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Sample records for hypersonic turbulent boundary

  1. Non-Equilibrium Effects on Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pilbum

    Understanding non-equilibrium effects of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers is essential in order to build cost efficient and reliable hypersonic vehicles. It is well known that non-equilibrium effects on the boundary layers are notable, but our understanding of the effects are limited. The overall goal of this study is to improve the understanding of non-equilibrium effects on hypersonic turbulent boundary layers. A new code has been developed for direct numerical simulations of spatially developing hypersonic turbulent boundary layers over a flat plate with finite-rate reactions. A fifth-order hybrid weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme with a low dissipation finite-difference scheme is utilized in order to capture stiff gradients while resolving small motions in turbulent boundary layers. The code has been validated by qualitative and quantitative comparisons of two different simulations of a non-equilibrium flow and a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer. With the validated code, direct numerical simulations of four different hypersonic turbulent boundary layers, perfect gas and non-equilibrium flows of pure oxygen and nitrogen, have been performed. In order to rule out uncertainties in comparisons, the same inlet conditions are imposed for each species, and then mean and turbulence statistics as well as near-wall turbulence structures are compared at a downstream location. Based on those comparisons, it is shown that there is no direct energy exchanges between internal and turbulent kinetic energies due to thermal and chemical non-equilibrium processes in the flow field. Instead, these non-equilibria affect turbulent boundary layers by changing the temperature without changing the main characteristics of near-wall turbulence structures. This change in the temperature induces the changes in the density and viscosity and the mean flow fields are then adjusted to satisfy the conservation laws. The perturbation fields are modified according to

  2. Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary-Layer and Free Sheer Database Datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Settles, Gary S.; Dodson, Lori J.

    1993-01-01

    A critical assessment and compilation of data are presented on attached hypersonic turbulent boundary layers in pressure gradients and compressible turbulent mixing layers. Extensive searches were conducted to identify candidate experiments, which were subjected to a rigorous set of acceptance criteria. Accepted datasets are both tabulated and provided in machine-readable form. The purpose of this database effort is to make existing high quality data available in detailed form for the turbulence-modeling and computational fluid dynamics communities. While significant recent data were found on the subject of compressible turbulent mixing, the available boundary-layer/pressure-gradient experiments are all older ones of which no acceptable data were found at hypersonic Mach numbers.

  3. Turbulence stress measurements in a nonadiabatic hypersonic boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulla, V.; Horstman, C. C.

    1975-01-01

    Turbulent shear stress and direct turbulent total heat-flux measurements have been made across a nonadiabatic, zero pressure gradient, hypersonic boundary layer by using specially designed hot-wire probes free of strain-gauging and wire oscillation. Heat-flux measurements were in reasonably good agreement with values obtained by integrating the energy equation using measured profiles of velocity and temperature. The shear-stress values deduced from the measurements, by assuming zero correlation of velocity and pressure fluctuations, were lower than the values obtained by integrating the momentum equation. Statistical properties of the cross-correlations are similar to corresponding incompressible measurements at approximately the same momentum-thickness Reynolds number.

  4. Turbulence measurements in hypersonic boundary layers using constant-temperature anemometry and Reynolds stress measurements in hypersonic boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spina, Eric F.

    1995-01-01

    The primary objective in the two research investigations performed under NASA Langley sponsorship (Turbulence measurements in hypersonic boundary layers using constant temperature anemometry and Reynolds stress measurements in hypersonic boundary layers) has been to increase the understanding of the physics of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers. The study began with an extension of constant-temperature thermal anemometry techniques to a Mach 11 helium flow, including careful examinations of hot-wire construction techniques, system response, and system calibration. This was followed by the application of these techniques to the exploration of a Mach 11 helium turbulent boundary layer (To approximately 290 K). The data that was acquired over the course of more than two years consists of instantaneous streamwise mass flux measurements at a frequency response of about 500 kHz. The data are of exceptional quality in both the time and frequency domain and possess a high degree of repeatability. The data analysis that has been performed to date has added significantly to the body of knowledge on hypersonic turbulence, and the data reduction is continuing. An attempt was then made to extend these thermal anemometry techniques to higher enthalpy flows, starting with a Mach 6 air flow with a stagnation temperature just above that needed to prevent liquefaction (To approximately 475 F). Conventional hot-wire anemometry proved to be inadequate for the selected high-temperature, high dynamic pressure flow, with frequent wire breakage and poor system frequency response. The use of hot-film anemometry has since been investigated for these higher-enthalpy, severe environment flows. The difficulty with using hot-film probes for dynamic (turbulence) measurements is associated with construction limitations and conduction of heat into the film substrate. Work continues under a NASA GSRP grant on the development of a hot film probe that overcomes these shortcomings for hypersonic

  5. Surface pressure fluctuations in hypersonic turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, K. R.

    1974-01-01

    The surface pressure fluctuations on a flat plate model at hypersonic Mach numbers of 5.2, 7.4 and 10.4 with an attached turbulent boundary layer were measured using flush mounted small piezoelectric sensors. A high frequency resolution of the pressure field was achieved using specially designed small piezoelectric sensors that had a good frequency response well above 300 KHz. The RMS pressures and non-dimensional energy spectra for all above Mach numbers are presented. The convective velocities, obtained from space time correlation considerations are equal to 0.7 U sub infinity. The results indicate the RMS pressures vary from 5 to 25 percent of the mean static pressures. The ratios of RMS pressure to dynamic pressure are less than the universally accepted subsonic value of 6 x 10/3. The ratio decreases in value as the Mach number or the dynamic pressure is increased. The ratio of RMS pressure to wall shear for Mach number 7.4 satisfies one smaller than or equal to p/tau sub w smaller than or equal to three.

  6. Crosshatch roughness distortions on a hypersonic turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltier, S. J.; Humble, R. A.; Bowersox, R. D. W.

    2016-04-01

    The effects of periodic crosshatch roughness (k+ = 160) on a Mach 4.9 turbulent boundary layer (Reθ = 63 000) are examined using particle image velocimetry. The roughness elements generate a series of alternating shock and expansion waves, which span the entire boundary layer, causing significant (up to +50% and -30%) variations in the Reynolds shear stress field. Evidence of the hairpin vortex organization of incompressible flows is found in the comparative smooth-wall boundary layer case (Reθ = 47 000), and can be used to explain several observations regarding the rough-wall vortex organization. In general, the rough-wall boundary layer near-wall vortices no longer appear to be well-organized into streamwise-aligned packets that straddle relatively low-speed regions like their smooth-wall counterpart; instead, they lean farther away from the wall, become more spatially compact, and their populations become altered. In the lower half of the boundary layer, the net vortex swirling strength and outer-scaled Reynolds stresses increase relative to the smooth-wall case, and actually decrease in the outer half of the boundary layer, as ejection and entrainment processes are strengthened and weakened in these two regions, respectively. A spectral analysis of the data suggests a relative homogenizing of the most energetic scales near Λ = ˜ 0.5δ across the rough-wall boundary layer.

  7. Compressibility Considerations for kappa-omega Turbulence Models in Hypersonic Boundary Layer Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, C. L.

    2009-01-01

    The ability of kappa-omega models to predict compressible turbulent skin friction in hypersonic boundary layers is investigated. Although uncorrected two-equation models can agree well with correlations for hot-wall cases, they tend to perform progressively worse - particularly for cold walls - as the Mach number is increased in the hypersonic regime. Simple algebraic models such as Baldwin-Lomax perform better compared to experiments and correlations in these circumstances. Many of the compressibility corrections described in the literature are summarized here. These include corrections that have only a small influence for kappa-omega models, or that apply only in specific circumstances. The most widely-used general corrections were designed for use with jet or mixing-layer free shear flows. A less well-known dilatation-dissipation correction intended for boundary layer flows is also tested, and is shown to agree reasonably well with the Baldwin-Lomax model at cold-wall conditions. It exhibits a less dramatic influence than the free shear type of correction. There is clearly a need for improved understanding and better overall physical modeling for turbulence models applied to hypersonic boundary layer flows.

  8. Documentation of Two- and Three-Dimensional Hypersonic Shock Wave/Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussoy, Marvin I.; Horstman, Clifford C.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental data for a series of two- and three-dimensional shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flows at Mach 7 are presented. Test bodies, composed of simple geometric shapes, were designed to generate flows with varying degrees of pressure gradient, boundary-layer separation, and turning angle. The data include surface-pressure and heat-transfer distributions as well as limited mean-flow-field surveys in both the undisturbed and the interaction regimes. The data are presented in a convenient form for use in validating existing or future computational models of these generic hypersonic flows.

  9. Pressure fluctuations beneath turbulent spots and instability wave packets in a hypersonic boundary layer.

    SciTech Connect

    Beresh, Steven Jay; Casper, Katya M.; Schneider, Steven P.

    2010-12-01

    The development of turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer was studied on the nozzle wall of the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel. Under quiet flow conditions, the nozzle wall boundary layer remains laminar and grows very thick over the long nozzle length. This allows the development of large turbulent spots that can be readily measured with pressure transducers. Measurements of naturally occurring wave packets and developing turbulent spots were made. The peak frequencies of these natural wave packets were in agreement with second-mode computations. For a controlled study, the breakdown of disturbances created by spark and glow perturbations were studied at similar freestream conditions. The spark perturbations were the most effective at creating large wave packets that broke down into turbulent spots. The flow disturbances created by the controlled perturbations were analyzed to obtain amplitude criteria for nonlinearity and breakdown as well as the convection velocities of the turbulent spots. Disturbances first grew into linear instability waves and then quickly became nonlinear. Throughout the nonlinear growth of the wave packets, large harmonics are visible in the power spectra. As breakdown begins, the peak amplitudes of the instability waves and harmonics decrease into the rising broad-band frequencies. Instability waves are still visible on either side of the growing turbulent spots during this breakdown process.

  10. Pressure fluctuations beneath instability wave packets and turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, Katya M.

    During atmospheric reentry, hypersonic vehicles are subjected to high levels of boundary-layer pressure fluctuations that cause vibration of internal components. Current models are not adequate to predict these fluctuations. A more physics-based approach can be obtained by using a turbulent-spot model of transition. In order to gain a better understanding of the pressure-fluctuation field and the growth of turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer, the development of disturbances was studied on the nozzle wall of the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel. Under quiet flow conditions, the nozzle wall boundary layer remains laminar and grows very thick over the long nozzle length. This allows the development of large disturbances that can be well-resolved with high-frequency pressure transducers. For a controlled study, disturbances were created by pulsed glow perturbations and studied at various freestream conditions. Both the centerline and the spanwise distribution of pressure fluctuations were measured as boundary-layer disturbances grew from linear instability wave packets into turbulent spots. A disturbance first grows into a linear instability wave packet and then quickly becomes nonlinear. At this point, the wave packet is still concentrated near the disturbance centerline, but weaker disturbances are seen spreading from the center. Throughout the nonlinear growth of the wave packets, large harmonics are visible in the power spectra. Breakdown to turbulence begins in the core of the wave packets where the wave amplitudes are largest. As breakdown begins, the peak amplitudes of the instability waves and harmonics decrease into the rising broadband frequencies. Second-mode waves are still evident in front of and behind the breakdown point and can be seen propagating in the spanwise direction at a spreading angle. The turbulent core grows downstream, resulting in a turbulent spot with a typical arrowhead shape. However, the spot is not merely a localized patch

  11. Pressure fluctuations beneath instability wavepackets and turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Casper, Katya M.; Beresh, Steven J.; Schneider, Steven P.

    2014-09-09

    To investigate the pressure-fluctuation field beneath turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer, a study was conducted on the nozzle wall of the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel. Controlled disturbances were created by pulsed-glow perturbations based on the electrical breakdown of air. Under quiet-flow conditions, the nozzle-wall boundary layer remains laminar and grows very thick over the long nozzle length. This allows the development of large disturbances that can be well-resolved with high-frequency pressure transducers. A disturbance first grows into a second-mode instability wavepacket that is concentrated near its own centreline. Weaker disturbances are seen spreading from the centre. The wavesmore » grow and become nonlinear before breaking down to turbulence. The breakdown begins in the core of the packets where the wave amplitudes are largest. Second-mode waves are still evident in front of and behind the breakdown point and can be seen propagating in the spanwise direction. The turbulent core grows downstream, resulting in a spot with a classical arrowhead shape. Behind the spot, a low-pressure calmed region develops. However, the spot is not merely a localized patch of turbulence; instability waves remain an integral part. Limited measurements of naturally occurring disturbances show many similar characteristics. From the controlled disturbance measurements, the convection velocity, spanwise spreading angle, and typical pressure-fluctuation field were obtained.« less

  12. Pressure fluctuations beneath instability wavepackets and turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Casper, Katya M.; Beresh, Steven J.; Schneider, Steven P.

    2014-09-09

    To investigate the pressure-fluctuation field beneath turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer, a study was conducted on the nozzle wall of the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel. Controlled disturbances were created by pulsed-glow perturbations based on the electrical breakdown of air. Under quiet-flow conditions, the nozzle-wall boundary layer remains laminar and grows very thick over the long nozzle length. This allows the development of large disturbances that can be well-resolved with high-frequency pressure transducers. A disturbance first grows into a second-mode instability wavepacket that is concentrated near its own centreline. Weaker disturbances are seen spreading from the centre. The waves grow and become nonlinear before breaking down to turbulence. The breakdown begins in the core of the packets where the wave amplitudes are largest. Second-mode waves are still evident in front of and behind the breakdown point and can be seen propagating in the spanwise direction. The turbulent core grows downstream, resulting in a spot with a classical arrowhead shape. Behind the spot, a low-pressure calmed region develops. However, the spot is not merely a localized patch of turbulence; instability waves remain an integral part. Limited measurements of naturally occurring disturbances show many similar characteristics. From the controlled disturbance measurements, the convection velocity, spanwise spreading angle, and typical pressure-fluctuation field were obtained.

  13. Uncertainty Assessments of 2D and Axisymmetric Hypersonic Shock Wave - Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction Simulations at Compression Corners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Berry, Scott A.; VanNorman, John W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is one of a series of five papers in a special session organized by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program that addresses uncertainty assessments for CFD simulations in hypersonic flow. Simulations of a shock emanating from a compression corner and interacting with a fully developed turbulent boundary layer are evaluated herein. Mission relevant conditions at Mach 7 and Mach 14 are defined for a pre-compression ramp of a scramjet powered vehicle. Three compression angles are defined, the smallest to avoid separation losses and the largest to force a separated flow engaging more complicated flow physics. The Baldwin-Lomax and the Cebeci-Smith algebraic models, the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras model with the Catrix-Aupoix compressibility modification and two-equation models including Menter SST, Wilcox k-omega 98, and Wilcox k-omega 06 turbulence models are evaluated. Each model is fully defined herein to preclude any ambiguity regarding model implementation. Comparisons are made to existing experimental data and Van Driest theory to provide preliminary assessment of model form uncertainty. A set of coarse grained uncertainty metrics are defined to capture essential differences among turbulence models. Except for the inability of algebraic models to converge for some separated flows there is no clearly superior model as judged by these metrics. A preliminary metric for the numerical component of uncertainty in shock-turbulent-boundary-layer interactions at compression corners sufficiently steep to cause separation is defined as 55%. This value is a median of differences with experimental data averaged for peak pressure and heating and for extent of separation captured in new, grid-converged solutions presented here. This value is consistent with existing results in a literature review of hypersonic shock-turbulent-boundary-layer interactions by Roy and Blottner and with more recent computations of MacLean.

  14. Turbulence modeling for hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, J. G.; Coakley, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    Turbulence modeling for high speed compressible flows is described and discussed. Starting with the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, methods of statistical averaging are described by means of which the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are developed. Unknown averages in these equations are approximated using various closure concepts. Zero-, one-, and two-equation eddy viscosity models, algebraic stress models and Reynolds stress transport models are discussed. Computations of supersonic and hypersonic flows obtained using several of the models are discussed and compared with experimental results. Specific examples include attached boundary layer flows, shock wave boundary layer interactions and compressible shear layers. From these examples, conclusions regarding the status of modeling and recommendations for future studies are discussed.

  15. Experimental Database with Baseline CFD Solutions: 2-D and Axisymmetric Hypersonic Shock-Wave/Turbulent-Boundary-Layer Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, Joseph G.; Brown, James L.; Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    A database compilation of hypersonic shock-wave/turbulent boundary layer experiments is provided. The experiments selected for the database are either 2D or axisymmetric, and include both compression corner and impinging type SWTBL interactions. The strength of the interactions range from attached to incipient separation to fully separated flows. The experiments were chosen based on criterion to ensure quality of the datasets, to be relevant to NASA's missions and to be useful for validation and uncertainty assessment of CFD Navier-Stokes predictive methods, both now and in the future. An emphasis on datasets selected was on surface pressures and surface heating throughout the interaction, but include some wall shear stress distributions and flowfield profiles. Included, for selected cases, are example CFD grids and setup information, along with surface pressure and wall heating results from simulations using current NASA real-gas Navier-Stokes codes by which future CFD investigators can compare and evaluate physics modeling improvements and validation and uncertainty assessments of future CFD code developments. The experimental database is presented tabulated in the Appendices describing each experiment. The database is also provided in computer-readable ASCII files located on a companion DVD.

  16. On Parametric Sensitivity of Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes SST Turbulence Model: 2D Hypersonic Shock-Wave Boundary Layer Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Examined is sensitivity of separation extent, wall pressure and heating to variation of primary input flow parameters, such as Mach and Reynolds numbers and shock strength, for 2D and Axisymmetric Hypersonic Shock Wave Turbulent Boundary Layer interactions obtained by Navier-Stokes methods using the SST turbulence model. Baseline parametric sensitivity response is provided in part by comparison with vetted experiments, and in part through updated correlations based on free interaction theory concepts. A recent database compilation of hypersonic 2D shock-wave/turbulent boundary layer experiments extensively used in a prior related uncertainty analysis provides the foundation for this updated correlation approach, as well as for more conventional validation. The primary CFD method for this work is DPLR, one of NASA's real-gas aerothermodynamic production RANS codes. Comparisons are also made with CFL3D, one of NASA's mature perfect-gas RANS codes. Deficiencies in predicted separation response of RANS/SST solutions to parametric variations of test conditions are summarized, along with recommendations as to future turbulence approach.

  17. Pressure-gradient effects on hypersonic turbulent skin friction and boundary-layer profiles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, E. J.; Keener, E. R.

    1972-01-01

    Local skin friction, total-temperature profiles, and pitot-pressure profiles were measured on the wall of a Mach-7.4 wind tunnel. The wall to adiabatic wall temperature ratio was varied from 0.3 to 0.5. Boundary-layer characteristics were compared with those predicted by a finite-difference method. Local skin friction was predicted to within 15%. Pressure-gradient effects on the temperature and Mach number distributions and the shape factor (displacement thickness/momentum thickness) were underpredicted, but the velocity distributions were closely predicted.

  18. Two-equation turbulence modeling for 3-D hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, J. E.; Coakley, T. J.; Marvin, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation to verify, incorporate and develop two-equation turbulence models for three-dimensional high speed flows is presented. The current design effort of hypersonic vehicles has led to an intensive study of turbulence models for compressible hypersonic flows. This research complements an extensive review of experimental data and the current development of 2D turbulence models. The review of experimental data on 2D and 3D flows includes complex hypersonic flows with pressure profiles, skin friction, wall heat transfer, and turbulence statistics data. In a parallel effort, turbulence models for high speed flows have been tested against flat plate boundary layers, and are being tested against the 2D database. In the present paper, we present the results of 3D Navier-Stokes numerical simulations with an improved k-omega two-equation turbulence model against experimental data and empirical correlations of an adiabatic flat plate boundary layer, a cold wall flat plate boundary layer, and a 3D database flow, the interaction of an oblique shock wave and a thick turbulent boundary layer with a free stream Mach number = 8.18 and Reynolds number = 5 x 10 to the 6th.

  19. Review and assessment of turbulence models for hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Christopher J.; Blottner, Frederick G.

    2006-10-01

    Accurate aerodynamic prediction is critical for the design and optimization of hypersonic vehicles. Turbulence modeling remains a major source of uncertainty in the computational prediction of aerodynamic forces and heating for these systems. The first goal of this article is to update the previous comprehensive review of hypersonic shock/turbulent boundary-layer interaction experiments published in 1991 by Settles and Dodson (Hypersonic shock/boundary-layer interaction database. NASA CR 177577, 1991). In their review, Settles and Dodson developed a methodology for assessing experiments appropriate for turbulence model validation and critically surveyed the existing hypersonic experiments. We limit the scope of our current effort by considering only two-dimensional (2D)/axisymmetric flows in the hypersonic flow regime where calorically perfect gas models are appropriate. We extend the prior database of recommended hypersonic experiments (on four 2D and two 3D shock-interaction geometries) by adding three new geometries. The first two geometries, the flat plate/cylinder and the sharp cone, are canonical, zero-pressure gradient flows which are amenable to theory-based correlations, and these correlations are discussed in detail. The third geometry added is the 2D shock impinging on a turbulent flat plate boundary layer. The current 2D hypersonic database for shock-interaction flows thus consists of nine experiments on five different geometries. The second goal of this study is to review and assess the validation usage of various turbulence models on the existing experimental database. Here we limit the scope to one- and two-equation turbulence models where integration to the wall is used (i.e., we omit studies involving wall functions). A methodology for validating turbulence models is given, followed by an extensive evaluation of the turbulence models on the current hypersonic experimental database. A total of 18 one- and two-equation turbulence models are reviewed

  20. An experimental and numerical investigation of shock-wave induced turbulent boundary-layer separation at hypersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, J. G.; Horstman, C. C.; Rubesin, M. W.; Coakley, T. J.; Kussoy, M. I.

    1975-01-01

    An experiment designed to test and guide computations of the interaction of an impinging shock wave with a turbulent boundary layer is described. Detailed mean flow-field and surface data are presented for two shock strengths which resulted in attached and separated flows, respectively. Numerical computations, employing the complete time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations along with algebraic eddy-viscosity and turbulent Prandtl number models to describe shear stress and heat flux, are used to illustrate the dependence of the computations on the particulars of the turbulence models. Models appropriate for zero-pressure-gradient flows predicted the overall features of the flow fields, but were deficient in predicting many of the details of the interaction regions. Improvements to the turbulence model parameters were sought through a combination of detailed data analysis and computer simulations which tested the sensitivity of the solutions to model parameter changes. Computer simulations using these improvements are presented and discussed.

  1. Status of turbulence modeling for hypersonic propulsion flowpaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Yoder, Dennis A.; Vyas, Manan A.; Engblom, William A.

    2014-06-01

    This report provides an assessment of current turbulent flow calculation methods for hypersonic propulsion flowpaths, particularly the scramjet engine. Emphasis is placed on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methods, but some discussion of newer methods such as large eddy simulation (LES) is also provided. The report is organized by considering technical issues throughout the scramjet-powered vehicle flowpath, including laminar-to-turbulent boundary layer transition, shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions, scalar transport modeling (specifically the significance of turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers), and compressible mixing. Unit problems are primarily used to conduct the assessment. In the combustor, results from calculations of a direct connect supersonic combustion experiment are also used to address the effects of turbulence model selection and in particular settings for the turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers. It is concluded that RANS turbulence modeling shortfalls are still a major limitation to the accuracy of hypersonic propulsion simulations, whether considering individual components or an overall system. Newer methods such as LES-based techniques may be promising, but are not yet at a maturity to be used routinely by the hypersonic propulsion community. The need for fundamental experiments to provide data for turbulence model development and validation is discussed.

  2. Status of Turbulence Modeling for Hypersonic Propulsion Flowpaths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Yoder, Dennis A.; Vyas, Manan A.; Engblom, William A.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of current turbulent flow calculation methods for hypersonic propulsion flowpaths, particularly the scramjet engine. Emphasis is placed on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methods, but some discussion of newer meth- ods such as Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is also provided. The report is organized by considering technical issues throughout the scramjet-powered vehicle flowpath including laminar-to-turbulent boundary layer transition, shock wave / turbulent boundary layer interactions, scalar transport modeling (specifically the significance of turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers) and compressible mixing. Unit problems are primarily used to conduct the assessment. In the combustor, results from calculations of a direct connect supersonic combustion experiment are also used to address the effects of turbulence model selection and in particular settings for the turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers. It is concluded that RANS turbulence modeling shortfalls are still a major limitation to the accuracy of hypersonic propulsion simulations, whether considering individual components or an overall system. Newer methods such as LES-based techniques may be promising, but are not yet at a maturity to be used routinely by the hypersonic propulsion community. The need for fundamental experiments to provide data for turbulence model development and validation is discussed.

  3. Swept-slot film-cooling effectiveness in hypersonic turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hefner, J. N.; Cary, A. M., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Measurement results are presented for the surface equilibrium temperature downstream of swept slots, with sonic tangential air injection into a thick hypersonic turbulent boundary layer. These results are compared with unswept slot results for cooling effectiveness.

  4. Turbulence modeling for complex hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, P. G.; Coakley, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents results of calculations for a range of 2D turbulent hypersonic flows using two-equation models. The baseline models and the model corrections required for good hypersonic-flow predictions will be illustrated. Three experimental data sets were chosen for comparison. They are: (1) the hypersonic flare flows of Kussoy and Horstman, (2) a 2D hypersonic compression corner flow of Coleman and Stollery, and (3) the ogive-cylinder impinging shock-expansion flows of Kussoy and Horstman. Comparisons with the experimental data have shown that baseline models under-predict the extent of flow separation but over-predict the heat transfer rate near flow reattachment. Modifications to the models are described which remove the above-mentioned deficiencies. Although we have restricted the discussion only to the selected baseline models in this paper, the modifications proposed are universal and can in principle be transferred to any existing two-equation model formulation.

  5. Hypersonic Shock/Boundary-Layer Interaction Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Settles, G. S.; Dodson, L. J.

    1991-01-01

    Turbulence modeling is generally recognized as the major problem obstructing further advances in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). A closed solution of the governing Navier-Stokes equations for turbulent flows of practical consequence is still far beyond grasp. At the same time, the simplified models of turbulence which are used to achieve closure of the Navier-Stokes equations are known to be rigorously incorrect. While these models serve a definite purpose, they are inadequate for the general prediction of hypersonic viscous/inviscid interactions, mixing problems, chemical nonequilibria, and a range of other phenomena which must be predicted in order to design a hypersonic vehicle computationally. Due to the complexity of turbulence, useful new turbulence models are synthesized only when great expertise is brought to bear and considerable intellectual energy is expended. Although this process is fundamentally theoretical, crucial guidance may be gained from carefully-executed basic experiments. Following the birth of a new model, its testing and validation once again demand comparisons with data of unimpeachable quality. This report concerns these issues which arise from the experimental aspects of hypersonic modeling and represents the results of the first phase of an effort to develop compressible turbulence models.

  6. On Numerical Methods For Hypersonic Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjogreen, B.; Shu, C. W.; Wang, W.; Magin, T.; Hadjadj, A.

    2011-05-01

    Proper control of numerical dissipation in numerical methods beyond the standard shock-capturing dissipation at discontinuities is an essential element for accurate and stable simulation of hypersonic turbulent flows, including combustion, and thermal and chemical nonequilibrium flows. Unlike rapidly developing shock interaction flows, turbulence computations involve long time integrations. Improper control of numerical dissipation from one time step to another would be compounded over time, resulting in the smearing of turbulent fluctuations to an unrecognizable form. Hypersonic turbulent flows around re- entry space vehicles involve mixed steady strong shocks and turbulence with unsteady shocklets that pose added computational challenges. Stiffness of the source terms and material mixing in combustion pose yet other types of numerical challenges. A low dissipative high order well- balanced scheme, which can preserve certain non-trivial steady solutions of the governing equations exactly, may help minimize some of these difficulties. For stiff reactions it is well known that the wrong propagation speed of discontinuities occurs due to the under-resolved numerical solutions in both space and time. Schemes to improve the wrong propagation speed of discontinuities for systems of stiff reacting flows remain a challenge for algorithm development. Some of the recent algorithm developments for direct numerical simulations (DNS) and large eddy simulations (LES) for the subject physics, including the aforementioned numerical challenges, will be discussed.

  7. On Challenges for Hypersonic Turbulent Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjögreen, B.

    2009-04-01

    This short note discusses some of the challenges for design of suitable spatial numerical schemes for hypersonic turbulent flows, including combustion, and thermal and chemical nonequilibrium flows. Often, hypersonic turbulent flows around re-entry space vehicles and space physics involve mixed steady strong shocks and turbulence with unsteady shocklets. Material mixing in combustion poses additional computational challenges. Proper control of numerical dissipation in numerical methods beyond the standard shock-capturing dissipation at discontinuities is an essential element for accurate and stable simulations of the subject physics. On the one hand, the physics of strong steady shocks and unsteady turbulence/shocklet interactions under the nonequilibrium environment is not well understood. On the other hand, standard and newly developed high order accurate (fourth-order or higher) schemes were developed for homogeneous hyperbolic conservation laws and mixed hyperbolic and parabolic partial differential equations (PDEs) (without source terms). The majority of finite rate chemistry and thermal nonequilibrium simulations employ methods for homogeneous time-dependent PDEs with a pointwise evaluation of the source terms. The pointwise evaluation of the source term might not be the best choice for stability, accuracy and minimization of spurious numerics for the overall scheme.

  8. On Challenges for Hypersonic Turbulent Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, H C; Sjogreen, B

    2009-01-14

    This short note discusses some of the challenges for design of suitable spatial numerical schemes for hypersonic turbulent flows, including combustion, and thermal and chemical nonequilibrium flows. Often, hypersonic turbulent flows in re-entry space vehicles and space physics involve mixed steady strong shocks and turbulence with unsteady shocklets. Material mixing in combustion poses additional computational challenges. Proper control of numerical dissipation in numerical methods beyond the standard shock-capturing dissipation at discontinuities is an essential element for accurate and stable simulations of the subject physics. On one hand, the physics of strong steady shocks and unsteady turbulence/shocklet interactions under the nonequilibrium environment is not well understood. On the other hand, standard and newly developed high order accurate (fourth-order or higher) schemes were developed for homogeneous hyperbolic conservation laws and mixed hyperbolic and parabolic partial differential equations (PDEs) (without source terms). The majority of finite rate chemistry and thermal nonequilibrium simulations employ methods for homogeneous time-dependent PDEs with a pointwise evaluation of the source terms. The pointwise evaluation of the source term might not be the best choice for stability, accuracy and minimization of spurious numerics for the overall scheme.

  9. Turbulence modeling for hypersonic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, Jorge E.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the proposed work is to continue to develop, verify, and incorporate the baseline two-equation turbulence models, which account for the effects of compressibility at high speeds, into a three-dimensional Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code. Additionally, we plan to provide documented descriptions of the models and their numerical procedures so that they can be implemented into the NASP CFD codes.

  10. Hypersonic flow separation in shock wave boundary layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamed, A.; Kumar, Ajay

    1992-01-01

    An assessment is presented for the experimental data on separated flow in shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions at hypersonic and supersonic speeds. The data base consists mainly of two dimensional and axisymmetric interactions in compression corners or cylinder-flares, and externally generated oblique shock interactions with boundary layers over flat plates or cylindrical surfaces. The conditions leading to flow separation and the subsequent changes in the flow empirical correlations for incipient separation are reviewed. The effects of the Mach number, Reynolds number, surface cooling and the methods of detecting separation are discussed. The pertinent experimental data for the separated flow characteristics in separated turbulent boundary layer shock interaction are also presented and discussed.

  11. DNS of Turbulent Boundary Layers under Highenthalpy Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lian; Martín, Pino

    2010-11-01

    To study real-gas effects and turbulence-chemistry interaction, direct numerical simulations (DNS) of hypersonic boundary layers are conducted under typical hypersonic conditions. We consider the boundary layer on a lifting-body consisting of a flat plate at an angle of attack, which flies at altitude 30km with a Mach number 21. Two different inclined angles, 35^o and 8^o, are considered,representing blunt and slender bodies. Both noncatalytic and supercatalytic wall conditions are considered. The DNS data are studied to assess the validity of Morkovin's hypothesis, the strong Reynolds analogy, as well as the behaviors of turbulence structures under high-enthalpy conditions.Relative to low-enthalpy conditions [1], significant differences in typical scalings are observed. [4pt] [1] L. Duan and I. Beekman and M. P. Mart'in, Direct numerical simulation of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers. Part 2: Effect of temperature, J. Fluid Mech. 655 (2010), 419-445.

  12. Measurement of density and temperature in a hypersonic turbulent boundary layer using the electron beam fluorescence technique. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report, 1 Oct. 1969 - 1 Sep. 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcronald, A. D.

    1975-01-01

    Mean density and temperature fluctuations were measured across the turbulent, cooled-wall boundary layer in a continuous hypersonic (Mach 9.4) wind tunnel in air, using the nitrogen fluorescence excited by a 50 kV electron beam. Data were taken at three values of the tunnel stagnation pressure, the corresponding free stream densities being equivalent to 1.2, 4.0, and 7.4 torr at room temperature, and the boundary layer thicknesses about 4.0, 4.5, and 6.0 inches. The mean temperature and density profiles were similar to those previously determined in the same facility by conventional probes (static and pitot pressure, total temperature). A static pressure variation of about 50% across the boundary layer was found, the shape of the variation changing somewhat for the three stagnation pressure levels. The quadrupole model for rotational temperature spectra gave closer agreement with the free stream isentropic level (approximately 44 K) than the dipole model.

  13. Turbulent Supersonic/Hypersonic Heating Correlations for Open and Closed Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Greene, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    Supersonic/hypersonic laminar heating correlations that were developed for damage assessment analysis of atmospheric re-entry vehicles have been modified and extended to cover fully-turbulent conditions over rectangular cavity geometries that are aligned with the local velocity. Turbulent boundary layer properties were computationally determined and used to develop the cavity geometry parametrics and to correlate experimental closed cavity heating data to yield new relationships for the floor-averaged and centerline endwall peakheating augmentation. With the form of the closed-cavity correlations established, historical data were used to develop new correlations for turbulent open-cavity heating.

  14. Turbulent Supersonic/Hypersonic Heating Correlations for Open and Closed Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Greene, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    Supersonic/hypersonic laminar heating correlations that were developed for damage assessment analysis of atmospheric re-entry vehicles have been modified and extended to cover fully-turbulent conditions over rectangular cavity geometries that are aligned with the local velocity. Turbulent boundary layer properties were computationally determined and used to develop the cavity geometry parametrics and to correlate experimental closed cavity heating data to yield new relationships for the floor-averaged and centerline endwall peak-heating augmentation. With the form of the closed-cavity correlations established, historical data were used to develop new correlations for turbulent open-cavity heating.

  15. BOUndary Plasma Turbulence

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-01-25

    BOUT is a parallelized 3D nonlocal electromagnetic turbulence code. The principal calculations are the boundary plasma turbulence in a realistic magnetic geometry. BOUT uses fluid Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density, electron and ion temperature and Parallel mementum. With sources added in the core-edge region and sinks in the scrape-off-layer (SOL), BOUT follows the self-consistent profile evolution together with turbulence. BOUT also includes coupling to a magnetohyfrodynamic equlibrium (EFIT package) and a two-dimensional hydrodynamic edgemore » transport model (UEDGE package).« less

  16. Boundary Layer Control for Hypersonic Airbreathing Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Nowak, Robert J.; Horvath, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Active and passive methods for tripping hypersonic boundary layers have been examined in NASA Langley Research Center wind tunnels using a Hyper-X model. This investigation assessed several concepts for forcing transition, including passive discrete roughness elements and active mass addition (or blowing), in the 20-Inch Mach 6 Air and the 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnels. Heat transfer distributions obtained via phosphor thermography, shock system details, and surface streamline patterns were measured on a 0.333-scale model of the Hyper-X forebody. The comparisons between the active and passive methods for boundary layer control were conducted at test conditions that nearly match the Hyper-X nominal Mach 7 flight test-point of an angle-of-attack of 2-deg and length Reynolds number of 5.6 million. For passive roughness, the primary parametric variation was a range of trip heights within the calculated boundary layer thickness for several trip concepts. The passive roughness study resulted in a swept ramp configuration, scaled to be roughly 0.6 of the calculated boundary layer thickness, being selected for the Mach 7 flight vehicle. For the active blowing study, the manifold pressure was systematically varied (while monitoring the mass flow) for each configuration to determine the jet penetration height, with schlieren, and transition movement, with the phosphor system, for comparison to the passive results. All the blowing concepts tested, which included various rows of sonic orifices (holes), two- and three-dimensional slots, and random porosity, provided transition onset near the trip location with manifold stagnation pressures on the order of 40 times the model surface static pressure, which is adequate to ensure sonic jets. The present results indicate that the jet penetration height for blowing was roughly half the height required with passive roughness elements for an equivalent amount of transition movement.

  17. Trends in hypersonic boundary layer stability and transition research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Roger L.

    1999-01-01

    Boundary layer transition impacts hypersonic vehicle performance more profoundly than low speed vehicle performance. Accurate prediction is difficult due to the sensitivity of transition to initial conditions. Computational tools continue to improve, but their use is limited largely to specialists. Ground testing continues to be a valuable tool, but new facility development is slow. Emphasis on transition control methods will increase as our understanding of the physics of hypersonic transition improves.

  18. Turbulent shear stresses in compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laderman, A. J.; Demetriades, A.

    1979-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometer measurements of turbulent shear stresses in a Mach 3 compressible boundary layer were performed in order to investigate the effects of heat transfer on turbulence. Measurements were obtained by an x-probe in a flat plate, zero pressure gradient, two dimensional boundary layer in a wind tunnel with wall to freestream temperature ratios of 0.94 and 0.71. The measured shear stress distributions are found to be in good agreement with previous results, supporting the contention that the shear stress distribution is essentially independent of Mach number and heat transfer for Mach numbers from incompressible to hypersonic and wall to freestream temperature ratios of 0.4 to 1.0. It is also found that corrections for frequency response limitations of the electronic equipment are necessary to determine the correct shear stress distribution, particularly at the walls.

  19. Turbulence Models for Accurate Aerothermal Prediction in Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang-Hong; Wu, Yi-Zao; Wang, Jiang-Feng

    Accurate description of the aerodynamic and aerothermal environment is crucial to the integrated design and optimization for high performance hypersonic vehicles. In the simulation of aerothermal environment, the effect of viscosity is crucial. The turbulence modeling remains a major source of uncertainty in the computational prediction of aerodynamic forces and heating. In this paper, three turbulent models were studied: the one-equation eddy viscosity transport model of Spalart-Allmaras, the Wilcox k-ω model and the Menter SST model. For the k-ω model and SST model, the compressibility correction, press dilatation and low Reynolds number correction were considered. The influence of these corrections for flow properties were discussed by comparing with the results without corrections. In this paper the emphasis is on the assessment and evaluation of the turbulence models in prediction of heat transfer as applied to a range of hypersonic flows with comparison to experimental data. This will enable establishing factor of safety for the design of thermal protection systems of hypersonic vehicle.

  20. Direct numerical simulation of laminar-turbulent flow over a flat plate at hypersonic flow speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, I. V.; Novikov, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    A method for direct numerical simulation of a laminar-turbulent flow around bodies at hypersonic flow speeds is proposed. The simulation is performed by solving the full three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. The method of calculation is oriented to application of supercomputers and is based on implicit monotonic approximation schemes and a modified Newton-Raphson method for solving nonlinear difference equations. By this method, the development of three-dimensional perturbations in the boundary layer over a flat plate and in a near-wall flow in a compression corner is studied at the Mach numbers of the free-stream of M = 5.37. In addition to pulsation characteristic, distributions of the mean coefficients of the viscous flow in the transient section of the streamlined surface are obtained, which enables one to determine the beginning of the laminar-turbulent transition and estimate the characteristics of the turbulent flow in the boundary layer.

  1. Role of Turbulent Prandtl Number on Heat Flux at Hypersonic Mach Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiao, X.; Edwards, J. R.; Hassan, H. A.

    2004-01-01

    Present simulation of turbulent flows involving shock wave/boundary layer interaction invariably overestimates heat flux by almost a factor of two. One possible reason for such a performance is a result of the fact that the turbulence models employed make use of Morkovin's hypothesis. This hypothesis is valid for non-hypersonic Mach numbers and moderate rates of heat transfer. At hypersonic Mach numbers, high rates of heat transfer exist in regions where shock wave/boundary layer interactions are important. As a result, one should not expect traditional turbulence models to yield accurate results. The goal of this investigation is to explore the role of a variable Prandtl number formulation in predicting heat flux in flows dominated by strong shock wave/boundary layer interactions. The intended applications involve external flows in the absence of combustion such as those encountered in supersonic inlets. This can be achieved by adding equations for the temperature variance and its dissipation rate. Such equations can be derived from the exact Navier-Stokes equations. Traditionally, modeled equations are based on the low speed energy equation where the pressure gradient term and the term responsible for energy dissipation are ignored. It is clear that such assumptions are not valid for hypersonic flows. The approach used here is based on the procedure used in deriving the k-zeta model, in which the exact equations that governed k, the variance of velocity, and zeta, the variance of vorticity, were derived and modeled. For the variable turbulent Prandtl number, the exact equations that govern the temperature variance and its dissipation rate are derived and modeled term by term. The resulting set of equations are free of damping and wall functions and are coordinate-system independent. Moreover, modeled correlations are tensorially consistent and invariant under Galilean transformation. The final set of equations will be given in the paper.

  2. Assessment of CFD Hypersonic Turbulent Heating Rates for Space Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.; Oliver, A. Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Turbulent CFD codes are assessed for the prediction of convective heat transfer rates at turbulent, hypersonic conditions. Algebraic turbulence models are used within the DPLR and LAURA CFD codes. The benchmark heat transfer rates are derived from thermocouple measurements of the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery windward tiles during the STS-119 and STS-128 entries. The thermocouples were located underneath the reaction-cured glass coating on the thermal protection tiles. Boundary layer transition flight experiments conducted during both of those entries promoted turbulent flow at unusually high Mach numbers, with the present analysis considering Mach 10{15. Similar prior comparisons of CFD predictions directly to the flight temperature measurements were unsatisfactory, showing diverging trends between prediction and measurement for Mach numbers greater than 11. In the prior work, surface temperatures and convective heat transfer rates had been assumed to be in radiative equilibrium. The present work employs a one-dimensional time-accurate conduction analysis to relate measured temperatures to surface heat transfer rates, removing heat soak lag from the flight data, in order to better assess the predictive accuracy of the numerical models. The turbulent CFD shows good agreement for turbulent fuselage flow up to Mach 13. But on the wing in the wake of the boundary layer trip, the inclusion of tile conduction effects does not explain the prior observed discrepancy in trends between simulation and experiment; the flight heat transfer measurements are roughly constant over Mach 11-15, versus an increasing trend with Mach number from the CFD.

  3. Boundary Layer Transition Experiments in Support of the Hypersonics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Chen, Fang-Jenq; Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.

    2007-01-01

    Two experimental boundary layer transition studies in support of fundamental hypersonics research are reviewed. The two studies are the HyBoLT flight experiment and a new ballistic range effort. Details are provided of the objectives and approach associated with each experimental program. The establishment of experimental databases from ground and flight are to provide better understanding of high-speed flows and data to validate and guide the development of simulation tools.

  4. Three-dimensional separation for interaction of shock waves with turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, T. J.

    1973-01-01

    For the interaction of shock waves with turbulent boundary layers, obtained experimental three-dimensional separation results and correlations with earlier two-dimensional and three-dimensional data are presented. It is shown that separation occurs much earlier for turbulent three-dimensional than for two-dimensional flow at hypersonic speeds.

  5. Application of a transitional boundary-layer theory in the low hypersonic Mach number regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamroth, S. J.; Mcdonald, H.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation is made to assess the capability of a finite-difference boundary-layer procedure to predict the mean profile development across a transition from laminar to turbulent flow in the low hypersonic Mach-number regime. The boundary-layer procedure uses an integral form of the turbulence kinetic-energy equation to govern the development of the Reynolds apparent shear stress. The present investigation shows the ability of this procedure to predict Stanton number, velocity profiles, and density profiles through the transition region and, in addition, to predict the effect of wall cooling and Mach number on transition Reynolds number. The contribution of the pressure-dilatation term to the energy balance is examined and it is suggested that transition can be initiated by the direct absorption of acoustic energy even if only a small amount (1 per cent) of the incident acoustic energy is absorbed.

  6. High enthalpy hypersonic boundary layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanow, G.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of an ionizing laminar boundary layer formed by a very high enthalpy flow (in excess of 12 eV per atom or 7000 cal/gm) with allowance for the presence of helium driver gas is described. The theoretical investigation has shown that the use of variable transport properties and their respective derivatives is very important in the solution of equilibrium boundary layer equations of high enthalpy flow. The effect of low level helium contamination on the surface heat transfer rate is minimal. The variation of ionization is much smaller in a chemically frozen boundary layer solution than in an equilibrium boundary layer calculation and consequently, the variation of the transport properties in the case of the former was not essential in the integration. The experiments have been conducted in a free piston shock tunnel, and a detailed study of its nozzle operation, including the effects of low levels of helium driver gas contamination has been made. Neither the extreme solutions of an equilibrium nor of a frozen boundary layer will adequately predict surface heat transfer rate in very high enthalpy flows.

  7. Unsteady turbulent boundary layer analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singleton, R. E.; Nash, J. F.; Carl, L. W.; Patel, V. C.

    1973-01-01

    The governing equations for an unsteady turbulent boundary layer on a swept infinite cylinder, composed of a continuity equation, a pair of momentum equations and a pair of turbulent energy equations which include upstream history efforts, are solved numerically. An explicit finite difference analog to the partial differential equations is formulated and developed into a computer program. Calculations were made for a variety of unsteady flows in both two and three dimensions but primarily for two dimensional flow fields in order to first understand some of the fundamental physical aspects of unsteady turbulent boundary layers. Oscillating free stream flows without pressure gradient, oscillating retarded free stream flows and monotonically time-varying flows have all been studied for a wide frequency range. It was found that to the lowest frequency considered, the lower frequency bound being determined by economic considerations (machine time), there were significant unsteady effects on the turbulent boundary layer.

  8. Stereoscopic Imaging in Hypersonics Boundary Layers using Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Bathel, Brett; Inman, Jennifer A.; Alderfer, David W.; Jones, Stephen B.

    2008-01-01

    Stereoscopic time-resolved visualization of three-dimensional structures in a hypersonic flow has been performed for the first time. Nitric Oxide (NO) was seeded into hypersonic boundary layer flows that were designed to transition from laminar to turbulent. A thick laser sheet illuminated and excited the NO, causing spatially-varying fluorescence. Two cameras in a stereoscopic configuration were used to image the fluorescence. The images were processed in a computer visualization environment to provide stereoscopic image pairs. Two methods were used to display these image pairs: a cross-eyed viewing method which can be viewed by naked eyes, and red/blue anaglyphs, which require viewing through red/blue glasses. The images visualized three-dimensional information that would be lost if conventional planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging had been used. Two model configurations were studied in NASA Langley Research Center's 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Wind tunnel. One model was a 10 degree half-angle wedge containing a small protuberance to force the flow to transition. The other model was a 1/3-scale, truncated Hyper-X forebody model with blowing through a series of holes to force the boundary layer flow to transition to turbulence. In the former case, low flowrates of pure NO seeded and marked the boundary layer fluid. In the latter, a trace concentration of NO was seeded into the injected N2 gas. The three-dimensional visualizations have an effective time resolution of about 500 ns, which is fast enough to freeze this hypersonic flow. The 512x512 resolution of the resulting images is much higher than high-speed laser-sheet scanning systems with similar time response, which typically measure 10-20 planes.

  9. Comparative study of turbulence models in predicting hypersonic inlet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, Kamlesh; Anderson, Bernhard H.; Shaw, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical study was conducted to analyze the performance of different turbulence models when applied to the hypersonic NASA P8 inlet. Computational results from the PARC2D code, which solves the full two-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equation, were compared with experimental data. The zero-equation models considered for the study were the Baldwin-Lomax model, the Thomas model, and a combination of the Baldwin-Lomax and Thomas models; the two-equation models considered were the Chien model, the Speziale model (both low Reynolds number), and the Launder and Spalding model (high Reynolds number). The Thomas model performed best among the zero-equation models, and predicted good pressure distributions. The Chien and Speziale models compared very well with the experimental data, and performed better than the Thomas model near the walls.

  10. Comparative study of turbulence models in predicting hypersonic inlet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, Kamlesh; Anderson, Bernhard H.; Shaw, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical study was conducted to analyze the performance of different turbulence models when applied to the hypersonic NASA P8 inlet. Computational results from the PARC2D code, which solves the full two-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equation, were compared with experimental data. The zero-equation models considered for the study were the Baldwin-Lomax model, the Thomas model, and a combination of the Baldwin-Lomax and Thomas models; the two-equation models considered were the Chien model, the Speziale model (both low Reynolds number), and the Launder and Spalding model (high Reynolds number). The Thomas model performed best among the zero-equation models, and predicted good pressure distributions. The Chien and Speziale models compared wery well with the experimental data, and performed better than the Thomas model near the walls.

  11. Assessment of a transitional boundary layer theory at low hypersonic Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamroth, S. J.; Mcdonald, H.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was carried out to assess the accuracy of a transitional boundary layer theory in the low hypersonic Mach number regime. The theory is based upon the simultaneous numerical solution of the boundary layer partial differential equations for the mean motion and an integral form of the turbulence kinetic energy equation which controls the magnitude and development of the Reynolds stress. Comparisions with experimental data show the theory is capable of accurately predicting heat transfer and velocity profiles through the transitional regime and correctly predicts the effects of Mach number and wall cooling on transition Reynolds number. The procedure shows promise of predicting the initiation of transition for given free stream disturbance levels. The effects on transition predictions of the pressure dilitation term and of direct absorption of acoustic energy by the boundary layer were evaluated.

  12. X-33 Hypersonic Boundary Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Hollis, Brian R.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hamilton, H. Harris, II

    1999-01-01

    Boundary layer and aeroheating characteristics of several X-33 configurations have been experimentally examined in the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. Global surface heat transfer distributions, surface streamline patterns, and shock shapes were measured on 0.013-scale models at Mach 6 in air. Parametric variations include angles-of-attack of 20-deg, 30-deg, and 40-deg; Reynolds numbers based on model length of 0.9 to 6.6 million; and body-flap deflections of 0, 10 and 20-deg. The effects of discrete and distributed roughness elements on boundary layer transition, which included trip height, size, location, and distribution, both on and off the windward centerline, were investigated. The discrete roughness results on centerline were used to provide a transition correlation for the X-33 flight vehicle that was applicable across the range of reentry angles of attack. The attachment line discrete roughness results were shown to be consistent with the centerline results, as no increased sensitivity to roughness along the attachment line was identified. The effect of bowed panels was qualitatively shown to be less effective than the discrete trips; however, the distributed nature of the bowed panels affected a larger percent of the aft-body windward surface than a single discrete trip.

  13. Nonparallel instability of supersonic and hypersonic boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Hady, Nabil M.

    1991-01-01

    Multiple scaling technique is used to examine the nonparallel instability of supersonic and hypersonic boundary-layer flows to three dimensional (first mode) and two dimensional (second mode) disturbances. The method is applied to the flat plate boundary layer for a range of Mach numbers from 0 to 10. Growth rates of disturbances are calculated based on three different criteria: following the maximum of the mass-flow disturbance, using an integral of the disturbance kinetic energy, and using the integral of the square of the mass-flow amplitude. By following the maximum of the mass-flow disturbance, the calculated nonparallel growth rates are in good quantitative agreement with the experimental results at Mach number 4.5.

  14. Nonparallel instability of supersonic and hypersonic boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Hady, Nabil M.

    1991-01-01

    Multiple scaling technique is used to examine the nonparallel instability of supersonic and hypersonic boundary-layer flows to three-dimensional (first mode) and two-dimensional (second mode) disturbances. The method is applied to the flat plate boundary layer for a range of Mach numbers from 0 to 10. Growth rates of disturbances are calculated based on three different criteria: following the maximum of the mass-flow disturbance, using an integral of the disturbance kinetic energy, and using an integral of the square of the mass-flow amplitude. By following the maximum of the mass-flow dusturbance, the calculated nonparallel growth rates are in good quantitative agreement with the experimental results of Kendall (1967) at Mach number 4.5.

  15. Nonparallel instability of supersonic and hypersonic boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Hady, Nabil M.

    1991-01-01

    Multiple scaling technique is used to examine the nonparallel instability of supersonic and hypersonic boundary-layer flows to three-dimensional (first mode) and two-dimensional (second mode) disturbances. The method is applied to the flat plate boundary layer for a range of Mach numbers from 0 to 10. Growth rates of disturbances are calculated based on three different criteria: following the maximum of the mass-flow disturbance, using an integral of the disturbance kinetic energy, and using the integral of the square of the mass-flow amplitude. By following the maximum of the mass-flow disturbance, the calculated nonparallel growth rates are in good quantitative agreement with the experimental results at Mach number 4.5.

  16. Recommendations for Hypersonic Boundary Layer Transition Flight Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Kimmel, Roger; Reshotko, Eli

    2011-01-01

    Much has been learned about the physics underlying the transition process at supersonic and hypersonic speeds through years of analysis, experiment and computation. Generally, the application of this knowledge has been restricted to simple shapes like plates, cones and spherical bodies. However, flight reentry vehicles are in reality never simple. They typically are highly complex geometries flown at angle of attack so three-dimensional effects are very important, as are roughness effects due to surface features and/or ablation. This paper will review our present understanding of the physics of the transition process and look back at some of the recent flight test programs for their successes and failures. The goal of this paper is to develop rationale for new hypersonic boundary layer transition flight experiments. Motivations will be derived from both an inward look at what we believe constitutes a good flight test program as well as an outward review of the goals and objectives of some recent US based unclassified proposals and programs. As part of our recommendations, this paper will address the need for careful experimental work as per the guidelines enunciated years ago by the U.S. Transition Study Group. Following these guidelines is essential to obtaining reliable, usable data for allowing refinement of transition estimation techniques.

  17. Assessment of Turbulent CFD Against STS-128 Hypersonic Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.; Kleb, William L.; Hyatt, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Turbulent CFD simulations are compared against surface temperature measurements of the space shuttle orbiter windward tiles at reentry flight conditions. Algebraic turbulence models are used within both the LAURA and DPLR CFD codes. The flight data are from temperature measurements obtained by seven thermocouples during the STS-128 mission (September 2009). The flight data indicate boundary layer transition onset over the Mach number range 13.5{15.5, depending upon the location on the vehicle. But the boundary layer flow appeared to be transitional down through Mach 12, based upon the flight data and CFD trends. At Mach 9 the simulations match the flight data on average within 20 F/11 C, where typical surface temperatures were approximately 1600 F/870 C.

  18. Downstream influence of swept slot injection in hypersonic turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hefner, J. N.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Bushnell, D. B.

    1977-01-01

    Results of an experimental and numerical investigation of tangential swept slot injection into a thick turbulent boundary layer at Mach 6 are presented. Film cooling effectiveness, skin friction, and flow structure downstream of the swept slot injection were investigated. The data were compared with that for unswept slots, and it was found that cooling effectiveness and skin friction reductions are not significantly affected by sweeping the slot.

  19. Hypersonic Boundary-Layer Trip Development for Hyper-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Auslender, Aaron H.; Dilley, Authur D.; Calleja, John F.

    2000-01-01

    Boundary layer trip devices for the Hper-X forebody have been experimentally examined in several wind tunnels. Five different trip configurations were compared in three hypersonic facilities, the LaRC 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel, the LaRC 31 -Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel, and in the HYPULSE Reflected Shock Tunnel at GASL. Heat transfer distributions, utilizing the phosphor thermography and thin-film techniques, shock system details, and surface streamline patterns were measured on a 0.333-scale model of the Hyper-X forebody. Parametric variations include angles-of-attack of 0-deg, 2-deg, and 4-deg; Reynolds numbers based on model length of 1.2 to 15.4 million: and inlet cowl door simulated in both open and closed positions. Comparisons of transition due to discrete roughness elements have led to the selection of a trip configuration for the Hyper-X Mach 7 flight vehicle.

  20. Acoustic Radiation from a Mach 14 Turbulent Boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan

    2015-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to examine the pressure fluctuations generated by a high-speed turbulent boundary layer with a nominal freestream Mach number of 14 and wall temperature of 0.18 times the recovery temperature. The emphasis is on characterizing the acoustic radiation from the turbulent boundary layer and comparing it with previous simulations at Mach 2.5 and Mach 6 to assess the Mach-number dependence of the freestream pressure fluctuations. In particular, the numerical database is used to provide insights into the pressure disturbance spectrum and amplitude scaling with respect to the freestream Mach number as well as to understand the acoustic source mechanisms at very high Mach numbers. Such information is important for characterizing the freestream disturbance environment in conventional (i.e., noisy) hypersonic wind tunnels. Spectral characteristics of pressure fluctuations at the surface are also investigated. Sponsored by Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  1. Effects of injection on the instability of boundary layers over hypersonic configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan; Chang, Chau-Lyan; White, Jeffery

    2013-10-01

    Computations are performed to study the boundary layer instability mechanisms pertaining to hypersonic vehicles with significant ablative effects. The process of laminar-turbulent transition over vehicles with ablative heat shields can be influenced by both the out-gassing associated with surface pyrolysis and the resulting modification of surface geometry including the formation of micro-roughness. To isolate the effects of out-gassing, this paper examines the stability of canonical boundary layer flows over smooth surfaces in the presence of gas injection into the boundary layer, with an emphasis on the case of massive injection that is relevant to previous laboratory experiments. For a slender cone, the effects of strong out-gassing on the predominantly second mode instability are found to be weakly stabilizing. This new, somewhat surprising result is confirmed by computations carried out on a flat plate boundary layer at high Mach numbers. In contrast, for a blunt capsule flow dominated by first mode instability, the effect of out-gassing is shown to be strongly destabilizing, consistent with the well-known behavior of subsonic boundary layers.

  2. Turbulent boundary layers over nonstationary plane boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roper, A. T.

    1976-01-01

    Methods of predicting integral parameters and skin-friction coefficients of turbulent boundary layers developing over moving-ground-planes are evaluated using test information from three different wind tunnel facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center. These data include test information from the VSTOL tunnel which is presented for the first time. The three methods evaluated were: (1) relative integral parameter method, (2) relative power law method, and (3) modified law of the wall method. Methods (1) and (2) can be used to predict moving-ground-plane shape factors with an expected accuracy of + or - 10%. They may also be used to predict moving-ground-plane displacement and momentum thicknesses with lower expected accuracy. This decrease in accuracy can be traced to the failure of approximations upon which these methods are based to prove universal when compared with VSTOL tunnel test results.

  3. Fluorescence Visualization of Hypersonic Flow Past Triangular and Rectangular Boundary-layer Trips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Garcia, A. P.; Borg, Stephen E.; Dyakonov, Artem A.; Berry, Scott A.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Alderfer, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) flow visualization has been used to investigate the hypersonic flow of air over surface protrusions that are sized to force laminar-to-turbulent boundary layer transition. These trips were selected to simulate protruding Space Shuttle Orbiter heat shield gap-filler material. Experiments were performed in the NASA Langley Research Center 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Wind Tunnel, which is an electrically-heated, blowdown facility. Two-mm high by 8-mm wide triangular and rectangular trips were attached to a flat plate and were oriented at an angle of 45 degrees with respect to the oncoming flow. Upstream of these trips, nitric oxide (NO) was seeded into the boundary layer. PLIF visualization of this NO allowed observation of both laminar and turbulent boundary layer flow downstream of the trips for varying flow conditions as the flat plate angle of attack was varied. By varying the angle of attack, the Mach number above the boundary layer was varied between 4.2 and 9.8, according to analytical oblique-shock calculations. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of the flowfield with a laminar boundary layer were also performed to better understand the flow environment. The PLIF images of the tripped boundary layer flow were compared to a case with no trip for which the flow remained laminar over the entire angle-of-attack range studied. Qualitative agreement is found between the present observed transition measurements and a previous experimental roughness-induced transition database determined by other means, which is used by the shuttle return-to-flight program.

  4. Transition Delay in Hypersonic Boundary Layers via Optimal Perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paredes, Pedro; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei

    2016-01-01

    The effect of nonlinear optimal streaks on disturbance growth in a Mach 6 axisymmetric flow over a 7deg half-angle cone is investigated in an e ort to expand the range of available techniques for transition control. Plane-marching parabolized stability equations are used to characterize the boundary layer instability in the presence of azimuthally periodic streaks. The streaks are observed to stabilize nominally planar Mack mode instabilities, although oblique Mack mode disturbances are destabilized. Experimentally measured transition onset in the absence of any streaks correlates with an amplification factor of N = 6 for the planar Mack modes. For high enough streak amplitudes, the transition threshold of N = 6 is not reached by the Mack mode instabilities within the length of the cone, but subharmonic first mode instabilities, which are destabilized by the presence of the streaks, reach N = 6 near the end of the cone. These results suggest a passive flow control strategy of using micro vortex generators to induce streaks that would delay transition in hypersonic boundary layers.

