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1

Design of image sensors for hyperspectral applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The sensor design for Hyperspectral observation is significantly different to many other imaging applications and the various requirements are discussed. An early programme is the MERIS (Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) instrument on ENVISAT, which has been producing high quality Hyperspectral images for the last 7 years. The requirements for MERIS originally led to the development at e2v of both back-thinning technology, to meet the spectral requirements, and the manufacture of devices with a graded antireflection coating, to fully optimize the QE at every spectral band. A number of other hyperspectral missions are being planned or in preparation. For example Sentinel 3 is to be an almost direct repeat of the MERIS instrument and will be followed by Sentinel 4 and 5. In the future as the technology matures it is likely that Hyperspectral missions will tend to use CMOS sensors rather than CCD. CMOS sensors have a number of potential advantages for Hyperspectral imaging and if these can be successfully exploited then enhanced performance would result. The design of a CMOS sensor is discussed that is targeted at Hyperspectral application to give fully optimized performance at all spectral bands.

Jerram, Paul; Burt, David; Morris, David; Eaton, Tim; Fryer, Martin

2009-09-01

2

Hyperspectral imaging sensors and the marine coastal zone  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hyperspectral imaging sensors greatly expand the potential of remote sensing to assess, map, and monitor marine coastal zones. Each pixel in a hyperspectral image contains an entire spectrum of information. As a result, hyperspectral image data can be processed in two very different ways: by image classification techniques, to produce mapped outputs of features in the image on a regional scale; and by use of spectral analysis of the spectral data embedded within each pixel of the image. The latter is particularly useful in marine coastal zones because of the spectral complexity of suspended as well as benthic features found in these environments. Spectral-based analysis of hyperspectral (AVIRIS) imagery was carried out to investigate a marine coastal zone of South Florida, USA. Florida Bay is a phytoplankton-rich estuary characterized by taxonomically distinct phytoplankton assemblages and extensive seagrass beds. End-member spectra were extracted from AVIRIS image data corresponding to ground-truth sample stations and well-known field sites. Spectral libraries were constructed from the AVIRIS end-member spectra and used to classify images using the Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) algorithm, a spectral-based approach that compares the spectrum in each pixel of an image with each spectrum in a spectral library. Using this approach different phytoplankton assemblages containing diatoms, cyanobacteria, and green microalgae, as well as benthic community (seagrasses), were mapped.

Richardson, Laurie L.

2001-01-01

3

Standoff Detection and Identification of Chemical Plumes with Long Wave Hyperspectral Imaging Sensors.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Long-wave infrared (LWIR) hyperspectral imaging sensors are widely used for the detection and identification of released chemical agents in many civilian and military applications. Current hyperspectral system capabilities are limited by variation in the ...

D. Manolakis

2009-01-01

4

Hyperspectral Sensor.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The goal of the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO) program is to demonstrate the utility of maritime imaging for Naval applications in the littoral ocean from a space borne platform. The coastal ocean is a dark target and visible and Near I...

A. Velasco D. Even

2007-01-01

5

Methods for gas detection using stationary hyperspectral imaging sensors  

SciTech Connect

According to one embodiment, a method comprises producing a first hyperspectral imaging (HSI) data cube of a location at a first time using data from a HSI sensor; producing a second HSI data cube of the same location at a second time using data from the HSI sensor; subtracting on a pixel-by-pixel basis the second HSI data cube from the first HSI data cube to produce a raw difference cube; calibrating the raw difference cube to produce a calibrated raw difference cube; selecting at least one desired spectral band based on a gas of interest; producing a detection image based on the at least one selected spectral band and the calibrated raw difference cube; examining the detection image to determine presence of the gas of interest; and outputting a result of the examination. Other methods, systems, and computer program products for detecting the presence of a gas are also described.

Conger, James L. (San Ramon, CA); Henderson, John R. (Castro Valley, CA)

2012-04-24

6

Image capture: simulation of sensor responses from hyperspectral images  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the design and performance of an image capture simulator. The general model underlying the sim- ulator assumes that the image capture device contains multiple classes of sensors with different spectral sensitivities and that each sensor responds in a known way to irradiance over most of its op- erating range. The input to the simulator is a set

Poorvi L. Vora; Joyce E. Farrell; Jerome D. Tietz; David H. Brainard

2001-01-01

7

Cross-sensor resolution enhancement of hyperspectral images using wavelet decomposition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the satellite remote-sensing domain, some technological and physical constraints are not in favor of acquiring high spatial resolution hyperspectral images when there is a need to use high resolution panchromatic images as complementary data to the hyperspectral images. If the data are taken nearly at the same time, some cross-sensor resolution enhancement techniques are able to produce a merged image as close as possible of what would be a high spatial resolution hyperspectral image. Multiresolution wavelet decomposition is the most interesting tool to perform this process. Some merging experiments on AVIRIS images (pixel size 20 meters) and USGS digital aerial images (pixel size 1 meter) have been conducted using this technique. They produced simulated AVIRIS images having a spatial resolution of 5 meters. If the preliminary co-registration step remains critical, global spectral statistics and visual qualitative experimentations show that the result is a non-disturbed hyperspectral image, good candidate for straight exploitation.

Peytavin, Laurent

1996-06-01

8

LWIR\\/MWIR imaging hyperspectral sensor for airborne and ground-based remote sensing  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe the design and performance of an infrared imaging spectrograph that was first used as an airborne sensor in October, 1995. This instrument, called the spatially-enhanced broadband array spectrograph system (SEBASS), is intended to explore the utility of hyperspectral infrared sensors for remotely identifying solids, liquids, gases, and chemical vapors in the 2 to 14 micrometers 'chemical fingerprint' spectral

John A. Hackwell; David W. Warren; Robert P. Bongiovi; Steven J. Hansel; Thomas L. Hayhurst; Dan J. Mabry; Mazaher G. Sivjee; James W. Skinner

1996-01-01

9

Performance of the FIRST, a Longwave Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging Sensor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emerging applications in Defense and Security require sensors with state-of-the-art sensitivity and capabilities. Among these sensors, the imaging spectrometer is an instrument yielding a large amount of rich information about the measured scene. Standoff detection, identification and quantification of chemicals in the gaseous state are fundamental needs in several fields of applications. Imaging spectrometers have unmatched capabilities to meet the

Vincent Farley; Alexandre Vallières; Martin Chamberland; André Villemaire

10

Low-light hyperspectral imager for characterization of biological samples based on an sCMOS image sensor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The new "scientific CMOS" (sCMOS) sensor technology has been tested for use in hyperspectral imaging. The sCMOS offers extremely low readout noise combined with high resolution and high speed, making it attractive for hyperspectral imaging applications. A commercial HySpex hyperspectral camera has been modified to be used in low light conditions integrating an sCMOS sensor array. Initial tests of fluorescence imaging in challenging light settings have been performed. The imaged objects are layered phantoms labelled with controlled location and concentration of fluorophore. The camera has been compared to a state of the art spectral imager based on CCD technology. The image quality of the sCMOS-based camera suffers from artifacts due to a high density of pixels with excessive noise, attributed to the high operating temperature of the array. Image processing results illustrate some of the benefits and challenges of the new sCMOS technology.

Hernandez-Palacios, J.; Randeberg, L. L.; Haug, I. J.; Baarstad, I.; Løke, T.; Skauli, T.

2011-02-01

11

Automatic Target Cueing of Hyperspectral Image Data.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Modern imaging sensors produce vast amounts data, overwhelming human analysts. One such sensor is the Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) hyperspectral sensor. The AVIRIS sensor simultaneously collects data in 224 spectral bands th...

T. A. Wilson

1998-01-01

12

Evaluation of onboard hyperspectral-image compression techniques for a parallel push-broom sensor  

SciTech Connect

A single hyperspectral imaging sensor can produce frames with spatially-continuous rows of differing, but adjacent, spectral wavelength. If the frame sample-rate of the sensor is such that subsequent hyperspectral frames are spatially shifted by one row, then the sensor can be thought of as a parallel (in wavelength) push-broom sensor. An examination of data compression techniques for such a sensor is presented. The compression techniques are intended to be implemented onboard a space-based platform and to have implementation speeds that match the date rate of the sensor. Data partitions examined extend from individually operating on a single hyperspectral frame to operating on a data cube comprising the two spatial axes and the spectral axis. Compression algorithms investigated utilize JPEG-based image compression, wavelet-based compression and differential pulse code modulation. Algorithm performance is quantitatively presented in terms of root-mean-squared error and root-mean-squared correlation coefficient error. Implementation issues are considered in algorithm development.

Briles, S.

1996-04-01

13

AUTOMATED REGISTRATION OF HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGES  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Hyperspectral images are increasingly being acquired of the Earth's surface from aerial platforms. The dozens or hundreds of bands acquired by a typical hyperspectral sensor are acquired either through a scanning process or by collecting a sequential series of images at varying wavelengths. This lat...

14

Airborne measurements in the longwave infrared using an imaging hyperspectral sensor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Emerging applications in Defense and Security require sensors with state-of-the-art sensitivity and capabilities. Among these sensors, the imaging spectrometer is an instrument yielding a large amount of rich information about the measured scene. Standoff detection, identification and quantification of chemicals in the gaseous state is one important application. Analysis of the surface emissivity as a means to classify ground properties and usage is another one. Imaging spectrometers have unmatched capabilities to meet the requirements of these applications. Telops has developed the FIRST, a LWIR hyperspectral imager. The FIRST is based on the Fourier Transform technology yielding high spectral resolution and enabling high accuracy radiometric calibration. The FIRST, a man portable sensor, provides datacubes of up to 320×256 pixels at 0.35mrad spatial resolution over the 8-12 ?m spectral range at spectral resolutions of up to 0.25cm-1. The FIRST has been used in several field campaigns, including the demonstration of standoff chemical agent detection [http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.788027.1]. More recently, an airborne system integrating the FIRST has been developed to provide airborne hyperspectral measurement capabilities. The airborne system and its capabilities are presented in this paper. The FIRST sensor modularity enables operation in various configurations such as tripod-mounted and airborne. In the airborne configuration, the FIRST can be operated in push-broom mode, or in staring mode with image motion compensation. This paper focuses on the airborne operation of the FIRST sensor.

Allard, Jean-Pierre; Chamberland, Martin; Farley, Vincent; Marcotte, Frédérick; Rolland, Matthias; Vallières, Alexandre; Villemaire, André

2008-08-01

15

Airborne measurements in the longwave infrared using an imaging hyperspectral sensor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Emerging applications in Defense and Security require sensors with state-of-the-art sensitivity and capabilities. Among these sensors, the imaging spectrometer is an instrument yielding a large amount of rich information about the measured scene. Standoff detection, identification and quantification of chemicals in the gaseous state is one important application. Analysis of the surface emissivity as a means to classify ground properties and usage is another one. Imaging spectrometers have unmatched capabilities to meet the requirements of these applications. Telops has developed the FIRST, a LWIR hyperspectral imager. The FIRST is based on the Fourier Transform technology yielding high spectral resolution and enabling high accuracy radiometric calibration. The FIRST, a man portable sensor, provides datacubes of up to 320×256 pixels at 0.35mrad spatial resolution over the 8-12 ?m spectral range at spectral resolutions of up to 0.25cm-1. The FIRST has been used in several field campaigns, including the demonstration of standoff chemical agent detection. More recently, an airborne system integrating the FIRST has been developed to provide airborne hyperspectral measurement capabilities. The airborne system and its capabilities are presented in this paper. The FIRST sensor modularity enables operation in various configurations such as tripod-mounted and airborne. In the airborne configuration, the FIRST can be operated in push-broom mode, or in staring mode with image motion compensation. This paper focuses on the airborne operation of the FIRST sensor.

Allard, Jean-Pierre; Chamberland, Martin; Farley, Vincent; Marcotte, Frédérick; Rolland, Matthias; Vallières, Alexandre; Villemaire, André

2008-05-01

16

Airborne measurements in the longwave infrared using an imaging hyperspectral sensor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Emerging applications in Defense and Security require sensors with state-of-the-art sensitivity and capabilities. Among these sensors, the imaging spectrometer is an instrument yielding a large amount of rich information about the measured scene. Standoff detection, identification and quantification of chemicals in the gaseous state is one important application. Analysis of the surface emissivity as a means to classify ground properties and usage is another one. Imaging spectrometers have unmatched capabilities to meet the requirements of these applications. Telops has developed the FIRST, a LWIR hyperspectral imager. The FIRST is based on the Fourier Transform technology yielding high spectral resolution and enabling high accuracy radiometric calibration. The FIRST, a man portable sensor, provides datacubes of up to 320x256 pixels at 0.35mrad spatial resolution over the 8-12 ?m spectral range at spectral resolutions of up to 0.25cm-1. The FIRST has been used in several field campaigns, including the demonstration of standoff chemical agent detection [http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.795119.1]. More recently, an airborne system integrating the FIRST has been developed to provide airborne hyperspectral measurement capabilities. The airborne system and its capabilities are presented in this paper. The FIRST sensor modularity enables operation in various configurations such as tripod-mounted and airborne. In the airborne configuration, the FIRST can be operated in push-broom mode, or in staring mode with image motion compensation. This paper focuses on the airborne operation of the FIRST sensor.

Allard, Jean-Pierre; Chamberland, Martin; Farley, Vincent; Marcotte, Frédérick; Rolland, Matthias; Vallières, Alexandre; Villemaire, André

2008-08-01

17

Diffused Matrix Format: a new storage and processing format for airborne hyperspectral sensor images.  

PubMed

At present, hyperspectral images are mainly obtained with airborne sensors that are subject to turbulences while the spectrometer is acquiring the data. Therefore, geometric corrections are required to produce spatially correct images for visual interpretation and change detection analysis. This paper analyzes the data acquisition process of airborne sensors. The main objective is to propose a new data format called Diffused Matrix Format (DMF) adapted to the sensor's characteristics including its spectral and spatial information. The second objective is to compare the accuracy of the quantitative maps derived by using the DMF data structure with those obtained from raster images based on traditional data structures. Results show that DMF processing is more accurate and straightforward than conventional image processing of remotely sensed data with the advantage that the DMF file structure requires less storage space than other data formats. In addition the data processing time does not increase when DMF is used. PMID:22399919

Martínez, Pablo; Cristo, Alejandro; Koch, Magaly; Pérez, Rosa Ma; Schmid, Thomas; Hernández, Luz M

2010-05-18

18

Diffused Matrix Format: A New Storage and Processing Format for Airborne Hyperspectral Sensor Images  

PubMed Central

At present, hyperspectral images are mainly obtained with airborne sensors that are subject to turbulences while the spectrometer is acquiring the data. Therefore, geometric corrections are required to produce spatially correct images for visual interpretation and change detection analysis. This paper analyzes the data acquisition process of airborne sensors. The main objective is to propose a new data format called Diffused Matrix Format (DMF) adapted to the sensor's characteristics including its spectral and spatial information. The second objective is to compare the accuracy of the quantitative maps derived by using the DMF data structure with those obtained from raster images based on traditional data structures. Results show that DMF processing is more accurate and straightforward than conventional image processing of remotely sensed data with the advantage that the DMF file structure requires less storage space than other data formats. In addition the data processing time does not increase when DMF is used.

Martinez, Pablo; Cristo, Alejandro; Koch, Magaly; Perez, Rosa M?.; Schmid, Thomas; Hernandez, Luz M.

2010-01-01

19

Detection of surface mines using hyperspectral sensors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hyperspectral imaging is an important technology for the detection of surface and buried land mines from an airborne platform. For this reason, hyperspectral was included in the two experiments that were executed by the Army RDECOM Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) in Fall 2002 and in Spring 2003. The purpose of these experiments was to bring together a

Edwin M. Winter

2004-01-01

20

Mine detection experiments using hyperspectral sensors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hyperspectral imaging is an important technology for the detection of surface and buried land mines from an airborne platform. For this reason, hyperspectral was included with SAR sensors in the two deployments that were executed by the CECOM RDEC Night Vision and Electronic Systems Directorate (NVESD) in Fall 2002 and in Spring 2003. The purpose of these deployments was to

Edwin M. Winter; Miranda A. Miller; Christopher G. Simi; Anthony B. Hill; Timothy J. Williams; David Hampton; Mark Wood; Jerry Zadnick; Marc D. Sviland

2004-01-01

21

Super-resolution reconstruction of hyperspectral images  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hyperspectral images are used for aerial and space imagery applications including target detection, tracking, agricultural and natural resource exploration. Unfortunately atmospheric scattering, secondary illumination, changing viewing angles and sensor noise degrade the quality of these images. In this paper we introduce a novel superresolution reconstruc- tion method for hyperspectral images. An integral part of our work is to model the

Toygar Akgun; Yucel Altunbasak; Russell M. Mersereau

2005-01-01

22

Performance of the FIRST: a long-wave infrared hyperspectral imaging sensor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Emerging applications in Defense and Security require sensors with state-of-the-art sensitivity and capabilities. Among these sensors, the imaging spectrometer is an instrument yielding a large amount of rich information about the measured scene. Standoff detection, identification and quantification of chemicals in the gaseous state are fundamental needs in several fields of applications. Imaging spectrometers have unmatched capabilities to meet the requirements of these applications. Telops has developed the FIRST, a LWIR hyperspectral imager. The FIRST is based on FTIR technology to provide high spectral resolution and to enable high accuracy radiometric calibration. The FIRST, a man portable sensor, provides datacubes of up to 320x256 pixels at 0.35 mrad spatial resolution over the 8-12 ?m spectral range at spectral resolutions of up to 0.25 cm-1. The FIRST has been used in several field measurements, including demonstration of standoff chemical agent detection. One key feature of the FIRST is its ability to give calibrated measurements. The quality of the calibrated measurements will be presented in this paper. Sensitivity, spectral resolution and radiometric stability as obtained during field and laboratory measurements will be presented. Finally, images of chemical releases detected with the FIRST will be shown.

Farley, Vincent; Vallières, Alexandre; Chamberland, Martin; Villemaire, André; Legault, Jean-François

2006-09-01

23

Radiometric calibration stability of the FIRST: a longwave infrared hyperspectral imaging sensor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Emerging applications in Defense and Security require sensors with state-of-the-art sensitivity and capabilities. Among these sensors, the imaging spectrometer is an instrument yielding a large amount of rich information about the measured scene. Standoff detection, identification and quantification of chemicals in the gaseous state are fundamental needs in several fields of applications. Imaging spectrometers have unmatched capabilities to meet the requirements of these applications. Telops has developed the FIRST, a LWIR hyperspectral imager. The FIRST is based on FTIR technology to yield high spectral resolution and to enable high accuracy radiometric calibration. The FIRST, a man portable sensor, provides datacubes of up to 320x256 pixels at 0.35 mrad spatial resolution over the 8-12 ?m spectral range at spectral resolutions of up to 0.25 cm-1. The FIRST has been used in several field measurements, including demonstration of standoff chemical agent detection. One key feature of the FIRST is its ability to give calibrated measurements. The quality of the radiometric and spectral calibration will be presented in this paper. During the field measurements, the FIRST operated under changing environmental conditions while many calibration measurements were taken. In this paper, we will present the stability of the calibration of the FIRST obtained during the field campaigns.

Farley, Vincent; Chamberland, Martin; Vallières, Alexandre; Villemaire, André; Legault, Jean-François

2006-06-01

24

Multipurpose hyperspectral imaging system  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A hyperspectral imaging system of high spectral and spatial resolution that incorporates several innovative features has been developed to incorporate a focal plane scanner (U.S. Patent 6,166,373). This feature enables the system to be used for both airborne/spaceborne and laboratory hyperspectral i...

25

Automated registration of hyperspectral images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hyperspectral images of the Earth"s surface are increasingly being acquired from aerial platforms. The dozens or hundreds of bands acquired by a typical hyperspectral sensor are acquired either through a scanning process or by collecting a sequence of images at varying wavelengths. This latter method has the advantage of acquiring coherent images of a scene at different wavelengths. However, it takes time to collect these images and some form of co-registration is required to build coherent image cubes. In this paper, we present a method to register many bands acquired sequentially at different wavelengths from a helicopter. We discuss the application of the Phase Correlation (PC) Method to recover scaling, rotation, and translation from an airborne hyperspectral imaging system, dubbed PHyTIS. This approach is well suited for remotely sensed images acquired from a moving platform, which induces image registration errors due to along and across track movement. We were able to register images to within +/- 1 pixel across entire image cubes obtained from the PHyTIS hyperspectral imaging system, which was developed for precision farming applications.

Erives, Hector; Fitzgerald, Glenn J.

2004-11-01

26

Fast compression implementation for hyperspectral sensor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fast and small foot print lossless image compressors aiming at hyper-spectral sensor for the earth observation satellite have been developed. Since more than one hundred channels are required for hyper-spectral sensors on optical observation satellites, fast compression algorithm with small foot print implementation is essential for reducing encoder size and weight resulting in realizing light-weight and small-size sensor system. The image compression method should have low complexity in order to reduce size and weight of the sensor signal processing unit, power consumption and fabrication cost. Coding efficiency and compression speed enables enlargement of the capacity of signal compression channels, which resulted in reducing signal compression channels onboard by multiplexing sensor signal channels into reduced number of compression channels. The employed method is based on FELICS1, which is hierarchical predictive coding method with resolution scaling. To improve FELICS's performance of image decorrelation and entropy coding, we applied two-dimensional interpolation prediction and adaptive Golomb-Rice coding, which enables small footprint. It supports progressive decompression using resolution scaling, whilst still delivering superior performance as measured by speed and complexity. The small footprint circuitry is embedded into the hyper-spectral sensor data formatter. In consequence, lossless compression function has been added without additional size and weight.

Hihara, Hiroki; Yoshida, Jun; Ishida, Juro; Takada, Jun; Senda, Yuzo; Suzuki, Makoto; Seki, Taeko; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Ohgi, Nagamitsu

2010-10-01

27

Visualization of hyperspectral images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hyperspectral images provide an innovative means for visualizing information about a scene or object that exists outside of the visible spectrum. Among other capabilities, hyperspectral image data enable detection of contamination in soil, identification of the minerals in an unfamiliar material, and discrimination between real and artificial leaves in a potted plant that are otherwise indistinguishable to the human eye. One of the drawbacks of working with hyperspectral data is that the massive amounts of information they provide requiring efficient means of being processed. In this study wavelet analysis was used to approach this problem by investigating the capabilities it provides for producing a visually appealing image from data that have been reduced in the spatial and spectral dimensions. We suggest that a procedure for visualizing hyperspectral image data that uses the peaks of the spectral signatures of pixels of interest provides a promising method for visualization. Using wavelet coefficients and data from the hyperspectral bands produces noticeably different results, which suggests that wavelet analysis could provide a superior means for visualization in some instances when the use of bands does not provide acceptable results.

Schockling, Mindy; Bonce, Roberto; Gutierrez, Angel; Robila, Stefan A.

2009-05-01

28

Airis Hyperspectral Imaging Technology.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Adaptive Infrared Imaging Sectroradiometer (AIRIS) is a hyperspectral imaging system comprising a low order tunable Fabry Perot etalon coupled to an IR focal plane array. A MWIR AIRIS system utilizing an InSb focal plane was developed by Physical Scie...

C. M. Gittins W. J. Marinelli A. J. Ratkowski

1997-01-01

29

Hyperspectral Fluorescence Imaging for Mouse Skin Tumor Detection  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a hyperspectral imaging technique based on laser-induced fluorescence for non-invasive detection of tumorous tissue on mouse skin. Hyperspectral imaging sensors collect image data in a number of narrow, adjacent spectral bands. Such high-resolution measurement of spectral information reveals contiguous emission spectra at each image pixel useful for the characterization of constituent materials. The hyperspectral image data used

Seong G. Kong; Matthew E. Martin; Tuan Vo-Dinh

2006-01-01

30

Development of the second generation Hyperspectral Airborne Terrestrial Imager (HATI): HATI - 2500  

Microsoft Academic Search

Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) has a long legacy developing and fielding hyperspectral sensors, including airborne and space based systems covering the visible through Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) wavelength ranges. Most recently NGAS has developed the Hyperspectral Airborne Terrestrial Instrument (HATI) family of hyperspectral sensors, which are compact airborne hyperspectral imagers designed to fly on a variety of platforms and

S. Sandor-Leahy; S. Thordarson; B. Baldauf; M. Figueroa; M. Helmlinger; H. Miller; T. Reynolds; J. Shepanski

2010-01-01

31

Miniaturization of a VNIR hyperspectral imager  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new approach for the design and fabrication of a miniaturized Hyperspectral imager is described. A unique and compact instrument has been developed by taking advantage of light propagation within bonded solid blocks of fused silica. The resulting microHSI is a VNIR hyperspectral sensor capable of operating in the 400-1000 nm wavelength range developed, patented, and built by NovaSol. The

Christopher P. Warren; Michael Friend; Arleen Velasco; John Hinrichs; Charles Carleton; Michael Duncan; Jonathan Neumann

2006-01-01

32

Hyperspectral image analysis for measuring ripeness of tomatoes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The latest developments in optics and sensors allow imaging spectrometry: the creation of hyperspectral image s, i.e. images with wavelength-specific measurements over a large part of the spectrum. In this study, hyperspectral images of several stages of ripeness of tomatoes were recorded and analyzed. The electromagnetic spectrum between 450 and 850 nm was recorded in 80 bands (every 5 nm).

G. Polder; Heijden van der G. W. A. M; I. T. Young

2000-01-01

33

Compression technique for plume hyperspectral images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The authors recently developed a hyperspectral image output option for a standardized government code designed to predict missile exhaust plume infrared signatures. Typical predictions cover the 2- to 5-m wavelength range (2000 to 5000 cm-1) at 5 cm-1 spectral resolution, and as a result the hyperspectral images have several hundred frequency channels. Several hundred hyperspectral plume images are needed to span the full operational envelope of missile altitude, Mach number, and aspect angle. Since the net disk storage space can be as large as 100 GB, a Principal Components Analysis is used to compress the spectral dimension, reducing the volume of data to just a few gigabytes. The principal challenge was to specify a robust default setting for the data compression routine suitable for general users, who are not necessarily specialists in data compression. Specifically, the objective was to provide reasonable data compression efficiency of the hyperspectral imagery while at the same time retaining sufficient accuracy for infrared scene generation and hardware-in-the-loop test applications over a range of sensor bandpasses and scenarios. In addition, although the end users of the code do not usually access the detailed spectral information contained in these hyperspectral images, this information must nevertheless be of sufficient fidelity so that atmospheric transmission losses between the missile plume and the sensor could be reliably computed as a function of range. Several metrics were used to determine how far the plume signature hyperspectral data could be safely compressed while still meeting these end-user requirements.

Feather, B. K.; Fulkerson, S. A.; Jones, J. H.; Reed, R. A.; Simmons, M. A.; Swann, D. G.; Taylor, W. E.; Bernstein, L. S.

2005-06-01

34

Hyperspectral imaging applied to forensic medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Remote sensing techniques now include the use of hyperspectral infrared imaging sensors covering the mid-and- long wave regions of the spectrum. They have found use in military surveillance applications due to their capability for detection and classification of a large variety of both naturally occurring and man-made substances. The images they produce reveal the spatial distributions of spectral patterns that

Donald B. Malkoff; William R. Oliver

2000-01-01

35

Performance of the FIRST: a long-wave infrared hyperspectral imaging sensor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emerging applications in Defense and Security require sensors with state-of-the-art sensitivity and capabilities. Among these sensors, the imaging spectrometer is an instrument yielding a large amount of rich information about the measured scene. Standoff detection, identification and quantification of chemicals in the gaseous state are fundamental needs in several fields of applications. Imaging spectrometers have unmatched capabilities to meet the

Vincent Farley; Alexandre Vallières; Martin Chamberland; André Villemaire; Jean-François Legault

2006-01-01

36

Radiometric calibration stability of the FIRST: a longwave infrared hyperspectral imaging sensor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emerging applications in Defense and Security require sensors with state-of-the-art sensitivity and capabilities. Among these sensors, the imaging spectrometer is an instrument yielding a large amount of rich information about the measured scene. Standoff detection, identification and quantification of chemicals in the gaseous state are fundamental needs in several fields of applications. Imaging spectrometers have unmatched capabilities to meet the

Vincent Farley; Martin Chamberland; Alexandre Vallières; André Villemaire; Jean-François Legault

2006-01-01

37

Face Recognition in Hyperspectral Images  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hyperspectral cameras provide useful discriminants for human face recognition that cannot be obtained by other imaging methods.Weexaminethe utilityof usingnear-infrared hyperspectral imagesfor therecognitionof facesoveradatabaseof 200subjects. The hyperspectral images were collected using a CCD camera equipped with a liquid crystal tunable filter to provide 31 bands over the near-infrared (0.7? m-1.0? m). Spectral measurements over the near-infrared allow the sensing of subsurface

Zhihong Pan; Glenn Healey; Manish Prasad; Bruce J. Tromberg

2003-01-01

38

Novel hyperspectral imager for lightweight UAVs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed a new miniaturized staring hyperspectral imager with a weight of 350 g making the system compatible with lightweight UAS platforms. The instrument is able to record 2D spatial images at the selected wavelength bands simultaneously. The concept of the hyperspectral imager has been published in the SPIE Proc. 74741. The operational wavelength range of the imager can be tuned in the range 400 - 1100 nm and spectral resolution is in the range 5 - 10 nm @ FWHM. Presently the spatial resolution is 480 × 750 pixels but it can be increased simply by changing the image sensor. The field of view of the system is 20 × 30 degrees and ground pixel size at 100 m flying altitude is around 7.5 cm. The system contains batteries, image acquisition control system and memory for the image data. It can operate autonomously recording hyperspectral data cubes continuously or controlled by the autopilot system of the UAS. The new hyperspectral imager prototype was first tried in co-operation with the Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO) on their UAS helicopter. The instrument was configured for the spectral range 500 - 900 nm selected for the vegetation and natural water monitoring applications. The design of the UAS hyperspectral imager and its characterization results together with the analysis of the spectral data from first test flights will be presented.

Saari, Heikki; Aallos, Ville-Veikko; Holmlund, Christer; Mäkynen, Jussi; Delauré, Bavo; Nackaerts, Kris; Michiels, Bart

2010-04-01

39

Rapid hyperspectral fluorescence lifetime imaging.  

PubMed

We report a rapid hyperspectral fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) instrument that exploits high-speed FLIM technology in a line-scanning microscope. We demonstrate the acquisition of whole-field optically sectioned hyperspectral fluorescence lifetime image stacks (with 32 spectral bins) in less than 40 s and illustrate its application to unstained biological tissue. PMID:17366615

De Beule, Pieter; Owen, Dylan M; Manning, Hugh B; Talbot, Clifford B; Requejo-Isidro, Jose; Dunsby, Christopher; McGinty, James; Benninger, Richard K P; Elson, Daniel S; Munro, Ian; John Lever, M; Anand, Praveen; Neil, Mark A A; French, Paul M W

2007-05-01

40

Airborne measurements in the longwave infrared using an imaging hyperspectral sensor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emerging applications in Defense and Security require sensors with state-of-the-art sensitivity and capabilities. Among these sensors, the imaging spectrometer is an instrument yielding a large amount of rich information about the measured scene. Standoff detection, identification and quantification of chemicals in the gaseous state is one important application. Analysis of the surface emissivity as a means to classify ground properties

Jean-Pierre Allard; Martin Chamberland; Vincent Farley; Frédérick Marcotte; Matthias Rolland; Alexandre Vallières; André Villemaire

2008-01-01

41

Atmospheric correction of DAIS hyperspectral image data  

Microsoft Academic Search

A software package for the atmospheric correction of airborne hyperspectral and multispectral image data has been developed at DLR. Reflective and thermal spectral channels are taken into account employing the MODTRAN code to calculate the radiative transfer. A list of four airborne sensors is included currently in a menu-driven user-friendly environment. New instruments may be added easily. This paper focuses

Rudolf Richter

1996-01-01

42

Aerospace wetland monitoring by hyperspectral imaging sensors: a case study in the coastal zone of San Rossore Natural Park.  

PubMed

The San Rossore Natural Park, located on the Tuscany (Italy) coast, has been utilized over the last 10 years for many remote sensing campaigns devoted to coastal zone monitoring. A wet area is located in the south-west part of the Natural Park and it is characterized by a system of ponds and dunes formed by sediment deposition occurring at the Arno River estuary. The considerable amount of collected data has permitted us to investigate the evolution of wetland spreading and land coverage as well as to retrieve relevant biogeochemical parameters, e.g. green biomass, from remote sensing images and products. This analysis has proved that the monitoring of coastal wetlands, characterized by shallow waters, moor and dunes, demands dedicated aerospace sensors with high spatial and spectral resolution. The outcomes of the processing of images gathered during several remote sensing campaigns by airborne and spaceborne hyperspectral sensors are presented and discussed. A particular effort has been devoted to sensor response calibration and data validation due to the complex heterogeneity of the observed natural surfaces. PMID:18423842

Barducci, Alessandro; Guzzi, Donatella; Marcoionni, Paolo; Pippi, Ivan

2008-04-21

43

Hyperspectral imager development at Army Research Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Development of robust compact optical imagers that can acquire both spectral and spatial features from a scene of interest is of utmost importance for standoff detection of chemical and biological agents as well as targets and backgrounds. Spectral features arise due to the material properties of objects as a result of the emission, reflection, and absorption of light. Using hyperspectral imaging one can acquire images with narrow spectral bands and take advantage of the characteristic spectral signatures of different materials making up the scene in detection of objects. Traditional hyperspectral imaging systems use gratings and prisms that acquire one-dimensional spectral images and require relative motion of sensor and scene in addition to data processing to form a two-dimensional image cube. There is much interest in developing hyperspectral imagers using tunable filters that acquire a two-dimensional spectral image and build up an image cube as a function of time. At the Army Research Laboratory (ARL), we are developing hyperspectral imagers using a number of novel tunable filter technologies. These include acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTFs) that can provide adaptive no-moving-parts imagers from the UV to the long wave infrared, diffractive optics technology that can provide image cubes either in a single spectral region or simultaneously in different spectral regions using a single moving lens or by using a lenslet array, and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS)-based Fabry-Perot (FP) tunable etalons to develop miniature sensors that take advantage of the advances in microfabrication and packaging technologies. New materials are being developed to design AOTFs and a full Stokes polarization imager has been developed, diffractive optics lenslet arrays are being explored, and novel FP tunable filters are under fabrication for the development of novel miniature hyperspectral imagers. Here we will brief on all the technologies being developed and present highlights of our research and development efforts.

Gupta, Neelam

2008-05-01

44

Thermal hyperspectral chemical imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several chemical compounds have their strongest spectral signatures in the thermal region. This paper presents three push-broom thermal hyperspectral imagers. The first operates in MWIR (2.8-5 ?m) with 35 nm spectral resolution. It consists of uncooled imaging spectrograph and cryogenically cooled InSb camera, with spatial resolution of 320/640 pixels and image rate to 400 Hz. The second imager covers LWIR in 7.6-12 ?m with 32 spectral bands. It employs an uncooled microbolometer array and spectrograph. These imagers have been designed for chemical mapping in reflection mode in industry and laboratory. An efficient line-illumination source has been developed, and it makes possible thermal hyperspectral imaging in reflection with much higher signal and SNR than is obtained from room temperature emission. Application demonstrations including sorting of dark plastics and mineralogical mapping of drill cores are presented. The third imager utilizes a cryo-cooled MCT array with precisely temperature stabilized optics. The optics is not cooled, but instrument radiation is suppressed by special filtering and corrected by BMC (Background-Monitoring-on-Chip) method. The approach provides excellent sensitivity in an instrument which is portable and compact enough for installation in UAVs. The imager has been verified in 7.6 to 12.3 ?m to provide NESR of 18 mW/(m2 sr ?m) at 10 ?m for 300 K target with 100 spectral bands and 384 spatial samples. It results in SNR of higher than 500. The performance makes possible various applications from gas detection to mineral exploration and vegetation surveys. Results from outdoor and airborne experiments are shown.

Holma, Hannu; Hyvärinen, Timo; Mattila, Antti-Jussi; Kormano, Ilkka

2012-05-01

45

Perceptual-based image fusion for hyperspectral data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three hierarchical multiresolution image fusion techniques are implemented and tested using image data from the Airborne Visual\\/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) hyperspectral sensor. The methods presented focus on combining multiple images from the AVIRIS sensor into a smaller subset of images white maintaining the visual information necessary for human analysis. Two of the techniques are published algorithms that were originally designed

Terry A. Wilson; Steven K. Rogers; Matthew Kabrisky

1997-01-01

46

Detection Algorithms for Hyperspectral Imaging Applications.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Detection and identification of military and civilian targets from airborne platforms using hyperspectral sensors is of great interest. Relative to multispectral sensing, hyperspectral sensing can increase the detectability of pixel and subpixel size targ...

D. Manolakis

2002-01-01

47

Development of a polarization hyperspectral image projector  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes the development of a new instrument for calibrating satellite imaging sensors - the Polarization Hyperspectral Image Projector (PHIP). The PHIP instrument is capable of producing realistic standards-based satellite imagery, simultaneously projecting spectral, spatial and polarization scenes. The feasibility study outlined here demonstrates that liquid crystal devices are capable of producing arbitrary polarization states. Boulder Nonlinear Systems is currently developing a complete spectral/spatial/polarization instrument to be delivered to NASA in 2013.

Ewing, Teresa K.; King, Sharon V.; Masterson, Hugh M.; Gonzales, Nicholas; Elshof, Dane

2012-05-01

48

Parametric adaptive signal detection for hyperspectral imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) sensors can provide very fine spectral resolution that allows remote identification of ground objects smaller than a full pixel in an HSI image. Traditional approaches to the so-called subpixel target signal detection problem are training inefficient due to the need for an estimate of a large-size covariance matrix of the background from target-free training pixels. This imposes

Hongbin Li; James H. Michels

2006-01-01

49

Hyper-Cam automated calibration method for continuous hyperspectral imaging measurements  

Microsoft Academic Search

The midwave and longwave infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum contain rich information which can be captured by hyperspectral sensors thus enabling enhanced detection of targets of interest. A continuous hyperspectral imaging measurement capability operated 24\\/7 over varying seasons and weather conditions permits the evaluation of hyperspectral imaging for detection of different types of targets in real world environments. Such

Jean-Philippe Gagnon; Zewdu Habte; Jacks George; Vincent Farley; Pierre Tremblay; Martin Chamberland; Joao Romano; Dalton Rosario

2010-01-01

50

Advanced pushbroom hyperspectral LWIR imagers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Performance studies and instrument designs for hyperspectral pushbroom imagers in thermal wavelength region are introduced. The studies involve imaging systems based on both MCT and microbolometer detector. All the systems employ pushbroom imaging spectrograph with transmission grating and on-axis optics. The aim of the work was to design high performance instruments with good image quality and compact size for various

Hannu Holma; Timo Hyvärinen; Jarmo Lehtomaa; Harri Karjalainen; Risto Jaskari

2009-01-01

51

Miniaturization of a SWIR hyperspectral imager  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new approach for the design and fabrication of a miniaturized SWIR Hyperspectral imager is described. Previously, good results were obtained with a VNIR Hyperspectral imager, by use of light propagation within bonded solid blocks of fused silica. These designs use the Offner design form, providing excellent, low distortion imaging. The same idea is applied to the SWIR Hyperspectral imager

Christopher P. Warren; William Pfister; Detlev Even; Arleen Velasco; Selwyn Yee; David Breitwieser; Joseph Naungayan

2011-01-01

52

Recent results from AHI: a LWIR hyperspectral imager  

Microsoft Academic Search

The University of Hawaii AHI LWIR hyperspectral sensor has been in active use for several years. Since previous publications the sensor characteristics have evolved, and new applications have been encountered. This paper reviews the current status of the sensor and its characteristics, reviews a gas detection experiment conducted using natural sulfur dioxide emitted from a Hawaiian volcano, and test images

Paul G. Lucey; Tim Williams; Michael Winter

2004-01-01

53

Recent results from AHI: a LWIR hyperspectral imager  

Microsoft Academic Search

The University of Hawaii AHI LWIR hyperspectral sensor has been in active use for several years. Since previous publications the sensor characteristics have evolved, and new applications have been encountered. This paper reviews the current status of the sensor and its characteristics, reviews a gas detection experiment conducted using natural sulfur dioxide emitted from a Hawaiian volcano, and test images

Paul G. Lucey; Tim Williams; Michael Winter

2003-01-01

54

Hyperspectral Image Classification Using Relevance Vector Machines  

Microsoft Academic Search

This letter presents a hyperspectral image classification method based on relevance vector machines (RVMs). Support vector machine (SVM)-based approaches have been recently proposed for hyperspectral image classification and have raised important interest. In this letter, it is genuinely proposed to use an RVM-based approach for the classification of hyperspectral images. It is shown that approximately the same classification accuracy is

Begüm Demir; Sarp Erturk

2007-01-01

55

Compression technique for plume hyperspectral images  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors recently developed a hyperspectral image output option for a standardized government code designed to predict missile exhaust plume infrared signatures. Typical predictions cover the 2- to 5-m wavelength range (2000 to 5000 cm-1) at 5 cm-1 spectral resolution, and as a result the hyperspectral images have several hundred frequency channels. Several hundred hyperspectral plume images are needed to

B. K. Feather; S. A. Fulkerson; J. H. Jones; R. A. Reed; M. A. Simmons; D. G. Swann; W. E. Taylor; L. S. Bernstein

2005-01-01

56

Compact high-resolution VIS\\/NIR hyperspectral sensor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current hyperspectral imagers are either bulky with good performance, or compact with only moderate performance. This paper presents a new hyperspectral technology which overcomes this drawback, and makes it possible to integrate extremely compact and high performance push-broom hyperspectral imagers for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) and other demanding applications. Hyperspectral imagers in VIS\\/NIR, SWIR, MWIR and LWIR spectral ranges have

Timo Hyvärinen; Esko Herrala; Wes Procino; Oliver Weatherbee

2011-01-01

57

Miniaturization of a SWIR hyperspectral imager  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new approach for the design and fabrication of a miniaturized SWIR Hyperspectral imager is described. Previously, good results were obtained with a VNIR Hyperspectral imager, by use of light propagation within bonded solid blocks of fused silica. These designs use the Offner design form, providing excellent, low distortion imaging. The same idea is applied to the SWIR Hyperspectral imager here, resulting in a microHSITM SWIR Hyperspectral sensor, capable of operating in the 850-1700 nm wavelength range. The microHSI spectrometer weighs 910 g from slit input to camera output. This spectrometer can accommodate custom foreoptics to adapt to a wide range of fields-of-view (FOV). The current application calls for a 15 degree FOV, and utilizes an InGaAs image sensor with a spatial format of 640 x 25 micron pixels. This results in a slit length of 16 mm, and a foreoptics focal length of 61 mm, operating at F# = 2.8. The resulting IFOV is 417 ?rad for this application, and a spectral dispersion of 4.17 nm/pixel. A prototype SWIR microHSI was fabricated, and the blazed diffraction grating was embedded within the optical blocks, resulting in a 72% diffraction efficiency at the wavelength of 1020 nm. This spectrometer design is capable of accommodating slit lengths of up to 25.6 mm, which opens up a wide variety of applications. The microHSI concepts can be extended to other wavelength regions, and a miniaturized LWIR microHSI sensor is in the conceptual design stage.

Warren, Christopher P.; Pfister, William; Even, Detlev; Velasco, Arleen; Yee, Selwyn; Breitwieser, David; Naungayan, Joseph

2011-05-01

58

Fiber optic snapshot hyperspectral imager  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

OPTRA is developing a snapshot hyperspectral imager (HSI) employing a fiber optic bundle and dispersive spectrometer. The fiber optic bundle converts a broadband spatial image to an array of fiber columns which serve as multiple entrance slits to a prism spectrometer. The dispersed spatially resolved spectra are then sampled by a two-dimensional focal plane array (FPA) at a greater than 30 Hz update rate, thereby qualifying the system as snapshot. Unlike snapshot HSI systems based on computed tomography or coded apertures, our approach requires only the remapping of the FPA frame into hyperspectral cubes rather than a complex reconstruction. Our system has high radiometric efficiency and throughput supporting sufficient signal to noise for hyperspectral imaging measurements made over very short integration times (< 33 ms). The overall approach is compact, low cost, and contains no moving parts, making it ideal for unmanned airborne surveillance. In this paper we present a preliminary design for the fiber optic snapshot HSI system.

Mansur, David J.; Rentz Dupuis, Julia; Vaillancourt, Robert

2012-05-01

59

New Thermal Infrared Hyperspectral Imagers.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The aim for this paper is to present designs and performance characteristics of the new push-broom hyperspectral imagers in thermal wavelength region. The guiding motive for this work has been to design high performance instruments with good image quality...

