkins, 2005) in three conditions: red intense (bull's-eye dot stimulus with a red center [3.5° diameter] and black surround [6° diameter] alternating with a bull's-eye dot with a green center and white surround), green intense (green is paired with black, red with white), and a non-induction control (red and green dots alternating with no inducing annulus). Subjects performed HFP (minimize flicker by adjusting relative red/green luminances) on the red/green central dot for each induction condition. The red/green center dot was presented at seven contrasts (25-60% of the maximum possible on the monitor; 6.99-8.24% root mean square cone contrast), in seven linear steps. The logic of the induction paradigm is that as the contrast of the stimulus decreases, the center should appear to flicker slower, thus becoming perceptually out of phase with the inducing surround. At low enough contrasts, the center may be perceptually 180° out of phase with the inducer, thus appearing as assimilation instead of induction. The HFP settings do show changes in induction magnitude with contrast, reflecting changes in neural response time. Results are not yet statistically significant - data collection continues. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326085

  18. Prediction of drug-induced immediate hypersensitivity in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Chazal, I; Verdier, F; Virat, M; Descotes, J

    1994-10-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate an assay to assess the risk for drug-induced immediate hypersensitivity reactions. Groups of five to 10 guinea-pigs were given six ip injections of the test compound on days 1, 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12. Aluminium hydroxide was also given in the first injection. At day 33, the animals were given an iv injection of the test compound and the response was recorded by grading the severity of clinical symptoms. Cutaneous passive anaphylaxis was also evaluated in six naive guinea pigs using Evans blue and sera collected from treated animals on day 26. A panel of six positive model compounds (ovalbumin, aprotinin, chymopapain, tetracosactide, cyanocobalamin and procaine), and the negative compound Ribomunyl were tested. Positive systemic and/or cutaneous anaphylactic responses were observed with ovalbumin, aprotinin, chymopapain and tetracosactide whereas no responses were noted with cyanocobalamin, procaine and Ribomunyl. Our results suggest that this protocol can help differentiate positive model compounds (known to induce reactions in man) from negative model compounds, provided that their molecular weight is large enough, but that it is not applicable to substances of low molecular weight. PMID:20693069

  19. Single-cell quantification of IL-2 response by effector and regulatory T cells reveals critical plasticity in immune response

    PubMed Central

    Feinerman, Ofer; Jentsch, Garrit; Tkach, Karen E; Coward, Jesse W; Hathorn, Matthew M; Sneddon, Michael W; Emonet, Thierry; Smith, Kendall A; Altan-Bonnet, Grégoire

    2010-01-01

    Understanding how the immune system decides between tolerance and activation by antigens requires addressing cytokine regulation as a highly dynamic process. We quantified the dynamics of interleukin-2 (IL-2) signaling in a population of T cells during an immune response by combining in silico modeling and single-cell measurements in vitro. We demonstrate that IL-2 receptor expression levels vary widely among T cells creating a large variability in the ability of the individual cells to consume, produce and participate in IL-2 signaling within the population. Our model reveals that at the population level, these heterogeneous cells are engaged in a tug-of-war for IL-2 between regulatory (Treg) and effector (Teff) T cells, whereby access to IL-2 can either increase the survival of Teff cells or the suppressive capacity of Treg cells. This tug-of-war is the mechanism enforcing, at the systems level, a core function of Treg cells, namely the specific suppression of survival signals for weakly activated Teff cells but not for strongly activated cells. Our integrated model yields quantitative, experimentally validated predictions for the manipulation of Treg suppression. PMID:21119631

  20. Integrin ?E(CD103) Is Involved in Regulatory T-Cell Function in Allergic Contact Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Braun, Andrea; Dewert, Nadin; Brunnert, Fiona; Schnabel, Viktor; Hardenberg, Jan-Hendrik; Richter, Beatrice; Zachmann, Karolin; Cording, Sascha; Claßen, Anna; Brans, Richard; Hamann, Alf; Huehn, Jochen; Schön, Michael P

    2015-12-01

    Murine contact hypersensitivity (CHS) is a dendritic cell (DC)-dependent T-cell-mediated inflammation with CD8(+) T cells as effectors and CD4(+) T cells as regulators (Treg cells) that models human allergic contact dermatitis. The integrin ?E(CD103) is expressed by some T-cell and DC subsets and has been implicated in epithelial lymphocyte localization, but its role in immune regulation remains enigmatic. We have identified a function for CD103 in the development of cutaneous allergic immune responses. CHS responses, but not irritant contact dermatitis, were significantly augmented in CD103-deficient mice in hapten-challenged skin. Phenotype and function of skin DCs during sensitization were normal, whereas adoptive transfer experiments revealed that the elevated CHS response in CD103-deficient mice is transferred by primed T cells and is independent of resident cells in recipient mice. While T-cell counts were elevated in challenged skin of CD103-deficient mice, the FoxP3 expression level of CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells was significantly reduced, indicating impaired functionality. Indeed, Treg cells from CD103-deficient mice were not able to suppress CHS reactions during the elicitation phase. Further, CD103 on FoxP3(+) Treg cells was involved in Treg retention to inflamed skin. These findings indicate an unexpected dichotomous functional role for CD103 on Treg cells by modulating FoxP3 expression. PMID:26203637

  1. Hypersensitivity to Ticks and Lyme Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Georgine; Wikel, Stephen K.; Spielman, Andrew; Telford, Sam R.; McKay, Kathleen

    2005-01-01

    Although residents of Lyme disease–endemic regions describe frequent exposure to ticks, Lyme disease develops in relatively few. To determine whether people who experience cutaneous hypersensitivity against tick bite have fewer episodes of Lyme disease than those who do not, we examined several factors that might restrict the incidence of Lyme disease among residents of Block Island, Rhode Island. Of 1,498 study participants, 27% (95% confidence interval [CI] 23%–31%) reported >1 tick bites, and 17% (95% CI 13%–21%) reported itch associated with tick bite in the previous year. Borrelia burgdorferi infected 23% (95% CI 20%–26%) of 135 nymphal Ixodes scapularis (I. dammini) ticks. The likelihood of Lyme disease infection decreased with >3 reports of tick-associated itch (odds ratio 0.14, 95% CI 0.94–0.03, p = 0.01). Prior exposure to uninfected vector ticks protects residents of disease-endemic sites from Lyme disease. PMID:15705320

  2. Metagenome, metatranscriptome and single-cell sequencing reveal microbial response to Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Olivia U; Hazen, Terry C; Borglin, Sharon; Chain, Patrick S G; Dubinsky, Eric A; Fortney, Julian L; Han, James; Holman, Hoi-Ying N; Hultman, Jenni; Lamendella, Regina; Mackelprang, Rachel; Malfatti, Stephanie; Tom, Lauren M; Tringe, Susannah G; Woyke, Tanja; Zhou, Jizhong; Rubin, Edward M; Jansson, Janet K

    2012-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico resulted in a deep-sea hydrocarbon plume that caused a shift in the indigenous microbial community composition with unknown ecological consequences. Early in the spill history, a bloom of uncultured, thus uncharacterized, members of the Oceanospirillales was previously detected, but their role in oil disposition was unknown. Here our aim was to determine the functional role of the Oceanospirillales and other active members of the indigenous microbial community using deep sequencing of community DNA and RNA, as well as single-cell genomics. Shotgun metagenomic and metatranscriptomic sequencing revealed that genes for motility, chemotaxis and aliphatic hydrocarbon degradation were significantly enriched and expressed in the hydrocarbon plume samples compared with uncontaminated seawater collected from plume depth. In contrast, although genes coding for degradation of more recalcitrant compounds, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, total xylenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, were identified in the metagenomes, they were expressed at low levels, or not at all based on analysis of the metatranscriptomes. Isolation and sequencing of two Oceanospirillales single cells revealed that both cells possessed genes coding for n-alkane and cycloalkane degradation. Specifically, the near-complete pathway for cyclohexane oxidation in the Oceanospirillales single cells was elucidated and supported by both metagenome and metatranscriptome data. The draft genome also included genes for chemotaxis, motility and nutrient acquisition strategies that were also identified in the metagenomes and metatranscriptomes. These data point towards a rapid response of members of the Oceanospirillales to aliphatic hydrocarbons in the deep sea. PMID:22717885

  3. Metagenomics, metatranscriptomics and single cell genomics reveal functional response of active Oceanospirillales to Gulf oil spill

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Olivia U.; Hazen, Terry C.; Borglin, Sharon; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Dubinsky, Eric A.; Fortney, Julian L.; Han, James; Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Hultman, Jenni; Lamendella, Regina; Mackelprang, Rachel; Malfatti, Stephanie; Tom, Lauren M.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Woyke, Tanja; Zhou, Jizhong; Rubin, Edward M.; Jansson, Janet K.

    2012-06-12

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico resulted in a deep-sea hydrocarbon plume that caused a shift in the indigenous microbial community composition with unknown ecological consequences. Early in the spill history, a bloom of uncultured, thus uncharacterized, members of the Oceanospirillales was previously detected, but their role in oil disposition was unknown. Here our aim was to determine the functional role of the Oceanospirillales and other active members of the indigenous microbial community using deep sequencing of community DNA and RNA, as well as single-cell genomics. Shotgun metagenomic and metatranscriptomic sequencing revealed that genes for motility, chemotaxis and aliphatic hydrocarbon degradation were significantly enriched and expressed in the hydrocarbon plume samples compared with uncontaminated seawater collected from plume depth. In contrast, although genes coding for degradation of more recalcitrant compounds, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, total xylenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, were identified in the metagenomes, they were expressed at low levels, or not at all based on analysis of the metatranscriptomes. Isolation and sequencing of two Oceanospirillales single cells revealed that both cells possessed genes coding for n-alkane and cycloalkane degradation. Specifically, the near-complete pathway for cyclohexane oxidation in the Oceanospirillales single cells was elucidated and supported by both metagenome and metatranscriptome data. The draft genome also included genes for chemotaxis, motility and nutrient acquisition strategies that were also identified in the metagenomes and metatranscriptomes. These data point towards a rapid response of members of the Oceanospirillales to aliphatic hydrocarbons in the deep sea.

  4. Kidney tissue proteomics reveals regucalcin downregulation in response to diabetic nephropathy with reflection in urinary exosomes.

    PubMed

    Zubiri, Irene; Posada-Ayala, Maria; Benito-Martin, Alberto; Maroto, Aroa S; Martin-Lorenzo, Marta; Cannata-Ortiz, Pablo; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Gonzalez-Calero, Laura; Barderas, Maria G; Fernandez-Fernandez, Beatriz; Ortiz, Alberto; Vivanco, Fernando; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria

    2015-11-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a major complication of diabetes mellitus and the most frequent cause of end-stage renal disease. DN progresses silently and without clinical symptoms at early stages. Current noninvasive available markers as albuminuria account with severe limitations (late response, unpredictable prognosis, and limited sensitivity). Thus, it urges the discovery of novel markers to help in diagnosis and outcome prediction. Tissue proteomics allows zooming-in where pathophysiological changes are taking place. We performed a differential analysis of renal tissue proteome in a rat model of early DN by 2-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Confirmation was performed by Western blot, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and selected reaction monitoring (SRM). Rat urine samples were collected and exosomes were isolated from urine to evaluate if these microvesicles reflect changes directly occurring at tissue level. The protein showing maximum altered expression in rat tissue in response to DN was further analyzed in human kidney tissue and urinary exosomes. Regucalcin protein or senescence marker protein-30 (SMP30) (Swiss-Prot Q03336) was found to be strongly downregulated in DN kidney tissue compared with healthy controls. The same trend was observed in exosomes isolated from urine of control and DN rats. These data were further confirmed in a pilot study with human samples. IHC revealed a significant decrease of regucalcin in human kidney disease tissue vs control kidney tissue, and regucalcin was detected in exosomes isolated from healthy donors' urine but not from kidney disease patients. In conclusion, regucalcin protein expression is reduced in DN kidney tissue and this significant change is reflected in exosomes isolated from urine. Urinary exosomal regucalcin represents a novel tool, which should be explored for early diagnosis and progression monitoring of diabetic kidney disease. PMID:26072307

  5. Gene response profiles for Daphnia pulex exposed to the environmental stressor cadmium reveals novel crustacean metallothioneins

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Joseph R; Colbourne, John K; Davey, Jennifer C; Glaholt, Stephen P; Hampton, Thomas H; Chen, Celia Y; Folt, Carol L; Hamilton, Joshua W

    2007-01-01

    Background Genomic research tools such as microarrays are proving to be important resources to study the complex regulation of genes that respond to environmental perturbations. A first generation cDNA microarray was developed for the environmental indicator species Daphnia pulex, to identify genes whose regulation is modulated following exposure to the metal stressor cadmium. Our experiments revealed interesting changes in gene transcription that suggest their biological roles and their potentially toxicological features in responding to this important environmental contaminant. Results Our microarray identified genes reported in the literature to be regulated in response to cadmium exposure, suggested functional attributes for genes that share no sequence similarity to proteins in the public databases, and pointed to genes that are likely members of expanded gene families in the Daphnia genome. Genes identified on the microarray also were associated with cadmium induced phenotypes and population-level outcomes that we experimentally determined. A subset of genes regulated in response to cadmium exposure was independently validated using quantitative-realtime (Q-RT)-PCR. These microarray studies led to the discovery of three genes coding for the metal detoxication protein metallothionein (MT). The gene structures and predicted translated sequences of D. pulex MTs clearly place them in this gene family. Yet, they share little homology with previously characterized MTs. Conclusion The genomic information obtained from this study represents an important first step in characterizing microarray patterns that may be diagnostic to specific environmental contaminants and give insights into their toxicological mechanisms, while also providing a practical tool for evolutionary, ecological, and toxicological functional gene discovery studies. Advances in Daphnia genomics will enable the further development of this species as a model organism for the environmental sciences. PMID:18154678

  6. Growth and carbon isotopes of Mediterranean trees reveal contrasting responses to increased carbon dioxide and drought.

    PubMed

    Granda, Elena; Rossatto, Davi Rodrigo; Camarero, J Julio; Voltas, Jordi; Valladares, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Forest dynamics will depend upon the physiological performance of individual tree species under more stressful conditions caused by climate change. In order to compare the idiosyncratic responses of Mediterranean tree species (Quercus faginea, Pinus nigra, Juniperus thurifera) coexisting in forests of central Spain, we evaluated the temporal changes in secondary growth (basal area increment; BAI) and intrinsic water-use efficiency (iWUE) during the last four decades, determined how coexisting species are responding to increases in atmospheric CO2 concentrations (C(a)) and drought stress, and assessed the relationship among iWUE and growth during climatically contrasting years. All species increased their iWUE (ca. +15 to +21%) between the 1970s and the 2000s. This increase was positively related to C(a) for J. thurifera and to higher C(a) and drought for Q. faginea and P. nigra. During climatically favourable years the study species either increased or maintained their growth at rising iWUE, suggesting a higher CO2 uptake. However, during unfavourable climatic years Q. faginea and especially P. nigra showed sharp declines in growth at enhanced iWUE, likely caused by a reduced stomatal conductance to save water under stressful dry conditions. In contrast, J. thurifera showed enhanced growth also during unfavourable years at increased iWUE, denoting a beneficial effect of C(a) even under climatically harsh conditions. Our results reveal significant inter-specific differences in growth driven by alternative physiological responses to increasing drought stress. Thus, forest composition in the Mediterranean region might be altered due to contrasting capacities of coexisting tree species to withstand increasingly stressful conditions. PMID:23928889

  7. Mixed Adjuvant Formulations Reveal a New Combination That Elicit Antibody Response Comparable to Freund's Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Rachel P. J.; Seaman, Michael S.; Tonks, Paul; Wegmann, Frank; Seilly, David J.; Frost, Simon D. W.; LaBranche, Celia C.; Montefiori, David C.; Dey, Antu K.; Srivastava, Indresh K.; Sattentau, Quentin; Barnett, Susan W.; Heeney, Jonathan L.

    2012-01-01

    Adjuvant formulations capable of inducing high titer and high affinity antibody responses would provide a major advance in the development of vaccines to viral infections such as HIV-1. Although oil-in-water emulsions, such as Freund's adjuvant (FCA/FIA), are known to be potent, their toxicity and reactogenicity make them unacceptable for human use. Here, we explored different adjuvants and compared their ability to elicit antibody responses to FCA/FIA. Recombinant soluble trimeric HIV-1 gp140 antigen was formulated in different adjuvants, including FCA/FIA, Carbopol-971P, Carbopol-974P and the licensed adjuvant MF59, or combinations of MF59 and Carbopol. The antigen-adjuvant formulation was administered in a prime-boost regimen into rabbits, and elicitation of antigen binding and neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) was evaluated. When used individually, only FCA/FIA elicited significantly higher titer of nAbs than the control group (gp140 in PBS (p<0.05)). Sequential prime-boost immunizations with different adjuvants did not offer improvements over the use of FCA/FIA or MF59. Remarkably however, the concurrent use of the combination of Carbopol-971P and MF59 induced potent adjuvant activity with significantly higher titer nAbs than FCA/FIA (p<0.05). This combination was not associated with any obvious local or systemic adverse effects. Antibody competition indicated that the majority of the neutralizing activities were directed to the CD4 binding site (CD4bs). Increased antibody titers to the gp41 membrane proximal external region (MPER) and gp120 V3 were detected when the more potent adjuvants were used. These data reveal that the combination of Carbopol-971P and MF59 is unusually potent for eliciting nAbs to a variety of HIV-1 nAb epitopes. PMID:22509385

  8. Transgenic zebrafish reveal tissue-specific differences in estrogen signaling in response to environmental water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gorelick, Daniel A.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Hung, Alice L.; Blazer, Vicki; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Environmental endocrine disruptors (EED) are exogenous chemicals that mimic endogenous hormones, such as estrogens. Previous studies using a zebrafish transgenic reporter demonstrated that the EEDs bisphenol A and genistein preferentially activate estrogen receptors (ER) in the larval heart compared to the liver. However, it was not known whether the transgenic zebrafish reporter was sensitive enough to detect estrogens from environmental samples, whether environmental estrogens would exhibit similar tissue-specific effects as BPA and genistein or why some compounds preferentially target receptors in the heart. Methods: We tested surface water samples using a transgenic zebrafish reporter with tandem estrogen response elements driving green fluorescent protein expression (5xERE:GFP). Reporter activation was colocalized with tissue-specific expression of estrogen receptor genes by RNA in situ hybridization. Results: Selective patterns of ER activation were observed in transgenic fish exposed to river water samples from the Mid-Atlantic United States, with several samples preferentially activating receptors in embryonic and larval heart valves. We discovered that tissue-specificity in ER activation is due to differences in the expression of estrogen receptor subtypes. ER? is expressed in developing heart valves but not in the liver, whereas ER?2 has the opposite profile. Accordingly, subtype-specific ER agonists activate the reporter in either the heart valves or the liver. Conclusion: The use of 5xERE:GFP transgenic zebrafish has revealed an unexpected tissue-specific difference in the response to environmentally relevant estrogenic compounds. Exposure to estrogenic EEDs in utero is associated with adverse health effects, with the potentially unanticipated consequence of targeting developing heart valves.

  9. Genetic Interaction Landscape Reveals Critical Requirements for Schizosaccharomyces pombe Brc1 in DNA Damage Response Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Arancha; Roguev, Assen; Krogan, Nevan J.; Russell, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Brc1, which was first identified as a high-copy, allele-specific suppressor of a mutation impairing the Smc5-Smc6 holocomplex in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, protects genome integrity during normal DNA replication and when cells are exposed to toxic compounds that stall or collapse replication forks. The C-terminal tandem BRCT (BRCA1 C-terminus) domain of fission yeast Brc1 docks with phosphorylated histone H2A (?H2A)-marked chromatin formed by ATR/Rad3 checkpoint kinase at arrested and damaged replication forks; however, how Brc1 functions in relation to other genome protection modules remains unclear. Here, an epistatic mini-array profile reveals critical requirements for Brc1 in mutants that are defective in multiple DNA damage response pathways, including checkpoint signaling by Rad3-Rad26/ATR-ATRIP kinase, DNA repair by Smc5-Smc6 holocomplex, replication fork stabilization by Mrc1/claspin and Swi1-Swi3/Timeless-Tipin, and control of ubiquitin-regulated proteolysis by the COP9 signalosome (CSN). Exogenous genotoxins enhance these negative genetic interactions. Rad52 and RPA foci are increased in CSN-defective cells, and loss of ?H2A increases genotoxin sensitivity, indicating a critical role for the ?H2A-Brc1 module in stabilizing replication forks in CSN-defective cells. A negative genetic interaction with the Nse6 subunit of Smc5-Smc6 holocomplex indicates that the DNA repair functions of Brc1 and Smc5-Smc6 holocomplex are at least partially independent. Rtt107, the Brc1 homolog in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has a very different pattern of genetic interactions, indicating evolutionary divergence of functions and DNA damage responses. PMID:25795664

  10. Human herpesvirus 6 encephalitis associated with hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Yasuhiro; Nakajima, Masashi; Inoue, Hirosato; Kusuhara, Tomohiko; Yamada, Tatsuo

    2002-06-01

    Hypersensitivity syndrome, a serious systematic reaction to a limited number of drugs, is associated with the reactivation of human herpesvirus 6. A 56-year-old man developed acute limbic encephalitis followed by multiple organ failure during the course of toxic dermatitis induced by aromatic anticonvulsants. The clinical features of skin eruptions, high fever, eosinophilia, and atypical lymphocytosis were compatible with drug hypersensitivity syndrome. The patient showed seroconversion for human herpesvirus 6, and polymerase chain reaction detected human herpesvirus 6 DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid. To our knowledge, this is the first report of human herpesvirus 6 encephalitis associated with hypersensitivity syndrome. PMID:12112085

  11. Genetic structure along an elevational gradient in Hawaiian honeycreepers reveals contrasting evolutionary responses to avian malaria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eggert, L.S.; Terwilliger, L.A.; Woodworth, B.L.; Hart, P.J.; Palmer, D.; Fleischer, R.C.

    2008-01-01

    Background. The Hawaiian honeycreepers (Drepanidinae) are one of the best-known examples of an adaptive radiation, but their persistence today is threatened by the introduction of exotic pathogens and their vector, the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus. Historically, species such as the amakihi (Hemignathus virens), the apapane (Himatione sanguinea), and the iiwi (Vestiaria coccinea) were found from the coastal lowlands to the high elevation forests, but by the late 1800's they had become extremely rare in habitats below 900 m. Recently, however, populations of amakihi and apapane have been observed in low elevation habitats. We used twelve polymorphic microsatellite loci to investigate patterns of genetic structure, and to infer responses of these species to introduced avian malaria along an elevational gradient on the eastern flanks of Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes on the island of Hawaii. Results. Our results indicate that amakihi have genetically distinct, spatially structured populations that correspond with altitude. We detected very few apapane and no iiwi in low-elevation habitats, and genetic results reveal only minimal differentiation between populations at different altitudes in either of these species. Conclusion. Our results suggest that amakihi populations in low elevation habitats have not been recolonized by individuals from mid or high elevation refuges. After generations of strong selection for pathogen resistance, these populations have rebounded and amakihi have become common in regions in which they were previously rare or absent. ?? 2008 Eggert et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  12. Plasminogen activator urokinase expression reveals TRAIL responsiveness and supports fractional survival of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Pavet, V; Shlyakhtina, Y; He, T; Ceschin, D G; Kohonen, P; Perälä, M; Kallioniemi, O; Gronemeyer, H

    2014-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL/TNFSF10/Apo2L) holds promise for cancer therapy as it induces apoptosis in a large variety of cancer cells while exerting negligible toxicity in normal ones. However, TRAIL can also induce proliferative and migratory signaling in cancer cells resistant to apoptosis induced by this cytokine. In that regard, the molecular mechanisms underlying the tumor selectivity of TRAIL and those balancing apoptosis versus survival remain largely elusive. We show here that high mRNA levels of PLAU, which encodes urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), are characteristic of cancer cells with functional TRAIL signaling. Notably, decreasing uPA levels sensitized cancer cells to TRAIL, leading to markedly increased apoptosis. Mechanistic analyses revealed three molecular events taking place in uPA-depleted cells: reduced basal ERK1/2 prosurvival signaling, decreased preligand decoy receptor 2 (DcR2)-death receptor 5 (DR5) interaction and attenuated recruitment of DcR2 to the death-inducing signaling complex upon TRAIL challenge. These phenomena were accompanied by increased FADD and procaspase-8 recruitment and processing, thus guiding cells toward a caspase-dependent cell death that is largely independent of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. Collectively, our results unveil PLAU mRNA levels as marker for the identification of TRAIL-responsive tumor cells and highlight a key role of uPA signaling in ‘apoptosis versus survival' decision-making processes upon TRAIL challenge. PMID:24481457

  13. Optical tweezers reveal a dynamic mechanical response of cationic peptide-DNA complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Amy; Zheng, Tai; Sucayan, Sarah; Chou, Szu-Ting; Tricoli, Lucas; Hustedt, Jason; Kahn, Jason; Mixson, A. James; Seog, Joonil

    2013-03-01

    Nonviral carriers have been developed to deliver nucleic acids by forming nanoscale complexes; however, there has been limited success in achieving high transfection efficiency. Our hypothesis is that a factor affecting gene delivery efficiency is the mechanical response of the condensed complex. To begin to test this hypothesis, we directly measured the mechanical properties of DNA-carrier complexes using optical tweezers. Histidine-lysine (HK) polymer, Asparagine-lysine (NK) polymer and poly-L-lysine were used to form complexes with a single DNA molecule. As carriers were introduced, a sudden decrease in DNA extension occurrs at a force level which is defined as critical force (Fc). Fc is carrier and concentration dependent. Pulling revealed reduction in DNA extension length for HK-DNA complexes. The characteristics of force profiles vary by agent and can be dynamically manipulated by changes in environmental conditions such as ionic strength of the buffer as well as pH. Heparin can remove cationic reagents which are otherwise irreversibly bound to DNA. The implications for optimizing molecular interactions to enhance transfection efficiency will be discussed.

  14. Responses of a bursting pacemaker to excitation reveal spatial segregation between bursting and spiking mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Maran, Selva K; Sieling, Fred H; Demla, Kavita; Prinz, Astrid A; Canavier, Carmen C

    2011-01-01

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) frequently include bursting neurons that serve as pacemakers for rhythm generation. Phase resetting curves (PRCs) can provide insight into mechanisms underlying phase locking in such circuits. PRCs were constructed for a pacemaker bursting complex in the pyloric circuit in the stomatogastric ganglion of the lobster and crab. This complex is comprised of the Anterior Burster (AB) neuron and two Pyloric Dilator (PD) neurons that are all electrically coupled. Artificial excitatory synaptic conductance pulses of different strengths and durations were injected into one of the AB or PD somata using the Dynamic Clamp. Previously, we characterized the inhibitory PRCs by assuming a single slow process that enabled synaptic inputs to trigger switches between an up state in which spiking occurs and a down state in which it does not. Excitation produced five different PRC shapes, which could not be explained with such a simple model. A separate dendritic compartment was required to separate the mechanism that generates the up and down phases of the bursting envelope (1) from synaptic inputs applied at the soma, (2) from axonal spike generation and (3) from a slow process with a slower time scale than burst generation. This study reveals that due to the nonlinear properties and compartmentalization of ionic channels, the response to excitation is more complex than inhibition. PMID:21360137

  15. Probabilistic Independent Component Analysis for Laser Speckle Contrast Images Reveals in vivo Multi – Component Vascular Responses to Forepaw Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Pelled, Galit; Thakor, Nitish V.

    2015-01-01

    Brain’s functional response can be studied by observing the spatiotemporal dynamics of functional and structural changes in cerebral vasculature. However, very few studies explore detailed changes at the level of individual microvessels while revealing the simultaneous wide field view of microcirculation responses to functional stimulation. Here we use a high spatiotemporal resolution laser speckle contrast imaging method, in combination with probabilistic independent component analysis to reveal the changes of cerebral blood flow pattern in response to electrical forepaw stimulation in an anesthetized rat model. The proposed method is able to pick up the response of a single vessel down to ~20?m diameter in a 4mm × 4mm field of view, and automatically extract response from multiple vascular components. Two main vascular components, arteriolar and capillary responses respectively, show significantly different temporal dynamics. Overall, the experimental results from five rats reveal that the specific arteriole branch proximal to the activation sites dilate prior consistently to the increase of blood flow in the capillaries with a latency time 0.91±0.05s. The presented results provide novel microscopic scale evidence of the contribution of different vascular compartments in the hemodynamic response to neuronal activation. PMID:21096788

  16. Pseudomonas corrugata crpCDE is part of the cyclic lipopeptide corpeptin biosynthetic gene cluster and is involved in bacterial virulence in tomato and in hypersensitive response in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Strano, Cinzia Patricia; Bella, Patrizia; Licciardello, Grazia; Fiore, Alberto; Lo Piero, Angela Roberta; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Venturi, Vittorio; Catara, Vittoria

    2015-06-01

    Pseudomonas corrugata?CFBP 5454 produces two kinds of cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs), cormycin A and corpeptins, both of which possess surfactant, antimicrobial and phytotoxic activities. In this study, we identified genes coding for a putative non-ribosomal peptide synthetase and an ABC-type transport system involved in corpeptin production. These genes belong to the same transcriptional unit, designated crpCDE. The genetic organization of this locus is highly similar to other Pseudomonas?CLP biosynthetic clusters. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) analysis revealed that transporter and synthetase genomic knock-out mutants were unable to produce corpeptins, but continued to produce cormycin A. This suggests that CrpCDE is the only system involved in corpeptin production in P.?corrugata?CFBP 5454. In addition, phylogenetic analysis revealed that the CrpE ABC transporter clustered with the transporters of CLPs with a long peptide chain. Strains depleted in corpeptin production were significantly less virulent than the wild-type strain when inoculated in tomato plants and induced only chlorosis when infiltrated into Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Thus, corpeptins are important effectors of P.?corrugata interaction with plants. Expression analysis revealed that crpC transcription occurs at high cell density. Two LuxR transcriptional regulators, PcoR and RfiA, have a pivotal role in crpC expression and thus in corpeptin production. PMID:25231335

  17. A single-arm Phase II validation study of preventing oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions by dexamethasone: the AVOID trial

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Yoichiro; Hirata, Keiji; Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Iwamoto, Shigeyoshi; Kotaka, Masahito; Fujita, Hideto; Aisu, Naoya; Hoshino, Seiichiro; Kosaka, Takeo; Maeda, Kotaro; Kiyomi, Fumiaki; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with colorectal cancer treated with oxaliplatin are at risk of hypersensitivity reactions, with the incidence estimated to be 12%–20%. Coinfusion of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin could potentially reduce the incidence of these reactions, but oxaliplatin is reported to be incompatible with alkaline compounds in solution. However, in a previous retrospective study we found that the pH of a solution of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin was less than 7.4, and that hypersensitivity to oxaliplatin could have been prevented by coinfusion of dexamethasone. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of coinfusion of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin to prevent oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions. Patients and methods The AVOID trial was a prospective, multicenter, open-label, single-arm Phase II trial conducted from January to September 2013. The study included 73 patients who received capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (XELOX) or XELOX plus bevacizumab therapy for colorectal cancer. In all patients, oxaliplatin was administered in combination with dexamethasone. The primary outcome measure was the presence of hypersensitivity reactions. Results Hypersensitivity reactions occurred in three patients (4.1%); all three experienced a cutaneous reaction (grade 1 erythema). None of the 73 patients developed respiratory symptoms, ocular symptoms, or anaphylaxis. Grade 3 or higher hemotoxicity occurred in 13.7% of the patients and grade 3 or higher nonhematological toxicity occurred in 13.7%. The response rate to treatment was 64.4%. Conclusion The coinfusion of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin effectively reduced oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions in patients with colorectal cancer. This approach should be considered for all patients treated with oxaliplatin, allowing treatment to be completed as planned. PMID:26648694

  18. Diagnosis and management of immediate hypersensitivity reactions to cephalosporins.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Scott D; Salazar, Kimberly C

    2013-08-01

    Cephalosporins are one of the most commonly prescribed classes of antibiotics. Immediate IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions have been reported with use of a specific cephalosporin, as a cross-reaction between different cephalosporins or as a cross-reaction to other ?-lactam antibiotics, namely, penicillin. Historically, frequent reports of anaphylaxis following administration of first- and second-generation cephalosporins to patients with a history of penicillin allergy led to the belief of a high degree of allergic cross-reactivity. More recent evidence reveals a significantly lower risk of cross-reactivity between penicillins and the newer-generation cephalosporins. The current thought is that a shared side chain, rather than the ?-lactam ring structure, is the determining factor in immunologic cross-reactivity. Understanding the chemical structure of these agents has allowed us to identify the allergenic determinants for penicillin; however, the exact allergenic determinants of cephalosporins are less well understood. For this reason, standardized diagnostic skin testing is not available for cephalosporins as it is for penicillin. Nevertheless, skin testing to the cephalosporin in question, using a nonirritating concentration, provides additional information, which can further guide the work-up of a patient suspected of having an allergy to that drug. Together, the history and the skin test results can assist the allergist in the decision to recommend continued drug avoidance or to perform a graded challenge versus an induction of tolerance procedure. PMID:23546989

  19. Mutation, specialization, and hypersensitivity in highly optimized tolerance

    E-print Network

    Carlson, Jean

    Mutation, specialization, and hypersensitivity in highly optimized tolerance Tong Zhou*, J. M a cluster connected to a randomly selected site. High-fitness individuals arising through mutation evolution. In biological evolution, new species continually arise through mutation as natural selection

  20. 21 CFR 866.5500 - Hypersensitivity pneumonitis immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5500 Hypersensitivity...pneumonitis immunological test system. (a) Identification...pneumonitis immunological test system is a device that consists...with such dusts in the lung, immune complexes precipitate...

  1. 21 CFR 866.5500 - Hypersensitivity pneumonitis immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5500 Hypersensitivity...pneumonitis immunological test system. (a) Identification...pneumonitis immunological test system is a device that consists...with such dusts in the lung, immune complexes precipitate...

  2. 21 CFR 866.5500 - Hypersensitivity pneumonitis immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5500 Hypersensitivity...pneumonitis immunological test system. (a) Identification...pneumonitis immunological test system is a device that consists...with such dusts in the lung, immune complexes precipitate...

  3. 21 CFR 866.5500 - Hypersensitivity pneumonitis immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5500 Hypersensitivity...pneumonitis immunological test system. (a) Identification...pneumonitis immunological test system is a device that consists...with such dusts in the lung, immune complexes precipitate...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5500 - Hypersensitivity pneumonitis immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5500 Hypersensitivity...pneumonitis immunological test system. (a) Identification...pneumonitis immunological test system is a device that consists...with such dusts in the lung, immune complexes precipitate...

  5. Metagenomic analysis of a permafrost microbial community reveals a rapid response to thaw

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacKelprang, R.; Waldrop, M.P.; Deangelis, K.M.; David, M.M.; Chavarria, K.L.; Blazewicz, S.J.; Rubin, E.M.; Jansson, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    Permafrost contains an estimated 1672????????Pg carbon (C), an amount roughly equivalent to the total currently contained within land plants and the atmosphere. This reservoir of C is vulnerable to decomposition as rising global temperatures cause the permafrost to thaw. During thaw, trapped organic matter may become more accessible for microbial degradation and result in greenhouse gas emissions. Despite recent advances in the use of molecular tools to study permafrost microbial communities, their response to thaw remains unclear. Here we use deep metagenomic sequencing to determine the impact of thaw on microbial phylogenetic and functional genes, and relate these data to measurements of methane emissions. Metagenomics, the direct sequencing of DNA from the environment, allows the examination of whole biochemical pathways and associated processes, as opposed to individual pieces of the metabolic puzzle. Our metagenome analyses reveal that during transition from a frozen to a thawed state there are rapid shifts in many microbial, phylogenetic and functional gene abundances and pathways. After one week of incubation at 5 ??C, permafrost metagenomes converge to be more similar to each other than while they are frozen. We find that multiple genes involved in cycling of C and nitrogen shift rapidly during thaw. We also construct the first draft genome from a complex soil metagenome, which corresponds to a novel methanogen. Methane previously accumulated in permafrost is released during thaw and subsequently consumed by methanotrophic bacteria. Together these data point towards the importance of rapid cycling of methane and nitrogen in thawing permafrost. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  6. Hypersensitivities for Acetaldehyde and Other Agents among Cancer Cells Null for Clinically Relevant Fanconi Anemia Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Soma; Sur, Surojit; Yerram, Sashidhar R.; Rago, Carlo; Bhunia, Anil K.; Hossain, M. Zulfiquer; Paun, Bogdan C.; Ren, Yunzhao R.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Azad, Nilofer A.; Kern, Scott E.

    2014-01-01

    Large-magnitude numerical distinctions (>10-fold) among drug responses of genetically contrasting cancers were crucial for guiding the development of some targeted therapies. Similar strategies brought epidemiological clues and prevention goals for genetic diseases. Such numerical guides, however, were incomplete or low magnitude for Fanconi anemia pathway (FANC) gene mutations relevant to cancer in FANC-mutation carriers (heterozygotes). We generated a four-gene FANC-null cancer panel, including the engineering of new PALB2/FANCN-null cancer cells by homologous recombination. A characteristic matching of FANCC-null, FANCG-null, BRCA2/FANCD1-null, and PALB2/FANCN-null phenotypes was confirmed by uniform tumor regression on single-dose cross-linker therapy in mice and by shared chemical hypersensitivities to various inter-strand cross-linking agents and ?-radiation in vitro. Some compounds, however, had contrasting magnitudes of sensitivity; a strikingly high (19- to 22-fold) hypersensitivity was seen among PALB2-null and BRCA2-null cells for the ethanol metabolite, acetaldehyde, associated with widespread chromosomal breakage at a concentration not producing breaks in parental cells. Because FANC-defective cancer cells can share or differ in their chemical sensitivities, patterns of selective hypersensitivity hold implications for the evolutionary understanding of this pathway. Clinical decisions for cancer-relevant prevention and management of FANC-mutation carriers could be modified by expanded studies of high-magnitude sensitivities. PMID:24200853

  7. A novel regulatory mechanism of naringenin through inhibition of T lymphocyte function in contact hypersensitivity suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Feng; Tang, Yijun; Gao, Zhe; Xu, Qiang

    2010-06-25

    Naringenin, a flavonoid in grapefruits and citrus fruits, has been reported to exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities. Contact hypersensitivity (CHS) is a T cell-mediated immune reaction, and the factors released from macrophages also contribute to this response. Previous studies showed that naringenin suppressed CHS by inhibiting activation and migration of macrophages. However, little is known about naringenin's effects on T lymphocytes. Our study indicated that naringenin potently suppressed picryl chloride (PCl)-induced contact hypersensitivity by inhibiting the proliferation and activation of T lymphocytes. In vitro, both of the activated hapten-specific T cells and the T cells stimulated with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 showed growth arrest after naringenin treatment. Furthermore, naringenin reduced CD69 (the protein level) and cytokines such as IL-2, TNF-{alpha}, and IFN-{gamma} (the mRNA level) expressions which highly expressed by activated T cells. Meanwhile, naringenin also induced T cell apoptosis by upregulation of Bax, Bad, PARP, cleaved-caspase 3 and downregulation of phosphorylated Akt, Bcl-2. These findings suggest that, besides its anti-inflammatory activities in macrophages, naringenin also showed inhibitory effects on the activation and proliferation of T cells to alleviate symptoms of contact hypersensitivity.

  8. New genetic findings lead the way to a better understanding of fundamental mechanisms of drug hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Pirmohamed, Munir; Ostrov, David A.; Park, B. Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions are an important clinical problem for both health care and industry. Recent advances in genetics have identified a number of HLA alleles associated with a range of these adverse reactions predominantly affecting the skin but also other organs, such as the liver. The associations between abacavir hypersensitivity and HLA-B*57:01 and carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome and HLA-B*15:02 have been implemented in clinical practice. There are many different mechanisms proposed in the pathogenesis of drug hypersensitivity reactions, including the hapten hypothesis, direct binding to T-cell receptors (the pharmacologic interaction hypothesis), and peptide-binding displacement. A problem with all the hypotheses is that they are largely based on in vitro findings, with little direct in vivo evidence. Although most studies have focused on individual mechanisms, it is perhaps more important to consider them all as being complementary, potentially occurring at the same time with the same drug in the same patient. This might at least partly account for the heterogeneity of the immune response seen in different patients. There is a need to develop novel methodologies to evaluate how the in vitro mechanisms relate to the in vivo situation and how the highly consistent genetic findings with different HLA alleles can be more consistently used for both prediction and prevention of these serious adverse reactions. PMID:26254050

  9. Hypersensitivity to wheat flour in bakers.

    PubMed

    Valero Santiago, A; Amat Par, P; Sanosa Valls, J; Sierra Martínez, P; Malet Casajuana, A; García Calderón, P A

    1988-01-01

    Eleven bakers and 4 pastry cooks with hypersensitivity to wheat flour underwent skin tests to flours (wheat, barley, rye, oats), pollens (wheat, barley, rye, oats, grasses), mites (dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, dermatophagoides farinae), molds (alternaria, aspergillus) and weeds (parietaria judaica). The levels of serum immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA, IgM and IgE) were studied and the values of specific IgE (RAST) in the presence of wheat flour and the histamine release test for wheat flour, grass pollens, mites, molds and weeds were assessed. All the patients underwent a nasal challenge test to wheat flour. The results demonstrated the existence of cross reactions between the extracts of barley and rye flour with wheat flour (15/15) as well as between the pollens of cereals and cereal flours. The levels of specific IgE (PRU greater than .35) and the percentages of histamine release (greater than 10%) were positive in 14/15 cases. The nasal challenge test was positive for all the 15 patients under study. Of the patients studied, 11 received immunotherapy for periods ranging from 12 to 18 months. Of these patients, 9/11 continued working in the same occupation whereas the 2 who left their jobs in the industry corresponded to the cases of severe asthma which were polysensitized (flour, mites, molds). PMID:3228051

  10. A modular gradient-sensing network for chemotaxis in Escherichia coli revealed by responses to time-varying

    E-print Network

    Shimizu, Tom

    A modular gradient-sensing network for chemotaxis in Escherichia coli revealed by responses to time 1114; E-mail: hberg@mcb.harvard.edu Received 22.9.09; accepted 7.5.10 The Escherichia coli chemotaxis that time derivatives can be computed by the chemotaxis system for input frequencies below 0.006 Hz at 221C

  11. Hypersensitivity to Aeroallergens in Patients with Nasobronchial Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Balaban, Jagoda; Bijelic, Radojka; Milicevic, Snjezana

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Aeroallergens are the most common causes of allergy. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine hypersensitivity to aeroallergens in patients with nasobronchial allergy. Methods: This retrospective population study included 2254 patients with nasobronchial allergy, from late adolescents to adults. Their response to aeroallergens was assessed by skin prick tests. Results: More patients had rhinitis (72.7%), than asthma (27.6%). Although majority of patients were female, allergy is more common in men than in women (p<0.05). Both groups of patients had the greatest number of positive skin prick tests for Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (27.5%) and weed pollens (21.9%), followed by grass (18.3%) and tree pollens (10.1%). Ragweed is the most common positive weed pollen in both groups, more in patients with rhinitis (p=0.022). The cocksfoot is the most common grass pollen in rhinitis group (15.3%), but meadow grass (12.6%) in asthma patients. Birch is the most common tree allergen in the both groups. Conclusions: More patients with nasobronchial allergy have rhinitis than asthma. Skin prick tests are usually positive for Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and weed pollens, followed by grass and tree pollens, and they are more common positive in patients with rhinitis than asthma. PMID:24937928

  12. HDAC4 is required for inflammation-associated thermal hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Crow, Megan; Khovanov, Nikita; Kelleher, Jayne H; Sharma, Simone; Grant, Andrew D; Bogdanov, Yury; Wood, John N; McMahon, Stephen B; Denk, Franziska

    2015-08-01

    Transcriptional alterations are characteristic of persistent pain states, but the key regulators remain elusive. HDAC4 is a transcriptional corepressor that has been linked to synaptic plasticity and neuronal excitability, mechanisms that may be involved in peripheral and central sensitization. Using a conditional knockout (cKO) strategy in mice, we sought to determine whether the loss of HDAC4 would have implications for sensory neuron transcription and nociception. HDAC4 was found to be largely unnecessary for transcriptional regulation of naïve sensory neurons but was essential for appropriate transcriptional responses after injury, with Calca and Trpv1 expression consistently down-regulated in HDAC4 cKO compared to levels in the littermate controls (0.2-0.44-fold change, n = 4 in 2 separate experiments). This down-regulation corresponded to reduced sensitivity to 100 nM capsaicin in vitro (IC50 = 230 ± 20 nM, 76 ± 4.4% wild-type capsaicin responders vs. 56.9 ± 4.7% HDAC4 cKO responders) and to reduced thermal hypersensitivity in the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) model of inflammatory pain (1.3-1.4-fold improvement over wild-type controls; n = 5-12, in 2 separate experiments). These data indicate that HDAC4 is a novel inflammatory pain mediator and may be a good therapeutic target, capable of orchestrating the regulation of multiple downstream effectors. PMID:25903105

  13. Hypersensitivity of phospholipase C in platelets of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Koutouzov, S.; Remmal, A.; Marche, P.; Meyer, P.