  5. Hypersonic Boundary Layer Transition Measurements Using NO2 approaches NO Photo-dissociation Tagging Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Johansen, Craig T.; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Goyne, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of instantaneous and mean streamwise velocity profiles in a hypersonic laminar boundary layer as well as a boundary layer undergoing laminar-to-turbulent transition were obtained over a 10-degree half-angle wedge model. A molecular tagging velocimetry technique consisting of a NO2 approaches?NO photo-dissociation reaction and two subsequent excitations of NO was used. The measurement of the transitional boundary layer velocity profiles was made downstream of a 1-mm tall, 4-mm diameter cylindrical trip along several lines lying within a streamwise measurement plane normal to the model surface and offset 6-mm from the model centerline. For laminar and transitional boundary layer measurements, the magnitudes of streamwise velocity fluctuations are compared. In the transitional boundary layer the fluctuations were, in general, 2-4 times larger than those in the laminar boundary layer. Of particular interest were fluctuations corresponding to a height of approximately 50% of the laminar boundary layer thickness having a magnitude of nearly 30% of the mean measured velocity. For comparison, the measured fluctuations in the laminar boundary layer were approximately 5% of the mean measured velocity at the same location. For the highest 10% signal-to-noise ratio data, average single-shot uncertainties using a 1 ?Es and 50 ?Es interframe delay were 115 m/s and 3 m/s, respectively. By averaging single-shot measurements of the transitional boundary layer, uncertainties in mean velocity as low as 39 m/s were obtained in the wind tunnel. The wall-normal and streamwise spatial resolutions were 0.14-mm (2 pixel) and 0.82-mm (11 pixels), respectively. These measurements were performed in the 31-inch Mach 10 Air Wind Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  6. Evaluation of CFD Turbulent Heating Prediction Techniques and Comparison With Hypersonic Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dilley, Arthur D.; McClinton, Charles R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Results from a study to assess the accuracy of turbulent heating and skin friction prediction techniques for hypersonic applications are presented. The study uses the original and a modified Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model with a space marching code. Grid converged turbulent predictions using the wall damping formulation (original model) and local damping formulation (modified model) are compared with experimental data for several flat plates. The wall damping and local damping results are similar for hot wall conditions, but differ significantly for cold walls, i.e., T(sub w) / T(sub t) < 0.3, with the wall damping heating and skin friction 10-30% above the local damping results. Furthermore, the local damping predictions have reasonable or good agreement with the experimental heating data for all cases. The impact of the two formulations on the van Driest damping function and the turbulent eddy viscosity distribution for a cold wall case indicate the importance of including temperature gradient effects. Grid requirements for accurate turbulent heating predictions are also studied. These results indicate that a cell Reynolds number of 1 is required for grid converged heating predictions, but coarser grids with a y(sup +) less than 2 are adequate for design of hypersonic vehicles. Based on the results of this study, it is recommended that the local damping formulation be used with the Baldwin-Lomax and Cebeci-Smith turbulence models in design and analysis of Hyper-X and future hypersonic vehicles.

  7. Nonlinear spatial evolution of inviscid instabilities on hypersonic boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wundrow, David W.

    1996-01-01

    The spatial development of an initially linear vorticity-mode instability on a compressible flat-plate boundary layer is considered. The analysis is done in the framework of the hypersonic limit where the free-stream Mach number M approaches infinity. Nonlinearity is shown to become important locally, in a thin critical layer, when sigma, the deviation of the phase speed from unity, becomes o(M(exp -8/7)) and the magnitude of the pressure fluctuations becomes 0(sigma(exp 5/2)M(exp 2)). The unsteady flow outside the critical layer takes the form of a linear instability wave but with its amplitude completely determined by the nonlinear flow within the critical layer. The coupled set of equations which govern the critical-layer dynamics reflect a balance between spatial-evolution, (linear and nonlinear) convection and nonlinear vorticity-generation terms. The numerical solution to these equations shows that nonlinear effects produce a dramatic reduction in the instability-wave amplitude.

  8. Characterization of structural response to hypersonic boundary-layer transition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Riley, Zachary B.; Deshmukh, Rohit; Miller, Brent A.; McNamara, Jack J.; Casper, Katya M.

    2016-05-24

    The inherent relationship between boundary-layer stability, aerodynamic heating, and surface conditions makes the potential for interaction between the structural response and boundary-layer transition an important and challenging area of study in high-speed flows. This paper phenomenologically explores this interaction using a fundamental two-dimensional aerothermoelastic model under the assumption of an aluminum panel with simple supports. Specifically, an existing model is extended to examine the impact of transition onset location, transition length, and transitional overshoot in heat flux and fluctuating pressure on the structural response of surface panels. Transitional flow conditions are found to yield significantly increased thermal gradients, and theymore » can result in higher maximum panel temperatures compared to turbulent flow. Results indicate that overshoot in heat flux and fluctuating pressure reduces the flutter onset time and increases the strain energy accumulated in the panel. Furthermore, overshoot occurring near the midchord can yield average temperatures and peak displacements exceeding those experienced by the panel subject to turbulent flow. Lastly, these results suggest that fully turbulent flow does not always conservatively predict the thermo-structural response of surface panels.« less

  9. Secondary Instability of Second Modes in Hypersonic Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; White, Jeffery A.

    2012-01-01

    Second mode disturbances dominate the primary instability stage of transition in a number of hypersonic flow configurations. The highest amplification rates of second mode disturbances are usually associated with 2D (or axisymmetric) perturbations and, therefore, a likely scenario for the onset of the three-dimensionality required for laminar-turbulent transition corresponds to the parametric amplification of 3D secondary instabilities in the presence of 2D, finite amplitude second mode disturbances. The secondary instability of second mode disturbances is studied for selected canonical flow configurations. The basic state for the secondary instability analysis is obtained by tracking the linear and nonlinear evolution of 2D, second mode disturbances using nonlinear parabolized stability equations. Unlike in previous studies, the selection of primary disturbances used for the secondary instability analysis was based on their potential relevance to transition in a low disturbance environment and the effects of nonlinearity on the evolution of primary disturbances was accounted for. Strongly nonlinear effects related to the self-interaction of second mode disturbances lead to an upstream shift in the upper branch neutral location. Secondary instability computations confirm the previously known dominance of subharmonic modes at relatively small primary amplitudes. However, for the Purdue Mach 6 compression cone configuration, it was shown that a strong fundamental secondary instability can exist for a range of initial amplitudes of the most amplified second mode disturbance, indicating that the exclusive focus on subharmonic modes in the previous applications of secondary instability theory to second mode primary instability may not have been fully justified.

  10. Numerical Computations of Hypersonic Boundary-Layer over Surface Irregularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei

    2010-01-01

    Surface irregularities such as protuberances inside a hypersonic boundary layer may lead to premature transition on the vehicle surface. Early transition in turn causes large localized surface heating that could damage the thermal protection system. Experimental measurements as well as numerical computations aimed at building a knowledge base for transition Reynolds numbers with respect to different protuberance sizes and locations have been actively pursued in recent years. This paper computationally investigates the unsteady wake development behind large isolated cylindrical roughness elements and the scaled wind-tunnel model of the trip used in a recent flight measurement during the reentry of space shuttle Discovery. An unstructured mesh, compressible flow solver based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for the flow past a roughness element under several wind-tunnel conditions. For a cylindrical roughness element with a height to the boundary-layer thickness ratio from 0.8 to 2.5, the wake flow is characterized by a mushroom-shaped centerline streak and horse-shoe vortices. While time-accurate solutions converged to a steady-state for a ratio of 0.8, strong flow unsteadiness is present for a ratio of 1.3 and 2.5. Instability waves marked by distinct disturbance frequencies were found in the latter two cases. Both the centerline streak and the horse-shoe vortices become unstable downstream. The oscillatory vortices eventually reach an early breakdown stage for the largest roughness element. Spectral analyses in conjunction with the computed root mean square variations suggest that the source of the unsteadiness and instability waves in the wake region may be traced back to possible absolute instability in the front-side separation region.

  11. Hypersonic turbulent expansion-corner flow with shock impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Kung-Ming; Lu, Frank K.

    1992-01-01

    Mean and fluctuating surface pressure data were obtained in a Mach 8, turbulent, cold flow past an expansion corner subjected to shock impingement. The expansion corner of 2.5 or 4.25 deg was located at 0.77 m (30.25 in.) from the leading edge of a shape-edged flat plate while an external shock, generated by either a 2- or 4-deg sharp wedge, impinged at the corner, or at one boundary layer thickness ahead or behind the corner. The mean pressure distribution was strongly influenced by the mutual interaction between the shock and the expansion. For example, the upstream influence decreased when the shock impinged downstream of the corner. Also, the unsteadiness of the interactions was characterized by an intermittent region and a local rms pressure peak near the upstream influence line. The peak rms pressure fluctuations increased with a larger overall interaction strength. Shock impingement downstream of the corner resulted in lower peaks and also in a shorter region of reduced fluctuation levels. These features may be exploited in inlet design by impinging the cowl shock downstream of an expansion corner instead of at the corner. In addition, a limited Pitot pressure survey showed a thinning of the boundary layer downstream of the corner.

  12. Cyclone separator having boundary layer turbulence control

    DOEpatents

    Krishna, Coimbatore R.; Milau, Julius S.

    1985-01-01

    A cyclone separator including boundary layer turbulence control that is operable to prevent undue build-up of particulate material at selected critical areas on the separator walls, by selectively varying the fluid pressure at those areas to maintain the momentum of the vortex, thereby preventing particulate material from inducing turbulence in the boundary layer of the vortical fluid flow through the separator.

  13. A method for the direct numerical simulation of hypersonic boundary-layer instability with finite-rate chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Marxen, Olaf; Magin, Thierry E.; Shaqfeh, Eric S.G.; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2013-12-15

    A new numerical method is presented here that allows to consider chemically reacting gases during the direct numerical simulation of a hypersonic fluid flow. The method comprises the direct coupling of a solver for the fluid mechanical model and a library providing the physio-chemical model. The numerical method for the fluid mechanical model integrates the compressible Navier–Stokes equations using an explicit time advancement scheme and high-order finite differences. This Navier–Stokes code can be applied to the investigation of laminar-turbulent transition and boundary-layer instability. The numerical method for the physio-chemical model provides thermodynamic and transport properties for different gases as well as chemical production rates, while here we exclusively consider a five species air mixture. The new method is verified for a number of test cases at Mach 10, including the one-dimensional high-temperature flow downstream of a normal shock, a hypersonic chemical reacting boundary layer in local thermodynamic equilibrium and a hypersonic reacting boundary layer with finite-rate chemistry. We are able to confirm that the diffusion flux plays an important role for a high-temperature boundary layer in local thermodynamic equilibrium. Moreover, we demonstrate that the flow for a case previously considered as a benchmark for the investigation of non-equilibrium chemistry can be regarded as frozen. Finally, the new method is applied to investigate the effect of finite-rate chemistry on boundary layer instability by considering the downstream evolution of a small-amplitude wave and comparing results with those obtained for a frozen gas as well as a gas in local thermodynamic equilibrium.

  14. Shuttle Damage/Repair from the Perspective of Hypersonic Boundary Layer Transition - Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Thomas J.; Berry, Scott A.; Merski, N. Ronald; Berger, Karen T.; Buck, Gregory M.; Liechty, Derek S.; Schneider, Steven P.

    2006-01-01

    An overview is provided of the experimental wind tunnel program conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center Aerothermodynamics Laboratory in support of an agency-wide effort to prepare the Shuttle Orbiter for Return-to-Flight. The effect of an isolated protuberance and an isolated rectangular cavity on hypersonic boundary layer transition onset on the windward surface of the Shuttle Orbiter has been experimentally characterized. These experimental studies were initiated to provide a protuberance and cavity effects database for developing hypersonic transition criteria to support on-orbit disposition of thermal protection system damage or repair. In addition, a synergistic experimental investigation was undertaken to assess the impact of an isolated mass-flow entrainment source (simulating pyrolysis/outgassing from a proposed tile repair material) on boundary layer transition. A brief review of the relevant literature regarding hypersonic boundary layer transition induced from cavities and localized mass addition from ablation is presented. Boundary layer transition results were obtained using 0.0075-scale Orbiter models with simulated tile damage (rectangular cavities) of varying length, width, and depth and simulated tile damage or repair (protuberances) of varying height. Cavity and mass addition effects were assessed at a fixed location (x/L = 0.3) along the model centerline in a region of near zero pressure gradient. Cavity length-to-depth ratio was systematically varied from 2.5 to 17.7 and length-to-width ratio of 1 to 8.5. Cavity depth-to-local boundary layer thickness ranged from 0.5 to 4.8. Protuberances were located at several sites along the centerline and port/starboard attachment lines along the chine and wing leading edge. Protuberance height-to-boundary layer thickness was varied from approximately 0.2 to 1.1. Global heat transfer images and heating distributions of the Orbiter windward surface using phosphor thermography were used to infer the

  15. Unsteady Heat-Flux Measurements of Second-Mode Instability Waves in a Hypersonic Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kergerise, Michael A.; Rufer, Shann J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report on the application of the atomic layer thermopile (ALTP) heat- flux sensor to the measurement of laminar-to-turbulent transition in a hypersonic flat plate boundary layer. The centerline of the flat-plate model was instrumented with a streamwise array of ALTP sensors and the flat-plate model was exposed to a Mach 6 freestream over a range of unit Reynolds numbers. Here, we observed an unstable band of frequencies that are associated with second-mode instability waves in the laminar boundary layer that forms on the flat-plate surface. The measured frequencies, group velocities, phase speeds, and wavelengths of these instability waves are in agreement with data previously reported in the literature. Heat flux time series, and the Morlet-wavelet transforms of them, revealed the wave-packet nature of the second-mode instability waves. In addition, a laser-based radiative heating system was developed to measure the frequency response functions (FRF) of the ALTP sensors used in the wind tunnel test. These measurements were used to assess the stability of the sensor FRFs over time and to correct spectral estimates for any attenuation caused by the finite sensor bandwidth.

  16. Numerical solution of the hypersonic viscous-shock-layer equations for laminar, transitional, and turbulent flows of a perfect gas over blunt axially symmetric bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, E. C.; Moss, J. N.

    1975-01-01

    The viscous shock layer equations applicable to hypersonic laminar, transitional, and turbulent flows of a perfect gas over two-dimensional plane or axially symmetric blunt bodies are presented. The equations are solved by means of an implicit finite difference scheme, and the results are compared with a turbulent boundary layer analysis. The agreement between the two solution procedures is satisfactory for the region of flow where streamline swallowing effects are negligible. For the downstream regions, where streamline swallowing effects are present, the expected differences in the two solution procedures are evident.

  17. Longitudinal vortices imbedded in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, R. D.; Shabaka, I. M. M.; Shibl, A.; Bradshaw, P.

    1983-01-01

    The attenuation of skew-induced longitudinal vortices by turbulent or viscous stresses is studied for the case of pure, artificially-generated longitudinal vortices entrained into initially two-dimensional boundary layers in nominally zero pressure gradients. Three types of vortex-boundary interactions are studied in detail: (1) an isolated vortex in a two-dimensional boundary layer; (2) a vortex pair in a turbulent boundary layer with the common flow between the vortices moving away from the surface; (3) a vortex pair in a boundary layer with the common flow moving towards the surface. Detailed mean flow and turbulence measurements are made, showing that the eddy viscosities defined for the different shear-stress components behave in different and complicated ways. Terms in the Reynolds stress transport equations, notably the triple products that effect turbulent diffusion of Reynolds stress, also fail to obey simple rules.

  18. Calculation methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Harris, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Calculation procedures for non-reacting compressible two- and three-dimensional turbulent boundary layers were reviewed. Integral, transformation and correlation methods, as well as finite difference solutions of the complete boundary layer equations summarized. Alternative numerical solution procedures were examined, and both mean field and mean turbulence field closure models were considered. Physics and related calculation problems peculiar to compressible turbulent boundary layers are described. A catalog of available solution procedures of the finite difference, finite element, and method of weighted residuals genre is included. Influence of compressibility, low Reynolds number, wall blowing, and pressure gradient upon mean field closure constants are reported.

  19. Roles of Engineering Correlations in Hypersonic Entry Boundary Layer Transition Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Charles H.; King, Rudolph A.; Kergerise, Michael A.; Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Efforts to design and operate hypersonic entry vehicles are constrained by many considerations that involve all aspects of an entry vehicle system. One of the more significant physical phenomenon that affect entry trajectory and thermal protection system design is the occurrence of boundary layer transition from a laminar to turbulent state. During the Space Shuttle Return To Flight activity following the loss of Columbia and her crew of seven, NASA's entry aerothermodynamics community implemented an engineering correlation based framework for the prediction of boundary layer transition on the Orbiter. The methodology for this implementation relies upon the framework of correlation techniques that have been in use for several decades. What makes the Orbiter boundary layer transition correlation implementation unique is that a statistically significant data set was acquired in multiple ground test facilities, flight data exists to assist in establishing a better correlation and the framework was founded upon state of the art chemical nonequilibrium Navier Stokes flow field simulations. The basic tenets that guided the formulation and implementation of the Orbiter Return To Flight boundary layer transition prediction capability will be reviewed as a recommended format for future empirical correlation efforts. The validity of this approach has since been demonstrated by very favorable comparison of recent entry flight testing performed with the Orbiter Discovery, which will be graphically summarized. These flight data can provide a means to validate discrete protuberance engineering correlation approaches as well as high fidelity prediction methods to higher confidence. The results of these Orbiter engineering and flight test activities only serve to reinforce the essential role that engineering correlations currently exercise in the design and operation of entry vehicles. The framework of information-related to the Orbiter empirical boundary layer transition

  20. Aero-optic characteristics of turbulent compressible boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyckham, Christopher Mark

    This dissertation presents a detailed study of the aberrating effect on a plane incident wavefront of light due to its passage through a turbulent, compressible boundary layer. This aberration has important implications for the design of airborne optical systems for imaging, communications, or projection. A Shack-Hartmann sensor and associated data analysis software suite were developed and validated for the high resolution measurement of two dimensional wavefront phase. Significant improvements in wavefront reconstruction were achieved by using the calculated centroid uncertainties to weight the least squares fitting of the phase surface. Using the Shack-Hartmann sensor in a high speed, one dimensional mode, individual structures are observed propagating past the sensor in a transonic flow. The uncertainties on the reconstructed phase in this mode are very high, however. In a two dimensional mode the uncertainties are greatly reduced and a large database of individual, uncorrelated wavefronts was collected, allowing statistics to be calculated such as the rms wavefront height and the Strehl ratio. Data were collected at transonic and hypersonic speeds and with no injection or with helium or nitrogen injection into the boundary layer. In all cases except the hypersonic helium injection case, the time averaged wavefronts reveal no features in the boundary layer which are steady in time. In the hypersonic helium injection case, however, steady, longitudinal features are observed, in agreement with previous observations. When helium is injected for window cooling at high speeds, the results show there may be an opportunity to reduce the resulting distortion by taking advantage of the stable structures that form in the boundary layer by using a low bandwidth adaptive optic system. A new scaling argument is also presented to allow the prediction and comparison of wavefront data for different compressible boundary layer flow conditions. The proposed formula gives

  1. Structure of relaminarizing turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, O.; Patwardhan, Saurabh

    2014-11-01

    Relaminarization of a turbulent boundary layer in a strongly accelerated flow has received a great attention in recent times. It has been found that such relaminarization is a general and regularly occurring phenomenon in the leading-edge region of a swept wing of an airplane (van Dam et al., 1993). In this work, we investigate the effect of initial Reynolds number on the process of relaminarization in turbulent boundary layers. The experimental and numerical investigation of relaminarizing turbulent boundary layers undergoing same history reveals that the boundary layer with higher initial Reynolds number relaminarizes at a lower pressure gradient value compared to the one with lower Reynolds number. This effect can be explained on the inviscid theory proposed earlier in the literature. Further, various parameter criteria proposed to predict relaminarization, are assessed and the structure of relaminarizing boundary layers is investigated. A mechanism for stabilization of near-wall low speed streaks is proposed.

  2. Interaction of turbulent plasma flow with a hypersonic shock wave

    SciTech Connect

    Belay, K.; Valentine, J.M.; Williams, R.L.; Johnson, J.A. III

    1997-02-01

    A transient increase is observed in both the spectral energy decay rate and the degree of chaotic complexity at the interface of a shock wave and a turbulent ionized gas. Even though the gas is apparently brought to rest by the shock wave, no evidence is found either of prompt relaminarization or of any systematic influence of end-wall material thermal conductivities on the turbulence parameters. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. 2D Turbulence with Complicated Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roullet, G.; McWilliams, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    We examine the consequences of lateral viscous boundary layers on the 2D turbulence that arises in domains with complicated boundaries (headlands, bays etc). The study is carried out numerically with LES. The numerics are carefully designed to ensure all global conservation laws, proper boundary conditions and a minimal range of dissipation scales. The turbulence dramatically differs from the classical bi-periodic case. Boundary layer separations lead to creation of many small vortices and act as a continuing energy source exciting the inverse cascade of energy throughout the domain. The detachments are very intermittent in time. In free decay, the final state depends on the effective numerical resolution: laminar with a single dominant vortex for low Re and turbulent with many vortices for large enough Re. After very long time, the turbulent end-state exhibits a striking tendency for the emergence of shielded vortices which then interact almost elastically. In the forced case, the boundary layers allow the turbulence to reach a statistical steady state without any artificial hypo-viscosity or other large-scale dissipation. Implications are discussed for the oceanic mesoscale and submesoscale turbulence.

  4. Hairpin vortices in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eitel-Amor, G.; Örlü, R.; Schlatter, P.; Flores, O.

    2015-02-01

    The present work presents a number of parallel and spatially developing simulations of boundary layers to address the question of whether hairpin vortices are a dominant feature of near-wall turbulence, and which role they play during transition. In the first part, the parent-offspring regeneration mechanism is investigated in parallel (temporal) simulations of a single hairpin vortex introduced in a mean shear flow corresponding to either turbulent channels or boundary layers (Reτ ≲ 590). The effect of a turbulent background superimposed on the mean flow is considered by using an eddy viscosity computed from resolved simulations. Tracking the vortical structure downstream, it is found that secondary hairpins are only created shortly after initialization, with all rotational structures decaying for later times. For hairpins in a clean (laminar) environment, the decay is relatively slow, while hairpins in weak turbulent environments (10% of νt) dissipate after a couple of eddy turnover times. In the second part, the role of hairpin vortices in laminar-turbulent transition is studied using simulations of spatial boundary layers tripped by hairpin vortices. These vortices are generated by means of specific volumetric forces representing an ejection event, creating a synthetic turbulent boundary layer initially dominated by hairpin-like vortices. These hairpins are advected towards the wake region of the boundary layer, while a sinusoidal instability of the streaks near the wall results in rapid development of a turbulent boundary layer. For Reθ > 400, the boundary layer is fully developed, with no evidence of hairpin vortices reaching into the wall region. The results from both the parallel and spatial simulations strongly suggest that the regeneration process is rather short-lived and may not sustain once a turbulent background is developed. From the transitional flow simulations, it is conjectured that the forest of hairpins reported in former direct numerical

  5. Three-Dimensional Navier-Stokes Simulations with Two-Equation Turbulence Models of Intersecting Shock-Waves/Turbulent Boundary Layer at Mach 8.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, J. E.; Coakley, T. J.

    1994-01-01

    An investigation of the numerical simulation with two-equation turbulence models of a three-dimensional hypersonic intersecting (SWTBL) shock-wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flow is presented. The flows are solved with an efficient implicit upwind flux-difference split Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes code. Numerical results are compared with experimental data for a flow at Mach 8.28 and Reynolds number 5.3x10(exp 6) with crossing shock-waves and expansion fans generated by two lateral 15 fins located on top of a cold-wall plate. This experiment belongs to the hypersonic database for modeling validation. Simulations show the development of two primary counter-rotating cross-flow vortices and secondary turbulent structures under the main vortices and in each corner singularity inside the turbulent boundary layer. A significant loss of total pressure is produced by the complex interaction between the main vortices and the uplifted jet stream of the boundary layer. The overall agreement between computational and experimental data is generally good. The turbulence modeling corrections show improvements in the predictions of surface heat transfer distribution and an increase in the strength of the cross-flow vortices. Accurate predictions of the outflow flowfield is found to require accurate modeling of the laminar/turbulent boundary layers on the fin walls.

  6. Measurement and correlation of aerodynamic heating to surface corrugation stiffened structures in thick turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, H. J.; Masek, R. V.

    1974-01-01

    The flow conditions for which heating distributions were measured on corrugated surfaces and wavy walls in turbulent boundary layers are shown, along with the ratio of the displacement thickness to the roughness height versus the local edge Mach number for an equivalent smooth surface. The present data are seen to greatly extend the range of data available on corrugated surfaces in turbulent boundary layers. These data were obtained by testing fullscale corrugation roughened panels in the wall boundary layer of a supersonic and hypersonic wind tunnel. The experimental program used to obtain the data is described. The data are analyzed and correlated in terms of the pertinent flow and geometric parameters. The developed correlations are compared with the available thin boundary layer data, as well as with previously published correlation techniques.

  7. Hairpin vortices in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eitel-Amor, G.; Flores, O.; Schlatter, P.

    2014-04-01

    The present work addresses the question whether hairpin vortices are a dominant feature of near-wall turbulence and which role they play during transition. First, the parent-offspring mechanism is investigated in temporal simulations of a single hairpin vortex introduced in a mean shear flow corresponding to turbulent channels and boundary layers up to Reτ = 590. Using an eddy viscosity computed from resolved simulations, the effect of a turbulent background is also considered. Tracking the vortical structure downstream, it is found that secondary hairpins are created shortly after initialization. Thereafter, all rotational structures decay, whereas this effect is enforced in the presence of an eddy viscosity. In a second approach, a laminar boundary layer is tripped to transition by insertion of a regular pattern of hairpins by means of defined volumetric forces representing an ejection event. The idea is to create a synthetic turbulent boundary layer dominated by hairpin-like vortices. The flow for Reτ < 250 is analysed with respect to the lifetime of individual hairpin-like vortices. Both the temporal and spatial simulations demonstrate that the regeneration process is rather short-lived and may not sustain once a turbulent background has formed. From the transitional flow simulations, it is conjectured that the forest of hairpins reported in former DNS studies is an outer layer phenomenon not being connected to the onset of near-wall turbulence.

  8. A Turbulent Boundary Layer over Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunwook; Kim, John

    2015-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer (TBL) developing over superhydrophobic surfaces (SHS) were performed in order to investigate the underlying physics of turbulent flow over SHS. SHS were modeled through the shear-free boundary condition, assuming that the gas-liquid interfaces remained as non-deformable. Pattern-averaged turbulence statistics were examined in order to determine the effects of SHS on turbulence in no-slip and slip regions separately. Near-wall turbulence over the slip region was significantly affected by SHS due to insufficient mean shear required to sustain near-wall turbulence. SHS also indirectly affected near-wall turbulence over the no-slip region. In addition to the effects of the spanwise width of SHS on skin-friction drag reduction reported previously, spatial effects in the streamwise direction were examined. A guideline for optimal design of SHS geometry will be discussed. This research was supported by the ONR (Grant No. N000141410291).

  9. Bursting frequency prediction in turbulent boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    LIOU,WILLIAM W.; FANG,YICHUNG

    2000-02-01

    The frequencies of the bursting events associated with the streamwise coherent structures of spatially developing incompressible turbulent boundary layers were predicted using global numerical solution of the Orr-Sommerfeld and the vertical vorticity equations of hydrodynamic stability problems. The structures were modeled as wavelike disturbances associated with the turbulent mean flow. The global method developed here involves the use of second and fourth order accurate finite difference formula for the differential equations as well as the boundary conditions. An automated prediction tool, BURFIT, was developed. The predicted resonance frequencies were found to agree very well with previous results using a local shooting technique and measured data.

  10. Calculation methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers, 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Harris, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Equations and closure methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers are discussed. Flow phenomena peculiar to calculation of these boundary layers were considered, along with calculations of three dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers. Procedures for ascertaining nonsimilar two and three dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers were appended, including finite difference, finite element, and mass-weighted residual methods.

  11. A DNS study of supersonic boundary layer trip induced transition and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beekman, Izaak; Martin, M. Pino

    2014-11-01

    We perform the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a Mach 7 . 2 , turbulent boundary layer, with a laminar inflow. A two-dimensional, semi-circular, bar-type roughness element is introduced near the inlet to hasten transition to turbulence. We choose this geometry because two-dimensional trip-wire-type devices have been used extensively by the experimental community, but we know of no computational studies to simulate transition behind such a roughness element in supersonic flow. We vary the trip size to investigate how size and trip-imposed length scales affect the transition process and the resulting turbulence. The incoming boundary layer conditions are matched to those of experiments being conducted at Princeton University Gas Dynamics Laboratory, where the free stream Mach number is 7 . 2 . This work is sponsored by the USAF under Grant AF/9550-10-1-0535 STW 21 - Revitalization of the Hypersonics Testing and Evaluation Workforce.

  12. LDV measurements of turbulent baroclinic boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Neuwald, P.; Reichenbach, H.; Kuhl, A.L.

    1993-07-01

    Described here are shock tube experiments of nonsteady, turbulent boundary layers with large density variations. A dense-gas layer was created by injecting Freon through the porous floor of the shock tube. As the shock front propagated along the layer, vorticity was created at the air-Freon interface by an inviscid, baroclinic mechanism. Shadow-schlieren photography was used to visualize the turbulent mixing in this baroclinic boundary layer. Laser-Doppler-Velocimetry (LDV) was used to measure the streamwise velocity histories at 14 heights. After transition, the boundary layer profiles may be approximated by a power-law function u {approximately} u{sup {alpha}} where {alpha} {approx_equal} 3/8. This value lies between the clean flat plate value ({alpha} = 1/7) and the dusty boundary layer value ({alpha} {approx_equal} 0.7), and is controlled by the gas density near the wall.

  13. Experimental studies of hypersonic shock-wave boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Frank K.

    1992-01-01

    Two classes of shock-wave boundary-layer interactions were studied experimentally in a shock tunnel in which a low Reynolds number, turbulent flow at Mach 8 was developed on a cold, flat test surface. The two classes of interactions were: (1) a swept interaction generated by a wedge ('fin') mounted perpendicularly on the flat plate; and (2) a two-dimensional, unseparated interaction induced by a shock impinging near an expansion corner. The swept interaction, with wedge angles of 5-20 degrees, was separated and there was also indication that the strongest interactions prossessed secondary separation zones. The interaction spread out extensively from the inviscid shock location although no indication of quasi-conical symmetry was evident. The surface pressure from the upstream influence to the inviscid shock was relatively low compared to the inviscid downstream value but it rose rapidly past the inviscid shock location. However, the surface pressure did not reach the downstream inviscid value and reasons were proposed for this anomalous behavior compared to strongly separated, supersonic interactions. The second class of interactions involved weak shocks impinging near small expansion corners. As a prelude to studying this interaction, a hypersonic similarity parameter was identified for the pure, expansion corner flow. The expansion corner severely damped out surface pressure fluctuations. When a shock impinged upstream of the corner, no significant changes to the surface pressure were found as compared to the case when the shock impinged on a flat plate. But, when the shock impinged downstream of the corner, a close coupling existed between the two wave systems, unlike the supersonic case. This close coupling modified the upstream influence. Regardless of whether the shock impinged ahead or behind the corner, the downstream region was affected by the close coupling between the shock and the expansion. Not only was the mean pressure distribution modified but the

  14. Pressure gradient influence in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuther, Nico; Kaehler, Christian J.

    2015-11-01

    Understanding wall-bounded turbulence is still an ongoing process. Although remarkable progress has been made in the last decades, many challenges still remain. Mean flow statistics are well understood in case of zero pressure gradient flows. However, almost all turbulent boundary layers in technical applications, such as aircrafts, are subjected to a streamwise pressure gradient. When subjecting turbulent boundary layers to adverse pressure gradients, significant changes in the statistical behavior of the near-wall flow have been observed in experimental studies conducted however the details dynamics and characteristics of these flows has not been fully resolved. The sensitivity to Reynolds number and the dependency on several parameters, including the dependence on the pressure gradient parameter, is still under debate and very little information exists about statistically averaged quantities such as the mean velocity profile or Reynolds stresses. In order to improve the understanding of wall-bounded turbulence, this work experimentally investigates turbulent boundary layer subjected to favorable and adverse pressure gradients by means of Particle Image Velocimetry over a wide range of Reynolds numbers, 4200

  15. Stabilization of the hypersonic boundary layer by finite-amplitude streaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jie; Fu, Song; Hanifi, Ardeshir

    2016-02-01

    Stabilization of two-dimensional disturbances in hypersonic boundary layer flows by finite-amplitude streaks is investigated using nonlinear parabolized stability equations. The boundary-layer flows at Mach numbers 4.5 and 6.0 are studied in which both first and second modes are supported. The streaks considered here are driven either by the so-called optimal perturbations (Klebanoff-type) or the centrifugal instability (Görtler-type). When the streak amplitude is in an appropriate range, i.e., large enough to modulate the laminar boundary layer but low enough to not trigger secondary instability, both first and second modes can effectively be suppressed.

  16. Correlation of heat transfer for the zero pressure gradient hypersonic laminar boundary layer for several gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    A theoretical study of heat transfer for zero pressure gradient hypersonic laminar boundary layers for various gases with particular application to the flows produced in an expansion tube facility was conducted. A correlation based on results obtained from solutions to the governing equations for five gases was formulated. Particular attention was directed toward the laminar boundary layer shock tube splitter plates in carbon dioxide flows generated by high speed shock waves. Computer analysis of the splitter plate boundary layer flow provided information that is useful in interpreting experimental data obtained in shock tube gas radiation studies.

  17. Boundary Plasma Turbulence Simulations for Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X; Umansky, M; Dudson, B; Snyder, P

    2008-05-15

    The boundary plasma turbulence code BOUT models tokamak boundary-plasma turbulence in a realistic divertor geometry using modified Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density (ni), electron and ion temperature (T{sub e}; T{sub i}) and parallel momenta. The BOUT code solves for the plasma fluid equations in a three dimensional (3D) toroidal segment (or a toroidal wedge), including the region somewhat inside the separatrix and extending into the scrape-off layer; the private flux region is also included. In this paper, a description is given of the sophisticated physical models, innovative numerical algorithms, and modern software design used to simulate edge-plasmas in magnetic fusion energy devices. The BOUT code's unique capabilities and functionality are exemplified via simulations of the impact of plasma density on tokamak edge turbulence and blob dynamics.

  18. A quiet tunnel investigation of hypersonic boundary-layer stability over a cooled, flared cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Alan E.; Selby, Gregory V.; Wilkinson, Stephen P.

    1996-01-01

    A flared-cone model under adiabatic and cooled-wall conditions was placed in a calibrated, low-disturbance Mach 6 flow and the stability of the boundary layer was investigated using a prototype constant-voltage anemometer. The results were compared with linear-stability theory predictions and good agreement was found in the prediction of second-mode frequencies and growth. In addition, the same 'N = 10' criterion used to predict boundary-layer transition in subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flows under low freestream noise conditions was found to be applicable for the hypersonic flow regime as well. Under cooled-wall conditions, a unique set of spectral data was acquired that documents the linear, nonlinear, and breakdown regions associated with the transition of hypersonic flow under low-noise conditions.

  19. Supersonic boundary-layer flow turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Chi-Rong

    1993-01-01

    Baldwin-Lomax and kappa-epsilon turbulence models were modified for use in Navier-Stokes numerical computations of Mach 2.9 supersonic turbulent boundary layer flows along compression ramps. The computational results of Reynolds shear stress profiles were compared with experimental data. The Baldwin-Lomax model was modified to account for the Reynolds shear stress amplification within the flow field. A hybrid kappa-epsilon model with viscous sublayer turbulence treatment was constructed to predict the Reynolds shear stress profiles within the entire flow field. These modified turbulence models were effective for the computations of the surface pressure and the skin friction factor variations along an 8 deg ramp surface. The hybrid kappa-epsilon model could improve the predictions of the Reynolds shear stress profile and the skin friction factor near the corner of a 16 deg ramp.

  20. Geometric invariance of compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Wei-Tao; Wu, Bin; She, Zhen-Su; Hussain, Fazle

    2015-11-01

    A symmetry based approach is applied to analyze the mean velocity and temperature fields of compressible, flat plate turbulent boundary layers (CTBL). A Reynolds stress length scale and a turbulent heat flux length scale are identified to possess the same defect scaling law in the CTBL bulk, which is solely owing to the constraint of the wall to the geometry of the wall-attached eddies, but invariant to compressibility and wall heat transfer. This invariance is called the geometric invariance of CTBL eddies and is likely the origin of the Mach number invariance of Morkovin's hypothesis, as well as the similarity of energy and momentum transports. A closure for the turbulent transport by using the invariant lengths is attainted to predict the mean velocity and temperature profiles in the CTBL bulk- superior to the van Driest transformation and the Reynolds analogy based relations for its sound physics and higher accuracy. Additionally, our approach offers a new understanding of turbulent Prandtl number.

  1. A comparative study of turbulence models in predicting hypersonic inlet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, Kamlesh

    1993-01-01

    A computational study has been conducted to evaluate the performance of various turbulence models. The NASA P8 inlet, which represents cruise condition of a typical hypersonic air-breathing vehicle, was selected as a test case for the study; the PARC2D code, which solves the full two dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations, was used. Results are presented for a total of six versions of zero- and two-equation turbulence models. Zero-equation models tested are the Baldwin-Lomax model, the Thomas model, and a combination of the two. Two-equation models tested are low-Reynolds number models (the Chien model and the Speziale model) and a high-Reynolds number model (the Launder and Spalding model).

  2. An experimental study on the efficiency of transpiration cooling in laminar and turbulent hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gülhan, A.; Braun, S.

    2011-03-01

    An experimental study on the efficiency of transpiration cooling in hypersonic laminar and turbulent flow regimes is carried out in the Hypersonic Windtunnel Cologne with a focus on the aerothermal problems downstream of the cooled model part. The model is made of a material of low thermal conductivity (PEEK) with an integrated probe of a porous material. The experimental setup allows the direct comparison of the thermal behavior of transpiration cooling to a well-defined and radiatively cooled reference surface. Experiments are performed at Mach number of 6 and two different Reynolds numbers. Air, argon and helium are used as coolants at various flow rates, in order to identify the influence of coolant medium on cooling efficiency. The cooling efficiency of air and argon is comparable. Helium provides significantly higher cooling efficiency at the same blowing ratio, i.e. same coolant mass flow rate. The experimental data shows that the efficiency of the transpiration cooling in turbulent flows is much lower than in laminar flow.

  3. Turbulent boundary layer in an adverse pressure gradient without effect of wall curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakkay, V.; Chi-Rong, W.

    1972-01-01

    The hypersonic compressible turbulent boundary layer in an adverse pressure gradient along a cylindrical axisymmetric body was studied. The tests were conducted in a Mach 6 contoured axisymmetric nozzle. An external compression cowl was used to produce the gradual adverse pressure gradient and a maximum pressure rise of 7 times the freestream static pressure was achieved in a test region of 23 cm. Boundary layer profiles of static pressure, total pressure, and total temperature, as well as wall transient heat transfer rates were measured. Comparisons of the velocity total temperature profiles to linear and quadratic relations were made. Measured heat transfer data were in good agreement with the prediction from the flat-plate reference enthalpy method. Integral parameters were also in good agreement with results of numerical solutions for compressible turbulent boundary layer equations.

  4. The Kinematics of Turbulent Boundary Layer Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Stephen Kern

    1991-01-01

    The long history of research into the internal structure of turbulent boundary layers has not provided a unified picture of the physics responsible for turbulence production and dissipation. The goals of the present research are to: (1) define the current state of boundary layer structure knowledge; and (2) utilize direct numerical simulation results to help close the unresolved issues identified in part A and to unify the fragmented knowledge of various coherent motions into a consistent kinematic model of boundary layer structure. The results of the current study show that all classes of coherent motion in the low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer may be related to vortical structures, but that no single form of vortex is representative of the wide variety of vortical structures observed. In particular, ejection and sweep motions, as well as entrainment from the free-streem are shown to have strong spatial and temporal relationships with vortical structures. Disturbances of vortex size, location, and intensity show that quasi-streamwise vortices dominate the buffer region, while transverse vortices and vortical arches dominate the wake region. Both types of vortical structure are common in the log region. The interrelationships between the various structures and the population distributions of vortices are combined into a conceptual kinematic model for the boundary layer. Aspects of vortical structure dynamics are also postulated, based on time-sequence animations of the numerically simulated flow.

  5. Sound Radiation from a Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, J.

    1961-01-01

    If the restriction of incompressibility in the turbulence problem is relaxed, the phenomenon of energy radiation in the form of sound from the turbulent zone arises. In order to calculate this radiated energy, it is shown that new statistical quantities, such as time-space correlation tensors, have to be known within the turbulent zone in addition to the conventional quantities. For the particular case of the turbulent boundary layer, indications are that the intensity of radiation becomes significant only in supersonic flows. Under these conditions, the recent work of Phillips is examined together with some experimental findings of the author. It is shown that the qualitative features of the radiation field (intensity, directionality) as predicted by the theory are consistent with the measurements; however, even for the highest Mach number flow, some of the assumptions of the asymptotic theory are not yet satisfied in the experiments. Finally, the question of turbulence damping due to radiation is discussed, with the result that in the Mach number range covered by the experiments, the energy lost from the boundary layer due to radiation is a small percentage of the work done by the wall shearing stresses.

  6. Study of effect of a smooth hump on hypersonic boundary layer instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Donghun; Park, Seung O.

    2016-05-01

    Effect of a two-dimensional smooth hump on linear instability of hypersonic boundary layer is studied by using parabolized stability equations. Linear evolution of mode S over a hump is analyzed for Mach 4.5 and 5.92 flat plate and Mach 7.1 sharp cone boundary layers. Mean flow for stability analysis is obtained by solving the parabolized Navier-Stokes equations. Hump with height smaller than local boundary layer thickness is considered. The case of flat plate and sharp cone without the hump are also studied to provide comparable data. For flat plate boundary layers, destabilization and stabilization effect is confirmed for hump located at upstream and downstream of synchronization point, respectively. Results of parametric studies to examine the effect of hump height, location, etc., are also given. For sharp cone boundary layer, stabilization influence of hump is also identified for a specific range of frequency. Stabilization influence of hump on convective instability of mode S is found to be a possible cause of previous experimental observations of delaying transition in hypersonic boundary layers.

  7. Hypersonic three-dimensional nonequilibrium boundary-layer equations in generalized curvilinear coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jong-Hun

    1993-01-01

    The basic governing equations for the second-order three-dimensional hypersonic thermal and chemical nonequilibrium boundary layer are derived by means of an order-of-magnitude analysis. A two-temperature concept is implemented into the system of boundary-layer equations by simplifying the rather complicated general three-temperature thermal gas model. The equations are written in a surface-oriented non-orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system, where two curvilinear coordinates are non-orthogonial and a third coordinate is normal to the surface. The equations are described with minimum use of tensor expressions arising from the coordinate transformation, to avoid unnecessary confusion for readers. The set of equations obtained will be suitable for the development of a three-dimensional nonequilibrium boundary-layer code. Such a code could be used to determine economically the aerodynamic/aerothermodynamic loads to the surfaces of hypersonic vehicles with general configurations. In addition, the basic equations for three-dimensional stagnation flow, of which solution is required as an initial value for space-marching integration of the boundary-layer equations, are given along with the boundary conditions, the boundary-layer parameters, and the inner-outer layer matching procedure. Expressions for the chemical reaction rates and the thermodynamic and transport properties in the thermal nonequilibrium environment are explicitly given.

  8. A pulsed jet for generation of turbulent spots in a mach 6 boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abney, Andrew D.

    Hypersonic vehicles operate in an environment with a high level of boundary-layer pressure fluctuations. The largest of these fluctuations are due to the intermittent passage of turbulent spots within the transition region, and can be sufficiently large to affect internal components of the vehicle. In order to better predict these flow variations, a turbulent spot model could be used. The boundary layer on the Boeing/ AFOSR Mach 6 Quiet Tunnel nozzle-wall provided a convenient location for studying the statistical properties of turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer, including growth rates, convection velocities, and pressure-fluctuation intensities. A valve system was developed to inject a transverse jet of air into the nozzle-wall boundary layer in an attempt to generate controlled spots. The resulting perturbations were characterized. The pressure fluctuations were measured on the tunnel centerline downstream of the perturber. Pressure traces and spectra were examined to determine the effectiveness of the perturber system. The initial perturber system produced disturbances with a duration that was too long. A reduction in perturbation duration was achieved through modification of the perturber electronics. Physical modifications were also made to the valve, with mixed success. The perturbations were of a longer duration and higher initial amplitude than perturbations generated using a pulsed glow perturber in previous studies in the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel, including fully turbulent perturbations at the maximum quiet freestream Reynolds number. Inconsistent alignment of the perturber became the largest difficulty in using the device. A new method of aligning the valve was developed. A more effective means of maintaining the alignment during transfer from the alignment tool to the nozzle wall is necessary. Additional reductions to the perturbation duration could be possible by optimizing the geometry of the passage through the nozzle wall

  9. Experiments on passive hypersonic boundary layer control using ultrasonically absorptive carbon-carbon material with random microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Alexander; Kuhn, Markus; Martinez Schramm, Jan; Hannemann, Klaus

    2013-10-01

    For the first time, the influence of ultrasonically absorptive carbon-carbon material on hypersonic laminar to turbulent boundary layer transition was investigated experimentally. A 7° half-angle blunted cone with a nose radius of 2.5 mm and a total length of 1,077 mm was tested at zero angle of attack in the High Enthalpy Shock Tunnel Göttingen of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) at Mach 7.5. One-third of the metallic model surface in circumferential direction was replaced by DLR in-house manufactured ultrasonically absorptive carbon-carbon material with random microstructure for passive transition control. The remaining model surface consisted of polished steel and served as reference surface. The model was equipped with coaxial thermocouples to determine the transition location by means of surface heat flux distribution. Flush-mounted piezoelectric fast-response pressure transducers were used to measure the pressure fluctuations in the boundary layer associated with second-mode instabilities. The free-stream unit Reynolds number was varied over a range of Re m = 1.5 × 106 m-1 to Re m = 6.4 × 106 m-1 at a stagnation enthalpy of h 0 ≈ 3.2 MJ/kg and a wall temperature ratio of T w/ T 0 ≈ 0.1. The present study revealed a clear damping of the second-mode instabilities and a delay of boundary layer transition along the ultrasonically absorptive carbon-carbon insert.

  10. Role of Turbulent Prandtl Number on Heat Flux at Hypersonic Mach Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiao, X.; Edwards, J. R.; Hassan, H. A.; Gaffney, R. L., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    A new turbulence model suited for calculating the turbulent Prandtl number as part of the solution is presented. The model is based on a set of two equations: one governing the variance of the enthalpy and the other governing its dissipation rate. These equations were derived from the exact energy equation and thus take into consideration compressibility and dissipation terms. The model is used to study two cases involving shock wave/boundary layer interaction at Mach 9.22 and Mach 5.0. In general, heat transfer prediction showed great improvement over traditional turbulence models where the turbulent Prandtl number is assumed constant. It is concluded that using a model that calculates the turbulent Prandtl number as part of the solution is the key to bridging the gap between theory and experiment for flows dominated by shock wave/boundary layer interactions.

  11. Role of Turbulent Prandtl Number on Heat Flux at Hypersonic Mach Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffney, R. L., Jr.; Xiao, X.; Edwards, J. R.; Hassan, H. A.

    2005-01-01

    A new turbulence model suited for calculating the turbulent Prandtl number as part of the solution is presented. The model is based on a set of two equations: one governing the variance of the enthalpy and the other governing its dissipation rate. These equations were derived from the exact energy equation and thus take into consideration compressibility and dissipation terms. The model is used to study two cases involving shock wave/boundary layer interaction at Mach 9.22 and Mach 5.0. In general, heat transfer prediction showed great improvement over traditional turbulence models where the turbulent Prandtl number is assumed constant. It is concluded that using a model that calculates the turbulent Prandtl number as part of the solution is the key to bridging the gap between theory and experiment for flows dominated by shock wave/boundary layer interactions.

  12. Crossflow effects on the growth rate of inviscid Goertler vortices in a hypersonic boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Yibin; Hall, Philip

    1992-01-01

    The effects of crossflow on the growth rate of inviscid Goertler vortices in a hypersonic boundary layer with pressure gradient are studied. Attention is focused on the inviscid mode trapped in the temperature adjustment layer; this mode has greater growth rate than any other mode. The eigenvalue problem which governs the relationship between the growth rate, the crossflow amplitude, and the wavenumber is solved numerically, and the results are then used to clarify the effects of crossflow on the growth rate of inviscid Goertler vortices. It is shown that crossflow effects on Goertler vortices are fundamentally different for incompressible and hypersonic flows. The neutral mode eigenvalue problem is found to have an exact solution, and as a by-product, we have also found the exact solution to a neutral mode eigenvalue problem which was formulated, but unsolved before, by Bassom and Hall (1991).

  13. Wall catalytic recombination and boundary conditions in nonequilibrium hypersonic flows - With applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.

    1992-01-01

    The meaning of catalysis and its relation to aerodynamic heating in nonequilibrium hypersonic flows are discussed. The species equations are described and boundary conditions for them are derived for a multicomponent gas and for a binary gas. Slip effects are included for application of continuum methods to low-density flows. Measurement techniques for determining catalytic wall recombination rates are discussed. Among them are experiments carried out in arc jets as well as flow reactors. Diagnostic methods for determining the atom or molecule concentrations in the flow are included. Results are given for a number of materials of interest to the aerospace community, including glassy coatings such as the RCG coating of the Space Shuttle and for high temperature refractory metals such as coated niobium. Methods of calculating the heat flux to space vehicles in nonequilibrium flows are described. These methods are applied to the Space Shuttle, the planned Aeroassist Flight Experiment, and a hypersonic slender vehicle such as a transatmospheric vehicle.

  14. Hypersonic Nozzle/Afterbody Experiment: Flow Visualization and Boundary Layer Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keener, Earl R.; Spaid, Frank W.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This study was conducted to experimentally characterize the flow field created by the interaction of a single-expansion-ramp-nozzle (SERN) flow with a hypersonic external stream Data were obtained from a generic nozzle/afterbody model in the 3.5-Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel of the NASA Ames Research Center in a cooperative experimental program involving Ames and the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace. The model design and test planning were performed in close cooperation with members of the Ames computational fluid dynamics (CFD) team for the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) program. This paper presents experimental results consisting of oil-flow and shadowgraph flow-visualization photographs, afterbody surface-pressure distributions, boundary-layer rake measurements, and Preston-tube skin-friction measurements.

  15. Boundary layer study on nozzle wall at hypersonic velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kenneth M.; Dejarnette, Fred R.; Griffith, Wayland C.; Yanta, William J.

    1992-01-01

    The boundary layer on the wall of the Hypervelocity Tunnel 9 was investigated with pitot pressure and total temperature measurements. Experimental results are presented for standard and supercooled Mach 14 runs. The boundary layer data at supercooled conditions are compared to numerical predictions made with a Navier-Stokes algorithm including vibrational nonequilibrium and intermolecular force effects. For standard tunnel conditions, the numerical solutions agree well with experimental data. For the supercooled cases, the numerical code predicts the total temperature but overpredicts the pitot pressure.

  16. Free-Stream Boundaries of Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrsin, Stanley; Kistler, Alan L

    1955-01-01

    Report presents the results of an experimental and theoretical study made of the instantaneously sharp and irregular front which is always found to separate turbulent fluid from contiguous "nonturbulent" fluid at a free-stream boundary. This distinct demarcation is known to give an intermittent character to hot-wire signals in the boundary zone. The overall behavior of the front is described statistically in terms of its wrinkle-amplitude growth and its lateral propagation relative to the fluid as functions of downstream coordinate.

  17. Turbulent Plasmaspheric Boundary Layer: Observables and Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, Evgeny

    2014-10-01

    In situ satellite observations reveal strong lower hybrid/fast magnetosonic turbulence and broadband hiss-like VLF waves in the substorm subauroral geospace at and earthward of the electron plasmasheet boundary. These coincide with subauroral ion drifts/polarization streams (SAID/SAPS) in the plasmasphere and topside ionosphere. SAID/SAPS appear in ~10 min after the substorm onset consistent with the fast propagation of substorm injection fronts. The SAID channel follows the dispersionless cutoff of the energetic electron flux at the plasmapause. This indicates that the cold plasma maintains charge neutrality within the channel, thereby short-circuiting the injected plasma jet (injection fronts over the plasmasphere. Plasma turbulence leads to the circuit resistivity and magnetic diffusion as well as significant electron heating and acceleration. As a result, a turbulent boundary layer forms between the inner edge of the electron plasmasheet and plasmasphere. The SAID/SAPS-related VLF emissions appear to constitute a distinctive subset of substorm/storm-related VLF activity in the region co-located with freshly injected energetic ions inside the plasmasphere. Significant pitch-angle diffusion coefficients suggest that substorm SAID/SAPS-related VLF waves could be responsible for the alteration of the outer radiation belt boundary during (sub)storms. Supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  18. Receptivity of Hypersonic Boundary Layers to Acoustic and Vortical Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakamar, P.; Kegerise, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Boundary layer receptivity to two-dimensional acoustic disturbances at different incidence angles and to vortical disturbances is investigated by solving the Navier-Stokes equations for Mach 6 flow over a 7deg half-angle sharp-tipped wedge and a cone. Higher order spatial and temporal schemes are employed to obtain the solution. The results show that the instability waves are generated in the leading edge region and that the boundary layer is much more receptive to slow acoustic waves as compared to the fast waves. It is found that the receptivity of the boundary layer on the windward side (with respect to the acoustic forcing) decreases when the incidence angle is increased from 0 to 30 degrees. However, the receptivity coefficient for the leeward side is found to vary relatively weakly with the incidence angle. The maximum receptivity is obtained when the wave incident angle is about 20 degrees. Vortical disturbances also generate unstable second modes, however the receptivity coefficients are smaller than that for the acoustic waves. Vortical disturbances first generate the fast acoustic modes and they switch to the slow mode near the continuous spectrum.

  19. PNS calculations for 3-D hypersonic corner flow with two turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Gregory E.; Liou, May-Fun; Benson, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    A three-dimensional parabolized Navier-Stokes code has been used as a testbed to investigate two turbulence models, the McDonald Camarata and Bushnell Beckwith model, in the hypersonic regime. The Bushnell Beckwith form factor correction to the McDonald Camarata mixing length model has been extended to three-dimensional flow by use of an inverse averaging of the resultant length scale contributions from each wall. Two-dimensional calculations are compared with experiment for Mach 18 helium flow over a 4-deg wedge. Corner flow calculations have been performed at Mach 11.8 for a Reynolds number of .67 x 10 to the 6th, based on the duct half-width, and a freestream stagnation temperature of 1750-deg Rankine.

  20. Unsteady heat-flux measurements of second-mode instability waves in a hypersonic flat-plate boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kegerise, Michael A.; Rufer, Shann J.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we report on the application of the atomic layer thermopile (ALTP) heat-flux sensor to the measurement of laminar-to-turbulent transition in a hypersonic flat-plate boundary layer. The centerline of the flat-plate model was instrumented with a streamwise array of ALTP sensors, and the flat-plate model was exposed to a Mach 6 freestream over a range of unit Reynolds numbers. Here, we observed an unstable band of frequencies that are associated with second-mode instability waves in the laminar boundary layer that forms on the flat-plate surface. The measured frequencies, group velocities, phase speeds, and wavelengths of these instability waves are consistent with data previously reported in the literature. Heat flux time series, and the Morlet wavelet transforms of them, revealed the wave-packet nature of the second-mode instability waves. In addition, a laser-based radiative heating system was used to measure the frequency response functions (FRF) of the ALTP sensors used in the wind tunnel test. These measurements were used to assess the stability of the sensor FRFs over time and to correct spectral estimates for any attenuation caused by the finite sensor bandwidth.

  1. Hypersonic Boundary-Layer Transition for X-33 Phase 2 Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Richard A.; Hamilton, Harris H., II; Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Nowak, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    A status review of the experimental and computational work performed to support the X-33 program in the area of hypersonic boundary-layer transition is presented. Global transition fronts are visualized using thermographic phosphor measurements. Results are used to derive transition correlations for "smooth body" and discrete roughness data and a computational tool is developed to predict transition onset for X-33 using these results. The X-33 thermal protection system appears to be conservatively designed for transition effects based on these studies. Additional study is needed to address concerns related to surface waviness. A discussion of future test plans is included.

  2. Turbulence Modeling for Shock Wave/Turbulent Boundary Layer Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillard, Randolph P.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate aerodynamic computational predictions are essential for the safety of space vehicles, but these computations are of limited accuracy when large pressure gradients are present in the flow. The goal of the current project is to improve the state of compressible turbulence modeling for high speed flows with shock wave / turbulent boundary layer interactions (SWTBLI). Emphasis will be placed on models that can accurately predict the separated region caused by the SWTBLI. These flows are classified as nonequilibrium boundary layers because of the very large and variable adverse pressure gradients caused by the shock waves. The lag model was designed to model these nonequilibrium flows by incorporating history effects. Standard one- and two-equation models (Spalart Allmaras and SST) and the lag model will be run and compared to a new lag model. This new model, the Reynolds stress tensor lag model (lagRST), will be assessed against multiple wind tunnel tests and correlations. The basis of the lag and lagRST models are to preserve the accuracy of the standard turbulence models in equilibrium turbulence, when the Reynolds stresses are linearly related to the mean strain rates, but create a lag between mean strain rate effects and turbulence when nonequilibrium effects become important, such as in large pressure gradients. The affect this lag has on the results for SWBLI and massively separated flows will be determined. These computations will be done with a modified version of the OVERFLOW code. This code solves the RANS equations on overset grids. It was used for this study for its ability to input very complex geometries into the flow solver, such as the Space Shuttle in the full stack configuration. The model was successfully implemented within two versions of the OVERFLOW code. Results show a substantial improvement over the baseline models for transonic separated flows. The results are mixed for the SWBLI assessed. Separation predictions are not as good as the

  3. Boundary Layer Transition over Blunt Hypersonic Vehicles Including Effects of Ablation-Induced Out-Gassing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan; Chang, Chau-Lyan; White, Jeffery

    2011-01-01

    Computations are performed to study the boundary layer instability mechanisms pertaining to hypersonic flow over blunt capsules. For capsules with ablative heat shields, transition may be influenced both by out-gassing associated with surface pyrolysis and the resulting modification of surface geometry including the formation of micro-roughness. To isolate the effects of out-gassing, this paper examines the stability of canonical boundary layer flows over a smooth surface in the presence of gas injection into the boundary layer. For a slender cone, the effects of out-gassing on the predominantly second mode instability are found to be stabilizing. In contrast, for a blunt capsule flow dominated by first mode instability, out-gassing is shown to be destabilizing. Analogous destabilizing effects of outgassing are also noted for both stationary and traveling modes of crossflow instability over a blunt sphere-cone configuration at angle of attack.

  4. Computation of unsteady turbulent boundary layers with flow reversal and evaluation of two separate turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, T.; Carr, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure which solves the governing boundary layer equations within Keller's box method was developed for calculating unsteady laminar flows with flow reversal. This method is extended to turbulent boundary layers with flow reversal. Test cases are used to investigate the proposition that unsteady turbulent boundary layers also remain free of singularities. Turbulent flow calculations are performed. The governing equations for both models are solved. As in laminar flows, the unsteady turbulent boundary layers are free from singularities, but there is a clear indication of rapid thickening of the boundary layer with increasing flow reversal. Predictions of both turbulence models are the same for all practical purposes.

  5. Coherent motions in the turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Stephen K.

    1991-01-01

    The role of coherent structures in the production and dissipation of turbulence in a boundary layer is characterized, summarizing the results of recent investigations. Coherent motion is defined as a three-dimensional region of flow where at least one fundamental variable exhibits significant correlation with itself or with another variable over a space or time range significantly larger than the smallest local scales of the flow. Sections are then devoted to flow-visualization experiments, statistical analyses, numerical simulation techniques, the history of coherent-structure studies, vortices and vortical structures, conceptual models, and predictive models. Diagrams and graphs are provided.

  6. Calculation of three-dimensional compressible laminar and turbulent boundary flows. Three-dimensional compressible boundary layers of reacting gases over realistic configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, R. M.; Bonnett, W. S.; Nardo, C. T.; Abbett, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    A three-dimensional boundary-layer code was developed for particular application to realistic hypersonic aircraft. It is very general and can be applied to a wide variety of boundary-layer flows. Laminar, transitional, and fully turbulent flows of compressible, reacting gases are efficiently calculated by use of the code. A body-oriented orthogonal coordinate system is used for the calculation and the user has complete freedom in specifying the coordinate system within the restrictions that one coordinate must be normal to the surface and the three coordinates must be mutually orthogonal.

  7. Structure of turbulence in three-dimensional boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, Chelakara S.

    1993-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the three dimensional turbulent boundary layer concepts and of the currently available experimental information for their turbulence modeling. It is found that more reliable turbulence data, especially of the Reynolds stress transport terms, is needed to improve the existing modeling capabilities. An experiment is proposed to study the three dimensional boundary layer formed by a 'sink flow' in a fully developed two dimensional turbulent boundary layer. Also, the mean and turbulence field measurement procedure using a three component laser Doppler velocimeter is described.