A. Mattila H. Holma T. Hyvarinen

2009-01-01

60

Snapshot hyperspectral imaging: the hyperpixel array camera  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hyperspectral imaging has important benefits in remote sensing and material identification. This paper describes a class of hyperspectral imaging systems which utilize a novel optical processor that provides video-rate hyperspectral datacubes. These systems have no moving parts and do not operate by scanning in either the spatial or spectral dimension. They are capable of recording a full three-dimensional (two spatial,

Andrew Bodkin; A. Sheinis; A. Norton; J. Daly; S. Beaven; J. Weinheimer

2009-01-01

61

Hyperspectral sensor HSC3000 for nano-satellite TAIKI  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hokkaido Satellite Project was kicked off at April in 2003 by the volunteer group that consists of students, researchers and engineers in order to demonstrate the space business models using nanosatellites of 15kg/50kg in Japan. The Hokkaido satellite named "TAIKI" is characterized by a hyperspectral sensor with a VNIR (visible and near infrared range) and a laser communication instrument for data downlink communication. At the beginning of 2008 we started to develop a space qualified hyperspectral sensor HSC3000 based on the optical design of HSC1700. Last year we developed the hyperspectral camera HSC-3000 BBM funded by New Energy Development Organization (NEDO) as the position of the breadboard model of HSC3000. HSC-3000 BBM is specified by the spectral range from 400nm to 1000nm, 81 spectral bands, image size of 640 x 480 pixels, radiometric resolution of 10 bits and data transfer rate of 200 f/s. By averaging outputs of several adjacent pixels to increase S/N, HSC3000 of the spaceborne is targeted at the specification of 30 m spatial resolution, 61 spectral bands, 10 nm spectral resolution and S/N300. Spin-off technology of the hyperspectral imager is also introduced. We have succeeded to develop a hyperspectral camera as the spin-off product named HSC1700 which installs both the hyperspectral sensor unit and a scanning mechanism inside. The HSC1700 is specified by the spectral range from 400nm to 800nm, 81 spectral bands, image size of 640 x 480 pixels, radiometric resolution of 8 bits and data transfer rate of 30 f/s.

Satori, S.; Aoyanagi, Y.; Hara, U.; Mitsuhashi, R.; Takeuchi, Y.

2008-11-01

62

Curvelet based hyperspectral image fusion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hyperspectral imagery typically possesses high spectral resolution but low spatial resolution. One way to enhance the spatial resolution of a hyperspectral image is to fuse its spectral information and the spatial information of another high resolution image. In this paper, we propose a novel image fusion strategy for hyperspectral image and high spatial resolution panchromatic image, which is based on the curvelet transform. Firstly, determine a synthesized image with the specified RGB bands of the original hyperspectral images according to the optimal index factor (OIF) model. Then use the IHS transform to extract the intensity component of the synthesized image. After that, the histogram matching is performed between the intensity component and the panchromatic image. Thirdly, the curvelet transform is applied to decompose the two source images (the intensity component and the panchromatic image) in different scales and directions. Different fusion strategies are applied to coefficients in various scales and directions. Finally, the fused image is achieved by the inverse IHS transform. The experimental result shows that the proposed method has a superior performance. Comparing with the traditional methods such as the PCA transform, wavelet-based or pyramid-based methods and the multi-resolution fusion methods (shearlet or contourlet decomposition), the fused image achieves the highest entropy index and average gradient value. While providing a better human visual quality, a good correlation coefficient index indicates that the fused image keeps good spectral information. Both visual quality and objective evaluation criteria demonstrate that this method can well preserve the spatial quality and the spectral characteristics.

Wang, Sha; Feng, Hua-jun; Xu, Zhi-hai; Li, Qi; Chen, Yue-ting

2013-08-01

63

The application of hyperspectral sensors to the detection of land mines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hyperspectral imaging is an important technology for the detection of surface and buried land mines from an airborne platform. For this reason, hyperspectral was included in the three experiments that were executed by the Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) in Fall 2002, Spring 2003 and Summer 2004. The purpose of these experiments was to bring

Edwin M. Winter

2005-01-01

64

Detection of disturbed earth using hyperspectral LWIR imaging data  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Reststrahlen effect has been investigated for detecting regions of recently disturbed earth, by taking images where metallic objects had been buried in a sandy soil and comparing with images of undisturbed soil. The images were taken with a Long wave Infrared (LWIR) Hyperspectral Sensor, the Hyper-Cam.

Wendy Hubbard; Gary Bishop; Jean-Philippe Gagnon; Philippe Lagueux; Sion Hannuna; Neill Campbell

2010-01-01

65

Detection of disturbed earth using hyperspectral LWIR imaging data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Reststrahlen effect has been investigated for detecting regions of recently disturbed earth, by taking images where metallic objects had been buried in a sandy soil and comparing with images of undisturbed soil. The images were taken with a Long wave Infrared (LWIR) Hyperspectral Sensor, the Hyper-Cam.

Hubbard, Wendy; Bishop, Gary; Gagnon, Jean-Philippe; Lagueux, Philippe; Hannuna, Sion; Campbell, Neill

2010-10-01

66

Calibration procedures and measurements for the COMPASS hyperspectral imager  

Microsoft Academic Search

The COMPact Airborne Spectral Sensor (COMPASS) hyperspectral imager (HSI) developed at the Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) operates in the solar reflective region. The fundamental advance of the COMPASS instrument is the ability to capture 400nm to 2350nm on a single focal plane, eliminating boresighting and co-registration issues characteristic of dual FPA instruments for visible and SWIR

Jerome Zadnik; Daniel Guerin; Robert Moss; Alan Orbeta; Roberta Dixon; Christopher G. Simi; Susannah Dunbar; Anthony Hill

2004-01-01

67

Visualization of Hyperspectral Images Using Bilateral Filtering  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a new approach for hyperspectral image visualization. A bilateral filtering-based approach is presented for hyperspectral image fusion to generate an appropriate resultant image. The proposed approach retains even the minor details that exist in individual image bands, by exploiting the edge-preserving characteristics of a bilateral filter. It does not introduce visible artifacts in the fused image. A

Ketan Kotwal; Subhasis Chaudhuri

2010-01-01

68

Advanced pushbroom hyperspectral LWIR imagers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Performance studies and instrument designs for hyperspectral pushbroom imagers in thermal wavelength region are introduced. The studies involve imaging systems based on both MCT and microbolometer detector. All the systems employ pushbroom imaging spectrograph with transmission grating and on-axis optics. The aim of the work was to design high performance instruments with good image quality and compact size for various application requirements. A big challenge in realizing these goals without considerable cooling of the whole instrument is to control the instrument radiation from all the surfaces of the instrument itself. This challenge is even bigger in hyperspectral instruments, where the optical power from the target is spread spectrally over tens of pixels, but the instrument radiation is not dispersed. Without any suppression, the instrument radiation can overwhelm the radiation from the target by 1000 times. In the first imager design, BMC-technique (background monitoring on-chip), background suppression and temperature stabilization have been combined with cryo-cooled MCT-detector. The performance of a very compact hyperspectral imager with 84 spectral bands and 384 spatial samples has been studied and NESR of 18 mW/(m2sr?m) at 10 ?m wavelength for 300 K target has been achieved. This leads to SNR of 580. These results are based on a simulation model. The second version of the imager with an uncooled microbolometer detector and optics in ambient temperature aims at imaging targets at higher temperatures or with illumination. Heater rods with ellipsoidal reflectors can be used to illuminate the swath line of the hyperspectral imager on a target or sample, like drill core in mineralogical analysis. Performance characteristics for microbolometer version have been experimentally verified.

Holma, Hannu; Hyvärinen, Timo; Lehtomaa, Jarmo; Karjalainen, Harri; Jaskari, Risto

2009-05-01

69

A Snapshot foveal hyperspectral imager  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a new approach to hyperspectral imaging that is inspired by biological imaging systems, such as human vision, which employ high spectral and spatial discrimination only in a small central patch. This foveal technique addresses several problems of conventional approaches to HSI: they cannot provide snapshot, high spectral-resolution imagery in a two dimensional format. The ability to provide the data in a single snapshot removes temporal mis-registration issues. High signal to noise ratios naturally result from the absence of any multiplexing technique and the corresponding loss of light. Other reported snapshot techniques are either low spectral resolution or provide only a one-dimensional field of view. A high-spectral-resolution imager with a wide field of view could produce giga-sample data rates, which would make real-time data processing problematic. By gathering hyperspectral data from only a selected portion of the scene, we reduce the data processing rates to manageable levels. For many applications only a small field of view is required, but needs to be cued for situational awareness. In our system, this is provided for by a wide field of view, panchromatic imager, which fills a similar role to peripheral vision in the biological systems mentioned above. Our technique images the selected region onto a coherent fibre bundle, which reformats the input into a line array constituting the input to a dispersive hyperspectral imager. Computer processing reformats the dispersed one-dimensional output into a rectangular image and applies calibration routines to produce a high spectral resolution, small hyperspectral image. This is combined with a high-spatial-resolution panchromatic image. Experimental results will be presented.

Fletcher-Holmes, David W.; Harvey, Andrew R.

2002-09-01

70

The civil air patrol ARCHER hyperspectral sensor system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Civil Air Patrol (CAP) is procuring Airborne Real-time Cueing Hyperspectral Enhanced Reconnaissance (ARCHER) systems to increase their search-and-rescue mission capability. These systems are being installed on a fleet of Gippsland GA-8 aircraft, and will position CAP to gain realworld mission experience with the application of hyperspectral sensor and processing technology to search and rescue. The ARCHER system design, data processing, and operational concept leverage several years of investment in hyperspectral technology research and airborne system demonstration programs by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Each ARCHER system consists of a NovaSol-designed, pushbroom, visible/near-infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral imaging (HSI) sensor, a co-boresighted visible panchromatic high-resolution imaging (HRI) sensor, and a CMIGITS-III GPS/INS unit in an integrated sensor assembly mounted inside the GA-8 cabin. ARCHER incorporates an on-board data processing system developed by Space Computer Corporation (SCC) to perform numerous real-time processing functions including data acquisition and recording, raw data correction, target detection, cueing and chipping, precision image geo-registration, and display and dissemination of image products and target cue information. A ground processing station is provided for post-flight data playback and analysis. This paper describes the requirements and architecture of the ARCHER system, including design, components, software, interfaces, and displays. Key sensor performance characteristics and real-time data processing features are discussed in detail. The use of the system for detecting and geo-locating ground targets in real-time is demonstrated using test data collected in Southern California in the fall of 2004.

Stevenson, Brian; O'Connor, Rory; Kendall, William; Stocker, Alan; Schaff, William; Holasek, Rick; Even, Detlev; Alexa, Drew; Salvador, John; Eismann, Michael; Mack, Robert; Kee, Pat; Harris, Steve; Karch, Barry; Kershenstein, John

2005-05-01

71

Dual band hyperspectral imaging spectrometer  

Microsoft Academic Search

A temporally and spatially non-scanning imaging spectrometer covering two separate spectral bands in the visible region using computed tomographic imaging techniques is described. The computed tomographic techniques allow for the construction of a three-dimensional hyperspectral data cube (x, y, lambda) from the two-dimensional input in a single frame time. A computer generated holographic dispersive grating is used to disperse the

John Paul Hartke

2005-01-01

72

Information-theoretic assessment of sampled hyperspectral imagers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work focuses on estimating the information conveyed to a user by hyperspectral image data. The goal is establishing the extent to which an increase in spectral resolution enhances the amount of usable information. Indeed, a tradeoff exists between spatial and spectral resolution due to physical constraints of multi-band sensors imaging with a prefixed SNR. After describing an original method

Bruno Aiazzi; Luciano Alparone; Alessandro Barducci; Stefano Baronti; Ivan Pippi

2001-01-01

73

Hyperspectral imaging of bruised skin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bruises can be important evidence in legal medicine, for example in cases of child abuse. Optical techniques can be used to discriminate and quantify the chromophores present in bruised skin, and thereby aid dating of an injury. However, spectroscopic techniques provide only average chromophore concentrations for the sampled volume, and contain little information about the spatial chromophore distribution in the bruise. Hyperspectral imaging combines the power of imaging and spectroscopy, and can provide both spectroscopic and spatial information. In this study a hyperspectral imaging system developed by Norsk Elektro Optikk AS was used to measure the temporal development of bruised skin in a human volunteer. The bruises were inflicted by paintball bullets. The wavelength ranges used were 400 - 1000 nm (VNIR) and 900 - 1700 nm (SWIR), and the spectral sampling intervals were 3.7 and 5 nm, respectively. Preliminary results show good spatial discrimination of the bruised areas compared to normal skin. Development of a white spot can be seen in the central zone of the bruises. This central white zone was found to resemble the shape of the object hitting the skin, and is believed to develop in areas where the impact caused vessel damage. These results show that hyperspectral imaging is a promising technique to evaluate the temporal and spatial development of bruises on human skin.

Randeberg, Lise L.; Baarstad, Ivar; Løke, Trond; Kaspersen, Peter; Svaasand, Lars O.

2006-03-01

74

Calibration of the Hyperspectral Imaging Polarimeter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Space Dynamics Laboratory at Utah State University (SDL/USU) built a Hyper-spectral Imaging Polarimeter (HIP) that flew aborad the Flying IR Signatures Technology Aircraft, an Air Force KC135, in September and October of 1998. The primary objective of the HIP program is to characterize the linear polarization of sunlight reflected from high-altitude clouds in the 2.7 micrometers water region. SDL/USU performed a post-flight calibration of the HIP sensor to characterize the as-flown sensor capabilities and to provide the equations and coefficients require to interpret flight data and estimate measurement uncertainties. This paper present a brief sensor overview along with an in-depth look at the calibration techniques and results.

Peterson, James Q.; Jensen, Gary L.; Greenman, Mark E.; Kristl, Joseph

1999-10-01

75

HYMAP*: AN AUSTRALIAN HYPERSPECTRAL SENSOR SOLVING GLOBAL PROBLEMS - RESULTS FROM USA HYMAP DATA ACQUISITIONS  

Microsoft Academic Search

HyMap , an advanced hyperspectral sensor developed by Integrated Spectronics, Sydney Australia, represents the current state-of-the-art in airborne hyperspectral remote sensing. The sensor covers the 0.45 - 2.5 µm region in 126, approximately 15- nm-wide spectral bands with 3-10m spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratios of 500- 1000 or better. Analytical Imaging and Geophysics (AIG), Boulder, Colorado, USA, in cooperation with

F. A. Kruse; J. W. Boardman; A. B. Lefkoff; K. S. Kierein-Young; T. D. Cocks; R. Jenssen; P. A. Cocks

76

Hyperspectral imaging applied to forensic medicine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Remote sensing techniques now include the use of hyperspectral infrared imaging sensors covering the mid-and- long wave regions of the spectrum. They have found use in military surveillance applications due to their capability for detection and classification of a large variety of both naturally occurring and man-made substances. The images they produce reveal the spatial distributions of spectral patterns that reflect differences in material temperature, texture, and composition. A program is proposed for demonstrating proof-of-concept in using a portable sensor of this type for crime scene investigations. It is anticipated to be useful in discovering and documenting the affects of trauma and/or naturally occurring illnesses, as well as detecting blood spills, tire patterns, toxic chemicals, skin injection sites, blunt traumas to the body, fluid accumulations, congenital biochemical defects, and a host of other conditions and diseases. This approach can significantly enhance capabilities for determining the circumstances of death. Potential users include law enforcement organizations (police, FBI, CIA), medical examiners, hospitals/emergency rooms, and medical laboratories. Many of the image analysis algorithms already in place for hyperspectral remote sensing and crime scene investigations can be applied to the interpretation of data obtained in this program.

Malkoff, Donald B.; Oliver, William R.

2000-03-01

77

Calibration of a fluorescence hyperspectral imaging system for agricultural inspection and detection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fluorescence hyperspectral imaging is increasingly being used for food quality inspection and detection of potential food safety concerns. The flexible nature of a self-scanning pushbroom hyperspectral imager lends itself to these kinds of applications, among others. To increase the use of this technique there has been a tendency to use low cost off-the-shelf hyperspectral sensors which are typically not radiometrically

Ambrose E. Ononye; Haibo Yao; Zuzana Hruska; Russell Kincaid

2010-01-01

78

Dimension selective tensor compression of hyperspectral images  

Microsoft Academic Search

An efficient method for hyperspectral image compression is presented using tensor approximation. Hyperspectral images are first modeled as 3D tensors. Every tensor is then represented using its Tucker representation and matrices for every mode are calculated. Choosing eigenvectors corresponding to greatest eigenvalues of projection matrices, we reach a lower order tensor. Our method not only exploits redundancies between bands but

Mahdi Salmani Rahimi; Shabnam Sodagari; Alireza Nasiri Avanaki

2008-01-01

79

HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGING FOR FOOD PROCESSING AUTOMATION  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A hyperspectral imaging system could be used effectively for detecting feces (from duodenum, ceca, and colon) and ingesta on the surface of poultry carcasses, and potential application for real-time, on-line processing of poultry for automatic safety inspection. The hyperspectral imaging system inc...

80

HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGING APPLICATION FOR FOOD SAFETY ENGINEERING  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A pushbroom hyperspectral imaging system including area scan camera, prism-grating-prism spectrograph, quartz halogen lighting, motorized lens control, and a hyperspectral image processing software was developed for detection of fecal and ingesta contamination of poultry carcasses. A calibration mo...

81

Dual Band (MWIR\\/LWIR) Hyperspectral Imager  

Microsoft Academic Search

The demonstration of a dual band, MWIR\\/LWIR hyperspectral imaging system with a single lens and single focal plane array was performed at the Army Research Laboratory in the spring of 2003. To our knowledge this is the first time that a single two color focal plane array has been used for hyperspectral imaging. The ability of the IMSS diffractive optic

Michele Hinnrichs; Neelam Gupta; Arnold Goldberg

2003-01-01

82

Feature level fusion for hyperspectral images  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a new method for detecting poultry skin tumors based on serial feature fusion in hyperspectral images. First, some transform methods, including principal component analysis, discrete wavelet transform and band ratio method, are used to generate largely independent datasets in the hyperspectral fluorescence images. Then, the kernel discriminant analysis is utilized to extract features from each represented dataset

Chengzhe Xu; Intaek Kim; Seong G. Kong

2009-01-01

83

Hyperspectral Imaging and Obstacle Detection for Robotics Navigation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Recently, object detection based on hyperspectral sensors in support of autonomous robotics navigation has been of great interest. Hyperspectral sensors have been widely used for automatic target detection in military applications, mainly because a wealth...

D. Rosario D. Smith H. Kwon M. Thielke N. Gupta

2005-01-01

84

Volume Holographic Hyperspectral Imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

A volume hologram has two degenerate Bragg-phase-matching dimensions and provides the capability of volume holographic imaging. We demonstrate two volume holographic imaging architectures and investigate their imaging resolution, aberration, and sensitivity. The first architecture uses the hologram directly as an objective imaging element where strong aberration is observed and confirmed by simulation. The second architecture uses an imaging lens and

Wenhai Liu; George Barbastathis; Demetri Psaltis

2004-01-01

85

Hyperspectral Image Analysis Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Information on imaging spectrometry is given in the forms of outlines, graphs, and charts. Topics covered include impacts on science users, program objectives, expert systems for imaging spectrometry, and imaging spectrometer data analysis methods.

1985-01-01

86

Volume holographic hyperspectral imaging.  

PubMed

A volume hologram has two degenerate Bragg-phase-matching dimensions and provides the capability of volume holographic imaging. We demonstrate two volume holographic imaging architectures and investigate their imaging resolution, aberration, and sensitivity. The first architecture uses the hologram directly as an objective imaging element where strong aberration is observed and confirmed by simulation. The second architecture uses an imaging lens and a transmission geometry hologram to achieve linear two-dimensional optical sectioning and imaging of a four-dimensional (spatial plus spectral dimensions) object hyperspace. Multiplexed holograms can achieve simultaneously three-dimensional imaging of an object without a scanning mechanism. PMID:15218597

Liu, Wenhai; Barbastathis, George; Psaltis, Demetri

2004-06-20

87

Volume Holographic Hyperspectral Imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A volume hologram has two degenerate Bragg-phase-matching dimensions and provides the capability of volume holographic imaging. We demonstrate two volume holographic imaging architectures and investigate their imaging resolution, aberration, and sensitivity. The first architecture uses the hologram directly as an objective imaging element where strong aberration is observed and confirmed by simulation. The second architecture uses an imaging lens and a transmission geometry hologram to achieve linear two-dimensional optical sectioning and imaging of a four-dimensional (spatial plus spectral dimensions) object hyperspace. Multiplexed holograms can achieve simultaneously three-dimensional imaging of an object without a scanning mechanism.

Liu, Wenhai; Barbastathis, George; Psaltis, Demetri

2004-06-01

88

Hyperspectral sensors and the conservation of monumental buildings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The continuous control of the conservation state of outdoor materials is a good practice for timely planning conservative interventions and therefore to preserve historical buildings. The monitoring of surfaces composition, in order to characterize compounds of neo-formation and deposition, by traditional diagnostic campaigns, although gives accurate results, is a long and expensive method, and often micro-destructive analyses are required. On the other hand, hyperspectral analysis in the visible and near infrared (VNIR) region is a very common technique for determining the characteristics and properties of soils, air, and water in consideration of its capability to give information in a rapid, simultaneous and not-destructive way. VNIR Hypespectral analysis, which discriminate materials on the basis of their different patterns of absorption at specific wavelengths, are in fact successfully used for identifying minerals and rocks (1), as well as for detecting soil properties including moisture, organic content and salinity (2). Among the existing VNIR techniques (Laboratory Spectroscopy - LS, Portable Spectroscopy - PS and Imaging Spectroscopy - IS), PS and IS can play a crucial role in the characterization of components of exposed stone surfaces. In particular, the Imaging Spectroscopic (remote sensing), which uses sensors placed both on land or airborne, may contribute to the monitoring of large areas in consideration of its ability to produce large areal maps at relatively low costs. In this presentation the application of hyperspectral instruments (mainly PS and IS, not applied before in the field of monumental building diagnostic) to quantify the degradation of carbonate surfaces will be discussed. In particular, considering gypsum as the precursor symptom of damage, many factors which may affect the estimation of gypsum content on the surface will be taken into consideration. Two hyperspectral sensors will be considered: 1) A portable radiometer (ASD-FieldSpec FP Pro spectroradiometer), which continuously acquires punctual reflectance spectra in the range 350-2500 nm, both in natural light conditions and by a contact probe (fixed geometry of shot). This instrument is used on field for the identification of different materials, as well as for the definition of maps (e.g geological maps) if coupled with other hyperspectral instruments. 2) Hyperspectral sensor SIM-GA (Selex Galileo Multisensor Hyperspectral System), a system with spatial acquisition of data which may be used on an earth as well as on an airborne platform. SIM-GA consists of two electro-optical heads, which operate in the VNIR and SWIR regions, respectively, between 400-1000 nm and 1000-2500 nm (3). Although the spectral signature in the VNIR of many minerals is known, the co-presence of more minerals on a surface can affect the quantitative analysis of gypsum. Different minerals, such as gypsum, calcite, weddellite, whewellite, and other components (i.e. carbon particles in black crusts) are, in fact, commonly found on historical surfaces. In order to illustrate the complexity, but also the potentiality of hyperspectral sensors (portable or remote sensing) for the characterization of stone surfaces, a case study, the Facade of Santa Maria Novella in Florence - Italy, will be presented. References 1) R.N. Clark and G.A. Swayze, 1995, "Mapping minerals, amorphous materials, environmental materials, vegetation, water, ice, and snow, and other materials: The USGS Tricorder Algorithm", in "Summaries of the Fifth Annual JPL Airborne Earth Science Workshop", JPL Publication 95-1,1,39-40 2) E. Ben-Dor, K. Patin, A. Banin and A. Karnieli, 2002, "Mapping of several soil properties using DATS-7915 hyperspectral scanner data. A case study over clayely soils in Israel", International Journal of Remote Sensing, 23(6), 1043-1062 3) S. Vettori, M. Benvenuti, M. Camaiti, L. Chiarantini, P. Costagliola, S. Moretti, E. Pecchioni, 2008, "Assessment of the deterioration status of historical buildings by Hyperspectral Imaging techniques&q

Camaiti, Mara; Benvenuti, Marco; Chiarantini, Leandro; Costagliola, Pilar; Moretti, Sandro; Paba, Francesca; Pecchioni, Elena; Vettori, Silvia

2010-05-01

89

Hyperspectral imaging of pathology samples  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The object of the experiment described in this paper was to demonstrate that cells stained with multiple fluorophores could be identified and quantified simultaneously. Hyperspectral imaging was used to classify spleen cells of a Balb/c mouse, with the anti-mouse CD4 antibody conjugated with Alexa 488, 532, 546 and 568. It was found that the system was able to identify the specific fluorophore present and map their location in the cells. The system also provided relative signal strength data. Spectral libraries were constructed with color-coded spectra that enabled automatic spectral identification in subsequent acquisitions.

Tsurui, Hiromichi; Lerner, Jeremy M.; Takahashi, Kuniaki; Hirose, S.; Mitsui, K.; Okumura, K.; Shirai, T.

1999-05-01

90

Infrared hyperspectral imaging stokes polarimeter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work presents the design, development, and testing of a field portable imaging spectropolarimeter that operates over the short-wavelength and middle-wavelength portion of the infrared spectrum. The sensor includes a pair of sapphire Wollaston prisms and several high order retarders to produce the first infrared implementation of an imaging Fourier transform spectropolarimeter, providing for the measurement of the complete spectropolarimetric datacube over the passband. The Wollaston prisms serve as a birefringent interferometer with reduced sensitivity to vibration when compared to an unequal path interferometer, such as a Michelson. Polarimetric data are acquired through the use of channeled spectropolarimetry to modulate the spectrum with the Stokes parameter information. The collected interferogram is Fourier filtered and reconstructed to recover the spatially and spectrally varying Stokes vector data across the image. The intent of this dissertation is to provide the reader with a detailed understanding of the steps involved in the development of this infrared hyperspectral imaging polarimeter (IHIP) instrument. First, Chapter 1 provides an overview of the fundamental concepts relevant to this research. These include imaging spectrometers, polarimeters, and spectropolarimeters. A detailed discussion of channeled spectropolarimetry, including a historical study of previous implementations, is also presented. Next a few of the design alternatives that are possible for this work are outlined and discussed in Chapter 2. The configuration that was selected for the IHIP is then presented in detail, including the optical layout, design, and operation. Chapter 3 then presents an artifact reduction technique (ART) that was developed to improve the IHIP's spectropolarimetric reconstructions by reducing errors associated with non-band-limited spectral features. ART is experimentally verified in the infrared using a commercial Fourier transform spectrometer in combination with Yttrium Vanadate as well as Cadmium Sulfide retarders. The remainder of this dissertation then details the testing and analysis of the IHIP instrument. Implementation of ART with the IHIP as well as the employed calibration techniques are described in Chapter 4. Complete calibration of the IHIP includes three distinct processes to provide radiometric, spectral, and polarimetric calibration. With the instrument assembled and calibrated, results and error analyses are presented in Chapter 5. Spectropolarimetric results are obtained in the laboratory as well as outdoors to test the IHIP's real world functionality. The performance of the instrument is also assessed, including experimental measurement of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and an analysis of the potential sources of systematic error (such as retarder misalignment and finite polarizer extinction ratio). Chapter 6 presents the design and experimental results for a variable Wollaston prism that can be added to the IHIP to vary the fringe contrast across the field of view. Finally, Chapter 7 includes brief closing remarks summarizing this work and a few observations which may be useful for future infrared imaging Fourier transform channeled spectropolarimeter instruments.

Jones, Julia Craven

91

Common hyperspectral image database design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper is to introduce Common hyperspectral image database with a demand-oriented Database design method (CHIDB), which comprehensively set ground-based spectra, standardized hyperspectral cube, spectral analysis together to meet some applications. The paper presents an integrated approach to retrieving spectral and spatial patterns from remotely sensed imagery using state-of-the-art data mining and advanced database technologies, some data mining ideas and functions were associated into CHIDB to make it more suitable to serve in agriculture, geological and environmental areas. A broad range of data from multiple regions of the electromagnetic spectrum is supported, including ultraviolet, visible, near-infrared, thermal infrared, and fluorescence. CHIDB is based on dotnet framework and designed by MVC architecture including five main functional modules: Data importer/exporter, Image/spectrum Viewer, Data Processor, Parameter Extractor, and On-line Analyzer. The original data were all stored in SQL server2008 for efficient search, query and update, and some advance Spectral image data Processing technology are used such as Parallel processing in C#; Finally an application case is presented in agricultural disease detecting area.

Tian, Lixun; Liao, Ningfang; Chai, Ali

2009-11-01

92

Hyperspectral imaging of rivers and estuaries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO) is the first spaceborne imaging spectrometer designed to sample the coastal ocean. HICO samples selected coastal regions at 92 m ground sample distance with full spectral coverage (88 channels covering 400 to 900 nm) and a high signal-to-noise ratio to resolve the complexity of the coastal ocean. HICO has been operating on the International Space Station since October 2009 and collected over 8000 scenes for more than 50 users. We have been using HICO data to study major rivers and estuaries in the US and Asia. Our results show the advantages of HICO's additional spectral channels and higher spatial resolution for studying these complex coastal waters. We use these data to suggest requirements for spatial and spectral sampling for future ocean color sensors.

Davis, Curtiss O.; Tufillaro, Nicholas

2013-09-01

93

Modular hyperspectral imager enables multiple research applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The MR-i spectroradiometer can support a wide range of applications from its architecture suited to multiple configurations. Its modular 4-port FTIR spectroradiometer architecture allows the simultaneous use of two different detector modules, direct or differential input(s) and multiple telescopes. In a given configuration, MR-i can combine a MWIR focal plane array and a LWIR focal plane array to provide an extended spectral range from the two imaging sensors. The two detector array modules are imaging the same scene allowing synchronized pixel-to-pixel spectral range combination. In another configuration, MR-i can combine two identical focal plane arrays with different attenuation factors and two interleaved integration times per detector array. This configuration generates four sets of hyperspectral data cubes with different dynamic ranges that can be combined to produce a single hyperspectral cube with unmatched dynamic range. This configuration is particularly well suited for high-speed, high-dynamic range characterization of targets such as aircrafts, flares, and explosions. In a third configuration, named iCATSI, the spectroradiometer is used in differential input configuration to provide efficient optical background subtraction. The iCATSI configuration features an MCT detectors array with spectral cutoff near 14 µm. This extended spectral range and high sensitivity allows the detection and identification of a wide range of chemicals.

Hô, Nicolas; Prel, Florent; Moreau, Louis; Lavoie, Hugo; Bouffard, François; Dubé, Denis; Thériault, Jean-Marc; Vallières, Christian; Roy, Claude

2012-09-01

94

Feature level fusion for hyperspectral images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a new method for detecting poultry skin tumors based on serial feature fusion in hyperspectral images. First, some transform methods, including principal component analysis, discrete wavelet transform and band ratio method, are used to generate largely independent datasets in the hyperspectral fluorescence images. Then, the kernel discriminant analysis is utilized to extract features from each represented dataset for the purpose of classification; another set of features are extracted from hyperspectral reflectance images by using kernel discriminant analysis. Finally, new fused features are made by combining aforementioned features. The experimental result based on the proposed method shows the better performance in detecting tumors compared with previous works.

Xu, Chengzhe; Kim, Intaek; Kong, Seong G.

2009-05-01

95

Hyperspectral image acquisition and analysis of skin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hyperspectral imaging of skin combines the spectral information of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy with the spatial information of 2D imaging. Skin chromophore maps can be reconstructed in which features such as pigmented lesions, diffuse and localized erythema, areas of increased blood stasis, etc. could be identified and the relative parameters quantified. Hyperspectral imaging is the only reliable method to produce a quantitative distribution map of chromophores contributing to the color appearance of the skin.

Stamatas, Georgios N.; Balas, Costas J.; Kollias, Nikiforos

2003-04-01

96

Reflectance and fluorescence hyperspectral elastic image registration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Science and Technology International (STI) presents a novel multi-modal elastic image registration approach for a new hyperspectral medical imaging modality. STI's HyperSpectral Diagnostic Imaging (HSDI) cervical instrument is used for the early detection of uterine cervical cancer. A Computer-Aided-Diagnostic (CAD) system is being developed to aid the physician with the diagnosis of pre-cancerous and cancerous tissue regions. The CAD system

Holger Lange; Ross Baker; Johan Hakansson; Ulf P. Gustafsson

2004-01-01

97

Development of a handheld widefield hyperspectral imaging (HSI) sensor for standoff detection of explosive, chemical, and narcotic residues  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The utility of Hyper Spectral Imaging (HSI) passive chemical detection employing wide field, standoff imaging continues to be advanced in detection applications. With a drive for reduced SWaP (Size, Weight, and Power), increased speed of detection and sensitivity, developing a handheld platform that is robust and user-friendly increases the detection capabilities of the end user. In addition, easy to use handheld detectors could improve the effectiveness of locating and identifying threats while reducing risks to the individual. ChemImage Sensor Systems (CISS) has developed the HSI Aperio™ sensor for real time, wide area surveillance and standoff detection of explosives, chemical threats, and narcotics for use in both government and commercial contexts. Employing liquid crystal tunable filter technology, the HSI system has an intuitive user interface that produces automated detections and real-time display of threats with an end user created library of threat signatures that is easily updated allowing for new hazardous materials. Unlike existing detection technologies that often require close proximity for sensing and so endanger operators and costly equipment, the handheld sensor allows the individual operator to detect threats from a safe distance. Uses of the sensor include locating production facilities of illegal drugs or IEDs by identification of materials on surfaces such as walls, floors, doors, deposits on production tools and residue on individuals. In addition, the sensor can be used for longer-range standoff applications such as hasty checkpoint or vehicle inspection of residue materials on surfaces or bulk material identification. The CISS Aperio™ sensor has faster data collection, faster image processing, and increased detection capability compared to previous sensors.

Nelson, Matthew P.; Basta, Andrew; Patil, Raju; Klueva, Oksana; Treado, Patrick J.

2013-05-01

98

Inter-Sensor Comparison of Global Imager (GLI) Vegetation Index on board ADEOS-II Satellite Using Hyperspectral Field and Airborne Data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Environmental monitoring over land surfaces has various complexities caused by highly heterogeneous surface structures with a vegetation layer, soil surfaces, and atmospheric contamination. Despite this complexity, vegetation biophysical parameters such as leaf area index (LAI) and fractional absorbed PAR (fAPAR) by vegetation must be provided with sufficient accuracy to be useful as inputs to general circulation models, where satellite remote sensing can play an important role. One common approach of satellite remote sensing is the use of a vegetation index (VI) as an intermediate variable to quantify status and amount of vegetation from radiometric measurements from a sensor. Although various VI products currently exist and/ or will soon become available, the estimation of biophysical parameters through the VI has to be compatible across various sensors to ensure continuity of global time series data records. Thus, it is important to investigate the compatibility of VI products from new sensor systems with the existing satellite sensors. A soon to be launched optical sensor on board the Japanese ADEOS-II platform, named Global Imager (GLI), is the focus of this study. The purpose of this study is to investigate the compatibility of the GLI vegetation index products (250m and 1km pixel, repeat cycle of 4 days), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and enhanced vegetation index (EVI) with several other satellite sensors, such as Landsat TM, TERRA-MODIS, NOAA-AVHRR, and ALI, which is on board the recently launched EO-1 satellite. In this study we focus on inter-sensor VI differences caused by the band-pass filters unique to each sensor. This is achieved by using various hyperspectral reflectance data sets acquired by a series of field measurements and airborne data collections over some EOS core sites, including semi-arid, grass, and forests. The high spectral resolution radiometric data were convoluted to simulate the reflectances of multi-spectral bands from those sensors. Compatibility of the GLI-VI products with other sensors is discussed from a spectral point of view based on the data from field and airborne radiometric measurements.

Yamamoto, H.; Yoshioka, H.; Huete, A. R.; Honda, Y.; Kajiwara, K.; Didan, K.; Ferreira, L.

2001-05-01

99

Miniaturization of a VNIR hyperspectral imager  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new approach for the design and fabrication of a miniaturized Hyperspectral imager is described. A unique and compact instrument has been developed by taking advantage of light propagation within bonded solid blocks of fused silica. The resulting microHSI is a VNIR hyperspectral sensor capable of operating in the 400-1000 nm wavelength range developed, patented, and built by NovaSol. The microHSI spectrograph weighs 12.4 oz from slit input to camera output. The microHSI can accommodate either custom foreoptics or C-mount input lenses to adapt to a wide range of fields-of-view (FOV). The prototype microHSI uses a telecentric F2.8 foreoptic, with 36 mm focal length, to cover a 15 degree FOV. It can resolve 960 spatial pixels, resulting in a 280 ?rad IFOV for this particular foreoptics implementation. With a 1 nm/unbinned pixel dispersion, the spectrometer spectral resolution is 3.5 nm. Results of field and laboratory testing of the prototype microHSI are presented and show that the sensor consistently meets technical performance predictions. The prototype microHSI employs a holographic diffraction grating embedded within the optical blocks resulting in a 19% diffraction efficiency. Future units are anticipated to incorporate a blazed grating for improved throughput and SNR. The microHSI concept can be extended to operation over other wavelength regions. Designs are nearing completion for a SWIR version of the device, and a miniaturized LWIR microHSI sensor is currently at the conceptual design stage.

Warren, Christopher P.; Friend, Michael; Velasco, Arleen; Hinrichs, John; Carleton, Charles; Duncan, Michael; Neumann, Jonathan

2006-09-01

100

Hyperspectral imaging of atherosclerotic plaques in vitro  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Vulnerable plaques constitute a risk for serious heart problems, and are difficult to identify using existing methods. Hyperspectral imaging combines spectral- and spatial information, providing new possibilities for precise optical characterization of atherosclerotic lesions. Hyperspectral data were collected from excised aorta samples (n = 11) using both white-light and ultraviolet illumination. Single lesions (n = 42) were chosen for further investigation, and classified according to histological findings. The corresponding hyperspectral images were characterized using statistical image analysis tools (minimum noise fraction, K-means clustering, principal component analysis) and evaluation of reflectance/fluorescence spectra. Image analysis combined with histology revealed the complexity and heterogeneity of aortic plaques. Plaque features such as lipids and calcifications could be identified from the hyperspectral images. Most of the advanced lesions had a central region surrounded by an outer rim or shoulder-region of the plaque, which is considered a weak spot in vulnerable lesions. These features could be identified in both the white-light and fluorescence data. Hyperspectral imaging was shown to be a promising tool for detection and characterization of advanced atherosclerotic plaques in vitro. Hyperspectral imaging provides more diagnostic information about the heterogeneity of the lesions than conventional single point spectroscopic measurements.

Larsen, Eivind L. P.; Randeberg, Lise L.; Olstad, Elisabeth; Haugen, Olav A.; Aksnes, Astrid; Svaasand, Lars O.

2011-02-01

101

Hyperspectral imaging of atherosclerotic plaques in vitro.  

PubMed

Vulnerable plaques constitute a risk for serious heart problems, and are difficult to identify using existing methods. Hyperspectral imaging combines spectral- and spatial information, providing new possibilities for precise optical characterization of atherosclerotic lesions. Hyperspectral data were collected from excised aorta samples (n = 11) using both white-light and ultraviolet illumination. Single lesions (n = 42) were chosen for further investigation, and classified according to histological findings. The corresponding hyperspectral images were characterized using statistical image analysis tools (minimum noise fraction, K-means clustering, principal component analysis) and evaluation of reflectance/fluorescence spectra. Image analysis combined with histology revealed the complexity and heterogeneity of aortic plaques. Plaque features such as lipids and calcifications could be identified from the hyperspectral images. Most of the advanced lesions had a central region surrounded by an outer rim or shoulder-region of the plaque, which is considered a weak spot in vulnerable lesions. These features could be identified in both the white-light and fluorescence data. Hyperspectral imaging was shown to be a promising tool for detection and characterization of advanced atherosclerotic plaques in vitro. Hyperspectral imaging provides more diagnostic information about the heterogeneity of the lesions than conventional single point spectroscopic measurements. PMID:21361695

Larsen, Eivind L P; Randeberg, Lise L; Olstad, Elisabeth; Haugen, Olav A; Aksnes, Astrid; Svaasand, Lars O

2011-02-01

102

Hyperspectral Imaging of Forest Resources: The Malaysian Experience  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Remote sensing using satellite and aircraft images are well established technology. Remote sensing application of hyperspectral imaging, however, is relatively new to Malaysian forestry. Through a wide range of wavelengths hyperspectral data are precisely capable to capture narrow bands of spectra. Airborne sensors typically offer greatly enhanced spatial and spectral resolution over their satellite counterparts, and able to control experimental design closely during image acquisition. The first study using hyperspectral imaging for forest inventory in Malaysia were conducted by Professor Hj. Kamaruzaman from the Faculty of Forestry, Universiti Putra Malaysia in 2002 using the AISA sensor manufactured by Specim Ltd, Finland. The main objective has been to develop methods that are directly suited for practical tropical forestry application at the high level of accuracy. Forest inventory and tree classification including development of single spectral signatures have been the most important interest at the current practices. Experiences from the studies showed that retrieval of timber volume and tree discrimination using this system is well and some or rather is better than other remote sensing methods. This article reviews the research and application of airborne hyperspectral remote sensing for forest survey and assessment in Malaysia.

Mohd Hasmadi, I.; Kamaruzaman, J.

2008-08-01

103

Hyperspectral imaging for food processing automation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the research results that demonstrates hyperspectral imaging could be used effectively for detecting feces (from duodenum, ceca, and colon) and ingesta on the surface of poultry carcasses, and potential application for real-time, on-line processing of poultry for automatic safety inspection. The hyperspectral imaging system included a line scan camera with prism-grating-prism spectrograph, fiber optic line lighting, motorized

Kurt C. Lawrence; William R. Windham; Doug P. Smith; Peggy W. Feldner

2002-01-01

104

Semisupervised Graph-based Hyperspectral Image Classification  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a semi-supervised graph-based method for the classification of hyperspectral images. The method is designed to handle the special characteristics of hyperspectral images, namely high input dimension of pixels, low number of labeled samples, and spatial variability of the spectral signature. To alleviate these problems, the method incorporates three ingredients, respectively. First, being a kernel-based method, it combats

Gustavo Camps-Valls; Tatyana V. Bandos; Dengyong Zhou

2007-01-01

105

Snapshot hyperspectral imaging: the hyperpixel array camera  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hyperspectral imaging has important benefits in remote sensing and material identification. This paper describes a class of hyperspectral imaging systems which utilize a novel optical processor that provides video-rate hyperspectral datacubes. These systems have no moving parts and do not operate by scanning in either the spatial or spectral dimension. They are capable of recording a full three-dimensional (two spatial, one spectral) hyperspectral datacube with each video frame, ideal for recording data on transient events, or from unstabilized platforms. We will present the results of laboratory and field-tests for several of these imagers operating in the visible, near-infrared, mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) regions.

Bodkin, Andrew; Sheinis, A.; Norton, A.; Daly, J.; Beaven, S.; Weinheimer, J.

2009-05-01

106

Airborne Radiative Transfer Spectral Scanner: A new airborne hyperspectral imager for hyperspectral volcano observations  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 2006, a new airborne hyperspectral imager, the Airborne Radiative Transfer Spectral Scanner (ARTS), was developed for hyperspectral volcano observations. ARTS provides hyperspectral images to support developing algorithms for the remote sensing of the geothermal distribution, the ash fall areas, and the volcanic gasses columnar content from the air. ARTS will be used mainly to assess volcanic activity and to

T. Jitsufuchi

2007-01-01

107

3D set partitioning coding methods in hyperspectral image compression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hyperspectral images are generated by collecting hundreds of narrow and contiguously spaced spectral bands of data producing a highly correlated long sequence of images. Some application specific data compression techniques may be applied advantageously before we process, store or transmit hyperspectral images. This paper applies asymmetric tree 3DSPIHT (AT-3DSPIHT) for hyperspectral image compression; it also investigates and compares the performance

Xiaoli Tang; Sungdae Cho; William A. Pearlman

2003-01-01

108

Inspection of poultry skin tumor using hyperspectral fluorescence imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hyperspectral fluorescence images reveal useful information for detecting skin tumor on poultry carcasses. In this paper, a hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system with fuzzy interference scheme is presented for detecting skin tumors on poultry carcasses. Image samples are obtained from a hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system for 65 spectral bands whose wavelength is ranged from 425(nm) to 711(nm). The approximation component of

Seong-Gon Kong

2003-01-01

109

On Endmember Identification in Hyperspectral Images Without Pure Pixels: A Comparison of Algorithms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hyperspectral imaging is an active area of research in Earth and planetary observation. One of the most important techniques\\u000a for analyzing hyperspectral images is spectral unmixing, in which mixed pixels (resulting from insufficient spatial resolution\\u000a of the imaging sensor) are decomposed into a collection of spectrally pure constituent spectra, called endmembers weighted by their correspondent fractions, or abundances. Over the

Javier Plaza; Eligius M. T. Hendrix; Inmaculada García; Gabriel Martín; Antonio Plaza

2012-01-01

110

Real-time snapshot hyperspectral imaging endoscope  

PubMed Central

Hyperspectral imaging has tremendous potential to detect important molecular biomarkers of early cancer based on their unique spectral signatures. Several drawbacks have limited its use for in vivo screening applications: most notably the poor temporal and spatial resolution, high expense, and low optical throughput of existing hyperspectral imagers. We present the development of a new real-time hyperspectral endoscope (called the image mapping spectroscopy endoscope) based on an image mapping technique capable of addressing these challenges. The parallel high throughput nature of this technique enables the device to operate at frame rates of 5.2 frames per second while collecting a (x, y, ?) datacube of 350 × 350 × 48. We have successfully imaged tissue in vivo, resolving a vasculature pattern of the lower lip while simultaneously detecting oxy-hemoglobin.

