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Sample records for hypertension-induced redox-mediated endothelial

  1. Regular exercise alleviates renovascular hypertension-induced cardiac/endothelial dysfunction and oxidative injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumral, Z N O; Sener, G; Ozgur, S; Koc, M; Suleymanoglu, S; Hurdag, C; Yegen, B C

    2016-02-01

    alterations in echocardiographic and oxidative parameters. Regular exercise commenced after RVH surgery alleviated renovascular hypertension-induced oxidative injury, by modulating oxidant-antioxidant balance via the involvement of the endothelial NO system. PMID:27010894

  2. Selective Serotonin-norepinephrine Re-uptake Inhibition Limits Renovas-cular-hypertension Induced Cognitive Impairment, Endothelial Dysfunction, and Oxidative Stress Injury.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prabhat; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension has been reported to induce cognitive decline and dementia of vascular origin. Serotonin- norepinephrine reuptake transporters take part in the control of inflammation, cognitive functions, motivational acts and deterioration of neurons. This study was carried out to examine the effect of venlafaxine; a specific serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), in two-kidney-one-clip-2K1C (renovascular hypertension) provoked vascular dementia (VaD) in albino rats. 2K1C technique was performed to provoke renovascular-hypertension in adult male albino Wistar rats. Learning and memory were assessed by using the elevated plus maze and Morris water maze. Mean arterial blood pressure- MABP, as well as endothelial function, were assessed by means of BIOPAC system. Serum nitrosative stress (nitrite/ nitrate), aortic superoxide anion, brain oxidative stress, inflammation, cholinergic dysfunction and brain damage (2,3,5-triphenylterazolium chloride staining) were also assessed. 2K1C has increased MABP, endothelial dysfunction as well as learning and memory impairments. 2K1C method has increased serum nitrosative stress (reduced nitrite/nitrate level), oxidative stress (increased brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species and aortic superoxide anion content along with decreased levels of brain superoxide dismutase, glutathione, and catalase), brain inflammation (increased myeloperoxidase), cholinergic dysfunction (increased acetylcholinesterase activity) and brain damage. Treatment with venlafaxine considerably attenuated renovascular-hypertension induced cognition impairment, endothelial dysfunction, serum nitrosative stress, brain and aortic oxidative stress, cholinergic function, inflammation as well as cerebral damage. The finding of this study indicates that specific modulation of the serotonin-norepinephrine transporter perhaps regarded as potential interventions for the management of renovascular hypertension provoked VaD. PMID:26915517

  3. A pivotal role of the vascular endothelial growth factor signaling pathway in the formation of venous hypertension-induced dural arteriovenous fistulas

    PubMed Central

    LI, QIANG; ZHANG, QI; HUANG, QING-HAI; FANG, YI-BIN; ZHANG, ZHAO-LONG; XU, YI; LIU, JIAN-MIN

    2014-01-01

    angiogenesis in the dura mater. In conclusion, VEGF and its receptor may be important in the formation of venous hypertension-induced DAVFs. PMID:24626343

  4. A pivotal role of the vascular endothelial growth factor signaling pathway in the formation of venous hypertension-induced dural arteriovenous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Zhang, Qi; Huang, Qing-Hai; Fang, Yi-Bin; Zhang, Zhao-Long; Xu, Yi; Liu, Jian-Min

    2014-05-01

    angiogenesis in the dura mater. In conclusion, VEGF and its receptor may be important in the formation of venous hypertension-induced DAVFs. PMID:24626343

  5. Impaired renal endothelial nitric oxide synthase and reticulocyte production as modulators of hypertension induced by rHuEPO in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Sandra; Garrido, Patrícia; Fernandes, João; Vala, Helena; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Costa, Elísio; Belo, Luís; Reis, Flávio; Santos-Silva, Alice

    2016-04-15

    Our aim was to study the effect of a broad range of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) doses on hematological and biochemical parameters, blood pressure (BP), renal function and damage in the rat, focusing on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Male Wistar rats were divided in 5 groups receiving different doses of rHuEPO (100, 200, 400 and 600IU/kg body weight (BW)/week) and saline solution (control), during 3weeks. Blood and 24h urine were collected to perform hematological and biochemical analysis. BP was measured by the tail-cuff method. Kidney tissue was collected to mRNA and protein expression assays and to characterize renal lesions. A dose-dependent increase in red blood cells count, hematocrit and hemoglobin levels was found with rHuEPO therapy, in rHuEPO200, rHuEPO400 and rHuEPO600 groups. Increased reticulocyte count was found in rHuEPO400 and rHuEPO600 groups. BP raised in all groups receiving rHuEPO. The rHuEPO200 and rHuEPO600 groups presented increased kidney protein levels of HIF2α, a reduction in kidney protein levels of eNOS, and the highest grade of vascular and tubular renal lesions. Our study showed that rHuEPO-induced hypertension is present before significant hematological changes occur and, therefore, might involve direct (renal) and indirect (hematological) effects, which varies according to the dose used. The presence of renal hypoxia reduces eNOS activity. Excessive erythrocytosis increases blood hyperviscosity, which can be modulated by an increase in reticulocytes. Hypertension leads to early renal damage without alterations in traditional markers of renal function, thus underestimating the serious adverse effects and risks. PMID:26924494

  6. Redox mediation and hydrogen-generation with bipyridinium reagents

    DOEpatents

    Wrighton, Mark S.; Bookbinder, Dana C.; Bruce, James A.; Dominey, Raymond N.; Lewis, Nathan S.

    1984-03-27

    A variety of redox mediating agents employing bipyridinium reagents and such reagents in conjunction with dispersed noble metals, such as platinium, are disclosed as coatings for substrates and electrodes. The agents may be charged by an applied voltage or by photoelectric effects or may be equilibrated with hydrogen. The agents are useful in reducing biological materials and electrolytic hydrogen production.

  7. A redox-mediated chromogenic reaction and application in immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ru-Jia; Ma, Wei; Peng, Mao-Pan; Bai, Zhi-Shan; Long, Yi-Tao

    2016-08-31

    A novel redox-mediated chromogenic reaction was demonstrated based on the reaction between HAuCl4 and 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), which generate various color responses from red to green in the resulting solutions. Various redox substance could be used to mediate the reaction and trigger a distinct color response. We established a sensitive hydrogen peroxide colorimetric sensor based on the redox-mediated chromogenic reaction and depicted the application both in detection of enzyme and in an immunoassay. Combining the traditional chromogenic reagent with gold nanoparticles, our assay has the advantage in short response time (within three minutes), high sensitivity (10(-12) g mL(-1) for HBsAg) and stability. PMID:27506364

  8. Enhanced microbial decolorization of methyl red with oxidized carbon fiber as redox mediator.

    PubMed

    Emilia Rios-Del Toro, E; Celis, Lourdes B; Cervantes, Francisco J; Rangel-Mendez, J Rene

    2013-09-15

    The anaerobic degradation of azo dyes under anaerobic conditions is possible but at a slow rate. Redox mediators (quinones, activated carbon) are used to improve the reduction rate. The aim of this work was to use activated carbon fiber (ACF) as a redox mediator for the anaerobic reduction of the azo dye methyl red. ACF was chemically modified with 8M HNO₃ to increase its redox-mediating capacity and used in chemical and anaerobic biological batch assays for the reduction of methyl red. ACF increased its redox-mediating capacity up to 3-fold in chemical assays; in biological assays ACF increased the reduction rate up to 8-fold compared to controls without ACF. However, since the ACF served as support for biomass, a biofilm formed on the fiber significantly reduced its redox-mediating capacity; substrate consumption suggested that the electron transport from ACF to methyl red was the rate-limiting step in the process. These results are the first evidence of the role of ACF as a redox mediator in the reductive decolorization of methyl red, in addition to the effect of biofilm attached to ACF on methyl red reduction. Due to the versatile characteristics of ACF and its redox-mediating capacity, carbon fibers could be used in biological wastewater treatment systems to accelerate the reductive transformation of pollutants commonly found in industrial effluents. PMID:23892163

  9. Critical Role of Redox Mediator in Suppressing Charging Instabilities of Lithium-Oxygen Batteries.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhuojian; Lu, Yi-Chun

    2016-06-22

    Redox mediators have been widely applied to reduce the charge overpotentials of lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries. Here, we reveal the critical role of redox mediator in suppressing the charging instability of Li-O2 batteries. Using high temporal resolution online electrochemical mass spectrometry, we show that charging with redox mediators (using lithium bromide as a model system) significantly reduces parasitic gas evolution and improves oxygen recovery efficiency. Using redox mediator transforms the charge reactions from electrochemical pathways to chemical pathways, which unexpectedly bypasses the formation of highly reactive intermediates upon electro-oxidation of lithium peroxide (Li2O2). Such transformation reduces self-amplifying degradation reactions of electrode and electrolyte in Li-O2 cells. We further show that the improved stability associated with the redox mediator is much more pronounced at higher charging rates, owing to fast charge-transfer kinetics of the redox mediator. Together, we show that employing redox mediator not only reduces the charge overpotential but also suppresses side reactions of Li-O2 cells with improved charging rate. Our work demonstrates that transforming electro-oxidation of Li2O2 to chemical oxidation of Li2O2 is a promising strategy to simultaneously mitigate charging side reactions and achieve low overpotential for the Li-O2 batteries. PMID:27228413

  10. Mn(II/III) complexes as promising redox mediators in quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Haring, Andrew J; Pomatto, Michelle E; Thornton, Miranda R; Morris, Amanda J

    2014-09-10

    The advancement of quantum dot sensitized solar cell (QDSSC) technology depends on optimizing directional charge transfer between light absorbing quantum dots, TiO2, and a redox mediator. The nature of the redox mediator plays a pivotal role in determining the photocurrent and photovoltage from the solar cell. Kinetically, reduction of oxidized quantum dots by the redox mediator should be rapid and faster than the back electron transfer between TiO2 and oxidized quantum dots to maintain photocurrent. Thermodynamically, the reduction potential of the redox mediator should be sufficiently positive to provide high photovoltages. To satisfy both criteria and enhance power conversion efficiencies, we introduced charge transfer spin-crossover Mn(II/III) complexes as promising redox mediator alternatives in QDSSCs. High photovoltages ∼ 1 V were achieved by a series of Mn poly(pyrazolyl)borates, with reduction potentials ∼ 0.51 V vs Ag/AgCl. Back electron transfer (recombination) rates were slower than Co(bpy)3, where bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, evidenced by electron lifetimes up to 4 orders of magnitude longer. This is indicative of a large barrier to electron transport imposed by spin-crossover in these complexes. Low solubility prevented the redox mediators from sustaining high photocurrent due to mass transport limits. However, with high fill factors (∼ 0.6) and photovoltages, they demonstrate competitive efficiencies with Co(bpy)3 redox mediator at the same concentration. More positive reduction potentials and slower recombination rates compared to current redox mediators establish the viability of Mn poly(pyrazolyl)borates as promising redox mediators. By capitalizing on these characteristics, efficient Mn(II/III)-based QDSSCs can be achieved with more soluble Mn-complexes. PMID:25137595

  11. [Biocatalyst of redox mediators on the denitrification by Paracoccus versutus strain GW1].

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Bo; Lian, Jing; Guo, Yan-Kai; Zhao, Li-Jun; Du, Hai-Feng; Yang, Jing-Liang; Guo, Jian-Bo

    2012-07-01

    The quinone respiration process of Paracoccus versutus strain GW1 was characterized and the effects of the four redox mediators on the denitrification process were studied. The experiment results suggested that quinones were utilized by Paracoccus versutus strain GW1 as electron acceptors in the respiratory chain and reduced to hydroquinone. Batch experiments were carried out to investigate the biocatalyst effect of redox mediators as catalyst on the denitrification process at 35 degrees C. All four redox mediators tested were able to enhance the nitrate removal efficiency and the denitrification efficiency by 1.14-1.63 fold and 1.12-2.02 fold, respectively. The accelerating effect from high to low was AQDS > 1,5-AQDS > AQS > alpha-AQS. In the presence of redox mediators, the stabilized ORP values in the nitrate decomposition process were reduced by 33-75 mV. The pH variations in denitrification with redox mediators showed similar tendency to that of the conventional nitrate removal process. In the concentration range of 0-0.32 mmol x L(-1), AQDS had the best accelerating effect and a linear correlation was found for the denitrification rate K and the AQDS concentration cAQDS. This study indicated that the application of redox mediators significantly improved the denitrification process by enhancing the decomposition rate. PMID:23002627

  12. Sustainable Redox Mediation for Lithium-Oxygen Batteries by a Composite Protective Layer on the Lithium-Metal Anode.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Jin; Lee, Hongkyung; Kim, Yun-Jung; Park, Jung-Ki; Kim, Hee-Tak

    2016-02-01

    A synergic combination of a soluble -redox mediator and a protected Li metal -electrode to prevent the self-discharge of the redox mediator is realized by -exploiting a 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl 1-oxyl (TEMPO) redox mediator and an Al2 O3 /PVdF-HFP composite -protective layer (CPL). Stabilization of Li metal by simple CPL coating is effective at -suppressing the chemical reduction of the oxidized TEMPO and opens up the possibility of sustainable redox mediation for robust cycling of Li-O2 batteries. PMID:26627981

  13. Enhanced transformation of triclosan by laccase in the presence of redox mediators.

    PubMed

    Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Chang, Yoon-Young; Kim, Young-Mo; Jeon, Jong-Rok; Kim, Eun-Ju; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2010-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS), an antimicrobial agent, is an emerging and persistent environmental pollutant that is often found as a contaminant in surface waters and sediments; hence, knowledge of its degradability is important. In this study we investigated laccase-mediated TCS transformation and detoxification, using laccase (from the fungus Ganoderma lucidum) in the presence and absence of redox mediators. Transformation products were identified using HPLC, ESI-MS and GC-MS, and transformation mechanisms were proposed. In the absence of redox mediator, 56.5% TCS removal was observed within 24h, concomitant with formation of new products with molecular weights greater than that of TCS. These products were dimers and trimers of TCS, as confirmed by ESI-MS analysis. Among the various mediators tested, 1-hydroxybenzotriazole (HBT) and syringaldehyde (SYD) significantly enhanced TCS transformation ( approximately 90%). The presence of these mediators resulted in products with lower molecular weights than TCS, including 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP; confirmed by GC-MS) and dechlorinated forms of 2,4-DCP. When SYD was used as the mediator, dechlorination resulted in 2-chlorohydroquinone (2-CHQ). Bacterial growth inhibition studies revealed that laccase-mediated transformation of TCS effectively decreased its toxicity, with ultimate conversion to less toxic or nontoxic products. Our results confirmed the involvement of two mechanisms of laccase-catalyzed TCS removal: (i) oligomerization in the absence of redox mediators, and (ii) ether bond cleavage followed by dechlorination in the presence of redox mediators. These results suggest that laccase in combination with natural redox mediator systems may be a useful strategy for the detoxification and elimination of TCS from aqueous systems. PMID:19854464

  14. CsI as Multifunctional Redox Mediator for Enhanced Li-Air Batteries.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chan Kyu; Park, Yong Joon

    2016-04-01

    We introduce CsI as a multifunctional redox mediator to enhance the performance of Li-air batteries. CsI dissolved in the electrolyte is ionized into Cs(+) and I(-), which perform their roles in the Li anode and air electrode, respectively. The I(-) ions in the electrolyte facilitate the dissolution of Li2O2 in the air electrode as a redox mediator, which reduces the overpotential of the cell. The low overpotential also leads to the suppression of parasitic reactions occurring in the high-voltage range, such as the decomposition of the electrolyte and the reaction between Li2O2 and carbon. At the same time, the Cs(+) ions act as an electrostatic shield at the sharp points of the Li anode, hindering the growth of Li dendrite. The combined effects of reduced parasitic reactions and hindered Li-dendrite growth successfully improve the cyclic performance of Li-air cells. PMID:26999060

  15. Electrochemical stimulation of microbial reductive dechlorination of pentachlorophenol using solid-state redox mediator (humin) immobilization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongdong; Zhang, Chunfang; Li, Zhiling; Suzuki, Daisuke; Komatsu, Daisuke D; Tsunogai, Urumu; Katayama, Arata

    2014-07-01

    Immobilized solid-phase humin on a graphite electrode set at -500 mV (vs. standard hydrogen electrode) significantly enhanced the microbial reductive dechlorination of pentachlorophenol as a stable solid-phase redox mediator in bioelectrochemical systems (BESs). Compared with the suspended system, the immobilized system dechlorinated PCP at a much higher efficiency, achieving 116 μmol Cl(-)g(-1) humin d(-1). Fluorescence microscopy showed a conspicuous growth of bacteria on the negatively poised immobilized humin. Electron balance analyses suggested that the electrons required for microbial dechlorination were supplied primarily from the humin-immobilized electrode. Microbial community analyses based on 16S rRNA genes showed that Dehalobacter and Desulfovibrio grew on the immobilized humin as potential dechlorinators. These findings extend the potential of BESs using immobilized solid-phase humin as the redox mediator for in situ bioremediation, given the wide distribution of humin and its efficiency and stability as a mediator. PMID:24859215

  16. A novel method to directionally stabilize enzymes together with redox mediators by electrodeposition.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wentao; Lin, Nansen; Song, Yilin; Liu, Chunxiu; Zhou, Shuai; Cai, Xinxia

    2014-01-15

    This paper depicts a novel method to directionally stabilize enzymes together with redox mediators by electrodeposition. Chitosan was used as a stabilizing matrix. By electrochemical removal of local H(+), chitosan close to working electrode became locally insoluble, and enzymes and redox mediators in chitosan were stabilized. The microelectrode on home-made microelectrode array (MEA) served as the working electrode. Three model enzymes--horseradish peroxidase (HRP), glucose oxidase (GOD), and glutamate oxidase (GlOD)--were used to fabricate different biosensors, and the redox mediator model was a poly(vinylpyridine) complex of Os(bpy)2Cl and a diepoxide (PVP-Os). Biosensors fabricated by the method exhibited very high performance. For HRP biosensor fabricated by this method, the sensitivity was 5.274 nA μM(-1) mm(-2), with linear detection range (LDR) of 2-220 μM and limit of detection (LOD) of 1 μM (S/N=3); for GOD biosensor, the sensitivity was 2.65 nA μM(-1) mm(-2), with LDR of 4-500 μM and LOD of 2 μM (S/N=3); for GlOD biosensor, the sensitivity was 0.33 nA μM(-1)mm(-2), with LDR of 4-500 μM and LOD of 2 μM (S/N=3). Since this method is very simple and especially suitable for directionally introducing enzymes and redox mediators onto microelectrode without contaminating other sites in the same microenvironment, it could be used for fabricating in vivo or in vitro 2nd generation biosensors in μm-scale, especially in neuroscience. PMID:23974156

  17. Horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed polymerization of cardanol in the presence of redox mediators.

    PubMed

    Won, Keehoon; Kim, Yong Hwan; An, Eun Suk; Lee, Yeon Soo; Song, Bong Keun

    2004-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed polymerization of cardanol in aqueous organic solvent was investigated in the presence of a redox mediator. Cardanol is a phenol derivative from a renewable resource mainly having a C15 unsaturated hydrocarbon chain with mostly 1-3 double bonds at a meta position. Unlike soybean peroxidase (SBP), it has been shown that horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is not able to perform oxidative polymerization of phenol derivatives having a bulky meta substituent such as cardanol. For the first time, redox mediators have been applied to enable horseradish peroxidase to polymerize cardanol. Veratryl alcohol, N-ethyl phenothiazine, and phenothiazine-10-propionic acid were tested as a mediator. It is surprising that the horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed polymerization of cardanol took place in the presence of N-ethyl phenothiazine or phenothiazine-10-propionic acid. However, veratryl alcohol showed no effect. FT-IR and GPC analysis of the product revealed that the structure and properties of polycardanol formed by HRP with a mediator were similar to those by SBP. This is the first work to apply a redox mediator to enzyme-catalyzed oxidative polymerization. Our new finding that oxidative polymerization of a poor substrate, which the enzyme is not active with, can take place in the presence of an appropriate mediator will present more opportunities for the application of enzyme-catalyzed polymerization. PMID:14715000

  18. Melatonin attenuates hypertension-induced renal injury partially through inhibiting oxidative stress in rats

    PubMed Central

    QIAO, YU-FENG; GUO, WEN-JUAN; LI, LU; SHAO, SHAN; QIAO, XI; SHAO, JIN-JIN; ZHANG, QIONG; LI, RONG-SHAN; WANG, LI-HUA

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of melatonin (MLT) on hypertension-induced renal injury and identify its mechanism of action. Twenty-four healthy male Wistar rats were divided into a sham control group (n=8), which was subjected to sham operation and received vehicle treatment (physiological saline intraperitoneally at 0.1 ml/100 g), a vehicle group (n=8), which was subjected to occlusion of the left renal artery and vehicle treatment, and the MLT group (n=8), which was subjected to occlusion of the left renal artery and treated with MLT (10 mg/kg/day). Pathological features of the renal tissues were determined using hematoxylin and eosin staining and Masson staining. Urine protein, serum creatinine (Scr), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were determined. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed to determine the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Furthermore, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was conducted to determine the mRNA expression of HO-1, ICAM-1, eNOS and iNOS. A marked decrease in blood pressure was noticed in the MLT group at week 4 compared with that of the vehicle group (P<0.01). Furthermore, MLT treatment attenuated the infiltration of inflammatory cells and oedema/atrophy of renal tubules. MLT attenuated hypertension-induced increases in urine protein excretion, serum creatinine and MDA as well as decreases in SOD activity in renal tissues. Furthermore, MLT attenuated hypertension-induced increases in iNOS and ICAM-1 as well as decreases in eNOS and HO-1 expression at the mRNA and protein level. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that MLT had protective roles in hypertension-induced renal injury. Its mechanism of action is, at least in part, associated with the inhibition of oxidative stress. PMID:26531807

  19. Production of Cellobionate from Cellulose Using an Engineered Neurospora crassa Strain with Laccase and Redox Mediator Addition

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, Amanda; Kasuga, Takao; Fan, Zhiliang

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel production process for cellobionic acid from cellulose using an engineered fungal strain with the exogenous addition of laccase and a redox mediator. A previously engineered strain of Neurospora crassa (F5∆ace-1∆cre-1∆ndvB) was shown to produce cellobionate directly from cellulose without the addition of exogenous cellulases. Specifically, N. crassa produces cellulases, which hydrolyze cellulose to cellobiose, and cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH), which oxidizes cellobiose to cellobionate. However, the conversion of cellobiose to cellobionate is limited by the slow re-oxidation of CDH by molecular oxygen. By adding low concentrations of laccase and a redox mediator to the fermentation, CDH can be efficiently oxidized by the redox mediator, with in-situ re-oxidation of the redox mediator by laccase. The conversion of cellulose to cellobionate was optimized by evaluating pH, buffer, and laccase and redox mediator addition time on the yield of cellobionate. Mass and material balances were performed, and the use of the native N. crassa laccase in such a conversion system was evaluated against the exogenous Pleurotus ostreatus laccase. This paper describes a working concept of cellobionate production from cellulose using the CDH-ATBS-laccase system in a fermentation system. PMID:25849253

  20. Long Noncoding RNA-GAS5: A Novel Regulator of Hypertension-Induced Vascular Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang-Ning-Zhi; Shan, Kun; Yao, Mu-Di; Yao, Jin; Wang, Jia-Jian; Li, Xiang; Liu, Ban; Zhang, Yang-Yang; Ji, Yong; Jiang, Qin; Yan, Biao

    2016-09-01

    Vascular remodeling is an important pathological feature of hypertension, leading to increased vascular resistance and reduced compliance. Endothelial cell (EC) and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) dysfunction is involved in vascular remodeling. Long noncoding RNAs are potential regulators of EC and VSMC function. Herein, we determined whether long noncoding RNA-growth arrest-specific 5 (GAS5) is involved in hypertension-related vascular remodeling. We revealed that GAS5 knockdown aggravated hypertension-induced microvascular dysfunction as shown by increased retinal neovascularization and capillary leakage. GAS5 regulated the remodeling of arteries, including caudal arteries, carotid arteries, renal arteries, and thoracic arteries. GAS5 was mainly expressed in ECs and VSMCs, and its expression was significantly downregulated in hypertension. GAS5 knockdown affected endothelial activation, endothelial proliferation, VSMC phenotypic conversion, and EC-VSMC communication in vivo and in vitro. Mechanistically, GAS5 regulated EC and VSMC function through β-catenin signaling. This study identified GAS5 as a critical regulator in hypertension and demonstrated the potential of gene therapy and drug development for treating hypertension. PMID:27432865

  1. Manipulation of microbial extracellular electron transfer by changing molecular structure of phenazine-type redox mediators.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie-Jie; Chen, Wei; He, Hui; Li, Dao-Bo; Li, Wen-Wei; Xiong, Lu; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-01-15

    Phenazines, as a type of electron shuttle, are involved in various biological processes to facilitate microbial energy metabolism and electron transfer. They constitute a large group of nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds, which can be produced by a diverse range of bacteria or by artificial synthesis. They vary significantly in their properties, depending mainly on the nature and position of substitutent group. Thus, it is of great interest to find out the most favorable substituent type and molecular structure of phenazines for electron transfer routes. Here, the impacts of the substituent group on the reduction potentials of phenazine-type redox mediators in aqueous solution were investigated by quantum chemical calculations, and the calculation results were further validated with experimental data. The results show that the reaction free energy was substantially affected by the location of substituent groups on the phenazine molecule and the protonated water clusters. For the main proton addition process, the phenazines substituted with electron-donating groups and those with electron-withdrawing groups interacted with different protonated water clusters, attributed to the proximity effect of water molecules on proton transfer. Thus, high energy conversion efficiency could be achieved by controlling electron flow route with appropriate substituted phenazines to reduce the biological energy acquisition. This study provides useful information for designing efficient redox mediators to promote electron transfer between microbes and terminal acceptors, which are essential to bioenergy recovery from wastes and environmental bioremediation. PMID:23244024

  2. Melatonin attenuates hypertension-induced renal injury partially through inhibiting oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yu-Feng; Guo, Wen-Juan; Li, Lu; Shao, Shan; Qiao, Xi; Shao, Jin-Jin; Zhang, Qiong; Li, Rong-Shan; Wang, Li-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of melatonin (MLT) on hypertension-induced renal injury and identify its mechanism of action. Twenty-four healthy male Wistar rats were divided into a sham control group (n=8), which was subjected to sham operation and received vehicle treatment (physiological saline intraperitoneally at 0.1 ml/100 g), a vehicle group (n=8), which was subjected to occlusion of the left renal artery and vehicle treatment, and the MLT group (n=8), which was subjected to occlusion of the left renal artery and treated with MLT (10 mg/kg/day). Pathological features of the renal tissues were determined using hematoxylin and eosin staining and Masson staining. Urine protein, serum creatinine (Scr), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were determined. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed to determine the expression of heme oxygenase‑1 (HO‑1), intercellular adhesion molecule‑1 (ICAM‑1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Furthermore, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was conducted to determine the mRNA expression of HO‑1, ICAM‑1, eNOS and iNOS. A marked decrease in blood pressure was noticed in the MLT group at week 4 compared with that of the vehicle group (P<0.01). Furthermore, MLT treatment attenuated the infiltration of inflammatory cells and oedema/atrophy of renal tubules. MLT attenuated hypertension-induced increases in urine protein excretion, serum creatinine and MDA as well as decreases in SOD activity in renal tissues. Furthermore, MLT attenuated hypertension-induced increases in iNOS and ICAM‑1 as well as decreases in eNOS and HO‑1 expression at the mRNA and protein level. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that MLT had protective roles in hypertension‑induced renal injury. Its mechanism of action is, at least in part, associated with the inhibition of oxidative stress. PMID:26531807

  3. Influence of the Phase State of Self-Assembling Redox Mediators on their Electrochemical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Muller, John P. E.; Aytar, Burcu S.; Kondo, Yukishige; Lynn, David M.; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembling redox mediators have the potential to be broadly useful in a range of interfacial electrochemical contexts because the oxidation state and state of assembly of the mediator are closely coupled. In this paper, we report an investigation of the self-assembly of single- and double-tailed ferrocenyl amphiphiles (FTMA and BFDMA, respectively) at the surfaces of Pt electrodes and the impact of the dynamic assembled state of the amphiphiles on their rate of oxidation. We conclude that frozen aggregates of BFDMA adsorb to the surfaces of the Pt electrodes, and that slow dynamics of reorganization BFDMA within these aggregates limits the rate of electrooxidation of BFDMA. In contrast, FTMA, while forming assemblies on the surfaces of Pt electrodes, is characterized by fast reorganization dynamics and a corresponding rate of oxidation that is an order of magnitude greater than BFDMA. PMID:24882870

  4. Effects of different quinoid redox mediators on the removal of sulphide and nitrate via denitrification.

    PubMed

    Aranda-Tamaura, Clicerio; Estrada-Alvarado, María Isabel; Texier, Anne-Claire; Cuervo, Flor; Gómez, Jorge; Cervantes, Francisco J

    2007-11-01

    The impact of different quinoid redox mediators on the simultaneous conversion of sulphide and nitrate in a denitrifying culture was evaluated. All quinones evaluated, including anthraquinone-2,6-disulphonate (AQDS), 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone and 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulphonate (NQS) were reduced by sulphide under abiotic conditions. NQS showed the highest reduction rate by sulphide (132 micromol h(-1)) and promoted the maximum rate of sulphide oxidation (87 micromol h(-1)) by denitrifying sludge, which represents an increase of 44% compared to the control lacking quinones. The reduced form of AQDS (AH(2)QDS) served as an electron donor for the microbial reduction of nitrite and N(2)O, which represents the first demonstration of hydroquinones supporting the microbial reduction of denitrifying intermediates. The results taken as a whole suggest that some quinones may significantly increase the rate of removal of S and N under denitrifying conditions. PMID:17624404

  5. Aflatoxin B₁ and M₁ Degradation by Lac2 from Pleurotus pulmonarius and Redox Mediators.

    PubMed

    Loi, Martina; Fanelli, Francesca; Zucca, Paolo; Liuzzi, Vania C; Quintieri, Laura; Cimmarusti, Maria T; Monaci, Linda; Haidukowski, Miriam; Logrieco, Antonio F; Sanjust, Enrico; Mulè, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    Laccases (LCs) are multicopper oxidases that find application as versatile biocatalysts for the green bioremediation of environmental pollutants and xenobiotics. In this study we elucidate the degrading activity of Lac2 pure enzyme form Pleurotus pulmonarius towards aflatoxin B₁ (AFB₁) and M₁ (AFM₁). LC enzyme was purified using three chromatographic steps and identified as Lac2 through zymogram and LC-MS/MS. The degradation assays were performed in vitro at 25 °C for 72 h in buffer solution. AFB₁ degradation by Lac2 direct oxidation was 23%. Toxin degradation was also investigated in the presence of three redox mediators, (2,2'-azino-bis-[3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid]) (ABTS) and two naturally-occurring phenols, acetosyringone (AS) and syringaldehyde (SA). The direct effect of the enzyme and the mediated action of Lac2 with redox mediators univocally proved the correlation between Lac2 activity and aflatoxins degradation. The degradation of AFB₁ was enhanced by the addition of all mediators at 10 mM, with AS being the most effective (90% of degradation). AFM₁ was completely degraded by Lac2 with all mediators at 10 mM. The novelty of this study relies on the identification of a pure enzyme as capable of degrading AFB₁ and, for the first time, AFM₁, and on the evidence that the mechanism of an effective degradation occurs via the mediation of natural phenolic compounds. These results opened new perspective for Lac2 application in the food and feed supply chains as a biotransforming agent of AFB₁ and AFM₁. PMID:27563923

  6. Enhanced photovoltaic properties and long-term stability in plasmonic dye-sensitized solar cells via noncorrosive redox mediator.

    PubMed

    Jung, Heesuk; Koo, Bonkee; Kim, Jae-Yup; Kim, Taehee; Son, Hae Jung; Kim, BongSoo; Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Doh-Kwon; Kim, Honggon; Cho, Jinhan; Ko, Min Jae

    2014-11-12

    We demonstrate the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effect, which can enhance the photovoltaic properties of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), and the long-term stability of size-controlled plasmonic structures using a noncorrosive redox mediator. Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) were synthesized with a phase transfer method based on ligand exchange. This synthetic method is advantageous because the uniformly sized Au NPs, can be mass produced and easily applied to DSSC photoanodes. The plasmonic DSSCs showed an 11% improvement of power conversion efficiency due to the incorporation of 0.07 wt % Au NPs, compared to the reference DSSCs without Au NPs. The improved efficiency was primarily due to the enhanced photocurrent generation by LSPR effect. With the cobalt redox mediator, the long-term stability of the plasmonic structures also significantly increased. The plasmonic DSSCs with cobalt(II/III) tris(2,2'-bipyridine) ([Co(bpy)3](2+/3+)) redox mediator maintained the LSPR effect with stable photovoltaic performance for 1000 h. This is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of the long-term stability of plasmonic nanostructures in plasmonic DSSCs based on liquid electrolytes. As a result, the enhanced long-term stability of plasmonic NPs via a noncorrosive redox mediator will increase the feasibility of plasmonic DSSCs. PMID:25296336

  7. Production of cellobionate from cellulose using an engineered Neurospora crassa strain with laccase and redox mediator addition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report a novel production process for cellobionic acid from cellulose using an engineered fungal strain with the exogenous addition of laccase and a redox mediator. A previously engineered strain of Neurospora crassa (F5'ace-1'cre-1'ndvB) was shown to produce cellobionate directly from cellulose ...

  8. Understanding the fundamentals of redox mediators in Li-O2 batteries: a case study on nitroxides.

    PubMed

    Bergner, Benjamin J; Hofmann, Christine; Schürmann, Adrian; Schröder, Daniel; Peppler, Klaus; Schreiner, Peter R; Janek, Jürgen

    2015-12-21

    The development of aprotic lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries suffers from high charging overvoltages. Dissolved redox mediators, like nitroxides, providing increased energy efficiency and longer lifetime are promising tools to overcome this challenge. Since this auspicious concept is still in its infancy, the underlying chemical reactions as well as the impact of the different (electro)chemical parameters are poorly understood. Herein, we derive an electrochemical model for the charging reactions, which is validated by potentiostatic measurements. The model elucidates the impact of the major factors including basic cell parameters and the chemical properties of the redox mediator. The model is applied to the promising class of nitroxides, which is systematically investigated by using derivatives of TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy), AZADO (2-azaadamantane-N-oxyl), and an azaphenalene based nitroxide. The nitroxides are electrochemically characterized by cyclic voltammetry and their performance as redox mediators is studied in Li-O2 batteries with an ether-based electrolyte. Based on the presented model, the charging profiles of the different nitroxide redox mediators are correlated with their molecular structures. PMID:26563563

  9. Charging a Li-O2 battery using a redox mediator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuhui; Freunberger, Stefan A.; Peng, Zhangquan; Fontaine, Olivier; Bruce, Peter G.

    2013-06-01

    The non-aqueous Li-air (O2) battery is receiving intense interest because its theoretical specific energy exceeds that of Li-ion batteries. Recharging the Li-O2 battery depends on oxidizing solid lithium peroxide (Li2O2), which is formed on discharge within the porous cathode. However, transporting charge between Li2O2 particles and the solid electrode surface is at best very difficult and leads to voltage polarization on charging, even at modest rates. This is a significant problem facing the non-aqueous Li-O2 battery. Here we show that incorporation of a redox mediator, tetrathiafulvalene (TTF), enables recharging at rates that are impossible for the cell in the absence of the mediator. On charging, TTF is oxidized to TTF+ at the cathode surface; TTF+ in turn oxidizes the solid Li2O2, which results in the regeneration of TTF. The mediator acts as an electron-hole transfer agent that permits efficient oxidation of solid Li2O2. The cell with the mediator demonstrated 100 charge/discharge cycles.

  10. Rational design of redox mediators for advanced Li–O2 batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hee-Dae; Lee, Byungju; Zheng, Yongping; Hong, Jihyun; Kim, Jinsoo; Gwon, Hyeokjo; Ko, Youngmin; Lee, Minah; Cho, Kyeongjae; Kang, Kisuk

    2016-06-01

    The discovery of effective catalysts is an important step towards achieving Li–O2 batteries with long cycle life and high round-trip efficiency. Soluble-type catalysts or redox mediators (RMs) possess great advantages over conventional solid catalysts, generally exhibiting much higher efficiency. Here, we select a series of organic RM candidates as a model system to identify the key descriptor in determining the catalytic activities and stabilities in Li–O2 cells. It is revealed that the level of ionization energies, readily available parameters from a database of the molecules, can serve such a role when comparing with the formation energy of Li2O2 and the highest occupied molecular orbital energy of the electrolyte. It is demonstrated that they are critical in reducing the overpotential and improving the stability of Li–O2 cells, respectively. Accordingly, we propose a general principle for designing feasible catalysts and report a RM, dimethylphenazine, with a remarkably low overpotential and high stability.