  8. Characteristics of turbulence in boundary layer with zero pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klebanoff, P S

    1955-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of a turbulent boundary layer with zero pressure gradient are presented. Measurements with the hot-wire anemometer were made of turbulent energy and turbulent shear stress, probability density and flattening factor of u-fluctuation (fluctuation in x-direction), spectra of turbulent energy and shear stress, and turbulent dissipation. The importance of the region near the wall and the inadequacy of the concept of local isotropy are demonstrated. Attention is given to the energy balance and the intermittent character of the outer region of the boundary layer. Also several interesting features of the spectral distribution of the turbulent motions are discussed.

  9. The effects of anisotropic free-stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layer behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang-Wei, F.; Hoffman, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of near-isotropic and highly anisotropic free-stream turbulence on mean flow properties of the turbulence structure of turbulent boundary layers in a near zero pressure gradient flow has been experimentally evaluated. Turbulence levels vary from 0.5% to 8.0% and the momentum thickness Reynolds number varies from 800 to 1100. The results indicate that the effects of free-stream turbulence on the classical boundary layer properties for near-isotropic turbulence which have been published by other investigators are similar to the case of highly anisotropic turbulence fields, while the effects of free-stream turbulence on the properties of the turbulent structure within the boundary layer for the case of near-isotropic turbulence are quite different compared to the highly anisotropic case.

  10. A Comparison of Active and Passive Methods for Control of Hypersonic Boundary Layers on Airbreathing Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Nowak, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    Active and passive methods for control of hypersonic boundary layers have been experimentally examined in NASA Langley Research Center wind tunnels on a Hyper-X model. Several configurations for forcing transition using passive discrete roughness elements and active mass addition, or blowing, methods were compared in two hypersonic facilities, the 20-Inch Mach 6 Air and the 31-Inch Mach 10 Air tunnels. Heat transfer distributions, obtained via phosphor thermography, shock system details, and surface streamline patterns were measured on a 0.333-scale model of the Hyper-X forebody. The comparisons between the active and passive methods for boundary layer control were conducted at test conditions that nearly match the nominal Mach 7 flight trajectory of an angle-of-attack of 2-deg and length Reynolds number of 5.6 million. For the passive roughness examination, the primary parametric variation was a range of trip heights within the calculated boundary layer thickness for several trip concepts. The prior passive roughness study resulted in a swept ramp configuration being selected for the Mach 7 flight vehicle that was scaled to be roughly 0.6 of the calculated boundary layer thickness. For the active jet blowing study, the blowing manifold pressure was systematically varied for each configuration, while monitoring the mass flow, to determine the jet penetration height with schlieren and transition movement with the phosphor system for comparison to the passive results. All the blowing concepts tested were adequate for providing transition onset near the trip location with manifold stagnation pressures on the order of 40 times the model static pressure or higher.

  11. Response of a hypersonic boundary layer to freestream pulse acoustic disturbance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenqing; Tang, Xiaojun; Lv, Hongqing

    2014-01-01

    The response of hypersonic boundary layer over a blunt wedge to freestream pulse acoustic disturbance was investigated. The stability characteristics of boundary layer for freestream pulse wave and continuous wave were analyzed comparatively. Results show that freestream pulse disturbance changes the thermal conductivity characteristics of boundary layer. For pulse wave, the number of main disturbance clusters decreases and the frequency band narrows along streamwise. There are competition and disturbance energy transfer among different modes in boundary layer. The dominant mode of boundary layer has an inhibitory action on other modes. Under continuous wave, the disturbance modes are mainly distributed near fundamental and harmonic frequencies, while under pulse wave, the disturbance modes are widely distributed in different modes. For both pulse and continuous waves, most of disturbance modes slide into a lower-growth or decay state in downstream, which is tending towards stability. The amplitude of disturbance modes in boundary layer under continuous wave is considerably larger than pulse wave. The growth rate for the former is also considerably larger than the later the disturbance modes with higher growth are mainly distributed near fundamental and harmonic frequencies for the former, while the disturbance modes are widely distributed in different frequencies for the latter. PMID:24737993

  12. Response of a Hypersonic Boundary Layer to Freestream Pulse Acoustic Disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenqing; Tang, Xiaojun; Lv, Hongqing

    2014-01-01

    The response of hypersonic boundary layer over a blunt wedge to freestream pulse acoustic disturbance was investigated. The stability characteristics of boundary layer for freestream pulse wave and continuous wave were analyzed comparatively. Results show that freestream pulse disturbance changes the thermal conductivity characteristics of boundary layer. For pulse wave, the number of main disturbance clusters decreases and the frequency band narrows along streamwise. There are competition and disturbance energy transfer among different modes in boundary layer. The dominant mode of boundary layer has an inhibitory action on other modes. Under continuous wave, the disturbance modes are mainly distributed near fundamental and harmonic frequencies, while under pulse wave, the disturbance modes are widely distributed in different modes. For both pulse and continuous waves, most of disturbance modes slide into a lower-growth or decay state in downstream, which is tending towards stability. The amplitude of disturbance modes in boundary layer under continuous wave is considerably larger than pulse wave. The growth rate for the former is also considerably larger than the later the disturbance modes with higher growth are mainly distributed near fundamental and harmonic frequencies for the former, while the disturbance modes are widely distributed in different frequencies for the latter. PMID:24737993

  13. Laser-spectroscopic measurement techniques for hypersonic, turbulent wind tunnel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, Robert L.; Fletcher, Douglas G.

    1992-01-01

    A review is given of the nature, present status, and capabilities of two laser spectroscopic methods for the simultaneous measurement of temperature, density, and their fluctuations owing to turbulence in high speed wind tunnel flows. One method is based on the two frequency excitation of nitric oxide seeded into a nitrogen flow, using tunable dye lasers. The second, more recent method relies on the excitation of oxygen in air flows using a tunable, ArF excimer laser. Signal are obtained from both the laser induced fluorescence and from Raman scattering of the same laser pulse. Measurements are demonstrated in the turbulent boundary layer of a Mach-2 channel flow.

  14. Hypersonic Boundary Layer Stability Experiments in a Quiet Wind Tunnel with Bluntness Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lachowicz, Jason T.; Chokani, Ndaona

    1996-01-01

    Hypersonic boundary layer measurements over a flared cone were conducted in a Mach 6 quiet wind tunnel at a freestream unit Reynolds number of 2.82 million/ft. This Reynolds number provided laminar-to-transitional flow over the cone model in a low-disturbance environment. Four interchangeable nose-tips, including a sharp-tip, were tested. Point measurements with a single hot-wire using a novel constant voltage anemometer were used to measure the boundary layer disturbances. Surface temperature and schlieren measurements were also conducted to characterize the transitional state of the boundary layer and to identify instability modes. Results suggest that second mode disturbances were the most unstable and scaled with the boundary layer thickness. The second mode integrated growth rates compared well with linear stability theory in the linear stability regime. The second mode is responsible for transition onset despite the existence of a second mode subharmonic. The subharmonic disturbance wavelength also scales with the boundary layer thickness. Furthermore, the existence of higher harmonics of the fundamental suggests that nonlinear disturbances are not associated with 'high' free stream disturbance levels. Nose-tip radii greater than 2.7% of the base radius completely stabilized the second mode.

  15. Investigations on entropy layer along hypersonic hyperboloids using a defect boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brazier, J. P.; Aupoix, B.; Cousteix, J.

    1992-01-01

    A defect approach coupled with matched asymptotic expansions is used to derive a new set of boundary layer equations. This method ensures a smooth matching of the boundary layer with the inviscid solution. These equations are solved to calculate boundary layers over hypersonic blunt bodies involving the entropy gradient effect. Systematic comparisons are made for both axisymmetric and plane flows in several cases with different Mach and Reynolds numbers. After a brief survey of the entropy layer characteristics, the defect boundary layer results are compared with standard boundary layer and full Navier-Stokes solutions. The entropy gradient effects are found to be more important in the axisymmetric case than in the plane one. The wall temperature has a great influence on the results through the displacement effect. Good predictions can be obtained with the defect approach over a cold wall in the nose region, with a first order solution. However, the defect approach gives less accurate results far from the nose on axisymmetric bodies because of the thinning of the entropy layer.

  16. Hypersonic Boundary Layer Stability over a Flared Cone in a Quiet Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lachowicz, Jason T.; Chokani, Ndaona; Wilkinson, Stephen P.

    1996-01-01

    Hypersonic boundary layer measurements were conducted over a flared cone in a quiet wind tunnel. The flared cone was tested at a freestream unit Reynolds number of 2.82x106/ft in a Mach 6 flow. This Reynolds number provided laminar-to-transitional flow over the model in a low-disturbance environment. Point measurements with a single hot wire using a novel constant voltage anemometry system were used to measure the boundary layer disturbances. Surface temperature and schlieren measurements were also conducted to characterize the laminar-to-transitional state of the boundary layer and to identify instability modes. Results suggest that the second mode disturbances were the most unstable and scaled with the boundary layer thickness. The integrated growth rates of the second mode compared well with linear stability theory in the linear stability regime. The second mode is responsible for transition onset despite the existence of a second mode sub-harmonic. The sub-harmonic wavelength also scales with the boundary layer thickness. Furthermore, the existence of higher harmonics of the fundamental suggests that non-linear disturbances are not associated with high free stream disturbance levels.

  17. Intersecting Shock-Wave/Turbulent Boundary-Layer Interactions at Mach 8.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussoy, M. I.; Horstman, K. C.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental data for two three-dimensional intersecting shock-wave/turbulent boundary-layer interaction flows at Mach 8.3 are presented. The test bodies, composed of two sharp fins fastened to a flat-plate test bed, were designed to generate flows with varying degrees of pressure gradient, boundary-layer separation, and turning angle. The data include surface pressure and heat transfer distributions as well as mean flow-field surveys both in the undisturbed and interaction regimes. The data are presented in a convenient form to be used to validate existing or future computational models of these hypersonic flows. The data are also on a 3.5-inch diskette included and are available through E-mail.

  18. Persistent Structures in the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Dan; Chabalko, Chris

    2005-01-01

    Persistent structures in the turbulent boundary layer are located and analyzed. The data are taken from flight experiments on large commercial aircraft. An interval correlation technique is introduced which is able to locate the structures. The Morlet continuous wavelet is shown to not only locates persistent structures but has the added benefit that the pressure data are decomposed in time and frequency. To better understand how power is apportioned among these structures, a discrete Coiflet wavelet is used to decompose the pressure data into orthogonal frequency bands. Results indicate that some structures persist a great deal longer in the TBL than would be expected. These structure contain significant power and may be a primary source of vibration energy in the airframe.

  19. Laminar superlayer at the turbulence boundary.

    PubMed

    Holzner, M; Lüthi, B

    2011-04-01

    In this Letter we present results from particle tracking velocimetry and direct numerical simulation that are congruent with the existence of a laminar superlayer, as proposed in the pioneering work of Corrsin and Kistler (NACA, Technical Report No. 1244, 1955). We find that the local superlayer velocity is dominated by a viscous component and its magnitude is comparable to the characteristic velocity of the smallest scales of motion. This slow viscous process involves a large surface area so that the global rate of turbulence spreading is set by the largest scales of motion. These findings are important for a better understanding of mixing of mass and momentum in a variety of flows where thin layers of shear exist. Examples are boundary layers, clouds, planetary atmospheres, and oceans. PMID:21517388

  20. Control of turbulent boundary layer flows by sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Whipkey, R. R.; Jones, G. S.

    1983-04-01

    The effects of acoustic excitation on the turbulent boundary-layer characteristics over an airfoil were examined as a function of excitation frequency and level and also flow velocity. The measured data primarily consisted of: (1) lift coefficients, (2) mean velocities and turbulence intensities as measured by a laser velocimeter, and (3) flow visualization. The experiments successfully demonstrated that separation of turbulent boundary layer flows can be controlled by sound in both pre- and post-stall regions. In addition, it was shown that, with high-frequency acoustic excitation, the turbulence levels in the boundary layer at a fixed measurement point can be reduced considerably.

  1. A simplified Reynolds stress model for unsteady turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Sixin; Lakshminarayana, Budugur

    1993-01-01

    A simplified Reynolds stress model has been developed for the prediction of unsteady turbulent boundary layers. By assuming that the net transport of Reynolds stresses is locally proportional to the net transport of the turbulent kinetic energy, the time dependent full Reynolds stress model is reduced to a set of ordinary differential equations. These equations contain only time derivatives and can be readily integrated in a time dependent boundary layer or Navier-Stokes code. The turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate needed for the model are obtained by solving the k-epsilon equations. This simplified Reynolds stress turbulence model (SRSM) does not use the eddy viscosity assumption, which may not be valid for unsteady turbulent flows. The anisotropy of both the steady and the unsteady turbulent normal stresses can be captured by the SRSM model. Through proper damping of the shear stresses, the present model can be used in the near wall region of turbulent boundary layers. This model has been validated against data for steady and unsteady turbulent boundary layers, including periodic turbulent boundary layers subjected to a mean adverse pressure gradient. For the cases tested, the predicted unsteady velocity and turbulent stress components agree well with the experimental data. Comparison between the predictions from the SRSM model and a k-epsilon model is also presented.

  2. Thermal And Chemical Non-Equilibrium Effects In The Wake Of A Boundary-Layer Sized Object In Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birrer, Marcel; Stemmer, Christian; Adams, Nikolaus N.

    2011-05-01

    Investigations of hypersonic boundary-layer flows around a cubical obstacle with a height in the order of half the boundary layer thickness were carried out in this work. Special interest was laid on the influence of chemical non-equilibrium effects on the wake flow of the obstacle. Direct numerical simulations were conducted using three different gas models, a caloric perfect, an equilibrium and a chemical non-equilibrium gas model. The geometry was chosen as a wedge with a six degree half angle, according to the aborted NASA HyBoLT free flight experiment. At 0.5 m downstream of the leading edge, a surface trip was positioned. The free-stream flow was set to Mach 8.5 with air conditions taken from the 1976 standard atmosphere at an altitude of 42 km according to the predicted flight path. The simulations were done in three steps for all models. First, two-dimensional calculations of the whole configuration including the leading edge and the obstacle were conducted. These provide constant span-wise profiles for detailed, steady three-dimensional simulations around the close vicinity of the obstacle. A free-stream Mach number of about 6.3 occurs behind the shock. A cross-section in the wake of the object then delivers the steady inflow for detailed unsteady simulations of the wake. Perturbations at unstable frequencies, obtained from a bi-global secondary stability analysis, were added to these profiles. The solutions are time-Fourier transformed to investigate the unsteady downstream development of the different modes due to the interaction with the base-flow containing two counter-rotating vortices. Results will be presented that show the influence of the presence of chemical non-equilibrium on the instability in the wake of the object leading to a laminar or a turbulent wake.

  3. Effects of Nose Bluntness on Stability of Hypersonic Boundary Layers over Blunt Cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kara, K.; Balakumar, P.; Kandil, O. A.

    2007-01-01

    Receptivity and stability of hypersonic boundary layers are numerically investigated for boundary layer flows over a 5-degree straight cone at a free-stream Mach number of 6.0. To compute the shock and the interaction of shock with the instability waves, we solve the Navier-Stokes equations in axisymmetric coordinates. The governing equations are solved using the 5th-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using third-order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. After the mean flow field is computed, disturbances are introduced at the upstream end of the computational domain. Generation of instability waves from leading edge region and receptivity of boundary layer to slow acoustic waves are investigated. Computations are performed for a cone with nose radii of 0.001, 0.05 and 0.10 inches that give Reynolds numbers based on the nose radii ranging from 650 to 130,000. The linear stability results showed that the bluntness has a strong stabilizing effect on the stability of axisymmetric boundary layers. The transition Reynolds number for a cone with the nose Reynolds number of 65,000 is increased by a factor of 1.82 compared to that for a sharp cone. The receptivity coefficient for a sharp cone is about 4.23 and it is very small, approx.10(exp -3), for large bluntness.

  4. Effects of Nose Bluntness on Hypersonic Boundary-Layer Receptivity and Stability Over Cones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kara, Kursat; Balakumar, Ponnampalam; Kandil, Osama A.

    2011-01-01

    The receptivity to freestream acoustic disturbances and the stability properties of hypersonic boundary layers are numerically investigated for boundary-layer flows over a 5 straight cone at a freestream Mach number of 6.0. To compute the shock and the interaction of the shock with the instability waves, the Navier-Stokes equations in axisymmetric coordinates were solved. In the governing equations, inviscid and viscous flux vectors are discretized using a fifth-order accurate weighted-essentially-non-oscillatory scheme. A third-order accurate total-variation-diminishing Runge-Kutta scheme is employed for time integration. After the mean flow field is computed, disturbances are introduced at the upstream end of the computational domain. The appearance of instability waves near the nose region and the receptivity of the boundary layer with respect to slow mode acoustic waves are investigated. Computations confirm the stabilizing effect of nose bluntness and the role of the entropy layer in the delay of boundary-layer transition. The current solutions, compared with experimental observations and other computational results, exhibit good agreement.

  5. Effects of free-stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with mild adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, J. A.; Kassir, S. M.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of near isotropic free-stream turbulence on the shape factors and skin friction coefficients of turbulent boundary layers is presented for the cases of zero and mild adverse pressure gradients. With free-stream turbulence, improved fluid mixing occurs in boundary layers with adverse pressure gradients relative to the zero pressure gradient condition, with the same free-stream turbulence intensity and length scale. Stronger boundary layers with lower shape factors occur as a result of a lower ratio of the integral scale of turbulence to the boundary layer thickness, and to vortex stretching of the turbulent eddies in the free-stream, both of which act to improve the transmission of momentum from the free-stream to the boundary layers.

  6. The influence of free-stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with mild adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, J. A.; Kassir, S. M.; Larwood, S. M.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of near isotropic free-stream turbulence on the shape factors and skin friction coefficients of turbulent boundary layers is presented for the cases of zero and mild adverse pressure gradients. With free-stream turbulence, improved fluid mixing occurs in boundary layers with adverse pressure gradients relative to the zero pressure gradient condition, with the same free-stream turbulence intensity and length scale. Stronger boundary layers with lower shape factors occur as a result of a lower ratio of the integral scale of turbulence to the boundary layer thickness, and to vortex stretching of the turbulent eddies in the free-stream, both of which act to improve the transmission of momentum from the free-stream to the boundary layers.

  7. Finite-element numerical modeling of atmospheric turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. N.; Kao, S. K.

    1979-01-01

    A dynamic turbulent boundary-layer model in the neutral atmosphere is constructed, using a dynamic turbulent equation of the eddy viscosity coefficient for momentum derived from the relationship among the turbulent dissipation rate, the turbulent kinetic energy and the eddy viscosity coefficient, with aid of the turbulent second-order closure scheme. A finite-element technique was used for the numerical integration. In preliminary results, the behavior of the neutral planetary boundary layer agrees well with the available data and with the existing elaborate turbulent models, using a finite-difference scheme. The proposed dynamic formulation of the eddy viscosity coefficient for momentum is particularly attractive and can provide a viable alternative approach to study atmospheric turbulence, diffusion and air pollution.

  8. Symmetries in Turbulent Boundary Layer Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberlack, M.

    1996-01-01

    The objective is the development of a new theory which enables the algorithmic computation of all self-similar mean velocity profiles. The theory is based on Liegroup analysis and unifies a large set of self-similar solutions for the mean velocity of stationary parallel turbulent shear flows. The results include the logarithmic law of the wall, an algebraic law, the viscous sublayer, the linear region in the middle of a Couette flow and in the middle of a rotating channel flow, and a new exponential mean velocity profile not previously reported. Experimental results taken in the outer parts of a high Reynolds number flat-plate boundary layer, strongly support the exponential profile. From experimental as well as from DNS data of a turbulent channel flow the algebraic scaling law could be confirmed in both the center region and in the near wall region. In the case of the logarithmic law of the wall, the scaling with the wall distance arises as a result of the analysis and has not been assumed in the derivation. The crucial part of the derivation of all the different mean velocity profiles is to consider the invariance of the equation for the velocity fluctuations at the same time as the invariance of the equation for the velocity product equations. The latter is the dyad product of the velocity fluctuations with the equation for the velocity fluctuations. It has been proven that all the invariant solutions are also consistent with similarity of all velocity moment equations up to any arbitrary order.

  9. Experimental measurements of unsteady turbulent boundary layers near separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Investigations conducted to document the behavior of turbulent boundary layers on flat surfaces that separate due to adverse pressure gradients are reported. Laser and hot wire anemometers measured turbulence and flow structure of a steady free stream separating turbulent boundary layer produced on the flow of a wind tunnel section. The effects of sinusoidal and unsteadiness of the free stream velocity on this separating turbulent boundary layer at a reduced frequency were determined. A friction gage and a thermal tuft were developed and used to measure the surface skin friction and the near wall fraction of time the flow moves downstream for several cases. Abstracts are provided of several articles which discuss the effects of the periodic free stream unsteadiness on the structure or separating turbulent boundary layers.

  10. Development of a two-equation turbulence model for hypersonic flows. Volume 1; Evaluation of a low Reynolds number correction to the Kappa - epsilon two equation compressible turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Doyle D.; Becht, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the current research is the development of an improved k-epsilon two-equation compressible turbulence model for turbulent boundary layer flows experiencing strong viscous-inviscid interactions. The development of an improved model is important in the design of hypersonic vehicles such as the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) and the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). Improvements have been made to the low Reynolds number functions in the eddy viscosity and dissipation of solenoidal dissipation of the k-epsilon turbulence mode. These corrections offer easily applicable modifications that may be utilized for more complex geometries. The low Reynolds number corrections are functions of the turbulent Reynolds number and are therefore independent of the coordinate system. The proposed model offers advantages over some current models which are based upon the physical distance from the wall, that modify the constants of the standard model, or that make more corrections than are necessary to the governing equations. The code has been developed to solve the Favre averaged, boundary layer equations for mass, momentum, energy, turbulence kinetic energy, and dissipation of solenoidal dissipation using Keller's box scheme and the Newton spatial marching method. The code has been validated by removing the turbulent terms and comparing the solution with the Blasius solution, and by comparing the turbulent solution with an existing k-epsilon model code using wall function boundary conditions. Excellent agreement is seen between the computed solution and the Blasius solution, and between the two codes. The model has been tested for both subsonic and supersonic flat-plate turbulent boundary layer flow by comparing the computed skin friction with the Van Driest II theory and the experimental data of Weighardt; by comparing the transformed velocity profile with the data of Weighardt, and the Law of the Wall and the Law of the Wake; and by comparing the computed results

  11. Receptivity of Hypersonic Boundary Layers to Acoustic and Vortical Disturbances (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.

    2015-01-01

    Boundary-layer receptivity to two-dimensional acoustic and vortical disturbances for hypersonic flows over two-dimensional and axi-symmetric geometries were numerically investigated. The role of bluntness, wall cooling, and pressure gradients on the receptivity and stability were analyzed and compared with the sharp nose cases. It was found that for flows over sharp nose geometries in adiabatic wall conditions the instability waves are generated in the leading-edge region and that the boundary layer is much more receptive to slow acoustic waves as compared to the fast waves. The computations confirmed the stabilizing effect of nose bluntness and the role of the entropy layer in the delay of boundary layer transition. The receptivity coefficients in flows over blunt bodies are orders of magnitude smaller than that for the sharp cone cases. Wall cooling stabilizes the first mode strongly and destabilizes the second mode. However, the receptivity coefficients are also much smaller compared to the adiabatic case. The adverse pressure gradients increased the unstable second mode regions.

  12. Total temperature probes for high-temperature hypersonic boundary-layer measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albertson, Cindy W.; Bauserman, Willard A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The design and test results of two types of total temperature probes that were used for hypersonic boundary-layer measurements are presented. The intent of each design was to minimize the total error and to maintain minimal size for measurements in boundary layers 1.0 in. thick and less. A single platinum-20-percent-rhodium shield was used in both designs to minimize radiation heat transfer losses during exposure to the high-temperature test stream. The shield of the smaller design was flattened at the flow entrance to an interior height of 0.02 in., compared with 0.03 in. for the larger design. The resulting vent-to-inlet area ratios were 60 and 50 percent. A stainless steel structural support sleeve that was used in the larger design was excluded from the smaller design, which resulted in an outer diameter of 0.059 in., to allow closer placement of the probes to each other and to the wall. These small design changes to improve resolution did not affect probe performance. Tests were conducted at boundary-layer-edge Mach numbers of 5.0 and 6.2. The nominal free-stream total temperatures were 2600 degrees and 3200 degrees R. The probes demonstrated extremely good reliability. The best performance in terms of recovery factor occurred when the wire-based Nusselt number was at least 0.04. Recommendations for future probe designs are included.

  13. Crossing turbulent boundaries: interfacial flux in environmental flows.

    PubMed

    Grant, Stanley B; Marusic, Ivan

    2011-09-01

    Advances in the visualization and prediction of turbulence are shedding new light on mass transfer in the turbulent boundary layer. These discoveries have important implications for many topics in environmental science and engineering, from the transport of earth-warming CO2 across the sea-air interface, to nutrient processing and sediment erosion in rivers, lakes, and the ocean, to pollutant removal in water and wastewater treatment systems. In this article we outline current understanding of turbulent boundary layer flows, with particular focus on coherent turbulence and its impact on mass transport across the sediment-water interface in marine and freshwater systems. PMID:21793569

  14. An investigation of turbulence structure in a low-Reynolds-number incompressible turbulent boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, B. R.; Strataridakis, C. J.

    1987-01-01

    An existing high turbulence intensity level (5%) atmospheric boundary-layer wind tunnel has been successfully converted to a relatively low level turbulence (0.3%) wind tunnel through extensive modification, testing, and calibration. A splitter plate was designed, built, and installed into the wind-tunnel facility to create thick, mature, two-dimensional turbulent boundary layer flow at zero pressure gradient. Single and cross hot-wire measurements show turbulent boundary layer characteristics of good quality with unusually large physical size, i.e., viscous sublayer of the order of 1 mm high. These confirm the potential ability of the tunnel to be utilized for future high-quality near-wall turbulent boundary layer measurements. It compares very favorably with many low turbulence research tunnels.

  15. The influence of free-stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with mild adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, Jon A.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of near isotropic free-stream turbulence on the shape factors and skin friction coefficients of turbulent bounday layers is presented for the cases of zero and mild adverse pressure gradients. With free-stream turbulence, improved fluid mixing occurs in boundary layers with adverse pressure gradients relative to the zero pressure gradient condition, with the same free-stream turbulence intensity and length scale. Stronger boundary layers with lower shape factors occur as a result of a lower ratio of the integral scale of turbulence to the boundary layer thickness, and to vortex stretching of the turbulent eddies in the free stream, both of which act to improve the transmission of momentum from the free stream to the boundary layers.

  16. Characteristics of turbulent spots in transitional boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marxen, Olaf; Zaki, Tamer

    2015-11-01

    The laminar-turbulent transition process in a flat-plate boundary layer beneath free-stream turbulence takes place through the inception and spreading of confined patches of turbulence in an otherwise laminar flow. These patches, also referred to as turbulent spots, result from a secondary instability of the Klebanoff streaks in the pre-transitional region. The dynamics of turbulence in the spots are investigated by analyzing data sets obtained from direct numerical simulations. Conditionally-averaged and spot-ensemble-averaged statistics are evaluated and describe the flow in the intermittent transition zone. Both mean-flow and disturbance root mean square levels obtained from conditional averaging agree very well with results for fully turbulent flows, in particular near the wall and at high intermittency levels. At relatively low intermittency, the spatial inhomogeneity of turbulence within the spots is important, and is examined using ensemble averaging of turbulent patches that have comparable volume and a similar streamwise location.

  17. The Effect of Freestream Turbulence on a Rough Surface Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzek, Brian; Torres-Nieves, Sheilla; Lebron-Bosques, Jose; Cal, Raul; Meneveau, Charles; Castillo, Luciano

    2007-11-01

    Measurements are performed in the Stanley Corrsin Wind Tunnel Facility at The Johns Hopkins University to study the effects of freestream turbulence on a rough surface turbulent boundary layer. The upstream turbulence was generated with the use of an active grid, resulting in freestream turbulence levels of 6.2 % and 5.2 %. The effects of the freestream turbulence on this rough surface, alter the mean velocity deficit profiles. The effects of freestream turbulence are identifiable in the streamwise Reynolds stress profiles throughout the entire boundary layer, but not necessarily for the wall-normal and shear stress profiles. The reduced velocity gradient reduced the production term in the streamwise Reynolds stress despite the increase in the profiles. Thus, an important mechanism becomes the turbulent diffusion from the freestream turbulence as it relates to the Reynolds stress equations.

  18. Effects of Crack on Heat Flux in Hypersonic Shock/Boundary-Layer Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Hiroshi; Hanai, Katsuhisa; Kitamura, Keiichi; Mori, Koichi; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    A small crack on body surface led to a tragic accident in 2003, which is the Columbia accident. During the shuttle's re-entry, high temperature gas penetrated crack on leading-edge of the left wing and melted the aluminum structure, finally the Columbia blew up. Since early times, there are many fundamental studies about simple cavity-flow formed on body surface in hypersonic speeds. However, an investigation of Shock/Boundary-Layer Interaction (SBLI) on crack has not been researched. For multistage space transportation vehicle such as TSTO, SBLI is an inevitable problem, and then SBLI on crack becomes a critical issue for TSTO development. In this study, the effects of crack, where SBLI occurs, were investigated for TSTO hypersonic speed (M∞ = 8.1). A square crack locates at SBLI point on the TSTO booster. Results show that a crack and its depth strongly effect on peak heat flux and aerodynamic interaction flow-field. In the cases of shallow crack (d/C ≤ 0.10), there exist two high heat flux regions on crack floor, which locates at a flow reattachment region and a back end wall of crack. In this case, a peak heat flux at flow reattachment region becomes about 2 times as large as the stagnation point heat flux, which value becomes larger compared with a peak heat flux in the case of No-Crack TSTO. While in the case of deep crack (d/C = 0.20), overall heat flux on crack floor decreases to below the stagnation point heat flux. These results provide useful data for a development of TSTO thermal protection system (TPS) such as thermal protection tile.

  19. PLIF Visualization of Active Control of Hypersonic Boundary Layers Using Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Alderfer, David W.; Berry, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging was used to visualize the boundary layer flow on a 1/3-scale Hyper-X forebody model. The boundary layer was perturbed by blowing out of orifices normal to the model surface. Two blowing orifice configurations were used: a spanwise row of 17-holes spaced at 1/8 inch, with diameters of 0.020 inches and a single-hole orifice with a diameter of 0.010 inches. The purpose of the study was to visualize and identify laminar and turbulent structures in the boundary layer and to make comparisons with previous phosphor thermography measurements of surface heating. Jet penetration and its influence on the boundary layer development was also examined as was the effect of a compression corner on downstream boundary layer transition. Based upon the acquired PLIF images, it was determined that global surface heating measurements obtained using the phosphor thermography technique provide an incomplete indicator of transitional and turbulent behavior of the corresponding boundary layer flow. Additionally, the PLIF images show a significant contribution towards transition from instabilities originating from the underexpanded jets. For this experiment, a nitric oxide/nitrogen mixture was seeded through the orifices, with nitric oxide (NO) serving as the fluorescing gas. The experiment was performed in the 31-inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center.

  20. Investigations on the turbulent wake of a generic space launcher geometry in the hypersonic flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saile, D.; Gülhan, A.; Henckels, A.; Glatzer, C.; Statnikov, V.; Meinke, M.

    2013-06-01

    The turbulent wake flow of generic rocket configurations is investigated experimentally and numerically at a freestream Mach number of 6.0 and a unit Reynolds number of 10·106 m-1. The flow condition is based on the trajectory of Ariane V-like launcher at an altitude of 50 km, which is used as the baseline to address the overarching tasks of wake flows in the hypersonic regime like fluid-structural coupling, reverse hot jets and base heating. Experimental results using pressure transducers and the high-speed Schlieren measurement technique are shown to gain insight into the local pressure fluctuations on the base and the oscillations of the recompression shock. This experimental configuration features a wedgeprofiled strut orthogonally mounted to the main body. Additionally, the influence of cylindrical dummy nozzles attached to the base of the rocket is investigated, which is the link to the numerical investigations. Here, the axisymmetric model possesses a cylindrical sting support of the same diameter as the dummy nozzles. The sting support allows investigations for an undisturbed wake flow. A time-accurate zonal Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes/Large Eddy Simulation (RANS/LES) approach is applied to identify shocks, expansion waves, and the highly unsteady recompression region numerically. Subsequently, experimental and numerical results in the strut-averted region are compared with regard to the wall pressure and recompression shock frequency spectra. For the compared configurations, experimental pressure spectra exhibit dominant Strouhal numbers at about SrD = 0.03 and 0.27, and the recompression shock oscillates at 0.2. In general, the pressure and recompression shock fluctuations numerically calculated agree reasonably with the experimental results. The experiments with a blunt base reveal base-pressure spectra with dominant Strouhal numbers at 0.08 at the center position and 0.145, 0.21-0.22, and 0.31-0.33 at the outskirts of the base.

  1. Laminarization model for turbulent eddy transport in highly accelerated nozzle turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, J. F.; Boldman, D. R.; Todd, C.

    1972-01-01

    A laminarization model which consists of a completely laminar sublayer region near the wall and a turbulent wake region is developed for the turbulent eddy transport in accelerated turbulent boundary layers. This laminarization model is used in a differential boundary layer calculation which was applied to nozzle flows. The resulting theoretical velocity profiles are in good agreement with the experimental nozzle data in the convergent region.

  2. Numerical simulation of shock/turbulent boundary layer interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, Sedat; Hatay, Ferhat F.

    1993-01-01

    Most flows of aerodynamic interest are compressible and turbulent. However, our present knowledge on the structures and mechanisms of turbulence is mostly based on incompressible flows. In the present work, compressibility effects in turbulent, high-speed, boundary layer flows are systematically investigated using the Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) approach. Three-dimensional, time-dependent, fully nonlinear, compressible Navier-Stokes equations were numerically integrated by high-order finite-difference methods; no modeling for turbulence is used during the solution because the available resolution is sufficient to capture the relevant scales. The boundary layer problem deals with fully-turbulent compressible flows over flat geometries. Apart from its practical relevance to technological flows, turbulent compressible boundary layer flow is the simplest experimentally realizable turbulent compressible flow. Still, measuring difficulties prohibit a detailed experimental description of the flow, especially in the near-wall region. DNS studies provide a viable means to probe the physics of compressible turbulence in this region. The focus of this work is to explore the paths of energy transfer through which compressible turbulence is sustained. The structural similarities and differences between the incompressible and compressible turbulence are also investigated. The energy flow patterns or energy cascades are found to be directly related to the evolution of vortical structures which are generated in the near-wall region. Near-wall structures, and mechanisms which are not readily accessible through physical experiments are analyzed and their critical role on the evolution and the behavior of the flow is documented extensively.

  3. On the determination of the position of laminar-turbulent transition in boundary layer by optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bountin, D. A.; Gromyko, Yu. V.; Maslov, A. A.; Polivanov, P. A.; Sidorenko, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    As a rule, aerodynamic studies at hypersonic flow velocities are carried out in short-duration wind-tunnel facilities. For such facilities, optical diagnostic methods are most preferable. In the present study, we give for the first time a comparison of two methods for determining the end of laminar-turbulent transition: from the distribution of heat fluxes and from schlieren visualization data for the boundary-layer flow. Parametric data on the position of the transition are obtained. These data can be used in the future as reference ones while calibrating semi-empirical calculation models for the transition.

  4. A study of boundary layer transition on outgassing cones in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalmach, C. J., Jr.; Bertin, J. J.; Pope, T. C.; Mccloskey, M. H.

    1971-01-01

    Surface heat-transfer rates and pressures were measured at hypersonic speeds on sharp cones at zero angle of attack with and without gas injection. Using the non-injection results for reference data the effects on heating and transition location of surface roughness and injectant rate, distribution and composition were determined. The transition location was sensitive to the injectant distribution. The transition Reynolds numbers were significantly greater when the injectant distribution was constant than with a variable distribution. The measured heat-transfer distribution were also strongly dependent upon the injectant distribution. Transition Reynolds number results obtained during this program with a variable injectant distribution were correlated with a limited amount of data available for a degrading model tested in a different facility. Transitional data with constant injectant distribution were correlated with earlier results. An empirical correlation of heat-transfer reduction due to gas injection in turbulent flow was developed for both distributions tested. Several effects of mass addition on heating and transition, which have been earlier reported, were observed.

  5. Analysis of Instabilities in Non-Axisymmetric Hypersonic Boundary Layers Over Cones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; White, Jeffery A.

    2010-01-01

    Hypersonic flows over circular cones constitute one of the most important generic configurations for fundamental aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic studies. In this paper, numerical computations are carried out for Mach 6 flows over a 7-degree half-angle cone with two different flow incidence angles and a compression cone with a large concave curvature. Instability wave and transition-related flow physics are investigated using a series of advanced stability methods ranging from conventional linear stability theory (LST) and a higher-fidelity linear and nonlinear parabolized stability equations (PSE), to the 2D eigenvalue analysis based on partial differential equations. Computed N factor distribution pertinent to various instability mechanisms over the cone surface provides initial assessments of possible transition fronts and a guide to corresponding disturbance characteristics such as frequency and azimuthal wave numbers. It is also shown that strong secondary instability that eventually leads to transition to turbulence can be simulated very efficiently using a combination of advanced stability methods described above.

  6. Experiments on hypersonic boundary layer transition on blunt cones with acoustic-absorption coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiplyuk, A.; Lukashevich, S.; Bountin, D.; Maslov, A.; Knaus, H.

    2012-01-01

    The laminar-turbulent transition is studied experimentally on a cone with an acoustic-absorption coating and with different nose bluntness in a high-speed flow. The acoustic-absorption coating is a felt metal sheet with a random microstructure. Experiments were carried out on a 1-meter length 7 degree cone at free-stream Mach number M = 8 and zero angle of attack. Locations of the laminar-turbulent transition are detected using heat flux distributions registered by calorimeter sensors. In addition, boundary layer pulsations are measured by means of ultrafast heat flux sensors. It is shown that the laminar-turbulent transition is caused by the second-mode instability, and the laminar run extends as the bluntness is increased. The porous coating effectively suppresses this instability for all tested bluntness values and 1.3-1.85 times extends the laminar run.

  7. Modeling turbulent boundary layers in adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, Stephen E.

    1991-01-01

    Many of the turbulent layers encountered in practical flows develop in adverse pressure gradients; hence, the dynamics of the thickening and possible separation of the boundary layer has important implications for design practices. What are the key physical processes that govern how a turbulent boundary layer responds to an adverse pressure gradient, and how should these processes be modeled? Despite the ubiquity of such flows in engineering and nature, these equations remain largely unanswered. The turbulence closure models presently used to describe these flows commonly use 'wall functions' that have ad hoc corrections for the effects of pressure gradients. There is, therefore, a practical and theoretical need to examine the effects of adverse pressure gradients on wall bounded turbulent flows in order to develop models based on sound physical principle. The evolution of a turbulent boundary layer on a flat wall with an externally imposed pressure gradient is studied.

  8. Turbulence and diffusion in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskett, Ronald L.

    1990-05-01

    This conference addressed recent theoretical advancements of turbulence and diffusion in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). Activities were centered on the technical sessions of the conference. Sessions addressed clouds and the marine atmospheric boundary layer, field experimental techniques, physical and numerical simulations, transport and diffusion, surface properties, general boundary layer, stratified turbulence and turbulence in complex terrain. A jointly authored poster on an evaluation of the ARAC emergency response models with and without on-site sound detection and ranging systems (sodars) which measure vertical wind profiles was presented. Several scientists commented on our work and some requested further information. In addition, there was a workshop on dispersion around groups of buildings and a tour of Riso National Laboratory. Developments relevant to our work included work on dispersion model evaluation, especially using Monte Carlo random walk techniques, parameterizations of mixing height and turbulence from remote sensing systems such as sodars and radars, and measurements and parameterizations of enhanced turbulence around groups of buildings.

  9. Receptivity of hypersonic boundary layer due to fast-slow acoustics interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jun; Luo, Ji-Sheng; Wu, Xue-Song

    2015-12-01

    The objective of receptivity is to investigate the mechanisms by which external disturbances generate unstable waves. In hypersonic boundary layers, a new receptivity process is revealed, which is that fast and slow acoustics through nonlinear interaction can excite the second mode near the lower-branch of the second mode. They can generate a sum-frequency disturbance though nonlinear interaction, which can excite the second mode. This receptivity process is generated by the nonlinear interaction and the nonparallel nature of the boundary layer. The receptivity coefficient is sensitive to the wavenumber difference between the sum-frequency disturbance and the lower-branch second mode. When the wavenumber difference is zero, the receptivity coefficient is maximum. The receptivity coefficient decreases with the increase of the wavenumber difference. It is also found that the evolution of the sum-frequency disturbance grows linearly in the beginning. It indicates that the forced term generated by the sum-frequency disturbance resonates with the second mode.

  10. Schlieren-based techniques for investigating instability development and transition in a hypersonic boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurence, S. J.; Wagner, A.; Hannemann, K.

    2014-08-01

    Three variants of schlieren techniques are employed to investigate the development of second-mode instability waves in the hypersonic boundary layer of a slender cone in a reflected shock tunnel. First, a previously proposed technique using high frame rate (i.e., at least as high as the dominant instability frequency) schlieren visualization with a continuous light source is shown to provide repeatable measurements of the instability propagation speed and frequency. A modified version of the technique is then introduced whereby a pulsed light source allows the use of a higher-resolution camera with a lower frame rate: this provides significant benefits in terms of spatial resolution and total recording time. A detailed picture of the surface-normal intensity distribution for individual wave packets is obtained, and the images provide comprehensive insight into the unsteady flow structures within the boundary layer. Finally, two-point schlieren deflectometry is implemented and shown to be capable of providing second-mode growth information in the challenging shock tunnel environment.

  11. Real gas scale effects on hypersonic laminar boundary-layer parameters including effects of entropy-layer swallowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. C., Jr.; Martindale, W. R.; Mayne, A. W., Jr.; Marchand, E. O.

    1976-01-01

    Inviscid and viscous (laminar boundary-layer) flow-field calculations under perfect gas hypersonic wind tunnel and equilibrium real gas flight conditions are presented for the windward centerline of the Rockwell International 139 Space Shuttle Orbiter at a 30-deg angle of attack. Correlation parameters for laminar boundary-layer edge quantities and surface heat transfer are developed which properly account for entropy-layer-swallowing effects under both real and perfect gas conditions. Some implications of the proposed correlation parameters on boundary-layer transition are discussed.

  12. Trip-Induced Transition Measurements in a Hypersonic Boundary Layer Using Molecular Tagging Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Jones, Stephen B.; Johansen, Craig T.; Goyne, Christopher P.

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of mean streamwise velocity, fluctuating streamwise velocity, and instantaneous streamwise velocity profiles in a hypersonic boundary layer were obtained over a 10-degree half-angle wedge model. A laser-induced fluorescence-based molecular tagging velocimetry technique was used to make the measurements. The nominal edge Mach number was 4.2. Velocity profiles were measured both in an untripped boundary layer and in the wake of a 4-mm diameter cylindrical tripping element centered 75.4 mm downstream of the sharp leading edge. Three different trip heights were investigated: k = 0.53 mm, k = 1.0 mm and k = 2.0 mm. The laminar boundary layer thickness at the position of the measurements was approximately 1 mm, though the exact thickness was dependent on Reynolds number and wall temperature. All of the measurements were made starting from a streamwise location approximately 18 mm downstream of the tripping element. This measurement region continued approximately 30 mm in the streamwise direction. Additionally, measurements were made at several spanwise locations. An analysis of flow features show how the magnitude, spatial location, and spatial growth of streamwise velocity instabilities are affected by parameters such as the ratio of trip height to boundary layer thickness and roughness Reynolds number. The fluctuating component of streamwise velocity measured along the centerline of the model increased from approximately 75 m/s with no trip to +/-225 m/s with a 0.53-mm trip, and to +/-240 m/s with a 1-mm trip, while holding the freestream Reynolds number constant. These measurements were performed in the 31-inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  13. Three-Dimensional Turbulent Boundary Layer With Adverse Pressure Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driver, David M.; Hebbar, Sheshagiri K.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes experiment to measure effects of adverse pressure gradient on three-dimensional turbulent boundary-layer flow; effect of streamwise gradient of pressure on crossflow of particular interest. Production of turbulent kinetic energy grows rapidly in vicinity of step as result of steep mean-flow velocity gradients. Dissipation grows less quickly than production; leading to net growth with distance along streamline.

  14. Calculation of compressible nonadiabatic boundary layers in laminar, transitional and turbulent flow by the method of integral relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, G. D.

    1971-01-01

    A computer program was developed to do the calculations for two-dimensional or axisymmetric configurations from low speeds to hypersonic speeds with arbitrary streamwise pressure, temperature, and Mach number distributions. Options are provided for obtaining initial conditions either from experimental information or from a theoretical similarity solution. The transition region can be described either by an arbitrary distribution of intermittency or by a function based on Emmons' probability theory. Correlations were developed for use in estimating the parameters of the theoretical intermittency function. Correlations obtained from other sources are used for estimating the transition point. Comparisons were made between calculated and measured boundary layer quantities for laminar, transitional, and turbulent flows on flat plates, cones, cone flares, and a waisted body of revolution. Excellent agreement was obtained between the present theory and two other theories based on the method of finite differences. The intermittency required to reproduce some experimental heat transfer results in hypersonic flow was found to be quite different from the theoretical function. It is suggested that the simple probability theory of Emmons may not be valid for representing the intermittency of hypersonic transitional boundary layers and that the program could be useful as a tool for detailed study of the intermittency of the transition region.

  15. Onset of turbulent mean dynamics in boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamman, Curtis; Sayadi, Taraneh; Moin, Parviz

    2012-11-01

    Statistical properties of turbulence in low Reynolds number boundary layers are compared. Certain properties are shown to approach an asymptotic state resembling higher Reynolds number flow much earlier during transition than previously thought. This incipient turbulence is less stochastic and more organized than developed turbulence farther downstream, but the mean dynamics and production mechanisms are remarkably similar. The onset of turbulence in our recent simulations is also similar to that observed in the bypass transition of Wu & Moin where continuous freestream turbulence, rather than small-amplitude linear waves, triggers transition. For these inflow disturbances, self-sustaining turbulence occurs rapidly after laminar flow breakdown without requiring a significant development length nor significant randomization. Slight disagreements with FST-induced bypass transition are observed that correlate with the extra strain a turbulent freestream would impose upon the near-wall dynamics. Nevertheless, the turbulence statistics are similar shortly after the skin-friction overshoot independent of upstream receptivity. This early onset of deterministic turbulence provides support for reduced-order modeling of turbulent boundary layers based on non-linear stability mechanisms.

  16. Turbulent Boundary Layer in High Rayleigh Number Convection in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    du Puits, Ronald; Li, Ling; Resagk, Christian; Thess, André; Willert, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Flow visualizations and particle image velocimetry measurements in the boundary layer of a Rayleigh-Bénard experiment are presented for the Rayleigh number Ra =1.4×1010. Our visualizations indicate that the appearance of the flow structures is similar to ordinary (isothermal) turbulent boundary layers. Our particle image velocimetry measurements show that vorticity with both positive and negative sign is generated and that the smallest flow structures are 1 order of magnitude smaller than the boundary layer thickness. Additional local measurements using laser Doppler velocimetry yield turbulence intensities up to I=0.4 as in turbulent atmospheric boundary layers. From our observations, we conclude that the convective boundary layer becomes turbulent locally and temporarily although its Reynolds number Re ≈200 is considerably smaller than the value 420 underlying existing phenomenological theories. We think that, in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection, the transition of the boundary layer towards turbulence depends on subtle details of the flow field and is therefore not universal.

  17. Assessment of One- and Two-Equation Turbulence Models for Hypersonic Transitional Flows

    SciTech Connect

    ROY,CHRISTOPHER J.; BLOTTNER,FREDERICK G.

    2000-01-14

    Many Navier-Stokes codes require that the governing equations be written in conservation form with a source term. The Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model was originally developed in substantial derivative form and when rewritten in conservation form, a density gradient term appears in the source term. This density gradient term causes numerical problems and has a small influence on the numerical predictions. Further work has been performed to understand and to justify the neglect of this term. The transition trip term has been included in the one-equation eddy viscosity model of Spalart-Allmaras. Several problems with this model have been discovered when applied to high-speed flows. For the Mach 8 flat plate boundary layer flow with the standard transition method, the Baldwin-Barth and both k-{omega} models gave transition at the specified location. The Spalart-Allmaras and low Reynolds number k-{var_epsilon} models required an increase in the freestream turbulence levels in order to give transition at the desired location. All models predicted the correct skin friction levels in both the laminar and turbulent flow regions. For Mach 8 flat plate case, the transition location could not be controlled with the trip terms as given in the Spalart-Allmaras model. Several other approaches have been investigated to allow the specification of the transition location. The approach that appears most appropriate is to vary the coefficient that multiplies the turbulent production term in the governing partial differential equation for the eddy viscosity (Method 2). When this coefficient is zero, the flow remains laminar. The coefficient is increased to its normal value over a specified distance to crudely model the transition region and obtain fully turbulent flow. While this approach provides a reasonable interim solution, a separate effort should be initiated to address the proper transition procedure associated with the turbulent production term. Also, the transition process

  18. Numerical Simulation of a Spatially Evolving Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatski, T. B.; Erlebacher, G.

    2002-01-01

    The results from direct numerical simulations of a spatially evolving, supersonic, flat-plate turbulent boundary-layer flow, with free-stream Mach number of 2.25 are presented. The simulated flow field extends from a transition region, initiated by wall suction and blowing near the inflow boundary, into the fully turbulent regime. Distributions of mean and turbulent flow quantities are obtained and an analysis of these quantities is performed at a downstream station corresponding to Re(sub x)= 5.548 x10(exp 6) based on distance from the leading edge.

  19. On the growth of turbulent regions in laminar boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gad-El-hak, M.; Riley, J. J.; Blackwelder, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    Turbulent spots evolving in a laminar boundary layer on a nominally zero pressure gradient flat plate are investigated. The plate is towed through an 18 m water channel, using a carriage that rides on a continuously replenished oil film giving a vibrationless tow. Turbulent spots are initiated using a solenoid valve that ejects a small amount of fluid through a minute hole on the working surface. A novel visualization technique that utilizes fluorescent dye excited by a sheet of laser light is employed. Some new aspects of the growth and entrainment of turbulent spots, especially with regard to lateral growth, are inferred from the present experiments. To supplement the information on lateral spreading, a turbulent wedge created by placing a roughness element in the laminar boundary layer is also studied both visually and with probe measurements. The present results show that, in addition to entrainment, another mechanism is needed to explain the lateral growth characteristics of a turbulent region in a laminar boundary layer. This mechanism, termed growth by destabilization, appears to be a result of the turbulence destabilizing the unstable laminar boundary layer in its vicinity. To further understand the growth mechanisms, the turbulence in the spot is modulated using drag-reducing additives and salinity stratification.

  20. Turbulence in the convective boundary layer observed by microwave interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, X.M.; Carlos, R.C.; Kirkland, M.W.

    1997-12-01

    A 9-antenna, 400 meter microwave interferometer was utilized in SALSA MEX on the San Pedro River area in July and August, 1997, to measure the turbulence in the Convective Boundary Layer. Water vapor has an appreciable index of refraction at radio frequencies around 10 GHz, and acts as a passive tracer of the magnitude and motion of turbulence. The relative phase changes of a signal from a satellite were tracked by an array of 9 antennas, and the phase differences between antennas were then used to derive the turbulence properties of the boundary layer. Preliminary analysis shows clearly different characteristics for the convection activity of the boundary layer between day and night. From the structure function analysis they can see that the turbulence structure starts to decorrelate at scale sizes of 200 meters for a temporal passband around 100 seconds. Derivation of average wind fields is currently in process.

  1. Rarefied hypersonic flow simulations using the Navier-Stokes equations with non-equilibrium boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenshields, Christopher J.; Reese, Jason M.

    2012-07-01

    This paper investigates the use of Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations with non-equilibrium boundary conditions (BCs) for simulation of rarefied hypersonic flows. It revisits a largely forgotten derivation of velocity slip and temperature jump by Patterson, based on Grad's moment method. Mach 10 flow around a cylinder and Mach 12.7 flow over a flat plate are simulated using both computational fluid dynamics using the temperature jump BCs of Patterson and Smoluchowski and the direct simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) method. These flows exhibit such strongly non-equilibrium behaviour that, following Patterson's analysis, they are strictly beyond the range of applicability of the BCs. Nevertheless, the results using Patterson's temperature jump BC compare quite well with the DSMC and are consistently better than those using the standard Smoluchowski temperature jump BC. One explanation for this better performance is that an assumption made by Patterson, based on the flow being only slightly non-equilibrium, introduces an additional constraint to the resulting BC model in the case of highly non-equilibrium flows.

  2. Stability of Hypersonic Boundary Layers on a Cone at an Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.; Owens, Lewis R.

    2010-01-01

    The stability and receptivity of a three-dimensional hypersonic boundary layer over a 7deg half-angle straight cone at an angle of attack of 6deg is numerically investigated at a freestream Mach number of 6.0 and a Reynolds number of 10.4x10(exp 6)/m. The generation and evolution of stationary crossflow vortices are also investigated by performing simulations with three-dimensional roughness elements located on the surface of the cone. The flow fields with and without the roughness elements are obtained by solving the full Navier- Stokes equations in cylindrical coordinates using a fifth-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for spatial discretization and a third-order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for temporal integration. Stability computations produced azimuthal wavenumbers in the range of m approx. 20-50 for the most amplified traveling disturbances and in the range of m approx.30-70 for the stationary disturbances. The frequency of the unstable second-mode ranges from 400 kHz to 900 kHz along the windward ray. The N-Factor computations predicted transition would occur more forward on the sides of the cone as compared to the transition fronts near the windward and the leeward rays. The simulations also show the crossflow vortices originating from the nose region propagate towards the leeward ray. No perturbations were observed toward the windward half of the cone.

  3. Use of shear-stress-sensitive, temperature-insensitive liquid crystals for hypersonic boundary-layer transition detection

    SciTech Connect

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Croll, R.H.; Kuntz, D.W.

    1997-04-01

    The use of shear-stress-sensitive, temperature-insensitive (SSS/TI) liquid crystals (LCs) has been evaluated as a boundary-layer transition detection technique for hypersonic flows. Experiments were conducted at Mach 8 in the Sandia National Laboratories Hypersonic Wind Tunnel using a flat plate model at near zero-degree angle of attack over the freestream unit Reynolds number range 1.2-5.8x10{sup 6}/ft. Standard 35mm color photography and Super VHS color video were used to record LC color changes due to varying surface shear stress during the transition process for a range of commercial SSS liquid crystals. Visual transition data were compared to an established method using calorimetric surface heat-transfer measurements to evaluate the LC technique. It is concluded that the use of SSS/TI LCs can be an inexpensive, safe, and easy to use boundary-layer transition detection method for hypersonic flows. However, a valid interpretation of the visual records requires careful attention to illumination intensity levels and uniformity, lighting and viewing angles, some prior understanding of the general character of the flow, and the selection of the appropriate liquid crystal for the particular flow conditions.

  4. Comparing Experiment and Computation of Hypersonic Laminar Boundary Layers with Isolated Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Iyer, Prahladh S.; Mahesh, Krishnan; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Johansen, Craig T.

    2014-01-01

    Streamwise velocity profile behavior in a hypersonic laminar boundary layer in the presence of an isolated roughness element is presented for an edge Mach number of 8.2. Two different roughness element types are considered: a 2-mm tall, 4-mm diameter cylinder, and a 2-mm radius hemisphere. Measurements of the streamwise velocity behavior using nitric oxide (NO) planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV) have been performed on a 20-degree wedge model. The top surface of this model acts as a flat-plate and is oriented at 5 degrees with respect to the freestream flow. Computations using direct numerical simulation (DNS) of these flows have been performed and are compared to the measured velocity profiles. Particular attention is given to the characteristics of velocity profiles immediately upstream and downstream of the roughness elements. In these regions, the streamwise flow can experience strong deceleration or acceleration. An analysis in which experimentally measured MTV profile displacements are compared with DNS particle displacements is performed to determine if the assumption of constant velocity over the duration of the MTV measurement is valid. This assumption is typically made when reporting MTV-measured velocity profiles, and may result in significant errors when comparing MTV measurements to computations in regions with strong deceleration or acceleration. The DNS computations with the cylindrical roughness element presented in this paper were performed with and without air injection from a rectangular slot upstream of the cylinder. This was done to determine the extent to which gas seeding in the MTV measurements perturbs the boundary layer flowfield.

  5. Turbulent boundary layer of an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fediaevsky, K

    1937-01-01

    A need has arisen for a new determination of the velocity profiles in the boundary layer. Assuming that the character of the velocity distribution depends to a large extent on the character of the shear distribution across the boundary layer, we shall consider the nature of the shear distribution for a boundary layer with a pressure gradient.

  6. Laminar-turbulent transition calculations of heat transfer at hypersonic Mach numbers over sharp cones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, U. K.

    1988-01-01

    Computations of the hypersonic flow around sharp cones were carried out using the PNS code with attention given to the heat transfer predictions around the transition region. Results of calculations performed over 5, 8, and 10 deg half-angle sharp cones in the Mach number range of 7 to 10 are presented. It is noted that calculations of this type have become an integral part of the general design procedure for hypersonic vehicles such as the National Aerospace Plane and the Space Shuttle.

  7. Microbubble formulation and splitting in a turbulent boundary layer for turbulence reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, James C. S.; Uhlman, James S., Jr.

    The mechanisms which dominate during bubble formation in a turbulent boundary layer are analytically studied. The relationships among the gas ejection rate, pore diameter, and liquid flow speed are qualitatively established. The role of these parameters in turbulence reduction is examined.

  8. Laminarization of Turbulent Boundary Layer on Flexible and Rigid Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    2001-01-01

    An investigation of the control of turbulent boundary layer flow over flexible and rigid surfaces downstream of a concave-convex geometry has been made. The concave-convex curvature induces centrifugal forces and a pressure gradient on the growth of the turbulent boundary layer. The favorable gradient is not sufficient to overcome the unfavorable; thus, the net effect is a destabilizing, of the flow into Gortler instabilities. This study shows that control of the turbulent boundary layer and structural loading can be successfully achieved by using localized surface heating because the subsequent cooling and geometrical shaping downstream over a favorable pressure gradient is effective in laminarization of the turbulence. Wires embedded in a thermally insulated substrate provide surface heating. The laminarized velocity profile adjusts to a lower Reynolds number, and the structure responds to a lower loading. In the laminarization, the turbulent energy is dissipated by molecular transport by both viscous and conductivity mechanisms. Laminarization reduces spanwise vorticity because of the longitudinal cooling gradient of the sublayer profile. The results demonstrate that the curvature-induced mean pressure gradient enhances the receptivity of the flow to localized surface heating, a potentially viable mechanism to laminarize turbulent boundary layer flow; thus, the flow reduces the response of the flexible structure and the resultant sound radiation.

  9. Investigation of the three-dimensional turbulent flow downstream of swept slot injection in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hefner, J. N.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Bushnell, D. M.

    1974-01-01

    Results of an experimental and numerical investigation of tangential swept slot injection (sweep angles of 22.5 and 45 deg) into a thick turbulent boundary layer at Mach 6 are presented. Film cooling effectiveness, skin friction, and flow structure downstream of the swept slot injection are investigated. The data are compared to that for unswept slots, and it is found that cooling effectiveness and skin-friction reductions are not significantly affected by sweeping the slot. Predictions of cooling effectiveness and skin friction obtained by a numerical finite-difference technique agree reasonably well with experimental surface variables. As in previous supersonic two-dimensional slot research, reduced mixing was found downstream of the slot lip in the present three-dimensional case.

  10. Turbulence models for compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, P. G.; Bradshaw, P.; Coakley, T. J.

    1994-01-01

    It is shown that to satisfy the general accepted compressible law of the wall derived from the Van Driest transformation, turbulence modeling coefficients must actually be functions of density gradients. The transformed velocity profiles obtained by using standard turbulence model constants have too small a value of the effective von Karman constant kappa in the log-law region (inner layer). Thus, if the model is otherwise accurate, the wake component is overpredicted and the predicted skin friction is lower than the expected value.

  11. Vorticity interaction effects on blunt bodies. [hypersonic viscous shock layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, E. C.; Wilcox, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the viscous shock layer equations governing laminar and turbulent flows of a perfect gas and radiating and nonradiating mixtures of perfect gases in chemical equilibrium are presented for hypersonic flow over spherically blunted cones and hyperboloids. Turbulent properties are described in terms of the classical mixing length. Results are compared with boundary layer and inviscid flowfield solutions; agreement with inviscid flowfield data is satisfactory. Agreement with boundary layer solutions is good except in regions of strong vorticity interaction; in these flow regions, the viscous shock layer solutions appear to be more satisfactory than the boundary layer solutions. Boundary conditions suitable for hypersonic viscous shock layers are devised for an advanced turbulence theory.

  12. Turbulent boundary layers with secondary flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grushwitz, E.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental analysis of the boundary layer on a plane wall, along which the flow occurs, whose potential flow lines are curved in plane parallel to the wall is discussed. According to the equation frequently applied to boundary layers in a plane flow, which is usually obtained by using the pulse law, a generalization is derived which is valid for boundary layers with spatial flow. The wall shear stresses were calculated with this equation.

  13. Turbulence structures in a strongly decelerated boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gungor, Ayse G.; Maciel, Yvan; Simens, Mark P.