Kester, Robert T.; Bedard, Noah; Gao, Liang; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.

2011-01-01

111

System engineering trades for the LWIR hyperspectral imager  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes the modeling of system engineering trades for the LWIR hyperspectral imager. First the operational scenario is defined to constrain the system trade space. Then modeling trades for spectral sampling, spectral bandwidth and SNR are presented. Issues unique to operating in the LWIR band are addressed. These trades are presented in the context of current technology for FPA and optical design. Radiometric calibration is addressed in preparation for flight testing of the sensor.

Hanna, Raymond E.

2006-06-01

112

Advances in hyperspectral LWIR pushbroom imagers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two long-wave infrared (LWIR) hyperspectral imagers have been under extensive development. The first one utilizes a microbolometer focal plane array (FPA) and the second one is based on an Mercury Cadmium Telluride (MCT) FPA. Both imagers employ a pushbroom imaging spectrograph with a transmission grating and on-axis optics. The main target has been to develop high performance instruments with good

Hannu Holma; Antti-Jussi Mattila; Timo Hyvärinen; Oliver Weatherbee

2011-01-01

113

Hyperspectral image segmentation using active contours  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multispectral or hyperspectral image processing has been studied as a possible approach to automatic target recognition (ATR). Hundreds of spectral bands may provide high data redundancy, compensating the low contrast in medium wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long wavelength infrared (LWIR) images. Thus, the combination of spectral (image intensity) and spatial (geometric feature) information analysis could produce a substantial improvement. Active

Cheolha P. Lee; Wesley E. Snyder

2004-01-01

114

Multi-FOV hyperspectral imager concept  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is increasing interest in imaging spectrometers working in the SWIR and LWIR wavelength bands. Commercially available detectors are not only expensive, but have a limited number of pixels, compared with visible band detectors. Typical push broom hyperspectral imaging systems consist of a fore optic imager, a slit, a line spectrometer, and a two dimensional focal plane with a spatial

Lovell E. Comstock; Richard L. Wiggins

2011-01-01

115

Cutaneous wound analysis using hyperspectral imaging.  

PubMed

A correlative bright-field and hyperspectral analysis of full-thickness, cutaneous wounds in a porcine model was undertaken to investigate the efficacy of hyperspectral imaging as an alternate method for wound identification. Analysis of a randomly selected specimen yielded distinct spectral signatures for cutaneous regions of interest including the epidermis, injured dermis, and normal dermis. The scanning of the entire specimen group using these hyperspectral signatures revealed an exclusionary, pseudo-color pattern whereby a central wound region was consistently defined by a unique spectral signature. An algorithm was derived as an objective tool for the comparison of the wound regions defined by the hyperspectral classification versus the pathologists' manual tracings. The dimensions of the wound identified in the hyperspectral assay did not differ significantly from the wound region identified by the pathologists using standard bright-field microscopy. These data indicate that hyperspectral analysis may provide a high-throughput alternative for wound estimation that approximates standard bright-field imaging and pathologist evaluation. PMID:12613264

Shah, S A; Bachrach, N; Spear, S J; Letbetter, D S; Stone, R A; Dhir, R; Prichard, J W; Brown, H G; LaFramboise, W A

2003-02-01

116

Airborne hyperspectral data collection with the UMBC VNIR sensor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) airborne Visible-Near Infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral sensor is a grating spectrometer that collects data in the 380 to 985 nm spectral range with spectral resolution as high as 1.15 nm. This imager is a push-broom type sensor utilizing a two dimensional charge coupled device (CCD, 480×640) camera to collect the spectral information along a single line on the ground perpendicular to the aircraft flight line. The UMBC sensor can provide measurements for a variety of studies, including land development and land use, cultivated and natural vegetation and forestry, and water turbidity and coastal environments. Due to the sensor's wealth of spectral bands, high signal-to-noise, and narrow band widths, a number of atmospheric constituents can be also detected that can be incorporated into atmospheric correction models to benefit the retrievals of surface properties. We present a detailed description of the sensor as well as preliminary results of its calibration in this paper. Related on-going research and some potential applications of this sensor are summarized.

Warner, J. X.; Grossmann, J. M.; Chu, D. A.; Huemmrich, K. F.; Warner, R. A.

2006-09-01

117

Hyperspectral Imaging Using Ultraviolet Light.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The LINEATE IMAGING NEAR ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROMETER (LINUS) instrument has been used to remotely detect and measure sulfur dioxide (SO2). The sensor was calibrated in the lab, with curves of growth created for the 0.29 0.31 - spectral range of the LINUS sen...

M. A. Porter

2005-01-01

118

Hyperspectral image feature extraction accelerated by GPU  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

PCA (principal components analysis) algorithm is the most basic method of dimension reduction for high-dimensional data1, which plays a significant role in hyperspectral data compression, decorrelation, denoising and feature extraction. With the development of imaging technology, the number of spectral bands in a hyperspectral image is getting larger and larger, and the data cube becomes bigger in these years. As a consequence, operation of dimension reduction is more and more time-consuming nowadays. Fortunately, GPU-based high-performance computing has opened up a novel approach for hyperspectral data processing6. This paper is concerning on the two main processes in hyperspectral image feature extraction: (1) calculation of transformation matrix; (2) transformation in spectrum dimension. These two processes belong to computationally intensive and data-intensive data processing respectively. Through the introduction of GPU parallel computing technology, an algorithm containing PCA transformation based on eigenvalue decomposition 8(EVD) and feature matching identification is implemented, which is aimed to explore the characteristics of the GPU parallel computing and the prospects of GPU application in hyperspectral image processing by analysing thread invoking and speedup of the algorithm. At last, the result of the experiment shows that the algorithm has reached a 12x speedup in total, in which some certain step reaches higher speedups up to 270 times.

Qu, HaiCheng; Zhang, Ye; Lin, Zhouhan; Chen, Hao

2012-10-01

119

Phase congruency assesses hyperspectral image quality  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Blind image quality assessment (QA) is a tough task especially for hyperspectral imagery which is degraded by noise, distortion, defocus, and other complex factors. Subjective hyperspectral imagery QA methods are basically measured the degradation of image from human perceptual visual quality. As the most important image quality measurement features, noise and blur, determined the image quality greatly, are employed to predict the objective hyperspectral imagery quality of each band. We demonstrate a novel no-reference hyperspectral imagery QA model based on phase congruency (PC), which is a dimensionless quantity and provides an absolute measure of the significance of feature point. First, Log Gabor wavelet is used to calculate the phase congruency of frequencies of each band image. The relationship between noise and PC can be derived from above transformation under the assumption that noise is additive. Second, PC focus measure evaluation model is proposed to evaluate blur caused by different amounts of defocus. The ratio and mean factors of edge blur level and noise is defined to assess the quality of each band image. This image QA method obtains excellent correlation with subjective image quality score without any reference. Finally, the PC information is utilized to improve the quality of some bands images.

Shao, Xiaopeng; Zhong, Cheng

2012-10-01

120

Hyperspectral confocal fluorescence imaging of cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Confocal fluorescence imaging of biological systems is an important method by which researchers can investigate molecular processes occurring in live cells. We have developed a new 3D hyperspectral confocal fluorescence microscope that can further enhance the usefulness of fluorescence microscopy in studying biological systems. The new microscope can increase the information content obtained from the image since, at each voxel,

David M. Haaland; Howland D. T. Jones; Michael B. Sinclair; Bryan Carson; Catherine Branda; Jens F. Poschet; Roberto Rebeil; Bing Tian; Ping Liu; Allan R. Brasier

2007-01-01

121

Hyperspectral imaging of blood perfusion and chromophore distribution in skin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hyperspectral imaging is a modality which combines spatial resolution and spectroscopy in one technique. Analysis of hyperspectral data from biological samples is a demanding task due to the large amount of data, and due to the complex optical properties of biological tissue. In this study it was investigated if depth information could be revealed from hyperspectral images using a combination

Lise L. Randeberg; Eivind L. P. Larsen; Lars O. Svaasand

2009-01-01

122

Surface emissivity and temperature retrieval for a hyperspectral sensor  

SciTech Connect

With the growing use of hyper-spectral imagers, e.g., AVIRIS in the visible and short-wave infrared there is hope of using such instruments in the mid-wave and thermal IR (TIR) some day. The author believes that this will enable him to get around using the present temperature-emissivity separation algorithms using methods which take advantage of the many channels available in hyper-spectral imagers. A simple fact used in coming up with a novel algorithm is that a typical surface emissivity spectrum are rather smooth compared to spectral features introduced by the atmosphere. Thus, a iterative solution technique can be devised which retrieves emissivity spectra based on spectral smoothness. To make the emissivities realistic, atmospheric parameters are varied using approximations, look-up tables derived from a radiative transfer code and spectral libraries. One such iterative algorithm solves the radiative transfer equation for the radiance at the sensor for the unknown emissivity and uses the blackbody temperature computed in an atmospheric window to get a guess for the unknown surface temperature. By varying the surface temperature over a small range a series of emissivity spectra are calculated. The one with the smoothest characteristic is chosen. The algorithm was tested on synthetic data using MODTRAN and the Salisbury emissivity database.

Borel, C.C.

1998-12-01

123

Accurate reconstruction of hyperspectral images from compressive sensing measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The emerging field of Compressive Sensing (CS) provides a new way to capture data by shifting the heaviest burden of data collection from the sensor to the computer on the user-end. This new means of sensing requires fewer measurements for a given amount of information than traditional sensors. We investigate the efficacy of CS for capturing HyperSpectral Imagery (HSI) remotely. We also introduce a new family of algorithms for constructing HSI from CS measurements with Split Bregman Iteration [Goldstein and Osher,2009]. These algorithms combine spatial Total Variation (TV) with smoothing in the spectral dimension. We examine models for three different CS sensors: the Coded Aperture Snapshot Spectral Imager-Single Disperser (CASSI-SD) [Wagadarikar et al.,2008] and Dual Disperser (CASSI-DD) [Gehm et al.,2007] cameras, and a hypothetical random sensing model closer to CS theory, but not necessarily implementable with existing technology. We simulate the capture of remotely sensed images by applying the sensor forward models to well-known HSI scenes - an AVIRIS image of Cuprite, Nevada and the HYMAP Urban image. To measure accuracy of the CS models, we compare the scenes constructed with our new algorithm to the original AVIRIS and HYMAP cubes. The results demonstrate the possibility of accurately sensing HSI remotely with significantly fewer measurements than standard hyperspectral cameras.

Greer, John B.; Flake, J. C.

2013-05-01

124

Biometric study using hyperspectral imaging during stress  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To the casual observer, transient stress results in a variety of physiological changes that can be seen in the face. Although the conditions can be seen visibly, the conditions affect the emissivity and absorption properties of the skin, which imaging spectrometers, commonly referred to as Hyperspectral (HS) cameras, can quantify at every image pixel. The study reported on in this paper, using Hyperspectral cameras, provides a basis for continued study of HS imaging to eventually quantify biometric stress. This study was limited to the visible to near infrared (VNIR) spectral range. Signal processing tools and algorithms have been developed and are described for using HS face data from human subjects. The subjects were placed in psychologically stressful situations and the camera data were analyzed to detect stress through changes in dermal reflectance and emissivity. Results indicate that hyperspectral imaging may potentially serve as a non-invasive tool to measure changes in skin emissivity indicative of a stressful incident. Particular narrow spectral bands in the near-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum seem especially important. Further studies need to be performed to determine the optimal spectral bands and to generalize the conclusions. The enormous information available in hyperspectral imaging needs further analysis and more spectral regions need to be exploited. Non-invasive stress detection is a prominent area of research with countless applications for both military and commercial use including border patrol, stand-off interrogation, access control, surveillance, and non-invasive and un-attended patient monitoring.

Nagaraj, Sheela; Quoraishee, Shafik; Chan, Gabriel; Short, Kenneth R.

2010-04-01

125

Airborne Radiative Transfer Spectral Scanner: A new airborne hyperspectral imager for hyperspectral volcano observations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 2006, a new airborne hyperspectral imager, the Airborne Radiative Transfer Spectral Scanner (ARTS), was developed for hyperspectral volcano observations. ARTS provides hyperspectral images to support developing algorithms for the remote sensing of the geothermal distribution, the ash fall areas, and the volcanic gasses columnar content from the air. ARTS will be used mainly to assess volcanic activity and to mitigate volcanic disasters. ARTS is a pushbroom imaging spectrometer covering wavelengths from 380 to 2450nm and 8000 to 11500nm with 421 bands. The ARTS imaging spectrometer consists of three sensor head units (SHUs). These SHUs are the visible - near infrared (VNIR) SHU, the shortwave infrared (SWIR) SHU, and the long-wave infrared (LWIR) SHU. These sensor head units operate as a line scanner in the pushbroom mode from an aircraft. The VNIR SHU covers wavelengths from 380 to 1050nm with 288 spectrum bands. The field of view (FOV) is 40 degrees, and the image of this SHU is 1500 pixels wide cross-track, making the instantaneous field of view (IFOV) 0.49mrad. The SWIR SHU covers wavelengths from 900 to 2450nm with 101 spectrum bands. The LWIR SHU covers wavelengths from 8000 to 11500nm with 32 spectrum bands. SWIR SHU and LWIR SHU have FOVs of 40 degrees and 600-pixel-wide images cross-track, giving them an IFOV of 1.2mrad. ARTS has precise position and attitude measurement systems (GPS/IMU). Direct, accurate geo-corrections of each SHU image can be made using the GPS/IMU systems. ARTS will be used for the operational volcano observation beginning in 2008. We are now validating the in-flight performance of this sensor. In this study, we describe the ARTS optical, electrical, and mechanical systems; its data acquisition and system design; and present some preliminary in- flight performance test results obtained from measurements acquired aboard the Beechcraft King Air B200 aircraft. The validation results indicate that the geo-correction accuracy is typically less than a 2-pixel difference (RMS) for each SHU, and there was the good agreement between the predicted radiance at the sensor and the measured radiance at the sensor at a flight altitude of 1000m AGL. We expect that ARTS will be a well-calibrated instrument for assessing volcanic activity.

Jitsufuchi, T.

2007-12-01

126

[Spectral calibration of hyperspectral imager based on spectral absorption target].  

PubMed

Retrieval of center wavelength and bandwidth is a key step for quantitative analysis of hyperspectral data. The present paper proposes a spectral calibration method of hyperspectral imager, whose spectrum covers visible and near-infrared band, using spectral absorption target. Ground calibration experiment was designed for a hyperspectral imager with a bandwidth of 6 nm. Hyperspectral imager and ASD spectrometer measured the same spectral absorption target synchronously. Reflectance spectrum was derived from the different data set. Center wavelength and bandwidth were retrieved by matching the reflectance data from hyperspectral imager and ASD spectrometer. The experiment result shows that this method can be applied in spectral calibration of hyperspectral imagers to improve the quantitative studies on hyperspectral imagery. PMID:23697157

Gou, Zhi-Yang; Yan, Lei; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Hong-Ying; Yin, Zhong-Yi; Duan, Yi-Ni

2013-02-01

127

Unsupervised hyperspectral image analysis with projection pursuit  

Microsoft Academic Search

Principal components analysis (PCA) is effective at compressing information in multivariate data sets by computing orthogonal projections that maximize the amount of data variance. Unfortunately, information content in hyperspectral images does not always coincide with such projections. The authors propose an application of projection pursuit (PP), which seeks to find a set of projections that are \\

Agustin Ifarraguerri; Chein-I Chang

2000-01-01

128

Composite Kernels for Hyperspectral Image Classification  

Microsoft Academic Search

This letter presents a framework of composite kernel machines for enhanced classification of hyperspectral images. This novel method exploits the properties of Mercer's kernels to construct a family of composite kernels that easily combine spatial and spectral information. This framework of composite kernels demonstrates: 1) enhanced classification accuracy as compared to traditional approaches that take into account the spectral information

Gustavo Camps-Valls; Luis Gomez-Chova; J. Munoz-Mari; J. Vila-Franc'es; J. Calpe-Maravilla

2006-01-01

129

Some recent results on hyperspectral image classification  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we present a summary of our ongoing research on the classification of hyperspectral images. We are experimenting with both supervised and unsupervised algorithms. In particular, we have developed an unsupervised classification algorithm based on Independent Component Analysis (ICA). This algorithm is known as the ICA mixture model (ICAMM) algorithm and has shown promising results. In addition, we

C. A. Shah; P. Watanachaturaporn; P. K. Varshney; M. K. Arora

2003-01-01

130

Prior important band hyperspectral image compression  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a Prior Important Band (PIB) algorithm for the compression of hyper-spectral images. The PIB method endows some of the bands with high priority so that the quality of these bands after compression is better than other bands. The rationale behind this approach is that, the bands of a data cube have different amount of information. Some bands

Feipeng Li; Haimai Shao; Guorui Ma; Qianqing Qin; Deren Li

2003-01-01

131

Liquid-crystal-based hyperspectral image projector  

Microsoft Academic Search

A hyperspectral image projector (HIP) is introduced that is built with liquid crystal based spatial light modulators (SLM) as opposed to micromirror arrays. The use of an SLM as a broadband intensity modulator presents several benefits to this application. With slight modifications to the SLM design, SLMs can be built for a wide range of spectral regimes, ranging from the

Anna Linnenberger; Hugh Masterson; Joseph P. Rice; Jay Stockley

2010-01-01

132

Texture feature analysis using a gauss-Markov model in hyperspectral image classification  

Microsoft Academic Search

Texture analysis has been widely investigated in the monospectral and multispectral imagery domains. At the same time, new image sensors with a large number of bands (more than ten) have been designed. They are able to provide images with both fine spectral and spatial sampling, and are called hyperspectral images. The aim of this work is to perform a joint

Guillaume Rellier; Xavier Descombes; Frederic Falzon; Josiane Zerubia

2004-01-01

133

Atmospheric correction of airborne infrared hyperspectral images by direct estimation of the radiative terms  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper deals with an autonomous method to retrieve the spectral emissivity and surface temperature from a hyperspectral infrared airborne sensor, covering both the MWIR and the LWIR bands. Atmospheric spectral radiative terms are assessed from the acquired sensor radiance by using a parametric model of the atmosphere and an optimization of likelihood criteria based on the whole image. Decomposition

F. Lemaitre; L. Poutier; Y. Boucher

2010-01-01

134

Theoretical Analysis of the Sensitivity and Speed Improvement of ISIS over a Comparable Traditional Hyperspectral Imager  

SciTech Connect

The analysis presented herein predicts that, under signal-independent noise limited conditions, an Information-efficient Spectral Imaging Sensor (ISIS) style hyperspectral imaging system design can obtain significant signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and speed increase relative to a comparable traditional hyperspectral imaging (HSI) instrument. Factors of forty are reasonable for a single vector, and factors of eight are reasonable for a five-vector measurement. These advantages can be traded with other system parameters in an overall sensor system design to allow a variety of applications to be done that otherwise would be impossible within the constraints of the traditional HSI style design.

Brian R. Stallard; Stephen M. Gentry

1998-09-01

135

Assessment of hyperspectral MIVIS sensor capability for heterogeneous landscape classification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The potential and limitations of the hyperspectral remote sensing MIVIS sensor (Multispectral Infrared Visible Imaging Spectrometer) in classifying heterogeneous landscapes are explored in this study. In order to quantify the discriminant information derived from selected MIVIS subsets we classified a monitored scenario by progressively increasing the feature space dimensionality. The hyperspectral subsets are defined through the Sequential Forward Selection algorithm, while mapping processes have been performed through the Maximum Likelihood, Spectral Angle Mapper and Spectral Information Divergence classifiers. Impacts of spectral bands on the overall classification accuracies and single land cover-scale reliability, as well as possible dimensionality effects (Hughes phenomenon) are investigated. The analysis is tested on a 20-km stretch of the Marecchia River (Emilia Romagna, Italy) by using MIVIS data acquired in autumn 2009 and 2010 for a 17-class mapping including complex urban/rural areas. For the considered dataset, the MIVIS sensor showed an equipment failure: of the nominal 102-band MIVIS dataset, only the first 24 bands, spanning within the 0.441-1.319 ?m spectral range, were exploitable. Nevertheless, the available information provided valuable discriminant contributions in land cover mapping (Maximum Likelihood Overall Accuracy ˜85%) with encouraging reliability on mixed forests, croplands, and no-vegetated floodplain patterns, whereas riparian vegetation and urban zones exhibited low classification accuracies. The relationship between the spectral space dimensionality and the minimum training-set size that is necessary to achieve a given inter-class separability has also been experimentally investigated by progressively under-sampling the original training set. The maximum under-sampling factor that avoided a decrease in the overall accuracy turned out to be, at maximum, 15 for the considered data set.

Forzieri, Giovanni; Moser, Gabriele; Catani, Filippo

2012-11-01

136

Pattern recognition via multispectral, hyperspectral, and polarization-based imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pattern recognition deals with the detection and identification of a specific target in an unknown input scene. Target features such as shape, color, surface dynamics, and material characteristics are common target attributes used for identification and detection purposes. Pattern recognition using multispectral (MS), hyperspectral (HS), and polarization-based spectral (PS) imaging can be effectively exploited to highlight one or more of these attributes for more efficient target identification and detection. In general, pattern recognition involves two steps: gathering target information from sensor data and identifying and detecting the desired target from sensor data in the presence of noise, clutter, and other artifacts. Multispectral and hyperspectral imaging (MSI/HSI) provide both spectral and spatial information about the target. As the reflection or emission spectral signatures depend on the elemental composition of objects residing within the scene, the polarization state of radiation is sensitive to the surface features such as relative smoothness or roughness, surface material, shapes and edges, etc. Therefore, polarization information imparted by surface reflections of the target yields unique and discriminatory signatures which could be used to augment spectral target detection techniques, through the fusion of sensor data. Sensor data fusion is currently being used to effectively recognize and detect one or more of the target attributes. However, variations between sensors and temporal changes within sensors can introduce noise in the measurements, contributing to additional target variability that hinders the detection process. This paper provides a quick overview of target identification and detection using MSI/HSI, highlighting the advantages and disadvantages of each. It then discusses the effectiveness of using polarization-based imaging in highlighting some of the target attributes at single and multiple spectral bands using polarization spectral imaging (PSI), known as spectropolarimetry imaging.

El-Saba, Aed; Alam, Mohammad S.; Sakla, Wesam A.

2010-04-01

137

Hyperspectral imaging for safety inspection of food and agricultural products  

Microsoft Academic Search

Development of effective food inspection systems is critical in successful implementation of the hazard analysis and critical control points (HACCP) program. Hyperspectral imaging or imaging spectroscopy, which combines techniques of imaging and spectroscopy to acquire spatial and spectral information simultaneously, has great potential in food quality and safety inspection. This paper reviewed the basic principle and features of hyperspectral imaging

Renfu Lu; Yud-Ren Chen

1999-01-01

138

Biomedical Applications of the Information-efficient Spectral Imaging Sensor (ISIS).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Information-efficient Spectral Imaging Sensor (ISIS) approach to spectral imaging seeks to bridge the gap between tuned multispectral and fixed hyperspectral imaging sensors. By allowing the definition of completely general spectral filter functions, ...

S. M. Gentry R. Levenson

1999-01-01

139

A Bayesian MRF framework for labeling terrain using hyperspectral imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies of hyperspectral images point to non-Gaussian statistics of pixels values, and consequently, standard Gaussian models may not perform well in hyperspectral image analysis. This paper presents novel probability models that capture non-Gaussian statistics of hyperspectral images, and uses them in automated classification of terrain sites. After the data are preprocessed using standard dimension-reduction tools, we use: 1) a nonparametric

R. Neher; A. Srivastava

2005-01-01

140

Infrared hyperspectral imaging for chemical vapour detection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Active hyperspectral imaging is a valuable tool in a wide range of applications. One such area is the detection and identification of chemicals, especially toxic chemical warfare agents, through analysis of the resulting absorption spectrum. This work presents a selection of results from a prototype midwave infrared (MWIR) hyperspectral imaging instrument that has successfully been used for compound detection at a range of standoff distances. Active hyperspectral imaging utilises a broadly tunable laser source to illuminate the scene with light at a range of wavelengths. While there are a number of illumination methods, the chosen configuration illuminates the scene by raster scanning the laser beam using a pair of galvanometric mirrors. The resulting backscattered light from the scene is collected by the same mirrors and focussed onto a suitable single-point detector, where the image is constructed pixel by pixel. The imaging instrument that was developed in this work is based around an IR optical parametric oscillator (OPO) source with broad tunability, operating in the 2.6 to 3.7 ?m (MWIR) and 1.5 to 1.8 ?m (shortwave IR, SWIR) spectral regions. The MWIR beam was primarily used as it addressed the fundamental absorption features of the target compounds compared to the overtone and combination bands in the SWIR region, which can be less intense by more than an order of magnitude. We show that a prototype NCI instrument was able to locate hydrocarbon materials at distances up to 15 metres.

Ruxton, K.; Robertson, G.; Miller, W.; Malcolm, G. P. A.; Maker, G. T.; Howle, C. R.

2012-10-01

141

Hyperspectral imaging spectro radiometer improves radiometric accuracy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reliable and accurate infrared characterization is necessary to measure the specific spectral signatures of aircrafts and associated infrared counter-measures protections (i.e. flares). Infrared characterization is essential to improve counter measures efficiency, improve friend-foe identification and reduce the risk of friendly fire. Typical infrared characterization measurement setups include a variety of panchromatic cameras and spectroradiometers. Each instrument brings essential information; cameras measure the spatial distribution of targets and spectroradiometers provide the spectral distribution of the emitted energy. However, the combination of separate instruments brings out possible radiometric errors and uncertainties that can be reduced with Hyperspectral imagers. These instruments combine both spectral and spatial information into the same data. These instruments measure both the spectral and spatial distribution of the energy at the same time ensuring the temporal and spatial cohesion of collected information. This paper presents a quantitative analysis of the main contributors of radiometric uncertainties and shows how a hyperspectral imager can reduce these uncertainties.

Prel, Florent; Moreau, Louis; Bouchard, Robert; Bullis, Ritchie D.; Roy, Claude; Vallières, Christian; Levesque, Luc

2013-06-01

142

Hyperspectral Image Analysis for Precision Viticulture  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a We analyze the capabilities of CASI data for the discrimination of vine varieties in hyperspectral images. To analyze the\\u000a discrimination capabilities of the CASI data, principal components analysis and linear discriminant analysis methods are used.\\u000a We assess the performance of various classification techniques: Multi-layer perceptrons, radial basis function neural networks,\\u000a and support vector machines. We also discuss the trade-off between

Marcos Ferreiro-armán; J.-P. Da Costa; S. Homayouni; Julio Martín-herrero

2006-01-01

143

Pulse tube cooler for flight hyperspectral imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new version of TRW's miniature pulse tube cooler system maintains the short wave infrared–focal plane array (SWIR–FPA) (with wavelength spectrum of 0.9–2.5 ?m in the hyperspectral imaging spectrometer for the Hyperion Instrument) interface at a temperature of 110 K. The cooler provides the nominally required cooling load of 0.84W to the FPA via a cold thermal strap, at 72%

C. K Chan; Pamela Clancy; John Godden

1999-01-01

144

Wideband Hyperspectral Imaging for Space Situational Awareness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wideband hyperspectral imaging (WHSI) systems collect simultaneous spectral and spatial imagery across a broad spectrum that includes the visible\\/near infrared (VNIR), short-wave infrared (SWIR), mid-wave infrared (MWIR), and long-wave infrared (LWIR) regimes. These passive optical systems capture reflected sunlight and thermal emissions from targets enabling the characterization of surface material, thermal properties, propellants, and gaseous emissions when targets are sunlit

Ian S. Robinson; A. Klier

2006-01-01

145

Advances in hyperspectral LWIR pushbroom imagers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two long-wave infrared (LWIR) hyperspectral imagers have been under extensive development. The first one utilizes a microbolometer focal plane array (FPA) and the second one is based on an Mercury Cadmium Telluride (MCT) FPA. Both imagers employ a pushbroom imaging spectrograph with a transmission grating and on-axis optics. The main target has been to develop high performance instruments with good image quality and compact size for various industrial and remote sensing application requirements. A big challenge in realizing these goals without considerable cooling of the whole instrument is to control the instrument radiation. The challenge is much bigger in a hyperspectral instrument than in a broadband camera, because the optical signal from the target is spread spectrally, but the instrument radiation is not dispersed. Without any suppression, the instrument radiation can overwhelm the radiation from the target even by 1000 times. The means to handle the instrument radiation in the MCT imager include precise instrument temperature stabilization (but not cooling), efficient optical background suppression and the use of background-monitoring-on-chip (BMC) method. This approach has made possible the implementation of a high performance, extremely compact spectral imager in the 7.7 to 12.4 ?m spectral range. The imager performance with 84 spectral bands and 384 spatial pixels has been experimentally verified and an excellent NESR of 14 mW/(m2sr?m) at 10 ?m wavelength with a 300 K target has been achieved. This results in SNR of more than 700. The LWIR imager based on a microbolometer detector array, first time introduced in 2009, has been upgraded. The sensitivity of the imager has improved drastically by a factor of 3 and SNR by about 15 %. It provides a rugged hyperspectral camera for chemical imaging applications in reflection mode in laboratory and industry.

Holma, Hannu; Mattila, Antti-Jussi; Hyvärinen, Timo; Weatherbee, Oliver

2011-05-01

146

REPEATABILITY OF HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGING SYSTEMS FOR REMOTE SENSING  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This paper addresses a generic problem in remote sensing by aerial hyperspectral imaging systems, that is, very low spatial and spectral repeatability of image cubes. Most analysts are either unaware of this problem or just ignore it. Hyperspectral image cubes acquired in consecutive flights over th...

147

Performance and application of real-time hyperspectral imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hyperspectral imaging is the latest advent in imaging technology, providing the potential to extract information about the objects in a scene that is unavailable to panchromatic imagers. This increased utility, however, comes at the cost of tremendously increased data. The ultimate utility of hyperspectral imagery is in the information that can be gleaned from the spectral dimension, rather than in

Mark S. Dombrowski; Paul Willson; Clayton C. Labaw

1998-01-01

148

Video-rate visible to LWIR hyperspectral image generation exploitation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hyperspectral imaging is the latest advent in imaging technology, providing the potential to extract information about the objects in a scene that is unavailable to panchromatic imagers. This increased utility, however, comes at the cost of tremendously increased data. The ultimate utility of hyperspectral imagery is in the information that can be gleaned from the spectral dimension, rather than in

Mark S. Dombrowski; Paul Willson

1999-01-01

149

REPEATABILITY OF HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGING SYSTEMS - QUANTIFICATION AND IMPROVEMENT  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This paper addresses a generic problem in remote sensing by aerial hyperspectral imaging systems, that is, very low spatial and spectral repeatability of image cubes. Most analysts are either unaware of this problem or just ignore it. Hyperspectral image cubes acquired in consecutive flights over th...

150

Analysis of hyperspectral fluorescence images for poultry skin tumor inspection  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system with a fuzzy inference scheme for detecting skin tumors on poultry carcasses. Hyperspectral images reveal spatial and spectral information useful for finding pathological lesions or contaminants on agricultural products. Skin tumors are not obvious because the visual signature appears as a shape distortion rather than a discoloration. Fluorescence imaging allows the visualization of

Seong G. Kong; Yud-Ren Chen; Intaek Kim; Moon S. Kim

2004-01-01

151

Hyper-Cam automated calibration method for continuous hyperspectral imaging measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The midwave and longwave infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum contain rich information which can be captured by hyperspectral sensors thus enabling enhanced detection of targets of interest. A continuous hyperspectral imaging measurement capability operated 24/7 over varying seasons and weather conditions permits the evaluation of hyperspectral imaging for detection of different types of targets in real world environments. Such a measurement site was built at Picatinny Arsenal under the Spectral and Polarimetric Imagery Collection Experiment (SPICE), where two Hyper-Cam hyperspectral imagers are installed at the Precision Armament Laboratory (PAL) and are operated autonomously since Fall of 2009. The Hyper-Cam are currently collecting a complete hyperspectral database that contains the MWIR and LWIR hyperspectral measurements of several targets under day, night, sunny, cloudy, foggy, rainy and snowy conditions. The Telops Hyper-Cam sensor is an imaging spectrometer that enables the spatial and spectral analysis capabilities using a single sensor. It is based on the Fourier-transform technology yielding high spectral resolution and enabling high accuracy radiometric calibration. It provides datacubes of up to 320x256 pixels at spectral resolutions of up to 0.25 cm-1. The MWIR version covers the 3 to 5 ?m spectral range and the LWIR version covers the 8 to 12 ?m spectral range. This paper describes the automated operation of the two Hyper-Cam sensors being used in the SPICE data collection. The Reveal Automation Control Software (RACS) developed collaboratively between Telops, ARDEC, and ARL enables flexible operating parameters and autonomous calibration. Under the RACS software, the Hyper-Cam sensors can autonomously calibrate itself using their internal blackbody targets, and the calibration events are initiated by user defined time intervals and on internal beamsplitter temperature monitoring. The RACS software is the first software developed for COTS hyperspectal sensors that allows for full autonomous data collection capability for the user. The accuracy of the automatic calibration was characterized and is presented in this paper.

Gagnon, Jean-Philippe; Habte, Zewdu; George, Jacks; Farley, Vincent; Tremblay, Pierre; Chamberland, Martin; Romano, Joao; Rosario, Dalton

2010-04-01

152

A low cost thermal infrared hyperspectral imager for small satellites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The traditional model for space-based earth observations involves long mission times, high cost, and long development time. Because of the significant time and monetary investment required, riskier instrument development missions or those with very specific scientific goals are unlikely to successfully obtain funding. However, a niche for earth observations exploiting new technologies in focused, short lifetime missions is opening with the growth of the small satellite market and launch opportunities for these satellites. These low-cost, short-lived missions provide an experimental platform for testing new sensor technologies that may transition to larger, more long-lived platforms. The low costs and short lifetimes also increase acceptable risk to sensors, enabling large decreases in cost using commercial off the shelf (COTS) parts and allowing early-career scientists and engineers to gain experience with these projects. We are building a low-cost long-wave infrared spectral sensor, funded by the NASA Experimental Project to Stimulate Competitive Research program (EPSCOR), to demonstrate the ways in which a university's scientific and instrument development programs can fit into this niche. The sensor is a low-mass, power efficient thermal hyperspectral imager with electronics contained in a pressure vessel to enable the use of COTS electronics, and will be compatible with small satellite platforms. The sensor, called Thermal Hyperspectral Imager (THI), is based on a Sagnac interferometer and uses an uncooled 320x256 microbolometer array. The sensor will collect calibrated radiance data at long-wave infrared (LWIR, 8-14 microns) wavelengths in 230-meter pixels with 20 wavenumber spectral resolution from a 400-km orbit.

Crites, S. T.; Lucey, P. G.; Wright, R.; Garbeil, H.; Horton, K. A.

2011-05-01

153

Unsupervised data fusion for hyperspectral imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hyperspectral images contain a great amount of information in terms of hundreds of narrowband channels. This should lead to better parameter estimation and to more accurate classifications. However, traditional classification methods based on multispectral analysis fail to work properly on this type of data. High dimensional space poses a difficulty in obtaining accurate parameter estimates and as a consequence this makes unsupervised classification a challenge that requires new techniques. Thus, alternative methods are needed to take advantage of the information provided by the hyperdimensional data. Data fusion is an alternative when dealing with such large data sets in order to improve classification accuracy. Data fusion is an important process in the areas of environmental systems, surveillance, automation, medical imaging, and robotics. The uses of this technique in Remote Sensing have been recently expanding. A relevant application is to adapt the data fusion approaches to be used on hyperspectral imagery taking into consideration the special characteristics of such data. The approach of this paper is to presents a scheme that integrates information from most of the hyperspectral narrow-bands in order to increase the discrimination accuracy in unsupervised classification.

Jimenez-Rodriguez, Luis O.; Velez-Reyes, Miguel; Rivera-Medina, Jorge; Velasquez, Hector

2002-01-01

154

Hyperspectral all-sky imaging of auroras.  

PubMed

A prototype auroral hyperspectral all-sky camera has been constructed and tested. It uses electro-optical tunable filters to image the night sky as a function of wavelength throughout the visible spectrum with no moving mechanical parts. The core optical system includes a new high power all-sky lens with F-number equal to f/1.1. The camera has been tested at the Kjell Henriksen Observatory (KHO) during the auroral season of 2011/2012. It detects all sub classes of aurora above ~½ of the sub visual 1kR green intensity threshold at an exposure time of only one second. Supervised classification of the hyperspectral data shows promise as a new method to process and identify auroral forms. PMID:23262713

Sigernes, Fred; Ivanov, Yuriy; Chernouss, Sergey; Trondsen, Trond; Roldugin, Alexey; Fedorenko, Yury; Kozelov, Boris; Kirillov, Andrey; Kornilov, Ilia; Safargaleev, Vladimir; Holmen, Silje; Dyrland, Margit; Lorentzen, Dag; Baddeley, Lisa

2012-12-01

155

Real-time data processor for the COMPASS hyperspectral sensor system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The NVESD COMPASS instrument is an airborne dispersive hyperspectral imager that covers the VNIR through SWIR bands and incorporates a real-time data processing system. The processing system consists of a Data Processing Computer (DPC) and an Operator Display\\/Control Computer (ODC). The high-performance DPC executes real-time sensor calibration and multiple spectral detection algorithms on 13 G4-processors in a Race++ switched backplane.

William E. Schaff; Anthony Copeland; Mike Steffen; Rory O'Connor; Christopher Simi; Jerry Zadnik; Ed M. Winter; Glenn Healey

2004-01-01

156

Real-time data processor for the COMPASS hyperspectral sensor system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The NVESD COMPASS instrument is an airborne dispersive hyperspectral imager that covers the VNIR through SWIR bands and incorporates a real-time data processing system. The processing system consists of a Data Processing Computer (DPC) and an Operator Display\\/Control Computer (ODC). The high-performance DPC executes real-time sensor calibration and multiple spectral detection algorithms on 13 G4-processors in a Race++ switched backplane.

William E. Schaff; Anthony Copeland; Mike Steffen; Rory O'Connor; Christopher Simi; Jerry Zadnik; Ed M. Winter; Glenn Healey

2003-01-01

157

The Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO): fast build for the ISS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO) is the only spaceborne hyperspectral sensor designed for characterization of the coastal maritime environment. It was taken from a set of written requirements to a complete hardware package ready for spacecraft-level testing in 16 months. It had to meet NASA's safety requirements for the ISS. A means of directing the sensor's line of sight to off-nadir directions was essential. Construction of HICO was made possible by extensive use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components, with minor modifications for spaceflight/vacuum conditions where necessary. Efficient engineering combined these components into a complete system that met all requirements.

Lucke, R. L.; Corson, M.; McGlothlin, N. R.; Butcher, S. D.; Wood, D. L.

2010-08-01

158

Extending the fractional order Darwinian particle swarm optimization to segmentation of hyperspectral images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hyperspectral sensors generate detailed information about the earth's surface and climate in numerous contiguous narrow spectral bands, being widely used in resource management, agriculture, environmental monitoring, and others. However, due to the high dimensionality of hyperspectral data, it is difficult to design accurate and efficient image segmentation algorithms for hyperspectral imagery. In this paper a new multilevel thresholding method for segmentation of hyperspectral images into different homogenous regions is proposed. The new method is based on the Fractional-Order Darwinian Particle Swarm Optimization (FODPSO) which exploits the many swarms of test solutions that may exist at any time. In addition, the concept of fractional derivative is used to control the convergence rate of particles. The FODPSO is used to solve the so-called Otsu problem for each channel of the hyperspectral data as a grayscale image that indicates the spectral response to a particular frequency in the electromagnetic spectrum. In other words, the problem of n-level thresholding is reduced to an optimization problem in order to search for the thresholds that maximize the between-class variance. Experimental results successfully compare the FODPSO with the traditional PSO for multi-level segmentation of hyperspectral images. The FODPSO acts better than the other method in terms of both CPU time and fitness, thus being able to find the optimal set of thresholds with a larger between-class variance in less computational time.

Ghamisi, Pedram; Couceiro, Micael S.; Benediktsson, Jon Atli

2012-11-01

159

Detection of hatching and table egg defects using hyperspectral imaging  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A hyperspectral imaging system was developed to detect problem hatching eggs (non-fertile or dead embryos) prior to or during early incubation and to detect table eggs with blood spots and cracked shells. All eggs were imaged using a hyperspectral camera system (wavelengths detected from 400-900mm) ...

160

Band Selection Using Independent Component Analysis for Hyperspectral Image Processing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although hyperspectral images provide abundant infor- mation about objects, their high dimensionality also sub- stantially increases computational burden. Dimensional- ity reduction offers one approach to Hyperspectral Image (HSI) analysis. Currently, there are two methods to reduce the dimension, band selection and feature extraction. In this paper, we present a band selection method based on Inde- pendent Component Analysis (ICA). This

Hongtao Du; Hairong Qi; Xiaoling Wang; Rajeev Ramanath; Wesley E. Snyder

2003-01-01

161

Recent advances in techniques for hyperspectral image processing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Imaging spectroscopy, also known as hyperspectral imaging, has been transformed in less than 30 years from being a sparse research tool into a commodity product available to a broad user community. Currently, there is a need for standardized data processing techniques able to take into account the special properties of hyperspectral data. In this paper, we provide a seminal view on

Antonio Plaza; Jon Atli Benediktsson; Joseph W. Boardman; Gustavo Camps-Valls; Lorenzo Bruzzone; Jocelyn Chanussot; Mathieu Fauvel; Paolo Gamba; Anthony Gualtieri; Mattia Marconcini; James C. Tilton; Giovanna Trianni

2009-01-01

162

Citrus greening detection using airborne hyperspectral and multispectral imaging techniques  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Hyperspectral imaging can provide unique spectral signatures for diseased vegetation. Airborne multispectral and hyperspectral imaging can be used to detect potentially infected trees over a large area for rapid detection of infected zones. This paper proposes a method to detect the citrus greening...

163

Clustered DPCM for the lossless compression of hyperspectral images  

Microsoft Academic Search

A clustered differential pulse code modulation lossless compression method for hyperspectral images is presented. The spectra of a hyperspectral image is clustered, and an optimized predictor is calculated for each cluster. Prediction is performed using a linear predictor. After prediction, the difference between the predicted and original values is computed. The difference is entropy-coded using an adaptive entropy coder for

Jarno Mielikainen; Pekka Toivanen

2003-01-01

164

PERFORMANCE OF HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGING SYSTEM FOR POULTRY SURFACE CONTAMINANT DETECTION  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A hyperspectral imaging system demonstrated potential to detect surface fecal and ingesta contaminants on poultry carcasses. Hyperspectral data were analyzed with four pre-processing methods considering two parameters: calibration and 20-nm spectral smoothing. A band-ratio image-processing algorit...

165

ASSESSMENT OF HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGING SYSTEM FOR POULTRY SAFETY INSPECTION  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A hyperspectral imaging system demonstrated potential to detect surface fecal and ingesta contaminants on poultry carcasses. Hyperspectral data were analyzed with four pre-processing methods considering two parameters: calibration and 20-nm spectral smoothing. A band-ratio image-processing algorit...

166

A Hyperspectral Imaging System for Quality Detection of Pickles  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A hyperspectral imaging system in simultaneous reflectance (400-675 nm) and transmittance (675-1000 nm) modes was developed for detection of hollow or bloater damage on whole pickles. Hyperspectral reflectance and transmittance images were acquired from normal and bloated whole pickle samples collec...