  11. A Highly Active Low Voltage Redox Mediator for Enhanced Rechargeability of Lithium–Oxygen Batteries

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Owing to its high theoretical specific energy, the Li-oxygen battery is one of the fundamentally most promising energy storage systems, but also one of the most challenging. Poor rechargeability, involving the oxidation of insoluble and insulating lithium peroxide (Li2O2), has remained the “Achilles’ heel” of this electrochemical energy storage system. We report here on a new redox mediator tris[4-(diethylamino)phenyl]amine (TDPA), that—at 3.1 V—exhibits the lowest and closest potential redox couple compared to the equilibrium voltage of the Li-oxygen cell of those reported to date, with a second couple also at a low potential of 3.5 V. We show it is a soluble “catalyst” capable of lowering the Li2O2 charging potential by >0.8 V without requiring direct electrical contact of the peroxide and that it also facilitates high discharge capacities. Its chemical and electrochemical stability, fast diffusion kinetics, and two dynamic redox potentials represent a significant advance in oxygen-evolution catalysis. It enables Li–O2 cells that can be recharged more than 100 cycles with average round-trip efficiencies >80%, opening a new avenue for practical Li-oxygen batteries. PMID:27163015

  12. Effects of Protonation State on a Tyrosine-Histidine Bioinspired Redox Mediator

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Gary F.; Hambourger, Michael; Kodis, Gerdenis; Michl, Weston; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A.; Moore, Ana L.

    2010-11-18

    The conversion of tyrosine to the corresponding tyrosyl radical in photosytem II (PSII) is an example of proton-coupled electron transfer. Although the tyrosine moiety (TyrZ) is known to function as a redox mediator between the photo-oxidized primary donor (P680 •+) and the Mn-containing oxygen-evolving complex, the protonation states involved in the course of the reaction remain an active area of investigation. Herein, we report on the optical, structural, and electrochemical properties of tyrosine-histidine constructs, which model the function of their naturally occurring counterparts in PSII. Electrochemical studies show that the phenoxyl/phenol couple of the model is chemically reversible and thermodynamically capable of water oxidation. Studies under acidic and basic conditions provide clear evidence that an ionizable proton controls the electrochemical potential of the tyrosine-histidine mimic and that an exogenous base or acid can be used to generate a low-potential or high-potential mediator, respectively. The phenoxyl/phenoxide couple associated with the low-potential mediator is thermodynamically incapable of water oxidation, whereas the relay associated with the high-potential mediator is thermodynamically incapable of reducing an attached photoexcited porphyrin. These studies provide insight regarding the mechanistic role of the tyrosine-histidine complex in water oxidation and strategies for making use of hydrogen bonds to affect the coupling between proton and electron transfer in artificial photosynthetic systems.

  13. A Highly Active Low Voltage Redox Mediator for Enhanced Rechargeability of Lithium-Oxygen Batteries.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Dipan; Black, Robert; Adams, Brian; Nazar, Linda F

    2015-12-23

    Owing to its high theoretical specific energy, the Li-oxygen battery is one of the fundamentally most promising energy storage systems, but also one of the most challenging. Poor rechargeability, involving the oxidation of insoluble and insulating lithium peroxide (Li2O2), has remained the "Achilles' heel" of this electrochemical energy storage system. We report here on a new redox mediator tris[4-(diethylamino)phenyl]amine (TDPA), that-at 3.1 V-exhibits the lowest and closest potential redox couple compared to the equilibrium voltage of the Li-oxygen cell of those reported to date, with a second couple also at a low potential of 3.5 V. We show it is a soluble "catalyst" capable of lowering the Li2O2 charging potential by >0.8 V without requiring direct electrical contact of the peroxide and that it also facilitates high discharge capacities. Its chemical and electrochemical stability, fast diffusion kinetics, and two dynamic redox potentials represent a significant advance in oxygen-evolution catalysis. It enables Li-O2 cells that can be recharged more than 100 cycles with average round-trip efficiencies >80%, opening a new avenue for practical Li-oxygen batteries. PMID:27163015

  14. Nox2 Deficiency Prevents Hypertension-Induced Vascular Dysfunction and Hypertrophy in Cerebral Arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Siu-Lung; Baumbach, Gary L.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in many hypertension-related vascular diseases in the brain, including stroke and dementia. Thus, we examined the role of genetic deficiency of NADPH oxidase subunit Nox2 in the function and structure of cerebral arterioles during hypertension. Arterial pressure was increased in right-sided cerebral arterioles with transverse aortic banding for 4 weeks in 8-week-old wild-type (WT) and Nox2-deficient (-/y) mice. Mice were given NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 10 mg/kg) or vehicle to drink. We measured the reactivity in cerebral arterioles through open cranial window in anesthetized mice and wall cross-sectional area and superoxide levels ex vivo. Aortic constriction increased systolic and pulse pressures in right-sided carotid arteries in all groups of mice. Ethidium fluorescence showed increased superoxide in right-sided cerebral arterioles in WT, but not in Nox2-/y mice. Dilation to acetylcholine, but not sodium nitroprusside, was reduced, and cross-sectional areas were increased in the right-sided arterioles in WT, but were unchanged in Nox2-/y mice. L-NAME reduced dilation to acetylcholine but did not result in hypertrophy in right-sided arterioles of Nox2-/y  mice. In conclusion, hypertension-induced superoxide production derived from Nox2-containing NADPH oxidase promotes hypertrophy and causes endothelial dysfunction in cerebral arterioles, possibly involving interaction with nitric oxide. PMID:23573415

  15. The accelerating effect and mechanism of a newly functional bio-carrier modified by redox mediators for the azo dyes decolorization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianbo; Kang, Li; Lian, Jing; Yang, Jingliang; Yan, Bin; Li, Zaixing; Liu, Chun; Yue, Lin

    2010-11-01

    In this study, a functional bio-carrier modified by redox meditors was developed as a redox mediator for application in azo dye decolorization processes. Its accelerating effect and mechanism for azo dyes decolorization were also examined. The decolorization rates of 10 azo dyes were enhanced about 1.5-3 fold by the functional bio-carrier modified with disperse turquoise blue S-GL, and the ORP value during the acid red GR decolorization process was changed to a more negative value of 20-25 mV. Non-dissolved redox mediator on the functional bio-carrier played a similar role as NADH during the azo dyes decolorization process. At the same time, the functional bio-carrier exhibited good reusability and the combinational technology of the redox mediator and bio-carrier was a great improvement of the redox mediator application and represents a new bio-treatment concept. PMID:20490625

  16. Redox-mediated activation of latent transforming growth factor-beta 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Dix, T. A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF beta) is a multifunctional cytokine that orchestrates response to injury via ubiquitous cell surface receptors. The biological activity of TGF beta is restrained by its secretion as a latent complex (LTGF beta) such that activation determines the extent of TGF beta activity during physiological and pathological events. TGF beta action has been implicated in a variety of reactive oxygen-mediated tissue processes, particularly inflammation, and in pathologies such as reperfusion injury, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. It was recently shown to be rapidly activated after in vivo radiation exposure, which also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the present studies, the potential for redox-mediated LTGF beta activation was investigated using a cell-free system in which ROS were generated in solution by ionizing radiation or metal ion-catalyzed ascorbate reaction. Irradiation (100 Gray) of recombinant human LTGF beta in solution induced 26% activation compared with that elicited by standard thermal activation. Metal-catalyzed ascorbate oxidation elicited extremely efficient recombinant LTGF beta activation that matched or exceeded thermal activation. The efficiency of ascorbate activation depended on ascorbate concentrations and the presence of transition metal ions. We postulate that oxidation of specific amino acids in the latency-conferring peptide leads to a conformation change in the latent complex that allows release of TGF beta. Oxidative activation offers a novel route for the involvement of TGF beta in tissue processes in which ROS are implicated and endows LTGF beta with the ability to act as a sensor of oxidative stress and, by releasing TGF beta, to function as a signal for orchestrating the response of multiple cell types. LTGF beta redox sensitivity is presumably directed toward recovery of homeostasis; however, oxidation may also be a mechanism of LTGF beta activation that can be deleterious during

  17. Redox-mediated activation of latent transforming growth factor-beta 1.

    PubMed

    Barcellos-Hoff, M H; Dix, T A

    1996-09-01

    Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF beta) is a multifunctional cytokine that orchestrates response to injury via ubiquitous cell surface receptors. The biological activity of TGF beta is restrained by its secretion as a latent complex (LTGF beta) such that activation determines the extent of TGF beta activity during physiological and pathological events. TGF beta action has been implicated in a variety of reactive oxygen-mediated tissue processes, particularly inflammation, and in pathologies such as reperfusion injury, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. It was recently shown to be rapidly activated after in vivo radiation exposure, which also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the present studies, the potential for redox-mediated LTGF beta activation was investigated using a cell-free system in which ROS were generated in solution by ionizing radiation or metal ion-catalyzed ascorbate reaction. Irradiation (100 Gray) of recombinant human LTGF beta in solution induced 26% activation compared with that elicited by standard thermal activation. Metal-catalyzed ascorbate oxidation elicited extremely efficient recombinant LTGF beta activation that matched or exceeded thermal activation. The efficiency of ascorbate activation depended on ascorbate concentrations and the presence of transition metal ions. We postulate that oxidation of specific amino acids in the latency-conferring peptide leads to a conformation change in the latent complex that allows release of TGF beta. Oxidative activation offers a novel route for the involvement of TGF beta in tissue processes in which ROS are implicated and endows LTGF beta with the ability to act as a sensor of oxidative stress and, by releasing TGF beta, to function as a signal for orchestrating the response of multiple cell types. LTGF beta redox sensitivity is presumably directed toward recovery of homeostasis; however, oxidation may also be a mechanism of LTGF beta activation that can be deleterious during

  18. Application of redox mediators to accelerate the transformation of reactive azo dyes in anaerobic bioreactors.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, F P; Bouwman, R H; Strik, D P; Lettinga, G; Field, J A

    2001-12-20

    Azo dyes are nonspecifically reduced under anaerobic conditions but the slow rates at which reactive azo dyes are converted presents a serious problem for the application of anaerobic technology as a first stage in the complete biodegradation of these compounds. As quinones have been found to catalyze reductive transfers by acting as redox mediators, the application of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid (AQDS) during continuous anaerobic treatment of the reactive azo dye, Reactive Red 2 (RR2), was evaluated. A mixture of volatile fatty acids was used as the electron-donating primary substrate. Batch experiments demonstrated that AQDS could increase the first-order rate constant of RR2 reductive cleavage by one order of magnitude. In the continuous experiment, treatment of RR2 containing synthetic wastewater in a lab-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor yielded low dye removal efficiencies (<30%). Consequently, severe toxicity problems occurred, eventually resulting in almost complete inhibition of the methanogenic activity. Addition of catalytic concentrations of AQDS (19 microM) to the reactor influent caused an immediate increase in the dye removal efficiency and recovery of biological activity. Ultimately, RR2 removal efficiency stabilized at 88%, and higher AQDS loads resulted in higher RR2 removal efficiencies (up to 98% at 155 microM AQDS). Examination of the RR2 decolorizing properties of dye-adapted reactor sludge and of nonadapted reactor seed sludge revealed that RR2 decolorization was principally a biologically driven transfer of reducing equivalents from endogenous and added substrates to the dye. Hydrogen, added in bulk, was clearly the preferred electron donor. Bacteria that couple dye decolorization to hydrogen oxidation were naturally present in seed sludge. However, enrichment was required for the utilization of electrons from volatile fatty acids for dye reduction. The stimulatory effect of AQDS on RR2 decolorization by AQDS

  19. Utilizing redox-mediated Bergman cyclization toward the development of dual-action metalloenediyne therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Sarah E; Park, Hyunsoo; Pink, Maren; Zaleski, Jeffrey M

    2013-03-13

    Reaction of 2 equiv of 1,2-bis((diphenylphosphino)ethynyl)benzene (dppeb, 1) with Pt(cod)Cl2 followed by treatment with N2H4 yields the reduced Pt(0) metalloenediyne, Pt(dppeb)2, 2. This complex is stable to both air oxidation and metal-mediated Bergman cyclization under ambient conditions due to the nearly idealized tetrahedral geometry. Reaction of 2 with 1 equiv of I2 in the presence of excess 1,4-cyclohexadiene (1,4-CHD) radical trap rapidly and near-quantitatively generates the cis-Bergman-cyclized, diiodo product 3 ((31)P: δ = 41 ppm, J(Pt-P) = 3346 Hz) with concomitant loss of 1 equiv of uncyclized phosphine chelate ((31)P: δ = -33 ppm). In contrast, addition of 2 equiv of I2 in the absence of additional radical trap instantaneously forms a metastable Pt(dppeb)2(2+) intermediate species, 4, that is characterized by δ = 51 ppm in the (31)P NMR (J(Pt-P) = 3171 Hz) and ν(C≡C) = 2169 cm(-1) in the Raman profile, indicating that it is an uncyclized, bis-ligated complex. Over 24 h, 4 undergoes ligand exchange to form a neutral, square planar complex that spontaneously Bergman cyclizes at ambient temperature to give the crystalline product Pt(dppnap-I2)I2 (dppnap-I2 = (1,4-diiodonaphthalene-2,3-diyl)bis(diphenylphosphine)), 5, in 52% isolated yield. Computational analysis of the oxidation reaction proposes two plausible flattened tetrahedral structures for intermediate 4: one where the phosphine core has migrated to a trans-spanning chelate geometry, and a second, higher energy structure (3.3 kcal/mol) with two cis-chelating phosphine ligands (41° dihedral angle) via a restricted alkyne-terminal starting point. While the energies are disparate, the common theme in both structures is the elongated Pt-P bond lengths (>2.4 Å), indicating that nucleophilic ligand substitution by I(-) is on the reaction trajectory to the cyclized product 5. The efficiency of the redox-mediated Bergman cyclization reaction of this stable Pt(0) metalloenediyne prodrug and

  20. How To Improve Capacity and Cycling Stability for Next Generation Li-O2 Batteries: Approach with a Solid Electrolyte and Elevated Redox Mediator Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Bergner, Benjamin J; Busche, Martin R; Pinedo, Ricardo; Berkes, Balázs B; Schröder, Daniel; Janek, Jürgen

    2016-03-30

    Because of their exceptionally high specific energy, aprotic lithium oxygen (Li-O2) batteries are considered as potential future energy stores. Their practical application is, however, still hindered by the high charging overvoltages and detrimental side reactions. Recently, the use of redox mediators dissolved in the electrolyte emerged as a promising tool to enable charging at moderate voltages. The presented work advances this concept and distinctly improves capacity and cycling stability of Li-O2 batteries by combining high redox mediator concentrations with a solid electrolyte (SE). The use of high redox mediator concentrations significantly increases the discharge capacity by including the oxidation and reduction of the redox mediator into charge cycling. Highly efficient cycling is achieved by protecting the lithium anode with a solid electrolyte, which completely inhibits unfavored deactivation of oxidized species at the anode. Surprisingly, the SE also suppresses detrimental side reactions at the carbon electrode to a large extent and enables stable charging completely below 4.0 V over a prolonged period. It is demonstrated that anode and cathode communicate deleteriously via the liquid electrolyte, which induces degradation reactions at the carbon electrode. The separation of cathode and anode with a SE is therefore considered as a key step toward stable Li-O2 batteries, in conjunction with a concentrated redox mediator electrolyte. PMID:26942895

  1. Discharging a Li-S battery with ultra-high sulphur content cathode using a redox mediator.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwi Ryong; Lee, Kug-Seung; Ahn, Chi-Yeong; Yu, Seung-Ho; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Lithium-sulphur batteries are under intense research due to the high specific capacity and low cost. However, several problems limit their commercialization. One of them is the insulating nature of sulphur, which necessitates a large amount of conductive agent and binder in the cathode, reducing the effective sulphur load as well as the energy density. Here we introduce a redox mediator, cobaltocene, which acts as an electron transfer agent between the conductive surface and the polysulphides in the electrolyte. We confirmed that cobaltocene could effectively convert polysulphides to Li2S using scanning electron microscope, X-ray absorption near-edge structure and in-situ X-ray diffraction studies. This redox mediator enabled excellent electrochemical performance in a cathode with ultra-high sulphur content (80 wt%). It delivered 400 mAh g(-1)cathode capacity after 50 cycles, which is equivalent to 800 mAh g(-1)S in a typical cathode with 50 wt% sulphur. Furthermore, the volumetric capacity was also dramatically improved. PMID:27573528

  2. Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells Employing Heteropolyacids as Redox Mediators for Oxygen Reduction Reactions: Pt-Free Cathode Systems.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Toshiaki; Morikawa, Eri; Nakada, Shintaro; Okanishi, Takeou; Muroyama, Hiroki; Hirao, Yoshifumi; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Eguchi, Koichi

    2016-07-20

    In this study, the heteropolyacids of H3+xPVxMO12-xO40 (x = 0, 2, and 3) were applied as redox mediators for the oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, of which the cathode is free from the usage of noble metals such as Pt/C. In this system, the electrochemical reduction of heteropolyacid over the carbon cathode and the subsequent reoxidation of the partially reduced heteropolyacid by exposure to the dissolved oxygen in the regenerator are important processes for continuous power generation. Thus, the redox properties of catholytes containing these heteropolyacids were investigated in detail. The substitution quantity of V in the heteropolyacid affected the onset reduction potential as well as the reduction current density, resulting in a difference in cell performance. The chemical composition of heteropolyacid also had a significant impact on the reoxidation property. Among the three compounds, H6PV3Mo9O40 was the most suitable redox mediator. Furthermore, the pH of the catholyte was found to be the crucial factor in determining the reoxidation rate of partially reduced heteropolyacid as well as cell performance. PMID:27348019

  3. Discharging a Li-S battery with ultra-high sulphur content cathode using a redox mediator

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwi Ryong; Lee, Kug-Seung; Ahn, Chi-Yeong; Yu, Seung-Ho; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Lithium-sulphur batteries are under intense research due to the high specific capacity and low cost. However, several problems limit their commercialization. One of them is the insulating nature of sulphur, which necessitates a large amount of conductive agent and binder in the cathode, reducing the effective sulphur load as well as the energy density. Here we introduce a redox mediator, cobaltocene, which acts as an electron transfer agent between the conductive surface and the polysulphides in the electrolyte. We confirmed that cobaltocene could effectively convert polysulphides to Li2S using scanning electron microscope, X-ray absorption near-edge structure and in-situ X-ray diffraction studies. This redox mediator enabled excellent electrochemical performance in a cathode with ultra-high sulphur content (80 wt%). It delivered 400 mAh g−1cathode capacity after 50 cycles, which is equivalent to 800 mAh g−1S in a typical cathode with 50 wt% sulphur. Furthermore, the volumetric capacity was also dramatically improved. PMID:27573528

  4. Enzyme mediated synthesis of polypyrrole in the presence of chondroitin sulfate and redox mediators of natural origin.

    PubMed

    Grijalva-Bustamante, G A; Evans-Villegas, A G; del Castillo-Castro, T; Castillo-Ortega, M M; Cruz-Silva, R; Huerta, F; Morallón, E

    2016-06-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) was synthesized by enzyme mediated oxidation of pyrrole using naturally occurring compounds as redox mediators. The catalytic mechanism is an enzymatic cascade reaction in which hydrogen peroxide is the oxidizer and soybean peroxidase, in the presence of acetosyringone, syringaldehyde or vanillin, acts as a natural catalysts. The effect of the initial reaction composition on the polymerization yield and electrical conductivity of PPy was analyzed. Morphology of the PPy particles was studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy whereas the chemical structure was studied by X-ray photoelectron and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopic techniques. The redox mediators increased the polymerization yield without a significant modification of the electronic structure of PPy. The highest conductivity of PPy was reached when chondroitin sulfate was used simultaneously as dopant and template during pyrrole polymerization. Electroactive properties of PPy obtained from natural precursors were successfully used in the amperometric quantification of uric acid concentrations. PPy increases the amperometric sensitivity of carbon nanotube screen-printed electrodes toward uric acid detection. PMID:27040261

  5. Continuous glucose monitoring microsensor with a nanoscale conducting matrix and redox mediator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesantez, Daniel

    vitro testing for glucose shows increasing current with increasing analyte concentration. Testing the glucose microsensor with known concentrations of glucose over a period of 48 hours demonstrated both the potential durability and sensitivity of the device. Unknown/blind in vitro glucose experiments showed the reproducibility and accuracy of the microsensor to detect various glucose levels. Thinner polymer matrix films lead to better sensing performance during in vitro tests (0.6nA/mM lower limit sensitivity and 0.2nA/mM upper limit sensitivity). In vitro experiments using electroactive ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA) showed the selectivity of the sensor for glucose. In an effort to reduce the sensor's oxidation potential (0.7V) and noise, a second generation electron transfer approach was developed by incorporating into a modified Platinum WE with a nanoscale PPy and GOx matrix, a redox mediator. Ferrocene (Fc) was selected as the artificial electron carrier, substituting molecular oxygen in the enzymatic reaction. The incorporation of Fc into the polymer matrix is done by a simple electrochemical synthesis. Modifications in the microsensor design, materials and fabrication process are presented. Experiments with the new sensor generation resulted in higher sensitivity values (22.8nA/mM lower limit sensitivity and 12.5nA/mM upper limit sensitivity) for glucose and noise was further eliminated by operating the sensor at a lower oxidation potential (0.3V). The final experimental work consisted of preliminary ex vivo tests with the MetaSense microdevice on bovine kidney samples, which showed a qualitatively correlation between glucose consumption trend profile during preservation and viability histology outcome.

  6. Exploring redox-mediating characteristics of textile dye-bearing microbial fuel cells: thionin and malachite green.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bor-Yann; Xu, Bin; Qin, Lian-Jie; Lan, John Chi-Wei; Hsueh, Chung-Chuan

    2014-10-01

    Prior studies indicated that biodecolorized intermediates of azo dyes could act as electron shuttles to stimulate wastewater decolorization and bioelectricity generation (WD&BG) in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). This study tended to explore whether non-azo textile dyes (i.e., thionin and malachite green) could also own such redox-mediating capabilities for WD&BG. Prior findings mentioned that OH and/or NH2 substitute-containing auxochrome compounds (e.g., 2-aminophenol and 1,2-dihydroxybenzene) could effectively mediate electron transport in MFCs for simultaneous WD&BG. This work clearly suggested that the presence of electron-mediating textile dyes (e.g., thionin and malachite green (MG)) in MFCs is promising to stimulate color removal and bioelectricity generation. That is, using MFCs as operation strategy for wastewater biodecolorization is economically promising in industrial applications due to autocatalytic acceleration of electron-flux for WD&BG in MFCs. PMID:25062539

  7. Characteristics and Kinetic Analysis of AQS Transformation and Microbial Goethite Reduction:Insight into “Redox mediator-Microbe-Iron oxide” Interaction Process

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Weihuang; Shi, Mengran; Yu, Dan; Liu, Chongxuan; Huang, Tinglin; Wu, Fengchang

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics and kinetics of redox transformation of a redox mediator, anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS), during microbial goethite reduction by Shewanella decolorationis S12, a dissimilatory iron reduction bacterium (DIRB), were investigated to provide insights into “redox mediator-iron oxide” interaction in the presence of DIRB. Two pre-incubation reaction systems of the “strain S12- goethite” and the “strain S12-AQS” were used to investigate the dynamics of goethite reduction and AQS redox transformation. Results show that the concentrations of goethite and redox mediator, and the inoculation cell density all affect the characteristics of microbial goethite reduction, kinetic transformation between oxidized and reduced species of the redox mediator. Both abiotic and biotic reactions and their coupling regulate the kinetic process for “Quinone-Iron” interaction in the presence of DIRB. Our results provide some new insights into the characteristics and mechanisms of interaction among “quinone-DIRB- goethite” under biotic/abiotic driven. PMID:27020166

  8. Characteristics and Kinetic Analysis of AQS Transformation and Microbial Goethite Reduction:Insight into “Redox mediator-Microbe-Iron oxide” Interaction Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weihuang; Shi, Mengran; Yu, Dan; Liu, Chongxuan; Huang, Tinglin; Wu, Fengchang

    2016-03-01

    The characteristics and kinetics of redox transformation of a redox mediator, anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS), during microbial goethite reduction by Shewanella decolorationis S12, a dissimilatory iron reduction bacterium (DIRB), were investigated to provide insights into “redox mediator-iron oxide” interaction in the presence of DIRB. Two pre-incubation reaction systems of the “strain S12- goethite” and the “strain S12-AQS” were used to investigate the dynamics of goethite reduction and AQS redox transformation. Results show that the concentrations of goethite and redox mediator, and the inoculation cell density all affect the characteristics of microbial goethite reduction, kinetic transformation between oxidized and reduced species of the redox mediator. Both abiotic and biotic reactions and their coupling regulate the kinetic process for “Quinone-Iron” interaction in the presence of DIRB. Our results provide some new insights into the characteristics and mechanisms of interaction among “quinone-DIRB- goethite” under biotic/abiotic driven.

  9. SPINDLY, ERECTA, and Its Ligand STOMAGEN Have a Role in Redox-Mediated Cortex Proliferation in the Arabidopsis Root

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Hongchang; Kong, Danyu; Wei, Pengcheng; Hao, Yueling; Torii, Keiko U.; Lee, Jin Suk; Li, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are harmful to all living organisms and therefore they must be removed to ensure normal growth and development. ROS are also signaling molecules, but so far little is known about the mechanisms of ROS perception and developmental response in plants. We here report that hydrogen peroxide induces cortex proliferation in the Arabidopsis root and that SPINDLY (SPY), an O-linked glucosamine acetyltransferase, regulates cortex proliferation by maintaining cellular redox homeostasis. We also found that mutation in the leucine-rich receptor kinase ERECTA and its putative peptide ligand STOMAGEN block the effect of hydrogen peroxide on root cortex proliferation. However, ERECTA and STOMAGEN are expressed in the vascular tissue, whereas extra cortex cells are produced from the endodermis, suggesting the involvement of intercellular signaling. SPY appears to act downstream of ERECTA, because the spy mutation still caused cortex proliferation in the erecta mutant background. We therefore have not only gained insight into the mechanism by which SPY regulates root development but also uncovered a novel pathway for ROS signaling in plants. The importance of redox-mediated cortex proliferation as a protective mechanism against oxidative stress is also discussed. PMID:25267734

  10. Trapping of redox-mediators at the surface of Chlorella vulgaris leads to error in measurements of cell reducing power.

    PubMed

    Thorne, Rebecca J; Hu, Huaining; Schneider, Kenneth; Cameron, Petra J

    2014-03-28

    The reduction of the redox mediator ferricyanide, [Fe(CN)6](3-), by a range of algal and bacterial species, is frequently measured to probe plasma membrane ferrireductase activity or to quantify the reducing power of algal/bacterial biofilms and suspensions. In this study we have used rotating disk electrochemistry (RDE) to investigate the reduction of ferricyanide by the model organism Chlorella vulgaris. Importantly, we have seen that the diffusion limited current due to the oxidation of ferrocyanide, [Fe(CN)6](4-), at the electrode decreased linearly as C. vulgaris was added to the solution, even though in a pure ferrocyanide solution the algae are not able to reduce the mediator further and are simply spectator 'particles'. We attribute this effect to trapping of ferrocyanide at the cell surface, with up to 14% of the ferrocyanide missing from the solution at the highest cell concentration. The result has important implications for all techniques that use electrochemistry and other concentration dependent assays (e.g. fluorescence and colourimetry) to monitor ferrocyanide concentrations in the presence of both biofilms and cell suspensions. Analyte trapping could lead to a substantial underestimation of the concentration of reduced product. PMID:24535230

  11. SPINDLY, ERECTA, and its ligand STOMAGEN have a role in redox-mediated cortex proliferation in the Arabidopsis root.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hongchang; Kong, Danyu; Wei, Pengcheng; Hao, Yueling; Torii, Keiko U; Lee, Jin Suk; Li, Jie

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are harmful to all living organisms and therefore they must be removed to ensure normal growth and development. ROS are also signaling molecules, but so far little is known about the mechanisms of ROS perception and developmental response in plants. We here report that hydrogen peroxide induces cortex proliferation in the Arabidopsis root and that SPINDLY (SPY), an O-linked glucosamine acetyltransferase, regulates cortex proliferation by maintaining cellular redox homeostasis. We also found that mutation in the leucine-rich receptor kinase ERECTA and its putative peptide ligand STOMAGEN block the effect of hydrogen peroxide on root cortex proliferation. However, ERECTA and STOMAGEN are expressed in the vascular tissue, whereas extra cortex cells are produced from the endodermis, suggesting the involvement of intercellular signaling. SPY appears to act downstream of ERECTA, because the spy mutation still caused cortex proliferation in the erecta mutant background. We therefore have not only gained insight into the mechanism by which SPY regulates root development but also uncovered a novel pathway for ROS signaling in plants. The importance of redox-mediated cortex proliferation as a protective mechanism against oxidative stress is also discussed. PMID:25267734

  12. Effects of different quinoid redox mediators on the simultaneous removal of p-cresol and sulphide in a denitrifying process.

    PubMed

    Meza-Escalante, Edna R; Texier, Anne-Claire; Cuervo-López, Flor; Gómez, Jorge; Cervantes, Francisco J

    2009-01-01

    The catalytic effects of different quinoid redox mediators (RM) on the simultaneous removal of sulphide and p-cresol in a denitrifying process were evaluated in batch studies. 2-Hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (LAW) and anthraquinone-2,6-disulphonate (AQDS) did not significantly affect the sulphide oxidation rate, which, in contrast, was increased 14% in the presence of 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulphonate (NQS). The input of NQS on the oxidation of sulphide was also favourably reflected in a 13% higher sulphate production. All RM promoted a higher (up to 34% compared to the control lacking RM) degree of mineralization of p-cresol. LAW also supported a 47% higher denitrifying yield (Y(N2)), compared to the control lacking quinones. Nevertheless, AQDS and NQS decreased the Y(N2) by 12-13%. Our results suggest that a proper scrutiny should be conducted before deciding the sort of quinone to be applied in denitrifying processes. The heterogeneous effects observed also advise to consider both the respiratory rates and the yields as important parameters for deciphering the impact of RM on denitrifying processes. PMID:19474488

  13. Three-Dimensional Growth of Li2S in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries Promoted by a Redox Mediator.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Laura C H; Frischmann, Peter D; Fan, Frank Y; Doris, Sean E; Qu, Xiaohui; Scheuermann, Angelique M; Persson, Kristin; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Helms, Brett A

    2016-01-13

    During the discharge of a lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery, an electronically insulating 2D layer of Li2S is electrodeposited onto the current collector. Once the current collector is enveloped, the overpotential of the cell increases, and its discharge is arrested, often before reaching the full capacity of the active material. Guided by a new computational platform known as the Electrolyte Genome, we advance and apply benzo[ghi]peryleneimide (BPI) as a redox mediator for the reduction of dissolved polysulfides to Li2S. With BPI present, we show that it is now possible to electrodeposit Li2S as porous, 3D deposits onto carbon current collectors during cell discharge. As a result, sulfur utilization improved 220% due to a 6-fold increase in Li2S formation. To understand the growth mechanism, electrodeposition of Li2S was carried out under both galvanostatic and potentiostatic control. The observed kinetics under potentiostatic control were modeled using modified Avrami phase transformation kinetics, which showed that BPI slows the impingement of insulating Li2S islands on carbon. Conceptually, the pairing of conductive carbons with BPI can be viewed as a vascular approach to the design of current collectors for energy storage devices: here, conductive carbon "arteries" dominate long-range electron transport, while BPI "capillaries" mediate short-range transport and electron transfer between the storage materials and the carbon electrode. PMID:26691496

  14. The effect of salinity, redox mediators and temperature on anaerobic biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Adelaja, Oluwaseun; Keshavarz, Tajalli; Kyazze, Godfrey

    2015-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) need to be robust if they are to be applied in the field for bioremediation. This study investigated the effect of temperature (20-50°C), salinity (0.5-2.5% (w/v) as sodium chloride), the use of redox mediators (riboflavin and anthraquinone-2-sulphonate, AQS) and prolonged fed-batch operation (60 days) on biodegradation of a petroleum hydrocarbon mix (i.e. phenanthrene and benzene) in MFCs. The performance criteria were degradation efficiency, % COD removal and electrochemical performance. Good electrochemical and degradation performance were maintained up to a salinity of 1.5% (w/v) but deteriorated by 35-fold and 4-fold respectively as salinity was raised to 2.5%w/v. Degradation rates and maximum power density were both improved by approximately 2-fold at 40°C compared to MFC performance at 30°C but decreased sharply by 4-fold when operating temperature was raised to 50°C. The optimum reactor performance obtained at 40°C was 1.15 mW/m(2) maximum power density, 89.1% COD removal and a degradation efficiency of 97.10%; at moderately saline (1% w/v) conditions the maximum power density was 1.06 mW/m(2), 79.1% COD removal and 91.6% degradation efficiency. This work suggests the possible application of MFC technology in the effective treatment of petroleum hydrocarbons contaminated site and refinery effluents. PMID:25279757

  15. p66Shc regulates renal vascular tone in hypertension-induced nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Bradley; Palygin, Oleg; Rufanova, Victoriya A; Chong, Andrew; Lazar, Jozef; Jacob, Howard J; Mattson, David; Roman, Richard J; Williams, Jan M; Cowley, Allen W; Geurts, Aron M; Staruschenko, Alexander; Imig, John D; Sorokin, Andrey

    2016-07-01

    Renal preglomerular arterioles regulate vascular tone to ensure a large pressure gradient over short distances, a function that is extremely important for maintaining renal microcirculation. Regulation of renal microvascular tone is impaired in salt-sensitive (SS) hypertension-induced nephropathy, but the molecular mechanisms contributing to this impairment remain elusive. Here, we assessed the contribution of the SH2 adaptor protein p66Shc (encoded by Shc1) in regulating renal vascular tone and the development of renal vascular dysfunction associated with hypertension-induced nephropathy. We generated a panel of mutant rat strains in which specific modifications of Shc1 were introduced into the Dahl SS rats. In SS rats, overexpression of p66Shc was linked to increased renal damage. Conversely, deletion of p66Shc from these rats restored the myogenic responsiveness of renal preglomerular arterioles ex vivo and promoted cellular contraction in primary vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) that were isolated from renal vessels. In primary SMCs, p66Shc restricted the activation of transient receptor potential cation channels to attenuate cytosolic Ca2+ influx, implicating a mechanism by which overexpression of p66Shc impairs renal vascular reactivity. These results establish the adaptor protein p66Shc as a regulator of renal vascular tone and a driver of impaired renal vascular function in hypertension-induced nephropathy. PMID:27270176

  16. Efficient dye regeneration at low driving force achieved in triphenylamine dye LEG4 and TEMPO redox mediator based dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenxing; Vlachopoulos, Nick; Hao, Yan; Hagfeldt, Anders; Boschloo, Gerrit

    2015-06-28

    Minimizing the driving force required for the regeneration of oxidized dyes using redox mediators in an electrolyte is essential to further improve the open-circuit voltage and efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Appropriate combinations of redox mediators and dye molecules should be explored to achieve this goal. Herein, we present a triphenylamine dye, LEG4, in combination with a TEMPO-based electrolyte in acetonitrile (E(0) = 0.89 V vs. NHE), reaching an efficiency of up to 5.4% under one sun illumination and 40% performance improvement compared to the previously and widely used indoline dye D149. The origin of this improvement was found to be the increased dye regeneration efficiency of LEG4 using the TEMPO redox mediator, which regenerated more than 80% of the oxidized dye with a driving force of only ∼0.2 eV. Detailed mechanistic studies further revealed that in addition to electron recombination to oxidized dyes, recombination of electrons from the conducting substrate and the mesoporous TiO2 film to the TEMPO(+) redox species in the electrolyte accounts for the reduced short circuit current, compared to the state-of-the-art cobalt tris(bipyridine) electrolyte system. The diffusion length of the TEMPO-electrolyte based DSSCs was determined to be ∼0.5 μm, which is smaller than the ∼2.8 μm found for cobalt-electrolyte based DSSCs. These results show the advantages of using LEG4 as a sensitizer, compared to previously record indoline dyes, in combination with a TEMPO-based electrolyte. The low driving force for efficient dye regeneration presented by these results shows the potential to further improve the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of DSSCs by utilizing redox couples and dyes with a minimal need of driving force for high regeneration yields. PMID:26016854

  17. A redox-mediator-free solar-driven Z-scheme water-splitting system consisting of modified Ta3N5 as an oxygen-evolution photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Ma, Su Su Khine; Maeda, Kazuhiko; Hisatomi, Takashi; Tabata, Masashi; Kudo, Akihiko; Domen, Kazunari

    2013-06-01

    Tantalum nitride (Ta3N5) modified with various O2-evolution cocatalysts was employed as a photocatalyst for water oxidation under visible light (λ>420 nm) in an attempt to construct a redox-mediator-free Z-scheme water-splitting system. Ta3N5 was prepared by nitriding Ta2O5 powder under a flow of NH3 at 1023-1223 K. The activity of Ta3N5 for water oxidation from an aqueous AgNO3 solution as an electron acceptor without cocatalyst was dependent on the generation of a well-crystallized Ta3N5 phase with a low density of anionic defects. Modification of Ta3N5 with nanoparticulate metal oxides as cocatalysts for O2 evolution improved water-oxidation activity. Of the cocatalysts examined, cobalt oxide (CoO(x)) was found to be the most effective, improving the water-oxidation efficiency of Ta3N5 by six to seven times. Further modification of CoO(x)/Ta3N5 with metallic Ir as an electron sink allowed one to achieve Z-scheme water splitting under simulated sunlight through interparticle electron transfer without the need for a shuttle redox mediator in combination with Ru-loaded SrTiO3 doped with Rh as a H2-evolution photocatalyst. PMID:23584996

  18. AFM nanometer surface morphological study of in situ electropolymerized neutral red redox mediator oxysilane sol-gel encapsulated glucose oxidase electrochemical biosensors.