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics of three-dimensional intense Reynolds shear stress structures (Qs) are presented from a direct numerical simulation of an adverse pressure gradient boundary layer at Reθ = 1500 -2175. The intense Q2 (ejections) and Q4 (sweeps) structures separate into two groups: wall-attached and wall-detached structures. In the region where turbulent activity is maximal, between 0 . 2 δ and 0 . 6 δ , 94 % of the structures are detached structures. In comparison to canonical wall flows, the large velocity defect turbulent boundary layers are less efficient in extracting turbulent energy from the mean flow. There is, furthermore, much less turbulence activity and less velocity coherence near the wall. Additionally, the wall-detached structures are more frequent and carry a much larger amount of Reynolds shear stress. Funded in part by ITU, NSERC of Canada, and Multiflow program of the ERC.

  14. A review of unsteady turbulent boundary-layer experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    The essential results of a comprehensive review of existing unsteady turbulent boundary-layer experiments are presented. Different types of unsteady flow facilities are described, and the related unsteady turbulent boundary-layer experiments are cataloged and discussed. The measurements that were obtained in the various experiments are described, and a complete list of experimental results is presented. All the experiments that measured instantaneous values of velocity, turbulence intensity, or turbulent shear stress are identified, and the availability of digital data is indicated. The results of the experiments are analyzed, and several significant trends are identified. An assessment of the available data is presented, delineating gaps in the existing data, and indicating where new or extended information is needed. Guidelines for future experiments are included. Previously announced in STAR as N81-29382

  15. A review of unsteady turbulent boundary-layer experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    The essential results of a comprehensive review of existing unsteady turbulent boundary-layer experiments are presented. Different types of unsteady flow facilities are described, and the related unsteady turbulent boundary-layer experiments are cataloged and discussed. The measurements that were obtained in the various experiments are described, and a complete list of experimental results is presented. All the experiments that measured instantaneous values of velocity, turbulence intensity, or turbulent shear stress are identified, and the availability of digital data is indicated. The results of the experiments are analyzed, and several significant trends are identified. An assessment of the available data is presented, delineating gaps in the existing data, and indicating where new or extended information is needed. Guidelines for future experiments are included.

  16. Calculation of compressible adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Alston, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    Difficulties encountered in computing profile shapes in supersonic turbulent boundary layers with large pressure gradients, which result from a disagreement between data and theory, are investigated. Possible reasons given by various authors for this disagreement are discussed. Initial results seem to indicate that conventional reasons do not account for the observed difficulties. However, inclusion of the effect of curvature upon turbulent mixing has brought an improvement in calculations. Possible three-dimensional effects are also examined.

  17. Heat transfer to the transpired turbulent boundary layer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kays, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    This paper contains a summarization of five years work on an investigation on heat transfer to the transpired turbulent boundary layer. Experimental results are presented for friction coefficient and Stanton number over a wide range of blowing and suction for the case of constant free-stream velocity, holding certain blowing parameters constant. The problem of the accelerated turbulent boundary layer with transpiration is considered, experimental data are presented and discussed, and theoretical models for solution of the momentum equation under these conditions are presented. Data on turbulent Prandtl number are presented so that solutions to the energy equation may be obtained. Some examples of boundary layer heat transfer and friction coefficient predictions are presented using one of the models discussed, employing a finite difference solution method.

  18. Hypersonic Boundary Layer Measurements with Variable Blowing Rates Using Molecular Tagging Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Johansen, Craig T.; Jones, Stephen B.; Goyne, Christopher P.

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of mean and instantaneous streamwise velocity profiles in a hypersonic boundary layer with variable rates of mass injection (blowing) of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) were obtained over a 10-degree half-angle wedge model. The NO2 was seeded into the flow from a slot located 29.4 mm downstream of the sharp leading edge. The top surface of the wedge was oriented at a 20 degree angle in the Mach 10 flow, yielding an edge Mach number of approximately 4.2. The streamwise velocity profiles and streamwise fluctuating velocity component profiles were obtained using a three-laser NO2->NO photolysis molecular tagging velocimetry method. Observed trends in the mean streamwise velocity profiles and profiles of the fluctuating component of streamwise velocity as functions of the blowing rate are described. An effort is made to distinguish between the effect of blowing rate and wall temperature on the measured profiles. An analysis of the mean velocity profiles for a constant blowing rate is presented to determine the uncertainty in the measurement for different probe laser delay settings. Measurements of streamwise velocity were made to within approximately 120 gm of the model surface. The streamwise spatial resolution in this experiment ranged from 0.6 mm to 2.6 mm. An improvement in the spatial precision of the measurement technique has been made, with spatial uncertainties reduced by about a factor of 2 compared to previous measurements. For the quiescent flow calibration measurements presented, uncertainties as low as 2 m/s are obtained at 95% confidence for long delay times (25 gs). For the velocity measurements obtained with the wind tunnel operating, average single-shot uncertainties of less than 44 m/s are obtained at 95% confidence with a probe laser delay setting of 1 gs. The measurements were performed in the 31-inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  19. Turbulence Structure in Rough and Smooth Wall Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volino, Ralph; Schultz, Michael; Flack, Karen

    2006-11-01

    The outer region structure of turbulent boundary layers on smooth and rough walls was studied experimentally. Turbulence spectra were computed from LDV data. Velocity fields were computed from PIV data. Instantaneous swirl strength fields were computed from the velocity fields. The heads of hairpin vortices grouped as packets were visible in the streamwise wall normal plane, and the legs of these vortices were visible along the length of low speed streaks in streamwise spanwise planes at y/δ=0.1 and 0.4. These structures, observed previously in smooth wall boundary layers, were qualitatively similar in the rough and smooth wall cases. Two point correlations of the velocity and swirl strength were quantitatively similar for the smooth and rough walls. The turbulence spectra and probability density functions of the turbulence and swirl strength also showed quantitative similarity between the rough and smooth wall cases when the results were normalized using the friction velocity and the boundary layer thickness. This similarity in turbulence structure is in agreement with the similarity in turbulence statistics reported previously.

  20. Turbulence studies in Tokamak boundary plasmas with realistic divertor geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.Q.

    1998-10-14

    Results are presented from the 3D nonlocal electromagnetic turbulence code BOUT [1] and the linearized shooting code BAL[2] to study turbulence in tokamak boundary plasmas and its relationship to the L-H transition, in a realistic divertor plasma geometry. The key results include: (1) the identification of the dominant, resistive X-point mode in divertor geometry and (2) turbulence suppression in the L-H transition by shear in the ExB drift speed, ion diamagnetism and finite polarization. Based on the simulation results, a parameterization of the transport is given that includes the dependence on the relevant physical parameters.

  1. Combustion-turbulence interaction in the turbulent boundary layer over a hot surface

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, T.T.; Cheng, R.K.; Robben, F.; Talbot, L.

    1982-01-01

    The turbulence-combustion interaction in a reacting turbulent boundary layer over a heated flat plate was studied. Ethylene/air mixture with equivalence ratio of 0.35 was used. The free stream velocity was 10.5 m/s and the wall temperature was 1250/sup 0/K. Combustion structures visualization was provided by high-speed schlieren photographs. Fluid density statistics were deduced from Rayleigh scattering intensity measurements. A single-component laser Doppler velocimetry system was used to obtain mean and root-mean-square velocity distributions, the Reynolds stress, the streamwise and the cross-stream turbulent kinetic energy diffusion, and the production of turbulent kinetic energy by Reynolds stress. The combustion process was dominated by large-scale turbulent structures of the boundary layer. Combustion causes expansion of the boundary layer. No overall self-similarity is observed in either the velocity or the density profiles. Velocity fluctuations were increased in part of the boundary layer and the Reynolds stress was reduced. The turbulent kinetic energy diffusion pattern was changed significantly and a modification of the boundary layer assumption will be needed when dealing with this problem analytically. 11 figures, 1 table.

  2. Finite-Difference Solution for Laminar or Turbulent Boundary Layer Flow over Axisymmetric Bodies with Ideal Gas, CF4, or Equilibrium Air Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, H. Harris, II; Millman, Daniel R.; Greendyke, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    A computer code was developed that uses an implicit finite-difference technique to solve nonsimilar, axisymmetric boundary layer equations for both laminar and turbulent flow. The code can treat ideal gases, air in chemical equilibrium, and carbon tetrafluoride (CF4), which is a useful gas for hypersonic blunt-body simulations. This is the only known boundary layer code that can treat CF4. Comparisons with experimental data have demonstrated that accurate solutions are obtained. The method should prove useful as an analysis tool for comparing calculations with wind tunnel experiments and for making calculations about flight vehicles where equilibrium air chemistry assumptions are valid.

  3. Mixing length in low Reynolds number compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Holley, B. B.

    1975-01-01

    The paper studies the effect of low Reynolds number in high-speed turbulent boundary layers on variations of mixing length. Boundary layers downstream of natural transition on plates, cones and cylinders, and boundary layers on nozzle walls without laminarization-retransition are considered. The problem of whether low Reynolds number amplification of shear stress is a result of transitional flow structure is considered. It is concluded that a knowledge of low Reynolds number boundary layer transition may be relevant to the design of high-speed vehicles.

  4. An experimental investigation of turbulent boundary layers along curved surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, R. M. C.; Mellor, G. L.

    1972-01-01

    A curved wall tunnel was designed, and an equilibrium turbulent boundary layer was set up on the straight section preceding the curved test section. Turbulent boundary layer flows with uniform and adverse pressure distributions along convex and concave walls were investigated. Hot-wire measurements along the convex surface indicated that turbulent mixing between fluid layers was very much reduced. However, the law of the wall held and the skin friction, thus determined, correlated well with other measurements. Hot-wire measurements along the concave test wall revealed a system of longitudinal vortices inside the boundary layer and confirmed that concave curvature enhances mixing. A self-consistent set of turbulent boundary layer equations for flows along curved surfaces was derived together with a modified eddy viscosity. Solution of these equations together with the modified eddy viscosity gave results that correlated well with the present data on flows along the convex surface with arbitrary pressure distribution. However, it could only be used to predict the mean characteristics of the flow along concave walls because of the existence of the system of longitudinal vortices inside the boundary layer.

  5. Direct Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guarini, Stephen; Moser, R.; Shariff, K.; Wray, A.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The talk will present some initial results from the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of compressible turbulent boundary layers. We solve numerically the compressible Navier-Stokes equations using a method based on Spalart's transformation for the incompressible turbulent boundary layer. This allows the spatially developing boundary layer to be transformed to a calculation with periodic boundary conditions in the streamwise and spanwise directions. The equations are solved using Fourier expansions in the horizontal directions and B-splines in the wall-normal direction. The first simulation is at Mach 2.5 with a momentum thickness Reynolds number based on wall viscosity of R(sub theta(sup 1)) = 825. We are examining the physics of the compressible boundary layer using turbulence statistics and budget equations. The turbulence statistics include: rms (root mean square) and mean profiles, energy spectra, and two-point correlations. It is found that there are large density gradients which require significantly more resolution than the incompressible case.

  6. Uncertainty Propagation in Hypersonic Vehicle Aerothermoelastic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamorte, Nicolas Etienne

    Hypersonic vehicles face a challenging flight environment. The aerothermoelastic analysis of its components requires numerous simplifying approximations. Identifying and quantifying the effect of uncertainties pushes the limits of the existing deterministic models, and is pursued in this work. An uncertainty quantification framework is used to propagate the effects of identified uncertainties on the stability margins and performance of the different systems considered. First, the aeroelastic stability of a typical section representative of a control surface on a hypersonic vehicle is examined. Variability in the uncoupled natural frequencies of the system is modeled to mimic the effect of aerodynamic heating. Next, the stability of an aerodynamically heated panel representing a component of the skin of a generic hypersonic vehicle is considered. Uncertainty in the location of transition from laminar to turbulent flow and the heat flux prediction is quantified using CFD. In both cases significant reductions of the stability margins are observed. A loosely coupled airframe--integrated scramjet engine is considered next. The elongated body and cowl of the engine flow path are subject to harsh aerothermodynamic loading which causes it to deform. Uncertainty associated with deformation prediction is propagated to the engine performance analysis. The cowl deformation is the main contributor to the sensitivity of the propulsion system performance. Finally, a framework for aerothermoelastic stability boundary calculation for hypersonic vehicles using CFD is developed. The usage of CFD enables one to consider different turbulence conditions, laminar or turbulent, and different models of the air mixture, in particular real gas model which accounts for dissociation of molecules at high temperature. The system is found to be sensitive to turbulence modeling as well as the location of the transition from laminar to turbulent flow. Real gas effects play a minor role in the

  7. Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Compression Corners and Hypersonic Inlet Flows Using the RPLUS2D Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, Kamlesh; Anderson, Bernhard H.; Shaw, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    A two-dimensional computational code, PRLUS2D, which was developed for the reactive propulsive flows of ramjets and scramjets, was validated for two-dimensional shock-wave/turbulent-boundary-layer interactions. The problem of compression corners at supersonic speeds was solved using the RPLUS2D code. To validate the RPLUS2D code for hypersonic speeds, it was applied to a realistic hypersonic inlet geometry. Both the Baldwin-Lomax and the Chien two-equation turbulence models were used. Computational results showed that the RPLUS2D code compared very well with experimentally obtained data for supersonic compression corner flows, except in the case of large separated flows resulting from the interactions between the shock wave and turbulent boundary layer. The computational results compared well with the experiment results in a hypersonic NASA P8 inlet case, with the Chien two-equation turbulence model performing better than the Baldwin-Lomax model.

  8. An Experimental Investigation of Wall-Cooling Effects on Hypersonic Boundary-Layer Stability in a Quiet Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Alan E.; Selby, Gregory V.

    1996-01-01

    One of the primary reasons for developing quiet tunnels is for the investigation of high-speed boundary-layer stability and transition phenomena without the transition-promoting effects of acoustic radiation from tunnel walls. In this experiment, a flared-cone model under adiabatic- and cooled-wall conditions was placed in a calibrated, 'quiet' Mach 6 flow and the stability of the boundary layer was investigated using a prototype constant-voltage anemometer. The results were compared with linear-stability theory predictions and good agreement was found in the prediction of second-mode frequencies and growth. In addition, the same 'N=10' criterion used to predict boundary-layer transition in subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flows was found to be applicable for the hypersonic flow regime as well. Under cooled-wall conditions, a unique set of continuous spectra data was acquired that documents the linear, nonlinear, and breakdown regions associated with the transition of hypersonic flow under low-noise conditions.

  9. Interacting turbulent boundary layer over a wavy wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polak, A.; Werle, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    The two dimensional supersonic flow of a thick turbulent boundary layer over a train of relatively small wave-like protuberances is considered. The flow conditions and the geometry are such that there exists a strong interaction between the viscous and inviscid flow. The problem cannot be solved without inclusion of interaction effects due to the occurrence of the separation singularity in classical boundary layer methods. The interacting boundary layer equations are solved numerically using a time-like relaxation method with turbulence effects represented by the inclusion of the eddy viscosity model. Results are presented for flow over a train of up to six waves for Mach numbers of 10 and 32 million/meter, and wall temperature rations (T sub w/T sub 0) of 0.4 and 0.8. Limited comparisons with independent experimental and analytical results are also given. Detailed results on the influence of small protuberances on surface heating by boundary layers are presented.

  10. Laminar Turbulent Transition in a Boundary Layer Subjected to Weak Free Stream Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenchi, Toshiaki; Matsubara, Masaharu; Ikeda, Toshihiko

    For revealing the transition process in a flat plate boundary layer subjected to a weak free stream turbulence, flow visualization and hot-wire measurements were performed. A weak free stream turbulence was generated by a turbulence grid mounted upstream of the contraction. The flow visualization clearly displayed a transition scenario in which a local two-dimensional wave packet rapidly forms a Λ shape structure and then breaks down to turbulence, resulting in the generation of a turbulent spot. Quantitative measurements performed by using a hot-wire anemometer also confirmed the existence of local Tollmien-Schlichting waves that agreed with the parallel linear theory in terms of their frequency, phase velocity, and the wall-normal distribution of band-pass-filtered fluctuations. For comparison, a boundary layer subjected to a moderate-intensity free stream turbulence was investigated. This investigation showed that streaky structures play an important role in the boundary layer transition, as shown by Matsubara et al. [J. Fluid Mech., 430, (2001), 149-168.] A drastic change occurred in the transition process and this change could be sensitively determined by employing the intensity and/or spectra of the free stream turbulence.

  11. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent thermal boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Hojin; Choi, Haecheon; Lee, Joon Sik

    2000-10-01

    In this paper, a method of generating realistic turbulent temperature fluctuations at a computational inlet is proposed and direct numerical simulations of turbulent thermal boundary layers developing on a flat plate with isothermal and isoflux wall boundary conditions are carried out. Governing equations are integrated using a fully implicit fractional-step method with 352×64×128 grids for the Reynolds number of 300, based on the free-stream velocity and the inlet momentum thickness, and the Prandtl number of 0.71. The computed Stanton numbers for the isothermal and isoflux walls are in good agreement with power-law relations without transient region from the inlet. The mean statistical quantities including root-mean-square temperature fluctuations, turbulent heat fluxes, turbulent Prandtl number, and skewness and flatness of temperature fluctuations agree well with existing experimental and numerical data. A quadrant analysis is performed to investigate the coherence between the velocity and temperature fluctuations. It is shown that the behavior of the wall-normal heat flux is similar to that of the Reynolds shear stress, indicating close correlation between the streamwise velocity and temperature. The effect of different thermal boundary conditions at the wall on the near-wall turbulence statistics is also discussed.

  12. Anisotropic Mesh Adaptivity for Turbulent Flows with Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitale, Kedar C.

    Turbulent flows are found everywhere in nature and are studied, analyzed and simulated using various experimental and numerical tools. For computational analysis, a variety of turbulence models are available and the accuracy of these models in capturing the phenomenon depends largely on the mesh spacings, especially near the walls, in the boundary layer region. Special semi-structured meshes called "mesh boundary layers" are widely used in the CFD community in simulations of turbulent flows, because of their graded and orthogonal layered structure. They provide an efficient way to achieve very fine and highly anisotropic mesh spacings without introducing poorly shaped elements. Since usually the required mesh spacings to accurately resolve the flow are not known a priori to the simulations, an adaptive approach based on a posteriori error indicators is used to achieve an appropriate mesh. In this study, we apply the adaptive meshing techniques to turbulent flows with a focus on boundary layers. We construct a framework to calculate the critical wall normal mesh spacings inside the boundary layers based on the flow physics and the knowledge of the turbulence model. This approach is combined with numerical error indicators to adapt the entire flow region. We illustrate the effectiveness of this hybrid approach by applying it to three aerodynamic flows and studying their superior performance in capturing the flow structures in detail. We also demonstrate the capabilities of the current developments in parallel boundary layer mesh adaptation by applying them to two internal flow problems. We also study the application of adaptive boundary layer meshes to complex geometries like multi element wings. We highlight the advantage of using such techniques for superior wake and tip region resolution by showcasing flow results. We also outline the future direction for the adaptive meshing techniques to be useful to the large scale flow computations.

  13. Energy dissipating structures in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farge, Marie; Nguyen van Yen, Romain; Schneider, Kai

    2011-11-01

    We present numerical experiments of a dipole crashing into a wall, a generic event in two-dimensional incompressible flows with solid boundaries. The Reynolds number Re is varied from 985 to 7880, and no-slip boundary conditions are approximated by Navier boundary conditions with a slip length proportional to Re-1 . Energy dissipation is shown to first set up within a vorticity sheet of thickness proportional to Re-1 in the neighborhood of the wall, and to continue as this sheet rolls up into a spiral and detaches from the wall. The energy dissipation rate integrated over these regions appears to converge towards Rey -independent values, indicating the existence of energy dissipating structures that persist in the vanishing viscosity limit. Details can be found in Nguyen van yen, Farge and Schneider, PRL, 106, 184502 (2011).

  14. Structure of rough-wall turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Watson, Ralph D.

    1988-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that, in rough-wall turbulent boundary layers, drag varies systematically with the spanwise aspect ratio lambda(z) (span/height) of roughness elements. In this paper, the effect of lambda(z) on turbulence structure has been examined. Based on lambda(z), the roughness in a transversely grooved surface with lambda(z) much greater than 1 is the opposite extreme of model plant canopies with lambda(z) much less than 1, studied in wind tunnels, whereas sandgrain is an intermediate type. Second-, third-, and fourth-order turbulence moments have been measured in turbulent boundary layers over transversely grooved and smooth surfaces and compared with available turbulence structure measurements over other types of surfaces. The near-wall turbulence structure is found to vary with lambda(z). The instantaneous motions involved in the flux of shear stress near the wall in smooth and transversely grooved surfaces are opposite in sign to those in three-dimensional roughness. The former is explained in terms of hairpin vortices alone, while the latter group is modeled to have an additional vortex (the so-called necklace vortex which straddles a three-dimensional roughness element near its base).

  15. Dynamic Boundary Layer Properties in Turbulent Thermal Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ke-Qing; Har Cheung, Yin; Sun, Chao

    2004-11-01

    We report an experimental study on the properties of the velocity and temperature boundary layers in turbulent thermal convection in a rectangular-shaped box over a range of Rayleigh numbers and at a constant Prandtl number. Velocity components both parallel and perpendicular to the conducting plate are measured simultaneously using the PIV technique. Our results show that, for the given geometry of the cell, the velocity boundary layer at the conduction plate is of a Blasius type, i.e. the boundary layer thickness δv scales with the Reynolds number Re as δv ˜ Re-1/2. The measurement further reveals that, at the velocity boundary layer, the turbulent (Reynolds) shear tress becomes larger than the viscous shear stress when Ra reaches 1-2×10^10, indicating that the boundary layer becomes turbulent for Ra >10^10. The viscous dissipation rate calculated based on the measured velocity field shows that it is dominated by contribution from the bulk over that from the boundary layer.

  16. Boundary Layer Theory. Part 2; Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlichting, H.

    1949-01-01

    The flow laws of the actual flows at high Reynolds numbers differ considerably from those of the laminar flows treated in the preceding part. These actual flows show a special characteristic, denoted as turbulence. The character of a turbulent flow is most easily understood the case of the pipe flow. Consider the flow through a straight pipe of circular cross section and with a smooth wall. For laminar flow each fluid particle moves with uniform velocity along a rectilinear path. Because of viscosity, the velocity of the particles near the wall is smaller than that of the particles at the center. i% order to maintain the motion, a pressure decrease is required which, for laminar flow, is proportional to the first power of the mean flow velocity. Actually, however, one oberves that, for larger Reynolds numbers, the pressure drop increases almost with the square of the velocity and is very much larger then that given by the Hagen Poiseuille law. One may conclude that the actual flow is very different from that of the Poiseuille flow.

  17. Direct numerical simulation of supersonic turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarini, Stephen

    The objectives of this research were to develop a method by which the spatially developing compressible turbulent boundary layer could be simulated using a temporally developing numerical simulation and to study the physics of the compressible turbulent boundary layer. We take advantage of the technique developed by Spalart (1987, 1988) for the incompressible case. In this technique, it is recognized that the boundary layer exhibits slow growth in the streamwise direction, so the turbulence can be treated as approximately homogeneous in this direction. The slow growth is accounted for with a coordinate transformation and a multiple scale analysis. The result is a modified system of equations (Navier-Stokes plus some extra terms, which we call "slow growth terms") that are homogeneous in both the streamwise and spanwise directions and represent the state of the boundary layer at a given streamwise location (or, equivalently, a given thickness). The compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a mixed Fourier and B-spline "spectral" method. The dependent variables are expanded in terms of a Fourier representation in the horizontal directions and a B-spline representation in the wall-normal direction. In the wall-normal direction non-reflecting boundary conditions are used at the freestream boundary, and zero-heat-flux no-slip boundary conditions are used at the wall. This combination of splines and Fourier methods produces a very accurate numerical method. Mixed implicit/explicit time discretization is used. Results are presented for a case with a Mach number of 2.5, and a Reynolds number, based on momentum integral thickness and wall viscosity, of Rsb{thetasp'} = 840. The results show that the van Driest transformed velocity satisfies the incompressible scalings and a narrow logarithmic region is obtained. The results for the turbulence intensities compare well with the incompressible simulations of Spalart. Pressure fluctuations are found to be higher than

  18. Boundary layer loss sensitivity study using a modified ICRPG turbulent boundary layer computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omori, S.; Krebsbach, A.; Gross, K. W.

    1972-01-01

    Modifications of the turbulent boundary layer (TBL) computer program refer to a more accurate representation of boundary layer edge conditions, internal calculation of the Prandtl number, a changed friction coefficient relationship, and computation of the performance degradation. Important input parameters of the modified TBL program such as wall temperature distribution, Prandtl number, Stanton number, and velocity profile exponent were changed and the individual effects on significant boundary layer parameters, heat transfer, and performance degradation are described.

  19. The Turbulent Boundary Layer on a Rough Curvilinear Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Droblenkov, V. F.

    1958-01-01

    A number of semiempirical approximate methods exist for determining the characteristics of the turbulent boundary layer on a curvilinear surface. At present, among these methods, the one proposed by L. G. Loitsianskii is given frequent practical application. This method is sufficiently effective and permits, in the case of wing profiles with technically smooth surfaces, calculating the basic characteristics of the boundary layer and the values of the overall drag with an accuracy which suffices for practical purposes. The idea of making use of the basic integral momentum equation ((d delta(sup xx))/dx) + ((V' delta(sup xx))/V) (2 + H) = (tau(sub 0))/(rho V(exp 2)) proves to be fruitful also for the solution of the problems in the determination of the characteristics of the turbulent boundary layer on a rough surface.

  20. Modeling Disturbance Dynamics in Transitional and Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, C. E.; Gatski, T. B. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The dynamics of an ensemble of linear disturbances in boundary-layer flows at various Reynolds numbers is studied through an analysis of the transport equations for the mean disturbance kinetic energy and energy dissipation rate. Effects of adverse and favorable pressure-gradients on the disturbance dynamics are also included in the analysis. Unlike the fully turbulent regime where nonlinear phase scrambling of the fluctuations affects the flow field even in proximity to the wall, the early stage transition regime fluctuations studied here are influenced across the boundary layer by the solid boundary. In addition, the dominating dynamics in the disturbance kinetic energy equation is governed by the energy production, pressure-transport and viscous diffusion - also in contrast to the fully turbulent regime. For the disturbance dissipation rate, a dynamic balance exists between the destruction and diffusion of dissipation.

  1. On the theory of the turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rotta, J

    1953-01-01

    As a rule, a division of the turbulent boundary layer is admissible: a division into a part near the wall, where the flow is governed only by the wall effects, and into an outer part, where the wall roughness and the viscosity of the flow medium affects only the wall shearing stress occurring as boundary condition but does not exert any other influence on the flow. Both parts may be investigated to a large extent independently. Under certain presuppositions there result for the outer part "similar" solutions. The theoretical considerations give a cue how to set up, by appropriate experiments and their evaluation, generally valid connections which are required for the approximate calculation of the turbulent boundary layer according to the momentum and energy theorem.

  2. A Simple Method for Determining Heat Transfer, Skin Friction, and Boundary-Layer Thickness for Hypersonic Laminar Boundary-Layer Flows in a Pressure Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertram, Mitchel H.; Feller, William V.

    1959-01-01

    A procedure based on the method of similar solutions is presented by which the skin friction, heat transfer, and boundary-layer thickness in a laminar hypersonic flow with pressure gradient may be rapidly evaluated if the pressure distribution is known. This solution, which at present is. restricted to power-law variations of pressure with surface distance, is presented for a wide range of exponents in the power law corresponding to both favorable and adverse pressure gradients. This theory has been compared to results from heat-transfer experiments on blunt-nose flat plates and a hemisphere cylinder at free-stream Mach numbers of 4 and 6.8. The flat-plate experiments included tests made at a Mach number of 6.8 over a range of angle of attack of +/- 10 deg. Reasonable agreement of the experimental and theoretical heat-transfer coefficients has been obtained as well as good correlation of the experimental results over the entire range of angle of attack studied. A similar comparison of theory with experiment was not feasible for boundary-layer-thickness data; however, the hypersonic similarity theory was found to account satisfactorily for the variation in boundary-layer thickness due to local pressure distribution for several sets of measurements.

  3. Near-wall turbulence modeling for boundary layers with separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, S. H.

    1991-12-01

    As a turbulent boundary layer undergoes a strong adverse pressure gradient, the flow may separate from the wall, and the use of empirical wall functions is inappropriate. The turbulence transport equations as well as the momentum equations must be solved through the laminar sublayer to the wall. The laminar sublayer encompasses a region where viscous effects become increasingly important. For the past two decades, many proposals for near-wall turbulence models of the kappa-epsilon type have been presented for calculating near-wall flows. A thorough review and a systematic evaluation of these models was previously given. It was found that some of the models tested failed to reproduce even the simple flat-plate boundary layer flow. Overall, the authors concluded that the near-wall turbulence models needed further refinement if they were to be used with confidence to calculate near-wall flows. Recently, the use of a direct numerical simulation (DNS) data base has provided new insight and data for development and testing of near-wall turbulence models.

  4. Simulations of curved turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlandi, Paolo

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a space-time accurate numerical method for the solution of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in generalized coordinates. The resulting code is to be used for direct and large-eddy simulation of turbulence in complex geometries. In a previous paper, the system of Navier-Stokes equations in general curvilinear coordinates was solved by a second-order accurate finite-difference scheme. Satisfactory results were obtained for several flows in two and three dimensions. The system of Navier-Stokes for the fluxes are given in Orlandi (1989). The main deficiency of the numerical scheme was the large CPU time required for the solution of the Poisson equation for the 'pressure' field. The point SOR relaxation, in conjunction with a multigrid scheme, was used for the Poisson equation. In some cases, particularly with very fine grids, it was impossible to obtain a divergent-free flow. A preliminary attempt is made to compute the spatially evolving flow of Swearingen & Blackwelder. To reduce the streamwise distance, the inflow was at a distance x = 60 cm from the leading edge.

  5. The interaction of synthetic jets with turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jing

    In recent years, a promising approach to the control of wall bounded as well as free shear flows, using synthetic jet (oscillatory jet with zero-net-mass-flux) actuators, has received a great deal of attention. A variety of impressive flow control results have been achieved experimentally by many researchers including the vectoring of conventional propulsive jets, modification of aerodynamic characteristics of bluff bodies, control of lift and drag of airfoils, reduction of skin-friction of a flat plate boundary layer, enhanced mixing in circular jets, and control of external as well as internal flow separation and of cavity oscillations. More recently, attempts have been made to numerically simulate some of these flowfields. Numerically several of the above mentioned flow fields have been simulated primarily by employing the Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (URANS) equations with a turbulence model and a limited few by Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS). In simulations, both the simplified boundary conditions at the exit of the jet as well as the details of the cavity and lip have been included. In this dissertation, I describe the results of simulations for several two- and three-dimensional flowfields dealing with the interaction of a synthetic jet with a turbulent boundary layer and control of separation. These simulations have been performed using the URANS equations in conjunction with either one- or a two-equation turbulence model. 2D simulations correspond to the experiments performed by Honohan at Georgia Tech. and 3D simulations correspond to the CFD validation test cases proposed in the NASA Langley Research Center Workshop---"CFD Validation of Synthetic Jets and Turbulent Separation Control" held at Williamsburg VA in March 2004. The sources of uncertainty due to grid resolution, time step, boundary conditions, turbulence modeling etc. have been examined during the computations. Extensive comparisons for various flow variables are made with the

  6. Direct simulation of a turbulent oscillating boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalart, Philippe R.; Baldwin, Barrett S.

    1987-01-01

    The turbulent boundary layer driven by a freestream velocity that varies sinusoidally in time around a zero mean is considered. The flow has a rich behavior including strong pressure gradients, inflection points, and reversal. A theory for the velocity and stress profiles at high Reynolds number is formulated. Well-resolved direct Navier-Stokes simulations are conducted over a narrow range of Reynolds numbers, and the results are compared with the theoretical predictions. The flow is also computed over a wide range of Reynolds numbers using a new algebraic turbulence model; the results are compared with the direct simulations and the theory.

  7. Interaction of a Boundary Layer with a Turbulent Wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piomelli, Ugo

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this grant was to study the transition mechanisms on a flat-plate boundary layer interacting with the wake of a bluff body. This is a simplified configuration presented and designed to exemplify the phenomena that occur in multi-element airfoils, in which the wake of an upstream element impinges on a downstream one. Some experimental data is available for this configuration at various Reynolds numbers. The first task carried out was the implementation and validation of the immersed-boundary method. This was achieved by performing calculations of the flow over a cylinder at low and moderate Reynolds numbers. The low-Reynolds number results are discussed, which is enclosed as Appendix A. The high-Reynolds number results are presented in a paper in preparation for the Journal of Fluid Mechanics. We performed calculations of the wake-boundary-layer interaction at two Reynolds numbers, Re approximately equal to 385 and 1155. The first case is discussed and a comparison of the two calculations is reported. The simulations indicate that at the lower Reynolds number the boundary layer is buffeted by the unsteady Karman vortex street shed by the cylinder. This is shown: long streaky structures appear in the boundary layer in correspondence of the three-dimensionalities in the rollers. The fluctuations, however, cannot be self-sustained due to the low Reynolds-number, and the flow does not reach a turbulent state within the computational domain. In contrast, in the higher Reynolds-number case, boundary-layer fluctuations persist after the wake has decayed (due, in part, to the higher values of the local Reynolds number Re achieved in this case); some evidence could be observed that a self-sustaining turbulence generation cycle was beginning to be established. A third simulation was subsequently carried out at a higher Reynolds number, Re=3900. This calculation gave results similar to those of the Re=l155 case. Turbulence was established at fairly low

  8. The high-order statistics of APG turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciel, Yvan; Gungor, Ayse G.; Simens, Mark P.; Soria, Julio

    2013-11-01

    One and two-point statistics are presented from a new direct numerical simulation of an adverse pressure gradient boundary layer, at Reθ = 250 - 2175 , in which the transition to turbulence is triggered by a trip wire which is modeled using the immersed boundary method. Mean velocity results in the attached turbulent region do not show log law profiles. Departure from the law of the wall occurs throughout the inner region. The production and Reynolds stress peaks move to roughly the middle of the boundary layer. The profiles of the uv correlation factor reveal that de-correlation between u and v takes place throughout the boundary layer, but especially near the wall, as the mean velocity defect increases. The non-dimensional stress ratios and quadrant analysis of uv indicate changes to the turbulence structure. The structure parameter is low, similar to equilibrium APG flows and mixing layers in the present flow and seems to be decreasing as the mean velocity defect increases. The statistics of the upper half of the APG flow show resemblance with results for a mixing layer. Funded in part by ITU, NSERC of Canada, ARC Discovery Grant, and Multiflow program of the ERC.

  9. Turbulent boundary layers subjected to multiple curvatures and pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Ahmed, Anwar

    1993-01-01

    The effects of abruptly applied cycles of curvatures and pressure gradients on turbulent boundary layers are examined experimentally. Two two-dimensional curved test surfaces are considered: one has a sequence of concave and convex longitudinal surface curvatures and the other has a sequence of convex and concave curvatures. The choice of the curvature sequences were motivated by a desire to study the asymmetric response of turbulent boundary layers to convex and concave curvatures. The relaxation of a boundary layer from the effects of these two opposite sequences has been compared. The effect of the accompaying sequences of pressure gradient has also been examined but the effect of curvature dominates. The growth of internal layers at the curvature junctions have been studied. Measurements of the Gortler and corner vortex systems have been made. The boundary layer recovering from the sequence of concave to convex curvature has a sustained lower skin friction level than in that recovering from the sequence of convex to concave curvature. The amplification and suppression of turbulence due to the curvature sequences have also been studied.

  10. Turbulence in rough-wall boundary layers: universality issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, Mohammad; Castro, Ian P.

    2011-08-01

    Wind tunnel measurements of turbulent boundary layers over three-dimensional rough surfaces have been carried out to determine the critical roughness height beyond which the roughness affects the turbulence characteristics of the entire boundary layer. Experiments were performed on three types of surfaces, consisting of an urban type surface with square random height elements, a diamond-pattern wire mesh and a sand-paper type grit. The measurements were carried out over a momentum thickness Reynolds number ( Re θ) range of 1,300-28,000 using two-component Laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) and hot-wire anemometry (HWA). A wide range of the ratio of roughness element height h to boundary layer thickness δ was covered (0.04 ≤ h/δ ≤ 0.40). The results confirm that the mean profiles for all the surfaces collapse well in velocity defect form up to surprisingly large values of h/δ, perhaps as large as 0.2, but with a somewhat larger outer layer wake strength than for smooth-wall flows, as previously found. At lower h/δ, at least up to 0.15, the Reynolds stresses for all surfaces show good agreement throughout the boundary layer, collapsing with smooth-wall results outside the near-wall region. With increasing h/δ, however, the turbulence above the near-wall region is gradually modified until the entire flow is affected. Quadrant analysis confirms that changes in the rough-wall boundary layers certainly exist but are confined to the near-wall region at low h/δ; for h/δ beyond about 0.2 the quadrant events show that the structural changes extend throughout much of the boundary layer. Taken together, the data suggest that above h/δ ≈ 0.15, the details of the roughness have a weak effect on how quickly (with rising h/δ) the turbulence structure in the outer flow ceases to conform to the classical boundary layer behaviour. The present results provide support for Townsend's wall similarity hypothesis at low h/δ and also suggest that a single critical roughness

  11. The large Reynolds number - Asymptotic theory of turbulent boundary layers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mellor, G. L.

    1972-01-01

    A self-consistent, asymptotic expansion of the one-point, mean turbulent equations of motion is obtained. Results such as the velocity defect law and the law of the wall evolve in a relatively rigorous manner, and a systematic ordering of the mean velocity boundary layer equations and their interaction with the main stream flow are obtained. The analysis is extended to the turbulent energy equation and to a treatment of the small scale equilibrium range of Kolmogoroff; in velocity correlation space the two-thirds power law is obtained. Thus, the two well-known 'laws' of turbulent flow are imbedded in an analysis which provides a great deal of other information.

  12. Modelling Unsteady Wall Pressures Beneath Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, B-K.; Graham, W. R.; Rizzi, S. A.

    2004-01-01

    As a structural entity of turbulence, hairpin vortices are believed to play a major role in developing and sustaining the turbulence process in the near wall region of turbulent boundary layers and may be regarded as the simplest conceptual model that can account for the essential features of the wall pressure fluctuations. In this work we focus on fully developed typical hairpin vortices and estimate the associated surface pressure distributions and their corresponding spectra. On the basis of the attached eddy model, we develop a representation of the overall surface pressure spectra in terms of the eddy size distribution. Instantaneous wavenumber spectra and spatial correlations are readily derivable from this representation. The model is validated by comparison of predicted wavenumber spectra and cross-correlations with existing emperical models and experimental data.

  13. Lateral straining of turbulent boundary layers. Part 2. Streamline convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchapakesan, N. R.; Nickels, T. B.; Joubert, P. N.; Smits, A. J.

    1997-10-01

    Experimental measurements are presented showing the effects of streamline convergence on developing turbulent boundary layers. The longitudinal pressure-gradient in these experiments is nominally zero so the only extra rate-of-strain is the lateral convergence. Measurements have been made of mean flow and turbulence quantities at two different Reynolds numbers. The results show that convergence leads to a significant reduction in the skin-friction and an increase in the boundary layer thickness. There are also large changes in the Reynolds stresses with reductions occurring in the inner region and some increase in the outer flow. This is in contrast to the results of Saddoughi & Joubert (1991) for a diverging flow of the same included angle and zero pressure-gradient which show much smaller changes in the stresses and an approach to equilibrium. A new non-dimensional parameter, [beta]D, is proposed to characterize the local effect of the convergence and it is shown how this parameter is related to Clauser's pressure-gradient parameter, [beta]x. It is suggested that this is an equilibrium parameter for turbulent boundary layers with lateral straining. In the present flow case [beta]D increases rapidly with streamwise distance leading to a significant departure from equilibrium. Measurement of terms in the transport equations suggest that streamline convergence leads to a reduction in production and generation and large increases in mean advection. The recovery of the flow after the removal of convergence has been shown to be characterized by a significant increase in the turbulent transport of shear-stress and turbulent kinetic energy from the very near-wall region to the flow further out where the stresses have been depleted by convergence.

  14. Temporal and spatial evolution characteristics of disturbance wave in a hypersonic boundary layer due to single-frequency entropy disturbance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenqing; Tang, Xiaojun; Lv, Hongqing; Shi, Jianqiang

    2014-01-01

    By using a high-order accurate finite difference scheme, direct numerical simulation of hypersonic flow over an 8° half-wedge-angle blunt wedge under freestream single-frequency entropy disturbance is conducted; the generation and the temporal and spatial nonlinear evolution of boundary layer disturbance waves are investigated. Results show that, under the freestream single-frequency entropy disturbance, the entropy state of boundary layer is changed sharply and the disturbance waves within a certain frequency range are induced in the boundary layer. Furthermore, the amplitudes of disturbance waves in the period phase are larger than that in the response phase and ablation phase and the frequency range in the boundary layer in the period phase is narrower than that in these two phases. In addition, the mode competition, dominant mode transformation, and disturbance energy transfer exist among different modes both in temporal and in spatial evolution. The mode competition changes the characteristics of nonlinear evolution of the unstable waves in the boundary layer. The development of the most unstable mode along streamwise relies more on the motivation of disturbance waves in the upstream than that of other modes on this motivation. PMID:25143983

  15. Temporal and Spatial Evolution Characteristics of Disturbance Wave in a Hypersonic Boundary Layer due to Single-Frequency Entropy Disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Hongqing; Shi, Jianqiang

    2014-01-01

    By using a high-order accurate finite difference scheme, direct numerical simulation of hypersonic flow over an 8° half-wedge-angle blunt wedge under freestream single-frequency entropy disturbance is conducted; the generation and the temporal and spatial nonlinear evolution of boundary layer disturbance waves are investigated. Results show that, under the freestream single-frequency entropy disturbance, the entropy state of boundary layer is changed sharply and the disturbance waves within a certain frequency range are induced in the boundary layer. Furthermore, the amplitudes of disturbance waves in the period phase are larger than that in the response phase and ablation phase and the frequency range in the boundary layer in the period phase is narrower than that in these two phases. In addition, the mode competition, dominant mode transformation, and disturbance energy transfer exist among different modes both in temporal and in spatial evolution. The mode competition changes the characteristics of nonlinear evolution of the unstable waves in the boundary layer. The development of the most unstable mode along streamwise relies more on the motivation of disturbance waves in the upstream than that of other modes on this motivation. PMID:25143983

  16. Logarithmic Boundary Layers in Strong Taylor-Couette Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohse, Detlef; Huisman, Sander; Ostilla, Rodolfo; Scharnowski, Sven; Cierpka, Christian; Kähler, Christian; Verzicco, Roberto; Sun, Chao; Grossmann, Siegfried

    2013-11-01

    We provide direct measurements of boundary layer profiles in highly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow up to Re = 2 ×106 using high-resolution particle image velocimetry and particle tracking velocimetry, complemented by DNS data on the same system up to Re =105 . We find that the mean azimuthal velocity profile at the inner and outer cylinder can be fitted by the von Kármán log law, but with corrections due to the curvature of the cylinder, which we theoretically account for, based on the Navier-Stokes equation and a closure assumption for the turbulent diffusivity. In particular, we study how these corrections depend on the cylinder radius ratio and show that they are different for the boundary layers at the inner and at the outer cylinder.

  17. Characteristics of Mach 10 transitional and turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of the mean flow properties of transitional and turbulent boundary layers in helium on 4 deg and 5 deg wedges were made for flows with edge Mach numbers from 9.5 to 11.3, ratios of wall temperature to total temperature of 0.4 to 0.95, and maximum length Reynolds numbers of one hundred million. The data include pitot and total temperature surveys and measurements of heat transfer and surface shear. In addition, with the assumption of local similarity, turbulence quantities such as the mixing length were derived from the mean flow profiles. Low Reynolds number and precursor transition effects were significant factors at these test conditions and were included in finite difference boundary layer predictions.

  18. Turbulence measurements in high Reynolds number boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallikivi, Margit; Smits, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    Measurements are conducted in zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers for Reynolds numbers from Reθ = 9,000 to 225,000. The experiments were performed in the High Reynolds number Test Facility (HRTF) at Princeton University, which uses compressed air as the working fluid. Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probes (NSTAPs) are used to acquire data with very high spatial and temporal precision. These new data are used to study the scaling behavior of the streamwise velocity fluctuations in the boundary layer and make comparisons with the scaling of other wall-bounded turbulent flows. Supported under ONR Grant N00014-09-1-0263 (program manager Ron Joslin) and NSF Grant CBET-1064257 (program manager Henning Winter).

  19. Calculation of turbulent shear stress in supersonic boundary layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, C. C.; Childs, M. E.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis of turbulent boundary layer flow characteristics and the computational procedure used are discussed. The integrated mass and momentum flux profiles and differentials of the integral quantities are used in the computations so that local evaluation of the streamwise velocity gradient is not necessary. The computed results are compared with measured shear stress data obtained by using hot wire anemometer and laser velocimeter techniques. The flow measurements were made upstream and downstream of an adiabatic unseparated interaction of an oblique shock wave with the turbulent boundary layer on the flat wall of a two dimensional wind tunnel. A comparison of the numerical analysis and actual measurements is made and the effects of small differences in mean flow profiles on the computed shear stress distributions are discussed.

  20. Turbulent boundary layer on a convex, curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, J. C.; Johnston, J. P.; Kays, W. M.; Moffat, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of strong convex curvature on boundary layer turbulence were investigated. The data gathered on the behavior of Reynolds stress suggested the formulation of a simple turbulence model. Three sets of data were taken on two separate facilities. Both rigs had flow from a flat surface, over a convex surface with 90 deg of turning, and then onto a flat recovery surface. The geometry was adjusted so that, for both rigs, the pressure gradient along the test surface was zero - thus avoiding any effects of streamwise acceleration on the wall layers. Results show that after a sudden introduction of curvature, the shear stress in the outer part of the boundary layer is sharply diminished and is even slightly negative near the edge. The wall shear also drops off quickly downstream. In contrast, when the surface suddenly becomes flat again, the wall shear and shear stress profiles recover very slowly towards flat wall conditions.

  1. Boundary-layer turbulence as a kangaroo process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, H.; de Leeuw, G.; Maassen van den Brink, A.

    1995-09-01

    A nonlocal mixing-length theory of turbulence transport by finite size eddies is developed by means of a novel evaluation of the Reynolds stress. The analysis involves the contruct of a sample path space and a stochastic closure hypothesis. The simplifying property of exhange (strong eddies) is satisfied by an analytical sampling rate model. A nonlinear scaling relation maps the path space onto the semi-infinite boundary layer. The underlying near-wall behavior of fluctuating velocities perfectly agrees with recent direct numerical simulations. The resulting integro-differential equation for the mixing of scalar densities represents fully developed boundary-layer turbulence as a nondiffusive (Kubo-Anderson or kangaroo) type of stochastic process. The model involves a scaling exponent ɛ (with ɛ-->∞ in the diffusion limit). For the (partly analytical) solution for the mean velocity profile, excellent agreement with the experimental data yields ɛ~=0.58.

  2. Characteristics of turbulent boundary layer flow over algal biofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Elizabeth; Barros, Julio; Schultz, Michael; Steppe, Cecily; Flack, Karen; Reidenbach, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Algal biofilms are an important fouling community on ship hulls, with severe economic consequences due to drag-induced increases in fuel use and cleaning costs. Here, we characterize the boundary layer flow structure in turbulent flow over diatomaceous slime, a type of biofilm. Diatomaceous slime composed of three species of diatoms commonly found on ship hulls was grown on acrylic test plates under shear stress. The slime averages 1.6 mm in thickness and has a high density of streamers, which are flexible elongated growths with a length on the order of 1- 2 mm located at the top of the biofilm that interact with the flow. Fouled acrylic plates were placed in a water tunnel facility specialized for detailed turbulent boundary layer measurements. High resolution Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) data are analyzed for mean velocity profile as well as local turbulent stresses and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) production, dissipation and transport. Quadrant analysis is used to characterize the impact of the instantaneous events of Reynolds shear stress (RSS) in the flow. To investigate the coherence of the large-scale motion in the flow two-point correlation analysis is employed. Funding provided by the Office of Naval Research and the National Science Foundation.

  3. Optically relevant turbulence parameters in the Marine boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, K. L.; Houlihan, T. M.

    1976-01-01

    Shipboard measurements of temperature and velocity fluctuations were performed to determine optical propagation properties of the marine boundary layer. Empirical expressions describing the temperature structure parameter in terms of the Richardson Number overland were used to analyze data obtained for open ocean conditions. Likewise, profiles of mean wind and velocity fluctuation spectra derived from shipboard observations were utilized to calculate associated boundary layer turbulence parameters. In general, there are considerable differences between the open-ocean results of this study and previously determined overland results.

  4. Acoustic Radiation From a Mach 14 Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Chao; Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2016-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to examine the turbulence statistics and the radiation field generated by a high-speed turbulent boundary layer with a nominal freestream Mach number of 14 and wall temperature of 0:18 times the recovery temperature. The flow conditions fall within the range of nozzle exit conditions of the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) Hypervelocity Tunnel No. 9 facility. The streamwise domain size is approximately 200 times the boundary-layer thickness at the inlet, with a useful range of Reynolds number corresponding to Re 450 ?? 650. Consistent with previous studies of turbulent boundary layer at high Mach numbers, the weak compressibility hypothesis for turbulent boundary layers remains applicable under this flow condition and the computational results confirm the validity of both the van Driest transformation and Morkovin's scaling. The Reynolds analogy is valid at the surface; the RMS of fluctuations in the surface pressure, wall shear stress, and heat flux is 24%, 53%, and 67% of the surface mean, respectively. The magnitude and dominant frequency of pressure fluctuations are found to vary dramatically within the inner layer (z/delta 0.< or approx. 0.08 or z+ < or approx. 50). The peak of the pre-multiplied frequency spectrum of the pressure fluctuation is f(delta)/U(sub infinity) approx. 2.1 at the surface and shifts to a lower frequency of f(delta)/U(sub infinity) approx. 0.7 in the free stream where the pressure signal is predominantly acoustic. The dominant frequency of the pressure spectrum shows a significant dependence on the freestream Mach number both at the wall and in the free stream.

  5. Radiation efficiency of plates subjected to turbulent boundary layer fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Kou, Yiwei; Liu, Bilong; Chang, Daoqing

    2016-05-01

    The modal averaged radiation efficiency of a rectangular plate subjected to turbulent boundary layer fluctuations is discussed in this letter. Numerical results demonstrate that below the hydrodynamic coincidence frequency, the modal averaged radiation efficiency will be larger with the increase of the convection velocity, and an increase of the structural damping will increase the modal averaged radiation efficiency at sub-critical frequencies. PMID:27250169

  6. Simulation of Turbulent Boundary Layer Flow with Large Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Erika; Subramanian, Chelakara

    2006-11-01

    Several studies indicate that in situations where surface roughness is very strong, the friction velocity scaling for the mean and turbulent velocities are not satisfactory. Subramanian et al showed a dramatic effect of a strong irregular roughened surface on the turbulent properties. The log-law relation in the overlap region was distorted. A significant pressure gradient normal to the surface was observed with a concomitant increase in normal turbulent stress, v^'2 . The pressure gradient velocity scale, uP, was suggested as a better alternative for capturing the effects of this roughness induced pressure gradient. Here, we performed a numerical simulation of a roughened boundary layer to gain more insight on the correlation between the wall normal pressure gradient and normal turbulent stress, v^'2 and further validate this new pressure gradient velocity scale, uP for different types of roughness. A two-dimensional flat plate computational model with strong regular (k-type) roughness, was constructed in GAMBIT and a CFD analysis performed using FLUENT, version 6.2. The roughness elements cause the pressure near the wall to increase suddenly at the first element and then decrease gradually similar to experiments. The variation of this normal pressure gradient is well correlated with the normal turbulent stress v^'2 variation. Application of the uP as scaling parameter for other non-equilibrium flows such as with suction and blowing is also investigated.

  7. Wave-Particle Interactions in the Turbulent Plasmaspheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, Evgeny

    2015-11-01

    A wealth of wave activity around the plasmasphere's boundary enhances during substorm injection events. A turbulent plasmaspheric boundary layer forms initially near the pre-substorm plasmapause due to interactions between the injected and plasmaspheric populations. The free energy for plasma instabilities driving lower hybrid/fast magnetosonic turbulence and broadband hiss-like VLF waves come from substorm-injected hot plasma particles impacting the cold plasmasphere. In particular, the hot electron diamagnetic drift and the highly anisotropic hot ion distribution drive the modified two-stream and ion-ring instabilities in the entry layer and the central part, respectively. The diamagnetic drift of hot ions dominates near the inner edge. Enhanced plasma turbulence leads to heating of the cold plasma and to acceleration of suprathermal electron tails, thereby enhancing the downward heat transport and concomitant heating of the ionospheric electrons. Broadband, hiss-like VLF waves have amplitudes sufficient to provide rapid precipitation of the radiation belt electrons thereby shaping the outer radiation belt boundary. In addition, the hot ions penetrating inside the plasmasphere satisfy the orbit chaotization condition and become demagnetized. These results can also be helpful for understanding impulsive penetration at the magnetopause. Supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  8. Effect of wall temperature on a supersonic turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laderman, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    Measurement of mean flow profiles in a fully developed Mach 3 turbulent boundary layer with negligible pressure gradient is reported. Data were acquired at several streamwise locations for wall-to-total temperature ratios of 0.94, 0.71, and 0.54. The results demonstrate that the velocity defect formulation of the law-of-the-wake, which successfully correlates compressible, adiabatic boundary layers, is also valid for nonadiabatic flows. It is also shown that for adiabatic walls, the linear Crocco relation between total temperature and velocity does not provide a valid test of the nature of the boundary-layer flow for practical cases where the Prandtl number departs from unity. Finally, the turbulent shear stress, mixing length, and eddy viscosity were extracted from the 'time-averaged' conservation equations using the measured mean flow profiles and found to be insensitive to wall temperature. In particular, the latter properties are in good agreement with earlier compressible, adiabatic correlations of turbulent transport properties.

  9. Turbulent boundary layer over porous surfaces with different surface geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, F. Y.; Schetz, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    The turbulent boundary layer over three porous walls with different surface geometries was studied in order to investigate the individual influences of porosity and small roughness, as well as their combined effects, on turbulent boundary layer behavior. The tests were conducted in a 2 m x 2 m tunnel on a large axisymmetric model at speeds corresponding to Re(L) = 5,000,000-6,000,000. The development of the turbulent boundary layer was compared for that of sintered metal, bonded screening, and perforated sheet and then to that for the flow over a solid smooth wall and a solid, sand-roughened wall. The comparisons reveal that the effect of porosity is to shift the logarithmic region of the wall law down by a certain amount from the solid wall results and to increase the skin friction values by about 30-40%. The downward shift of the logarithmic region of the wall law and the increase of the skin friction value by the combined effects of small roughness and porosity are found to be roughly the sum of their individual effects.

  10. Turbulent Boundary Layers in the Vicinity of Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indinger, Thomas; Buschmann, Matthias H.; Gad-El-Hak, Mohamed

    2004-11-01

    There has been some controversy regarding the behavior of the mean velocity profile of turbulent boundary layers approaching separation. While a number of experiments show that the logarithmic law is sustained even under strong adverse-pressure-gradient and non-equilibrium conditions, other experiments and DNS results reveal that the mean velocity profile breaks down in the vicinity of separation. Measurements at TU Dresden of a decelerated, fully developed turbulent boundary layer over a smooth flat plate in a closed water channel show that the classical log law no longer describes the mean velocity in the overlap region after a certain fraction of the flow travels in the upstream direction. This finding is consistent with the physical explanation advanced by Dengel & Fernholz (J. Fluid Mech. 212, 1990) that the log law failure is caused by the first occurrence of reverse flow. Analyzing adverse-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer data from three independent groups, we demonstrate that the log law can be restored by replacing y^+ with a new variable depending both on the wall-normal coordinate and the reverse-flow parameter \\chi_w. This finding is of importance in cases where other complexities such as surface roughness or structured walls (riblets, dimples, etc.) are involved and a universal profile in inner variables is desired.

  11. Turbulent thermal boundary layers subjected to severe acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, Guillermo; Castillo, Luciano

    2013-11-01

    Favorable turbulent boundary layers are flows of great importance in industry. Particularly, understanding the mechanisms of quasi-laminarization by means of a very strong favorable streamwise pressure gradient is indeed crucial in drag reduction and energy management applications. Furthermore, due to the low Reynolds numbers involved in the quasi-laminarization process, abundant experimental investigation can be found in the literature for the past few decades. However, several grey zones still remain unsolved, principally associated with the difficulties that experiments encounter as the boundary layer becomes smaller. In addition, little attention has been paid to the heat transfer in a quasi-laminarization process. In this investigation, DNS of spatially-developing turbulent thermal boundary layers with prescribed very strong favorable pressure gradients (K = 4 × 10-6) are performed. Realistic inflow conditions are prescribed based on the Dynamic Multi-scale Approach (DMA) [Araya et al. JFM, Vol. 670, pp. 581-605, 2011]. In this sense the flow carries the footprint of turbulence, particularly in the streamwise component of the Reynolds stresses.

  12. Interaction of Pulsed Vortex Generator Jets with Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McManus, K. R.; Johari, H.

    1996-11-01

    Vortex Generator Jets (VGJ) have been proposed as a means for active control of turbulent boundary layer separation by Johnston footnote AIAA J. 28, 989 (1990). It has been shown that a vortex generator jet can create weak longitudinal vorticity of a single sign when the surface-mounted jets are pitched and skewed with respect to the solid surface. The primary advantages of VGJs when compared to solid vortex generators are their lack of parasitic drag when the jets are off and the ability to rapidly activate and deactivate the jets for dynamic control. Pulsing of the jets is proposed as a way of increasing the turbulent mixing and therefore, improving the performance of vortex generator jets. Initial experiments with jets pitched at 45 deg and skewed at 90 deg degrees in air have indicated that large-scale turbulent structures are formed by the pulsed VGJs. Subsequent flow visualization experiments in a water tunnel suggest that fully-modulated jets embedded in a flat plate boundary layer result in a series of puffs which penetrate through the boundary layer. The influence of jet velocity, diameter, pulsing frequency and duty-cycle will be discussed. * Supported by NSF and PSI.

  13. Effect of Freestream Turbulence over Rough, Favorable Pressure Gradient Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Nieves, Sheilla; Lebron-Bosques, Jose; Brzek, Brian; Castillo, Luciano; Bayoan Cal, Raul; Meneveau, Charles

    2007-11-01

    Laser Doppler anemometry measurements are performed downstream of an active grid in the Corrsin wind tunnel at The Johns Hopkins University to study the effect of freestream turbulence (Tu<=7%), surface roughness and external favorable pressure gradient. Overall, the effect of freestream turbulence has proven to be dominant over pressure gradient and roughness. Mean profiles show that freestream turbulence effects alter the entire boundary layer including the inner flow. A reduction in the wake is also seen. Moreover, freestream turbulence increases the Reynolds stresses, making the values near the edge of the boundary layer to be non-zero. For the streamwise fluctuations, turbulence intensity affects the inner and outer regions, while the wall-normal and shear stress only change in the outer flow. Also, it is seen that roughness prevents the streamwise fluctuations from increasing near the wall, mainly because of the destruction of the viscous regions. Furthermore, a 20% increase in the skin friction is reported, 25% more than the increase obtained over smooth surfaces.

  14. Turbulence in a convective marine atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, S.-H.; Atlas, D.; Yeh, E.-N.

    1986-01-01

    The structure and kinetic energy budget of turbulence in the convective marine atmospheric boundary layer as observed by aircraft during a cold air outbreak have been studied using mixed layer scaling. The results are significantly different from those of previous studies under conditions closer to free convection. The normalized turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent transport are about twice those found during the Air Mass Transformation Experiment (AMTEX). This implies that for a given surface heating the present case is dynamically more active. The difference is mainly due to the greater importance of wind shear in the present case. This case is closer to the roll vortex regime, whereas AMTEX observed mesoscale cellular convection which is closer to free convection. Shear generation is found to provide a significant energy source, in addition to buoyancy production, to maintain a larger normalized turbulent kinetic energy and to balance a larger normalized dissipation. The interaction between turbulent pressure and divergence (i.e., pressure scrambling) is also found to transfer energy from the vertical to the horizontal components, and is expected to be stronger in roll vortices than in m esoscale cells. The sensible heat flux is found to fit well with a linear vertical profile in a clear or subcloud planetary boundary layer (PBL), in good agreement with the results of Lenschow et al., (1980). The heat flux ratio between the PBL top and the surface, derived from the linear fitted curve, is approximately -0.14, in good agreement with that derived from the lidar data for the same case. Near the PBL top, the heat flux profiles are consistent with those of Deardoff (1979) and Deardorff et al. (1980).

  15. Turbulence modeling for sharp-fin-induced shock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstman, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    Solutions of the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations are presented and compared with a family of experimental results for the 3-D interaction of a sharp fin induced shock wave with a turbulent boundary layer. Several algebraic and two equation eddy viscosity turbulence models are employed. The computed results are compared with experimental surface pressure, skin friction, and yaw angle data as well as the overall size of the interaction. Although the major feature of the flow fields are correctly predicted, several discrepancies are noted. Namely, the maximum skin friction values are significantly underpredicted for the strongest interaction cases. These and other deficiencies are discussed.