    1987-11-01

    Thrombin-induced aggregation and serotonin release were markedly enhanced in platelets from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) when compared with those from normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY). Since phosphoinositides are involved in calcium-mediated platelet responses, the metabolism of these lipids was investigated in SHR and WKY by using /sup 32/P-labeled quiescent platelets. In unstimulated cells, both the rate and extent of /sup 32/P incorporation into individual inositol-containing phospholipids and phosphatidic acid were identical in SHR and WKY. This finding suggests that the pool size and basal turnover of phosphoinositides did not differ between the two strains. In contrast, early thrombin-induced phosphoinositide metabolism, when monitored as changes in (/sup 32/P)phosphatidic acid, was significantly higher in SHR than in WKY. For example, a 20-second exposure to thrombin, 0.3 U/ml, induced the formation of 1.6 times more (/sup 32/P)phosphatidic acid in SHR than in WKY. These results provide evidence for a leftward shift of the dose-response and time-course curves of thrombin-induced (/sup 32/P)phosphatidic acid formation in SHR. Moreover, the extent of the difference between SHR and WKY was independent of the extracellular calcium concentration. Following thrombin stimulation, (/sup 32/P)phosphatidic acid formation likely reflects the initial agonist-receptor interaction; therefore, these results suggest that phospholipase C activity is enhanced in platelets of SHR and that the hypersensitivity of phospholipase C in SHR may play a role in the overall alteration of cell calcium handling and, hence, in the platelet responses of SHR.

  14. Rapid vs. delayed infrared responses after ischemia reveal recruitment of different vascular beds

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ken; Yoon, Stephen; Sheth, Niral; Seidel, Miles; Antalek, Matthew; Ahad, James; Darlington, Thomas; Ikeda, Allison; Kato, Gregory J.; Ackerman, Hans; Gorbach, Alexander M.

    2015-01-01

    Continuous infrared imaging revealed transient changes in forearm temperature during arterial occlusion, reperfusion, and recovery in a healthy subject group. Processing the imaging data with the k-means algorithm further revealed reactive vascular sites in the skin with rapid or delayed temperature amplification. The observed temporal and spatial diversity of blood-flow-derived forearm temperature allow consideration of thermal-imaging guided placement of skin sensors to achieve enhanced sensitivity in monitoring of skin hemodynamics. PMID:26435756

  15. Stromal Transcriptional Profiles Reveal Hierarchies of Anatomical Site, Serum Response and Disease and Identify Disease Specific Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Parsonage, Greg N.; Legault, Holly M.; O’Toole, Margot; Pearson, Mark J.; Thomas, Andrew M.; Scheel-Toellner, Dagmar; Raza, Karim; Buckley, Christopher D.; Falciani, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Synovial fibroblasts in persistent inflammatory arthritis have been suggested to have parallels with cancer growth and wound healing, both of which involve a stereotypical serum response programme. We tested the hypothesis that a serum response programme can be used to classify diseased tissues, and investigated the serum response programme in fibroblasts from multiple anatomical sites and two diseases. To test our hypothesis we utilized a bioinformatics approach to explore a publicly available microarray dataset including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA) and normal synovial tissue, then extended those findings in a new microarray dataset representing matched synovial, bone marrow and skin fibroblasts cultured from RA and OA patients undergoing arthroplasty. The classical fibroblast serum response programme discretely classified RA, OA and normal synovial tissues. Analysis of low and high serum treated fibroblast microarray data revealed a hierarchy of control, with anatomical site the most powerful classifier followed by response to serum and then disease. In contrast to skin and bone marrow fibroblasts, exposure of synovial fibroblasts to serum led to convergence of RA and OA expression profiles. Pathway analysis revealed three inter-linked gene networks characterising OA synovial fibroblasts: Cell remodelling through insulin-like growth factors, differentiation and angiogenesis through _3 integrin, and regulation of apoptosis through CD44. We have demonstrated that Fibroblast serum response signatures define disease at the tissue level, and that an OA specific, serum dependent repression of genes involved in cell adhesion, extracellular matrix remodelling and apoptosis is a critical discriminator between cultured OA and RA synovial fibroblasts. PMID:25807374

  16. Systems Scale Interactive Exploration Reveals Quantitative and Qualitative Differences in Response to Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Obermoser, Gerlinde; Presnell, Scott; Domico, Kelly; Xu, Hui; Wang, Yuanyuan; Anguiano, Esperanza; Thompson-Snipes, LuAnn; Ranganathan, Rajaram; Zeitner, Brad; Bjork, Anna; Anderson, David; Speake, Cate; Ruchaud, Emily; Skinner, Jason; Alsina, Laia; Sharma, Mamta; Dutartre, Helene; Cepika, Alma; Israelsson, Elisabeth; Nguyen, Phuong; Nguyen, Quynh-Anh; Harrod, A. Carson; Zurawski, Sandra M.; Pascual, Virginia; Ueno, Hideki; Nepom, Gerald T.; Quinn, Charlie; Blankenship, Derek; Palucka, Karolina; Banchereau, Jacques; Chaussabel, Damien

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Systems immunology approaches were employed to investigate innate and adaptive immune responses to influenza and pneumococcal vaccines. These two non-live vaccines show different magnitudes of transcriptional responses at different time points after vaccination. Software solutions were developed to explore correlates of vaccine efficacy measured as antibody titers at day 28. These enabled a further dissection of transcriptional responses. Thus, the innate response, measured within hours in the peripheral blood, was dominated by an interferon transcriptional signature after influenza vaccination and by an inflammation signature after pneumococcal vaccination. Day 7 plasmablast responses induced by both vaccines was more pronounced after pneumococcal vaccination. Together, these results suggest that comparing global immune responses elicited by different vaccines will be critical to our understanding of the immune mechanisms underpinning successful vaccination. PMID:23601689

  17. Oral administration of drugs with hypersensitivity potential induces germinal center hyperplasia in secondary lymphoid organ/tissue in Brown Norway rats, and this histological lesion is a promising candidate as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, Akitoshi Miyawaki, Izuru; Yamada, Toru; Kimura, Juki; Funabashi, Hitoshi

    2013-08-15

    It is important to evaluate the potential of drug hypersensitivity as well as other adverse effects during the preclinical stage of the drug development process, but validated methods are not available yet. In the present study we examined whether it would be possible to develop a new predictive model of drug hypersensitivity using Brown Norway (BN) rats. As representative drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans, phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), amoxicillin (AMX), and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) were orally administered to BN rats for 28 days to investigate their effects on these animals by examinations including observation of clinical signs, hematology, determination of serum IgE levels, histology, and flow cytometric analysis. Skin rashes were not observed in any animals treated with these drugs. Increases in the number of circulating inflammatory cells and serum IgE level did not necessarily occur in the animals treated with these drugs. However, histological examination revealed that germinal center hyperplasia was commonly induced in secondary lymphoid organs/tissues in the animals treated with these drugs. In cytometric analysis, changes in proportions of lymphocyte subsets were noted in the spleen of the animals treated with PHT or CBZ during the early period of administration. The results indicated that the potential of drug hypersensitivity was identified in BN rat by performing histological examination of secondary lymphoid organs/tissues. Data obtained herein suggested that drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans gained immune reactivity in BN rat, and the germinal center hyperplasia induced by administration of these drugs may serve as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence. - Highlights: • We tested Brown Norway rats as a candidate model for predicting drug hypersensitivity. • The allergic drugs did not induce skin rash, whereas D-penicillamine did so in the rats. • Some of allergic drugs increased inflammatory cells and IgE, but the others did not. • The allergic drugs commonly induced germinal center hyperplasia in lymphoid tissues. • Some of these allergic drugs transiently increased CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells in the spleen.

  18. Blast cells transfer experimental hypersensitivity pneumonitis in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Schuyler, M.; Cook, C.; Listrom, M.; Fengolio-Preiser, C.

    1988-06-01

    We previously demonstrated that experimental hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) can be transferred by lymph node cells (LNC) cultured in vitro with antigen. The purpose of this study was to identify the cells responsible for transfer and to determine if pulmonary cells can transfer HP. We cultured LNC from sensitized Strain 2 guinea pigs with a soluble extract of Micropolyspora faeni for 72 h, separated lymphoblasts from small lymphocytes, and transferred both subpopulations intravenously to syngeneic recipients. We also transferred irradiated lymphoblasts (1,500 rads), macrophage-depleted, lymphoblast-enriched populations, and pulmonary cells either without culture or after culture with M. faeni. Control animals received an equal volume of medium. All recipient animals were challenged intratracheally (i.t.) with M. faeni 48 h after the cell transfer, and they were killed 4 days after i.t. challenge. Randomly selected microscopic fields of the lung (250/animal) were judged to be normal or abnormal without knowledge of treatment. This measurement was reproducible (r = 0.95 for duplicate measurements, n = 55). All guinea pigs were maintained in HEPA-filtered air. There was a low level of pulmonary response to an i.t. challenge of M. faeni in animals that received medium. Animals that received pulmonary cells, either cultured or noncultured, did not differ from those in the control group. There was a substantial increase (p less than 0.01) in the extent of pulmonary abnormalities in the recipients of the lymphoblast population, with significant correlation (r = 0.87, p less than 0.01) between the number of lymphoblasts transferred and the extent of pulmonary abnormalities.

  19. RNA-seq analysis reveals genetic response and tolerance mechanisms to ozone exposure in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative stress caused by ground level ozone is a major contributor to yield loss in a number of important crop plants. Soybean (Glycine max) is especially ozone sensitive, and research into its response to oxidative stress is limited. To better understand the genetic response in soybean to oxida...

  20. Altered Evoked Gamma-Band Responses Reveal Impaired Early Visual Processing in ADHD Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenz, Daniel; Krauel, Kerstin; Flechtner, Hans-Henning; Schadow, Jeanette; Hinrichs, Hermann; Herrmann, Christoph S.

    2010-01-01

    Neurophysiological studies yield contrary results whether attentional problems of patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are related to early visual processing deficits or not. Evoked gamma-band responses (GBRs), being among the first cortical responses occurring as early as 90 ms after visual stimulation in human EEG, have…

  1. Modulation of Spinal GABAergic Inhibition and Mechanical Hypersensitivity following Chronic Compression of Dorsal Root Ganglion in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Moon Chul; Nam, Taick Sang; Jung, Se Jung; Gwak, Young S.; Leem, Joong Woo

    2015-01-01

    Chronic compression of dorsal root ganglion (CCD) results in neuropathic pain. We investigated the role of spinal GABA in CCD-induced pain using rats with unilateral CCD. A stereological analysis revealed that the proportion of GABA-immunoreactive neurons to total neurons at L4/5 laminae I–III on the injured side decreased in the early phase of CCD (post-CCD week 1) and then returned to the sham-control level in the late phase (post-CCD week 18). In the early phase, the rats showed an increase in both mechanical sensitivity of the hind paw and spinal WDR neuronal excitability on the injured side, and such increase was suppressed by spinally applied muscimol (GABA-A agonist, 5?nmol) and baclofen (GABA-B agonist, 25?nmol), indicating the reduced spinal GABAergic inhibition involved. In the late phase, the CCD-induced increase in mechanical sensitivity and neuronal excitability returned to pre-CCD levels, and such recovered responses were enhanced by spinally applied bicuculline (GABA-A antagonist, 15?nmol) and CGP52432 (GABA-B antagonist, 15?nmol), indicating the regained spinal GABAergic inhibition involved. In conclusion, the alteration of spinal GABAergic inhibition following CCD and leading to a gradual reduction over time of CCD-induced mechanical hypersensitivity is most likely due to changes in GABA content in spinal GABA neurons. PMID:26451259

  2. Total Knee Arthroplasty Failure Induced by Metal Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ryan; Phan, Duy; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 70 Final Diagnosis: Metal hypersensitivity Symptoms: Joint pain • swelling • instability Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Revision total knee arthroplasty Specialty: Orthopedics and Traumatology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Metal hypersensitivity is an uncommon complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that can lead to significant functional impairment and aseptic prosthesis failure. Case Report: We describe a 70-year-old patient who presented with persistent pain, swelling, and instability 2 years after a primary TKA. The patient had a history of metal hypersensitivity following bilateral metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (THA) that was revised to ceramic-on-polyethylene implants. Knee radiographs showed severe osteolysis with implant loosening. Serum cobalt was elevated and serum chromium was significantly elevated, while joint aspiration and inflammatory marker levels ruled out a periprosthetic infection. Revision TKA was performed, with intraoperative tissue pathology and postoperative leukocyte transformation testing confirming metal hypersensitivity as the cause for aseptic implant failure. Conclusions: This case report demonstrates the clinical and laboratory signs that suggest metal hypersensitivity in total knee arthroplasty and the potential for joint function restoration with revision surgery. PMID:26278890

  3. Effect of premedications in a murine model of asparaginase hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Christian A; Smith, Colton; Karol, Seth E; Ramsey, Laura B; Liu, Chengcheng; Pui, Ching-Hon; Jeha, Sima; Evans, William E; Finkelman, Fred D; Relling, Mary V

    2015-03-01

    A murine model was developed that recapitulates key features of clinical hypersensitivity to Escherichia coli asparaginase. Sensitized mice developed high levels of anti-asparaginase IgG antibodies and had immediate hypersensitivity reactions to asparaginase upon challenge. Sensitized mice had complete inhibition of plasma asparaginase activity (P = 4.2 × 10(-13)) and elevated levels of mouse mast cell protease 1 (P = 6.1 × 10(-3)) compared with nonsensitized mice. We investigated the influence of pretreatment with triprolidine, cimetidine, the platelet activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonist CV-6209 [2-(2-acetyl-6-methoxy-3,9-dioxo-4,8-dioxa-2,10-diazaoctacos-1-yl)-1-ethyl-pyridinium chloride], or dexamethasone on the severity of asparaginase-induced allergies. Combining triprolidine and CV-6209 was best for mitigating asparaginase-induced hypersensitivity compared with nonpretreated, sensitized mice (P = 1.2 × 10(-5)). However, pretreatment with oral dexamethasone was the only agent capable of mitigating the severity of the hypersensitivity (P = 0.03) and partially restoring asparaginase activity (P = 8.3 × 10(-4)). To rescue asparaginase activity in sensitized mice without requiring dexamethasone, a 5-fold greater dose of asparaginase was needed to restore enzyme activity to a similar concentration as in nonsensitized mice. Our results suggest a role of histamine and PAF in asparaginase-induced allergies and indicate that mast cell-derived proteases released during asparaginase allergy may be a useful marker of clinical hypersensitivity. PMID:25573198

  4. Transcriptional Dynamics Reveal Critical Roles for Non-coding RNAs in the Immediate-Early Response

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Stuart; Magi, Shigeyuki; Alhendi, Ahmad M. N.; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Daub, Carsten O.; Arner, Erik; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Khachigian, Levon M.; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Semple, Colin A.

    2015-01-01

    The immediate-early response mediates cell fate in response to a variety of extracellular stimuli and is dysregulated in many cancers. However, the specificity of the response across stimuli and cell types, and the roles of non-coding RNAs are not well understood. Using a large collection of densely-sampled time series expression data we have examined the induction of the immediate-early response in unparalleled detail, across cell types and stimuli. We exploit cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) time series datasets to directly measure promoter activities over time. Using a novel analysis method for time series data we identify transcripts with expression patterns that closely resemble the dynamics of known immediate-early genes (IEGs) and this enables a comprehensive comparative study of these genes and their chromatin state. Surprisingly, these data suggest that the earliest transcriptional responses often involve promoters generating non-coding RNAs, many of which are produced in advance of canonical protein-coding IEGs. IEGs are known to be capable of induction without de novo protein synthesis. Consistent with this, we find that the response of both protein-coding and non-coding RNA IEGs can be explained by their transcriptionally poised, permissive chromatin state prior to stimulation. We also explore the function of non-coding RNAs in the attenuation of the immediate early response in a small RNA sequencing dataset matched to the CAGE data: We identify a novel set of microRNAs responsible for the attenuation of the IEG response in an estrogen receptor positive cancer cell line. Our computational statistical method is well suited to meta-analyses as there is no requirement for transcripts to pass thresholds for significant differential expression between time points, and it is agnostic to the number of time points per dataset. PMID:25885578

  5. Observations on carotid sinus hypersensitivity from direct intraneural recordings of sympathetic nerve traffic.

    PubMed

    Luck, J C; Hoover, R J; Biederman, R W; Ettinger, S M; Sinoway, L I; Leuenberger, U A

    1996-06-15

    In summary, we studied 4 patients with mixed-type CS hypersensitivity. We demonstrated that CS massage rapidly inhibits sympathetic nerve activity and decreases heart rate. Arterial pressure starts to decline abruptly with complete sympathetic withdrawal, but the nadir is delayed, suggesting that arterial dilation is not instantaneous. Arterial pressure rebounds slowly, suggesting a latency between the neural reflex and vascular compliance. Pacing had little effect on preventing hypotension in these patients. Our data support the concept that sympathetic withdrawal is responsible for the vasodilatory component seen with CS syncope. PMID:8677881

  6. BCL-2 family genetic profiling reveals microenvironment-specific determinants of chemotherapeutic response

    E-print Network

    Pritchard, Justin Robert

    The Bcl-2 family encompasses a diverse set of apoptotic regulators that are dynamically activated in response to various cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic stimuli. An extensive variety of cell culture experiments have identified ...

  7. Transgenic AEQUORIN reveals organ-specific cytosolic Ca2+ responses to anoxia and Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedbrook, J. C.; Kronebusch, P. J.; Borisy, G. G.; Trewavas, A. J.; Masson, P. H.

    1996-01-01

    Using the transgenic AEQUORIN system, we showed that the cotyledons and leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings developed a biphasic luminescence response to anoxia, indicating changes in cytosolic Ca2+ levels. A fast and transient luminescence peak occurred within minutes of anoxia, followed by a second, prolonged luminescence response that lasted 1.5 to 4 h. The Ca2+ channel blockers Gd3+, La3+, and ruthenium red (RR) partially inhibited the first response and promoted a larger and earlier second response, suggesting different origins for these responses. Both Gd3+ and RR also partially inhibited anaerobic induction of alcohol dehydrogenase gene expression. However, although anaerobic alcohol dehydrogenase gene induction occurred in seedlings exposed to water-agar medium and in roots, related luminescence responses were absent. Upon return to normoxia, the luminescence of cotyledons, leaves, and roots dropped quickly, before increasing again in a Gd3+, La3+, ethyleneglycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid-, and RR-sensitive fashion.

  8. Human cortical responses to slow and fast binaural beats reveal multiple mechanisms of binaural hearing.

    PubMed

    Ross, Bernhard; Miyazaki, Takahiro; Thompson, Jessica; Jamali, Shahab; Fujioka, Takako

    2014-10-15

    When two tones with slightly different frequencies are presented to both ears, they interact in the central auditory system and induce the sensation of a beating sound. At low difference frequencies, we perceive a single sound, which is moving across the head between the left and right ears. The percept changes to loudness fluctuation, roughness, and pitch with increasing beat rate. To examine the neural representations underlying these different perceptions, we recorded neuromagnetic cortical responses while participants listened to binaural beats at a continuously varying rate between 3 Hz and 60 Hz. Binaural beat responses were analyzed as neuromagnetic oscillations following the trajectory of the stimulus rate. Responses were largest in the 40-Hz gamma range and at low frequencies. Binaural beat responses at 3 Hz showed opposite polarity in the left and right auditory cortices. We suggest that this difference in polarity reflects the opponent neural population code for representing sound location. Binaural beats at any rate induced gamma oscillations. However, the responses were largest at 40-Hz stimulation. We propose that the neuromagnetic gamma oscillations reflect postsynaptic modulation that allows for precise timing of cortical neural firing. Systematic phase differences between bilateral responses suggest that separate sound representations of a sound object exist in the left and right auditory cortices. We conclude that binaural processing at the cortical level occurs with the same temporal acuity as monaural processing whereas the identification of sound location requires further interpretation and is limited by the rate of object representations. PMID:25008412

  9. Colony-specific investigations reveal highly variable responses among individual corals to ocean acidification and warming.

    PubMed

    Kavousi, Javid; Reimer, James Davis; Tanaka, Yasuaki; Nakamura, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    As anthropogenic climate change is an ongoing concern, scientific investigations on its impacts on coral reefs are increasing. Although impacts of combined ocean acidification (OA) and temperature stress (T) on reef-building scleractinian corals have been studied at the genus, species and population levels, there are little data available on how individual corals respond to combined OA and anomalous temperatures. In this study, we exposed individual colonies of Acropora digitifera, Montipora digitata and Porites cylindrica to four pCO2-temperature treatments including 400 ?atm-28 °C, 400 ?atm-31 °C, 1000 ?atm-28 °C and 1000 ?atm-31 °C for 26 days. Physiological parameters including calcification, protein content, maximum photosynthetic efficiency, Symbiodinium density, and chlorophyll content along with Symbiodinium type of each colony were examined. Along with intercolonial responses, responses of individual colonies versus pooled data to the treatments were investigated. The main results were: 1) responses to either OA or T or their combination were different between individual colonies when considering physiological functions; 2) tolerance to either OA or T was not synonymous with tolerance to the other parameter; 3) tolerance to both OA and T did not necessarily lead to tolerance of OA and T combined (OAT) at the same time; 4) OAT had negative, positive or no impacts on physiological functions of coral colonies; and 5) pooled data were not representative of responses of all individual colonies. Indeed, the pooled data obscured actual responses of individual colonies or presented a response that was not observed in any individual. From the results of this study we recommend improving experimental designs of studies investigating physiological responses of corals to climate change by complementing them with colony-specific examinations. PMID:26009841

  10. Differential reproductive responses to stress reveal the role of life-history strategies within a species

    PubMed Central

    Schultner, J.; Kitaysky, A. S.; Gabrielsen, G. W.; Hatch, S. A.; Bech, C.

    2013-01-01

    Life-history strategies describe that ‘slow’- in contrast to ‘fast’-living species allocate resources cautiously towards reproduction to enhance survival. Recent evidence suggests that variation in strategies exists not only among species but also among populations of the same species. Here, we examined the effect of experimentally induced stress on resource allocation of breeding seabirds in two populations with contrasting life-history strategies: slow-living Pacific and fast-living Atlantic black-legged kittiwakes. We tested the hypothesis that reproductive responses in kittiwakes under stress reflect their life-history strategies. We predicted that in response to stress, Pacific kittiwakes reduce investment in reproduction compared with Atlantic kittiwakes. We exposed chick-rearing kittiwakes to a short-term (3-day) period of increased exogenous corticosterone (CORT), a hormone that is released during food shortages. We examined changes in baseline CORT levels, parental care and effects on offspring. We found that kittiwakes from the two populations invested differently in offspring when facing stress. In response to elevated CORT, Pacific kittiwakes reduced nest attendance and deserted offspring more readily than Atlantic kittiwakes. We observed lower chick growth, a higher stress response in offspring and lower reproductive success in response to CORT implantation in Pacific kittiwakes, whereas the opposite occurred in the Atlantic. Our findings support the hypothesis that life-history strategies predict short-term responses of individuals to stress within a species. We conclude that behaviour and physiology under stress are consistent with trade-off priorities as predicted by life-history theory. We encourage future studies to consider the pivotal role of life-history strategies when interpreting inter-population differences of animal responses to stressful environmental events. PMID:24089339

  11. Diagnosis of carotid sinus hypersensitivity in older adults: carotid sinus massage in the upright position is essential

    PubMed Central

    Parry, S; Richardson, D; O'Shea, D; Sen, B; Kenny, R

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the diagnostic value of supine and upright carotid sinus massage in elderly patients.?DESIGN—Prospective controlled cohort study.?SETTING—Three inner city accident and emergency departments and a dedicated syncope facility.?PATIENTS—1375 consecutive patients aged > 55 years presenting with unexplained syncope and drop attacks; 25 healthy controls.?INTERVENTIONS—Bilateral supine carotid sinus massage, repeated in the 70° head up tilt position if the initial supine test was not diagnostic of cardioinhibitory and mixed carotid sinus hypersensitivity.?MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Diagnosis of cardioinhibitory or mixed carotid sinus hypersensitivity; clinical characteristics of supine v upright positive groups.?RESULTS—226 patients were excluded for contraindications to carotid sinus massage. Of 1149 patients undergoing massage, 223 (19%) had cardioinhibitory or mixed carotid sinus hypersensitivity; 70 (31%) of these had a positive response to massage with head up tilt following negative supine massage (95% confidence interval, 25.3% to 37.5%). None of the healthy controls showed carotid sinus hypersensitivity on erect or supine massage. The initially positive supine test had 74% specificity and 100% sensitivity; these were both 100% for the upright positive test. The clinical characteristics of the supine v upright positive subgroups were similar.?CONCLUSIONS—The diagnosis of carotid sinus hypersensitivity amenable to treatment by pacing may be missed in one third of cases if only supine massage is performed. Massage should be done routinely in the head up tilt position if the initial supine test is negative.???Keywords: carotid sinus; tilt table testing; syncope; elderly patients PMID:10618329

  12. [Limbic encephalitis associated with drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome due to phenobarbital--a case report].

    PubMed

    Ito, Takao; Ooishi, Chizuko; Chiba, Atsuro; Sakuta, Manabu; Sakuma, Keiichi; Shiohara, Tetsuo

    2005-07-01

    A 68-year-old man was diagnosed as drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) with erythema and liver dysfunction three weeks after an administration of phenobarbital. Three weeks after the appearance of skin eruptions, the patient developed disturbed consciousness and status epilepticus. MRI findings revealed bilateral symmetrical abnormalities localized in the amygdala, hippocampi, parahippocampal gyri, and insula regions, which showed high intensities on diffusion weighted images and decreased apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values on an ADC map. We considered that the MRI abnormalities were indicative of cytotoxic edema. Increased serum anti-human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) IgG antibody titer and presence of HHV-6 DNA in peripheral blood, revealed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis, suggested reactivation of HHV-6. However, PCR analysis performed with DNA extracted from the CSF was negative for HHV-6. We concluded that limbic encephalitis in the present case might have been caused by an autoimmune inflammatory mechanism associated with drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome, as well as a direct infection of HHV-6 to the central nervous system. PMID:16119831

  13. [Salmonella typhi vaccination response study reveals defective antibody production selective IgA deficiency patient].

    PubMed

    Pleguezuelo, Daniel E; Gianelli, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Selective IgA deficiency (SIgAD) is the most prevalent immunodeficiency worldwide, progressing to common variable immunodeficiency only in few reported cases. We report the case of a Spanish female aged 22 and diagnosed of selective IgA deficiency, a long history of bronchitis, several episodes of pneumonia, bilateral bronchiectasis, normal IgG, IgM, IgG subclasses, and detectable pre-vaccination IgG antibodies against tetanus toxoid and Streptococcus pneumoniae. She was evaluated in our clinic in order to rule out common variable immunodeficiency. We observed good antibody response to tetanus toxoid, absence of circulating switched memory B cells, decreased response to pneumococcal polysaccharide antigens and a lack of response to Salmonella typhi vaccine. Most SIgAD patients presents with upper respiratory tract infections or mild diarrhea. Those with lower tract infections, pneumonia or untreatable diarrhea should follow B-cell subpopulations' study and antibody response to vaccines. Absence of response to Salmonella typhi vaccine allowed us to expose the defective antibody production. PMID:26556667

  14. EEG neural oscillatory dynamics reveal semantic and response conflict at difference levels of conflict awareness

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jun; Zhang, Qinglin; Van Gaal, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Although previous work has shown that conflict can be detected in the absence of awareness, it is unknown how different sources of conflict (i.e., semantic, response) are processed in the human brain and whether these processes are differently modulated by conflict awareness. To explore this issue, we extracted oscillatory power dynamics from electroencephalographic (EEG) data recorded while human participants performed a modified version of the Stroop task. Crucially, in this task conflict awareness was manipulated by masking a conflict-inducing color word preceding a color patch target. We isolated semantic from response conflict by introducing four color words/patches, of which two were matched to the same response. We observed that both semantic as well as response conflict were associated with mid-frontal theta-band and parietal alpha-band power modulations, irrespective of the level of conflict awareness (high vs. low), although awareness of conflict increased these conflict-related power dynamics. These results show that both semantic and response conflict can be processed in the human brain and suggest that the neural oscillatory mechanisms in EEG reflect mainly “domain general” conflict processing mechanisms, instead of conflict source specific effects. PMID:26169473

  15. Environmental Interactions and Epistasis Are Revealed in the Proteomic Responses to Complex Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Samir, Parimal; Rahul; Slaughter, James C.; Link, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Ultimately, the genotype of a cell and its interaction with the environment determine the cell’s biochemical state. While the cell’s response to a single stimulus has been studied extensively, a conceptual framework to model the effect of multiple environmental stimuli applied concurrently is not as well developed. In this study, we developed the concepts of environmental interactions and epistasis to explain the responses of the S. cerevisiae proteome to simultaneous environmental stimuli. We hypothesize that, as an abstraction, environmental stimuli can be treated as analogous to genetic elements. This would allow modeling of the effects of multiple stimuli using the concepts and tools developed for studying gene interactions. Mirroring gene interactions, our results show that environmental interactions play a critical role in determining the state of the proteome. We show that individual and complex environmental stimuli behave similarly to genetic elements in regulating the cellular responses to stimuli, including the phenomena of dominance and suppression. Interestingly, we observed that the effect of a stimulus on a protein is dominant over other stimuli if the response to the stimulus involves the protein. Using publicly available transcriptomic data, we find that environmental interactions and epistasis regulate transcriptomic responses as well. PMID:26247773

  16. Theta dynamics reveal domain-specific control over stimulus and response conflict.

    PubMed

    Nigbur, Roland; Cohen, Michael X; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; Stürmer, Birgit

    2012-05-01

    Cognitive control allows us to adjust to environmental changes. The medial frontal cortex (MFC) is thought to detect conflicts and recruit additional resources from other brain areas including the lateral prefrontal cortices. Here we investigated how the MFC acts in concert with visual, motor, and lateral prefrontal cortices to support adaptations of goal-directed behavior. Physiologically, these interactions may occur through local and long-range synchronized oscillation dynamics, particularly in the theta range (4-8 Hz). A speeded flanker task allowed us to investigate conflict-type-specific control networks for perceptual and response conflicts. Theta power over MFC was sensitive to both perceptual and response conflict. Interareal theta phase synchrony, however, indicated a selective enhancement specific for response conflicts between MFC and left frontal cortex as well as between MFC and the presumed motor cortex contralateral to the response hand. These findings suggest that MFC theta-band activity is both generally involved in conflict processing and specifically involved in linking a neural network controlling response conflict. PMID:21861681

  17. Dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome not related to G6PD deficiency.

    PubMed

    Schulkes, Karlijn J G; Tervaert, J W Cohen; Rijken, Feiko; Haas, Lenneke E M

    2015-01-01

    Dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome (DHS) is a rare, but potentially life-threatening reaction to dapsone. We describe a 55-year-old Caucasian woman with normal glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase levels presenting with an extensive skin eruption, high-grade fever, pneumonitis and hepatitis, which occurred within 3?weeks after initiation of dapsone. In addition to supportive care, the patient was successfully treated with high-dose corticosteroids and antibiotics. The combination of high-grade fever, skin rash, lung and liver involvement made a dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome very likely. PMID:26682839

  18. Application of hypersensitivity skin testing in chemotherapy-induced pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, James C; Hawkins, Carolyn A

    2015-01-01

    Skin testing has been utilised to determine the culprit allergenic agent in drug reactions. Its application in the setting of hypersensitivity reaction relating to combination chemotherapeutic regimens may help identify the causative drug, allowing drug that is safe to be continued and avoiding limiting treatment options for patients. We report what we believe to be the first published case of hypersensitivity skin testing for gemcitabine-induced pneumonitis in a patient with metastatic leiomyosarcoma and another case of docetaxel-induced pneumonitis in a patient with metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:26539407

  19. Application of hypersensitivity skin testing in chemotherapy-induced pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Kuo, James C; Hawkins, Carolyn A; Yip, Desmond

    2015-10-01

    Skin testing has been utilised to determine the culprit allergenic agent in drug reactions. Its application in the setting of hypersensitivity reaction relating to combination chemotherapeutic regimens may help identify the causative drug, allowing drug that is safe to be continued and avoiding limiting treatment options for patients. We report what we believe to be the first published case of hypersensitivity skin testing for gemcitabine-induced pneumonitis in a patient with metastatic leiomyosarcoma and another case of docetaxel-induced pneumonitis in a patient with metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:26539407

  20. Learning theories reveal loss of pancreatic electrical connectivity in diabetes as an adaptive response

    E-print Network

    Goel, Pranay

    2013-01-01

    Cells of almost all solid tissues are connected with gap junctions which permit the direct transfer of ions and small molecules, integral to regulating coordinated function in the tissue. The pancreatic islets of Langerhans are responsible for secreting the hormone insulin in response to glucose stimulation. Gap junctions are the only electrical contacts between the beta-cells in the tissue of these excitable islets. It is generally believed that they are responsible for synchrony of the membrane voltage oscillations among beta-cells, and thereby pulsatility of insulin secretion. Most attempts to understand connectivity in islets are often interpreted, bottom-up, in terms of measurements of gap junctional conductance. This does not, however explain systematic changes, such as a diminished junctional conductance in type 2 diabetes. We attempt to address this deficit via the model presented here, which is a learning theory of gap junctional adaptation derived with analogy to neural systems. Here, gap junctions ...

  1. Hapten-Induced Contact Hypersensitivity, Autoimmune Reactions, and Tumor Regression: Plausibility of Mediating Antitumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Erkes, Dan A.; Selvan, Senthamil R.

    2014-01-01

    Haptens are small molecule irritants that bind to proteins and elicit an immune response. Haptens have been commonly used to study allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) using animal contact hypersensitivity (CHS) models. However, extensive research into contact hypersensitivity has offered a confusing and intriguing mechanism of allergic reactions occurring in the skin. The abilities of haptens to induce such reactions have been frequently utilized to study the mechanisms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to induce autoimmune-like responses such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia and to elicit viral wart and tumor regression. Hapten-induced tumor regression has been studied since the mid-1900s and relies on four major concepts: (1) ex vivo haptenation, (2) in situ haptenation, (3) epifocal hapten application, and (4) antigen-hapten conjugate injection. Each of these approaches elicits unique responses in mice and humans. The present review attempts to provide a critical appraisal of the hapten-mediated tumor treatments and offers insights for future development of the field. PMID:24949488

  2. Integrative “omic” analysis reveals distinctive cold responses in leaves and roots of strawberry, Fragaria × ananassa ‘Korona’

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Gage; Rohloff, Jens; Wilson, Robert C.; Kopka, Joachim; Erban, Alexander; Winge, Per; Bones, Atle M.; Davik, Jahn; Alsheikh, Muath K.; Randall, Stephen K.

    2015-01-01

    To assess underlying metabolic processes and regulatory mechanisms during cold exposure of strawberry, integrative “omic” approaches were applied to Fragaria × ananassa Duch. ‘Korona.’ Both root and leaf tissues were examined for responses to the cold acclimation processes. Levels of metabolites, proteins, and transcripts in tissues from plants grown at 18°C were compared to those following 1–10 days of cold (2°C) exposure. When leaves and roots were subjected to GC/TOF-MS-based metabolite profiling, about 160 compounds comprising mostly structurally annotated primary and secondary metabolites, were found. Overall, ‘Korona’ showed a modest increase of protective metabolites such as amino acids (aspartic acid, leucine, isoleucine, and valine), pentoses, phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated hexoses, and distinct compounds of the raffinose pathway (galactinol and raffinose). Distinctive responses were observed in roots and leaves. By 2DE proteomics a total of 845 spots were observed in leaves; 4.6% changed significantly in response to cold. Twenty-one proteins were identified, many of which were associated with general metabolism or photosynthesis. Transcript levels in leaves were determined by microarray, where dozens of cold associated transcripts were quantitatively characterized, and levels of several potential key contributors (e.g., the dehydrin COR47 and GADb) to cold tolerance were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Cold responses are placed within the existing knowledge base of low temperature-induced changes in plants, allowing an evaluation of the uniqueness or generality of Fragaria responses in photosynthetic tissues. Overall, the cold response characteristics of ‘Korona’ are consistent with a moderately cold tolerant plant. PMID:26528299

  3. Linear response in infinite nuclear matter as a tool to reveal finite size instabilities

    E-print Network

    A. Pastore; K. Bennaceur; D. Davesne; J. Meyer

    2011-10-28

    Nuclear effective interactions are often modelled by simple analytical expressions such as the Skyrme zero-range force. This effective interaction depends on a limited number of parameters that are usually fitted using experimental data obtained from doubly magic nuclei. It was recently shown that many Skyrme functionals lead to the appearance of instabilities, in particular when symmetries are broken, for example unphysical polarization of odd-even or rotating nuclei. In this article, we show how the formalism of the linear response in infinite nuclear matter can be used to predict and avoid the regions of parameters that are responsible for these unphysical instabilities.

  4. Lymphangiogenic factors are associated with the severity of hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Masahiro; Mouri, Takashi; Niisato, Miyuki; Nitanai, Hiroo; Kobayashi, Hitoshi; Ogasawara, Masahito; Endo, Ryujin; Konishi, Kazuki; Sugai, Tamotsu; Sawai, Takashi; Yamauchi, Kohei

    2015-01-01

    Background Antigen presenting cells play a pivotal role in the adaptive immune response in hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP). It was hypothesised that lymphangiogenesis is involved in the pathophysiology of HP via cell transport. Objective To determine the clinical significance of lymphangiogenic factors in HP. Methods Levels of vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF)-A, VEGF-C, VEGF-D and CCL21 in the serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were measured in 29 healthy volunteers, 14 patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and 26 patients with HP by ELISA. Additionally, immunohistochemical analyses were performed using lung specimens of patients with HP (n=8) and IPF (n=10). Results BALF VEGF-D levels were significantly elevated in patients with HP compared to the other groups. BALF VEGF–D levels in patients with HP correlated significantly with the BALF total cell and lymphocyte counts (r=0.485, p=0.014 and r=0.717, p<0.0001, respectively). BALF VEGF-C and CCL21 levels were increased in patients with HP compared to healthy volunteers, but not patients with IPF. BALF CCL21 levels were negatively correlated with the forced expiratory volume in 1?s percentage and diffuse capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (r=?0.662, p=0.007 and r=?0.671, p=0.024, respectively). According to the immunohistochemical analyses, CCL21 was expressed in the lymphatic endothelium in both conditions and CCR7+ cells were aggregated around lymphatics in patients with HP, but not in patients with IPF. Conclusions Lymphangiogenic factors might be associated with the inflammatory and functional severity of HP. The increased BALF VEGF-D levels were associated with lymphatic alveolitis intensity, and CCL21 with lung function impairment. PMID:26448865

  5. RNA-Seq Analysis of Rice Roots Reveals the Involvement of Post-Transcriptional Regulation in Response to Cadmium Stress

    PubMed Central

    He, Fei; Liu, Qingquan; Zheng, Li; Cui, Yaqiong; Shen, Zhenguo; Zheng, Luqing

    2015-01-01

    Widely-spread cadmium (Cd) pollution in the soil threatens both crop production and human health. How plants deal with the excess Cd are largely unknown. To evaluate the molecular mechanism by which plants respond to Cd stress, rice seedlings were treated with two concentrations of Cd and subjected to deep RNA sequencing. Comprehensive RNA-Seq analysis of rice roots under two gradients of Cd treatment revealed 1169 Cd toxicity-responsive genes. These genes were involved in the reactive oxygen species scavenging system, stress response, cell wall formation, ion transport, and signal transduction. Nine out of 93 predicted long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) were detected as Cd-responsive lncRNAs due to their high correlation with the Cd stress response. In addition, we analyzed alternative splicing (AS) events under different Cd concentrations. Four hundred and seventy-six differential alternatively spliced genes with 542 aberrant splicing events were identified. GO analysis indicated that these genes were highly enriched in oxidation reduction and cellular response to chemical stimulus. Real-time qRT-PCR validation analysis strengthened the reliability of our RNA-Seq results. The results suggest that post-transcriptional AS regulation may also be involved in plant responses to high Cd stress.

  6. Genome wide transcriptome analysis reveals ABA mediated response in Arabidopsis during gold (AuCl?4) treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Devesh; Krishnamurthy, Sneha; Sahi, Shivendra V.

    2014-01-01

    The unique physico-chemical properties of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) find manifold applications in diagnostics, medicine and catalysis. Chemical synthesis produces reactive AuNPs and generates hazardous by-products. Alternatively, plants can be utilized to produce AuNPs in an eco-friendly manner. To better control the biosynthesis of AuNPs, we need to first understand the detailed molecular response induced by AuCl?4 In this study, we carried out global transcriptome analysis in root tissue of Arabidopsis grown for 12- h in presence of gold solution (HAuCl4) using the novel unbiased Affymetrix exon array. Transcriptomics analysis revealed differential regulation of a total of 704 genes and 4900 exons. Of these, 492 and 212 genes were up- and downregulated, respectively. The validation of the expressed key genes, such as glutathione-S-transferases, auxin responsive genes, cytochrome P450 82C2, methyl transferases, transducin (G protein beta subunit), ERF transcription factor, ABC, and MATE transporters, was carried out through quantitative RT-PCR. These key genes demonstrated specific induction under AuCl4? treatment relative to other heavy metals, suggesting a unique plant-gold interaction. GO enrichment analysis reveals the upregulation of processes like oxidative stress, glutathione binding, metal binding, transport, and plant hormonal responses. Changes predicted in biochemical pathways indicated major modulation in glutathione mediated detoxification, flavones and derivatives, and plant hormone biosynthesis. Motif search analysis identified a highly significant enriched motif, ACGT, which is an abscisic acid responsive core element (ABRE), suggesting the possibility of ABA- mediated signaling. Identification of abscisic acid response element (ABRE) points to the operation of a predominant signaling mechanism in response to AuCl?4 exposure. Overall, this study presents a useful picture of plant-gold interaction with an identification of candidate genes involved in nanogold synthesis. PMID:25506348

  7. Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals the role of protein arginine phosphorylation in the bacterial stress response.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Andreas; Trentini, Débora Broch; Spiess, Silvia; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Ammerer, Gustav; Mechtler, Karl; Clausen, Tim

    2014-02-01

    Arginine phosphorylation is an emerging protein modification implicated in the general stress response of Gram-positive bacteria. The modification is mediated by the arginine kinase McsB, which phosphorylates and inactivates the heat shock repressor CtsR. In this study, we developed a mass spectrometric approach accounting for the peculiar chemical properties of phosphoarginine. The improved methodology was used to analyze the dynamic changes in the Bacillus subtilis arginine phosphoproteome in response to different stress situations. Quantitative analysis showed that a B. subtilis mutant lacking the YwlE arginine phosphatase accumulated a strikingly large number of arginine phosphorylations (217 sites in 134 proteins), however only a minor fraction of these sites was increasingly modified during heat shock or oxidative stress. The main targets of McsB-mediated arginine phosphorylation comprise central factors of the stress response system including the CtsR and HrcA heat shock repressors, as well as major components of the protein quality control system such as the ClpCP protease and the GroEL chaperonine. These findings highlight the impact of arginine phosphorylation in orchestrating the bacterial stress response. PMID:24263382

  8. Adaptive responses reveal contemporary and future ecotypes in a desert shrub.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Bryce A; Kitchen, Stanley G; Pendleton, Rosemary L; Pendleton, Burton K; Germino, Matthew J; Rehfeldt, Gerald E; Meyer, Susan E

    2014-03-01

    Interacting threats to ecosystem function, including climate change, wildfire, and invasive species necessitate native plant restoration in desert ecosystems. However, native plant restoration efforts often remain unguided by ecological genetic information. Given that many ecosystems are in flux from climate change, restoration plans need to account for both contemporary and future climates when choosing seed sources. In this study we analyze vegetative responses, including mortality, growth, and carbon isotope ratios in two blackbrush (Coleogyne ramosissima) common gardens that included 26 populations from a range-wide collection. This shrub occupies ecotones between the warm and cold deserts of Mojave and Colorado Plateau ecoregions in western North America. The variation observed in the vegetative responses of blackbrush populations was principally explained by grouping populations by ecoregions and by regression with site-specific climate variables. Aridity weighted by winter minimum temperatures best explained vegetative responses; Colorado Plateau sites were usually colder and drier than Mojave sites. The relationship between climate and vegetative response was mapped within the boundaries of the species-climate space projected for the contemporary climate and for the decade surrounding 2060. The mapped ecological genetic pattern showed that genetic variation could be classified into cool-adapted and warm-adapted ecotypes, with populations often separated by steep dines. These transitions are predicted to occur in both the Mojave Desert and Colorado Plateau ecoregions. While under contemporary conditions the warm-adapted ecotype occupies the majority of climate space, climate projections predict that the cool-adapted ecotype could prevail as the dominant ecotype as the climate space of blackbrush expands into higher elevations and latitudes. This study provides the framework for delineating climate change-responsive seed transfer guidelines, which are needed to inform restoration and management planning. We propose four transfer zones in blackbrush that correspond to areas currently dominated by cool-adapted and warm-adapted ecotypes in each of the two ecoregions. PMID:24689151

  9. Fine-root responses to fertilization reveal multiple nutrient limitation in a lowland tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Wurzburger, Nina; Wright, S Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Questions remain as to which soil nutrients limit primary production in tropical forests. Phosphorus (P) has long been considered the primary limiting element in lowland forests, but recent evidence demonstrates substantial heterogeneity in response to nutrient addition, highlighting a need to understand and diagnose nutrient limitation across diverse forests. Fine-root characteristics including their abundance, functional traits, and mycorrhizal symbionts can be highly responsive to changes in soil nutrients and may help to diagnose nutrient limitation. Here, we document the response of fine roots to long-term nitrogen (N), P, and potassium (K) fertilization in a lowland forest in Panama. Because this experiment has demonstrated that N and K together limit tree growth and P limits fine litter production, we hypothesized that fine roots would also respond to nutrient addition. Specifically we hypothesized that N, P, and K addition would reduce the biomass, diameter, tissue density, and mycorrhizal colonization of fine roots, and increase nutrient concentration in root tissue. Most morphological root traits responded to the single addition of K and the paired addition of N and P, with the greatest response to all three nutrients combined. The addition of N, P, and K together reduced fine-root biomass, length, and tissue density, and increased specific root length, whereas root diameter remained unchanged. Nitrogen addition did not alter root N concentration, but P and K addition increased root P and K concentration, respectively. Mycorrhizal colonization of fine roots declined with N, increased with P, and was unresponsive to K addition. Although plant species composition remains unchanged after 14 years of fertilization, fine-root characteristics responded to N, P, and K addition, providing some of the strongest stand-level responses in this experiment. Multiple soil nutrients regulate fine-root abundance, morphological and chemical traits, and their association with mycorrhizal fungi in a species-rich lowland tropical forest. PMID:26405739

  10. Meta-analysis reveals profound responses of plant traits to glacial CO2 levels

    PubMed Central

    Temme, A A; Cornwell, W K; Cornelissen, J H C; Aerts, R

    2013-01-01

    A general understanding of the links between atmospheric CO2 concentration and the functioning of the terrestrial biosphere requires not only an understanding of plant trait responses to the ongoing transition to higher CO2 but also the legacy effects of past low CO2. An interesting question is whether the transition from current to higher CO2 can be thought of as a continuation of the past trajectory of low to current CO2 levels. Determining this trajectory requires quantifying the effect sizes of plant response to low CO2. We performed a meta-analysis of low CO2 growth experiments on 34 studies with 54 species. We quantified how plant traits vary at reduced CO2 levels and whether C3 versus C4 and woody versus herbaceous plant species respond differently. At low CO2, plant functioning changed drastically: on average across all species, a 50% reduction in current atmospheric CO2 reduced net photosynthesis by 38%; increased stomatal conductance by 60% and decreased intrinsic water use efficiency by 48%. Total plant dry biomass decreased by 47%, while specific leaf area increased by 17%. Plant types responded similarly: the only significant differences being no increase in SLA for C4 species and a 16% smaller decrease in biomass for woody C3 species at glacial CO2. Quantitative comparison of low CO2 effect sizes to those from high CO2 studies showed that the magnitude of response of stomatal conductance, water use efficiency and SLA to increased CO2 can be thought of as continued shifts along the same line. However, net photosynthesis and dry weight responses to low CO2 were greater in magnitude than to high CO2. Understanding the causes for this discrepancy can lead to a general understanding of the links between atmospheric CO2 and plant responses with relevance for both the past and the future. PMID:24340192

  11. Adaptive responses reveal contemporary and future ecotypes in a desert shrub

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richardson, Bryce A.; Kitchen, Stanley G.; Pendleton, Rosemary L.; Pendleton, Burton K.; Germino, Matthew J.; Rehfeldt, Gerald E.; Meyer, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    Interacting threats to ecosystem function, including climate change, wildfire, and invasive species necessitate native plant restoration in desert ecosystems. However, native plant restoration efforts often remain unguided by ecological genetic information. Given that many ecosystems are in flux from climate change, restoration plans need to account for both contemporary and future climates when choosing seed sources. In this study we analyze vegetative responses, including mortality, growth, and carbon isotope ratios in two blackbrush (Coleogyne ramosissima) common gardens that included 26 populations from a range-wide collection. This shrub occupies ecotones between the warm and cold deserts of Mojave and Colorado Plateau ecoregions in western North America. The variation observed in the vegetative responses of blackbrush populations was principally explained by grouping populations by ecoregions and by regression with site-specific climate variables. Aridity weighted by winter minimum temperatures best explained vegetative responses; Colorado Plateau sites were usually colder and drier than Mojave sites. The relationship between climate and vegetative response was mapped within the boundaries of the species–climate space projected for the contemporary climate and for the decade surrounding 2060. The mapped ecological genetic pattern showed that genetic variation could be classified into cool-adapted and warm-adapted ecotypes, with populations often separated by steep clines. These transitions are predicted to occur in both the Mojave Desert and Colorado Plateau ecoregions. While under contemporary conditions the warm-adapted ecotype occupies the majority of climate space, climate projections predict that the cool-adapted ecotype could prevail as the dominant ecotype as the climate space of blackbrush expands into higher elevations and latitudes. This study provides the framework for delineating climate change-responsive seed transfer guidelines, which are needed to inform restoration and management planning. We propose four transfer zones in blackbrush that correspond to areas currently dominated by cool-adapted and warm-adapted ecotypes in each of the two ecoregions.