    PubMed

    Chiorcea-Paquim, Ana-Maria; Pauliukaite, Rasa; Brett, Christopher M A; Oliveira-Brett, Ana Maria

    2008-10-15

    Four different silica sol-gel films: methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMOS), tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTOS) and 3-glycidoxypropyl-trimethoxysilane (GOPMOS) assembled onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) were characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM), due to their use in the development of glucose biosensors. The chemical structure of the oxysilane precursor and the composition of the sol-gel mixture both influenced the roughness, the size and the distribution of pores in the sol-gel films, which is relevant for enzyme encapsulation. The GOPMOS sol-gel film fulfils all the morphological characteristics required for good encapsulation of the enzyme, due to a smooth topography with very dense and uniform distribution of only small, 50 nm diameter, pores at the surface. APTOS and MTMOS sol-gel films developed small pores together with large ones of 300-400 nm that allow the leakage of enzymes, while the TEOS film formed a rough and incomplete network on the electrode, less suitable for enzyme immobilisation. GOPMOS sol-gel film with encapsulated glucose oxidase and poly(neutral red) redox mediator, prepared by in situ electropolymerization, were also morphologically characterized by AFM. The AFM results explain the variation of the stability in time, sensitivity and limit of detection obtained with different oxysilane sol-gel encapsulated glucose oxidase biosensors with redox mediator. PMID:18485690

  19. Evaluation of docosahexaenoic acid in a dog model of hypertension induced left ventricular hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Stanley, William C; Cox, James W; Asemu, Girma; O'Connell, Kelly A; Dabkowski, Erinne R; Xu, Wenhong; Ribeiro, Rogerio F; Shekar, Kadambari C; Hoag, Stephen W; Rastogi, Sharad; Sabbah, Hani N; Daneault, Caroline; des Rosiers, Christine

    2013-12-01

    Marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids alter cardiac phospholipids and prevent cardiac pathology in rodents subjected to pressure overload. This approach has not been evaluated in humans or large animals with hypertension-induced pathological hypertrophy. We evaluated docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in old female dogs with hypertension caused by 16 weeks of aldosterone infusion. Aldosterone-induced hypertension resulted in concentric left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and impaired diastolic function in placebo-treated dogs. DHA supplementation increased DHA and depleted arachidonic acid in cardiac phospholipids, but did not improve LV parameters compared to placebo. Surprisingly, DHA significantly increased serum aldosterone concentration and blood pressure compared to placebo. Cardiac mitochondrial yield was decreased in placebo-treated hypertensive dogs compared to normal animals, which was prevented by DHA. Extensive analysis of mitochondrial function found no differences between DHA and placebo groups. In conclusion, DHA did not favorably impact mitochondrial or LV function in aldosterone hypertensive dogs. PMID:24065618

  20. Enhanced reduction of an azo dye using henna plant biomass as a solid-phase electron donor, carbon source, and redox mediator.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingang; Chu, Shushan; Chen, Jianjun; Chen, Yi; Xie, Zhengmiao

    2014-06-01

    The multiple effects of henna plant biomass as a source of carbon, electron donor, and redox mediator (RM) on the enhanced bio-reduction of Orange II (AO7) were investigated. The results indicated that the maximum AO7 reduction rate in the culture with henna powder was ∼6-fold that in the sludge control culture lacking henna. On the one hand, AO7 reduction can be advantageously enhanced by the release of available electron donors; on the other hand, the associated lawsone can act as a fixed RM and play a potential role in shuttling electrons from the released electron donors to the final electron acceptor, AO7. The soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) during each experiment and the FTIR spectra suggested that the weakened AO7 reduction along with the retention of henna powder might not be attributed to the lack of fixed lawsone but rather to the insufficiency of electron donors. PMID:24759768

  1. Effect of metal ions and redox mediators on decolorization of synthetic dyes by crude laccase from a novel white rot fungus Peniophora sp. (NFCCI-2131).

    PubMed

    Shankar, Shiv; Shikha; Nill, Shikha

    2015-01-01

    The effect of different metal ions and two redox mediators on laccase activity and laccase-catalyzed decolorization of five synthetic dyes was investigated in vitro using crude laccase from a novel white rot fungus Peniophora sp. (NFCCI-2131). The fungus effectively decolorized crystal violet and brilliant green on malt extract agar medium. Laccase activity was enhanced by metal ions such as Cd(2+), Mn(2+), Ni(2+), Co(2+), Na(+) Ca(2+), and Cu(2+). Among the different dyes tested, highest decolorization of crystal violet (96.30 %) was obtained in the presence of 1 mM ABTS followed by 86.01 % by HBT. The results conspicuously indicated that laccase from Peniophora sp. has the potential for color removal from textile dye effluent even in the presence of toxic metal ions. PMID:25293639

  2. Increased Klk9 Urinary Excretion Is Associated to Hypertension-Induced Cardiovascular Damage and Renal Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Blázquez-Medela, Ana M.; García-Sánchez, Omar; Quirós, Yaremi; Blanco-Gozalo, Victor; Prieto-García, Laura; Sancho-Martínez, Sandra M.; Romero, Miguel; Duarte, Juan M.; López-Hernández, Francisco J.; López-Novoa, José M.; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Early detection of hypertensive end-organ damage and secondary diseases are key determinants of cardiovascular prognosis in patients suffering from arterial hypertension. Presently, there are no biomarkers for the detection of hypertensive target organ damage, most outstandingly including blood vessels, the heart, and the kidneys. We aimed to validate the usefulness of the urinary excretion of the serine protease kallikrein-related peptidase 9 (KLK9) as a biomarker of hypertension-induced target organ damage. Urinary, plasma, and renal tissue levels of KLK9 were measured by the Western blot in different rat models of hypertension, including angiotensin-II infusion, DOCA-salt, L-NAME administration, and spontaneous hypertension. Urinary levels were associated to cardiovascular and renal injury, assessed by histopathology. The origin of urinary KLK9 was investigated through in situ renal perfusion experiments. The urinary excretion of KLK9 is increased in different experimental models of hypertension in rats. The ACE inhibitor trandolapril significantly reduced arterial pressure and the urinary level of KLK9. Hypertension did not increase kidney, heart, liver, lung, or plasma KLK9 levels. Hypertension-induced increased urinary excretion of KLK9 results from specific alterations in its tubular reabsorption, even in the absence of overt nephropathy. KLK9 urinary excretion strongly correlates with cardiac hypertrophy and aortic wall thickening. KLK9 appears in the urine in the presence of hypertension as a result of subtle renal handling alterations. Urinary KLK9 might be potentially used as an indicator of hypertensive cardiac and vascular damage. PMID:26469898

  3. Novel process for simultaneous removal of NO(x) and SO2 from simulated flue gas by using a sustainable Ag(I)/Ag(II) redox mediator.

    PubMed

    Raju, Thasan; Chung, Sang Joon; Moon, Il Shik

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a sustainable process for simultaneous removal of waste gases such as NO, NO2, and SO2 by an electrochemically generated Ag(I)/Ag(II) redox mediator system. High removal efficiency was achieved for NO and SO2 by the wet scrubbing method at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. This removal is achieved through oxidation and absorption by contacting the gaseous stream with redox mediator ions that offer specific or selective solubility for the solute gases to be recovered in a wet scrubber. The process parameters such as gas velocity, liquid velocity, Ag(I) concentration, and HNO3 concentration were investigated to explore the possibility of complete removal of waste gases. The Ag(I)/Ag(II)-based mediated electrochemical oxidation process proved to be quite effective for simultaneous removal of NO, NO(x), and SO2 from the simulated flue gas mixtures containing NO and SO2 over a wide concentration range of 100-400 ppm. Studies were carried out with individual gas components for the mixture, and the effect of input NO and input SO2 concentrations on the NO(x) and SO2 removal efficiencies at 20 degrees C was examined. Complete oxidation of NO to NO2 with 100% NO removal efficiency and 92% NO(x) removal efficiency was achieved along with 100% SO2 removal efficiency, highlighting a potentially far greater efficiency of the Ag(I)/Ag(II)-based system in functionality and selectivity. Active research work in this direction is anticipated in the near future. PMID:18939587

  4. Biochemical characterization of laccase from hairy root culture of Brassica juncea L. and role of redox mediators to enhance its potential for the decolorization of textile dyes.

    PubMed

    Telke, Amar A; Kagalkar, Anuradha N; Jagtap, Umesh B; Desai, Neetin S; Bapat, Vishwas A; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2011-12-01

    In vitro transgenic hairy root cultures provide a rapid system for physiological, biochemical studies and screening of plants for their phytoremediation potential. The hairy root cultures of Brassica juncea L. showed 92% decolorization of Methyl orange within 4 days. Out of the different redox mediators that were used to achieve enhanced decolorization, 2, 2'-Azinobis, 3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) was found to be the most efficient. Laccase activity of 4.5 U mg(-1) of protein was observed in hairy root cultures of Brassica juncea L., after the decolorization of Methyl orange. Intracellular laccase produced by B. juncea root cultures grown in MS basal medium was purified up to 2.0 fold with 6.62 U mg(-1) specific activity using anion-exchange chromatography. Molecular weight of the purified laccase was estimated to be 148 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The purified enzyme efficiently oxidized ABTS which was also required for oxidation of the other tested substrates. The pH and temperature optimum for laccase activity were 4.0 and 40°C, respectively. The purified enzyme was stable up to 50°C and was stable in the pH range of 4.0-6.0. Laccase activity was strongly inhibited by sodium azide, EDTA, dithiothreitol and L: -cysteine. The purified enzyme decolorized various textile dyes in the presence of ABTS as an efficient redox mediator. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the enzymatic process involved in phytoremediation of textile dyes by using hairy roots. PMID:21735196

  5. Loss of p53 in Stromal Fibroblasts Promotes Epithelial Cell Invasion through Redox-Mediated ICAM1 Signal

    PubMed Central

    Trachootham, Dunyaporn; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Wan; Lu, Weiqin; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Jinsong; Huang, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment plays a major role in cancer development. Understanding how the stroma affects epithelial transformation will provide a basis for new preventive strategies. Recent evidences suggest that oxidative stress in stroma may play a role in cancer progression and loss of p53 function in the stromal cells were associated with poor prognosis and high tumor recurrence. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated the role of p53 loss in fibroblasts on epithelial transformation and the mechanistic involvement of reactive species. Using 3D-organotypic culture and other assays, we report that the stroma containing p53-deficient fibroblasts could transform the non-tumorigenic epithelial cells of oral and ovarian tissues origins to become invasive through reactive nitrogen species (RNS)-mediated release of cytokine ICAM1. The p53-deficient fibroblasts have increased RNS production and accumulation of oxidative DNA damage products associated with specific up-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Suppression of RNS production by siRNA of eNOS or antioxidant NAC reduced ICAM1 expression and prevented the stroma-mediated epithelial invasion. Our study uncovers the novel mechanism by which redox alteration associated with loss of p53 in stromal fibroblasts function as a key inducer of epithelial transformation and invasion via RNS-mediated-ICAM1 signaling. Thus, modulation of the redox signaling in microenvironment may serve as a new approach to prevent epithelial transformation and suppress cancer invasion. PMID:23376231

  6. Oxidovanadium(IV/V) complexes as new redox mediators in dye-sensitized solar cells: a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Apostolopoulou, Andigoni; Vlasiou, Manolis; Tziouris, Petros A; Tsiafoulis, Constantinos; Tsipis, Athanassios C; Rehder, Dieter; Kabanos, Themistoklis A; Keramidas, Anastasios D; Stathatos, Elias

    2015-04-20

    Corrosiveness is one of the main drawbacks of using the iodide/triiodide redox couple in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Alternative redox couples including transition metal complexes have been investigated where surprisingly high efficiencies for the conversion of solar to electrical energy have been achieved. In this paper, we examined the development of a DSSC using an electrolyte based on square pyramidal oxidovanadium(IV/V) complexes. The oxidovanadium(IV) complex (Ph4P)2[V(IV)O(hybeb)] was combined with its oxidized analogue (Ph4P)[V(V)O(hybeb)] {where hybeb(4-) is the tetradentate diamidodiphenolate ligand [1-(2-hydroxybenzamido)-2-(2-pyridinecarboxamido)benzenato}and applied as a redox couple in the electrolyte of DSSCs. The complexes exhibit large electron exchange and transfer rates, which are evident from electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and electrochemistry, rendering the oxidovanadium(IV/V) compounds suitable for redox mediators in DSSCs. The very large self-exchange rate constant offered an insight into the mechanism of the exchange reaction most likely mediated through an outer-sphere exchange mechanism. The [V(IV)O(hybeb)](2-)/[V(V)O(hybeb)](-) redox potential and the energy of highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the sensitizing dye N719 and the HOMO of [V(IV)O(hybeb)](2-) were calculated by means of density functional theory electronic structure calculation methods. The complexes were applied as a new redox mediator in DSSCs, while the cell performance was studied in terms of the concentration of the reduced and oxidized form of the complexes. These studies were performed with the commercial Ru-based sensitizer N719 absorbed on a TiO2 semiconducting film in the DSSC. Maximum energy conversion efficiencies of 2% at simulated solar light (AM 1.5; 1000 W m(-2)) with an open circuit voltage of 660 mV, a short-circuit current of 5.2 mA cm(-2), and a fill factor of 0.58 were recorded without the presence of any additives in the

  7. Immobilization of metal-humic acid complexes in anaerobic granular sludge for their application as solid-phase redox mediators in the biotransformation of iopromide in UASB reactors.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Zavala, Aracely S; Pat-Espadas, Aurora M; Rangel-Mendez, J Rene; Chazaro-Ruiz, Luis F; Ascacio-Valdes, Juan A; Aguilar, Cristobal N; Cervantes, Francisco J

    2016-05-01

    Metal-humic acid complexes were synthesized and immobilized by a granulation process in anaerobic sludge for their application as solid-phase redox mediators (RM) in the biotransformation of iopromide. Characterization of Ca- and Fe-humic acid complexes revealed electron accepting capacities of 0.472 and 0.556milli-equivalentsg(-1), respectively. Once immobilized, metal-humic acid complexes significantly increased the biotransformation of iopromide in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors. Control UASB reactor (without humic material) achieved 31.6% of iopromide removal, while 80% was removed in UASB reactors supplied with each metal-humic acid complex. Further analyses indicated multiple transformation reactions taking place in iopromide including deiodination, N-dealkylation, decarboxylation and deacetylation. This is the first successful application of immobilized RM, which does not require a supporting material to maintain the solid-phase RM in long term operation of bioreactors. The proposed redox catalyst could be suitable for enhancing the redox conversion of different recalcitrant pollutants present in industrial effluents. PMID:26868154

  8. Effective killing of Gleevec-resistant CML cells with T315I mutation by a natural compound PEITC through redox-mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, H; Trachootham, D; Lu, W; Carew, J; Giles, FJ; Keating, MJ; Arlinghaus, RB; Huang, P

    2008-01-01

    Mutation of Bcr-Abl is an important mechanism by which chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells become resistant to Gleevec. The T315I mutation is clinically significant since CML cells harboring this mutation are insensitive to Gleevec and other Bcr-Abl-targeted drugs. Identification of new agents capable of effectively killing CML cells with T315I mutation would have important therapeutic implications in Gleevec-resistant CML. Here, we showed that β-phenylethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), a natural compound found in vegetables, is effective in killing CML cells expressing T315I BCR-ABL. Treatment of leukemia cell lines harboring wild-type or mutant Bcr-Abl with 10 μm PEITC resulted in an elevated ROS stress and a redox-mediated degradation of the BCR-ABL protein, leading to massive death of the leukemia cells. Antioxidant NAC attenuated the PEITC-induced oxidative stress in CML cells and prevented the degradation of BCR-ABL, caspase-3 activation and cell death. We further showed that the ROS-induced degradation of BCR-ABL was mediated partially by caspase-3 and the proteasome pathway. The ability of PEITC to effectively kill T315I-positive CML cells was further confirmed using primary leukemia cells isolated from CML patients. Our results suggest that PEITC is a promising compound capable of killing Gleevec-resistant CML cells through a ROS-mediated mechanism and warrants further investigations. PMID:18385754

  9. Hypertension alters phosphorylation of VASP in brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Arlier, Zulfikar; Basar, Murat; Kocamaz, Erdogan; Kiraz, Kemal; Tanriover, Gamze; Kocer, Gunnur; Arlier, Sefa; Giray, Semih; Nasırcılar, Seher; Gunduz, Filiz; Senturk, Umit K; Demir, Necdet

    2015-04-01

    Hypertension impairs cerebral vascular function. Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) mediates active reorganization of the cytoskeleton via membrane ruffling, aggregation and tethering of actin filaments. VASP regulation of endothelial barrier function has been demonstrated by studies using VASP(-/-) animals under conditions associated with tissue hypoxia. We hypothesize that hypertension regulates VASP expression and/or phosphorylation in endothelial cells, thereby contributing to dysfunction in the cerebral vasculature. Because exercise has direct and indirect salutary effects on vascular systems that have been damaged by hypertension, we also investigated the effect of exercise on maintenance of VASP expression and/or phosphorylation. We used immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and immunocytochemistry to examine the effect of hypertension on VASP expression and phosphorylation in brain endothelial cells in normotensive [Wistar-Kyoto (WKY)] and spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats under normal and exercise conditions. In addition, we analyzed VASP regulation in normoxia- and hypoxia-induced endothelial cells. Brain endothelial cells exhibited significantly lower VASP immunoreactivity and phosphorylation at the Ser157 residue in SHR versus WKY rats. Exercise reversed hypertension-induced alterations in VASP phosphorylation. Western blotting and immunocytochemistry indicated reduction in VASP phosphorylation in hypoxic versus normoxic endothelial cells. These results suggest that diminished VASP expression and/or Ser157 phosphorylation mediates endothelial changes associated with hypertension and exercise may normalize these changes, at least in part, by restoring VASP phosphorylation. PMID:24894047

  10. Fractal Dimension in Quantifying Experimental-Pulmonary-Hypertension-Induced Cardiac Dysfunction in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pacagnelli, Francis Lopes; Sabela, Ana Karênina Dias de Almeida; Mariano, Thaoan Bruno; Ozaki, Guilherme Akio Tamura; Castoldi, Robson Chacon; do Carmo, Edna Maria; Carvalho, Robson Francisco; Tomasi, Loreta Casquel; Okoshi, Katashi; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques

    2016-01-01

    Background Right-sided heart failure has high morbidity and mortality, and may be caused by pulmonary arterial hypertension. Fractal dimension is a differentiated and innovative method used in histological evaluations that allows the characterization of irregular and complex structures and the quantification of structural tissue changes. Objective To assess the use of fractal dimension in cardiomyocytes of rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension, in addition to providing histological and functional analysis. Methods Male Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups: control (C; n = 8) and monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (M; n = 8). Five weeks after pulmonary arterial hypertension induction with monocrotaline, echocardiography was performed and the animals were euthanized. The heart was dissected, the ventricles weighed to assess anatomical parameters, and histological slides were prepared and stained with hematoxylin/eosin for fractal dimension analysis, performed using box-counting method. Data normality was tested (Shapiro-Wilk test), and the groups were compared with non-paired Student t test or Mann Whitney test (p < 0.05). Results Higher fractal dimension values were observed in group M as compared to group C (1.39 ± 0.05 vs. 1.37 ± 0.04; p < 0.05). Echocardiography showed lower pulmonary artery flow velocity, pulmonary acceleration time and ejection time values in group M, suggesting function worsening in those animals. Conclusion The changes observed confirm pulmonary-arterial-hypertension-induced cardiac dysfunction, and point to fractal dimension as an effective method to evaluate cardiac morphological changes induced by ventricular dysfunction. PMID:27223643

  11. [Role of endogenous hydrogen sulfide in pulmonary hypertension induced by lipopolysaccharide].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin-Li; Zhou, Xiao-Hong; Wei, Peng; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Meng, Xiang-Yan; Xian, Xiao-Hui

    2008-04-25

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the role of endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in pulmonary arterial hypertension induced by endotoxin. Adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into four groups: Control group (0.5 mL/kg body weight of normal saline, i.v.), lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated group (5 mg/kg body weight of LPS, i.v.), LPS + NaHS (5 mg/kg body weight of LPS, i.v., and 28 μmol/kg body weight of NaHS, i.p.) and LPS + PPG group (5 mg/kg body weight of LPS, i.v., and 30 μmol/kg body weight of PPG, i.p.). Rats were anesthetized with 20% urethane (1 g/kg body weight, i.p.). A polyethylene catheter was inserted into the pulmonary artery through the right external jugular vein to measure the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) for 7 h, and then the pulmonary artery was isolated rapidly by the method described previously. Pulmonary arterial activity was detected. H2S concentration and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) activity in pulmonary artery tissues were determined by biochemical method. CSE mRNA expression was detected by competitive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Compared with control, LPS significantly increased mPAP [(1.82±0.29) kPa vs (1.43±0.26) kPa, P<0.01], decreased H2S production [(26.33±7.84) vs (42.92±8.73) pmol/g wet tissue per minute, P<0.01), and reduced endothelium-dependent relaxation response [(75.72±7.22)% vs (86.40±4.40) %, P<0.01) induced by ACh (1×10(-6) mol/L). These effects were partly reversed by co-administration of NaHS and enhanced by co-administration of PPG. Both CSE activity and CSE mRNA expression were consistent with H2S production. It is suggested that the inhibitory effect of LPS on endothelium-dependent relaxation results in pulmonary hypertension, which might be mediated through H(2)S. PMID:18425308

  12. Endothelial Lessons.

    PubMed

    Vanhoutte, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    This essay focuses on nine important lessons learned during more than thirty years of endothelial research. They include: the danger of hiding behind a word, the confusion generated by abbreviations, the need to define the physiological role of the response studied, the local role of endothelium- dependent responses, the strength of pharmacological analyses, endothelial dysfunction as consequence and cause of disease, the importance of rigorous protocols, the primacy of in vivo studies and the importance of serendipity. PMID:26638800

  13. Age- and hypertension-induced changes in abnormal contractions in rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Abeywardena, Mahinda Y; Jablonskis, Lina T; Head, Richard J

    2002-12-01

    The current investigation explored the potential age-dependant modulation of abnormal spontaneous constrictions (thromboxane-like) in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) aorta, observed only after the inhibition of endogenous production of nitric oxide (NO). Aortic rings from SHR and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) control rats of varying ages (4, 8, 12, and 18 months) were mounted in organ baths, and changes in tension were monitored. Inhibition of NO with Nomega-nitro-L-arginine (NOLA) unmasked a slow contraction, which appeared to be age dependent (p < 0.05). This contraction was found in SHRs of all age groups and in older WKY rats. Denuding the endothelium in young SHRs did not influence the constriction, confirming a nonendothelial cell origin, while in the older groups this led to a 30-40% reduction in contraction. Comparable attenuation of the constrictor response was observed after incubation of endothelium intact rings with superoxide dismutase (100 U/ml) or 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. Of the residual activity that was unaffected by free radical scavengers or de-endothelialization, 60-70% was sensitive to cyclooxygenase inhibition by indomethacin and/or ibuprofen. The thromboxane (TxA ) receptor antagonist SQ29548 induced a complete reversal of the abnormal constriction. In contrast, thromboxane synthetase inhibition had no effect, ruling out any involvement of TxA in mediating this abnormality. Collectively, these observations support the view that as compared with the normotensive setting, contraction induced by NO inhibition in the SHR develops prematurely and deteriorates more rapidly during the aging process. In aged rats, prostaglandin endoperoxide intermediates PGG /H and endothelium-derived free radicals rather than TxA per se appear to contribute to the NOLA-dependent TxA -like vasoconstriction. PMID:12451327

  14. Increased Clearance of Reactive Aldehydes and Damaged Proteins in Hypertension-Induced Compensated Cardiac Hypertrophy: Impact of Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Juliane Cruz; Fernandes, Tiago; Bechara, Luiz Roberto Grassmann; da Paixão, Nathalie Alves; Brum, Patricia Chakur; de Oliveira, Edilamar Menezes; Ferreira, Julio Cesar Batista

    2015-01-01

    Background. We previously reported that exercise training (ET) facilitates the clearance of damaged proteins in heart failure. Here, we characterized the impact of ET on cardiac protein quality control during compensated ventricular hypertrophy in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Methods and Results. SHR were randomly assigned into sedentary and swimming-trained groups. Sedentary SHR displayed cardiac hypertrophy with preserved ventricular function compared to normotensive rats, characterizing a compensated cardiac hypertrophy. Hypertensive rats presented signs of cardiac oxidative stress, depicted by increased lipid peroxidation. However, these changes were not followed by accumulation of lipid peroxidation-generated reactive aldehydes and damaged proteins. This scenario was explained, at least in part, by the increased catalytic activity of both aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) and proteasome. Of interest, ET exacerbated cardiac hypertrophy, improved ventricular function, induced resting bradycardia, and decreased blood pressure in SHR. These changes were accompanied by reduced cardiac oxidative stress and a consequent decrease in ALDH2 and proteasome activities, without affecting small chaperones levels and apoptosis in SHR. Conclusion. Increased cardiac ALDH2 and proteasomal activities counteract the deleterious effect of excessive oxidative stress in hypertension-induced compensated cardiac hypertrophy in rats. ET has a positive effect in reducing cardiac oxidative stress without affecting protein quality control. PMID:25954323

  15. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Inhibitor-Induced Hypertension: Basics for Primary Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Escalante, Carmen P.; Zalpour, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Frequently, primary care providers continue to manage the overall medical care of cancer patients. With newer and often more potent antitumor agents, patients may present to their local physicians with drug-induced toxicities such as hypertension induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors. It is imperative that these healthcare providers are aware of basic aspects of this drug class, as its use has increased significantly in the last several years. Uncontrolled or malignant hypertension due to these agents should be recognized readily and treated early to prevent more severe outcomes. This overview provides a brief background on the role of VEGF and angiogenesis in tumor metabolism as well as theories of the mechanism of VEGF inhibitors and hypertension. Helpful clinical practice aspects including the types of inhibitors used in the United States and their pharmacologic characteristics will be discussed. Also, diagnosis and treatment of hypertension induced by vascular endothelial growth factors are reviewed. A summary of key aspects of this drug class and hypertension is included. PMID:21629798

  16. Apigenin ameliorates hypertension-induced cardiac hypertrophy and down-regulates cardiac hypoxia inducible factor-lα in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zeng-Yan; Gao, Tian; Huang, Yan; Xue, Jie; Xie, Mei-Lin

    2016-04-20

    Apigenin is a natural flavonoid compound that can inhibit hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α expression in cultured tumor cells under hypoxic conditions. Hypertension-induced cardiac hypertrophy is always accompanied by abnormal myocardial glucolipid metabolism due to an increase of HIF-1α. However, whether or not apigenin may ameliorate the cardiac hypertrophy and abnormal myocardial glucolipid metabolism remains unknown. This study aimed to examine the effects of apigenin. Rats with cardiac hypertrophy induced by renovascular hypertension were treated with apigenin 50-100 mg kg(-1) (the doses can be achieved by pharmacological or dietary supplementation for an adult person) by gavage for 4 weeks. The results showed that after treatment with apigenin, the blood pressure, heart weight, heart weight index, cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area, serum angiotensin II, and serum and myocardial free fatty acids were reduced. It is important to note that apigenin decreased the expression level of myocardial HIF-1α protein. Moreover, apigenin simultaneously increased the expression levels of myocardial peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α, carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT)-1, and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK)-4 proteins and decreased the expression levels of myocardial PPARγ, glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase genes (GPAT), and glucose transporter (GLUT)-4 proteins. These findings demonstrated that apigenin could improve hypertensive cardiac hypertrophy and abnormal myocardial glucolipid metabolism in rats, and its mechanisms might be associated with the down-regulation of myocardial HIF-1α expression and, subsequently increasing the expressions of myocardial PPARα and its target genes CPT-1 and PDK-4, and decreasing the expressions of myocardial PPARγ and its target genes GPAT and GLUT-4. PMID:26987380

  17. Borane-protected phosphines are redox-active radioprotective agents for endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Megan E; Lieven, Christopher J; Thompson, Alex F; Sheibani, Nader; Levin, Leonard A

    2015-12-01

    Exposure to radiation can damage endothelial cells in the irradiated area via the production of reactive oxygen species. We synthesized phosphine-borane complexes that reduce disulfide bonds and had previously been shown to interfere with redox-mediated signaling of cell death. We hypothesized that this class of drugs could interfere with the downstream effects of oxidative stress after irradiation and rescue endothelial cells from radiation damage. Cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells were plated for clonogenic assay prior to exposure to varying doses of irradiation from a (137)Cs irradiator and treated with various concentrations of bis(3-propionic acid methyl ester)phenylphosphine borane complex (PB1) at different time points. The clone-forming ability of the irradiated cells was assessed seven days after irradiation. We compared the radioprotective effects of PB1 with the aminothiol radioprotectant WR1065 and known superoxide scavengers. PB1 significantly protected bovine aortic endothelial cells from radiation damage, particularly when treated both before and after radiation. The radioprotection with 1 µM PB1 corresponded to a dose-reduction factor of 1.24. Radioprotection by PB1 was comparable to the aminothiol WR1065, but was significantly less toxic and required much lower concentrations of drug (1 µM vs. 4 mM, respectively). Superoxide scavengers were not radioprotective in this paradigm, indicating the mechanisms for both loss of clonogenicity and PB1 radioprotection are independent of superoxide signaling. These data demonstrate that PB1 is an effective redox-active radioprotectant for endothelial cells in vitro, and is radioprotective at a concentration approximately 4 orders of magnitude lower than the aminothiol WR1065 with less toxicity. PMID:26188467

  18. Borane-protected phosphines are redox-active radioprotective agents for endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, Megan E.; Lieven, Christopher J.; Thompson, Alex F.; Sheibani, Nader; Levin, Leonard A.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to radiation can damage endothelial cells in the irradiated area via the production of reactive oxygen species. We synthesized phosphine–borane complexes that reduce disulfide bonds and had previously been shown to interfere with redox-mediated signaling of cell death. We hypothesized that this class of drugs could interfere with the downstream effects of oxidative stress after irradiation and rescue endothelial cells from radiation damage. Cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells were plated for clonogenic assay prior to exposure to varying doses of irradiation from a 137Cs irradiator and treated with various concentrations of bis(3-propionic acid methyl ester)phenylphosphine borane complex (PB1) at different time points. The clone-forming ability of the irradiated cells was assessed seven days after irradiation. We compared the radioprotective effects of PB1 with the aminothiol radioprotectant WR1065 and known superoxide scavengers. PB1 significantly protected bovine aortic endothelial cells from radiation damage, particularly when treated both before and after radiation. The radioprotection with 1 µM PB1 corresponded to a dose-reduction factor of 1.24. Radioprotection by PB1 was comparable to the aminothiol WR1065, but was significantly less toxic and required much lower concentrations of drug (1 µM vs. 4 mM, respectively). Superoxide scavengers were not radioprotective in this paradigm, indicating the mechanisms for both loss of clonogenicity and PB1 radioprotection are independent of superoxide signaling. These data demonstrate that PB1 is an effective redox-active radioprotectant for endothelial cells in vitro, and is radioprotective at a concentration approximately 4 orders of magnitude lower than the aminothiol WR1065 with less toxicity. PMID:26188467

  19. Imperatorin derivative OW1 inhibits the upregulation of TGF-β and MMP-2 in renovascular hypertension-induced cardiac remodeling

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, NAN; ZHU, YANING; ZHANG, PENG; ZHANG, YU; ZHOU, MINGYAO; WANG, TAO; HE, LANGCHONG

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hypertension induces vascular and cardiac remodeling. OW1 is a novel imperatorin derivative that was previously reported to inhibit vascular remodeling and improve kidney function affected by hypertension. In the present study, the effect of OW1 on the cardiac remodeling induced by hypertension was investigated. OW1 inhibited vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and the phenotypic modulation of VSMCs induced by angiotensin II (Ang II). The OW1-induced vasodilatation of rat cardiac arteries was evaluated in vitro. Renovascular hypertensive rats were developed using the two-kidney one-clip method and treated with OW1 (40 or 80 mg/kg/day) or nifedipine (30 mg/kg per day) for 5 weeks. OW1 markedly reduced the systolic and diastolic blood pressure compared with that in the hypertension group or the respective baseline value during the first week. OW1 also reduced cardiac weight, and the concentrations of Ang II, aldosterone and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Histological examination demonstrated that OW1 exerted an inhibitory effect on vascular and cardiac remodeling. These inhibitory effects were associated with decreased cardiac levels of Ang II, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and TGF-β1 in the hypertensive rats. In summary, OW1 exhibited a clear antihypertensive effect. More importantly, it inhibited vascular and cardiovascular remodeling, which may reduce the risk of hypertension-induced cardiovascular diseases. These results have potential implications in the development of new antihypertensive drugs. PMID:27168797

  20. Role of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system gene polymorphisms and hypertension-induced end-stage renal disease in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Gnanasambandan; Elumalai, Ramprasad; Periyasamy, Soundararajan; Lakkakula, Bhaskar

    2014-07-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited disease of the kidneys and is marked by progressive cyst growth and decline in kidney function, resulting in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Hypertension is thought to be a significant modifying factor in the progression of renal failure in ADPKD. A number of genetic variations involved in renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) pathway genes have clinical or physiological impacts on pathogenesis of hypertension-induced ESRD in ADPKD. Information on RAAS pathway gene polymorphisms and their association with ESRD and ADPKD, published till March 2013, was collected using MEDLINE search. The present review deals with RAAS gene polymorphisms focused on hypertension-induced ESRD in ADPKD in different populations. The results were inconclusive and limited by heterogeneity in the study designs and the population stratification. In lieu of applying next generation sequencing technologies to study complex diseases, it is also possible to apply the same to unravel the complexity of ESRD in ADPKD. PMID:25001132

  1. The Endothelial Prolyl-4-Hydroxylase Domain 2/Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 2 Axis Regulates Pulmonary Artery Pressure in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kapitsinou, Pinelopi P; Rajendran, Ganeshkumar; Astleford, Lindsay; Michael, Mark; Schonfeld, Michael P; Fields, Timothy; Shay, Sheila; French, Jaketa L; West, James; Haase, Volker H

    2016-05-15

    Hypoxia-inducible factors 1 and 2 (HIF-1 and -2) control oxygen supply to tissues by regulating erythropoiesis, angiogenesis and vascular homeostasis. HIFs are regulated in response to oxygen availability by prolyl-4-hydroxylase domain (PHD) proteins, with PHD2 being the main oxygen sensor that controls HIF activity under normoxia. In this study, we used a genetic approach to investigate the endothelial PHD2/HIF axis in the regulation of vascular function. We found that inactivation of Phd2 in endothelial cells specifically resulted in severe pulmonary hypertension (∼118% increase in right ventricular systolic pressure) but not polycythemia and was associated with abnormal muscularization of peripheral pulmonary arteries and right ventricular hypertrophy. Concurrent inactivation of either Hif1a or Hif2a in endothelial cell-specific Phd2 mutants demonstrated that the development of pulmonary hypertension was dependent on HIF-2α but not HIF-1α. Furthermore, endothelial HIF-2α was required for the development of increased pulmonary artery pressures in a model of pulmonary hypertension induced by chronic hypoxia. We propose that these HIF-2-dependent effects are partially due to increased expression of vasoconstrictor molecule endothelin 1 and a concomitant decrease in vasodilatory apelin receptor signaling. Taken together, our data identify endothelial HIF-2 as a key transcription factor in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26976644

  2. Fabrication of hierarchically structured novel redox-mediator-free ZnIn2S4 marigold flower/Bi2WO6 flower-like direct Z-scheme nanocomposite photocatalysts with superior visible light photocatalytic efficiency.