  16. Multi-Exciter Vibroacoustic Simulation of Hypersonic Flight Vibration

    SciTech Connect

    GREGORY,DANNY LYNN; CAP,JEROME S.; TOGAMI,THOMAS C.; NUSSER,MICHAEL A.; HOLLINGSHEAD,JAMES RONALD

    1999-11-11

    Many aerospace structures must survive severe high frequency, hypersonic, random vibration during their flights. The random vibrations are generated by the turbulent boundary layer developed along the exterior of the structures during flight. These environments have not been simulated very well in the past using a fixed-based, single exciter input with an upper frequency range of 2 kHz. This study investigates the possibility of using acoustic ardor independently controlled multiple exciters to more accurately simulate hypersonic flight vibration. The test configuration, equipment, and methodology are described. Comparisons with actual flight measurements and previous single exciter simulations are also presented.

  17. Hypersonic Wind Tunnels: Latest Citations from the Aerospace Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, construction, operation, performance, and use of hypersonic wind tunnels. References cover the design of flow nozzles, diffusers, test sections, and ejectors for tunnels driven by compressed air, high-pressure gases, or cryogenic liquids. Methods for flow calibration, boundary layer control, local and freestream turbulence reduction, and force measurement are discussed. Intrusive and non-intrusive instrumentation, sources of measurement error, and measurement corrections are also covered. The citations also include the testing of inlets, nozzles, airfoils, and other components of hypersonic aerospace vehicles. Comprehensive coverage of supersonic and blowdown wind tunnels, and force balance systems for wind tunnels are covered in separate bibliographies.

  18. Computation of turbulent boundary layer flows with an algebraic stress turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sang-Wook; Chen, Yen-Sen

    1986-01-01

    An algebraic stress turbulence model is presented, characterized by the following: (1) the eddy viscosity expression is derived from the Reynolds stress turbulence model; (2) the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate equation is improved by including a production range time scale; and (3) the diffusion coefficients for turbulence equations are adjusted so that the kinetic energy profile extends further into the free stream region found in most experimental data. The turbulent flow equations were solved using a finite element method. Examples include: fully developed channel flow, fully developed pipe flow, flat plate boundary layer flow, plane jet exhausting into a moving stream, circular jet exhausting into a moving stream, and wall jet flow. Computational results compare favorably with experimental data for most of the examples considered. Significantly improved results were obtained for the plane jet flow, the circular jet flow, and the wall jet flow; whereas the remainder are comparable to those obtained by finite difference methods using the standard kappa-epsilon turbulence model. The latter seems to be promising with further improvement of the expression for the eddy viscosity coefficient.

  19. Rough-wall turbulent boundary layers in the transition regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation of turbulent boundary layers over two-dimensional spanwise groove and three-dimensional sandgrain roughnesses in the transition regime between hydraulically smooth and fully rough conditions is presented. It is found that a self-preserving state can be reached in boundary layers developing over both d-type groove and sandgrain roughnesses, and that the drag of a k-type rough wall can be reduced by lowering the spanwise aspect ratio of the roughness elements. The two roughness Reynolds numbers defining the boundaries of the transition regime of the k-type roughnesses are shown to decrease with increasing roughness-element spanwise aspect ratio, and the upper critical transition Reynolds number is shown to determine the roughness behavior in both the transition and fully rough regime.

  20. A compilation of unsteady turbulent boundary-layer experimental data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    An extensive literature search was conducted and those experiments related to unsteady boundary layer behavior were cataloged. In addition, an international survey of industrial, university, and governmental research laboratories was made in which new and ongoing experimental programs associated with unsteady turbulent boundary layer research were identified. Pertinent references were reviewed and classified based on the technical emphasis of the various experiments. Experiments that include instantaneous or ensemble averaged profiles of boundary layer variables are stressed. The experimental apparatus and flow conditions are described and summaries of acquired data and significant conclusions are summarized. Measurements obtained from the experiments which exist in digital form were stored on magnetic tape. Instructions are given for accessing these data sets for further analysis.

  1. Influence of wall permeability on turbulent boundary-layer properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, S. P.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental boundary-layer studies of a series of low pressure drop, permeable surfaces have been conducted to characterize their surface interaction with a turbulent boundary layer. The models were flat and tested at nominally zero pressure gradient in low speed air. The surfaces were thin metal sheets with discrete perforations. Direct drag balance measurements of skin friction indicate that the general effect of surface permeability is to increase drag above that of a smooth plate reference level. Heuristic arguments are presented to show that this type of behavior is to be expected. Other boundary-layer data are also presented including mean velocity profiles and conditionally sampled streamwise velocity fluctuations (hot wire) for selected models.

  2. Scaling of pressure spectrum in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patwardhan, Saurabh S.; Ramesh, O. N.

    2014-04-01

    Scaling of pressure spectrum in zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layers is discussed. Spatial DNS data of boundary layer at one time instant (Reθ = 4500) are used for the analysis. It is observed that in the outer regions the pressure spectra tends towards the -7/3 law predicted by Kolmogorov's theory of small-scale turbulence. The slope in the pressure spectra varies from -1 close to the wall to a value close to -7/3 in the outer region. The streamwise velocity spectra also show a -5/3 trend in the outer region of the flow. The exercise carried out to study the amplitude modulation effect of the large scales on the smaller ones in the near-wall region reveals a strong modulation effect for the streamwise velocity, but not for the pressure fluctuations. The skewness of the pressure follows the same trend as the amplitude modulation coefficient, as is the case for the velocity. In the inner region, pressure spectra were seen to collapse better when normalized with the local Reynolds stress than when scaled with the local turbulent kinetic energy

  3. Role of the basin boundary conditions in gravity wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berhanu, Michael; Deike, Luc; Miquel, Benjamin; Gutierrez, Pablo; Jamin, Timothee; Semin, Benoit; Falcon, Eric; Bonnefoy, Felicien

    2015-11-01

    Gravity wave turbulence is studied in a large wave basin where irregular waves are generated unidirectionally. The role of the basin boundary conditions (absorbing or reflecting) are investigated. To that purpose, an absorbing sloping beach opposite to the wavemaker can be replaced by a reflecting vertical wall. The wave field properties depend strongly on these boundary conditions. Unidirectional waves propagate before to be damped by the beach whereas a more multidirectional wave field is observed with the wall. In both cases, the wave spectrum scales as a frequency-power law with an exponent that increases continuously with the forcing amplitude up to a value close to -4. We have also studied freely decaying gravity wave turbulence in the closed basin. No self-similar decay of the spectrum is observed, whereas its Fourier modes decay first as a time power law due to nonlinear mechanisms, and then exponentially due to linear viscous damping. We estimate the linear, nonlinear and dissipative time scales to test the time scale separation. Using the mean energy flux from the initial decay of wave energy, the Kolmogorov-Zakharov constant of the weak turbulence theory is evaluated experimentally for the first time.

  4. Developments in the computation of turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubesin, M. W.

    1979-01-01

    Computational techniques applicable to turbulent boundary layers are classified into solutions of Reynolds-averaged equations, in which all the effects of the turbulence are modelled, and solutions of three-dimensional, time dependent Navier-Stokes equations, in which the large eddies are calculated and only the turbulence at scales smaller than the computational mesh spacings has to be modelled. Current computation costs place engineering computations in the first of these categories; large eddy simulations are appropriate currently for special studies of the dynamical processes of turbulence in idealized flow fields. It is shown that the two methods are interrelated and that each can gain from advances in the other. The degree of success of a pair of increasingly complex Reynolds stress models to broaden their range of applicability is examined through comparisons with experimental data for a variety of flow conditions. An example of a large-eddy simulation is presented, compared with experimental results, and used to evaluate the models for pressure rate-of-strain correlations and dissipation in the Reynolds-averaged equations.

  5. Control of flow separation in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Minjeong; Choi, Sangho; Choi, Haecheon

    2015-11-01

    Towards the development of successful control methods for separation delay in a turbulent boundary layer, we adopt a model flow field, in which a turbulent separation occurs above a flat plate (Na and Moin 1998 JFM), and apply controls to this flow for reducing the size of the separation bubble and investigating the interaction between the forcing and flow near the separation bubble. We provide a single-frequency forcing with zero net mass flow rate at the upstream of the separation bubble. At low forcing frequencies, spanwise vortices are generated and travel downstream, bringing high momentum toward the wall and reducing the size of the separation bubble. Also, these vortices cause the separation and reattachment points to travel downstream. On the other hand, at high forcing frequencies, the size of the separation bubble becomes smaller and larger in time, respectively, due to the pressure gradient alternating favorably and adversely in time. Supported by NRF-2011-0028032 and 2014048162.

  6. Turbulent thermal boundary layer on a permeable flat plate

    SciTech Connect

    Vigdorovich, I. I.

    2007-06-15

    Scaling laws are established for the profiles of temperature, turbulent heat flux, rms temperature fluctuation, and wall heat transfer in the turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate with transpiration. In the case of blowing, the temperature distribution represented in scaling variables outside the viscous sublayer has a universal form known from experimental data for flows over impermeable flat plates. In the case of suction, the temperature distribution is described by a one-parameter family of curves. A universal law of heat transfer having the form of a generalized Reynolds analogy provides a basis for representation of the heat flux distributions corresponding to different Reynolds numbers and transpiration velocities in terms of a function of one variable. The results are obtained without invoking any special closure hypotheses.

  7. Small particle transport across turbulent nonisothermal boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.; Fernandez De La Mora, J.

    1982-01-01

    The interaction between turbulent diffusion, Brownian diffusion, and particle thermophoresis in the limit of vanishing particle inertial effects is quantitatively modeled for applications in gas turbines. The model is initiated with consideration of the particle phase mass conservation equation for a two-dimensional boundary layer, including the thermophoretic flux term directed toward the cold wall. A formalism of a turbulent flow near a flat plate in a heat transfer problem is adopted, and variable property effects are neglected. Attention is given to the limit of very large Schmidt numbers and the particle concentration depletion outside of the Brownian sublayer. It is concluded that, in the parameter range of interest, thermophoresis augments the high Schmidt number mass-transfer coefficient by a factor equal to the product of the outer sink and the thermophoretic suction.

  8. Tracking Coherent Structures in a Mach 4 Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbareddy, Pramod; Moss, Alin; Marusic, Ivan; Candler, Graham

    2000-11-01

    We describe a study of different criteria for the detection and tracking of coherent vortical structures in a turbulent compressible boundary layer. Several vortex identification methods are presented, with special attention to methods based on the eigenvalues of the velocity gradient tensor. We find that for the Mach 4 compressible flow, the discriminant of the characteristic polynomial of the tensor is most suitable in the sense that the near wall coherent features are better defined. The vortex connection/reconnection process that we observe is tracked in time and studied. The visualizations are done using a classical ray-casting volume renderer which makes it possible to color-fill specific structures and follow their motion through the flow field. A qualitative comparison with an incompressible wall turbulence is also made. The long term goal of this study is to develop feature extraction tools which can track the evolution of structures in large data sets efficiently.

  9. Compressible turbulent channel flow with impedance boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalo, Carlo; Bodart, Julien; Lele, Sanjiva

    2014-11-01

    We have performed large-eddy simulations of compressible turbulent channel flow at one bulk Reynolds number, Reb = 6900, for bulk Mach numbers Mb = 0.05, 0.2, 0.5, with linear acoustic impedance boundary conditions (IBCs). The IBCs are formulated in the time domain following Fung and Ju (2004) and coupled with a Navier-Stokes solver. The impedance model adopted is a three-parameter Helmholtz oscillator with resonant frequency tuned to the outer layer eddies. The IBC's resistance, R, has been varied in the range, R = 0.01, 0.10, 1.00. Tuned IBCs result in a noticeable drag increase for sufficiently high Mb and/or low R, exceeding 300% for Mb = 0.5 and R = 0.01, and thus represents a promising passive control technique for delaying boundary layer separation and/or enhancing wall heat transfer. Alterations to the turbulent flow structure are confined to the first 15% of the boundary layer thickness where the classical buffer-layer coherent vortical structures are replaced by an array of Kelvin-Helmholtz-like rollers. The non-zero asymptotic value of the Reynolds shear stress gradient at the wall results in the disappearance of the viscous sublayer and very early departure of the mean velocity profiles from the law of the wall.

  10. Manipulation of Turbulent Boundary Layers Using Synthetic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Zachary; Gomit, Guillaume; Lavoie, Philippe; Ganapathisubramani, Bharath

    2015-11-01

    This work focuses on the application of active flow control, in the form of synthetic jet actuators, of turbulent boundary layers. An array of 2 synthetic jets are oriented in the spanwise direction and located approximately 2.7 meters downstream from the leading edge of a flat plate. Actuation is applied perpendicular to the surface of the flat plate with varying blowing ratios and reduced frequencies (open-loop). Two-component large window particle image velocimetry (PIV) was performed at the University of Southampton, in the streamwise-wall-normal plane. Complementary stereo PIV measurements were performed at the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS), in the spanwise-wall-normal plane. The freestream Reynolds number is 3x104, based on the boundary layer thickness. The skin friction Reynolds number is 1,200 based on the skin friction velocity. The experiments at Southampton allow for the observation of the control effects as the flow propagates downstream. The experiments at UTIAS allow for the observation of the streamwise vorticity induced from the actuation. Overall the two experiments provide a 3D representation of the flow field with respect to actuation effects. The current work focuses on the comparison of the two experiments, as well as the effects of varying blowing ratios and reduced frequencies on the turbulent boundary layer. Funded Supported by Airbus.

  11. Heterogeneous evaporation across a turbulent internal boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahraeeni, Ebrahim; Vanderborght, Jan; Vereecken, Harry

    2014-05-01

    In local evaporation from sufficiently uniform and large surfaces, horizontal advection close to the changes in surface condition is not significant. Under natural condition, this assumption is often invalid and horizontal inhomogeneity is important. When partially saturated air flows from a uniform dry land surface over a wet surface, all lower boundary conditions of transport equations change abruptly. Also surface humidity and roughness are likely to be different from their upwind values. Due to these changes, the velocity profile and turbulence structure of the airflow must readjust. The vertical profiles are no longer in equilibrium and the horizontal gradients do not equal to zero. When there is more than one of these changes in the domain of interest, the interaction between different patches with a contrast in roughness, temperature or surface water content is also important. Rigorous experimental and numerical analysis of turbulent transfer of mass and momentum in the so-called internal boundary layer (the region affected by such step changes in surface condition) is the aim of this work. A combination of numerical simulations using in-house codes and commercial softwares and experimental measurements in the environmental wind tunnel is performed. We are specifically interested in correct depiction of roughness, in a more accurate representation of the turbulent velocity profile and in a better description of turbulent diffusion close to the interface. A series of simplifying assumptions in the classical representation of this problem are investigated and a sensitivity analysis is performed to identify the contribution of neglected terms. We are also interested in the parameterization of the heat and mass exchange processes for the case with different wet patches in a background of dry soil, which is of interest in several field scale applications.

  12. Boundary-layer turbulence modeling and vorticity dynamics: I. A kangaroo-process mixing model of boundary-layer turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, H.; de Leeuw, G.; van den Brink, A. Maassen

    A nonlocal turbulence transport theory is presented by means of a novel analysis of the Reynolds stress, inter alia involving the construct of a sample path space and a stochastic hypothesis. An analytical sampling rate model (satisfying exchange) and a nonlinear scaling relation (mapping the path space onto the boundary layer) lead to an integro-differential equation for the mixing of scalar densities, which represents fully-developed boundary-layer turbulence as a nondiffusive (Kubo-Anderson or kangaroo) type stochastic process. The underlying near-wall behavior (i.e. for y +→0) of fluctuating velocities fully agrees with recent direct numerical simulations. The model involves a scaling exponent ɛ, with ɛ→∞ in the diffusion limit. For the (partly analytical) solution for the mean velocity profile, excellent agreement with the experimental data yields ɛ≈0.58. The significance of ɛ as a turbulence Cantor set dimension (in the logarithmic profile region, i.e. for y +→∞) is discussed.

  13. Spherical bubble motion in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felton, Keith; Loth, Eric

    2001-09-01

    Monodisperse dilute suspensions of spherical air bubbles in a tap-water turbulent vertical boundary layer were experimentally studied to note their motion and distribution. Bubbles with diameters of 0.37-1.2 mm were injected at various transverse wall-positions for free-stream velocities between 0.4 and 0.9 m/s. The bubbles were released from a single injector at very low frequencies such that two-way coupling and bubble-bubble interaction were negligible. The experimental diagnostics included ensemble-averaged planar laser intensity profiles for bubble concentration distribution, as well as Cinematic Particle Image Velocimetry with bubble tracking for bubble hydrodynamic forces. A variety of void distributions within the boundary layer were found. For example, there was a tendency for bubbles to collect along the wall for higher Stokes number conditions, while the lower Stokes number conditions produced Gaussian-type profiles throughout the boundary layer. In addition, three types of bubble trajectories were observed—sliding bubbles, bouncing bubbles, and free-dispersion bubbles. Instantaneous liquid forces acting on individual bubbles in the turbulent flow were also obtained to provide the drag and lift coefficients (with notable experimental uncertainty). These results indicate that drag coefficient decreases with increasing Reynolds number as is conventionally expected but variations were observed. In general, the instantaneous drag coefficient (for constant bubble Reynolds number) tended to be reduced as the turbulence intensity increased. The averaged lift coefficient is higher than that given by inviscid theory (and sometimes even that of creeping flow theory) and tends to decrease with increasing bubble Reynolds number.

  14. Identification of lagrangian coherent structures in the turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Chong; Wang, Jinjun; Zhang, Cao

    2009-02-01

    Using Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponents (FTLE) method, Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) in a fully developed flat-plate turbulent boundary layer are successfully identified from a two-dimensional (2D) velocity field obtained by time-resolved 2D PIV measurement. The typical LCSs in the turbulent boundary layer are hairpin-like structures, which are characterized as legs of quasi-streamwise vortices extending deep into the near wall region with an inclination angle θ to the wall, and heads of the transverse vortex tube located in the outer region. Statistical analysis on the characteristic shape of typical LCS reveals that the probability density distribution of θ accords well with t-distribution in the near wall region, but presents a bimodal distribution with two peaks in the outer region, corresponding to the hairpin head and the hairpin neck, respectively. Spatial correlation analysis of FTLE field is implemented to get the ensemble-averaged inclination angle θ R of typical LCS. θ R first increases and then decreases along the wall-normal direction, similar to that of the mean value of θ. Moreover, the most probable value of θ saturates at y +=100 with the maximum value of about 24°, suggesting that the most likely position where hairpins transit from the neck to the head is located around y +=100. The ensemble- averaged convection velocity U c of typical LCS is finally calculated from temporal-spatial correlation analysis of FTLE field. It is found that the wall-normal profile of the convection velocity U c( y) accords well with the local mean velocity profile U( y) beyond the buffer layer, evidencing that the downstream convection of hairpins determines the transportation properties of the turbulent boundary layer in the log-region and beyond.

  15. Turbulent flux events in a nearly neutral atmospheric boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Narasimha, Roddam; Kumar, S Rudra; Prabhu, A; Kailas, S V

    2007-03-15

    We propose here a novel method of analysing turbulent momentum flux signals. The data for the analysis come from a nearly neutral atmospheric boundary layer and are taken at a height of 4m above ground corresponding to 1.1 x 10(5) wall units, within the log layer for the mean velocity. The method of analysis involves examining the instantaneous flux profiles that exceed a given threshold, for which an optimum value is found to be 1 s.d. of the flux signal. It is found feasible to identify normalized flux variation signatures separately for positive and negative 'flux events'-the sign being determined by that of the flux itself. Using these signatures, the flux signal is transformed to one of events characterized by the time of occurrence, duration and intensity. It is also found that both the average duration and the average time-interval between successive events are of order 1s, about four orders of magnitude higher than a wall unit in time. This episodic description of the turbulence flux in the time domain enables us to identify separately productive, counter-productive and idle periods (accounting, respectively, for 36, 15 and 49% of the time), taking as criterion the generation of the momentum flux. A 'burstiness' index of 0.72 is found for the data. Comparison with laboratory data indicates higher (/lower) ejection (/sweep) quadrant occupancy but lower (/higher) contributions to flux from the ejection (/sweep) quadrant at the high Reynolds numbers of the atmospheric boundary layer. Possible connections with the concept of active and passive motion in a turbulent boundary layer are briefly discussed. PMID:17244581

  16. Turbulent boundary-layer structure of flows over freshwater biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, J. M.; Sargison, J. E.; Henderson, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    The structure of the turbulent boundary-layer for flows over freshwater biofilms dominated by the diatom Tabellaria flocculosa was investigated. Biofilms were grown on large test plates under flow conditions in an Australian hydropower canal for periods up to 12 months. Velocity-profile measurements were obtained using LDV in a recirculating water tunnel for biofouled, smooth and artificially sandgrain roughened surfaces over a momentum thickness Reynolds number range of 3,000-8,000. Significant increases in skin friction coefficient of up to 160 % were measured over smooth-wall values. The effective roughnesses of the biofilms, k s, were significantly higher than their physical roughness measured using novel photogrammetry techniques and consisted of the physical roughness and a component due to the vibration of the biofilm mat. The biofilms displayed a k-type roughness function, and a logarithmic relationship was found between the roughness function and roughness Reynolds number based on the maximum peak-to-valley height of the biofilm, R t. The structure of the boundary layer adhered to Townsend's wall-similarity hypothesis even though the scale separation between the effective roughness height and the boundary-layer thickness was small. The biofouled velocity-defect profiles collapsed with smooth and sandgrain profiles in the outer region of the boundary layer. The Reynolds stresses and quadrant analysis also collapsed in the outer region of the boundary layer.

  17. Injection-induced turbulence in stagnation-point boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, C.

    1984-02-01

    A theory is developed for the stagnation point boundary layer with injection under the hypothesis that turbulence is produced at the wall by injection. From the existing experimental heat transfer rate data obtained in wind tunnels, the wall mixing length is deduced to be a product of a time constant and an injection velocity. The theory reproduces the observed increase in heat transfer rates at high injection rates. For graphite and carbon-carbon composite, the time constant is determined to be 0.0002 sec from the existing ablation data taken in an arc-jet tunnel and a balistic range.

  18. Injection-induced turbulence in stagnation-point boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.

    1984-01-01

    A theory is developed for the stagnation point boundary layer with injection under the hypothesis that turbulence is produced at the wall by injection. From the existing experimental heat transfer rate data obtained in wind tunnels, the wall mixing length is deduced to be a product of a time constant and an injection velocity. The theory reproduces the observed increase in heat transfer rates at high injection rates. For graphite and carbon-carbon composite, the time constant is determined to be 0.0002 sec from the existing ablation data taken in an arc-jet tunnel and a balistic range.

  19. Shock wave-turbulent boundary layer interactions in transonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, T. C., Jr.; Messiter, A. F.

    1976-01-01

    The method of matched asymptotic expansions is used in analyzing the structure of the interaction region formed when a shock wave impinges on a turbulent flat plate boundary layer in transonic flow. Solutions in outer regions, governed by inviscid flow equations, lead to relations for the wall pressure distribution. Solutions in the inner regions, governed by equations in which Reynolds and/or viscous stresses are included, lead to a relation for the wall shear stress. Solutions for the wall pressure distribution are reviewed for both oblique and normal incoming shock waves. Solutions for the wall shear stress are discussed.

  20. Kubo-Anderson Mixing in the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, H.; de Leeuw, G.; Brink, A. Maassen Van Den

    A novel ab initio analysis of the Reynolds stress is presented in order to model non-local turbulence transport. The theory involves a sample path space and a stochastic hypothesis. A scaling relation maps the path space onto the boundary layer. Analytical sampling rates are shown to model mixing by exchange. Nonlocal mixing involves a scaling exponent ɛ≈0.58 (ɛ→∞ in the diffusion limit). The resulting transport equation represents a nondiffusive (Kubo-Anderson or kangaroo) type stochastic process.

  1. Thermodynamic and Turbulence Characteristics of the Southern Great Plains Nocturnal Boundary Layer Under Differing Turbulent Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonin, Timothy A.; Blumberg, William G.; Klein, Petra M.; Chilson, Phillip B.

    2015-12-01

    The nocturnal stable boundary layer (SBL) can generally be classified into the weakly stable boundary layer (wSBL) and very stable boundary layer (vSBL). Within the wSBL, turbulence is relatively continuous, whereas in the vSBL, turbulence is intermittent and not well characterized. Differentiating characteristics of each type of SBL are still unknown. Herein, thermodynamic and kinematic data collected by a suite of instruments in north central Oklahoma in autumn 2012 are analyzed to better understand both SBL regimes and their differentiating characteristics. Many low-level jets were observed during the experiment, as it took place near a climatological maximum. A threshold wind speed, above which bulk shear-generated turbulence develops, is found to exist up to 300 m. The threshold wind speed must also be exceeded at lower heights (down to the surface) in order for strong turbulence to develop. Composite profiles, which are normalized using low-level jet scaling, of potential temperature, wind speed, vertical velocity variance, and the third-order moment of vertical velocity (overline{w'^3}) are produced for weak and moderate/strong turbulence regimes, which exhibit features of the vSBL and wSBL, respectively. Within the wSBL, turbulence is generated at the surface and transported upward. In the vSBL, values of vertical velocity variance are small throughout the entire boundary layer, likely due to the fact that a strong surface inversion typically forms after sunset. The temperature profile tends to be approximately isothermal in the lowest portions of the wSBL, and it did not substantially change over the night. Within both types of SBL, stability in the residual layer tends to increase as the night progresses. It is thought that this stability increase is due to differential warm air advection, which frequently occurs in the southern Great Plains when southerly low-level jets and a typical north-south temperature gradient are present. Differential radiative

  2. Lateral straining of turbulent boundary layers. I - Streamline divergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saddoughi, Seyed G.; Joubert, Peter N.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of prolonged streamline divergence on developing turbulent boundary layers is investigated using an experimental approximation of the source flow over a flat plate to achieve a simple divergence. Results are presented of hot-wire measurements for the planes of symmetry of two layers which had the same (low) Reynolds number and were developed in the presence of the same amount of simple divergence with a maximum divergence parameter of about 0.075 but with different (by a factor of 2) pressure-gradient parameters. It was found that there were two overlapping stages of development. In the initial stage, which covered a distance of about 20 initial boundary-layer thicknesses from the start of divergence, the coupled effects of both the pressure gradient and divergence were present. In the second region, which lasts nearly to the end of the diverging section, the pressure-gradient effects were negligible.

  3. Temporally optimized spanwise vorticity sensor measurements in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill-Winter, C.; Klewicki, J.; Baidya, R.; Marusic, I.

    2015-12-01

    Multi-element hot-wire anemometry was used to measure spanwise vorticity fluctuations in turbulent boundary layers. Smooth wall boundary layer profiles, with very good spatial and temporal resolution, were acquired over a Kármán number range of 2000-12,700 at the Melbourne Wind Tunnel at the University of Melbourne and the University of New Hampshire's Flow Physics Facility. A custom hot-wire probe was necessary to simultaneously obtain velocity and spanwise vorticity measurements centered at a fixed point in space. A custom calibration/processing scheme was developed to utilize single-wall-parallel wires to optimize the accuracy of the measured wall-normal velocity fluctuations derived from the sensor's ×-array.

  4. The Saharan atmospheric boundary layer: Turbulence, stratification and mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Carreras, Luis; Parker, Douglas J.; Marsham, John H.; Rosenberg, Philip D.; Marenco, Franco; Mcquaid, James B.

    2013-04-01

    High-resolution large-eddy model simulations, combined with aircraft and radiosonde observations from the Fennec observational campaign are used to describe the vertical structure of the Saharan atmospheric boundary layer (SABL). The SABL, probably the deepest dry convective boundary layer on Earth, is crucial in controlling the vertical redistribution and long-range transport of dust, heat, water and momentum in the Sahara, with significant implications for the large-scale Saharan heat low and West African monsoon systems. The daytime SABL has a unique structure, with an actively growing convective region driven by high sensible heating at the surface, capped by a weak (≤1K) temperature inversion and a deep, near-neutrally stratified Saharan residual layer (SRL) above it, which is mostly well mixed in humidity and temperature and reaches a height of ~500hPa. Large-eddy model (LEM) simulations were initialized with radiosonde data and driven by surface heat flux observations from Fennec supersite-1 at Bordj Bardji Mokhtar (BBM), southern Algeria. Aircraft observations are used to validate the processes of interest identified in the model, as well as providing unprecedented detail of the turbulent characteristics of the SABL. Regular radiosondes from BBM during June 2011 are used to generate a climatology of the day-time SABL structure, providing further evidence that the processes identified with the LEM are recurrent features of the real SABL. The model is shown to reproduce the typical SABL structure from observations, and different tracers are used to illustrate the penetration of the convective boundary layer into the residual layer above as well as mixing processes internal to the residual layer. Despite the homogeneous surface fluxes and tracer initialization, the large characteristic length-scale of the turbulent eddies leads to large horizontal changes in boundary layer depth (which control the formation of clouds) and significant heterogeneity in tracer

  5. Aerothermodynamic heating due to shock wave/laminar boundary-layer interactions in high-enthalpy hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackett, Charles M.

    1993-01-01

    The interaction between a swept shock wave and a laminar boundary layer was investigated experimentally in high-enthalpy hypersonic flow. The effect of high-temperature, real gas physics on the interaction was examined by conducting tests in air and helium. Heat transfer measurements were made on the surface of a flat plate and a shock-generating fin using thin-film resistance sensors for fin incidence angles of 0, 5, and 10 deg at Mach numbers of 6.9 in air and 7.2 in helium. The experiments were conducted in the NASA HYPULSE expansion tube, an impulse-type facility capable of generating high-enthalpy, high-velocity flow with freestream levels of dissociated species that are particularly low. The measurements indicate that the swept shock wave creates high local heat transfer levels in the interaction region, with the highest heating found in the strongest interaction. The maximum measured heating rates in the interaction are order of magnitude greater than laminar flat plate boundary layer heating levels at the same location.

  6. Subgrid-scale turbulence in shock-boundary layer flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jammalamadaka, Avinash; Jaberi, Farhad

    2015-04-01

    Data generated by direct numerical simulation (DNS) for a Mach 2.75 zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer interacting with shocks of different intensities are used for a priori analysis of subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulence and various terms in the compressible filtered Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical method used for DNS is based on a hybrid scheme that uses a non-dissipative central scheme in the shock-free turbulent regions and a robust monotonicity-preserving scheme in the shock regions. The behavior of SGS stresses and their components, namely Leonard, Cross and Reynolds components, is examined in various regions of the flow for different shock intensities and filter widths. The backscatter in various regions of the flow is found to be significant only instantaneously, while the ensemble-averaged statistics indicate no significant backscatter. The budgets for the SGS kinetic energy equation are examined for a better understanding of shock-tubulence interactions at the subgrid level and also with the aim of providing useful information for one-equation LES models. A term-by-term analysis of SGS terms in the filtered total energy equation indicate that while each term in this equation is significant by itself, the net contribution by all of them is relatively small. This observation is consistent with our a posteriori analysis.

  7. Investigation of the temperature field in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers, Clayton; Hultmark, Marcus

    2015-11-01

    The scaling and evolution of a developing turbulent thermal boundary layer is investigated. By allowing the temperature differences in the fluid to remain small enough to treat temperature as a passive scalar, the analysis can be extended to any turbulent convection/diffusion problem. Mean temperature scaling is developed and analyzed by utilizing the ``Asymptotic Invariance Principle'' developed by George and Castillo (1997). Possible effects of the Reynolds and Prandtl number are discussed. The derived power law solution for the inner and outer scaling is then used to develop a ``heat transfer law'' for the wall heat flux, qw. Data collection is performed with a newly developed MEMS sensor, allowing improved performance and reduced spatial and temporal filtering of the signal. Integration with a PIV system will allow direct measurements of the turbulent heat flux - θv to investigate the extent of the overlap layer and validity of the proposed scaling laws. Temperature variance 1/2 θ2 will also be investigated, with a possible scaling proposed.

  8. Turbulent boundary layer over a convergent and divergent superhydrophobic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, Muhammad; Hwang, Jinyul; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2015-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of spatially developing turbulent boundary layer (TBL) over a convergent and divergent superhydrophobic surface (SHS) was performed. The convergent and divergent SHS was aligned in the streamwise direction. The SHS was modeled as a pattern of slip and no-slip surfaces. For comparison, DNS of TBL over a straight SHS was also carried out. The momentum thickness Reynolds number was varied from 800 to 1400. The gas fraction of the convergent and divergent SHS was the same as that of the straight SHS, keeping the slip area constant. The slip velocity in the convergent SHS was higher than that of the straight SHS. An optimal streamwise length of the convergent and divergent SHS was obtained. The convergent and divergent SHS gave more drag reduction than the straight SHS. The convergent and divergent SHS led to the modification of near wall-turbulent structures, resembling the narrowing and widening streaky structures near the wall. The convergent and divergent SHS had a relatively larger damping effect on near-wall turbulence than the straight SHS. These observations will be further analyzed statistically to demonstrate the effect of the convergent and divergent SHS on the interaction of inner and outer regions of TBL.

  9. Influence of transverse surface waves on turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, R.; Ash, R. L.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Bushnell, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    Wavy wall experiments using solid waves and progressive waves have been reported. For this paper, the major effects of waviness of the wall on the flow are identified as due to oscillatory curvature (convex-concavity) and oscillatory acceleration/deceleration of the flow, which imposes a highly nonequilibrium influence upon the turbulence structure. The theoretical analysis in this presentation takes into account proper turbulence modeling (including the nonequilibrium effects) for the wavy wall problem. The analysis proceeds in three stages: (1) inviscid solution for induced pressure due to the physical wall, (2) solution of a turbulent boundary layer with pressure gradients and curvature effects in the modeling from which the profile correction is computed, and (3) induced pressure computations for the corrected profile. The phase shift of pressure perturbations with respect to the physical wall can be predicted, and pressure drag and skin friction drag can be estimated, with nonlinear viscous effects included. Comparison of the theoretical estimates with experimental data are also presented.

  10. Turbulence and transport in a 3D magnetic boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, Matteo; Carraro, Lorella; Ciaccio, Giovanni; de Masi, Gianluca; Rea, Cristina; Scarin, Paolo; Spizzo, Gianluca; Spolaore, Monica; Vianello, Nicola

    2014-10-01

    In present fusion devices the interaction between 3D magnetic field, edge kinetic properties and turbulence is a crucial issue; not only in intrinsically 3D configurations such as the stellarators, but also in tokamaks, where magnetic perturbations are applied to control ELMs and plasma wall interaction. In the RFX-mod reversed field pinch the spontaneous development at high plasma current of a helical magnetic state displays strong analogies with the aforementioned configurations. At the edge the presence of a stochastic layer and magnetic islands with a well-defined helical symmetry leads to a helical pattern of flow, pressure gradients and turbulent fluctuations: larger fluctuations and shorter correlation lengths are observed near the X-point of the magnetic island, where also a flow slowing-down occurs. Aim of this work is to study the effect of edge turbulence on particle transport in a 3D magnetic boundary, characterizing the properties of the edge blobs along the helical deformation. The magnetic topology also modifies kinetic properties, with higher pressure gradients observed close to the O-point of the island. The measurement of the time evolution of pressure gradient and blob characteristics, can clarify the mutual relation between these two quantities.

  11. Orientation and circulation of vortices in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qi; Ortiz-Dueñas, Cecilia; Longmire, Ellen

    2007-11-01

    The strengths of individual vortices are important in determining the generation and development of surrounding vortices in turbulent boundary layers. The dual-plane PIV data at z^+ = 110 and z/δ = 0.53 in a turbulent boundary layer at Reτ=1160 obtained by Ganapathisubramani et al. (2006) were investigated. 3D swirl strength was used to identify vortex cores. The eigenvector of the velocity gradient tensor was used to determine the orientation of each core, and the resulting eigenvector direction was compared with the average vorticity direction. Circulation of the cores was calculated using the vorticity vector only and using the vorticity vector projected onto the eigenvector. The probability distribution of the angle between the eigenvector and the vorticity vector indicated a peak at 15-20 degrees. The eigenvector angle distributions indicate that at z^+=110, more hairpin legs cross the measurement plane while at z/δ = 0.53, more heads are evident. Details of the orientation and circulation distributions will be discussed in the presentation.

  12. Turbulent Boundary Layer Facility to Investigate Superhydrophobic Drag Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gose, James W.; Perlin, Marc; Ceccio, Steven L.

    2013-11-01

    Recent developments in superhydrophobic surfaces have led to potential economic and environmental benefits, perhaps most notably in skin-friction drag reduction. A team from the University of Michigan has developed a recirculating turbulent boundary layer facility to investigate the reduction of drag along engineered superhydrophobic surfaces (SHS). The facility can accommodate both small and large SHS samples in a test section 7 mm (depth)×100 mm (span)×1000 mm (length). Coupled with an 11.2 kilowatt pump and a 30:1 contraction the facility is capable of producing an average flow velocity of 25 m/s, yielding a Reynolds number of 84,000. Flexure-mounted test samples subjected to shear deflect to a max of 50 microns; movements are measured using a digital microscope composed of a high-resolution camera and a water immersion objective. The setup yields an optical resolution of about one micron whereas sub-micron resolution is achieved by implementing an FFT of two Ronchi rulings. Additional drag measurement methods include pressure drop across the test specimen and PIV measured boundary layers. Additional SHS investigations include the implementation of active gas replenishment, providing an opportunity to replace gas-pockets that would otherwise be disrupted in traditional passive SHS surfaces due to high shear stress and turbulent pressure fluctuations. The authors recognize the support of ONR.

  13. Entropy generation in the viscous parts of turbulent boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Donald M. McEligot; Edmund J. Walsh; Eckart Laurien; Philippe R. Spalart

    2008-06-01

    The local (pointwise) entropy generation rate per unit volume S is a key to improving many energy processes and applications. Consequently, in the present study, the objectives are to examine the effects of Reynolds number and favorable streamwise pressure gradients on entropy generation rates across turbulent boundary layers on flat plates and—secondarily—to assess a popular approximate technique for their evaluation. About two-thirds or more of the entropy generation occurs in the viscous part, known as the viscous layer. Fundamental new results for entropy generation in turbulent boundary layers are provided by extending available direct numerical simulations. It was found that, with negligible pressure gradients, results presented in wall coordinates are predicted to be near “universal” in the viscous layer. This apparent universality disappears when a significant pressure gradient is applied; increasing the pressure gradient decreases the entropy generation rate. Within the viscous layer, the approximate evaluation of S differs significantly from the “proper” value but its integral, the entropy generation rate per unit surface area S, agrees within 5% at its edge.

  14. On the development of turbulent boundary layer with wall transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferro, Marco; Downs, Robert S., III; Fallenius, Bengt E. G.; Fransson, Jens H. M.

    2015-11-01

    An experimental study of the development of the transpired boundary layer in zero pressure gradient is carried out on a 6.4 m long hydrodynamically smooth and perforated plate. The relatively longer development length of the present perforated plate compared to the ones used in previous studies allows us to investigate whether an asymptotic suction boundary layer with constant thickness is achieved for the turbulent state, analogously to what happens in the laminar state. Velocity profiles are obtained via hot-wire anemometry while the wall shear stress is measured at several streamwise locations with hot-film and wall-wire probes as well as with oil-film interferometry. The threshold suction coefficient above which relaminarization starts to occur is examined. The scaling of the mean velocity and of higher order velocity moments is discussed in light of the measured wall shear stress data. Support from the European Research Council of the Advanced Fluid Research On Drag reduction in Turbulence Experiments (AFRODITE) is acknowledged.

  15. Characteristic Lifelength of Coherent Structure in the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.

    2006-01-01

    A characteristic lifelength is defined by which a Gaussian distribution is fit to data correlated over a 3 sensor array sampling streamwise sidewall pressure. The data were acquired at subsonic, transonic and supersonic speeds aboard a Tu-144. Lifelengths are estimated using the cross spectrum and are shown to compare favorably with Efimtsov's prediction of correlation space scales. Lifelength distributions are computed in the time/frequency domain using an interval correlation technique on the continuous wavelet transform of the original time data. The median values of the lifelength distributions are found to be very close to the frequency averaged result. The interval correlation technique is shown to allow the retrieval and inspection of the original time data of each event in the lifelength distribution, thus providing a means to locate and study the nature of the coherent structure in the turbulent boundary layer. The lifelength data can be converted to lifetimes using the convection velocity. The lifetime of events in the time/frequency domain are displayed in Lifetime Maps. The primary purpose of the paper is to validate these new analysis techniques so that they can be used with confidence to further characterize coherent structure in the turbulent boundary layer.

  16. The influence of free-stream turbulence on separation of turbulent boundary layers in incompressible, two-dimensional flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. Leith; Barnett, R. Joel; Fisher, Carl E.; Koukousakis, Costas E.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine if free-stream turbulence scale affects separation of turbulent boundary layers. In consideration of possible interrelation between scale and intensity of turbulence, the latter characteristic also was varied and its role was evaluated. Flow over a 2-dimensional airfoil in a subsonic wind tunnel was studied with the aid of hot-wire anemometry, liquid-film flow visualization, a Preston tube, and static pressure measurements. Profiles of velocity, relative turbulence intensity, and integral scale in the boundary layer were measured. Detachment boundary was determined for various angles of attack and free-stream turbulence. The free-stream turbulence intensity and scale were found to spread into the entire turbulent boundary layer, but the effect decreased as the airfoil surface was approached. When the changes in stream turbulence were such that the boundary layer velocity profiles were unchanged, detachment location was not significantly affected by the variations of intensity and scale. Pressure distribution remained the key factor in determining detachment location.

  17. Effect of pressure gradient fluctuations on boundary layer turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Pranav; Katz, Joseph; Liu, Xiaofeng

    2013-11-01

    The present study focuses on the effect of large-scale pressure gradient fluctuations on turbulence in both, zero pressure gradient (ZPG) and mean favorable pressure gradient (FPG) boundary layers. Time-resolved, two-dimensional PIV data in the streamwise-wall-normal plane enables us to calculate the instantaneous pressure distributions by integrating the planar projection of the material acceleration of the fluid. In both boundary layers, sweeps (u'> 0, v'< 0) mostly occur during periods of adverse pressure gradient fluctuations (∂p'/ ∂x > 0), while favorable pressure gradient fluctuations (∂p'/ ∂x < 0) accompany ejections (u'< 0, v'> 0). Conditional averaging indicates that in the ZPG boundary layer, large-scale ∂p'/ ∂x > 0 events accompanying sweeps lead to the formation of a growing region of ejection downstream, in a phenomenon resembling adverse-pressure induced flow separation. This phenomenon is much less pronounced in the FPG boundary layer, as the large-scale ∂p'/ ∂x > 0 events are for the most part significantly weaker than the mean FPG. Conditional sampling and instantaneous data in the ZPG boundary layer also confirm that although some of the ejections are preceded, and presumably initiated, by regions of adverse pressure gradients and sweeps, others are not. In the FPG boundary layer, there is no evidence of sweeps or adverse pressure gradients immediately upstream of ejections. The mechanisms initiating these structures presumably occur far upstream of the peak in favorable pressure gradient fluctuations. Sponsored by NSF, CBET Division, Fluid Dynamics program.

  18. Direct intervention of hairpin structures for turbulent boundary-layer control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yong-Duck; Choi, Kwing-So; Chun, Ho Hwan

    2008-10-01

    Direct intervention of large-scale, outer-layer structures of a turbulent boundary layer has been carried out by counteracting the upwash motion of hairpin vortices with jets issued from a nozzle placed outside the boundary layer. The methodology of this turbulent boundary-layer control is similar in concept to the opposition control of near-wall turbulence, where the induced velocity field of vortical motion during the turbulence activities is opposed by suction and blowing at the wall. Unlike wall-based turbulence control techniques whose time and length scales reduce with an increase in the Reynolds number, scales of the proposed control are those of the outer layer, making this control technique highly practical. Here we show some results from a direct intervention of hairpin structures in a turbulent boundary layer, demonstrating that this is a promising technique for turbulence control.

  19. Hypersonic boundary-layer transition measurements at Mach 10 on a large seven-degree cone at angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraru, Ciprian G.

    The ability to predict the onset of boundary-layer transition is critical for hypersonic flight vehicles. The development of prediction methods depends on a thorough comprehension of the mechanisms that cause transition. In order to improve the understanding of hypersonic boundary-layer transition, tests were conducted on a large 7° half-angle cone at Mach 10 in the Arnold Engineering Development Complex Wind Tunnel 9. Twenty-four runs were performed at varying unit Reynolds numbers and angles of attack for sharp and blunt nosetip configurations. Heat-transfer measurements were used to determine the start of transition on the cone. Increasing the unit Reynolds number caused a forward movement of transition on the sharp cone at zero angle of attack. Increasing nosetip radius delayed transition up to a radius of 12.7 mm. Larger nose radii caused the start of transition to move forward. At angles of attack up to 10°, transition was leeside forward for nose radii up to 12.7 mm and windside forward for nose radii of 25.4 mm and 50.8 mm. Second-mode instability waves were measured on the sharp cone and cones with small nose radii. At zero angle of attack, waves at a particular streamwise location on the sharp cone were in earlier stages of development as the unit Reynolds number was decreased. The same trend was observed as the nosetip radius was increased. No second-mode waves were apparent for the cones with large nosetip radii. As the angle of attack was increased, waves at a particular streamwise location on the sharp cone moved to earlier stages of growth on the windward ray and later stages of growth on the leeward ray. RMS amplitudes of second-mode waves were computed. Comparison between maximum second-mode amplitudes and edge Mach numbers showed good correlation for various nosetip radii and unit Reynolds numbers. Using the e N method, initial amplitudes were estimated and compared to freestream noise in the second-mode frequency band. Correlations indicate

  20. A vectorized code for calculating laminar and turbulent hypersonic flows about blunt axisymmetric bodies at zero and small angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.; Graves, R. A., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A user's guide is provided for a computer code which calculates the laminar and turbulent hypersonic flows about blunt axisymmetric bodies, such as spherically blunted cones, hyperboloids, etc., at zero and small angles of attack. The code is written in STAR FORTRAN language for the CDC-STAR-100 computer. Time-dependent, viscous-shock-layer-type equations are used to describe the flow field. These equations are solved by an explicit, two-step, time asymptotic, finite-difference method. For the turbulent flow, a two-layer, eddy-viscosity model is used. The code provides complete flow-field properties including shock location, surface pressure distribution, surface heating rates, and skin-friction coefficients. This report contains descriptions of the input and output, the listing of the program, and a sample flow-field solution.

  1. A Simple Technique for Controlling the Görtler Vortex Wavelength in Hypersonic Shock-Wave/Boundary-Layer Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Hajime; Honda, Hirokazu

    This paper describes results of an exploratory study to investigate the capability of a passive approach for controlling the characteristic spanwise length of Görtler vortices generated in hypersonic flows: a serrated leading edge. Heat transfer, pressure measurements, encapsulated thermochromic liquid crystal, schlieren and glow spark visualizations were conducted with a flat plate/ramp model whose leading edge had a triangular wave shape in a gun tunnel at Mach number 10. Effect of wavelength Λ of the triangular waves on downstream flows was studied. Aerodynamic heating patterns observed with the liquid crystal confirmed that the vortex wavelength was equal to Λ. This was also supported by the spark results that filamentary bright lines perpendicular to an installed line-anode parallel to the spanwise direction at the ramp surface emerged at intervals of Λ. Phase lag was observed only between heat transfer data measured in the spanwise direction, which suggests that the vortex structure existed in the reattaching boundary layers. Pressure distribution in the streamwise direction was similar among all of the Λ tested. In contrast, the heat transfer data points exhibited a large scatter and the peak heating value for the finite Λ was somewhat larger than that for the infinite Λ. Schlieren results indicated that the appropriate Λ can mitigate flow separation.

  2. Measurements in Transitional Boundary Layers Under High Free-Stream Turbulence and Strong Acceleration Conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volino, Ralph John

    1995-01-01

    Measurements from transitional, heated boundary layers along a concave-curved test wall are presented and discussed. A boundary layer subject to low free-stream turbulence intensity (FSTI), which contains stationary streamwise (Gortler) vortices, is documented. The low FSTI measurements are followed by measurements in boundary layers subject to high (initially 8%) free-stream turbulence intensity and moderate to strong (K = {nuover U_sp{infty} {2}}{dUinftyover dx} as high as 9times 10^{ -6}) acceleration. The high FSTI experiments are the main focus of the work. Conditions were chosen to simulate those present on the downstream half of the pressure side of a gas turbine airfoil. The high FSTI boundary layers undergo transition from a strongly disturbed non-turbulent state to a fully-turbulent state. Due to the stabilizing effect of strong acceleration, the transition zones are of extended length in spite of the high FSTI. Transitional values of skin friction coefficients and Stanton numbers drop below flat-plate, low FSTI, turbulent flow correlations, but remain well above laminar flow values. Mean velocity and temperature profiles exhibit clear changes in shape as the flow passes through transition. Turbulence statistics, including the turbulent shear stress, turbulent heat flux, and turbulent Prandtl number, are documented. Turbulent transport is strongly suppressed below values in unaccelerated turbulent boundary layers. A technique called "octant analysis" is introduced and applied to several cases from the literature as well as to data from the present study. Octant analysis shows a fundamental difference between transitional and fully-turbulent boundary layers. Transitional boundary layers are characterized by incomplete mixing compared to fully-turbulent boundary layers. Similar octant analysis results are observed in both low and high FSTI cases. Spectral analysis suggests that the non-turbulent zone of the high FSTI flow is dominated by large scale

  3. Direct Numerical Simulation of Two Shock Wave/Turbulent Boundary Layer Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priebe, Stephan

    Direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of two shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions (STBLIs) are presented in this thesis. The first interaction is a 24° compression ramp at Mach 2.9, and the second interaction is an 8° compression ramp at Mach 7.2. The large-scale low-frequency unsteadiness in the Mach 2.9 DNS is investigated with the aim of shedding some light on its physical origin. Previous experimental and computational works have linked the unsteadiness either to fluctuations in the incoming boundary layer or to a mechanism in the downstream separated flow. Consistent with experimental observations, the shock in the DNS is found to undergo streamwise oscillations, which are broadband and occur at frequencies that are about two orders of magnitude lower than the characteristic frequency of the energy-containing turbulent scales in the incoming boundary layer. Based on a coherence and phase analysis of signals at the wall and in the flow field, it is found that the low frequency shock unsteadiness is statistically linked to pulsations of the downstream separated flow. The statistical link with fluctuations in the upstream boundary layer is also investigated. A weak link is observed: the value of the low-frequency coherence with the upstream flow is found to lie just above the limit of statistical significance, which is determined by means of a Monte Carlo study. The dynamics of the downstream separated flow are characterized further based on low-pass filtered DNS fields. The results suggest that structural changes occur in the downstream separated flow during the low-frequency motions, including the breaking-up of the separation bubble, which is observed when the shock moves downstream. The structural changes are described based on the Cf distribution through the interaction, as well as the velocity and vorticity fields. The possible link between the low-frequency dynamics observed in the DNS and results from global instability theory is explored. It

  4. Logarithmic Boundary Layers in Strong Taylor-Couette Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Sander G.; Scharnowski, Sven; Cierpka, Christian; Kähler, Christian J.; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2013-06-01

    We provide direct measurements of the boundary layer properties in highly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow up to Re=2×106 (Ta=6.2×1012) using high-resolution particle image velocimetry and particle tracking velocimetry. We find that the mean azimuthal velocity profile at the inner and outer cylinder can be fitted by the von Kármán log law u+=1/κln⁡y++B. The von Kármán constant κ is found to depend on the driving strength Ta and for large Ta asymptotically approaches κ≈0.40. The variance profiles of the local azimuthal velocity have a universal peak around y+≈12 and collapse when rescaled with the driving velocity (and not with the friction velocity), displaying a log dependence of y+ as also found for channel and pipe flows.

  5. Turbulent boundary layer flow under a sudden contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eloranta, H.; Saarenrinne, P.; Wei, T.

    2002-11-01

    Fluid dynamics plays an essential role in the paper manufacturing process. In this work, a complex turbulent flow taking place in the headbox slice of a modern papermaking machine is studied. A significant source of instabilities in the very last section of the headbox is the slice bar, which is attached to the upper wall of the slice exit. These instabilities are expected to affect the quality of produced paper sheet. The geometry of the headbox slice is simplified to a 2D-channel flow with one-sided forward facing step representing the slice bar. The experiments are carried out in a large-scale water tunnel in which the simplified headbox model is mounted. The forward-facing step generates an intense acceleration and streamline curvature as the flow passes by vertical blockage. The slice bar is also a source of streamwise vortices. These disturbances and their effect to the boundary layer on opposite wall is studied by examining both the time-mean statistics and instantaneous velocity fields measured by a DPIV-system. Experiments are conducted in all three orthogonal planes. Turbulence length-scales, spatial structure and intensities are of special interest. Also flow visualization is performed in the cross-stream (i.e. y-z) plane.

  6. Resolvent mode identification in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Kevin; McKeon, Beverley

    2014-11-01

    The resolvent analysis developed by McKeon and Sharma (J. Fluid Mechanics, 2010) has demonstrated a connection between the most amplified disturbances in wavenumber/frequency space and observed structures in wall turbulence. Three simultaneous hotwire measurements are made across a zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer to identify the resolvent modes associated with these structures. A resolvent mode is designated by a streamwise wavenumber, a spanwise number, and a temporal frequency (k, n, ω respectively) and physically represents a travelling wave. The three wires are aligned in the wall normal direction and spaced in the streamwise and spanwise directions. The signals are filtered at the frequency corresponding to the resolvent mode of interest and ensemble averaged over a single period; the resulting phase differences between wires and their respective separation distances allows for the calculation of the spatial wavenumbers. The eventual goal is to sense these modes in real time as this will provide an important first step towards the development of closed-loop control schemes, specifically within the context of the resolvent framework. The support of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Grant # FA 9550-12-1-0469 (P.M. Doug Smith) is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. Calculation of shock-separated turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, B. S.; Rose, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the complete, time-averaged conservation equations using several eddy-viscosity models for the Reynolds shear stress to close the equations are compared with experimental measurements in a compressible, turbulent separated flow. An efficient time-splitting, explicit difference scheme was used to solve the two-dimensional conservation equations. The experiment used for comparison was a turbulent boundary layer that was separated by an incident shock wave in a Mach 2.93 flow with a unit Reynolds number of 5.7 x 10 to the seventh power m. Comparisons of predicted and experimental values of surface pressure, shear stress along the wall, and velocity profiles are shown. One of the tested eddy-viscosity models which allows the shear stress to be out of equilibrium with the mean flow produces substantially better agreement with the experimental measurements than the simpler models. A tool is thereby provided for inferring additional information about the flow, such as static pressures in the stream, which might not be directly obtainable from experiments.

  8. Near Wall Bubble Transport in a Forced Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, David

    2005-11-01

    Transport of bubbles in turbulent boundary layers remains an area of active research. One of the areas of recent interest is the use of bubbles in skin friction drag reduction. However, for drag reduction to be effective, it seems that bubbles need to be kept in the near wall region, where wall shear stress derives from. Simulating the conditions meaningful to full scale vessels is very difficult in the laboratory due to scaling issues. Towards that end, we have used the idea of forced turbulence to simulate the near wall region. This allows us to inject bubbles into what is effectively the sub-layer, letting us explore bubble transport very close to the wall. We used the hydrogen wire technique to generate bubbles through electrolysis of water. The generating wire was placed at various heights above the wall to measure how transport is affected by injection location. Results indicate that injection at the wall may not be optimal with regards to keeping the bubbles near the wall. The authors would like to thank the Office of Naval Research for their support under Grant No. N00014-00-1-0110.

  9. Proper orthogonal decomposition of a decelerating turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutkun, Murat

    2010-11-01

    Our analysis is based only on streamwise component of velocity fluctuations since the data were simultaneously obtained using a hot-wire rake of 143 single wire probes. The experiment was carried out in the large wind tunnel of Laboratoire de M'ecanique de Lille whose test section is 20 m long, 2 m wide and 1 m high. A 2D bump was used to create converging-diverging flow inside the test section. The thickness of the boundary layer was 25 cm at the measurement location and Reynolds number based on momentum thickness, Reθ, was 17:100 for 10 m s-1 external free stream velocity measured before the bump. Eigenvalue distribution over POD modes shows that approximately 90% of turbulence kinetic energy due to streamwise fluctuations within the domain was captured by the first 5 POD modes. The first POD mode carried more than 45% of turbulence kinetic energy. Resulting eigenspectra are studied for different frequencies and spanwise Fourier indices in order to reduce the number of modes used in reconstructed velocity fields.

  10. Approximate convective heating equations for hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoby, E. V.; Moss, J. N.; Sutton, K.

    1979-01-01

    Laminar and turbulent heating-rate equations appropriate for engineering predictions of the convective heating rates about blunt reentry spacecraft at hypersonic conditions are developed. The approximate methods are applicable to both nonreacting and reacting gas mixtures for either constant or variable-entropy edge conditions. A procedure which accounts for variable-entropy effects and is not based on mass balancing is presented. Results of the approximate heating methods are in good agreement with existing experimental results as well as boundary-layer and viscous-shock-layer solutions.

  11. Numerical study of shock-wave/boundary layer interactions in premixed hydrogen-air hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yungster, Shaye

    1990-01-01

    A computational study of shock wave/boundary layer interactions involving premixed combustible gases, and the resulting combustion processes is presented. The analysis is carried out using a new fully implicit, total variation diminishing (TVD) code developed for solving the fully coupled Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and species continuity equations in an efficient manner. To accelerate the convergence of the basic iterative procedure, this code is combined with vector extrapolation methods. The chemical nonequilibrium processes are simulated by means of a finite-rate chemistry model for hydrogen-air combustion. Several validation test cases are presented and the results compared with experimental data or with other computational results. The code is then applied to study shock wave/boundary layer interactions in a ram accelerator configuration. Results indicate a new combustion mechanism in which a shock wave induces combustion in the boundary layer, which then propagates outwards and downstream. At higher Mach numbers, spontaneous ignition in part of the boundary layer is observed, which eventually extends along the entire boundary layer at still higher values of the Mach number.

  12. Receptivity of Hypersonic Boundary Layers to Distributed Roughness and Acoustic Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, Ponnampalam

    2012-01-01

    Boundary-layer receptivity and stability of Mach 6 flow over smooth and rough 7 half-angle sharp-tipped cones are numerically investigated. The receptivity of the boundary layer to slow acoustic disturbances, fast acoustic disturbances, and vortical disturbances are considered. The effects of two-dimensional isolated and distributed roughness on the receptivity and stability are also simulated. The results show that the instability waves are generated in the leading edge region and that the boundary layer is much more receptive to slow acoustic waves than to the fast waves. Vortical disturbances also generate unstable second modes, however the receptivity coefficients are smaller than that of the slow acoustic wave. An isolated two-dimensional roughness element of height h/delta =1/4 did not produce any difference in the receptivity or in the stability of the boundary layer. Distributed roughness elements produced a small decrease in the receptivity coefficient and also stabilized the boundary layer by small amounts.

  13. Streamline correction for the analysis of boundary layer turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Zoë S.; Baas, Andreas C. W.

    2012-10-01

    Improvements in the design and affordability of ultrasonic anemometers have provided significant contributions to aeolian research, by facilitating high frequency monitoring of three dimensional wind velocities. From these data it is possible to calculate quasi-instantaneous Reynolds stresses to evaluate boundary layer turbulence, moving beyond time-averaged measures, such as shear velocity (U*). As ultrasonic anemometry is used more frequently in aeolian geomorphology it is important to question accepted conventions concerning data processing and analysis. This paper examines data processing questions associated with the application of ultrasonic anemometry to field studies in aeolian geomorphology, through an investigation of three streamline correction routines, the two-step, three-step and planar-fit methods, on data recorded on a gently sloping beach at Magilligan Strand, Northern Ireland in May 2010. The planar-fit technique has not previously been used in aeolian geomorphology. Results are compared with data that have been corrected only for wind direction (yaw). The effects that these different methods have on quadrant analysis and Reynolds stress calculation are discussed. Streamline correction is applied as a time-variable procedure using a characteristic timescale of 8 s following analysis of the resultant wind speed energy spectrum. It is found that Reynolds shear stress is dependent on streamline correction method, with run mean estimates of resultant horizontal shear stress ranging from 0.05 to 0.11 N m- 2 depending on the technique. The two-step method consistently maximises the shear stress and when the resultant horizontal shear is calculated, it produces the most robust estimate for application to aeolian research. In contrast, the different methods have little effect on the identification or sequencing of turbulent structures using quadrant analysis. Streamline correction is an essential processing step when using Reynolds decomposition, however

  14. Compressible turbulent channel flow with impedance boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalo, Carlo; Bodart, Julien; Lele, Sanjiva K.