  12. Genomic localization of tomato genes that control a hypersensitive reaction to Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Doidge) dye.

    PubMed

    Yu, Z H; Wang, J F; Stall, R E; Vallejos, C E

    1995-10-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria causes bacterial spot, one of the most serious diseases of tomatoes. The lycopersicon esculentum accession 'Hawaii 7998' is the only reliable source of resistance to race 1 strains of the pathogen. This resistance is associated with a hypersensitive reaction controlled by multiple nondominant genes. The inoculated area becomes fully necrotic 24 hr after inoculation in 'Hawaii 7998,' whereas full necrosis is observed 5 and 4 days after inoculation in the susceptible species L. pennellii (LA 716) and their F1, respectively. An interspecific backcross population, using 'Hawaii 7998' as the recurrent parent, was analyzed to determine the linkage relationships between the resistance genes and 135 molecular marker loci. The range of responses of the BC1 population included those of the parents. Linkage to a hypersensitive response factor was assessed by comparing the rates of necrosis development between homozygous and heterozygous plants at 8 hr-intervals. Three factors that affect the hypersensitive response of 'Hawaii 7998' were detected. One factor is on the short arm of chromosome I, another on the long arm of chromosome I, and a third on the long arm of chromosome 5. These factors appeared to act independently and to have additive effects. PMID:8647402

  13. Plasma Proteome Response to Severe Burn Injury Revealed by 18O-Labeled “Universal” Reference-based Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Wei-Jun; Petritis, Brianne O.; Kaushal, Amit; Finnerty, Celeste C; Jeschke, Marc G; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Davis, Ronald W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Herndon, David N.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    A burn injury represents one of the most severe forms of human trauma and is responsible for significant mortality worldwide. Here, we present the first quantitative proteomics investigation of the blood plasma proteome response to severe burn injury by comparing the plasma protein concentrations of 10 healthy control subjects with those of 15 severe burn patients at two time-points following the injury. The overall analytical strategy for this work integrated immunoaffinity depletion of the 12 most abundant plasma proteins with cysteinyl-peptide enrichment-based fractionation prior to LC-MS analyses of individual patient samples. Incorporation of an 18O-labeled “universal” reference among the sample sets enabled precise relative quantification across samples. In total, 313 plasma proteins confidently identified with two or more unique peptides were quantified. Following statistical analysis, 110 proteins exhibited significant abundance changes in response to the burn injury. The observed changes in protein concentrations suggest significant inflammatory and hypermetabolic response to the injury, which is supported by the fact that many of the identified proteins are associated with acute phase response signaling, the complement system, and coagulation system pathways. The regulation of ~35 proteins observed in this study is in agreement with previous results reported for inflammatory or burn response, but approximately 50 potentially novel proteins previously not known to be associated with burn response or inflammation are also found. Elucidating proteins involved in the response to severe burn injury may reveal novel targets for therapeutic interventions, as well as potential predictive biomarkers for patient outcomes such as multiple organ failure. PMID:20698492

  14. Multivariate genetic analysis of plant responses to water deficit and high temperature revealed contrasting adaptive strategies

    PubMed Central

    Vasseur, François; Bontpart, Thibaut; Dauzat, Myriam; Granier, Christine; Vile, Denis

    2014-01-01

    How genetic factors control plant performance under stressful environmental conditions is a central question in ecology and for crop breeding. A multivariate framework was developed to examine the genetic architecture of performance-related traits in response to interacting environmental stresses. Ecophysiological and life history traits were quantified in the Arabidopsis thaliana Ler×Cvi mapping population exposed to constant soil water deficit and high air temperature. The plasticity of the genetic variance–covariance matrix (G-matrix) was examined using mixed-effects models after regression into principal components. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis was performed on the predictors of genotype effects and genotype by environment interactions (G×E). Three QTLs previously identified for flowering time had antagonistic G×E effects on carbon acquisition and the other traits (phenology, growth, leaf morphology, and transpiration). This resulted in a size-dependent response of water use efficiency (WUE) to high temperature but not soil water deficit, indicating that most of the plasticity of carbon acquisition and WUE to temperature is controlled by the loci that control variation of development, size, growth, and transpiration. A fourth QTL, MSAT2.22, controlled the response of carbon acquisition to specific combinations of watering and temperature irrespective of plant size and development, growth, and transpiration rate, which resulted in size-independent plasticity of WUE. These findings highlight how the strategies to optimize plant performance may differ in response to water deficit and high temperature (or their combination), and how different G×E effects could be targeted to improve plant tolerance to these stresses. PMID:25246443

  15. Phosphoproteomic Analyses Reveal Early Signaling Events in the Osmotic Stress Response1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    E. Stecker, Kelly; Minkoff, Benjamin B.; Sussman, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Elucidating how plants sense and respond to water loss is important for identifying genetic and chemical interventions that may help sustain crop yields in water-limiting environments. Currently, the molecular mechanisms involved in the initial perception and response to dehydration are not well understood. Modern mass spectrometric methods for quantifying changes in the phosphoproteome provide an opportunity to identify key phosphorylation events involved in this process. Here, we have used both untargeted and targeted isotope-assisted mass spectrometric methods of phosphopeptide quantitation to characterize proteins in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) whose degree of phosphorylation is rapidly altered by hyperosmotic treatment. Thus, protein phosphorylation events responsive to 5 min of 0.3 m mannitol treatment were first identified using 15N metabolic labeling and untargeted mass spectrometry with a high-resolution ion-trap instrument. The results from these discovery experiments were then validated using targeted Selected Reaction Monitoring mass spectrometry with a triple quadrupole. Targeted Selected Reaction Monitoring experiments were conducted with plants treated under nine different environmental perturbations to determine whether the phosphorylation changes were specific for osmosignaling or involved cross talk with other signaling pathways. The results indicate that regulatory proteins such as members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family are specifically phosphorylated in response to osmotic stress. Proteins involved in 5? messenger RNA decapping and phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate synthesis were also identified as targets of dehydration-induced phosphoregulation. The results of these experiments demonstrate the utility of targeted phosphoproteomic analysis in understanding protein regulation networks and provide new insight into cellular processes involved in the osmotic stress response. PMID:24808101

  16. Phosphoproteomic Analyses Reveal Early Signaling Events in the Osmotic Stress Response.

    PubMed

    E Stecker, Kelly; Minkoff, Benjamin B; Sussman, Michael R

    2014-05-01

    Elucidating how plants sense and respond to water loss is important for identifying genetic and chemical interventions that may help sustain crop yields in water-limiting environments. Currently, the molecular mechanisms involved in the initial perception and response to dehydration are not well understood. Modern mass spectrometric methods for quantifying changes in the phosphoproteome provide an opportunity to identify key phosphorylation events involved in this process. Here, we have used both untargeted and targeted isotope-assisted mass spectrometric methods of phosphopeptide quantitation to characterize proteins in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) whose degree of phosphorylation is rapidly altered by hyperosmotic treatment. Thus, protein phosphorylation events responsive to 5 min of 0.3 m mannitol treatment were first identified using (15)N metabolic labeling and untargeted mass spectrometry with a high-resolution ion-trap instrument. The results from these discovery experiments were then validated using targeted Selected Reaction Monitoring mass spectrometry with a triple quadrupole. Targeted Selected Reaction Monitoring experiments were conducted with plants treated under nine different environmental perturbations to determine whether the phosphorylation changes were specific for osmosignaling or involved cross talk with other signaling pathways. The results indicate that regulatory proteins such as members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family are specifically phosphorylated in response to osmotic stress. Proteins involved in 5' messenger RNA decapping and phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate synthesis were also identified as targets of dehydration-induced phosphoregulation. The results of these experiments demonstrate the utility of targeted phosphoproteomic analysis in understanding protein regulation networks and provide new insight into cellular processes involved in the osmotic stress response. PMID:24808101

  17. Multivariate genetic analysis of plant responses to water deficit and high temperature revealed contrasting adaptive strategies.

    PubMed

    Vasseur, François; Bontpart, Thibaut; Dauzat, Myriam; Granier, Christine; Vile, Denis

    2014-12-01

    How genetic factors control plant performance under stressful environmental conditions is a central question in ecology and for crop breeding. A multivariate framework was developed to examine the genetic architecture of performance-related traits in response to interacting environmental stresses. Ecophysiological and life history traits were quantified in the Arabidopsis thaliana Ler × Cvi mapping population exposed to constant soil water deficit and high air temperature. The plasticity of the genetic variance-covariance matrix (G-matrix) was examined using mixed-effects models after regression into principal components. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis was performed on the predictors of genotype effects and genotype by environment interactions (G × E). Three QTLs previously identified for flowering time had antagonistic G × E effects on carbon acquisition and the other traits (phenology, growth, leaf morphology, and transpiration). This resulted in a size-dependent response of water use efficiency (WUE) to high temperature but not soil water deficit, indicating that most of the plasticity of carbon acquisition and WUE to temperature is controlled by the loci that control variation of development, size, growth, and transpiration. A fourth QTL, MSAT2.22, controlled the response of carbon acquisition to specific combinations of watering and temperature irrespective of plant size and development, growth, and transpiration rate, which resulted in size-independent plasticity of WUE. These findings highlight how the strategies to optimize plant performance may differ in response to water deficit and high temperature (or their combination), and how different G × E effects could be targeted to improve plant tolerance to these stresses. PMID:25246443

  18. Genomic regions associated with the nitrogen limitation response revealed in a global wheat core collection.

    PubMed

    Bordes, Jacques; Ravel, C; Jaubertie, J P; Duperrier, B; Gardet, O; Heumez, E; Pissavy, A L; Charmet, G; Le Gouis, J; Balfourier, F

    2013-03-01

    Modern wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) varieties in Western Europe have mainly been bred, and selected in conditions where high levels of nitrogen-rich fertilizer are applied. However, high input crop management has greatly increased the risk of nitrates leaching into groundwater with negative impacts on the environment. To investigate wheat nitrogen tolerance characteristics that could be adapted to low input crop management, we supplied 196 accessions of a wheat core collection of old and modern cultivars with high or moderate amounts of nitrogen fertilizer in an experimental network consisting of three sites and 2 years. The main breeding traits were assessed including grain yield and grain protein content. The response to nitrogen level was estimated for grain yield and grain number per m(2) using both the difference and the ratio between performance at the two input levels and the slope of joint regression. A large variability was observed for all the traits studied and the response to nitrogen level. Whole genome association mapping was carried out using 899 molecular markers taking into account the five ancestral group structure of the collection. We identified 54 main regions involving almost all chromosomes that influence yield and its components, plant height, heading date and grain protein concentration. Twenty-three regions, including several genes, spread over 16 chromosomes were involved in the response to nitrogen level. These chromosomal regions may be good candidates to be used in breeding programs to improve the performance of wheat varieties at moderate nitrogen input levels. PMID:23192671

  19. Metabolomics Reveals Metabolically Healthy and Unhealthy Obese Individuals Differ in their Response to a Caloric Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Perreault, Maude; Zulyniak, Michael A.; Britz-McKibbin, Philip; Mutch, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if metabolically healthy obese (MHO) individuals have a different metabolic response to a standardized diet compared to lean healthy (LH) and metabolically unhealthy obese (MUO) individuals. Methods Thirty adults (35–70 yrs) were classified as LH, MHO, and MUO according to anthropometric and clinical measurements. Participants consumed a standardized high calorie meal (~1330 kcal). Blood glucose and insulin were measured at fasting, and 15, 30, 60, 90 and 120 min postprandially. Additional blood samples were collected for the targeted analysis of amino acids (AAs) and derivatives, and fatty acids (FAs). Results The postprandial response (i.e., area under the curve, AUC) for serum glucose and insulin were similar between MHO and LH individuals, and significantly lower than MUO individuals (p < 0.05). Minor differences were found in postprandial responses for AAs between MHO and MUO individuals, while three polyunsaturated FAs (linoleic acid, ?-linolenic acid, arachidonic acid) showed smaller changes in serum after the meal in MHO individuals compared to MUO. Fasting levels for various AAs (notably branched-chain AA) and FAs (e.g., saturated myristic and palmitic acids) were found to correlate with glucose and insulin AUC. Conclusion MHO individuals show preserved insulin sensitivity and a greater ability to adapt to a caloric challenge compared to MUO individuals. PMID:26274804

  20. A novel phototropic response to red light is revealed in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Millar, Katherine D L; Kumar, Prem; Correll, Melanie J; Mullen, Jack L; Hangarter, Roger P; Edelmann, Richard E; Kiss, John Z

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate phototropism in plants grown in microgravity conditions without the complications of a 1-g environment. Experiments performed on the International Space Station (ISS) were used to explore the mechanisms of both blue-light- and red-light-induced phototropism in plants. This project utilized the European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS), which has environmental controls for plant growth as well as centrifuges for gravity treatments used as a 1-g control. Images captured from video tapes were used to analyze the growth, development, and curvature of Arabidopsis thaliana plants that developed from seed in space. A novel positive phototropic response to red light was observed in hypocotyls of seedlings that developed in microgravity. This response was not apparent in seedlings grown on Earth or in the 1-g control during the space flight. In addition, blue-light-based phototropism had a greater response in microgravity compared with the 1-g control. Although flowering plants are generally thought to lack red light phototropism, our data suggest that at least some flowering plants may have retained a red light sensory system for phototropism. Thus, this discovery may have important implications for understanding the evolution of light sensory systems in plants. PMID:20298479

  1. A zebrafish larval model reveals early tissue-specific innate immune responses to Mucor circinelloides

    PubMed Central

    Voelz, Kerstin; Gratacap, Remi L.; Wheeler, Robert T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mucormycosis is an emerging fungal infection that is clinically difficult to manage, with increasing incidence and extremely high mortality rates. Individuals with diabetes, suppressed immunity or traumatic injury are at increased risk of developing disease. These individuals often present with defects in phagocytic effector cell function. Research using mammalian models and phagocytic effector cell lines has attempted to decipher the importance of the innate immune system in host defence against mucormycosis. However, these model systems have not been satisfactory for direct analysis of the interaction between innate immune effector cells and infectious sporangiospores in vivo. Here, we report the first real-time in vivo analysis of the early innate immune response to mucormycete infection using a whole-animal zebrafish larval model system. We identified differential host susceptibility, dependent on the site of infection (hindbrain ventricle and swim bladder), as well as differential functions of the two major phagocyte effector cell types in response to viable and non-viable spores. Larval susceptibility to mucormycete spore infection was increased upon immunosuppressant treatment. We showed for the first time that macrophages and neutrophils were readily recruited in vivo to the site of infection in an intact host and that spore phagocytosis can be observed in real-time in vivo. While exploring innate immune effector recruitment dynamics, we discovered the formation of phagocyte clusters in response to fungal spores that potentially play a role in fungal spore dissemination. Spores failed to activate pro-inflammatory gene expression by 6 h post-infection in both infection models. After 24?h, induction of a pro-inflammatory response was observed only in hindbrain ventricle infections. Only a weak pro-inflammatory response was initiated after spore injection into the swim bladder during the same time frame. In the future, the zebrafish larva as a live whole-animal model system will contribute greatly to the study of molecular mechanisms involved in the interaction of the host innate immune system with fungal spores during mucormycosis. PMID:26398938

  2. A zebrafish larval model reveals early tissue-specific innate immune responses to Mucor circinelloides.

    PubMed

    Voelz, Kerstin; Gratacap, Remi L; Wheeler, Robert T

    2015-11-01

    Mucormycosis is an emerging fungal infection that is clinically difficult to manage, with increasing incidence and extremely high mortality rates. Individuals with diabetes, suppressed immunity or traumatic injury are at increased risk of developing disease. These individuals often present with defects in phagocytic effector cell function. Research using mammalian models and phagocytic effector cell lines has attempted to decipher the importance of the innate immune system in host defence against mucormycosis. However, these model systems have not been satisfactory for direct analysis of the interaction between innate immune effector cells and infectious sporangiospores in vivo. Here, we report the first real-time in vivo analysis of the early innate immune response to mucormycete infection using a whole-animal zebrafish larval model system. We identified differential host susceptibility, dependent on the site of infection (hindbrain ventricle and swim bladder), as well as differential functions of the two major phagocyte effector cell types in response to viable and non-viable spores. Larval susceptibility to mucormycete spore infection was increased upon immunosuppressant treatment. We showed for the first time that macrophages and neutrophils were readily recruited in vivo to the site of infection in an intact host and that spore phagocytosis can be observed in real-time in vivo. While exploring innate immune effector recruitment dynamics, we discovered the formation of phagocyte clusters in response to fungal spores that potentially play a role in fungal spore dissemination. Spores failed to activate pro-inflammatory gene expression by 6 h post-infection in both infection models. After 24?h, induction of a pro-inflammatory response was observed only in hindbrain ventricle infections. Only a weak pro-inflammatory response was initiated after spore injection into the swim bladder during the same time frame. In the future, the zebrafish larva as a live whole-animal model system will contribute greatly to the study of molecular mechanisms involved in the interaction of the host innate immune system with fungal spores during mucormycosis. PMID:26398938

  3. Transcriptome analysis reveals regulatory networks underlying differential susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea in response to nitrogen availability in Solanum lycopersicum

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Andrea; Canessa, Paulo; Hoppe, Gustavo; Retamal, Ignacio; Moyano, Tomas C.; Canales, Javier; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A.; Rubilar, Joselyn

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is one of the main limiting nutrients for plant growth and crop yield. It is well documented that changes in nitrate availability, the main N source found in agricultural soils, influences a myriad of developmental programs and processes including the plant defense response. Indeed, many agronomical reports indicate that the plant N nutritional status influences their ability to respond effectively when challenged by different pathogens. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in N-modulation of plant susceptibility to pathogens are poorly characterized. In this work, we show that Solanum lycopersicum defense response to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea is affected by plant N availability, with higher susceptibility in nitrate-limiting conditions. Global gene expression responses of tomato against B. cinerea under contrasting nitrate conditions reveals that plant primary metabolism is affected by the fungal infection regardless of N regimes. This result suggests that differential susceptibility to pathogen attack under contrasting N conditions is not only explained by a metabolic alteration. We used a systems biology approach to identify the transcriptional regulatory network implicated in plant response to the fungus infection under contrasting nitrate conditions. Interestingly, hub genes in this network are known key transcription factors involved in ethylene and jasmonic acid signaling. This result positions these hormones as key integrators of nitrate and defense against B. cinerea in tomato plants. Our results provide insights into potential crosstalk mechanisms between necrotrophic defense response and N status in plants. PMID:26583019

  4. Application of xCELLigence RTCA Biosensor Technology for Revealing the Profile and Window of Drug Responsiveness in Real Time

    PubMed Central

    Kho, Dan; MacDonald, Christa; Johnson, Rebecca; Unsworth, Charles P.; O’Carroll, Simon J.; du Mez, Elyce; Angel, Catherine E.; Graham, E. Scott

    2015-01-01

    The xCELLigence technology is a real-time cellular biosensor, which measures the net adhesion of cells to high-density gold electrode arrays printed on custom-designed E-plates. The strength of cellular adhesion is influenced by a myriad of factors that include cell type, cell viability, growth, migration, spreading and proliferation. We therefore hypothesised that xCELLigence biosensor technology would provide a valuable platform for the measurement of drug responses in a multitude of different experimental, clinical or pharmacological contexts. In this manuscript, we demonstrate how xCELLigence technology has been invaluable in the identification of (1) not only if cells respond to a particular drug, but (2) the window of drug responsiveness. The latter aspect is often left to educated guess work in classical end-point assays, whereas biosensor technology reveals the temporal profile of the response in real time, which enables both acute responses and longer term responses to be profiled within the same assay. In our experience, the xCELLigence biosensor technology is suitable for highly targeted drug assessment and also low to medium throughput drug screening, which produces high content temporal data in real time. PMID:25893878

  5. High-fat taste challenge reveals altered striatal response in women recovered from bulimia nervosa: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    RADELOFF, DANIEL; WILLMANN, KATHRIN; OTTO, LISA; LINDNER, MICHAEL; PUTNAM, KAREN; VAN LEEUWEN, SARA; KAYE, WALTER H; POUSTKA, FRITZ; WAGNER, ANGELA

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) tend to have disordered thinking and eating behaviours in regards to fat containing foods. This is the first study to investigate neuronal pathways that may contribute to altered fat consumption in eating disordered patients. Methods We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare responses to a high-fat cream stimulus, water, and a non-caloric viscous stimulus (CMC) to control for response to viscosity in individuals recovered from AN (N = 15), BN (N = 14) and a healthy control sample (CW, N = 18). Results An interaction analysis (ANOVAR) comparing the three groups (AN, BN, CW) and the three conditions (cream, CMC, water) revealed significant differences in the left anterior ventral striatum (AVS). A post hoc analysis displayed a higher magnitude of response for the contrast cream/water in BN compared to AN or CW and for the contrast CMC/water in BN compared to AN. Conclusions BN showed an exaggerated AVS response for the cream/water contrast in comparison to AN or CW. Moreover, BN showed an exaggerated AVS response for the CMC/water contrast in comparison to AN. These findings support the possibility that BN have an altered hedonic and/or motivational drive to consume fats. PMID:22540408

  6. Peripheral Mechanisms Contributing to the Glucocorticoid Hypersensitivity in 

    E-print Network

    Michailidou, Zoi; Coll, Anthony P; Kenyon, Christopher J; Morton, Nicholas M; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Seckl, Jonathan R; Chapman, Karen E

    2007-01-01

    this glucocorticoid hypersensitivity, we examined the expression levels of key determinants and targets of glucocorticoid action in adipose tissue and liver. Despite lower basal expression of 11ß-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11ß-HSD1), which generates active...

  7. 21 CFR 866.5500 - Hypersensitivity pneumonitis immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques the immunoglobulin antibodies in serum which react specifically with organic dust derived from fungal or animal protein sources. When these antibodies react with such dusts in the lung...). Measurement of these immunoglobulin G antibodies aids in the diagnosis of hypersensitivity pneumonitis...

  8. 21 CFR 866.5500 - Hypersensitivity pneumonitis immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques the immunoglobulin antibodies in serum which react specifically with organic dust derived from fungal or animal protein sources. When these antibodies react with such dusts in the lung...). Measurement of these immunoglobulin G antibodies aids in the diagnosis of hypersensitivity pneumonitis...

  9. 21 CFR 866.5500 - Hypersensitivity pneumonitis immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques the immunoglobulin antibodies in serum which react specifically with organic dust derived from fungal or animal protein sources. When these antibodies react with such dusts in the lung...). Measurement of these immunoglobulin G antibodies aids in the diagnosis of hypersensitivity pneumonitis...

  10. 21 CFR 866.5500 - Hypersensitivity pneumonitis immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques the immunoglobulin antibodies in serum which react specifically with organic dust derived from fungal or animal protein sources. When these antibodies react with such dusts in the lung...). Measurement of these immunoglobulin G antibodies aids in the diagnosis of hypersensitivity pneumonitis...

  11. 21 CFR 866.5500 - Hypersensitivity pneumonitis immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques the immunoglobulin antibodies in serum which react specifically with organic dust derived from fungal or animal protein sources. When these antibodies react with such dusts in the lung...). Measurement of these immunoglobulin G antibodies aids in the diagnosis of hypersensitivity pneumonitis...

  12. Metagenomics reveals sediment microbial community response to Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Olivia U; Scott, Nicole M; Gonzalez, Antonio; Robbins-Pianka, Adam; Bælum, Jacob; Kimbrel, Jeffrey; Bouskill, Nicholas J; Prestat, Emmanuel; Borglin, Sharon; Joyner, Dominique C; Fortney, Julian L; Jurelevicius, Diogo; Stringfellow, William T; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa; Hazen, Terry C; Knight, Rob; Gilbert, Jack A; Jansson, Janet K

    2014-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill in the spring of 2010 resulted in an input of ?4.1 million barrels of oil to the Gulf of Mexico; >22% of this oil is unaccounted for, with unknown environmental consequences. Here we investigated the impact of oil deposition on microbial communities in surface sediments collected at 64 sites by targeted sequencing of 16S rRNA genes, shotgun metagenomic sequencing of 14 of these samples and mineralization experiments using 14C-labeled model substrates. The 16S rRNA gene data indicated that the most heavily oil-impacted sediments were enriched in an uncultured Gammaproteobacterium and a Colwellia species, both of which were highly similar to sequences in the DWH deep-sea hydrocarbon plume. The primary drivers in structuring the microbial community were nitrogen and hydrocarbons. Annotation of unassembled metagenomic data revealed the most abundant hydrocarbon degradation pathway encoded genes involved in degrading aliphatic and simple aromatics via butane monooxygenase. The activity of key hydrocarbon degradation pathways by sediment microbes was confirmed by determining the mineralization of 14C-labeled model substrates in the following order: propylene glycol, dodecane, toluene and phenanthrene. Further, analysis of metagenomic sequence data revealed an increase in abundance of genes involved in denitrification pathways in samples that exceeded the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)'s benchmarks for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) compared with those that did not. Importantly, these data demonstrate that the indigenous sediment microbiota contributed an important ecosystem service for remediation of oil in the Gulf. However, PAHs were more recalcitrant to degradation, and their persistence could have deleterious impacts on the sediment ecosystem. PMID:24451203

  13. Metagenomics reveals sediment microbial community response to Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    PubMed

    Mason, Olivia U; Scott, Nicole M; Gonzalez, Antonio; Robbins-Pianka, Adam; Bælum, Jacob; Kimbrel, Jeffrey; Bouskill, Nicholas J; Prestat, Emmanuel; Borglin, Sharon; Joyner, Dominique C; Fortney, Julian L; Jurelevicius, Diogo; Stringfellow, William T; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa; Hazen, Terry C; Knight, Rob; Gilbert, Jack A; Jansson, Janet K

    2014-07-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill in the spring of 2010 resulted in an input of ?4.1 million barrels of oil to the Gulf of Mexico; >22% of this oil is unaccounted for, with unknown environmental consequences. Here we investigated the impact of oil deposition on microbial communities in surface sediments collected at 64 sites by targeted sequencing of 16S rRNA genes, shotgun metagenomic sequencing of 14 of these samples and mineralization experiments using (14)C-labeled model substrates. The 16S rRNA gene data indicated that the most heavily oil-impacted sediments were enriched in an uncultured Gammaproteobacterium and a Colwellia species, both of which were highly similar to sequences in the DWH deep-sea hydrocarbon plume. The primary drivers in structuring the microbial community were nitrogen and hydrocarbons. Annotation of unassembled metagenomic data revealed the most abundant hydrocarbon degradation pathway encoded genes involved in degrading aliphatic and simple aromatics via butane monooxygenase. The activity of key hydrocarbon degradation pathways by sediment microbes was confirmed by determining the mineralization of (14)C-labeled model substrates in the following order: propylene glycol, dodecane, toluene and phenanthrene. Further, analysis of metagenomic sequence data revealed an increase in abundance of genes involved in denitrification pathways in samples that exceeded the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)'s benchmarks for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) compared with those that did not. Importantly, these data demonstrate that the indigenous sediment microbiota contributed an important ecosystem service for remediation of oil in the Gulf. However, PAHs were more recalcitrant to degradation, and their persistence could have deleterious impacts on the sediment ecosystem. PMID:24451203

  14. Super-resolution microscopy reveals protein spatial reorganization in early innate immune responses.

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, Bryan D.; Aaron, Jesse S.; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann

    2010-10-01

    Over the past decade optical approaches were introduced that effectively break the diffraction barrier. Of particular note were introductions of Stimulated Emission/Depletion (STED) microscopy, Photo-Activated Localization Microscopy (PALM), and the closely related Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM). STORM represents an attractive method for researchers, as it does not require highly specialized optical setups, can be implemented using commercially available dyes, and is more easily amenable to multicolor imaging. We implemented a simultaneous dual-color, direct-STORM imaging system through the use of an objective-based TIRF microscope and filter-based image splitter. This system allows for excitation and detection of two fluorophors simultaneously, via projection of each fluorophor's signal onto separate regions of a detector. We imaged the sub-resolution organization of the TLR4 receptor, a key mediator of innate immune response, after challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a bacteria-specific antigen. While distinct forms of LPS have evolved among various bacteria, only some LPS variations (such as that derived from E. coli) typically result in significant cellular immune response. Others (such as from the plague bacteria Y. pestis) do not, despite affinity to TLR4. We will show that challenge with LPS antigens produces a statistically significant increase in TLR4 receptor clusters on the cell membrane, presumably due to recruitment of receptors to lipid rafts. These changes, however, are only detectable below the diffraction limit and are not evident using conventional imaging methods. Furthermore, we will compare the spatiotemporal behavior of TLR4 receptors in response to different LPS chemotypes in order to elucidate possible routes by which pathogens such as Y. pestis are able to circumvent the innate immune system. Finally, we will exploit the dual-color STORM capabilities to simultaneously image LPS and TLR4 receptors in the cellular membrane at resolutions at or below 40nm.

  15. Nicotine Dependence Reveals Distinct Responses from Neurons and Their Resident Nicotinic Receptors in Medial Habenula.

    PubMed

    Shih, Pei-Yu; McIntosh, J Michael; Drenan, Ryan M

    2015-12-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are the molecular target of nicotine. nAChRs in the medial habenula (MHb) have recently been shown to play a role in nicotine dependence, but it is not clear which nAChR subtypes or MHb neuron types are most important. To identify MHb nAChRs and/or cell types that play a role in nicotine dependence, we studied these receptors and cells with brain slice electrophysiology using both acute and chronic nicotine application. Cells in the ventroinferior (MHbVI) and ventrolateral MHb (MHbVL) subregions expressed functional nAChRs with different pharmacology. Further, application of nicotine to cells in these subregions led to different action potential firing patterns. The latter result was correlated with a differing ability of nicotine to induce nAChR desensitization. Chronic nicotine caused functional upregulation of nAChRs selectively in MHbVI cells, but did not change nAChR function in MHbVL. Importantly, firing responses were also differentially altered in these subregions following chronic nicotine. MHbVI neurons treated chronically with nicotine exhibited enhanced basal pacemaker firing but a blunted nicotine-induced firing response. MHbVL neurons did not change their firing properties in response to chronic nicotine. Together, these results suggest that acute and chronic nicotine differentially affect nAChR function and output of cells in MHb subregions. Because the MHb extensively innervates the interpeduncular nucleus, an area critical for both affective and somatic signs of withdrawal, these results could reflect some of the neurophysiological changes thought to occur in the MHb to the interpeduncular nucleus circuit in human smokers. PMID:26429939

  16. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Revealed Glucose-Stimulated Responses of Islet Associated with Insulin Secretion.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiaming; Li, Qingrun; Tang, Jiashu; Xia, Fangying; Wu, Jiarui; Zeng, Rong

    2015-11-01

    As central tissue of glucose homeostasis, islet has been an important focus of diabetes research. Phosphorylation plays pivotal roles in islet function, especially in islet glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. A systematic view on how phosphorylation networks were coordinately regulated in this process remains lacking, partially due to the limited amount of islets from an individual for a phosphoproteomic analysis. Here we optimized the in-tip and best-ratio phosphopeptide enrichment strategy and a SILAC-based workflow for processing rat islet samples. With limited islet lysates from each individual rat (20-47 ?g), we identified 8539 phosphosites on 2487 proteins. Subsequent quantitative analyses uncovered that short-term (30 min) high glucose stimulation induced coordinate responses of islet phosphoproteome on multiple biological levels, including insulin secretion related pathways, cytoskeleton dynamics, protein processing in ER and Golgi, transcription and translation, and so on. Furthermore, three glucose-responsive phosphosites (Prkar1a pT75pS77 and Tagln2 pS163) from the data set were proved to be correlated with insulin secretion. Overall, we initially gave an in-depth map of islet phosphoproteome regulated by glucose on individual rat level. This was a significant addition to our knowledge about how phosphorylation networks responded in insulin secretion. Also, the list of changed phosphosites was a valuable resource for molecular researchers in diabetes field. PMID:26437020

  17. Gene expression profiling in tibial muscular dystrophy reveals unfolded protein response and altered autophagy.

    PubMed

    Screen, Mark; Raheem, Olayinka; Holmlund-Hampf, Jeanette; Jonson, Per Harald; Huovinen, Sanna; Hackman, Peter; Udd, Bjarne

    2014-01-01

    Tibial muscular dystrophy (TMD) is a late onset, autosomal dominant distal myopathy that results from mutations in the two last domains of titin. The cascade of molecular events leading from the causative Titin mutations to the preterm death of muscle cells in TMD is largely unknown. In this study we examined the mRNA and protein changes associated with the myopathology of TMD. To identify these components we performed gene expression profiling using muscle biopsies from TMD patients and healthy controls. The profiling results were confirmed through quantitative real-time PCR and protein level analysis. One of the pathways identified was activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. ER stress activates the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway. UPR activation was supported by elevation of the marker genes HSPA5, ERN1 and the UPR specific XBP1 splice form. However, UPR activation appears to be insufficient to correct the protein abnormalities causing its activation because degenerative TMD muscle fibres show an increase in ubiquitinated protein inclusions. Abnormalities of VCP-associated degradation pathways are also suggested by the presence of proteolytic VCP fragments in western blotting, and VCP's accumulation within rimmed vacuoles in TMD muscle fibres together with p62 and LC3B positive autophagosomes. Thus, pathways controlling turnover and degradation, including autophagy, are distorted and lead to degeneration and loss of muscle fibres. PMID:24618559

  18. Nylon Filter Arrays Reveal Differential Gene Expression in Proteoid Roots of White Lupin in Response to Phosphorus Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Uhde-Stone, Claudia; Zinn, Kelly E.; Ramirez-Yáñez, Mario; Li, Aiguo; Vance, Carroll P.; Allan, Deborah L.

    2003-01-01

    White lupin (Lupinus albus) adapts to phosphorus deficiency (?P) by the development of short, densely clustered lateral roots called proteoid (or cluster) roots. In an effort to better understand the molecular events mediating these adaptive responses, we have isolated and sequenced 2,102 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from cDNA libraries prepared with RNA isolated at different stages of proteoid root development. Determination of overlapping regions revealed 322 contigs (redundant copy transcripts) and 1,126 singletons (single-copy transcripts) that compile to a total of 1,448 unique genes (unigenes). Nylon filter arrays with these 2,102 ESTs from proteoid roots were performed to evaluate global aspects of gene expression in response to ?P stress. ESTs differentially expressed in P-deficient proteoid roots compared with +P and ?P normal roots include genes involved in carbon metabolism, secondary metabolism, P scavenging and remobilization, plant hormone metabolism, and signal transduction. PMID:12644659

  19. Phosphoproteomic Profiling Reveals Epstein-Barr Virus Protein Kinase Integration of DNA Damage Response and Mitotic Signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Renfeng; Liao, Gangling; Nirujogi, Raja Sekhar; Pinto, Sneha M; Shaw, Patrick G; Huang, Tai-Chung; Wan, Jun; Qian, Jiang; Gowda, Harsha; Wu, Xinyan; Lv, Dong-Wen; Zhang, Kun; Manda, Srikanth S; Pandey, Akhilesh; Hayward, S Diane

    2015-12-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is etiologically linked to infectious mononucleosis and several human cancers. EBV encodes a conserved protein kinase BGLF4 that plays a key role in the viral life cycle. To provide new insight into the host proteins regulated by BGLF4, we utilized stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics to compare site-specific phosphorylation in BGLF4-expressing Akata B cells. Our analysis revealed BGLF4-mediated hyperphosphorylation of 3,046 unique sites corresponding to 1,328 proteins. Frequency analysis of these phosphosites revealed a proline-rich motif signature downstream of BGLF4, indicating a broader substrate recognition for BGLF4 than its cellular ortholog cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1). Further, motif analysis of the hyperphosphorylated sites revealed enrichment in ATM, ATR and Aurora kinase substrates while functional analyses revealed significant enrichment of pathways related to the DNA damage response (DDR), mitosis and cell cycle. Phosphorylation of proteins associated with the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) indicated checkpoint activation, an event that inactivates the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome, APC/C. Furthermore, we demonstrated that BGLF4 binds to and directly phosphorylates the key cellular proteins PP1, MPS1 and CDC20 that lie upstream of SAC activation and APC/C inhibition. Consistent with APC/C inactivation, we found that BGLF4 stabilizes the expression of many known APC/C substrates. We also noted hyperphosphorylation of 22 proteins associated the nuclear pore complex, which may contribute to nuclear pore disassembly and SAC activation. A drug that inhibits mitotic checkpoint activation also suppressed the accumulation of extracellular EBV virus. Taken together, our data reveal that, in addition to the DDR, manipulation of mitotic kinase signaling and SAC activation are mechanisms associated with lytic EBV replication. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002411 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002411). PMID:26714015

  20. Fast-Response Calmodulin-Based Fluorescent Indicators Reveal Rapid Intracellular Calcium Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Helassa, Nordine; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Conte, Ianina; Scaringi, John; Esposito, Elric; Bradley, Jonathan; Carter, Thomas; Ogden, David; Morad, Martin; Török, Katalin

    2015-01-01

    Faithful reporting of temporal patterns of intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics requires the working range of indicators to match the signals. Current genetically encoded calmodulin-based fluorescent indicators are likely to distort fast Ca(2+) signals by apparent saturation and integration due to their limiting fluorescence rise and decay kinetics. A series of probes was engineered with a range of Ca(2+) affinities and accelerated kinetics by weakening the Ca(2+)-calmodulin-peptide interactions. At 37?°C, the GCaMP3-derived probe termed GCaMP3fast is 40-fold faster than GCaMP3 with Ca(2+) decay and rise times, t1/2, of 3.3?ms and 0.9?ms, respectively, making it the fastest to-date. GCaMP3fast revealed discreet transients with significantly faster Ca(2+) dynamics in neonatal cardiac myocytes than GCaMP6f. With 5-fold increased two-photon fluorescence cross-section for Ca(2+) at 940?nm, GCaMP3fast is suitable for deep tissue studies. The green fluorescent protein serves as a reporter providing important novel insights into the kinetic mechanism of target recognition by calmodulin. Our strategy to match the probe to the signal by tuning the affinity and hence the Ca(2+) kinetics of the indicator is applicable to the emerging new generations of calmodulin-based probes. PMID:26527405

  1. Fast-Response Calmodulin-Based Fluorescent Indicators Reveal Rapid Intracellular Calcium Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Helassa, Nordine; Zhang, Xiao-hua; Conte, Ianina; Scaringi, John; Esposito, Elric; Bradley, Jonathan; Carter, Thomas; Ogden, David; Morad, Martin; Török, Katalin

    2015-01-01

    Faithful reporting of temporal patterns of intracellular Ca2+ dynamics requires the working range of indicators to match the signals. Current genetically encoded calmodulin-based fluorescent indicators are likely to distort fast Ca2+ signals by apparent saturation and integration due to their limiting fluorescence rise and decay kinetics. A series of probes was engineered with a range of Ca2+ affinities and accelerated kinetics by weakening the Ca2+-calmodulin-peptide interactions. At 37?°C, the GCaMP3-derived probe termed GCaMP3fast is 40-fold faster than GCaMP3 with Ca2+ decay and rise times, t1/2, of 3.3?ms and 0.9?ms, respectively, making it the fastest to-date. GCaMP3fast revealed discreet transients with significantly faster Ca2+ dynamics in neonatal cardiac myocytes than GCaMP6f. With 5-fold increased two-photon fluorescence cross-section for Ca2+ at 940?nm, GCaMP3fast is suitable for deep tissue studies. The green fluorescent protein serves as a reporter providing important novel insights into the kinetic mechanism of target recognition by calmodulin. Our strategy to match the probe to the signal by tuning the affinity and hence the Ca2+ kinetics of the indicator is applicable to the emerging new generations of calmodulin-based probes. PMID:26527405

  2. Harmonic strain-optical response revealed in the isotropic (liquid) phase of liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, P.; Baroni, P.; Noirez, L.

    2015-08-01

    A strong optical birefringence is observed when applying a small amplitude oscillatory strain to the liquid phase of a liquid crystal. This unpredicted birefringence is found to oscillate at the same frequency as the driving frequency, with frequencies down to 0.01 Hz. This birefringence is visible up to 15 °C above the liquid crystal transition. This opto-dynamic property is interpreted as a result of a coupling of the orientational pretransitional fluctuations existing in the isotropic phase and long range elastic interactions recently identified in liquids. The conversion of the mechanical wave in an optical response is shapeable. Two examples of synchronized periodic signals are shown: the sine and the square waves. The optimization of the signal is analyzed using a Heaviside-step shear test. This optical property is immediately exploitable to design low energy on/off switching materials.

  3. In Vivo Profiling Reveals a Competent Heat Shock Response in Adult Neurons: Implications for Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Carnemolla, Alisia; Lazell, Hayley; Moussaoui, Saliha; Bates, Gillian P.