    PubMed

    Jo, Wan-Kuen; Lee, Joon Yeob; Natarajan, Thillai Sivakumar

    2016-01-14

    Novel, hierarchically nanostructured, redox-mediator-free, direct Z-scheme nanocomposite photocatalysts were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal method followed by wet-impregnation. The photocatalysts had a ZnIn2S4 marigold flower/Bi2WO6 flower-like (ZIS/BW) composition, which led to superior visible-light photocatalytic efficiency with excellent stability and reusability. The hierarchical marigold flower and flower-like morphologies of ZIS and BW were confirmed by FE-SEM and TEM analyses and further revealed that formation of the hierarchical marigold flower-like ZIS structure followed the formation of nanoparticles, growth of the ZIS petals, and self-assembly of these species. Powder X-ray diffraction and UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy analyses as well as the enhancement in the surface area and pore volume of the composite provide evidence of strong coupling between hierarchical BW and the ZIS nanostructures. The efficiency of the hierarchical direct Z-scheme photocatalysts for photocatalytic decomposition of metronidazole (MTZ) under visible-light irradiation was evaluated. The hierarchically nanostructured ZIS/BW nanocomposites with 50% loading of ZIS exhibited superior visible-light photocatalytic decomposition efficiency (PDE) compared to the composites with other percentages of ZIS and pristine BW. A probable mechanism for the enhanced photocatalytic efficiency of the ZIS/BW composite in MTZ degradation under visible irradiation was proposed. Radical quenching studies demonstrated that h(+), ˙OH, and O2˙(-) are the primary reactive radicals involved, which confirms that the Z-scheme mechanism of transfer of charge carriers accounts for the higher photocatalytic activity. Kinetic analysis revealed that MTZ degradation follows pseudo-first-order kinetics and the reusability of the composite catalyst for up to four cycles confirms the excellent stability of the hierarchical structure. It is concluded that the hierarchical structure of the ZIS

  3. Adipose-derived stromal cell autologous transplantation ameliorates pulmonary arterial hypertension induced by shunt flow in rat models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Liu, Ruifang; Cao, Guangqing; Sun, Hourong; Wang, Xuping; Wu, Shuming

    2011-06-01

    Hyperkinetic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) severely influences the success of operation for congenital heart disease and deteriorates the prognosis of disease. Adipose-derived stromal cell (ADSC) is a good alternative multipotent stem cell for regeneration medicine. PAH rat models were established by arteriovenous shunt and ADSCs were isolated, cultured, and labeled in vitro. Twelve weeks after shunt operation, rats received an injection of 5 × 10(7) ADSCs. Two weeks after transplantation, hemodynamic abnormality induced by the shunt flow and the hypertrophy of right ventricle were reversed, which was confirmed by invasive measurement and echocardiography examination. The PAH rats receiving cell transplantation demonstrated decreased remodeling of small arteries in the lung; immunohistochemistry analysis showed augmented expression of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and increased number of pulmonary small arteries. Western blot and real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction indicated that the protein and mRNA levels of HGF and endothelial nitric oxide synthase increased, respectively, in the lung after cell transplantation. Our results suggested that ADSC transplantation can ameliorate PAH induced by shunt flow by enhancing the expression of HGF and subsequently promoting angiogenesis in the injured lung tissue. PMID:20828291

  4. Icariin Inhibits Pulmonary Hypertension Induced by Monocrotaline through Enhancement of NO/cGMP Signaling Pathway in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-sheng; Luo, Yun-mei; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Yu; Fu, Xiao-xia; Yang, Dan-li

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that icariin (ICA) increased contents of nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) by improving expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inhibition of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5). In addition, dysfunction of the NO/cGMP pathway may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension (PH). In this study, the potential protective effects of ICA on PH induced by monocrotaline (MCT, 50 mg/kg) singly subcutaneous injection were investigated and the possible mechanisms involved in NO/cGMP pathway were explored in male Sprague Dawley rats. The results showed that ICA (20, 40, and 80 mg/kg/d) treatment by intragastric administration could significantly ameliorate PH and upregulate the expression of eNOS gene and downregulate the expression of PDE5 gene in MCT-treated rats. Both ICA (40 mg/kg/d) and L-arginine (200 mg/kg/d), a precursor of NO as positive control, notably increased the contents of NO and cGMP in lung tissue homogenate, which were inversed by treatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME), a NOS inhibitor, and L-NAME-treatment could also inhibit the protective effects of ICA (40 mg/kg/d) on mean pulmonary artery pressure and artery remodeling and tends to inhibit right ventricle hypertrophy index. In summary, ICA is effective in protecting against MCT-induced PH in rats through enhancement of NO/cGMP signaling pathway in rats. PMID:27366192

  5. The Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulator Riociguat Ameliorates Pulmonary Hypertension Induced by Hypoxia and SU5416 in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xia; Kalymbetov, Anuar; Weissmann, Norbert; Grimminger, Friedrich; Kretschmer, Axel; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Seeger, Werner; Ghofrani, Hossein Ardeschir; Schermuly, Ralph Theo

    2012-01-01

    Background The nitric oxide (NO)–soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)–cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signal-transduction pathway is impaired in many cardiovascular diseases, including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Riociguat (BAY 63–2521) is a stimulator of sGC that works both in synergy with and independently of NO to increase levels of cGMP. The aims of this study were to investigate the role of NO–sGC–cGMP signaling in a model of severe PAH and to evaluate the effects of sGC stimulation by riociguat and PDE5 inhibition by sildenafil on pulmonary hemodynamics and vascular remodeling in severe experimental PAH. Methods and Results Severe angioproliferative PAH was induced in rats by combined exposure to the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor antagonist SU5416 and hypoxia (SUHx). Twenty-one days thereafter rats were randomized to receive either riociguat (10 mg/kg/day), sildenafil (50 mg/kg/day) or vehicle by oral gavage, for 14 days until the day of the terminal hemodynamic measurements. Administration of riociguat or sildenafil significantly decreased right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP). Riociguat significantly decreased RV hypertrophy (RVH) (0.55±0.02, p<0.05), increased cardiac output (60.8±.8 mL/minute, p<0.05) and decreased total pulmonary resistance (4.03±0.3 mmHg min−1 ml−1 100 g BW, p<0.05), compared with sildenafil and vehicle. Both compounds significantly decreased the RV collagen content and improved RV function, but the effects of riociguat on tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion and RV myocardial performance were significantly better than those of sildenafil (p<0.05). The proportion of occluded arteries was significantly lower in animals receiving riociguat than in those receiving vehicle (p<0.05); furthermore, the neointima/media ratio was significantly lower in those receiving riociguat than in those receiving sildenafil or vehicle (p<0.05). Conclusion Riociguat and sildenafil significantly reduced

  6. Hypoxia activates 15-PGDH and its metabolite 15-KETE to promote pulmonary artery endothelial cells proliferation via ERK1/2 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Cui; Liu, Yun; Wang, Yanyan; Zhang, Chen; Yao, Hongmin; Ma, Jun; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Dandan; Shen, Tingting; Zhu, Daling

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Dysfunction and injury of endothelial cells in the pulmonary artery play critical roles in the hypertension induced by chronic hypoxia. One consequence of hypoxia is increased activity of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (PGDH). Here, we have explored, in detail, the effects of hypoxia on the proliferation of pulmonary artery endothelial cells. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We used bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, cell-cycle analysis, immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis to study the effects of hypoxia, induced 15-PGDH) activity and its product, 15-keto-6Z, 8Z, 11Z, 13E-eicosatetraenoic acid (15-KETE), on endothelial cell proliferation. Scratch-wound and tube formation assays were also used to study migration of endothelial cells. KEY RESULTS 15-KETE increased DNA synthesis and enhanced the transition from the G0/G1 phase to the S phase in hypoxia. Inhibition of 15-PGDH or siRNA for 15-PGDH reversed these effects. 15-KETE also activated the ERK1/2 signalling pathway. 15-KETE-induced cell migration and tube formation were reversed by blocking ERK1/2, but not the p38 MAPK pathway. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Hypoxia-induced endothelial proliferation and migration, an important underlying mechanism contributing to hypoxic pulmonary vascular remodelling, appears to be mediated by 15-PGDH and 15-KETE, via the ERK1/2 signalling pathway. PMID:24467360

  7. Endothelin and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Tomoh; Sawamura, Tatsuya

    2006-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and endothelin (ET) produced in endothelial cells are leading molecules which regulate vascular function. Failure of the physiological balance between these two molecules is usually referred to as endothelial dysfunction. ET was initially identified as a potent vasoconstrictive peptide. Three ET isoforms and two ET receptors have been identified. One of the isoforms, ET-1, plays a significant role in many cardiovascular diseases. On the other hand, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is known to induce endothelial dysfunction. The endothelial receptor for oxLDL was cloned, and named lectin-like oxidized receptor-1 (LOX-1). Activation of LOX-1 generates reactive oxygen species (ROS), and acivates a transcriptional factor, nuclear factor κB (NFκB), resulting in down-regulation of NO and up-regulation of ET-1. LOX-1 might be a key molecule in the generation of endothelial dysfunction. In endothelial dysfunction, ET-1 is an aggravating factor of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25792766

  8. The effect of hydro-alcoholic celery (Apiumgraveolens) leaf extract on cardiovascular parameters and lipid profile in animal model of hypertension induced by fructose

    PubMed Central

    Dianat, Mahin; Veisi, Ali; Ahangarpour, Akram; Fathi Moghaddam, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Hypertension is one of the most common diseases of the modern era. This study evaluates the effect of hydro-alcoholic celery leaf extract onsystolic blood pressure (SBP), heart rate (HR) and lipid profile in animals’ model of hypertension induced by fructose. Materials and Methods: Sprague Dawley rats were divided into five groups: 1) control group (free access to tap drinking water), 2) group receiving 200mg/kg celery leaf extract, 3) group receiving fructose 10%, and 4,5) receiving fructose and 100mg/kg or 200mg/kg of extract (n=8). In all groups, before and during the test period, SBP and HR were measured by Power lab system. Lipid profiles were determined by auto analysis. Repeated measurement and one way ANOVA were used for data analysis. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The SBP in the fructose group significantly increased compared to control group (P<0.01). SBP, in groups receiving fructose+100mg/kg extract, fructose and receiving 200mg/kg extract, and receiving 200mg/kg of extract, compared to fructose group significantly decreased. Heart rate in any of these groups showed no significant difference. Cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL and VLDL in the fructose group significantly increased; however, these effects significantly decreased in the recipient extract groups. HDL levels in the fructose group showed no difference while in the groups receiving the extract they significantly increased. Conclusions: Celery leaf extract reduces SBP, cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL and VLDL in animal model of fructose-induced hypertension. In conclusion, celery leaf extract with its blood pressure and lipid lowering effects, can be considered as an antihypertensive agent in chronic treatment of elevated SBP. PMID:26101753

  9. Evolution of endothelial keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Price, Francis W; Price, Marianne O

    2013-11-01

    Endothelial keratoplasty has evolved into a popular alternative to penetrating keratoplasty (PK) for the treatment of endothelial dysfunction. Although the earliest iterations were challenging and were not widely adopted, the iteration known as Descemet stripping endothelial keratoplasty (DSEK) has gained widespread acceptance. DSEK combines a simplified technique for stripping dysfunctional endothelium from the host cornea and microkeratome dissection of the donor tissue, a step now commonly completed in advance by eye bank technicians. Studies show that a newer endothelial keratoplasty iteration, known as Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK), provides an even faster and better visual recovery than DSEK does. In addition, DMEK significantly reduces the risk of immunologic graft rejection episodes compared with that in DSEK or in PK. Although the DMEK donor tissue, consisting of the bare endothelium and Descemet membrane without any stroma, is more challenging to prepare and position in the recipient eye, recent improvements in instrumentation and surgical techniques are increasing the ease and the reliability of the procedure. DSEK successfully mitigates 2 of the main liabilities of PK: ocular surface complications and structural problems (including induced astigmatism and perpetually weak wounds), whereas DMEK further mitigates the 2 principal remaining liabilities of PK: immunologic graft reactions and secondary glaucoma from prolonged topical corticosteroid use. PMID:24104929

  10. [Endothelial function test].

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Hirofumi

    2015-11-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is thought to have pivotal roles for the development of hypertension, initiation/progression of hypertensive organ damages, and prognosis. In clinical setting, flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) of brachial artery is used as a marker of endothelial function. However, well-trained sonographer is needed to conduct FMD measurement, and therefore, FMD has not been fully standardized (i.e., the reference value of FMD has not been established). Even so, FMD predicts future cardiovascular events. Lifestyle modifications (i.e., smoking cessation, exercise, or weight loss) and antihypertensive medication provide beneficial effects on endothelial function. Thus, FMD have a potential as a useful surrogate marker for the management of hypertension. PMID:26619655

  11. Mechanisms regulating endothelial permeability

    PubMed Central

    Sukriti, Sukriti; Tauseef, Mohammad; Yazbeck, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The endothelial monolayer partitioning underlying tissue from blood components in the vessel wall maintains tissue fluid balance and host defense through dynamically opening intercellular junctions. Edemagenic agonists disrupt endothelial barrier function by signaling the opening of the intercellular junctions leading to the formation of protein-rich edema in the interstitial tissue, a hallmark of tissue inflammation that, if left untreated, causes fatal diseases, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome. In this review, we discuss how intercellular junctions are maintained under normal conditions and after stimulation of endothelium with edemagenic agonists. We have focused on reviewing the new concepts dealing with the alteration of adherens junctions after inflammatory stimulus. PMID:25610592

  12. Cicletanine stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and NO production via Akt and MAP kinase/Erk signaling in sinusoidal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Songling; Rockey, Don C

    2013-07-15

    The function of the endothelial isoform of nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and production of nitric oxide (NO) is altered in a number of disease states. Pharmacological approaches to enhancing NO synthesis and thus perhaps endothelial function could have substantial benefits in patients. We analyzed the effect of cicletanine, a synthetic pyridine with potent vasodilatory characteristics, on eNOS function and NO production in normal (liver) and injured rat sinusoidal endothelial cells, and we studied the effect of cicletanine-induced NO on stellate cell contraction and portal pressure in an in vivo model of liver injury. Sinusoidal endothelial cells were isolated from normal and injured rat livers. After exposure to cicletanine, eNOS phosphorylation, NO synthesis, and the signaling pathway regulating eNOS activation were measured. Cicletanine led to an increase in eNOS (Ser¹¹⁷⁷) phosphorylation, cytochrome c reductase activity, L-arginine conversion to L-citrulline, as well as NO production. The mechanism of the effect of cicletanine appeared to be via the protein kinase B (Akt) and MAP kinase/Erk signaling pathways. Additionally, cicletanine improved NO synthesis in injured sinusoidal endothelial cells. NO production induced by cicletanine in sinusoidal endothelial cells increased protein kinase G (PKG) activity as well as relaxation of stellate cells. Finally, administration of cicletanine to mice with portal hypertension induced by bile duct ligation led to reduction of portal pressure. The data indicate that cicletanine might improve eNOS activity in injured sinusoidal endothelial cells and likely activates hepatic stellate cell NO/PKG signaling. It raises the possibility that cicletanine could improve intrahepatic vascular function in portal hypertensive patients. PMID:23639812

  13. Wine and endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Caimi, G; Carollo, C; Lo Presti, R

    2003-01-01

    In recent years many studies have focused on the well-known relationship between wine consumption and cardiovascular risk. Wine exerts its protective effects through various changes in lipoprotein profile, coagulation and fibrinolytic cascades, platelet aggregation, oxidative mechanisms and endothelial function. The last has earned more attention for its implications in atherogenesis. Endothelium regulates vascular tone by a delicate balancing among vasorelaxing (nitric oxide [NO]) and vasoconstrincting (endothelins) factors produced by endothelium in response to various stimuli. In rat models, wine and other grape derivatives exerted an endothelium-dependent vasorelaxing capacity especially associated with the NO-stimulating activity of their polyphenol components. In experimental conditions, reservatrol (a stilbene polyphenol) protected hearts and kidneys from ischemia-reperfusion injury through antioxidant activity and upregulation of NO production. Wine polyphenols are also able to induce the expression of genes involved in the NO pathway within the arterial wall. The effects of wine on endothelial function in humans are not yet clearly understood. A favorable action of red wine or dealcoholized wine extract or purple grape juice on endothelial function has been observed by several authors, but discrimination between ethanol and polyphenol effects is controversial. It is, however likely that regular and prolonged moderate wine drinking positively affects endothelial function. The beneficial effects of wine on cardiovascular health are greater if wine is associated with a healthy diet. The most recent nutritional and epidemiologic studies show that the ideal diet closely resembles the Mediterranean diet. PMID:15134380

  14. HYPAZ: Hypertension Induced by Pazopanib

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-04

    Renal Cell Carcinoma; Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Glioblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Cervical Cancer; Breast Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Small Cell Lung Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Melanoma; Gastrointestinal Cancer

  15. PARP-inhibitor treatment prevents hypertension induced cardiac remodeling by favorable modulation of heat shock proteins, Akt-1/GSK-3β and several PKC isoforms.

    PubMed

    Deres, Laszlo; Bartha, Eva; Palfi, Anita; Eros, Krisztian; Riba, Adam; Lantos, Janos; Kalai, Tamas; Hideg, Kalman; Sumegi, Balazs; Gallyas, Ferenc; Toth, Kalman; Halmosi, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) is a suitable model for studies of the complications of hypertension. It is known that activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase enzyme (PARP) plays an important role in the development of postinfarction as well as long-term hypertension induced heart failure. In this study, we examined whether PARP-inhibitor (L-2286) treatment could prevent the development of hypertensive cardiopathy in SHRs. 6-week-old SHR animals were treated with L-2286 (SHR-L group) or placebo (SHR-C group) for 24 weeks. Wistar-Kyoto rats were used as aged-matched, normotensive controls (WKY group). Echocardiography was performed, brain-derived natriuretic peptide (BNP) activity and blood pressure were determined at the end of the study. We detected the extent of fibrotic areas. The amount of heat-shock proteins (Hsps) and the phosphorylation state of Akt-1(Ser473), glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β(Ser9), forkhead transcription factor (FKHR)(Ser256), mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and protein kinase C (PKC) isoenzymes were monitored. The elevated blood pressure in SHRs was not influenced by PARP-inhibitor treatment. Systolic left ventricular function and BNP activity did not differ among the three groups. L-2286 treatment decreased the marked left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy which was developed in SHRs. Interstitial collagen deposition was also decreased by L-2286 treatment. The phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2(Thr183-Tyr185), Akt-1(Ser473), GSK-3β(Ser9), FKHR(Ser256), and PKC ε(Ser729) and the level of Hsp90 were increased, while the activity of PKC α/βII(Thr638/641), ζ/λ(410/403) were mitigated by L-2286 administration. We could detect signs of LV hypertrophy without congestive heart failure in SHR groups. This alteration was prevented by PARP inhibition. Our results suggest that PARP-inhibitor treatment has protective effect already in the early stage of hypertensive myocardial remodeling. PMID

  16. Endothelial dysfunction and antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Duvall, W Lane

    2005-03-01

    The vascular endothelium plays a crucial role in the physiology of blood vessels and the pathological processes of atherosclerotic disease and acute coronary syndromes. Endothelial dysfunction is the core problem; it is an impairment of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation caused by a loss of nitric oxide activity in the vessel wall, which results in impairment in the regulation of vascular homeostasis. Further understanding of its mechanisms of action and possible therapeutic targets will be of great importance. The group of antioxidant vitamins, A, C and E, would seem uniquely situated to reduce cardiovascular events by improving endothelial function by reducing the concentration of reactive oxygen species in the vessel wall and by preventing oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein. Unfortunately, despite extensive studies in both observational and randomized trials, the weight of evidence points to little or no benefit from antioxidant therapy. PMID:15770336

  17. Reactive oxygen species' role in endothelial dysfunction by electron paramagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassall, Cynthia D.

    % increase in ROS generation; this implies that higher ROS concentrations in sliced tissue indicate extraneous ROS generation not associated with the ROS stimulus of interest. We also investigated the role of ROS in chronic flow overload (CFO). Elevation of shear stress that increases production of vascular ROS has not been well investigated. We hypothesize that CFO increases ROS production mediated in part by NADPH oxidase, which leads to endothelial dysfunction. ROS production increased threefold in response to CFO. The endothelium dependent vasorelaxation was compromised in the CFO group. Treatment with apocynin significantly reduced ROS production in the vessel wall, preserved endothelial function, and inhibited expressions of p22/p47phox and NOX2/NOX4. The present data implicate NADPH oxidase produced ROS and eNOS uncoupling in endothelial dysfunction at 1 wk of CFO. In further work, a swine right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) model induced by pulmonary artery (PA) banding was used to study right coronary artery (RCA) endothelial function and ROS level. Endothelial function was compromised in RCA of RVH as attributed to insufficient endothelial nitric oxide synthase cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin. In conclusion, stretch due to outward remodeling of RCA during RVH (at constant wall shear stress), similar to vessel stretch in hypertension, appears to induce ROS elevation, endothelial dysfunction, and an increase in basal tone. Finally, although hypertension-induced vascular stiffness and dysfunction are well established in patients and animal models, we hypothesize that stretch or distension due to hypertension and outward expansion is the cause of endothelial dysfunction mediated by angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor in coronary arteries. The expression and activation of AT1 receptor and the production of ROS were up regulated and endothelial function deteriorated in the RCA. The acute inhibition of AT1 receptor and NADPH oxidase partially restored the endothelial

  18. Cytochrome P4501A1 Is Required for Vascular Dysfunction and Hypertension Induced by 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-Dioxin

    PubMed Central

    Kopf, Phillip G.; Scott, Jason A.; Agbor, Larry N.; Boberg, Jason R.; Elased, Khalid M.; Huwe, Janice K.; Walker, Mary K.

    2010-01-01

    National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data show an association between hypertension and exposure to dioxin-like halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs). Furthermore, chronic exposure of mice to the prototypical HAH, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), induces reactive oxygen species (ROS), endothelial dysfunction, and hypertension. Because TCDD induces cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) and CYP1A1 can increase ROS, we tested the hypothesis that TCDD-induced endothelial dysfunction and hypertension are mediated by CYP1A1. CYP1A1 wild-type (WT) and knockout (KO) mice were fed one control or TCDD-containing pill (180 ng TCDD/kg, 5 days/week) for 35 days (n = 10–14/genotype/treatment). Blood pressure was monitored by radiotelemetry, and liver TCDD concentration, CYP1A1 induction, ROS, and aortic reactivity were measured at 35 days. TCDD accumulated to similar levels in livers of both genotypes. TCDD induced CYP1A1 in endothelium of aorta and mesentery without detectable expression in the vessel wall. TCDD also induced superoxide anion production, measured by NADPH-dependent lucigenin luminescence, in aorta, heart, and kidney of CYP1A1 WT mice but not KO mice. In contrast, TCDD induced hydrogen peroxide, measured by amplex red assay, to similar levels in aorta of CYP1A1 WT and KO mice but not in heart or kidney. TCDD reduced acetylcholine-dependent vasorelaxation in aortic rings of CYP1A1 WT mice but not in KO mice. Finally, TCDD steadily increased blood pressure after 15 days, which plateaued after 25 days (+20 mmHg) in CYP1A1 WT mice but failed to alter blood pressure in KO mice. These results demonstrate that CYP1A1 is required for TCDD-induced cardiovascular superoxide anion production, endothelial dysfunction, and hypertension. PMID:20634294

  19. Endothelial RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function

    SciTech Connect

    Asdonk, Tobias; Nickenig, Georg; Zimmer, Sebastian

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation alters HCAEC biology in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPC function is affected by RIG-I stimulation in vitro. -- Abstract: Background: Endothelial dysfunction is a crucial part of the chronic inflammatory atherosclerotic process and is mediated by innate and acquired immune mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that pattern recognition receptors (PRR) specialized in immunorecognition of nucleic acids may play an important role in endothelial biology in a proatherogenic manner. Here, we analyzed the impact of endothelial retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) activation upon vascular endothelial biology. Methods and results: Wild type mice were injected intravenously with 32.5 {mu}g of the RIG-ligand 3pRNA (RNA with triphosphate at the 5 Prime end) or polyA control every other day for 7 days. In 3pRNA-treated mice, endothelium-depended vasodilation was significantly impaired, vascular oxidative stress significantly increased and circulating endothelial microparticle (EMP) numbers significantly elevated compared to controls. To gain further insight in RIG-I dependent endothelial biology, cultured human coronary endothelial cells (HCAEC) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) were stimulated in vitro with 3pRNA. Both cells types express RIG-I and react with receptor upregulation upon stimulation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation is enhanced in both cell types, whereas apoptosis and proliferation is not significantly affected in HCAEC. Importantly, HCAEC release significant amounts of proinflammatory cytokines in response to RIG-I stimulation. Conclusion: This study shows that activation of the cytoplasmatic nucleic acid receptor RIG-I leads to endothelial dysfunction. RIG-I induced endothelial damage could therefore be an important pathway in atherogenesis.

  20. In Vitro Endothelialization Test of Biomaterials Using Immortalized Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Ken; Hiruma, Hitomi; Kobayashi, Shingo; Sato, Yoji; Tanaka, Masaru; Sawada, Rumi; Niimi, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    Functionalizing biomaterials with peptides or polymers that enhance recruitment of endothelial cells (ECs) can reduce blood coagulation and thrombosis. To assess endothelialization of materials in vitro, primary ECs are generally used, although the characteristics of these cells vary among the donors and change with time in culture. Recently, primary cell lines immortalized by transduction of simian vacuolating virus 40 large T antigen or human telomerase reverse transcriptase have been developed. To determine whether immortalized ECs can substitute for primary ECs in material testing, we investigated endothelialization on biocompatible polymers using three lots of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and immortalized microvascular ECs, TIME-GFP. Attachment to and growth on polymer surfaces were comparable between cell types, but results were more consistent with TIME-GFP. Our findings indicate that TIME-GFP is more suitable for in vitro endothelialization testing of biomaterials. PMID:27348615

  1. Reactive oxygen species' role in endothelial dysfunction by electron paramagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassall, Cynthia D.

    % increase in ROS generation; this implies that higher ROS concentrations in sliced tissue indicate extraneous ROS generation not associated with the ROS stimulus of interest. We also investigated the role of ROS in chronic flow overload (CFO). Elevation of shear stress that increases production of vascular ROS has not been well investigated. We hypothesize that CFO increases ROS production mediated in part by NADPH oxidase, which leads to endothelial dysfunction. ROS production increased threefold in response to CFO. The endothelium dependent vasorelaxation was compromised in the CFO group. Treatment with apocynin significantly reduced ROS production in the vessel wall, preserved endothelial function, and inhibited expressions of p22/p47phox and NOX2/NOX4. The present data implicate NADPH oxidase produced ROS and eNOS uncoupling in endothelial dysfunction at 1 wk of CFO. In further work, a swine right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) model induced by pulmonary artery (PA) banding was used to study right coronary artery (RCA) endothelial function and ROS level. Endothelial function was compromised in RCA of RVH as attributed to insufficient endothelial nitric oxide synthase cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin. In conclusion, stretch due to outward remodeling of RCA during RVH (at constant wall shear stress), similar to vessel stretch in hypertension, appears to induce ROS elevation, endothelial dysfunction, and an increase in basal tone. Finally, although hypertension-induced vascular stiffness and dysfunction are well established in patients and animal models, we hypothesize that stretch or distension due to hypertension and outward expansion is the cause of endothelial dysfunction mediated by angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor in coronary arteries. The expression and activation of AT1 receptor and the production of ROS were up regulated and endothelial function deteriorated in the RCA. The acute inhibition of AT1 receptor and NADPH oxidase partially restored the endothelial

  2. NHERF-2 maintains endothelial homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Resham; Wang, Enfeng; Dutta, Shamit K.; Vohra, Pawan K.; E, Guangqi; Prakash, Y. S.

    2012-01-01

    The Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor-2 (NHERF-2) is an integral component of almost all endothelial cells (ECs), yet its endothelial function is not known. Here, we found that NHERF-2, is a key regulator of endothelial homeostasis because NHERF-2–silenced ECs proliferate at a much higher rate even in the absence of mitogens such as VEGF compared with control ECs. We further show that the hyperproliferation phenotype of NHERF-2–silenced EC is because of an accelerated cell cycle that is probably caused by a combination of the following factors: increased cytoplasmic calcium, increased expression of c-Myc, increased expression of cyclin D1, and reduced expression of p27. Using an experimental mouse model of human hemangioma, we found that the endothelial neoplasms derived from NHERF-2–silenced cells were much larger in volume than those derived from control cells. Thus, NHERF-2 is a negative regulator of endothelial proliferation and may have important roles in endothelial homeostasis and vascular modeling. PMID:22343917

  3. Endothelial mitochondria and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Sean Michael

    2010-10-01

    The endothelium is vital to the proper functioning in the heart, in particular due to its production of nitric oxide (NO) which regulates vascular tone. Damage to the endothelium contributes to the development of atherosclerosis, and hence to possible myocardial infarction and subsequent heart failure. Like most cells, endothelial cells contain mitochondria, despite their having relatively little dependence on oxidative phosphorylation for ATP production. However, endothelial mitochondria are centrally involved in maintaining the fine regulatory balance between mitochondrial calcium concentration, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and NO. This raises the question of whether damage to endothelial mitochondria would have repercussions in terms of the development of heart disease. In fact, increasingly nuanced techniques enabling restricted transgenic expression of antioxidant proteins in mice has demonstrated that mitochondrial ROS do contribute to endothelial damage. New pharmaceutical approaches designed to target protective molecules such as ROS scavengers to the mitochondria promise to be effective in preventing heart disease. As well as protecting cardiomyocytes, these drugs may have the added benefit of preventing damage to the endothelial mitochondria. However, much remains to be done in understanding the contribution that mitochondria make to endothelial function. PMID:20558442

  4. Radial keratotomy associated endothelial degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Moshirfar, Majid; Ollerton, Andrew; Semnani, Rodmehr T; Hsu, Maylon

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To describe the presentation and clinical course of eyes with a history of radial keratotomy (RK) and varying degrees of endothelial degeneration. Methods Retrospective case series were used. Results Thirteen eyes (seven patients) were identified with clinical findings of significant guttata and a prior history of RK. The mean age of presentation for cornea evaluation was 54.3 years (range: 38–72 years), averaging 18.7 years (range: 11–33 years) after RK. The presentation of guttata varied in degree from moderate to severe. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) ranged from 20/25 to 20/80. All patients had a history of bilateral RK, except one patient who did not develop any guttata in the eye without prior RK. No patients reported a family history of Fuch’s Dystrophy. One patient underwent a penetrating keratoplasty in one eye and a Descemet’s stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK) in the other eye. Conclusions RK may induce a spectrum of endothelial degeneration. In elderly patients, the findings of guttata may signify comorbid Fuch’s dystrophy in which RK incisions could potentially hasten endothelial decomposition. In these select patients with stable cornea topography and prior RK, DSAEK may successfully treat RK endothelial degeneration. PMID:22347792

  5. How cholesterol regulates endothelial biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Zhongkui; Staiculescu, Marius C.; Hampel, Paul; Levitan, Irena; Forgacs, Gabor

    2012-01-01

    As endothelial cells form the barrier between blood flow and surrounding tissue, many of their functions depend on mechanical integrity, in particular those of the plasma membrane. As component and organizer of the plasma membrane, cholesterol is a regulator of cellular mechanical properties. Disruption of cholesterol balance leads to impairment of endothelial functions and eventually to disease. The mechanical properties of the membrane are strongly affected by the cytoskeleton. As Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) is a key mediator between the membrane and cytoskeleton, it also affects cellular biomechanical properties. Typically, PIP2 is concentrated in cholesterol-rich microdomains, such as caveolae and lipid rafts, which are particularly abundant in the endothelial plasma membrane. We investigated the connection between cholesterol and PIP2 by extracting membrane tethers from bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) at different cholesterol levels and PIP2 conditions. Our results suggest that in BAEC the role of PIP2, as a mediator of membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion, is regulated by cholesterol. Our findings confirm the specific role of cholesterol in endothelial cells and may have implications for cholesterol-dependent vascular pathologies. PMID:23162471

  6. Apoptosis in vascular endothelial cells caused by serum deprivation, oxidative stress and transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed

    Hogg, N; Browning, J; Howard, T; Winterford, C; Fitzpatrick, D; Gobé, G

    1999-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cell apoptosis has previously been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of hypertension-induced vessel deletion and damage. In the present in vitro study we analyse several possible relevant causative factors of vascular endothelial cell apoptosis, namely, serum deprivation and nutrient depletion, oxidative stress in the forms of hypoxia, hyperoxia or free radical damage, and altered levels of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) protein. An established cell line, bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC), was maintained in complete growth medium (RPMI-1640 plus 15% fetal calf serum and antibiotics, abbreviated as RPMI) in 25cm2 flasks or in 12-well plates on glass coverslips. Confluent but actively-growing cultures were treated with either hypoxia (PO2 of RPMI = 50mmHg), serum-free media (SFM), SFM plus hypoxia, hyperoxia (PO2 of RPMI = 450mmHg), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 1mM) in SFM, or TGF-beta1 protein (10ng/mL) in SFM. Appropriate control cultures were used. BAEC were collected 48h or 72h after all treatments except for TGF-beta1 and H2O2 treatments that were collected at 16-18h. Cell death was assessed using morphological characteristics or in situ end labeling (ISEL), cell proliferation assessed using proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and TGF-beta1 expression assessed using transcript levels or immunohistochemistry. All treatments significantly increased levels of apoptosis over control cultures (P<0.05), and decreased levels of cell proliferation. Treatment with TGF-beta1 protein or SFM plus hypoxia induced greatest levels of apoptosis. TGF-beta1 protein and transcript levels were decreased in treated cultures, results suggesting that a paracrine source of TGF-beta1 protein would be needed as a cause of endothelial cell apoptosis in viva. Future therapies against inappropriate vessel deletion in disease states may use the known gene-driven nature of apoptosis to modify this sort of cell death in endothelial cells. PMID

  7. Traumatic corneal endothelial rings from homemade explosives.

    PubMed

    Ng, Soo Khai; Rudkin, Adam K; Galanopoulos, Anna

    2013-08-01

    Traumatic corneal endothelial rings are remarkably rare ocular findings that may result from blast injury. We present a unique case of bilateral traumatic corneal endothelial rings secondary to blast injury from homemade explosives. PMID:23474743

  8. Redox-Mediated Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid Sensitivity in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chiaradonna, Ferdinando; Barozzi, Iros; Miccolo, Claudia; Bucci, Gabriele; Palorini, Roberta; Fornasari, Lorenzo; Botrugno, Oronza A.; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Masullo, Michele; Passafaro, Alfonso; Galimberti, Viviana E.; Fantin, Valeria R.; Richon, Victoria M.; Pece, Salvatore; Viale, Giuseppe; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Draetta, Giulio; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid; SAHA) is a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) approved in the clinics for the treatment of T-cell lymphoma and with the potential to be effective also in breast cancer. We investigated the responsiveness to SAHA in human breast primary tumors and cancer cell lines. Results: We observed a differential response to drug treatment in both human breast primary tumors and cancer cell lines. Gene expression analysis of the breast cancer cell lines revealed that genes involved in cell adhesion and redox pathways, especially glutathione metabolism, were differentially expressed in the cell lines resistant to SAHA compared with the sensitive ones, indicating their possible association with drug resistance mechanisms. Notably, such an association was also observed in breast primary tumors. Indeed, addition of buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), a compound capable of depleting cellular glutathione, significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of SAHA in both breast cancer cell lines and primary breast tumors. Innovation: We identify and validate transcriptional differences in genes involved in redox pathways, which include potential predictive markers of sensitivity to SAHA. Conclusion: In breast cancer, it could be relevant to evaluate the expression of antioxidant genes that may favor tumor resistance as a factor to consider for potential clinical application and treatment with epigenetic drugs (HDACis). Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 15–29. PMID:25897982

  9. Evaluation of photosynthetic electrons derivation by exogenous redox mediators.

    PubMed

    Longatte, Guillaume; Fu, Han-Yi; Buriez, Olivier; Labbé, Eric; Wollman, Francis-André; Amatore, Christian; Rappaport, Fabrice; Guille-Collignon, Manon; Lemaître, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is the complex process that occurs in plants or algae by which the energy from the sun is converted into an electrochemical potential that drives the assimilation of carbon dioxide and the synthesis of carbohydrates. Quinones belong to a family of species commonly found in key processes of the Living, like photosynthesis or respiration, in which they act as electron transporters. This makes this class of molecules a popular candidate for biofuel cell and bioenergy applications insofar as they can be used as cargo to ship electrons to an electrode immersed in the cellular suspension. Nevertheless, such electron carriers are mostly selected empirically. This is why we report on a method involving fluorescence measurements to estimate the ability of seven different quinones to accept photosynthetic electrons downstream of photosystem II, the first protein complex in the light-dependent reactions of oxygenic photosynthesis. To this aim we use a mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular green alga, impaired in electron downstream of photosystem II and assess the ability of quinones to restore electron flow by fluorescence. In this work, we defined and extracted a "derivation parameter" D that indicates the derivation efficiency of the exogenous quinones investigated. D then allows electing 2,6-dichlorobenzoquinone, 2,5-dichlorobenzoquinone and p-phenylbenzoquinone as good candidates. More particularly, our investigations suggested that other key parameters like the partition of quinones between different cellular compartments and their propensity to saturate these various compartments should also be taken into account in the process of selecting exogenous quinones for the purpose of deriving photoelectrons from intact algae. PMID:26051794

  10. An algorithm for the management of hypertension in the setting of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling inhibition.