167

Citrus greening disease detection using airborne multispectral and hyperspectral imaging  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Hyperspectral imaging can provide unique spectral signatures for diseased vegetation. Airborne hyperspectral imaging can be used to detect potentially infected trees over a large area for rapid detection of infected zones. Ground inspection and management can be focused on these infected zones rath...

168

Hyperspectral Imaging for Defect Detection of Pickling Cucumber  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This book chapter reviews the recent progress on hyperspectral imaging technology for defect inspection of pickling cucumbers. The chapter first describes near-infrared hyperspectral reflectance imaging technique for the detection of bruises on pickling cucumbers. The technique showed good detection...

169

Video rate visible to LWIR hyperspectral image generation and exploitation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hyperspectral imaging is the latest advent in imagin technology, providing the potential to extract information about the objects in a scene that is unavailable to panchromatic imagers. This increased utility, however, comes at the cost of tremendously increased data. The ultimate utility of hyperspectral imagery is in the information that can be gleaned from the spectral dimensions, rather than in

Mark S. Dombrowski; Paul Willson

1999-01-01

170

Hyperspectral fluorescence image analysis for use in medical diagnostics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents hyperspectral fluorescence imaging and a support vector machine for detecting skin tumors. Skin cancers may not be visually obvious since the visual signature appears as shape distortion rather than discoloration. As a definitive test for cancer diagnosis, skin biopsy requires both trained professionals and significant waiting time. Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging offers an instant, non-invasive diagnostic procedure based

Seong G. Kong; Zheng Du; Matthew Martin; Tuan Vo-Dinh

2005-01-01

171

Meat Quality Evaluation by Hyperspectral Imaging Technique: An Overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the last two decades, a number of methods have been developed to objectively measure meat quality attributes. Hyperspectral imaging technique as one of these methods has been regarded as a smart and promising analytical tool for analyses conducted in research and industries. Recently there has been a renewed interest in using hyperspectral imaging in quality evaluation of different food

Gamal Elmasry; Douglas F. Barbin; Da-Wen Sun; Paul Allen

2012-01-01

172

Meat Quality Evaluation by Hyperspectral Imaging Technique: an overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

During last two decades, a number of methods have been developed to objectively measure meat quality attributes. Hyperspectral imaging technique as one of these methods has been regarded as a smart and promising analytical tool for analyses conducted in research and industries. Recently there have been renewed interests in using hyperspectral imaging in quality evaluation of different food products. The

Gamal Elmasry; Douglas F. Barbin; Da-Wen Sun; Paul Allen

2011-01-01

173

Using spectral distances for speedup in hyperspectral image processing  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper investigates the efficiency of spectral screening as a tool for speedup in hyperspectral image processing. Spectral screening is a technique for reducing the hyperspectral data to a representative subset of spectra. The subset is formed such that any two spectra in it are dissimilar and, for any spectrum in the original image cube, there is a similar spectrum

S. A. Robila

2005-01-01

174

Trade study for wide area chemical imaging sensors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A systems analysis framework for assessing performance of long wave infra-red (LWIR) hyperspectral chemical imaging sensors (HCIS) is presented. The trade space study includes assessment of HCIS detection sensitivity and deployment impact on meeting specified mission requirements.

Rajan, Nandini; Hsu, Su May; Griffin, Michael; Upham, Carolyn; Wack, Edward

2005-11-01

175

A new search algorithm for feature selection in hyperspectral remote sensing images  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new suboptimal search strategy suitable for feature selection in very high-dimensional remote sensing images (e.g., those acquired by hyperspectral sensors) is proposed. Each solution of the feature selection problem is represented as a binary string that indicates which features are selected and which are disregarded. In turn, each binary string corresponds to a point of a multidimensional binary space.

Sebastiano B. Serpico; Lorenzo Bruzzone

2001-01-01

176

Noise properties of a corner-cube Michelson interferometer LWIR hyperspectral imager  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interferometric hyperspectral imagers using infrared focal plane array (FPA) sensors have received increasing interest within the field of security and defence. Setups are commonly based upon either the Sagnac or the Michelson configuration, where the former is usually preferred due to its mechanical robustness. However, the Michelson configuration shows advantages in larger FOV due to better vignetting performance and improved

D. Bergstrom; I. Renhorn; T. Svensson; R. Persson; T. Hallberg; R. Lindell; G. Boreman

2010-01-01

177

Compact high-resolution VIS/NIR hyperspectral sensor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Current hyperspectral imagers are either bulky with good performance, or compact with only moderate performance. This paper presents a new hyperspectral technology which overcomes this drawback, and makes it possible to integrate extremely compact and high performance push-broom hyperspectral imagers for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) and other demanding applications. Hyperspectral imagers in VIS/NIR, SWIR, MWIR and LWIR spectral ranges have been implemented. This paper presents the measured performance attributes for a VIS/NIR imager which covers 350 to 1000 nm with spectral resolution of 3 nm. The key innovation is a new imaging spectrograph design which employs both transmissive and reflective optics in order to achieve high light throughput and large spatial image size in an extremely compact format. High light throughput is created by numerical aperture of F/2.4 and high diffraction efficiency. Image distortions are negligible, keystone being <2 um and smile 0.13 nm across the full focal plane image size of 24 mm (spatially) x 6 m (spectrally). The spectrograph is integrated with an advanced camera which provides 1300 spatial pixels and image rate of 160 Hz. A higher resolution version with 2000 spatial pixels will produce up to 100 images/s. The camera achieves, with spectral binning, an outstanding signal-to-noise ratio of 800:1, orders of magnitude higher than any current compact VIS/NIR imager. The imager weighs only 1.4 kg, including fore optics, imaging spectrograph with shutter and camera, in a format optimized for installation in small payload compartments and gimbals. In addition to laboratory characterization, results from a flight test mission are presented.

Hyvärinen, Timo; Herrala, Esko; Procino, Wes; Weatherbee, Oliver

2011-05-01

178

Characterization of a spectrograph based hyperspectral imaging system.  

PubMed

A significant part of the uniformity degradation in the acquired hyperspectral images can be attributed to the coregistration distortions and spectrally and spatially dependent resolution arising from the misalignments and the operation principle of the spectrograph based hyperspectral imaging system. The aim of this study was the development and validation of a practical method for characterization of the geometric coregistration distortions and position dependent resolution. The proposed method is based on modeling the imaging system response to several affordable reference objects. The results of the characterization can be used for calibration of the acquired images or as a tool for assessment of the expected errors in various hyperspectral imaging systems. PMID:23736429

Kosec, Matjaž; Bürmen, Miran; Tomaževi?, Dejan; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

2013-05-20

179

Research on a project of the new computational hyperspectral imager  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper brings hyperspectral technology and compute image together, on the basis of geometrical optics theory and compressed sensing theory, put forward a new computational spectral Imaging technology. That raises two to four times on spatial resolution and double on spectral resolution compared conventional hyperspectral imagers. Owing to have finished compressing when getting the imaging signal, that could resolve the conflict between the mass of data bringing with high resolution and transfers and storage. The paper carries out a project to the new hyperspectral imager.

Li, Huan; Zhou, Feng; Zhang, Zhi; Shi, Guang-ming

2012-09-01

180

Novel miniaturized hyperspectral sensor for UAV and space applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

In many hyperspectral applications it is beneficial to produce 2D spatial images with a single exposure at a few selected wavelength bands instead of 1D spatial and all spectral band images like in push-broom instruments. VTT has developed a new concept based on the Piezo actuated Fabry-Perot Interferometer to enable recording of 2D spatial images at the selected wavelength bands

Heikki Saari; Ville-Veikko Aallos; Altti Akujärvi; Tapani Antila; Christer Holmlund; Uula Kantojärvi; Jussi Mäkynen; Jyrki Ollila

2009-01-01

181

Commodity cluster and hardware-based massively parallel implementations of hyperspectral imaging algorithms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The incorporation of hyperspectral sensors aboard airborne/satellite platforms is currently producing a nearly continual stream of multidimensional image data, and this high data volume has soon introduced new processing challenges. The price paid for the wealth spatial and spectral information available from hyperspectral sensors is the enormous amounts of data that they generate. Several applications exist, however, where having the desired information calculated quickly enough for practical use is highly desirable. High computing performance of algorithm analysis is particularly important in homeland defense and security applications, in which swift decisions often involve detection of (sub-pixel) military targets (including hostile weaponry, camouflage, concealment, and decoys) or chemical/biological agents. In order to speed-up computational performance of hyperspectral imaging algorithms, this paper develops several fast parallel data processing techniques. Techniques include four classes of algorithms: (1) unsupervised classification, (2) spectral unmixing, and (3) automatic target recognition, and (4) onboard data compression. A massively parallel Beowulf cluster (Thunderhead) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland is used to measure parallel performance of the proposed algorithms. In order to explore the viability of developing onboard, real-time hyperspectral data compression algorithms, a Xilinx Virtex-II field programmable gate array (FPGA) is also used in experiments. Our quantitative and comparative assessment of parallel techniques and strategies may help image analysts in selection of parallel hyperspectral algorithms for specific applications.

Plaza, Antonio; Chang, Chein-I.; Plaza, Javier; Valencia, David

2006-06-01

182

Snapshot hyperspectral imaging in ophthalmology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Retinal imaging spectroscopy can provide functional maps using chromophore spectra. For example, oxygen saturation maps show ischemic areas from diabetes and venous occlusions. Obtaining retinal spatial-spectral data has been difficult due to saccades and long data acquisition times 5s . We present a snapshot imaging spectrometer with far-reaching applicability that acquires a complete spatial-spectral image cube in 3m sfrom 450

William R. Johnson; Daniel W. Wilson; Wolfgang Fink; Mark Humayun; Greg Bearman

2007-01-01

183

Dimensionality reduction of hyperspectral images using kernel ICA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Computational burden due to high dimensionality of Hyperspectral images is an obstacle in efficient analysis and processing of Hyperspectral images. In this paper, we use Kernel Independent Component Analysis (KICA) for dimensionality reduction of Hyperspectraql images based on band selection. Commonly used ICA and PCA based dimensionality reduction methods do not consider non linear transformations and assumes that data has non-gaussian distribution. When the relation of source signals (pure materials) and observed Hyperspectral images is nonlinear then these methods drop a lot of information during dimensionality reduction process. Recent research shows that kernel-based methods are effective in nonlinear transformations. KICA is robust technique of blind source separation and can even work on near-gaussina data. We use Kernel Independent Component Analysis (KICA) for the selection of minimum number of bands that contain maximum information for detection in Hyperspectral images. The reduction of bands is basd on the evaluation of weight matrix generated by KICA. From the selected lower number of bands, we generate a new spectral image with reduced dimension and use it for hyperspectral image analysis. We use this technique as preprocessing step in detection and classification of poultry skin tumors. The hyperspectral iamge samples of chicken tumors used contain 65 spectral bands of fluorescence in the visible region of the spectrum. Experimental results show that KICA based band selection has high accuracy than that of fastICA based band selection for dimensionality reduction and analysis for Hyperspectral images.

Khan, Asif; Kim, Intaek; Kong, Seong G.

2009-05-01

184

Real-time SWIR hyperspectral imaging with polarimetric capability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Traditional hyperspectral imaging (HSI) sensors are inherently time-sequential during capture, relying upon scanning techniques to construct the resultant hypercube. This temporal constraint hence restricts the use of HSI to static scenes or platforms. The novel sensor outlined within this paper enables snapshot HSI. The Near-Infrared Image Replicating Imaging Spectrometer (N-IRIS) operates without any rejection in polarized light. This prototype has eight SWIR bands and a diagonal FoV of two degrees, with potential for sixteen bands in other infrared regions. Unlike other snapshot techniques, N-IRIS produces a spectral image directly without inversion. Many additional benefits include inherent compactness, robustness, no-moving-parts operation, lower processing overheads and resource needs. Dual polarimetricspectral imaging is also possible due to its inherent design, which offers additional discrimination and higher throughput. HSI algorithms for anomaly detection are prolific in variety, but almost none of them consider the temporal dimension, mainly due to current limitations on speed. This paper describes the results from advanced algorithms implemented on COTS hardware for video-rate operation and designed to exploit the temporal dimension. The synergy with N-IRIS has achieved anomaly detection within streaming HSI hypercubes at video frame-rates. Recorded datasets include static ground scenes with transient targets, while further AVRIS imagery achieved the video-rate detection of embedded simulated targets therein. This new capability through N-IRIS hence broadens the potential application and benefit of HSI sensors to dynamic or transient situations.

Wong, Gerald; Harvey, Andrew R.; Pilkington, Roger; Rickman, Rick

2010-08-01

185

Active Volcano Monitoring using a Space-based Hyperspectral Imager  

Microsoft Academic Search

Active volcanoes occur on every continent, often in close proximity to heavily populated areas. While ground-based studies are essential for scientific research and disaster mitigation, remote sensing from space can provide rapid and continuous monitoring of active and potentially active volcanoes [Ramsey and Flynn, 2004]. In this paper, we report on hyperspectral measurements of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii. Hyperspectral images obtained

J. J. Cipar; R. Dunn; T. Cooley

2010-01-01

186

Detection of aircraft exhaust in hyperspectral image data  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of a hyperspectral imaging system for the detection of gases has been investigated, and algorithms have been developed for various applications. Of particular interest here is the ability to use these algorithms in the detection of the wake disturbances trailing an aircraft. A dataset of long wave infrared (LWIR) hyperspectral datacubes taken with a Telops Hyper-Cam at Hartsfield-Jackson

Leanne L. West; Gary G. Gimmestad; William L. Smith Sr.; Edward M. Burdette

2011-01-01

187

Hyperspectral low-light camera for imaging of biological samples  

Microsoft Academic Search

The capability of acquiring hyperspectral information in low light conditions is potentially important for a variety of applications, ranging from remote sensing to biomedical fluorescence imaging. Particularly interesting is its use in optical analysis of biological samples in which the light level should be kept low to prevent tissue damage. For this purpose a low-light hyperspectral camera has been developed

J. Hernandez-Palacios; L. L. Randeberg; I. Baarstad; T. Loke; T. Skauli

2010-01-01

188

DETECTING PITS IN TART CHERRIES BY HYPERSPECTRAL TRANSMISSION IMAGING  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The presence of pits in processed cherry products causes safety concerns for consumers and imposes potential liability for the food industry. The objective of this research was to investigate a hyperspectral transmission imaging technique for detecting the pit in tart cherries. A hyperspectral imagi...

189

Hyperspectral imaging from space: Warfighter-1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Air Force Research Laboratory Integrated Space Technology Demonstrations (ISTD) Program Office has partnered with Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC) to complement the commercial satellite's high-resolution panchromatic imaging and Multispectral imaging (MSI) systems with a moderate resolution Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) spectrometer camera. The program is an advanced technology demonstration utilizing a commercially based space capability to provide unique functionality in remote sensing technology. This leveraging of commercial industry to enhance the value of the Warfighter-1 program utilizes the precepts of acquisition reform and is a significant departure from the old-school method of contracting for government managed large demonstration satellites with long development times and technology obsolescence concerns. The HSI system will be able to detect targets from the spectral signature measured by the hyperspectral camera. The Warfighter-1 program will also demonstrate the utility of the spectral information to theater military commanders and intelligence analysts by transmitting HSI data directly to a mobile ground station that receives and processes the data. After a brief history of the project origins, this paper will present the details of the Warfighter-1 system and expected results from exploitation of HSI data as well as the benefits realized by this collaboration between the Air Force and commercial industry.

Cooley, Thomas; Seigel, Gary; Thorsos, Ivan

1999-01-01

190

Hyperspectral imaging: the colorimetric high ground  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Color is the human sensory perception triggered by a portion of the electromagnetic spectrum commonly called light. Mechanisms for capturing and reproducing these perceptions can trace their origins to four events. First, Newton’s deduction that “white light” was a mixture of rays able to induce the sensation of color in a human. Some 140 years later Young offered a physiological explanation for color perception, photosensitive receptors in the eye, which came to be known as the trichromatic theory. About 55 years later Maxwell applied Young’s theory to photography, demonstrating the three primary process that even now underpins commercial methods of capturing and reproducing color. And finally, In 1931, an international scientific standards organization, the International Illumination Commission (CIE), offered a precise, reproducible system for measuring and specifying color. However, CIE31was never integrated into the generally accepted procedure for reproducing color. The goal of this paper is to demonstrate, via discussion of technical issues and disclosure of a practical image capture device, that the CIE31 method and related improvements, collectively described as hyperspectral imaging, can be integrated into the general process of color reproduction. The author maintains hyperspectral imaging is the path to virtually all future color reproduction techniques.

Kleiman, Larry

2003-01-01

191

Data collection with a dual-band infrared hyperspectral imager  

Microsoft Academic Search

A novel dual-band hyperspectral imaging system has been used to collect field test data for robotics vision applications. The imaging system can collect full scene hyperspectral images in both the long wave infrared (LWIR) band (8-10.5 mum) and the mid-wave infrare (MWIR) band (4-5.25 mum) simultaneously. The imager uses a specially designed Ge diffractive lens with a dual-band 320×240 HgCdTe

Dale J. Smith; Neelam Gupta

2005-01-01

192

Noise properties of a corner-cube Michelson interferometer LWIR hyperspectral imager  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Interferometric hyperspectral imagers using infrared focal plane array (FPA) sensors have received increasing interest within the field of security and defence. Setups are commonly based upon either the Sagnac or the Michelson configuration, where the former is usually preferred due to its mechanical robustness. However, the Michelson configuration shows advantages in larger FOV due to better vignetting performance and improved signal-to-noise ratio and cost reduction due to relaxation of beamsplitter specifications. Recently, a laboratory prototype of a more robust and easy-to-align corner-cube Michelson hyperspectral imager has been demonstrated. The prototype is based upon an uncooled bolometric FPA in the LWIR (8-14 ?m) spectral band and in this paper the noise properties of this hyperspectral imager are discussed.

Bergstrom, D.; Renhorn, I.; Svensson, T.; Persson, R.; Hallberg, T.; Lindell, R.; Boreman, G.

2010-04-01

193

Point-and-stare operation and high-speed image acquisition in real-time hyperspectral imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The design and optical performance of a small-footprint, low-power, turnkey, Point-And-Stare hyperspectral analyzer, capable of fully automated field deployment in remote and harsh environments, is described. The unit is packaged for outdoor operation in an IP56 protected air-conditioned enclosure and includes a mechanically ruggedized fully reflective, aberration-corrected hyperspectral VNIR (400-1000 nm) spectrometer with a board-level detector optimized for point and stare operation, an on-board computer capable of full system data-acquisition and control, and a fully functioning internal hyperspectral calibration system for in-situ system spectral calibration and verification. Performance data on the unit under extremes of real-time survey operation and high spatial and high spectral resolution will be discussed. Hyperspectral acquisition including full parameter tracking is achieved by the addition of a fiber-optic based downwelling spectral channel for solar illumination tracking during hyperspectral acquisition and the use of other sensors for spatial and directional tracking to pinpoint view location. The system is mounted on a Pan-And-Tilt device, automatically controlled from the analyzer's on-board computer, making the HyperspecTM particularly adaptable for base security, border protection and remote deployments. A hyperspectral macro library has been developed to control hyperspectral image acquisition, system calibration and scene location control. The software allows the system to be operated in a fully automatic mode or under direct operator control through a GigE interface.

Driver, Richard D.; Bannon, David P.; Ciccone, Domenic; Hill, Sam L.

2010-04-01

194

Performance and application of real-time hyperspectral imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hyperspectral imaging is the latest advent in imaging technology, providing the potential to extract information about the objects in a scene that is unavailable to panchromatic imagers. This increased utility, however, comes at the cost of tremendously increased data. The ultimate utility of hyperspectral imagery is in the information that can be gleaned from the spectral dimension, rather than in the hyperspectral imagery itself. To have the broadest range of applications, extraction of this information must occur in real-time. Attempting to produce and exploit complete cubes of hyperspectral imagery at video rates, however, present unique problems for both the imager and the processor, since data rates are scaled by the number of spectral planes in the cube. MIDIS, the Multi-band Identification and Discrimination Imaging Spectroradiometer, allows both real-time here are the major design innovations associated with producing high-speed, high-sensitivity hyperspectral imagers operating in the SWIR and LWIR, and of the electronics capable of handling data rates up to 160 megapixels per second, continuously. Discussion of real-time algorithms capable of exploiting the spectral dimension of the imagery is also included. Beyond design and performance issues associated with producing and processing hyperspectral imagery at such high speeds, this paper also discusses applications of real-time hyperspectral imaging technology. Example imagery includes such problems as detecting counterfeit money, inspecting surfaces, and countering CCD.

Dombrowski, Mark S.; Willson, Paul; Labaw, Clayton C.

1998-10-01

195

Radiometric calibration and noise estimation of acousto-optic tunable filter hyperspectral imaging systems.  

PubMed

The accuracy of the radiometric response of acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) hyperspectral imaging systems is crucial for obtaining reliable measurements. It is therefore important to know the radiometric response and noise characteristics of the hyperspectral imaging system used. A radiometric model of an AOTF hyperspectral imaging system composed of an imaging sensor radiometric model (CCD, CMOS, and sCMOS) and an AOTF light transmission model is proposed. Using the radiometric model, a method for obtaining the fixed pattern noise (FPN) of the imaging system by displacing and imaging an illuminated reference target is developed. Methods for estimating the temporal noise of the imaging system, using the photon transfer method, and for correcting FPN are also presented. Noise estimation and image restoration methods were tested on an AOTF hyperspectral imaging system. The results indicate that the developed methods can accurately calculate temporal and FPN, and can effectively correct the acquired images. After correction, the signal-to-noise ratio of the acquired images was shown to increase by 26%. PMID:23736239

Katrašnik, Jaka; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

2013-05-20

196

Snapshot hyperspectral imaging in ophthalmology.  

PubMed

Retinal imaging spectroscopy can provide functional maps using chromophore spectra. For example, oxygen saturation maps show ischemic areas from diabetes and venous occlusions. Obtaining retinal spatial-spectral data has been difficult due to saccades and long data acquisition times (>5 s). We present a snapshot imaging spectrometer with far-reaching applicability that acquires a complete spatial-spectral image cube in approximately 3 ms from 450 to 700 nm with 50 bands, eliminating motion artifacts and pixel misregistration. Current retinal spectral imaging approaches are incapable of true snapshot operation over a wide spectral range with a large number of spectral bands. Coupled to a fundus camera, the instrument returns true color retinal images for comparison to standard fundus images and for image validation while the patient is still dilated. Oxygen saturation maps were obtained with a three-wavelength algorithm: for healthy subjects arteries were approximately 95% and veins 30 to 35% less. The instrument is now undergoing clinical trials. PMID:17343511

Johnson, William R; Wilson, Daniel W; Fink, Wolfgang; Humayun, Mark; Bearman, Greg

197

Hyperspectral Imaging for Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper highlights SSC San Diego contributions to the research and development of hyperspectral technology. SSC San Diego developed the real- time, onboard hyperspectral data processor for automated cueing of high- resolution imagery as part of the Ada...

D. Stein J. Schoonmaker E. Coolbaugh

2001-01-01

198

MightySat II.1 hyperspectral imager: summary of on-orbit performance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The primary payload on a small-satellite, the Air Force Research Laboratory's MightySat II.1, is a spatially modulated Fourier Transform Hyperspectral Imager (FTHSI) designed for terrain classification. The heart of this instrument is a solid block Sagnac interferometer with 85cm-1 spectral resolution over the 475nm to 1050nm bands and 30m spatial resolution. Coupled with this hyperspectral imager is a Quad-C40 card, used for on-orbit processing. The satellite was launched on 19 July 2000 into a 575km, 97.8 degree inclination, sun-synchronous orbit. The hyperspectral imager collected its first data set on 1 August 2000, and has been in continuous operation since that time. To the best of our knowledge, the MightySat II.1 sensor is the first true hyperspectral imager to be successfully operated in space. The paper will describe the satellite and instrument, pre-launch calibration results, on-orbit performance, and the calibration process used to characterize the sensor. We will also present data on the projected lifetime of the sensor along with samples of the types of data being collected.

Yarbrough, Summer; Caudill, Thomas R.; Kouba, Eric T.; Osweiler, Victor; Arnold, James; Quarles, Rojan; Russell, Jim; Otten, Leonard John; Jones, Bernard A.; Edwards, Ana; Lane, Joshua; Meigs, Andrew D.; Lockwood, Ronald B.; Armstrong, Peter S.

2002-01-01

199

Prior important band hyperspectral image compression  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a Prior Important Band (PIB) algorithm for the compression of hyper-spectral images. The PIB method endows some of the bands with high priority so that the quality of these bands after compression is better than other bands. The rationale behind this approach is that, the bands of a data cube have different amount of information. Some bands contain much more information and features than other bands. In the PIB algorithm, all bands are classified into four categories according to their importance and easiness for compression. For the simplicity of the compression algorithm, we choose spectral correlation and information amount as the main index. Bands of low spectral correlation and high information are selected as Important Bands. The benefit of this algorithm lies in that it treats the important bands with higher quality quantization, and other bands with comparatively low quality quantization, so that the information can be better preserved after compression. Experimental results illustrate that PIB hyper-spectral image compression algorithm would be suitable for most applications.

Li, Feipeng; Shao, Haimai; Ma, Guorui; Qin, Qianqing; Li, Deren

2003-09-01

200

Development of an Integrated Hyperspectral Imager and 3D-Flash LADAR for Terrestrial Characterization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The characterization of terrestrial ecosystems using remote sensing technology has a long history with using multi-spectral imagers for vegetation classification indices, ecosystem health, and change detection. Traditional multi-band imagers are now being replaced with more advanced hyperspectral imagers, which offer finer spectral resolution and more specific characterization of terrestrial reflectances. Recently, 3- dimensional (3D) imaging technologies, such as radar interferometry and scanning laser rangers, have added a vertical dimensional to the characterization of ecosystems. The combination of hyperspectral imagery with 3D LADAR allows for detailed analysis of terrestrial biomass, health and species identification. Recognizing the need, and the technical feasibility of this type of environmental assessment, the National Research Counsel has advocated two future NASA satellite missions to measure terrestrial ecosystem health and structure, the DESDynI and HyspIRI missions. These programs will orbit synthetic aperture radar, LADAR and hyperspectral imagers. To mitigate program risk it is desirable and prudent to first demonstrate the integration of these instruments on an airborne platform. Although systems developed for separate purposes have been flown on a single aircraft, the requirements and performance of a dual sensor system has not yet been developed nor integrated as a single unit. We demonstrate a development pathway from an aircraft platform with an integrated sensor suite, using a hyperspectral imager and a laser ranger for a comprehensive remote sensing characterization of terrestrial ecology.

Swanson, A. L.; Sandor-Leahy, S.; Shepanski, J.; Wong, C.; Bracikowski, C.; Abelson, L.; Helmlinger, M.; Bauer, D.; Folkman, M.

2009-05-01

201

Development of the second generation Hyperspectral Airborne Terrestrial Imager (HATI): HATI - 2500  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) has a long legacy developing and fielding hyperspectral sensors, including airborne and space based systems covering the visible through Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) wavelength ranges. Most recently NGAS has developed the Hyperspectral Airborne Terrestrial Instrument (HATI) family of hyperspectral sensors, which are compact airborne hyperspectral imagers designed to fly on a variety of platforms and be integrated with other sensors in NGAS's instrument suite. The current sensor under development is the HATI-2500, a full range Visible Near Infrared (VNIR) through Short Wave Infrared (SWIR) instrument covering the 0.4 - 2.5 micron wavelength range with high spectral resolution (3nm). The system includes a framing camera integrated with a GPS/INS to provide high-resolution multispectral imagery and precision geolocation. Its compact size and flexible acquisition parameters allow HATI-2500 to be integrated on a large variety of aerial platforms. This paper describes the HATI-2500 sensor and subsystems and its expected performance specifications.

Sandor-Leahy, S.; Thordarson, S.; Baldauf, B.; Figueroa, M.; Helmlinger, M.; Miller, H.; Reynolds, T.; Shepanski, J.

2010-08-01

202

Linear mixture analysis-based compression for hyperspectral image analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Due to significantly improved spectral resolution produced by hyperspectral sensors, the band-to-band correlation is generally very high and can be removed without loss of crucial information. Data compression is an effective means to eliminate such redundancy resulting from high interband correlation. In hyperspectral imagery, various information comes from different signal sources, which include man-made targets, natural backgrounds, unknown clutters, interferers,

Qian Du; Chein-I Chang

2004-01-01

203

LWIR hyperspectral imaging application and detection of chemical precursors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Detection and identification of Toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) represent a major challenge to protect and sustain first responder and public security. In this context, passive Hyperspectral Imaging (HSI) is a promising technology for the standoff detection and identification of chemical vapors emanating from a distant location. To investigate this method, the Department of National Defense and Public Safety Canada have mandated Defense Research and Development Canada (DRDC) - Valcartier to develop and test Very Long Wave Infrared (VLWIR) HSI sensors for standoff detection. The initial effort was focused to address the standoff detection and identification of toxic industrial chemicals (TICs), surrogates and precursors. Sensors such as the Improved Compact ATmospheric Sounding Interferometer (iCATSI) and the Multi-option Differential Detection and Imaging Fourier Spectrometer (MoDDIFS) were developed for this application. This paper presents the sensor developments and preliminary results of standoff detection and identification of TICs and precursors. The iCATSI and MoDDIFS sensors are based on the optical differential Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) radiometric technology and are able to detect, spectrally resolve and identify small leak at ranges in excess of 1 km. Results from a series of trials in asymmetric threat type scenarios are reported. These results serve to establish the potential of passive standoff HSI detection of TICs, precursors and surrogates.

Lavoie, Hugo; Thériault, Jean-Marc; Bouffard, François; Puckrin, Eldon; Dubé, Denis

2012-10-01

204

Detection of chemical pollutants by passive LWIR hyperspectral imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) represent a major threat to public health and security. Their detection constitutes a real challenge to security and first responder's communities. One promising detection method is based on the passive standoff identification of chemical vapors emanating from the laboratory under surveillance. To investigate this method, the Department of National Defense and Public Safety Canada have mandated Defense Research and Development Canada (DRDC) - Valcartier to develop and test passive Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) hyperspectral imaging (HSI) sensors for standoff detection. The initial effort was focused to address the standoff detection and identification of toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) and precursors. Sensors such as the Multi-option Differential Detection and Imaging Fourier Spectrometer (MoDDIFS) and the Improved Compact ATmospheric Sounding Interferometer (iCATSI) were developed for this application. This paper describes the sensor developments and presents initial results of standoff detection and identification of TICs and precursors. The standoff sensors are based on the differential Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) radiometric technology and are able to detect, spectrally resolve and identify small leak plumes at ranges in excess of 1 km. Results from a series of trials in asymmetric threat type scenarios will be presented. These results will serve to establish the potential of the method for standoff detection of TICs precursors and surrogates.

Lavoie, Hugo; Thériault, Jean-Marc; Bouffard, François; Puckrin, Eldon; Dubé, Denis

2012-09-01

205

MEMS scanner enabled real-time depth sensitive hyperspectral imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

We demonstrate a hyperspectral and depth sensitive optical scattering diffusion imaging microsystem, where fast scanning is provided by a CMOS compatible 2-axis MEMS mirror. By using lissajous scanning patterns, large field-of-view (FOV) of 1.2cm × 1.2cm images with lateral resolution of 100?m can be taken at 1.3 frame-per-second (fps). Hyperspectral and depth-sensitive images were acquired on phantom samples consisting of

Youmin Wang; S. Bish; A. Gopal; J. W. Tunnell; Xiaojing Zhang

2010-01-01

206

Egg embryo development detection with hyperspectral imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the U. S. egg industry, anywhere from 130 million to over one billion infertile eggs are incubated each year. Some of these infertile eggs explode in the hatching cabinet and can potentially spread molds or bacteria to all the eggs in the cabinet. A method to detect the embryo development of incubated eggs was developed. Twelve brown-shell hatching eggs from two replicates (n=24) were incubated and imaged to identify embryo development. A hyperspectral imaging system was used to collect transmission images from 420 to 840 nm of brown-shell eggs positioned with the air cell vertical and normal to the camera lens. Raw transmission images from about 400 to 900 nm were collected for every egg on days 0, 1, 2, and 3 of incubation. A total of 96 images were collected and eggs were broken out on day 6 to determine fertility. After breakout, all eggs were found to be fertile. Therefore, this paper presents results for egg embryo development, not fertility. The original hyperspectral data and spectral means for each egg were both used to create embryo development models. With the hyperspectral data range reduced to about 500 to 700 nm, a minimum noise fraction transformation was used, along with a Mahalanobis Distance classification model, to predict development. Days 2 and 3 were all correctly classified (100%), while day 0 and day 1 were classified at 95.8% and 91.7%, respectively. Alternatively, the mean spectra from each egg were used to develop a partial least squares regression (PLSR) model. First, a PLSR model was developed with all eggs and all days. The data were multiplicative scatter corrected, spectrally smoothed, and the wavelength range was reduced to 539 - 770 nm. With a one-out cross validation, all eggs for all days were correctly classified (100%). Second, a PLSR model was developed with data from day 0 and day 3, and the model was validated with data from day 1 and 2. For day 1, 22 of 24 eggs were correctly classified (91.7%) and for day 2, all eggs were correctly classified (100%). Although the results are based on relatively small sample sizes, they are encouraging. However, larger sample sizes, from multiple flocks, will be needed to fully validate and verify these models. Additionally, future experiments must also include non-fertile eggs so the fertile / non-fertile effect can be determined.

Lawrence, Kurt C.; Smith, Douglas P.; Windham, William R.; Heitschmidt, Gerald W.; Park, Bosoon

2006-10-01

207

Does virtual dimensionality work in hyperspectral images?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effective dimensionality (ED) of hyperspectral images is often viewed as the dimensionality of an affine subspace defined by linear combinations of spectra of materials present in the image. That affine subspace is expected to give an acceptable approximation to all pixels. At this point, there is no precise definition of ED. In an effort to assess ED, a notion of virtual dimensionality (VD) has been developed, and it is being used in many papers including those published in TGARS. The ever- spreading use of VD warrants its thorough investigation. In this paper, we investigate properties of VD, and we show that VD largely depends on the average value of all spectra rather than on ED. We show specific examples when VD would give entirely misleading results. We also explain fallacies associated with justifications for VD.

Bajorski, Peter

2009-05-01

208

Hyperspectral Remote Sensing-Sensors and Applications  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Multispectral remote sensors have been traditionally used to map and monitor anthropogenic and environmental changes in the biosphere. While these sensors have proven robust for many applications, they often lack the spectral resolution necessary to differentiate characteristics of the Earth’s surfa...

209

Hyperspectral Imaging in Diabetic Foot Wound Care  

PubMed Central

Diabetic foot ulceration is a major complication of diabetes and afflicts as many as 15 to 25% of type 1 and 2 diabetes patients during their lifetime. If untreated, diabetic foot ulcers may become infected and require total or partial amputation of the affected limb. Early identification of tissue at risk of ulcerating could enable proper preventive care, thereby reducing the incidence of foot ulceration. Furthermore, noninvasive assessment of tissue viability around already formed ulcers could inform the diabetes caregiver about the severity of the wound and help assess the need for amputation. This article reviews how hyperspectral imaging between 450 and 700 nm can be used to assess the risk of diabetic foot ulcer development and to predict the likelihood of healing noninvasively. Two methods are described to analyze the in vivo hyperspectral measurements. The first method is based on the modified Beer-Lambert law and produces a map of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations in the dermis of the foot. The second is based on a two-layer optical model of skin and can retrieve not only oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations but also epidermal thickness and melanin concentration along with skin scattering properties. It can detect changes in the diabetic foot and help predict and understand ulceration mechanisms.

Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nouvong, Aksone; Pilon, Laurent

2010-01-01

210

Unsupervised hyperspectral image analysis using independent component analysis (ICA)  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, an ICA-based approach is proposed for hyperspectral image analysis. It can be viewed as a random version of the commonly used linear spectral mixture analysis, in which the abundance fractions in a linear mixture model are considered to be unknown independent signal sources. It does not require the full rank of the separating matrix or orthogonality as most ICA methods do. More importantly, the learning algorithm is designed based on the independency of the material abundance vector rather than the independency of the separating matrix generally used to constrain the standard ICA. As a result, the designed learning algorithm is able to converge to non-orthogonal independent components. This is particularly useful in hyperspectral image analysis since many materials extracted from a hyperspectral image may have similar spectral signatures and may not be orthogonal. The AVIRIS experiments have demonstrated that the proposed ICA provides an effective unsupervised technique for hyperspectral image classification.

S. S. Chiang; I. W. Ginsberg

2000-06-30

211

Linear mixture analysis-based compression for hyperspectral image analysis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In this paper, the authors present a fully constrained least squares linear spectral mixture analysis-based compression technique for hyperspectral image analysis, particularly, target detection and classification. Unlike most compression techniques that ...

C. I. Chang I. W. Ginsberg

2000-01-01

212

Extraction of Spectral Channels From Hyperspectral Images for Classification Purposes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper proposes a procedure to extract spectral channels of variable bandwidths and spectral positions from the hyperspectral image in such a way as to optimize the accuracy for a specific classification problem. In particular, each spectral channel (\\

Sebastiano B. Serpico; Gabriele Moser

2007-01-01

213

Food quality assessment by NIR hyperspectral imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Near infrared reflectance (NIR) spectroscopy is well established in the food industry for rapid compositional analysis of bulk samples. NIR hyperspectral imaging provides new opportunities to measure the spatial distribution of components such as moisture and fat, and to identify and measure specific regions of composite samples. An NIR hyperspectral imaging system has been constructed for food research applications, incorporating a SWIR camera with a cooled 14 bit HgCdTe detector and N25E spectrograph (Specim Ltd, Finland). Samples are scanned in a pushbroom mode using a motorised stage. The system has a spectral resolution of 256 pixels covering a range of 970-2500 nm and a spatial resolution of 320 pixels covering a swathe adjustable from 8 to 300 mm. Images are acquired at a rate of up to 100 lines s-1, enabling samples to be scanned within a few seconds. Data are captured using SpectralCube software (Specim) and analysed using ENVI and IDL (ITT Visual Information Solutions). Several food applications are presented. The strength of individual absorbance bands enables the distribution of particular components to be assessed. Examples are shown for detection of added gluten in wheat flour and to study the effect of processing conditions on fat distribution in chips/French fries. More detailed quantitative calibrations have been developed to study evolution of the moisture distribution in baguettes during storage at different humidities, to assess freshness of fish using measurements of whole cod and fillets, and for prediction of beef quality by identification and separate measurement of lean and fat regions.

Whitworth, Martin B.; Millar, Samuel J.; Chau, Astor

2010-04-01

214

Development of image mappers for hyperspectral biomedical imaging applications.  

PubMed

A new design and fabrication method is presented for creating large-format (>100 mirror facets) image mappers for a snapshot hyperspectral biomedical imaging system called an image mapping spectrometer (IMS). To verify this approach a 250 facet image mapper with 25 multiple-tilt angles is designed for a compact IMS that groups the 25 subpupils in a 5 x 5 matrix residing within a single collecting objective's pupil. The image mapper is fabricated by precision diamond raster fly cutting using surface-shaped tools. The individual mirror facets have minimal edge eating, tilt errors of <1 mrad, and an average roughness of 5.4 nm. PMID:20357875

Kester, Robert T; Gao, Liang; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S

2010-04-01

215

Semi-Supervised Graph-Based Hyperspectral Image Classification  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a semi-supervised graph-based method for the classification of hyperspectral images. The method is designed to handle the special characteristics of hyperspectral images, namely high input dimension of pixels, low number of labeled samples, and spatial variability of the spectral signature. To alleviate these problems, the method incorporates three ingredients, respectively. First, being a kernel-based method, it combats

Gustavo Camps-Valls; Tatyana V. Bandos Marsheva; Dengyong Zhou

2007-01-01

216

Maximum likelihood estimation of spatially correlated signal-dependent noise in hyperspectral images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new algorithm is described for estimating the noise model parameters in hyperspectral data when neither noise components variance nor noise spatial/spectral correlation priors are available. A maximum likelihood (ML) technique is introduced for checking the noise spatial correlation hypothesis and estimating the spatial correlation function width alongside with estimating signal-independent and signal-dependent noise components variance. The hyperspectral image is assumed to match a limited set of assumptions. A three-dimensional (3-D) fractional Brownian motion (fBm) model is introduced for describing locally the texture of the 3-D image noisy textural fragment. Nonstationarity of the useful image signal is taken into account by performing the estimation locally on a 3-D block-by-block basis. The accuracy of the proposed algorithm is first illustrated for synthetic images obtained from either pure fBm or almost noise-free AVIRIS hyperspectral images artificially degraded with spatially correlated noise. The results obtained for synthetic images demonstrate appropriate accuracy and robustness of the proposed method. Then results obtained for real life AVIRIS hyperspectral data sets confirm the noise spatial uncorrelation hypothesis for images acquired by the AVIRIS sensor. Conclusions and open problems are outlined.

Uss, Mykhail L.; Vozel, Benoit; Lukin, Vladimir V.; Chehdi, Kacem

2012-11-01

217

Best band selection of hyperspectral remote sensing image based on differential evolution algorithm  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The hyperspectral remote sensing makes use of spectrum resolution with the nano-scale collecting image data simultaneously in dozens or hundreds of narrow and adjacent spectral bands above the earth's surface. These hyperspectral remote sensors make it possible to derive a continuous spectrum line for each image pixel (or a special sort of material). It can acquire space information, radiated information and spectrum information of images synchronously, so that it has remarkable application value and extensive development prospect in many related fields. However, the hyperspectral remote sensing images' characteristics, such as hundreds of bands, high spectral resolution and large volumes of data, have induced many problems such as high ratio of redundant information, large-scale storage space query, long processing delay, the Hughes phenomenon and so on. The main approach to solve these problems is making dimensional reduction before the classification or visual interpretation with the hyperspectral image data. There are two main methods for dimensional reduction: feature abstraction and bands selection. Although the feature abstraction that can achieve the purpose of dimensional reduction, in the process of feature abstraction or non-linear changes in both linear transformation, it will cause the loss of the physical implication of the original image data and also make it hard to apply hyperspectral images to visual interpretation. In contrast, band selection method outperforms in terms of being more universal for application. The selected bands can not only be used as attributes (features) for classification but also synthesize RGB false color image for visual interpretation. Therefore, band selection of hyperspectral remote sensing images is an important dimensional reduction method. Here, we design a hyperspectral remote sensing image band selection algorithm based on differential evolution algorithm. Differential evolution is an evolutionary method based on the idea of recombining different individuals. Evolutionary approach imitates the natural evolution in order to optimize the parameters. Differential evolution method illustrates individuals with floating-point vectors, and processes simple operations to search the optimal solution by natural selection. We employ hyperspectral remote sensing images of 701 uranium deposit (EO1H1320332005197110PY) in the areas of Gansu, China. We compared our new method with the traditional bands selection ways such as genetic algorithm, exhaustive search and steepest rise methods. The experiment results show that the new algorithm can improve the efficiency and stability of the band selection algorithm.

Cai, Z.; Li, Z.; Jiang, A.; Chen, X.

2010-12-01

218

Liquid-crystal-based hyperspectral image projector  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A hyperspectral image projector (HIP) is introduced that is built with liquid crystal based spatial light modulators (SLM) as opposed to micromirror arrays. The use of an SLM as a broadband intensity modulator presents several benefits to this application. With slight modifications to the SLM design, SLMs can be built for a wide range of spectral regimes, ranging from the ultraviolet (UV) to the long-wavelength infrared (LWIR). SLMs can have a large pixel pitch, significantly reducing diffraction in the mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) and LWIR. Liquid crystal based devices offer direct analog intensity modulation, thus eliminating flicker from time sequential drive schemes. SLMs allow for an on-axis configuration, enabling a simple and compact optical layout. The design of the HIP system is broken into two parts consisting of a spectral and spatial engine. In the spectral engine a diffraction grating is used to disperse a broadband source into spectral components, where an SLM modulates the relative intensity of the components to dynamically generate complex spectra. The recombined output is fed to the spatial engine which is used to construct two-dimensional scenes. The system is used to simulate a broad range of real world environments, and will be delivered to the National Institute of Standards and Technology as an enabling tool for the development of calibration standards and performance testing techniques for multispectral and hyperspectral imagers. The focus of this paper is on a visible-band HIP system; however, related work is presented with regard to SLM use in the MWIR and LWIR.