    2015-01-01

    The heat shock response (HSR) is the main pathway used by cells to counteract proteotoxicity. The inability of differentiated neurons to induce an HSR has been documented in primary neuronal cultures and has been proposed to play a critical role in ageing and neurodegeneration. However, this accepted dogma has not been demonstrated in vivo. We used BAC transgenic mice generated by the Gene Expression Nervous System Atlas project to investigate the capacity of striatal medium sized spiny neurons to induce an HSR as compared to that of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. We found that all cell populations were competent to induce an HSR upon HSP90 inhibition. We also show the presence and relative abundance of heat shock-related genes and proteins in these striatal cell populations. The identification of a competent HSR in adult neurons supports the development of therapeutics that target the HSR pathway as treatments for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26134141

  4. Apoplast proteome reveals that extracellular matrix contributes to multistress response in poplar

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Riverine ecosystems, highly sensitive to climate change and human activities, are characterized by rapid environmental change to fluctuating water levels and siltation, causing stress on their biological components. We have little understanding of mechanisms by which riverine plant species have developed adaptive strategies to cope with stress in dynamic environments while maintaining growth and development. Results We report that poplar (Populus spp.) has evolved a systems level "stress proteome" in the leaf-stem-root apoplast continuum to counter biotic and abiotic factors. To obtain apoplast proteins from P. deltoides, we developed pressure-chamber and water-displacement methods for leaves and stems, respectively. Analyses of 303 proteins and corresponding transcripts coupled with controlled experiments and bioinformatics demonstrate that poplar depends on constitutive and inducible factors to deal with water, pathogen, and oxidative stress. However, each apoplast possessed a unique set of proteins, indicating that response to stress is partly compartmentalized. Apoplast proteins that are involved in glycolysis, fermentation, and catabolism of sucrose and starch appear to enable poplar to grow normally under water stress. Pathogenesis-related proteins mediating water and pathogen stress in apoplast were particularly abundant and effective in suppressing growth of the most prevalent poplar pathogen Melampsora. Unexpectedly, we found diverse peroxidases that appear to be involved in stress-induced cell wall modification in apoplast, particularly during the growing season. Poplar developed a robust antioxidative system to buffer oxidation in stem apoplast. Conclusion These findings suggest that multistress response in the apoplast constitutes an important adaptive trait for poplar to inhabit dynamic environments and is also a potential mechanism in other riverine plant species. PMID:21114852

  5. Phylogenetically Driven Sequencing of Extremely Halophilic Archaea Reveals Strategies for Static and Dynamic Osmo-response

    PubMed Central

    Tritt, Andrew; Larsen, David; Krusor, Megan; Yao, Andrew I.; Wu, Dongying; Madern, Dominique; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Darling, Aaron E.; Facciotti, Marc T.

    2014-01-01

    Organisms across the tree of life use a variety of mechanisms to respond to stress-inducing fluctuations in osmotic conditions. Cellular response mechanisms and phenotypes associated with osmoadaptation also play important roles in bacterial virulence, human health, agricultural production and many other biological systems. To improve understanding of osmoadaptive strategies, we have generated 59 high-quality draft genomes for the haloarchaea (a euryarchaeal clade whose members thrive in hypersaline environments and routinely experience drastic changes in environmental salinity) and analyzed these new genomes in combination with those from 21 previously sequenced haloarchaeal isolates. We propose a generalized model for haloarchaeal management of cytoplasmic osmolarity in response to osmotic shifts, where potassium accumulation and sodium expulsion during osmotic upshock are accomplished via secondary transport using the proton gradient as an energy source, and potassium loss during downshock is via a combination of secondary transport and non-specific ion loss through mechanosensitive channels. We also propose new mechanisms for magnesium and chloride accumulation. We describe the expansion and differentiation of haloarchaeal general transcription factor families, including two novel expansions of the TATA-binding protein family, and discuss their potential for enabling rapid adaptation to environmental fluxes. We challenge a recent high-profile proposal regarding the evolutionary origins of the haloarchaea by showing that inclusion of additional genomes significantly reduces support for a proposed large-scale horizontal gene transfer into the ancestral haloarchaeon from the bacterial domain. The combination of broad (17 genera) and deep (?5 species in four genera) sampling of a phenotypically unified clade has enabled us to uncover both highly conserved and specialized features of osmoadaptation. Finally, we demonstrate the broad utility of such datasets, for metagenomics, improvements to automated gene annotation and investigations of evolutionary processes. PMID:25393412

  6. Plant root transcriptome profiling reveals a strain-dependent response during Azospirillum-rice cooperation.

    PubMed

    Drogue, Benoît; Sanguin, Hervé; Chamam, Amel; Mozar, Michael; Llauro, Christel; Panaud, Olivier; Prigent-Combaret, Claire; Picault, Nathalie; Wisniewski-Dyé, Florence

    2014-01-01

    Cooperation involving Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria results in improvements of plant growth and health. While pathogenic and symbiotic interactions are known to induce transcriptional changes for genes related to plant defense and development, little is known about the impact of phytostimulating rhizobacteria on plant gene expression. This study aims at identifying genes significantly regulated in rice roots upon Azospirillum inoculation, considering possible favored interaction between a strain and its original host cultivar. Genome-wide analyzes of Oryza sativa japonica cultivars Cigalon and Nipponbare were performed, by using microarrays, seven days post-inoculation with Azospirillum lipoferum 4B (isolated from Cigalon) or Azospirillum sp. B510 (isolated from Nipponbare) and compared to the respective non-inoculated condition. A total of 7384 genes were significantly regulated, which represent about 16% of total rice genes. A set of 34 genes is regulated by both Azospirillum strains in both cultivars, including a gene orthologous to PR10 of Brachypodium, and these could represent plant markers of Azospirillum-rice interactions. The results highlight a strain-dependent response of rice, with 83% of the differentially expressed genes being classified as combination-specific. Whatever the combination, most of the differentially expressed genes are involved in primary metabolism, transport, regulation of transcription and protein fate. When considering genes involved in response to stress and plant defense, it appears that strain B510, a strain displaying endophytic properties, leads to the repression of a wider set of genes than strain 4B. Individual genotypic variations could be the most important driving force of rice roots gene expression upon Azospirillum inoculation. Strain-dependent transcriptional changes observed for genes related to auxin and ethylene signaling highlight the complexity of hormone signaling networks in the Azospirillum-rice cooperation. PMID:25414716

  7. Apoplast proteome reveals that extracellular matrix contributes to multi-stress response in poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Pechanova, Olga; Hsu, Chuan-Yu; Adams, Joshua P.; Pechan, Tibor; Vandervelde, Lindsay; Drnevich, Jenny; Jawdy, Sara; Adeli, Ardeshir; Suttle, Jeffrey; Lawrence, Amanda; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Seguin, Armand; Yuceer, Cetin

    2010-01-01

    Riverine ecosystems, highly sensitive to climate change and human activities, are characterized by rapid environmental change to fluctuating water levels and siltation, causing stress on their biological components. We have little understanding of mechanisms by which riverine plant species have developed adaptive strategies to cope with stress in dynamic environments while maintaining growth and development. We report that poplar (Populus spp.) has evolved a systems level 'stress proteome' in the leaf-stem-root apoplast continuum to counter biotic and abiotic factors. To obtain apoplast proteins from P. deltoides, we developed pressure-chamber and water-displacement methods for leaves and stems, respectively. Analyses of 303 proteins and corresponding transcripts coupled with controlled experiments and bioinformatics demonstrate that poplar depends on constitutive and inducible factors to deal with water, pathogen, and oxidative stress. However, each apoplast possessed a unique set of proteins, indicating that response to stress is partly compartmentalized. Apoplast proteins that are involved in glycolysis, fermentation, and catabolism of sucrose and starch appear to enable poplar to grow normally under water stress. Pathogenesis-related proteins mediating water and pathogen stress in apoplast were particularly abundant and effective in suppressing growth of the most prevalent poplar pathogen Melampsora. Unexpectedly, we found diverse peroxidases that appear to be involved in stress-induced cell wall modification in apoplast, particularly during the growing season. Poplar developed a robust antioxidative system to buffer oxidation in stem apoplast. These findings suggest that multistress response in the apoplast constitutes an important adaptive trait for poplar to inhabit dynamic environments and is also a potential mechanism in other riverine plant species.

  8. Characterization of Amphioxus IFN Regulatory Factor Family Reveals an Archaic Signaling Framework for Innate Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shaochun; Zheng, Tingting; Li, Peiyi; Yang, Rirong; Ruan, Jie; Huang, Shengfeng; Wu, Zhenxin; Xu, Anlong

    2015-12-15

    The IFN regulatory factor (IRF) family encodes transcription factors that play important roles in immune defense, stress response, reproduction, development, and carcinogenesis. Although the origin of the IRF family has been dated back to multicellular organisms, invertebrate IRFs differ from vertebrate IRFs in genomic structure and gene synteny, and little is known about their functions. Through comparison of multiple amphioxus genomes, in this study we suggested that amphioxus contains nine IRF members, whose orthologs are supposed to be shared among three amphioxus species. As the orthologs to the vertebrate IRF1 and IRF4 subgroups, Branchiostoma belcheri tsingtauense (bbt)IRF1 and bbtIRF8 bind the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) and were upregulated when amphioxus intestinal cells were stimulated with poly(I:C). As amphioxus-specific IRFs, both bbtIRF3 and bbtIRF7 bind ISRE. When activated, they can be phosphorylated by bbtTBK1 and then translocate into nucleus for target gene transcription. As transcriptional repressors, bbtIRF2 and bbtIRF4 can inhibit the transcriptional activities of bbtIRF1, 3, 7, and 8 by competing for the binding of ISRE. Interestingly, amphioxus IRF2, IRF8, and Rel were identified as target genes of bbtIRF1, bbtIRF7, and bbtIRF3, respectively, suggesting a dynamic feedback regulation among amphioxus IRF and NF-?B. Collectively, to our knowledge we present for the first time an archaic IRF signaling framework in a basal chordate, shedding new insights into the origin and evolution of vertebrate IFN-based antiviral networks. PMID:26573836

  9. Plant root transcriptome profiling reveals a strain-dependent response during Azospirillum-rice cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Drogue, Benoît; Sanguin, Hervé; Chamam, Amel; Mozar, Michael; Llauro, Christel; Panaud, Olivier; Prigent-Combaret, Claire; Picault, Nathalie; Wisniewski-Dyé, Florence

    2014-01-01

    Cooperation involving Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria results in improvements of plant growth and health. While pathogenic and symbiotic interactions are known to induce transcriptional changes for genes related to plant defense and development, little is known about the impact of phytostimulating rhizobacteria on plant gene expression. This study aims at identifying genes significantly regulated in rice roots upon Azospirillum inoculation, considering possible favored interaction between a strain and its original host cultivar. Genome-wide analyzes of Oryza sativa japonica cultivars Cigalon and Nipponbare were performed, by using microarrays, seven days post-inoculation with Azospirillum lipoferum 4B (isolated from Cigalon) or Azospirillum sp. B510 (isolated from Nipponbare) and compared to the respective non-inoculated condition. A total of 7384 genes were significantly regulated, which represent about 16% of total rice genes. A set of 34 genes is regulated by both Azospirillum strains in both cultivars, including a gene orthologous to PR10 of Brachypodium, and these could represent plant markers of Azospirillum-rice interactions. The results highlight a strain-dependent response of rice, with 83% of the differentially expressed genes being classified as combination-specific. Whatever the combination, most of the differentially expressed genes are involved in primary metabolism, transport, regulation of transcription and protein fate. When considering genes involved in response to stress and plant defense, it appears that strain B510, a strain displaying endophytic properties, leads to the repression of a wider set of genes than strain 4B. Individual genotypic variations could be the most important driving force of rice roots gene expression upon Azospirillum inoculation. Strain-dependent transcriptional changes observed for genes related to auxin and ethylene signaling highlight the complexity of hormone signaling networks in the Azospirillum-rice cooperation. PMID:25414716

  10. Proteomic Analysis of Urine Exosomes Reveals Renal Tubule Response to Leptospiral Colonization in Experimentally Infected Rats

    PubMed Central

    RamachandraRao, Satish P.; Matthias, Michael A.; Mondrogon, Chanthel-Kokoy; Aghania, Eamon; Park, Cathleen; Kong, Casey; Ishaya, Michelle; Madrigal, Assael; Horng, Jennifer; Khoshaba, Roni; Bounkhoun, Anousone; De Palma, Antonella; Agresta, Anna Maria; Awdishu, Linda; Naviaux, Robert K.; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Mauri, Pierluigi

    2015-01-01

    Background Infectious Leptospira colonize the kidneys of reservoir (e.g. rats) and accidental hosts such as humans. The renal response to persistent leptospiral colonization, as measured by urinary protein biosignatures, has not been systematically studied. Urinary exosomes--bioactive membrane-bound nanovesicles--contain cell-state specific cargo that additively reflect formation all along the nephron. We hypothesized that Leptospira-infection will alter the content of urine exosomes, and further, that these Leptospira-induced alterations will hold clues to unravel novel pathways related to bacterial-host interactions. Methodology/Principal findings Exosome protein content from 24 hour urine samples of Leptospira-infected rats was compared with that of uninfected rats using SDS-PAGE and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Statistical models were used to identify significantly dysregulated proteins in Leptospira-infected and uninfected rat urine exosomes. In all, 842 proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS proteomics of total rat urine and 204 proteins associated specifically with exosomes. Multivariate analysis showed that 25 proteins significantly discriminated between uninfected control and infected rats. Alanyl (membrane) aminopeptidase, also known as CD13 topped this list with the highest score, a finding we validated by Western immunoblotting. Whole urine analysis showed Tamm-Horsfall protein level reduction in the infected rat urine. Total urine and exosome proteins were significantly different in male vs. female infected rats. Conclusions We identified exosome-associated renal tubule-specific responses to Leptospira infection in a rat chronic colonization model. Quantitative differences in infected male and female rat urine exosome proteins vs. uninfected controls suggest that urine exosome analysis identifies important differences in kidney function that may be of clinical and pathological significance. PMID:25793258

  11. Auditory profile and high resolution CT scan in autism spectrum disorders children with auditory hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Thabet, Elsaeid M; Zaghloul, Hesham S

    2013-08-01

    Autism is the third most common developmental disorder, following mental retardationand cerebral palsy. ASD children have been described more often as beingpreoccupied with or agitated by noise. The aim of this study was to evaluate theprevalence and clinical significance of semicircular canal dehiscence detected on CTimages in ASD children with intolerance to loud sounds in an attempt to find ananatomical correlate with hyperacusis.14 ASD children with auditory hypersensitivity and 15 ASD children without auditoryhypersensitivity as control group age and gender matched were submitted to historytaking, otological examination, tympanometry and acoustic reflex thresholdmeasurement. ABR was done to validate normal peripheral hearing and integrity ofauditory brain stem pathway. High resolution CT scan petrous and temporal boneimaging was performed to all participated children. All participants had normal hearingsensitivity in ABR testing. Absolute ABR peak waves of I and III showed no statisticallysignificant difference between the two groups, while absolute wave V peak andinterpeak latencies I-V and III-V were shorter in duration in study group whencompared to the control group. CT scans revealed SSCD in 4 out of 14 of the studygroup (29%), the dehiscence was bilateral in one patient and unilateral in threepatients. None of control group showed SSCD. In conclusion, we have reportedevidence that apparent hypersensitivity to auditory stimuli (short conduction time in ABR) despite the normal physiological measures in ASD children with auditoryhypersensitivity can provide a clinical clue of a possible SSCD. PMID:23580033

  12. Hyperacusis Questionnaire as a Tool for Measuring Hypersensitivity to Sound in a Tinnitus Research Population

    PubMed Central

    Fackrell, Kathryn; Fearnley, Constance; Hoare, Derek J.; Sereda, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Hypersensitivity to external sounds is often comorbid with tinnitus and may be significant for adherence to certain types of tinnitus management. Therefore, a clear measure of sensitivity to sound is important. The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of the Hyperacusis Questionnaire (HQ) for use as a measurement tool using data from a sample of 264 adults who took part in tinnitus research. We evaluated the HQ factor structure, internal consistency, convergent and discriminant validity, and floor and ceiling effects. Internal consistency was high (Cronbach's alpha = 0.88) and moderate correlations were observed between the HQ, uncomfortable loudness levels, and other health questionnaires. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the original HQ three-factor solution and a one-factor solution were both a poor fit to the data. Four problematic items were removed and exploratory factor analysis identified a two-factor (attentional and social) solution. The original three-factor structure of the HQ was not confirmed. All fourteen items do not accurately assess hypersensitivity to sound in a tinnitus population. We propose a 10-item (2-factor) version of the HQ, which will need to be confirmed using a new tinnitus and perhaps nontinnitus population. PMID:26557658

  13. RNA-seq reveals regional differences in transcriptome response to heat stress in the marine snail Chlorostoma funebralis.

    PubMed

    Gleason, Lani U; Burton, Ronald S

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the role of gene expression in adaptation of marine ectotherms to different temperatures, we examined the transcriptome-wide thermal stress response in geographically separated populations of the intertidal snail Chlorostoma funebralis. Snails from two southern (heat tolerant) and two northern (heat sensitive) populations were acclimated to a common thermal environment, exposed to an environmentally relevant thermal stress and analysed using RNA-seq. Pooling across all populations revealed 306 genes with differential expression between control and heat-stressed samples, including 163 significantly upregulated and 143 significantly downregulated genes. When considered separately, regional differences in response were widely apparent. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) were upregulated in both regions, but the magnitude of response was significantly greater in northern populations for most Hsp70s, while the southern populations showed greater upregulation for approximately half of the Hsp40s. Of 177 stress-responsive genes in northern populations, 55 responded to heat stress only in northern populations. Several molecular chaperones and antioxidant genes that were not differentially expressed in southern populations showed higher expression under control conditions compared with northern populations. This suggests that evolution of elevated expression of these genes under benign conditions preadapts the southern populations to frequent heat stress and contributes to their higher thermal tolerance. These results indicate that evolution has resulted in different transcriptome responses across populations, including upregulation of genes in response to stress and preadaptation of genes in anticipation of stress (based on evolutionary history of frequent heat exposure). The relative importance of the two mechanisms differs among gene families and among populations. PMID:25524431

  14. Epidermal growth factor upregulates serotonin transporter and its association with visceral hypersensitivity in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiu-Fang; Zhou, Wei-Mei; Yang, Yan; Zhou, Jun; Li, Xue-Liang; Lin, Lin; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in visceral hypersensitivity and its effect on the serotonin transporter (SERT). METHODS: A rat model for visceral hypersensitivity was established by intra-colonic infusion of 0.5% acetic acid in 10-d-old Sprague-Dawley rats. The visceral sensitivity was assessed by observing the abdominal withdrawal reflex and recording electromyographic activity of the external oblique muscle in response to colorectal distension. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure the EGF levels in plasma and colonic tissues. SERT mRNA expression was detected by real-time PCR while protein level was determined by Western blot. The correlation between EGF and SERT levels in colon tissues was analyzed by Pearson’s correlation analysis. SERT function was examined by tritiated serotonin (5-HT) uptake experiments. Rat intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) were used to examine the EGF regulatory effect on SERT expression and function via the EGF receptor (EGFR). RESULTS: EGF levels were significantly lower in the rats with visceral hypersensitivity as measured in plasma (2.639 ± 0.107 ng/mL vs 4.066 ± 0.573 ng/mL, P < 0.01) and in colonic tissue (3.244 ± 0.135 ng/100 mg vs 3.582 ± 0.197 ng/100 mg colon tissue, P < 0.01) compared with controls. Moreover, the EGF levels were positively correlated with SERT levels (r = 0.820, P < 0.01). EGF displayed dose- and time-dependent increased SERT gene expressions in IEC-6 cells. An EGFR kinase inhibitor inhibited the effect of EGF on SERT gene upregulation. SERT activity was enhanced following treatment with EGF (592.908 ± 31.515 fmol/min per milligram vs 316.789 ± 85.652 fmol/min per milligram protein, P < 0.05) and blocked by the EGFR kinase inhibitor in IEC-6 cells (590.274 ± 25.954 fmol/min per milligram vs 367.834 ± 120.307 fmol/min per milligram protein, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: A decrease in EGF levels may contribute to the formation of visceral hypersensitivity through downregulation of SERT-mediated 5-HT uptake into enterocytes. PMID:25309082

  15. Molecular profiling of prostate cancer derived exosomes may reveal a predictive signature for response to docetaxel

    PubMed Central

    Kharaziha, Pedram; Chioureas, Dimitris; Rutishauser, Dorothea; Baltatzis, George; Lennartsson, Lena; Fonseca, Pedro; Azimi, Alireza; Hultenby, Kjell; Zubarev, Roman; Ullén, Anders; Yachnin, Jeffrey; Nilsson, Sten; Panaretakis, Theocharis

    2015-01-01

    Docetaxel is a cornerstone treatment for metastatic, castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) which remains a leading cause of cancer-related deaths, worldwide. The clinical usage of docetaxel has resulted in modest gains in survival, primarily due to the development of resistance. There are currently no clinical biomarkers available that predict whether a CRPC patient will respond or acquire resistance to this therapy. Comparative proteomics analysis of exosomes secreted from DU145 prostate cancer cells that are sensitive (DU145 Tax-Sen) or have acquired resistance (DU145 Tax-Res) to docetaxel, demonstrated significant differences in the amount of exosomes secreted and in their molecular composition. A panel of proteins was identified by proteomics to be differentially enriched in DU145 Tax-Res compared to DU145 Tax-Sen exosomes and was validated by western blotting. Importantly, we identified MDR-1, MDR-3, Endophilin-A2 and PABP4 that were enriched only in DU145 Tax-Res exosomes. We validated the presence of these proteins in the serum of a small cohort of patients. DU145 cells that have uptaken DU145 Tax-Res exosomes show properties of increased matrix degradation. In summary, exosomes derived from DU145 Tax-Res cells may be a valuable source of biomarkers for response to therapy. PMID:25844599

  16. Revealing real-time emotional responses: a personalized assessment based on heartbeat dynamics.

    PubMed

    Valenza, Gaetano; Citi, Luca; Lanatá, Antonio; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Emotion recognition through computational modeling and analysis of physiological signals has been widely investigated in the last decade. Most of the proposed emotion recognition systems require relatively long-time series of multivariate records and do not provide accurate real-time characterizations using short-time series. To overcome these limitations, we propose a novel personalized probabilistic framework able to characterize the emotional state of a subject through the analysis of heartbeat dynamics exclusively. The study includes thirty subjects presented with a set of standardized images gathered from the international affective picture system, alternating levels of arousal and valence. Due to the intrinsic nonlinearity and nonstationarity of the RR interval series, a specific point-process model was devised for instantaneous identification considering autoregressive nonlinearities up to the third-order according to the Wiener-Volterra representation, thus tracking very fast stimulus-response changes. Features from the instantaneous spectrum and bispectrum, as well as the dominant Lyapunov exponent, were extracted and considered as input features to a support vector machine for classification. Results, estimating emotions each 10 seconds, achieve an overall accuracy in recognizing four emotional states based on the circumplex model of affect of 79.29%, with 79.15% on the valence axis, and 83.55% on the arousal axis. PMID:24845973

  17. Nanoscale histone localization in live cells reveals reduced chromatin mobility in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Vidi, Pierre-Alexandre; Lelièvre, Sophie A; Irudayaraj, Joseph M K

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear functions including gene expression, DNA replication and genome maintenance intimately rely on dynamic changes in chromatin organization. The movements of chromatin fibers might play important roles in the regulation of these fundamental processes, yet the mechanisms controlling chromatin mobility are poorly understood owing to methodological limitations for the assessment of chromatin movements. Here, we present a facile and quantitative technique that relies on photoactivation of GFP-tagged histones and paired-particle tracking to measure chromatin mobility in live cells. We validate the method by comparing live cells to ATP-depleted cells and show that chromatin movements in mammalian cells are predominantly energy dependent. We also find that chromatin diffusion decreases in response to DNA breaks induced by a genotoxic drug or by the ISceI meganuclease. Timecourse analysis after cell exposure to ionizing radiation indicates that the decrease in chromatin mobility is transient and precedes subsequent increased mobility. Future applications of the method in the DNA repair field and beyond are discussed. PMID:25501817

  18. Label-free microscopy and stress responses reveal the functional organization of Pseudodiaptomus marinus copepod myofibrils.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Ali; Hage, Charles Henri; Souissi, Anissa; Leray, Aymeric; Héliot, Laurent; Souissi, Sami; Vandenbunder, Bernard

    2015-08-01

    Pseudodiaptomus marinus copepods are small crustaceans living in estuarine areas endowed with exceptional swimming and adaptative performances. Since the external cuticle acts as an impermeable barrier for most dyes and molecular tools for labeling copepod proteins with fluorescent tags are not available, imaging cellular organelles in these organisms requires label free microscopy. Complementary nonlinear microscopy techniques have been used to investigate the structure and the response of their myofibrils to abrupt changes of temperature or/and salinity. In contrast with previous observations in vertebrates and invertebrates, the flavin autofluorescence which is a signature of mitochondria activity and the Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) pattern assigned to T-tubules overlapped along myofibrils with the second harmonic generation (SHG) striated pattern generated by myosin tails in sarcomeric A bands. Temperature jumps from 18 to 4 °C or salinity jumps from 30 to 15 psu mostly affected flavin autofluorescence. Severe salinity jumps from 30 to 0 psu dismantled myofibril organization with major changes both in the SHG and CARS patterns. After a double stress (from 18 °C/30 psu to 4° C/0 psu) condensed and distended regions appeared within single myofibrils, with flavin autofluorescence bands located between sarcomeric A bands. These results shed light on the interactions between the different functional compartments which provide fast acting excitation-contraction coupling and adequate power supply in copepods muscles. PMID:26057347

  19. A Versatile Phenotyping System and Analytics Platform Reveals Diverse Temporal Responses to Water Availability in Setaria.

    PubMed

    Fahlgren, Noah; Feldman, Maximilian; Gehan, Malia A; Wilson, Melinda S; Shyu, Christine; Bryant, Douglas W; Hill, Steven T; McEntee, Colton J; Warnasooriya, Sankalpi N; Kumar, Indrajit; Ficor, Tracy; Turnipseed, Stephanie; Gilbert, Kerrigan B; Brutnell, Thomas P; Carrington, James C; Mockler, Todd C; Baxter, Ivan

    2015-10-01

    Phenotyping has become the rate-limiting step in using large-scale genomic data to understand and improve agricultural crops. Here, the Bellwether Phenotyping Platform for controlled-environment plant growth and automated multimodal phenotyping is described. The system has capacity for 1140 plants, which pass daily through stations to record fluorescence, near-infrared, and visible images. Plant Computer Vision (PlantCV) was developed as open-source, hardware platform-independent software for quantitative image analysis. In a 4-week experiment, wild Setaria viridis and domesticated Setaria italica had fundamentally different temporal responses to water availability. While both lines produced similar levels of biomass under limited water conditions, Setaria viridis maintained the same water-use efficiency under water replete conditions, while Setaria italica shifted to less efficient growth. Overall, the Bellwether Phenotyping Platform and PlantCV software detected significant effects of genotype and environment on height, biomass, water-use efficiency, color, plant architecture, and tissue water status traits. All ?79 000 images acquired during the course of the experiment are publicly available. PMID:26099924

  20. Random number generation in neglect patients reveals enhanced response stereotypy, but no neglect in number space.

    PubMed

    Loetscher, Tobias; Brugger, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Based on interactions between number and space apparent from healthy subjects' randomization attempts we expected random number generation (RNG) to be sensitive for the monitoring of unilateral spatial deficits. Specifically, we predicted patients with left-sided hemineglect to evidence "neglect in number space", i.e. to produce a deficiency in the generation of small, "left-sided" numbers. In RNG of digits from 1 to 6, 19 patients with left-sided neglect generated sequences with a higher redundancy, but as many small numbers as did a matched control group. We discuss possible reasons for the absence of a small-number neglect and emphasize that the observed redundancy was not due to a counting bias, as known from other neurological patients, but to an unspecific imbalance in the use of response alternatives. We speculate that this may be the consequence of disrupted fronto-parietal functions normally serving in the sequential organization and manipulation of items in working memory. PMID:18771676

  1. Extensive differences in antifungal immune response in two Drosophila species revealed by comparative transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Seto, Yosuke; Tamura, Koichiro

    2013-01-01

    The innate immune system of Drosophila is activated by ingestion of microorganisms. D. melanogaster breeds on fruits fermented by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, whereas D. virilis breeds on slime flux and decaying bark of tree housing a variety of bacteria, yeasts, and molds. In this study, it is shown that D. virilis has a higher resistance to oral infection of a species of filamentous fungi belonging to the genus Penicillium compared to D. melanogaster. In response to the fungal infection, a transcriptome profile of immune-related genes was considerably different between D. melanogaster and D. virilis: the genes encoding antifungal peptides, Drosomycin and Metchnikowin, were highly expressed in D. melanogaster whereas, the genes encoding Diptericin and Defensin were highly expressed in D. virilis. On the other hand, the immune-induced molecule (IM) genes showed contrary expression patterns between the two species: they were induced by the fungal infection in D. melanogaster but tended to be suppressed in D. virilis. Our transcriptome analysis also showed newly predicted immune-related genes in D. virilis. These results suggest that the innate immune system has been extensively differentiated during the evolution of these Drosophila species. PMID:24151578

  2. Revealing Real-Time Emotional Responses: a Personalized Assessment based on Heartbeat Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenza, Gaetano; Citi, Luca; Lanatá, Antonio; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2014-05-01

    Emotion recognition through computational modeling and analysis of physiological signals has been widely investigated in the last decade. Most of the proposed emotion recognition systems require relatively long-time series of multivariate records and do not provide accurate real-time characterizations using short-time series. To overcome these limitations, we propose a novel personalized probabilistic framework able to characterize the emotional state of a subject through the analysis of heartbeat dynamics exclusively. The study includes thirty subjects presented with a set of standardized images gathered from the international affective picture system, alternating levels of arousal and valence. Due to the intrinsic nonlinearity and nonstationarity of the RR interval series, a specific point-process model was devised for instantaneous identification considering autoregressive nonlinearities up to the third-order according to the Wiener-Volterra representation, thus tracking very fast stimulus-response changes. Features from the instantaneous spectrum and bispectrum, as well as the dominant Lyapunov exponent, were extracted and considered as input features to a support vector machine for classification. Results, estimating emotions each 10 seconds, achieve an overall accuracy in recognizing four emotional states based on the circumplex model of affect of 79.29%, with 79.15% on the valence axis, and 83.55% on the arousal axis.

  3. Revealing Real-Time Emotional Responses: a Personalized Assessment based on Heartbeat Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Valenza, Gaetano; Citi, Luca; Lanatá, Antonio; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Emotion recognition through computational modeling and analysis of physiological signals has been widely investigated in the last decade. Most of the proposed emotion recognition systems require relatively long-time series of multivariate records and do not provide accurate real-time characterizations using short-time series. To overcome these limitations, we propose a novel personalized probabilistic framework able to characterize the emotional state of a subject through the analysis of heartbeat dynamics exclusively. The study includes thirty subjects presented with a set of standardized images gathered from the international affective picture system, alternating levels of arousal and valence. Due to the intrinsic nonlinearity and nonstationarity of the RR interval series, a specific point-process model was devised for instantaneous identification considering autoregressive nonlinearities up to the third-order according to the Wiener-Volterra representation, thus tracking very fast stimulus-response changes. Features from the instantaneous spectrum and bispectrum, as well as the dominant Lyapunov exponent, were extracted and considered as input features to a support vector machine for classification. Results, estimating emotions each 10 seconds, achieve an overall accuracy in recognizing four emotional states based on the circumplex model of affect of 79.29%, with 79.15% on the valence axis, and 83.55% on the arousal axis. PMID:24845973

  4. Physiological and proteomic analyses of leaves from the halophyte Tangut Nitraria reveals diverse response pathways critical for high salinity tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tielong; Chen, Jinhui; Zhang, Jingbo; Shi, Shengqing; Zhou, Yanwei; Lu, Lu; Wang, Pengkai; Jiang, Zeping; Yang, Jinchang; Zhang, Shougong; Shi, Jisen

    2015-01-01

    Soil salinization poses a serious threat to the environment and agricultural productivity worldwide. Studies on the physiological and molecular mechanisms of salinity tolerance in halophytic plants provide valuable information to enhance their salt tolerance. Tangut Nitraria is a widely distributed halophyte in saline-alkali soil in the northern areas of China. In this study, we used a proteomic approach to investigate the molecular pathways of the high salt tolerance of T. Nitraria. We analyzed the changes in biomass, photosynthesis, and redox-related enzyme activities in T. Nitraria leaves from plant seedlings treated with high salt concentration. Comparative proteomic analysis of the leaves revealed that the expression of 71 proteins was significantly altered after salinity treatments of T. Nitraria. These salinity-responsive proteins were mainly involved in photosynthesis, redox homeostasis, stress/defense, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, protein metabolism, signal transduction, and membrane transport. Results showed that the reduction of photosynthesis under salt stress was attributed to the down-regulation of the enzymes and proteins involved in the light reaction and Calvin cycle. Protein-protein interaction analysis revealed that the proteins involved in redox homeostasis, photosynthesis, and energy metabolism constructed two types of response networks to high salt stress. T. Nitraria plants developed diverse mechanisms for scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) in their leaves to cope with stress induced by high salinity. This study provides important information regarding the salt tolerance of the halophyte T. Nitraria. PMID:25713577

  5. Physiological and proteomic analyses of leaves from the halophyte Tangut Nitraria reveals diverse response pathways critical for high salinity tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tielong; Chen, Jinhui; Zhang, Jingbo; Shi, Shengqing; Zhou, Yanwei; Lu, Lu; Wang, Pengkai; Jiang, Zeping; Yang, Jinchang; Zhang, Shougong; Shi, Jisen

    2015-01-01

    Soil salinization poses a serious threat to the environment and agricultural productivity worldwide. Studies on the physiological and molecular mechanisms of salinity tolerance in halophytic plants provide valuable information to enhance their salt tolerance. Tangut Nitraria is a widely distributed halophyte in saline–alkali soil in the northern areas of China. In this study, we used a proteomic approach to investigate the molecular pathways of the high salt tolerance of T. Nitraria. We analyzed the changes in biomass, photosynthesis, and redox-related enzyme activities in T. Nitraria leaves from plant seedlings treated with high salt concentration. Comparative proteomic analysis of the leaves revealed that the expression of 71 proteins was significantly altered after salinity treatments of T. Nitraria. These salinity-responsive proteins were mainly involved in photosynthesis, redox homeostasis, stress/defense, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, protein metabolism, signal transduction, and membrane transport. Results showed that the reduction of photosynthesis under salt stress was attributed to the down-regulation of the enzymes and proteins involved in the light reaction and Calvin cycle. Protein–protein interaction analysis revealed that the proteins involved in redox homeostasis, photosynthesis, and energy metabolism constructed two types of response networks to high salt stress. T. Nitraria plants developed diverse mechanisms for scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) in their leaves to cope with stress induced by high salinity. This study provides important information regarding the salt tolerance of the halophyte T. Nitraria. PMID:25713577

  6. Microseismicity and Temporal Changes in Seismic Velocity Reveal Crustal Response to Dynamic Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delorey, A. A.; Johnson, P. A.; Chao, K.; Obara, K.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquake occurrence is both a driver of and the result of complexity in the stress field and elastic properties of the crust. If we understand how static and dynamic stresses perturb the crust, we can use these observations to better understand the current state of the crust. Here we focus on how the crust responds to dynamic stresses outside the region where static stresses are important. A tool to understand the current state of the crust has broad applications in seismic hazards, induced seismicity, and a general understanding of earthquake physics. As dynamic strains outside of the near field of an earthquake are small, often no more than a micro strain, we need sensitive measures to detect any resulting perturbations to the properties of the crust. Two methods we currently use are (i) measuring temporal changes in seismic velocities applying ambient noise, and (ii) measuring the spatiotemporal change in microseismic activity. A strength of using ambient noise to detect changes in seismic velocities is the ability to stack over space and time to reveal very small changes. We use microseismicity because there are many more small earthquakes than large ones, so more robust statistics can be applied to small earthquakes—applying microseismicity improves the detection of changes within the crust. A striking observation applying these methods is widespread increased seismicity and a transient increase in seismic velocities in Japan after the passage of surface waves from the 2012 M8.6 Indian Ocean earthquake. The velocity observations are obtained by stacking 113 Hinet stations and using 10-day windows. The velocity change extends to at least 5 km depth based on the spatial wavelengths employed (0.1-5 Hz). Based on our field observations and those of others, as well as our laboratory studies one may expect a decrease in the crustal velocity from wave dynamics. The observed increase in velocity could be an indirect effect such that frictional contacts stiffen under changing quasi-static stress conditions in the presence of an increase in microseismicity. Alternatively, an increase in velocity may suggest that weak motions strengthen frictional contacts within the crust, whereas those contacts are slightly destabilized under ambient conditions.

  7. Different Responses to Heat Shock Stress Revealed Heteromorphic Adaptation Strategy of Pyropia haitanensis (Bangiales, Rhodophyta)

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhujun; Yang, Rui; Qian, Feijian; Chen, Haimin; Yan, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    Pyropia has a unique heteromorphic life cycle with alternation stages between thallus and conchocelis, which lives at different water temperatures in different seasons. To better understand the different adaptation strategies for temperature stress, we tried to observe comparative biochemical changes of Pyropia haitanensis based on a short term heat shock model. The results showed that: (1) At normal temperature, free-living conchocelis contains significantly higher levels of H2O2, fatty acid-derived volatiles, the copy number of Phrboh and Phhsp70 genes,the activities of NADPH oxidase and floridoside than those in thallus. The released H2O2 and NADPH oxidase activity of conchocelis were more than 7 times higher than those of thallus. The copy number of Phrboh in conchocelis was 32 times that in thallus. (2) After experiencing heat shock at 35°C for 30 min, the H2O2 contents, the mRNA levels of Phrboh and Phhsp70, NADPH oxidase activity and the floridoside content in thallus were all significantly increased. The mRNA levels of Phrboh increased 5.78 times in 5 min, NADPH oxidase activity increased 8.45 times in 20 min. (3) Whereas, in conchocelis, the changes in fatty acids and their down-stream volatiles predominated, significantly increasing levels of saturated fatty acids and decreasing levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids occurred, and the 8-carbon volatiles were accumulated. However, the changes in H2O2 content and expression of oxidant-related genes and enzymatic activity were not obvious. Overall, these results indicate that conchocelis maintains a high level of active protective apparatus to endure its survival at high temperature, while thallus exhibit typical stress responses to heat shock. It is concluded that Pyropia haitanensis has evolved a delicate strategy for temperature adaptation for its heteromorphic life cycle. PMID:24709783

  8. Zircon response to high-grade metamorphism as revealed by U-Pb and cathodoluminescence studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebel, W.; Shang, C. K.; Thern, E.; Danišík, M.; Rohrmüller, J.

    2012-11-01

    Correct interpretation of zircon ages from high-grade metamorphic terrains poses a major challenge because of the differential response of the U-Pb system to metamorphism, and many aspects like pressure-temperature conditions, metamorphic mineral transformations and textural properties of the zircon crystals have to be explored. A large (c. 450 km2) coherent migmatite complex was recently discovered in the Bohemian Massif, Central European Variscides. Rocks from this complex are characterized by granulite- and amphibolite-facies mineral assemblages and, based on compositional and isotopic trends, are identified as the remnants of a magma body derived from mixing between tonalite and supracrustal rocks. Zircon crystals from the migmatites are exclusively large (200-400 ?m) and yield 207Pb/206Pb evaporation ages between 342-328 Ma and single-grain zircon fractions analysed by U-Pb ID-TIMS method plot along the concordia curve between 342 and 325 Ma. High-resolution U-Pb SHRIMP analyses substantiate the existence of a resolvable age variability and yield older 206Pb/238U ages (342-330 Ma, weighted mean age = 333.6 ± 3.1 Ma) for inner zone domains without relict cores and younger 206Pb/238U ages (333-320 Ma, weighted mean age = 326.0 ± 2.8 Ma) for rim domains. Pre-metamorphic cores were identified only in one sample (206Pb/238U ages at 375.0 ± 3.9, 420.3 ± 4.4 and 426.2 ± 4.4 Ma). Most zircon ages bracket the time span between granulite-facies metamorphism in the Bohemian Massif (~345 Ma) and the late-Variscan anatectic overprint (Bavarian phase, ~325 Ma). It is argued that pre-existing zircon was variously affected by these metamorphic events and that primary magmatic growth zones were replaced by secondary textures as a result of diffusion reaction processes and replacement of zircon by dissolution and recrystallization followed by new zircon rim growth. Collectively, the results show that the zircons equilibrated during high-grade metamorphism and record partial loss of radiogenic Pb during post-peak granulite events and new growth under subsequent anatectic conditions.

  9. Systems Biology of Tissue-Specific Response to Anaplasma phagocytophilum Reveals Differentiated Apoptosis in the Tick Vector Ixodes scapularis

    PubMed Central

    Ayllón, Nieves; Villar, Margarita; Galindo, Ruth C.; Kocan, Katherine M.; Šíma, Radek; López, Juan A.; Vázquez, Jesús; Alberdi, Pilar; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Kopá?ek, Petr; de la Fuente, José

    2015-01-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum is an emerging pathogen that causes human granulocytic anaplasmosis. Infection with this zoonotic pathogen affects cell function in both vertebrate host and the tick vector, Ixodes scapularis. Global tissue-specific response and apoptosis signaling pathways were characterized in I. scapularis nymphs and adult female midguts and salivary glands infected with A. phagocytophilum using a systems biology approach combining transcriptomics and proteomics. Apoptosis was selected for pathway-focused analysis due to its role in bacterial infection of tick cells. The results showed tissue-specific differences in tick response to infection and revealed differentiated regulation of apoptosis pathways. The impact of bacterial infection was more pronounced in tick nymphs and midguts than in salivary glands, probably reflecting bacterial developmental cycle. All apoptosis pathways described in other organisms were identified in I. scapularis, except for the absence of the Perforin ortholog. Functional characterization using RNA interference showed that Porin knockdown significantly increases tick colonization by A. phagocytophilum. Infection with A. phagocytophilum produced complex tissue-specific alterations in transcript and protein levels. In tick nymphs, the results suggested a possible effect of bacterial infection on the inhibition of tick immune response. In tick midguts, the results suggested that A. phagocytophilum infection inhibited cell apoptosis to facilitate and establish infection through up-regulation of the JAK/STAT pathway. Bacterial infection inhibited the intrinsic apoptosis pathway in tick salivary glands by down-regulating Porin expression that resulted in the inhibition of Cytochrome c release as the anti-apoptotic mechanism to facilitate bacterial infection. However, tick salivary glands may promote apoptosis to limit bacterial infection through induction of the extrinsic apoptosis pathway. These dynamic changes in response to A. phagocytophilum in I. scapularis tissue-specific transcriptome and proteome demonstrated the complexity of the tick response to infection and will contribute to characterize gene regulation in ticks. PMID:25815810

  10. The hypersensitive induced reaction and leucine-rich repeat proteins regulate plant cell death associated with disease and plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Kim, Young Jin; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2011-01-01

    Pathogen-induced programmed cell death (PCD) is intimately linked with disease resistance and susceptibility. However, the molecular components regulating PCD, including hypersensitive and susceptible cell death, are largely unknown in plants. In this study, we show that pathogen-induced Capsicum annuum hypersensitive induced reaction 1 (CaHIR1) and leucine-rich repeat 1 (CaLRR1) function as distinct plant PCD regulators in pepper plants during Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria infection. Confocal microscopy and protein gel blot analyses revealed that CaLRR1 and CaHIR1 localize to the extracellular matrix and plasma membrane (PM), respectively. Bimolecular fluorescent complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that the extracellular CaLRR1 specifically binds to the PM-located CaHIR1 in pepper leaves. Overexpression of CaHIR1 triggered pathogen-independent cell death in pepper and Nicotiana benthamiana plants but not in yeast cells. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of CaLRR1 and CaHIR1 distinctly strengthened and compromised hypersensitive and susceptible cell death in pepper plants, respectively. Endogenous salicylic acid levels and pathogenesis-related gene transcripts were elevated in CaHIR1-silenced plants. VIGS of NbLRR1 and NbHIR1, the N. benthamiana orthologs of CaLRR1 and CaHIR1, regulated Bax- and avrPto-/Pto-induced PCD. Taken together, these results suggest that leucine-rich repeat and hypersensitive induced reaction proteins may act as cell-death regulators associated with plant immunity and disease. PMID:20635864

  11. The edible brown seaweed Ecklonia cava reduces hypersensitivity in postoperative and neuropathic pain models in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Goo; Lim, Dong Wook; Cho, Suengmok; Han, Daeseok; Kim, Yun Tai

    2014-01-01

    The current study was designed to investigate whether edible brown seaweed Ecklonia cava extracts exhibits analgesic effects in plantar incision and spared nerve injury (SNI) rats. To evaluate pain-related behavior, we performed the mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) and thermal hypersensitivity tests measured by von Frey filaments and a hot/cold plate analgesia meter. Pain-related behavior was also determined through analysis of ultrasonic vocalization. The results of experiments showed MWT values of the group that was treated with E. cava extracts by 300 mg/kg significantly increased; on the contrary, number of ultrasonic distress vocalization of the treated group was reduced at 6 h and 24 h after plantar incision operation (62.8%, p < 0.05). Moreover, E. cava 300 mg/kg treated group increased the paw withdrawal latency in hot-and cold-plate tests in the plantar incision rats. After 15 days of continuous treatment with E. cava extracts at 300 mg/kg, the treated group showed significantly alleviated SNI-induced hypersensitivity response by MWT compared with the control group. In conclusion, these results suggest that E. cava extracts have potential analgesic effects in the case of postoperative pain and neuropathic pain in rats. PMID:24918539

  12. Hypersensitivity reactions to intravenous iron: guidance for risk minimization and management

    PubMed Central

    Rampton, David; Folkersen, Joergen; Fishbane, Steven; Hedenus, Michael; Howaldt, Stefanie; Locatelli, Francesco; Patni, Shalini; Szebeni, Janos; Weiss, Guenter

    2014-01-01

    Intravenous iron is widely used for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia when oral iron is inappropriate, ineffective or poorly tolerated. Acute hypersensitivity reactions during iron infusions are very rare but can be life-threatening. This paper reviews their frequency, pathogenesis and risk factors, and provides recommendations about their management and prevention. Complement activation-related pseudo-allergy triggered by iron nanoparticles is probably a more frequent pathogenetic mechanism in acute reactions to current formulations of intravenous iron than is an immunological IgE-mediated response. Major risk factors for hypersensitivity reactions include a previous reaction to an iron infusion, a fast iron infusion rate, multiple drug allergies, severe atopy, and possibly systemic inflammatory diseases. Early pregnancy is a contraindication to iron infusions, while old age and serious co-morbidity may worsen the impact of acute reactions if they occur. Management of iron infusions requires meticulous observation, and, in the event of an adverse reaction, prompt recognition and severity-related interventions by well-trained medical and nursing staff. PMID:25420283

  13. Pretreatment with glycomacropeptide reduces allergen sensitization, alleviates immediate cutaneous hypersensitivity and protects from anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, M; Chávez, N A; Salinas, E

    2012-01-01

    Allergic disorders are characterized by the involvement of allergen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)E antibodies and T helper type 2 (Th2) cells. The search for new therapies for allergic diseases has been the primary focus of interest for many investigators in recent years. Glycomacropeptide (GMP) is a biologically active component of milk that exhibits a range of immunomodulatory functions. We examined whether oral administration of GMP could affect the development of allergic sensitization and the severity of immediate cutaneous hypersensitivity reactions and of anaphylaxis. Rats treated with or without GMP were ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized and several indicators of allergy were evaluated. Pretreatment with GMP resulted in reduction of antigen-specific IgE titre in rats when sensitized with OVA. GMP administration also markedly suppressed the proliferative response of splenocytes to antigen and the production of interleukin (IL)-13 by splenocytes of sensitized animals. In addition, GMP pretreatment attenuated the intensity of the immediate cutaneous reaction induced by antigen and protected the sensitized rats from severe anaphylaxis. These data demonstrate, for the first time, that the administration of GMP prevents allergen sensitization and reduces the severity of the early-phase reaction induced by antigen in cutaneous hypersensitivity and in anaphylaxis. GMP may be used as a novel prophylactic agent for the control of allergic diseases. PMID:22943197

  14. Sinus node electrogram in patients with the hypersensitive carotid sinus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gang, E S; Oseran, D S; Mandel, W J; Peter, T

    1985-06-01

    Sinus node electrograms were obtained in two patients with unexplained syncope and the cardioinhibitory form of the hypersensitive carotid sinus syndrome. Direct recordings of sinus node potentials were obtained using a transvenous electrode catheter. Sinus node function was normal in both patients during standard electrophysiologic evaluation. Carotid sinus massage was performed in both patients and the sinus node electrogram was continuously recorded. After the onset of carotid sinus massage, prolongation of sinoatrial time, slowing of sinus rate of depolarization, sinoatrial exit block and finally sinus node arrest were recorded. After termination of carotid sinus massage, sinus node potentials did not precede the first atrial impulse; subsequent beats showed markedly prolonged sinoatrial times as well as changes in the P wave on the surface electrocardiogram. Sinus rate and sinoatrial time returned to control values gradually, as did the P wave configuration. Intravenous atropine (1.0 mg) abolished the abnormal response to carotid sinus massage. It is concluded that the application of carotid sinus massage in patients with the hypersensitive carotid sinus syndrome produces profound changes in sinoatrial conduction including sinoatrial exit block, as well as shifts in primary pacemaker site and sinus node arrest. These alterations in conduction and automaticity are reversible with atropine and may be secondary to denervation sensitivity to acetylcholine. PMID:3889101

  15. Rhesus Macaque B-Cell Responses to an HIV-1 Trimer Vaccine Revealed by Unbiased Longitudinal Repertoire Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Kaifan; He, Linling; Khan, Salar N.; O’Dell, Sijy; McKee, Krisha; Tran, Karen; Li, Yuxing; Sundling, Christopher; Morris, Charles D.; Mascola, John R.; Hedestam, Gunilla B. Karlsson

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has been used to investigate the diversity and maturation of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) in HIV-1-infected individuals. However, the application of NGS to the preclinical assessment of human vaccines, particularly the monitoring of vaccine-induced B-cell responses in a nonhuman primate (NHP) model, has not been reported. Here, we present a longitudinal NGS analysis of memory B-cell responses to an HIV-1 trimer vaccine in a macaque that has been extensively studied by single B-cell sorting and antibody characterization. We first established an NHP antibodyomics pipeline using the available 454 pyrosequencing data from this macaque and developed a protocol to sequence the NHP antibody repertoire in an unbiased manner. Using these methods, we then analyzed memory B-cell repertoires at four time points of NHP immunization and traced the lineages of seven CD4-binding site (CD4bs)-directed monoclonal antibodies previously isolated from this macaque. Longitudinal analysis revealed distinct patterns of B-cell lineage development in response to an HIV-1 trimer vaccine. While the temporal B-cell repertoire profiles and lineage patterns provide a baseline for comparison with forthcoming HIV-1 trimer vaccines, the newly developed NHP antibody NGS technologies and antibodyomics tools will facilitate future evaluation of human vaccine candidates. PMID:26530382

  16. 520-d Isolation and confinement simulating a flight to Mars reveals heightened immune responses and alterations of leukocyte phenotype.