    PubMed

    Copur, M Sitki; Obermiller, Angela

    2011-09-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling is considered to be one of the key factors involved in tumor-associated angiogenesis. Inhibition of angiogenesis has significantly improved anticancer therapy making it one of the cornerstones of treatment for various solid tumors. Several antiangiogenesis inhibitory compounds (eg, bevacizumab, sunitinib, sorafenib) are now widely used in the treatment of patients with colorectal, non-small-cell lung, advanced renal cell, hepatocellular, and breast cancer. One of the most commonly observed side effects of inhibition of VEGF signaling is hypertension, which is dose-dependent and varies in incidence among the different angiogenesis inhibitor drugs. Poorly controlled hypertension not only can lead to cardiovascular events, renal disease, and stroke, but may also necessitate discontinuation of anticancer therapy, thereby potentially limiting overall clinical benefit. In contrast, hypertension induced by VEGF inhibitors has been shown to represent an important pharmacodynamic biomarker of oncologic response. For the practicing oncologist, knowledge and optimal management of this toxicity is essential. Because of the lack of controlled studies on this topic, no clear recommendations are available. In this article, we review the available preclinical and clinical data on the pathogenesis and management of hypertension resulting from anti-VEGF inhibitor therapy and propose a treatment algorithm that our group has now implemented for daily clinical practice. PMID:21855035

  11. Retinal Endothelial Cell Apoptosis Stimulates Recruitment of Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhatwadekar, Ashay D.; Glenn, Josephine V.; Curtis, Tim M.; Grant, Maria B.; Stitt, Alan W.; Gardiner, Tom A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Bone marrow–derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) contribute to vascular repair although it is uncertain how local endothelial cell apoptosis influences their reparative function. This study was conducted to determine how the presence of apoptotic bodies at sites of endothelial damage may influence participation of EPCs in retinal microvascular repair. Methods Microlesions of apoptotic cell death were created in monolayers of retinal microvascular endothelial cells (RMECs) by using the photodynamic drug verteporfin. The adhesion of early-EPCs to these lesions was studied before detachment of the apoptotic cells or after their removal from the wound site. Apoptotic bodies were fed to normal RMECs and mRNA levels for adhesion molecules were analyzed. Results Endothelial lesions where apoptotic bodies were left attached at the wound site showed a fivefold enhancement in EPC recruitment (P < 0.05) compared with lesions where the apoptotic cells had been removed. In intact RMEC monolayers exposed to apoptotic bodies, expression of ICAM, VCAM, and E-selectin was upregulated by 5- to 15-fold (P < 0.05– 0.001). EPCs showed a characteristic chemotactic response (P < 0.05) to conditioned medium obtained from apoptotic bodies, whereas analysis of the medium showed significantly increased levels of VEGF, IL-8, IL-6, and TNF-α when compared to control medium; SDF-1 remained unchanged. Conclusions The data indicate that apoptotic bodies derived from retinal capillary endothelium mediate release of proangiogenic cytokines and chemokines and induce adhesion molecule expression in a manner that facilitates EPC recruitment. PMID:19474402

  12. Endothelial cells in dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Srikiatkhachorn, Anon; Kelley, James F

    2014-09-01

    Therapies to prevent or reverse endothelial dysfunction and vascular leak found in dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) have not been identified. In this review we summarize dengue viruses and the spectrum of human disease and highlight evidence of endothelial cell dysfunction in DHF based on studies in patients and mouse and tissue culture models. Evidence suggests that both virus antigen and host immune response, can cause endothelial cell dysfunction and weaken endothelial barrier integrity. We suggest possible therapeutic interventions and highlight how therapies targeting altered endothelial function might be evaluated in animal models and in patients with DHF. PMID:25025934

  13. Analysis of endothelial barrier function in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuping; Alexander, J Steven

    2011-01-01

    Increased microvascular solute permeability underlies many forms of pathophysiological conditions, including inflammation. Endothelial monolayer cultures provide an excellent model system which allows systemic and mechanistic study of endothelial barrier function and paracellular permeability in vitro. The endothelial-specific complexus adherens junction protein VE-cadherin and their intracellular complex form pericellular structures along the cell borders which are critical to regulate endothelial barrier function by controlling pericellular permeability of vasculature. Here, we describe methods for both visualizing and quantifying junctional permeability and barrier changes in endothelial monolayers in vitro. PMID:21874457

  14. Endothelial Plasticity: Shifting Phenotypes through Force Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Krenning, Guido; Barauna, Valerio G.; Krieger, José E.; Harmsen, Martin C.; Moonen, Jan-Renier A. J.

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial lining of the vasculature is exposed to a large variety of biochemical and hemodynamic stimuli with different gradients throughout the vascular network. Adequate adaptation requires endothelial cells to be highly plastic, which is reflected by the remarkable heterogeneity of endothelial cells in tissues and organs. Hemodynamic forces such as fluid shear stress and cyclic strain are strong modulators of the endothelial phenotype and function. Although endothelial plasticity is essential during development and adult physiology, proatherogenic stimuli can induce adverse plasticity which contributes to disease. Endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT), the hallmark of endothelial plasticity, was long thought to be restricted to embryonic development but has emerged as a pathologic process in a plethora of diseases. In this perspective we argue how shear stress and cyclic strain can modulate EndMT and discuss how this is reflected in atherosclerosis and pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:26904133

  15. Endothelial dysfunction: a comprehensive appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Esper, Ricardo J; Nordaby, Roberto A; Vilariño, Jorge O; Paragano, Antonio; Cacharrón, José L; Machado, Rogelio A

    2006-01-01

    The endothelium is a thin monocelular layer that covers all the inner surface of the blood vessels, separating the circulating blood from the tissues. It is not an inactive organ, quite the opposite. It works as a receptor-efector organ and responds to each physical or chemical stimulus with the release of the correct substance with which it may maintain vasomotor balance and vascular-tissue homeostasis. It has the property of producing, independently, both agonistic and antagonistic substances that help to keep homeostasis and its function is not only autocrine, but also paracrine and endocrine. In this way it modulates the vascular smooth muscle cells producing relaxation or contraction, and therefore vasodilatation or vasoconstriction. The endothelium regulating homeostasis by controlling the production of prothrombotic and antithrombotic components, and fibrynolitics and antifibrynolitics. Also intervenes in cell proliferation and migration, in leukocyte adhesion and activation and in immunological and inflammatory processes. Cardiovascular risk factors cause oxidative stress that alters the endothelial cells capacity and leads to the so called endothelial "dysfunction" reducing its capacity to maintain homeostasis and leads to the development of pathological inflammatory processes and vascular disease. There are different techniques to evaluate the endothelium functional capacity, that depend on the amount of NO produced and the vasodilatation effect. The percentage of vasodilatation with respect to the basal value represents the endothelial functional capacity. Taking into account that shear stress is one of the most important stimulants for the synthesis and release of NO, the non-invasive technique most often used is the transient flow-modulate "endothelium-dependent" post-ischemic vasodilatation, performed on conductance arteries such as the brachial, radial or femoral arteries. This vasodilatation is compared with the vasodilatation produced by drugs that

  16. Endothelial Cells Derived From Nuclear Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Wing Tak; Huang, Ngan F.; Botham, Crystal M.; Sayed, Nazish; Cooke, John P.

    2012-01-01

    The endothelium plays a pivotal role in vascular homeostasis, regulating the tone of the vascular wall, and its interaction with circulating blood elements. Alterations in endothelial functions facilitate the infiltration of inflammatory cells and permit vascular smooth muscle proliferation and platelet aggregation. Therefore, endothelial dysfunction is an early event in disease processes including atherosclerosis, and because of its critical role in vascular health the endothelium is worthy of the intense focus it has received. However, there are limitations to studying human endothelial function in vivo, or human vascular segments ex vivo. Thus, methods for endothelial cell culture have been developed and refined. More recently, methods to derive endothelial cells from pluripotent cells have extended the scientific range of human endothelial cell studies. Pluripotent stem cells may be generated, expanded and then differentiated into endothelial cells for in vitro studies. Constructs for molecular imaging can also be employed to facilitate tracking these cells in vivo. Furthermore, one can generate patient-specific endothelial cells to study the effects of genetic or epigenetic alterations on endothelial behavior. Finally, there is the opportunity to apply these cells for vascular therapy. This review focuses on the generation of endothelial cells from stem cells; their characterization by genetic, histological and functional studies; and their translational applications. PMID:23104878

  17. Flow-Mediated Endothelial Mechanotransduction

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Peter F.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical forces associated with blood flow play important roles in the acute control of vascular tone, the regulation of arterial structure and remodeling, and the localization of atherosclerotic lesions. Major regulation of the blood vessel responses occurs by the action of hemodynamic shear stresses on the endothelium. The transmission of hemodynamic forces throughout the endothelium and the mechanotransduction mechanisms that lead to biophysical, biochemical, and gene regulatory responses of endothelial cells to hemodynamic shear stresses are reviewed. PMID:7624393

  18. Endothelial progenitor cells: identity defined?

    PubMed Central

    Timmermans, Frank; Plum, Jean; Yöder, Mervin C; Ingram, David A; Vandekerckhove, Bart; Case, Jamie

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In the past decade, researchers have gained important insights on the role of bone marrow (BM)-derived cells in adult neovascularization. A subset of BM-derived cells, called endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), has been of particular interest, as these cells were suggested to home to sites of neovascularization and neoendothelialization and differentiate into endothelial cells (ECs) in situ, a process referred to as postnatal vasculogenesis. Therefore, EPCs were proposed as a potential regenerative tool for treating human vascular disease and a possible target to restrict vessel growth in tumour pathology. However, conflicting results have been reported in the field, and the identification, characterization, and exact role of EPCs in vascular biology is still a subject of much discussion. The focus of this review is on the controversial issues in the field of EPCs which are related to the lack of a unique EPC marker, identification challenges related to the paucity of EPCs in the circulation, and the important phenotypical and functional overlap between EPCs, haematopoietic cells and mature ECs. We also discuss our recent findings on the origin of endothelial outgrowth cells (EOCs), showing that this in vitro defined EC population does not originate from circulating CD133+ cells or CD45+ haematopoietic cells. PMID:19067770

  19. Novel regulators of endothelial barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, Krishnan; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial barrier function is an essential and tightly regulated process that ensures proper compartmentalization of the vascular and interstitial space, while allowing for the diffusive exchange of small molecules and the controlled trafficking of macromolecules and immune cells. Failure to control endothelial barrier integrity results in excessive leakage of fluid and proteins from the vasculature that can rapidly become fatal in scenarios such as sepsis or the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding on the regulation of endothelial permeability, with a specific focus on the endothelial glycocalyx and endothelial scaffolds, regulatory intracellular signaling cascades, as well as triggers and mediators that either disrupt or enhance endothelial barrier integrity, and provide our perspective as to areas of seeming controversy and knowledge gaps, respectively. PMID:25381026

  20. Replication of human endothelial cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Lewis, L J; Hoak, J C; Maca, R D; Fry, G L

    1973-08-01

    Investigative studies dealing with the properties and functions of endothelial cells have been hampered because there has been little or no success in the isolation, growth, and passage of individual cells in large numbers. We have developed a system whereby pure cultures of endothelial cells derived from umbilical veins can be subcultured for at least five serial passages. Many facets of endothelial function and interaction can be evaluated with the use of this new adaptive system of isolation and culture. PMID:4718112

  1. Progenitor endothelial cell involvement in Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Budinger, Thomas F.

    2003-05-01

    There is compelling evidence that endothelial cells of the brain and periphery are dysfunctional in Alzheimer's Disease. There is evidence for a fundamental defect in, or abnormal aging of, endothelial progenitor cells in atherosclerosis. The possibility that endothelial cell defects are a primary cause for Alzheimer's Disease or other dementias can be researched by molecular and cell biology studies as well as cell trafficking studies using recently demonstrated molecular imaging methods. The evidence for abnormal endothelial function and the methods to explore this hypothesis are presented.

  2. Endothelial function and coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kinlay, S; Libby, P; Ganz, P

    2001-08-01

    The endothelium produces a number of vasodilator and vasoconstrictor substances that not only regulate vasomotor tone, but also the recruitment and activity of inflammatory cells and the propensity towards thrombosis. Endothelial vasomotor function is a convenient way to assess these other functions, and is related to the long-term risk of cardiovascular disease. Lipids (particularly low density lipoprotein cholesterol) and oxidant stress play a major role in impairing these functions, by reducing the bioavailability of nitric oxide and activating pro-inflammatory signalling pathways such as nuclear factor kappa B. Biomechanical forces on the endothelium, including low shear stress from disturbed blood flow, also activate the endothelium increasing vasomotor dysfunction and promoting inflammation by upregulating pro-atherogenic genes. In contrast, normal laminar shear stress promotes the expression of genes that may protect against atherosclerosis. The sub-cellular structure of endothelial cells includes caveolae that play an integral part in regulating the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Low density lipoprotein cholesterol and oxidant stress impair caveolae structure and function and adversely affect endothelial function. Lipid-independent pathways of endothelial cell activation are increasingly recognized, and may provide new therapeutic targets. Endothelial vasoconstrictors, such as endothelin, antagonize endothelium-derived vasodilators and contribute to endothelial dysfunction. Some but not all studies have linked certain genetic polymorphisms of the nitric oxide synthase enzyme to vascular disease and impaired endothelial function. Such genetic heterogeneity may nonetheless offer new insights into the variability of endothelial function. PMID:11507322

  3. Vascular endothelial growth factor C promotes survival of retinal vascular endothelial cells via vascular endothelial growth factor receptor‐2

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bojun; Smith, Gill; Cai, Jun; Ma, Aihua; Boulton, Mike

    2007-01-01

    Aim To determine vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF‐C) expression in retinal endothelial cells, its antiapoptotic potential and its putative role in diabetic retinopathy. Method Cultured retinal endothelial cells and pericytes were exposed to tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α and VEGF‐C expression determined by reverse transcriptase‐polymerase chain reaction. Secreted VEGF‐C protein levels in conditioned media from endothelial cells were examined by western blotting analysis. The ability of VEGF‐C to prevent apoptosis induced by TNFα or hyperglycaemia in endothelial cells was assessed by flow cytometry. The expression of VEGF‐C in diabetic retinopathy was studied by immunohistochemistry of retinal tissue. Result VEGF‐C was expressed by both vascular endothelial cells and pericytes. TNFα up regulated both VEGF‐C and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor‐2 (VEGFR)‐2 expression in endothelial cells in a dose‐dependent manner, but had no effect on VEGFR‐3. Flow cytometry results showed that VEGF‐C prevented endothelial cell apoptosis induced by TNFα and hyperglycaemia and that the antiapoptotic effect was mainly via VEGFR‐2. In pericytes, the expression of VEGF‐C mRNA remained stable on exogenous TNFα treatment. VEGF‐C immunostaining was increased in retinal vessels in specimens with diabetes compared with retinal specimens from controls without diabetes. Conclusion In retinal endothelial cells, TNFα stimulates the expression of VEGF‐C, which in turn protects endothelial cells from apoptosis induced by TNFα or hyperglycaemia via VEGFR‐2 and thus helps sustain retinal neovascularisation. PMID:16943230

  4. Human liver endothelial cells, but not macrovascular or microvascular endothelial cells, engraft in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Filali, Ebtisam El; Hiralall, Johan K; van Veen, Henk A; Stolz, Donna B; Seppen, Jurgen

    2013-01-01

    Liver cell transplantation has had limited clinical success so far, partly due to poor engraftment of hepatocytes. Instead of hepatocytes. other cell types, such as endothelial cells, could be used in ex vivo liver gene therapy. The goal of the present study was to compare the grafting and repopulation capacity of human endothelial cells derived from various tissues. Human endothelial cells were isolated from adult and fetal livers using anti-human CD31 antibody-conjugated magnetic beads. Human macrovascular endothelial cells were obtained from umbilical vein. Human microvascular endothelial cells were isolated from adipose tissue. Cells were characterized using flow cytometry. Liver engraftment and repopulation of endothelial cells was studied after intrasplenic transplantation in monocrotaline-treated immunodeficient mice. Following transplantation, human liver endothelial cells engrafted throughout the mouse liver. With immunoscanning electron microscopy, fenestrae in engrafted human liver endothelial cells were identified, a characteristic feature of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells. In contrast, CD31-negative liver cells, human macrovascular and microvascular endothelial cells were not capable of repopulating mouse liver. Characterization of human liver, macrovascular, and microvascular endothelial cells demonstrated expression of CD31, CD34, and CD146 but not CD45. Our study shows that only human liver endothelial cells, but not macro- and microvascular endothelial cells, have the unique capacity to engraft and repopulate the mouse liver. These results indicate that mature endothelial cells cannot transdifferentiate in vivo and thus do not exhibit phenotypic plasticity. Our results have set a basis for further research to the potential of human liver endothelial cells in liver-directed cell and gene therapy. PMID:23044355

  5. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jin Bo

    2015-01-01

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smoking, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease. PMID:26635921

  6. How mental stress affects endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Toda, Noboru; Nakanishi-Toda, Megumi

    2011-12-01

    Mental stress is an important factor contributing to recognized mechanisms underlying cardiovascular events. Among these, stress-related endothelial dysfunction is an early risk factor that predicts future development of severe cardiovascular disorders. Acute mental stress by a variety of tests impairs endothelial function in humans, although the opposite results have been reported by some investigators. Chronic stress always deteriorates endothelial function in humans and experimental animals. Stress hormones, such as glucocorticoids and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and endothelin-1 liberated in response to mental stress participate in endothelial dysfunction possibly via downregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression, eNOS inactivation, decreased nitric oxide (NO) actions, and increased NO degradation, together with vasoconstriction counteracting against NO-induced vasodilatation. Catecholamines do not directly affect endothelial function but impair its function when blood pressure elevation by the amines is sustained. Endogenous opioids favorably affect endothelial function, which counteract deteriorating effects of other stress hormones and mediators. Inhibition of cortisol and endothelin-1 production, prevention of pro-inflammatory mediator accumulation, hypnotics, mirthful laughter, humor orientation, and lifestyle modification would contribute to the prevention and treatment for stress-related endothelial dysfunction and future serious cardiovascular disease. PMID:21947555

  7. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin Bo

    2015-11-26

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smoking, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease. PMID:26635921

  8. Quantitation of Endothelial Cell Adhesiveness In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Donna J.; Raj, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    One of the cardinal processes of inflammation is the infiltration of immune cells from the lumen of the blood vessel to the surrounding tissue. This occurs when endothelial cells, which line blood vessels, become adhesive to circulating immune cells such as monocytes. In vitro measurement of this adhesiveness has until now been done by quantifying the total number of monocytes that adhere to an endothelial layer either as a direct count or by indirect measurement of the fluorescence of adherent monocytes. While such measurements do indicate the average adhesiveness of the endothelial cell population, they are confounded by a number of factors, such as cell number, and do not reveal the proportion of endothelial cells that are actually adhesive. Here we describe and demonstrate a method which allows the enumeration of adhesive cells within a tested population of endothelial monolayer. Endothelial cells are grown on glass coverslips and following desired treatment are challenged with monocytes (that may be fluorescently labeled). After incubation, a rinsing procedure, involving multiple rounds of immersion and draining, the cells are fixed. Adhesive endothelial cells, which are surrounded by monocytes are readily identified and enumerated, giving an adhesion index that reveals the actual proportion of endothelial cells within the population that are adhesive. PMID:26132714

  9. Signaling hierarchy regulating human endothelial cell development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our present knowledge of the regulation of mammalian endothelial cell differentiation has been largely derived from studies of mouse embryonic development. However, unique mechanisms and hierarchy of signals that govern human endothelial cell development are unknown and, thus, explored in these stud...

  10. Endothelial Transmigration by Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Coates, Bria M.; Sullivan, David P.; Makanji, Ming Y.; Du, Nga Y.; Olson, Cheryl L.; Muller, William A.; Engman, David M.; Epting, Conrad L.

    2013-01-01

    Chagas heart disease, the leading cause of heart failure in Latin America, results from infection with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Although T. cruzi disseminates intravascularly, how the parasite contends with the endothelial barrier to escape the bloodstream and infect tissues has not been described. Understanding the interaction between T. cruzi and the vascular endothelium, likely a key step in parasite dissemination, could inform future therapies to interrupt disease pathogenesis. We adapted systems useful in the study of leukocyte transmigration to investigate both the occurrence of parasite transmigration and its determinants in vitro. Here we provide the first evidence that T. cruzi can rapidly migrate across endothelial cells by a mechanism that is distinct from productive infection and does not disrupt monolayer integrity or alter permeability. Our results show that this process is facilitated by a known modulator of cellular infection and vascular permeability, bradykinin, and can be augmented by the chemokine CCL2. These represent novel findings in our understanding of parasite dissemination, and may help identify new therapeutic strategies to limit the dissemination of the parasite. PMID:24312535

  11. Endothelial Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dhananjayan, R; Koundinya, K S Srivani; Malati, T; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is an imbalance in the production of vasodilator factors and when this balance is disrupted, it predisposes the vasculature towards pro-thrombotic and pro-atherogenic effects. This results in vasoconstriction, leukocyte adherence, platelet activation, mitogenesis, pro-oxidation, impaired coagulation and nitric oxide production, vascular inflammation, atherosclerosis and thrombosis. Endothelial dysfunction is focussed as it is a potential contributor to the pathogenesis of vascular disease in diabetes mellitus. Under physiological conditions, there is a balanced release of endothelial-derived relaxing and contracting factors, but this delicate balance is altered in diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis, thereby contributing to further progression of vascular and end-organ damage. This review focuses on endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerosis, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, oxidative stress associated with diabetes mellitus, markers and genetics that are implicated in endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27605734

  12. Endothelial cell micropatterning: Methods, effects, and applications

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Deirdre E.J.; Hinds, Monica T.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of flow on endothelial cells have been widely examined for the ability of fluid shear stress to alter cell morphology and function; however, the effects of endothelial cell morphology without flow have only recently been observed. An increase in lithographic techniques in cell culture spurred a corresponding increase in research aiming to confine cell morphology. These studies lead to a better understanding of how morphology and cytoskeletal configuration affect the structure and function of the cells. This review examines endothelial cell micropatterning research by exploring both the many alternative methods used to alter endothelial cell morphology and the resulting changes in cellular shape and phenotype. Micropatterning induced changes in endothelial cell proliferation, apoptosis, cytoskeletal organization, mechanical properties, and cell functionality. Finally, the ways these cellular manipulation techniques have been applied to biomedical engineering research, including angiogenesis, cell migration, and tissue engineering, is discussed. PMID:21761242

  13. [Transplantation of corneal endothelial cells].

    PubMed

    Amano, Shiro

    2002-12-01

    Though conventional corneal transplantation has achieved great success, it still has several drawbacks including limited availability of donor corneas, recurrent allograft rejection, and subsequent graft failure in certain cases. Reconstructing clinically usable corneas by applying the technology of regenerative medicine can offer a solution to these problems, as well as making corneal transplantation a non-emergency surgery and enabling the usage of banked corneal cells. In the present study, we focused on corneal endothelium that is critical for corneal transparency and investigated the reconstruction of cornea utilizing cultured human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs). We succeeded in steadily culturing HCECs by using culture dishes pre-coated with extracellular matrix produced by calf corneal endothelial cells and culture media that contained basic fibroblast growth factor and fetal bovine serum. We performed the following analysis utilizing these cultured HCECs. The older the donor was, the more frequently large senescent cells appeared in the passaged HCECs. The telomeres of HCECs were measured as terminal restriction fragments (TRF) by Southern blotting. HCECs, in vivo from donors in their seventies had a long TRFs of over 12 kilobases. Passaging shortened the TRFs but there was no difference in TRFs among donors of various ages. These results indicated that shortening of telomere length is not related to senescence of HCECs. We investigated the role of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in the senescence of in vivo HCECs. The results indicated that AGE-protein in the aqueous humor is endocytosed into HCECs via AGE receptors expressed on the surface of HCECs and damages HCECs by producing reactive oxygen species and inducing apoptosis, suggesting that AGEs, at least partly, cause the senescence of HECEs. HCECs were cultured using adult human serum instead of bovine serum to get rid of bovine material that can be infected with prions. Primary and passage

  14. Blood cells and endothelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Stephen F; Granger, D Neil

    2015-01-01

    The barrier properties of endothelial cells are critical for the maintenance of water and protein balance between the intravascular and extravascular compartments. An impairment of endothelial barrier function has been implicated in the genesis and/or progression of a variety of pathological conditions, including pulmonary edema, ischemic stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, angioedema, sepsis and cancer. The altered barrier function in these conditions is often linked to the release of soluble mediators from resident cells (e.g., mast cells, macrophages) and/or recruited blood cells. The interaction of the mediators with receptors expressed on the surface of endothelial cells diminishes barrier function either by altering the expression of adhesive proteins in the inter-endothelial junctions, by altering the organization of the cytoskeleton, or both. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), proteolytic enzymes (e.g., matrix metalloproteinase, elastase), oncostatin M, and VEGF are part of a long list of mediators that have been implicated in endothelial barrier failure. In this review, we address the role of blood borne cells, including, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, and platelets, in the regulation of endothelial barrier function in health and disease. Attention is also devoted to new targets for therapeutic intervention in disease states with morbidity and mortality related to endothelial barrier dysfunction. PMID:25838983

  15. Blood cells and endothelial barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Stephen F; Granger, D Neil

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The barrier properties of endothelial cells are critical for the maintenance of water and protein balance between the intravascular and extravascular compartments. An impairment of endothelial barrier function has been implicated in the genesis and/or progression of a variety of pathological conditions, including pulmonary edema, ischemic stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, angioedema, sepsis and cancer. The altered barrier function in these conditions is often linked to the release of soluble mediators from resident cells (e.g., mast cells, macrophages) and/or recruited blood cells. The interaction of the mediators with receptors expressed on the surface of endothelial cells diminishes barrier function either by altering the expression of adhesive proteins in the inter-endothelial junctions, by altering the organization of the cytoskeleton, or both. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), proteolytic enzymes (e.g., matrix metalloproteinase, elastase), oncostatin M, and VEGF are part of a long list of mediators that have been implicated in endothelial barrier failure. In this review, we address the role of blood borne cells, including, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, and platelets, in the regulation of endothelial barrier function in health and disease. Attention is also devoted to new targets for therapeutic intervention in disease states with morbidity and mortality related to endothelial barrier dysfunction. PMID:25838983

  16. Fibrinogen induces endothelial cell permeability

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Neetu; Roberts, Andrew M.; Dean, William L.; Tyagi, Suresh C.

    2010-01-01

    Many cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disorders are accompanied by an increased blood content of fibrinogen (Fg), a high molecular weight plasma adhesion protein. Fg is a biomarker of inflammation and its degradation products have been associated with microvascular leakage. We tested the hypothesis that at pathologically high levels, Fg increases endothelial cell (EC) permeability through extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling and by inducing F-actin formation. In cultured ECs, Fg binding to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and to α5β1 integrin, caused phosphorylation of ERK. Subsequently, F-actin formation increased and coincided with formation of gaps between ECs, which corresponded with increased permeability of ECs to albumin. Our data suggest that formation of F-actin and gaps may be the mechanism for increased albumin leakage through the EC monolayer. The present study indicates that elevated un-degraded Fg may be a factor causing microvascular permeability that typically accompanies cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disorders. PMID:17849175

  17. The relationship between oxidised LDL, endothelial progenitor cells and coronary endothelial function in patients with CHD

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Jonathan; Kennedy, Simon; Ahmed, Nadeem; Hayhurst, James; McClure, John D; Berry, Colin; Wadsworth, Roger M; Oldroyd, Keith G

    2016-01-01

    Objective The balance between coronary endothelial dysfunction and repair is influenced by many protective and deleterious factors circulating in the blood. We studied the relationship between oxidised low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL), circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and coronary endothelial function in patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods 33 patients with stable CHD were studied. Plasma oxLDL was measured using ELISA, coronary endothelial function was assessed using intracoronary acetylcholine infusion and EPCs were quantified using flow cytometry for CD34+/KDR+ cells. Results Plasma oxLDL correlated positively with the number of EPCs in the blood (r=0.46, p=0.02). There was a positive correlation between the number of circulating EPCs and coronary endothelial function (r=0.42, p=0.04). There was no significant correlation between oxLDL and coronary endothelial function. Conclusions Plasma levels of oxLDL are associated with increased circulating EPCs in the blood of patients with CHD, which may reflect a host-repair response to endothelial injury. Patients with stable CHD had a high prevalence of coronary endothelial dysfunction, which was associated with lower numbers of circulating EPCs, suggesting a mechanistic link between endothelial dysfunction and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PMID:26848395

  18. Endothelial glucocorticoid receptor suppresses atherogenesis- Brief Report

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinbo; Rotllan, Noemi; Feng, Yan; Zhou, Han; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos; Yu, Jun; Sessa, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the role of the endothelial glucocorticoid receptor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Approach and Results Control mice and mice lacking the endothelial glucocorticoid receptor were bred onto an Apoe knockout background and subjected to high-fat diet feeding for 12 weeks. Assessment of body weight and total cholesterol and triglycerides before and after the diet revealed no differences between the two groups of mice. However, mice lacking the endothelial glucocorticoid receptor developed more severe atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta, brachiocephalic artery and aortic sinus as well as a heightened inflammatory milieu as evidence by increased macrophage recruitment in the lesions. Conclusions These data suggest the endothelial glucocorticoid receptor is important for tonic inhibition of inflammation and limitation of atherosclerosis progression in this model. PMID:25810297

  19. Specular Microscopic Features of Corneal Endothelial Vacuolation

    PubMed Central

    Kanavi, Mozhgan Rezaei; Javadi, Mohammad-Ali; Chamani, Tahereh

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To introduce a specular microscopic reference image for endothelial vacuolation in donated corneas. Methods Two corneas from a donor with diffuse, round to oval dark areas at the endothelial level on slit lamp biomicroscopy and one normal-appearing donor cornea underwent specular microscopy, histopathologic evaluation and transmission electron microscopy. Results Specular microscopy of the two corneas with abnormal-looking endothelium revealed large numbers of dark, round to oval structures within the endothelium in favor of endothelial vacuolation. Light microscopy disclosed variable sized cyst-like structures within the cytoplasm. Transmission electron microscopy showed electron-lucent and relatively large-sized intracytoplasmic vacuoles. These features were not observed in the endothelium of the normal cornea. Conclusion The specular microscopic features of endothelial vacuolation in donated corneas were confirmed by light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, therefore the specular image may be proposed as a reference to eye banks. PMID:22454699

  20. The endothelial glycocalyx: composition, functions, and visualization

    PubMed Central

    Reitsma, Sietze; Slaaf, Dick W.; Vink, Hans; van Zandvoort, Marc A. M. J.

    2007-01-01

    This review aims at presenting state-of-the-art knowledge on the composition and functions of the endothelial glycocalyx. The endothelial glycocalyx is a network of membrane-bound proteoglycans and glycoproteins, covering the endothelium luminally. Both endothelium- and plasma-derived soluble molecules integrate into this mesh. Over the past decade, insight has been gained into the role of the glycocalyx in vascular physiology and pathology, including mechanotransduction, hemostasis, signaling, and blood cell–vessel wall interactions. The contribution of the glycocalyx to diabetes, ischemia/reperfusion, and atherosclerosis is also reviewed. Experimental data from the micro- and macrocirculation alludes at a vasculoprotective role for the glycocalyx. Assessing this possible role of the endothelial glycocalyx requires reliable visualization of this delicate layer, which is a great challenge. An overview is given of the various ways in which the endothelial glycocalyx has been visualized up to now, including first data from two-photon microscopic imaging. PMID:17256154

  1. Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Vedana, Gustavo; Villarreal, Guadalupe; Jun, Albert S

    2016-01-01

    Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD) is the most common corneal dystrophy and frequently results in vision loss. Hallmarks of the disease include loss of corneal endothelial cells and formation of excrescences of Descemet’s membrane. Later stages involve all layers of the cornea. Impairment of endothelial barrier and pump function and cell death from oxidative and unfolded protein stress contribute to disease progression. The genetic basis of FECD includes numerous genes and chromosomal loci, although alterations in the transcription factor 4 gene are associated with the majority of cases. Definitive treatment of FECD is corneal transplantation. In this paper, we highlight advances that have been made in understanding FECD’s clinical features, pathophysiology, and genetics. We also discuss recent advances in endothelial keratoplasty and potential future treatments. PMID:26937169

  2. Soluble endoglin, hypercholesterolemia and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Rathouska, Jana; Jezkova, Katerina; Nemeckova, Ivana; Nachtigal, Petr

    2015-12-01

    A soluble form of endoglin (sEng) is known to be an extracellular domain of the full-length membrane endoglin, which is elevated during various pathological conditions related to vascular endothelium. In the current review, we tried to summarize a possible role of soluble endoglin in cardiovascular pathologies, focusing on its relation to endothelial dysfunction and cholesterol levels. We discussed sEng as a proposed biomarker of cardiovascular disease progression, cardiovascular disease treatment and endothelial dysfunction. We also addressed a potential interaction of sEng with TGF-β/eNOS or BMP-9 signaling. We suggest soluble endoglin levels to be monitored, because they reflect the progression/treatment efficacy of cardiovascular diseases related to endothelial dysfunction and hypercholesterolemia. A possible role of soluble endoglin as an inducer of endothelial dysfunction however remains to be elucidated. PMID:26520890

  3. Apicobasal polarity of brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Worzfeld, Thomas; Schwaninger, Markus

    2016-02-01

    Normal brain homeostasis depends on the integrity of the blood-brain barrier that controls the access of nutrients, humoral factors, and immune cells to the CNS. The blood-brain barrier is composed mainly of brain endothelial cells. Forming the interface between two compartments, they are highly polarized. Apical/luminal and basolateral/abluminal membranes differ in their lipid and (glyco-)protein composition, allowing brain endothelial cells to secrete or transport soluble factors in a polarized manner and to maintain blood flow. Here, we summarize the basic concepts of apicobasal cell polarity in brain endothelial cells. To address potential molecular mechanisms underlying apicobasal polarity in brain endothelial cells, we draw on investigations in epithelial cells and discuss how polarity may go awry in neurological diseases. PMID:26661193

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Fuchs endothelial dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... a protein that is part of type VIII collagen. Type VIII collagen is largely found within the cornea, surrounding the endothelial cells. Specifically, type VIII collagen is a major component of a tissue at ...