    2015-03-01

    We have performed large-eddy simulations of isothermal-wall compressible turbulent channel flow with linear acoustic impedance boundary conditions (IBCs) for the wall-normal velocity component and no-slip conditions for the tangential velocity components. Three bulk Mach numbers, Mb = 0.05, 0.2, 0.5, with a fixed bulk Reynolds number, Reb = 6900, have been investigated. For each Mb, nine different combinations of IBC settings were tested, in addition to a reference case with impermeable walls, resulting in a total of 30 simulations. The adopted numerical coupling strategy allows for a spatially and temporally consistent imposition of physically realizable IBCs in a fully explicit compressible Navier-Stokes solver. The IBCs are formulated in the time domain according to Fung and Ju ["Time-domain impedance boundary conditions for computational acoustics and aeroacoustics," Int. J. Comput. Fluid Dyn. 18(6), 503-511 (2004)]. The impedance adopted is a three-parameter damped Helmholtz oscillator with resonant angular frequency, ωr, tuned to the characteristic time scale of the large energy-containing eddies. The tuning condition, which reads ωr = 2πMb (normalized with the speed of sound and channel half-width), reduces the IBCs' free parameters to two: the damping ratio, ζ, and the resistance, R, which have been varied independently with values, ζ = 0.5, 0.7, 0.9, and R = 0.01, 0.10, 1.00, for each Mb. The application of the tuned IBCs results in a drag increase up to 300% for Mb = 0.5 and R = 0.01. It is shown that for tuned IBCs, the resistance, R, acts as the inverse of the wall-permeability and that varying the damping ratio, ζ, has a secondary effect on the flow response. Typical buffer-layer turbulent structures are completely suppressed by the application of tuned IBCs. A new resonance buffer layer is established characterized by large spanwise-coherent Kelvin-Helmholtz rollers, with a well-defined streamwise wavelength λx, traveling downstream with

  15. Turbulence measurements in axisymmetric supersonic boundary layer flow in adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gootzait, E.; Childs, M. E.

    1977-01-01

    Mean flow and turbulence measurements are presented for adiabatic compressible turbulent boundary layer flow in adverse pressure gradients. The gradients were induced on the wall of an axially symmetric wind tunnel by contoured centerbodies mounted on the wind tunnel centerline. The boundary layer turbulence downstream of a boundary layer bleed section in a zero pressure gradient was also examined. The measurements were obtained using a constant temperature hot-wire anemometer. The adverse pressure gradients were found to significantly alter the turbulence properties of the boundary layer. With flow through the bleed holes there was a measureable decrease in the rms longitudinal velocity fluctuations near the wall and the turbulent shear stress in the boundary layer was reduced.

  16. Modification in drag of turbulent boundary layers resulting from manipulation of large-scale structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corke, T. C.; Guezennec, Y.; Nagib, H. M.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of placing a parallel-plate turbulence manipulator in a boundary layer are documented through flow visualization and hot wire measurements. The boundary layer manipulator was designed to manage the large scale structures of turbulence leading to a reduction in surface drag. The differences in the turbulent structure of the boundary layer are summarized to demonstrate differences in various flow properties. The manipulator inhibited the intermittent large scale structure of the turbulent boundary layer for at least 70 boundary layer thicknesses downstream. With the removal of the large scale, the streamwise turbulence intensity levels near the wall were reduced. The downstream distribution of the skin friction was also altered by the introduction of the manipulator.

  17. Developing mass spectrometric techniques for boundary layer measurement in hypersonic high enthalpy test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, G. M., Jr.; Lewis, B. W.; Nowak, R. J.; Eide, D. G.; Paulin, P. A.; Upchurch, B. T.

    1983-01-01

    Thermodynamic flow properties of gases in the boundary layer or the flowfield have been mainly deduced from pressures and temperatures measured on a model. However, further progress with respect to an understanding of these properties requires a more complete characterization of the layer including determination of the gas composition and chemistry. Most attempts to measure boundary layer chemistry involve the employment of a mass spectrometer and an associated gas sampling system. The three major limiting factors which must be addressed for species measurement in aerothermodynamic investigations on models at reentry stream velocities, are gas sampling effects, instrument limitations, and problems with data acquisition. The present investigation is concerned with a concentrated effort to quantitatively identify and correct for instrument and sampling system effects, and to develop a miniaturized high performance mass spectrometer for on-model real-time analysis of the boundary layer and its associated atmosphere.

  18. Characteristics of the laminar-turbulent edge in transitional boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin; Zaki, Tamer

    2015-11-01

    Characteristics of the boundary separating the laminar and turbulent regions in a transitional boundary layer are examined using a time series of three-dimensional flow fields extracted from direct numerical simulations (DNS). In order to accurately mimic boundary-layer experiments perturbed by grid turbulence, the current simulation includes the leading edge of the flat plate and the incoming homogeneous isotropic turbulence. The Reynolds number based on the momentum thickness reaches up to 1400, and high-resolution three-dimensional flow fields of the DNS data will be publicly accessible via the Johns Hopkins Turbulence Database (JHTDB). The laminar-turbulence discrimination algorithm isolates the turbulence spots within the transition zone and the bounding surface of the fully-turbulent flow. Attention is placed on the cross-stream surface between the transition zone and fully-turbulent boundary layer. The shape of this interface is dictated by a balance between downstream advection, destabilization of upstream flow and merging of turbulence spots. Conditionally sampled statistics are examined across the interface, and are also compared to the downstream equilibrium turbulent boundary layer.

  19. Turbulent Suspension Mechanics in Sediment-Laden Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiger, K.

    2013-05-01

    Accurate prediction of benthic sediment transport is a challenging problem due the two-phase nature of the flow near the mobile bed, as well as the large difference in scales between the meso-scale flow and smaller-scale structures interacting with the sediment bed. Of particular importance is the parameterization of the physics at the bottom boundary. This requires estimation of key quantities such as effective bed stress and sediment flux based on the on the outer regional-scale velocity field. An appropriate turbulence/sediment parameterization is needed to specify the correct bottom momentum and sediment flux. Prior work has shown the shortcoming of standard models to properly predict such behavior, which is speculated to result from the dominant role played by large-scale coherent structures in the generation of the bed morphology, suspension of particulates, and important particle-fluid coupling effects. The goal of the current work is to elucidate such relationships through a combination of direct simulation and laboratory-scale experiment, the latter of which will be the primary focus of this paper. Specifically, two-phase PIV is used to provide a novel quantitative description of both phases, allowing for a detailed examination of the flow behavior and particle-turbulence coupling. Experiments were conducted in both a steady, fully-developed turbulent channel flow and an oscillatory boundary layer in order to examine the fundamental behaviour of the suspension and particle coupling mechanisms. The turbulent channel flow measurements indicated an increase in the effective wall stress due to the presence of the sediment on the order of 7%. The sediment suspension was directly correlated with the ejection dynamics of prototypical hairpin structures, but were found to settle back towards the bed in a manner uncorrelated with the fluid structure. In contrast, the measurements of the oscillatory flow reveal it to be dominated by alternating streaming motions and

  20. Characterization of the influence of a favorable pressure gradient on the basic structure of a mach 5.0 high reynolds number supersonic turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichenor, Nathan Ryan

    High-speed high Reynolds number boundary layer flows with mechanical non-equilibrium effects have numerous practical applications; examples include access-to-space ascent, re-entry and descent, and military hypersonic systems. However, many of the basic turbulent flow processes in this regime are poorly understood and are beyond the realm of modern direct numerical simulations Previous studies have shown that curvature driven pressure gradients significantly alter the state of the turbulence in high-speed boundary layers; the turbulence levels have been shown to decrease by large amounts (up to 100%) and the Reynolds shear stress has been shown to change sign. However, most of our understanding is based on point measurement techniques such as hot-wire and Laser Doppler anemometry acquired at low to moderate supersonic Mach numbers (i.e., M = 2-3). After reviewing the available literature, the following scientific questions remain unanswered pertaining to the effect of favorable pressure gradients: (1) How is state of the mean flow and turbulence statistics altered? (2) How is the structure of wall turbulence; break-up, stretch or a combination? (3) How are the Reynolds stress component production mechanisms altered? (4) What is the effect of Mach number on the above processes? To answer these questions and to enhance the current database, an experimental analysis was performed to provide high fidelity documentation of the mean and turbulent flow properties using two-dimensional particle image velocimetry (PIV) along with flow visualizations of a high speed (M = 4.88), high Reynolds number (Retheta ≈ 36,000) supersonic turbulent boundary layer with curvature-driven favorable pressure gradients (a nominally zero, a weak, and a strong favorable pressure gradient). From these data, detailed turbulence analyses were performed including calculating classical mean flow and turbulence statistics, examining turbulent stress production, and performing quadrant

  1. Multi-spacecraft tracing of turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, S.; Zelenyi, L.; Maynard, N.; Sandahl, I.; Kawano, H.; Russell, C. T.; Romanov, S.; Amata, E.; Avanov, L.; Blecki, J.; Buechner, J.; Consolini, G.; Gustafsson, G.; Klimov, S.; Marcucci, F.; Nemecek, Z.; Nikutowski, B.; Pickett, J.; Rauch, J. L.; Safrankova, J.; Skalsky, A.; Smirnov, V.; Stasiewicz, K.; Song, P.; Trotignon, J. G.; Yermolaev, Yu.

    Multi-spacecraft tracing of the high latitude magnetopause (MP) and boundary layers and Interball-1 statistics indicate that: (a) The turbulent boundary layer (TBL) is a persistent feature in the region of the cusp and 'sash', a noticeable part of the disturbances weakly depends on the interplanetary magnetic field By component; TBL is a major site for magnetosheath (MSH) plasma penetration inside the magnetosphere through percolation and local reconnection. (b) The TBL disturbances are mainly inherent with the characteristic kinked double-slope spectra and, most probably, 3-wave cascading. The bi-spectral phase coupling indicates self-organization of the TBL as the entire region with features of the non-equilibrium multi-scale and multi-phase system in the near-critical state. (c) We've found the different outer cusp topologies in summer/winter periods: the summer cusp throat is open for the decelerated MSH flows, the winter one is closed by the distant MP with a large-scale (˜several Re) diamagnetic 'plasma ball' inside the MP; the 'ball' is filled from MSH through patchy merging rather than large-scale reconnection. (d) A mechanism for the energy release and mass inflow is the local TBL reconnection, which operates at the larger scales for the average anti-parallel fields and at the smaller scales for the nonlinear fluctuating fields; the latter is operative throughout the TBL. The remote from TBL anti-parallel reconnection seems to happen independently.

  2. Receptivity of Hypersonic Boundary Layers Due to Acoustic Disturbances over Blunt Cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kara, K.; Balakumar, P.; Kandil, O. A.

    2007-01-01

    The transition process induced by the interaction of acoustic disturbances in the free-stream with boundary layers over a 5-degree straight cone and a wedge with blunt tips is numerically investigated at a free-stream Mach number of 6.0. To compute the shock and the interaction of shock with the instability waves the Navier-Stokes equations are solved in axisymmetric coordinates. The governing equations are solved using the 5th -order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using third-order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. After the mean flow field is computed, acoustic disturbances are introduced at the outer boundary of the computational domain and unsteady simulations are performed. Generation and evolution of instability waves and the receptivity of boundary layer to slow and fast acoustic waves are investigated. The mean flow data are compared with the experimental results. The results show that the instability waves are generated near the leading edge and the non-parallel effects are stronger near the nose region for the flow over the cone than that over a wedge. It is also found that the boundary layer is much more receptive to slow acoustic wave (by almost a factor of 67) as compared to the fast wave.

  3. Hypersonic Laminar Boundary Layer Velocimetry with Discrete Roughness on a Flat Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Watkins, A. Neal; Jones, Stephen B.; Lipford, William E.; Goodman, Kyle Z.; Ivey, Christopher B.; Goyne, Christopher P.

    2010-01-01

    Laminar boundary layer velocity measurements are made on a 10-degree half-angle wedge in a Mach 10 flow. Two types of discrete boundary layer trips were used to perturb the boundary layer gas. The first was a 2-mm tall, 4-mm diameter cylindrical trip. The second was a scaled version of the Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition (BLT) Detailed Test Objective (DTO) trip. Both 1-mm and 2.5-mm tall BLT DTO trips were tested. Additionally, side-view and plan-view axial boundary layer velocity measurements were made in the absence of these tripping devices. The free-stream unit Reynolds numbers tested for the cylindrical trips were 1.7x10(exp 6)/m and 3.3x10(exp 6)/m. The free-stream unit Reynolds number tested for the BLT DTO trips was 1.7x10(exp 6)/m. The angle of attack was kept at approximately 5-degrees for most of the tests resulting in a Mach number of approximately 8.3. These combinations of unit Reynolds numbers and angle of attack resulted in laminar flowfields. To study the precision of the measurement technique, the angle of attack was varied during one run. Nitric-oxide (NO) molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV) was used to obtain averaged axial velocity values and associated uncertainties. These uncertainties are as low as 20 m/s. An interline, progressive scan CCD camera was used to obtain separate images of the initial reference and shifted NO molecules that had been tagged by the laser. The CCD configuration allowed for sub-microsecond sequential acquisition of both images. The maximum planar spatial resolution achieved for the side-view velocity measurements was 0.07-mm in the wall-normal direction by 1.45-mm in the streamwise direction with a spatial depth of 0.5-mm. For the plan-view measurements, the maximum planar spatial resolution in the spanwise and streamwise directions was 0.69-mm by 1.28-mm, respectively, with a spatial depth of 0.5-mm. Temperature sensitive paint (TSP) measurements are provided to compliment the velocity data and to provide further

  4. Time-domain inflow boundary condition for turbulence-airfoil interaction noise prediction using synthetic turbulence modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daehwan; Heo, Seung; Cheong, Cheolung

    2015-03-01

    The present paper deals with development of the synthetic turbulence inflow boundary condition (STIBC) to predict inflow broadband noise generated by interaction between turbulence and an airfoil/a cascade of airfoils in the time-domain. The STIBC is derived by combining inflow boundary conditions that have been successfully applied in external and internal computational aeroacoustics (CAA) simulations with a synthetic turbulence model. The random particle mesh (RPM) method based on a digital filter is used as the synthetic turbulence model. Gaussian and Liepmann spectra are used to define the filters for turbulence energy spectra. The linearized Euler equations are used as governing equations to evaluate the suitability of the STIBC in time-domain CAA simulations. First, the velocity correlations and energy spectra of the synthesized turbulent velocities are compared with analytic ones. The comparison results reveal that the STIBC can reproduce a turbulent velocity field satisfying the required statistical characteristics of turbulence. Particularly, the Liepmann filter representing a non-Gaussian filter is shown to be effectively described by superposing the Gaussian filters. Each Gaussian filter has a different turbulent kinetic energy and integral length scale. Second, two inflow noise problems are numerically solved using the STIBC: the turbulence-airfoil interaction and the turbulence-a cascade of airfoils interaction problems. The power spectrum of noise due to an isolated flat plate airfoil interacting with incident turbulence is predicted, and its result is successfully validated against Amiet's analytic model (Amiet, 1975) [4]. The prediction results of the upstream and downstream acoustic power spectra from a cascade of flat plates are then compared with Cheong's analytic model (Cheong et al., 2006) [30]. These comparisons are also in excellent agreement. On the basis of these illustrative computation results, the STIBC is expected to be applied to

  5. Effects of free-stream turbulence intensity on a boundary layer recovering from concave curvature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kestoras, M. D.; Simon, T. W.

    1995-04-01

    In an attempt to characterize the turbulence characteristics of the high free-stream turbulence (TI approximately 8%) flow, several experiments are conducted on a flat recovery wall downstream of sustained concave curvature in the presence of such flow. A turbulent boundary layer that grows from the leading edge of a concave wall, then passes onto a downstream flat wall is considered. The results indicate that turbulence intensities increase profoundly in the outer region of the boundary layer over the recovery wall. The recovery wall is found to be lifted off by near-wall turbulent eddies while a 'stabilized' region forms near the wall. Contrary to the low-free-stream turbulence intensity flow, turbulent eddies penetrate the outer parts of the 'stabilized' region. The behavior of the Stanton numbers as well as the velocity distribution on the core of the flow are also accounted for.

  6. Effect of Sub-Boundary Layer Vortex Generations on Incident Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casper, J.; Lin, J. C.; Yao, C. S.

    2003-01-01

    Sub-boundary layer vortex generators were tested in a wind tunnel to assess their effect on the velocity field within the wake region of a turbulent boundary layer. Both mean flow quantities and turbulence statistics were measured. Although very small relative to the boundary layer thickness, these so-called micro vortex generators were found to have a measurable effect on the power spectra and integral length scales of the turbulence at a distance many times the height of the devices themselves. In addition, the potential acoustic impact of these devices is also discussed. Measured turbulence spectra are used as input to an acoustic formulation in a manner that compares predicted sound pressure levels that result from the incident boundary-layer turbulence, with and without the vortex generators in the flow.

  7. Receptivity of Hypersonic Boundary Layers to Distributed Roughness and Acoustic Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.

    2013-01-01

    Boundary-layer receptivity and stability of Mach 6 flows over smooth and rough seven-degree half-angle sharp-tipped cones are numerically investigated. The receptivity of the boundary layer to slow acoustic disturbances, fast acoustic disturbances, and vortical disturbances is considered. The effects of three-dimensional isolated roughness on the receptivity and stability are also simulated. The results for the smooth cone show that the instability waves are generated in the leading edge region and that the boundary layer is much more receptive to slow acoustic waves than to the fast acoustic waves. Vortical disturbances also generate unstable second modes, however the receptivity coefficients are smaller than that of the slow acoustic wave. Distributed roughness elements located near the nose region decreased the receptivity of the second mode generated by the slow acoustic wave by a small amount. Roughness elements distributed across the continuous spectrum increased the receptivity of the second mode generated by the slow and fast acoustic waves and the vorticity wave. The largest increase occurred for the vorticity wave. Roughness elements distributed across the synchronization point did not change the receptivity of the second modes generated by the acoustic waves. The receptivity of the second mode generated by the vorticity wave increased in this case, but the increase is lower than that occurred with the roughness elements located across the continuous spectrum. The simulations with an isolated roughness element showed that the second mode waves generated by the acoustic disturbances are not influenced by the small roughness element. Due to the interaction, a three-dimensional wave is generated. However, the amplitude is orders of magnitude smaller than the two-dimensional wave.

  8. Turbulent eddy viscosity modeling in transonic shock/boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inger, G. R.

    1989-01-01

    The treatment of turbulence effects on transonic shock/turbulent boundary layer interaction is addressed within the context of a triple deck approach valid for arbitrary practical Reynolds numbers between 1000 and 10 billion. The modeling of the eddy viscosity and basic turbulent boundary profile effects in each deck is examined in detail using Law-of-the-Wall/Law-of-the-Wake concepts as the foundation. Results of parametric studies showing how each of these turbulence model aspects influences typical interaction zone property distributions (wall pressure, displacement thickness and local skin friction) are presented and discussed.

  9. Turbulent shear spectra and local isotropy in the low-speed boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandborn, Virgil A; Braun, Willis H

    1956-01-01

    From measurements of turbulent shear spectra together with previously reported longitudinal turbulent energy spectra, the concept of local isotropy in a low-speed boundary layer was examined. Results of these measurements and measurements of the time derivatives of turbulent velocities in the x- and y- directions for various frequency bands showed no evidence of local isotropy in the boundary layer. Several methods (based on isotropy) of evaluating the turbulent dissipation term failed to give consistent answers, further emphasizing a lack of local isotropy.

  10. Effects of Wall Cooling on Hypersonic Boundary Layer Receptivity Over a Cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kara, K.; Balakumar, P.; Kandil, O. A.

    2008-01-01

    Effects of wall cooling on the receptivity process induced by the interaction of slow acoustic disturbances in the free-stream are numerically investigated for a boundary layer flow over a 5-degrees straight cone. The free-stream Mach number is 6.0 and the Reynolds number is 7.8x10(exp 6)/ft. Both the steady and unsteady solutions are obtained by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations using 5th-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using 3rd-order total variation diminishing (T VD) Runge-K utta scheme for time integration. Computations are performed for a cone with nose radius of 0.001 inch for adiabatic wall temperature (T(sub aw)), 0.75*T(sub aw), 0.5*T(sub aw), 0.40*T(sub aw), 0.30*T(sub aw), and 0.20*T(sub aw). Once the mean flow field is computed, disturbances are introduced at the upstream end of the computational domain. Generation of instability waves from leading edge region and receptivity of boundary layer to slow acoustic waves are investigated. Computations showed that wall cooling has strong stabilization effect on the first mode disturbances as was observed in the experiments. T ransition location moved to upstream when wall cooling was applied It is also found that the boundary layer is much more receptive to fast acoustic wave (by almost a factor of 50). When simulations performed using the same forcing frequency growth of the second mode disturbances are delayed with wall cooling and they attained values two times higher than that of adiabatic case. In 0.20*T(sub aw) case the transition Reynolds number is doubled compared to adiabatic conditions. The receptivity coefficient for adiabatic wall case (804 R) is 1.5225 and for highly cooled cones (241, and 161 R); they are in the order of 10(exp -3).

  11. The Physics of Turbulence in the Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, Stephen; Cantwell, Brian

    1995-01-01

    The geometry of the velocity field in a numerically simulated incompressible turbulent boundary layer over a flat plate at Re theta=670 has been studied using the invariants of the velocity gradient tensor. These invariants are computed at every grid point in the flow and used to form the discriminant. Of primary interest are those regions in the flow where the discriminant is positive; regions where, according to the characteristic equation, the eigenvalues of the velocity gradient tensor are complex. An observer moving with a frame of reference which is attached to a fluid particle lying within such a region would see a local flow pattern of the type stable-focus-stretching or unstable-focus-compressing. When the flow is visualized this way, continuous, connected, large-scale structures are revealed that extend from the point just below the buffer layer out to the beginning of the wake region. These structures are aligned with the mean shear close to the wall and arch in the cross-stream direction away from the wall. In some cases the structures observed are very similar to to the hairpin eddy vision of boundary layer structure proposed by Theodorsen. That the structure of the flow is revealed more effectively by the discriminant rather than by the vorticity is important and adds support to recent observations of the discriminant in a channel flow simulation. Of particular importance is the fact that the procedure does not require the use of an arbitrary threshold in the discriminant. Further analysis using computer flow visualization shows a high degree of spatial correlation between regions of positive discriminant, extreme negative pressure fluctuations and large instantaneous values of Reynolds shear stress.

  12. Validation of High-Speed Turbulent Boundary Layer and Shock-Boundary Layer Interaction Computations with the OVERFLOW Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, A. B.; Lillard, R. P.; Blaisdell, G. A.; Lyrintizis, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    The capability of the OVERFLOW code to accurately compute high-speed turbulent boundary layers and turbulent shock-boundary layer interactions is being evaluated. Configurations being investigated include a Mach 2.87 flat plate to compare experimental velocity profiles and boundary layer growth, a Mach 6 flat plate to compare experimental surface heat transfer,a direct numerical simulation (DNS) at Mach 2.25 for turbulent quantities, and several Mach 3 compression ramps to compare computations of shock-boundary layer interactions to experimental laser doppler velocimetry (LDV) data and hot-wire data. The present paper describes outlines the study and presents preliminary results for two of the flat plate cases and two small-angle compression corner test cases.

  13. Effects of Thermochemical Nonequilibrium on Hypersonic Boundary-Layer Instability in the Presence of Surface Ablation or Isolated Two-Dimensional Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Clifton Holden

    The current understanding of the effects of thermochemical nonequilibrium on hypersonic boundary-layer instability still contains uncertainties, and there has been little research into the effects of surface ablation, or two-dimensional roughness, on hypersonic boundary-layer instability. The objective of this work is to study the effects of thermochemical nonequilibrium on hypersonic boundary-layer instability. More specifically, two separate nonequilibrium flow configurations are studied: 1) flows with graphite surface ablation, and 2) flows with isolated two-dimensional surface roughness. These two flow types are studied numerically and theoretically, using direct numerical simulation and linear stability theory, respectively. To study surface ablation, a new high-order shock-fitting method with thermochemical nonequilibrium and finite-rate chemistry boundary conditions for graphite ablation is developed and validated. The method is suitable for direct numerical simulation of boundary-layer transition in a hypersonic real-gas flow with graphite ablation. The new method is validated by comparison with three computational data sets and one set of experimental data. Also, a thermochemical nonequilibrium linear stability theory solver with a gas phase model that includes multiple carbon species, as well as a linearized surface graphite ablation model, is developed and validated. It is validated with previously published linear stability analysis and direct numerical simulation results. A high-order method for discretizing the linear stability equations is used which can easily include high-order boundary conditions. The developed codes are then used to study hypersonic boundary-layer instability for a 7 deg half angle blunt cone at Mach 15.99 and the Reentry F experiment at 100~kft. Multiple simulations are run with the same geometry and freestream conditions to help separate real gas, blowing, and carbon species effects on hypersonic boundary-layer instability. For

  14. Numerical Investigation of PLIF Gas Seeding for Hypersonic Boundary Layer Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johanson, Craig T.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations of gas-seeding strategies required for planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) in a Mach 10 air flow were performed. The work was performed to understand and quantify adverse effects associated with gas seeding and to compare different flow rates and different types of seed gas. The gas was injected through a slot near the leading edge of a flat plate wedge model used in NASA Langley Research Center's 31- Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel facility. Nitric oxide, krypton, and iodine gases were simulated at various injection rates. Simulation results showing the deflection of the velocity field for each of the cases are presented. Streamwise distributions of velocity and concentration boundary layer thicknesses as well as vertical distributions of velocity, temperature, and mass distributions are presented for each of the cases. Relative merits of the different seeding strategies are discussed.

  15. Development of an effusive inlet for mass spectrometric gas analysis of hypersonic boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Kenneth G.; Fishel, Charles E.; Brown, David R.; Lewis, Beverley W.; Wood, George M., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The use of a microchannel plate (MCP) as a mass spectrometer inlet device to allow nonintrusive sampling of flight vehicle boundary layers is investigated. Two possible configurations for mounting the inlet are studied: (1) flow coaxial with the channels; and (2) flow perpendicular to the channel axis. The test gases are pure Kr; pure Ne; and a mixture of 10 pct Kr, 10 pct Ne, and 80 pct N2. The pressure ranges studied vary from 500 to 10 microns. A mass discrimination at the quadrupole mass spectrometer is observed, indicating an enrichment in the heavier gas. Possible explanations for this enrichment are discussed. It is shown that an MCP is capable of acting as a nonintrusive sampling device. Further work that will enable quantitative determination of the species at the surface is discussed.

  16. Integral method for the calculation of three-dimensional, laminar and turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, H. W.

    1978-01-01

    The method for turbulent flows is a further development of an existing method; profile families with two parameters and a lag entrainment method replace the simple entrainment method and power profiles with one parameter. The method for laminar flows is a new development. Moment of momentum equations were used for the solution of the problem, the profile families were derived from similar solutions of boundary layer equations. Laminar and turbulent flows at the wings were calculated. The influence of wing tapering on the boundary layer development was shown. The turbulent boundary layer for a revolution ellipsoid is calculated for 0 deg and 10 deg incidence angles.

  17. Investigation of turbulent boundary layer structures using Tomographic PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Longmire, Ellen; Wieneke, Bernd

    2008-11-01

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry (TPIV) data were acquired in the logarithmic region of a zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer flow at friction Reynolds number Reτ = 1160. Experiments were conducted in a suction type wind tunnel seeded with olive oil particles of diameter ˜ 1μm. The volume of interest was illuminated by two Nd:YAG laser beams expanded with appropriate optics into sheets of 8mm thickness in the wall-normal direction (z). Images were acquired by four 2k x 2k pixel cameras, and correlation of reconstructed fields provided the full velocity gradient tensor in a volume of 0.7δ x 0.7δ x 0.07δ, which resolved the region z^+ = 70-150 in the log layer. Various vortex identification techniques, such as Galilean decomposition and iso-surfaces of two- and three-dimensional swirl, were utilized to visualize and analyze the eddy structures present in instantaneous fields. The results of the present study will be compared to results from earlier experimental studies that relied on planar PIV data only to identify vortices and vortex packets as well as from a direct numerical simulation of fully developed channel flow at comparable Reτ.

  18. Predetermined control of turbulent boundary layer with a piezoelectric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao-Bo, Zheng; Nan, Jiang; Hao, Zhang

    2016-01-01

    With a piezoelectric (PZT) oscillator, the predetermined controls of the turbulent boundary layer (TBL) are effective in reducing the drag force. The stream-wise velocities in the TBL are accurately measured downstream of the oscillator driven by an adjustable power source. The mean velocity profiles in the inner and outer scales are reported and the skin friction stresses with different voltage parameters are compared. Reduction of integral spatial scales in the inner region below y+ of 30 suggests that the oscillator at work breaks up the near-wall stream-wise vortices responsible for high skin friction. For the TBL at Reθ of 2183, the controls with a frequency of 160 Hz are superior among our experiments and a relative drag reduction rate of 26.83% is exciting. Wavelet analyses provide a reason why the controls with this special frequency perform best. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11332006, 11272233, and 11411130150) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2012CB720101 and 2012CB720103).

  19. Theoretical Prediction of the Hypersonic Boundary-Layer Over a Row of Microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duck, Peter

    2002-09-01

    This report results from a contract tasking University of Manchester as follows: The key deliverable will be the ability to provide an improved integral condition for calculations in the main body of the flow. Given the plethora of parameters (M, Re, m, d, d/D, d/s), only a small subset of parameter space will be investigated within the available year; however a theoretical approach provides a fast means to investigate certain parameter regimes. Particular attention will be focused on the choice of (boundary) conditions to be imposed inside the cavity. Various asymptotic limits to the problem will be considered analytically, where appropriate, including the limit of very narrow and also very deep cavities. The possibility of modeling the cavity flow as incompressible will be thoroughly investigated. Also, the sensitivity of some of the underlying assumptions will be investigated. Once the micro' detail of the pressure field has been determined (through analytic and/or numerical means), a study will be undertaken to determine the best/most appropriate manner in which to construct a surface integral condition for use within the outer flow calculations. Progress of the proposed work will be monitored by means of one intermediate and one final report.

  20. Pegasus hypersonic flight research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Robert E.; Meyer, Robert R., Jr.; Budd, Gerald D.

    1992-01-01

    Hypersonic aeronautics research using the Pegasus air-launched space booster is described. Two areas are discussed in the paper: previously obtained results from Pegasus flights 1 and 2, and plans for future programs. Proposed future research includes boundary-layer transition studies on the airplane-like first stage and also use of the complete Pegasus launch system to boost a research vehicle to hypersonic speeds. Pegasus flight 1 and 2 measurements were used to evaluate the results of several analytical aerodynamic design tools applied during the development of the vehicle as well as to develop hypersonic flight-test techniques. These data indicated that the aerodynamic design approach for Pegasus was adequate and showed that acceptable margins were available. Additionally, the correlations provide insight into the capabilities of these analytical tools for more complex vehicles in which design margins may be more stringent. Near-term plans to conduct hypersonic boundary-layer transition studies are discussed. These plans involve the use of a smooth metallic glove at about the mid-span of the wing. Longer-term opportunities are proposed which identify advantages of the Pegasus launch system to boost large-scale research vehicles to the real-gas hypersonic flight regime.

  1. Large-eddy simulations of mean and turbulence dynamics in unsteady Ekman boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momen, Mostafa; Bou-Zeid, Elie

    2015-11-01

    Unsteady geostrophic forcing in the atmosphere or ocean not only influences the mean wind, but also affects the turbulent statistics. In order to see when turbulence is in quasi-equilibrium with the mean, one needs to understand how the turbulence decays or develops, and how do the turbulent production, transport and dissipation respond to changes in the imposed forcing. This helps us understand the underlying dynamics of the unsteady boundary layers and develop better turbulence closures for weather/climate models and engineering applications. The present study focuses on the unsteady Ekman boundary layer where pressure gradient, Coriolis, and friction forces interact but are not necessarily in equilibrium. Several cases are simulated using LES to examine how the turbulence and resolved TKE budget terms are modulated by the variability of the mean pressure gradient. We also examine the influence of the forcing variability time-scale on the turbulence equilibrium and TKE budget. It is shown that when the forcing time-scale is in the order of the turbulence characteristic time-scale, the turbulence is no longer in quasi-equilibrium due to highly nonlinear mean-turbulence interactions and hence the conventional log-law and turbulence closures are no longer valid. NSF-PDM under AGS-10266362. Simulations performed at NCAR, and Della server at Princeton University. Cooperative Institute for Climate Science, NOAA-Princeton University under NA08OAR4320752.

  2. Uncertainty Assessment of Hypersonic Aerothermodynamics Prediction Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak; Brown, James L.; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Gnoffo, Peter; Johnston, Christopher O.; Hollis, Brian

    2011-01-01

    The present paper provides the background of a focused effort to assess uncertainties in predictions of heat flux and pressure in hypersonic flight (airbreathing or atmospheric entry) using state-of-the-art aerothermodynamics codes. The assessment is performed for four mission relevant problems: (1) shock turbulent boundary layer interaction on a compression corner, (2) shock turbulent boundary layer interaction due a impinging shock, (3) high-mass Mars entry and aerocapture, and (4) high speed return to Earth. A validation based uncertainty assessment approach with reliance on subject matter expertise is used. A code verification exercise with code-to-code comparisons and comparisons against well established correlations is also included in this effort. A thorough review of the literature in search of validation experiments is performed, which identified a scarcity of ground based validation experiments at hypersonic conditions. In particular, a shortage of useable experimental data at flight like enthalpies and Reynolds numbers is found. The uncertainty was quantified using metrics that measured discrepancy between model predictions and experimental data. The discrepancy data is statistically analyzed and investigated for physics based trends in order to define a meaningful quantified uncertainty. The detailed uncertainty assessment of each mission relevant problem is found in the four companion papers.

  3. Hypersonic flows as related to the National Aerospace Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussoy, Marvin; Huang, George; Menter, Florian

    1995-01-01

    The object of Cooperative Agreement NCC2-452 was to identify, develop, and document reliable turbulence models for incorporation into CFD codes, which would then subsequently be incorporated into numerical design procedures for the NASP and any other hypersonic vehicles. In a two-pronged effort, consisting of an experimental and a theoretical approach, several key features of flows over complex vehicles were identified, and test bodies were designed which were composed of simple geometric shapes over which these flow features were measured. The experiments were conducted in the 3.5' Hypersonic Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center, at nominal Mach numbers from 7 to 8.3 and Re/m from 4.9 x 10(exp 6) to 5.8 x 10(exp 6). Boundary layers approaching the interaction region were 2.5 to 3.7 cm thick. Surface and flow field measurements were conducted, and the initial boundary conditions were experimentally documented.

  4. The relation between skin friction fluctuations and turbulent fluctuating velocities in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz Daniel, Carlos; Laizet, Sylvain; Vassilicos, John Christos

    2015-11-01

    The Townsend-Perry hypothesis of wall-attached eddies relates the friction velocity uτ at the wall to velocity fluctuations at a position y from the wall, resulting in a wavenumber range where the streamwise fluctuating velocity spectrum scales as E (k) ~k-1 and the corresponding structure function scales as uτ2 in the corresponding length-scale range. However, this model does not take in account the fluctuations of the skin friction velocity, which are in fact strongly intermittent. A DNS of zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer suggests a 10 to 15 degree angle from the lag of the peak in the cross-correlations between the fluctuations of the shear stress and streamwise fluctuating velocities at different heights in the boundary layer. Using this result, it is possible to refine the definition of the attached eddy range of scales, and our DNS suggests that, in this range, the second order structure function depends on filtered skin friction fluctuations in a way which is about the same at different distances from the wall and different local Reynolds numbers.

  5. Shock-Wave/Boundary-Layer Interactions in Hypersonic Low Density Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Olejniczak, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    Results of numerical simulations of Mach 10 air flow over a hollow cylinder-flare and a double-cone are presented where viscous effects are significant. The flow phenomena include shock-shock and shock- boundary-layer interactions with accompanying flow separation, recirculation, and reattachment. The purpose of this study is to promote an understanding of the fundamental gas dynamics resulting from such complex interactions and to clarify the requirements for meaningful simulations of such flows when using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Particular emphasis is placed on the sensitivity of computed results to grid resolution. Comparisons of the DSMC results for the hollow cylinder-flare (30 deg.) configuration are made with the results of experimental measurements conducted in the ONERA RSCh wind tunnel for heating, pressure, and the extent of separation. Agreement between computations and measurements for various quantities is good except that for pressure. For the same flow conditions, the double- cone geometry (25 deg.- 65 deg.) produces much stronger interactions, and these interactions are investigated numerically using both DSMC and Navier-Stokes codes. For the double-cone computations, a two orders of magnitude variation in free-stream density (with Reynolds numbers from 247 to 24,7 19) is investigated using both computational methods. For this range of flow conditions, the computational results are in qualitative agreement for the extent of separation with the DSMC method always predicting a smaller separation region. Results from the Navier-Stokes calculations suggest that the flow for the highest density double-cone case may be unsteady; however, the DSMC solution does not show evidence of unsteadiness.

  6. Experimental study of boundary layer transition with elevated freestream turbulence on a heated flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Ki-Hyeon; Reshotko, Eli

    1991-01-01

    A detailed investigation to document momentum and thermal development of boundary layers undergoing natural transition on a heated flat plate was performed. Experimental results of both overall and conditionally sampled characteristics of laminar, transitional, and low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers are presented. Measurements were acquired in a low-speed, closed-loop wind tunnel with a freestream velocity of 100 ft/s and zero pressure gradient over a range of freestream turbulence intensities (TI) from 0.4 to 6 percent. The distributions of skin friction, heat transfer rate and Reynolds shear stress were all consistent with previously published data. Reynolds analogy factors for R(sub theta) is less than 2300 were found to be well predicted by laminar and turbulent correlations which accounted for an unheated starting length. The measured laminar value of Reynolds analogy factor was as much as 53 percent higher than the Pr(sup -2/3). A small dependence of turbulent results on TI was observed. Conditional sampling performed in the transitional boundary layer indicated the existence of a near-wall drop in intermittency, pronounced at certain low intermittencies, which is consistent with the cross-sectional shape of turbulent spots observed by others. Non-turbulent intervals were observed to possess large magnitudes of near-wall unsteadiness and turbulent intervals had peak values as much as 50 percent higher than were measured at fully turbulent stations. Non-turbulent and turbulent profiles in transitional boundary layers cannot be simply treated as Blasius and fully turbulent profiles, respectively. The boundary layer spectra indicate predicted selective amplification of T-S waves for TI is approximately 0.4 percent. However, for TI is approximately 0.8 and 1.1 percent, T-S waves are localized very near the wall and do not play a dominant role in transition process.

  7. Free-stream turbulence and concave curvature effects on heated, transitional boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, J.; Simon, T. W.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the transition process on flat-plate and concave curved-wall boundary layers for various free-stream turbulence levels was performed. Results show that for transition of a flat-plate, the two forms of boundary layer behavior, identified as laminar-like and turbulent-like, cannot be thought of as separate Blasius and fully-turbulent profiles, respectively. Thus, simple transition models in which the desired quantity is assumed to be an average, weighted on intermittency, of the theoretical laminar and fully turbulent values is not expected to be successful. Deviation of the flow identified as laminar-like from theoretical laminar behavior is shown to be due to recovery after the passage of a turbulent spot, while deviation of the flow identified as turbulent-like from the full-turbulent values is thought to be due to incomplete establishment of the fully-turbulent power spectral distribution. Turbulent Prandtl numbers for the transitional flow, computed from measured shear stress, turbulent heat flux and mean velocity and temperature profiles, were less than unity. For the curved-wall case with low free-stream turbulence intensity, the existence of Gortler vortices on the concave wall within both laminar and turbulent flows was established using liquid crystal visualization and spanwise velocity and temperature traverses. Transition was found to occur via a vortex breakdown mode. The vortex wavelength was quite irregular in both the laminar and turbulent flows, but the vortices were stable in time and space. The upwash was found to be more unstable, with higher levels of u' and u'v', and lower skin friction coefficients and shape factors. Turbulent Prandtl numbers, measured using a triple-wire probe, were found to be near unity for all post-transitional profiles, indicating no gross violation of Reynolds analogy. No evidence of streamwise vortices was seen in the high turbulence intensity case.

  8. A turbulent burst model for boundary layer flows with pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, L. C.; Benton, D. J.

    The object of this paper is to develop a surface renewal model of the turbulent burst phenomenon for momentum and energy transfer in the wall region for turbulent boundary layer flows with pressure gradient. In addition to obtaining inner laws for the distributions in velocity and temperature, predictions are obtained for the effect of pressure gradient on the mean burst frequency and on the turbulent Prandtl number within the wall region for slight favorable and mild adverse pressure gradients.

  9. Heat Transfer in the Turbulent Boundary Layer of a Compressible Gas at High Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankl, F.

    1942-01-01

    The Reynolds law of heat transfer from a wall to a turbulent stream is extended to the case of flow of a compressible gas at high speeds. The analysis is based on the modern theory of the turbulent boundary layer with laminar sublayer. The investigation is carried out for the case of a plate situated in a parallel stream. The results are obtained independently of the velocity distribution in the turbulent boundar layer.

  10. A general integral form of the boundary-layer equation for incompressible flow with an application to the calculation of the separation point of turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tetervin, Neal; Lin, Chia Chiao

    1951-01-01

    A general integral form of the boundary-layer equation, valid for either laminar or turbulent incompressible boundary-layer flow, is derived. By using the experimental finding that all velocity profiles of the turbulent boundary layer form essentially a single-parameter family, the general equation is changed to an equation for the space rate of change of the velocity-profile shape parameter. The lack of precise knowledge concerning the surface shear and the distribution of the shearing stress across turbulent boundary layers prevented the attainment of a reliable method for calculating the behavior of turbulent boundary layers.

  11. Supplement to the ICRPG turbulent boundary layer nozzle analysis computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omori, S.; Gross, K. W.

    1972-01-01

    A supplement is presented for a turbulent boundary layer nozzle analysis computer program. It describes the program calculation sequence and presents a detailed documentation of each subroutine. Important equations are derived explicitly, and improvements to the program are discussed.

  12. Turbulence characteristics of separated boundary layer flow under unsteady pressure gradients using direct numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Junshin; Bromby, William; You, Donghyun

    2013-11-01

    To understand turbulence characteristics of separated boundary layer flow under unsteady pressure gradients, a direct numerical simulation study is performed. Steady and unsteady blowing-suction velocity distributions are imposed along the upper boundary of the computational domain to introduce steady and unsteady adverse pressure gradients leading to steady and unsteady separated turbulent boundary layers, respectively. Time averaged and phase averaged turbulence statistics such as velocity, vorticity, kinetic energy budgets, Reynolds stress budgets, wall pressure fluctuations and skin friction distributions are examined in detail with aims of gaining understanding of flow physics for unsteady separated turbulent boundary layer and the sources of incapability of the conventional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes models in predicting unsteady separation. Supported by the Army Research Office Grant W911NF1010348 and the National Research Foundation of Korea Grant NRF-2012R1A1A2003699.

  13. Laminar boundary layer in conditions of natural transition to turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polyakov, N. F.

    1986-01-01

    Results of experimental study of regularities of a natural transition of a laminar boundary layer to a turbulent layer at low subsonic air flow velocities are presented, analyzed and compared with theory and model experiments.

  14. Velocity fields and optical turbulence near the boundary in a strongly convective laboratory flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matt, Silvia; Hou, Weilin; Goode, Wesley; Hellman, Samuel

    2016-05-01

    Boundary layers around moving underwater vehicles or other platforms can be a limiting factor for optical communication. Turbulence in the boundary layer of a body moving through a stratified medium can lead to small variations in the index of refraction, which impede optical signals. As a first step towards investigating this boundary layer effect on underwater optics, we study the flow near the boundary in the Rayleigh-Bénard laboratory tank at the Naval Research Laboratory Stennis Space Center. The tank is set up to generate temperature-driven, i.e., convective turbulence, and allows control of the turbulence intensity. This controlled turbulence environment is complemented by computational fluid dynamics simulations to visualize and quantify multi-scale flow patterns. The boundary layer dynamics in the laboratory tank are quantified using a state-of-the-art Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system to examine the boundary layer velocities and turbulence parameters. The velocity fields and flow dynamics from the PIV are compared to the numerical model and show the model to accurately reproduce the velocity range and flow dynamics. The temperature variations and thus optical turbulence effects can then be inferred from the model temperature data. Optical turbulence is also visible in the raw data from the PIV system. The newly collected data are consistent with previously reported measurements from high-resolution Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter profilers (Nortek Vectrino), as well as fast thermistor probes and novel next-generation fiber-optics temperature sensors. This multi-level approach to studying optical turbulence near a boundary, combining in-situ measurements, optical techniques, and numerical simulations, can provide new insight and aid in mitigating turbulence impacts on underwater optical signal transmission.

  15. Large Eddy Simulation of Stable Boundary Layer Turbulent Processes in Complex Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Eric D. Skyllingstad

    2005-01-26

    Research was performed using a turbulence boundary layer model to study the behavior of cold, dense flows in regions of complex terrain. Results show that flows develop a balance between turbulent entrainment of warm ambient air and dense, cold air created by surface cooling. Flow depth and strength is a function of downslope distance, slope angle and angle changes, and the ambient air temperature.

  16. Measurements in Transitional Boundary Layers Under High Free-Stream Turbulence and Strong Acceleration Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volino, Ralph J.; Simon, Terrence W.

    1995-01-01

    Measurements from transitional, heated boundary layers along a concave-curved test wall are presented and discussed. A boundary layer subject to low free-stream turbulence intensity (FSTI), which contains stationary streamwise (Gortler) vortices, is documented. The low FSTI measurements are followed by measurements in boundary layers subject to high (initially 8%) free-stream turbulence intensity and moderate to strong streamwise acceleration. Conditions were chosen to simulate those present on the downstream half of the pressure side of a gas turbine airfoil. Mean flow characteristics as well as turbulence statistics, including the turbulent shear stress, turbulent heat flux, and turbulent Prandtl number, are documented. A technique called "octant analysis" is introduced and applied to several cases from the literature as well as to data from the present study. Spectral analysis was applied to describe the effects of turbulence scales of different sizes during transition. To the authors'knowledge, this is the first detailed documentation of boundary layer transition under such high free-stream turbulence conditions.

  17. Characteristics of the behavior of the small-scale turbulence structure in the boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrocheev, O.V.; Wojciechowski, J.

    1995-12-01

    Results of theoretical and experimental studies of the structure of turbulence in the boundary layer are presented. It is shown that the spectral density of turbulence energy deviates systematically from Kolmogorov-Obukhov`s law and a theoretical explanation of this deviation is given.

  18. Forced unsteady deceleration of a turbulent boundary layer from a temporal perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brereton, G. J.

    1992-01-01

    The behavior of a turbulent boundary layer which has been subjected to a local ramp-like deceleration in the external velocity field, which leads to forced separation, has been studied experimentally. The data of this study are re-interpreted in light of more recent findings concerning the temporal nature of boundary layer turbulence in the presence of forced unsteady shear. In particular, the robustness of the near-wall turbulent motions to organized deformation is recognized. Their resilence during unsteady shearing action promotes continued efficient turbulent mixing and rapid redistribution of turbulent kinetic energy during forced transients. In aerodynamic problems, the rapid nature of the adjustment of the turbulence field to a new temporal boundary condition necessitates equally rapid remedial measures to be taken if means of control/prevention of forced unsteady separation are to be deployed to maximum effect. This requirement suggests exploration of the use of simple, real-time statistical forecasting techniques, based upon time-series analysis of easily-measurable features of the flow, to help assure timely deployment of mechanisms of boundary-layer control. This paper focuses upon the nature of turbulence in boundary layers undergoing forced deceleration which would lead to separation. A preliminary form of a forecasting model is presented and evaluated. Using observations of the previous two large eddies passing a detector, it forecasts the behavior of the future large eddy rather well.

  19. Practical calculation of laminar and turbulent bled-off boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, R.

    1978-01-01

    Bleed-off of boundary layer material is shown to be an effective means for reducing drag by conserving the laminar boundary layer and preventing separation of the turbulent boundary layer. The case in which the two effects of bleed-off overlap is examined. Empirical methods are extended to the case of bleed-off. Laminar and turbulent boundary layers are treated simultaneously and the approximation differential equations are solved without an uncertain error. The case without bleed-off is also treated.

  20. Extraction of the large eddy structure of a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemmerman, L. A.; Payne, F. R.

    1977-01-01

    Much attention is currently being focused on turbulence modeling by separation of large-scale and small-scale turbulence. One major difficulty with this method is the problem of separating and defining the large-scale structure. In this paper, a method is presented which does this separation by analyzing time-averaged, two-point double velocity correlation measurements. The basis of the method is a maximization of the inner product of a candidate velocity field with the measured turbulent velocity field. An eigenvalue problem results, whose solution provides a set of orthogonal eigenfunctions associated with specific modes of turbulent motion. The large-scale eddy, containing most of the turbulent energy, is associated with the first (largest) mode. The turbulent velocity field is then represented as a sum of the eigenfunctions. A short description of the equations is given, the methods of solution are discussed, and some results for a two-dimensional fully developed turbulent boundary layer are presented.

  1. Investigations of the wall-shearing stress in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwieg, Hubert; Tillmann, W

    1950-01-01

    Because of the unsatisfactory state of knowledge concerning the surface shearing stress of boundary layers with pressure gradients, the problem is re-examined. It is found that for general turbulent boundary layers in wall proximity, that is, in the laminar sublayer, in the transition zone and in the part of the completely turbulent zone near the wall, the same universal law applies as for the plate flow.

  2. Conditionally-Sampled Turbulent and Non-turbulent Measurements of Entropy Generation Rate in the Transition Region of Boundary Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Edmond J. Walsh; Kevin P. Nolan; Donald M. McEligot; Ralph J. Volino; Adrian Bejan

    2007-05-01

    Conditionally-sampled boundary layer data for an accelerating transitional boundary layer have been analyzed to calculate the entropy generation rate in the transition region. By weighing the nondimensional dissipation coefficient for the laminar-conditioned-data and turbulent-conditioned-data with the intermittency factor the average entropy generation rate in the transition region can be determined and hence be compared to the time averaged data and correlations for steady laminar and turbulent flows. It is demonstrated that this method provides, for the first time, an accurate and detailed picture of the entropy generation rate during transition. The data used in this paper have been taken from detailed boundary layer measurements available in the literature. This paper provides, using an intermittency weighted approach, a methodology for predicting entropy generation in a transitional boundary layer.

  3. An embedded boundary formulation for large-eddy simulation of turbulent flows interacting with moving boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianming

    2005-11-01

    A non-boundary-conforming formulation for simulating transitional and turbulent flows with complex geometries and dynamically moving boundaries on fixed orthogonal grids is developed. The underlying finite-difference solver for the filtered incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in both Cartesian and cylindrical coordinates is based on a second-order fractional step method on staggered grid. To satisfy the boundary conditions on an arbitrary immersed interface, the velocity field at the grid points near the interface is reconstructed locally without smearing the sharp interface. The complications caused by the Eulerian grid points emerging from a moving solid body into the fluid phase are treated with a novel "field-extension" strategy. To treat the two-way interactions between the fluid and structure, a strong coupling scheme based on Hamming's fourth-order predictor-corrector method has been developed. The fluid and the structure are treated as elements of a single dynamical system, and all of the governing equations are integrated simultaneously, and iteratively in the time-domain. A variety of two and three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction problems of increasing complexity have been considered to demonstrate the accuracy and the range of applicability of the method. In particular, forced vibrations of a rigid circular cylinder including the harmonic in-line vibrations in a quiescent fluid and the transverse vibrations in a free-stream, and the vortex-induced vibrations of an elastic cylinder with one and two degrees of freedom in a free-stream are presented and compared with reference simulations and experiments. Three-dimensional DNS and LES of fluid flows involving stationary complex geometries include the flow past a sphere at Re = 50 ˜ 1,000, the transitional flow past an airfoil with a 10° attack angle at Re = 10,000. Then, the turbulent flow over a traveling wavy wall at Re = 10,170 are simulated are compared with the detailed DNS using body

  4. The effect of boundary-layer turbulence on mixing in heated jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strykowski, P. J.; Russ, S.

    1992-05-01

    The mixing properties of a heated axisymmetric jet at a density ratio of 0.55 were examined for initially laminar and turbulent separated boundary layers. Initially laminar jets displayed large intermittent spread rates with half-angles up to 45° and a corresponding rapid decay of the streamwise velocity and temperature on the jet axis. When the boundary layer was disturbed upstream of the nozzle exit, creating an initially turbulent separated layer, the jet mixing was significantly reduced. Flow visualization revealed that the turbulent conditions eliminated the intermittent nature of the jet spreading, producing constant spreading rates at half-angles near 10°.

  5. The effect of boundary-layer turbulence on mixing in heated jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strykowski, P. J.; Russ, S.

    1992-05-01

    The mixing properties of a heated axisymmetric jet at a density ratio of 0.55 were examined for initially laminar and turbulent separated boundary layers. Initially laminar jets displayed large intermittent spread rates with half-angles up to 45 deg and a corresponding rapid decay af the streamwise velocity and temperature on the jet axis. When the boundary layer was disturbed upstream of the nozzle exit, creating an initially turbulent separated layer, the jet mixing was significantly reduced. Flow visualization revealed that the turbulent conditions eliminated the intermittent nature of the jet spreading, producing constant spreading rates at half-angles near 10 deg.

  6. Comments on Crocco's solution and the independence principle for compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckwith, I. E.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of the present note is to show that on a flat plate where both the wall temperature and mean wall pressure are constant, neither of the limitations of parallel flow or of unity for the turbulent Prandtl number are required in order for the Crocco solution to apply to the turbulent boundary-layer flow. It is shown herein that this result is subject to restrictions on the magnitude of pressure fluctuations. The same analysis is generalized to show that the compressible turbulent boundary layer on an isothermal swept flat plate is independent of the spanwise flow if the molecular Prandtl number is unity.

  7. Calculation of laminar and turbulent boundary layers for two-dimensional time-dependent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, T.

    1977-01-01

    A general method for computing laminar and turbulent boundary layers for two-dimensional time-dependent flows is presented. The method uses an eddy-viscosity formulation to model the Reynolds shear-stress term and a very efficient numerical method to solve the governing equations. The model was applied to steady two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows and was shown to give good results. A discussion of the numerical method and the results obtained by the present method for both laminar and turbulent flows are discussed. Based on these results, the method is efficient and suitable for solving time-dependent laminar and turbulent boundary layers.

  8. Determination of general relations for the behavior of turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Doenhoff, Albert E; Tetervin, Neal

    1943-01-01

    An analysis has been made of a considerable amount of data for turbulent boundary layers along wings and bodies of various shapes in order to determine the fundamental variables that control the development of turbulent boundary layers. It was found that the type of velocity distribution in the boundary layer could be expressed in terms of a single parameter. This parameter was chosen as the ratio of the displacement thickness to the momentum thickness of the boundary layer. The variables that control the development of the turbulent boundary layer apparently are: (1) the ratio of the nondimensional pressure gradient, expressed in terms of the local dynamic pressure outside the boundary layer and boundary-layer thickness, to the local skin-friction coefficient and (2) the shape of the boundary layer. An empirical equation has been developed in terms of these variables that, when used with the momentum equation and the skin-friction relation, makes it possible to trace the development of the turbulent boundary layer to the separation point.

  9. Turbulence model investigations on the boundary layer flow with adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Zhao; Zhi, Zong; Li, Zou; Tianlin, Wang

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a numerical study of flow in the turbulence boundary layer with adverse and pressure gradients (APGs) is conducted by using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. This research chooses six typical turbulence models, which are critical to the computing precision, and to evaluating the issue of APGs. Local frictional resistance coefficient is compared between numerical and experimental results. The same comparisons of dimensionless averaged velocity profiles are also performed. It is found that results generated by Wilcox (2006) k- w are most close to the experimental data. Meanwhile, turbulent quantities such as turbulent kinetic energy and Reynolds-stress are also studied.

  10. Implicit Large-Eddy Simulations of Zero-Pressure Gradient, Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekhar, Susheel; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2015-01-01

    A set of direct simulations of zero-pressure gradient, turbulent boundary layer flows are conducted using various span widths (62-630 wall units), to document their influence on the generated turbulence. The FDL3DI code that solves compressible Navier-Stokes equations using high-order compact-difference scheme and filter, with the standard recycling/rescaling method of turbulence generation, is used. Results are analyzed at two different Re values (500 and 1,400), and compared with spectral DNS data. They show that a minimum span width is required for the mere initiation of numerical turbulence. Narrower domains ((is) less than 100 w.u.) result in relaminarization. Wider spans ((is) greater than 600 w.u.) are required for the turbulent statistics to match reference DNS. The upper-wall boundary condition for this setup spawns marginal deviations in the mean velocity and Reynolds stress profiles, particularly in the buffer region.

  11. A note on turbulent spots over a rough bed in wave boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carstensen, S.; Sumer, B. M.; Fredsøe, J.

    2012-11-01

    This study is a continuation of the investigation of turbulent spots in wave boundary layers over a smooth wall reported by Carstensen et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 646, 169-206 (2010), 10.1017/S0022112009992825]. The present paper summarises the results of an experimental investigation of turbulent spots in wave boundary layers over a rough wall. Two kinds of experiments were made: flow visualization tests and velocity profile measurements. The experiments show that turbulent spots as observed in the smooth-wall wave boundary layers are present irrespective of wall roughness conditions. As in the smooth-wall case the turbulent spots over the rough wall appear locally in time and space and grow in size as time progresses.

  12. A documentation of two- and three-dimensional shock-separated turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. D.; Brown, J. L.; Kussoy, M. I.

    1988-01-01

    A shock-related separation of a turbulent boundary layer has been studied and documented. The flow was that of an axisymmetric turbulent boundary layer over a 5.02-cm-diam cylinder that was aligned with the wind tunnel axis. The boundary layer was compressed by a 30 deg half-angle conical flare, with the cone axis inclined at an angle alpha to the cylinder axis. Nominal test conditions were P sub tau equals 1.7 atm and M sub infinity equals 2.85. Measurements were confined to the upper-symmetry, phi equals 0 deg, plane. Data are presented for the cases of alpha equal to 0. 5. and 10 deg and include mean surface pressures, streamwise and normal mean velocities, kinematic turbulent stresses and kinetic energies, as well as reverse-flow intermittencies. All data are given in tabular form; pressures, streamwise velocities, turbulent shear stresses, and kinetic energies are also presented graphically.

  13. Influence of bulk turbulence and entrance boundary layer thickness on the curved duct flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of bulk turbulence and boundary layer thickness on the secondary flow development in a square, 90 degree turning duct was investigated. A three-dimensional laser velocimetry system was utilized to measure the mean and fluctuating components of velocity at six cross-planes in the duct. The results from this investigation, with entrance boundary layer thickness of 20 percent, were compared with the thin boundary layer results documented in NASA CR-174811. The axial velocity profiles, cross-flow velocities, and turbulence intensities were compared and evaluated with regard to the influence of bulk turbulence intensity and boundary layer thickness, and the influence was significant. The results of this investigation expand the 90 degree curved duct experimental data base to higher turbulence levels and thicker entrance boundary layers. The experimental results provide a challenging benchmark data base for computational fluid dynamics code development and validation. The variation of inlet bulk turbulence intensity provides additional information to aid in turbulence model evaluation.

  14. Moist turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection with Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidauer, Thomas; Schumacher, Jörg

    2012-07-01

    Turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection with phase changes in an extended layer between two parallel impermeable planes is studied by means of three-dimensional direct numerical simulations for Rayleigh numbers between 104 and 1.5 × 107 and for Prandtl number Pr = 0.7. Two different sets of boundary conditions of temperature and total water content are compared: imposed constant amplitudes which translate into Dirichlet boundary conditions for the scalar field fluctuations about the quiescent diffusive equilibrium and constant imposed flux boundary conditions that result in Neumann boundary conditions. Moist turbulent convection is in the conditionally unstable regime throughout this study for which unsaturated air parcels are stably and saturated air parcels unstably stratified. A direct comparison of both sets of boundary conditions with the same parameters requires to start the turbulence simulations out of differently saturated equilibrium states. Similar to dry Rayleigh-Bénard convection the differences in the turbulent velocity fluctuations, the cloud cover, and the convective buoyancy flux decrease across the layer with increasing Rayleigh number. At the highest Rayleigh numbers the system is found in a two-layer regime, a dry cloudless and stably stratified layer with low turbulence level below a fully saturated and cloudy turbulent one which equals a classical Rayleigh-Bénard convection layer. Both are separated by a strong inversion that gets increasingly narrower for growing Rayleigh number.

  15. An active control system for the turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lew, James

    This thesis presents the development process and the experimental results of a system constructed to apply real-time control to the structures of the turbulent boundary layer region in order to reduce surface shear stress. The system is composed of three main components: an array of MEMS surface shear stress, tauw sensors; a MEMS flap actuator; and a control logic which integrates the hardware components together into a closed system. The objective of this system is to reduce the stress contained in streak-like regions of high tauw. The sensor array, used to image the tauw distribution, is an extension of the thermal based tauw sensor developed by Jiang. Numerous studies have been performed using this device, the results of which have validated its performance. For this study, a new temperature compensation methodology, based on the surface temperature of the sensor chip, was employed in order to account for possible temperature variations at the wall surface. The actuator, a pneumatically driven flap, is developed as part of the present research. The device is, in essence, a 3 mm x 1 mm cantilever beam that sits on top of an inflatable diaphragm and is capable of actuation frequencies of over 200 Hz and amplitudes of over .11 mm. When it is oscillated in the open loop mode, the effect over one cycle of motion is an average reduction by as much as 2.5% in tauw in the region immediately downstream. A neural network is employed to identify the streak-like regions of interest. Results have shown that this network is successful in identifying the streak-like regions of interest. The control logic employs this network in a predictive, feed-forward scheme to determine the appropriate actuator response. Offline studies have shown that under optimal conditions, the signature of the streak-like regions can be eliminated. Online results conform well to the offline predictions. While unable to achieve the optimal conditions, online experiments show that the system is capable

  16. Control and reduction of unsteady pressure loads in separated shock wave turbulent boundary layer interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolling, David S.; Barter, John W.