    PubMed

    Yi, B; Rykova, M; Feuerecker, M; Jäger, B; Ladinig, C; Basner, M; Hörl, M; Matzel, S; Kaufmann, I; Strewe, C; Nichiporuk, I; Vassilieva, G; Rinas, K; Baatout, S; Schelling, G; Thiel, M; Dinges, D F; Morukov, B; Choukèr, A

    2014-08-01

    During interplanetary exploration, chronic stress caused by long term isolation and confinement in the spacecraft is one of the major concerns of physical and psychological health of space travelers. And for human on Earth, more and more people live in an isolated condition, which has become a common social problem in modern western society. Collective evidences have indicated prolonged chronic stress could bring big influence to human immune function, which may lead to a variety of health problems. However, to what extent long-term isolation can affect the immune system still remains largely unknow. A simulated 520-d Mars mission provided an extraordinary chance to study the effect of prolonged isolation. Six healthy males participated in this mission and their active neuroendocrine and immune conditions were studied with saliva and blood samples from all participants on chosen time points during the isolation period. As a typical neuroendocrine parameter, stress hormone cortisol was measured in the morning saliva samples. Immune phenotype changes were monitored through peripheral leukocyte phenotype analysis. Using an ex vivo viral infection simulation assay we assessed the immune response changes characterized by the ability to produce representative endogenous pro-inflammatory cytokines. The results of this study revealed elevated cortisol levels, increased lymphocyte amount and heightened immune responses, suggesting that prolonged isolation acting as chronic stressors are able to trigger leukocyte phenotype changes and poorly controlled immune responses. PMID:24704568

  17. Genome-scale Mapping of DNaseI Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    John, Sam; Sabo, Peter J.; Canfield, Theresa K.; Lee, Kristen; Vong, Shinny; Weaver, Molly; Wang, Hao; Vierstra, Jeff; Reynolds, Alex P.; Thurman, Robert E.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.

    2014-01-01

    DNaseI-seq is a global and high-resolution method that uses the non-specific endonuclease DNaseI to map chromatin accessibility. These accessible regions, designated as DNaseI hypersensitive sites (DHSs), define the regulatory features, (eg. promoters, enhancers, insulators, locus control regions) of complex genomes. In this unit, we will describe systematic methods for nuclei isolation, digestion of nuclei with limiting concentrations of DNaseI and the biochemical fractionation of DNaseI hypersensitive sites in preparation for high-throughput sequencing. DNaseI-seq is an unbiased and robust method that is not predicated on an a priori understanding of regulatory patterns or chromatin features. PMID:23821440

  18. The Hypersensitivity of Horses to Culicoides Bites in British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Gail S.; Belton, Peter; Kleider, Nicholas

    1988-01-01

    Culicoides hypersensitivity is a chronic, recurrent, seasonal dermatitis of horses that has a worldwide distribution, but has only recently been reported in Canada. It is characterized by intense pruritus resulting in lesions associated with self-induced trauma. A survey of veterinarians and horse-owners in British Columbia showed no differences in susceptibility due to the sex, color, breed, or height of the horses. The prevalence of the disease in the 209 horses surveyed was 26%. Horses sharing the same pasture could be unaffected. The disease was reported primarily from southwestern British Columbia; it occurred between April and October and usually affected the ventral midline, mane, and tail. Horses were generally less than nine years old when the clinical signs first appeared ([unk]=5.9 yr). Culicoides hypersensitivity was common in the lineage of several affected horses, possibly indicating a genetic susceptibility. Most cases were severe enough to require veterinary attention and some horses were euthanized. PMID:17423117

  19. Adrenergic hypersensitivity after beta-blocker withdrawal in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Gilligan, D M; Chan, W L; Stewart, R; Oakley, C M

    1991-09-15

    Withdrawal of beta-blocker therapy has been associated with the development of adrenergic hypersensitivity and adverse clinical effects in patients with coronary artery disease and hypertension. The aim of this study was to establish the occurrence and clinical significance of adrenergic hypersensitivity after abrupt withdrawal of long-term beta blockade in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Beta-adrenergic sensitivity was measured using the isoprenaline chronotropic dose25. Symptom assessment chronotropic dose25 calculation, bicycle exercise, echocardiography and Holter monitoring were performed while the patient received beta-blocker therapy and repeated on days 2, 4, 6, 8 (acute withdrawal period) and on day 21 after abrupt withdrawal. The study was terminated after 7 patients had been studied because all patients experienced a marked deterioration in symptoms and several clinical events had occurred. The chronotropic dose25 (mean +/- standard deviation) demonstrated beta 1-adrenergic hypersensitivity with a minimal value of 1.6 +/- 0.8 micrograms during the acute withdrawal period compared with 3.8 +/- 1.7 micrograms on day 21 (p = 0.003). Heart rates during rest and exercise showed an overshoot increase during the acute withdrawal period. The maximal 24-hour ventricular ectopic count was higher during the acute withdrawal period than during day 21 (p = 0.04). Of 3 patients with inducible outflow tract gradients, 2 developed resting gradients greater than 30 mm Hg during the acute withdrawal period. There was an increase in peak late filling velocity of mitral inflow after beta-blocker withdrawal. In conclusion, transient beta-adrenergic hypersensitivity occurs after beta-blocker withdrawal in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and is associated with significant physiologic changes and adverse clinical consequences. PMID:1892084

  20. Occupational hypersensitivity pneumonitis in a smelter exposed to zinc fumes

    SciTech Connect

    Ameille, J.; Brechot, J.M.; Brochard, P.; Capron, F.; Dore, M.F. )

    1992-03-01

    A smelter exposed to zinc fumes reported severe recurrent episodes of cough, dyspnea and fever. Bronchoalveolar lavage showed a marked increase in lymphocytes count with predominance of CD8 T-lymphocytes. Presence of zinc in alveolar macrophages was assessed by analytic transmission electron microscopy. This is the first case of recurrent bronchoalveolitis related to zinc exposure in which the clinical picture and BAL results indicate a probable hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

  1. Transfection of normal human and Chinese hamster DNA corrects diepoxybutane-induced chromosomal hypersensitivity of Fanconi anemia fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Shaham, M.; Adler, B.; Ganguly, S.; Chaganti, R.S.K.

    1987-08-01

    Cultured cells from individuals affected with Fanconi anemia (FA) exhibit spontaneous chromosome breakage and hypersensitivity to the cell killing and clastogenic effects of the difunctional alkylating agent diepoxybutane (DEB). The authors report here the correction of both of these DEB-hypersensitivity phenotypes of FA cells achieved by cotransfection of normal placental of Chinese hamster lung cell DNA and the plasmid pSV2-neo-SVgpt. Transfectants were selected for clonogenic survival after treatment with DEB at a dose of 5 ..mu..gml. At this dose of DEB, the clonogenicity of normal fibroblasts was reduced to 50% and that of FA fibroblasts was reduced to zero. DEB-resistant (DEB/sup r/) colonies selected in this system exhibited a normal response to DEB-induced chromosome breakage and resistance to repeated DEB treatment. The neo and gpt sequences were detected by Southern blot analysis of DNA from one of four DEB/sup r/ colonies independently derived from transfection of human DNA and one of three DEB/sup r/ colonies independently derived from transfection of Chinese hamster DNA. The results demonstrate that DNA sequences that complement the two hallmark cellular phenotypes (cellular and chromosomal hypersensitivity to alkylating agents) of FA are present in human as well as Chinese hamster DNA. The cloning of these genes using transfection strategies can be expected to enable molecular characterization of FA

  2. Cracking the egg: An insight into egg hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Dhanapala, Pathum; De Silva, Chamika; Doran, Tim; Suphioglu, Cenk

    2015-08-01

    Hypersensitivity to the chicken egg is a widespread disorder mainly affecting 1-2% of children worldwide. It is the second most common food allergy in children, next to cow's milk allergy. Egg allergy is mainly caused by hypersensitivity to four allergens found in the egg white; ovomucoid, ovalbumin, ovotransferrin and lysozyme. However, some research suggests the involvement of allergens exclusively found in the egg yolk such as chicken serum albumin and YGP42, which may play a crucial role in the overall reaction. In egg allergic individuals, these allergens cause conditions such as itching, atopic dermatitis, bronchial asthma, vomiting, rhinitis, conjunctivitis, laryngeal oedema and chronic urticaria, and anaphylaxis. Currently there is no permanent cure for egg allergy. Upon positive diagnosis for egg allergy, strict dietary avoidance of eggs and products containing traces of eggs is the most effective way of avoiding future hypersensitivity reactions. However, it is difficult to fully avoid eggs since they are found in a range of processed food products. An understanding of the mechanisms of allergic reactions, egg allergens and their prevalence, egg allergy diagnosis and current treatment strategies are important for future studies. This review addresses these topics and discusses both egg white and egg yolk allergy as a whole. PMID:25965316

  3. Upper ocean response to Hurricane Gonzalo (2014): Salinity effects revealed by targeted and sustained underwater glider observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingues, Ricardo; Goni, Gustavo; Bringas, Francis; Lee, Sang-Ki; Kim, Hyun-Sook; Halliwell, George; Dong, Jili; Morell, Julio; Pomales, Luis

    2015-09-01

    During October 2014, Hurricane Gonzalo traveled within 85 km from the location of an underwater glider situated north of Puerto Rico. Observations collected before, during, and after the passage of this hurricane were analyzed to improve our understanding of the upper ocean response to hurricane winds. The main finding in this study is that salinity potentially played an important role on changes observed in the upper ocean; a near-surface barrier layer likely suppressed the hurricane-induced upper ocean cooling, leading to smaller than expected temperature changes. Poststorm observations also revealed a partial recovery of the ocean to prestorm conditions 11 days after the hurricane. Comparison with a coupled ocean-atmosphere hurricane model indicates that model-observations discrepancies are largely linked to salinity effects described. Results presented in this study emphasize the value of underwater glider observations for improving our knowledge of how the ocean responds to tropical cyclone winds and for tropical cyclone intensification studies and forecasts.

  4. Secretome analysis revealed adaptive and non-adaptive responses of the Staphylococcus carnosus femB mutant

    PubMed Central

    Nega, Mulugeta; Dube, Linda; Kull, Melanie; Ziebandt, Anne-Kathrin; Ebner, Patrick; Albrecht, Dirk; Krismer, Bernhard; Rosenstein, Ralf; Hecker, Michael; Götz, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    FemABX peptidyl transferases are involved in non-ribosomal pentaglycine interpeptide bridge biosynthesis. Here, we characterized the phenotype of a Staphylococcus carnosus femB deletion mutant, which was affected in growth and showed pleiotropic effects such as enhanced methicillin sensitivity, lysostaphin resistance, cell clustering, and decreased peptidoglycan cross-linking. However, comparative secretome analysis revealed a most striking difference in the massive secretion or release of proteins into the culture supernatant in the femB mutant than the wild type. The secreted proteins can be categorized into typical cytosolic proteins and various murein hydrolases. As the transcription of the murein hydrolase genes was up-regulated in the mutant, they most likely represent an adaption response to the life threatening mutation. Even though the transcription of the cytosolic protein genes was unaltered, their high abundance in the supernatant of the mutant is most likely due to membrane leakage triggered by the weakened murein sacculus and enhanced autolysins. PMID:25430637

  5. Alopecia in Rhesus macaques correlates with immunophenotypic alterations in dermal inflammatory infiltrates consistent with hypersensitivity etiology

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Joshua; Fahey, Michele; Santos, Rosemary; Carville, Angela; Wachtman, Lynn; Mansfield, Keith

    2010-01-01

    Background Although alopecia is a commonly recognized problem affecting many captive Rhesus macaque colonies, there is no consensus as to the underlying etiology or appropriate course of management. Methods and Results We performed skin biopsies on a group of Rhesus macaques and demonstrate that alopecia is associated with superficial dermal perivascular mononuclear cell infiltrates and skin pathology consistent with chronic hypersensitivity dermatitis. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the inflammation is primarily composed of CD4+ cells admixed with histiocytes and mast cells. Inflammation is correlated with degree of alopecia. Further analysis in different groups of macaques revealed that animals born outdoors or infected with lung mites had reduced dermal inflammatory cell infiltrates and a lower incidence of alopecia. Conclusions These findings support a hypothesis that an altered housing status resulting in decreased pathogen burden in Rhesus macaque colonies may contribute to dermal immunophenotypic alterations and subsequent development of dermatitis with resultant alopecia. PMID:20102458

  6. STRUCTURE OF THE MACULA UTRICULI WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO DIRECTIONAL INTERPLAY OF SENSORY RESPONSES AS REVEALED BY MORPHOLOGICAL POLARIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Flock, Åke

    1964-01-01

    The anatomy of the labyrinth and the structure of the macula utriculi of the teleost fish (burbot) Lota vulgaris was studied by dissection, phase contrast, and electron microscopy. The innervating nerve fibers end at the bottom of the sensory cells where two types of nerve endings are found, granulated and non-granulated. The ultrastructure and organization of the sensory hair bundles are described, and the finding that the receptor cells are morphologically polarized by the presence of an asymmetrically located kinocilium in the sensory hair bundle is discussed in terms of directional sensitivity. The pattern of orientation of the hair cells in the macula utriculi was determined, revealing a complicated morphological polarization of the sensory epithelium. The findings suggest that the interplay of sensory responses is intimately related to the directional sensitivity of the receptor cells as revealed by their morphological polarization. The problem of efferent innervation is discussed, and it is concluded that the positional information signaled by the nerve fibers innervating the vestibular organs comprises an intricate pattern of interacting afferent and efferent impulses PMID:14203389

  7. Amygdala subnuclei connectivity in response to violence reveals unique influences of individual differences in psychopathic traits in a nonforensic sample.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Keith J; Porges, Eric C; Decety, Jean

    2015-04-01

    Atypical amygdala function and connectivity have reliably been associated with psychopathy. However, the amygdala is not a unitary structure. To examine how psychopathic traits in a nonforensic sample are linked to amygdala response to violence, this study used probabilistic tractography to classify amygdala subnuclei based on anatomical projections to and from amygdala subnuclei in a group of 43 male participants. The segmentation identified the basolateral complex (BLA; lateral, basal, and accessory basal subnuclei) and the central subnucleus (CE), which were used as seeds in a functional connectivity analysis to identify differences in neuronal coupling specific to observed violence. While a full amygdala seed showed significant connectivity only to right middle occipital gyrus, subnuclei seeds revealed unique connectivity patterns. BLA showed enhanced coupling with anterior cingulate and prefrontal regions, while CE showed increased connectivity with the brainstem, but reduced connectivity with superior parietal and precentral gyrus. Further, psychopathic personality factors were related to specific patterns of connectivity. Fearless Dominance scores on the psychopathic personality inventory predicted increased coupling between the BLA seed and sensory integration cortices, and increased connectivity between the CE seed and posterior insula. Conversely, Self-Centered Impulsivity scores were negatively correlated with coupling between BLA and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, and Coldheartedness scores predicted increased functional connectivity between BLA and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. Taken together, these findings demonstrate how subnuclei segmentations reveal important functional connectivity differences that are otherwise inaccessible. Such an approach yields a better understanding of amygdala dysfunction in psychopathy. PMID:25557777

  8. Transcriptomics of the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae in response to the bacterial antagonist Lysobacter enzymogenes reveals candidate fungal defense response genes.

    PubMed

    Mathioni, Sandra M; Patel, Nrupali; Riddick, Bianca; Sweigard, James A; Czymmek, Kirk J; Caplan, Jeffrey L; Kunjeti, Sridhara G; Kunjeti, Saritha; Raman, Vidhyavathi; Hillman, Bradley I; Kobayashi, Donald Y; Donofrio, Nicole M

    2013-01-01

    Plants and animals have evolved a first line of defense response to pathogens called innate or basal immunity. While basal defenses in these organisms are well studied, there is almost a complete lack of understanding of such systems in fungal species, and more specifically, how they are able to detect and mount a defense response upon pathogen attack. Hence, the goal of the present study was to understand how fungi respond to biotic stress by assessing the transcriptional profile of the rice blast pathogen, Magnaporthe oryzae, when challenged with the bacterial antagonist Lysobacter enzymogenes. Based on microscopic observations of interactions between M. oryzae and wild-type L. enzymogenes strain C3, we selected early and intermediate stages represented by time-points of 3 and 9 hours post-inoculation, respectively, to evaluate the fungal transcriptome using RNA-seq. For comparative purposes, we also challenged the fungus with L. enzymogenes mutant strain DCA, previously demonstrated to be devoid of antifungal activity. A comparison of transcriptional data from fungal interactions with the wild-type bacterial strain C3 and the mutant strain DCA revealed 463 fungal genes that were down-regulated during attack by C3; of these genes, 100 were also found to be up-regulated during the interaction with DCA. Functional categorization of genes in this suite included those with roles in carbohydrate metabolism, cellular transport and stress response. One gene in this suite belongs to the CFEM-domain class of fungal proteins. Another CFEM class protein called PTH11 has been previously characterized, and we found that a deletion in this gene caused advanced lesion development by C3 compared to its growth on the wild-type fungus. We discuss the characterization of this suite of 100 genes with respect to their role in the fungal defense response. PMID:24098512

  9. A Systems Biology Approach Reveals the Role of a Novel Methyltransferase in Response to Chemical Stress and Lipid Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Lissina, Elena; Young, Brian; Urbanus, Malene L.; Guan, Xue Li; Lowenson, Jonathan; Hoon, Shawn; Baryshnikova, Anastasia; Riezman, Isabelle; Michaut, Magali; Riezman, Howard; Cowen, Leah E.; Wenk, Markus R.; Clarke, Steven G.; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey

    2011-01-01

    Using small molecule probes to understand gene function is an attractive approach that allows functional characterization of genes that are dispensable in standard laboratory conditions and provides insight into the mode of action of these compounds. Using chemogenomic assays we previously identified yeast Crg1, an uncharacterized SAM-dependent methyltransferase, as a novel interactor of the protein phosphatase inhibitor cantharidin. In this study we used a combinatorial approach that exploits contemporary high-throughput techniques available in Saccharomyces cerevisiae combined with rigorous biological follow-up to characterize the interaction of Crg1 with cantharidin. Biochemical analysis of this enzyme followed by a systematic analysis of the interactome and lipidome of CRG1 mutants revealed that Crg1, a stress-responsive SAM-dependent methyltransferase, methylates cantharidin in vitro. Chemogenomic assays uncovered that lipid-related processes are essential for cantharidin resistance in cells sensitized by deletion of the CRG1 gene. Lipidome-wide analysis of mutants further showed that cantharidin induces alterations in glycerophospholipid and sphingolipid abundance in a Crg1-dependent manner. We propose that Crg1 is a small molecule methyltransferase important for maintaining lipid homeostasis in response to drug perturbation. This approach demonstrates the value of combining chemical genomics with other systems-based methods for characterizing proteins and elucidating previously unknown mechanisms of action of small molecule inhibitors. PMID:22028670

  10. Effect of Pre-Stressing on the Acid-Stress Response in Bifidobacterium Revealed Using Proteomic and Physiological Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Junhua; Qin, Qian; Guo, Huiyuan; Liu, Songling; Ge, Shaoyang; Zhang, Hongxing; Cui, Jianyun; Ren, Fazheng

    2015-01-01

    Weak acid resistance limits the application of Bifidobacteria as a probiotic in food. The acid tolerance response (ATR), caused by pre-stressing cells at a sublethal pH, could improve the acid resistance of Bifidobacteria to subsequent acid stress. In this study, we used Bifidobacterium longum sub. longum BBMN68 to investigate the effect of the ATR on the acid stress response (ASR), and compared the difference between the ATR and the ASR by analyzing the two-dimensional-PAGE protein profiles and performing physiological tests. The results revealed that a greater abundance of proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism and protein protection was present after the ASR than after the ATR in Bifidobacterium. Pre-stressing cells increased the abundance of proteins involved in energy production, amino acid metabolism, and peptidoglycan synthesis during the ASR of Bifidobacterium. Moreover, after the ASR, the content of ATP, NH3, thiols, and peptidoglycan, the activity of H+-ATPase, and the maintenance of the intracellular pH in the pre-stressed Bifidobacterium cells was significantly higher than in the uninduced cells. These results provide the first explanation as to why the resistance of Bifidobacterium to acid stress improved after pre-stressing. PMID:25689631

  11. Transcriptional responses of invasive and indigenous whiteflies to different host plants reveal their disparate capacity of adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong-Xing; Hong, Yue; Zhang, Min-Zhu; Wang, Yong-Liang; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci contains more than 35 cryptic species. The higher adaptability of Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1) cryptic species has been recognized as one important factor for its invasion and displacement of other indigenous species worldwide. Here we compared the performance of the invasive MEAM1 and the indigenous Asia II 3 whitefly species following host plant transfer from a suitable host (cotton) to an unsuitable host (tobacco) and analyzed their transcriptional responses. After transfer to tobacco for 24 h, MEAM1 performed much better than Asia II 3. Transcriptional analysis showed that the patterns of gene regulation were very different with most of the genes up-regulated in MEAM1 but down-regulated in Asia II 3. Whereas carbohydrate and energy metabolisms were repressed in Asia II 3, the gene expression and protein metabolisms were activated in MEAM1. Compared to the constitutive high expression of detoxification genes in MEAM1, most of the detoxification genes were down-regulated in Asia II 3. Enzymatic activities of P450, GST and esterase further verified that the detoxification of MEAM1 was much higher than that of Asia II 3. These results reveal obvious differences in responses of MEAM1 and Asia II 3 to host transfer. PMID:26041313

  12. Environmental proteomics reveals early microbial community responses to biostimulation at a uranium- and nitrate-contaminated site

    SciTech Connect

    Chourey, Karuna; Nissen, Silke; Vishnivetskaya, T.; Shah, Manesh B; Pffifner, Susan; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Loeffler, Frank E

    2013-01-01

    High performance mass spectrometry instrumentation coupled with improved protein extraction techniques enable metaproteomics to identify active members of soil and groundwater microbial communities. Metaproteomics workflows were applied to study the initial responses (i.e., 4 days post treatment) of the indigenous aquifer microbiota to biostimulation with emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) at a uranium-contaminated site. Members of the Betaproteobacteria (i.e., Dechloromonas, Ralstonia, Rhodoferax, Polaromonas, Delftia, Chromobacterium) and Firmicutes dominated the biostimulated aquifer community. Proteome characterization revealed distinct differences in protein expression between the microbial biomass collected from groundwater influenced by biostimulation and groundwater collected up-gradient of the EVO injection points. In particular, proteins involved in ammonium assimilation, EVO degradation, and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) granule formation were prominent following biostimulation. Interestingly, the atypical NosZ of a Dechloromonas sp. was highly expressed suggesting active nitrous oxide (N2O) respiration. c-type cytochromes were barely detected, as was citrate synthase, a biomarker for hexavalent uranium reduction activity, suggesting that metal reduction has not commenced 4 days post EVO delivery. Environmental metaproteomics identified microbial community responses to biostimulation and elucidated active pathways demonstrating the value of this technique for complementing nucleic acid-based approaches.

  13. Imaging reveals the focal area of spreading depolarizations and a variety of hemodynamic responses in a rat microembolic stroke model.

    PubMed

    Bere, Zsófia; Obrenovitch, Tihomir P; Kozák, Gábor; Bari, Ferenc; Farkas, Eszter

    2014-10-01

    Spreading depolarizations (SDs) occur in stroke, but the spatial association between SDs and the corresponding hemodynamic changes is incompletely understood. We applied multimodal imaging to visualize the focal area of selected SDs, and hemodynamic responses with SDs propagating over the ischemic cortex. The intracarotid infusion of polyethylene microspheres (d=45 to 53??m) produced multifocal ischemia in anesthetized rats (n=7). Synchronous image sequences captured through a cranial window above the frontoparietal cortex revealed: Changes in membrane potential (voltage-sensitive (VS) dye method); cerebral blood flow (CBF; laser speckle contrast (LSC) imaging); and hemoglobin (Hb) deoxygenation (red intrinsic optical signal (IOS) at 620 to 640?nm). A total of 31 SD events were identified. The foci of five SDs were seen in the cranial window, originating where CBF was the lowest (56.9±9%), but without evident signs of infarcts. The hyperemic CBF responses to propagating SDs were coupled with three types of Hb saturation kinetics. More accentuated Hb desaturation was related to a larger decrease in CBF shortly after ischemia induction. Microsphere-induced embolization triggers SDs in the rat brain, relevant for small embolic infarcts in patients. The SD occurrence during the early phase of ischemia is not tightly associated with immediate infarct evolution. Various kinetics of Hb saturation may determine the metabolic consequences of individual SDs. PMID:25074743

  14. Mos1 Mutagenesis Reveals a Diversity of Mechanisms Affecting Response of Caenorhabditis elegans to the Bacterial Pathogen Microbacterium nematophilum

    PubMed Central

    Yook, Karen; Hodgkin, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    A specific host–pathogen interaction exists between Caenorhabditis elegans and the gram-positive bacterium Microbacterium nematophilum. This bacterium is able to colonize the rectum of susceptible worms and induces a defensive tail-swelling response in the host. Previous mutant screens have identified multiple loci that affect this interaction. Some of these loci correspond to known genes, but many bus genes [those with a bacterially unswollen (Bus) mutant phenotype] have yet to be cloned. We employed Mos1 transposon mutagenesis as a means of more rapidly cloning bus genes and identifying new mutants with altered pathogen response. This approach revealed new infection-related roles for two well-characterized and much-studied genes, egl-8 and tax-4. It also allowed the cloning of a known bus gene, bus-17, which encodes a predicted galactosyltransferase, and of a new bus gene, bus-19, which encodes a novel, albeit ancient, protein. The results illustrate advantages and disadvantages of Mos1 transposon mutagenesis in this system. PMID:17151260

  15. Aquaporin-9-expressing neutrophils are required for the establishment of contact hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Moniaga, Catharina Sagita; Watanabe, Sachiko; Honda, Tetsuya; Nielsen, Søren; Hara-Chikuma, Mariko

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin-9 (AQP9), a water/glycerol channel protein, is expressed in several immune cells including neutrophils; however, its role in immune response remains unknown. Here we show the involvement of AQP9 in hapten-induced contact hypersensitivity (CHS), as a murine model of skin allergic contact dermatitis, using AQP9 knockout (AQP9?/?) mice. First, the CHS response to hapten dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) was impaired in AQP9?/? mice compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Adoptive transfer of sensitized AQP9?/? draining lymph node (dLN) cells into WT recipients resulted in a reduced CHS response, indicating impaired sensitization in AQP9?/? mice. Second, administration of WT neutrophils into AQP9?/? mice during sensitization rescued the impaired CHS response. Neutrophil recruitment to dLNs upon hapten application was attenuated by AQP9 deficiency. Coincidentally, AQP9?/? neutrophils showed a reduced CC-chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) ligand-induced migration efficacy, which was attributed to the attenuated recruitment of neutrophils to dLNs. Furthermore, we found that neutrophil deficiency, observed in AQP9?/? or neutrophil-depleted mice, decreased IL-17A production by dLN cells, which might be responsible for T cell activation during a subsequent CHS response. Taken together, these findings suggest that AQP9 is required for the development of sensitization during cutaneous acquired immune responses via regulating neutrophil function. PMID:26489517

  16. Aquaporin-9-expressing neutrophils are required for the establishment of contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Moniaga, Catharina Sagita; Watanabe, Sachiko; Honda, Tetsuya; Nielsen, Søren; Hara-Chikuma, Mariko

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin-9 (AQP9), a water/glycerol channel protein, is expressed in several immune cells including neutrophils; however, its role in immune response remains unknown. Here we show the involvement of AQP9 in hapten-induced contact hypersensitivity (CHS), as a murine model of skin allergic contact dermatitis, using AQP9 knockout (AQP9(-/-)) mice. First, the CHS response to hapten dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) was impaired in AQP9(-/-) mice compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Adoptive transfer of sensitized AQP9(-/-) draining lymph node (dLN) cells into WT recipients resulted in a reduced CHS response, indicating impaired sensitization in AQP9(-/-) mice. Second, administration of WT neutrophils into AQP9(-/-) mice during sensitization rescued the impaired CHS response. Neutrophil recruitment to dLNs upon hapten application was attenuated by AQP9 deficiency. Coincidentally, AQP9(-/-) neutrophils showed a reduced CC-chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) ligand-induced migration efficacy, which was attributed to the attenuated recruitment of neutrophils to dLNs. Furthermore, we found that neutrophil deficiency, observed in AQP9(-/-) or neutrophil-depleted mice, decreased IL-17A production by dLN cells, which might be responsible for T cell activation during a subsequent CHS response. Taken together, these findings suggest that AQP9 is required for the development of sensitization during cutaneous acquired immune responses via regulating neutrophil function. PMID:26489517

  17. Expression Profiling during Arabidopsis/Downy Mildew Interaction Reveals a Highly-Expressed Effector That Attenuates Responses to Salicylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Asai, Shuta; Caillaud, Marie-Cécile; Furzer, Oliver J.; Ishaque, Naveed; Wirthmueller, Lennart; Fabro, Georgina; Shirasu, Ken; Jones, Jonathan D. G.

    2014-01-01

    Plants have evolved strong innate immunity mechanisms, but successful pathogens evade or suppress plant immunity via effectors delivered into the plant cell. Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa) causes downy mildew on Arabidopsis thaliana, and a genome sequence is available for isolate Emoy2. Here, we exploit the availability of genome sequences for Hpa and Arabidopsis to measure gene-expression changes in both Hpa and Arabidopsis simultaneously during infection. Using a high-throughput cDNA tag sequencing method, we reveal expression patterns of Hpa predicted effectors and Arabidopsis genes in compatible and incompatible interactions, and promoter elements associated with Hpa genes expressed during infection. By resequencing Hpa isolate Waco9, we found it evades Arabidopsis resistance gene RPP1 through deletion of the cognate recognized effector ATR1. Arabidopsis salicylic acid (SA)-responsive genes including PR1 were activated not only at early time points in the incompatible interaction but also at late time points in the compatible interaction. By histochemical analysis, we found that Hpa suppresses SA-inducible PR1 expression, specifically in the haustoriated cells into which host-translocated effectors are delivered, but not in non-haustoriated adjacent cells. Finally, we found a highly-expressed Hpa effector candidate that suppresses responsiveness to SA. As this approach can be easily applied to host-pathogen interactions for which both host and pathogen genome sequences are available, this work opens the door towards transcriptome studies in infection biology that should help unravel pathogen infection strategies and the mechanisms by which host defense responses are overcome. PMID:25329884

  18. Solution structure of the PsIAA4 oligomerization domain reveals interaction modes for transcription factors in early auxin response

    PubMed Central

    Dinesh, Dhurvas Chandrasekaran; Kovermann, Michael; Gopalswamy, Mohanraj; Hellmuth, Antje; Calderón Villalobos, Luz Irina A.; Lilie, Hauke; Balbach, Jochen; Abel, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone auxin activates primary response genes by facilitating proteolytic removal of AUXIN/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID (AUX/IAA)-inducible repressors, which directly bind to transcriptional AUXIN RESPONSE FACTORS (ARF). Most AUX/IAA and ARF proteins share highly conserved C-termini mediating homotypic and heterotypic interactions within and between both protein families. The high-resolution NMR structure of C-terminal domains III and IV of the AUX/IAA protein PsIAA4 from pea (Pisum sativum) revealed a globular ubiquitin-like ?-grasp fold with homologies to the Phox and Bem1p (PB1) domain. The PB1 domain of wild-type PsIAA4 features two distinct surface patches of oppositely charged amino acid residues, mediating front-to-back multimerization via electrostatic interactions. Mutations of conserved basic or acidic residues on either face suppressed PsIAA4 PB1 homo-oligomerization in vitro and confirmed directional interaction of full-length PsIAA4 in vivo (yeast two-hybrid system). Mixing of oppositely mutated PsIAA4 PB1 monomers enabled NMR mapping of the negatively charged interface of the reconstituted PsIAA4 PB1 homodimer variant, whose stoichiometry (1:1) and equilibrium binding constant (KD ?6.4 ?M) were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. In silico protein–protein docking studies based on NMR and yeast interaction data derived a model of the PsIAA4 PB1 homodimer, which is comparable with other PB1 domain dimers, but indicated considerable differences between the homodimeric interfaces of AUX/IAA and ARF PB1 domains. Our study provides an impetus for elucidating the molecular determinants that confer specificity to complex protein–protein interaction circuits between members of the two central families of transcription factors important to the regulation of auxin-responsive gene expression. PMID:25918389

  19. Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction in Food Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Linda Chia-Hui

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial barrier plays a critical role in the maintenance of gut homeostasis by limiting the penetration of luminal bacteria and dietary allergens, yet allowing antigen sampling for the generation of tolerance. Undigested proteins normally do not gain access to the lamina propria due to physical exclusion by tight junctions at the cell-cell contact sites and intracellular degradation by lysosomal enzymes in enterocytes. An intriguing question then arises: how do macromolecular food antigens cross the epithelial barrier? This review discusses the epithelial barrier dysfunction in sensitized intestine with special emphasis on the molecular mechanism of the enhanced transcytotic rates of allergens. The sensitization phase of allergy is characterized by antigen-induced cross-linking of IgE bound to high affinity Fc?RI on mast cell surface, leading to anaphylactic responses. Recent studies have demonstrated that prior to mast cell activation, food allergens are transported in large quantity across the epithelium and are protected from lysosomal degradation by binding to cell surface IgE and low-affinity receptor CD23/Fc?RII. Improved immunotherapies are currently under study including anti-IgE and anti-CD23 antibodies for the management of atopic disorders. PMID:21912563

  20. Langerhans cell function dictates induction of contact hypersensitivity or unresponsiveness to DNFB in Syrian hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Streilein, J.W.; Bergstresser, P.R.

    1981-09-01

    The relationship between distribution and function of Langerhans cells within the epidermis and the capacity of cutaneous surfaces to promote the induction of contact hypersensitivity to DNFB have been examined in inbred Syrian hamsters. In a manner very similar to previous findings in mice, the results indicate that hamster cutaneous surfaces deficient in normally functioning Langerhans cells, naturally (cheek pouch epithelium) or artificially (after perturbation with ultraviolet light), are inefficient at promoting DNFB sensitization. Instead, DNFB applied to these regions of skin results in the induction of a state of specific unresponsiveness. Viable lymphoid cells from unresponsive hamsters can transfer the unresponsiveness to naive hamsters suggesting that active suppression is at least partly responsible, probably mediated by T lymphocytes.

  1. Hypereosinophilia, hyper-IgE syndrome, and atopic dermatitis in a toddler with food hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Reyes, E; Hernnández-Román, M P; Gamboa-Marrufo, J D; Valencia-Herrera, A; Nava-Ocampo, A A

    2008-01-01

    We describe a 20-month-old girl with hypereosinophilia, hyper-immunoglobulin (Ig) E syndrome, and atopic dermatitis. Her peripheral eosinophil count and IgE plasma levels were 2.65 x 10(9)/L and 6702 IU/mL, respectively. Specific IgE levels for a variety of foods and inhalants were high and single-blind food challenges were positive for cow's milk, hen's egg, oat, wheat, and soy. When the patient received an extensively hydrolyzed milk formula, an exclusion diet, and 2 mg/kg of prednisone daily, the atopic dermatitis partially improved. Further improvement was observed with 1 mg/kg of azathioprine daily. Long-term clinical response was satisfactory. We suggest that food hypersensitivity should be ruled out in patients with hypereosinophilia, hyper-IgE syndrome, and atopic dermatitis. Azathioprine may be a good therapeutic alternative for treatment in such cases. PMID:18447144

  2. HLA Associations and Clinical Implications in T-Cell Mediated Drug Hypersensitivity Reactions: An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Chen, Chi-Hua; Chen, Wei-Li; Deng, Shin-Tarng; Chung, Wen-Hung

    2014-01-01

    T-cell mediated drug hypersensitivity reactions may range from mild rash to severe fatal reactions. Among them, drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS), Stevens-Johnson syndrome/ toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), are some of the most life-threatening severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs). Recent advances in pharmacogenetic studies show strong genetic associations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and susceptibility to drug hypersensitivity. This review summarizes the literature on recent progresses in pharmacogenetic studies and clinical application of pharmacogenetic screening based on associations between SCARs and specific HLA alleles to avoid serious conditions associated with drug hypersensitivity. PMID:24901010

  3. Novel in vitro method for identification of individuals at risk for beryllium hypersensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Ojo-Amaize, E A; Agopian, M S; Peter, J B

    1994-01-01

    Beryllium-specific lymphocytes were generated by in vitro immunization of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy unexposed individuals. Measurement of blastogenic responses of PBMC by [3H]thymidine uptake demonstrated that sensitization of PBMC with beryllium salts followed by stimulation with unrelated salts resulted in a negative response, whereas sensitization and restimulation of PBMC with beryllium salts produced a positive response. Flow cytometric and cell depletion analyses showed that all of the responding cells were CD4+ T cells. The in vitro immunization system was used to screen 52 human subjects for susceptibility to beryllium sensitization in vitro. The results show that of the 52 healthy unexposed subjects tested, only 1 (2%) was highly responsive, 4 subjects (8%) were moderately responsive, 20 subjects (39%) were low-level responders, and 27 subjects (52%) were nonresponders. The results showing 2% high-level responsiveness to beryllium sensitization in vitro correlate with the 1 to 5% prevalence of chronic beryllium disease in individuals sensitized to beryllium dust in vivo and thus support the thesis that the in vitro immunization system may permit the identification of individuals at risk for beryllium hypersensitivity. PMID:7496939

  4. Transcriptional response of BALB/c mouse thyroids following in vivo astatine-211 exposure reveals distinct gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Astatine-211 (211At) is an alpha particle emitting halogen with almost optimal linear energy transfer for creating DNA double-strand breaks and is thus proposed for radionuclide therapy when bound to tumor-seeking agents. Unbound 211At accumulates in the thyroid gland, and the concept of basal radiation-induced biological effects in the thyroid tissue is, to a high degree, unknown and is most valuable. Methods Female BALB/c nude mice were intravenously injected with 0.064 to 42 kBq of 211At, resulting in absorbed doses of 0.05 to 32 Gy in the thyroid gland. Thyroids were removed 24 h after injection; total RNA was extracted from pooled thyroids and processed in triplicate using Illumina MouseRef-8 Whole-Genome Expression Beadchips. Results Thyroids exposed to 211At revealed distinctive gene expression profiles compared to non-irradiated controls. A larger number of genes were affected at low absorbed doses (0.05 and 0.5 Gy) compared to intermediate (1.4 Gy) and higher absorbed doses (11 and 32 Gy). The proportion of dose-specific genes increased with decreased absorbed dose. Additionally, 1.4 Gy often exerted opposite regulation on gene expression compared to the other absorbed doses. Using Gene Ontology data, an immunological effect was detected at 0.05 and 11 Gy. Effects on cellular response to external stress and cell cycle regulation and proliferation were detected at 1.4 and 11 Gy. Conclusions Conclusively, the cellular response to ionizing radiation is complex and differs with absorbed dose. The response acquired at high absorbed doses cannot be extrapolated down to low absorbed doses or vice versa. We also demonstrated that the thyroid - already at absorbed doses similar to those obtained in radionuclide therapy - responds with expression of a high number of genes. Due to the increased heterogeneous irradiation at low absorbed doses, we suggest that this response partly originates from non-irradiated cells in the tissue, i.e., bystander cells. PMID:22697397

  5. Ten Weeks of Infection with a Tissue-Invasive Helminth Protects against Local Immune Complex-Mediated Inflammation, but Not Cutaneous Type I Hypersensitivity, in Previously Sensitized Mice.