  5. Endothelial Cell Stimulation by Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Quynh T.; Filler, Scott G.

    2013-01-01

    The opportunistic fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, enters the bloodstream and causes hematogenously disseminated infection in hospitalized patients. During the initiation of a hematogenously disseminated infection, endothelial cells are one of the first host cells to come in contact with C. albicans. Endothelial cells can significantly influence the local host response to C. albicans by expressing leukocyte adhesion molecules and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Thus, it is of interest to investigate the response of endothelial cells to C. albicans in vitro. We describe the use of real-time PCR and enzyme immunoassays to measure the effects of C. albicans on the endothelial cell production of E-selectin and tumor necrosis factor α in vitro. PMID:19089392

  6. Endothelial microparticles: Sophisticated vesicles modulating vascular function

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Anne M; Edelberg, Jay; Jonas, Rebecca; Rogers, Wade T; Moore, Jonni S; Syed, Wajihuddin; Mohler, Emile R

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial microparticles (EMPs) belong to a family of extracellular vesicles that are dynamic, mobile, biological effectors capable of mediating vascular physiology and function. The release of EMPs can impart autocrine and paracrine effects on target cells through surface interaction, cellular fusion, and, possibly, the delivery of intra-vesicular cargo. A greater understanding of the formation, composition, and function of EMPs will broaden our understanding of endothelial communication and may expose new pathways amenable for therapeutic manipulation. PMID:23892447

  7. Endothelial Dysfunction in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Steyers, Curtis M.; Miller, Francis J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases are associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). As the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is increasingly recognized as an inflammatory process, similarities between atherosclerosis and systemic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, lupus, psoriasis, spondyloarthritis and others have become a topic of interest. Endothelial dysfunction represents a key step in the initiation and maintenance of atherosclerosis and may serve as a marker for future risk of cardiovascular events. Patients with chronic inflammatory diseases manifest endothelial dysfunction, often early in the course of the disease. Therefore, mechanisms linking systemic inflammatory diseases and atherosclerosis may be best understood at the level of the endothelium. Multiple factors, including circulating inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α), reactive oxygen species, oxidized LDL (low density lipoprotein), autoantibodies and traditional risk factors directly and indirectly activate endothelial cells, leading to impaired vascular relaxation, increased leukocyte adhesion, increased endothelial permeability and generation of a pro-thrombotic state. Pharmacologic agents directed against TNF-α-mediated inflammation may decrease the risk of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease in these patients. Understanding the precise mechanisms driving endothelial dysfunction in patients with systemic inflammatory diseases may help elucidate the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in the general population. PMID:24968272

  8. Aging and vascular endothelial function in humans

    PubMed Central

    SEALS, Douglas R.; JABLONSKI, Kristen L.; DONATO, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Advancing age is the major risk factor for the development of CVD (cardiovascular diseases). This is attributable, in part, to the development of vascular endothelial dysfunction, as indicated by reduced peripheral artery EDD (endothelium-dependent dilation) in response to chemical [typically ACh (acetylcholine)] or mechanical (intravascular shear) stimuli. Reduced bioavailability of the endothelium-synthesized dilating molecule NO (nitric oxide) as a result of oxidative stress is the key mechanism mediating reduced EDD with aging. Vascular oxidative stress increases with age as a consequence of greater production of reactive oxygen species (e.g. superoxide) without a compensatory increase in antioxidant defences. Sources of increased superoxide production include up-regulation of the oxidant enzyme NADPH oxidase, uncoupling of the normally NO-producing enzyme, eNOS (endothelial NO synthase) (due to reduced availability of the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin) and increased mitochondrial synthesis during oxidative phosphorylation. Increased bioactivity of the potent endothelial-derived constricting factor ET-1 (endothelin-1), reduced endothelial production of/responsiveness to dilatory prostaglandins, the development of vascular inflammation, formation of AGEs (advanced glycation end-products), an increased rate of endothelial apoptosis and reduced expression of oestrogen receptor α (in postmenopausal females) also probably contribute to impaired EDD with aging. Several lifestyle and biological factors modulate vascular endothelial function with aging, including regular aerobic exercise, dietary factors (e.g. processed compared with non-processed foods), body weight/fatness, vitamin D status, menopause/oestrogen deficiency and a number of conventional and non-conventional risk factors for CVD. Given the number of older adults now and in the future, more information is needed on effective strategies for the prevention and treatment of vascular endothelial aging. PMID

  9. Lymphatic endothelial differentiation in pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis cells.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jennifer M; Hyjek, Elizabeth; Husain, Aliya N; Shen, Le; Jones, Jennifer; Schuger, Lucia A

    2013-08-01

    Pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare, low-grade neoplasm affecting almost exclusively women of childbearing age. LAM belongs to the family of perivascular epithelioid cell tumors, characterized by spindle and epithelioid cells with smooth muscle and melanocytic differentiation. LAM cells infiltrate the lungs, producing multiple, bilateral lesions rich in lymphatic channels and forming cysts, leading to respiratory insufficiency. Here we used antibodies against four lymphatic endothelial markers-podoplanin (detected by D2-40), prospero homeobox 1 (PROX1), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 (VEGFR-3), and lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1 (LYVE1)-to determine whether LAM cells show lymphatic differentiation. Twelve of 12 diagnostic biopsy specimens (early-stage LAM) and 19 of 19 explants (late-stage LAM) showed immunopositivity for D2-40 in most neoplastic cells. PROX1, VEGFR-3, and LYVE1 immunoreactivity varied from scarce in the early stage to abundant in the late stage. Lymphatic endothelial, smooth muscle, and melanocytic markers were partially co-localized. These findings indicate that lymphatic endothelial differentiation is a feature of LAM and provide evidence of a previously unidentified third lineage of differentiation in this neoplasm. This study has implications for the histological diagnosis of LAM, the origin of the neoplastic cells, and potential future treatment with drugs targeting lymphangiogenesis. PMID:23609227

  10. PECAM-1: regulator of endothelial junctional integrity.

    PubMed

    Privratsky, Jamie R; Newman, Peter J

    2014-03-01

    PECAM-1 (also known as CD31) is a cellular adhesion and signaling receptor comprising six extracellular immunoglobulin (Ig)-like homology domains, a short transmembrane domain and a 118 amino acid cytoplasmic domain that becomes serine and tyrosine phosphorylated upon cellular activation. PECAM-1 expression is restricted to blood and vascular cells. In circulating platelets and leukocytes, PECAM-1 functions largely as an inhibitory receptor that, via regulated sequential phosphorylation of its cytoplasmic domain, limits cellular activation responses. PECAM-1 is also highly expressed at endothelial cell intercellular junctions, where it functions as a mechanosensor, as a regulator of leukocyte trafficking and in the maintenance of endothelial cell junctional integrity. In this review, we will describe (1) the functional domains of PECAM-1 and how they contribute to its barrier-enhancing properties, (2) how the physical properties of PECAM-1 influence its subcellular localization and its ability to influence endothelial cell barrier function, (3) various stimuli that initiate PECAM-1 signaling and/or function at the endothelial junction and (4) cross-talk of PECAM-1 with other junctional molecules, which can influence endothelial cell function. PMID:24435645

  11. Endothelial Cell Response to Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Reila Tainá; Nguyen, Daniel; Stephens, Danielle; Pamuk, Ferda; Fernandes, Daniel; Van Dyke, Thomas E; Kantarci, Alpdogan

    2016-07-01

    Vascular response is an essential aspect of an effective immune response to periodontal disease pathogens, as new blood vessel formation contributes to wound healing and inflammation. Gaining a greater understanding of the factors that affect vascular response may then contribute to future breakthroughs in dental medicine. In this study, we have characterized the endothelial cell response to the common bacterium Fusobacterium nucleatum, an important bridging species that facilitates the activity of late colonizers of the dental biofilm. Endothelial cells were infected with Fusobacterium nucleatum (strain 25586) for periods of 4, 12, 24, or 48 h. Cell proliferation and tube formation were analyzed, and expression of adhesion molecules (CD31 and CD34) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors 1 and 2 was measured by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Data indicate that F. nucleatum impaired endothelial cell proliferation and tube formation. The findings suggest that the modified endothelial cell response acts as a mechanism promoting the pathogenic progression of periodontal diseases and may potentially suggest the involvement of periodontopathogens in systemic diseases associated with periodontal inflammation. PMID:27185790

  12. Molecular Bases of Corneal Endothelial Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Schmedt, Thore; Silva, Mariana Mazzini; Ziaei, Alireza; Jurkunas, Ula

    2011-01-01

    The phrase “corneal endothelial dystrophies” embraces a group of bilateral corneal conditions that are characterized by a non-inflammatory and progressive degradation of corneal endothelium. Corneal endothelial cells exhibit a high pump site density and, along with barrier function, are responsible for maintaining the cornea in its natural state of relative dehydration. Gradual loss of endothelial cells leads to an insufficient water outflow, resulting in corneal edema and loss of vision. Since the pathologic mechanisms remain largely unknown, the only current treatment option is surgical transplantation when vision is severely impaired. In the past decade, important steps have been taken to understand how endothelial degeneration progresses on the molecular level. Studies of affected multigenerational families and sporadic cases identified genes and chromosomal loci, and revealed either Mendelian or complex disorder inheritance patterns. Mutations have been detected in genes that carry important structural, metabolic, cytoprotective, and regulatory functions in corneal endothelium. In addition to genetic predisposition, environmental factors like oxidative stress were found to be involved in the pathogenesis of endotheliopathies. This review summarizes and crosslinks the recent progress on deciphering the molecular bases of corneal endothelial dystrophies. PMID:21855542

  13. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling in Endothelial Disorders.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Teresa

    2016-06-01

    Numerous preclinical studies indicate that sustained endothelial activation significantly contributes to tissue edema, perpetuates the inflammatory response, and exacerbates tissue injury ultimately resulting in organ failure. However, no specific therapies aimed at restoring endothelial function are available as yet. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is emerging as a potent modulator of endothelial function and endothelial responses to injury. Recent studies indicate that S1PR are attractive targets to treat not only disorders of the arterial endothelium but also microvascular dysfunction caused by ischemic or inflammatory injury. In this article, we will review the current knowledge of the role of S1P and its receptors in endothelial function in health and disease, and we will discuss the therapeutic potential of targeting S1PR not only for disorders of the arterial endothelium but also the microvasculature. The therapeutic targeting of S1PR in the endothelium could help to bridge the gap between biomedical research in vascular biology and clinical practice. PMID:27115142

  14. KRIT1 Protein Depletion Modifies Endothelial Cell Behavior via Increased Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    DiStefano, Peter V.; Kuebel, Julia M.; Sarelius, Ingrid H.; Glading, Angela J.

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of endothelial cell-cell contact is a key event in many cardiovascular diseases and a characteristic of pathologically activated vascular endothelium. The CCM (cerebral cavernous malformation) family of proteins (KRIT1 (Krev-interaction trapped 1), PDCD10, and CCM2) are critical regulators of endothelial cell-cell contact and vascular homeostasis. Here we show novel regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling in KRIT1-depleted endothelial cells. Loss of KRIT1 and PDCD10, but not CCM2, increases nuclear β-catenin signaling and up-regulates VEGF-A protein expression. In KRIT1-depleted cells, increased VEGF-A levels led to increased VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) activation and subsequent alteration of cytoskeletal organization, migration, and barrier function and to in vivo endothelial permeability in KRIT1-deficient animals. VEGFR2 activation also increases β-catenin phosphorylation but is only partially responsible for KRIT1 depletion-dependent disruption of cell-cell contacts. Thus, VEGF signaling contributes to modifying endothelial function in KRIT1-deficient cells and microvessel permeability in Krit1+/− mice; however, VEGF signaling is likely not the only contributor to disrupted endothelial cell-cell contacts in the absence of KRIT1. PMID:25320085

  15. Development of Endothelial-Specific Single Inducible Lentiviral Vectors for Genetic Engineering of Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guanghua; Kramer, M. Gabriela; Fernandez-Ruiz, Veronica; Kawa, Milosz P.; Huang, Xin; Liu, Zhongmin; Prieto, Jesus; Qian, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are able to migrate to tumor vasculature. These cells, if genetically modified, can be used as vehicles to deliver toxic material to, or express anticancer proteins in tumor. To test this hypothesis, we developed several single, endothelial-specific, and doxycycline-inducible self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vectors. Two distinct expression cassettes were inserted into a SIN-vector: one controlled by an endothelial lineage-specific, murine vascular endothelial cadherin (mVEcad) promoter for the expression of a transactivator, rtTA2S-M2; and the other driven by an inducible promoter, TREalb, for a firefly luciferase reporter gene. We compared the expression levels of luciferase in different vector constructs, containing either the same or opposite orientation with respect to the vector sequence. The results showed that the vector with these two expression cassettes placed in opposite directions was optimal, characterized by a robust induction of the transgene expression (17.7- to 73-fold) in the presence of doxycycline in several endothelial cell lines, but without leakiness when uninduced. In conclusion, an endothelial lineage-specific single inducible SIN lentiviral vector has been developed. Such a lentiviral vector can be used to endow endothelial progenitor cells with anti-tumor properties. PMID:26612671

  16. Endothelial α3β1-Integrin Represses Pathological Angiogenesis and Sustains Endothelial-VEGF

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Rita Graça; Tavora, Bernardo; Robinson, Stephen D.; Reynolds, Louise E.; Szekeres, Charles; Lamar, John; Batista, Sílvia; Kostourou, Vassiliki; Germain, Mitchel A.; Reynolds, Andrew R.; Jones, Dylan T.; Watson, Alan R.; Jones, Janet L.; Harris, Adrian; Hart, Ian R.; Iruela-Arispe, M. Luisa; DiPersio, C. Michael; Kreidberg, Jordan A.; Hodivala-Dilke, Kairbaan M.

    2010-01-01

    Integrin α3β1 is a major receptor for laminin. The expression levels of laminins-8 and -10 in the basement membrane surrounding blood vessels are known to change during tumor angiogenesis. Although some studies have suggested that certain ligands of α3β1 can affect angiogenesis either positively or negatively, either a direct in vivo role for α3β1 in this process or its mechanism of action in endothelial cells during angiogenesis is still unknown. Because the global genetic ablation of α3-integrin results in an early lethal phenotype, we have generated conditional-knockout mice where α3 is deleted specifically in endothelial cells (ec-α3−/−). Here we show that ec-α3−/− mice are viable, fertile, and display enhanced tumor growth, elevated tumor angiogenesis, augmented hypoxia-induced retinal angiogenesis, and increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-mediated neovascularization ex vivo and in vivo. Furthermore, our data provide a novel method by which an integrin may regulate angiogenesis. We show that α3β1 is a positive regulator of endothelial-VEGF and that, surprisingly, the VEGF produced by endothelial cells can actually repress VEGF-receptor 2 (Flk-1) expression. These data, therefore, identify directly that endothelial α3β1 negatively regulates pathological angiogenesis and implicate an unexpected role for low levels of endothelial-VEGF as an activator of neovascularization. PMID:20639457

  17. Development of Endothelial-Specific Single Inducible Lentiviral Vectors for Genetic Engineering of Endothelial Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guanghua; Kramer, M Gabriela; Fernandez-Ruiz, Veronica; Kawa, Milosz P; Huang, Xin; Liu, Zhongmin; Prieto, Jesus; Qian, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are able to migrate to tumor vasculature. These cells, if genetically modified, can be used as vehicles to deliver toxic material to, or express anticancer proteins in tumor. To test this hypothesis, we developed several single, endothelial-specific, and doxycycline-inducible self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vectors. Two distinct expression cassettes were inserted into a SIN-vector: one controlled by an endothelial lineage-specific, murine vascular endothelial cadherin (mVEcad) promoter for the expression of a transactivator, rtTA2S-M2; and the other driven by an inducible promoter, TREalb, for a firefly luciferase reporter gene. We compared the expression levels of luciferase in different vector constructs, containing either the same or opposite orientation with respect to the vector sequence. The results showed that the vector with these two expression cassettes placed in opposite directions was optimal, characterized by a robust induction of the transgene expression (17.7- to 73-fold) in the presence of doxycycline in several endothelial cell lines, but without leakiness when uninduced. In conclusion, an endothelial lineage-specific single inducible SIN lentiviral vector has been developed. Such a lentiviral vector can be used to endow endothelial progenitor cells with anti-tumor properties. PMID:26612671

  18. Corneal endothelial changes in superficial epithelial keratopathy.

    PubMed

    Brooks, A M; Grant, G; Gillies, W E

    1986-05-01

    A series of five cases is described in which superficial punctate keratopathy was associated with endothelial cell changes. The most striking change was the presence of dark areas or blebs, usually two to four cell diameters in extent. There was also distortion and crumpling of the corneal endothelium, mild pleomorphism and polymegathism of the endothelial cells, with a reduced cell count in some cases. These blebs have previously been reported in hard and soft contact lens wearers and are due to intercellular oedema with separation of endothelial cells from Descemet's membrane. Anoxia and interference with osmosis have been proposed as possible mechanisms for the production of these blebs, but our cases demonstrate that fine disruption of the corneal epithelium can affect the integrity of the corneal endothelium and may lead to significant damage over a long period of time. PMID:3801208

  19. Digital imaging of diabetic endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paltauf-Doburzynska, Jolanta; Kohlwein, Sepp D.; Graier, Wolfgang F.

    2001-05-01

    Endothelial cells release factors that regulate dilatation and contraction of the vessels. They play an important role in modulating both the inflammatory response and vasomotor abnormalities that occur in coronary artery diseases. This endothelial function is associated with changes of intracellular Ca2+ concentration. For this study we used spatially and temporally resolved measurements of local Ca2+ concentration in human endothelial cells cultured in high glucose containing medium. Deconvolution techniques procedure allowed determination of intracellular Ca2+ concentration and its distribution into cellular compartments. We also used a confocal microscope for visualization of intracellular compartments (endoplasmatic reticulum, mitochondria) under normal and pathological conditions. We showed that the interrupted connection between superficial compartments and membrane channels is already the beginning of the cell damage in diabetes.

  20. The phacoemulsification procedure. II. Corneal endothelial changes.

    PubMed

    Polack, F M; Sugar, A

    1976-06-01

    The effect of phacoemulsification, with the Cavitron-Kelman instrument, on the corneal endothelium of rabbit and cats was studied by scanning electron microscopy and nitroblue tetrazolium staining. The various steps of the procedure were examined separately. Irrigation of the anterior chamber of the eye with balanced salt solution (Plasma-Lyte) for ten minutes caused no cell damage. Ultrasound and irrigation alone for four to six minutes caused increased permeability to NBT. Edema of endothelial cells and cell junction disruption occurred after eight minutes of anterior chamber irrigation with Plasma-Lyte. Uncomplicated phacoemulsification produced moderate cellular edema with scattered loss of endothelial cells. Destruction of endothelial cells was frequent after phacoemulsification, it appeared to be due to lens nucleus manipulation in the anterior chamber, instrumentation, and needle contact. From two to five days postoperatively, intercellular edema, altered cell morphology, and mosaic pattern were seen. However, it gradually recovered and seven to ten days later the endothelium appeared normal. PMID:931690

  1. Chronic vagal nerve stimulation prevents high-salt diet-induced endothelial dysfunction and aortic stiffening in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Chapleau, Mark W; Rotella, Diane L; Reho, John J; Rahmouni, Kamal; Stauss, Harald M

    2016-07-01

    Parasympathetic activity is often reduced in hypertension and can elicit anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Thus we hypothesized that chronic vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) may alleviate cardiovascular end-organ damage in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats. Vagal nerve stimulators were implanted, a high-salt diet initiated, and the stimulators turned on (VNS, n = 10) or left off (sham, n = 14) for 4 wk. Arterial pressure increased equally in both groups. After 4 wk, endothelial function, assessed by in vivo imaging of the long posterior ciliary artery (LPCA) after stimulation (pilocarpine) and inhibition (N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester) of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), had significantly declined (-2.3 ± 1.2 μm, P < 0.05) in sham, but was maintained (-0.7 ± 0.8 μm, nonsignificant) in VNS. Furthermore, aortic eNOS activation (phosphorylated to total eNOS protein content ratio) was greater in VNS (0.83 ± 0.07) than in sham (0.47 ± 0.08, P < 0.05). After only 3 wk, ultrasound imaging of the aorta demonstrated decreased aortic strain (-9.7 ± 2.2%, P < 0.05) and distensibility (-2.39 ± 0.49 1,000/mmHg, P < 0.05) and increased pulse-wave velocity (+2.4 ± 0.7 m/s, P < 0.05) in sham but not in VNS (-3.8 ± 3.8%, -0.70 ± 1.4 1,000/mmHg, and +0.1 ± 0.7 m/s, all nonsignificant). Interleukin (IL)-6 serum concentrations tended to be higher in VNS than in sham (34.3 ± 8.3 vs. 16.1 ± 4.6 pg/ml, P = 0.06), and positive correlations were found between NO-dependent relaxation of the LPCA and serum levels of IL-6 (r = +0.70, P < 0.05) and IL-10 (r = +0.56, P < 0.05) and between aortic eNOS activation and IL-10 (r = +0.48, P < 0.05). In conclusion, chronic VNS prevents hypertension-induced endothelial dysfunction and aortic stiffening in an animal model of severe hypertension. We speculate that anti-inflammatory mechanisms may contribute to these effects. PMID:27208157

  2. Isolation and culture of pulmonary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ryan, U S

    1984-06-01

    Methods for isolation, identification and culture of pulmonary endothelial cells are now routine. In the past, methods of isolation have used proteolytic enzymes to detach cells; thereafter, traditional methods for cell passaging have used trypsin/EDTA mixtures. Cells isolated and passaged using proteolytic enzymes have been useful in establishing the field and in verifying certain endothelial properties. However, there is a growing awareness of the role of endothelial cells in processing vasoactive substances, in responding to hormones and other agonists and in cell-cell interactions with other cell types of the vascular wall, with blood cells and with cellular products. Consequently, a new requirement has arisen for cells in vitro that maintain the differentiated properties of their counterparts in vivo. The deleterious effects of trypsin and other proteolytic enzymes commonly used in cell culture on surface structures of endothelial cells such as enzymes, receptors and junctional proteins, as well as on extracellular layers such as the glycocalyx or "endothelial fuzz," have led to the development of methods that avoid use of proteolytic enzymes at both the isolation step and during subsequent subculture. This chapter describes traditional methods for isolating pulmonary endothelial cells but emphasizes newer approaches using mechanical harvest and scale-up using microcarriers. The new methods allow maintenance of long-term, large-scale cultures of cells that retain the full complement of surface properties and that maintain the cobblestone monolayer morphology and differentiated functional properties. Methods for identification of isolated cells are therefore also considered as methods for validation of cultures during their in vitro lifespan. PMID:6090112

  3. Human Pulmonary Endothelial Cells in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Alice R.

    1980-01-01

    Endothelial cells were cultured from various different human vessels, including aortas, pulmonary, ovarian, and umbilical arteries, and pulmonary, ovarian, and umbilical veins. The cultured cells were identified as endothelial cells by the presence of Factor VIII antigen and antiotensin I converting enzyme (kininase II). They retained these markers for at least five passages in culture, and some cells had them for seven passages or more. Endothelial cells from the various vessels were compared with respect to their ability to metabolize angiotensins I and II and bradykinin. Cells from arteries had three to five times the angiotensin I converting enzyme activity as cells from veins. The activity of angiotensinase A (aspartyl aminopeptidase) had a similar distribution, and cells from arteries were consistently more active than cells from veins. Cultures of endothelial cells from pulmonary and umbilical vessels formed prostacyclin in response to mechanical stimulation. Media from cell monolayers that were subjected to a change of medium and gentle agitation inhibited aggregation of human platelets. This inhibitory activity was generated within 2-5 min, and it was not formed by cells that were treated with indomethacin or tranylcypromine. Addition of prostaglandin (PG)H2 to indomethacin-treated cells restored the ability to form the inhibitor, but cells treated with tranylcypromine were not responsive to PGH2. In experiments where [14C]arachidonic acid was added to the cells before stimulation, the major metabolite identified by thin-layer chromatography was 6-keto PGF1α. Thus, it appears that pulmonary endothelial cells, as well as umbilical cord cells, can form prostacyclin. In experiments comparing the ability of arterial and venous cells to form prostacyclin, arterial cells were more active than venous cells. These studies of cells from various human vessels suggest that the vascular origin of cultured endothelial cells determines how they metabolize vasoactive

  4. In Brief: Endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Duffhues, Gonzalo; Orlova, Valeria; Ten Dijke, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Recent evidence has highlighted the role of endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndoMT) in the onset and progression of a number of human pathologies. EndoMT involves the loss of an endothelial signature to generate unspecialized mesenchymal-like cells, susceptible to being re-differentiated into mesodermal cell types, including osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. Therefore, modulation of the molecular pathways controlling EndoMT can be considered as a therapeutic approach for particular human diseases. In addition, EndoMT may be harnessed for tissue engineering by producing multipotent mesenchymal cells able to differentiate into mutiple cell types. PMID:26446982

  5. Crossing the endothelial barrier during metastasis.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Nicolas; d'Água, Bárbara Borda; Ridley, Anne J

    2013-12-01

    During metastasis, cancer cells disseminate to other parts of the body by entering the bloodstream in a process that is called intravasation. They then extravasate at metastatic sites by attaching to endothelial cells that line blood vessels and crossing the vessel walls of tissues or organs. This Review describes how cancer cells cross the endothelial barrier during extravasation and how different receptors, signalling pathways and circulating cells such as leukocytes and platelets contribute to this process. Identification of the mechanisms that underlie cancer cell extravasation could lead to the development of new therapies to reduce metastasis. PMID:24263189

  6. Rapamycin inhibits re-endothelialization after percutaneous coronary intervention by impeding the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells and inducing apoptosis of endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Tao; Li, Fei; Wang, Wen-Yong; Li, Xiao-Jing; Liu, Yi-Meng; Wang, Rui-An; Guo, Wen-Yi; Wang, Hai-Chang

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial-cell function is important in the healing of damaged endothelium after percutaneous coronary artery damage. In 3 different animal models, we sought to determine whether rapamycin (sirolimus) affects the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells and endothelial progenitor cells. First, after we implanted stents in dogs, we found that re-endothelialization was impeded more by drug-eluting stents than by bare-metal stents, 30 days after percutaneous coronary intervention. Second, in vitro in rats, we found that 1-100 ng/mL of rapamycin time- and dose-dependently inhibited proliferation over 72 hr (with effects evident as early as 24 hr) and also dose-dependently induced endothelial progenitor-cell apoptosis. Finally, in vivo in rats, we observed that vascular endothelial growth factor expression was decreased after 5 days of rapamycin treatment. We conclude that rapamycin impedes re-endothelialization after drug-eluting stent implantation by inhibiting the proliferation and migration of coronary endothelial cells, inducing endothelial progenitor-cell apoptosis, and decreasing vascular endothelial growth factor expression in the circulation. PMID:20401293

  7. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 and mechanotransduction in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, K

    2006-04-01

    Endothelial cells are known to respond to mechanical forces such as fluid shear stress and cyclic stretch, but elucidating the mechanism for mechanosensing has been difficult. Experimental data indicate that there are probably several sensing mechanisms. We have recently proposed a novel mechanoresponse mechanism that involves platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1). When endothelial cells are stimulated by fluid shear stress, PECAM-1 is tyrosine phosphorylated and activates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) signalling cascade. The same signalling events occurred when we applied pulling force directly on PECAM-1 on the endothelial cell surface using magnetic beads coated with antibodies against the external domain of PECAM-1. These results appear to indicate that PECAM-1 is a mechanotransduction molecule. To our knowledge, this is the first mammalian molecule that is shown to respond to mechanical force directly exerted to it. PMID:16594905

  8. Brain endothelial dysfunction in cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Musolino, Patricia L; Gong, Yi; Snyder, Juliet M T; Jimenez, Sandra; Lok, Josephine; Lo, Eng H; Moser, Ann B; Grabowski, Eric F; Frosch, Matthew P; Eichler, Florian S

    2015-11-01

    See Aubourg (doi:10.1093/awv271) for a scientific commentary on this article.X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene leading to accumulation of very long chain fatty acids. Its most severe neurological manifestation is cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy. Here we demonstrate that progressive inflammatory demyelination in cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy coincides with blood-brain barrier dysfunction, increased MMP9 expression, and changes in endothelial tight junction proteins as well as adhesion molecules. ABCD1, but not its closest homologue ABCD2, is highly expressed in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, far exceeding its expression in the systemic vasculature. Silencing of ABCD1 in human brain microvascular endothelial cells causes accumulation of very long chain fatty acids, but much later than the immediate upregulation of adhesion molecules and decrease in tight junction proteins. This results in greater adhesion and transmigration of monocytes across the endothelium. PCR-array screening of human brain microvascular endothelial cells after ABCD1 silencing revealed downregulation of both mRNA and protein levels of the transcription factor c-MYC (encoded by MYC). Interestingly, MYC silencing mimicked the effects of ABCD1 silencing on CLDN5 and ICAM1 without decreasing the levels of ABCD1 protein itself. Together, these data demonstrate that ABCD1 deficiency induces significant alterations in brain endothelium via c-MYC and may thereby contribute to the increased trafficking of leucocytes across the blood-brain barrier as seen in cerebral adrenouleukodystrophy. PMID:26377633

  9. Chronic Inflammatory Diseases and Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Castellon, Xavier; Bogdanova, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases are associated with increases in cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and subclinical atherosclerosis as well as early-stage endothelial dysfunction screening using the FMD method (Flow Mediated Dilation). This phenomenon, referred to as accelerated pathological remodeling of arterial wall, could be attributed to traditional risk factors associated with atherosclerosis. Several new non-invasive techniques have been used to study arterial wall’s structural and functional alterations. These techniques (based of Radio Frequency, RF) allow for an assessment of artery age through calculations of intima-media thickness (RF- QIMT), pulse wave rate (RF- QAS) and endothelial dysfunction degree (FMD). The inflammatory and autoimmune diseases should now be considered as new cardiovascular risk factors, result of the major consequences of oxidative stress and RAS (Renin Angiotensin System) imbalance associated with the deleterious effect of known risk factors that lead to the alteration of the arterial wall. Inflammation plays a key role in all stages of the formation of vascular lesions maintained and exacerbated by the risk factors. The consequence of chronic inflammation is endothelial dysfunction that sets in and we can define it as an integrated marker of the damage to arterial walls by classic risk factors. The atherosclerosis, which develops among these patients, is the main cause for cardiovascular morbi-mortality and uncontrolled chronic biological inflammation, which quickly favors endothelial dysfunction. These inflammatory and autoimmune diseases should now be considered as new cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:26815098

  10. Chromogranin A and the endothelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Corti, A; Ferrero, E

    2012-01-01

    Chromogranin A (CgA) is an acidic glycoprotein belonging to a family of regulated secretory proteins stored in the dense core granules of many neuroendocrine cells and neurons. This protein is produced, in certain conditions also by cardiomyocytes, keratinocytes and granulocytes. Upon secretion CgA is released in the extracellular environment and then in circulation. Increased levels of circulating CgA have been detected in patients with cancer, heart failure, hypertension, atrophic gastritis, renal failure, giant cell artheritis, rheumatoid arthritis, sepsis and other inflammatory diseases. Endothelial cells, either those located in the close proximity of secretory cells or in distant tissues, may be exposed, therefore, to variable levels of CgA. In this review we discuss recent findings that implicate CgA and its fragments as a modulators of the physiology of endothelial cells in normal and in pathological conditions. In particular, we review data that suggest that CgA and its N-terminal fragment, called vasostatin-1, are important modulators of the endothelial barrier function and potent inhibitors of the endothelial cell activation caused by inflammatory and pro-angiogenic cytokines, with potential implications in angiogenesis, inflammation and cancer. PMID:22834794

  11. Endothelium-Dependent Hyperpolarization and Endothelial Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Félétou, Michel

    2016-05-01

    The endothelium controls vascular tone not only by releasing various vasoactive substances but also by another pathway associated with the hyperpolarization of both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells and is termed endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH). These responses involve an increase in the endothelial intracellular Ca concentration by the activation of transient receptor potential channels (predominantly TRPV4) followed by the opening of Ca-activated K channels of small and intermediate conductance (SKCa and IKCa). These channels show a distinct subcellular distribution. SKCa are widely distributed over the plasma membrane but segregates at sites of homocellular endothelial junctions, whereas IKCa are preferentially expressed in the myoendothelial projections. Following KCa activation, smooth muscle hyperpolarization is evoked by electrical coupling through myoendothelial gap junctions and/or by the potassium efflux that subsequently activates smooth muscle Kir2.1 and/or Na/K-ATPase. Alteration of the EDH contributes to the endothelial dysfunctions observed in various pathologies or conversely compensates for the loss in NO bioavailability. A better characterization of EDH should allow determining whether new druggable targets can be identified for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26657714

  12. Novel mechanisms of endothelial mechano-transduction

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Jun-ichi; Berk, Bradford C

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a focal disease that develops preferentially where non-laminar, disturbed blood flow (d-flow) occurs such as branches, bifurcations, and curvatures of large arteries. Endothelial cells sense and respond differently to d-flow compared to steady laminar flow (s-flow). D-flow that occurs in so-called athero-prone areas activates pro-inflammatory and apoptotic signaling, and this results in endothelial dysfunction and leads to subsequent development of atherosclerosis. In contrast, s-flow as “athero-protective flow” promotes expression of many anti-inflammatory genes such as Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inhibits endothelial inflammation and athrogenesis. Here we will discuss that d-flow and s-flow induce pro- and anti-atherogenic events via flow type-specific “mechanotransduction” pathways. We will focus on five mechano-sensitive pathways: MEK5 (MAPK/ERK kinase 5)-ERK5-KLF2 signaling, ERK5-PPAR (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor) signaling, and mechano-signaling pathways involving SUMOylation, protein kinase C-ζ, (PKCζ), and p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (p90RSK). We believe that clarifying regulation mechanisms between these two flow types will provide new insights into therapeutic approaches for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:25301843

  13. Lymphatic endothelial lineage assemblage during corneal lymphangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Connor, Alicia L; Kelley, Philip M; Tempero, Richard M

    2016-03-01

    Postnatal inflammatory lymphangiogenesis presumably requires precise regulatory processes to properly assemble proliferating lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). The specific mechanisms that regulate the assembly of LECs during new lymphatic vessel synthesis are unclear. Dynamic endothelial shuffling and rearrangement has been proposed as a mechanism of blood vessel growth. We developed genetic lineage-tracing strategies using an inductive transgenic technology to track the fate of entire tandem dimer tomato-positive (tdT) lymphatic vessels or small, in some cases clonal, populations of LECs. We coupled this platform with a suture-induced mouse model of corneal lymphangiogenesis and used different analytic microscopy techniques including serial live imaging to study the spatial properties of proliferating tdT(+) LEC progenies. LEC precursors and their progeny expanded from the corneal limbal lymphatic vessel and were assembled contiguously to comprise a subunit within a new lymphatic vessel. VE-cadherin blockade induced morphologic abnormalities in newly synthesized lymphatic vessels, but did not disrupt the tdT(+) lymphatic endothelial lineage assembly. Analysis of this static and dynamic data based largely on direct in vivo observations supports a model of lymphatic endothelial lineage assemblage during corneal inflammatory lymphangiogenesis. PMID:26658452

  14. Endothelial progenitor cells in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Saulle, Ernestina; Castelli, Germana; Pelosi, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Studies carried out in the last years have improved the understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling angiogenesis during adult life in normal and pathological conditions. Some of these studies have led to the identification of some progenitor cells that sustain angiogenesis through indirect, paracrine mechanisms (hematopoietic angiogenic cells) and through direct mechanisms, i.e., through their capacity to generate a progeny of phenotypically and functionally competent endothelial cells [endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs)]. The contribution of these progenitors to angiogenetic processes under physiological and pathological conditions is intensively investigated. Angiogenetic mechanisms are stimulated in various hematological malignancies, including chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndromes and multiple myeloma, resulting in an increased angiogenesis that contributes to disease progression. In some of these conditions there is preliminary evidence that some endothelial cells could derive from the malignant clone, thus leading to the speculation that the leukemic cell derives from the malignant transformation of a hemangioblastic progenitor, i.e., of a cell capable of differentiation to the hematopoietic and to the endothelial cell lineages. Our understanding of the mechanisms underlying increased angiogenesis in these malignancies not only contributed to a better knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for tumor progression, but also offered the way for the discovery of new therapeutic targets. PMID:27583252

  15. Regulation of endothelial cell differentiation and specification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The circulatory system is the first organ system to develop in the vertebrate embryo and is critical throughout gestation for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to, as well as removal of metabolic waste products from, growing tissues. Endothelial cells, which constitute the luminal layer of all bl...

  16. [Endothelial cells in the blood in psoriasis].

    PubMed

    Sochorova, R; Sinka, L; Svecova, D; Benova, B; Rybarova, L

    2000-01-01

    The authors have examined the changes in the amount of endothelial cells in vascular bed in psoriatic patients, since one of the basic signs of pathogenesis of psoriasis is represented by angiogenesis. The authors have used the method of quantitative evaluation of endothelaemia. PMID:11187061

  17. Lymphatic endothelial lineage assemblage during corneal lymphangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Alicia L.; Kelley, Philip M.; Tempero, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Post natal inflammatory lymphangiogenesis presumably requires precise regulatory processes to properly assemble proliferating lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). The specific mechanisms that regulate the assembly of LECs during new lymphatic vessel synthesis are unclear. Dynamic endothelial shuffling and rearrangement has been proposed as a mechanism of blood vessel growth. We developed genetic lineage tracing strategies using an inductive transgenic technology to track the fate of entire tandem dimer tomato positive (tdT) lymphatic vessels or small, in some cases clonal, populations of LECs. We coupled this platform with a suture induced mouse model of corneal lymphangiogenesis and used different analytic microscopy techniques including serial live imaging to study the spatial properties of proliferating tdT+ LEC progenies. LEC precursors and their progeny expanded from the corneal limbal lymphatic vessel and were assembled contiguously to comprise a subunit within a new lymphatic vessel. VE-cadherin blockade induced morphologic abnormalities in newly synthesized lymphatic vessels, but did not disrupt the tdT+ lymphatic endothelial lineage assembly. Analysis of this static and dynamic data based largely on direct in vivo observations supports a model of lymphatic endothelial lineage assemblage during corneal inflammatory lymphangiogenesis. PMID:26658452

  18. Circulating endothelial cells in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Boos, Christopher J; Lip, Gregory Y H; Blann, Andrew D

    2006-10-17

    Quantification of circulating endothelial cells (CECs) in peripheral blood is developing as a novel and reproducible method of assessing endothelial damage/dysfunction. The CECs are thought to be mature cells that have detached from the intimal monolayer in response to endothelial injury and are a different cell population to endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). The EPCs are nonleukocytes derived from the bone marrow that are believed to have proliferative potential and may be important in vascular regeneration. Currently accepted methods of CEC quantification include the use of immunomagnetic bead separation (with cell counting under fluorescence microscopy) and flow cytometry. Several recent studies have shown increased numbers of CECs in cardiovascular disease and its risk factors, such as unstable angina, acute myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes mellitus, and critical limb ischemia, but no change in stable intermittent claudication, essential hypertension, or atrial fibrillation. Furthermore, CEC quantification at 48 h after acute myocardial infarction has been shown to be an accurate predictor of major adverse coronary events and death at both 1 month and 1 year. This article presents an overview of the pathophysiology of CECs in the setting of cardiovascular disease and a brief comparison with EPCs. PMID:17045885

  19. Endothelialized ePTFE Graft by Nanobiotechnology

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-29

    The Apparatus for Processing the Tubular Graft Modification Will be Designed and Evaluated.; The On-site Capturing of the Endothelial (Progenitor) Cells by Peptide-mediated Selective Adhesion in Vitro and in Vivo Will Also be Elucidated.; The Patency Rate of ITRI-made Artificial Blood Vessels Will be Evaluated by the Porcine Animal Model.