    1995-01-01

    The focus was on developing means of controlling and reducing unsteady pressure loads in separated shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions. Section 1 describes how vortex generators can be used to effectively reduce loads in compression ramp interaction, while Section 2 focuses on the effects of 'boundary-layer separators' on the same interaction.

  17. A class of unsteady, three-dimensional flow structures in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    A restricted class of mathematically admissible, unsteady, three dimensional flows was identified which may constitute part of the structure observed in turbulent boundary layers. The development of the model and some general results are discussed. The resulting solution has characteristics which suggest how upwelling low speed flow can trigger a downward jetting of irrotational high speed fluid into the boundary layer.

  18. Parametric study of relaminarization of turbulent boundary layers on nozzle walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreskovsky, J. P.; Shamroth, S. J.; Mcdonald, H.

    1974-01-01

    By means of comparisons between theoretical predictions and experimental data, the accuracy of a boundary procedure to predict the effect of large streamwise accelerations upon initially turbulent boundary layers is assessed. The boundary layer procedure is based upon simultaneous solution of the boundary layer partial differential equations and the integral turbulence kinetic energy equation. The results of the present investigation show the ability of the procedure to accurately predict properties of boundary layers subjected to large streamwise accelerations. The procedure is used to conduct a parametric study of the effect of free stream turbulence, heat transfer, Reynolds number, acceleration, and Mach number on boundary layers in supersonic nozzles to assist in the design of a quiet tunnel. Results of the investigation show that, even in the presence of moderate free-stream turbulence levels, the boundary layer in the approach section of the quiet tunnel nozzle relaminarizes and becomes thin enough to be removed by a small slot in the nozzle wall. Furthermore, the calculations indicate that it should be possible to maintain a laminar boundary layer for the entire length of the supersonic portion of the quiet tunnel nozzle.

  19. Effect of Free Stream Turbulence and Other Vortical Disturbances on a Laminar Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Marvin E.; Leib, S. J.; Wundrow, David W.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the effect of free-stream turbulence on the pretransitional flat-plate boundary layer. It is assumed that either the turbulence Reynolds number or the downstream distance (or both) is small enough so that the flow can be linearized. The dominant disturbances in the boundary layer, which are of the Klebanoff type, are governed by the linearized unsteady boundary-region equations, i.e., the Navier Stokes equations with the streamwise derivatives neglected in the viscous and pressure-gradient terms. The turbulence is represented as a superposition of vortical free-stream Fourier modes, and the corresponding individual Fourier component solutions to the boundary-region equations are obtained numerically. The results are then superposed to compute the root mean square of the fluctuating streamwise velocity in the boundary layer produced by the actual free-stream turbulence. The calculated boundary-layer disturbances are in good quantitative agreement with the experimentally observed Klebanoff modes when strong low-frequency anisotropic effects are included in the free-stream turbulence spectrum. We discuss some additional effects that may need to be accounted for in order to obtain a complete description of the Klebanoff modes.

  20. INDIVIDUAL TURBULENT CELL INTERACTION: BASIS FOR BOUNDARY LAYER ESTABLISHMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Boundary layers are important in determining the forces on objects in flowing fluids, mixing characteristics, and other phenomena. For example, benthic boundary layers are frequently active resuspension layers that determine bottom turbidity and transniissivity. Traditionally, bo...

  1. Turbulence vertical structure of the boundary layer during the afternoon transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbieu, C.; Lohou, F.; Lothon, M.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Couvreux, F.; Durand, P.; Pino, D.; Patton, E. G.; Nilsson, E.; Blay-Carreras, E.; Gioli, B.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the decay of planetary boundary layer (PBL) turbulence in the afternoon, from the time the surface buoyancy flux starts to decrease until sunset. Dense observations of mean and turbulent parameters were acquired during the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) field experiment by several meteorological surface stations, sounding balloons, radars, lidars and two aircraft during the afternoon transition. We analysed a case study based on some of these observations and large-eddy simulation (LES) data focusing on the turbulent vertical structure throughout the afternoon transition. The decay of turbulence is quantified through the temporal and vertical evolution of (1) the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), (2) the characteristic length scales of turbulence and (3) the shape of the turbulence spectra. A spectral analysis of LES data, airborne and surface measurements is performed in order to characterize the variation in the turbulent decay with height and study the distribution of turbulence over eddy size. This study highlights the LES ability to reproduce the turbulence evolution throughout the afternoon. LESs and observations agree that the afternoon transition can be divided in two phases: (1) a first phase during which the TKE decays at a low rate, with no significant change in turbulence characteristics, and (2) a second phase characterized by a larger TKE decay rate and a change in spectral shape, implying an evolution of eddy size distribution and energy cascade from low to high wave number. The changes observed either in TKE decay (during the first phase) or in the vertical wind spectra shape (during the second phase of the afternoon transition) occur first in the upper region of the PBL. The higher within the PBL, the stronger the spectra shape changes.

  2. Shifted periodic boundary conditions for simulations of wall-bounded turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munters, Wim; Meneveau, Charles; Meyers, Johan

    2016-02-01

    In wall-bounded turbulent flow simulations, periodic boundary conditions combined with insufficiently long domains lead to persistent spanwise locking of large-scale turbulent structures. This leads to statistical inhomogeneities of 10%-15% that persist in time averages of 60 eddy turnover times and more. We propose a shifted periodic boundary condition that eliminates this effect without the need for excessive streamwise domain lengths. The method is tested based on a set of direct numerical simulations of a turbulent channel flow, and large-eddy simulations of a high Reynolds number rough-wall half-channel flow. The method is very useful for precursor simulations that generate inlet conditions for simulations that are spatially inhomogeneous, but require statistically homogeneous inlet boundary conditions in the spanwise direction. The method's advantages are illustrated for the simulation of a developing wind-farm boundary layer.

  3. Reynolds shear stress near its maxima, turbulent bursting process and associated velocity profle in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, Noor

    2014-11-01

    The Reynolds shear stress around maxima, turbulent bursting process and associate velocity profile in ZGP turbulent boundary layer is considered in the intermediate layer/mesolayer proposed by Afzal (1982 Ing. Arch. 53, 355-277), in addition to inner and outer layers. The intermediate length scale δm = δRτ- 1 / 2 having velocity Um = mUe with 1 / 2 <= m <= 2 / 3 where Ue is velocity at boundary layer edge. Long & Chen (1981 JFM) intermediate layer/ mesolayer scale δm = δRτ- 1 / 2 with velocity Um the friction velocity uτ, is untenable assumption (Afzal 1984 AIAA J). For channel/pipe flow, Sreenivasan et al. (1981989, 1997, 2006a,b) proposed critical layer / mesolayer, cited/adopted work Long and Chen and McKeon, B.J. & Sharma, A. 2010 JFM 658, page 370 stated ``retaining the assumption that the critical layer occurs when U (y) = (2 / 3) UCL (i.e. that the critical layer scales with y+ ~Rτ+ 2 / 3),'' both untenable assumptions, but ignored citation of papers Afzal 1982 onwards on pipe flow. The present turbulent boundary layer work shows that Reynolds shear maxima, shape factor and turbulent bursting time scale with mesolayer variables and Taylor length/time scale. Residence, Embassy Hotel Rasal Gang Aligarh 202001 UP India.

  4. Representation of the grey zone of turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honnert, Rachel

    2016-04-01

    Numerical weather prediction model forecasts at horizontal grid lengths in the range of 100 to 1 km are now possible. This range of scales is the "grey zone of turbulence". Previous studies, based on large-eddy simulation (LES) analysis from the MésoNH model, showed that some assumptions of some turbulence schemes on boundary-layer structures are not valid. Indeed, boundary-layer thermals are now partly resolved, and the subgrid remaining part of the thermals is possibly largely or completely absent from the model columns. First, some modifications of the equations of the shallow convection scheme have been tested in the MésoNH model and in an idealized version of the operational AROME model at resolutions coarser than 500 m. Secondly, although the turbulence is mainly vertical at mesoscale (> 2 km resolution), it is isotropic in LES (< 100 m resolution). It has been proved by LES analysis that, in convective boundary layers, the horizontal production of turbulence cannot be neglected at resolutions finer than half of the boundary-layer height. Thus, in the grey zone, fully unidirectional turbulence scheme should become tridirectional around 500 m resolution. At Météo-France, the dynamical turbulence is modelled by a K-gradient in LES as well as at mesoscale in both MésoNH and AROME, which needs mixing lengths in the formulation. Vertical and horizontal mixing lengths have been calculated from LES of neutral and convective cases at resolutions in the grey zone.

  5. Turbulent Transfer Between Street Canyons and the Overlying Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salizzoni, Pietro; Marro, Massimo; Soulhac, Lionel; Grosjean, Nathalie; Perkins, Richard J.

    2011-12-01

    The turbulent exchange of momentum between a two-dimensional cavity and the overlying boundary layer has been studied experimentally, using hot-wire anemometry and particle image velocimetry (PIV). Conditions within the boundary layer were varied by changing the width of the canyons upstream of the test canyon, whilst maintaining the square geometry of the test canyon. The results show that turbulent transfer is due to the coupling between the instabilities generated in the shear layer above the canyons and the turbulent structures in the oncoming boundary layer. As a result, there is no single, unique velocity scale that correctly characterizes all the processes involved in the turbulent exchange of momentum across the boundary layer. Similarly, there is no single velocity scale that can characterize the different properties of the turbulent flow within the canyon, which depends strongly on the way in which turbulence from the outer flow is entrained into the cavity and carried round by the mean flow. The results from this study will be useful in developing simple parametrizations for momentum exchange in the urban canopy, in situations where the street geometry consists principally of relatively long, uniform streets arranged in grid-like patterns; they are unlikely to be applicable to sparse geometries composed of isolated three-dimensional obstacles.

  6. Thermal Boundary Layer Equation for Turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching, Emily Sc; Shishkina, Olga; Horn, Susanne; Wagner, Sebastian

    Turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection, consisting of a fluid confined between two horizontal plates, heated from below and cooled from above, is a paradigm system for studying turbulent thermal convection, which is ubiquitous in nature. In turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection, there are viscous boundary layers near all rigid walls and two thermal boundary layers, one above the bottom plate and one below the top plate. The classical Prandtl-Blasius-Pohlhausen theory has often been used to describe the mean velocity and temperature boundary layer profiles but systematic deviations are known to exist. These deviations are due to turbulent fluctuations. In this talk, we report a new thermal boundary layer equation for turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection derived for Prandtl number (Pr) greater than 1, which takes into account the effects of turbulent fluctuations by using the idea of an eddy thermal diffusivity. Solving this equation, we have obtained two analytical mean temperature profiles for Pr ~ 1 and Pr >> 1 . These two theoretical predictions are shown to be in excellent agreement with the results of our direct numerical simulations for Pr=4.38 (water) and Pr=2547.9 (glycerol). Work of ESCC was supported by the Hong Kong Research Grants Council under Grant No. CUHK-400311.

  7. POD Analysis of a ZPG Turbulent Boundary Layer with and without Surface Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Jensen; Russo, Pat; Castillo, Lucianno; Araya, Guillermo; Drew, Don

    2011-11-01

    Effects of surface roughness on coherent structures of a zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer are investigated via the POD method. In this study we seek to gain better understanding of how the small scales of turbulence are able to influence the large scales; particularly in rough surface flows. Comparison with coherent structures in a smooth case by Baltzer et al (2010) will be shown to assess the role of surface roughness in a transitional rough regime. The POD analysis is performed using the method of snapshots on two turbulent boundary layer DNS databases created using the dynamic multi scale recycling plane method developed by Araya et al. (2011) at Reynolds numbers of 2000-2300. Snapshots are separated by a time of 150θ0 /U∞ Resulting POD modes are qualitatively compared to assess the effects of roughness on the coherent structures. Baltzer, R.J.; Adrian, J.; Wu, X., ``Turbulent Boundary Layer Structure Identification via POD,'' in Stanford Center for Turbulence Research Summer Program, 2010. G. Araya, et al., ``A dynamic multi-scale approach for turbulent inflow boundary conditions in spatially developing flows,'' Journal of Fluid Mechanics,vol. 670, pp. 581-605, 2011.

  8. Effects of free-stream turbulence intensity on a boundary layer recovering from concave curvature effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kestoras, M.D.; Simon, T.W.

    1995-04-01

    Experiments are conducted on a flat recovery wall downstream of sustained concave curvature in the presence of high free-stream turbulence (TI {approximately} 8%). This flow simulates some of the features of the flow on the latter parts of the pressure surface of a gas turbine airfoil. The combined effects of concave curvature and TI, both present in the flow over a turbine airfoil, have so far been little studied. Computation of such flows with standard turbulence closure models has not been particularly successful. This experiment attempts to characterize the turbulence characteristics of this flow. In the present study, a turbulent boundary layer grows from the leading edge of a concave wall, then passes onto a downstream flat wall. Results show that turbulence intensities increase profoundly in the outer region of the boundary layer over the recovery wall. Near-wall turbulent eddies appear to lift off the recovery wall and a stabilized region forms near the wall. In contrast to a low-free-stream turbulence intensity flow, turbulent eddies penetrate the outer parts of the stabilized region where sharp velocity and temperature gradients exist. These eddies can more readily transfer momentum and heat. As a result, skin friction coefficients and Stanton numbers on the recovery wall are 20 and 10%, respectively, above their values in the low-free-stream turbulence intensity case. Stanton numbers do not undershoot flat-wall expectations at the same Re{sub {Delta}2} values as seen in the low-TI case. Remarkably, the velocity distribution in the core of the flow over the recovery wall exhibits a negative gradient normal to the wall under high-free-stream turbulence intensity conditions. This velocity distribution appears to be the result of two effects: (1) cross transport of kinetic energy by boundary work in the upstream curved flow and (2) readjustment of static pressure profiles in response to the removal of concave curvature.

  9. Turbulent boundary-layer control with spanwise travelling waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalley, Richard D.; Choi, Kwing-So

    2011-12-01

    It has been demonstrated through numerical simulations using Lorentz forcing that spanwise travelling waves on turbulent wall flows can lead to a skin-friction drag reduction on the order of 30%. As an aeronautical application of this innovative flow control technique, we have investigated into the use of Dielectric-Barrier-Discharge (DBD) plasma actuators to generate spanwise travelling waves in air. The near-wall structures modified by the spanwise travelling waves were studied using the PIV technique in a wind tunnel, while the associated turbulence statistics were carefully documented using hot-wire anemometry. We observed the spreading of low-speed fluid by the spanwise travelling streamwise vortices, which seems to have greatly attenuated the turbulence production process. This is very much in line with the finding of DNS studies, where wide low-speed ribbons replaced the low-speed streaks.

  10. A perspective on coherent structures and conceptual models for turbulent boundary layer physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Stephen K.

    1990-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of turbulent boundary layers have been analyzed to develop a unified conceptual model for the kinematics of coherent motions in low Reynolds number canonical turbulent boundary layers. All classes of coherent motions are considered in the model, including low-speed streaks, ejections and sweeps, vortical structures, near-wall and outer-region shear layers, sublayer pockets, and large-scale outer-region eddies. The model reflects the conclusions from the study of the simulated boundary layer that vortical structures are directly associated with the production of turbulent shear stresses, entrainment, dissipation of turbulence kinetic energy, and the fluctuating pressure field. These results, when viewed from the perspective of the large body of published work on the subject of coherent motions, confirm that vortical structures may be considered the central dynamic element in the maintenance of turbulence in the canonical boundary layer. Vortical structures serve as a framework on which to construct a unified picture of boundary layer structure, providing a means to relate the many known structural elements in a consistent way.

  11. Calculation of eddy viscosity in a compressible turbulent boundary layer with mass injection and chemical reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omori, S.; Gross, K. W.

    1973-01-01

    The turbulent kinetic energy equation is coupled with boundary layer equations to solve the characteristics of compressible turbulent boundary layers with mass injection and combustion. The Reynolds stress is related to the turbulent kinetic energy using the Prandtl-Wieghardt formulation. When a lean mixture of hydrogen and nitrogen is injected through a porous plate into the subsonic turbulent boundary layer of air flow and ignited by external means, the turbulent kinetic energy increases twice as much as that of noncombusting flow with the same mass injection rate of nitrogen. The magnitudes of eddy viscosity between combusting and noncombusting flows with injection, however, are almost the same due to temperature effects, while the distributions are different. The velocity profiles are significantly affected by combustion. If pure hydrogen as a transpiration coolant is injected into a rocket nozzle boundary layer flow of combustion products, the temperature drops significantly across the boundary layer due to the high heat capacity of hydrogen. At a certain distance from the wall hydrogen reacts with the combustion products, liberating an extensive amount of heat.

  12. Grid resolution and turbulent inflow boundary condition recommendations for NPARC calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Dudek, Julianne C.; Tierney, Thomas P.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of grid resolution and specification of turbulent inflow boundary conditions were examined using the NPARC code with the Baldwin-Lomax and Chien k-e turbulence models. Three benchmark turbulent test cases were calculated: two were wall bounded flows and the third was a compressible mixing layer. The wall bounded flows were essentially insensitive to axial grid density; however, the location of the first point off the wall had a substantial effect on flow solutions. It was determined that the first point off the wall must be in the laminar sublayer (y+ less than or equal to 5) for the entire boundary layer. For the compressible mixing layer cases, the axial grid density affected the capturing of oblique shock waves in the mixing region, but the overall mixing rate was not strongly dependent on grid resolution. In specifying the inflow turbulent boundary conditions, it was very important to match the boundary layer and momentum thicknesses of the two flows entering the mixing region; calculations obtained with smaller or no boundary layers resulted in substantially reduced mixing. The solutions were relatively insensitive to freestream turbulence level.

  13. Computer program for calculating laminar, transitional, and turbulent boundary layers for a compressible axisymmetric flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, J. A.; Gregg, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    A finite-difference program is described for calculating the viscous compressible boundary layer flow over either planar or axisymmetric surfaces. The flow may be initially laminar and progress through a transitional zone to fully turbulent flow, or it may remain laminar, depending on the imposed boundary conditions, laws of viscosity, and numerical solution of the momentum and energy equations. The flow may also be forced into a turbulent flow at a chosen spot by the data input. The input may contain the factors of arbitrary Reynolds number, free-stream Mach number, free-stream turbulence, wall heating or cooling, longitudinal wall curvature, wall suction or blowing, and wall roughness. The solution may start from an initial Falkner-Skan similarity profile, an approximate equilibrium turbulent profile, or an initial arbitrary input profile.

  14. Direct simulation of a turbulent boundary layer up to R(sub)(theta)= 1410

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalart, Philippe R.

    1986-01-01

    The turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate, with zero pressure gradient, is simulated numerically at four stations between R sub theta = 225 and R sub theta = 1410. The three-dimensional time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a spectra method with up to about 10 to the 7th power grid points. Periodic spanwise and stream-wise conditions are applied, and a multiple-scale procedure is applied to approximate the slow streamwise growth of the boundary layer. The flow is studied, primarily, from a statistical point of view. The solutions are compared with experimental results. The scaling of the mean and turbulent quantities with Reynolds number is examined and compared with accepted laws, and the significant deviations are documented. The turbulence at the highest Reynolds number is studied in detail. The spectra are compared with various theoretical models. Reynolds-stress budget data are provided for turbulence-model testing.

  15. Skin friction and Reynolds stress measurements for a turbulent boundary layer following manipulation using flat plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, R. V.

    1986-01-01

    Research has been undertaken to experimentally study the alterations in turbulent boundary-layer properties due to turbulence manipulation using thin flat plates. Plate geometry and placement within the boundary layer were selected to coincide with recent studies. Direct, local measurements of skin friction and Reynolds stresses were made within the boundary layer downstream of the manipulator devices for cases with an approach momentum thickness Reynolds number of 3700. A strong tendency for recovery of the Reynolds stresses was observed, accompanied by local skin-friction reductions of up to 15 percent. The mean velocity profile in the manipulated flow displayed the same similarity shape in the logarithmic region as a natural boundary layer, but had an enhanced wake component. The results indicate that the plate wake plays an important role in the boundary layer response to this sort of manipulation.

  16. A review of turbulent-boundary-layer heat transfer research at Stanford, 1958-1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffat, R. J.; Kays, W. M.

    1984-01-01

    For the past 25 years, there has existed in the Thermosciences Laboratory of the Mechanical Engineering Department of Stanford University a research program, primarily experimental, concerned with heat transfer through turbulent boundary layers. In the early phases of the program, the topics considered were the simple zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer with constant and with varying surface temperature, and the accelerated boundary layer. Later equilibrium boundary layers were considered along with factors affecting the boundary layer, taking into account transpired flows, flows with axial pressure gradients, transpiration, acceleration, deceleration, roughness, full-coverage film cooling, surface curvature, free convection, and mixed convection. A description is provided of the apparatus and techniques used, giving attention to the smooth plate rig, the rough plate rig, the full-coverage film cooling rig, the curvature rig, the concave wall rig, the mixed convection tunnel, and aspects of data reduction and uncertainty analysis.

  17. Measurements of laminar and turbulent flow in a curved duct with thin inlet boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, A. M. K. P.; Whitelaw, J. H.; Yianneskis, M.

    1981-01-01

    Laser Doppler velocimetry was used to measure the laminar and turbulent flow in a 90 deg square bend of strong curvature. The boundary layers at the inlet to the bend were approximately 25 percent and 15 percent of the hydraulic diameter for the laminar and turbulent flows, respectively. The development of the pressure driven secondary motion is more rapid for laminar flow: the maximum cross stream component measured was 60 percent of the bulk velocity in contrast to 40 percent for turbulent flow. The streamwise isotachs show that, for laminar flow, large velocities are found progressively nearer to the outer radius of the bend and along the sidewalls. For turbulent flow, the isotachs move towards the inner radius until about 60 deg around the bend where strong secondary motion results in a similar redistribution. Turbulence level and shear stress measurements are also presented.

  18. Turbulent flows over a modeled steep topography in a thermally-stratified boundary layer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Markfort, Corey; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2015-11-01

    Turbulent flows with features of separation and reattachment, induced by topography of steep slopes, have been very challenging to predict using numerical models. The geometry of the topography, surface roughness and temperature along with the inflow characteristics (velocity, turbulence level, and atmospheric thermal stability) play important roles in determining onset of separation, reattachment location and momentum and heat flux distribution. To address the coupled effects of steep slope and thermal stability on turbulent flows over topography, series of wind-tunnel measurements of velocity fields, temperature and heat fluxes will be presented. Results will demonstrate the turbulent flow properties, including the size of the separation bubble, separated shear layers and the boundary layer recovery in different cases. Focus will be placed on correlation of momentum and heat flux distribution in the wake and turbulent kinetic energy transport.

  19. Turbulence measurements in axisymmetric supersonic boundary layer flow in adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gootzait, E.; Childs, M. E.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the mean-flow and turbulence properties in adiabatic turbulent boundary layer flows subjected to adverse pressure gradients. In the freestream region upstream of the adverse pressure gradient the Mach number was 3.86, the unit Reynolds number 5.3 million per foot. The boundary layer developed on the wall of an axisymmetric nozzle and straight test section. The pressure gradients at the test section wall were induced by contoured centerbodies mounted on the wind tunnel centerline. The flow under study simulated that which might be found in an axially symmetric engine inlet of a supersonic aircraft. The results obtained have shown good agreement to exist between the measured normalized turbulent velocity fluctuations and the results from other recent investigations of compressible boundary layers.

  20. DNS of transcritical turbulent boundary layers at supercritical pressures under abrupt variations in thermodynamic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Soshi

    2014-11-01

    In this talk, we first propose a numerical strategy that is robust and high-order accurate for enabling to simulate transcritical flows at supercritical pressures under abrupt variations in thermodynamic properties due to the real fluid effects. The method is based on introducing artificial density diffusion in a physically-consistent manner in order to capture the steep variation of thermodynamic properties in transcritical conditions robustly, while solving a pressure evolution equation to achieve pressure equilibrium at the transcritical interfaces. We then discuss the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of transcritical heated turbulent boundary layers on a zero-pressure-gradient flat plate at supercritical pressures. To the best of my knowledge, the present DNS is the first DNS of zero-pressure-gradient flat-plate transcritical turbulent boundary layer. The turbulent kinetic budget indicates that the compressibility effects (especially, pressure-dilatation correlation) are not negligible at the transcritical conditions even if the flow is subsonic. The unique and interesting interactions between the real fluid effects and wall turbulence, and their turbulence statistics, which have never been seen in the ideal-fluid turbulent boundary layers, are also discussed. This work was supported in part by Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists (A) KAKENHI 26709066 and the JAXA International Top Young Fellowship Program.

  1. Wavelet-based identification of localized turbulent regions in a transitional boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Joe; Nishio, Yu; Izawa, Seiichiro; Fukunishi, Yu

    2014-11-01

    A numerical study in order to develop a method to identify localized turbulent regions in a transitional boundary layer is carried out using a wavelet transformation. Finding the onset of turbulence is quite difficult because it is not easy to distinguish the localized turbulent regions from ``non-active'' groups of vortices. The base flow with low-speed streaks is generated by placing an array of obstacles. Then a short duration jet is ejected from the wall into the low-speed streak. First, a hairpin vortex appears in the laminar boundary layer which travels downstream growing up. Downstream, localized turbulent regions appear in the boundary layer, where a lot of vortices are entangled with each other. A wavelet analysis is applied to the spatial waveforms of streamwise velocity fluctuations obtained from these two flow fields. It is shown that the hairpin vortex appears as a high amplitude spot in the wavelet spectrum, which is small in both wavenumber-wise and streamwise scales. On the other hand, the isolated turbulent region appears more wide spread in the wavenumber-wise scale. So, using this method, localized turbulent regions can be identified.

  2. Turbulent secondary flows in high Reynolds number boundary layers induced by streamwise-elongated complex roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, William; Barros, Julio; Christensen, Kenneth

    2014-11-01

    It has been reported that complex roughness with a predominant streamwise elongation induces secondary mean flow heterogeneities in the above turbulent boundary layer (Mejia-Alvarez and Christensen, Phys. Fluids 25, 115 (2013), MAC; Nugroho et al., Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow 41, 90 (2013)). These mean secondary flows exist as transverse variations of mean streamwise velocity (so-called low- and high-momentum pathways, MAC) and are flanked by mean counter-rotating, boundary layer-scale circulations (Christensen and Barros, J. Fluid Mech. 748, R1 (2014)). In related work, we have used large-eddy simulation to model turbulent boundary layer flow over a suite of topographies composed of ``strips'' of high and low roughness length (drag imposed with the equilibrium logarithmic law); in all cases, we observe the formation of high- and low-momentum pathways (Willingham et al., Phys. Fluids 26, 025111 (2013)). Here, we investigate turbulence statistics from large-eddy simulation such as magnitudes and spatial gradients of Reynolds stresses and turbulence kinetic energy, to discern underlying physical processes responsible for the secondary flows. We demonstrate that elevated production of turbulence above ``high'' roughness necessitates the mean circulations by virtue of turbulent kinetic energy production-dissipation non-equilibrium. We propose that the mean flow is Prandtl's secondary flow of the second kind.

  3. Measurements of turbulence moments in boundary layers over transversely grooved surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandyopadhyay, P. R.; Watson, R. D.

    1987-01-01

    Wind tunnel measurements of second, third, and fourth order turbulence moments in turbulent boundary layers over d-types and k-types of grooved and smooth surfaces are discussed. The near-wall turbulence structure is found to vary with the spanwise aspect ratio. For decreasing height, the third moment of the normal velocity fluctuations is shown to become negative over crop canopies and model plant canopies, although not in smooth, two-dimensional, sandgrain or gravel roughness. The instantaneous motions related to the flux of shear stress near the wall in smooth and transversely grooved surfaces are shown to be opposite in sign to those in three-dimensional roughness.

  4. Effects of turbulent dispersion of atmospheric balance motions of planetary boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shikuo; Huang, Wei; Rong, Pingping

    1992-06-01

    New Reynolds’ mean momentum equations including both turbulent viscosity and dispersion are used to analyze atmospheric balance motions of the planetary boundary layer. It is pointed out that turbulent dispersion with γ 0 will increase depth of Ekman layer, reduce wind velocity in Ekman layer and produce a more satisfactory Ekman spiral lines fit the observed wind hodograph. The wind profile in the surface layer including turbulent dispersion is still logarithmic but the von Karman constant k is replaced by k 1 = √ 1 — k/2, the wind increases a little more rapidly with height.

  5. Characterization of an incipiently separated shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreyer, A.-M.; Dussauge, J.-P.; Krämer, E.

    2016-05-01

    The turbulence structure in a shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction at incipient separation was investigated in order to get insight into turbulence generation and amplification mechanisms in such flow fields. The flow along a two-dimensional 11.5° compression corner was studied experimentally at a Mach number of M=2.53 and with a momentum-thickness Reynolds number of Re_{θ }=5370 . From hot-wire boundary layer traverses and surface heat-flux density fluctuation measurements with the fast-response atomic layer thermopile, the turbulence structure and amplification was described. Space-time correlations of the mass-flux fluctuations across the boundary layer and the surface heat-flux density fluctuations were measured to further characterize the development of the turbulence structure across the interaction. The large-scale boundary layer structures are concealed by shock-related effects in the strongly disturbed shock-foot region. Shortly downstream, however, large-scale structures dominate the signal again, just as in the incoming flow. A mechanism explaining this behavior is suggested.

  6. Entropy production rates from viscous flow calculations. I - A turbulent boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J.; Moore, J. G.

    1983-03-01

    A procedure for obtaining entropy production rates from viscous flow calculations is described. The method is based on process thermodynamics; it allows loss production to be calculated in 'irreversible equilibrium processes'. The two-dimensional turbulent boundary layer of Samuel and Joubert is considered. Mean rates of entropy production are evaluated from measured data using rates of dissipation and rates of increase of turbulence kinetic energy. Calculations performed with the Moore Cascade Flow Program give good agreement with mean rates of entropy production and reveal details of the distribution of entropy production throughout the boundary layer.

  7. Measured response of a complex structure to supersonic turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Monteith, J. H.; Manning, J. C.; Smith, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of the response of a large frame-stringer panel excited by supersonic turbulent boundary layer are reported. The statistical description of the wall pressure fluctuations in terms of the mean flow parameters governing the turbulent boundary layer is given. These results can be used in the development of design criteria on the response of sidewall structure of a large airplane in supersonic flight, since both forcing field and structure are realistic. Results indicate the significant importance of the modal coupling and the acoustic damping. The acoustic damping plays a major role in the response of the structure.

  8. Influence of free-stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layer heat transfer and mean profile development. I - Experimental data. II - Analysis of results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, M. F.

    1983-02-01

    The effect of free stream turbulence on the heat transfer in the boundary layer flow was examined in a zero pressure gradient, two-dimensional channel. A heated flat plate was instrumented for turbulence intensity measurements. The free stream turbulence intensity distributions, turbulence length scale distributions, and power spectral density distributions were quantified. The two dimensionality of the test boundary layers was verified in various test conditions and the Stanton number distributions were measured for five free stream turbulence levels as a function of Re. The skin friction number was also determined as a function of the momentum thickness Re at specific locations. The test data were found to agree well with two-dimensional, incompressible analytical predictions and correlations. The free stream turbulence was determined to have significant effect on the skin friction and heat transfer, e.g., up to a 20% increase in friction for a turbulence intensity of 6%.

  9. Skin friction measurements following manipulation of a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, V. D.; Savill, A. M.; Westphal, R. V.

    1987-01-01

    Results are presented from three experiments in which direct, local measurements of the skin friction reduction due to flat-plate turbulence manipulators for overall viscous drag reduction were obtained. The results suggest that only a very small overall net drag reduction will be possible for such devices at moderate momentum thickness-derived Reynolds number values, since maximum skin friction drag is neither large nor sustained.

  10. New Large-scale Control Strategies for Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoppa, Wade; Hussain, Fazle

    1997-11-01

    Using direct numerical simulations of turbulent channel flow, we present robust strategies for drag reduction by prevention of streamwise vortex formation near the wall. Instability of lifted, vortex-free low-speed streaks is shown to generate new streamwise vortices, which dominate near-wall turbulence phenomena. The newly-found instability mechanism initiates streak waviness in the (x,z) plane which leads to ωx sheets. Streak waviness induces positive partial u/partial x (i.e. positive VISA) which causes these sheets to then collapse via stretching (rather than roll up) into streamwise vortices. Significantly, the 3D features of the (instantaneous) instability-generated vortices agree well with the coherent structures educed (i.e. ensemble-averaged) from fully turbulent flow, suggesting the prevalence of this instability mechanism. The new control via large-scale streak manipulation exploits this crucial role of streak instability in vortex generation. An x-independent forcing with a z wavelength of 4 streak spacings, with an amplitude of only 5% of the centerline velocity, produces a significant sustained drag reduction: 20% for imposed counterrotating large-scale swirls and 50% for colliding spanwise wall jet-like forcing. These results suggest promising drag reduction strategies, involving large-scale (hence more durable) actuation and requiring no wall sensors or feedback logic.

  11. An analytical study of the effects of surface roughness on a compressible turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Z. H.

    1983-12-01

    A previous study on the effect of surface roughness on the turbulent boundary layer, using a FORTRAN code, ITRACT, solved for the characteristics of a laminar, transitional and turbulent boundary layer on smooth surfaces. The present study investigates the influence of surface roughness on a compressible turbulent boundary layer and then extends the usefulness of ITRACT by including in it the optional capability of rough-surface boundary-layer calculations. Surface roughness was represented by distributed sources and sinks in the appropriate governing equations. The most important term is a sink term in the mean momentum equation, representing the form drag due to the roughness element. Governing boundary-layer equations for continuity, momentum, and energy were derived in a form to account for blockage effects due to roughness elements. The modified governing equations were then transformed using Probstein-Elliott and Levy-Lees transformations. The resulting equations, with appropriate boundary conditions, were solved by finite-difference techniques to determine the nondimensional velocity components and temperature at a finite number of nodes in the boundary-layer flow field.

  12. Optimal Control of Shock Wave Turbulent Boundary Layer Interactions Using Micro-Array Actuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Tinapple, Jon; Surber, Lewis

    2006-01-01

    The intent of this study on micro-array flow control is to demonstrate the viability and economy of Response Surface Methodology (RSM) to determine optimal designs of micro-array actuation for controlling the shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions within supersonic inlets and compare these concepts to conventional bleed performance. The term micro-array refers to micro-actuator arrays which have heights of 25 to 40 percent of the undisturbed supersonic boundary layer thickness. This study covers optimal control of shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions using standard micro-vane, tapered micro-vane, and standard micro-ramp arrays at a free stream Mach number of 2.0. The effectiveness of the three micro-array devices was tested using a shock pressure rise induced by the 10 shock generator, which was sufficiently strong as to separate the turbulent supersonic boundary layer. The overall design purpose of the micro-arrays was to alter the properties of the supersonic boundary layer by introducing a cascade of counter-rotating micro-vortices in the near wall region. In this manner, the impact of the shock wave boundary layer (SWBL) interaction on the main flow field was minimized without boundary bleed.

  13. HIFiRE-1 Turbulent Shock Boundary Layer Interaction - Flight Data and Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimmel, Roger L.; Prabhu, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    The Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation (HIFiRE) program is a hypersonic flight test program executed by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and Australian Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO). This flight contained a cylinder-flare induced shock boundary layer interaction (SBLI). Computations of the interaction were conducted for a number of times during the ascent. The DPLR code used for predictions was calibrated against ground test data prior to exercising the code at flight conditions. Generally, the computations predicted the upstream influence and interaction pressures very well. Plateau pressures on the cylinder were predicted well at all conditions. Although the experimental heat transfer showed a large amount of scatter, especially at low heating levels, the measured heat transfer agreed well with computations. The primary discrepancy between the experiment and computation occurred in the pressures measured on the flare during second stage burn. Measured pressures exhibited large overshoots late in the second stage burn, the mechanism of which is unknown. The good agreement between flight measurements and CFD helps validate the philosophy of calibrating CFD against ground test, prior to exercising it at flight conditions.

  14. Investigation of boundary layer and turbulence characteristics inside the passages of an axial flow inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anand, A.; Gorton, C.; Lakshminarayana, B.; Yamaoka, H.

    1973-01-01

    A study of the boundary layer and turbulence characteristics inside the passages of an axial flow inducer is reported. The first part deals with the analytical and experimental investigation of the boundary layer characteristics in a four bladed flat plate inducer passage operated with no throttle. An approximate analysis for the prediction of radial and chordwise velocity profiles across the passage is carried out. The momentum integral technique is used to predict the gross properties of the boundary layer. Equations are given for the exact analysis of the turbulent boundary layer characteristics using the turbulent field method. Detailed measurement of boundary layer profiles, limiting streamline angle and skin friction stress on the rotating blade is also reported. Part two of this report deals with the prediction of the flow as well as blade static pressure measurements in a three bladed inducer with cambered blades operated at a flow coefficient of 0.065. In addition, the mean velocity and turbulence measurements carried out inside the passage using a rotating triaxial probe is reported.

  15. Simultaneous measurement of aero-optical distortion and turbulent structure in a heated boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxton-Fox, Theresa; McKeon, Beverley; Smith, Adam; Gordeyev, Stanislav

    2014-11-01

    This study examines the relationship between turbulent structures and the aero-optical distortion of a laser beam passing through a turbulent boundary layer. Previous studies by Smith et al. (AIAA, 2014--2491) have found a bulk convection velocity of 0 . 8U∞ for aero-optical distortion in turbulent boundary layers, motivating a comparison of the distortion with the outer boundary layer. In this study, a turbulent boundary layer is developed over a flat plate with a moderately-heated section of length 25 δ . Density variation in the thermal boundary layer leads to aero-optical distortion, which is measured with a Malley probe (Smith et al., AIAA, 2013--3133). Simultaneously, 2D PIV measurements are recorded in a wall-normal, streamwise plane centered on the Malley probe location. Experiments are run at Reθ = 2100 and at a Mach number of 0.03, with the heated wall 10 to 20°C above the free stream temperature. Correlations and conditional averages are carried out between Malley probe distortion angles and flow features in the PIV vector fields. Aero-optical distortion in this study will be compared to distortion in higher Mach number flows studied by Gordeyev et al. (J. Fluid Mech., 2014), with the aim of extending conclusions into compressible flows. This research is made possible by the Department of Defense through the National Defense & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program and by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Grant # FA9550-12-1-0060.

  16. Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment Implementation on OV-103

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanos, Theodoros A.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the boundary layer transition experiment flown on Discovery. The purpose of the boundary layer transition flight experiment was to obtain hypersonic aero-thermodynamic data for the purpose of better understanding the flow transition from a laminar to turbulent boundary layer using a known height protuberance. The preparation of the shuttle is described, with the various groups responsibilities outlined. Views of the shuttle in flight with the experimental results are shown.

  17. Wind and Temperature Oscillations Generated by Wave-Turbulence Interactions in the Stably Stratified Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jielun; Mahrt, Larry; Nappo, Carmen; Lenschow, Donald

    2015-04-01

    We investigate atmospheric internal gravity waves (IGWs): their generation and induction of global intermittent turbulence in the nocturnal stable atmospheric boundary layer based on the new concept of turbulence generation discussed in Sun et al. (2012). The IGWs are generated by air lifted by convergence forced by the colliding background flow and cold currents near the ground. The buoyancy-forced IGWs enhance wind speed at the wind-speed wave crests such that the bulk shear instability generates large coherent eddies, which augment local turbulent mixing and vertically redistribute momentum and heat. The periodically enhanced turbulent mixing, in turn, modifies the air temperature and flow oscillations of the original IGWs. These turbulence-forced oscillations (TFOs) resemble waves and coherently transport momentum and sensible heat. The observed momentum and sensible heat fluxes at the IGW frequency, which are either due to the buoyancy-forced IGWs themselves or by the TFOs, are larger than turbulent fluxes near the surface. The IGWs enhance not only the bulk shear at the wave crests, but also local shear over the wind speed troughs of the surface IGWs. Temporal and spatial variations of turbulent mixing as a result of this wave-induced turbulent mixing change the mean air flow and the shape of the IGWs.

  18. Transitional regime and laminar-turbulent coexistence in the asymptotic suction boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khapko, Taras; Schlatter, Philipp; Duguet, Yohann; Henningson, Dan

    2015-11-01

    We study numerically the asymptotic suction boundary layer (ASBL) in the transitional regime on the verge of laminarization. Starting from a turbulent state the Reynolds number Re is decreased in small steps until the laminar state is established. This study protocol allows not only to investigate the regime at the onset of turbulence, but also to identify the critical Reynolds number Reg ~ 270 , below which turbulence is not sustained. In other planar shear flows the transitional regime at the onset takes the form of stable laminar-turbulent bands, however in ASBL no regime of sustained laminar-turbulent coexistence has been identified. The flow stays fully turbulent even at the lowest Re before laminarization. During the laminarization process streamwise turbulent and laminar avenues are created with no oblique interfaces between the two. This behavior is connected with the existence of a large-scale vertical transport, the feature that distinguishes ASBL from the other wall-bounded shear flows. After an artificial forcing is added canceling all spanwise and wall-normal fluctuations above y+ = 100 , transient oblique bands are observed similar to the ones in other subcritical shear flows, while the flow later laminarizes or becomes fully turbulent again.

  19. The relaxation of a turbulent boundary layer in an adverse pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Andrew D.; Johnston, James P.

    1989-01-01

    Reattached turbulent boundary layer relaxation downstream of a wall fence is investigated. An adverse pressure gradient is imposed upon it which is adjusted to bring the boundary layer into equilibrium. The pressure gradient is adjusted so as to bring the Clauser parameter G down to a value of about 11.4 and then maintain it constant. In the region from the reattachment point to 2 or 3 reattachment lengths downstream, the boundary layer recovers from the initial major effects of reattachment. Farther downstream, where G is constant, the pressure-gradient parameter changes very slowly and profiles of non-dimensionalized eddy viscosity appear self-similar. However, pressure gradient and eddy viscosity are both roughly twice as large as expected on the basis of previous equilibrium turbulent boundary layer studies.

  20. Numerical simulations of two-fluid boundary layers beneath free-stream turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Seo Yoon; Zaki, Tamer

    2011-11-01

    In two-fluid boundary layers, a wall-film is sheared by an external stream with different density and viscosity. As a result, the flow becomes prone to both shear and interfacial instabilities. In this study, the evolution of two-fluid boundary layers beneath free-stream vortical forcing is investigated using DNS. The simulations employ a conservative level-set technique in conjunction with a ghost fluid approach in order to capture a sharp interface. The wall film is less viscous than the outer flow, and its thickness is 10 % of that of the boundary layer at the inlet. The choice of viscosity ratio influences the spatial development of disturbances within the boundary layer. The spatial growth of instabilities is examined into the non-linear regime, which includes the region of breakdown to turbulence. We demonstrate that, at moderate levels of free-stream turbulence intensities, appropriate choice of the viscosity ratio can yield considerable transition delay.

  1. Effects of Riblets on Skin Friction in High-Speed Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2012-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of spatially developing turbulent boundary layers over riblets are conducted to examine the effects of riblets on skin friction at supersonic speeds. Zero-pressure gradient boundary layers with an adiabatic wall, a Mach number of M1 = 2.5, and a Reynolds number based on momentum thickness of Re = 1720 are considered. Simulations are conducted for boundary-layer flows over a clean surface and symmetric V- groove riblets with nominal spacings of 20 and 40 wall units. The DNS results confirm the few existing experimental observations and show that a drag reduction of approximately 7% is achieved for riblets with proper spacing. The influence of riblets on turbulence statistics is analyzed in detail with an emphasis on identifying the differences, if any, between the drag reduction mechanisms for incompressible and high-speed boundary layers.

  2. Estimation of boundary heat flux using experimental temperature data in turbulent forced convection flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parwani, Ajit K.; Talukdar, Prabal; Subbarao, P. M. V.

    2014-09-01

    Heat flux at the boundary of a duct is estimated using the inverse technique based on conjugate gradient method (CGM) with an adjoint equation. A two-dimensional inverse forced convection hydrodynamically fully developed turbulent flow is considered. The simulations are performed with temperature data measured in the experimental test performed on a wind tunnel. The results show that the present numerical model with CGM is robust and accurate enough to estimate the strength and position of boundary heat flux.

  3. Estimation of boundary heat flux using experimental temperature data in turbulent forced convection flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parwani, Ajit K.; Talukdar, Prabal; Subbarao, P. M. V.

    2015-03-01

    Heat flux at the boundary of a duct is estimated using the inverse technique based on conjugate gradient method (CGM) with an adjoint equation. A two-dimensional inverse forced convection hydrodynamically fully developed turbulent flow is considered. The simulations are performed with temperature data measured in the experimental test performed on a wind tunnel. The results show that the present numerical model with CGM is robust and accurate enough to estimate the strength and position of boundary heat flux.

  4. Mechanisms of drag reduction of superhydrophobic surfaces in a turbulent boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingxian; Tian, Haiping; Yao, Zhaohui; Hao, Pengfei; Jiang, Nan

    2015-09-01

    The drag-reducing property of a superhydrophobic surface is investigated along with its mechanism. A superhydrophobic surface with micro-nanotextures is fabricated and tested using SEM and contact angle measurement. Velocity distributions in the turbulent boundary layer with a superhydrophobic surface and a smooth surface are measured by particle image velocimetry at Re θ = 810, 990, and 1220. An upward lift effect on the velocity profile caused by the rugged air layer on the superhydrophobic surface is observed, which indicates drag reduction. Estimated by the wall shear stress, a drag reduction of 10.1, 20.7, and 24.1 % is observed for Re θ equal to 810, 990, and 1220, respectively. The drag reduction is caused mainly by slip on the interface and modifications in the turbulent structures, and the latter plays a more important role as Re θ increases. Suppressions are observed in turbulence intensities, and reductions in the total Reynolds shear stress T {turb/+} are 2.5, 18.5, and 23.1 % for Re θ = 810, 990, and 1220, respectively. Vortex fields above the superhydrophobic and smooth surfaces at Re θ = 990 are investigated. Vortexes are weakened and lifted upward by the superhydrophobic surface, and the position of the maximum swirling strength is lifted 0.17 δ ( δ is the boundary layer thickness) upward in the wall-normal direction. This modification in turbulence structures contributes significantly to the drag reduction in the turbulent boundary layer flow.

  5. A near-wall four-equation turbulence model for compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sommer, T. P.; So, R. M. C.; Zhang, H. S.

    1992-01-01

    A near-wall four-equation turbulence model is developed for the calculation of high-speed compressible turbulent boundary layers. The four equations used are the k-epsilon equations and the theta(exp 2)-epsilon(sub theta) equations. These equations are used to define the turbulent diffusivities for momentum and heat fluxes, thus allowing the assumption of dynamic similarity between momentum and heat transport to be relaxed. The Favre-averaged equations of motion are solved in conjunction with the four transport equations. Calculations are compared with measurements and with another model's predictions where the assumption of the constant turbulent Prandtl number is invoked. Compressible flat plate turbulent boundary layers with both adiabatic and constant temperature wall boundary conditions are considered. Results for the range of low Mach numbers and temperature ratios investigated are essentially the same as those obtained using an identical near-wall k-epsilon model. In general, the numerical predictions are in very good agreement with measurements and there are significant improvements in the predictions of mean flow properties at high Mach numbers.

  6. Some Recent Contributions to the Study of Transition and Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryden, Hugh L

    1947-01-01

    The first part of this paper reviews the present state of the problem of the instability of laminar boundary layers which has formed an important part of the general lectures by von Karman at the first and fourth Congresses and by Taylor at the fifth Congress. This problem may now be considered as essentially solved as the result of work completed since 1938. When the velocity fluctuations of the free-stream flow are less than 0.1 percent of the mean speed, instability occurs as described by the well-known Tollmien-Schlichting theory. The Tollmien-Schlichting waves were first observed experimentally by Schubauer and Skramstad in 1940. They devised methods of introducing controlled small disturbances and obtained measured values of frequency, damping, and wave length at various Reynolds numbers which agreed well with the theoretical results. Their experimental results were confirmed by Liepmann. Much theoretical work was done in Germany in extending the Tol1mien-Schlichting theory to other boundary conditions, in particular to flow along a porous wall to which suction is applied for removing part of the boundary layer. The second part of this paper summarizes the present state of knowledge of the mechanics of turbulent boundary layers, and of the methods now being used for fundamental studies of the turbulent fluctuations in turbulent boundary layers. A brief review is given of the semi-empirical method of approach as developed by Buri, Gruschwitz, Fediaevsky, and Kalikhman. In recent years the National Advisory.Commsittee for Aeronautics has sponsored a detailed study at the National Bureau of Standards of the turbulent fluctuations in a turbulent boundary layer under adverse pressure gradient sufficient to produce separation. The aims of this investigation and its present status are described.

  7. The BOUT Project: Validation and Benchmark of BOUT Code and Experimental Diagnostic Tools for Fusion Boundary Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X Q

    2001-08-09

    A boundary plasma turbulence code BOUT is presented. The preliminary encouraging results have been obtained when comparing with probe measurements for a typical Ohmic discharge in CT-7 tokamak. The validation and benchmark of BOUT code and experimental diagnostic tools for fusion boundary plasma turbulence is proposed.

  8. Vegetation Effects on Turbulent Boundary Layer Flows and their Role in Lotic Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neary, V. S.

    2009-12-01

    The effects of vegetation on fully developed turbulent boundary layer flows are profound and play an important role in lotic ecosystems. Recent experiments on flow past isolated plant stems (e.g. tree trunks in flood plains), alternating vegetation patches (e.g. Justicia americana in gravel bed rivers), and simulated emergent and submerged plant stem arrays in laboratory flumes are reviewed. Particular emphasis is given to fully developed turbulent flows through submerged vegetation modeled by large eddy simulation (LES), with a focus on understanding the role of the coherent structures on the momentum transfer across the water-plant interface. Comparisons are made with fully developed turbulent boundary layer flows in unobstructed (unvegetated) channels to show how the vegetation significantly changes the mean flow, Reynolds shear stress, turbulence intensities, turbulence event frequencies and the energy budget within and above the vegetation layer. The results demonstrate how vegetation in the lotic environment delineates ecotones with edge effects that are beneficial to mobile organisms (e.g. macroinvertebrates and fish), and how it alters mean flow and turbulence characteristics near the bed to promote desirable physical habitat conditions, e.g. substrate composition and stability, for benthic organisms such as mussels and crayfish. Vincent Neary, Ph.D., P.E. President, Springburn LLC Natural Engineering and Restoration

  9. Investigation of turbulent processes in magnetospheric boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lotko, William; Sonnerup, B. U. O.

    1990-01-01

    A self-consistent non-evolving two dimensional slab model of a viscous low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL) coupled to the ionosphere was developed by Phan, et al., (1989). Numerical results from the model and possible use of observations to determine the model parameters are discussed. The dynamical model developed by Lotko, et al., (1987) was used by Lotko and Shen (1991) to examine dynamical processes relevant to the LLBL with particular application to post-noon auroral shear layers. Initial results from a magnetohydrodynamic study of flank-side mangetopause boundary configuration are described. Effects of compressibility, scalar viscosity, and electrical resistivity are included in the MHD equations.

  10. Numerical simulation and design of a radiatively driven hypersonic wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Robert Wade

    The radiatively driven hypersonic wind tunnel (RDHWT) is a new concept for extending hypersonic ground testing capabilities to higher Mach numbers while maintaining true flight conditions. The RDHWT is based upon the idea that if the total stagnation enthalpy required in the test section is generated not only in the plenum, but also by the addition of heat from a radiative source to the supersonic portion of the flow, the maximum static temperature of the flow can be substantially lowered, and the operational envelope can be considerably extended. This concept is investigated using a hierarchy of models ranging from pure thermodynamics to the full compressible Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations with algebraic turbulent closure. An idealized thermodynamic theory of operation provides a goal for one dimensional synthesis of potential designs. Two-dimensional planar and axisymmetric models are used to analyze fundamental questions regarding the coupled flow-radiation system, in particular the question of stability and flow quality for the case of laser based heat addition. A fundamental optical-fluid unsteady interaction is identified, and investigation of model problems reveal insight into its implications for laser based RDHWT operation. A method for implementing near-wall boundary conditions in turbulent boundary layers of real gas flows is introduced to relieve the numerical ill-conditioning associated with high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer flows. This method enables unsteady calculations of laser energy addition at high pressure with turbulent boundary layers to examine fully coupled unsteady system dynamics.

  11. Vertical structure of aeolian turbulence in a boundary layer with sand transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Zoe S.; Baas, Andreas C. W.

    2016-04-01

    Recently we have found that Reynolds shear stress shows a significant variability with measurement height (Lee and Baas, 2016), and so an alternative parameter for boundary layer turbulence may help to explain the relationship between wind forcing and sediment transport. We present data that were collected during a field study of boundary layer turbulence conducted on a North Atlantic beach. High-frequency (50 Hz) 3D wind velocity measurements were collected using ultrasonic anemometry at thirteen different measurement heights in a tight vertical array between 0.11 and 1.62 metres above the surface. Thanks to the high density installation of sensors a detailed analysis of the boundary layer flow can be conducted using methods more typically used in studies where data is only available from one or just a few measurement heights. We use quadrant analysis to explore the vertical structure of turbulence and track the changes in quadrant signatures with measurement elevation and over time. Results of quadrant analysis, at the 'raw' 50 Hz timescale, demonstrates the tendency for event clustering across all four quadrants, which implies that at-a-point quadrant events are part of larger-scale turbulent structures. Using an HSV colour model, applied to the quadrant analysis data and plotted in series, we create colour maps of turbulence, which can provide a clear visualisation of the clustering of event activity at each height and illustrate the shape of the larger coherent flow structures that are present within the boundary layer. By including a saturation component to the colour model, the most significant stress producing sections of the data are emphasised. This results in a 'banded' colour map, which relates to clustering of quadrant I (Outward Interaction) and quadrant IV (Sweep) activity, separate from clustering of quadrant II (Burst) and quadrant III (Inward Interaction). Both 'sweep-type' and 'burst-type' sequences are shown to have a diagonal structure

  12. Fundamental and subharmonic transition to turbulence in zero-pressure-gradient flat-plate boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayadi, Taraneh; Hamman, Curtis W.; Moin, Parviz

    2012-09-01

    In this fluid dynamics video, recent simulations of transition to turbulence in compressible (M = 0.2), zero-pressure-gradient flat-plate boundary layers triggered by fundamental (Klebanoff K-type) and subharmonic (Herbert H-type) secondary instabilities of Tollmien-Schlichting waves are highlighted.

  13. Direct simulation of flat-plate boundary layer with mild free-stream turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaohua; Moin, Parviz

    2014-11-01

    Spatially evolving direct numerical simulation of the flat-plate boundary layer has been performed. The momentum thickness Reynolds number develops from 80 to 3000 with a free-stream turbulence intensity decaying from 3 percent to 0.8 percent. Predicted skin-friction is in agreement with the Blasius solution prior to breakdown, follows the well-known T3A bypass transition data during transition, and agrees with the Erm and Joubert Melbourne wind-tunnel data after the completion of transition. We introduce the concept of bypass transition in the narrow sense. Streaks, although present, do not appear to be dynamically important during the present bypass transition as they occur downstream of infant turbulent spots. For the turbulent boundary layer, viscous scaling collapses the rate of dissipation profiles in the logarithmic region at different Reynolds numbers. The ratio of Taylor microscale and the Kolmogorov length scale is nearly constant over a large portion of the outer layer. The ratio of large-eddy characteristic length and the boundary layer thickness scales very well with Reynolds number. The turbulent boundary layer is also statistically analyzed using frequency spectra, conditional-sampling, and two-point correlations. Near momentum thickness Reynolds number of 2900, three layers of coherent vortices are observed: the upper and lower layers are distinct hairpin forests of large and small sizes respectively; the middle layer consists of mostly fragmented hairpin elements.

  14. An investigation of the turbulence scale tensor in a flat-plate boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, R. D.; Donaldson, C. D.; Sandri, G.

    1979-01-01

    A differential equation for the scale tensor in turbulent flow is developed from basic considerations and applied to the flow of a constant-density fluid in the boundary layer on a flat plate. Results from preliminary runs of a computer implementation are discussed.

  15. Multiple Regimes of Flow, Stratification, and Turbulence in the Stable Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monahan, A. H.; Rees, T.

    2014-12-01

    It is well established that the atmospheric Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) can display distinct regimes of flow. In the weakly stable boundary layer, turbulence is weak but continuous and the surface flow is coupled to that aloft. In the very stable boundary layer, turbulence collapses and the surface flow becomes decoupled from the flow above.This study demonstrates the clear presence of two distinct SBL regimes in a long record of observations from the 213m tower in Cabauw, Netherlands. These regimes are found in the joint distribution of near-surface stratification, shear, and vertically-averaged wind speed. Hidden Markov model (HMM) analysis is used to distinguish these regimes and objectively classify states as being in one regime or the other. This classification allows for a detailed diagnosis of the flow, stratification, and turbulence structures within each of the two regimes, as well as their relation to large-scale forcing through the geostrophic wind and cloud cover. Observational evidence is presented that the very stable boundary layer is produced by a previously-discussed positive feedback associated with a maximum sustainable turbulent heat flux.

  16. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces with gas pockets using linearized boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jongmin; Bose, Sanjeeb; Garcia-Mayoral, Ricardo; Mani, Ali

    2012-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces are shown to be effective for surface drag reduction under laminar regime by both experiments and simulations (see for example, Ou and Rothstein, Phys. Fluids 17:103606, 2005). However, such drag reduction for fully developed turbulent flow maintaining the Cassie-Baxter state remains an open problem due to high shear rates and flow unsteadiness of turbulent boundary layer. Our work aims to develop an understanding of mechanisms leading to interface breaking and loss of gas pockets due to interactions with turbulent boundary layers. We take advantage of direct numerical simulation of turbulence with slip and no-slip patterned boundary conditions mimicking the superhydrophobic surface. In addition, we capture the dynamics of gas-water interface, by deriving a proper linearized boundary condition taking into account the surface tension of the interface and kinematic matching of interface deformation and normal velocity conditions on the wall. We will show results from our simulations predicting the dynamical behavior of gas pocket interfaces over a wide range of dimensionless surface tensions. Supported by the Office of Naval Research and the Kwanjeong Educational Scholarship Foundation.

  17. On the dynamic behavior of composite panels under turbulent boundary layer excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciappi, E.; De Rosa, S.; Franco, F.; Vitiello, P.; Miozzi, M.

    2016-03-01

    In this work high Mach number aerodynamic and structural measurements acquired in the CIRA (Italian Aerospace Research Center) transonic wind tunnel and the models used to analyze the response of composite panels to turbulent boundary layer excitation are presented. The two investigated panels are CFRP (Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer) composite plates and their lay-up is similar to configurations used in aeronautical structures. They differ only for the presence of an embedded viscoelastic layer. The experimental set-up has been designed to reproduce a pressure fluctuations field beneath a turbulent boundary layer as close as possible to those in flight. A tripping system, specifically conceived to this aim for this facility, has been used to generate thick turbulent boundary layers at Mach number values ranging between 0.4 and 0.8. It is shown that the designed setup provides a realistic representation of full scale size pressure spectra in the frequency range of interest for the noise component inside the fuselage, generated by turbulent boundary layer. The significant role of the viscoelastic layer at reducing panel's response is detailed and discussed. Finally, it is demonstrated that at high Mach number the aeroelastic effect cannot be neglected when analyzing the panel response, especially when composite materials are considered.

  18. Drag reduction effects in turbulent boundary layers over wavy walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, R.; Orszag, S. A.

    1980-01-01

    Two dimensional incompressible flow over wavy surfaces are analyzed numerically by spectral methods. Algorithms for periodic flows (Fourier modes in the periodic flow direction and Chebycheff modes in the normal direction), and inflow-outflow boundary conditions (Chebycheff modes used in both directions) are described. Results obtained using both codes are reported for laminar flows. Comparisons with known theoretical and experimental results are made.

  19. Comparison of several methods for predicting separation in a compressible turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhart, P. M.; Bober, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    Several methods for predicting the separation point for a compressible turbulent boundary layer were applied to the flow over a bump on a wind-tunnel wall. Measured pressure distributions were used as input. Two integral boundary-layer methods, three finite-difference boundary-layer methods, and three simple methods were applied at five free-stream Mach numbers ranging from 0.354 to 0.7325. Each of the boundary-layer methods failed to explicitly predict separation. However, by relaxing the theoretical separation criteria, several boundary-layer methods were made to yield reasonable separation predictions, but none of the methods accurately predicted the important boundary-layer parameters at separation. Only one of the simple methods consistently predicted separation with reasonable accuracy in a manner consistent with the theory. The other methods either indicated several possible separation locations or only sometimes predicted separation.