Linnenberger, Anna; Masterson, Hugh; Rice, Joseph P.; Stockley, Jay

2010-04-01

219

Unmixing hyperspectral images using Markov random fields  

SciTech Connect

This paper proposes a new spectral unmixing strategy based on the normal compositional model that exploits the spatial correlations between the image pixels. The pure materials (referred to as endmembers) contained in the image are assumed to be available (they can be obtained by using an appropriate endmember extraction algorithm), while the corresponding fractions (referred to as abundances) are estimated by the proposed algorithm. Due to physical constraints, the abundances have to satisfy positivity and sum-to-one constraints. The image is divided into homogeneous distinct regions having the same statistical properties for the abundance coefficients. The spatial dependencies within each class are modeled thanks to Potts-Markov random fields. Within a Bayesian framework, prior distributions for the abundances and the associated hyperparameters are introduced. A reparametrization of the abundance coefficients is proposed to handle the physical constraints (positivity and sum-to-one) inherent to hyperspectral imagery. The parameters (abundances), hyperparameters (abundance mean and variance for each class) and the classification map indicating the classes of all pixels in the image are inferred from the resulting joint posterior distribution. To overcome the complexity of the joint posterior distribution, Markov chain Monte Carlo methods are used to generate samples asymptotically distributed according to the joint posterior of interest. Simulations conducted on synthetic and real data are presented to illustrate the performance of the proposed algorithm.

Eches, Olivier; Dobigeon, Nicolas; Tourneret, Jean-Yves [University of Toulouse, IRIT/INP-ENSEEIHT, 2 rue Camichel, 31071 Toulouse cedex 7 (France)

2011-03-14

220

Hyperspectral imaging technology for pharmaceutical analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The sensitivity and spatial resolution of hyperspectral imaging instruments are tested in this paper using pharmaceutical applications. The first experiment tested the hypothesis that a near-IR tunable diode-based remote sensing system is capable of monitoring degradation of hard gelatin capsules at a relatively long distance. Spectra from the capsules were used to differentiate among capsules exposed to an atmosphere containing imaging spectrometry of tablets permits the identification and composition of multiple individual tables to be determined simultaneously. A near-IR camera was used to collect thousands of spectra simultaneously from a field of blister-packaged tablets. The number of tablets that a typical near-IR camera can currently analyze simultaneously form a field of blister- packaged tablets. The number of tablets that a typical near- IR camera can currently analyze simultaneously was estimated to be approximately 1300. The bootstrap error-adjusted single-sample technique chemometric-imaging algorithm was used to draw probability-density contour plots that revealed tablet composition. The single-capsule analysis provides an indication of how far apart the sample and instrumentation can be and still maintain adequate S/N, while the multiple- sample imaging experiment gives an indication of how many samples can be analyzed simultaneously while maintaining an adequate S/N and pixel coverage on each sample.

Hamilton, Sara J.; Lodder, Robert A.

2002-06-01

221

Impacts of hyperspectral sensor spectral coverage, sampling and resolution on cross-comparison with broadband sensor for reflective solar bands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new generation of hyperspectral imagers requires a much higher absolute accuracy for reflected solar radiation measurements to further improve climate monitoring capabilities. For example, the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission, a future satellite mission led and developed by NASA and partner organizations, is currently considered to consist of two hyperspectral imagers that cover the reflected solar (RS) and infrared radiation. The design of the CLARREO RS instrument operates from 320 to 2300 nm with 4 nm in spectral sampling and 8 nm in spectral resolution. In this study, the sensitivity of spectral coverage, sampling and resolution of the CLARREO RS type instrument is tested for their impacts on integrated radiances using the relative spectral responses (RSR) of existing broadband sensors. As a proxy, our hyperspectral data is based on MODTRAN simulations and SCIAMACHY observations and the RSR data is from those used in MODIS, VIIRS and AVHRR level 1B (L1B) products. The sensitivity is conducted for ocean, forest, desert, snow and cloud.

Wu, Aisheng; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Wenny, Brian

2013-09-01

222

Mapping coral reef benthic substrates using hyperspectral space-borne images and spectral libraries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The suitability of Hyperion, the first civilian hyperspectral sensor in space, for mapping coral reef benthic substrates has been investigated in this study. An image of Cairns Reef, in the northern section of the Australian Great Barrier Reef (GBR), was acquired during Hyperion Calibration and Validation activities. A field experiment was carried out on Cairns Reef to collect information about the optical properties of the water in the area and to map benthic cover by means of video transects. An approach was used to classify the Hyperion image that allows convenient mapping of benthic substrate type and water depth simultaneously. A hyperspectral library of radiance at Hyperion altitude was simulated using a spectral library of GBR benthic substrates, a Hydrolight 4.1 radiative transfer model, and an in-house atmospheric model similar to Modtran-3.7. The image was then classified using the Hyperion at-sensor radiance data and the Spectral Angle Mapper metric using the simulated at-sensor spectral library. The results suggest that using spectral libraries created with forward modelling from the sea bottom to top of the atmosphere are useful tools for interpretation of reefs and can give better results in image classification than classifying the image after removing atmospheric and water column effects. The results also suggest that bottom type and water depth can be separated and mapped simultaneously provided hyperspectral data is available.

Kutser, Tiit; Miller, Ian; Jupp, David L. B.

2006-11-01

223

Hyperspectral Image Compression Using Three-Dimensional Wavelet Coding  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract: Hyperspectral image is a sequence of images generated by hundreds of detectors. Each detector is sensitive only to a narrow range of wavelengths. One can view such an image sequence as a three-dimensional array of intensity values (pixels) within a rectangular prism. This image prism reveals contiguous spectrum information about the composition of the area being viewed by the

Xaoli Tang; William A. Pearlman; James W. Modestino

2002-01-01

224

Spatial enhancement of hyperion hyperspectral data through ALI panchromatic image  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents two novel image fusion methods, suitable for sharpening of hyperspectral (HS) images by means of a panchromatic (Pan) observation: the HS bands expanded to the finer scale of the Pan image are sharpened by adding the spatial details which are calculated by the PAN image. Since a direct, unconditioned injection of Pan details gives unsatisfactory results, a

Luca Capobianco; Andrea Garzelli; Filippo Nencini; Luciano Alparone; Stefano Baronti

2007-01-01

225

Utilizing fluorescence hyperspectral imaging to differentiate corn inoculated with toxigenic and atoxigenic fungal strains  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Naturally occurring Aspergillus flavus strains can be either toxigenic or atoxigenic, indicating their ability to produce aflatoxin or not, under specific conditions. Corn contaminated with toxigenic strains of A. flavus can result in great losses to the agricultural industry and pose threats to public health. Past research showed that fluorescence hyperspectral imaging could be a potential tool for rapid and non-invasive detection of aflatoxin contaminated corn. The objective of the current study was to assess, with the use of a hyperspectral sensor, the difference in fluorescence emission between corn kernels inoculated with toxigenic and atoxigenic inoculums of A. flavus. Corn ears were inoculated with AF13, a toxigenic strain of A. flavus, and AF38, an atoxigenic strain of A. flavus, at dough stage of development and harvested 8 weeks after inoculation. After harvest, single corn kernels were divided into three groups prior to imaging: control, adjacent, and glowing. Both sides of the kernel, germplasm and endosperm, were imaged separately using a fluorescence hyperspectral imaging system. It was found that the classification accuracies of the three manually designated groups were not promising. However, the separation of corn kernels based on different fungal inoculums yielded better results. The best result was achieved with the germplasm side of the corn kernels. Results are expected to enhance the potential of fluorescence hyperspectral imaging for the detection of aflatoxin contaminated corn.

Yao, Haibo; Hruska, Zuzana; Kincaid, Russell; Brown, Robert L.; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Cleveland, Thomas E.

2012-05-01

226

Kernel-based methods for hyperspectral image classification  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the framework of kernel-based methods in the context of hyperspectral image classification, illustrating from a general viewpoint the main characteristics of different kernel-based approaches and analyzing their prop- erties in the hyperspectral domain. In particular, we assess performance of regularized radial basis function neural networks (Reg-RBFNN), standard support vector machines (SVMs), kernel Fisher discriminant (KFD) analysis, and

Gustavo Camps-Valls; Lorenzo Bruzzone

2005-01-01

227

Non-destructive hyperspectral imaging of quarantined Mars Returned Samples  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: In preparation for the upcoming International Mars Sample Return mission (MSR), returning samples containing potential biohazards, we have implemented a hyperspec-tral method of in-situ analysis of grains performed in BSL4 quarantine conditions, by combining several non-destructive imaging diagnostics. This allows sample transportation on optimized experimental setups, while monitoring the sample quarantine conditions. Our hyperspectral methodology was tested during analyses

Alexandre Simionovici; Michel Viso; Pierre Beck; Laurence Lemelle; Andrew Westphal; Laszlo Vincze; Tom Schoonjans; Francois Fihman; Pascale Chazalnoel; Tristan Ferroir; Vicente Armando Solé; R. Tucoulou

2010-01-01

228

AHI: an airborne long-wave infrared hyperspectral imager  

Microsoft Academic Search

The AHI system was designed to detect the presence of buried land mines from the air through detection of along wave IR observable associated with mine installation. The system is a helicopter-borne LWIR hyperspectral imager with real time on-board radiometric calibration and mine detection. It collects hyperspectral imagery from 7.5 to 11.5 micrometers in either 256 or 32 spectral bands.

Paul G. Lucey; Tim J. Williams; Marc Mignard; Jeffrey Julian; Daniel Kobubun; Gregory Allen; David Hampton; William Schaff; Mike J. Schlangen; Edwin M. Winter; William B. Kendall; Alan D. Stocker; Keith A. Horton; Anu P. Bowman

1998-01-01

229

An experimental comparison of parallel algorithms for hyperspectral analysis using heterogeneous and homogeneous networks of workstations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Imaging spectroscopy, also known as hyperspectral imaging, is a new technique that has gained tremendous popularity in many research areas, including satellite imaging and aerial reconnaissance. In particular, NASA is continuously gathering high-dimensional image data from the surface of the earth with hyperspectral sensors such as the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Airborne Visible-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) or the Hyperion hyperspectral imager

Antonio Plaza; David Valencia; Javier Plaza

2008-01-01

230

Raman hyperspectral imaging of microfossils: potential pitfalls.  

PubMed

Abstract Initially, Raman spectroscopy was a specialized technique used by vibrational spectroscopists; however, due to rapid advancements in instrumentation and imaging techniques over the last few decades, Raman spectrometers are widely available at many institutions, allowing Raman spectroscopy to become a widespread analytical tool in mineralogy and other geological sciences. Hyperspectral imaging, in particular, has become popular due to the fact that Raman spectroscopy can quickly delineate crystallographic and compositional differences in 2-D and 3-D at the micron scale. Although this rapid growth of applications to the Earth sciences has provided great insight across the geological sciences, the ease of application as the instruments become increasingly automated combined with nonspecialists using this techique has resulted in the propagation of errors and misunderstandings throughout the field. For example, the literature now includes misassigned vibration modes, inappropriate spectral processing techniques, confocal depth of laser penetration incorrectly estimated into opaque crystalline solids, and a misconstrued understanding of the anisotropic nature of sp(2) carbons. Key Words: Raman spectroscopy-Raman imaging-Confocal Raman spectroscopy-Disordered sp(2) carbons-Hematite-Microfossils. Astrobiology 13, 920-931. PMID:24088070

Marshall, Craig P; Olcott Marshall, Alison

2013-10-02

231

Bayesian fusion of hyperspectral astronomical images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The new integral-field spectrograph MUSE will acquire hyperspectral images of the deep sky, requiring huge amounts of raw data to be processed, posing a challenge to modern algorithms and technologies. In order to achieve the required sensitivity to observe very faint objects, many observations need to be reconstructed and co-added into a single data cube. In this paper, we propose a new fusion method to combine all raw observations while removing most of the instrumental and observational artifacts such as blur or cosmic rays. Thus, the results can be accurately and consistently analyzed by astronomers. We use a Bayesian framework allowing for optimal data fusion and uncertainty estimation. The knowledge of the instrument allows to write the direct problem (data acquisition on the detector matrix) and then to invert it through Bayesian inference, assuming a smoothness prior for the data cube to be reconstructed. Compared to existing methods, the originality of the new technique is in the propagation of errors throughout the fusion pipeline and the ability to deal with various acquisition parameters for each input image. For this paper, we focus on small-size, simulated astronomical observations with varying parameters to validate the image formation model, the reconstruction algorithm and the predicted uncertainties.

Jalobeanu, André; Petremand, Matthieu; Collet, Christophe

2011-03-01

232

Geographical classification of apple based on hyperspectral imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Attribute of apple according to geographical origin is often recognized and appreciated by the consumers. It is usually an important factor to determine the price of a commercial product. Hyperspectral imaging technology and supervised pattern recognition was attempted to discriminate apple according to geographical origins in this work. Hyperspectral images of 207 Fuji apple samples were collected by hyperspectral camera (400-1000nm). Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed on hyperspectral imaging data to determine main efficient wavelength images, and then characteristic variables were extracted by texture analysis based on gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) from dominant waveband image. All characteristic variables were obtained by fusing the data of images in efficient spectra. Support vector machine (SVM) was used to construct the classification model, and showed excellent performance in classification results. The total classification rate had the high classify accuracy of 92.75% in the training set and 89.86% in the prediction sets, respectively. The overall results demonstrated that the hyperspectral imaging technique coupled with SVM classifier can be efficiently utilized to discriminate Fuji apple according to geographical origins.

Guo, Zhiming; Huang, Wenqian; Chen, Liping; Zhao, Chunjiang; Peng, Yankun

2013-05-01

233

Evaluation of the CASSI-DD hyperspectral compressive sensing imaging system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Compressive Sensing (CS) systems capture data with fewer measurements than traditional sensors assuming that imagery is redundant and compressible in the spatial and spectral dimensions. We utilize a model of the Coded Aperture Snapshot Spectral Imager-Dual Disperser (CASSI-DD) CS model to simulate CS measurements from HyMap images. Flake et al's novel reconstruction algorithm, which combines a spectral smoothing parameter and spatial total variation (TV), is used to create high resolution hyperspectral imagery.1 We examine the e ect of the number of measurements, which corresponds to the percentage of physical data sampled, on the delity of simulated data. The impacts of the CS sensor model and reconstruction of the data cloud and the utility for various hyperspectral applications are described to identify the strengths and limitations of CS.

Busuioceanu, Maria; Messinger, David W.; Greer, John B.; Flake, J. Christopher

2013-05-01

234

Airborne infrared hyperspectral imager for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Persistent surveillance and collection of airborne intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance information is critical in today's warfare against terrorism. High resolution imagery in visible and infrared bands provides valuable detection capabilities based on target shapes and temperatures. However, the spectral resolution provided by a hyperspectral imager adds a spectral dimension to the measurements, leading to additional tools for detection and identification of targets, based on their spectral signature. The Telops Hyper-Cam sensor is an interferometer-based imaging system that enables the spatial and spectral analysis of targets using a single sensor. It is based on the Fourier-transform technology yielding high spectral resolution and enabling high accuracy radiometric calibration. It provides datacubes of up to 320×256 pixels at spectral resolutions as fine as 0.25 cm-1. The LWIR version covers the 8.0 to 11.8 ?m spectral range. The Hyper-Cam has been recently used for the first time in two compact airborne platforms: a bellymounted gyro-stabilized platform and a gyro-stabilized gimbal ball. Both platforms are described in this paper, and successful results of high-altitude detection and identification of targets, including industrial plumes, and chemical spills are presented.

Lagueux, Philippe; Puckrin, Eldon; Turcotte, Caroline S.; Gagnon, Marc-André; Bastedo, John; Farley, Vincent; Chamberland, Martin

2012-09-01

235

Airborne infrared hyperspectral imager for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Persistent surveillance and collection of airborne intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance information is critical in today's warfare against terrorism. High resolution imagery in visible and infrared bands provides valuable detection capabilities based on target shapes and temperatures. However, the spectral resolution provided by a hyperspectral imager adds a spectral dimension to the measurements, leading to additional tools for detection and identification of targets, based on their spectral signature. The Telops Hyper-Cam sensor is an interferometer-based imaging system that enables the spatial and spectral analysis of targets using a single sensor. It is based on the Fourier-transform technology yielding high spectral resolution and enabling high accuracy radiometric calibration. It provides datacubes of up to 320×256 pixels at spectral resolutions as fine as 0.25 cm-1. The LWIR version covers the 8.0 to 11.8 ?m spectral range. The Hyper-Cam has been recently used for the first time in two compact airborne platforms: a belly-mounted gyro-stabilized platform and a gyro-stabilized gimbal ball. Both platforms are described in this paper, and successful results of high-altitude detection and identification of targets, including industrial plumes, and chemical spills are presented.

Puckrin, Eldon; Turcotte, Caroline S.; Gagnon, Marc-André; Bastedo, John; Farley, Vincent; Chamberland, Martin

2012-05-01

236

Hyperspectral imaging in the infrared using LIFTIRS. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

In this article the ideal performance for various possible designs for imaging spectrometers is discussed. Recent characterization measurements made with LIFTIRS, the Livermore Imaging Fourier Transform InfraRed Spectrometer are also presented. Hyperspectral imagers, characterized by having a large number of spectral channels, enable definitive identification and quantitative measurement of the composition of objects in the field of view. Infrared hyperspectral imagers are particularly useful for remote chemical analysis, since almost all molecules have characteristic rotation-vibration spectra in the infrared, and a broad portion of the so-called fingerprint region of the infrared spectrum lies where the atmosphere is relatively transparent, between 8 and 13 {micro}m.

Bennett, C.L.; Carter, M.R.; Fields, D.J.

1995-10-01

237

Classification of Korla fragrant pears using NIR hyperspectral imaging analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Korla fragrant pears are small oval pears characterized by light green skin, crisp texture, and a pleasant perfume for which they are named. Anatomically, the calyx of a fragrant pear may be either persistent or deciduous; the deciduouscalyx fruits are considered more desirable due to taste and texture attributes. Chinese packaging standards require that packed cases of fragrant pears contain 5% or less of the persistent-calyx type. Near-infrared hyperspectral imaging was investigated as a potential means for automated sorting of pears according to calyx type. Hyperspectral images spanning the 992-1681 nm region were acquired using an EMCCD-based laboratory line-scan imaging system. Analysis of the hyperspectral images was performed to select wavebands useful for identifying persistent-calyx fruits and for identifying deciduous-calyx fruits. Based on the selected wavebands, an image-processing algorithm was developed that targets automated classification of Korla fragrant pears into the two categories for packaging purposes.

Rao, Xiuqin; Yang, Chun-Chieh; Ying, Yibin; Kim, Moon S.; Chao, Kuanglin

2012-05-01

238

Fractal signatures for multiscale processing of hyperspectral image data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A multiscale approach to hyperspectral image data analysis using fractal signatures was proposed and implemented in the Interactive Data Language (IDL). For 2-D hyperspectral curves, fractal signature measures the changes in curve length with changing scale. Using NASA’s Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) Hyperion image from a study area near Denton, Texas, USA, the capabilities of fractal signatures in discriminating different land cover types were presented in three different ways: (1) fractal signature curves, (2) distances between fractal signatures, and (3) fractal signature images. The asymmetry in length measurement was found to be effective in handling hyperspectral curves obtained from Hyperion radiance data. The contribution of fractal signature images was shown through comparison of image classification results. The results from the Hyperion radiance data suggest that fractal signatures at certain scales can reveal important differences in land cover types.

Dong, Pinliang

239

Hyperspectral fluorescence lifetime imaging for optical biopsy.  

PubMed

A hyperspectral fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) instrument is developed to study endogenous fluorophores in biological tissue as an optical biopsy tool. This instrument is able to spectrally, temporally, and spatially resolve fluorescence signal, thus providing multidimensional information to assist clinical tissue diagnosis. An acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) is used to realize rapid wavelength switch, and a photomultiplier tube and a high-speed digitizer are used to collect the time-resolved fluorescence decay at each wavelength in real time. The performance of this instrument has been characterized and validated on fluorescence tissue phantoms and fresh porcine skin specimens. This dual-arm AOTF design achieves high spectral throughput while allowing microsecond nonsequential, random wavelength switching, which is highly desirable for time-critical applications. In the results reported here, a motorized scanning stage is used to realize spatial scanning for two-dimensional images, while a rapid beam steering technique is feasible and being developed in an ongoing project. PMID:24002188

Nie, Zhaojun; An, Ran; Hayward, Joseph E; Farrell, Thomas J; Fang, Qiyin

2013-09-01

240

Bio-Inspired Adaptive Hyperspectral Imaging for Real-Time Target Tracking  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we present an efficient and novel approach to embed hyperspectral imaging (HSI) capability in an intelligent panoramic scanning system for real-time target tracking and signature acquisition. The sensor platform we propose consists of a dual-panoramic peripheral vision component and a narrow field-of-view (FOV) HSI component. The panoramic HSI design optimizes the tradeoff of a wide FOV, a

Tao Wang; Zhigang Zhu; Erik Blasch

2010-01-01

241

Effects of light pollution revealed during a nocturnal aerial survey by two hyperspectral imagers  

Microsoft Academic Search

A remote-sensing campaign was performed in September 2001 at nighttime under clear-sky conditions before moonrise to assess the level of light pollution of urban and industrial origin. Two hyperspectral sensors, namely, the Multispectral Infrared and Visible Imaging Spectrometer and the Visible Infrared Scanner-200, which provide spectral coverage from the visible to the thermal infrared, were flown over the Tuscany coast

Alessandro Barducci; Paolo Marcoionni; Ivan Pippi; Marco Poggesi

2003-01-01

242

A hyperspectral imaging system for in vivo optical diagnostics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper details the basic principles and instrumental systems as well as applications of hyperspectral imaging system in the biomedical field. The development of an HSI system that combines recent advances in several photonic technologies, including an AOTF, a 2-D CCD detector, and imaging fiber optics. The integration of these technologies leads to a versatile and powerful imaging system that

Tuan Vo-Dinh; DAVID L. STOKES; MUSUNDI B. WABUYELE; MATT E. MARTIN; Joon Myong Song; RAMESH JAGANNATHAN; EDWARD MICHAUD; ROBERT J. LEE; Xiaogang Pan

2004-01-01

243

Textural Analysis of Hyperspectral Images for Improving Contaminant Detection Accuracy  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Previous studies demonstrated a hyperspectral imaging system has a potential for poultry fecal contaminant detection by measuring reflectance intensity. The simple image ratio at 565 and 517-nm images with optimal thresholding was able to detect fecal contaminants on broiler carcasses with high acc...

244

In vivo fluorescence hyperspectral imaging of oral neoplasia  

Microsoft Academic Search

A hyperspectral imaging system using a liquid-crystal tunable filter (LCTF) was constructed for the purpose of in vivo optical imaging of oral neoplasia. The system operates in fluorescence mode and has the dual capability of capturing high quality widefield images and detecting fluorescence emission spectra from arbitrary locations within the captured field of view (FOV). The system was calibrated and

Darren Roblyer; Cristina Kurachi; Ann M. Gillenwater; Rebecca Richards-Kortum

2009-01-01

245

Accurate accommodation of scan-mirror distortion in the registration of hyperspectral image cubes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To improve the spatial sampling of scanning hyperspectral cameras, it is often necessary to capture numerous overlapping image cubes and later mosaic them to form the overall image cube. For hyperspectral camera systems having broad-area coverage, whisk-broom scanning using an external mirror is often employed. Creating the final image cube mosaic requires sub-pixel correction of the scan-mirror distortion, as well as alignment of the individual image cubes. For systems lacking geo-positional information that relates sensor to scene, alignment of the image scans is nontrivial. Here we present a novel algorithm that removes scan distortion and aligns hyperspectral image cubes based on correlation of the cubes' image content with a reference image. The algorithm is able to provide robust results by recognizing that the cubes' image content will not always match identically with that of the reference image. For example, in cultural heritage applications, the reference color image of the finished painting need not match the under-painting seen in the SWIR. Our approach is to identify a corresponding set of points between the cubes and the reference image, using a subset of wavelet scales, and then filtering out matches that are inconsistent with a map of the distortion. The filtering is performed by removing points iteratively according to their proximity to a function fit to their disparity (distance between the matched points). Our method will be demonstrated and our results validated using hyperspectral image cubes (976-1680 nm) and visible reference images from the fields of remote sensing and cultural heritage preservation.

Conover, Damon M.; Delaney, John K.; Loew, Murray H.

2013-05-01

246

Spectral Unmixing for the Classification of Hyperspectral Images at a Finer Spatial Resolution  

Microsoft Academic Search

The problem of classification of hyperspectral images containing mixed pixels is addressed. Hyperspectral imaging is a continuously growing area of remote sensing applications. The wide spectral range of such imagery, providing a very high spectral resolution, allows to detect and classify surfaces and chemical elements of the observed image. The main problem of hyperspectral data is the (relatively) low spatial

Alberto Villa; Jocelyn Chanussot; Jón Atli Benediktsson; Christian Jutten

2011-01-01

247

Assessment of effects of lossy compression of hyperspectral image data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) sensors provide imagery with hundreds of spectral bands, typically covering VNIR and/or SWIR wavelengths. This high spectral resolution aids applications such as terrain classification and material identification, but it can also produce imagery that occupies well over 100 MB, which creates problems for storage and transmission. This paper investigates the effects of lossy compression on a representative HSI cube, with background classification serving as an example application. The compression scheme first performs principal components analysis spectrally, then discards many of the lower-importance principal-component (PC) images, and then applies JPEG2000 spatial compression to each of the individual retained PC images. The assessment of compression effects considers both general-purpose distortion measures, such as root mean square difference, and statistical tests for deciding whether compression causes significant degradations in classification. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of proper PC-image rate allocation, which enabled compression at ratios of 100-340 without producing significant classification differences. Results also indicate that distortion might serve as a predictor of compression-induced changes in application performance.

Su, Jonathan K.; Hsu, Su May; Orloff, Seth

2004-08-01

248

Detecting Citrus Canker using Hyperspectral Reflectance Imaging and PCA-based Image Classification Method  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A portable hyperspectral imaging system was developed to measure the reflectance images from citrus samples with normal and various common diseased skin conditions in the wavelength range between 400 nm and 900 nm. PCA was used to reduce the spectral dimension of the 3-D hyperspectral image data and...

249

Ground-based hyperspectral imaging for the mapping of geological outcrop composition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of high resolution surveying techniques has increased dramatically in earth science applications over the last decade. New products, software solutions and an increased attention to "usability" have made terrestrial laser scanning (lidar) and digital photogrammetry popular methods for obtaining more detailed geometric data for many applications. Geology, especially the study of outcrops, is one such application area where the introduction of laser scanning in particular has benefitted, by allowing an increasingly quantitative approach at a variety of scales. Despite this, most of the contribution of modern surveying techniques has been related to the capture of topographic detail - the shape and form of outcrops - while the remote mapping of outcrop lithology has yet to be satisfactorily addressed. Ground-based spectral imaging offers new possibilities for an improved understanding of outcrop composition, by mapping lithology and the distribution of mineralogy with high resolution and increased automation. Advances in airborne and spaceborne multispectral and hyperspectral sensors have been successful for mineral prospecting and the regional mapping of rock types. However, because of the nadir viewing angle of the sensor, such a configuration is of limited value for near-vertical cliff sections. A new generation of close range hyperspectral imagers is now becoming available, with capabilities of measuring in the short-wave infra-red (SWIR) part of the electromagnetic spectrum suitable for detecting absorption features exhibited by many minerals found in sedimentary rocks. This research uses a ground-based hyperspectral sensor to acquire spectral images of geological outcrops, with the aim of remotely determining the distribution of lithologies. The method was applied to case studies from carbonate and siliciclastic rocks. The images were processed to obtain spectral classification maps of the distribution of representative rock types. To increase the quantitative approach, the spectral data were integrated with photorealistic 3D models derived from terrestrial laser scanning and conventional image acquisition. Because the push-broom hyperspectral sensor recorded panoramic rather than planar images, the integration was performed using a cylindrical camera model. Using this approach, it was possible to relate the pixels of the spectral images to a real-world coordinate system, aiding analysis and validation. In addition, the spectral images could be superimposed on the lidar-derived photorealistic models, allowing a simultaneous visualisation of multiple thematic results together with the conventional digital camera imagery. For the case studies used, encouraging results were produced, allowing the mapping of features that were not easily visible in conventional images. It is therefore concluded that ground-based hyperspectral imaging is an important method that may be applicable to many earth science applications.

Kurz, Tobias; Buckley, Simon; Schneider, Danilo; Howell, John

2010-05-01

250

Diagnosis method of cucumber downy mildew with NIR hyperspectral imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study was carried out to develop a hyperspectral imaging system in the near infrared (NIR) region (900-1700 nm) to diagnose cucumber downy mildew. Hyperspectral images were acquired from each diseased cucumber leaf samples with downy mildew and then their spectral data were extracted. Spectral data were analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA) to reduce the high dimensionality of the data and for selecting some important wavelengths. Out of 256 wavelengths, only two wavelengths (1426 and 1626nm) of first PC were selected as the optimum wavelengths for the diagnosis of cucumber downy mildew. The data analysis showed that it is possible to diagnose cucumber downy mildew with few numbers of wavelengths on the basis of their statistical image features and histogram features. The results revealed the potentiality of NIR hyperspectral imaging as an objective and non-destructive method for the authentication and diagnosis of cucumber downy mildew.

Tian, Youwen; Li, Tianlai; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Xiaodong

2011-11-01

251

[Nondestructive discrimination of waxed apples based on hyperspectral imaging technology].  

PubMed

The potential of hyperspectral imaging technology was evaluated for discriminating three types of waxed apples. Three types of apples smeared with fruit wax, with industrial wax, and not waxed respectively were imaged by a hyperspectral imaging system with a spectral range of 308-1 024 nm. ENVI software processing platform was used for extracting hyperspectral image object of diffuse reflection spectral response characteristics. Eighty four of 126 apple samples were selected randomly as calibration set and the rest were prediction set. After different preprocess, the related mathematical models were established by using the partial least squares (PLS), the least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) and BP neural network methods and so on. The results showed that the model of MSC-SPA-LSSVM was the best to discriminate three kinds of waxed apples with 100%, 100% and 92.86% correct prediction respectively. PMID:24059202

Gao, Jun-Feng; Zhang, Hai-Liang; Kong, Wen-Wen; He, Yong

2013-07-01

252

Investigating coral hyperspectral properties across coral species and coral state using hyperspectral imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Coral reefs are one of the most diverse and threatened ecosystems in the world. Corals worldwide are at risk, and in many instances, dying due to factors that affect their environment resulting in deteriorating environmental conditions. Because corals respond quickly to the quality of the environment that surrounds them, corals have been identified as bioindicators of water quality and marine environmental health. The hyperspectral imaging system is proposed as a noninvasive tool to monitor different species of corals as well as coral state over time. This in turn can be used as a quick and non-invasive method to monitor environmental health that can later be extended to climate conditions. In this project, a laboratory-based hyperspectral imaging system is used to collect spectral and spatial information of corals. In the work presented here, MATLAB and ENVI software tools are used to view and process spatial information and coral spectral signatures to identify differences among the coral data. The results support the hypothesis that hyperspectral properties of corals vary among different coral species, and coral state over time, and hyperspectral imaging can be a used as a tool to document changes in coral species and state.

Mehrubeoglu, Mehrube; Smith, Dustin K.; Smith, Shane W.; Strychar, Kevin B.; McLauchlan, Lifford

2013-09-01

253

A hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system for biological applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

We are developing a hyperspectral imaging system aimed at imaging fluorescent molecules in two different contexts: In vivo 3-D molecular imaging of mice and multi-fluorophore imaging of 2-D tissue samples. The main concept is to add high resolution spectral information to the intensity data to improve imaging capabilities. The system is based on an imaging spectrograph, ImSpector, coupled to a

G. Zavattini; S. Vecchi; R. M. Leahy; D. J. Smith; S. R. Cherry

2003-01-01

254

Spatial versus spectral compression ratio in compressive sensing of hyperspectral imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Compressive hyperspectral imaging is based on the fact that hyperspectral data is highly redundant. However, there is no symmetry between the compressibility of the spatial and spectral domains, and that should be taken into account for optimal compressive hyperspectral imaging system design. Here we present a study of the influence of the ratio between the compression in the spatial and spectral domains on the performance of a 3D separable compressive hyperspectral imaging method we recently developed.

August, Yitzhak; Vachman, Chaim; Stern, Adrian

2013-05-01

255

Illumination independent object recognitions in hyperspectral imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) systems have been used widely in many applications including the defence and military for target acquisitions. However, the effectiveness of HSI can be greatly hampered by illumination artifacts such as shadowing or bidirectional reflection differentials issues. This paper addresses how shadows in the HSI, particularly for the imageries that are taken in the indoor scenarios, can be partially mitigated through a diffused irradiance compensation (DIC) methodology. The effectiveness of the proposed work is then compared with the widely adopted pixel normalisation and band ratioing methods. The performances of all these processing methods have been assessed using Maximum Likelihood Classifier. The result has shown an almost 70% improvement in classification accuracy after the raw DN data is translated into 'apparent' reflectance using simple ELM based method, and the classification accuracy after spectral normalisation is ~26% worse than without normalization. When the proposed diffused irradiance compensation (DIC) is combined with other band ratioing techniques, the classification accuracy is found to be improved by ~7% over that processed by the ELM method for the entire scene. There are about 32% of shadowed pixels in this data set and hence 7% of improvement represents a significant improvement on the shadow mitigation.

Ibrahim, Izzati; Yuen, Peter; Tsitiridis, Aristeidis; Hong, Kan; Chen, Tong; Jackman, James; James, David; Richardson, Mark

2010-10-01

256

Pulse tube cooler for flight hyperspectral imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new version of TRW's miniature pulse tube cooler system maintains the short wave infrared-focal plane array (SWIR-FPA) (with wavelength spectrum of 0.9-2.5 ?m in the hyperspectral imaging spectrometer for the Hyperion Instrument) interface at a temperature of 110 K. The cooler provides the nominally required cooling load of 0.84W to the FPA via a cold thermal strap, at 72% stroke consuming 14.7 W of electrical power, when the heat reject temperature is at 300 K. This cooler can operate up to 90% stroke, having 1.5 W cooling load, thus having 79% performance margin for the Hyperion mission. Before the installation and operation of the cooler onto the instrument, both the mechanical and the electronics assemblies underwent the environmental tests of launch vibration, thermal vacuum cycling, and burn-in. The cooler performance in terms of mechanical efficiency, electronics efficiency, load lines, temperature stability, self-induced vibrational force reduction, ripple current reduction, and magnetic radiated emission was measured and are reported here.

Chan, C. K.; Clancy, Pamela; Godden, John

257

Hyperspectral imaging based techniques in fluff characterization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Light fractions produced after vehicles dismantling are conventionally defined as "fluff" or Automotive Shredder Residue (ASR). They represent about the 25% of the weight of a car and are usually constituted by materials characterized by intrinsic low specific gravity (i.e. plastics, rubber, synthetic foams, etc.). Fluff is usually polluted by metal contaminants (i.e. copper, aluminum, brass, iron, etc.), that strongly affect, especially in the final fractions, the possibility to utilize such material as fuel in co-combustion process, reducing the waste disposal and increasing at the same time energy production. In this paper, innovative selection-control architectures, based on hyperspectral imaging, in the visible- near infrared (VIS-NIR) field, have been investigated. In order to define suitable inspection strategies for the recognition and separation between useful (fluff) and polluting (metals) materials, samples of light and heavy plastics and metals have been collected in a recycling plant. Reflectance spectra have been acquired in the VIS-NIR field (400-1000 nm). Results showed as the different materials are characterized by different spectral signatures and that recognition of plastics and metals can be obtained adopting a wavelength ratio in the NIR (700-1000 nm) field.

Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Serranti, Silvia

2006-11-01

258

A new morphological anomaly detection algorithm for hyperspectral images and its GPU implementation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Anomaly detection is considered a very important task for hyperspectral data exploitation. It is now routinely applied in many application domains, including defence and intelligence, public safety, precision agriculture, geology, or forestry. Many of these applications require timely responses for swift decisions which depend upon high computing performance of algorithm analysis. However, with the recent explosion in the amount and dimensionality of hyperspectral imagery, this problem calls for the incorporation of parallel computing techniques. In the past, clusters of computers have offered an attractive solution for fast anomaly detection in hyperspectral data sets already transmitted to Earth. However, these systems are expensive and difficult to adapt to on-board data processing scenarios, in which low-weight and low-power integrated components are essential to reduce mission payload and obtain analysis results in (near) real-time, i.e., at the same time as the data is collected by the sensor. An exciting new development in the field of commodity computing is the emergence of commodity graphics processing units (GPUs), which can now bridge the gap towards on-board processing of remotely sensed hyperspectral data. In this paper, we develop a new morphological algorithm for anomaly detection in hyperspectral images along with an efficient GPU implementation of the algorithm. The algorithm is implemented on latest-generation GPU architectures, and evaluated with regards to other anomaly detection algorithms using hyperspectral data collected by NASA's Airborne Visible Infra-Red Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) over the World Trade Center (WTC) in New York, five days after the terrorist attacks that collapsed the two main towers in the WTC complex. The proposed GPU implementation achieves real-time performance in the considered case study.

Paz, Abel; Plaza, Antonio

2011-09-01

259

A method for characterizing illumination systems for hyperspectral imaging.  

PubMed

Near-infrared hyperspectral imaging is becoming a popular tool in various fields. In all imaging systems, proper illumination is crucial for attaining optimal image quality that is needed for the best performance of image analysis algorithms. In hyperspectral imaging, the acquired spectral signature has to be representative in all parts of the imaged object. Therefore, the whole object must be equally well illuminated-without shadows or specular reflections. As there are no restrictions imposed on the material and geometry of the object, the desired illumination of the object can only be achieved with completely diffuse illumination. In order to minimize shadows and specular reflections, the light illuminating the object must be spatially, angularly and spectrally uniform. The quality of illumination systems for hyperspectral imaging can therefore be assessed using spatial-intensity, spatial-spectral, angular-intensity and angular-spectral non-uniformity measures that are presented in this paper. Emphasis is given to the angular-intensity and angular-spectral non-uniformity measures, which are the most important contributions of this paper. The measures were defined on images of two reference targets-a flat, white diffuse reflectance target and a sphere grid target-acquired with an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) based hyperspectral imaging system. The proposed measures were tested on a ring light and on a diffuse dome illumination system. PMID:23482018

Katrašnik, Jaka; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

2013-02-25

260

Survey of Hyperspectral and Multispectral Imaging Technologies (Etude sur les technologies d'imagerie hyperspectrale et multispectrale).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Hyperspectral (HSI) and multispectral or multiband imaging (MSI) systems are powerful tools in the field of remote sensing. While HSI systems collect at least 100 spectral bands of 10 20 nm width, MSI sensors are systems collecting less than 20, generally...

F. Vagni

2007-01-01

261

Hyperspectral imaging using electro-optic Fourier transform spectrometer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

JPL and BNS Inc. are jointly developing a compact, low mass, Electro-Optic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (E-O IFTS) for hyperspectral imaging applications. The spectral region of this spectrometer will be 1 - 2.5 ?m (1000 - 4000 cm-1) to allow high-resolution, high-speed hyperspectral imaging applications. The specific applications for NASA's missions will focus on the measurement of a large number of different atmospheric gases simultaneously in the same airmass. Due to the use of a combination of birefringent phase retarders and multiple achromatic phase switches to achieve phase delay, this spectrometer is capable of hyperspectral measurements similar to that of the conventional Fourier transform spectrometer but without any moving parts. In this paper, the principle of operations, system architecture and recent experimental progress will be presented.

Chao, Tien-Hsin; Zhou, Hanying; Xia, Xiaowei; Serati, Steven A.

2004-04-01

262

THE DEVELOPMENT OF WIDE FIELD OF VIEW HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGER  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to provide a wider field of view and higher spatial resolution to meet requirement for a typical earth observation mission, the project to developing wide field of view hyperspectral imager is applied. The widener of field of view of the hyperspectal imager composed of one objective aperture and one dispersing element, not only is limited by the difficulty

HE Zhiping; XU Weiming; JIA Jianjun; SHU Rong; WANG Jianyu

263

An airborne pushbroom hyperspectral imager with wide field of view  

Microsoft Academic Search

An airborne pushbroom hyperspectral imager (APHI) with wide field (42 deg. field of view) is presented. It is composed of two 22 deg. field of view (FOV) imagers and can provide 1304 pixels in spatial dimension, 124 bands in spectral dimension in one frame. APHI has a bandwidth ranging from 400 to 900 nm. The spectral resolution is 5 nm

Peixin Hu; Qimin Lu; Rong Shu; Jianyu Wang

2005-01-01

264

Hyperspectral imaging: A novel approach for microscopic analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The usefulness of the light microscope has been dramatically enhanced by recent developments in hardware and software. However, current technologies lack the ability to capture and analyze a high-resolution image representing a broad diversity of spectral signatures in a single-pass view. We show that hyperspectral imaging offers such a technology. Methods and Results: We developed a prototype hyper- spectral

Roger A. Schultz; Thomas Nielsen; Jeff R. Zavaleta; Raynal Ruch; Robert Wyatt; Harold R. Garner

2001-01-01

265

Recent Advances in Techniques for Hyperspectral Image Processing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Imaging spectroscopy, also known as hyperspectral imaging, has been transformed in less than thirty years from being a sparse research tool into a commodity product available to a broad user community. Currently, there is a need for standardized data processing techniques able to take into account the special properties of hyperspec- tral data. In this paper, we provide a seminal

A. Plaza; J. A. Benediktsson; J. Boardman; J. Brazile; L. Bruzzone; G. Camps-Valls; J. Chanussot; M. Fauvel; P. Gamba; A. Gualtieri; M. Marconcini; J. C. Tilton; G. Trianni

2007-01-01

266

LED lighting for use in multispectral and hyperspectral imaging  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Lighting for machine vision and hyperspectral imaging is an important component for collecting high quality imagery. However, it is often given minimal consideration in the overall design of an imaging system. Tungsten-halogens lamps are the most common source of illumination for broad spectrum appl...

267

Spectral Unmixing of Hyperspectral Images using a Hierarchical Bayesian Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper addresses the problem of hyperspectral image unmixing. A new hierarchical Bayesian algorithm is proposed to estimate the coefficients of a linear mixture of spectra associated to a given pixel of the image. Appropriate priors are introduced to guaranty the positivity and additivity constraints inherent to the mixture coefficients. These coefficients referred to as abundances are then estimated from

Nicolas Dobigeon; Jean-Yves Tourneret

2007-01-01

268

Two years of operations of AHI: an LWIR hyperspectral imager  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Airborne Hyperspectral Imager (AHI) system is a long- wave infrared imaging spectrometer originally designed to detect the presence of buried land mines. Subsequent work with AHI has shown the utility of the long-wave infrared for other applications. The AHI system has been used successfully in the detection of buried land mines using infrared absorption features of disturbed soil. Gas

Paul G. Lucey; Tim J. Williams; Michael E. Winter; Edwin M. Winter

2000-01-01

269

Improved hyperspectral imaging system for fecal detection on poultry carcasses  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The Agricultural Research Service (ARS) has developed imaging technology to detect fecal contaminants on poultry carcasses. The hyperspectral imaging system operates from about 400 to 1000 nm, but only a few wavelengths are used in a real-time multispectral system. Recently, the upgraded system, inc...

270

Hyperspectral and Multispectral Imaging Technique for Food Quality and Safety Evaluation  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

In this chapter, recently developed ARS line-scan hyperspectral-based sensing technologies to address agro-food safety concerns are presented including a case study using the laboratory-based hyperspectral imaging platforms. An online line-scan imaging system capable of both hyperspectral and multi...

271

Theoretical Investigation of Electrically Tunable Birefringent Optical Filters as the Spectral Discriminator in Hyperspectral Imaging Systems.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study investigated electrically tunable birefringent optical filters for use as the spectral discriminator in hyperspectral imaging systems. Spectral discrimination requirements for hyperspectral systems were defined using specification from two stat...

D. A. Sauve

1993-01-01

272

Detection and identification of toxic air pollutants using airborne LWIR hyperspectral imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

Airborne longwave infrared (LWIR) hyperspectral imagery was utilized to detect and identify gaseous chemical release plumes at sites in southern Texas. The Airborne Hyperspectral Imager (AHI), developed by the University of Hawai\\

David J. Williams; Barry L. Feldman; Tim J. Williams; Drew Pilant; Paul G. Lucey; L. D. Worthy

2005-01-01

273

Water pollution monitoring using a hyperspectral imaging spectropolarimeter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hyperspectral sensing opens up great possibilities for future remote sensing. In particular, high-resolution hyperspectral analysis will be an indispensable tool for agricultural applications, hydrodynamics and ocean physics, and polarimetric analysis of solar radiation reflected from rivers, lakes and marshes is expected to play an important role in environmental observation. In conventional multispectral analysis, detailed information has not been able to be used because each pixel includes much mixed spectral radiometric information, so it is difficult to obtain high classification accuracy in the analysis. To address this problem, the authors have been investigating some experimental analysis schemes using a hyperspectral imaging spectropolarimeter with selectable plane of polarization developed by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), and these investigations have yielded some remarkable results in the observation of polluted water in laboratory models and field experiments. These results indicate the possibility of applying the imaging spectropolarimeter to wide area environmental observation. This paper describes preliminary experiments for detecting concentration of suspended solid in water using the hyperspectral imaging spectropolarimeter with multi-polarization. Several hyperspectral analysis schemes for detecting such water pollution and analysis results of the observation data are presented.