  20. Proteoglycans from human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Griesmacher, A; Hennes, R; Keller, R; Greiling, H

    1987-10-01

    Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with [35S]sulphate and investigated for their proteoglycan production. By gel chromatography, ion-exchange chromatography and CsCl density-gradient centrifugation we obtained preparative amounts of the endothelial proteoheparan sulphate HSI and of proteochondroitin sulphate from the conditioned medium of mass-cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Approximately 90% of the 35S-labeled material in the endothelial cell conditioned medium was proteochondroitin sulphate. This molecule, with a molecular mass of 180-200 kDa, contains four side-chains of 35-40 kDa and a core protein of 35-40 kDa. Two proteoheparan sulphate forms (HSI and HSII) from the conditioned medium were distinguished by molecular mass and transport kinetics from the cell layer to the medium in pulse-chase experiments. One major form (HSI), with an approximate molecular mass of 160-200 kDa a core protein of 55-60 kDa and three to four polysaccharide side-chains of 35 kDa each, was found enriched in the cellular membrane pellet. Another proteoheparan sulphate (HSII), with polysaccharide moieties of 20 kDa, is enriched in the subendothelial matrix (substratum). PMID:2959475

  1. Endothelial progenitor cells in hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Testa, Ugo; Saulle, Ernestina; Castelli, Germana; Pelosi, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Studies carried out in the last years have improved the understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling angiogenesis during adult life in normal and pathological conditions. Some of these studies have led to the identification of some progenitor cells that sustain angiogenesis through indirect, paracrine mechanisms (hematopoietic angiogenic cells) and through direct mechanisms, i.e., through their capacity to generate a progeny of phenotypically and functionally competent endothelial cells [endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs)]. The contribution of these progenitors to angiogenetic processes under physiological and pathological conditions is intensively investigated. Angiogenetic mechanisms are stimulated in various hematological malignancies, including chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndromes and multiple myeloma, resulting in an increased angiogenesis that contributes to disease progression. In some of these conditions there is preliminary evidence that some endothelial cells could derive from the malignant clone, thus leading to the speculation that the leukemic cell derives from the malignant transformation of a hemangioblastic progenitor, i.e., of a cell capable of differentiation to the hematopoietic and to the endothelial cell lineages. Our understanding of the mechanisms underlying increased angiogenesis in these malignancies not only contributed to a better knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for tumor progression, but also offered the way for the discovery of new therapeutic targets. PMID:27583252

  2. The control of vascular endothelial cell injury.

    PubMed

    Murota, S; Morita, I; Suda, N

    1990-01-01

    The mechanism by which MCI-186 showed a potent cytoprotective effect on the in vitro endothelial cell injury due to 15-HPETE was studied. Stimulation of human leukocytes with various chemical mediators such as TPA, f-Met-Leu-Phe, LTB4, etc. elicited the production of active oxygens, which could be detected by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Among the chemical mediators tested, TPA elicited the chemiluminescence the most, and f-Met-Leu-Phe and LTB4 came next. When the leukocytes were directly placed on a monolayer of cultured endothelial cells, followed by stimulating the leukocytes with TPA, severe endothelial cell injury was observed. The effect of TPA was dose dependent. There was good correlation between the active oxygen releasing activity and the cytotoxic activity. When the leukocytes were placed on a filter which was set apart from the monolayer of endothelial cell in a culture dish, and stimulated the leukocytes with TPA, no cytotoxicity was observed. These data strongly suggest that the substance responsible for the cytotoxicity must be a very labile and short-lived substance, presumably active oxygens. On the other hand, MCI-186 was found to have a complete quenching activity to the chemiluminescence due to active oxygens in the TPA-leukocyte system. Taken together, these factors indicate that the potent cytoprotective effect of MCI-186 may be due to its specific radical scavenging activity. PMID:2248437

  3. Genetic Variation in the Platelet Endothelial Aggregation Receptor 1 Gene Results in Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Fisch, Adam S.; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Backman, Joshua D.; Wang, Hong; Donnelly, Patrick; Ryan, Kathleen A.; Parihar, Ankita; Pavlovich, Mary A.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Herzog, William; Harman, Christopher R.; Wren, Jonathan D.; Lewis, Joshua P.

    2015-01-01

    Platelet Endothelial Aggregation Receptor 1 (PEAR1) is a newly identified membrane protein reported to be involved in multiple vascular and thrombotic processes. While most studies to date have focused on the effects of this receptor in platelets, PEAR1 is located in multiple tissues including the endothelium, where it is most highly expressed. Our first objective was to evaluate the role of PEAR1 in endothelial function by examining flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery in 641 participants from the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention Heart Study. Our second objective was to further define the impact of PEAR1 on cardiovascular disease computationally through meta-analysis of 75,000 microarrays, yielding insights regarding PEAR1 function, and predictions of phenotypes and diseases affected by PEAR1 dysregulation. Based on the results of this meta-analysis we examined whether genetic variation in PEAR1 influences endothelial function using an ex vivo assay of endothelial cell migration. We observed a significant association between rs12041331 and flow-mediated dilation in participants of the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention Heart Study (P = 0.02). Meta-analysis results revealed that PEAR1 expression is highly correlated with several genes (e.g. ANG2, ACVRL1, ENG) and phenotypes (e.g. endothelial cell migration, angiogenesis) that are integral to endothelial function. Functional validation of these results revealed that PEAR1 rs12041331 is significantly associated with endothelial migration (P = 0.04). Our results suggest for the first time that genetic variation of PEAR1 is a significant determinant of endothelial function through pathways implicated in cardiovascular disease. PMID:26406321

  4. Anesthetic propofol overdose causes endothelial cytotoxicity in vitro and endothelial barrier dysfunction in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ming-Chung; Chen, Chia-Ling; Yang, Tsan-Tzu; Choi, Pui-Ching; Hsing, Chung-Hsi; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2012-12-01

    An overdose and a prolonged treatment of propofol may cause cellular cytotoxicity in multiple organs and tissues such as brain, heart, kidney, skeletal muscle, and immune cells; however, the underlying mechanism remains undocumented, particularly in vascular endothelial cells. Our previous studies showed that the activation of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3 is pro-apoptotic in phagocytes during overdose of propofol treatment. Regarding the intravascular administration of propofol, we therefore hypothesized that propofol overdose also induces endothelial cytotoxicity via GSK-3. Propofol overdose (100 μg/ml) inhibited growth in human arterial and microvascular endothelial cells. After treatment, most of the endothelial cells experienced caspase-independent necrosis-like cell death. The activation of cathepsin D following lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) determined necrosis-like cell death. Furthermore, propofol overdose also induced caspase-dependent apoptosis, at least in part. Caspase-3 was activated and acted downstream of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP) loss; however, lysosomal cathepsins were not required for endothelial cell apoptosis. Notably, activation of GSK-3 was essential for propofol overdose-induced mitochondrial damage and apoptosis, but not necrosis-like cell death. Intraperitoneal administration of a propofol overdose in BALB/c mice caused an increase in peritoneal vascular permeability. These results demonstrate the cytotoxic effects of propofol overdose, including cathepsin D-regulated necrosis-like cell death and GSK-3-regulated mitochondrial apoptosis, on endothelial cells in vitro and the endothelial barrier dysfunction by propofol in vivo. Highlights: ► Propofol overdose causes apoptosis and necrosis in endothelial cells. ► Propofol overdose triggers lysosomal dysfunction independent of autophagy. ► Glycogen synthase kinase-3 facilitates propofol overdose-induced apoptosis. ► Propofol overdose causes an increase

  5. Molecular determinants of endothelial transcytosis and their role in endothelial permeability.

    PubMed

    Predescu, Sanda A; Predescu, Dan N; Malik, Asrar B

    2007-10-01

    Caveolae transcytosis with its diverse mechanisms-fluid phase, adsorptive, and receptor-mediated-plays an important role in the continuous exchange of molecules across the endothelium. We will discuss key features of endothelial transcytosis and caveolae that have been studied recently and have increased our understanding of caveolae function in transcytosis at the molecular level. During transcytosis, caveolae "pinch off" from the plasma membrane to form discrete vesicular carriers that shuttle to the opposite front of endothelial cells, fuse with the plasma membrane, and discharge their cargo into the perivascular space. Endothelial transcytosis exhibits distinct properties, the most important being rapid and efficient coupling of endocytosis to exocytosis on opposite plasma membrane. We address herein the membrane fusion-fission reactions that underlie transcytosis. Caveolae move across the endothelial cells with their cargo predominantly in the fluid phase through an active process that bypasses the lysosomes. Endothelial transcytosis is a constitutive process of vesicular transport. Recent studies show that transcytosis can be upregulated in response to pathological stimuli. Transcytosis via caveolae is an important route for the regulation of endothelial barrier function and may participate in different vascular diseases. PMID:17644753

  6. Endothelial cell transfusion ameliorates endothelial dysfunction in 5/6 nephrectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Pacurari, Maricica; Xing, Dongqi; Hilgers, Rob H. P.; Guo, Yuan Yuan; Yang, Zhengqin

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is prevalent in chronic kidney disease. This study tested the hypothesis that transfusion of rat aortic endothelial cells (ECs) ameliorates endothelial dysfunction in a rat model of chronic kidney disease. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent sham surgery or 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx). Five weeks after Nx, EC (1.5 × 106 cells/rat) or vehicle were transfused intravenously. One week later, vascular reactivity of mesenteric artery was assessed on a wire myograph. Sensitivity of endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine and maximum vasodilation were impaired by Nx and improved by EC transfusion. Using selective pharmacological nitric oxide synthase isoform inhibitors, we demonstrated that the negative effect of Nx on endothelial function and rescue by EC transfusion are, at least in part, endothelial nitric oxide synthase mediated. Plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine was increased by Nx and decreased by EC transfusion, whereas mRNA expression of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolases 1 (DDAH1) was decreased by Nx and restored by EC transfusion. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed that local expression of DDAH1 is decreased by Nx and increased by EC transfusion. In conclusion, EC transfusion attenuates Nx-induced endothelium-dependent vascular dysfunction by regulating DDAH1 expression and enhancing endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity. These results suggest that EC-based therapy could provide a novel therapeutic strategy to improve vascular function in chronic kidney disease. PMID:23955716

  7. Endothelial Cell Density to Predict Endothelial Graft Failure After Penetrating Keratoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lass, Jonathan H.; Sugar, Alan; Benetz, Beth Ann; Beck, Roy W.; Dontchev, Mariya; Gal, Robin L.; Kollman, Craig; Gross, Robert; Heck, Ellen; Holland, Edward J.; Mannis, Mark J.; Raber, Irving; Stark, Walter; Stulting, R. Doyle

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether preoperative and/or postoperative central endothelial cell density (ECD) and its rate of decline postoperatively are predictive of graft failure caused by endothelial decompensation following penetrating keratoplasty to treat a moderate-risk condition, principally, Fuchs dystrophy or pseudophakic corneal edema. Methods In a subset of Cornea Donor Study participants, a central reading center determined preoperative and postoperative ECD from available specular images for 17 grafts that failed because of endothelial decompensation and 483 grafts that did not fail. Results Preoperative ECD was not predictive of graft failure caused by endothelial decompensation (P = .91). However, the 6-month ECD was predictive of subsequent failure (P < .001). Among those that had not failed within the first 6 months, the 5-year cumulative incidence (±95% confidence interval) of failure was 13% (±12%) for the 33 participants with a 6-month ECD of less than 1700 cells/mm2 vs 2%(±3%) for the 137 participants with a 6-monthECDof 2500 cells/mm2 or higher. After 5 years’ follow-up, 40 of 277 participants (14%) with a clear graft had an ECD below 500 cells/mm2. Conclusions Preoperative ECD is unrelated to graft failure from endothelial decompensation, whereas there is a strong correlation of ECD at 6 months with graft failure from endothelial decompensation. A graft can remain clear after 5 years even when the ECD is below 500 cells/mm2. PMID:20065219

  8. Fusobacterium nucleatum adhesin FadA binds vascular-endothelial cadherin and alters endothelial integrity

    PubMed Central

    Fardini, Yann; Wang, Xiaowei; Témoin, Stéphanie; Nithianantham, Stanley; Lee, David; Shoham, Menachem; Han, Yiping W.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Fusobacterium nucleatum is a gram-negative oral anaerobe, capable of systemic dissemination causing infections and abscesses, often in mixed-species, at different body sites. We have shown previously that F. nucleatum adheres to and invades host epithelial and endothelial cells via a novel FadA adhesin. In this study, vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, a member of the cadherin family and a cell-cell junction molecule, was identified as the endothelial receptor for FadA, required for F. nucleatum binding to the cells. FadA co-localized with VE-cadherin on endothelial cells, causing relocation of VE-cadherin away from the cell-cell junctions. As a result, the endothelial permeability was increased, allowing the bacteria to cross the endothelium through loosened junctions. This crossing mechanism may explain why the organism is able to disseminate systemically to colonize in different body sites and even overcome the placental and blood-brain barriers. Co-incubation of F. nucleatum and E. coli enhanced penetration of the endothelial cells by the latter in the transwell assays, suggesting F. nucleatum may serve as an “enabler” for other microorganisms to spread systemically. This may explain why F. nucleatum is often found in mixed infections. This study reveals a possible novel dissemination mechanism utilized by pathogens. PMID:22040113

  9. Reduced Ang2 expression in aging endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hohensinner, P J; Ebenbauer, B; Kaun, C; Maurer, G; Huber, K; Wojta, J

    2016-06-01

    Aging endothelial cells are characterized by increased cell size, reduced telomere length and increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, we describe here that aging reduces the migratory distance of endothelial cells. Furthermore, we observe an increase of the quiescence protein Ang1 and a decrease of the endothelial activation protein Ang2 upon aging. Supplementing Ang2 to aged endothelial cells restored their migratory capacity. We conclude that aging shifts the balance of the Ang1/Ang2 network favouring a quiescent state. Activation of endothelial cells in aging might be necessary to enhance wound healing capacities. PMID:27137842

  10. Endothelial cells enhance migration of meniscus cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xiaoning; Eng, George M.; Arkonac, Derya E.; Chao, Pen-hsiu Grace; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the interactions between vascular endothelial cells and meniscal fibrochondrocytes from the inner avascular and outer vascular regions of the meniscus, and identify angiogenic factors that enhance cell migration and integrative repair. Methods Bovine meniscal fibrochondrocytes (bMFCs) from the inner and outer regions of meniscus were cultured for seven days with and without human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a micropatterned three-dimensional hydrogel system for cell migration. Angiogenic factors secreted by HUVECs were probed for their role in paracrine mechanisms governing bMFC migration, and applied to a full-thickness defect model of meniscal repair in explants from the inner and outer regions over four weeks. Results Endothelial cells enhanced migration of inner and outer bMFCs in the micropatterned system via endothelin-1 (ET-1) signaling. Supplementation of ET-1 significantly enhanced integration strength of full-thickness defects in inner and outer explants, and cell migration at the macro-scale, compared to controls without ET-1 treatment. Conclusion We report for the first time that bMFCs from both the avascular and vascular regions respond to the presence of endothelial cells with increased migration. Paracrine signaling by endothelial cells regulates the bMFCs differentially by region, but we identify ET-1 as an angiogenic factor that stimulates migration of inner and outer cells at the micro-scale, and integrative repair of inner and outer explants at the macro-scale. These findings reveal the regional interactions between vasculature and MFCs, and suggest ET-1 as a potential new treatment modality for avascular meniscal injuries, in order to prevent the development of osteoarthritis. PMID:25307081

  11. Endothelial TWIST1 Promotes Pathological Ocular Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Liu, Chi-Hsiu; Sun, Ye; Gong, Yan; Fu, Zhongjie; Evans, Lucy P.; Tian, Katherine T.; Juan, Aimee M.; Hurst, Christian G.; Mammoto, Akiko; Chen, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Pathological neovessel formation impacts many blinding vascular eye diseases. Identification of molecular signatures distinguishing pathological neovascularization from normal quiescent vessels is critical for developing new interventions. Twist-related protein 1 (TWIST1) is a transcription factor important in tumor and pulmonary angiogenesis. This study investigated the potential role of TWIST1 in modulating pathological ocular angiogenesis in mice. Methods. Twist1 expression and localization were analyzed in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). Pathological ocular angiogenesis in Tie2-driven conditional Twist1 knockout mice were evaluated in both OIR and laser-induced choroidal neovascularization models. In addition, the effects of TWIST1 on angiogenesis and endothelial cell function were analyzed in sprouting assays of aortic rings and choroidal explants isolated from Twist1 knockout mice, and in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells treated with TWIST1 small interfering RNA (siRNA). Results. TWIST1 is highly enriched in pathological neovessels in OIR retinas. Conditional Tie2-driven depletion of Twist1 significantly suppressed pathological neovessels in OIR without impacting developmental retinal angiogenesis. In a laser-induced choroidal neovascularization model, Twist1 deficiency also resulted in significantly smaller lesions with decreased vascular leakage. In addition, loss of Twist1 significantly decreased vascular sprouting in both aortic ring and choroid explants. Knockdown of TWIST1 in endothelial cells led to dampened expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and decreased endothelial cell proliferation. Conclusions. Our study suggests that TWIST1 is a novel regulator of pathologic ocular angiogenesis and may represent a new molecular target for developing potential therapeutic treatments to suppress pathological neovascularization in vascular eye diseases. PMID:25414194

  12. Phospholipase Cε Modulates Rap1 Activity and the Endothelial Barrier.

    PubMed

    DiStefano, Peter V; Smrcka, Alan V; Glading, Angela J

    2016-01-01

    The phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C, PLCε, is a unique signaling protein with known roles in regulating cardiac myocyte growth, astrocyte inflammatory signaling, and tumor formation. PLCε is also expressed in endothelial cells, however its role in endothelial regulation is not fully established. We show that endothelial cells of multiple origins, including human pulmonary artery (HPAEC), human umbilical vein (HUVEC), and immortalized brain microvascular (hCMEC/D3) endothelial cells, express PLCε. Knockdown of PLCε in arterial endothelial monolayers decreased the effectiveness of the endothelial barrier. Concomitantly, RhoA activity and stress fiber formation were increased. PLCε-deficient arterial endothelial cells also exhibited decreased Rap1-GTP levels, which could be restored by activation of the Rap1 GEF, Epac, to rescue the increase in monolayer leak. Reintroduction of PLCε rescued monolayer leak with both the CDC25 GEF domain and the lipase domain of PLCε required to fully activate Rap1 and to rescue endothelial barrier function. Finally, we demonstrate that the barrier promoting effects PLCε are dependent on Rap1 signaling through the Rap1 effector, KRIT1, which we have previously shown is vital for maintaining endothelial barrier stability. Thus we have described a novel role for PLCε PIP2 hydrolytic and Rap GEF activities in arterial endothelial cells, where PLCε-dependent activation of Rap1/KRIT1 signaling promotes endothelial barrier stability. PMID:27612188

  13. Nitric oxide modulates lipopolysaccharide-induced endothelial platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression via interleukin-10.

    PubMed

    Hebeda, C B; Teixeira, S A; Tamura, E K; Muscará, M N; de Mello, S B V; Markus, R P; Farsky, S H P

    2011-08-01

    We have shown previously that nitric oxide (NO) controls platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) expression on both neutrophils and endothelial cells under physiological conditions. Here, the molecular mechanism by which NO regulates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endothelial PECAM-1 expression and the role of interleukin (IL)-10 on this control was investigated. For this purpose, N-(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 20 mg/kg/day for 14 days dissolved in drinking water) was used to inhibit both constitutive (cNOS) and inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) synthase activities in LPS-stimulated Wistar rats (5 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). This treatment resulted in reduced levels of serum NO. Under this condition, circulating levels of IL-10 was enhanced, secreted mainly by circulating lymphocytes, dependent on transcriptional activation, and endothelial PECAM-1 expression was reduced independently on reduced gene synthesis. The connection between NO, IL-10 and PECAM-1 expression was examined by incubating LPS-stimulated (1 µg/ml) cultured endothelial cells obtained from naive rats with supernatant of LPS-stimulated lymphocytes, which were obtained from blood of control or L-NAME-treated rats. Supernatant of LPS-stimulated lymphocytes obtained from L-NAME-treated rats, which contained higher levels of IL-10, reduced LPS-induced PECAM-1 expression by endothelial cells, and this reduction was reversed by adding the anti-IL-10 monoclonal antibody. Therefore, an association between NO, IL-10 and PECAM-1 was found and may represent a novel mechanism by which NO controls endothelial cell functions. PMID:21564091

  14. Dysfunctional endothelial cells directly stimulate cancer inflammation and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Franses, Joseph W.; Drosu, Natalia C.; Gibson, William J.; Chitalia, Vipul C.; Edelman, Elazer R.

    2013-01-01

    Although the influence of context-dependent endothelial cell regulation of vascular disease and repair is well-established, the privileged roles endothelial cells play as paracrine regulators of tumor progression has only recently become appreciated. We hypothesized that if the same endothelial physiology governs vascular and cancer biology then endothelial cell control in cancer should follow endothelial regulation of vascular health. Healthy endothelial cells promote vascular repair and inhibit tumor invasiveness and metastasis; dysfunctional endothelial cells have the opposite effects. We now ask if dysfunctionally activated endothelial cells will promote cancer cell inflammatory signaling and aggressive properties. Indeed, while factors released from quiescent ECs induce balanced inflammatory signaling, correlating with decreased proliferation and invasiveness, factors released from dysfunctional ECs robustly activated NF-κB and STAT3 signaling within cancer cells, correlating with increased in vitro invasiveness and decreased proliferation and survival. Furthermore, matrix-embedded dysfunctional endothelial cells stimulated intratumoral pro-inflammatory signaling and spontaneous metastasis, while simultaneously slowing net primary tumor growth, when implanted adjacent to Lewis lung carcinoma tumors. These studies may broaden our realization of the roles of endothelial function and dysfunction, increase understanding and control of the tumor microenvironment, and facilitate optimization of anti-angiogenic and vascular-modifying therapies in cancer and related diseases. PMID:23463345

  15. Targeted endothelial nanomedicine for common acute pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    Shuvaev, Vladimir V; Brenner, Jacob S; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2015-12-10

    Endothelium, a thin monolayer of specialized cells lining the lumen of blood vessels is the key regulatory interface between blood and tissues. Endothelial abnormalities are implicated in many diseases, including common acute conditions with high morbidity and mortality lacking therapy, in part because drugs and drug carriers have no natural endothelial affinity. Precise endothelial drug delivery may improve management of these conditions. Using ligands of molecules exposed to the bloodstream on the endothelial surface enables design of diverse targeted endothelial nanomedicine agents. Target molecules and binding epitopes must be accessible to drug carriers, carriers must be free of harmful effects, and targeting should provide desirable sub-cellular addressing of the drug cargo. The roster of current candidate target molecules for endothelial nanomedicine includes peptidases and other enzymes, cell adhesion molecules and integrins, localized in different domains of the endothelial plasmalemma and differentially distributed throughout the vasculature. Endowing carriers with an affinity to specific endothelial epitopes enables an unprecedented level of precision of control of drug delivery: binding to selected endothelial cell phenotypes, cellular addressing and duration of therapeutic effects. Features of nanocarrier design such as choice of epitope and ligand control delivery and effect of targeted endothelial nanomedicine agents. Pathological factors modulate endothelial targeting and uptake of nanocarriers. Selection of optimal binding sites and design features of nanocarriers are key controllable factors that can be iteratively engineered based on their performance from in vitro to pre-clinical in vivo experimental models. Targeted endothelial nanomedicine agents provide antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and other therapeutic effects unattainable by non-targeted counterparts in animal models of common acute severe human disease conditions. The results of animal

  16. Androgen receptor in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Estay, Verónica; Carreño, Daniela V; San Francisco, Ignacio F; Sotomayor, Paula; Godoy, Alejandro S; Smith, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-inducible transcription factor, and a member of the steroid-thyroid-retinoid receptor superfamily, that mediates the biological effects of androgens in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. AR expression was identified in vascular cells nearly 20 years ago, and recent research has shown that AR mediates a variety of actions of androgens in endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells. In this mini-review, we review evidence indicating the importance of AR in human endothelial cell (HUVEC) homeostatic and pathogenic processes. Although a role for AR in the modulation of HUVEC biology is evident, the molecular mechanisms by which AR regulates HUVEC homeostasis and disease processes are not fully understood. Understanding these mechanisms could provide critical insights into the processes of pathogenesis of diseases ranging from cardiovascular disease to cancer that are major causes of human morbidity and mortality. PMID:25563353

  17. Arterial endothelial function measurement method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Maltz, Jonathan S; Budinger, Thomas F

    2014-03-04

    A "relaxoscope" (100) detects the degree of arterial endothelial function. Impairment of arterial endothelial function is an early event in atherosclerosis and correlates with the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. An artery (115), such as the brachial artery (BA) is measured for diameter before and after several minutes of either vasoconstriction or vasorelaxation. The change in arterial diameter is a measure of flow-mediated vasomodification (FMVM). The relaxoscope induces an artificial pulse (128) at a superficial radial artery (115) via a linear actuator (120). An ultrasonic Doppler stethoscope (130) detects this pulse 10-20 cm proximal to the point of pulse induction (125). The delay between pulse application and detection provides the pulse transit time (PTT). By measuring PTT before (160) and after arterial diameter change (170), FMVM may be measured based on the changes in PTT caused by changes in vessel caliber, smooth muscle tone and wall thickness.

  18. Phospholipid composition of cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Murphy, E J; Joseph, L; Stephens, R; Horrocks, L A

    1992-02-01

    Detailed analyses of the phospholipid compositions of cultured human endothelial cells are reported here. No significant differences were found between the phospholipid compositions of cells from human artery, saphenous and umbilical vein. However, due to the small sample sizes, relatively large standard deviations for some of the phospholipid classes were observed. A representative composition of endothelial cells is: phosphatidylcholine 36.6%, choline plasmalogen 3.7%, phosphatidylethanolamine 10.2%, ethanolamine plasmalogen 7.6%, sphingomyelin 10.8%, phosphatidylserine 7.1%, lysophosphatidylcholine 7.5%, phosphatidylinositol 3.1%, lysophosphatidylethanolamine 3.6%, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate 1.8%, phosphatidic acid 1.9%, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 1.5%, and cardiolipin 1.9%. The cells possess high choline plasmalogen and lysophosphatidylethanolamine contents. The other phospholipids are within the normal biological ranges expected. Phospholipids were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography and quantified by lipid phosphorus assay. PMID:1315902

  19. Ulinastatin attenuates pulmonary endothelial glycocalyx damage and inhibits endothelial heparanase activity in LPS-induced ARDS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lipeng; Huang, Xiao; Kong, Guiqing; Xu, Haixiao; Li, Jiankui; Hao, Dong; Wang, Tao; Han, Shasha; Han, Chunlei; Sun, Yeying; Liu, Xiangyong; Wang, Xiaozhi

    2016-09-16

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a syndrome of acute respiratory failure characterized by major pathologic mechanisms of increased microvascular permeability and inflammation. The glycocalyx lines on the endothelial surface, which determines the vascular permeability, and heparanase play pivotal roles in the degradation of heparan sulfate (HS). HS is the major component of the glycocalyx. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of Ulinastatin (UTI) on vascular permeability and pulmonary endothelial glycocalyx dysfunction induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In our study, C57BL/6 mice and human umbilical vein endothelial cells were stimulated with LPS to induce injury models. After 6 h of LPS stimulation, pulmonary pathological changes, pulmonary edema, and vascular permeability were notably attenuated by UTI. UTI inhibited LPS-induced endothelial glycocalyx destruction and significantly decreased the production of HS as determined by ELISA and immunofluorescence. UTI also reduced the active form of heparanase (50 kDa) expression and heparanase activity. Moreover, lysosome pH was investigated because heparanase (65 kDa) can be reduced easily in its active form at 50 kDa in a low pH environment within lysosome. Results showed that UTI could inhibit LPS-induced pH elevation in lysosome. In conclusion, UTI protects pulmonary endothelial glycocalyx integrity and inhibits heparanase activity during LPS-induced ARDS. PMID:27498004

  20. Activation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide (eNOS) Occurs through Different Membrane Domains in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Jason; Magenau, Astrid; Rodriguez, Macarena; Rentero, Carles; Royo, Teresa; Enrich, Carlos; Thomas, Shane R.; Grewal, Thomas; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to a large range of stimuli including circulating lipoproteins, growth factors and changes in haemodynamic mechanical forces to regulate the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and maintain blood pressure. While many signalling pathways have been mapped, the identities of membrane domains through which these signals are transmitted are less well characterized. Here, we manipulated bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) with cholesterol and the oxysterol 7-ketocholesterol (7KC). Using a range of microscopy techniques including confocal, 2-photon, super-resolution and electron microscopy, we found that sterol enrichment had differential effects on eNOS and caveolin-1 (Cav1) colocalisation, membrane order of the plasma membrane, caveolae numbers and Cav1 clustering. We found a correlation between cholesterol-induced condensation of the plasma membrane and enhanced high density lipoprotein (HDL)-induced eNOS activity and phosphorylation suggesting that cholesterol domains, but not individual caveolae, mediate HDL stimulation of eNOS. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced and shear stress-induced eNOS activity was relatively independent of membrane order and may be predominantly controlled by the number of caveolae on the cell surface. Taken together, our data suggest that signals that activate and phosphorylate eNOS are transmitted through distinct membrane domains in endothelial cells. PMID:26977592

  1. Endothelial and smooth muscle histamine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, R.S.; Hollis, T.M.

    1986-03-01

    Histamine is produced within the vascular wall and mediates a variety of normal and pathologic vascular responses. The interaction of histamine with its vascular cell receptors has been shown to affect factors such as actin cable formation, cyclase activities, prostacyclin synthesis, cell motility, and proliferation. In addition, abundant evidence exists to implicate an arterial nascent histamine pool in the control of vessel wall permeability under conditions of stress and injury. However, endothelial and smooth muscle cell histamine receptors have been only incompletely characterized. The authors report here the time-dependent, saturable, and trypsin sensitive binding of /sup 3/H-histamine to the endothelial cell surface. The K/sub d/ for endothelial and smooth muscle cell histamine receptors are 0.70 and 2.80 ..mu..M respectively. Histamine binding to smooth muscle cells also exhibited saturation with concentrations of /sup 3/H-histamine up to 4 ..mu..M. While the smooth muscle cell H/sub 1/ receptor binding was negligible, the H/sub 2/ receptor appeared to represent a relatively low affinity, high capacity site for histamine binding. The uptake of /sup 3/H-histamine in both cell types displayed kinetics consistent with that of fluid-phase pinocytosis.

  2. [Complications of Descemet's membrane endothelial keratoplasty].

    PubMed

    Spaniol, K; Borrelli, M; Holtmann, C; Schrader, S; Geerling, G

    2015-12-01

    Descemet's membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK) is a relatively new, but now established surgical procedure to cure corneal endothelial disorders. However, there are donor- and recipient-associated sources of potential complications, some of which can be identified and addressed prior to the procedure and others that may lead to intra- or postoperative problems. Preoperatively, risk factors for a limited visual outcome (ocular comorbidities, previous ocular surgery, subepithelial/stromal scars) and the specific indication for DMEK should be discussed with the patient. Intraoperatively, young donor age can be associated with a particularly elastic graft, which may be difficult to unfold. Such transplants are not appropriate for particularly difficult recipient situations (very opaque cornea, history of vitreoretinal surgery). Postoperatively, transplant dehiscence is the most common complication, which in many cases can be managed by reinjection of air (or a 20 % SF6 gas/air mix) into the anterior chamber. An elevation of the intraocular pressure after DMEK is often caused by a reaction to topical steroid therapy. Although immune rejections after DMEK are less likely than after Descemet's stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK) and perforating keratoplasty, adequate treatment with topical steroidal drugs is recommended. These common and several rare complications are discussed in this review. PMID:26597643

  3. [The role of endothelial lipase in atherogenesis].

    PubMed

    Pierart Z, Camila; Serrano L, Valentina

    2012-03-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL) is synthetized by endothelial cells and its main substrates are lipoprotein phospholipids. Over expression of EL reduces high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and phospholipids, in vivo and in vitro. Inhibition of the enzyme achieves the opposite effects. The synthesis of the enzyme is regulated by interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor a. These inflammatory cytokines play a role in diabetes and vascular disease. An increase in vascular mechanical forces, that play a role in atherogenesis, also increase the synthesis of EL. There is expression of EL in endothelial cells, macrophages and muscle cells of atherosclerotic lesions of coronary arteries of humans. This evidence leads to the suspicion that EL plays a role in atherogenesis. There are also higher plasma levels of EL in subjects with type 2 diabetes, who are especially susceptible to the development of vascular lesions. Therefore the inhibition of EL could play an important role in HDL metabolism and could be a new therapeutic strategy for the prevention of atherosclerosis. PMID:22689120

  4. Cadherin selectivity filter regulates endothelial sieving properties

    PubMed Central

    Quadri, Sadiqa K.; Sun, Li; Islam, Mohammad Naimul; Shapiro, Lawrence; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2013-01-01

    The molecular basis of endothelial protein sieving, the critical vascular barrier function that restricts flow of large plasma proteins into tissues while allowing small molecules and water to pass, is not understood. Here, we address this issue using a novel assay to detect macromolecular penetrance at microdomains of endothelial adherens junctions. Adherens junctions, as detected by cadherin-GFP expression, were distributed in the cell perimeter as high- or low-density segments. Low but not high-density segments permitted penetrance of a 70-kDa fluorescent dextran, a molecule of equivalent size to albumin. Expression of a cadherin mutant that abrogates strand–swap adhesive binding in the cadherin EC1 ectodomain, or alternatively of an α-actinin-1 mutant that inhibits F-actin bundling, increased both cadherin mobility and 70 kDa dextran penetrance at high-density segments. These findings suggest that adhesive interactions in the cadherin EC1 domain, which underlie adherens junction structure, are critical determinants of endothelial macromolecular sieving. PMID:23033075

  5. Endothelial dysfunction and atherothrombosis in mild hyperhomocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Norbert; Keller, Christiane; Hoffmann, Ulrich; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2002-08-01

    Mildly elevated plasma homocysteine levels are an independent risk factor for atherothrombotic vascular disease in the coronary, cerebrovascular, and peripheral arterial circulation. Endothelial dysfunction as manifested by impaired endothelium-dependent regulation of vascular tone and blood flow, by increased recruitment and adhesion of circulating inflammatory cells to the endothelium, and by a loss of endothelial cell antithrombotic function contributes to the vascular disorders linked to hyperhomocysteinemia. Increased vascular oxidant stress through imbalanced thiol redox status and inhibition of important antioxidant enzymes by homocysteine results in decreased bioavailability of the endothelium-derived signaling molecule nitric oxide via oxidative inactivation. This plays a central role in the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of homocysteine on endothelial function. Supplementation of folic acid and vitamin B12 has been demonstrated to be efficient in lowering mildly elevated plasma homocysteine levels and in reversing homocysteine-induced impairment of endothelium-dependent vasoreactivity. Results from ongoing intervention trials will determine whether homocysteine-lowering therapies contribute to the prevention and reduction of atherothrombotic vascular disease and may thereby provide support for the causal relationship between hyperhomocysteinemia and atherothrombosis. PMID:12553746

  6. Peripheral arterial endothelial dysfunction of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Yusuke; Hishikawa, Nozomi; Shang, Jingwei; Sato, Kota; Nakano, Yumiko; Morihara, Ryuta; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Yamashita, Toru; Abe, Koji

    2016-07-15

    This study evaluates endothelial functions of neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson's disease (PD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), multiple system atrophy (MSA) and spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA). The reactive hyperemia index (RHI) of peripheral arterial tonometry and serological data were compared between age- and gender-matched normal controls (n=302) and five disease groups (ALS; n=75, PD; n=180, PSP; n=30, MSA; n=35, SCA; n=53). Correlation analyses were performed in ALS with functional rating scale-revised (FRS-R), and in PD with the Hehn-Yahr scale (H-Y) and a heart to mediastinum ratio using (123)I-MIBG scintigraphy (MIBG). The RHI of ALS and PD, but not of PSP, MSA or SCA, were significantly lower than normal controls (p<0.01). ALS showed a negative correlation of RHI with serum triglycerides (TG) and immunoreactive insulin (IRI) levels, but not with disease severity (FRS-R) or rates of disease progression (∆FRS-R). On the other hand, PD showed a negative correlation of RHI with a progressive disease severity (H-Y) and a positive correlation of RHI with early/delayed MIBG scintigraphy, but not with serological data. The present study demonstrated significant declines of peripheral arterial endothelial functions in ALS and PD. The RHI of ALS was more correlated with disease duration and serum parameters while the RHI of PD was more correlated with disease severity and MIBG, suggesting different mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27288784

  7. Endothelial Mechanosignaling: Does One Sensor Fit All?

    PubMed Central

    Givens, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Forces are important in the cardiovascular system, acting as regulators of vascular physiology and pathology. Residing at the blood vessel interface, cells (endothelial cell, EC) are constantly exposed to vascular forces, including shear stress. Shear stress is the frictional force exerted by blood flow, and its patterns differ based on vessel geometry and type. These patterns range from uniform laminar flow to nonuniform disturbed flow. Although ECs sense and differentially respond to flow patterns unique to their microenvironment, the mechanisms underlying endothelial mechanosensing remain incompletely understood. Recent Advances: A large body of work suggests that ECs possess many mechanosensors that decorate their apical, junctional, and basal surfaces. These potential mechanosensors sense blood flow, translating physical force into biochemical signaling events. Critical Issues: Understanding the mechanisms by which proposed mechanosensors sense and respond to shear stress requires an integrative approach. It is also critical to understand the role of these mechanosensors not only during embryonic development but also in the different vascular beds in the adult. Possible cross talk and integration of mechanosensing via the various mechanosensors remain a challenge. Future Directions: Determination of the hierarchy of endothelial mechanosensors is critical for future work, as is determination of the extent to which mechanosensors work together to achieve force-dependent signaling. The role and primary sensors of shear stress during development also remain an open question. Finally, integrative approaches must be used to determine absolute mechanosensory function of potential mechanosensors. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 373–388. PMID:27027326

  8. Isolation of Murine Embryonic Hemogenic Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jennifer S; Gritz, Emily C; Marcelo, Kathrina L; Hirschi, Karen K

    2016-01-01

    The specification of hemogenic endothelial cells from embryonic vascular endothelium occurs during brief developmental periods within distinct tissues, and is necessary for the emergence of definitive HSPC from the murine extra embryonic yolk sac, placenta, umbilical vessels, and the embryonic aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region. The transient nature and small size of this cell population renders its reproducible isolation for careful quantification and experimental applications technically difficult. We have established a fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based protocol for simultaneous isolation of hemogenic endothelial cells and HSPC during their peak generation times in the yolk sac and AGM. We demonstrate methods for dissection of yolk sac and AGM tissues from mouse embryos, and we present optimized tissue digestion and antibody conjugation conditions for maximal cell survival prior to identification and retrieval via FACS. Representative FACS analysis plots are shown that identify the hemogenic endothelial cell and HSPC phenotypes, and describe a methylcellulose-based assay for evaluating their blood forming potential on a clonal level. PMID:27341393

  9. Safety of targeting tumor endothelial cell antigens.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Samuel C; Riordan, Neil H; Ichim, Thomas E; Szymanski, Julia; Ma, Hong; Perez, Jesus A; Lopez, Javier; Plata-Munoz, Juan J; Silva, Francisco; Patel, Amit N; Kesari, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying discrimination between "self" and "non-self", a central immunological principle, require careful consideration in immune oncology therapeutics where eliciting anti-cancer immunity must be weighed against the risk of autoimmunity due to the self origin of tumors. Whole cell vaccines are one promising immunotherapeutic avenue whereby a myriad of tumor antigens are introduced in an immunogenic context with the aim of eliciting tumor rejection. Despite the possibility collateral damage to healthy tissues, cancer immunotherapy can be designed such that off target autoimmunity remains limited in scope and severity or completely non-existent. Here we provide an immunological basis for reconciling the safety of cancer vaccines, focusing on tumor endothelial cell vaccines, by discussing the following topics: (a) Antigenic differences between neoplastic and healthy tissues that can be leveraged in cancer vaccine design; (b) The layers of tolerance that control T cell responses directed against antigens expressed in healthy tissues and tumors; and, (c) The hierarchy of antigenic epitope selection and display in response to whole cell vaccines, and how antigen processing and presentation can afford a degree of selectivity against tumors. We conclude with an example of early clinical data utilizing ValloVax™, an immunogenic placental endothelial cell vaccine that is being advanced to target the tumor endothelium of diverse cancers, and we report on the safety and efficacy of ValloVax™ for inducing immunity against tumor endothelial antigens. PMID:27071457

  10. Asymmetric Dimethylarginine, Endothelial Dysfunction and Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aldámiz-Echevarría, Luis; Andrade, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    l-Arginine (Arg) is oxidized to l-citrulline and nitric oxide (NO) by the action of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS). In contrast, protein-incorporated Arg residues can be methylated with subsequent proteolysis giving rise to methylarginine compounds, such as asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) that competes with Arg for binding to NOS. Most ADMA is degraded by dimethylarginine dimethyaminohydrolase (DDAH), distributed widely throughout the body and regulates ADMA levels and, therefore, NO synthesis. In recent years, several studies have suggested that increased ADMA levels are a marker of atherosclerotic change, and can be used to assess cardiovascular risk, consistent with ADMA being predominantly absorbed by endothelial cells. NO is an important messenger molecule involved in numerous biological processes, and its activity is essential to understand both pathogenic and therapeutic mechanisms in kidney disease and renal transplantation. NO production is reduced in renal patients because of their elevated ADMA levels with associated reduced DDAH activity. These factors contribute to endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress and the progression of renal damage, but there are treatments that may effectively reduce ADMA levels in patients with kidney disease. Available data on ADMA levels in controls and renal patients, both in adults and children, also are summarized in this review. PMID:23109853

  11. Viscoelastic response of a model endothelial glycocalyx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijenhuis, Nadja; Mizuno, Daisuke; Spaan, Jos A. E.; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2009-06-01

    Many cells cover themselves with a multifunctional polymer coat, the pericellular matrix (PCM), to mediate mechanical interactions with the environment. A particular PCM, the endothelial glycocalyx (EG), is formed by vascular endothelial cells at their luminal side, forming a mechanical interface between the flowing blood and the endothelial cell layer. The glycosaminoglycan (GAG) hyaluronan (HA) is involved in the main functions of the EG, mechanotransduction of fluid shear stress and molecular sieving. HA, due to its length, is the only GAG in the EG or any other PCM able to form an entangled network. The mechanical functions of the EG are, however, impaired when any one of its components is removed. We here used microrheology to measure the effect of the EG constituents heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate, whole blood plasma and albumin on the high-bandwidth mechanical properties of a HA solution. Furthermore, we probed the effect of the hyaldherin aggrecan, a constituent of the PCM of chondrocytes, and very similar to versican (present in the PCM of various cells, and possibly in the EG). We show that components directly interacting with HA (chondroitin sulfate and aggrecan) can increase the viscoelastic shear modulus of the polymer composite.