    PubMed

    Evans, Holly; Killoran, Kristin E; Mitre, Blima K; Morris, C Paul; Kim, So-Young; Mitre, Edward

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect chronic helminth infection has on allergic disease in mice previously sensitized to OVA. Ten weeks of infection with Litomosoides sigmodontis reduced immunological markers of type I hypersensitivity, including OVA-specific IgE, basophil activation, and mast cell degranulation. Despite these reductions, there was no protection against immediate clinical hypersensitivity following intradermal OVA challenge. However, late-phase ear swelling, due to type III hypersensitivity, was significantly reduced in chronically infected animals. Levels of total IgG2a, OVA-specific IgG2a, and OVA-specific IgG1 were reduced in the setting of infection. These reductions were most likely due to increased Ab catabolism as ELISPOT assays demonstrated that infected animals do not have suppressed Ab production. Ear histology 24 h after challenge showed infected animals have reduced cellular infiltration in the ear, with significant decreases in numbers of neutrophils and macrophages. Consistent with this, infected animals had less neutrophil-specific chemokines CXCL-1 and CXCL-2 in the ear following challenge. Additionally, in vitro stimulation with immune complexes resulted in significantly less CXCL-1 and CXCL-2 production by eosinophils from chronically infected mice. Expression of Fc?RI was also significantly reduced on eosinophils from infected animals. These data indicate that chronic filarial infection suppresses eosinophilic responses to Ab-mediated activation and has the potential to be used as a therapeutic for pre-existing hypersensitivity diseases. PMID:26324775

  6. De Novo Transcriptome and Small RNA Analysis of Two Chinese Willow Cultivars Reveals Stress Response Genes in Salix matsudana

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yanfei; He, Caiyun; Duan, Aiguo; Zhang, Jianguo

    2014-01-01

    Salix matsudana Koidz. is a deciduous, rapidly growing, and drought resistant tree and is one of the most widely distributed and commonly cultivated willow species in China. Currently little transcriptomic and small RNAomic data are available to reveal the genes involve in the stress resistant in S. matsudana. Here, we report the RNA-seq analysis results of both transcriptome and small RNAome data using Illumina deep sequencing of shoot tips from two willow variants(Salix. matsudana and Salix matsudana Koidz. cultivar ‘Tortuosa’). De novo gene assembly was used to generate the consensus transcriptome and small RNAome, which contained 106,403 unique transcripts with an average length of 944 bp and a total length of 100.45 MB, and 166 known miRNAs representing 35 miRNA families. Comparison of transcriptomes and small RNAomes combined with quantitative real-time PCR from the two Salix libraries revealed a total of 292 different expressed genes(DEGs) and 36 different expressed miRNAs (DEMs). Among the DEGs and DEMs, 196 genes and 24 miRNAs were up regulated, 96 genes and 12 miRNA were down regulated in S. matsudana. Functional analysis of DEGs and miRNA targets showed that many genes were involved in stress resistance in S. matsudana. Our global gene expression profiling presents a comprehensive view of the transcriptome and small RNAome which provide valuable information and sequence resources for uncovering the stress response genes in S. matsudana. Moreover the transcriptome and small RNAome data provide a basis for future study of genetic resistance in Salix. PMID:25275458

  7. Sensitization of Cutaneous, Neuronal Purinergic Receptors Contributes to Endothelin-1-Induced Mechanical Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Travis P.; Hrnjic, Alen; Khodorova, Alla; Sprague, Jared M.; Strichartz, Gary R.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelin (ET-1), an endogenous peptide with a prominent role in cutaneous pain, causes mechanical hypersensitivity in the rat hind paw, partly through mechanisms involving local release of algogenic molecules in the skin. The present study investigated involvement of cutaneous ATP, which contributes to pain in numerous animal models. Pre-exposure of ND7/104 immortalized sensory neurons to ET-1 (30 nM) for 10 min increased the proportion of cells responding to ATP (2 ?M) with an increase in intracellular calcium, an effect prevented by the ETA receptor-selective antagonist BQ-123. ET-1 (3 nM) pre-exposure also increased the proportion of isolated mouse DRG neurons responding to ATP (0.2-0.4 ?M). Blocking ET-1-evoked increases in intracellular calcium with the IP3 receptor antagonist 2-APB did not inhibit sensitization to ATP, indicating a mechanism independent of ET-1-mediated intracellular calcium increases. ET-1-sensitized ATP calcium responses were largely abolished in the absence of extracellular calcium, implicating ionotropic P2X receptors. Experiments using qPCR and receptor-selective ligands in ND7/104 showed that ET-1-induced sensitization most likely involves the P2X4 receptor subtype. ET-1-sensitized calcium responses to ATP were strongly inhibited by broad spectrum (TNP-ATP) and P2X4-selective (5-BDBD) antagonists, but not antagonists for other P2X subtypes. TNP-ATP and 5-BDBD also significantly inhibited ET-1-induced mechanical sensitization in the rat hind paw, supporting a role for purinergic receptor sensitization in vivo. These data provide evidence that mechanical hypersensitivity caused by cutaneous ET-1 involves an increase in the neuronal sensitivity to ATP in the skin, possibly due to sensitization of P2X4 receptors. PMID:24569146

  8. Differential liabilities of haloperidol and thioridazine for inducing apomorphine hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    De Veaugh-Geiss, J; Devanand, D P; Carey, R J

    1982-11-01

    In an animal model of tardive dyskinesia, sensitivity to apomorphine-induced stereotyped behavior reflects increased dopamine receptor activity induced by chronic neuroleptic treatment. Four groups of Sprague-Dawley rats received haloperidol (H) 0.5 mg/kg, haloperidol 0.5 mg/kg + benztropine 2.0 mg/kg (H + B), thioridazine (T) 25 mg/kg, or saline (S) ip daily for 18 days, were withdrawn for 21 days, and then received another 10 days of drug. Drug-induced catalepsy was measured daily during the second phase of drug treatment. Sensitivity to apomorphine 0.125 mg/kg and 0.250 mg/kg was assessed during the first and second weeks of withdrawal from each phase of drug treatment. Catalepsy scores for H, H + B, and T groups showed an unexpected progressive increase over treatment days. Following withdrawal from the first drug phase, only H and H + B rats showed enhanced apomorphine stereotypy. H rats were hypersensitive for both weeks of testing while H + B rats were only hypersensitive for the first week. All rats showed changes in apomorphine sensitivity after withdrawal from the second drug phase. H and H + B rats showed significant enhancement of stereotypy at both apomorphine dose levels and at both weeks of testing. T rats showed a significant enhancement but only at the higher apomorphine dose level and only during the first withdrawal week. S rats had a significant enhancement of apomorphine-induced stereotypy during the second withdrawal week. We conclude that H, H + B, and T have differential liability for inducing dopamine receptor hypersensitivity, with haloperidol being most effective and thioridazine being least effective. PMID:6891268

  9. Allopurinol associated hypersensitivity reactions: cutaneous and renal manifestations.

    PubMed

    Chan, H L; Ku, G; Khoo, O T

    1977-10-01

    Five patients developed fever, "toxaemia", severe skin reactions and eosinophilia, three to six weeks after commencing allopurinol therapy. The presenting feature in these patients was an extensive erythema, progressing to an exfoliative dermatitis, sometimes with oral mucous membrane involvement. One patient developed toxic epidermal necrolysis. The clinical course in two patients was complicated by acute renal failure which necessitated dialysis. The clinical and laboratory features support an acute hypersensitivity mechanism in these allopurinol associated reactions, in agreement with previous studies. Patients with chronic renal failure appear particularly prone to severe, potentially fatal reactions. If these patients need allopurinol, a lower dose than would be normally required should be given. PMID:146479

  10. Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome Followed by Subacute Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Mika; Mizuno, Yuki; Matsuyama, Kanako; Shu, En; Kanoh, Hiroyuki; Suwa, Tetsuya; Seishima, Mariko

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) is a severe multiorgan system adverse drug reaction with reactivation of human herpesviruses (HHVs) such as HHV-6, HHV-7, cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus. Various complications, including autoimmune diseases, sometimes appear during the course of DIHS. We report a case of salazosulfapyridine-induced DIHS associated with HHV-6 reactivation. Two and a half months after the onset of DIHS, subacute thyroiditis occurred, possibly associated with CMV reactivation. Prednisolone (20 mg/day) was effective for subacute thyroiditis. Long-term follow-up is needed in patients with DIHS because of the possible onset of autoimmune diseases. PMID:26351424

  11. Host and non-host roots in rice: cellular and molecular approaches reveal differential responses to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    PubMed Central

    Fiorilli, Valentina; Vallino, Marta; Biselli, Chiara; Faccio, Antonella; Bagnaresi, Paolo; Bonfante, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Oryza sativa, a model plant for Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, has both host and non-host roots. Large lateral (LLR) and fine lateral (FLR) roots display opposite responses: LLR support AM colonization, but FLR do not. Our research aimed to study the molecular, morphological and physiological aspects related to the non-host behavior of FLR. RNA-seq analysis revealed that LLR and FLR displayed divergent expression profiles, including changes in many metabolic pathways. Compared with LLR, FLR showed down-regulation of genes instrumental for AM establishment and gibberellin signaling, and a higher expression of nutrient transporters. Consistent with the transcriptomic data, FLR had higher phosphorus content. Light and electron microscopy demonstrated that, surprisingly, in the Selenio cultivar, FLR have a two-layered cortex, which is theoretically compatible with AM colonization. According to RNA-seq, a gibberellin inhibitor treatment increased anticlinal divisions leading to a higher number of cortex cells in FLR. We propose that some of the differentially regulated genes that lead to the anatomical and physiological properties of the two root types also function as genetic factors regulating fungal colonization. The rice root apparatus offers a unique tool to study AM symbiosis, allowing direct comparisons of host and non-host roots in the same individual plant. PMID:26322072

  12. Transcriptomic analysis of Staphylococcus xylosus in the presence of nitrate and nitrite in meat reveals its response to nitrosative stress

    PubMed Central

    Vermassen, Aurore; de la Foye, Anne; Loux, Valentin; Talon, Régine; Leroy, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus xylosus is one of the major starter cultures used for meat fermentation because of its crucial role in the reduction of nitrate to nitrite which contributes to color and flavor development. Despite longstanding use of these additives, their impact on the physiology of S. xylosus has not yet been explored. We present the first in situ global gene expression profile of S. xylosus in meat supplemented with nitrate and nitrite at the levels used in the meat industry. More than 600 genes of S. xylosus were differentially expressed at 24 or 72 h of incubation. They represent more than 20% of the total genes and let us to suppose that addition of nitrate and nitrite to meat leads to a global change in gene expression. This profile revealed that S. xylosus is subject to nitrosative stress caused by reactive nitrogen species (RNS) generated from nitrate and nitrite. To overcome this stress, S. xylosus has developed several oxidative stress resistance mechanisms, such as modulation of the expression of several genes involved in iron homeostasis and in antioxidant defense. Most of which belong to the Fur and PerR regulons, respectively. S. xylosus has also counteracted this stress by developing DNA and protein repair. Furthermore, it has adapted its metabolic response—carbon and nitrogen metabolism, energy production and cell wall biogenesis—to the alterations produced by nitrosative stress. PMID:25566208

  13. Structural ensembles reveal intrinsic disorder for the multi-stimuli responsive bio-mimetic protein Rec1-resilin

    PubMed Central

    Balu, Rajkamal; Knott, Robert; Cowieson, Nathan P.; Elvin, Christopher M.; Hill, Anita J.; Choudhury, Namita R.; Dutta, Naba K.

    2015-01-01

    Rec1-resilin is the first recombinant resilin-mimetic protein polymer, synthesized from exon-1 of the Drosophila melanogaster gene CG15920 that has demonstrated unusual multi-stimuli responsiveness in aqueous solution. Crosslinked hydrogels of Rec1-resilin have also displayed remarkable mechanical properties including near-perfect rubber-like elasticity. The structural basis of these extraordinary properties is not clearly understood. Here we combine a computational and experimental investigation to examine structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solution. The structure of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solutions is investigated experimentally using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Both bench-top and synchrotron SAXS are employed to extract structural data sets of Rec1-resilin and to confirm their validity. Computational approaches have been applied to these experimental data sets in order to extract quantitative information about structural ensembles including radius of gyration, pair-distance distribution function, and the fractal dimension. The present work confirms that Rec1-resilin is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that displays equilibrium structural qualities between those of a structured globular protein and a denatured protein. The ensemble optimization method (EOM) analysis reveals a single conformational population with partial compactness. This work provides new insight into the structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in solution. PMID:26042819

  14. Phenotypic and transcriptional profiling in Entamoeba histolytica reveal costs to fitness and adaptive responses associated with metronidazole resistance

    PubMed Central

    Penuliar, Gil M.; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial chemotherapy is critical in the fight against infectious diseases caused by Entamoeba histolytica. Among the drugs available for the treatment of amebiasis, metronidazole (MTZ) is considered the drug of choice. Recently, in vitro studies have described MTZ resistance and the potential mechanisms involved. Costs to fitness and adaptive responses associated with resistance, however, have not been investigated. In this study we generated an HM-1 derived strain resistant to 12 ?M MTZ (MTZR). We examined its phenotypic and transcriptional profile to determine the consequences and mRNA level changes associated with MTZ resistance. Our results indicated increased cell size and granularity, and decreased rates in cell division, adhesion, phagocytosis, cytopathogenicity, and glucose consumption. Transcriptome analysis revealed 142 differentially expressed genes in MTZR. In contrast to other MTZ resistant parasites, MTZR did not down-regulate pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, but showed increased expression of genes for a hypothetical protein (HP1) and several iron-sulfur flavoproteins, and downregulation of genes for leucine-rich proteins. Fisher's exact test showed 24 significantly enriched GO terms in MTZR, and a 3-way comparison of modulated genes in MTZR against those of MTZR cultured without MTZ and HM-1 cultured with MTZ, showed that 88 genes were specific to MTZR. Overall, our findings suggested that MTZ resistance is associated with specific transcriptional changes and decreased parasite virulence. PMID:25999919

  15. Phenotypic and transcriptional profiling in Entamoeba histolytica reveal costs to fitness and adaptive responses associated with metronidazole resistance.

    PubMed

    Penuliar, Gil M; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial chemotherapy is critical in the fight against infectious diseases caused by Entamoeba histolytica. Among the drugs available for the treatment of amebiasis, metronidazole (MTZ) is considered the drug of choice. Recently, in vitro studies have described MTZ resistance and the potential mechanisms involved. Costs to fitness and adaptive responses associated with resistance, however, have not been investigated. In this study we generated an HM-1 derived strain resistant to 12 ?M MTZ (MTZR). We examined its phenotypic and transcriptional profile to determine the consequences and mRNA level changes associated with MTZ resistance. Our results indicated increased cell size and granularity, and decreased rates in cell division, adhesion, phagocytosis, cytopathogenicity, and glucose consumption. Transcriptome analysis revealed 142 differentially expressed genes in MTZR. In contrast to other MTZ resistant parasites, MTZR did not down-regulate pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, but showed increased expression of genes for a hypothetical protein (HP1) and several iron-sulfur flavoproteins, and downregulation of genes for leucine-rich proteins. Fisher's exact test showed 24 significantly enriched GO terms in MTZR, and a 3-way comparison of modulated genes in MTZR against those of MTZR cultured without MTZ and HM-1 cultured with MTZ, showed that 88 genes were specific to MTZR. Overall, our findings suggested that MTZ resistance is associated with specific transcriptional changes and decreased parasite virulence. PMID:25999919

  16. Host and non-host roots in rice: cellular and molecular approaches reveal differential responses to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Fiorilli, Valentina; Vallino, Marta; Biselli, Chiara; Faccio, Antonella; Bagnaresi, Paolo; Bonfante, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Oryza sativa, a model plant for Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, has both host and non-host roots. Large lateral (LLR) and fine lateral (FLR) roots display opposite responses: LLR support AM colonization, but FLR do not. Our research aimed to study the molecular, morphological and physiological aspects related to the non-host behavior of FLR. RNA-seq analysis revealed that LLR and FLR displayed divergent expression profiles, including changes in many metabolic pathways. Compared with LLR, FLR showed down-regulation of genes instrumental for AM establishment and gibberellin signaling, and a higher expression of nutrient transporters. Consistent with the transcriptomic data, FLR had higher phosphorus content. Light and electron microscopy demonstrated that, surprisingly, in the Selenio cultivar, FLR have a two-layered cortex, which is theoretically compatible with AM colonization. According to RNA-seq, a gibberellin inhibitor treatment increased anticlinal divisions leading to a higher number of cortex cells in FLR. We propose that some of the differentially regulated genes that lead to the anatomical and physiological properties of the two root types also function as genetic factors regulating fungal colonization. The rice root apparatus offers a unique tool to study AM symbiosis, allowing direct comparisons of host and non-host roots in the same individual plant. PMID:26322072

  17. Structural ensembles reveal intrinsic disorder for the multi-stimuli responsive bio-mimetic protein Rec1-resilin.

    PubMed

    Balu, Rajkamal; Knott, Robert; Cowieson, Nathan P; Elvin, Christopher M; Hill, Anita J; Choudhury, Namita R; Dutta, Naba K

    2015-01-01

    Rec1-resilin is the first recombinant resilin-mimetic protein polymer, synthesized from exon-1 of the Drosophila melanogaster gene CG15920 that has demonstrated unusual multi-stimuli responsiveness in aqueous solution. Crosslinked hydrogels of Rec1-resilin have also displayed remarkable mechanical properties including near-perfect rubber-like elasticity. The structural basis of these extraordinary properties is not clearly understood. Here we combine a computational and experimental investigation to examine structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solution. The structure of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solutions is investigated experimentally using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Both bench-top and synchrotron SAXS are employed to extract structural data sets of Rec1-resilin and to confirm their validity. Computational approaches have been applied to these experimental data sets in order to extract quantitative information about structural ensembles including radius of gyration, pair-distance distribution function, and the fractal dimension. The present work confirms that Rec1-resilin is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that displays equilibrium structural qualities between those of a structured globular protein and a denatured protein. The ensemble optimization method (EOM) analysis reveals a single conformational population with partial compactness. This work provides new insight into the structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in solution. PMID:26042819

  18. Transcriptomic analysis of Staphylococcus xylosus in the presence of nitrate and nitrite in meat reveals its response to nitrosative stress.

    PubMed

    Vermassen, Aurore; de la Foye, Anne; Loux, Valentin; Talon, Régine; Leroy, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus xylosus is one of the major starter cultures used for meat fermentation because of its crucial role in the reduction of nitrate to nitrite which contributes to color and flavor development. Despite longstanding use of these additives, their impact on the physiology of S. xylosus has not yet been explored. We present the first in situ global gene expression profile of S. xylosus in meat supplemented with nitrate and nitrite at the levels used in the meat industry. More than 600 genes of S. xylosus were differentially expressed at 24 or 72 h of incubation. They represent more than 20% of the total genes and let us to suppose that addition of nitrate and nitrite to meat leads to a global change in gene expression. This profile revealed that S. xylosus is subject to nitrosative stress caused by reactive nitrogen species (RNS) generated from nitrate and nitrite. To overcome this stress, S. xylosus has developed several oxidative stress resistance mechanisms, such as modulation of the expression of several genes involved in iron homeostasis and in antioxidant defense. Most of which belong to the Fur and PerR regulons, respectively. S. xylosus has also counteracted this stress by developing DNA and protein repair. Furthermore, it has adapted its metabolic response-carbon and nitrogen metabolism, energy production and cell wall biogenesis-to the alterations produced by nitrosative stress. PMID:25566208

  19. Structural ensembles reveal intrinsic disorder for the multi-stimuli responsive bio-mimetic protein Rec1-resilin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balu, Rajkamal; Knott, Robert; Cowieson, Nathan P.; Elvin, Christopher M.; Hill, Anita J.; Choudhury, Namita R.; Dutta, Naba K.

    2015-06-01

    Rec1-resilin is the first recombinant resilin-mimetic protein polymer, synthesized from exon-1 of the Drosophila melanogaster gene CG15920 that has demonstrated unusual multi-stimuli responsiveness in aqueous solution. Crosslinked hydrogels of Rec1-resilin have also displayed remarkable mechanical properties including near-perfect rubber-like elasticity. The structural basis of these extraordinary properties is not clearly understood. Here we combine a computational and experimental investigation to examine structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solution. The structure of Rec1-resilin in aqueous solutions is investigated experimentally using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Both bench-top and synchrotron SAXS are employed to extract structural data sets of Rec1-resilin and to confirm their validity. Computational approaches have been applied to these experimental data sets in order to extract quantitative information about structural ensembles including radius of gyration, pair-distance distribution function, and the fractal dimension. The present work confirms that Rec1-resilin is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that displays equilibrium structural qualities between those of a structured globular protein and a denatured protein. The ensemble optimization method (EOM) analysis reveals a single conformational population with partial compactness. This work provides new insight into the structural ensembles of Rec1-resilin in solution.

  20. Pyrosequencing-Based Transcriptome Analysis of the Asian Rice Gall Midge Reveals Differential Response during Compatible and Incompatible Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Deepak Kumar; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Tomar, Archana; Bentur, Jagadish S.; Nair, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    The Asian rice gall midge (Orseolia oryzae) is a major pest responsible for immense loss in rice productivity. Currently, very little knowledge exists with regard to this insect at the molecular level. The present study was initiated with the aim of developing molecular resources as well as identifying alterations at the transcriptome level in the gall midge maggots that are in a compatible (SH) or in an incompatible interaction (RH) with their rice host. Roche 454 pyrosequencing strategy was used to develop both transcriptomics and genomics resources that led to the identification of 79,028 and 85,395 EST sequences from gall midge biotype 4 (GMB4) maggots feeding on a susceptible and resistant rice variety, TN1 (SH) and Suraksha (RH), respectively. Comparative transcriptome analysis of the maggots in SH and RH revealed over-representation of transcripts from proteolysis and protein phosphorylation in maggots from RH. In contrast, over-representation of transcripts for translation, regulation of transcription and transcripts involved in electron transport chain were observed in maggots from SH. This investigation, besides unveiling various mechanisms underlying insect-plant interactions, will also lead to a better understanding of strategies adopted by insects in general, and the Asian rice gall midge in particular, to overcome host defense. PMID:23202939

  1. Highly multiplexed profiling of single-cell effector functions reveals deep functional heterogeneity in response to pathogenic ligands

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yao; Xue, Qiong; Eisele, Markus R.; Sulistijo, Endah S.; Brower, Kara; Han, Lin; Amir, El-ad David; Pe’er, Dana; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn; Fan, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in single-cell genomic, transcriptional, and mass-cytometric profiling, it remains a challenge to collect highly multiplexed measurements of secreted proteins from single cells for comprehensive analysis of functional states. Herein, we combine spatial and spectral encoding with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchambers for codetection of 42 immune effector proteins secreted from single cells, representing the highest multiplexing recorded to date for a single-cell secretion assay. Using this platform to profile differentiated macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the ligand of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), reveals previously unobserved deep functional heterogeneity and varying levels of pathogenic activation. Uniquely protein profiling on the same single cells before and after LPS stimulation identified a role for macrophage inhibitory factor (MIF) to potentiate the activation of LPS-induced cytokine production. Advanced clustering analysis identified functional subsets including quiescent, polyfunctional fully activated, partially activated populations with different cytokine profiles. This population architecture is conserved throughout the cell activation process and prevails as it is extended to other TLR ligands and to primary macrophages derived from a healthy donor. This work demonstrates that the phenotypically similar cell population still exhibits a large degree of intrinsic heterogeneity at the functional and cell behavior level. This technology enables full-spectrum dissection of immune functional states in response to pathogenic or environmental stimulation, and opens opportunities to quantify deep functional heterogeneity for more comprehensive and accurate immune monitoring. PMID:25646488

  2. Transcriptomic analysis reveals importance of ROS and phytohormones in response to short-term salinity stress in Populus tomentosa

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lingyu; Meng, Yu; Ma, Jing; Zhao, Xiulian; Cheng, Tielong; Ji, Jing; Chang, Ermei; Meng, Chen; Deng, Nan; Chen, Lanzhen; Shi, Shengqing; Jiang, Zeping

    2015-01-01

    Populus tomentosa (Chinese white poplar) is well adapted to various extreme environments, and is considered an important species to study the effects of salinity stress on poplar trees. To decipher the mechanism of poplar's rapid response to short-term salinity stress, we firstly detected the changes in H2O2 and hormone, and then profiled the gene expression pattern of 10-week-old seedling roots treated with 200 mM NaCl for 0, 6, 12, and 24 h (h) by RNA-seq on the Illumina-Solexa platform. Physiological determination showed that the significant increase in H2O2 began at 6 h, while that in hormone ABA was at 24 h, under salt stress. Compared with controls (0 h), 3991, 4603, and 4903 genes were up regulated, and 1408, 2206, and 3461 genes were down regulated (adjusted P ? 0.05 and |log2Ratio|?1) at 6, 12, and 24 h time points, respectively. The Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway annotation revealed that the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were highly enriched in hormone- and reactive oxygen species-related biological processes, including “response to oxidative stress or abiotic stimulus,” “peroxidase activity,” “regulation of transcription,” “hormone synthetic and metabolic process,” “hormone signal transduction,” “antioxidant activity,” and “transcription factor activity.” Moreover, K-means clustering demonstrated that DEGs (total RPKM value>12 from four time points) could be categorized into four kinds of expression trends: quick up/down over 6 or 12 h, and slow up/down over 24 h. Of these, DEGs involved in H2O2- and hormone- producing and signal-related genes were further enriched in this analysis, which indicated that the two kinds of small molecules, hormones and H2O2, play pivotal roles in the short-term salt stress response in poplar. This study provides a basis for future studies of the molecular adaptation of poplar and other tree species to salinity stress. PMID:26442002

  3. Effects of electroacupuncture on corticotropin-releasing hormone in rats with chronic visceral hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui-Rong; Fang, Xiao-Yi; Wu, Huan-Gan; Wu, Lu-Yi; Li, Jing; Weng, Zhi-Jun; Guo, Xin-Xin; Li, Yu-Guang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of electroacupuncture on corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in the colon, spinal cord, and hypothalamus of rats with chronic visceral hypersensitivity. METHODS: A rat model of chronic visceral hypersensitivity was generated according to the internationally accepted method of colorectal balloon dilatation. In the 7th week after the procedure, rats were randomly divided into a model group (MG), electroacupuncture group (EA), and sham electroacupuncture group (S-EA). After treatment, the abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) score was used to assess the behavioral response of visceral hyperalgesia. Immunohistochemistry (EnVision method), ELISA, and fluorescence quantitative PCR methods were applied to detect the expression of CRH protein and mRNA in the colon, spinal cord, and hypothalamus. RESULTS: The sensitivity of the rats to the colorectal distension stimulus applied at different strengths (20-80 mmHg) increased with increasing stimulus strength, resulting in increasing AWR scores in each group. Compared with NG, the AWR score of MG was significantly increased (P < 0.01). After conducting EA, the AWR scores of the rats were decreased compared with MG rats. The relative expression of CRH mRNA in the colon, spinal cord, and hypothalamus of MG rats was significantly increased compared with NG rats (P < 0.01). CRH mRNA in the colon and spinal cord of EA and S-EA rats was decreased to varying degrees (P > 0.05) compared with normal rats (NG). However, the decrease in EA compared with MG rats was statistically significant (P < 0.01). The average optical density of CRH expression in the colon of the MG rats was significantly enhanced compared with NG (P < 0.05), while the average optical density of CRH expression in the EA and S-EA rats was significantly decreased compared with MG rats (P < 0.01, P < 0.05, respectively). Compared with MG rats, the CRH concentration in the spinal cord of EA rats was significantly reduced (P < 0.01), but there was no significant change in S-EA rats (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Electroacupuncture at the Shangjuxu acupoint was able to significantly reduce the visceral hypersensitivity in rats, and regulated the expression of CRH protein and mRNA in the colon, spinal cord and hypothalamus at different levels, playing a therapeutic role in this model of irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:26109804

  4. The effect of oxygen on low-dose hypersensitivity and increased radioresistance in Chinese hamster V79-379A cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marples, B.; Skov, K.A.; Joiner, M.C.

    1994-04-01

    Chinese hamster V79 cells irradiated in air are hypersensitive to X-ray doses less than 0.5 Gy and show an increased radioresistance over the dose range 0.5-1 Gy. Of considerable interest from both a mechanistic and clinical viewpoint is the response of hypoxic cells over this dose range. The data presented here indicate that hypoxic cells are also hypersensitive to low X-ray doses and exhibit an increased radioresistant response, albeit triggered at a somewhat higher dose (0.69 Gy, SEM {+-} 0.18 Gy) than observed in oxygenated cells (0.5 Gy, SEM {+-} 0.21 Gy). These data indicate that the triggering event for increased radioresistance may be independent of oxygen. As reported by others previously, the oxygen enhancement ratio was found to decrease with a decreasing X-ray dose. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Occupational hypersensitivity pneumonitis in a baker: a new cause.

    PubMed

    Gerfaud-Valentin, Mathieu; Reboux, Gabriel; Traclet, Julie; Thivolet-Béjui, Françoise; Cordier, Jean-François; Cottin, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    Bakers are exposed daily to flour and may be susceptible to immunologic occupational diseases. A 30-year-old, nonsmoking, female baker was referred for progressive dyspnea on exertion, basal crackles on auscultation, restrictive lung function, decreased diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide, ground glass hyperdensities with a mosaic pattern on high-resolution CT scan, 25% lymphocytosis by BAL, and cellular chronic bronchiolitis with peribronchiolar interstitial inflammation by lung biopsy specimen. Cultures from flours isolated nine species, including Aspergillus fumigatus. Twenty-six antigens were tested. Serum-specific precipitins were found against A fumigatus, the flour mite Acarus siro, and total extracts from maize and oat. Outcome was favorable with cessation of occupational exposure to flours and transient therapy with prednisone and immunosuppressive agents. To our knowledge, this report is the first of a well-documented case of hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to sensitization to fungi- and mite-contaminated flours. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis--and not only asthma and allergic rhinitis--should be suspected in bakers with respiratory symptoms. PMID:24687706

  6. Sorafenib induces delayed-onset cutaneous hypersensitivity: a case series.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Kyoung Hee; Oh, Soo Yeon; Lim, Kyung Whan; Kim, Mi Yeong; Lee, Suh Young; Kang, Hye Ryun

    2015-05-01

    Sorafenib is an oral multikinase inhibitor with clinical activity against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and renal cell carcinoma. Administration of sorafenib carries a variety of adverse cutaneous reactions. Common adverse effects induced by sorafenib include hand-foot skin reactions, facial erythema, splinter subungual hemorrhage, and alopecia. Although erythema multiforme (EM) related to sorafenib has been reported, delayed-type cutaneous hypersensitivity reactions are rare in patients treated with sorafenib and there has been no case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) reported so far. We recently experienced 3 cases of delayed-type cutaneous hypersensitivity related to administration of sorafenib. The first case was a 47-year female had targetoid erythematous rashes on her arms 12 days after starting sorafenib for HCC. The rashes spread from the arms to the trunk rapidly except for the hands and feet, and erosive lesions developed in the oral mucosa and lips. She was diagnosed as SJS. The second case was an 81-year-old male had maculopapular eruptions with multiple targetoid lesions on the trunk, arms, and legs 10 days after starting sorafenib for his HCC. There was no evidence of mucosal involvement. He was diagnosed with EM. The last one was a 20-year-old female developed generalized maculopapular eruptions in the whole body 10 days after starting sorafenib for the treatment of HCC. All 3 patients completely recovered after discontinuation of sorafenib. PMID:25749785

  7. Interleukin-17A and Neutrophils in a Murine Model of Bird-Related Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Ishizuka, Masahiro; Miyazaki, Yasunari; Masuo, Masahiro; Suhara, Kozo; Tateishi, Tomoya; Yasui, Makito; Inase, Naohiko

    2015-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is an immune mediated lung disease induced by the repeated inhalation of a wide variety of antigens. Bird-related hypersensitivity pneumonitis (BRHP) is one of the most common forms of HP in human and results from the inhalation of avian antigens. The findings of a recent clinical analysis suggest that in addition to Th1 factors, the levels of interleukin(IL)-17 and IL-17-associated transcripts are increased in the setting of HP, and that both IL-17A and neutrophils are crucial for the development of pulmonary inflammation in murine models of HP. Our objectives were to investigate the roles of IL-17A and neutrophils in granuloma-forming inflammation in an acute HP model. We developed a mouse model of acute BRHP using pigeon dropping extract. We evaluated the process of granuloma formation and the roles of both IL-17A and neutrophils in a model. We found that the neutralization of IL-17A by the antibody attenuated granuloma formation and the recruitment of neutrophils, and also decreased the expression level of chemokine(C-X-C motif) ligand 5 (CXCL5) in the acute HP model. We confirmed that most of the neutrophils in the acute HP model exhibited immunoreactivity to the anti-IL-17 antibody. We have identified the central roles of both IL-17A and neutrophils in the pathogenesis of granuloma formation in acute HP. We have also assumed that neutrophils are an important source of IL-17A in an acute HP model, and that the IL-17A-CXCL5 pathway may be responsible for the recruitment of neutrophils. PMID:26367130

  8. HC-030031, a TRPA1 selective antagonist, attenuates inflammatory- and neuropathy-induced mechanical hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Samer R; Crown, Eric D; Moore, Eric L; Liang, Hongyu A; Choong, Kar-Chan; Dima, Shelley; Henze, Darrell A; Kane, Stefanie A; Urban, Mark O

    2008-01-01

    Background Safe and effective treatment for chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain remains a key unmet medical need for many patients. The recent discovery and description of the transient receptor potential family of receptors including TRPV1 and TRPA1 has provided a number of potential new therapeutic targets for treating chronic pain. Recent reports have suggested that TRPA1 may play an important role in acute formalin and CFA induced pain. The current study was designed to further explore the therapeutic potential of pharmacological TRPA1 antagonism to treat inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Results The in vitro potencies of HC-030031 versus cinnamaldehyde or allyl isothiocyanate (AITC or Mustard oil)-induced TRPA1 activation were 4.9 ± 0.1 and 7.5 ± 0.2 ?M respectively (IC50). These findings were similar to the previously reported IC50 of 6.2 ?M against AITC activation of TRPA1 [1]. In the rat, oral administration of HC-030031 reduced AITC-induced nocifensive behaviors at a dose of 100 mg/kg. Moreover, oral HC-030031 (100 mg/kg) significantly reversed mechanical hypersensitivity in the more chronic models of Complete Freunds Adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain and the spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain. Conclusion Using oral administration of the selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031, our results demonstrated that TRPA1 plays an important role in the mechanisms responsible for mechanical hypersensitivity observed in inflammatory and neuropathic pain models. These findings suggested that TRPA1 antagonism may be a suitable new approach for the development of a potent and selective therapeutic agent to treat both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. PMID:18954467

  9. The Effect of Calcium Sodium Phosphosilicate on Dentin Hypersensitivity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bin; Mei, Li; Yao, Liang; Tian, Jinhui; Li, Huang

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of calcium sodium phosphosilicate (CSPS) in treating dentin hypersensitivity (DH) and to compare this effect to that of a negative (placebo) control. Materials and Methods Several databases, including Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, The Cochrane Library, and the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, were searched to identify relevant articles published through January 2015; grey literature (i.e., academic literature that is not formally published) was also searched. Two authors performed data extraction independently and jointly using data collection forms. The primary outcome was the DH pain response to routine activities or to thermal, tactile, evaporative, or electrical stimuli, and the secondary outcome was the side effects of CSPS use. Each study was evaluated using the Cochrane Collaboration tool for assessing risk bias. Meta-analysis of studies with the same participant demographics, interventions, controls, assessment methods and follow-up periods was performed. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment Development and Evaluation System was used to assess the quality of the evidence and the risk of bias across studies. Results Meta-analysis demonstrated that toothpaste containing 5% CSPS was more effective than the negative control at relieving dentin sensitivity, with the level of evidence classified as “moderate”. In addition, prophylaxis paste containing 15% calcium sodium phosphosilicate was favored over the negative control at reducing post-periodontal therapy hypersensitivity, with the level of evidence categorized as “low”. Only two studies reported side effects of CSPS use. Conclusions The majority of studies found that calcium sodium phosphosilicate was more effective than the negative control at alleviating DH. Because strong evidence is scarce, high-quality, well-designed clinical trials are required in the future before definitive recommendations can be made. PMID:26544035

  10. Successful desensitization protocol for hypersensitivity reaction probably caused by dabrafenib in a patient with metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Bar-Sela, Gil; Abu-Amna, Mahmoud; Hadad, Salim; Haim, Nissim; Shahar, Eduardo

    2015-09-01

    Vemurafenib and dabrafenib are both orally bioavailable small molecule agents that block mitogen activated protein kinase signalling in patients with melanoma and BRAF(V600E) mutation. Generalized hypersensitivity reactions to vemurafenib or dabrafenib have not been described. Continuing vemurafenib or dabrafenib therapy despite hypersensitivity reaction is especially important in patients with melanoma and BRAF(V600E) mutation, in whom this mutation plays a critical role in tumour growth. Desensitization protocols to overcome hypersensitivity reactions by gradual reintroduction of small amounts of the offending drug up to full therapeutic doses are available for many anti-cancer agents, including vemurafenib but, to the best of our knowledge, have not been reported for dabrafenib. We describe a patient with metastatic melanoma who developed Type I hypersensitivity reaction to vemurafenib and to subsequent treatment with dabrafenib, and who was successfully treated by drug desensitization which allowed safe prolonged continuation of dabrafenib. The development of hypersensitivity reactions for both dabrafenib and vemurafinib in the current case could be because these drugs have a similar chemical structure and cause a cross-reactivity. However, hypersensitivity reaction to a non-medicinal ingredient shared by the two drugs is also possible. Oral desensitization appears to be an option for patients with hypersensitivity Type I to dabrafenib. This approach may permit clinicians to safely administer dabrafenib to patients who experience hypersensitivity reactions to this life-prolonging medication. PMID:26056325

  11. Reversal of Peripheral Nerve Injury-induced Hypersensitivity in the Postpartum Period: Role of Spinal Oxytocin

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Silvia; Liu, Baogang; Hayashida, Ken-ichiro; Houle, Timothy T.; Eisenach, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Physical injury, including surgery, can result in chronic pain; yet chronic pain following childbirth, including cesarean delivery in women, is rare. The mechanisms involved in this protection by pregnancy or delivery have not been explored. Methods We examined the effect of pregnancy and delivery on hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli of the rat hindpaw induced by peripheral nerve injury (spinal nerve ligation) and after intrathecal oxytocin, atosiban and naloxone. Additionally, oxytocin concentration in lumbar spinal cerebrospinal fluid was determined. Results Spinal nerve ligation performed at mid-pregnancy resulted in similar hypersensitivity to nonpregnant controls, but hypersensitivity partially resolved beginning after delivery. Removal of pups after delivery prevented this partial resolution. Cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of oxytocin were greater in normal postpartum rats prior to weaning. To examine the effect of injury at the time of delivery rather than during pregnancy, spinal nerve ligation was performed within 24 h of delivery. This resulted in acute hypersensitivity that partially resolved over the next 2–3 weeks. Weaning of pups resulted only in a temporary return of hypersensitivity. Intrathecal oxytocin effectively reversed the hypersensitivity following separation of the pups. Postpartum resolution of hypersensitivity was transiently abolished by intrathecal injection of the oxytocin receptor antagonist, atosiban. Conclusions These results suggest that the postpartum period rather than pregnancy protects against chronic hypersensitivity from peripheral nerve injury and that this protection may reflect sustained oxytocin signaling in the central nervous system during this period. PMID:23249932

  12. Enhancement of the contact hypersensitivity reaction by acute morphine administration at the elicitation phase.

    PubMed

    Nelson, C J; How, T; Lysle, D T

    1999-11-01

    The present study investigated the effects of morphine on the irritant contact sensitivity (ICS) and contact hypersensitivity (CHS) reaction. ICS was induced by croton oil application on the pinnae of naïve rats. Morphine injected prior to croton oil application did not affect the ICS response when assessed by measurements of pinnae thickness. CHS was induced by applying the antigen 2,4-dinitro-1-fluorobenzene (DNFB) to the pinnae of rats sensitized to DNFB. Rats received an injection of morphine prior to either initial antigen exposure (sensitization) or antigen reexposure (challenge). Morphine prior to challenge, but not sensitization, resulted in a pronounced enhancement of the CHS response as measured by pinna thickness. Quantitative PCR also showed increased IFN-gamma mRNA levels in the inflamed tissue of morphine-treated rats. Naltrexone blocked the morphine-induced enhancement of the CHS response. The differential effects of morphine suggest that opioids have a more pronounced effect on in vivo immune responses that involve immunological memory. PMID:10527694

  13. Altered Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Responses to Nonpainful Sensory Stimulation in Fibromyalgia Patients

    PubMed Central

    López-Solá, Marina; Pujol, Jesus; Wager, Tor D.; Garcia-Fontanals, Alba; Blanco-Hinojo, Laura; Garcia-Blanco, Susana; Poca-Dias, Violant; Harrison, Ben J.; Contreras-Rodríguez, Oren; Monfort, Jordi; Garcia-Fructuoso, Ferran; Deus, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Fibromyalgia (FM) is a disorder characterized by chronic pain and enhanced responses to acute noxious events. However, the sensory systems affected in FM may extend beyond pain itself, as FM patients show reduced tolerance to non-nociceptive sensory stimulation. Characterizing the neural substrates of multisensory hypersensitivity in FM may thus provide important clues about the underlying pathophysiology of the disorder. The aim of this study was to characterize brain responses to non-nociceptive sensory stimulation in FM patients and their relationship to subjective sensory sensitivity and clinical pain severity. Methods Functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to assess brain response to auditory, visual, and tactile motor stimulation in 35 women with FM and 25 matched controls. Correlation and mediation analyses were performed to establish the relationship between brain responses and 3 types of outcomes: subjective hypersensitivity to daily sensory stimulation, spontaneous pain, and functional disability. Results Patients reported increased subjective sensitivity (increased unpleasantness) in response to multisensory stimulation in daily life. Functional MRI revealed that patients showed reduced task-evoked activation in primary/secondary visual and auditory areas and augmented responses in the insula and anterior lingual gyrus. Reduced responses in visual and auditory areas were correlated with subjective sensory hypersensitivity and clinical severity measures. Conclusion FM patients showed strong attenuation of brain responses to nonpainful events in early sensory cortices, accompanied by an amplified response at later stages of sensory integration in the insula. These abnormalities are associated with core FM symptoms, suggesting that they may be part of the pathophysiology of the disease. PMID:25220783

  14. Transcriptional response of P. pastoris in fed-batch cultivations to Rhizopus oryzae lipase production reveals UPR induction

    PubMed Central

    Resina, David; Bollók, Mónika; Khatri, Narendar K; Valero, Francisco; Neubauer, Peter; Ferrer, Pau

    2007-01-01

    Background The analysis of transcriptional levels of the genes involved in protein synthesis and secretion is a key factor to understand the host organism's responses to recombinant protein production, as well as their interaction with the cultivation conditions. Novel techniques such as the sandwich hybridization allow monitoring quantitatively the dynamic changes of specific RNAs. In this study, the transcriptional levels of some genes related to the unfolded protein response (UPR) and central metabolism of Pichia pastoris were analysed during batch and fed-batch cultivations using an X-33-derived strain expressing a Rhizopus oryzae lipase under control of the formaldehyde dehydrogenase promoter (FLD1), namely the alcohol oxidase gene AOX1, the formaldehyde dehydrogenase FLD1, the protein disulfide isomerase PDI, the KAR2 gene coding for the BiP chaperone, the 26S rRNA and the R. oryzae lipase gene ROL. Results The transcriptional levels of the selected set of genes were first analysed in P. pastoris cells growing in shake flask cultures containing different carbon and nitrogen sources combinations, glycerol + ammonium, methanol + methylamine and sorbitol + methylamine. The transcriptional levels of the AOX1 and FLD1 genes were coherent with the known regulatory mechanism of C1 substrates in P. pastoris, whereas ROL induction lead to the up-regulation of KAR2 and PDI transcriptional levels, thus suggesting that ROL overexpression triggers the UPR. This was further confirmed in fed-batch cultivations performed at different growth rates. Transcriptional levels of the analysed set of genes were generally higher at higher growth rates. Nevertheless, when ROL was overexpressed in a strain having the UPR constitutively activated, significantly lower relative induction levels of these marker genes were detected. Conclusion The bead-based sandwich hybridization assay has shown its potential as a reliable instrument for quantification of specific mRNA species in P. pastoris cells grown in fed-batch cultures. As a proof-of-principle, the influence of the carbon and nitrogen sources, the specific growth rate, as well as the ROL overexpression on the transcriptional levels of a reduced set of bioprocess-relevant genes has been quantitatively studied, revealing that ROL overexpression and secretion seems to trigger the UPR in P. pastoris, resulting in a physiological bottleneck for the production process. PMID:17634115

  15. High-density PhyloChip profiling of stimulated aquifer microbial communities reveals a complex response to acetate amendment

    SciTech Connect

    Handley, Kim M.; Wrighton, Kelly E.; Piceno, Y. M.; Anderson, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; N'Guessan, A. L.; Peacock, Aaron; Bargar, John R.; Long, Philip E.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2012-06-13

    There is increasing interest in harnessing the functional diversity of indigenous microbial communities to transform and remediate a wide range of environmental contaminants. Understanding the response of communities to stimulation, including flanking taxa, presents important opportunities for optimizing remediation approaches. We used high-density PhyloChip microarray analysis to comprehensively determine community membership and abundance patterns amongst a suite of samples from U(VI) bioremediation experiments. Samples were unstimulated or collected during Fe(III) and sulfate reduction from an acetate-augmented aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, and from laboratory experiments using field-collected materials. Results showed the greatest diversity in abundant SRB lineages was present in naturally-reduced sediment. Desulfuromonadales and Desulfobacterales were consistently identified as the dominant Fe(III)- and sulfate-reducing bacteria (IRB and SRB) throughout acetate amendment experiments. Stimulated communities also exhibited a high degree of functional redundancy amongst enriched flanking members. Not surprisingly, competition for both sulfate and iron was evident amongst abundant taxa, but the distribution and abundance of these ancillary SRB (Peptococcaceae, Desulfovibrionales and Syntrophobacterales), and lineages containing IRB (excluding Desulfobacteraceae) was heterogeneous amongst sample types. Interesting, amongst the most abundant taxa, particularly during sulfate reduction, were Epsilonproteobacteria that perform microaerobic or nitrate-dependant sulfur oxidation, and a number of bacteria other than Geobacteraceae that may enzymatically reduce U(VI). Finally, in depth community probing with PhyloChip determined the efficacy of experimental approaches, notably revealing striking similarity amongst stimulated sediment (from drill cores and in-situ columns) and groundwater communities, and demonstrating that sediment-packed in-situ (down-well) columns served as an ideal method for subsurface biostimulation.