Homma, Kohzo; Shibayama, Michio; Yamamoto, Hiromichi; Sugahara, Kazuo; Shingu, Hirokimi

2005-01-01

274

Content-based hyperspectral image retrieval using spectral unmixing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of content-based image retrieval (CBIR) is to retrieve, from real data stored in a database, information that is relevant to a query. A major challenge for the development of efficient CBIR systems in the context of hyperspectral remote sensing applications is how to deal with the extremely large volumes of data produced by current Earth-observing (EO) imaging spectrometers. The data resulting from EO campaigns often comprises many Gigabytes per flight. When multiple instruments or timelines are combined, this leads to the collection of massive amounts of data coming from heterogeneous sources, and these data sets need to be effectively stored, managed, shared and retrieved. Furthermore, the growth in size and number of hyperspectral data archives demands more sophisticated search capabilities to allow users to locate and reuse data acquired in the past. In this paper we develop a new strategy to effectively retrieve hyperspectral image data sets using spectral unmixing concepts. Spectral unmixing is a very important task for hyperspectral data exploitation since the spectral signatures collected in natural environments are invariably a mixture of the pure signatures of the various materials found within the spatial extent of the ground instantaneous field view of the imaging instrument. In this work, we use the information provided by spectral unmixing (i.e. the spectral endmembers and their corresponding abundances in the scene) as effective meta-data to develop a new CBIR system that can assist users in the task of efficiently searching hyperspectral image instances in large data repositories. The proposed approach is validated using a collection of 154 hyperspectral data sets (comprising seven full flightlines) gathered by NASA using the Airborne Visible Infra-Red Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) over the World Trade Center (WTC) area in New York City during the last two weeks of September, 2001, only a few days after the terrorist attacks that collapsed the two main towers and other buildings in the WTC complex.

Plaza, Antonio J.

2011-10-01

275

Video-rate Visible to LWIR Hyperspectral Imaging and Image Exploitation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hyperspectral imaging provides the potential to extract information about objects in a scene that is unavailable to panchromatic imagers. This increased utility, however, comes at the cost of tremendously increased data. To have the broadest range of applications, extraction of the spectral information must occur in real-time. Attempting to produce and exploit complete cubes of hyperspectral imagery at video rates,

Mark Dombrowski; Jagmohan Bajaj; Paul Willson

2002-01-01

276

Wideband Hyperspectral Imaging for Space Situational Awareness  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wideband hyperspectral imaging (WHSI) systems collect simultaneous spectral and spatial imagery across a broad spectrum that includes the visible/near infrared (VNIR), short-wave infrared (SWIR), mid-wave infrared (MWIR), and long-wave infrared (LWIR) regimes. These passive optical systems capture reflected sunlight and thermal emissions from targets enabling the characterization of surface material, thermal properties, propellants, and gaseous emissions when targets are sunlit or in shadow. WHSI systems can provide imagery with fine spatial detail but do not require this fine spatial resolution to characterize targets. It has been shown previously that multi-color photometry using distinct channels in the VNIR part of the spectrum can be used to identify objects that are similar to one another and perform some non-resolved object characterization (NROC). Wideband HSI systems collect a much richer signature from each object with the potential to fingerprint and identify specific space objects smaller than one pixel. WHSI provides unique information on the properties of space objects. Its ability to characterize objects smaller than a pixel is extremely valuable in developing situational awareness of targets at GEO, MEO, and HEO. WHSI can be deployed with cost-efficient, small aperture telescopes or be used as adjuncts to existing and planned assets. This paper will describe the utility and capabilities of ground-based and space-based WHSI systems including rapid identification and characterization of space objects, mitigation of interference from the atmosphere, separation of glints from diffuse signatures, determination of status of space objects, and gauging aging effects.

Robinson, I.; Klier, A.

277

LWIR hyperspectral imager based on a diffractive optics lens  

Microsoft Academic Search

A diffractive optics lens based longwave infrared hyperspectral imager has been used to collect laboratory and outdoor field test data. The imager uses a specially designed diffractive optics Ge lens with a 320×256 HgCdTe focal plane array (FPA) cooled with a Sterling-cooler. The imager operates in 8-10.5 mum (long wave IR, LWIR) spectral region and an image cube with 50

Neelam Gupta

2009-01-01

278

Analysis of hyperspectral fluorescence images for poultry skin tumor inspection.  

PubMed

We present a hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system with a fuzzy inference scheme for detecting skin tumors on poultry carcasses. Hyperspectral images reveal spatial and spectral information useful for finding pathological lesions or contaminants on agricultural products. Skin tumors are not obvious because the visual signature appears as a shape distortion rather than a discoloration. Fluorescence imaging allows the visualization of poultry skin tumors more easily than reflectance. The hyperspectral image samples obtained for this poultry tumor inspection contain 65 spectral bands of fluorescence in the visible region of the spectrum at wavelengths ranging from 425 to 711 nm. The large amount of hyperspectral image data is compressed by use of a discrete wavelet transform in the spatial domain. Principal-component analysis provides an effective compressed representation of the spectral signal of each pixel in the spectral domain. A small number of significant features are extracted from two major spectral peaks of relative fluorescence intensity that have been identified as meaningful spectral bands for detecting tumors. A fuzzy inference scheme that uses a small number of fuzzy rules and Gaussian membership functions successfully detects skin tumors on poultry carcasses. Spatial-filtering techniques are used to significantly reduce false positives. PMID:14960077

Kong, Seong G; Chen, Yud-Ren; Kim, Intaek; Kim, Moon S

2004-02-01

279

Hyperspectral confocal fluorescence imaging: exploring alternative multivariate curve resolution approaches.  

PubMed

Hyperspectral confocal fluorescence microscopy, when combined with multivariate curve resolution (MCR), provides a powerful new tool for improved quantitative imaging of multi-fluorophore samples. Generally, fully non-negatively constrained models are used in the constrained alternating least squares MCR analyses of hyperspectral images since real emission components are expected to have non-negative pure emission spectra and concentrations. However, in this paper, we demonstrate four separate cases in which partially constrained models are preferred over the fully constrained MCR models. These partially constrained MCR models can sometimes be preferred when system artifacts are present in the data or where small perturbations of the major emission components are present due to environmental effects or small geometric changes in the fluorescing species. Here we demonstrate that in the cases of hyperspectral images obtained from multicomponent spherical beads, autofluorescence from fixed lung epithelial cells, fluorescence of quantum dots in aqueous solutions, and images of mercurochrome-stained endosperm portions of a wild-type corn seed, these alternative, partially constrained MCR analyses provide improved interpretability of the MCR solutions. Often the system artifacts or environmental effects are more readily described as first and/or second derivatives of the main emission components in these alternative MCR solutions since they indicate spectral shifts and/or spectral broadening or narrowing of the emission bands, respectively. Thus, this paper serves to demonstrate the need to test alternative partially constrained models when analyzing hyperspectral images with MCR methods. PMID:19281642

Haaland, David M; Jones, Howland D T; Van Benthem, Mark H; Sinclair, Michael B; Melgaard, David K; Stork, Christopher L; Pedroso, Maria C; Liu, Ping; Brasier, Allan R; Andrews, Nicholas L; Lidke, Diane S

2009-03-01

280

Developing digital tissue phantoms for hyperspectral imaging of ischemic wounds  

PubMed Central

Hyperspectral imaging has the potential to achieve high spatial resolution and high functional sensitivity for non-invasive assessment of tissue oxygenation. However, clinical acceptance of hyperspectral imaging in ischemic wound assessment is hampered by its poor reproducibility, low accuracy, and misinterpreted biology. These limitations are partially caused by the lack of a traceable calibration standard. We proposed a digital tissue phantom (DTP) platform for quantitative calibration and performance evaluation of spectral wound imaging devices. The technical feasibility of such a DTP platform was demonstrated by both in vitro and in vivo experiments. The in vitro DTPs were developed based on a liquid blood phantom model. The in vivo DTPs were developed based on a porcine ischemic skin flap model. The DTPs were projected by a Hyperspectral Image Projector (HIP) with high fidelity. A wide-gap 2nd derivative oxygenation algorithm was developed to reconstruct tissue functional parameters from hyperspectral measurements. In this study, we have demonstrated not only the technical feasibility of using DTPs for quantitative calibration, evaluation, and optimization of spectral imaging devices but also its potential for ischemic wound assessment in clinical practice.

Xu, Ronald X.; Allen, David W.; Huang, Jiwei; Gnyawali, Surya; Melvin, James; Elgharably, Haytham; Gordillo, Gayle; Huang, Kun; Bergdall, Valerie; Litorja, Maritoni; Rice, Joseph P.; Hwang, Jeeseong; Sen, Chandan K.

2012-01-01

281

Hyperspectral imaging system for whole corn ear surface inspection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aflatoxin is a mycotoxin produced mainly by Aspergillus flavus (A.flavus) and Aspergillus parasitiucus fungi that grow naturally in corn. Very serious health problems such as liver damage and lung cancer can result from exposure to high toxin levels in grain. Consequently, many countries have established strict guidelines for permissible levels in consumables. Conventional chemical-based analytical methods used to screen for aflatoxin such as thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) are time consuming, expensive, and require the destruction of samples as well as proper training for data interpretation. Thus, it has been a continuing effort within the research community to find a way to rapidly and non-destructively detect and possibly quantify aflatoxin contamination in corn. One of the more recent developments in this area is the use of spectral technology. Specifically, fluorescence hyperspectral imaging offers a potential rapid, and non-invasive method for contamination detection in corn infected with toxigenic A.flavus spores. The current hyperspectral image system is designed for scanning flat surfaces, which is suitable for imaging single or a group of corn kernels. In the case of a whole corn cob, it is preferred to be able to scan the circumference of the corn ear, appropriate for whole ear inspection. This paper discusses the development of a hyperspectral imaging system for whole corn ear imaging. The new instrument is based on a hyperspectral line scanner using a rotational stage to turn the corn ear.

Yao, Haibo; Kincaid, Russell; Hruska, Zuzana; Brown, Robert L.; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Cleveland, Thomas E.

2013-05-01

282

Classification of hyperspectral remote sensing image based on genetic algorithm and SVM  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hyperspectral remote sensing data has been widely used in Terrain Classification for its high resolution. The classification of urban vegetation, identified as an indispensable and essential part of urban development system, is now facing a major challenge as different complex land-cover classes having similar spectral signatures. For a better accuracy in classification of urban vegetation, a classifier model was designed in this paper based on genetic algorithm (GA) and support vector machine (SVM) to address the multiclass problem, and tests were made with the classification of PHI hyperspectral remote sensing images acquired in 2003 which partially covers a corner of the Shanghai World Exposition Park, while PHI is a hyper-spectral sensor developed by Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics. SVM, based on statistical learning theory and structural risk minimization, is now widely used in classification in many fields such as two-class classification, and also the multi-class classification later due to its superior performance. On the other hand as parameters are very important factors affecting SVM's ability in classification, therefore, how to choose the optimal parameters turned out to be one of the most urgent problems. In this paper, GA was used to acquire the optimal parameters with following 3 steps. Firstly, useful training samples were selected according to the features of hyperspectral images, to build the classifier model by applying radial basis function (RBF) kernel function and decision Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG) strategy. Secondly, GA was introduced to optimize the parameters of SVM classification model based on the gridsearch and Bayesian algorithm. Lastly, the proposed GA-SVM model was tested for results' accuracy comparison with the maximum likelihood estimation and neural network model. Experimental results showed that GA-SVM model performed better classified accuracy, indicating the coupling of GA and SVM model could improve classification accuracy of hyperspectral remote sensing images, especially in vegetation classification.

Zhou, Mandi; Shu, Jiong; Chen, Zhigang

2010-08-01

283

An adaptive OPD and dislocation prediction used characteristic of interference pattern for interference hyperspectral image compression  

Microsoft Academic Search

According to the imaging principle and characteristic of LASIS (Large Aperture Static Interference Imaging Spectrometer), we discovered that the 3D (three dimensional) image sequences formed by different interference pattern frames, which were formed in the imaging process of LASIS Interference hyperspectral image, had much stronger correlation than the original interference hyperspectral image sequences, either in 2D (two dimensional) spatial domain

Jia Wen; Caiwen Ma; Penglang Shui

2011-01-01

284

Methodology for hyperspectral image classification using novel neural network  

SciTech Connect

A novel feed forward neural network is used to classify hyperspectral data from the AVIRIS sector. The network applies an alternating direction singular value decomposition technique to achieve rapid training times (few seconds per class). Very few samples (10-12) are required for training. 100% accurate classification is obtained using test data sets. The methodology combines this rapid training neural network together with data reduction and maximal feature separation techniques such as principal component analysis and simultaneous diagonalization of covariance matrices, for rapid and accurate classification of large hyperspectral images. The results are compared to those of standard statistical classifiers. 21 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

Subramanian, S., Gat, N., Sheffield, M., [Opto-Knowledge, Systems, Inc., Manhattan Beach, CA (United States); Barhen, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Toomarian, N. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA (United States)

1997-04-01

285

Snapshot hyperspectral retinal camera with the Image Mapping Spectrometer (IMS)  

PubMed Central

We present a snapshot hyperspectral retinal camera with the Image Mapping Spectrometer (IMS) for eye imaging applications. The resulting system is capable of simultaneously acquiring 48 spectral channel images in the range 470 nm–650 nm with frame rate at 5.2 fps. The spatial sampling of each measured spectral scene is 350 × 350 pixels. The advantages of this snapshot device are elimination of the eye motion artifacts and pixel misregistration problems in traditional scanning-based hyperspectral retinal cameras, and real-time imaging of oxygen saturation dynamics with sub-second temporal resolution. The spectral imaging performance is demonstrated in a human retinal imaging experiment in vivo. The absorption spectral signatures of oxy-hemoglobin and macular pigments were successfully acquired by using this device.

Gao, Liang; Smith, R. Theodore; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.

2011-01-01

286

Development of an Integrated Hyperspectral Imager and 3D-Flash Lidar for Terrestrial Characterization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The characterization of terrestrial ecosystems using remote sensing technology has a long history with using multi-spectral imagers for vegetation classification indices, ecosystem health, and change detection. Traditional multi-band imagers are now being replaced with more advanced hyperspectral imagers, which offer finer spectral resolution and more specific characterization of terrestrial reflectances. Recently, 3-dimensional (3D) imaging technologies, such as radar interferometry and scanning laser rangers, have added a vertical dimension to the characterization of ecosystems. The combination of hyperspectral imagery with 3D Lidar allows for detailed analysis of terrestrial biomass, health and species identification. Recognizing the need, and the technical feasibility of this type of environmental assessment, the National Research Counsel has advocated two future NASA satellite missions to measure terrestrial ecosystem health and structure, the DESDynI and HyspIRI missions. These programs will orbit synthetic aperture radar, Lidar and a hyperspectral imager. Northrop Grumman has integrated a hyperspectral vis-IR imager and 3D-flash Lidar and flown it on a twin-otter aircraft platform for measurements of terrestrial ecology. The goal of the system is to demonstrate an integrated system design, similar to that flown by Asner et al. on the Carnegie Airborne Observatory, but with a design path to high altitude systems that could offer pathfinders for an operational satellite system. Lidar systems are typically limited to either low altitude small-footprint sampling or higher altitude broad pixel resolution. The Northrop Grumman system goals are to be able to image terrestrial ecosystems at small horizontal resolutions from high altitude, while maintaining a relatively broad swath capability. Performance of the integrated system during collections from the twin-otter will be discussed, as well as design performance for a dual sensor system for high altitude platforms that could offer early development of space based systems.

Abelson, L.; Swanson, A. L.; Sandor-Leahy, S.; Shepanski, J.; Wong, C.; Helmlinger, M.; Folkman, M.

2009-12-01

287

Simplified Hyperspectral Imaging for Improved Geologic Mapping of Mine Slopes  

Microsoft Academic Search

A prototype portable hyperspectral imager that operates in the visible and near-infrared ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum was field tested at an open-pit mine. The tests were sponsored by the Spokane Research Laboratory, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, as part of an investigation of remote sensing technologies for use in detecting and monitoring conditions in surface mines that

Edward L. McHugh; Jami M. Girard; Louis J. Denes

288

Classification of hyperspectral remote sensing images with support vector machines  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper addresses the problem of the classification of hyperspectral remote sensing images by support vector machines (SVMs). First, we propose a theoretical discussion and experimental analysis aimed at understanding and assessing the potentialities of SVM classifiers in hyperdimensional feature spaces. Then, we assess the effectiveness of SVMs with respect to conventional feature-reduction-based approaches and their performances in hypersubspaces of

Farid Melgani; Lorenzo Bruzzone

2004-01-01

289

Multispectral and hyperspectral image analysis with convex cones  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new approach to multispectral and hyperspectral image analysis is presented. This method, called convex cone analysis (CCA), is based on the bet that some physical quantities such as radiance are nonnegative. The vectors formed by discrete radiance spectra are linear combinations of nonnegative components, and they lie inside a nonnegative, convex region. The object of CCA is to find

Agustin Ifarraguerri; Chein-I Chang

1999-01-01

290

Visible Hyperspectral Imaging for Standoff Detection of Explosives on Surfaces  

SciTech Connect

There is an ever-increasing need to be able to detect the presence of explosives, preferably from standoff distances. This paper presents an application of visible hyperspectral imaging using anomaly, polarization and spectral identification approaches for the standoff detection (13 meters) of nitroaromatic explosives on realistic painted surfaces based upon the colorimetric differences between tetryl and TNT which are enhanced by solar irradiation.

Bernacki, Bruce E.; Blake, Thomas A.; Mendoza, Albert; Johnson, Timothy J.

2010-11-01

291

Hyperspectral Imaging Technologies for Nondestructive Agro-Food Evaluation  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Over the past decade, researchers at the Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), have developed several versions of line-scan-based hyperspectral imaging systems capable of both visible to near-infrared reflectance and fluorescence methods. These line-s...

292

Unsupervised hyperspectral image analysis using independent component analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, an ICA-based approach is proposed for hyperspectral image analysis. It can be viewed as a random version of the commonly used linear spectral mixture analysis, in which the abundance fractions in a linear mixture model are considered to be unknown independent signal sources. It does not require the full rank of the separating matrix or orthogonality as

Shao-Shan Chiang; Chein-I Chang; Irving W. Ginsberg

2000-01-01

293

Lossless compression of hyperspectral images using lookup tables  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this letter, we propose a new algorithm for lossless compression of hyperspectral images. The proposed method searches the previous band for a pixel of equal value to the pixel co-located to the one to be coded. The pixel in the same position as the obtained pixel in the current band is used as the predictor. Lookup tables are used

Jarno Mielikainen

2006-01-01

294

Hyperspectral laser-induced fluorescence imaging for assessing apple quality  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Chlorophyll fluorescence is useful for assessing fruit postharvest quality and condition. The objective of this research was to investigate the potential of using hyperspectral imaging to measure laser induced fluorescence for assessing apple fruit quality. A blue laser of 408 nm was used as an exci...

295

System engineering trades for the LWIR hyperspectral imager  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the modeling of system engineering trades for the LWIR hyperspectral imager. First the operational scenario is defined to constrain the system trade space. Then modeling trades for spectral sampling, spectral bandwidth and SNR are presented. Issues unique to operating in the LWIR band are addressed. These trades are presented in the context of current technology for FPA

Raymond E. Hanna

2006-01-01

296

Tunable narrow-band filter for LWIR hyperspectral imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

IR sensing has been a key enabling technology in military systems providing advantages in night vision, surveillance, and ever more accurate targeting. Passive hyperspectral imagin, the ability to gather and process IR spectral information from each pixel of an IR image, can ultimately provide 2D composition maps of a scene under study. FInding applications such as atmospheric, and geophysical remote

James T. Daly; W. A. Bodkin; William J. Schneller; Robert B. Kerr; John Noto; Ray Haren; Michael T. Eismann; Barry K. Karch

2000-01-01

297

Classification of fecal contamination on leafy greens by hyperspectral imaging  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system was developed and used to obtain several two-waveband spectral ratios on leafy green vegetables, represented by romaine lettuce and baby spinach in this study. The ratios were analyzed to determine the proper one for detecting bovine fecal contamination on...

298

Classification of fecal contamination on leafy greens by hyperspectral imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reported the development of hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system using ultraviolet-A excitation (320-400 nm) for detection of bovine fecal contaminants on the abaxial and adaxial surfaces of romaine lettuce and baby spinach leaves. Six spots of fecal contamination were applied to each of 40 lettuce and 40 spinach leaves. In this study, the wavebands at 666 nm and 680

Chun-Chieh Yang; Won Jun; Moon S. Kim; Kaunglin Chao; Sukwon Kang; Diane E. Chan; Alan Lefcourt

2010-01-01

299

Hyperspectral analysis using the correlation between image and reference  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the use of correlation analysis on spectral data in order to quantify the amount of a given spectrum present with respect to a reference spectrum. The method is shown to be useful in analyzing hyperspectral fluorescence images. It is unhindered by the linear relationship assumed in linear spectral unmixing, and in addition, it is shown to be robust with respect to noise.

Ellingsen, Pål Gunnar; Reitan, Nina Kristine; Pedersen, Brede Dille; Lindgren, Mikael

2013-02-01

300

Application of hyperspectral fluorescence lifetime imaging to tissue autofluorescence: arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tissue contains many natural fluorophores and therefore by exploiting autofluorescence, we can obtain information from tissue with less interference than conventional histological techniques. However, conventional intensity imaging is prone to artifacts since it is an absolute measurement. Fluorescence lifetime and spectral measurements are relative measurements and therefore allow for better measurements. We have applied FLIM and hyperspectral FLIM to the

C. B. Talbot; R. K. P. Benninger; P. de Beule; J. Requejo-Isidro; D. S. Elson; C. Dunsby; I. Munro; M. A. Neil; A. Sandison; N. Sofat; H. Nagase; P. M. W. French; M. J. Lever

2005-01-01

301

Hyperspectral imaging for benthic species recognition in shallow coastal waters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Airborne hyperspectral data was collected in April 1999 over 16 square kilometres of coastal waters adjacent to the South Australian Bolivar Wastewater Treatment Plant (near Adelaide). Concurrent in situ measurements of benthic reflectances were collected. A subsequent field-work mission to validate the 1999 image analysis was completed in February 2000. The aim was to map substrate type accurately, differentiating species

J. M. Anstee; A. G. Dekker; V. Brando; N. Pinnel; G. Byrne; P. Daniel; A. Held

2001-01-01

302

DETECTION OF PITS IN TART CHERRIES BY HYPERSPECTRAL TRANSMISSION IMAGING  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Automatic detection and rejection of unpitted tart cherries will help the food industry in minimizing the product liability and maximizing the end-user and consumer acceptance of pitted cherry products. The objective of this research was to investigate the potential of hyperspectral imaging for dete...

303

Miniaturized visible near-infrared hyperspectral imager for remote-sensing applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new approach for the design and fabrication of a miniaturized hyperspectral imager is described. A unique and compact instrument has been developed by taking advantage of light propagation within bonded solid blocks of optically transmitting glass. The resulting series of micro-hyperspectral imaging (microHSI™) spectrometer has been developed, patented, and built as a visible near-infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral sensor capable of operating in the 400- to 1000-nm wavelength range. The spectrometer employs a blazed, convex diffraction grating in Offner configuration embedded within the optical blocks for ruggedized operation. This, in combination with fast spectrometer operation at f/2.0, results in high optical throughput. The resulting microHSI™VNIR spectrometer weighs 0.54 kg, including foreoptics and camera, which results in a 2× decrease in spectrometer volume compared with current air-spaced Offner spectrometers. These instruments can accommodate custom, ruggedized foreoptics to adapt to a wide range of field-of-view requirements. These fast, telecentric foreoptics are chromatically corrected for wideband spectral applications. Results of field and laboratory testing of the microHSI™ spectrometers are presented and show that the sensor consistently meets technical performance predictions.

Warren, Christopher P.; Even, Detlev; Pfister, William; Nakanishi, Keith; Velasco, Arleen; Breitwieser, David; Yee, Selwyn; Naungayan, Joseph

2012-11-01

304

Reliably estimating the noise in AVIRIS hyperspectral images  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new method is presented for computing the noise affecting each band of an AVIRIS hyperspectral image. Between-band (spectral) and within-band (spatial) correlations are used to decorrelate the image data via linear regression. Each band of the image is divided into small blocks, each of which is independently decorrelated. The decorrelation leaves noise-like residuals whose variance estimates the noise. A

R. E. ROGER; J. F. ARNOLD

1996-01-01

305

MEMS scanner based handheld fluorescent hyperspectral imaging system  

Microsoft Academic Search

We demonstrate a hand-held hyperspectral fluorescence imaging microsystem, where multiple narrow-band spectral images can be captured simultaneously across the area under examination. In addition to the advantages of combined functional imaging and spectroscopy, the system demonstrates the fast scanning over large field-of-view (FOV) provided by a CMOS compatible 2-axis microelectromechanical system (MEMS) scanning mirror in the probe. Spectral information from

Sheldon Bish; Youmin Wang; James W. Tunnell; Xiaojing Zhang

2011-01-01

306

Hyperspectral imaging with stimulated Raman scattering by chirped femtosecond lasers.  

PubMed

Raman microscopy is a quantitative, label-free, and noninvasive optical imaging technique for studying inhomogeneous systems. However, the feebleness of Raman scattering significantly limits the use of Raman microscopy to low time resolutions and primarily static samples. Recent developments in narrowband stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy have significantly increased the acquisition speed of Raman based label-free imaging by a few orders of magnitude, at the expense of reduced spectroscopic information. On the basis of a spectral focusing approach, we present a fast SRS hyperspectral imaging system using chirped femtosecond lasers to achieve rapid Raman spectra acquisition while retaining the full speed and image quality of narrowband SRS imaging. We demonstrate that quantitative concentration determination of cholesterol in the presence of interfering chemical species can be achieved with sensitivity down to 4 mM. For imaging purposes, hyperspectral imaging data in the C-H stretching region is obtained within a minute. We show that mammalian cell SRS hyperspectral imaging reveals the spatially inhomogeneous distribution of saturated lipids, unsaturated lipids, cholesterol, and protein. The combination of fast spectroscopy and label-free chemical imaging will enable new applications in studying biological systems and material systems. PMID:23256635

Fu, Dan; Holtom, Gary; Freudiger, Christian; Zhang, Xu; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

2013-01-18

307

In vivo fluorescence hyperspectral imaging of oral neoplasia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A hyperspectral imaging system using a liquid-crystal tunable filter (LCTF) was constructed for the purpose of in vivo optical imaging of oral neoplasia. The system operates in fluorescence mode and has the dual capability of capturing high quality widefield images and detecting fluorescence emission spectra from arbitrary locations within the captured field of view (FOV). The system was calibrated and evaluated for spectral resolution and accuracy. In vivo hyperspectral images were obtained from two normal volunteers and two patients with confirmed oral malignancy. Normal volunteer measurements revealed differences in intensity and lineshape of spectra between different anatomic locations, but intensity and lineshape were similar between different measurement sites from the same anatomic location. Measurements from normal and neoplastic areas of two patients with previously confirmed oral neoplasia showed differences in intensity, lineshape, and location of peak intensity. We have demonstrated that this system can provide both high quality widefield images, and spectral information at chosen locations within the field of view.

Roblyer, Darren; Kurachi, Cristina; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

2009-02-01

308

Detection of camouflaged targets using hyperspectral imaging technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hyperspectral imaging technology shows great potential for detection of camouflaged targets. Hyperspectral imagery provides fully registered high resolution spatial and spectral images that are invaluable in discriminating between camouflaged targets and backgrounds. However, current research on the processing of hyperspectral imagery tends to focus exclusively on spectral dimension, and thus the spatial and spectral information are not treated simultaneously. In order to get the shape of target, we have developed a new method based on mathematical morphology for edge detection in hyperspectal data. On the basis of analysis, spectral angle distance is utilized in extended morphological operations, which combine spectral and spatial information together. Then operator of edge extraction is used to extract the edge of target. Three major contributions are presented for detection of camouflaged targets in the paper. Firstly, in spectral domain, the best wave band to distinguish camouflaged targets and background is obtained by subtracting reflex intensity of targets and background. Secondly, we confirm the effectiveness of spectral angle mapping in detecting camouflaged targets, which lays a foundation for the use of spectral angle distance on the following study. Finally, as the prior knowledge about extended morphological operations and edge extraction known already, we successful extract the edge of the camouflaged target which is collected by a hyperspectral imager based on AOTF in the VIS-SWIR region.

Yang, Jia; Hua, Wenshen; Ma, Zuohong; Zhang, Yue

2013-08-01

309

Intelligent multimodal and hyperspectral sensing for real-time moving target tracking  

Microsoft Academic Search

Real time moving target tracking and identification with hyperspectral imagery is still very challenging with conventional sensors and algorithms. The increased information content of hyperspectral imaging has enabled improved classification and quantification of targets of interest. However, recording hyperspectral data for target classification is very time consuming. We design a sensor platform with multi-modalities, consisting of a dual-panoramic peripheral vision

Tao Wang; Zhigang Zhu

2008-01-01

310

Overview of hyperspectral remote sensing for mapping marine benthic habitats from airborne and underwater sensors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The seafloor, with its diverse and dynamic benthic habitats varying on meter to centimeter scales, is difficult to accurately monitor with traditional techniques. The technology used to build imaging spectrometers has rapidly advanced in recent years with the advent of smaller sensors and better signal-to-noise capabilities that has facilitated their use in mapping fine-scale benthic features. Here, the use of such sensors for hyperspectral remote sensing of the seafloor from both airborne and underwater platforms is discussed. Benthic constituents provide a so-called optical fingerprint with spectral properties that are often too subtle to be discerned with simple color photographs or multichannel spectrometers. Applications include the recent field validation of the airborne Portable Remote Imaging SpectroMeter (PRISM), a new imaging sensor package optimized for coastal ocean processes in Elkorn Slough California. In these turbid sediment-laden waters, only subtle spectral differences differentiate seafloor with sediment from that with eelgrass. The ultimate goal is to provide robust radiometric approaches that accurately consider light attenuation by the water column and are able to be applied to diverse habitats without considerable foreknowledge.

Dierssen, Heidi M.

2013-09-01

311

[Advance on application of hyperspectral imaging to nondestructive detection of agricultural products external quality].  

PubMed

Hyperspectral imaging is an emerging technique that integrates conventional imaging and spectroscopy to obtain both spatial and spectral information from a studied object simultaneously. The images data can reflect the external features, surface defects and contamination. The spectra data can analyze physical structure and chemical composition in studied object. Therefore, hyperspectral imaging technology causes more and more attention, and has become a hot research topic recently. In order to track the latest research developments at home and abroad, application of hyperspectral reflectance and fluorescence imaging techniques to nondestructive detection of agricultural products external quality was reviewed, which would provide reference for application of hyperspectral imaging to agriculture. PMID:22007376

Li, Jiang-Bo; Rao, Xiu-Qin; Ying, Yi-Bin

2011-08-01

312

Tomographic imaging of temperature and chemical species based on hyperspectral absorption spectroscopy.  

PubMed

A novel technique has been developed to obtain simultaneous tomographic images of temperature and species concentration based on hyperspectral absorption spectroscopy. The hyperspectral information enables several key advantages when compared to traditional tomography techniques based on limited spectral information. These advantages include a significant reduction in the number of required projection measurements, and an enhanced insensitivity to measurements/inversion uncertainties. These advantages greatly facilitate the practical implementation and application of the tomography technique. This paper reports the development of the technique, and the experimental demonstration of a prototype sensor in a near-adiabatic, atmospheric-pressure laboratory Hencken burner. The spatial and temporal resolution enabled by this new sensing technique is expected to resolve several key issues in practical combustion devices. PMID:19434193

Ma, Lin; Cai, Weiwei; Caswell, Andrew W; Kraetschmer, Thilo; Sanders, Scott T; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R

2009-05-11

313

Urban material characterization from the Hyperion hyperspectral imager: application to downtown Montreal (Quebec, Canada)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The present work analyzes the potential of NASA EO-1 Hyperion imaging spectrometer to characterize urban structure from summer-based cloud free data over downtown Montreal (Quebec, Canada). This spaceborne hyperspectral sensor provides Earth imagery at 30 m spatial resolution, 7.5 km swath in 220 contiguous spectral bands between 400 and 2500 nm with 10 nm spectral resolution. The investigations were carried out from a slight off-nadir imagery over Montreal (Canada) in order to respond to wireless telecommunication needs. A compiled urban material spectral library is also considered. Reduction to ground radiance (apparent reflectance) was achieved from several calibration procedures. Thereafter, well-established mapping techniques were considered to characterize urban materials, especially roofs and walls of buildings. The preliminaries results highlight the potential of spaceborne hyperspectral for urban space characterization.

Bokoye, Amadou I.; Dionne, Pascal

2004-02-01

314

CMOS image sensors  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, we provide a basic introduction to CMOS image-sensor technology, design and performance limits and present recent developments and future directions in this area. We also discuss image-sensor operation and describe the most popular CMOS image-sensor architectures. We note the main non-idealities that limit CMOS image sensor performance, and specify several key performance measures. One of the most

A. El Gamal; H. Eltoukhy

2005-01-01

315

Biologically-inspired data decorrelation for hyper-spectral imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hyper-spectral data allows the construction of more robust statistical models to sample the material properties than the standard tri-chromatic color representation. However, because of the large dimensionality and complexity of the hyper-spectral data, the extraction of robust features (image descriptors) is not a trivial issue. Thus, to facilitate efficient feature extraction, decorrelation techniques are commonly applied to reduce the dimensionality of the hyper-spectral data with the aim of generating compact and highly discriminative image descriptors. Current methodologies for data decorrelation such as principal component analysis (PCA), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), wavelet decomposition (WD), or band selection methods require complex and subjective training procedures and in addition the compressed spectral information is not directly related to the physical (spectral) characteristics associated with the analyzed materials. The major objective of this article is to introduce and evaluate a new data decorrelation methodology using an approach that closely emulates the human vision. The proposed data decorrelation scheme has been employed to optimally minimize the amount of redundant information contained in the highly correlated hyper-spectral bands and has been comprehensively evaluated in the context of non-ferrous material classification

Picon, Artzai; Ghita, Ovidiu; Rodriguez-Vaamonde, Sergio; Iriondo, Pedro Ma; Whelan, Paul F.

2011-12-01

316

Hyperspectral Image Processing for Automatic Target Detection Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

? This article presents an overview of the theoretical and practical issues associated with the development, analysis, and application of detection algorithms to exploit hyperspectral imaging data. We focus on techniques that exploit spectral information exclusively to make decisions regarding the type of each pixel—target or nontarget—on a pixel-by-pixel basis in an image. First we describe the fundamental structure of

Dimitris Manolakis; David Marden; Gary A. Shaw

2003-01-01

317

Parallel Classification of Hyperspectral Images Using Neural Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neural networks represent a widely used alternative to deal with remotely sensed image data. The improvement of spatial and\\u000a spectral resolution in latest-generation Earth observation instruments is expected to introduce extremely high computational\\u000a requirements in neural network-based algorithms for classification of high-dimensional data sets such as hyperspectral images,\\u000a with hundreds of spectral channels and very fine spatial resolution. A significant

Javier Plaza; Antonio Plaza; Rosa Pérez; Pablo Martínez

318

Demonstration of a Corner-cube-interferometer LWIR Hyperspectral Imager  

Microsoft Academic Search

An interferometric long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) hyperspectral imager is demonstrated, based on a Michelson corner-cube\\u000a interferometer. This class of system is inherently mechanically robust, and should have advantages over Sagnac-interferometer\\u000a systems in terms of relaxed beamsplitter-coating specifications, and wider unvignetted field of view. Preliminary performance\\u000a data from the laboratory prototype system are provided regarding imaging, spectral resolution, and fidelity of acquired

Ingmar G. E. Renhorn; Thomas Svensson; Staffan Cronström; Tomas Hallberg; Rolf Persson; Roland Lindell; Glenn D. Boreman

2010-01-01

319

Demonstration of a Corner-cube-interferometer LWIR Hyperspectral Imager  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An interferometric long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) hyperspectral imager is demonstrated, based on a Michelson corner-cube interferometer. This class of system is inherently mechanically robust, and should have advantages over Sagnac-interferometer systems in terms of relaxed beamsplitter-coating specifications, and wider unvignetted field of view. Preliminary performance data from the laboratory prototype system are provided regarding imaging, spectral resolution, and fidelity of acquired spectra.

Renhorn, Ingmar G. E.; Svensson, Thomas; Cronström, Staffan; Hallberg, Tomas; Persson, Rolf; Lindell, Roland; Boreman, Glenn D.

2010-01-01

320

Real-time data processor for the COMPASS hyperspectral sensor system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The NVESD COMPASS instrument is an airborne dispersive hyperspectral imager that covers the VNIR through SWIR bands and incorporates a real-time data processing system. The processing system consists of a Data Processing Computer (DPC) and an Operator Display/Control Computer (ODC). The high-performance DPC executes real-time sensor calibration and multiple spectral detection algorithms on 13 G4-processors in a Race++ switched backplane. The DPC sends three-band pseudo-color hyperspectral data, high-resolution target chips, and GPS/INS data to the ODC. The ODC outputs a geo-registered display of HSI color imagery with detection cue overlays. The COMPASS detection algorithms, which are particularly well suited to CC&D targeting applications, include the SSRX spectral anomaly detector, the NFINDR/STD spectral unmixing-based anomaly detector, (3) a supervised spectral matched filter (SSMF), and (4) Healey's invariant subspace detector. The DPC airborne component is VME-based in a compact, ruggedized chassis. The COMPASS real-time processor is a second generation system based on NRL-sponsored WarHORSE demonstrations. This paper reviews the DPC system design, capabilities and performance.

Schaff, William E.; Copeland, Anthony; Steffen, Mike; O'Connor, Rory; Simi, Christopher; Zadnik, Jerry; Winter, Ed M.; Healey, Glenn

2003-12-01

321

Real-time data processor for the COMPASS hyperspectral sensor system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The NVESD COMPASS instrument is an airborne dispersive hyperspectral imager that covers the VNIR through SWIR bands and incorporates a real-time data processing system. The processing system consists of a Data Processing Computer (DPC) and an Operator Display/Control Computer (ODC). The high-performance DPC executes real-time sensor calibration and multiple spectral detection algorithms on 13 G4-processors in a Race++ switched backplane. The DPC sends three-band pseudo-color hyperspectral data, high-resolution target chips, and GPS/INS data to the ODC. The ODC outputs a geo-registered display of HSI color imagery with detection cue overlays. The COMPASS detection algorithms, which are particularly well suited to CC&D targeting applications, include the SSRX spectral anomaly detector, the NFINDR/STD spectral unmixing-based anomaly detector, (3) a supervised spectral matched filter (SSMF), and (4) Healey's invariant subspace detector. The DPC airborne component is VME-based in a compact, ruggedized chassis. The COMPASS real-time processor is a second generation system based on NRL-sponsored WarHORSE demonstrations. This paper reviews the DPC system design, capabilities and performance.

Schaff, William E.; Copeland, Anthony; Steffen, Mike; O'Connor, Rory; Simi, Christopher; Zadnik, Jerry; Winter, Ed M.; Healey, Glenn

2004-01-01

322

Anomaly detection and classification for hyperspectral imagery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anomaly detection becomes increasingly important in hyperspectral image analysis, since hyperspectral imagers can now uncover many material substances which were previously unresolved by multispectral sensors. Two types of anomaly detection are of interest and considered in this paper. One was previously developed by Reed and Yu to detect targets whose signatures are distinct from their surroundings. Another was designed to

Chein-I. Chang; Shao-Shan Chiang

2002-01-01

323

Hyperspectral imaging of bruises in the SWIR spectral region  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Optical diagnostics of bruised skin might provide important information for characterization and age determination of such injuries. Hyperspectral imaging is one of the optical techniques that have been employed for bruise characterization. This technique combines high spatial and spectral resolution and makes it possible to study both chromophore signatures and -distributions in an injury. Imaging and spectroscopy in the visible spectral range have resulted in increased knowledge about skin bruises. So far the SWIR region has not been explored for this application. The main objective of the current study was to characterize bruises in the SWIR wavelength range. Hyperspectral images in the SWIR (950-2500nm ) and VNIR (400-850nm) spectral range were collected from 3 adult volunteers with bruises of known age. Data were collected over a period of 8 days. The data were analyzed using spectroscopic techniques and statistical image analysis. Preliminary results from the pilot study indicate that SWIR hyperspectral imaging might be an important supplement to imaging in the visible part of the spectrum. The technique emphasizes local edema and gives a possibility to visualize features that cannot easily be seen in the visible part of the spectrum.

Randeberg, Lise L.; Hernandez-Palacios, Julio

2012-02-01

324

HSI mapping of marine and coastal environments using the advanced airborne hyperspectral imaging system (AAHIS)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The advanced airborne hyperspectral imaging system (AAHIS) is an operational, high signal-to-noise ratio, high resolution, integrated hyperspectral imaging spectrometer. The compact, lightweight and portable AAHIS system is normally flown in Piper Aztec aircraft. AAHIS collect 'push- broom' data with 385 spatial channels and 288 simultaneous spectral channels from 433 nm to 832 nm, recording at 12 bits up to 55 frames/second. Typical operation incorporates on-chip pixel binning of four pixels spectrally and two pixels spatially, increasing the signal-to-noise ratio and reducing data rate. When binned, the spectral resolution is 5.5 nm and the instantaneous field-of-view is 1 mrad, resulting in a ground sample distance of 0.5 m from 500 m altitude. The sensor is optimized for littoral region remote sensing for a variety of civilian and defense applications including ecosystem surveying and inventory, detection and monitoring of environmental pollution, infrastructure mapping, and surveillance. Since August 1994, AAHIS has acquired over 120 GB of hyperspectral image data of littoral, urban, desert and tropical scenes. System upgrades include real-time spectral image processing, integrated flight navigation and 3-axis image stabilization. A description of the sensor system, its performance characteristics, and several processed images demonstrating material discrimination are presented. The remote assessment, characterization, and mapping of coral reef health and species identification and floral species at Nu'upia Ponds, are shown and compared to extensive ground truthing in and around Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Hawaii. SETS emphasizes providing georegistered, GIS-integrated, value- added data products for customers to help them solve real- world problems.

Holasek, Rick E.; Portigal, Frederick P.; Mooradian, Gregory C.; Voelker, Mark A.; Even, Detlev M.; Fene, Michael W.; Owensby, Pamela D.; Breitwieser, David S.

1997-08-01

325

Principal component analysis for poultry tumor inspection using hyperspectral fluorescence imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents detection of skin tumor on poultry carcasses using hyperspectral fluorescence images. Image samples are obtained from a hyperspectral imaging system that provides digital images of 65 spectral bands with wavelength ranging from 425 [nm] to 711 [nm]. The principal component analysis (PCA) technique finds an effective representation of spectral signature in a reduced dimensional feature space. A

John T. Fletcher; Seong G. Kong

2003-01-01

326

Multidimensional feature extraction from 3D hyperspectral images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A hyperspectral imaging system has been set up and used to capture hyperspectral image cubes from various samples in the 400-1000 nm spectral region. The system consists of an imaging spectrometer attached to a CCD camera with fiber optic light source as the illuminator. The significance of this system lies in its capability to capture 3D spectral and spatial data that can then be analyzed to extract information about the underlying samples, monitor the variations in their response to perturbation or changing environmental conditions, and compare optical properties. In this paper preliminary results are presented that analyze the 3D spatial and spectral data in reflection mode to extract features to differentiate among different classes of interest using biological and metallic samples. Studied biological samples possess homogenous as well as non-homogenous properties. Metals are analyzed for their response to different surface treatments, including polishing. Similarities and differences in the feature extraction process and results are presented. The mathematical approach taken is discussed. The hyperspectral imaging system offers a unique imaging modality that captures both spatial and spectral information that can then be correlated for future sample predictions.