  20. Direct Numerical Simulations of Turbulent Boundary Layers Over A Circular Aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Bodony, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    Motivated by the use of acoustic liners to reduce jet engine and aircraft noise, we use direct numerical simulation to study the interaction of a turbulent Mach 0.5 boundary layer with a circular aperture connected to a honeycomb cavity under acoustic excitation. The geometry and flow conditions correspond to experiments conducted at NASA Langley. The hole, whose diameter is on the order of the boundary layer's momentum thickness, interacts with the boundary layer in qualitatively different ways depending on the acoustic forcing amplitude. The influence of the hole on the boundary layer is quantified under a range of acoustic excitations and the details of the hole/boundary layer interaction will be presented. The acoustic impedance of the hole is determined, compared to experimentally educed values, and related to the dynamics of the hole/boundary layer interaction. These analyses will be helpful for improved understanding and low-order models of aircraft acoustic liners at realistic operating conditions.

  1. Dynamic Turbulence Modelling in Large-eddy Simulations of the Cloud-topped Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, M. P.; Mansour, N. N.; Ackerman, A. S.; Stevens, D. E.

    2003-01-01

    The use of large eddy simulation, or LES, to study the atmospheric boundary layer dates back to the early 1970s when Deardor (1972) used a three-dimensional simulation to determine velocity and temperature scales in the convective boundary layer. In 1974 he applied LES to the problem of mixing layer entrainment (Deardor 1974) and in 1980 to the cloud-topped boundary layer (Deardor 1980b). Since that time the LES approach has been applied to atmospheric boundary layer problems by numerous authors. While LES has been shown to be relatively robust for simple cases such as a clear, convective boundary layer (Mason 1989), simulation of the cloud-topped boundary layer has proved more of a challenge. The combination of small length scales and anisotropic turbulence coupled with cloud microphysics and radiation effects places a heavy burden on the turbulence model, especially in the cloud-top region. Consequently, over the past few decades considerable effort has been devoted to developing turbulence models that are better able to parameterize these processes. Much of this work has involved taking parameterizations developed for neutral boundary layers and deriving corrections to account for buoyancy effects associated with the background stratification and local buoyancy sources due to radiative and latent heat transfer within the cloud (see Lilly 1962; Deardor 1980a; Mason 1989; MacVean & Mason 1990, for example). In this paper we hope to contribute to this effort by presenting a number of turbulence models in which the model coefficients are calculated dynamically during the simulation rather than being prescribed a priori.

  2. Turbulent flow over a surface-mounted 2-D block in thermally-stratified boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Markfort, C. D.; Porte-Agel, F.

    2013-12-01

    Turbulent boundary-layer flows over complex topography have been of great interest in the atmospheric sciences and wind engineering communities. The geometry of the topography, surface characteristics and atmospheric thermal stability play important roles in determining momentum and scalar flux distribution. Studies of turbulent flow over simplified topography, such as 2-D or 3-D blocks and 2-D or 3-D sinusoidal hills, conducted under neutrally stratified boundary-layer conditions have provided insightful information of fluid dynamics. However, atmospheric thermal stability has rarely been incorporated into laboratory simulations, in particular, wind-tunnel experiments. Extension of such studies in thermally-stratified wind tunnels will fill this gap and advance our understanding of the underlying physics of flow over complex topography. Additionally, experimental data are useful for the development of new parameterizations for surface fluxes and validation of numerical models such as Large-Eddy Simulation (LES). A series of experiments involving neutral and thermally-stratified boundary-layer flows over a surface-mounted 2-D block, conducted at the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory boundary-layer wind tunnel, will be presented. The 2-D block, with a width to height ratio of 2:1, occupied the lowest 25% of the turbulent boundary layer. Thermal stratification of the boundary layer was achieved by independently controlling the temperature of both the airflow, the test section floor and block surfaces. Measurements using high-resolution PIV, x-wire/cold-wire anemometry, thermal-couples and surface heat flux sensors were made to identify and quantify the turbulent flow properties, including the size of the recirculation zone, coherent vortex structures and the subsequent boundary layer recovery. Emphasis will be put on addressing thermal stability effects on momentum and scalar flux distribution.

  3. Calculation of turbulent boundary layers with tangential slot injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cary, A. M., Jr.; Bushnell, D. M.; Hefner, J. N.

    1977-01-01

    Paper describes a numerical calculation scheme for tangential slot injection (wall-wake) flows; application of the scheme over a wide range of flow conditions indicates increased accuracy compared to previous work. Predictions from the numerical code were in good agreement with experiment (velocity profile, skin-friction, and effectiveness data) for low- and high-speed flows. To achieve improved accuracy, modifications in the turbulence modeling, compared to previous research, were necessary for the imbedded shear layer region in the near field and for the wall region near shear layer impingement. Anomalous behavior was noted for far field experimental velocity profiles in low-speed flow when the slot-to-free stream velocity ratio was near one

  4. Hypersonic Boundary-Layer Stability Experiments on a Flared-Cone Model at Angle of Attack in a Quiet Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, Glen P.; Chokani, Ndaona

    1996-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the effects of angle of attack on hypersonic boundary-layer stability on a flared-cone model was conducted in the low-disturbance Mach-6 Nozzle-Test Chamber Facility at NASA Langley Research Center. This unique facility provided a 'quiet' flow test environment which is well suited for stability experiments because the low levels of freestream 'noise' minimize artificial stimulation of flow-disturbance growth. Surface pressure and temperature measurements documented the adverse-pressure gradient and transition-onset location. Hot-wire anemometry diagnostics were applied to identify the instability mechanisms which lead to transition. In addition, the mean flow over the flared-cone geometry was modeled by laminar Navier-Stokes computations. Results show that the boundary layer becomes more stable on the windward ray and less stable on the leeward ray relative to the zero-degree angle-of-attack case. The second-mode instability dominates the transition process at a zero-degree angle of attack, however, on the windward ray at an angle of attack this mode was completely stabilized. The less-dominant first-mode instability was slightly destabilized on the windward ray. Non-linear mechanisms such as saturation and harmonic generation are identified from the flow-disturbance bispectra.

  5. A Parameterization of Intermittent Turbulence in the Stable Boundary Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, J K; Nitao, E N; Loosmore, G A

    2003-08-01

    This model explores the interaction between a cooling vegetated surface and the lower atmosphere. Neglecting any possibility of intermittence generated from the top of the stable boundary layer, the frequency of intermittency can be defined as a function of the three input quantities--pressure gradient force, cloud cover fraction, and boundary layer height. It is not clear if the amplitude of the intermittency and the time to reach a quasi-steady state can also be described as a function of the inputs. In addition, time-dependent inputs have an effect on the overall intermittency. Fluctuations in the pressure gradient force have the most influence in decreasing the periods while varying cloud cover fraction decreases the amplitude of the intermittence. It is unclear whether the transition time is affected by the fluctuating inputs. To gauge the sufficiency of this model, the results must be compared to experimental studies and models that include the forcing at the top of the stable boundary layer.

  6. Turbulent boundary layer flow over broad-banded roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, Geno; Aghsaee, Payam; Mazrouei, Saeed; Leonardi, Stefano; Rajagopalan, Krishnakumar; Kobayashi, Marcelo

    2014-11-01

    The response of the boundary layer to a regular roughness is often parameterized in terms of the length scales defining the roughness. Difficulty arises in the case of broad-banded and highly irregular roughness distributions such as over coral reefs or urban canopies where the length scale that determines the response of the boundary layer is not clear. Here we use a spectral description for roughness to create idealized two-dimensional irregular roughness profiles, using square waves as a basis function. Laboratory experiments along with Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) are used to examine the hydrodynamic response to the broad-banded roughness and flow characteristics are related to geometric characteristics of the boundary. The simulations and experiments show that the nature of the flow over two-dimensional irregular walls can be determined as a function of the hydrodynamic origin, which, in turn, can be determined as a function of a mean cavity shape. Results are interpreted in terms of the spectral characteristics of the roughness. The contribution of the various spectral components to the total drag is analyzed for each case. The roughness spectrum influences the flow through the shape of the cavities on the wall and can provide some guidance in predicting the nature of the flow.

  7. Numerical Study of Pressure Fluctuations due to High-Speed Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Wu, Minwei

    2012-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to examine the pressure fluctuations generated by fully developed turbulence in supersonic turbulent boundary layers with an emphasis on both pressure fluctuations at the wall and the acoustic fluctuations radiated into the freestream. The wall and freestream pressure fields are first analyzed for a zero pressure gradient boundary layer with Mach 2.5 and Reynolds number based on momentum thickness of approximately 2835. The single and multi-point statistics reported include the wall pressure fluctuation intensities, frequency spectra, space-time correlations, and convection velocities. Single and multi-point statistics of surface pressure fluctuations show good agreement with measured data and previously published simulations of turbulent boundary layers under similar flow conditions. Spectral analysis shows that the acoustic fluctuations outside the boundary layer region have much lower energy content within the high-frequency region. The space-time correlations reflect the convective nature of the pressure field both at the wall and in the freestream, which is characterized by the downstream propagation of pressure-carrying eddies. Relative to those at the wall, the pressure-carrying eddies associated with the freestream signal are larger and convect at a significantly lower speed. The preliminary DNS results of a Mach 6 boundary layer show that the pressure rms in the freestream region is significantly higher than that of the lower Mach number case.

  8. First Signs of Flow Reversal Within a Separated Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerton, Jared; Lang, Amy

    2015-11-01

    A shark's skin is covered in millions of microscopic scales that have been shown to be able to bristle in a reversing flow. The motive of this project is to further explore a potential bio-inspired passive separation control mechanism which can reduce drag. To better understand this mechanism, a more complete understanding of flow reversal within the turbulent boundary layer is required. In order to capture this phenomenon, water tunnel testing at The University of Alabama was conducted. Using a long flat plate and a rotating cylinder, a large turbulent boundary layer and adverse pressure gradient were generated. Under our testing conditions the boundary layer had a Reynolds number of 200,000 and a boundary layer height in the testing window of 5.6 cm. The adverse pressure gradient causes the viscous length scale to increase and thus increase the size of the individual components of the turbulent boundary layer. This will make the low speed streaks approximately 1 cm in width and thus large enough to measure. Results will be presented that test our hypothesis that the first signs of flow reversal will occur within the section of lowest momentum located furthest from the wall, or within the low speed streaks. This Project was funded by NSF REU Site Award 1358991.

  9. Large-eddy simulations of adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobke, Alexandra; Vinuesa, Ricardo; Örlü, Ramis; Schlatter, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    Adverse pressure-gradient (APG) turbulent boundary layers (TBL) are studied by performing well-resolved large-eddy simulations. The pressure gradient is imposed by defining the free-stream velocity distribution with the description of a power law. Different inflow conditions, box sizes and upper boundary conditions are tested in order to determine the final set-up. The statistics of turbulent boundary layers with two different power-law coefficients and thus magnitudes of adverse pressure gradients are then compared to zero pressure-gradient (ZPG) data. The effect of the APG on TBLs is manifested in the mean flow through a much more prominent wake region and in the Reynolds stresses through the existence of an outer peak. The pre-multiplied energy budgets show that more energy is transported from the near-wall region to farther away from the wall.

  10. Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements of a High Reynolds Number Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, Callum; Stanislas, Michel; Soria, Julio

    2009-11-01

    Streamwise/wall-parallel volumes in the buffer region of a turbulent boundary layer at Reθ =7800 and 11800 are measured using a 4 camera (2048 x 2048 px) tomographic particle image velocimetry (Tomo-PIV) system in the turbulent boundary layer wind tunnel at the Laboratoire de M'ecanique de Lille (LML). Measurement volumes of 1200 x 180 x 1200 pixels are achieved, the large boundary layer provided by this tunnel (δ˜ 0.3 m) resulting in volumes of 470^+ x 70^+ x 470^+ and 920^+ x 140^+ x 920^+ wall units, respectively. The quality of the data acquired by this technique is assessed based on the mean velocity profile, velocity fluctuations, velocity power spectrum and the fluctuating divergence. Streaks and streamwise vortices are examined and an attempt is made to classify the flow using the invariants of the full velocity gradient tensor.

  11. Experimental Investigation of Crossing Shock Wave-Turbulent Boundary Layer-Bleed Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyun; Hingst, Warren R.; Davis, David O.

    1996-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of a symmetric crossing shock wave/turbulent boundary layer/bleed interaction are presented for a freestream unit Reynolds number of 1.68 x 10(exp 7)/m, a Mach number of 2.81, and deflection angles of 8 degrees. The data obtained in this study are bleed mass flow rate using a trace gas technique, qualitative information in the form of oil flow visualization, flow field Pitot pressures, and static pressure measurements using pressure sensitive paint. The main objective of this test is two-fold. First, this study is conducted to explore boundary layer control through mass flow removal near a large region of separated flow caused by the interaction of a double fin-induced shock wave and an incoming turbulent boundary layer. Also, a comprehensive data set is needed for computational fluid dynamics code validation.

  12. Detached eddy simulation of high-Reynolds-number turbulent flows using the immersed boundary method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, Matteo; Pirozzoli, Sergio; Orlandi, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    Detached Eddy Simulation based on the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model is applied in conjunction with the immersed boundary method to simulate high-Reynolds number turbulent flows in complex geometries. A fourth-order, finite-difference solver capable of discretely preserving the kinetic energy in the limit of inviscid flow is adopted to solve the compressible Navier-Stokes equations and model-consistent, adaptive wall functions are employed to provide the proper numerical boundary conditions at the fluid/solid interface. Numerical tests, performed for several configurations involving massively separated flows, demonstrate that computations at high-Reynolds number, as typically occurring in flows of industrial relevance, can be successfully carried out using the immersed boundary strategy, providing predictions whose accuracy is comparable to that of standard, body-fitted, structured or unstructured flow solvers.

  13. Turbulent boundary layer over solid and porous surfaces with small roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, F. Y.; Schetz, J. A.; Collier, F.

    1982-01-01

    Skin friction and profiles of mean velocity, axial and normal turbulence intensity, and Reynolds stress in the untripped boundary layer were measured directly on a large diameter, axisymmetric body with: (1) a smooth, solid surface; (2) a sandpaper-roughened, solid surface; (3) a sintered metal, porous surface; (4) a smooth, perforated titanium surface; (5) a rough solid surface made of fine, diffusion bonded screening, and (6) a rough, porous surface of the same screening. Results obtained for each of these surfaces are discussed. It is shown that a rough, porous wall simply does not influence the boundary layer in the same way as a rough solid wall. Therefore, turbulent transport models for boundary layers over porous surfaces either with or without injection or suction, must include both surface roughness and porosity effects.

  14. A review of vortex structures and associated coherent motions in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Stephen K.

    1990-01-01

    The experimental and computational evidence for the existence and role of vortices in turbulent boundary layers is briefly reviewed. Quasi-streamwise and transverse vortices are considered, and various published conceptual models for horseshoe-like vortical structures are compared. The causes for upright and inverted horseshoe-shaped vorticity lines are discussed, and the distinction between vorticity lines and vortices is demonsrated. Finally, results from a numerically-simulated turbulent boundary layer are used to compute distributions of diameter, height, and strength for quasi-streamwise and spanwise vortices. These results confirm that quasi-streamwise vortices are clustered near the wall, while spanwise vortices are distributed throughout the layer. The variation of spanwise vortex core diameter with distance from the wall is found to be consistent with the mixing-length distribution for a boundary layer.

  15. Modification in drag of turbulent boundary layers resulting from manipulation of large-scale structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corke, T. C.; Guezennec, Y.; Nagib, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of placing a parallel-plate turbulence manipulator in a boundary layer are investigated by means of flow visualization and hot-wire measurements. The manipulator was found to be effective in inhibiting the intermittent large scale structure of the boundary layer, and the effect persists for at least 70 boundary-layer thicknesses downstream of the manipulator. With the removal of the large scale, there was an observed reduction in the streamwise turbulence intensity levels near the wall. The downstream distribution of the skin friction coefficient, determined from the stream wise change in fluid momentum, was also altered by the introduction of the manipulator. The data from both the visualization and hot wire studies are provided.

  16. Aerodynamic heating in gaps of thermal protection system tile arrays in laminar and turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental heat-transfer investigation was conducted on two staggered arrays of metallic tiles in laminar and turbulent boundary layers. This investigation was conducted for two purposes. The impingement heating distribution where flow in a longitudinal gap intersects a transverse gap and impinges on a downstream blocking tile was defined. The influence of tile and gap geometries was analyzed to develop empirical relationships for impingement heating in laminar and turbulent boundary layers. Tests were conducted in a high temperature structures tunnel at a nominal Mach number of 7, a nominal total temperature of 1800 K, and free-stream unit Reynolds numbers from 1.0 x 10 million to 4.8 x 10 million per meter. The test results were used to assess the impingement heating effects produced by parameters that include gap width, longitudinal gap length, slope of the tile forward-facing wall, boundary-layer displacement thickness, Reynolds number, and local surface pressure.

  17. Turbulence Kinetic Energy Budgets and Dissipation Rates in Disturbed Stable Boundary Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, J K; Piper, M; Kosovic, B

    2004-06-18

    An important parameter in the numerical simulation of atmospheric boundary layers is the dissipation length scale, l{sub {var_epsilon}}. It is especially important in weakly to moderately stable conditions, in which a tenuous balance between shear production of turbulence, buoyant destruction of turbulence, and turbulent dissipation is maintained. In large-scale models, the dissipation rate is often parameterized using a diagnostic equation based on the production of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and an estimate of the dissipation length scale. Proper parameterization of the dissipation length scale from experimental data requires accurate estimation of the rate of dissipation of TKE from experimental data. Using data from the MICROFRONTS and CASES-99 field programs, we evaluate turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), TKE dissipation rate {var_epsilon}, and dissipation length l{sub {var_epsilon}} over a range of stability regimes represented by a stable boundary layer (SBL), a destabilizing intrusion (by first a cold front and second a density current) and recovery. These data may be utilized to test recent parameterizations of dissipation rate {var_epsilon} and l{sub {var_epsilon}} in order to determine the suitability of these models for inclusion in mesoscale models for numerical weather prediction or pollution dispersion prediction.

  18. Theoretical investigation of three-dimensional shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions. Part 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, D. D.

    1984-12-01

    The focus of the research effort is the understanding of three-dimensional shock wave-turbulent boundary layer interactions. The approach uses the full mean compressible Navier-Stokes equations with turbulence incorporated through the algebraic turbulent eddy viscosity model of Baldwin and Lomax. This year's principle accomplishments are: (1) the Baldwin-Lomax model was evaluated for a series of non-separated two-dimensional turbulent boundary layers; (2) the 3-D Navier-Stokes codes was rewritten innto CYBER 200 FORTRAN; (3) the computed results for the 3-D sharp fin alpha sub g = 10 deg were compared with the results of a separate calculation by C. Horstmann using the k-epsilon turbulence model, and the experimental data of McClure and Dolling; and (4) the 3-D sharp fin at alpha sub g =20 deg was computed, and the results compared with the available experimental data. The examination of the flowfield structure of the 3-D sharp fin at alphaa sub g = 20 deg was initiated.

  19. Nonlocal stochastic mixing-length theory and the velocity profile in the turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, H.; de Leeuw, G.; Maassen van den Brink, A.

    1995-02-01

    Turbulence mixing by finite size eddies will be treated by means of a novel formulation of nonlocal K-theory, involving sample paths and a stochastic closure hypothesis, which implies a well defined recipe for the calculation of sampling and transition rates. The connection with the general theory of stochastic processes will be established. The relation with other nonlocal turbulence models (e.g. transilience and spectral diffusivity theory) is also discussed. Using an analytical sampling rate model (satisfying exchange) the theory is applied to the boundary layer (using a scaling hypothesis), which maps boundary layer turbulence mixing of scalar densities onto a nondiffusive (Kubo-Anderson or kangaroo) type stochastic process. The resulting transpport equation for longitudinal momentum P x ≡ ϱ U is solved for a unified description of both the inertial and the viscous sublayer including the crossover. With a scaling exponent ε ≈ 0.58 (while local turbulence would amount to ε → ∞) the velocity profile U+ = ƒ(y +) is found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental data. Inter alia (i) the significance of ε as a turbulence Cantor set dimension, (ii) the value of the integration constant in the logarithmic region (i.e. if y+ → ∞), (iii) linear timescaling, and (iv) finite Reynolds number effects will be investigated. The (analytical) predictions of the theory for near-wall behaviour (i.e. if y+ → 0) of fluctuating quantities also perfectly agree with recent direct numerical simulations.

  20. Vortex Studies Relating to Boundary Layer Turbulence and Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, J. L.; Hardin, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    The present study considers the two-dimensional case of an array of N rectilinear, like-sign vortices above an infinite flat boundary. The method of images can be employed with this configuration to reduce the problem to that of 2N vortices in free space, constrained by 2N symmetry relations. This system is Hamiltonian and therefore certain invariants of the motion are known. Further, from the Hamiltonian constant, the equations of motion are readily derived and may be integrated numerically to determine the vortex trajectories. This knowledge of the time-dependent vortex motion then allows the resulting noise radiation to be computed by standard aeroacoustic techniques.

  1. Vortex studies relating to boundary layer turbulence and noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, J. L.; Hardin, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    The present study considers the two-dimensional case of an array of N rectilinear, like-sign vortices above an infinite flat boundary. The method of images can be employed with this configuration to reduce the problem to that of 2N vortices in free space, constrained by 2N symmetry relations. This system is Hamiltonian and therefore certain invariants of the motion are known. Futher, from the Hamiltonian constant, the equations of motion are readily derived and may be integrated numerically to determine the vortex trajectories. This knowledge of the time-dependent vortex motion then allows the resulting noise radiation to be computed by standard aeroacoustic techniques.

  2. Helicity and potential vorticity in the surface boundary layer turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chkhetiani, Otto; Kurgansky, Michael; Koprov, Boris; Koprov, Victor

    2016-04-01

    An experimental measurement of all three components of the velocity and vorticity vectors, as well as the temperature and its gradient, and potential vorticity, has been developed using four acoustic anemometers. Anemometers were placed at vertices of a tetrahedron, the horizontal base of which was a rectangular triangle with equal legs, and the upper point was exactly above the top of the right angle. The distance from the surface to the tetrahedron its base was 5.5 m, and the lengths of legs and a vertical edge were 5 m. The measurements were carried out of total duration near 100 hours both in stable and unstable stratification conditions (at the Tsimlyansk Scientific Station in a uniform area of virgin steppe 700 x 650 m, August 2012). A covariance-correlation matrix for turbulent variations in all measured values has been calculated. In the daytime horizontal and vertical components of the helicity are of the order of -0.03 and +0.01 m s-2, respectively. The nighttime signs remain unchanged, but the absolute values are several times smaller. It is confirmed also by statistics of a relative helicity. The cospectra and spectral correlation coefficients have been calculated for all helicity components. The time variations in the components of "instantaneous" relative helicity and potential vorticity are considered. Connections of helicity with Monin-Obukhov length and the wind vertical profile structure are discussed. This work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (Project No 14-27-00134).

  3. Turbulent Boundary Layers in Oscillating Flows. Part 1: an Experimental and Computational Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental-computational study of the behavior of turbulent boundary layers for oscillating air flows over a plane surface with a small favorable mean pressure gradient is described. Experimental studies were conducted for boundary layers generated on the test section wall of a facility that produces a flow with a mean free stream velocity and a superposed nearly-pure sinusoidal component over a wide range of frequency. Flow at a nominal mean free stream velocity of 50 m/s were studied at atmospheric pressure and temperature at selected axial positions over a 2 m test length for frequencies ranging from 4 to 29 Hz. Quantitative experimental results are presented for unsteady velocity profiles and longitudinal turbulence levels obtained from hot wire anemometer measurements at three axial positions. Mean velocity profiles for oscillating flows were found to exhibit only small deviations from corresponding steady flow profiles, while amplitudes and phase relationships exhibited a strong dependence on axial position and frequency. Since sinusoidal flows could be generated over a wide range of frequency, studies at fixed values of reduced frequency at different axial positions were studied. Results show that there is some utility in the use of reduced frequency to correlate unsteady velocity results. The turbulence level u' sub rms was observed to vary essentially sinusoidally around values close to those measured in steady flow. However, the amplitude of oscillation and phase relations for turbulence level were found to be strongly frequency dependent. Numerical predictions were obtained using an unsteady boundary layer computational code and the Cebeci-Smith and Glushko turbulence models. Predicted quantities related to unsteady velocity profiles exhibit fair agreement with experiment when the Cebeci-Smith turbulence model is used.

  4. Mean velocity and turbulence measurements in a 90 deg curved duct with thin inlet boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, R. A.; Peters, C. E.; Steinhoff, J.; Hornkohl, J. O.; Nourinejad, J.; Ramachandran, K.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental database established by this investigation of the flow in a large rectangular turning duct is of benchmark quality. The experimental Reynolds numbers, Deans numbers and boundary layer characteristics are significantly different from previous benchmark curved-duct experimental parameters. This investigation extends the experimental database to higher Reynolds number and thinner entrance boundary layers. The 5% to 10% thick boundary layers, based on duct half-width, results in a large region of near-potential flow in the duct core surrounded by developing boundary layers with large crossflows. The turbulent entrance boundary layer case at R sub ed = 328,000 provides an incompressible flowfield which approaches real turbine blade cascade characteristics. The results of this investigation provide a challenging benchmark database for computational fluid dynamics code development.

  5. Near-marine boundary layer atmospheric and turbulence measurement and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzur, Tariq; Zeller, John; Magee, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Currently there are extensive modeling and measurement capabilities for the region extending from 100 ft above sea surface to space, but few such capabilities exist for the region extending up to 10 ft above the sea surface. By measuring and characterizing conditions in the marine boundary layer existing below 30 ft above the sea surface such as turbulence and extinction, the optical communication capabilities of maritime vessels when operating at or near the surface may be extended and enhanced. Key physical parameters such as absorption, scattering, and turbulence strength (Cn 2) along the propagation path have a degree of variability on meteorological conditions as well optical wavelength. Modeling of the atmospheric environment is thus critical in order to generate a good understanding of optical propagation through the atmosphere. NUWC is utilizing software provided by MZA to model Cn 2 and resultant beam propagation characteristics through the near-marine boundary layer. We are developing the capability of near-marine boundary layer atmospheric and turbulence measurements and modeling as well as optical laser link testing at outdoor test sites. Measurements are performed with optical laser links (e.g., bit rate error), scintillometer, and particle image velocimetry (PIV) cameras, while turbulence and propagation modeling is achieved using MODTRAN5, ATMTools, NSLOT, LEEDR, and WaveTrain modeling and simulation code. By better understanding the effects of turbulence on optical transmission in the near-marine boundary layer through modeling and experimental measurements, measures can be implemented to reduce the bit error rate and increase data throughput, enabling more efficient and accurate communication link capabilities.

  6. Thermal Boundary Layer Equation for Turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkina, Olga; Horn, Susanne; Wagner, Sebastian; Ching, Emily S. C.

    2015-03-01

    We report a new thermal boundary layer equation for turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection for Prandtl number Pr >1 that takes into account the effect of turbulent fluctuations. These fluctuations are neglected in existing equations, which are based on steady-state and laminar assumptions. Using this new equation, we derive analytically the mean temperature profiles in two limits: (a) Pr ≳1 and (b) Pr ≫1 . These two theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with the results of our direct numerical simulations for Pr =4.38 (water) and Pr =2547.9 (glycerol), respectively.

  7. GYC: A program to compute the turbulent boundary layer on a rotating cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    A computer program, GYC, which is capable of computing the properties of a compressible turbulent boundary layer on a rotating axisymmetric cone-cylinder body, according to the principles of invariant modeling was studied. The program is extended to include the calculation of the turbulence scale by a differential equation. GYC is in operation on the CDC-7600 computer and has undergone several corrections and improvements as a result of the experience gained. The theoretical basis for the program and the method of implementation, as well as information on its operation are given.

  8. Free-stream turbulence and concave curvature effects on heated, transitional boundary layers, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, J.; Simon, T. W.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the transition process on flat-plate and concave curved-wall boundary layers for various free-streem turbulence levels was performed. Where possible, sampling according to the intermittency function was made. Such sampling allowed segregation of the signal into two types of behavior: laminar-like and turbulent-like. The results from the investigation are discussed. Documentation is presented in two volumes. Volume one contains the text of the report including figures and supporting appendices. Volume two contains data reduction program listings and tabulated data.

  9. A law of the wall for turbulent boundary layers with suction: Stevenson's formula revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigdorovich, Igor

    2016-08-01

    The turbulent velocity field in the viscous sublayer of the boundary layer with suction to a first approximation is homogeneous in any direction parallel to the wall and is determined by only three constant quantities — the wall shear stress, the suction velocity, and the fluid viscosity. This means that there exists a finite algebraic relation between the turbulent shear stress and the longitudinal mean-velocity gradient, using which as a closure condition for the equations of motion, we establish an exact asymptotic behavior of the velocity profile at the outer edge of the viscous sublayer. The obtained relationship provides a generalization of the logarithmic law to the case of wall suction.

  10. Performance of Renormalization Group Algebraic Turbulence Model on Boundary Layer Transition Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, Kyung H.

    1994-01-01

    The RNG-based algebraic turbulence model, with a new method of solving the cubic equation and applying new length scales, is introduced. An analysis is made of the RNG length scale which was previously reported and the resulting eddy viscosity is compared with those from other algebraic turbulence models. Subsequently, a new length scale is introduced which actually uses the two previous RNG length scales in a systematic way to improve the model performance. The performance of the present RNG model is demonstrated by simulating the boundary layer flow over a flat plate and the flow over an airfoil.

  11. Interaction Between a Vortex and a Turbulent Boundary Layer. Part 1: Mean Flow Evolution and Turbulence Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, Russell V.; Pauley, Wayne R.; Eaton, John K.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to examine the interaction between a single weak streamwise vortex and a two-dimensional turbulent boundary layer. Attention was focused on characterizing the effect of the boundary layer on the vortex, including the effects of a moderate adverse pressure gradient. Rapid growth of the vortex core was observed, and a flattening of the core shape occurred when the dimension of the core radius became comparable to the distance of the vortex center from the surface. Adverse pressure gradients caused an increase in the rate of core growth, and therefore, a stronger distortion of the core shape. Measurements of surface skin friction beneath the vortex and some of the Reynolds stresses are presented.

  12. One-dimensional wave bottom boundary layer model comparison: specific eddy viscosity and turbulence closure models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Puleo, J.A.; Mouraenko, O.; Hanes, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    Six one-dimensional-vertical wave bottom boundary layer models are analyzed based on different methods for estimating the turbulent eddy viscosity: Laminar, linear, parabolic, k—one equation turbulence closure, k−ε—two equation turbulence closure, and k−ω—two equation turbulence closure. Resultant velocity profiles, bed shear stresses, and turbulent kinetic energy are compared to laboratory data of oscillatory flow over smooth and rough beds. Bed shear stress estimates for the smooth bed case were most closely predicted by the k−ω model. Normalized errors between model predictions and measurements of velocity profiles over the entire computational domain collected at 15° intervals for one-half a wave cycle show that overall the linear model was most accurate. The least accurate were the laminar and k−ε models. Normalized errors between model predictions and turbulence kinetic energy profiles showed that the k−ω model was most accurate. Based on these findings, when the smallest overall velocity profile prediction error is required, the processing requirements and error analysis suggest that the linear eddy viscosity model is adequate. However, if accurate estimates of bed shear stress and TKE are required then, of the models tested, the k−ω model should be used.

  13. Structural Composition and Turbulent Mixing Mechanisms of a Subsonic Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechlars, Patrick; Sandberg, Richard; Aerodynamics; Flight Mechanics Group-Southampton Team

    2015-11-01

    Turbulent mixing is a key mechanism for redistributing energy in a wide range of flows. The effect of this mixing on the flow is similar to that of viscous diffusion and the process is therefore often described as turbulent diffusion. Turbulence models based on the Boussinesq approximation rely on the accuracy of the model's description of the mixing to capture the correct energy redistribution. In this presentation the basic mechanism is illustrated using a subsonic turbulent boundary layer (TBL) as a case study, and the direct influence of turbulence on the mean flow is quantified. Through a characteristic analysis the structures involved in the mixing mechanism are identified and further analyzed. The key structures for the mixing in a TBL are large clusters of smaller turbulent structures that are known as large scale motions (LSMs). While the smaller structures are located in the near-wall region they mainly align in the stream-wise direction and pack densely, which affects production and dissipation. Within the LSMs the single vortices reach towards the outer regions and develop an arbitrary alignment as soon as their distance to the wall is sufficiently large. The discussed mechanisms are not limited to TBLs and a comparison to a jet flow is provided in the talk. The authors acknowledge EPSRC for supporting this project under the grand number EP/I003754/1.

  14. Transition and Breakdown to Turbulence in Incompressible Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, Ponnampalam

    1998-01-01

    We have developed a code where the nonlinear terms are treated implicitly. The equations are discretized using the two-point fourth order compact scheme in the y-direction and the backward Euler method in the x-direction. We investigated the transition process in a Blasius boundary layer due to fundamental type breakdown. With 8 modes in the w and 3 planes, we could compute the evolution of disturbances up to Re(x)=910, which is well into the strongly nonlinear region. The transition onset point is located around Re(x)=850. The comparison with the measurements and with the DNS computations are very good up to Re(x)=880.

  15. Prediction of turbulent boundary layers with a second-moment closure: Part 1--Effects of periodic pressure gradient, wall transpiration,and free-stream turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Shima, N. . College of Engineering)

    1993-03-01

    The purpose of this two-part paper is to assess the performance of a second-moment closure applicable up to a wall. In the present part, the turbulence model is applied to the boundary layers with periodic pressure gradient, with wall transpiration and with free-stream turbulence. The predictions are shown to be in good agreement with experiments and a direct simulation. In particular, a tendency towards relaminarization and a subsequent retransition in the oscillating boundary layer are faithfully reproduced, and the effect of the length scale of free-stream turbulence is correctly captured.

  16. Friction drag reduction achievable by near-wall turbulence manipulation in spatially developing boundary-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannier, Amaury; Garnier, Eric; Sagaut, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    Various control strategies, such as active feedback control or riblets, end up restraining near-wall turbulence. An analytical study is conducted to estimate the drag-reduction achievable by such control in zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary-layers. Based on an idealized control which damps all fluctuations within a near-wall layer, a composite flow profile is established. It leads to explicit models for both the drag-reduction and the boundary-layer development rate. A skin-friction decomposition is applied and gives physical insights on the underlying phenomena. The control is found to alter the spatial development of the boundary-layer, resulting in detrimental impact on the skin-friction. However, the drag-reducing mechanism, attributed to the turbulence weakening, is found predominant and massive drag reductions remain achievable at high Reynolds number, although a minute part of the boundary-layer is manipulated. The model is finally assessed against Large Eddy Simulations of riblet-controlled flow.

  17. DNS of self-similar adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer at incipient separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria, Julio; Kitsios, Vassili; Atkinson, Callum; Sillero, Juan; Borrell, Guillem; Gungar, Ayse; Jimenez, Javier

    2015-11-01

    A direct numerical simulation of a self-similar adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer (APG-TBL) flow at incipient separation has been carried out. The maximum Reynolds number based on the momentum thickness, Reδ2 , reached in this DNS is 6,500. A wall-normal far-field boundary condition to effect the desired APG that will lead to the desired self-similar flow at the verge of separation has been developed. The self-similar analysis of the mean turbulent boundary layer equations yields the necessary conditions for a self-similar mean flow to exists. These conditions are tested using the DNS APG-TBL data base. First and second order statistics of the velocity across the APG-TBL are also presented in the light of the self-similar analysis results and compared to the results of a zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer DNS with similar mean inflow characteristics as the APG-TBL. The support of the ARC, NCI and Pawsey SCC funded by the Australian and Western Australian governments as well as the support of PRACE funded by the European Union are gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Assessment of Turbulent Shock-Boundary Layer Interaction Computations Using the OVERFLOW Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, A. B.; Lillard, R. P.; Schwing, A. M.; Blaisdell, G> A.; Lyrintzis, A. S.

    2007-01-01

    The performance of two popular turbulence models, the Spalart-Allmaras model and Menter s SST model, and one relatively new model, Olsen & Coakley s Lag model, are evaluated using the OVERFLOWcode. Turbulent shock-boundary layer interaction predictions are evaluated with three different experimental datasets: a series of 2D compression ramps at Mach 2.87, a series of 2D compression ramps at Mach 2.94, and an axisymmetric coneflare at Mach 11. The experimental datasets include flows with no separation, moderate separation, and significant separation, and use several different experimental measurement techniques (including laser doppler velocimetry (LDV), pitot-probe measurement, inclined hot-wire probe measurement, preston tube skin friction measurement, and surface pressure measurement). Additionally, the OVERFLOW solutions are compared to the solutions of a second CFD code, DPLR. The predictions for weak shock-boundary layer interactions are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data. For strong shock-boundary layer interactions, all of the turbulence models overpredict the separation size and fail to predict the correct skin friction recovery distribution. In most cases, surface pressure predictions show too much upstream influence, however including the tunnel side-wall boundary layers in the computation improves the separation predictions.

  19. Flowfield measurements in a separated and reattached flat plate turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patrick, William P.

    1987-01-01

    The separation and reattachment of a large-scale, two-dimensional turbulent boundary layer at low subsonic speed on a flat plate has been studied experimentally. The separation bubble was 55 cm long and had a maximum bubble thickness, measured to the height of the mean dividing streamline, of 17 cm, which was twice the thickness of the inlet boundary layer. A combination of laser velocimetry, hot-wire anemometry, pneumatic probing techniques, and flow visualization were used as diagnostics. Principal findings were that an outer inviscid rotational flow was defined which essentially convected over the blockage associated with the inner, viscously dominated bubble recirculation region. A strong backflow region in which the flow moved upstream 100 percent of the time was measured near the test surface over the central 35 percent of the bubble. A laminar backflow boundary layer having pseudo-turbulent characteristics including a log-linear velocity profile was generated under the highly turbulent backflow. Velocity profile shapes in the reversed flow region matched a previously developed universal backflow profile at the upstream edge of the separation region but not in the steady backflow region downstream. A smoke flow visualization movie and hot-film measurements revealed low frequency nonperiodic flapping at reattachment. However, forward flow fraction data at reattachment and mean velocity profiles in the redeveloping boundary layer downstream of reattachment correlated with backward-facing step data when the axial dimension was scaled by the distance from the maximum bubble thickness to reattachment.

  20. Modeling Compressibility Effects in High-Speed Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkar, S.

    2004-01-01

    Man has strived to make objects fly faster, first from subsonic to supersonic and then to hypersonic speeds. Spacecraft and high-speed missiles routinely fly at hypersonic Mach numbers, M greater than 5. In defense applications, aircraft reach hypersonic speeds at high altitude and so may civilian aircraft in the future. Hypersonic flight, while presenting opportunities, has formidable challenges that have spurred vigorous research and development, mainly by NASA and the Air Force in the USA. Although NASP, the premier hypersonic concept of the eighties and early nineties, did not lead to flight demonstration, much basic research and technology development was possible. There is renewed interest in supersonic and hypersonic flight with the HyTech program of the Air Force and the Hyper-X program at NASA being examples of current thrusts in the field. At high-subsonic to supersonic speeds, fluid compressibility becomes increasingly important in the turbulent boundary layers and shear layers associated with the flow around aerospace vehicles. Changes in thermodynamic variables: density, temperature and pressure, interact strongly with the underlying vortical, turbulent flow. The ensuing changes to the flow may be qualitative such as shocks which have no incompressible counterpart, or quantitative such as the reduction of skin friction with Mach number, large heat transfer rates due to viscous heating, and the dramatic reduction of fuel/oxidant mixing at high convective Mach number. The peculiarities of compressible turbulence, so-called compressibility effects, have been reviewed by Fernholz and Finley. Predictions of aerodynamic performance in high-speed applications require accurate computational modeling of these "compressibility effects" on turbulence. During the course of the project we have made fundamental advances in modeling the pressure-strain correlation and developed a code to evaluate alternate turbulence models in the compressible shear layer.

  1. The vertical turbulence structure of the coastal marine atmospheric boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Tjernstroem, M.; Smedman, A.S. )

    1993-03-15

    The vertical turbulence structure in the marine atmosphere along a shoreline has been investigated using data from tower and aircraft measurements performed along the Baltic coast in the southeast of Sweden. Two properties make the Baltic Sea particularly interesting. It is surrounded by land in all directions within moderate advection distances, and it features a significant annual lag in sea surface temperature as compared with inland surface temperature. The present data were collected mostly during spring or early summer, when the water is cool, i.e., with a stably or neutrally stratified marine boundary layer usually capped by an inversion. Substantial daytime heating over the land area results in a considerable horizontal thermal contrast. Measurements were made on a small island, on a tower with a good sea fetch, and with an airborne instrument package. The profile data from the aircraft is from 25 slant soundings performed in connection to low level boundary layer flights. The results from the profiles are extracted through filtering techniques on individual time (space) series (individual profiles), applying different normalization and finally averaging over all or over groups of profiles. The land-based data are from a low tower situated on the shoreline of a small island with a wide sector of unobstructed sea fetch. Several factors are found that add to the apparent complexity of the coastal marine environment: the state of the sea appears to have a major impact on the turbulence structure of the surface layer, jet-shaped wind speed profiles were very common at the top of the boundary layer (in about 50% of the cases) and distinct layers with increased turbulence were frequently found well above the boundary layer (in about 80% of the cases). The present paper will concentrate on a description of the experiment, the analysis methods, and a general description of the boundary layer turbulence structure over the Baltic Sea. 40 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Validating coastal, near and far offshore boundary layer parameterizations with airborne helipod turbulence probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, A.; Bange, J.

    2009-09-01

    The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flow is more complex at the land-sea transition zone due to the formation of coherent mesoscale land-sea breeze circulation triggered by abrupt changes in the surface roughness and thermal forcing. Since the structure of the boundary layer flow is closely related to the representation of the surface conditions as determined by e.g. orography, land use, surface roughness etc., we begin with investigating the sensitivity of the boundary layer flow to the surface forcing at the land-sea transition zone including the coastline, the islands, the near (< 10 km) and the far offshore regions at the north-western German coast, the Borkum island and the offshore research platform FINO-1. The turbulent momentum, heat and moisture fluxes derived from in-situ airborne Helipod measurements are compared with results from the Mellor-Yamada-Janic (MYJ), Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (YMNN) and the Quasi Normal Scale Elimination (QSNE) boundary layer parameterization schemes implemented in the WRF (V3.1) mesoscale model. Since ground stations and measurement towers offer only isolated point measurements, and remote sensing methods rely strongly on assumptions on the turbulent structure of the lower part of the atmospheric boundary layer, the best strategy to obtain precise in-situ data are airborne measurements. Probably the most accurate airborne measurement platform offering highest spatial and temporal resolution of thermodynamic quantities is the helicopter-borne turbulence probe Helipod. The Helipod is attached to a 15 m rope and carried below a helicopter and outside the downwash area of the rotor blades at 40 m/s. At a sampling rate of 500 Hz, measurements of the wind vector, temperature and humidity resolve sub-meter turbulence but also large (e.g. convective) structures. Vertical profiles and horizontal legs can be flown between 1500 m and a few meters above the surface, although the latter is limited by local flight safety rules

  3. Wind tunnel study of a vertical axis wind turbine in a turbulent boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolin, Vincent; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    Vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) are in a relatively infant state of development when compared to their cousins the horizontal axis wind turbines. Very few studies have been carried out to characterize the wake flow behind VAWTs, and virtually none to observe the influence of the atmospheric boundary layer. Here we present results from an experiment carried out at the EPFL-WIRE boundary-layer wind tunnel and designed to study the interaction between a turbulent boundary layer flow and a VAWT. Specifically we use stereoscopic particle image velocimetry to observe and quantify the influence of the boundary layer flow on the wake generated by a VAWT, as well as the effect the VAWT has on the boundary layer flow profile downstream. We find that the wake behind the VAWT is strongly asymmetric, due to the varying aerodynamic forces on the blades as they change their position around the rotor. We also find that the wake adds strong turbulence levels to the flow, particularly on the periphery of the wake where vortices and strong velocity gradients are present. The boundary layer is also shown to cause greater momentum to be entrained downwards rather than upwards into the wake.

  4. Synthetic Jet Interaction With A Turbulent Boundary Layer Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Douglas R.

    2002-01-01

    Perhaps one of the more notable advances to have occurred in flow control technology in the last fifteen years is the application of surface-issuing jets for separation control on aerodynamic surfaces. The concept was introduced by Johnston and Night (1990) who proposed using circular jets, skewed and inclined to the wall, to generate streamwise vortices for the purpose of mitigating boundary layer separation. The skew and inclination angles have subsequently been shown to affect the strength and sign of the ensuing vortices. With a non-circular orifice, in addition to skew and inclination, the yaw angle of the major axis of the orifice can influence the flow control effectiveness of the jet. In particular, a study by Chang arid Collins (1997) revealed that a non-circular orifice, yawed relative to the freestream, can be used to control the size and strength of the vortices produced by the control jet. This early work used jets with only a steady injection of mass. Seifert et al. revealed that an unsteady blowing jet, could be as effective at separation control as a steady jet but with less mass flow. Seifert et al. showed that small amplitude blowing oscillations superimposed on a low momentum steady jet Was the most effective approach to delaying separation on a NACA 0015 airfoil at post-stall angles of attack. More recent work suggests that perhaps the most efficient jet control effect comes from a synthetic (oscillatory) jet where the time-averaged mass flux through the orifice is zero, but the net wall normal momentum is non-zero. The control effectiveness of synthetic jets has been demonstrated for several internal and external flow fields used synthetic jet control on a thick, blunt-nosed airfoil to delay stall well beyond the stall angles for the uncontrolled airfoil and with a dramatic increase in the lift-to-drag performance. Amitay et al. used an array of synthetic jets to mitigate flow separation in curved and diffusing ducts. While the control

  5. Laminar and turbulent boundary layer separation control of Mako shark skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afroz, Farhana

    The Shortfin Mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus) is one of the fastest swimmers in nature. They have an incredible turning agility and are estimated to achieve speeds as high as ten body lengths per second. Shark skin is known to contain flexible denticles or scales, capable of being actuated by the flow whereby a unique boundary layer control (BLC) method could reduce drag. It is hypothesized that shark scales bristle when the flow is reversed, and this bristling may serve to control flow separation by (1) inhibiting the localized flow reversal near the wall and (2) inducing mixing within the boundary layer by cavities formed between the scales that increases the momentum of the flow near the wall. To test this hypothesis, samples of Mako shark skin have been studied under various amounts of adverse pressure gradient (APG). These samples were collected from the flank region of a Shortfin Mako shark where the scales have the greatest potential for separation control due to the highest bristling angles. An easy technique for inducing boundary layer separation has been developed where an APG can be generated and varied using a rotating cylinder. Both the experimental and numerical studies showed that the amount of APG can be varied as a function of cylinder rotation speed or cylinder gap height for a wide range of Reynolds numbers. This method of generating an APG is used effectively for inducing both laminar and turbulent boundary layer separation over a flat plate. Laminar and turbulent boundary layer separation studies conducted over a smooth plate have been compared with the same setup repeated over shark skin. The time-averaged DPIV results showed that shark scale bristling controlled both laminar and turbulent boundary layer separation to a measurable extent. It shows that the shark scales cause an early transition to turbulence and reduce the degree of laminar separation. For turbulent separation, reverse flow near the wall and inside the boundary layer is

  6. Some effects of finite spatial resolution on skin friction measurements in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, Russell V.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of finite spatial resolution often cause serious errors in measurements in turbulent boundary layers, with particularly large effects for measurements of fluctuating skin friction and velocities within the sublayer. However, classical analyses of finite spatial resolution effects have generally not accounted for the substantial inhomogeneity and anisotropy of near-wall turbulence. The present study has made use of results from recent computational simulations of wall-bounded turbulent flows to examine spatial resolution effects for measurements made at a wall using both single-sensor probes and those employing two sensing volumes in a V shape. Results are presented to show the effects of finite spatial resolution on a variety of quantitites deduced from the skin friction field.

  7. Computation of a Synthetic Jet in a Turbulent Cross-Flow Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2004-01-01

    A series of unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computations are performed for the flow of a synthetic jet issuing into a turbulent boundary layer through a circular orifice. This is one of the validation test cases from a synthetic jet validation workshop held in March 2004. Several numerical parameters are investigated, and the effects of three different turbulence models are explored. Both long-time-averaged and time-dependent phase-averaged results are compared to experiment. On the whole, qualitative comparisons of the mean flow quantities are fairly good. There are many differences evident in the quantitative comparisons. The calculations do not exhibit a strong dependence on the type of turbulence model employed.

  8. Two-component LDV investigation of 3-dimensional shock/turbulent boundary layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. D.; Brown, J. L.; Kussoy, M. I.; Horstman, C. C.; Holt, M.

    1987-01-01

    Mean-velocity and turbulence measurements obtained by two-component laser Doppler velocimetry are presented, together with numerical predictions, for the shock-related separation of a turbulent boundary layer at Mach 2.85. The basic geometry, a 30 deg half-angle flare mounted on a long cylinder, is made three-dimensional by tipping the flare at an angle of attack, alpha. The separation length and general upstream influence increase with alpha. A recirculating vortex in the separated zone becomes stronger as three-dimensionality increases. A large-scale unsteadiness of the separation shock wave and surrounding flowfields grows in amplitude with alpha, and appears to strongly influence the amplification of turbulence correlations ahead of detachment. Scaling of the streamwise coordinate by separation length causes two-dimensional and three-dimensional data profiles on the cylinder to collapse for most measured quantities.

  9. A wind tunnel investigation of wind turbine wakes: Boundary-layer turbulence and surface roughness effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, L.; Porte-Agel, F.

    2008-12-01

    Wind turbine wakes are known to have an important effect on power generation and fatigue loads in wind energy parks. Wake characteristics are expected to depend on the incoming atmospheric boundary layer flow statistics (mean velocity and turbulence levels). Here, results are presented from a wind tunnel experiment carried out at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel to study turbulence levels in the wake of a model wind turbine placed over both rough and smooth surfaces. How-wire anemometry was used to characterize the cross-sectional distribution of turbulent intensity, kinematic shear stress and mean velocity at different locations downwind of the turbine for both surface roughness cases. Non-axisymmetric behavior of the wake is observed over both roughness types in response to the non- uniformity of the incoming boundary layer flow and the presence of the surface. Nevertheless, the velocity deficit with respect to the average incoming flow is nearly axisymmetric everywhere except near the surface in the far wake, where the wake interacts with the surface. It was found that the wind turbine induces a large enhancement of turbulence levels in the upper part of the wake. This is due to the effect of relatively large velocity fluctuations associated with helicoidal tip vortices near the wake edge. In the lower part of the wake, where the incoming flow has lower average velocity and higher turbulence levels, the turbulence intensity shows a small reduction. The non-axisymmetry of the turbulent intensity distribution of the wake is found to be stronger over the rough surface, where the incoming flow is less uniform at the turbine level. It was found that the average turbulent intensity produced by the wake, its positive and negative components and its local maximum decay as a power law of downwind distance (with a power of -0.3 to -0.5 for the rough surface and with a wider range for the smooth surface). Preliminary results will also

  10. Investigation of the separated region ahead of three-dimensional protuberances on plates and cones in hypersonic flows with laminar boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, C. S.; Singh, T.; Reddy, K. P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Heat transfer rate and pressure measurements were made upstream of surface protuberances on a flat plate and a sharp cone subjected to hypersonic flow in a conventional shock tunnel. Heat flux was measured using platinum thin-film sensors deposited on macor substrate and the pressure measurements were made using fast acting piezoelectric sensors. A distinctive hot spot with highest heat flux was obtained near the foot of the protuberance due to heavy vortex activity in the recirculating region. Schlieren flow visualization was used to capture the shock structures and the separation distance ahead of the protrusions was quantitatively measured for varying protuberance heights. A computational analysis was conducted on the flat plate model using commercial computational fluid dynamics software and the obtained trends of heat flux and pressure were compared with the experimental observation. Experiments were also conducted by physically disturbing the laminar boundary layer to check its effect on the magnitude of the hot spot heat flux. In addition to air, argon was also used as test gas so that the Reynolds number can be varied.

  11. Factors Influencing Pitot Probe Centerline Displacement in a Turbulent Supersonic Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosser, Wendy I.

    1997-01-01

    When a total pressure probe is used for measuring flows with transverse total pressure gradients, a displacement of the effective center of the probe is observed (designated Delta). While this phenomenon is well documented in incompressible flow and supersonic laminar flow, there is insufficient information concerning supersonic turbulent flow. In this study, three NASA Lewis Research Center Supersonic Wind Tunnels (SWT's) were used to investigate pitot probe centerline displacement in supersonic turbulent boundary layers. The relationship between test conditions and pitot probe centerline displacement error was to be determined. For this investigation, ten circular probes with diameter-to-boundary layer ratios (D/delta) ranging from 0.015 to 0.256 were tested in the 10 ft x 10 ft SWT, the 15 cm x 15 cm SWT, and the 1 ft x 1 ft SWT. Reynolds numbers of 4.27 x 10(exp 6)/m, 6.00 x 10(exp 6)/in, 10.33 x 10(exp 6)/in, and 16.9 x 10(exp 6)/m were tested at nominal Mach numbers of 2.0 and 2.5. Boundary layer thicknesses for the three tunnels were approximately 200 mm, 13 mm, and 30 mm, respectively. Initial results indicate that boundary layer thickness, delta, and probe diameter, D/delta play a minimal role in pitot probe centerline offset error, Delta/D. It appears that the Mach gradient, dM/dy, is an important factor, though the exact relationship has not yet been determined. More data is needed to fill the map before a conclusion can be drawn with any certainty. This research provides valuable supersonic, turbulent boundary layer data from three supersonic wind tunnels with three very different boundary layers. It will prove a valuable stepping stone for future research into the factors influencing pitot probe centerline offset error.

  12. A Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Wind-Turbine Wakes: Boundary-Layer Turbulence Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, Leonardo P.; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2009-07-01

    Wind-tunnel experiments were performed to study turbulence in the wake of a model wind turbine placed in a boundary layer developed over rough and smooth surfaces. Hot-wire anemometry was used to characterize the cross-sectional distribution of mean velocity, turbulence intensity and kinematic shear stress at different locations downwind of the turbine for both surface roughness cases. Special emphasis was placed on the spatial distribution of the velocity deficit and the turbulence intensity, which are important factors affecting turbine power generation and fatigue loads in wind energy parks. Non-axisymmetric behaviour of the wake is observed over both roughness types in response to the non-uniform incoming boundary-layer flow and the effect of the surface. Nonetheless, the velocity deficit with respect to the incoming velocity profile is nearly axisymmetric, except near the ground in the far wake where the wake interacts with the surface. It is found that the wind turbine induces a large enhancement of turbulence levels (positive added turbulence intensity) in the upper part of the wake. This is due to the effect of relatively large velocity fluctuations associated with helicoidal tip vortices near the wake edge, where the mean shear is strong. In the lower part of the wake, the mean shear and turbulence intensity are reduced with respect to the incoming flow. The non-axisymmetry of the turbulence intensity distribution of the wake is found to be stronger over the rough surface, where the incoming flow is less uniform at the turbine level. In the far wake the added turbulent intensity, its positive and negative contributions and its local maximum decay as a power law of downwind distance (with an exponent ranging from -0.3 to -0.5 for the rough surface, and with a wider variation for the smooth surface). Nevertheless, the effect of the turbine on the velocity defect and added turbulence intensity is not negligible even in the very far wake, at a distance of

  13. Acoustic Radiation from High-Speed Turbulent Boundary Layers in a Tunnel-Like Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Zhang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation of acoustic radiation from a turbulent boundary layer in a cylindrical domain will be conducted under the flow conditions corresponding to those at the nozzle exit of the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel (BAM6QT) operated under noisy-flow conditions with a total pressure p(sub t) of 225 kPa and a total temperature of T(sub t) equal to 430 K. Simulations of acoustic radiation from a turbulent boundary layer over a flat surface are used as a reference configuration to illustrate the effects of the cylindrical enclosure. A detailed analysis of acoustic freestream disturbances in the cylindrical domain will be reported in the final paper along with a discussion pertaining to the significance of the flat-plate acoustic simulations and guidelines concerning the modeling of the effects of an axisymmetric tunnel wall on the noise field.

  14. Measurements and a model for convective velocities in the turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, W. C.; Sandborn, V. A.

    1973-01-01

    A physical model is presented which describes convective velocities within a flat plate turbulent boundary layer. A production zone concept is used as a basis for the physical model. The production zone concept employs the idea that packets of turbulent fluid are generated near the viscous sublayer. These packets are found to be discernible from the mean motion and may move either outward from the production zone or inward depending on their circulation relative to the fluid surrounding the packet. The packets are predicted to travel with a convective velocity different from the local mean velocity throughout most of the boundary layer. The model also predicts that the convective velocities will be functions of wave number outside the production zone.

  15. Effect of Turbulizing Grid Near Wake on a Boundary Layer on a Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brylyakov, A. P.; Zanin, B. Yu.; Zharkova, G. M.; Sboev, D. S.

    2002-07-01

    The problem of flow about bodies with high free stream turbulence is very important for engineering, because these flows are frequently met in different technical devices and turbo-machines. The recent researches showed that a stationary system of longitudinal structures arose on the winward side of the wing from increasing level of free stream turbulence to 1%. Characteristic transversal size of these structures exceeded the boundary layer thickness in many times. The number of the structures was found to be dependent on the angle of attack and the distance from the wind tunnel nozzle. Those experiments were carried in the open test section and the flow about the wing was complicated because of transversal spread of the flow. The present work is an experimental investigation of a similar phenomenon which takes place in a boundary layer on the winward surface of two-dimensional wedge in close test section.

  16. Turbulent boundary layer on the surface of a sea geophysical antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smol'Yakov, A. V.

    2010-11-01

    A theory is constructed that makes it possible to calculate the initial parameters necessary for calculating the hydrodynamic (turbulent) noise, which is a handicap to the operation of sea geophysical antennas. Algorithms are created for calculating the profile and defect of the average speed, displacement thickness, momentum thickness, and friction resistance in a turbulent boundary layer on a cylinder in its axial flow. Results of calculations using the developed theory are compared to experimental data. As the diameter of the cylinder tends to infinity, all relations of the theory pass to known relations for the boundary layer on a flat plate. The developed theory represents the initial stage of creating a method to calculate hydrodynamic noise, which is handicap to the operation of sea geophysical antennas.

  17. Interaction between a shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer in transonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, T. C., Jr.; Feo, A.

    1975-01-01

    Interaction between a shock wave and an unseparated turbulent boundary layer is considered. The method of matched asymptotic expansions is used, with solutions valid in the double limit as Reynolds number tends to infinity and Mach number tends to unity. The shock is weak enough that interaction effects can be considered as perturbations to the undisturbed flow; the case considered is that where the sonic line is near the outer edge of the boundary layer. It is shown that, with order estimates for Reynolds stress perturbations, the induced wall pressure distribution can be calculated using only the two outer interaction regions, independent of a specific closure condition and that this solution is in fact a turbulent free interaction solution. A detailed analysis of the inner regions, for which an eddy viscosity model for the Reynolds shear stress is used, provides a description of the variations in velocity, temperature and density near and at the wall.

  18. A simple stochastic quadrant model for the transport and deposition of particles in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeks, Michael; Jin, Chunyu; Potts, Ian

    2015-11-01

    We present a simple stochastic quadrant model for calculating the transport and deposition of heavy particles in a fully developed turbulent boundary layer based on the statistics of wall-normal fluid velocity fluctuations obtained from a fully developed channel flow. Individual particles are tracked through the boundary layer via their interactions with a succession of random eddies found in each of the quadrants of the fluid Reynolds shear stress domain in a homogeneous Markov chain process. Deposition rates for a range of heavy particles predicted by the model compare well with benchmark experimental measurements. In addition deposition rates are compared with those obtained continuous random walk (CRW) models including those based on the Langevin equation for the turbulent fluctuations. In addition, various statistics related to the particle near wall behavior are also presented.

  19. On the Coupling Between a Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer and a Flexible Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader

    1996-01-01

    A mathematical model and a computer code have been developed to fully couple the vibration of an aircraft fuselage panel to the surrounding flow field, turbulent boundary layer and acoustic fluid. The turbulent boundary layer model is derived using a triple decomposition of the flow variables and applying a conditional averaging to the resulting equations. Linearized panel and acoustic equations are used. Results from this model are in good agreement with existing experimental and numerical data. It is shown that in the supersonic regime, full coupling of the flexible panel leads to lower response and radiation from the panel. This is believed to be due to an increase in acoustic damping on the panel in this regime. Increasing the Mach number increases the acoustic damping, which is in agreement with earlier work.

  20. Sound transmission through double cylindrical shells lined with porous material under turbulent boundary layer excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jie; Bhaskar, Atul; Zhang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigates sound transmission through double-walled cylindrical shell lined with poroelastic material in the core, excited by pressure fluctuations due to the exterior turbulent boundary layer (TBL). Biot's model is used to describe the sound wave propagating in the porous material. Three types of constructions, bonded-bonded, bonded-unbonded and unbonded-unbonded, are considered in this study. The power spectral density (PSD) of the inner shell kinetic energy is predicted for two turbulent boundary layer models, different air gap depths and three types of polyimide foams, respectively. The peaks of the inner shell kinetic energy due to shell resonance, hydrodynamic coincidence and acoustic coincidence are discussed. The results show that if the frequency band over the ring frequency is of interest, an air gap, even if very thin, should exist between the two elastic shells for better sound insulation. And if small density foam has a high flow resistance, a superior sound insulation can still be maintained.