  16. Lipidomic Profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii Reveals Critical Changes in Lipid Composition in Response to Acetic Acid Stress

    PubMed Central

    Riezman, Howard; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    When using microorganisms as cell factories in the production of bio-based fuels or chemicals from lignocellulosic hydrolysate, inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid, released from the biomass, reduce the production rate. The undissociated form of acetic acid enters the cell by passive diffusion across the lipid bilayer, mediating toxic effects inside the cell. In order to elucidate a possible link between lipid composition and acetic acid stress, the present study presents detailed lipidomic profiling of the major lipid species found in the plasma membrane, including glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids and sterols, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CEN.PK 113_7D) and Zygosaccharomyces bailii (CBS7555) cultured with acetic acid. Detailed physiological characterization of the response of the two yeasts to acetic acid has also been performed in aerobic batch cultivations using bioreactors. Physiological characterization revealed, as expected, that Z. bailii is more tolerant to acetic acid than S. cerevisiae. Z. bailii grew at acetic acid concentrations above 24 g L?1, while limited growth of S. cerevisiae was observed after 11 h when cultured with only 12 g L?1 acetic acid. Detailed lipidomic profiling using electrospray ionization, multiple-reaction-monitoring mass spectrometry (ESI-MRM-MS) showed remarkable changes in the glycerophospholipid composition of Z. bailii, including an increase in saturated glycerophospholipids and considerable increases in complex sphingolipids in both S. cerevisiae (IPC 6.2×, MIPC 9.1×, M(IP)2C 2.2×) and Z. bailii (IPC 4.9×, MIPC 2.7×, M(IP)2C 2.7×), when cultured with acetic acid. In addition, the basal level of complex sphingolipids was significantly higher in Z. bailii than in S. cerevisiae, further emphasizing the proposed link between lipid saturation, high sphingolipid levels and acetic acid tolerance. The results also suggest that acetic acid tolerance is associated with the ability of a given strain to generate large rearrangements in its lipid profile. PMID:24023914

  17. Milk as Desensitizing Agent for Treatment of Dentine Hypersensitivity Following Periodontal Treatment Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Sabir, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background Dentinal hypersensitivity is a commonly observed problem after periodontal treatment procedures in periodontal patients. This further complicates preventive oral hygiene procedures by patients which jeopardize periodontal treatment, or even may aid in periodontal treatment failure. Aims and Objectives The aims and objectives of present study were to assess the problem of dentine hypersensitivity after non-surgical periodontal treatment and selection of cases for evaluation of commercially available milk at room temperature as mouth rinse for the treatment of dentinal hypersensitivity caused by periodontal treatment. Materials and Methods Patients were selected randomly for nonsurgical periodontal treatment and then were assessed for dentine hypersensitivity. Those having dentine hypersensitivity were assigned in two groups. Group one patients were advised to rinse with commercially available milk at room temperature, group two patients were advised to rinse with luke warm water as control. A four point Verbal Rating Score (VRS) was designed to record the numerical value of dentine hypersensitivity. Results The results show incidence of 42.5% and prevalence of 77.5% for dentine hypersensitivity after periodontal treatment procedures. After rinsing with milk following periodontal treatment procedures, there was found a significant reduction of dentine hypersensitivity with probability by unpaired t-test as 0.0007 and 0.0001 at tenth and fifteenth day post periodontal treatment procedures respectively. Conclusion This study demonstrated that the milk rinse is a suitable, cheaper, fast acting, home-use and easily available solution to the problem of dentine hypersensitivity after non-surgical periodontal treatment. Milk can be used as desensitizing agent and rinsing with milk for few days is effective in quick reduction of dentine hypersensitivity due to periodontal treatment procedures. PMID:26674005

  18. Subjective Welfare, Well-Being, and Self-Reported Food Hypersensitivity in Four European Countries: Implications for European Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voordouw, Jantine; Antonides, Gerrit; Fox, Margaret; Cerecedo, Inmaculada; Zamora, Javier; de la Hoz Caballer, Belen; Rokicka, Ewa; Cornelisse-Vermaat, Judith; Jewczak, Maciej; Starosta, Pawel; Kowalska, Marek L.; Jedrzejczak-Czechowicz, Monika; Vazquez-Cortes, Sonia; Escudero, Cano; de Blok, Bertine Flokstra; Dubois, Anthony; Mugford, Miranda; Frewer, Lynn J.

    2012-01-01

    This study estimates the effects of food hypersensitivity on individuals' perceived welfare and well-being compared to non-food hypersensitive individuals. Study respondents were recruited in the Netherlands, Poland, Spain and UK. The difference in welfare between food hypersensitive respondents and those asymptomatic to foods was estimated using…

  19. The Phytoalexin Resveratrol Regulates the Initiation of Hypersensitive Cell Death in Vitis Cell

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Xiaoli; Heene, Ernst; Qiao, Fei; Nick, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Resveratrol is a major phytoalexin produced by plants in response to various stresses and promotes disease resistance. The resistance of North American grapevine Vitis rupestris is correlated with a hypersensitive reaction (HR), while susceptible European Vitis vinifera cv. ‘Pinot Noir’ does not exhibit HR, but expresses basal defence. We have shown previously that in cell lines derived from the two Vitis species, the bacterial effector Harpin induced a rapid and sensitive accumulation of stilbene synthase (StSy) transcripts, followed by massive cell death in V. rupestris. In the present work, we analysed the function of the phytoalexin resveratrol, the product of StSy. We found that cv. ‘Pinot Noir’ accumulated low resveratrol and its glycoside trans-piceid, whereas V. rupestris produced massive trans-resveratrol and the toxic oxidative ?-viniferin, indicating that the preferred metabolitism of resveratrol plays role in Vitis resistance. Cellular responses to resveratrol included rapid alkalinisation, accumulation of pathogenesis-related protein 5 (PR5) transcripts, oxidative burst, actin bundling, and cell death. Microtubule disruption and induction of StSy were triggered by Harpin, but not by resveratrol. Whereas most responses proceeded with different amplitude for the two cell lines, the accumulation of resveratrol, and the competence for resveratrol-induced oxidative burst differed in quality. The data lead to a model, where resveratrol, in addition to its classical role as antimicrobial phytoalexin, represents an important regulator for initiation of HR-related cell death. PMID:22053190

  20. Long-lasting hypersensitivity to methamphetamine following amygdaloid kindling in cats: the relationship between limbic epilepsy and the psychotic state.

    PubMed

    Sato, M

    1983-05-01

    This study attempts to analyze the biological mechanisms involved in the association of a psychotic state with temporal lobe epilepsy, and the inverse relation between the epilepsy and this psychotic state. Responses to a test dose of methamphetamine (MAP) were examined in amygdaloid-kindled cats. It was found that (i) MAP-induced stereotyped behavior was enhanced after amygdaloid kindling, and this hypersensitivity lasted for at least 10 days after the final convulsion, (ii) autonomic responses to MAP including piloerection, salivation, heart rate, and respiration rate were also enhanced by the kindling, (iii) kindled generalized convulsions were suppressed during MAP-induced stereotyped behavior in some cats, and (iv) this suppression was blocked by pretreatment with pimozide. Engel and Ackermann proposed that inhibitory events precipitated by each kindling stimulus could produce changes in the catecholaminergic system similar to the reverse tolerance seen with dopamine agonists, and that inhibitory hypersensitivity could parallel the development of kindled excitation. This was partially confirmed by the present study, and leads to the hypothesis that excitation of seizure-inhibiting activity, including activity of the dopamine system, may be related to the emergence of a psychotic state, and to the inverse relationship between epilepsy and the psychotic state in temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:6683106

  1. Evaluating microRNA profiles reveals discriminative responses following genotoxic or non-genotoxic carcinogen exposure in primary mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Rieswijk, Linda; Brauers, Karen J J; Coonen, Maarten L J; van Breda, Simone G J; Jennen, Danyel G J; Kleinjans, Jos C S

    2015-11-01

    Chemical carcinogenesis can be induced by genotoxic (GTX) or non-genotoxic (NGTX) carcinogens. GTX carcinogens have a well-described mode of action. However, the complex mechanisms by which NGTX carcinogens act are less clear and may result in conflicting results between species [e.g. Wy-14,643 (Wy)]. We hypothesise that common microRNA response pathways exist for each class of carcinogenic agents. Therefore, this study compares and integrates mRNA and microRNA expression profiles following short term acute exposure (24 and 48h) to three GTX [aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) and cisplatin (CisPl)] or three NGTX (2,3,7,8-tetrachloordibenzodioxine (TCDD), cyclosporine A (CsA) and Wy) carcinogens in primary mouse hepatocytes. Discriminative gene sets, microRNAs (not for 24h) and processes were identified following 24 and 48h of exposure. From the three discriminative microRNAs found following 48h of exposure, mmu-miR-503-5p revealed to have an interaction with mRNA target gene cyclin D2 (Ccnd2 - 12444) which was involved in the discriminative process of p53 signalling and metabolism. Following exposure to NGTX carcinogens Mmu-miR-503-5p may have an oncogenic function by stimulating Ccnd2 possibly leading to a tumourigenic cell cycle progression. By contrast, after GTX carcinogen exposure it may have a tumour-suppressive function (repressing Ccnd2) leading to cell cycle arrest and to increased DNA repair activities. In addition, compound-specific microRNA-mRNA interactions [mmu-miR-301b-3p-Papss2 (for AFB1), as well as mmu-miR-29b-3p-Col4a2 and mmu-miR-24-3p-Flna (for BaP)] were found to contribute to a better understanding of microRNAs in cell cycle arrest and the impairment of the DNA damage repair, an important hallmark of GTX-induced carcinogenesis. Overall, our results indicate that microRNAs represent yet another relevant intracellular regulatory level in chemical carcinogenesis. PMID:25976910

  2. Delayed hypersensitivity reaction resulting in maculopapular-type eruption due to entecavir in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Tae; Jeong, Hye Won; Choi, Ki Hwa; Yoon, Tae Young; Sung, Nohyun; Choi, Young Ki; Kim, Eun Ha; Chae, Hee Bok

    2014-01-01

    Several clinical trials have demonstrated the potent antiviral efficacy of entecavir (ETV), and this relatively new nucleoside analogue drug has rapidly become a frequently prescribed therapy for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) worldwide. While the studies have also shown a good overall safety profile for ETV, adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in patients with advanced cirrhosis have been reported and represent a broad spectrum of drug-induced injuries, including lactic acidosis, myalgia, neuropathy, azotemia, hypophosphatemia, muscular weakness, and pancreatitis, as well as immune-mediated responses (i.e., allergic reactions). Cutaneous ADRs associated with ETV are very rare, with only two case reports in the publicly available literature; both of these cases were classified as unspecified hypersensitivity allergic (type I) ADR, but neither were reported as pathologically proven or as evaluated by cytokine release analysis. Here, we report the case of a 45-year-old woman who presented with a generalized maculopapular rash after one week of ETV treatment for lamivudine-resistant CHB. The patient reported having experienced a similar skin eruption during a previous three-month regimen of ETV, for which she had self-discontinued the medication. Histopathological analysis of a skin biopsy showed acanthotic epidermis with focal parakeratosis and a perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate admixed with interstitial eosinophils in the papillary and reticular dermis, consistent with a diagnosis of drug sensitivity. A lymphocyte stimulation test showed significantly enhanced IL-4, indicating a classification of type IVb delayed hypersensitivity. The patient was switched to an adefovir-lamivudine combination regimen and the skin eruption resolved two weeks after the ETV withdrawal. This case represents the first pathologically and immunologically evidenced ETV-induced delayed type hypersensitivity skin reaction reported to date. Physicians should be aware of the potential, although rare, for cutaneous ADRs associated with ETV treatment. PMID:25400481

  3. Outbreak of hypersensitivity pneumonitis in an industrial setting.

    PubMed

    Woodard, E D; Friedlander, B; Lesher, R J; Font, W; Kinsey, R; Hearne, F T

    1988-04-01

    Symptoms consistent with hypersensitivity pneumonitis developed in several workers in two multistory buildings in an industrial complex. A health questionnaire survey was conducted to determine the extent of the problem. Eighty-seven percent of the population of 1050 employees completed the health questionnaire. Serological testing identified 152 positive precipitin reactors to the fungus Aureobasidium pullulans; 115 reactors were symptomatic. The clinical and laboratory features at the time of the acute illness and during four years of follow-up are described. The agent, A pullulans, was identified as a contaminant of the heating-cooling ventilation units containing open waterspray chambers. Control was accomplished by replacement of the ventilation systems. A secondary source of antigen was found to be corrugated cardboard. Some sensitized employees required removal from work exposure to corrugated cardboard to prevent recurrent symptoms. PMID:3346977

  4. Hypersensitivity to oxaliplatin: clinical features and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Oxaliplatin-based regimens induce a potential risk of hypersensitivity reaction (HSR), with incidence varying from 10% to 25% and lack of clearly identified risk factors. The present study aimed to assess incidence and risk factors in HSR. Methods All patients treated with oxaliplatin in the Medical Oncology Department of the Lyon Sud University Hospital (Hospices Civils de Lyon, France) from October 2004 to January 2011 were enrolled. Incidence and severity of HSR were analyzed retrospectively and the potential clinicopathological covariates were tested on univariate and multivariate analysis. Results A total of 1,221 doses of oxaliplatin were administered for 191 patients, 8.9% of whom experienced an HSR. Seventeen HSRs were observed, with 1.6% grade 3 and no grade 4 events. The first reaction appeared after a median of 3 oxaliplatin infusions. Using univariate analysis, HSR was associated with younger age (mean age, 56.2 years; p?=?0.04), female gender (p?=?0.01) and prior exposure to platinum salts (p?=?0.02). No increased risk was associated with mean dose or with presence of atopic background. Multivariate analysis confirmed that women were at higher risk of oxaliplatin HSR than men (p?hypersensitive patients using an appropriate premedication strategy. Patients who experienced a grade 3 HSR were not rechallenged. Conclusion The risk of developing oxaliplatin HSR should not be underestimated (8.9% of patients). The medical team’s vigilance should be increased with women, younger patients and patients with prior exposure to platinum salts. PMID:24417770

  5. Delayed Hypersensitivity: Indicator of Acquired Failure of Host Defenses in Sepsis and Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Meakins, Jonathan L.; Pietsch, John B.; Bubenick, Oldrich; Kelly, Ralph; Rode, Harold; Gordon, Julius; MacLean, Lloyd D.

    1977-01-01

    Primary failure of host defense mechanisms has been associated with increased infection and mortality. Anergy, the failure of delayed hypersensitivity response, has been shown to identify surgical patients at increased risk for sepsis and related mortality. The anergic and relatively anergic patients whose skin tests failed to improve had a mortality rate of 74.4%, whereas those who improved their responses had a mortality rate of 5.1% (P < 0.001). This study documents abnormalities of neutrophil chemotaxis, T-lymphocyte rosetting in anergic patients and the effect of autologous serum. These abnormalities may account for the increased infection and mortality rates in anergic patients. Skin testing with five standard antigens has identified 110 anergic (A) or relatively anergic (RA) patients in whom neutrophil chemotaxis (CTX) and bactericidal function (NBF), T-lymphocyte rosettes, mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC), cell-mediated lympholysis (CML), and blastogenic factor (BF) were studied. The MLC, CML and BF were normal in the patients studied, and were not clinically helpful. Neutrophil CTX in 19 controls was 117.5 ± 1.6 u whereas in 40 A patients, neutrophils migrated 81.7 ± 2.3 u and in 15 RA patients 97.2 ± 3.8 u (P < 0.01). In 14 patients whose skin tests converted to normal, neutrophil migration improved from 78.2 ± 5.4 u to 107.2 ± 4.0 u (P < 0.01). Incubation of A or control neutrophils in A serum reduced migration in A patients from 93 ± 3.7 u to 86.2 ± 3.5 u (P < 0.01) and in normals from 121.2 ± 1.6 u to 103.6 ± 2.6 u (P < 0.001). The per cent rosette forming cells in 66 A patients was 42.5 ± 3.1 compared to 53.6 ± 2.8 in normal responders (P < 0.02). Incubation of normal lymphocytes in anergic serum further reduced rosetting by 30%. Restoration of delayed hypersensitivity responses and concurrent improvement in cellular and serum components of host defense were correlated with maintenance of adequate nutrition and aggressive surgical drainage. PMID:142452

  6. Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 activation enhances hapten sensitization in a T-helper type 2-driven fluorescein isothiocyanate-induced contact hypersensitivity mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Shiba, Takahiro; Tamai, Takuma; Sahara, Yurina; Kurohane, Kohta; Watanabe, Tatsuo; Imai, Yasuyuki

    2012-11-01

    Some chemicals contribute to the development of allergies by increasing the immunogenicity of other allergens. We have demonstrated that several phthalate esters, including dibutyl phthalate (DBP), enhance skin sensitization to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) in a mouse contact hypersensitivity model, in which the T-helper type 2 (Th2) response is essential. On the other hand, some phthalate esters were found to activate transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) cation channels on sensory neurons. We then found a positive correlation between the enhancing effects of several types of phthalate esters on skin sensitization to FITC and their ability to activate TRPA1. Here we examined the involvement of TRPA1 in sensitization to FITC by using TRPA1 agonists other than phthalate esters. During skin sensitization to FITC, the TRPA1 agonists (menthol, carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde and DBP) augmented the ear-swelling response as well as trafficking of FITC-presenting dendritic cells to draining lymph nodes. We confirmed that these TRPA1 agonists induced calcium influx into TRPA1-expressing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We also found that TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 inhibited DBP-induced calcium influx into TRPA1-expressing CHO cells. After pretreatment with this antagonist upon skin sensitization to FITC, the enhancing effect of DBP on sensitization was suppressed. These results suggest that TRPA1 activation will become a useful marker to find chemicals that facilitate sensitization in combination with other immunogenic haptens. -- Highlights: ? Role of TRPA1 activation was revealed in a mouse model of skin sensitization to FITC. ? TRPA1 agonists enhanced skin sensitization as well as dendritic cell trafficking. ? Dibutyl phthalate (DBP) has been shown to enhance skin sensitization to FITC. ? TRPA1 activation by DBP was inhibited by a selective antagonist, HC-030031. ? HC-030031 inhibited the enhancing effect of DBP on skin sensitization to FITC.

  7. Suppressing the truth as a mechanism of deception: Delta plots reveal the role of response inhibition in lying.

    PubMed

    Debey, Evelyne; Ridderinkhof, Richard K; De Houwer, Jan; De Schryver, Maarten; Verschuere, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    Lying takes more time than telling the truth. Because lying involves withholding the truth, this "lie effect" has been related to response inhibition. We investigated the response inhibition hypothesis of lying using the delta-plot method: A leveling-off of the standard increase of the lie effect with slower reaction times would be indicative of successful response inhibition. Participants performed a reaction-time task that required them to alternate between lying and truth telling in response to autobiographical questions. In two experiments, we found that the delta plot of the lie effect leveled off with longer response latencies, but only in a group of participants who had better inhibitory skills as indexed by relatively small lie effects. This finding supports the role of response inhibition in lying. We elaborate on repercussions for cognitive models of deception and the data analysis of reaction-time based lie tests. PMID:26397036

  8. Uncertainty analysis of diffuse-gray radiation enclosure problems: A hypersensitive case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Robert P.; Luck, Rogelio; Hodge, B. K.; Steele, W. Glenn

    1993-01-01

    An uncertainty analysis of diffuse-gray enclosure problems is presented. The genesis was a diffuse-gray enclosure problem which proved to be hypersensitive to the specification of view factors. This genesis is discussed in some detail. The uncertainty analysis is presented for the general diffuse-gray enclosure problem and applied to the hypersensitive case study. It was found that the hypersensitivity could be greatly reduced by enforcing both closure and reciprocity for the view factors. The effects of uncertainties in the surface emissivities and temperatures are also investigated.

  9. Lack of the purinergic receptor P2X7 results in resistance to contact hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Felix C.; Esser, Philipp R.; Müller, Tobias; Ganesan, Jayanthi; Pellegatti, Patrizia; Simon, Markus M.; Zeiser, Robert; Idzko, Marco; Jakob, Thilo

    2010-01-01

    Sensitization to contact allergens requires activation of the innate immune system by endogenous danger signals. However, the mechanisms through which contact allergens activate innate signaling pathways are incompletely understood. In this study, we demonstrate that mice lacking the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) receptor P2X7 are resistant to contact hypersensitivity (CHS). P2X7-deficient dendritic cells fail to induce sensitization to contact allergens and do not release IL-1? in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and ATP. These defects are restored by pretreatment with LPS and alum in an NLRP3- and ASC-dependent manner. Whereas pretreatment of wild-type mice with P2X7 antagonists, the ATP-degrading enzyme apyrase or IL-1 receptor antagonist, prevents CHS, IL-1? injection restores CHS in P2X7-deficient mice. Thus, P2X7 is a crucial receptor for extracellular ATP released in skin in response to contact allergens. The lack of P2X7 triggering prevents IL-1? release, which is an essential step in the sensitization process. Interference with P2X7 signaling may be a promising strategy for the prevention of allergic contact dermatitis. PMID:21059855

  10. GLOBAL TRANSCRIPTION PROFILING REVEALS DIFFERENTIAL RESPONSES TO CHRONIC NITROGEN STRESS AND PUTATIVE NITROGEN REGULATORY COMPONENTS IN ARABIDOPSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: A large quantity of nitrogen (N) fertilizer is used for crop production to achieve high yields at a significant economic and environmental cost. Efforts have been directed to understanding the molecular basis of plant responses to N and to identifying N-responsive gen...

  11. B-lymphocytes from a population of children with autism spectrum disorder and their unaffected siblings exhibit hypersensitivity to thimerosal.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Martyn A; Gist, Taylor L; Baskin, David S

    2013-01-01

    The role of thimerosal containing vaccines in the development of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been an area of intense debate, as has the presence of mercury dental amalgams and fish ingestion by pregnant mothers. We studied the effects of thimerosal on cell proliferation and mitochondrial function from B-lymphocytes taken from individuals with autism, their nonautistic twins, and their nontwin siblings. Eleven families were examined and compared to matched controls. B-cells were grown with increasing levels of thimerosal, and various assays (LDH, XTT, DCFH, etc.) were performed to examine the effects on cellular proliferation and mitochondrial function. A subpopulation of eight individuals (4 ASD, 2 twins, and 2 siblings) from four of the families showed thimerosal hypersensitivity, whereas none of the control individuals displayed this response. The thimerosal concentration required to inhibit cell proliferation in these individuals was only 40% of controls. Cells hypersensitive to thimerosal also had higher levels of oxidative stress markers, protein carbonyls, and oxidant generation. This suggests certain individuals with a mild mitochondrial defect may be highly susceptible to mitochondrial specific toxins like the vaccine preservative thimerosal. PMID:23843785

  12. Perfluorooctanoic acid exposure for 28 days affects glucose homeostasis and induces insulin hypersensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shengmin; Zhang, Hongxia; Zheng, Fei; Sheng, Nan; Guo, Xuejiang; Dai, Jiayin

    2015-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are widely used in many applications due to their unique physical and chemical characteristics. Because of the increasing prevalence of metabolic syndromes, including obesity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, concern has arisen about the roles of environmental pollutants in such diseases. Earlier epidemiologic studies showed a potential association between perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and glucose metabolism, but how PFOA influences glucose homeostasis is still unknown. Here, we report on the modulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-serine/threonine protein kinase (PI3K-AKT) signaling pathway in the livers of mice after 28?d of exposure to PFOA. Compared with normal mice, PFOA exposure significantly decreased the expression of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) protein and affected the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway in the liver. Tolerance tests further indicated that PFOA exposure induced higher insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in mice. Biochemical analysis revealed that PFOA exposure reduced hepatic glycogen synthesis, which might be attributed to gluconeogenesis inhibition. The levels of several circulating proteins were altered after PFOA exposure, including proteins potentially related to diabetes and liver disease. Our results suggest that PFOA affected glucose metabolism and induced insulin hypersensitivity in mice. PMID:26066376

  13. Perfluorooctanoic acid exposure for 28 days affects glucose homeostasis and induces insulin hypersensitivity in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shengmin; Zhang, Hongxia; Zheng, Fei; Sheng, Nan; Guo, Xuejiang; Dai, Jiayin

    2015-06-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are widely used in many applications due to their unique physical and chemical characteristics. Because of the increasing prevalence of metabolic syndromes, including obesity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, concern has arisen about the roles of environmental pollutants in such diseases. Earlier epidemiologic studies showed a potential association between perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and glucose metabolism, but how PFOA influences glucose homeostasis is still unknown. Here, we report on the modulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-serine/threonine protein kinase (PI3K-AKT) signaling pathway in the livers of mice after 28?d of exposure to PFOA. Compared with normal mice, PFOA exposure significantly decreased the expression of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) protein and affected the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway in the liver. Tolerance tests further indicated that PFOA exposure induced higher insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in mice. Biochemical analysis revealed that PFOA exposure reduced hepatic glycogen synthesis, which might be attributed to gluconeogenesis inhibition. The levels of several circulating proteins were altered after PFOA exposure, including proteins potentially related to diabetes and liver disease. Our results suggest that PFOA affected glucose metabolism and induced insulin hypersensitivity in mice.

  14. Transcript abundance profiles reveal larger and more complex responses of grapevine to chilling compared to osmotic and salinity stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, iso-osmotic salinity (120 mM NaCl, 12mM CaCl2) and osmotic (PEG) stresses, along with chilling (5oC) stress, were applied to the cold-sensitive grapevine species V. vinifera cv. Cabernet Sauvignon. Microarray analysis of transcript abundance in shoot tips revealed that 43% of gene exp...

  15. Studies of several species of moths have begun to reveal the physiological basis that underlies behavioral responses of

    E-print Network

    Daly, Kevin Charles

    Studies of several species of moths have begun to reveal the physiological basis that underlies tuned subsystem within the male moth's olfactory system, which presumably evolved because of the reliability of the pheromonal signal over evolutionary time (Smith, 1996). Moths like Manduca sexta, also

  16. [A case of rib tuberculosis and chest wall abscess with multi-drug hypersensitivity reactions].

    PubMed

    Akduman Ala?ehir, Elçin; Sar?man, Nesrin; Yaman, Görkem; Olgaç, Müge; Sayg?, Attila

    2015-07-01

    Extrapulmonary tuberculosis is the reactivation of the remaining latent organism which spreads during primary infection by the lymphohematogenous way. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis especially in endemic countries for tuberculosis. Tuberculosis (TB) treatment is based on the principle of the combined use of several drugs. As a result of the combination therapy there can be life threatening side effects which can lead to improper use of medications and may also cause drug resistance. In this report, we present an 85-year-old male patient desensitized due to the development of allergy against multi-drugs with rib tuberculosis and chest wall abscess to whom, culture, drug susceptibility and genotypical tests were applied. In November 2012, the patient applied to a medical center with complaints of swelling and pain under the right rib, underwent rib resection and eventually diagnosed as rib TB by histopathological examination. However, the anti-TB treatment was discontinued due to the hypersensitivity reactions in the skin and in addition to the hepatic and renal dysfunction side effects. The patient had widespread redness, rash and pruritus on the body and the laboratory findings were as follows; ALT: 114 U/L, AST: 152 U/L, ALP: 93 U/L, GGT: 26U/L, blood urea nitrogen (BUN): 26 mg/dL and creatinine: 1.7 mg/dL. After the disapperance of the complaints within 3 days of drug discontinuation, isoniazid treatment was initiated. However, the new treatment was also discontinued when the reactions reoccurred. Afterwards, the patient developed hypersensitivity reactions against the combination of streptomycin and ethambutol. The patient refused any further treatment and was discharged from the hospital. The patient was untreated for the last 5 months and admitted to our clinic with a fistulized swelling and abscess in the right chest wall. Bacteria was not detected in the acid-fast staining of the abscess material, however Mycobacterium tuberculosis was isolated from culture by MGIT (Mycobacteria Growth Incubator Tube; BBL MGIT, BD, USA) system. The spoligotyping revealed that the genotype was Haarlem 1. Major drug susceptibility testing against rifampin, streptomycin, ethambutol, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide yielded sensitivity to those drugs. Minor drug susceptibility testing against paraaminosalicylic acid, ethionamide, kanamycin, capreomycin and ofloxacin was found to be sensitive. A regimen of isoniazid 300 mg/day, ethambutol 1000 mg/day and moxifloxacin 400 mg/day was initiated. Rapid oral desensitization against isoniazid and ethambutol were repeated on two consecutive days. The patient continued antituberculosis therapy for 12 months without adverse reactions. The chest wall fistula was closed. Abscess was drained surgically. Clinical and radiological improvements were achieved. The patient remains clinically disease free and continues his regular follow ups. This case is presented to emphasize about the importance of culture and susceptibility testing in extrapulmonary tuberculosis cases and desensitization in drug hypersensitivity reactions. PMID:26313287

  17. Microarray Analysis of Tomato’s Early and Late Wound Response Reveals New Regulatory Targets for Leucine Aminopeptidase A

    PubMed Central

    Scranton, Melissa A.; Fowler, Jonathan H.; Girke, Thomas; Walling, Linda L.

    2013-01-01

    Wounding due to mechanical injury or insect feeding causes a wide array of damage to plant cells including cell disruption, desiccation, metabolite oxidation, and disruption of primary metabolism. In response, plants regulate a variety of genes and metabolic pathways to cope with injury. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is a model for wound signaling but few studies have examined the comprehensive gene expression profiles in response to injury. A cross-species microarray approach using the TIGR potato 10-K cDNA array was analyzed for large-scale temporal (early and late) and spatial (locally and systemically) responses to mechanical wounding in tomato leaves. These analyses demonstrated that tomato regulates many primary and secondary metabolic pathways and this regulation is dependent on both timing and location. To determine if LAP-A, a known modulator of wound signaling, influences gene expression beyond the core of late wound-response genes, changes in RNAs from healthy and wounded Leucine aminopeptidase A-silenced (LapA-SI) and wild-type (WT) leaves were examined. While most of the changes in gene expression after wounding in LapA-SI leaves were similar to WT, overall responses were delayed in the LapA-SI leaves. Moreover, two pathogenesis-related 1 (PR-1c and PR-1a2) and two dehydrin (TAS14 and Dhn3) genes were negatively regulated by LAP-A. Collectively, this study has shown that tomato wound responses are complex and that LAP-A’s role in modulation of wound responses extends beyond the well described late-wound gene core. PMID:24205013

  18. Delayed-type hypersensitivity to Babesia microti-infected erythrocytes in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebush, M.J.; Troutman, E.H.; Kennedy, D.A.

    1986-04-01

    Strong delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to Babesia microti was elicited when intraerythrocytic parasites (IEP) were inoculated subcutaneously into the flank of normal mice 6 to 14 days before challenge in the ipsilateral footpad with 10(8) IEP. Intraperitoneal or intravenous administration of antigen did not sensitize mice for DTH. When challenge was given 21 days after immunization, the response was approximately half of the maximum and then rose again slowly over the next 3 weeks to levels that were not significantly different from those maximal values. The response was classified as a true DTH reaction on the basis of kinetics, histology, and the transfer of responsiveness with immune T lymphocytes of the Ly 1+ phenotype, but not with serum. The reaction was specific for IEP since control groups given two injections of red blood cells from uninfected syngeneic mice (NRBC) or one injection of NRBC or sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and one of IEP never developed significant footpad swelling. Freed parasites obtained by osmotic rupture, density gradient sedimentation, and lethally irradiated IEP were also effective for elicitation of DTH. Anti-IEP DTH was expressed in a dose-dependent fashion with 10(6), 10(7), or 10(8) parasites sufficing for immunizing inoculum as long as 10(8) parasites were used as the challenge dose. Mice immunized and challenged with 10(8) lethally irradiated IEP (60 krad, 60Co), were protected against subsequent intraperitoneal challenge with 10(8) viable IEP. If mice were infected intraperitoneally with 10(8) IEP at any time between 21 days before immunization to 2 hr after challenge, their ability to respond to immunization and challenge was profoundly depressed. Development of a strong anti-parasite DTH response can occur in parallel with resistance to infection, but is not a rapid sequela of bloodborne infection.

  19. RNA-sequencing reveals the complexities of the transcriptional response to lignocellulosic biofuel substrates in Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Delmas, Stéphane; Ibbett, Roger; Kokolski, Matthew; Neiteler, Almar; van Munster, Jolanda M; Wilson, Raymond; Blythe, Martin J; Gaddipati, Sanyasi; Tucker, Gregory A; Archer, David B

    2015-01-01

    Background Saprobic fungi are the predominant industrial sources of Carbohydrate Active enZymes (CAZymes) used for the saccharification of lignocellulose during the production of second generation biofuels. The production of more effective enzyme cocktails is a key objective for efficient biofuel production. To achieve this objective, it is crucial to understand the response of fungi to lignocellulose substrates. Our previous study used RNA-seq to identify the genes induced in Aspergillus niger in response to wheat straw, a biofuel feedstock, and showed that the range of genes induced was greater than previously seen with simple inducers. Results In this work we used RNA-seq to identify the genes induced in A. niger in response to short rotation coppice willow and compared this with the response to wheat straw from our previous study, at the same time-point. The response to willow showed a large increase in expression of genes encoding CAZymes. Genes encoding the major activities required to saccharify lignocellulose were induced on willow such as endoglucanases, cellobiohydrolases and xylanases. The transcriptome response to willow had many similarities with the response to straw with some significant differences in the expression levels of individual genes which are discussed in relation to differences in substrate composition or other factors. Differences in transcript levels include higher levels on wheat straw from genes encoding enzymes classified as members of GH62 (an arabinofuranosidase) and CE1 (a feruloyl esterase) CAZy families whereas two genes encoding endoglucanases classified as members of the GH5 family had higher transcript levels when exposed to willow. There were changes in the cocktail of enzymes secreted by A. niger when cultured with willow or straw. Assays for particular enzymes as well as saccharification assays were used to compare the enzyme activities of the cocktails. Wheat straw induced an enzyme cocktail that saccharified wheat straw to a greater extent than willow. Genes not encoding CAZymes were also induced on willow such as hydrophobins as well as genes of unknown function. Several genes were identified as promising targets for future study. Conclusions By comparing this first study of the global transcriptional response of a fungus to willow with the response to straw, we have shown that the inducing lignocellulosic substrate has a marked effect upon the range of transcripts and enzymes expressed by A. niger. The use by industry of complex substrates such as wheat straw or willow could benefit efficient biofuel production. PMID:26457194

  20. De novo sequencing of root transcriptome reveals complex cadmium-responsive regulatory networks in radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Wang, Yan; Liu, Wei; Wang, Jin; Zhu, Xianwen; Zhang, Keyun; Yu, Rugang; Wang, Ronghua; Xie, Yang; Zhang, Wei; Gong, Yiqin; Liu, Liwang

    2015-07-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a nonessential metallic trace element that poses potential chronic toxicity to living organisms. To date, little is known about the Cd-responsive regulatory network in root vegetable crops including radish. In this study, 31,015 unigenes representing 66,552 assembled unique transcripts were isolated from radish root under Cd stress based on de novo transcriptome assembly. In all, 1496 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) consisted of 3579 transcripts were identified from Cd-free (CK) and Cd-treated (Cd200) libraries. Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analysis indicated that the up- and down-regulated DEGs were predominately involved in glucosinolate biosynthesis as well as cysteine and methionine-related pathways, respectively. RT-qPCR showed that the expression profiles of DEGs were in consistent with results from RNA-Seq analysis. Several candidate genes encoding phytochelatin synthase (PCS), metallothioneins (MTs), glutathione (GSH), zinc iron permease (ZIPs) and ABC transporter were responsible for Cd uptake, accumulation, translocation and detoxification in radish. The schematic model of DEGs and microRNAs-involved in Cd-responsive regulatory network was proposed. This study represents a first comprehensive transcriptome-based characterization of Cd-responsive DEGs in radish. These results could provide fundamental insight into complex Cd-responsive regulatory networks and facilitate further genetic manipulation of Cd accumulation in root vegetable crops. PMID:26025544

  1. A comprehensive differential proteomic study of nitrate deprivation in Arabidopsis reveals complex regulatory networks of plant nitrogen responses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Bian, Yangyang; Cheng, Kai; Zou, Hanfa; Sun, Samuel Sai-Ming; He, Jun-Xian

    2012-04-01

    Nitrogen (N) is an important nutrient and signal for plant growth and development. However, to date, our knowledge of how plants sense and transduce the N signals is very limited. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of plant N responses, we took two-dimensional gel-based proteomic and phosphoproteomic approaches to profile the proteins with abundance and phosphorylation state changes during nitrate deprivation and recovery in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. After 7-day-old seedlings were N-deprived for up to 48 h followed by 24 h recovery, a total of 170 and 38 proteins were identified with significant changes in abundance and phosphorylation state, respectively. Bioinformatic analyses implicate these proteins in diverse cellular processes including N and protein metabolisms, photosynthesis, cytoskeleton, redox homeostasis, and signal transduction. Functional studies of the selected nitrate-responsive proteins indicate that the proteasome regulatory subunit RPT5a and the cytoskeleton protein Tubulin alpha-6 (TUA6) play important roles in plant nitrate responses by regulating plant N use efficiency (NUE) and low nitrate-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis, respectively. In conclusion, our study provides novel insights into plant responses to nitrate at the proteome level, which are expected to be highly useful for dissecting the N response pathways in higher plants and for improving plant NUE. PMID:22329444

  2. Linking transcriptional responses to organismal tolerance reveals mechanisms of thermal sensitivity in a mesothermal endangered fish.

    PubMed

    Komoroske, Lisa M; Connon, Richard E; Jeffries, Ken M; Fangue, Nann A

    2015-10-01

    Forecasting species' responses to climate change requires understanding the underlying mechanisms governing environmental stress tolerance, including acclimation capacity and acute stress responses. Current knowledge of these physiological processes in aquatic ectotherms is largely drawn from eurythermal or extreme stenothermal species. Yet many species of conservation concern exhibit tolerance windows and acclimation capacities in between these extremes. We linked transcriptome profiles to organismal tolerance in a mesothermal endangered fish, the delta smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus), to quantify the cellular processes, sublethal thresholds and effects of thermal acclimation on acute stress responses. Delta smelt initiated rapid molecular changes in line with expectations of theoretical thermal limitation models, but also exhibited diminished capacity to modify the expression of some genes and cellular mechanisms key to coping with acute thermal stress found in eurytherms. Sublethal critical thresholds occurred 4-6 °C below their upper tolerance limits, and thermal acclimation shifted the onset of acute thermal stress and tolerance as predicted. However, we found evidence that delta smelt's limited thermal plasticity may be partially due to an inability of individuals to effectively make physiological adjustments to truly achieve new homoeostasis under heightened temperatures, resulting in chronic thermal stress. These findings provide insight into the physiological basis of the diverse patterns of thermal tolerances observed in nature. Moreover, understanding how underlying molecular mechanisms shape thermal acclimation capacity, acute stress responses and ultimately differential phenotypes contributes to a predictive framework to deduce species' responses in situ to changes in selective pressures due to climate change. PMID:26339983

  3. Differential effect of anterior cingulate cortex lesion on mechanical hypersensitivity and escape/avoidance behavior in an animal model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    LaGraize, Stacey C; Labuda, Christopher J; Rutledge, Margaret A; Jackson, Raymond L; Fuchs, Perry N

    2004-07-01

    Various limbic system structures have been implicated in processing noxious information. One such structure is the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), a region that is thought to modulate higher order processing of noxious input related to the affective/motivational component of pain. The present experiment examined the involvement of the ACC in higher order pain processing by measuring paw withdrawal threshold and escape/avoidance responses in the L5 spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain before and following electrolytic lesion of the ACC. In the place/escape avoidance paradigm, the afflicted paw is mechanically stimulated when the animal is in the preferred dark area of the chamber and the contralateral paw is stimulated when the animal is in the light area. Escape/avoidance was defined as a shift from the preferred dark area to an increase of time spent in the light area of the chamber. Animals with L5 ligation had significantly lower mechanical paw withdrawal threshold (hypersensitivity) and enhanced escape/avoidance behavior. ACC lesion in animals with L5 ligation did not alter mechanical hypersensitivity, but did significantly decrease escape/avoidance behavior. Anxiety, as measured using the light-enhanced startle paradigm, was not altered by ACC lesion. These results highlight the utility of novel behavioral test paradigms and provide additional support for the role of the ACC in higher order processing of noxious information, suggesting that ACC lesions selectively decrease negative affect associated with neuropathy-induced hypersensitivity. PMID:15191810

  4. Food Hypersensitivity in Patients Over 14 Years of Age Suffering from Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    ?elakovská, Jarmila; Ettler, K; Ettlerová, K; Van??ková, J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients suffering from atopic dermatitis often describe food hypersensitivity. Rising prevalence of food hypersensitivity and severe allergic reactions to foods have been reported, but the data are scarce. Aims and Objectives: Evaluation of food hypersensitivity reactions in patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. Materials and Methods: The dermatological examination was performed in patients of age 14 years and above and the detailed history was taken concerning the food hypersensitivity. Results: A total of 228 patients were examined-72 men, 156 women, average age 26.2 (SD 9.5) years. The food hypersensitivity reactions were recorded in 196 patients from 228 (86%), no reactions were recorded in 32 patients (24%). Foods with the most often recorded reactions are: Nuts (in 35% of patients), tomatoes (in 20%), and kiwi (in 17, 5%), apples and spices (in 16%), tangerines and oranges (in 15%), capsicum (in 13%), fishes (in 12%), celery (in 9%), and chocolate (in 7%). Conclusion: Food hypersensitivity reactions are recorded in 86% of patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. Nuts, tomatoes, and pollen–associated foods play a role in the majority of patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. PMID:24891679

  5. An Arabidopsis soluble chloroplast proteomic analysis reveals the participation of the Executer pathway in response to increased light conditions

    PubMed Central

    Uberegui, Estefanía; Hall, Michael; Lorenzo, Óscar; Schröder, Wolfgang P.; Balsera, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    The Executer1 and Executer2 proteins have a fundamental role in the signalling pathway mediated by singlet oxygen in chloroplast; nonetheless, not much is known yet about their specific activity and features. Herein, we have followed a differential-expression proteomics approach to analyse the impact of Executer on the soluble chloroplast protein abundance in Arabidopsis. Because singlet oxygen plays a significant role in signalling the oxidative response of plants to light, our analysis also included the soluble chloroplast proteome of plants exposed to a moderate light intensity in the time frame of hours. A number of light- and genotype-responsive proteins were detected, and mass-spectrometry identification showed changes in abundance of several photosynthesis- and carbon metabolism-related proteins as well as proteins involved in plastid mRNA processing. Our results support the participation of the Executer proteins in signalling and control of chloroplast metabolism, and in the regulation of plant response to environmental changes. PMID:25740923

  6. Taxon-specific responses of Southern Ocean diatoms to Fe enrichment revealed by synchrotron radiation FTIR microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sackett, O.; Armand, L.; Beardall, J.; Hill, R.; Doblin, M.; Connelly, C.; Howes, J.; Stuart, B.; Ralph, P.; Heraud, P.

    2014-10-01

    Photosynthesis by marine diatoms contributes substantially to global biogeochemical cycling and ecosystem productivity. It is widely accepted that diatoms are extremely sensitive to changes in Fe availability, with numerous in situ experiments demonstrating rapid growth and increased export of elements (e.g. C, Si and Fe) from surface waters as a result of Fe addition. Less is known about the effects of Fe enrichment on the phenotypes of diatoms, such as associated changes in nutritional value - furthermore, data on taxon-specific responses are almost non-existent. Enhanced supply of nutrient-rich waters along the coast of the subantarctic Kerguelen Island provide a valuable opportunity to examine the responses of phytoplankton to natural Fe enrichment. Here we demonstrate the use of synchrotron radiation Fourier Transform Infrared (SR-FTIR) microspectroscopy to analyse changes in the macromolecular composition of diatoms collected along the coast and plateau of Kerguelen Island, Southern Ocean. SR-FTIR microspectroscopy enabled the analysis of individual diatom cells from mixed communities of field-collected samples, thereby providing insight into in situ taxon-specific responses in relation to changes in Fe availability. Phenotypic responses were taxon-specific in terms of intraspecific variability and changes in proteins, amino acids, phosphorylated molecules, silicate/silicic acid and carbohydrates. In contrast to some previous studies, silicate/silicic acid levels increased under Fe enrichment, in conjunction with increases in carbohydrate stores. The highly abundant taxon Fragilariopsis kerguelensis displayed a higher level of phenotypic plasticity than Pseudo-nitzschia spp., while analysis of the data pooled across all measured taxa showed different patterns in macromolecular composition compared to those for individual taxon. This study demonstrates that taxon-specific responses to Fe enrichment may not always be accurately reflected by bulk community measurements, highlighting the need for further research into taxon-specific phenotypic responses of phytoplankton to environmental change.

  7. Treatment of dentine hypersensitivity by diode laser: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Umberto, Romeo; Claudia, Russo; Gaspare, Palaia; Gianluca, Tenore; Alessandro, Del Vecchio

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Dentine hypersensitivity (DH) is characterized by pain after stimuli that usually provoke no symptoms. This study compared the effectiveness of GaAlAs diode laser alone and with topical sodium fluoride gel (NaF). Materials and Methods. The study was conducted on 10 patients (8 F/2 M, age 25-60) and 115 teeth with DH assessed by air and tactile stimuli measured by Numeric Rating Scale (NRS). Teeth were randomly divided into G1 (34 teeth) treated by 1.25% NaF; G2 (33 teeth) lased at 0.5?W PW (T on 100?m and T off 100?ms), fluence 62.2?J/cm(2) in defocused mode with a 320?? fiber. Each tooth received three 1' applications; G3 (48 teeth) received NaF gel plus laser at same G2 parameters. NRS was checked at each control. Results. Significant pain reduction was showed. The NRS reduction percentages were calculated, and there was a concrete decrease of DH above all in G3 than G2 and G1. Conclusion. Diode laser is a useful device for DH treatment if used alone and mainly if used with NaF gel. PMID:22792109

  8. Diagnosing the tight building syndrome or diagnosing chemical hypersensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, S.A. )

    1989-01-01

    The abrupt exposure to urea foam formaldehyde insulation served as an alert to its spectrum of symptoms, including attacks of headache, flushing, laryngitis, dizziness, nausea, extreme weakness or exhaustion, arthralgia, an inability to concentrate, unwarranted depression, arrhythmia, or muscle spasms, and baffled physicians from many specialties. Later it was learned that toluene, xylene, benzene, natural gas, trichloroethylene, and many other chemicals were also capable of triggering chemical hypersensitivity. Other names for this condition include Environmentally Induced Illness (EI), the Tight Building Syndrome (TBS), the Sick Building Syndrome, and Building-Related Illness. The very symptoms patients complain of can be provoked within minutes and then subsequently alleviated with an intradermal injection of the appropriate strength of the triggering chemical. This technique aids in convincing the patient of the EI or TBS triggers so that the patient can begin to relate symptoms to environmental exposures and initiate measure to bring the disease under control. The key to safer buildings is increased ventilation, increased filtration of air, and decreased use of off-gassing synthetic materials.