Mehrubeoglu, Mehrube; McLauchlan, Lifford

2011-09-01

327

Assessment of hyperspectral imaging system for poultry safety inspection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A hyperspectral imaging system demonstrated potential to detect surface fecal and ingesta contaminants on poultry carcasses. Hyperspectral data were analyzed with four pre-processing methods considering two parameters: calibration and 20-nm spectral smoothing. A band-ratio image-processing algorithm, using band equation including 2-wavelengths (565 nm / 517 nm) and 3-wavelengths (576 nm - 616 nm)/(529 nm - 616 nm) equations, was then applied to each pre-processed method that included applying a background mask to the ratio of images, and finally applying a fecal threshold. Based on a high accuracy of 96.2% for predicting surface contaminants and significantly less false positives on the 64 birds measured, the calibrated smooth method was considered the best pre-processing method for contaminant detection. In conjunction with an appropriate image-processing algorithm, the hyperspectral imaging system is an effective technique for the identification of fecal and ingesta contaminants on poultry carcasses. Specifically, band ratio with 2-wavelength equation (565/517) performed very well with 96.4% accuracy and 147 false positives for detecting both feces (duodenum, ceca, colon) and ingesta contaminants.

Park, Bosoon; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Windham, William R.; Smith, Doug P.

2003-03-01

328

Application study of principal component based physical retrieval algorithm for hyperspectral infrared sensors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An ultra-fast principal component based physical retrieval algorithm has been developed at NASA Langley research center. Works are under way to maximize the application potential of the algorithm in order to generate reliable products from hyper-spectral sensor data for climate studies. The algorithm has been tested using synthetic data for various infrared sensors. This paper describes in detail about retrieval sensitivity study carried out for several hyper-spectral infrared sensors using this physical algorithm. The retrieval accuracy obtained using the algorithm for the atmospheric parameters including trace gases of interests is discussed. Its dependence on the sensor system noise and spectral resolution is illustrated by comparing the retrieval performance achieved for different sensors. PCRTM has been demonstrated to be a reliable tool for end-to-end sensor performance simulations and has great potential for real-time trace gas retrieval applications.

Wu, Wan; Liu, Xu; Li, Hui; Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen M.

2013-09-01

329

A smart sensor with hyperspectral\\/range fovea and panoramic peripheral view  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose an adaptive and effective multimodal peripheral-fovea sensor design for real-time targets tracking. This design is inspired by the biological vision systems for achieving real-time target detection and recognition with a hyperspectral\\/range fovea and panoramic peripheral view. A realistic scene simulation approach is used to evaluate our sensor design and the related data exploitation algorithms before a real sensor

Tao Wang; Zhigang Zhu; Harvey Rhody

2009-01-01

330

Correction of axial optical aberrations in hyperspectral imaging systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In hyper-spectral imaging systems with a wide spectral range, axial optical aberrations may lead to a significant blurring of image intensities in certain parts of the spectral range. Axial optical aberrations arise from the indexof- refraction variations that is dependent on the wavelength of incident light. To correct axial optical aberrations the point-spread function (PSF) of the image acquisition system needs to be identified. We proposed a multiframe joint blur identification and image restoration method that maximizes the likelihood of local image energy distributions between spectral images. Gaussian mixture model based density estimate provides a link between corresponding spatial information shared among spectral images so as to find and restore the image edges via a PSF update. Model of the PSF was assumed to be a linear combination of Gaussian functions, therefore the blur identification process had to find only the corresponding scalar weights of each Gaussian function. Using the identified PSF, image restoration was performed by the iterative Richardson-Lucy algorithm. Experiments were conducted on four different biological samples using a hyper-spectral imaging system based on acousto-optic tunable filter in the visible spectral range (0.55 - 1.0 ?m). By running the proposed method, the quality of raw spectral images was substantially improved. Image quality improvements were quantified by a measure of contrast and demonstrate the potential of the proposed method for the correction of axial optical aberrations.

Špiclin, Žiga; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

2011-02-01

331

Automotive CMOS Image Sensors  

Microsoft Academic Search

After penetrating the consumer and industrial world for over a decade, digital imaging is slowly but inevitably gaining marketshare in the automotive world. Cameras will become a key sensor in increasing car safety, driving assistance and driving comfort. The image sensors for automotive will be dominated by CMOS sensors as the requirements are different from the consumer market or the

S. Maddalena; A. Darmon; R. Diels

332

Objective color classification of ecstasy tablets by hyperspectral imaging.  

PubMed

The general procedure followed in the examination of ecstasy tablets for profiling purposes includes a color description, which depends highly on the observers' perception. This study aims to provide objective quantitative color information using visible hyperspectral imaging. Both self-manufactured and illicit tablets, created with different amounts of known colorants were analyzed. We derived reflectance spectra from hyperspectral images of these tablets, and successfully determined the most likely colorant used in the production of all self-manufactured tablets and four of five illicit tablets studied. Upon classification, the concentration of the colorant was estimated using a photon propagation model and a single reference measurement of a tablet of known concentration. The estimated concentrations showed a high correlation with the actual values (R(2) = 0.9374). The achieved color information, combined with other physical and chemical characteristics, can provide a powerful tool for the comparison of tablet seizures, which may reveal their origin. PMID:23683098

Edelman, Gerda; Lopatka, Martin; Aalders, Maurice

2013-05-17

333

Automation of ROI extraction in hyperspectral breast images.  

PubMed

The extraction of regions-of-interest (ROIs) in hyperspectral images of breast cancer specimens is currently carried out manually or by visual inspection. In order to address the labor-intensive and time-consuming process of the manual extraction of ROIs in hyperspectral images, an algorithm is developed in this paper to automate the extraction process. This is achieved by using a contrast module and a homogeneity module to duplicate the same manual or visual steps that an expert goes through in order to extract ROIs. The success of the automated process is determined by comparing the classification rates of the automated approach with the manual approach in terms of the ability to separate cancer cases from normal cases. PMID:24110523

Kim, B; Kehtarnavaz, N; Leboulluec, P; Liu, H; Peng, Y; Euhus, D

2013-07-01

334

Near-infrared hyperspectral imaging of atherosclerotic tissue phantom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A method to identify vulnerable plaques that are likely to cause acute coronary events has been required. The object of this study is identifying vulnerable plaques by hyperspectral imaging in near-infrared range (NIR-HSI) for an angioscopic application. In this study, NIR-HSI of atherosclerotic tissue phantoms was demonstrated under simulated angioscopic conditions. NIR-HSI system was constructed by a NIR super continuum light and a mercury-cadmium-telluride camera. Spectral absorbance values were obtained in the wavelength range from 1150 to 2400 nm at 10 nm intervals. The hyperspectral images were constructed with spectral angle mapper algorithm. As a result, detections of the lipid area in the atherosclerotic tissue phantom under angioscopic observation conditions were achieved especially in the wavelength around 1200 nm, which corresponds to the second overtone of CH stretching vibration mode.

Ishii, K.; Nagao, R.; Kitayabu, A.; Awazu, K.

2013-06-01

335

Hyperspectral optical imaging of two different species of lepidoptera  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this article, we report a hyperspectral optical imaging application for measurement of the reflectance spectra of photonic structures that produce structural colors with high spatial resolution. The measurement of the spectral reflectance function is exemplified in the butterfly wings of two different species of Lepidoptera: the blue iridescence reflected by the nymphalid Morpho didius and the green iridescence of the papilionid Papilio palinurus. Color coordinates from reflectance spectra were calculated taking into account human spectral sensitivity. For each butterfly wing, the observed color is described by a characteristic color map in the chromaticity diagram and spreads over a limited volume in the color space. The results suggest that variability in the reflectance spectra is correlated with different random arrangements in the spatial distribution of the scales that cover the wing membranes. Hyperspectral optical imaging opens new ways for the non-invasive study and classification of different forms of irregularity in structural colors.

Medina, José Manuel; Nascimento, Sérgio Miguel Cardoso; Vukusic, Pete

2011-05-01

336

Hyperspectral optical imaging of two different species of lepidoptera.  

PubMed

In this article, we report a hyperspectral optical imaging application for measurement of the reflectance spectra of photonic structures that produce structural colors with high spatial resolution. The measurement of the spectral reflectance function is exemplified in the butterfly wings of two different species of Lepidoptera: the blue iridescence reflected by the nymphalid Morpho didius and the green iridescence of the papilionid Papilio palinurus. Color coordinates from reflectance spectra were calculated taking into account human spectral sensitivity. For each butterfly wing, the observed color is described by a characteristic color map in the chromaticity diagram and spreads over a limited volume in the color space. The results suggest that variability in the reflectance spectra is correlated with different random arrangements in the spatial distribution of the scales that cover the wing membranes. Hyperspectral optical imaging opens new ways for the non-invasive study and classification of different forms of irregularity in structural colors. PMID:21711872

Medina, José Manuel; Nascimento, Sérgio Miguel Cardoso; Vukusic, Pete

2011-05-04

337

Three-Dimensional Wavelet-Based Compression of Hyperspectral Images  

Microsoft Academic Search

This chapter proposed a three dimensional set partitioned embedded block coder for hyperspectral image compression. The three dimensional wavelet transform automatically exploits inter-band dependence. Two versions of the algorithm were implemented. The integer filter implementation enables lossy-to-lossless compression, and the floating point filter implementation provides better performance for lossy representation. Wavelet packet structure and bit shifting were applied on the

Xiaoli Tang; William A. Pearlman

338

Hyperspectral cathodoluminescence imaging of modern and fossil carbonate shells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Optical cathodoluminescence (CL) is commonly used to identify diagenetically altered carbonate fossils, yet such an interpretation is problematic as present-day carbonate shells may also luminesce. Hyperspectral CL imaging combines CL microscopy and CL spectroscopy to quantitatively analyze luminescence emission. Cold optical CL and hyperspectral CL imaging were carried out on four modern biominerals, a Rhynchonelliform brachiopod, a Craniid brachiopod, a bivalve, and the eggshell of the domestic fowl. A fossil Craniid brachiopod was analyzed to compare luminescence emission with that from the modern Craniid brachiopod. The beam conditions used for optical CL vary between studies, which hinders the direct comparison of CL analyses. This study assesses the effect of beam current and beam diameter on the intensity of luminescence emission. By characterizing the effect of beam conditions on different CaCO3 biominerals, comparisons can be made between CL studies. Hyperspectral CL imaging can be carried out in combination with WDS element analysis. By comparing hyperspectral CL images with element maps the causes of luminescence can to some extent be determined. The intensity of luminescence emitted from the modern biominerals differs under the same beam conditions. All four modern shells emit blue luminescence. In N. anomala, there is a correlation between Mn2+ concentration and luminescence intensity in the 620- to 630-nm wavelength band, which is apparent in the inner region of the shell. The fossil Craniid also emits blue luminescence, and texture within the shell wall is apparent; however, the luminescence emission between 620 and 630 nm that is evident in N. anomala is absent.

England, Jennifer; Cusack, Maggie; Paterson, Niall W.; Edwards, Paul; Lee, Martin R.; Martin, Robert

2006-09-01

339

Hyperspectral analysis using the correlation between image and reference.  

PubMed

We present the use of correlation analysis on spectral data in order to quantify the amount of a given spectrum present with respect to a reference spectrum. The method is shown to be useful in analyzing hyperspectral fluorescence images. It is unhindered by the linear relationship assumed in linear spectral unmixing, and in addition, it is shown to be robust with respect to noise. PMID:23322383

Ellingsen, Pål Gunnar; Reitan, Nina Kristine; Pedersen, Brede Dille; Lindgren, Mikael

2013-02-01

340

Tunable narrow-band filter for LWIR hyperspectral imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

IR sensing has been a key enabling technology in military systems providing advantages in night vision, surveillance, and ever more accurate targeting. Passive hyperspectral imagin, the ability to gather and process IR spectral information from each pixel of an IR image, can ultimately provide 2D composition maps of a scene under study. FInding applications such as atmospheric, and geophysical remote sensing, camouflaged target recognition, and defence against chemical weapons.

Daly, James T.; Bodkin, W. A.; Schneller, William J.; Kerr, Robert B.; Noto, John; Haren, Ray; Eismann, Michael T.; Karch, Barry K.

2000-04-01

341

Vegetation geochemical information exploration using pushbroom hyperspectral imager (PHI) data  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper quantified regional concentration of various metals(e. g. Pb, Cu, As, Hg, Mo) in the leaves by developed regression equations based on Kokaly and Clark(1998) using Pushbroom Hyperspectral Imager (PHI) data which acquired at Daxin'anling area, Helongjiang Province, China. The regression equations were developed and established between metal concentration and spectral absorption band-depth of vegetation branches which both were

Fuping Gan; Qiang Zhou; Runsheng Wang

2005-01-01

342

An information-theoretic approach to spectral variability, similarity, and discrimination for hyperspectral image analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

A hyperspectral image can be considered as an image cube where the third dimension is the spectral domain represented by hundreds of spectral wavelengths. As a result, a hyperspectral image pixel is actually a column vector with dimension equal to the number of spectral bands and contains valuable spectral information that can be used to account for pixel variability, similarity

Chein-i Chang

2000-01-01

343

A quantitative method for evaluating the performances of hyperspectral image fusion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hyperspectral image fusion is a key technique of hyperspectral data processing. In recent years, many fusion methods have been proposed, but there is little work concerning evaluation of the performances of different image fusion methods. In this paper, a method called quantitative correlation analysis {(QCA)} is proposed, which provides a quantitative measure of the information transferred by an image fusion

Qiang Wang; Yi Shen; Ye Zhang; Jian Qiu Zhang

2003-01-01

344

Visible to SWIR hyperspectral imaging for produce safety and quality evaluation  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Hyperspectral imaging techniques, combining the advantages of spectroscopy and imaging, have found wider use in food quality and safety evaluation applications during the past decade. In light of the prevalent use of hyperspectral imaging techniques in the visible to near-infrared (VNIR: 400 -1000 n...

345

Refinement of wavelength calibrations of hyperspectral imaging data using a spectrum-matching technique  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concept of imaging spectrometry, or hyperspectral imaging, is becoming increasingly popular in scientific communities in recent years. Hyperspectral imaging data covering the spectral region between 0.4 and 2.5 ?m and collected from aircraft and satellite platforms have been used in the study of the earth's atmosphere, land surface, and ocean color properties, as well as on planetary missions. In

Bo-Cai Gao; Marcos J. Montes; Curtiss O. Davis

2004-01-01

346

PARTIAL LEAST SQUARES REGRESSION OF HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGES FOR CONTAMINANT DETECTION ON POULTRY CARCASSES  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has developed multispectral and hyperspectral imaging systems to detect fecal contaminants. Until recently, the hyperspectral imaging system has been used as a research tool to detect a few optimum wavelengths for use in a multispectral imaging system. However, w...

347

PARTIAL LEAST SQUARES REGRESSION OF HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGES FOR CONTAMINATION DETECTION ON POULTRY CARCASSES  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Abstract The U.S. Department of Agriculture has developed multispectral and hyperspectral imaging systems to detect faecal contaminants. Until recently, the hyperspectral imaging system has been used as a research tool to detect a few optimum wavelengths for use in a multispectral imaging system. ...

348

DETECTION OF CECAL CONTAMINANTS IN VISCERAL CAVITY OF BROILER CARCASSES USING HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGING  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Detecting fecal contaminant in the visceral cavity of the broiler is difficult but extremely important for poultry safety inspection. A hyperspectral imaging system could be used effectively for detecting internal cecal contaminants. A hyperspectral imaging system was used to image broiler carcass...

349

Spatial and temporal point tracking in real hyperspectral images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper addresses the problem of tracking a dim moving point target from a sequence of hyperspectral cubes. The resulting tracking algorithm is useful for many staring technologies such as the ones used in space surveillance and missile tracking applications. In these applications, the images consist of targets moving at sub-pixel velocity and noisy background consisting of evolving clutter and noise. The demand for a low false alarm rate (FAR) on one hand and a high probability of detection (PD) on the other makes the tracking a challenging task. The use of hyperspectral images should be superior to current technologies using broadband IR images due to the ability of exploiting simultaneously two target specific properties: the spectral target characteristics and the time dependent target behavior. The proposed solution consists of three stages: the first stage transforms the hyperspectral cubes into a two dimensional sequence, using known point target detection acquisition methods; the second stage involves a temporal separation of the 2D sequence into sub-sequences and the usage of a variance filter (VF) to detect the presence of targets from the temporal profile of each pixel in each group, while suppressing clutter specific influences. This stage creates a new sequence containing a target with a seemingly faster velocity; the third stage applies the Dynamic Programming Algorithm (DPA) that proves to be a very effective algorithm for the tracking of moving targets with low SNR at around pixel velocity. The system is tested on both synthetic and real data.

Aminov, Benjamin; Nichtern, Ofir; Rotman, S. R.

2008-10-01

350

Spatial and spectral performance of a chromotomosynthetic hyperspectral imaging system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The spatial and spectral resolutions achievable by a prototype rotating prism chromotomosynthetic imaging (CTI) system operating in the visible spectrum are described. The instrument creates hyperspectral imagery by collecting a set of 2D images with each spectrally projected at a different rotation angle of the prism. Mathematical reconstruction techniques that have been well tested in the field of medical physics are used to reconstruct the data to produce the 3D hyperspectral image. The instrument operates with a 100 mm focusing lens in the spectral range of 400-900 nm with a field of view of 71.6 mrad and angular resolution of 0.8-1.6 ?rad. The spectral resolution is 0.6 nm at the shortest wavelengths, degrading to over 10 nm at the longest wavelengths. Measurements using a point-like target show that performance is limited by chromatic aberration. The system model is slightly inaccurate due to poor estimation of detector spatial resolution, this is corrected based on results improving model performance. As with traditional dispersion technology, calibration of the transformed wavelength axis is required, though with this technology calibration improves both spectral and spatial resolution. While this prototype does not operate at high speeds, components exist which will allow for CTI systems to generate hyperspectral video imagery at rates greater than 100 Hz.

Bostick, Randall L.; Perram, Glen P.

2012-03-01

351

Non-destructive hyperspectral imaging of quarantined Mars Returned Samples  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Introduction: In preparation for the upcoming International Mars Sample Return mission (MSR), returning samples containing potential biohazards, we have implemented a hyperspec-tral method of in-situ analysis of grains performed in BSL4 quarantine conditions, by combining several non-destructive imaging diagnostics. This allows sample transportation on optimized experimental setups, while monitoring the sample quarantine conditions. Our hyperspectral methodology was tested during analyses of meteorites [1-2] and cometary and interstellar grains from the recent NASA Stardust mission [3-6]. Synchrotron Radiation protocols: X-ray analysis methods are widely accepted as the least destructive probes of fragile, unique samples. Diffraction, X-ray fluorescence and ab-sorption micro/nano-spectroscopies were performed on chondritic test samples using focused monochromatic beams at the ESRF synchrotron in Grenoble, France. 2D maps of grain com-position down to ppm concentrations and polycrystalline structure have simultaneously been acquired, followed by X-ray absorption performed on elements of Z 26. Ideally, absorption micro-tomography can later be performed in full-beam mode to record the 3D morphology of the grain followed by fluorescence-tomography in focus-beam mode which complements this picture with a 3D elemental image of the grain. Lab-based protocols: Raman and IR-based spectroscopies have been performed in reflection mode for mineralogical imaging of the grains in the laboratory using commercial microscopes. The spatial resolution varied in the 1-10 m range. Laser limited penetration of opaque samples permits only 2D imaging of the few nanometer-thick outer layers of the grains. Mineralogical maps are now routinely acquired using Raman spectroscopy at sub-micron scales through the 3 container walls of the Martian sample holder, followed by IR few-micrometer spot measurements recording C-based and potential aqueous alteration distributions. Sample Holder: A miniaturized sample-holder [7] has been designed and built to allow direct analyses of a set of extraterrestrial grains confined in a sealed triple container and remotely po-sitioned in front of the X-ray or laser beams of the various setups. The grains are held in several thin walls (10 m) ultrapure silica capillaries which are sufficiently resistant for manual/remote-controlled micro-manipulation but semitransparent for the characteristic X-rays, Raman and IR radiations. Miniaturized pressure/temperature sensors located in each container periodically monitor the integrity of the ensemble, ensuring BSL4 condi-tions. References: [1] B. Golosio, A. Simionovici, A. Somogyi, L. Lemelle, M. Chukalina, A. Brunetti, Jrnl. of App. Phys. 94, 145-157, 2003 [2] L. Lemelle, A. Simionovici, R. Truche, Ch. Rau, M. Chukalina, Ph. Gillet, Am. Min. 87 , 547-553, 2004 [3] Michael E. Zolensky et al., Science 314, 1735-1739, 2006 [4] G. J. Flynn et al., Science 314, 1731-1735, 2006 [5] Pierre Bleuet, Alexandre Simionovici, Laurence Lemelle, Tristan Ferroir, Peter Cloetens, Rémi Tu-coulou, Jean Susini, App. Phys. Lett. 92, 213111-1-3, 2008. [6] A. J. Westphal, et al., AIP Proceedings of the ICXOM Congress, (in print) 2010. [8] A. Simionovici and CNES, patent pending.

Simionovici, Alexandre; Viso, Michel; Beck, Pierre; Lemelle, Laurence; Westphal, Andrew; Vincze, Laszlo; Schoonjans, Tom; Fihman, Francois; Chazalnoel, Pascale; Ferroir, Tristan; Solé, Vicente Armando; Tucoulou, R.

352

Infrared hyperspectral imaging results from vapor plume experiments  

SciTech Connect

In this article, recent measurements made with LIFTIRS, the Livermore Imaging Fourier Transform InfraRed Spectrometer, are presented. The experience gained with this instrument has produced a variety of insights into the tradeoffs between signal to noise ratio (SNR), spectral resolution and temporal resolution for time multiplexed Fourier transform imaging spectrometers. This experience has also clarified the practical advantages and disadvantages of Fourier transform hyperspectral imaging spectrometers regarding adaptation to varying measurement requirements on SNR vs. spectral resolution, spatial resolution and temporal resolution.

Bennett, C.L.; Carter, M.R.; Fields, D.J. [and others

1995-04-17

353

Static hyperspectral fluorescence imaging of viscous materials based on a linear variable filter spectrometer.  

PubMed

This paper presents a low-cost hyperspectral measurement setup in a new application based on fluorescence detection in the visible (Vis) wavelength range. The aim of the setup is to take hyperspectral fluorescence images of viscous materials. Based on these images, fluorescent and non-fluorescent impurities in the viscous materials can be detected. For the illumination of the measurement object, a narrow-band high-power light-emitting diode (LED) with a center wavelength of 370 nm was used. The low-cost acquisition unit for the imaging consists of a linear variable filter (LVF) and a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) 2D sensor array. The translucent wavelength range of the LVF is from 400 nm to 700 nm. For the confirmation of the concept, static measurements of fluorescent viscous materials with a non-fluorescent impurity have been performed and analyzed. With the presented setup, measurement surfaces in the micrometer range can be provided. The measureable minimum particle size of the impurities is in the nanometer range. The recording rate for the measurements depends on the exposure time of the used CMOS 2D sensor array and has been found to be in the microsecond range. PMID:24064604

Murr, Patrik J; Schardt, Michael; Koch, Alexander W

2013-09-23

354

Simultaneous acquisition of hyper-spectral image using the computed tomography imaging interferometer  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we introduce a new approach of simultaneous acquisition of hyper-spectral image by means of using Computed Tomography Imaging Interferometer. Detecting rapidly varying targets both spatially and spectrally using imaging spectrometer is an international phenomenon in remote sensing in recent years and worthwhile in many domains such as pollution inspection and biochemical arms detection. Computed Tomography Imaging Interferometer

Yu Lin; Ningfang Liao; Xinquan Wang; Deqi Cui; Minyong Liang; Yongdao Luo

2007-01-01

355

Image mapping spectrometry: a novel hyperspectral platform for rapid snapshot imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents the Image Mapping Spectrometry a new snapshot hyperspectral imaging platform for variety of applications. These applications span from remote sensing and surveillance use to life cell microscopy implementations and medical diagnostics. The IMS replaces the camera in a digital imaging system, allowing one to add parallel spectrum acquisition capability and to maximize the signal collection (> 80%). As such the IMS allows obtaining full spectral information in the image scene instantaneously at real time imaging rates. Presented implemention provides 350x350x48 datacube (x,y,?) and spectral sampling of 2 to 6 nm in visible spectral range but is easily expandable to larger cube dimensions and other spectral ranges. The operation of the IMS is based on redirecting image zones through the use of a custom-fabricated optical element known as an image mapper. The image mapper is a complex custom optical component comprised of high quality, thin mirror facets with unique 2D tilts. These mirror facets reorganize the original image onto a single large format CCD sensor to create optically "dark" regions between adjacent image lines. The full spectrum from each image line is subsequently dispersed into the void regions on the CCD camera. This mapping method provides a one-to-one correspondence between each voxel in the datacube and pixel on the CCD camera requiring only a simple and fast remapping algorithm. This paper provides fundamentals of IMS operations and describes an example design. Preliminary imaging results for gas detection acquired at 3 frames / second, for 350x350x48 data cubes are being presented. Real time unmixing of spectral signatures is also being discussed. Finally paper draws perspective of future directions and system potential for infrared imaging.

Kester, Robert T.; Bedard, Noah; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.

2011-05-01

356

ASIC image sensors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two image array sensors designed and fabricated using a standard two-level metal ASIC CMOS process are described. The results show that good quality grey-level images can be formed, and that CMOS sensors arrays can be successfully integrated with efficient analogue sense amplifiers and with digital control\\/image-processing logic. The first sensor is a prototype 128×128 pixel test array. The second is

D. Renshaw; P. B. Denyer; G. Wang; M. Lu

1990-01-01

357

Detection of aircraft exhaust in hyperspectral image data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of a hyperspectral imaging system for the detection of gases has been investigated, and algorithms have been developed for various applications. Of particular interest here is the ability to use these algorithms in the detection of the wake disturbances trailing an aircraft. A dataset of long wave infrared (LWIR) hyperspectral datacubes taken with a Telops Hyper-Cam at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta, Georgia is investigated. The methodology presented here assumes that the aircraft engine exhaust gases will become entrained in wake vortices that develop; therefore, if the exhaust can be detected upon exiting the engines, it can be followed through subsequent datacubes until the vortex disturbance is detected. Gases known to exist in aircraft exhaust are modeled, and the Adaptive Coherence/Cosine Estimator (ACE) is used to search for these gases. Although wake vortices have not been found in the data, an unknown disturbance following the passage of the aircraft has been discovered.

Lane, Sarah E.; West, Leanne L.; Gimmestad, Gary G.; Smith, William L., Sr.; Burdette, Edward M.

2011-09-01

358

Integrating Airborne Hyperspectral Sensor Data with GIS for Hail Storm Post-Disaster Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emergency planning requires spatio-temporal information on a large scale on urban areas at regular intervals. Hyperspectral remote sensor data may be analysed and integrated with GIS data for providing current spatio-temporal data in urban regions. The overall shape of a spectral curve and the position and strength of absorption bands can be used to identify and discriminate different surface materials.

Sunil BHASKARAN; Bruce FORSTER; Trevor NEAL

359

A generalized approach to the vicarious calibration of multiple Earth observation sensors using hyperspectral data  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper describes a new methodology that uses spatially extensive hyperspectral imagery as reference data to carry out vicarious radiometric calibrations for multiple satellite sensors. The methodology has been validated using data from a campaign at the Railroad Valley playa test site in Nevada in June 1998. The proof of concept has been further tested based on data acquisition campaigns

P. m. Teillet; G. Fedosejevs; R. p. Gauthier; N. t. O'neill; K. j. Thome; S. f. Biggar; H. Ripley; A. Meygret

2001-01-01

360

Independent component analysis in information extraction from visible\\/near-infrared hyperspectral imaging data of cucumber leaves  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hyperspectral imaging at visible and short near infrared (VIS\\/SNIR) region has been used to estimate the pigment content of leaves. A complicating feature of measurements with any hyperspectral imaging methodology is the large amount of information generated during the measurement process. In this paper we discuss the identification of the desirable information using independent component analysis (ICA). After hyperspectral image

Zou Xiaobo; Zhao Jiewen; Mel Holmes; Mao Hanpin; Shi Jiyong; Yin Xiaopin; Li Yanxiao

2010-01-01

361

Standoff Hyperspectral Imaging of Explosives Residues Using Broadly Tunable External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser Illumination  

SciTech Connect

We describe experimental results on the detection of explosives residues using active hyperspectral imaging by illumination of the target surface using an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) and imaging using a room temperature microbolometer camera. The active hyperspectral imaging technique forms an image hypercube by recording one image for each tuning step of the ECQCL. The resulting hyperspectral image contains the full absorption spectrum produced by the illumination laser at each pixel in the image which can then be used to identify the explosive type and relative quantity using spectral identification approaches developed initially in the remote sensing community.

Bernacki, Bruce E.; Phillips, Mark C.

2010-05-01

362

Research on method of geometry and spectral calibration of pushbroom dispersive hyperspectral imager  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Development and application of airborne and aerospace hyperspectral imager press for high precision geometry and spectral calibration of pixels of image cube. The research of geometry and spectral calibration of pushbroom hyperspectral imager, its target is giving the coordinate of angle field of view and center wavelength of each detect unit in focal plane detector of hyperspectral imager, and achieves the high precision, full field of view, full channel geometry and spectral calibration. It is importance for imaging quantitative and deep application of hyperspectal imager. The paper takes the geometry and spectral calibration of pushbroom dispersive hyperspectral imager as case study, and research on the constitution and analysis of imaging mathematical model. Aimed especially at grating-dispersive hyperspectral imaging, the specialty of the imaging mode and dispersive method has been concretely analyzed. Based on the analysis, the theory and feasible method of geometry and spectral calibration of dispersive hyperspectral imager is set up. The key technique has been solved is As follows: 1). the imaging mathematical model and feasible method of geometry and spectral calibration for full pixels of image cube has been set up, the feasibility of the calibration method has been analyzed. 2). the engineering model and method of the geometry and spectral calibration of pushbroom dispersive hyperspectral imager has been set up and the calibration equipment has been constructed, and the calibration precision has been analyzed.

He, Zhiping; Shu, Rong; Wang, Jianyu

2012-11-01

363

Research on a project of the new airborne polarization hyperspectral imager  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Polarization hyperspectral imagers combine polarization technology, spectral technology and imaging technology, get both the image of the target and the polarization and spectrum of the pixel to recognize the materials on the objects have broad applied foreground on airborne remote sensing domain. That arrests extensive attention abroad. This paper brings hyperspectral technology and polarization image together. On the basis of geometrical optics theory and polarization theory, puts forward a new polarization hyper-spectral Imaging technology. That could get hyper-spectral information and whole Stokes elements spectral from the object on the measuring the power spectral from the modulator only one time, and that raise the ability of recognization greatly. The paper carries out a project to the new airborne polarization hyperspectral imager.

Li, Huan; Zhao, Jia; Zhou, Feng; Lin, Xu-ling; Zhao, Hai-bo

2012-12-01

364

POULTRY SKIN TUMOR DETECTION IN HYPERSPECTRAL REFLECTANCE IMAGES BY COMBINING CLASSIFIERS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This paper presents a new method for detecting poultry skin tumors in hyperspectral reflectance images. We employ the principal component analysis (PCA), discrete wavelet transform (DWT), and kernel discriminant analysis (KDA) to extract the independent feature sets in hyperspectral reflectance imag...

365

Use of field reflectance data for crop mapping using airborne hyperspectral image  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent developments in hyperspectral remote sensing technologies enable acquisition of image with high spectral resolution, which is typical to the laboratory or in situ reflectance measurements. There has been an increasing interest in the utilization of in situ reference reflectance spectra for rapid and repeated mapping of various surface features. Here we examined the prospect of classifying airborne hyperspectral image

Rama Rao Nidamanuri; Bernd Zbell

2011-01-01

366

DETECTION OF BRUISES ON APPLES USING NEAR-INFRARED HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGING  

Microsoft Academic Search

Development of an automated bruise detection system will help the fruit industry to provide better fruit for the consumer and reduce potential economic losses. The objective of this research was to investigate the potential of near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging for detecting bruises on apples in the spectral region between 900 nm and 1700 nm. An NIR hyperspectral imaging system was

R. Lu

367

Hyperspectral Images Clustering on Reconfigurable Hardware Using the K-Means Algorithm  

Microsoft Academic Search

Unsupervised clustering is a powerful technique for understanding multispectral and hyperspectral images, being k-means one of the most used iterative approaches. It is a simple though computationally expensive algorithm, particularly for clustering large hyperspectral images into many categories. Software implementation presents advantages such as flexibility and low cost for implementation of complex functions. However, it presents limitations, such as difficulties

Abel Guilhermino da S. Filho; Alejandro César Frery; Cristiano Coêlho de Araújo; Haglay Alice; Jorge Cerqueira; Juliana A. Loureiro; Manoel Eusebio de Lima; Maria das Graças S. Oliveira; Michelle Matos Horta

2003-01-01

368

Measurement of the Absorption and Scattering Properties of Turbid Liquid Foods Using Hyperspectral Imaging  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This paper reports on the development of a hyperspectral imaging technique for rapid determination of the absorption and scattering properties of turbid liquid foods over the visible and near-infrared region of 530-900 nm. A hyperspectral imaging system in line scanning mode was first tested and val...

369

Hyperspectral imaging-based classification and wavebands selection for internal defect detection of pickling cucumbers  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Hyperspectral imaging is useful for detecting internal defect of pickling cucumbers. The technique, however, is not yet suitable for high-speed online implementation due to the challenges for analyzing large-scale hyperspectral images. This research was aimed to select the optimal wavebands from the...

370

Application of Hyperspectral Imaging in Food Safety Inspection and Control: A Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Food safety is a great public concern, and outbreaks of food-borne illnesses can lead to disturbance to the society. Consequently, fast and nondestructive methods are required for sensing the safety situation of produce. As an emerging technology, hyperspectral imaging has been successfully employed in food safety inspection and control. After presenting the fundamentals of hyperspectral imaging, this paper provides a

Yao-Ze Feng; Da-Wen Sun

2012-01-01

371

Analysis of VIS-LWIR hyperspectral image data for detailed geologic mapping  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research is being conducted into the usefulness of hyperspectral data for detailed geologic mapping applications. The data being analyzed were collected by the HYDICE (VIS-SWIR) and SEBASS (LWIR) airborne imaging spectrometers. Hyperspectral data provides a means of identifying surface minerology, which indicates lithology. In addition, because the data are collected in image format, photo-geologic observations can be made, such as

Timothy Bowers

2002-01-01

372

DETECTION OF BRUISES ON PICKLING CUCUMBERS USING NEAR-INFRARED HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGING  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging technique was investigated for the detection of bruises on pickling cucumbers caused by mechanical stress. An NIR hyperspectral imaging system was developed to acquire both spatial and spectral information from pickling cucumbers in the spectral region of 9...

373

On-Line Hyperspectral Transmittance Imaging for Internal Defect Detection of Pickling Cucumbers  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Hyperspectral imaging technique under transmittance mode was investigated for detection of internal defect in pickling cucumbers such as carpel suture separation or hollow cucumbers caused by mechanical stress. A prototype of on-line hyperspectral transmittance imaging system was developed for real...

374

MEASUREMENT OF THE OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF APPLES USING HYPERSPECTRAL DIFFUSE REFLECTANCE IMAGING  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This paper reports on the development of a novel hyperspectral imaging technique for rapid determination of the absorption and scattering properties of turbid food materials over the visible and near-infrared region of 450-1,000 nm. A hyperspectral imaging system in line scanning mode was tested and...

375

Multivariate Curve Resolution for Hyperspectral Image Analysis: Applications to Microarray Technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) using constrained alternating least squares algorithms represents a powerful analysis capability for the quantitative analysis of hyperspectral image data. We will demonstrate the application of MCR using data from a new hyperspectral fluorescence imaging microarray scanner for monitoring gene expression in cells from thousands of genes on the array. The new scanner collects the entire fluorescence

David M. Haaland; Jerilyn A. Timlin; Michael B. Sinclair; Mark H. Van Benthem

376

Multivariate curve resolution for hyperspectral image analysis: applications to microarray technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) using constrained alternating least squares algorithms represents a powerful analysis capability for a quantitative analysis of hyperspectral image data. We will demonstrate the application of MCR using data from a new hyperspectral fluorescence imaging microarray scanner for monitoring gene expression in cells from thousands of genes on the array. The new scanner collects the entire fluorescence

David M. Haaland; Jerilyn A. Timlin; Michael B. Sinclair; Mark H. Van Benthem; M. Juanita Martinez; Anthony D. Aragon; Margaret Werner-Washburne

2003-01-01

377

The role of digital bathymetry in mapping shallow marine vegetation from hyperspectral image data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hyperspectral remote sensing is a proven technology for measurement of coastal ocean colour, including sea?bed mapping in optically shallow waters. Using hyperspectral imagery of shallow (<15 m deep) sea bed acquired with the Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI?550), we examined how changes in the spatial resolution of bathymetric grids, created from sonar data (echosounding) and input to conventional image classifiers, affected

P. Gagnon; R. E. Scheibling; W. Jones; D. Tully

2008-01-01

378

Determining the intrinsic dimension of a hyperspectral image using random matrix theory.  

PubMed

Determining the intrinsic dimension of a hyperspectral image is an important step in the spectral unmixing process and under- or overestimation of this number may lead to incorrect unmixing in unsupervised methods. In this paper, we discuss a new method for determining the intrinsic dimension using recent advances in random matrix theory. This method is entirely unsupervised, free from any user-determined parameters and allows spectrally correlated noise in the data. Robustness tests are run on synthetic data, to determine how the results were affected by noise levels, noise variability, noise approximation, and spectral characteristics of the endmembers. Success rates are determined for many different synthetic images, and the method is tested on two pairs of real images, namely a Cuprite scene taken from Airborne Visible InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and SpecTIR sensors, and a Lunar Lakes scene taken from AVIRIS and Hyperion, with good results. PMID:23193450

Cawse-Nicholson, Kerry; Damelin, Steven B; Robin, Amandine; Sears, Michael

2012-11-16

379

Nonlinear Spectral Unmixing of Hyperspectral Images Using Gaussian Processes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents an unsupervised algorithm for nonlinear unmixing of hyperspectral images. The proposed model assumes that the pixel reflectances result from a nonlinear function of the abundance vectors associated with the pure spectral components. We assume that the spectral signatures of the pure components and the nonlinear function are unknown. The first step of the proposed method consists of the Bayesian estimation of the abundance vectors for all the image pixels and the nonlinear function relating the abundance vectors to the observations. The endmembers are subsequently estimated using Gaussian process regression. The performance of the unmixing strategy is evaluated with simulations conducted on synthetic and real data.

Altmann, Yoann; Dobigeon, Nicolas; McLaughlin, Steve; Tourneret, Jean-Yves

2013-05-01

380

Automated recognition and detection of dismounts and vehicles using close-in urban hyperspectral images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Advances in Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) sensor offer new avenues for precise detection, identification and characterization of materials or targets of military interest. HSI technologies are capable of exploiting 10s to 100s of images of a scene collected at contiguous or selective spectral bands to seek out mission-critical objects. In this paper, we develop and analyze several HSI algorithms for detection, recognition and tracking of dismounts, vehicles and other objects. Preliminary work on detection, classification and fingerprinting of dismount, vehicle and UAV has been performed using visible band HSI data. The results indicate improved performance with HSI when compared to traditional EO processing. All the detection and classification results reported in this paper were based on single HSI pixel used for testing. Furthermore, the close-in Hyperspectral data were collected for the experiments at indoor or outdoor by the authors. The collections were taken in different lighting conditions using a visible HSI sensor. The algorithms studied for performance comparison include PCA, Linear Discriminant Analysis method (LDA), Quadratic classifier and Fisher's Linear Discriminant and comprehensive results have been included in terms of confusion matrices and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves.

Karimkhan, Shamsaddin; Vongsy, Karmon; Shaw, Arnab K.; Wicker, Devert

2007-04-01

381

Evaluation of a hyperspectral image database for demosaicking purposes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a study on the the applicability of hyperspectral images to evaluate color filter array (CFA) design and the performance of demosaicking algorithms. The aim is to simulate a typical digital still camera processing pipe-line and to compare two different scenarios: evaluate the performance of demosaicking algorithms applied to raw camera RGB values before color rendering to sRGB, and evaluate the performance of demosaicking algorithms applied on the final sRGB color rendered image. The second scenario is the most frequently used one in literature because CFA design and algorithms are usually tested on a set of existing images that are already rendered, such as the Kodak Photo CD set containing the well-known lighthouse image. We simulate the camera processing pipe-line with measured spectral sensitivity functions of a real camera. Modeling a Bayer CFA, we select three linear demosaicking techniques in order to perform the tests. The evaluation is done using CMSE, CPSNR, s-CIELAB and MSSIM metrics to compare demosaicking results. We find that the performance, and especially the difference between demosaicking algorithms, is indeed significant depending if the mosaicking/demosaicking is applied to camera raw values as opposed to already rendered sRGB images. We argue that evaluating the former gives a better indication how a CFA/demosaicking combination will work in practice, and that it is in the interest of the community to create a hyperspectral image dataset dedicated to that effect.

Larabi, Mohamed-Chaker; Süsstrunk, Sabine

2011-01-01

382

[Atmospheric correction of hyperion hyperspectral image based on FLAASH].  

PubMed

Atmospheric correction of remote sensing image is the premise of quantitative remote sensing. The present paper evaluated the capability of FLAASH (fast line-of-sight atmospheric analysis of spectral hypercubes)in ENVI software to make atmospheric correction for EO-1 Hyperion hyperspectral image. Hyperion hyperspecreal image of Zhangye city in Heihe River valley of Gansu province, China was acquired on September 10, 2007. Canopy spectra, biochemical component and GPS data of 41 plots were measured in near real-time during the satellite overpass. Hyperion hyperspectral image was geometrically corrected using Lansat-7 ETM+ image, then DN values were transformed to radiance and apparent reflectance, and atmospheric correction of Hyperion image was made using FLAASH. The resulting radiance, apparent reflectance and reflectance after FLAASH of four typical objects, including corn, water body, desert and building, were compared. ASD spectra of corn were resampled to Hyperion corresponding bands using Gaussian filter function. The comparison between ASD resampled spectra and Hyperion spectra after FLAASH demonstrated that the atmospheric correction using FLAASH is very effective and these two spectra are consistent with each other and the correlation coefficient reached 0.987. PMID:19650448

Yuan, Jin-guo; Niu, Zheng; Wang, Xi-ping

2009-05-01

383

Derivative spectra matching for wetland vegetation identification and by hyperspectral image  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we reported some research result in applying hyperspectral remote sensing data in identification and classification of wetland plant species and associations. Hyperspectral data were acquired by Modular Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (MAIS) over Poyang Lake wetland, China. A derivative spectral matching algorithm was used in hyperspectral vegetation analysis. The field measurement spectra were as reference for derivative spectral matching. In the study area, seven wetland plant associations were identified and classified with overall average accuracy is 84.03%.

Wang, Jinnian; Zheng, Lanfen; Tong, Qingxi

1998-08-01

384

Improved detection and false alarm rejection for chemical vapors using passive hyperspectral imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two AIRIS sensors were tested at Dugway Proving Grounds against chemical agent vapor simulants. The primary objectives of the test were to: 1) assess performance of algorithm improvements designed to reduce false alarm rates with a special emphasis on solar effects, and 3) evaluate performance in target detection at 5 km. The tests included 66 total releases comprising alternating 120 kg glacial acetic acid (GAA) and 60 kg triethyl phosphate (TEP) events. The AIRIS sensors had common algorithms, detection thresholds, and sensor parameters. The sensors used the target set defined for the Joint Service Lightweight Chemical Agent Detector (JSLSCAD) with TEP substituted for GA and GAA substituted for VX. They were exercised at two sites located at either 3 km or 5 km from the release point. Data from the tests will be presented showing that: 1) excellent detection capability was obtained at both ranges with significantly shorter alarm times at 5 km, 2) inter-sensor comparison revealed very comparable performance, 3) false alarm rates < 1 incident per 10 hours running time over 143 hours of sensor operations were achieved, 4) algorithm improvements eliminated both solar and cloud false alarms. The algorithms enabling the improved false alarm rejection will be discussed. The sensor technology has recently been extended to address the problem of detection of liquid and solid chemical agents and toxic industrial chemical on surfaces. The phenomenology and applicability of passive infrared hyperspectral imaging to this problem will be discussed and demonstrated.