  9. Exploring Some Aspects Associated with Dentine Hypersensitivity in Children

    PubMed Central

    Shitsuka, Caleb; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros; Corrêa, Maria Salete Nahás Pires; Leite, Mariana Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Background. The etiology of dentine hypersensitivity (DH) is still inconclusive and there are few studies concerning it in children. Aim. To evaluate clinical, dietary, and salivary variables in children with DH complaints. Design. Forty-eight children were asked about DH. Data regarding dietary habits were collected from the children's parents and an examination was performed to determine dental erosion. Dental biofilm was estimated by oral hygiene status, according to Greene and Vermillion's Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (OHI-S). Whole saliva was collected under mechanical stimulation and evaluated salivary flow rate, initial pH, buffer capacity, and calcium and phosphate concentrations. The temperature of soft drinks, drinking method, sense of bitter taste, and other variables were also determined. Possible factors associated with DH were analyzed by univariate and multiple Poisson regression analyses. The prevalence ratio (PR) values and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. Results. DH was associated with the presence of dental erosion (PR; 95% CI = 2.23; 1.05 to 4.71) and salivary flow rate (2.49; 1.05 to 5.91). When the presence of erosion was not included, other variables were retained as follows: bitter taste (2.36; 1.38 to 4.03), OHI-S (0.47; 0.23 to 0.97). Conclusion. DH in children is associated with factors related to dental erosion. PMID:25879070

  10. Adjuvant Effect of an Alternative Plasticizer, Diisopropyl Adipate, on a Contact Hypersensitivity Mouse Model: Link with Sensory Ion Channel TRPA1 Activation.

    PubMed

    Kurohane, Kohta; Kimura, Ayako; Terasawa, Rie; Sahara, Yurina; Kobayashi, Kamiyu; Suzuki, Wakana; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Watanabe, Tatsuo; Imai, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Due to health concerns about phthalate esters, the use of alternative plasticizers is being considered. Phthalate esters enhance skin sensitization to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) in mouse models. We have demonstrated that phthalate esters stimulate transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) cation channels expressed on sensory neurons. We also found a correlation between TRPA1 activation and the enhancing effect on FITC-induced contact hypersensitivity (CHS) when testing various types of phthalate esters. Here we investigated the effects of an alternative plasticizer, diisopropyl adipate (DIA). Activation of TRPA1 by DIA was demonstrated by calcium mobilization using Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing TRPA1 in vitro. The effect of DIA was inhibited by a TRPA1-specific antagonist, HC-030031. The presence of DIA or dibutyl phthalate (DBP; positive control) during skin sensitization of BALB/c mice to FITC augmented the CHS response, as revealed by the level of ear-swelling. The enhancing effect of DIA was inhibited by in vivo pretreatment with HC-030031. FITC-presenting CD11c(+) dendritic cell (DC)-trafficking to draining lymph nodes was facilitated both by DIA and by DBP. DBP and DIA were similarly active in the enhancement of interferon-? production by draining lymph nodes, but the effect on interleukin-4 production was weaker with DIA. Overall, DIA activated TRPA1 and enhanced FITC-induced CHS, as DBP did. The adjuvant effects of adipate esters may need to be considered because they are used as ingredients in cosmetics and drug formulations topically applied to the skin. PMID:25959058

  11. Time-frequency analysis of auditory-nerve-fiber and basilar-membrane click responses reveal glide irregularities and non-characteristic-frequency skirts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tai; Guinan, John J.

    2004-07-01

    Although many properties of click responses can be accounted for by a single, frequency-dispersive traveling wave exciting a single, characteristic-frequency (CF) resonance, some properties, such as waxing and waning cannot. Joint time-frequency distributions (TFDs) were used to help understand click responses of cat single auditory-nerve (AN) fibers (CFs<4 kHz) and published measurements of chinchilla basilar-membrane (BM) motion. For CFs>800 Hz, the peak energy of the response decreased in latency and frequency as the level increased, as expected. However, at high levels the trend reversed for AN, but not BM, responses. Normalized TFDs, which show the frequency with the peak energy at each response time, revealed glides, as previously reported. Classical theory predicts smooth, upward glides. Instead, at low CFs there were downward glides, and at other CFs glides had substantial irregularities. Finally, click skirts, defined as the longest-latency part of click responses, sometimes showed deviations from CF for above-threshold sound levels. Most of these phenomena are not explained by a single, frequency-dispersive traveling wave exciting a single CF resonance, but they can be accounted for by the interaction of two (or more) excitation drives with different latencies and frequency contents.

  12. PPE38 of Mycobacterium marinum triggers the cross-talk of multiple pathways involved in the host response, as revealed by subcellular quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Dong, Dandan; Tang, Siwei; Chen, Xian; Gao, Qian

    2013-05-01

    The PE/PPE family of proteins which are in high abundance in pathogenic species such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. marinum , play the critical role in generating antigenic variation and evasion of host immune responses. However, little is known about their functional roles in mycobacterial pathogenesis. Previously, we found that PPE38 is associated with the virulence of mycobacteria, presumably by modulating the host immune response. To clarify the link between PPE38 and host response, we employed a subcellular, amino acid-coded mass tagging (AACT)/SILAC-based quantitative proteomic approach to determine the proteome changes during host response to M. marinum PPE38. As a result, 291 or 290 proteins were found respectively to be up- or down-regulated in the nucleus. Meanwhile, 576 upregulated and 272 downregulated proteins were respectively detected in the cytosol. The data of quantitative proteomic changes and concurrent biological validations revealed that M. marinum PPE38 could trigger extensive inflammatory responses in macrophages, probably through interacting with toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). We also found that PPE38 may arrest MHC-1 processing and presentation in infected macrophages. Using bioinformatics tools to analyze global changes in the host proteome, we obtained a PPE38-respondor network involved in various transcriptional factors (TFs) and TF-associated proteins. The results of our systems investigation now indicate that there is cross-talk involving a broad range of diverse biological pathways/processes that coordinate the host response to M. marinum PPE38. PMID:23514422

  13. Regulatory T cells dynamically regulate selectin ligand function during multiple challenge contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Abeynaike, Latasha D; Deane, James A; Westhorpe, Clare L V; Chow, Zachary; Alikhan, Maliha A; Kitching, A Richard; Issekutz, Andrew; Hickey, Michael J

    2014-11-15

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play critical roles in restricting T cell-mediated inflammation. In the skin, this is dependent on expression of selectin ligands required for leukocyte rolling in dermal microvessels. However, whether there are differences in the molecules used by Tregs and proinflammatory T cells to undergo rolling in the skin remains unclear. In this study, we used spinning disk confocal microscopy in Foxp3-GFP mice to visualize rolling of endogenous Tregs in dermal postcapillary venules. Tregs underwent consistent but low-frequency rolling interactions under resting and inflamed conditions. At the early stage of the response, Treg adhesion was minimal. However, at the peak of inflammation, Tregs made up 40% of the adherent CD4(+) T cell population. In a multiple challenge model of contact hypersensitivity, rolling of Tregs and conventional CD4(+) T cells was mostly dependent on overlapping contributions of P- and E-selectin. However, after a second challenge, rolling of Tregs but not conventional CD4(+) T cells became P-selectin independent, and Tregs showed reduced capacity to bind P-selectin. Moreover, inhibition of E-selectin at this time point resulted in exacerbation of inflammation. These findings demonstrate that in this multiple challenge model of inflammation, Treg selectin binding capacity and the molecular basis of Treg rolling can be regulated dynamically. PMID:25274531

  14. Staphylococcal lipoteichoic acid inhibits delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions via the platelet-activating factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiwei; Mousdicas, Nico; Yi, Qiaofang; Al-Hassani, Mohammed; Billings, Steven D; Perkins, Susan M; Howard, Katherine M; Ishii, Satoshi; Shimizu, Takao; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2005-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections are known triggers for skin inflammation and can modulate immune responses. The present studies used model systems consisting of platelet-activating factor receptor-positive and -negative (PAF-R-positive and -negative) cells and PAF-R-deficient mice to demonstrate that staphylococcal lipoteichoic acid (LTA), a constituent of Gram-positive bacteria cell walls, acts as a PAF-R agonist. We show that LTA stimulates an immediate intracellular Ca2+ flux only in PAF-R-positive cells. Intradermal injections of LTA and the PAF-R agonist 1-hexadecyl-2-N-methylcarbamoyl glycerophosphocholine (CPAF) induced cutaneous inflammation in wild-type but not PAF-R-deficient mice. Systemic exposure to LTA or CPAF inhibited delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions to the chemical dinitrofluorobenzene only in PAF-R-expressing mice. The inhibition of DTH reactions was abrogated by the addition of neutralizing antibodies to IL-10. Finally, we measured levels of LTA that were adequate to stimulate PAF-R in vitro on the skin of subjects with infected atopic dermatitis. Based on these studies, we propose that LTA exerts immunomodulatory effects via the PAF-R through production of the Th2 cytokine IL-10. These findings show a novel mechanism by which staphylococcal infections can inhibit Th1 reactions and thus worsen Th2 skin diseases, such as atopic dermatitis. PMID:16184199

  15. Effect of formaldehyde gas exposure in a murine allergic contact hypersensitivity model.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Kazuyasu; Tsuji, Kazuhide; Matsuura, Hironori; Okazaki, Fusako; Takahashi, Sachiko; Arata, Jirô; Iwatsuki, Keiji

    2005-01-01

    To clarify the effect of formaldehyde (FA) gas exposure on contact hypersensitivity (CHS), CHS reactions against 2,4,6-trinitrochlorobenzene (TNCB) was studied in BALB/c mice with a low dose of FA gas exposure. The TNCB-induced CHS reactions were slightly suppressed by the FA gas exposure immediately after sensitization, whereas they were significantly enhanced and prolonged in mice continuously exposed to FA gas before and after sensitization. We showed that exposure to FA gas enhanced the Th2 dominant responses in draining lymph node (LN) in early stage of CHS. In contrast, T cell subsets and their intracellular cytokine production in the draining LN were similar during the early stage of CHS by FA gas exposure during the sensitization phase. The percentage of CD8+ T cells was increased, and the percentage of CD4+CD25+ T cells was decreased in the FA gas-exposed group at 72 hr after elicitation. These results indicate that FA gas-exposed might influence regulatory T cells. Furthermore, in the chronic CHS model that was repetitively elicited with TNCB, more intensive and prolonged CHS reactions, and increased numbers of mast cells were found in the FA gas-exposed group at 4 hr after elicitation than in the control group, FA gas exposure may alter the intensity of allergic CHS. PMID:15803868

  16. The value of family history in the diagnosis of hypersensitivity pneumonitis in children*

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Joana; Carvalho, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), or extrinsic allergic alveolitis, is an immunologically mediated disease resulting from the inhalation of organic substances that trigger an inflammatory response in the alveolar wall, bronchioles, and interstitium in susceptible individuals. Although HP is predominantly an occupational disease, seen in adulthood, cases in children have been described. The diagnosis of HP requires a high degree of suspicion. The treatment consists in avoiding contact with the antigen, and, in some cases, systemic corticosteroids might be necessary in order to prevent its progression to pulmonary fibrosis. We report the clinical cases of three children with a history of contact with birds and a family history of HP. All three patients presented with cough and dyspnea on exertion. The disease was diagnosed on the basis of the clinical history and ancillary diagnostic test results consistent with the diagnosis, including a predominance of lymphocytes (> 60%, CD8+ T lymphocytes in particular) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and a ground-glass pattern seen on HRCT of the chest. Early diagnosis is crucial in order to prevent HP from progressing to pulmonary fibrosis. Hereditary factors seem to influence the onset of the disease. PMID:24831404

  17. Host Genotype and Hypersensitive Reaction Influence Population Levels of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians in Lettuce.

    PubMed

    Bull, Carolee T; Gebben, Samantha J; Goldman, Polly H; Trent, Mark; Hayes, Ryan J

    2015-03-01

    Dynamics of population sizes of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians inoculated onto or into lettuce leaves were monitored on susceptible and resistant cultivars. In general, population growth was greater for susceptible (Clemente, Salinas 88, Vista Verde) than resistant (Batavia Reine des Glaces, Iceberg, Little Gem) cultivars. When spray-inoculated or infiltrated, population levels of X. campestris pv. vitians were consistently significantly lower on Little Gem than on susceptible cultivars, while differences in the other resistant cultivars were not consistently statistically significant. Populations increased at an intermediate rate on cultivars Iceberg and Batavia Reine des Glaces. There were significant positive correlations between bacterial concentration applied and disease severity for all cultivars, but bacterial titer had a significantly greater influence on disease severity in the susceptible cultivars than in Little Gem and an intermediate influence in Iceberg and Batavia Reine des Glaces. Infiltration of X. campestris pv. vitians strains into leaves of Little Gem resulted in an incompatible reaction, whereas compatible reactions were observed in all other cultivars. It appears that the differences in the relationship between population dynamics for Little Gem and the other cultivars tested were due to the hypersensitive response in cultivar Little Gem. These findings have implications for disease management and lettuce breeding because X. campestris pv. vitians interacts differently with cultivars that differ for resistance mechanisms. PMID:25302523

  18. NYLON FILTER ARRAYS REVEAL DIFFERENTIAL GENE EXPRESSION IN PROTEOID ROOTS OF WHITE LUPIN IN RESPONSE TO P DEFICIENCY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White lupin (Lupinus albus L.) adapts to phosphorus deficiency (-P) by the development of short, densely clustered lateral roots called proteoid (or cluster) roots. In an effort to better understand the molecular events mediating these adaptive responses, we have isolated and sequenced 2,102 express...

  19. Transcriptomics in human blood incubation reveals the importance of oxidative stress response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae clinical strains

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In recent years an increasing number of yeast infections in humans have been related to certain clinical isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Some clinical strains showed in vivo and in vitro virulence traits and were able to cause death in mice whereas other clinical strains were avirulent. Results In this work, we studied the transcriptional profiles of two S. cerevisiae clinical strains showing virulent traits and two control non-virulent strains during a blood incubation model and detected a specific transcriptional response of clinical strains. This response involves an mRNA levels increase of amino acid biosynthesis genes and especially oxidative stress related genes. We observed that the clinical strains were more resistant to reactive oxygen species in vitro. In addition, blood survival of clinical isolates was high, reaching similar levels to pathogenic Candida albicans strain. Furthermore, a virulent strain mutant in the transcription factor Yap1p, unable to grow in oxidative stress conditions, presented decreased survival levels in human blood compared with the wild type or YAP1 reconstituted strain. Conclusions Our data suggest that this enhanced oxidative stress response in virulent clinical isolates, presumably induced in response to oxidative burst from host defense cells, is important to increase survival in human blood and can help to infect and even produce death in mice models. PMID:22916735

  20. Interrogating Practice in Culturally Diverse Classrooms: What Can an Analysis of Student Resistance and Teacher Response Reveal?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santoro, Ninetta; Forghani-Arani, Neda

    2015-01-01

    As classrooms have increasingly become diverse and complex, developing culturally responsive pedagogies is a professional imperative for teachers. However, considerable international research suggests that meeting the needs of diverse pupil cohorts is challenging for many teachers. In this article, we highlight how curriculum and teaching…

  1. Rapid transcriptional response of apple to fire blight disease revealed by cDNA suppression subtractive hybridization analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fire blight, caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora (Ea), is a destructive disease of many tree and shrub species of the Rosaceae. Suppression subtractive cDNA hybridization (SSH) was used to identify genes that are differentially up- and down- regulated in apple (Malus X domestica) in response ...

  2. cDNA-AFLP Reveals a Striking Overlap in Race-Specific Resistance and Wound Response Gene Expression Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Durrant, Wendy E.; Rowland, Owen; Piedras, Pedro; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E.; Jones, Jonathan D. G.

    2000-01-01

    The tomato Cf-9 gene confers resistance to races of the fungal pathogen Cladosporium fulvum expressing the Avr9 gene. cDNA amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis was used to display transcripts whose expression is rapidly altered during the Avr9- and Cf-9–mediated defense response in tobacco cell cultures. Diphenyleneiodonium was used to abolish the production of active oxygen species during gene induction. Of 30,000 fragments inspected, 290 showed altered abundance, of which 263 were induced independently of active oxygen species. cDNA clones were obtained for 13 ACRE (for Avr9/Cf-9 rapidly elicited) genes. ACRE gene induction occurred in the presence of cycloheximide. Avr9 induced ACRE gene expression in leaves. Surprisingly, ACRE genes were also rapidly but transiently induced in leaves in response to other stresses. The amino acid sequences of some ACRE proteins are homologous to sequences of known proteins such as ethylene response element binding protein transcription factors, the N resistance protein, a calcium binding protein, 13-lipoxygenase, and a RING-H2 zinc finger protein. Rapid induction of ACRE genes suggests that they play a pivotal role during plant defense responses. PMID:10852940

  3. Gosha-jinki-gan reduced oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity to cold sensation and its effect would be related to suppression of the expression of TRPM8 and TRPA1 in rats.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yoshinori; Tateai, Yoshikazu; Ohkubo, Misao; Saito, Yuka; Amagai, Syun-ya; Kimura, Yu-Suke; Iimura, Naohumi; Okada, Megumi; Matsumoto, Akiko; Mano, Yasunari; Hirosawa, Iori; Ohuchi, Kaori; Tajima, Masataka; Asahi, Mariko; Kotaki, Hajime; Yamada, Harumi

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common side effect of the chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin (Oxp), and is associated with hypersensitivity to cold sensation in the acute stage. Recently, gosha-jinki-gan (GJG), a Japanese herbal medicine, was reported to improve Oxp-induced cold hypersensitivity. However, the mechanism for this effect was not elucidated. We hypothesized that the effect of GJG on Oxp-induced cold hypersensitivity may be associated with the expression of the transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) and transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channels, which are cold-gated ion channels. To assess this hypothesis, we examined alteration of the withdrawal response to cold stimulation following coadministration of GJG and Oxp in rats, and the relationship between this altered withdrawal response and the expression of TRPM8 and TRPA1 mRNA in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Assessment of cold hypersensitivity was performed at 4 and 10°C using a cold plate. Compared with Oxp administration alone, coadministration of GJG (oral dose: 1 g/kg/day for 12 days) and Oxp (intraperitoneal dose: 4 mg/kg twice a week) significantly reduced the withdrawal response to cold stimulation. On the 12th day of drug administration, the L4-L6 DRG were removed and the expression of TRPM8 and TRPA1 mRNA was determined using RT-PCR. The expression of TRPM8 and TRPA1 in the DRG of rats that were coadministered GJG and Oxp decreased significantly compared with that in the rats administered Oxp alone. These results suggest that coadministration of GJG may improve Oxp-induced cold hypersensitivity by suppressing the overexpression of TRPM8 and TRPA1 mRNA. PMID:24052105

  4. Controlled Measurement and Comparative Analysis of Cellular Components in E. coli Reveals Broad Regulatory Changes in Response to Glucose Starvation.

    PubMed

    Houser, John R; Barnhart, Craig; Boutz, Daniel R; Carroll, Sean M; Dasgupta, Aurko; Michener, Joshua K; Needham, Brittany D; Papoulas, Ophelia; Sridhara, Viswanadham; Sydykova, Dariya K; Marx, Christopher J; Trent, M Stephen; Barrick, Jeffrey E; Marcotte, Edward M; Wilke, Claus O

    2015-08-01

    How do bacteria regulate their cellular physiology in response to starvation? Here, we present a detailed characterization of Escherichia coli growth and starvation over a time-course lasting two weeks. We have measured multiple cellular components, including RNA and proteins at deep genomic coverage, as well as lipid modifications and flux through central metabolism. Our study focuses on the physiological response of E. coli in stationary phase as a result of being starved for glucose, not on the genetic adaptation of E. coli to utilize alternative nutrients. In our analysis, we have taken advantage of the temporal correlations within and among RNA and protein abundances to identify systematic trends in gene regulation. Specifically, we have developed a general computational strategy for classifying expression-profile time courses into distinct categories in an unbiased manner. We have also developed, from dynamic models of gene expression, a framework to characterize protein degradation patterns based on the observed temporal relationships between mRNA and protein abundances. By comparing and contrasting our transcriptomic and proteomic data, we have identified several broad physiological trends in the E. coli starvation response. Strikingly, mRNAs are widely down-regulated in response to glucose starvation, presumably as a strategy for reducing new protein synthesis. By contrast, protein abundances display more varied responses. The abundances of many proteins involved in energy-intensive processes mirror the corresponding mRNA profiles while proteins involved in nutrient metabolism remain abundant even though their corresponding mRNAs are down-regulated. PMID:26275208

  5. Controlled Measurement and Comparative Analysis of Cellular Components in E. coli Reveals Broad Regulatory Changes in Response to Glucose Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Houser, John R.; Barnhart, Craig; Boutz, Daniel R.; Carroll, Sean M.; Dasgupta, Aurko; Michener, Joshua K.; Needham, Brittany D.; Papoulas, Ophelia; Sridhara, Viswanadham; Sydykova, Dariya K.; Marx, Christopher J.; Trent, M. Stephen; Barrick, Jeffrey E.; Marcotte, Edward M.; Wilke, Claus O.

    2015-01-01

    How do bacteria regulate their cellular physiology in response to starvation? Here, we present a detailed characterization of Escherichia coli growth and starvation over a time-course lasting two weeks. We have measured multiple cellular components, including RNA and proteins at deep genomic coverage, as well as lipid modifications and flux through central metabolism. Our study focuses on the physiological response of E. coli in stationary phase as a result of being starved for glucose, not on the genetic adaptation of E. coli to utilize alternative nutrients. In our analysis, we have taken advantage of the temporal correlations within and among RNA and protein abundances to identify systematic trends in gene regulation. Specifically, we have developed a general computational strategy for classifying expression-profile time courses into distinct categories in an unbiased manner. We have also developed, from dynamic models of gene expression, a framework to characterize protein degradation patterns based on the observed temporal relationships between mRNA and protein abundances. By comparing and contrasting our transcriptomic and proteomic data, we have identified several broad physiological trends in the E. coli starvation response. Strikingly, mRNAs are widely down-regulated in response to glucose starvation, presumably as a strategy for reducing new protein synthesis. By contrast, protein abundances display more varied responses. The abundances of many proteins involved in energy-intensive processes mirror the corresponding mRNA profiles while proteins involved in nutrient metabolism remain abundant even though their corresponding mRNAs are down-regulated. PMID:26275208

  6. Global analyses revealed age-related alterations in innate immune responses after stimulation of pathogen recognition receptors.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Talibah U; Cubas, Rafael A; Ghneim, Khader; Cartwright, Michael J; Grevenynghe, Julien Van; Richner, Justin M; Olagnier, David P; Wilkinson, Peter A; Cameron, Mark J; Park, Byung S; Hiscott, John B; Diamond, Michael S; Wertheimer, Anne M; Nikolich-Zugich, Janko; Haddad, Elias K

    2015-06-01

    Aging leads to dysregulation of multiple components of the immune system that results in increased susceptibility to infections and poor response to vaccines in the aging population. The dysfunctions of adaptive B and T cells are well documented, but the effect of aging on innate immunity remains incompletely understood. Using a heterogeneous population of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), we first undertook transcriptional profiling and found that PBMCs isolated from old individuals (? 65 years) exhibited a delayed and altered response to stimulation with TLR4, TLR7/8, and RIG-I agonists compared to cells obtained from adults (? 40 years). This delayed response to innate immune agonists resulted in the reduced production of pro-inflammatory and antiviral cytokines and chemokines including TNF?, IL-6, IL-1?, IFN?, IFN?, CCL2, and CCL7. While the major monocyte and dendritic cell subsets did not change numerically with aging, activation of specific cell types was altered. PBMCs from old subjects also had a lower frequency of CD40+ monocytes, impaired up-regulation of PD-L1 on monocytes and T cells, and increased expression of PD-L2 and B7-H4 on B cells. The defective immune response to innate agonists adversely affected adaptive immunity as TLR-stimulated PBMCs (minus CD3 T cells) from old subjects elicited significantly lower levels of adult T-cell proliferation than those from adult subjects in an allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). Collectively, these age-associated changes in cytokine, chemokine and interferon production, as well as co-stimulatory protein expression could contribute to the blunted memory B- and T-cell immune responses to vaccines and infections. PMID:25728020

  7. Gait Analysis at Multiple Speeds Reveals Differential Functional and Structural Outcomes in Response to Graded Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Krizsan-Agbas, Dora; Winter, Michelle K.; Eggimann, Linda S.; Meriwether, Judith; Berman, Nancy E.; McCarson, Kenneth E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Open-field behavioral scoring is widely used to assess spinal cord injury (SCI) outcomes, but has limited usefulness in describing subtle changes important for posture and locomotion. Additional quantitative methods are needed to increase the resolution of locomotor outcome assessment. This study used gait analysis at multiple speeds (GAMS) across a range of mild-to-severe intensities of thoracic SCI in the rat. Overall, Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) scores and subscores were assessed, and detailed automated gait analysis was performed at three fixed walking speeds (3.5, 6.0, and 8.5?cm/sec). Variability in hindpaw brake, propel, and stance times were analyzed further by integrating across the stance phase of stepping cycles. Myelin staining of spinal cord sections was used to quantify white matter loss at the injury site. Varied SCI intensity produced graded deficits in BBB score, BBB subscores, and spinal cord white matter and total volume loss. GAMS measures of posture revealed decreased paw area, increased limb extension, altered stance width, and decreased values for integrated brake, propel, and stance. Measures of coordination revealed increased stride frequency concomitant with decreased stride length, resulting in deviation from consistent forelimb/hindlimb coordination. Alterations in posture and coordination were correlated to impact severity. GAMS results correlated highly with functional and histological measures and revealed differential relationships between sets of GAMS dynamics and cord total volume loss versus epicenter myelin loss. Automated gait analysis at multiple speeds is therefore a useful tool for quantifying nuanced changes in gait as an extension of histological and observational methods in assessing SCI outcomes. PMID:24405378

  8. Neuronal selectivity of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in guinea-pig substantia nigra revealed by responses to anoxia.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, K P; Greenfield, S A

    1992-01-01

    1. Two sub-populations of pars compacta substantia nigra neurones were identified with very different electrophysiological properties and rostral-caudal distribution. Both cell types were identified by biocytin intracellular dye injection and found to be located within pars compacta containing tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells. These sub-populations displayed distinctly different responses to transient anoxia. 2. The first group ('Phasic' neurones) exhibited a low threshold calcium conductance LTS gCa associated with bursts of action potentials, were located at the level of the mammillary bodies and were highly sensitive to anoxia. The second group ('rhythmic' neurones) fired in a rhythmic pattern, were located at the level of the accessory optic tract and were relatively insensitive to anoxia. 3. The anoxic response of phasic cells was characterized by membrane hyperpolarization (mean 12 mV), a decrease in input resistance (mean 36%) and cessation of action potential firing. The axonic response of these neurones was not blocked by TEA (5-10 mM), haloperidol (100 microM), the removal of extracellular calcium or depletion of endogenous dopamine. However, this effect was blocked by both the sulphonylurea tolbutamide (50-500 microM), and also by quinine (100 microM) and could be mimicked by application of diazoxide (1 mM). 4. Rhythmic cells displayed a variable response to anoxia consisting of either modest depolarization, hyperpolarization or no change in membrane potential, in all cases accompanied by little or no change in input resistance. The polarity of the membrane potential shift during anoxia was reversed by TEA (5-10 mM) or the removal of calcium. These cells were also relatively insensitive to diazoxide (1 mM). 5. It is concluded from the neuronal responses to anoxia and the pharmacological modification of these responses, that the ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP channel) is functionally operative in the substantia nigra and is primarily distributed on the phasically discharging cells of the rostral pars compacta. The relevance of this recently discovered ionic channel is discussed with regard to the normal and abnormal functioning of the substantia nigra. Images Fig. 1 PMID:1464828

  9. The N-Ethyl-N-Nitrosourea-Induced Goldenticket Mouse Mutant Reveals an Essential Function of Sting in the In Vivo Interferon Response to Listeria monocytogenes and Cyclic Dinucleotides ?

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, John-Demian; Sotelo-Troha, Katia; von Moltke, Jakob; Monroe, Kathryn M.; Rae, Chris S.; Brubaker, Sky W.; Hyodo, Mamoru; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Woodward, Joshua J.; Portnoy, Daniel A.; Vance, Russell E.

    2011-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are central regulators of the innate and adaptive immune responses to viral and bacterial infections. Type I IFNs are induced upon cytosolic detection of microbial nucleic acids, including DNA, RNA, and the bacterial second messenger cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP). In addition, a recent study demonstrated that the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes stimulates a type I IFN response due to cytosolic detection of bacterially secreted c-di-AMP. The transmembrane signaling adaptor Sting (Tmem173, Mita, Mpys, Eris) has recently been implicated in the induction of type I IFNs in response to cytosolic DNA and/or RNA. However, the role of Sting in response to purified cyclic dinucleotides or during in vivo L. monocytogenes infection has not been addressed. In order to identify genes important in the innate immune response, we have been conducting a forward genetic mutagenesis screen in C57BL/6 mice using the mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU). Here we describe a novel mutant mouse strain, Goldenticket (Gt), that fails to produce type I IFNs upon L. monocytogenes infection. By genetic mapping and complementation experiments, we found that Gt mice harbor a single nucleotide variant (T596A) of Sting that functions as a null allele and fails to produce detectable protein. Analysis of macrophages isolated from Gt mice revealed that Sting is absolutely required for the type I interferon response to both c-di-GMP and c-di-AMP. Additionally, Sting is required for the response to c-di-GMP and L. monocytogenes in vivo. Our results provide new functions for Sting in the innate interferon response to pathogens. PMID:21098106

  10. Gene profiling reveals a role for stress hormones in the molecular and behavioral response to food restriction

    PubMed Central

    Guarnieri, Douglas J.; Brayton, Catherine E.; Richards, Sarah M.; Maldonado-Aviles, Jaime; Trinko, Joseph R.; Nelson, Jessica; Taylor, Jane R.; Gourley, Shannon L.; DiLeone, Ralph J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Food restriction is known to enhance learning and motivation. The neural mechanisms underlying these responses likely involve alterations in gene expression in brain regions mediating the motivation to feed. Methods Analysis of gene expression profiles in male C57BL6/J mice using whole-genome microarrays was completed in the medial prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, ventral tegmental area, and the hypothalamus following a five day food restriction. Quantitative PCR was used to validate these findings and determine the time-course of expression changes. Plasma levels of the stress hormone corticosterone (CORT) were measured by ELISA. Expression changes were measured in adrenalectomized animals that underwent food restriction, as well as in animals receiving daily injections of CORT. Progressive ratio responding for food, a measure of motivated behavior, was assessed after CORT treatment in restricted and fed animals. Results Brief food restriction results in an upregulation of peripheral stress responsive genes in the mammalian brain. Time-course analysis demonstrated rapid and persistent expression changes in all four brain regions under study. Administration of CORT to non-restricted animals was sufficient to induce a subset of the genes, and alterations in gene expression after food restriction were dependent on intact adrenal glands. CORT can increase the motivation to work for food only in the restricted state. Conclusions These data demonstrate a central role for CORT in mediating both molecular and behavioral responses to food restriction. The stress hormone-induced alterations in gene expression described here may be relevant for both adaptive and pathological responses to stress. PMID:21855858

  11. Analysis of Whitefly Transcriptional Responses to Beauveria bassiana Infection Reveals New Insights into Insect-Fungus Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shan; Li, Fang-Fang; Feng, Ming-Guang; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Background The fungal pathogen, Beauveria bassiana, is an efficient biocontrol agent against a variety of agricultural pests. A thorough understanding of the basic principles of insect-fungus interactions may enable the genetic modification of Beauveria bassiana to enhance its virulence. However, the molecular mechanism of insect response to Beauveria bassiana infection is poorly understood, let alone the identification of fungal virulent factors involved in pathogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, next generation sequencing technology was applied to examine the expression of whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) genes in response to the infection of Beauveria bassiana. Results showed that, compared to control, 654 and 1,681genes were differentially expressed at 48 hours and 72 hours post-infected whiteflies, respectively. Functional and enrichment analyses indicated that the DNA damage stimulus response and drug metabolism were important anti-fungi strategies of the whitefly. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway was also likely involved in the whitefly defense responses. Furthermore, the notable suppression of general metabolism and ion transport genes observed in 72 hours post-infected B. tabaci might be manipulated by fungal secreted effectors. By mapping the sequencing tags to B. bassiana genome, we also identified a number of differentially expressed fungal genes between the early and late infection stages. These genes are generally associated with fungal cell wall synthesis and energy metabolism. The expression of fungal cell wall protein genes might play an important role in fungal pathogenesis and the dramatically up-regulated enzymes of carbon metabolism indicate the increasing usage of energy during the fungal infection. Conclusions/Significance To our knowledge, this is the first report on the molecular mechanism of fungus-whitefly interactions. Our results provide a road map for future investigations on insect-pathogen interactions and genetically modifying the fungus to enhance its efficiency in whitefly control. PMID:23861870

  12. Functional genomics reveals the induction of inflammatory response and metalloproteinase gene expression during lethal Ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cilloniz, Cristian; Ebihara, Hideki; Ni, Chester; Neumann, Gabriele; Korth, Marcus J; Kelly, Sara M; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Feldmann, Heinz; Katze, Michael G

    2011-09-01

    Ebola virus is the etiologic agent of a lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates with mortality rates of up to 90%. Previous studies with Zaire Ebola virus (ZEBOV), mouse-adapted virus (MA-ZEBOV), and mutant viruses (ZEBOV-NP(ma), ZEBOV-VP24(ma), and ZEBOV-NP/VP24(ma)) allowed us to identify the mutations in viral protein 24 (VP24) and nucleoprotein (NP) responsible for acquisition of high virulence in mice. To elucidate specific molecular signatures associated with lethality, we compared global gene expression profiles in spleen samples from mice infected with these viruses and performed an extensive functional analysis. Our analysis showed that the lethal viruses (MA-ZEBOV and ZEBOV-NP/VP24(ma)) elicited a strong expression of genes 72 h after infection. In addition, we found that although the host transcriptional response to ZEBOV-VP24(ma) was nearly the same as that to ZEBOV-NP/VP24(ma), the contribution of a mutation in the NP gene was required for a lethal phenotype. Further analysis indicated that one of the most relevant biological functions differentially regulated by the lethal viruses was the inflammatory response, as was the induction of specific metalloproteinases, which were present in our newly identify functional network that was associated with Ebola virus lethality. Our results suggest that this dysregulated proinflammatory response increased the severity of disease. Consequently, the newly discovered molecular signature could be used as the starting point for the development of new drugs and therapeutics. To our knowledge, this is the first study that clearly defines unique molecular signatures associated with Ebola virus lethality. PMID:21734050

  13. Cross-species transcriptional network analysis reveals conservation and variation in response to metal stress in cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As one of the most dominant bacterial groups on Earth, cyanobacteria play a pivotal role in the global carbon cycling and the Earth atmosphere composition. Understanding their molecular responses to environmental perturbations has important scientific and environmental values. Since important biological processes or networks are often evolutionarily conserved, the cross-species transcriptional network analysis offers a useful strategy to decipher conserved and species-specific transcriptional mechanisms that cells utilize to deal with various biotic and abiotic disturbances, and it will eventually lead to a better understanding of associated adaptation and regulatory networks. Results In this study, the Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) approach was used to establish transcriptional networks for four important cyanobacteria species under metal stress, including iron depletion and high copper conditions. Cross-species network comparison led to discovery of several core response modules and genes possibly essential to metal stress, as well as species-specific hub genes for metal stresses in different cyanobacteria species, shedding light on survival strategies of cyanobacteria responding to different environmental perturbations. Conclusions The WGCNA analysis demonstrated that the application of cross-species transcriptional network analysis will lead to novel insights to molecular response to environmental changes which will otherwise not be achieved by analyzing data from a single species. PMID:23421563

  14. A dualistic conformational response to substrate binding in the human serotonin transporter reveals a high affinity state for serotonin.

    PubMed

    Bjerregaard, Henriette; Severinsen, Kasper; Said, Saida; Wiborg, Ove; Sinning, Steffen

    2015-03-20

    Serotonergic neurotransmission is modulated by the membrane-embedded serotonin transporter (SERT). SERT mediates the reuptake of serotonin into the presynaptic neurons. Conformational changes in SERT occur upon binding of ions and substrate and are crucial for translocation of serotonin across the membrane. Our understanding of these conformational changes is mainly based on crystal structures of a bacterial homolog in various conformations, derived homology models of eukaryotic neurotransmitter transporters, and substituted cysteine accessibility method of SERT. However, the dynamic changes that occur in the human SERT upon binding of ions, the translocation of substrate, and the role of cholesterol in this interplay are not fully elucidated. Here we show that serotonin induces a dualistic conformational response in SERT. We exploited the substituted cysteine scanning method under conditions that were sensitized to detect a more outward-facing conformation of SERT. We found a novel high affinity outward-facing conformational state of the human SERT induced by serotonin. The ionic requirements for this new conformational response to serotonin mirror the ionic requirements for translocation. Furthermore, we found that membrane cholesterol plays a role in the dualistic conformational response in SERT induced by serotonin. Our results indicate the existence of a subpopulation of SERT responding differently to serotonin binding than hitherto believed and that membrane cholesterol plays a role in this subpopulation of SERT. PMID:25614630

  15. Water Stress Responses of Tomato Mutants Impaired in Hormone Biosynthesis Reveal Abscisic Acid, Jasmonic Acid and Salicylic Acid Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Espinoza, Valeria A.; López-Climent, María F.; Casaretto, José A.; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the putative crosstalk between JA and ABA in Solanum lycopersicum plants in response to drought, suppressor of prosystemin-mediated responses2 (spr2, JA-deficient) and flacca (flc, ABA-deficient) mutants together with the naphthalene/salicylate hydroxylase (NahG) transgenic (SA-deficient) line were used. Hormone profiling and gene expression of key enzymes in ABA, JA and SA biosynthesis were analyzed during early stages of drought. ABA accumulation was comparable in spr2 and wild type (WT) plants whereas expression of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase 1 (NCED1) and NCED2 was different, implying a compensation mechanism between NCED genes and an organ-specific regulation of NCED1 expression. JA levels and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductase 3 (OPR3) expression in flc plants suggest that ABA regulates the induction of the OPR3 gene in roots. By contrast, ABA treatment to flc plants leads to a reduction of JA and SA contents. Furthermore, different pattern of SA accumulation (and expression of isochorismate synthase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase 1) was observed between WT seedlings and mutants, suggesting that SA plays an important role on the early response of tomato plants to drought and also that JA and ABA modulate its biosynthesis. Finally, hormone profiling in spr2 and NahG plants indicate a crosstalk between JA and SA that could enhance tolerance of tomato to water stress. PMID:26635826

  16. Responses of high-elevation herbaceous plant assemblages to low glacial CO? concentrations revealed by fossil marmot (Marmota) teeth.

    PubMed

    McLean, Bryan S; Ward, Joy K; Polito, Michael J; Emslie, Steven D

    2014-08-01

    Atmospheric CO2 cycles of the Quaternary likely imposed major constraints on the physiology and growth of C3 plants worldwide. However, the measured record of this remains both geographically and taxonomically sparse. We present the first reconstruction of physiological responses in a late Quaternary high-elevation herbaceous plant community from the Southern Rocky Mountains, USA. We used a novel proxy-fossilized tooth enamel of yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flaviventris)-which we developed using detailed isotopic analysis of modern individuals. Calculated C isotopic discrimination (?) of alpine plants was nearly 2 ‰ lower prior to the Last Glacial Maximum than at present, a response almost identical to that of nonherbaceous taxa from lower elevations. However, initial shifts in ? aligned most closely with the onset of the late Pleistocene bipolar temperature "seesaw" rather than CO2 increase, indicating unique limitations on glacial-age high-elevation plants may have existed due to both low temperatures and low CO2. Further development of system-specific faunal proxies can help to clarify this and other plant- and ecosystem-level responses to past environmental change. PMID:24916834

  17. Hyperresponsiveness of mice deficient in plasma-secreted sphingomyelinase reveals its pivotal role in early phase of host response

    PubMed Central

    Jbeily, Nayla; Suckert, Iris; Gonnert, Falk A.; Acht, Benedikt; Bockmeyer, Clemens L.; Grossmann, Sascha D.; Blaess, Markus F.; Lueth, Anja; Deigner, Hans-Peter; Bauer, Michael; Claus, Ralf A.

    2013-01-01

    Plasma secretion of acid sphingomyelinase is a hallmark of cellular stress response resulting in the formation of membrane embedded ceramide-enriched lipid rafts and the reorganization of receptor complexes. Consistently, decompartmentalization of ceramide formation from inert sphingomyelin has been associated with signaling events and regulation of the cellular phenotype. Herein, we addressed the question of whether the secretion of acid sphingomyelinase is involved in host response during sepsis. We found an exaggerated clinical course in mice genetically deficient in acid sphingomyelinase characterized by an increased bacterial burden, an increased phagocytotic activity, and a more pronounced cytokine storm. Moreover, on a functional level, leukocyte-endothelial interaction was found diminished in sphingomyelinase-deficient animals corresponding to a distinct leukocytes’ phenotype with respect to rolling and sticking as well as expression of cellular surface proteins. We conclude that hydrolysis of membrane-embedded sphingomyelin, triggered by circulating sphingomyelinase, plays a pivotal role in the first line of defense against invading microorganisms. This function might be essential during the early phase of infection leading to an adaptive response of remote cells and tissues. PMID:23230083

  18. Global genomic analysis reveals rapid control of a robust innate response in SIV-infected sooty mangabeys

    PubMed Central

    Bosinger, Steven E.; Li, Qingsheng; Gordon, Shari N.; Klatt, Nichole R.; Duan, Lijie; Xu, Luoling; Francella, Nicholas; Sidahmed, Abubaker; Smith, Anthony J.; Cramer, Elizabeth M.; Zeng, Ming; Masopust, David; Carlis, John V.; Ran, Longsi; Vanderford, Thomas H.; Paiardini, Mirko; Isett, R. Benjamin; Baldwin, Don A.; Else, James G.; Staprans, Silvija I.; Silvestri, Guido; Haase, Ashley T.; Kelvin, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Natural SIV infection of sooty mangabeys (SMs) is nonprogressive despite chronic virus replication. Strikingly, it is characterized by low levels of immune activation, while pathogenic SIV infection of rhesus macaques (RMs) is associated with chronic immune activation. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying this intriguing phenotype, we used high-density oligonucleotide microarrays to longitudinally assess host gene expression in SIV-infected SMs and RMs. We found that acute SIV infection of SMs was consistently associated with a robust innate immune response, including widespread upregulation of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) in blood and lymph nodes. While SMs exhibited a rapid resolution of ISG expression and immune activation, both responses were observed chronically in RMs. Systems biology analysis indicated that expression of the lymphocyte inhibitory receptor LAG3, a marker of T cell exhaustion, correlated with immune activation in SIV-infected RMs but not SMs. Our findings suggest that active immune regulatory mechanisms, rather than intrinsically attenuated innate immune responses, underlie the low levels of immune activation characteristic of SMs chronically infected with SIV. PMID:19959874

  19. Cloning the uteroglobin gene promoter from the relic volcano rabbit (Romerolagus diazi) reveals an ancient estrogen-response element.

    PubMed

    Acosta-MontesdeOca, Adriana; Zariñán, Teresa; Macías, Héctor; Pérez-Solís, Marco A; Ulloa-Aguirre, Alfredo; Gutiérrez-Sagal, Rubén

    2012-05-01

    To gain further insight on the estrogen-dependent transcriptional regulation of the uteroglobin (UG) gene, we cloned the 5'-flanking region of the UG gene from the phylogenetically ancient volcano rabbit (Romerolagus diazi; Rd). The cloned region spans 812 base pairs (bp; -812/-1) and contains a noncanonical TATA box (TACA). The translation start site is 48 bp downstream from the putative transcription initiation site (AGA), and is preceded by a consensus Kozak box. Comparison of the Rd-UG gene with that previously isolated from rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) showed 93% in sequence identity as well as a number of conserved cis-acting elements, including the estrogen-response element (ERE; -265/-251), which differs from the consensus by two nucleotides. In MCF-7 cells, 17?-estradiol (E(2)) induced transcription of a luciferase reporter driven by the Rd-UG promoter in a similar manner as in an equivalent rabbit UG reporter; the Rd-UG promoter was 30% more responsive to E(2) than the rabbit promoter. Mutagenesis studies on the Rd-ERE confirmed this cis-element as a target of E(2) as two luciferase mutant reporters of the Rd-promoter, one with the rabbit and the other with the consensus ERE, were more responsive to the hormone than the wild-type reporter. Gel shift and super-shift assays showed that estrogen receptor-? indeed binds to the imperfect palindromic sequence of the Rd-ERE. PMID:22389214

  20. Comparative Physiological and Proteomic Analysis Reveals the Leaf Response to Cadmium-Induced Stress in Poplar (Populus yunnanensis)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shihai; Zhou, Yanli; Dong, Chao; Ren, Jian; Sun, Xudong; Yang, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    Excess amounts of heavy metals are important environmental pollutants with significant ecological and nutritional effects. Cdmium (Cd) is of particular concern because of its widespread occurrence and high toxicity. We conducted physiological and proteomic analyses to improve our understanding of the responses of Populus yunnanensis to Cd stress. The plantlets experienced two apparent stages in their response to Cd stress. During the first stage, transiently induced defense-response molecules, photosynthesis- and energy-associated proteins, antioxidant enzymes and heat shock proteins (HSPs) accumulated to enhance protein stability and esta