Marinelli, William J.; Miyashiro, Rex; Gittins, Christopher M.; Konno, Daisei; Chang, Shing; Farr, Matt; Perkins, Brad

2013-05-01

385

Data collection with a dual-band infrared hyperspectral imager  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A novel dual-band hyperspectral imaging system has been used to collect field test data for robotics vision applications. The imaging system can collect full scene hyperspectral images in both the long wave infrared (LWIR) band (8-10.5 ?m) and the mid-wave infrare (MWIR) band (4-5.25 ?m) simultaneously. The imager uses a specially designed Ge diffractive lens with a dual-band 320×240 HgCdTe infrared focal plane array (FPA) cooled with a Sterling cooler. The stacked FPA consists of two layers: the top one sensitive in the MWIR region and the bottom one sensitive in the LWIR region. The diffractive lens is designed to focus a first order, single-color (i.e., 8.0 ?m) image in the LWIR onto the bottom layer of the FPA while at the same time focusing a second order single-color (i.e., 4.0 ?m) image in the MWIR onto the top layer of the FPA. Images at different wavelengths are acquired by moving the lens along its optical axis. Moving the lens over the entire range during data collection allows sequential collection of spectral images in each band resulting in the collection of two complete image cubes. The focal length of the lens is 75 mm at 9 ?m. The spectral resolution of the imager is 0.1 ?m at the 9 ?m wavelength. In general, 128 narrow wavelength bands are collected in each of the two broad spectral regions. After data collection, the images are processed to remove noise, contributions from unfocused wavelengths, and magnification differences. A description of the imager, data collection, noise removal, post-processing, and analysis are presented.

Smith, Dale J.; Gupta, Neelam

2005-08-01

386

Extended hyperspectral imaging system modeling and implementation for subpixel target detection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For hyperspectral imaging system design and parameter trade-o research, an analytical model to simulate the remote sensing system has been developed and is in progress to be made available to the community. The analytical model includes scene, sensor and target characteristics, and also atmospheric features, background spectral statistics, sensor speci cations and target spectral statistics. The model is being implemented as a web-based application through an RIT-hosted website. Predicting system performance has been veri ed by real world data collected during the RIT SHARE 2012 collection and the data shows consistency with the simulated results on calibration tarps and grass. Also, subpixel target spectral statistics are predicted by this model. Some parameter trade-o examples are given and analyzed to explain the utility of this model.

Ding, Bo; Kerekes, John P.

2013-09-01

387

Hyperspectral imaging in the infrared using LIFTIRS  

SciTech Connect

In this article, recent characterization measurements made with LIFTIRS, the Livermore Imaging Fourier Transform InfraRed Spectrometer, are presented. A discussion is also presented of the relative merits of the various alternative designs for imaging spectrometers.

Bennett, C.L.; Carter, M.R.; Fields, D.J.

1995-07-01

388

Signal processing for hyperspectral image exploitation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electro-optical remote sensing involves the acquisition of information about an object or scene without coming into physical contact with it. This is achieved by exploiting the fact that the materials comprising the various objects in a scene reflect, absorb, and emit electromagnetic radiation in ways characteristic of their molecular composition and shape. If the radiation arriving at the sensor is

G. Shaw; D. Manolakis

2002-01-01

389

Material characterization using a hyperspectral infrared imaging spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

Fourier transform spectroscopy has found application in many areas including chemometrics, biomedical and biochemical studies, and atmospheric chemistry. This paper describes an investigation into the application of the LLNL Hyperspectral Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (HIRIS) to the non-destructive evaluation of man-made and natural materials. We begin by describing the HIRIS system and the objects studied in the investigation. Next, we describe the technique used to collect the hyperspec- tral imagery, and discuss the processing required to transform the data into usable form. We then describe a technique to analyze the data, and provide some preliminary results.

Aimonetti, W D; Bixler, J V; Roberts, R S

1998-10-30

390

Surgical and clinical needs for DLP hyperspectral imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Surgical technology advances slowly and only when there is overwhelming need for change. Change is resisted by surgeons and is made hard by FDA rules that inhibit innovation. There is a pressing need to improve surgeon's visualization of the operative field during laparoscopic surgery to minimize the risk for significant injury that can occur when surgeons are operating around delicate, hidden structures. We propose to use a Digital Light Processor-based hyperspectral imaging system to assist an operating surgeon's ability to see through tissues and identify otherwise hidden structures such as bile ducts during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

Livingston, Edward H.

2010-02-01

391

Application of novel hyperspectral imaging technologies in combat casualty care  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Novel hyperspectral imaging (HSI) methods may play several important roles in Combat Casualty Care: (1) HSI of the skin may provide spatial data on hemoglobin saturation of oxygen, as a "window" into perfusion during shock. (2) HSI or similar technology could be incorporated into closed-loop, feedback-controlled resuscitation systems. (3) HSI may provide information about tissue viability and/or wound infection. (4) HSI in the near-infrared range may provide information on the tissue water content--greatly affected, e.g., by fluid resuscitation. Thus, further refinements in the speed and size of HSI systems are sought to make these capabilities available on the battlefield.

Cancio, Leopoldo C.

2010-02-01

392

The generating mechanism of strips and destriping algorithm of HJ-1A Hyperspectral Image  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hyperspectral remote sensing images are affected by different types of noise. In addition to typical random noise, nonperiodic partially deterministic disturbance patterns appear in the data. The strips usually found in images acquired by push-broom sensors, which are characterized by a high degree of spatial and spectral coherence. Many strips-reduction approaches such as histogram matching and moment matching have been developed. These methods assume that all sensor elements observe similar subscenes in a given image and adjust the distributions of values acquired by each sensor to some reference distribution by means of a histogram or moment matching, but this assumption usually is failure in many scenes which contain diverse materials. The formation of strips has close connection with the image formation process of push-broom imaging spectrometers. Many causes such as the uniformity of the pixels, the push-broom mode and the asymmetric width of thin slit at the entrance of imaging spectrometers can induce the strips in the images. Comparing with the dispersive spectrometers, interferometer spectrometers acquire the interference data, obtaining the spectrum by using the Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT). By analyzing the generating mechanism of strips in push-broom interferometer imaging spectrometers, we proposed an approach that corrects the strips using relative calibration factor directly computed from the acquired image. Once the relative calibration factor is determined, all the images acquired by the same imaging spectrometers can be corrected. So the methodology is an efficient one to reduce the strips. A formula is set up to describe the connection between gray values of pixels in images and relative calibration factor. The developed methodology is tested on data acquired by HJ-1A Hyperspectral Imaging Spectrometers, which is an interferometer spectrometer put into operation in 2008. The shortwave bands of HJ-1A HSI have severe strips. Results show excellent rejection of the noise with respect to the original HJ-1A HSI images, improving the removal in those scenes with diverse materials as well as being high efficient.

Gao, Xiao-hui; Xu, Guang-hui; Yu, Tao; Wei, Ru-yi

2013-08-01

393

Comparison of multi- and hyperspectral imaging data of leaf rust infected wheat plants  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the context of precision agriculture, several recent studies have focused on detecting crop stress caused by pathogenic fungi. For this purpose, several sensor systems have been used to develop in-field-detection systems or to test possible applications of remote sensing. The objective of this research was to evaluate the potential of different sensor systems for multitemporal monitoring of leaf rust (puccinia recondita) infected wheat crops, with the aim of early detection of infected stands. A comparison between a hyperspectral (120 spectral bands) and a multispectral (3 spectral bands) imaging system shows the benefits and limitations of each approach. Reflectance data of leaf rust infected and fungicide treated control wheat stand boxes (1sqm each) were collected before and until 17 days after inoculation. Plants were grown under controlled conditions in the greenhouse and measurements were taken under consistent illumination conditions. The results of mixture tuned matched filtering analysis showed the suitability of hyperspectral data for early discrimination of leaf rust infected wheat crops due to their higher spectral sensitivity. Five days after inoculation leaf rust infected leaves were detected, although only slight visual symptoms appeared. A clear discrimination between infected and control stands was possible. Multispectral data showed a higher sensitivity to external factors like illumination conditions, causing poor classification accuracy. Nevertheless, if these factors could get under control, even multispectral data may serve a good indicator for infection severity.

Franke, Jonas; Menz, Gunter; Oerke, Erich-Christian; Rascher, Uwe

2005-10-01

394

Using QR Factorization for Real-Time Anomaly Detection in Hyperspectral Images.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Anomaly detection has been used successfully on hyperspectral images for over a decade. However, there is an ever increasing need for real-time anomaly detectors. Historically, anomaly detection methods have focused on analysis after the entire image has ...

K. R. Bush

2012-01-01

395

Some Fundamentals and Methods for Hyperspectral Image Data Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multispectral image data has been a key data type for land observational remote sensing from aircraft and spacecraft since the 1960's1. Sensor technology was a primary limiting factor for many years for this method, as sensors such as Landsat could only collect data in four to seven spectral bands at once. In the last few years, advances in sensor technology

David Landgrebe

1999-01-01

396

HYPERSPECTRAL REFLECTANCE AND FLUORESCENCE LINE-SCAN IMAGING FOR ONLINE QUALITY AND SAFETY INSPECTION OF APPLES  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The Instrumentation and Sensing Laboratory has recently developed a rapid online line-scan imaging system capable of both hyperspectral Vis/NIR reflectance and fluorescence in the Vis with UV-A excitation. The hyperspectral online line-scan system integrated with a commercial apple-sorting machine ...

397

Support vector machines for hyperspectral image classification with spectral-based kernels  

Microsoft Academic Search

Support vector machines (SVM) has been recently used with success for the classification of hyperspectral images. This method appears to be a robust alternative for pattern recognition with hyperspectral data: since the method is based on a geometric point of view, no statistical estimation has to be achieved. Then, SVM outperforms classical supervised classification algorithms such as the maximum likelihood

G. Mercier; M. Lennon

2003-01-01

398

Support vector machines for classification of hyperspectral remote-sensing images  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we address the problem of classification of hyperspectral remote-sensing images (in the original hyperdimensional feature space) by Support Vector Machines (SVMs). In particular, we investigate the effectiveness of SVMs in terms of classification accuracy, computational time and stability to parameter setting. Experiments, carried out on a standard AVIRIS hyperspectral data set, include a comparison with two other

Farid MELGANI; Lorenzo BRUZZONE

2002-01-01

399

Detecting pits in tart cherries by hyperspectral transmission imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The presence of pits in processed cherry products causes safety concerns for consumers and imposes potential liability for the food industry. The objective of this research was to investigate a hyperspectral transmission imaging technique for detecting the pit in tart cherries. A hyperspectral imaging system was used to acquire transmission images from individual cherry fruit for four orientations before and after pits were removed over the spectral region between 450 nm and 1,000 nm. Cherries of three size groups (small, intermediate, and large), each with two color classes (light red and dark red) were used for determining the effect of fruit orientation, size, and color on the pit detection accuracy. Additional cherries were studied for the effect of defect (i.e., bruises) on the pit detection. Computer algorithms were developed using the neural network (NN) method to classify the cherries with and without the pit. Two types of data inputs, i.e., single spectra and selected regions of interest (ROIs), were compared. The spectral region between 690 nm and 850 nm was most appropriate for cherry pit detection. The NN with inputs of ROIs achieved higher pit detection rates ranging from 90.6% to 100%, with the average correct rate of 98.4%. Fruit orientation and color had a small effect (less than 1%) on pit detection. Fruit size and defect affected pit detection and their effect could be minimized by training the NN with properly selected cherry samples.

Qin, Jianwei; Lu, Renfu

2004-11-01

400

Lossless compression of hyperspectral images using hybrid context prediction.  

PubMed

In this letter a new algorithm for lossless compression of hyperspectral images using hybrid context prediction is proposed. Lossless compression algorithms are typically divided into two stages, a decorrelation stage and a coding stage. The decorrelation stage supports both intraband and interband predictions. The intraband (spatial) prediction uses the median prediction model, since the median predictor is fast and efficient. The interband prediction uses hybrid context prediction. The hybrid context prediction is the combination of a linear prediction (LP) and a context prediction. Finally, the residual image of hybrid context prediction is coded by the arithmetic coding. We compare the proposed lossless compression algorithm with some of the existing algorithms for hyperspectral images such as 3D-CALIC, M-CALIC, LUT, LAIS-LUT, LUT-NN, DPCM (C-DPCM), JPEG-LS. The performance of the proposed lossless compression algorithm is evaluated. Simulation results show that our algorithm achieves high compression ratios with low complexity and computational cost. PMID:22453490

Liang, Yuan; Li, Jianping; Guo, Ke

2012-03-26

401

Hyperspectral pixel classification from coded-aperture compressive imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes a new approach and its associated theoretical performance guarantees for supervised hyperspectral image classification from compressive measurements obtained by a Coded Aperture Snapshot Spectral Imaging System (CASSI). In one snapshot, the two-dimensional focal plane array (FPA) in the CASSI system captures the coded and spectrally dispersed source field of a three-dimensional data cube. Multiple snapshots are used to construct a set of compressive spectral measurements. The proposed approach is based on the concept that each pixel in the hyper-spectral image lies in a low-dimensional subspace obtained from the training samples, and thus it can be represented as a sparse linear combination of vectors in the given subspace. The sparse vector representing the test pixel is then recovered from the set of compressive spectral measurements and it is used to determine the class label of the test pixel. The theoretical performance bounds of the classifier exploit the distance preservation condition satisfied by the multiple shot CASSI system and depend on the number of measurements collected, code aperture pattern, and similarity between spectral signatures in the dictionary. Simulation experiments illustrate the performance of the proposed classification approach.

Ramirez, Ana; Arce, Gonzalo R.; Sadler, Brian M.

2012-05-01

402

NIR DLP hyperspectral imaging system for medical applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

DLP hyperspectral reflectance imaging in the visible range has been previously shown to quantify hemoglobin oxygenation in subsurface tissues, 1 mm to 2 mm deep. Extending the spectral range into the near infrared reflects biochemical information from deeper subsurface tissues. Unlike any other illumination method, the digital micro-mirror device, DMD, chip is programmable, allowing the user to actively illuminate with precisely predetermined spectra of illumination with a minimum bandpass of approximately 10 nm. It is possible to construct active spectral-based illumination that includes but is not limited to containing sharp cutoffs to act as filters or forming complex spectra, varying the intensity of light at discrete wavelengths. We have characterized and tested a pure NIR, 760 nm to 1600 nm, DLP hyperspectral reflectance imaging system. In its simplest application, the NIR system can be used to quantify the percentage of water in a subject, enabling edema visualization. It can also be used to map vein structure in a patient in real time. During gall bladder surgery, this system could be invaluable in imaging bile through fatty tissue, aiding surgeons in locating the common bile duct in real time without injecting any contrast agents.

Wehner, Eleanor; Thapa, Abhas; Livingston, Edward; Zuzak, Karel

2011-02-01

403

Hyperspectral and high-resolution image fusion based on second generation Bandelet transform  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A fusion algorithm of hyperspectral and high-resolution images based on principal component analysis (PCA) and second generation Bandelet transform is proposed. Primarily, the numerous components of the hyperspectral image are divided. Subsequently, the maximum rule is used to select the Bandelet coefficients and geometry flows of the hyperspectral image which are transformed by PCA in the following step. Finally, the fused image is reconstructed by taking inverse PCA and Bandelet transform. Some numerical simulations are made to test the validity and capability of the proposed fusion algorithm.

Du, Xiaoping; Chen, Hang; Liu, Zhengjun; Dou, Xiaojie; Xia, Lurui; Cheng, Xiangzhen; Shan, Congmiao

2013-06-01

404

Development of hyperspectral imaging technique for the detection of apple surface defects and contaminations  

Microsoft Academic Search

A high spatial resolution (0.5–1.0 mm) hyperspectral imaging system is presented as a tool for selecting better multispectral methods to detect defective and contaminated foods and agricultural products. Examples of direct linear or non-linear analysis of the spectral bands of hyperspectral images that resulted in more efficient multispectral imaging techniques are given. Various image analysis methods for the detection of

Patrick M. Mehl; Yud-Ren Chen; Moon S. Kim; Diane E. Chan

2004-01-01

405

Hyperspectral imaging - an emerging process analytical tool for food quality and safety control  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000aHyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an emerging platform technology that integrates conventional imaging and spectroscopy to attain both spatial and spectral information from an object. Although HSI was originally developed for remote sensing, it has recently emerged as a powerful process analytical tool for non-destructive food analysis. This paper provides an introduction to hyperspectral imaging: HSI equipment, image acquisition and processing

A. A. Gowen; C. P. O'Donnell; P. J. Cullen; G. Downey; J. M. Frias

2007-01-01

406

Development of a new sensor module for hyperspectral polarimetric measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Institute for Space Sciences at the Free University Berlin has built an instrument for hyperspectral measurements (FUBISS). A new polarization entrance optics and a motion control unit is going to be adopted to that system to open up the possibility to derive hyperspectral polarization measurements in the atmosphere in the spectral region from the visible to the near IR. The system is ground based and includes the ground based version of the aureole Sun-Photometer FUBISS-SIRA and FUBISS-ASA. The polarization measurements enable the calculation of the stokes vector and the degree of polarization measurements enable the calculation of the stokes vector and the degree of polarization and angle at predefined incident viewing angles. One possible application will be the characterization of aerosols by retrieving profiles of their optical and micro physical properties.

Ruhtz, Thomas; Boesche, Eyk; Fischer, Juergen

2002-01-01

407

Hyperspectral Image Compression on Reconfigurable Platforms  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we present an implementation of the image compression routine SPIHT in reconfigurable logic. A discussion on why adaptive logic is required, as opposed to an ASIC, is provided along with background material on the image compression algorithm. We analyzed several Discrete Wavelet Transform architectures and selected the folded DWT design. In addition we provide a study on

Thomas W. Fry; Scott Hauck

2002-01-01

408

Hyperspectral sensor for gypsum detection on monumental buildings  

Microsoft Academic Search

A portable hyperspectral device (ASD-FieldSpec FR Pro) has been employed for the characterization of alterations affecting the marble facade of the Santa Maria Novella church (XIII cent.) in Florence (Italy). The ASD-FieldSpec FR Pro collects the reflectance spectra of a selected target area (about 1.5 cm2). The spectra of calcite, gypsum and other mineral phases commonly occurring on outdoor surfaces

M. Camaiti; S. Vettori; M. Benvenuti; L. Chiarantini; P. Costagliola; F. Di Benedetto; S. Moretti; F. Paba; E. Pecchioni

2011-01-01

409

Application of hyperspectral imaging in food safety inspection and control: a review.  

PubMed

Food safety is a great public concern, and outbreaks of food-borne illnesses can lead to disturbance to the society. Consequently, fast and nondestructive methods are required for sensing the safety situation of produce. As an emerging technology, hyperspectral imaging has been successfully employed in food safety inspection and control. After presenting the fundamentals of hyperspectral imaging, this paper provides a comprehensive review on its application in determination of physical, chemical, and biological contamination on food products. Additionally, other studies, including detecting meat and meat bone in feedstuffs as well as organic residue on food processing equipment, are also reported due to their close relationship with food safety control. With these applications, it can be demonstrated that miscellaneous hyperspectral imaging techniques including near-infrared hyperspectral imaging, fluorescence hyperspectral imaging, and Raman hyperspectral imaging or their combinations are powerful tools for food safety surveillance. Moreover, it is envisaged that hyperspectral imaging can be considered as an alternative technique for conventional methods in realizing inspection automation, leading to the elimination of the occurrence of food safety problems at the utmost. PMID:22823350

Feng, Yao-Ze; Sun, Da-Wen

2012-01-01

410

Hyperspectral imagery: Clutter adaptation in anomaly detection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hyperspectral sensors are passive sensors that simultaneously record images for hundreds of contiguous and narrowly spaced regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Each image corresponds to the same ground scene, thus creating a cube of images that contain both spatial and spectral information about the objects and backgrounds in the scene. In this paper, we present an adaptive anomaly detector designed

Susan M. Schweizer; José M. F. Moura

2000-01-01

411

Mid-infrared hyperspectral imaging of painting materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A novel hyperspectral imaging system (HI90, Bruker Optics), working in the mid-infrared range and recently developed for the remote identification and mapping of hazardous compounds, has here been optimized for investigating painting surfaces. The painting Sestante 10 (1982) by Alberto Burri has been spectrally and spatially investigated with the HI90 system revealing the distribution of inorganic materials constituting the artworks. In order to validate the results obtainable by the imager for the pigment identification previous tests on laboratory models were performed. Yellow, white and blue pigments painted with different binders (namely egg, alkyd, acrylic and vinyl) were investigated by the HI90. Afterwards, the polychrome painting Sestante 10 was investigated focusing the attention on the inorganic material distribution revealing the presence of different extenders (kaolin, BaSO4, CaSO4) mixed with the various silica-based pigments present in the painting. The brightness temperature spectra collected by HI90 have also been compared to single point reflection spectra acquired by a conventional portable FTIR spectrometer (Alpha-R by Bruker Optics) highlighting the good spectral quality of the imaging system. This comparison permitted also to evaluate the spectral response and the diagnostic strengths of the spectral range available by the HI90 imaging (1300-860 cm-1), validating the reliability of the obtained chemical images. This study clearly highlights the high potential of the new hyperspectral imaging system and opens up new perspectives in the current scientific interest devoted to the application of mapping and imaging methods for the study of painting surfaces.

Rosi, Francesca; Harig, Roland; Miliani, Costanza; Braun, René; Sali, Diego; Daveri, Alessia; Brunetti, Brunetto G.; Sgamellotti, Antonio

2013-05-01

412

Combined Hyperspatial and Hyperspectral Imaging Spectrometer Concept.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

There is a user need for increasing spatial and spectral resolution in Earth Observation (EO) optical instrumentation. Higher spectral resolution will be achieved by the introduction of spaceborne imaging spectrometers. Higher spatial resolutions of 1 - 3...

I. Burke H. Zwick

1995-01-01

413

Design and laboratory calibration of the compact pushbroom hyperspectral imaging system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The designed hyperspectral imaging system is composed of three main parts, that is, optical subsystem, electronic subsystem and capturing subsystem. And a three-dimensional "image cube" can be obtained through push-broom. The fore-optics is commercial-off-the-shelf with high speed and three continuous zoom ratios. Since the dispersive imaging part is based on Offner relay configuration with an aberration-corrected convex grating, high power of light collection and variable view field are obtained. The holographic recording parameters of the convex grating are optimized, and the aberration of the Offner configuration dispersive system is balanced. The electronic system adopts module design, which can minimize size, mass, and power consumption. Frame transfer area-array CCD is chosen as the image sensor and the spectral line can be binned to achieve better SNR and sensitivity without any deterioration in spatial resolution. The capturing system based on the computer can set the capturing parameters, calibrate the spectrometer, process and display spectral imaging data. Laboratory calibrations are prerequisite for using precise spectral data. The spatial and spectral calibration minimize smile and keystone distortion caused by optical system, assembly and so on and fix positions of spatial and spectral line on the frame area-array CCD. Gases excitation lamp is used in smile calibration and the keystone calculation is carried out by different viewing field point source created by a series of narrow slit. The laboratory and field imaging results show that this pushbroom hyperspectral imaging system can acquire high quality spectral images.

Zhou, Jiankang; Ji, Yiqun; Chen, Yuheng; Chen, Xinhua; Shen, Weimin

2009-11-01

414

Direct reconstruction methods for hyperspectral imaging with rotational spectrotomography  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new technique for hyperspectral imaging called spectrotomography collects all available photons and relies on computer tomography to reconstruct the three-dimensional data cube of an object. A rotational spectrotomographic (RST) imager is designed with a wide-aperture, objective-grating camera that is rotated in steps around its optical axis. The full range of spatial and spectral resolution is achieved by the use of a stepped-focal-length (zoom) lens to illuminate the grating. Two-dimensional projections of the object are analyzed with the use of both direct Fourier methods and filter-backprojection algorithms. The RST imager has applications to detection of optical emissions where large photon throughput is required.

Bernhardt, P. A.

1995-09-01

415

Classification of oat and groat kernels using NIR hyperspectral imaging.  

PubMed

An innovative procedure to classify oat and groat kernels based on coupling hyperspectral imaging (HSI) in the near infrared (NIR) range (1006-1650 nm) and chemometrics was designed, developed and validated. According to market requirements, the amount of groat, that is the hull-less oat kernels, is one of the most important quality characteristics of oats. Hyperspectral images of oat and groat samples have been acquired by using a NIR spectral camera (Specim, Finland) and the resulting data hypercubes were analyzed applying Principal Component Analysis (PCA) for exploratory purposes and Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) to build the classification models to discriminate the two kernel typologies. Results showed that it is possible to accurately recognize oat and groat single kernels by HSI (prediction accuracy was almost 100%). The study demonstrated also that good classification results could be obtained using only three wavelengths (1132, 1195 and 1608 nm), selected by means of a bootstrap-VIP procedure, allowing to speed up the classification processing for industrial applications. The developed objective and non-destructive method based on HSI can be utilized for quality control purposes and/or for the definition of innovative sorting logics of oat grains. PMID:23200388

Serranti, Silvia; Cesare, Daniela; Marini, Federico; Bonifazi, Giuseppe

2012-10-27

416

Hyperspectral imaging of structure and composition in atomically thin heterostructures.  

PubMed

Precise vertical stacking and lateral stitching of two-dimensional (2D) materials, such as graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), can be used to create ultrathin heterostructures with complex functionalities, but this diversity of behaviors also makes these new materials difficult to characterize. We report a DUV-vis-NIR hyperspectral microscope that provides imaging and spectroscopy at energies of up to 6.2 eV, allowing comprehensive, all-optical mapping of chemical composition in graphene/h-BN lateral heterojunctions and interlayer rotations in twisted bilayer graphene (tBLG). With the addition of transmission electron microscopy, we obtain quantitative structure-property relationships, confirming the formation of interfaces in graphene/h-BN lateral heterojunctions that are abrupt on a micrometer scale, and a one-to-one relationship between twist angle and interlayer optical resonances in tBLG. Furthermore, we perform similar hyperspectral imaging of samples that are supported on a nontransparent silicon/SiO2 substrate, enabling facile fabrication of atomically thin heterostructure devices with known composition and structure. PMID:23841492

Havener, Robin W; Kim, Cheol-Joo; Brown, Lola; Kevek, Joshua W; Sleppy, Joel D; McEuen, Paul L; Park, Jiwoong

2013-07-12

417

Design goals and solutions for display of hyperspectral images  

Microsoft Academic Search

Design goals and solutions are proposed for the display of hyperspectral imagery on tristimulus displays. The requirements of a hyperspectral visualization depend on the task. We focus on creating consistent representations of hyper- spectral data that can facilitate understanding and analysis of hyperspectral scenes, and may be used in conjunction with task- specific visualizations. Fixed linear spectral weighting envelopes are

Nathaniel P. Jacobson; Maya R. Gupta

2005-01-01

418

Subpixel object detection using hyperspectral imaging for search and rescue operations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Time critical search & rescue (s&r) operations often requires the detection of small objects in a vast area. While an airborne search can cover the area, no operational instrumental tools currently exist to actually replace the human operator. By producing the spectral signature of each pixel in a spatial image, multi- and hyper-spectral imaging (HSI) sensors provides a powerful capability for automated detection of subpixel size objects that are otherwise unresolved objects in conventional imagery. This property of HSI naturally lends itself to s&r operations. A lost hiker, skier, life raft adrift in the ocean, downed pilot or small aircraft wreckage targets, can be detected from relatively high altitude based on their unique spectral signatures. Moreover, the spectral information obtained allows the search craft to operate at substantially reduced spatial resolution thereby increasing scene coverage without a significant loss in detection sensitivity. The paper demonstrates the detection of objects as small as 1/10 of an image pixel from a sensor flying at over 6 km altitude. A subpixel object detection algorithm using HSI, based on local image statistics without reliance on spectral libraries is presented. The technique is amenable to fast signal processing and the requisite hardware can be built using inexpensive off the shelf technology. This makes HSI a highly attractive tool for real-time, autonomous instrument-based implementation. It can complement current visual-based s&r operations or emerging synthetic aperture radar sensors that are much more expensive.

Subramanian, Suresh; Gat, Nahum

1998-09-01

419

LWIR hyperspectral imager based on a diffractive optics lens  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A diffractive optics lens based longwave infrared hyperspectral imager has been used to collect laboratory and outdoor field test data. The imager uses a specially designed diffractive optics Ge lens with a 320×256 HgCdTe focal plane array (FPA) cooled with a Sterling-cooler. The imager operates in 8-10.5 ?m (long wave IR, LWIR) spectral region and an image cube with 50 to 200 bands can be acquired rapidly. Spectral images at different wavelengths are obtained by moving the lens along its optical axis. An f/2.38 diffractive lens is used with a focal length of 70 mm at 8 ?m. The IFOV is 0.57 mrad which corresponds to an FOV of 10.48°. The spectral resolution of the imager is 0.034 ?m at 9 ?m. The pixel size is 40×40 ?m2 in the FPA. In post processing of image cube data contributions due to wavelengths other than the focused one are removed and a correction to account for the change in magnification due to the motion of the lens is applied to each spectral image. A brief description of the imager, data collection and analysis to characterize the performance of the imager will be presented in this paper.

Gupta, Neelam

2009-05-01

420

Breadboard Model of On-orbit Calibration Equipment for Small Hyperspectral Sensor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper examined the effect of atmospheric correction on that hyperspectral sensors have wavelength error. Also we examined the effects of classification result on erroneous atmospheric correction. Additionally, this paper proposes new spectral calibration device named OCE (On-orbit Calibration Equipment) which consists of the visible and near infrared LEDs. The calibration accuracy by OCE compared with spectral lines of mercury and xenon has been evaluated. The OCE-BBM to central pixel of spatial direction can be calibrated with sufficient accuracy.

Aoyanagi, Yoshihide; Satori, Shin; Takeuchi, Yusuke

421

Hyperspectral Image Compression on Reconfigurable Platforms1  

Microsoft Academic Search

NASA's satellites currently do not make use of advanced image compression techniques during data transmission to earth because of limitations in the available platforms. With the advent of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) and Adaptive Computing technologies it is now possible to construct a system, which compresses the data stream before down linking. Our work is part of a NASA-sponsored

Thomas W. Fry; Scott Hauck

2001-01-01

422

Prediction of white button mushroom ( Agaricus bisporus ) moisture content using hyperspectral imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hyperspectral imaging is a non-contact, non-destructive technique that combines spectroscopy and imaging to extract information\\u000a from a sample. This technology has recently emerged as a powerful technique for food analysis. In this study, the potential\\u000a of hyperspectral imaging (HSI) to predict white button mushroom moisture content (MC) was investigated. Mushrooms were subjected\\u000a to dehydration at 45 ± 1 °C for different time periods

Masoud Taghizadeh; Aoife Gowen; Colm P. O’Donnell

2009-01-01

423

A simultaneous dual-band infrared hyperspectral imager for standoff detection  

Microsoft Academic Search

A novel dual-band hyperspectral imager has been developed to collect 128-band hyperspectral image cubes simultaneously in both 4-5.25 mum (mid wave IR, MWIR) and 8-10.5 mum (long wave IR, LWIR) bands for both target detection and standoff detection of chemical and biological agents. The imager uses a specially designed diffractive optics Ge lens with a dual-band 320×240 HgCdTe infrared (IR)

Neelam Gupta; Dale Smith

2005-01-01

424

Quality and safety assessment of food and agricultural products by hyperspectral fluorescence imaging.  

PubMed

Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging (HSFI) is potentially useful for assessing food and agricultural products, because it combines the merits of both hyperspectral imaging and fluorescence spectroscopy. This paper provides an introduction to HSFI: the principle and components of HSFI, calibration and image processing are described. In addition, recent advances in the application of HSFI to food and agricultural product assessment are reviewed, such as contaminant detection, constituent analysis and quality evaluation. Finally, current limitations and likely future development trends are discussed. PMID:22522423

Zhang, Ruoyu; Ying, Yibin; Rao, Xiuqin; Li, Jiangbo

2012-04-23

425

Hyperspectral laser-induced flourescence imaging for assessing internal quality of kiwi fruit  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes an experimental study on non-destructive methods for predicting quality of kiwifruits using fluorescence imaging. The method is based on hyperspectral laser-induced fluorescence imaging in the region between 700 and 1110 nm, and estimates the kiwifruits quality in terms of internal sugar content and firmness. A station for acquiring hyperspectral laser-induced fluorescence imaging has been designed and carefully

Muhua Liu; Yifeng Liao; Xiaomei Zhou

2008-01-01

426

Estimating foliar water content of winter wheat with hyperspectral image  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Estimates of vegetation water content are of great interest for assessing vegetation water status in agriculture and forestry, and have been used for drought assessment. This study focuses on the retrieval of foliar water content with hyperspectral data at canopy level. The hyperspectral image used in this study was acquired by the airborne operative modular imaging spectrometer (OMIS) at Demonstration Site for Precision Agriculture in Xiaotangshan area, Beijing, on April 26th, 2001. 40 image spectra were extracted to correspond to the quasi-synchronous meansurements of foliar water content (FWC). The image spectra of winter wheat were utilized to validate the sensitivity of the existing and novel water indices and parameters of three water absorption features in NIR and SWIR regions. Correlation analysis showed that, NDWI(860,1241) and NDWI(860,1200) both had significant linear relationships with FWC (R2 were 0.4124 and 0.4042 respectively). Red edge position (REP) could reflect indirectly the variations of wheat FWC to some extent. Significant linear relationships were also found between WI(820,1600) and FWC, and between WI(900,1200) and FWC, while no relationship was shown between the traditional WI(900,970) and FWC. The derived depth of water absorption centered around 2078nm, namely AD2078, had the highest linear correlation with FWC (R2 is 0.4551) , much higher than those parameters derived from the two water absorption around 1175 and 1409. In the end, AD2078 was applied to OMIS image to map the foliar water content. The value range of the inverted foliar water content ranged from 69.39 to 78.35%, which was quite close to that of the field measurements (70.72-78.12%). The distribution of the FWC map was quite consistent with growth status of winter wheat.

Zhang, Xia; Jiao, Quanjun; Wu, Di; Zhang, Bing; Gao, Lianru

2007-11-01

427

Compression and classification methods for hyperspectral images  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article we present new lossless compression methods by combining existing methods and compare them using AVIRIS images.\\u000a These methods include the Self-Organizing Map (SOM), Principal Component Analysis (PCA), and the three-dimensional Wavelet\\u000a Transform combined with traditional lossless encoding methods. The two-dimensional JPEG2000 and SPIHT compression methods\\u000a were applied to the eigenimages produced by the PCA. The bit allocation

A. Kaarna; P. Toivanen; P. Keränen

2006-01-01

428

Digital compressive chemical quantitation and hyperspectral imaging.  

PubMed

Digital compressive detection, implemented using optimized binary (OB) filters, is shown to greatly increase the speed at which Raman spectroscopy can be used to quantify the composition of liquid mixtures and to chemically image mixed solid powders. We further demonstrate that OB filters can be produced using multivariate curve resolution (MCR) to pre-process mixture training spectra, thus facilitating the quantitation of mixtures even when no pure chemical component samples are available for training. PMID:23817274

Wilcox, David S; Buzzard, Gregery T; Lucier, Bradley J; Rehrauer, Owen G; Wang, Ping; Ben-Amotz, Dor

2013-09-01

429

Hyperspectral imaging for dermal hemoglobin spectroscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It has been shown previously that images collected at selected wavelengths in a sufficiently narrow bandwidth can be used to produce maps of the oxygen saturation of hemoglobin in the dermis. A four-wavelength algorithm has been developed based on a two-layer model of the skin, in which the blood is contained in the lower layer (dermis), while the upper layer attenuates some of the reflection and adds a clutter term. In the present work, the algorithm is compared analytically to simpler algorithms using three wavelengths and based on a single-layer model. It is shown through Monte-Carlo models that, for typical skin, the single-layer model is adequate to analyze data from fiber-optical reflectance spectroscopy, but the two-layer model produces better results for imaging systems. Although the model does not address the full complexity of reflectance of a two-layer skin, it has proven to be sufficient to recover the oxygen saturation, and perhaps other medically relevant information. The algorithm is demonstrated on a suction blister, where the epidermis is removed to reveal the underlying dermis. Applications for this imaging modality exist in dermatology, in surgery, and in developing treatment plans for various diseases.

Dwyer, Peter J.; Dimarzio, Charles A.

1999-10-01

430

An oil film information retrieval method overcoming the influence of sun glitter, based on AISA+ airborne hyper-spectral image  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As an effective survey tool for oil spill detection, the airborne hyper-spectral sensor affords the potentiality for retrieving the quantitative information of oil slick which is useful for the cleanup of spilled oil. But many airborne hyper-spectral images are affected by sun glitter which distorts radiance values and spectral ratios used for oil slick detection. In 2005, there's an oil spill event leaking at oil drilling platform in The South China Sea, and an AISA+ airborne hyper-spectral image recorded this event will be selected for studying in this paper, which is affected by sun glitter terribly. Through a spectrum analysis of the oil and water samples, two features -- "spectral rotation" and "a pair of fixed points" can be found in spectral curves between crude oil film and water. Base on these features, an oil film information retrieval method which can overcome the influence of sun glitter is presented. Firstly, the radiance of the image is converted to normal apparent reflectance (NormAR). Then, based on the features of "spectral rotation" (used for distinguishing oil film and water) and "a pair of fixed points" (used for overcoming the effect of sun glitter), NormAR894/NormAR516 is selected as an indicator of oil film. Finally, by using a threshold combined with the technologies of image filter and mathematic morphology, the distribution and relative thickness of oil film are retrieved.

Zhan, Yuanzeng; Mao, Tianming; Gong, Fang; Wang, Difeng; Chen, Jianyu

2010-10-01

431

Hyperspectral image data for mapping wetland vegetation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data acquired by the Airborne Visible\\/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) with 224 bands, each with 0.01-?m spectral resolution\\u000a and 20-meter spatial resolution, were used to produce a vegetation map for a portion of Everglades National Park, Florida,\\u000a USA. The vegetation map was tested for classification accuracy with a pre-existing detailed GIS wetland vegetation database\\u000a compiled by manual interpretation of 1?40,000-scale color

Akira Hirano; Marguerite Madden; Roy Welch

2003-01-01

432

Spatio-spectral bilateral filters for hyperspectral imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Due to the complex nature of hyper-spectra imaging, there are diversified noises in different bands of hyper-spectra image. Without proper pre-processing, these noises will lead to false target detection results in application. Furthermore, because of low signal to noise ratio, some bands, such as bands affected by water vapor in the infrared wavelengths, cannot be utilized in the target detection task. To improve the performance of hyper-spectra applications, many noise removal technologies have been developed. Most traditional denoising approaches either take only single band image into account at a time or only consider spectra shape at one location a time. But these approaches could not deal effectively with the common noises in hyper-spectra image that change from band to band and from one spatial spot to another. Also most generalized smooth filters without local adaptation will lead to losses in spatial details at band images. We propose a denoising approach that is based on bilateral filtering, which takes both spectra and spatial information into account. By locally adapt to adjacent spectra distribution, this approach will have the advantage of effective noise removal while keeping the spatial details in the band images. We also proposed parameter estimation method for hyperspectral image bilateral filtering. The experiment results show that this approach deliver better performance under various noises than other approach, the low signal to noise ratio in some band images have been significantly improved.

Peng, Honghong; Rao, Raghuveer; Messinger, David W.

2008-05-01

433

Defective CCDs detection and image restoration based on inter-band radiance interpolation for hyperspectral imager  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A 2D detector array is used popularly to acquire image in spatial and spectral dimension simultaneously for hyperspectral imager. The detector array will be malfunctioned gradually and partially after long-term operations. These defective CCDs will cause vertical stripes in images. But it's not cost effective to replace the detector due to a few of defects. In this article, we propose an algorithm including two parts for hyperspectral image restoration. One is the CCDs defect parts detection according to their radiance deviation, and another is the image restoration based on inter-band radiance interpolation using Lagrange polynomial. The detection process of finding CCDs defect parts for an imager must be conducted periodically to update the CCDs health status. HOPE images with simulated defective CCDs of various performance decay level are applied for validation. We found the accuracy for images with homogeneous ground feature is higher than the ones with non-homogeneous feature. And defect CCDs with performance decay of 10% still can be designated precisely. Restoration accuracy of pixel radiance is presented for various spectral bands using proposed algorithm. We also perform the image reconstruction using interpolation of spatial neighboring pixels. Radiance deviation for restored pixels is compared between both methods. Proposed algorithm can handle the images taken by hyperspectral imager with adjoining defective CCDs both in spatial and spectral. However, the method using interpolation of neighboring pixels can't. Applying the purposed algorithm on hyperspectral images, the imager can continue operating like a good one though there are a few of defects in detector.

Chen, Ming-Fu; Lai, Jyun-Yi; Lee, Long-Jeng; Huang, Ting-Ming

2010-10-01

434

Development of a hyperspectral fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope and its application to tissue imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present the design, characterization and application of a novel, rapid, optically sectioned hyperspectral fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) microscope. The system is based on a line scanning confocal configuration and uses a highspeed time-gated detector to extract lifetime information from many pixels in parallel. This allows the full spectraltemporal profiles of a fluorescence decay to be obtained from every pixel

Dylan M. Owen; Hugh B. Manning; Pieter de Beule; Clifford Talbot; Jose Requejo-Isidro; Chris Dunsby; James McGinty; Richard K. P. Benninger; Dan S. Elson; Ian Munro; Neil P. Galletly; M. Jon Lever; Gordon W. Stamp; Praveen Anand; Mark A. A. Neil; Paul M. W. French

2007-01-01

435

Infrared adaptive spectral imagers for direct detection of spectral signatures and hyperspectral imagery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Field test results are presented for a prototype long-wave adaptive imager that provides both hyperspectral imagery and contrast imagery based on the direct application of hyperspectral detection algorithms in hardware. Programmable spatial light modulators are used to provide both spectral and spatial resolution using a single element detector. Programmable spectral and spatial detection filters can be used to superimpose any possible analog spectral detection filter on the image. In this work, we demonstrate three modes of operation, including hyperspectral imagery, and one and two-dimensional imagery using a generalized matched filter for detection of a specific target gas within the scene.

Goldstein, Neil; Fox, Marsha; Adler-Golden, Steven; Gregor, Brian

2013-03-01

436

Development of algorithms for detection of mechanical injury on white mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) using hyperspectral imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

White mushrooms were subjected to mechanical injury by controlled shaking in a plastic box at 400 rpm for different times (0, 60, 120, 300 and 600 s). Immediately after shaking, hyperspectral images were obtained using two pushbroom line-scanning hyperspectral imaging instruments, one operating in the wavelength range of 400 - 1000 nm with spectroscopic resolution of 5 nm, the other operating in the wavelength range of 950 - 1700 nm with spectroscopic resolution of 7 nm. Different spectral and spatial pretreatments were investigated to reduce the effect of sample curvature on hyperspectral data. Algorithms based on Chemometric techniques (Principal Component Analysis and Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis) and image processing methods (masking, thresholding, morphological operations) were developed for pixel classification in hyperspectral images. In addition, correlation analysis, spectral angle mapping and scaled difference of sample spectra were investigated and compared with the chemometric approaches.

Gowen, A. A.; O'Donnell, C. P.

2009-05-01

437

Correction of Chandrayaan-1 M^3 Lunar Hyperspectral Image Data with Respect to Local Topography  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study we propose an empirical method to correct Chandrayaan-1 M³ hyperspectral image data with respect to the local topography based on a digital elevation model (DEM) of high lateral resolution.

Wöhler, C.; Grumpe, A.

2012-03-01

438

Design and Characterization of a Space Based Chromotomographic Hyperspectral Imaging Experiment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This research focuses upon the design, analysis and characterization of several systems related to a spacebased chromotomographic experiment (CTEx), a hyperspectral imager, currently in development at the Air Force Institute of Technology. Three interrela...

J. D. Niederhauser

2011-01-01

439

DETECTION AND IDENTIFICATION OF TOXIC AIR POLLUTANTS USING AIRBORNE LWIR HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGING  

EPA Science Inventory

Airborne longwave infrared LWIR) hyperspectral imagery was utilized to detect and identify gaseous chemical release plumes at sites in sourthern Texzas. The Airborne Hysperspectral Imager (AHI), developed by the University of Hawaii was flown over a petrochemical facility and a ...

440

Rapidly updated hyperspectral sounding and imaging data for severe storm prediction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several studies have shown that a geostationary hyperspectral imager/sounder can provide the most significant value increase in short term, regional numerical prediction weather models over a range of other options. In 1998, the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) proposal was selected by NASA as the New Millennium Earth Observation 3 program over several other geostationary instrument development proposals. After the EO3 GIFTS flight demonstration program was changed to an Engineering Development Unit (EDU) due to funding limitations by one of the partners, the EDU was subjected to flight-like thermal vacuum calibration and testing and successfully validated the breakthrough technologies needed to make a successful observatory. After several government stops and starts, only EUMETSAT's Meteosat Third Generation (MTG-S) sounder is in operational development. Recently, a commercial partnership has been formed to fill the significant data gap. AsiaSat has partnered with GeoMetWatch (GMW)1 to fund the development and launch of the Sounding and Tracking Observatory for Regional Meteorology (STORMTM) sensor, a derivative of the Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) EDU that was designed, built, and tested by Utah State University (USU). STORMTM combines advanced technologies to observe surface thermal properties, atmospheric weather, and chemistry variables in four dimensions to provide high vertical resolution temperature and moisture sounding information, with the fourth dimension (time) p