  12. Isolation of Murine Embryonic Hemogenic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Marcelo, Kathrina L.; Hirschi, Karen K.

    2016-01-01

    The specification of hemogenic endothelial cells from embryonic vascular endothelium occurs during brief developmental periods within distinct tissues, and is necessary for the emergence of definitive HSPC from the murine extra embryonic yolk sac, placenta, umbilical vessels, and the embryonic aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region. The transient nature and small size of this cell population renders its reproducible isolation for careful quantification and experimental applications technically difficult. We have established a fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based protocol for simultaneous isolation of hemogenic endothelial cells and HSPC during their peak generation times in the yolk sac and AGM. We demonstrate methods for dissection of yolk sac and AGM tissues from mouse embryos, and we present optimized tissue digestion and antibody conjugation conditions for maximal cell survival prior to identification and retrieval via FACS. Representative FACS analysis plots are shown that identify the hemogenic endothelial cell and HSPC phenotypes, and describe a methylcellulose-based assay for evaluating their blood forming potential on a clonal level. PMID:27341393

  13. Improved Endothelial Function of Endothelial Cell Monolayer on the Soft Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Film with Matrix-Bound Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hao; Hu, Mi; Zhang, He; Ren, Ke-Feng; Li, Bo-Chao; Li, Huan; Wang, Li-Mei; Lei, Wen-Xi; Ji, Jian

    2016-06-15

    Endothelialization on the vascular implants is of great importance for prevention of undesired postimplantation symptoms. However, endothelial dysfunction of regenerated endothelial cell (EC) monolayer has been frequently observed, leading to severe complications, such as neointimal hyperplasia, late thrombosis, and neoatherosclerosis. It has significantly impeded long-term success of the therapy. So far, very little attention has been paid on endothelial function of EC monolayer. Bioinspired by the microenvironment of the endothelium in a blood vessel, this study described a soft polyelectrolyte multilayer film (PEM) through layer-by-layer assembly of poly(l-lysine) (PLL) and hyaluronan (HA). The (PLL/HA) PEM was chemically cross-linked and further incorporated with vascular endothelial growth factor. It demonstrated that this approach could promote EC adhesion and proliferation, further inducing formation of EC monolayer. Further, improved endothelial function of the EC monolayer was achieved as shown with the tighter integrity, higher production of nitric oxide, and expression level of endothelial function related genes, compared to EC monolayers on traditional substrates with high stiffness (e.g., glass, tissue culture polystyrene, and stainless steel). Our findings highlighted the influence of substrate stiffness on endothelial function of EC monolayer, giving a new strategy in the surface design of vascular implants. PMID:27223460

  14. Endothelial-Cardiomyocyte Interactions in Cardiac Development and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Patrick C.H.; Davis, Michael E.; Lisowski, Laura K.; Lee, Richard T.

    2009-01-01

    Communication between endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes regulates not only early cardiac development but also adult cardiomyocyte function, including the contractile state. In the normal mammalian myocardium, each cardiomyocyte is surrounded by an intricate network of capillaries and is next to endothelial cells. Cardiomyocytes depend on endothelial cells not only for oxygenated blood supply but also for local protective signals that promote cardiomyocyte organization and survival. While endothelial cells direct cardiomyocytes, cardiomyocytes reciprocally secrete factors that impact endothelial cell function. Understanding how endothelial cells communicate with cardiomyocytes will be critical for cardiac regeneration, in which the ultimate goal is not simply to improve systolic function transiently but to establish new myocardium that is both structurally and functionally normal in the long term. PMID:16460266

  15. Radiation Effects on the Cytoskeleton of Endothelial Cells and Endothelial Monolayer Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrys, Dorota; Greco, Olga; Patel, Gaurang; Prise, Kevin M.; Tozer, Gillian M.; Kanthou, Chryso

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of radiation on the endothelial cytoskeleton and endothelial monolayer permeability and to evaluate associated signaling pathways, which could reveal potential mechanisms of known vascular effects of radiation. Methods and Materials: Cultured endothelial cells were X-ray irradiated, and actin filaments, microtubules, intermediate filaments, and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin junctions were examined by immunofluorescence. Permeability was determined by the passage of fluorescent dextran through cell monolayers. Signal transduction pathways were analyzed using RhoA, Rho kinase, and stress-activated protein kinase-p38 (SAPK2/p38) inhibitors by guanosine triphosphate-RhoA activation assay and transfection with RhoAT19N. The levels of junction protein expression and phosphorylation of myosin light chain and SAPK2/p38 were assessed by Western blotting. The radiation effects on cell death were verified by clonogenic assays. Results: Radiation induced rapid and persistent actin stress fiber formation and redistribution of VE-cadherin junctions in microvascular, but not umbilical vein endothelial cells, and microtubules and intermediate filaments remained unaffected. Radiation also caused a rapid and persistent increase in microvascular permeability. RhoA-guanosine triphosphatase and Rho kinase were activated by radiation and caused phosphorylation of downstream myosin light chain and the observed cytoskeletal and permeability changes. SAPK2/p38 was activated by radiation but did not influence either the cytoskeleton or permeability. Conclusion: This study is the first to show rapid activation of the RhoA/Rho kinase by radiation in endothelial cells and has demonstrated a link between this pathway and cytoskeletal remodeling and permeability. The results also suggest that the RhoA pathway might be a useful target for modulating the permeability and other effects of radiation for therapeutic gain.

  16. Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Syndrome, Endothelial Function and Markers of Endothelialization. Changes after CPAP

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez Armengol, Angeles; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Caballero-Eraso, Candela; Macher, Hada C.; Villar, Jose; Merino, Ana M; Castell, Javier; Capote, Francisco; Stiefel, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Study objectives This study tries to assess the endothelial function in vivo using flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and several biomarkers of endothelium formation/restoration and damage in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) syndrome at baseline and after three months with CPAP therapy. Design Observational study, before and after CPAP therapy. Setting and Patients We studied 30 patients with apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) >15/h that were compared with themselves after three months of CPAP therapy. FMD was assessed non-invasively in vivo using the Laser-Doppler flowmetry. Circulating cell-free DNA (cf-DNA) and microparticles (MPs) were measured as markers of endothelial damage and the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was determined as a marker of endothelial restoration process. Measurements and results After three month with CPAP, FMD significantly increased (1072.26 ± 483.21 vs. 1604.38 ± 915.69 PU, p< 0.005) cf-DNA and MPs significantly decreased (187.93 ± 115.81 vs. 121.28 ± 78.98 pg/ml, p<0.01, and 69.60 ± 62.60 vs. 39.82 ± 22.14 U/μL, p<0.05, respectively) and VEGF levels increased (585.02 ± 246.06 vs. 641.11 ± 212.69 pg/ml, p<0.05). These changes were higher in patients with more severe disease. There was a relationship between markers of damage (r = -0.53, p<0.005) but not between markers of damage and restoration, thus suggesting that both types of markers should be measured together. Conclusions CPAP therapy improves FMD. This improvement may be related to an increase of endothelial restoration process and a decrease of endothelial damage. PMID:25815511

  17. [Vasomotor Endothelial Function in Healthy Individuals: Contact Types of Character].

    PubMed

    Kirichuk, V F; Olenko, E S; Kodochigova, A I; Barylnik, Y B; Deeva, M A; Bazhenov, V A

    2015-01-01

    We studied the vascular endothelial vasomotor function in healthy young individuals, depending on the type of character accentuation, levels of neuroticism, depression and anxiety. It is shown that the types of character accentuation effect on endothelial vasomotor function in healthy men and women. Personality characteristics of a person can be a significant risk factor for disease, the pathogenesis of which is the starting element of endothelial vasomotor dysfunction. PMID:26237954

  18. MicroRNA-34a regulation of endothelial senescence

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Takashi; Yagi, Shusuke; Yamakuchi, Munekazu

    2010-08-06

    Research highlights: {yields} MicroRNA-34a (miR-34a) regulates senescence and cell cycle progression in endothelial cells. {yields} MiR-34a expression increases during endothelial cell senescence and in older mice. {yields} SIRT1 is a miR-34a target gene in endothelial cells. {yields} SIRT1 mediates the effects of miR-34a upon cell senescence in endothelial cells. -- Abstract: Endothelial senescence is thought to play a role in cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. We hypothesized that endothelial microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate endothelial survival and senescence. We found that miR-34a is highly expressed in primary endothelial cells. We observed that miR-34a expression increases in senescent human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and in heart and spleen of older mice. MiR-34a over-expression induces endothelial cell senescence and also suppresses cell proliferation by inhibiting cell cycle progression. Searching for how miR-34a affects senescence, we discovered that SIRT1 is a target of miR-34a. Over-expressing miR-34a inhibits SIRT1 protein expression, and knocking down miR-34a enhances SIRT1 expression. MiR-34a triggers endothelial senescence in part through SIRT1, since forced expression of SIRT1 blocks the ability of miR-34a to induce senescence. Our data suggest that miR-34a contributes to endothelial senescence through suppression of SIRT1.

  19. Sickle erythrocytes inhibit human endothelial cell DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, R.; Zhou, M.A.; Bartlett-Pandite, A.; Wenc, K. )

    1990-11-15

    Patients with sickle cell anemia experience severe vascular occlusive phenomena including acute pain crisis and cerebral infarction. Obstruction occurs at both the microvascular and the arterial level, and the clinical presentation of vascular events is heterogeneous, suggesting a complex etiology. Interaction between sickle erythrocytes and the endothelium may contribute to vascular occlusion due to alteration of endothelial function. To investigate this hypothesis, human vascular endothelial cells were overlaid with sickle or normal erythrocytes and stimulated to synthesize DNA. The erythrocytes were sedimented onto replicate monolayers by centrifugation for 10 minutes at 17 g to insure contact with the endothelial cells. Incorporation of 3H-thymidine into endothelial cell DNA was markedly inhibited during contact with sickle erythrocytes. This inhibitory effect was enhanced more than twofold when autologous sickle plasma was present during endothelial cell labeling. Normal erythrocytes, with or without autologous plasma, had a modest effect on endothelial cell DNA synthesis. When sickle erythrocytes in autologous sickle plasma were applied to endothelial monolayers for 1 minute, 10 minutes, or 1 hour and then removed, subsequent DNA synthesis by the endothelial cells was inhibited by 30% to 40%. Although adherence of sickle erythrocytes to the endothelial monolayers was observed under these experimental conditions, the effect of sickle erythrocytes on endothelial DNA synthesis occurred in the absence of significant adherence. Hence, human endothelial cell DNA synthesis is partially inhibited by contact with sickle erythrocytes. The inhibitory effect of sickle erythrocytes occurs during a brief (1 minute) contact with the endothelial monolayers, and persists for at least 6 hours of 3H-thymidine labeling.

  20. Heparin Binds Endothelial Cell Growth Factor, the Principal Endothelial Cell Mitogen in Bovine Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciag, Thomas; Mehlman, Tevie; Friesel, Robert; Schreiber, Alain B.

    1984-08-01

    Endothelial cell growth factor (ECGF), an anionic polypeptide mitogen, binds to immobilized heparin. The interaction between the acidic polypeptide and the anionic carbohydrate suggests a mechanism that is independent of ion exchange. Monoclonal antibodies to purified bovine ECGF inhibited the biological activity of ECGF in crude preparations of bovine brain. These data indicate that ECGF is the principal mitogen for endothelial cells from bovine brain, that heparin affinity chromatography may be used to purify and concentrate ECGF, and that the affinity of ECGF for heparin may have structural and perhaps biological significance.

  1. Eldecalcitol prevents endothelial dysfunction in postmenopausal osteoporosis model rats.

    PubMed

    Serizawa, Kenichi; Yogo, Kenji; Tashiro, Yoshihito; Takeda, Satoshi; Kawasaki, Ryohei; Aizawa, Ken; Endo, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    Postmenopausal women have high incidence of cardiovascular events as estrogen deficiency can cause endothelial dysfunction. Vitamin D is reported to be beneficial on endothelial function, but it remains controversial whether vitamin D is effective for endothelial dysfunction under the treatment for osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. The aim of this study was to evaluate the endothelial protective effect of eldecalcitol (ELD) in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. ELD (20  ng/kg) was orally administrated five times a week for 4 weeks from 1 day after surgery. After that, flow-mediated dilation (FMD) as an indicator of endothelial function was measured by high-resolution ultrasound in the femoral artery of living rats. ELD ameliorated the reduction of FMD in OVX rats. ELD inhibited the increase in NOX4, nitrotyrosine, and p65 and the decrease in dimer/monomer ratio of nitric oxide synthase in OVX rat femoral arteries. ELD also prevented the decrease in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) in femoral arteries and cultured endothelial cells. Although PPARγ is known to inhibit osteoblastogenesis, ELD understandably increased bone mineral density of OVX rats without increase in PPARγ in bone marrow. These results suggest that ELD prevented the deterioration of endothelial function under condition of preventing bone loss in OVX rats. This endothelial protective effect of ELD might be exerted through improvement of endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling, which is mediated by an antioxidative effect through normalization of vascular PPARγ/NF-κB signaling. PMID:26537128

  2. Molecular mechanisms associated with diabetic endothelial-erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Castela, Ângela; Costa, Carla

    2016-05-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common complication of diabetes, affecting up to 75% of all diabetic men. Although the aetiology of diabetic ED is multifactorial, endothelial dysfunction is recognized as a mainstay in the pathophysiology of the disease. Endothelial dysfunction is induced by the detrimental actions of high glucose levels and increased oxidative stress on endothelial cells that make up the vascular lining. Besides directly injuring the endothelium, diabetes might also hamper vascular repair mechanisms of angiogenesis and vasculogenesis. These states exacerbate and maintain endothelial dysfunction, impairing vasorelaxation events and cavernosal blood perfusion, which are crucial for normal erectile function. PMID:26878803

  3. Cilostazol suppresses angiotensin II-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    SHI, MIAO-QIAN; SU, FEI-FEI; XU, XUAN; LIU, XIONG-TAO; WANG, HONG-TAO; ZHANG, WEI; LI, XUE; LIAN, CHENG; ZHENG, QIANG-SUN; FENG, ZHI-CHUN

    2016-01-01

    Patients with essential hypertension undergo endothelial dysfunction, particularly in the conduit arteries. Cilostazol, a type III phosphodiesterase inhibitor, serves a role in the inhibition of platelet aggregation and it is widely used in the treatment of peripheral vascular diseases. Previous studies have suggested that cilostazol suppresses endothelial dysfunction; however, it remains unknown whether cilostazol protects the endothelial function in essential hypertension. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether, and how, cilostazol suppresses angiotensin II (angII)-induced endothelial dysfunction. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to angII and treated with cilostazol. Endothelial cell apoptosis and function, nitric oxide and superoxide production, phosphorylation (p) of Akt, and caspase-3 protein expression levels were investigated. AngII exposure resulted in the apoptosis of endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, cilostazol significantly suppressed the angII-induced apoptosis of HUVECs; however, this effect was reduced in the presence of LY294002, a phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor. Furthermore, cilostazol suppressed the angII-induced p-Akt downregulation and cleaved caspase-3 upregulation. These effects were also alleviated by LY294002. In vivo, cilostazol suppressed the angII-induced endothelial cell apoptosis and dysfunction. Cilostazol was also demonstrated to partially reduced the angII-induced increase in superoxide production. The results of the present study suggested that cilostazol suppresses endothelial apoptosis and dysfunction by modulating the PI3K/Akt pathway. PMID:26862035

  4. Apoptotic Cells Initiate Endothelial Cell Sprouting via Electrostatic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Weihua, Zhang; Tsan, Rachel; Schroit, Alan J.; Fidler, Isaiah J.

    2006-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the development of new blood vessels from preexisting vessels, is crucial to tissue growth, repair, and maintenance. This process begins with the formation of endothelial cell sprouts followed by the proliferation and migration of neighboring endothelial cells along the pre-formed extensions. The initiating event and mechanism of sprouting is not known. We demonstrate that the phenotypic expression of negative-charged membrane surface in apoptotic cells initiates the formation of directional endothelial cell sprouts that extend toward the dying cells by a mechanism that involves endothelial cell membrane hyperpolarization and cytoskeleton reorganization but is independent of diffusible molecules. PMID:16357162

  5. Infection of hepatitis B virus in extrahepatic endothelial tissues mediated by endothelial progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Qifei; Huang, Jun; Su, Enben; Li, Jun; Li, Jianyong; Zhang, Lili; Cao, Kejiang

    2007-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication has been reported to be involved in many extrahepatic viral disorders; however, the mechanism by which HBV is trans-infected into extrahepatic tissues such as HBV associated myocarditis remains largely unknown. Results In this study, we showed that human cord blood endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), but not human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) could be effectively infected by uptake of HBV in vitro. Exposure of EPCs with HBV resulted in HBV DNA and viral particles were detected in EPCs at day 3 after HBV challenge, which were peaked around day 7 and declined in 3 weeks. Consistently, HBV envelope surface and core antigens were first detected in EPCs at day 3 after virus challenge and were retained to be detectable for 3 weeks. In contrast, HBV covalently closed circular DNA was not detected in EPCs at any time after virus challenge. Intravenous transplantation of HBV-treated EPCs into myocardial infarction and acute renal ischemia mouse model resulted in incorporation of HBV into injured heart, lung, and renal capillary endothelial tissues. Conclusion These results strongly support that EPCs serve as virus carrier mediating HBV trans-infection into the injured endothelial tissues. The findings might provide a novel mechanism for HBV-associated myocarditis and other HBV-related extrahepatic diseases as well. PMID:17407553

  6. Adherence of Candida to cultured vascular endothelial cells: mechanisms of attachment and endothelial cell penetration.

    PubMed

    Rotrosen, D; Edwards, J E; Gibson, T R; Moore, J C; Cohen, A H; Green, I

    1985-12-01

    To elucidate the pathogenesis of hematogenous Candida infections, we developed an in vitro model of Candida adherence to and penetration of human endothelial cells. We enhanced or inhibited adherence in order to probe mechanisms of attachment. Adherence of Candida albicans showed a linear relation to Candida inoculum (range, 10(2)-10(5) cfu, r = .99, P less than .01) and exceeded that of less virulent Candida species and that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (P less than .01). Candida immune serum blocked attachment (greater than 95% inhibition; P less than .001), however, this activity was abolished by immunoprecipitation of immune serum with C. albicans mannan (P less than .001) and was unaffected by immunoprecipitation with S. cerevisiae mannan or by adsorption with particulate chitin. Adherence was diminished by exposing C. albicans to heat (greater than 99% inhibition; P less than .01), UV light (98% inhibition; P less than .01), or sodium periodate (greater than 72% inhibition; P less than .01). An extract from heat-exposed C. albicans blocked adherence (greater than 51% inhibition; P less than .001). Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that viable or killed Candida organisms were attached to endothelial cells, were enveloped by membrane processes from the endothelial cell surface, and were incorporated into the endothelial cells within phagosomes. Cytochalasin B blocked incorporation without blocking surface attachment. PMID:3905987

  7. Involvement of marrow-derived endothelial cells in vascularization.

    PubMed

    Larrivée, B; Karsan, A

    2007-01-01

    Until recently, the adult neovasculature was thought to arise only through angiogenesis, the mechanism by which new blood vessels form from preexisting vessels through endothelial cell migration and proliferation. However, recent studies have provided evidence that postnatal neovasculature can also arise though vasculogenesis, a process by which endothelial progenitor cells are recruited and differentiate into mature endothelial cells to form new blood vessels. Evidence for the existence of endothelial progenitors has come from studies demonstrating the ability of bone marrow-derived cells to incorporate into adult vasculature. However, the exact nature of endothelial progenitor cells remains controversial. Because of the lack of definitive markers of endothelial progenitors, the in vivo contribution of progenitor cells to physiological and pathological neovascularization remains unclear. Early studies reported that endothelial progenitor cells actively integrate into the adult vasculature and are critical in the development of many types of vascular-dependent disorders such as neoplastic progression. Moreover, it has been suggested that endothelial progenitor cells can be used as a therapeutic strategy aimed at promoting vascular growth in a variety of ischemic diseases. However, increasing numbers of studies have reported no clear contribution of endothelial progenitors in physiological or pathological angiogenesis. In this chapter, we discuss the origin of the endothelial progenitor cell in the embryo and adult, and we discuss the cell's link to the primitive hematopoietic stem cell. We also review the potential significance of endothelial progenitor cells in the formation of a postnatal vascular network and discuss the factors that may account for the current lack of consensus of the scientific community on this important issue. PMID:17554506

  8. [Hypertension, endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular risk].

    PubMed

    Nitenberg, A

    2006-10-01

    Increased blood pressure induces functional and structural changes of the vascular endothelium. Depression of endothelium-dependant vasodilatation is an early manifestation of endothelial dysfunction due to hypertension. It can be demonstrated by pharmacological or physiological tests. Decreased availability of nitric oxide (NO) is a major determinant of the depression of vasodilatation. It may be caused by a reduction in the activity of NO-endothelial synthase (NOSe) related to: 1) a deficit in substrate (L-arginine), 2) an inhibition by asymmetrical dimethylarginine, 3) a deficit in the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). However, the increase in oxidative stress, a producer of superoxide radicals which combine with NO to form peroxynitrates (ONOO-), is the determining factor. It is related to activation of membranous NAD(P)H oxidases initiated by the stimulation of activating mecanosensors of protein C kinase. The message is amplified by oxidation of BH4 which transforms the NOSe into a producer of superoxide radicals. A cascade of auto-amplification loops leading to atherosclerosis and its complications is then triggered. The superoxide radicals and the peroxynitrates oxidise the LDL-cholesterol. They activate the nuclear factor-kappaB which controls the genes stimulating the expression of many proteins: angiotensinogen and AT1 receptors which stimulate the sympathetic system, receptors of oxidised LDL, adhesion and migration factors (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin and MCP-1), pro-inflammatory cytokins (interleukines and TNF-alpha), growth factors (MAP kinases), plasminogen activator inhibitor 1. The monocytes and smooth muscle cells produce metalloproteinases and pro-inflammatory cytokins which destabilise the atheromatous plaque and favourise vascular remodelling. Inshort, the endothelial dysfunction due to hypertension plays a role in a complex physiopathological process and is a marker of future cardiovascular events. PMID:17100143

  9. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and endothelial function

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Leopold, Jane A.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperaldosteronism has been associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired vascular reactivity in patients with hypertension or congestive heart failure. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists spironolactone and eplerenone have been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality, in part, by ameliorating the adverse effects of aldosterone on vascular function. Although spironolactone and eplerenone are increasingly utilized in patients with cardiovascular disease, widespread clinical use is limited by the development of gynecomastia with spironolactone and hyperkalemia with both agents. This suggests that the development of newer agents with favorable side effect profiles is warranted. PMID:18729003

  10. The female athlete triad and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lanser, Erica M; Zach, Karie N; Hoch, Anne Z

    2011-05-01

    A tremendous increase in the number of female athletes of all ages and abilities has occurred in the past 35 years. In general, sports and athletic competition produce healthier and happier women. However, explosion in participation has revealed clear gender-specific injuries and medical conditions unique to the female athlete. This article focuses on the latest advances in our knowledge of the female athlete triad and the relationship between athletic-associated amenorrhea and endothelial dysfunction. Treatment of vascular dysfunction with folic acid is also discussed. PMID:21570034

  11. Production of soluble Neprilysin by endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kuruppu, Sanjaya; Rajapakse, Niwanthi W.; Minond, Dmitriy; Smith, A. Ian

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • A soluble full-length form of Neprilysin exists in media of endothelial cells. • Exosomal release is the key mechanism for the production of soluble Neprilysin. • Inhibition of ADAM-17 by specific inhibitors reduce Neprilysin release. • Exosome mediated release of Neprilysin is dependent on ADAM-17 activity. - Abstract: A non-membrane bound form of Neprilysin (NEP) with catalytic activity has the potential to cleave substrates throughout the circulation, thus leading to systemic effects of NEP. We used the endothelial cell line Ea.hy926 to identify the possible role of exosomes and A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease 17 (ADAM-17) in the production of non-membrane bound NEP. Using a bradykinin based quenched fluorescent substrate (40 μM) assay, we determined the activity of recombinant human NEP (rhNEP; 12 ng), and NEP in the media of endothelial cells (10% v/v; after 24 h incubation with cells) to be 9.35 ± 0.70 and 6.54 ± 0.41 μmols of substrate cleaved over 3 h, respectively. The presence of NEP in the media was also confirmed by Western blotting. At present there are no commercially available inhibitors specific for ADAM-17. We therefore synthesised two inhibitors TPI2155-14 and TPI2155-17, specific for ADAM-17 with IC{sub 50} values of 5.36 and 4.32 μM, respectively. Treatment of cells with TPI2155-14 (15 μM) and TPI2155-17 (4.3 μM) resulted in a significant decrease in NEP activity in media (62.37 ± 1.43 and 38.30 ± 4.70, respectively as a % of control; P < 0.0001), implicating a possible role for ADAM-17 in NEP release. However, centrifuging media (100,000g for 1 h at 4 °C) removed all NEP activity from the supernatant indicating the likely role of exosomes in the release of NEP. Our data therefore indicated for the first time that NEP is released from endothelial cells via exosomes, and that this process is dependent on ADAM-17.

  12. Spironolactone improves endothelial dysfunction in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Syngle, Ashit; Vohra, Kanchan; Khichi, Dinesh; Garg, Nidhi; Verma, Inderjeet; Kaur, Ladbans

    2013-07-01

    Chronic inflammation in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is associated with vascular endothelial dysfunction which leads to accelerated atherosclerosis. Accelerated atherosclerosis contributes to premature cardiovascular disease and increased cardiovascular mortality in AS. Spironolactone inhibits the production of proinflammatory cytokines and improves endothelial dysfunction in rheumatoid arthritis. This study aimed to determine the effect of spironolactone in antitumor necrosis factor (TNF)-naive AS patients. Twenty anti-TNF-naive AS patients (M/F = 15/5) with high disease activity (Bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index, BASDAI >4) despite treatment with stable doses of conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs were investigated. Inflammatory disease activity (BASDAI and Bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index (BASFI) scores, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels), serum nitrite concentration, and endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilatation of the brachial artery were measured at baseline and after 12 weeks of therapy with oral spironolactone 2 mg/kg/day. Ten healthy subjects matched for age and sex acted as the control. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in AS patients at baseline was significantly impaired compared with healthy control group (p < 0.001). After treatment, FMD improved from 11.3 ± 1.70 to 24.69 ± 2.34% (p < 0.001); nitrite concentration reduced from 7.9 ± 0.28 to 4.79 ± 0.19 μmol/L (p < 0.001); ESR from 33.8 ± 4.38 to 15.13 ± 1.30 mm in the first hour, (p < 0.001); and CRP level from 22.39 ± 3.80 to 6.3 ± 1.29 mg/dL, (p < 0.001). BASDAI and BASFI also reduced significantly (p < 0.001). The study suggests that in AS endothelial dysfunction is a part of the disease process. This is the first study to show that treatment with spironolactone improves both endothelial dysfunction and inflammatory disease activity in AS. PMID:23504211

  13. Using cultured endothelial cells to study endothelial barrier dysfunction: Challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Aman, Jurjan; Weijers, Ester M; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P; Malik, Asrar B; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M

    2016-08-01

    Despite considerable progress in the understanding of endothelial barrier regulation and the identification of approaches that have the potential to improve endothelial barrier function, no drug- or stem cell-based therapy is presently available to reverse the widespread vascular leak that is observed in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and sepsis. The translational gap suggests a need to develop experimental approaches and tools that better mimic the complex environment of the microcirculation in which the vascular leak develops. Recent studies have identified several elements of this microenvironment. Among these are composition and stiffness of the extracellular matrix, fluid shear stress, interaction of endothelial cells (ECs) with pericytes, oxygen tension, and the combination of toxic and mechanic injurious stimuli. Development of novel cell culture techniques that integrate these elements would allow in-depth analysis of EC biology that closely approaches the (patho)physiological conditions in situ. In parallel, techniques to isolate organ-specific ECs, to define EC heterogeneity in its full complexity, and to culture patient-derived ECs from inducible pluripotent stem cells or endothelial progenitor cells are likely to advance the understanding of ARDS and lead to development of therapeutics. This review 1) summarizes the advantages and pitfalls of EC cultures to study vascular leak in ARDS, 2) provides an overview of elements of the microvascular environment that can directly affect endothelial barrier function, and 3) discusses alternative methods to bridge the gap between basic research and clinical application with the intent of improving the translational value of present EC culture approaches. PMID:27343194

  14. Endothelial juxtaposition of distinct adult stem cells activates angiogenesis signaling molecules in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Elham; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi; Rahbarghazi, Reza; Siavashi, Vahid; Araghi, Atefeh

    2015-12-01

    Efficacy of therapeutic angiogenesis needs a comprehensive understanding of endothelial cell (EC) function and biological factors and cells that interplay with ECs. Stem cells are considered the key components of pro- and anti-angiogenic milieu in a wide variety of physiopathological states, and interactions of EC-stem cells have been the subject of controversy in recent years. In this study, the potential effects of three tissue-specific adult stem cells, namely rat marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs), rat adipose-derived stem cells (rADSCs) and rat muscle-derived satellite cells (rSCs), on the endothelial activation of key angiogenic signaling molecules, including VEGF, Ang-2, VEGFR-2, Tie-2, and Tie2-pho, were investigated. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and rat lung microvascular endothelial cells (RLMECs) were cocultured with the stem cells or incubated with the stem cell-derived conditioned media on Matrigel. Following HUVEC-stem cell coculture, CD31-positive ECs were flow sorted and subjected to western blotting to analyze potential changes in the expression of the pro-angiogenic signaling molecules. Elongation and co-alignment of the stem cells were seen along the EC tubes in the EC-stem cell cocultures on Matrigel, with cell-to-cell dye communication in the EC-rBMSC cocultures. Moreover, rBMSCs and rADSCs significantly improved endothelial tubulogenesis in both juxtacrine and paracrine manners. These two latter stem cells dynamically up-regulated VEGF, Ang-2, VREGR-2, and Tie-2 but down-regulated Tie2-pho and the Tie2-pho/Tie-2 ratio in HUVECs. Induction of pro-angiogenic signaling in ECs by marrow- and adipose-derived MSCs further indicates the significance of stem cell milieu in angiogenesis dynamics. PMID:26068799

  15. Tumor and Endothelial Cell Hybrids Participate in Glioblastoma Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    El Hallani, Soufiane; Colin, Carole; El Houfi, Younas; Boisselier, Blandine; Marie, Yannick; Ravassard, Philippe; Labussière, Marianne; Mokhtari, Karima; Thomas, Jean-Léon; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Eichmann, Anne; Sanson, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Background. Recently antiangiogenic therapy with bevacizumab has shown a high but transient efficacy in glioblastoma (GBM). Indeed, GBM is one of the most angiogenic human tumors and endothelial proliferation is a hallmark of the disease. We therefore hypothesized that tumor cells may participate in endothelial proliferation of GBM. Materials and Methods. We used EGFR FISH Probe to detect EGFR amplification and anti-CD31, CD105, VE-cadherin, and vWF to identify endothelial cells. Endothelial and GBM cells were grown separately, labeled with GFP and DsRed lentiviruses, and then cocultured with or without contact. Results. In a subset of GBM tissues, we found that several tumor endothelial cells carry EGFR amplification, characteristic of GBM tumor cells. This observation was reproduced in vitro: when tumor stem cells derived from GBM were grown in the presence of human endothelial cells, a fraction of them acquired endothelial markers (CD31, CD105, VE-cadherin, and vWF). By transduction with GFP and DsRed expressing lentiviral vectors, we demonstrate that this phenomenon is due to cell fusion and not transdifferentiation. Conclusion. A fraction of GBM stem cells thus has the capacity to fuse with endothelial cells and the resulting hybrids may participate in tumor microvascular proliferation and in treatment resistance. PMID:24868550

  16. Endothelial dysfunction as a potential contributor in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Takahiko; Tanabe, Katsuyuki; Croker, Byron P.; Johnson, Richard J.; Grant, Maria B.; Kosugi, Tomoki; Li, Qiuhong

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms that drive the development of diabetic nephropathy remain undetermined. Only 30–40% of patients with diabetes mellitus develop overt nephropathy, which suggests that other contributing factors besides the diabetic state are required for the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Endothelial dysfunction is associated with human diabetic nephropathy and retinopathy, and advanced diabetic glomerulopathy often exhibits thrombotic microangiopathy, including glomerular capillary microaneurysms and mesangiolysis, which are typical manifestations of endothelial dysfunction in the glomerulus. Likewise, diabetic mice with severe endothelial dysfunction owing to deficiency of endothelial nitric oxide synthase develop progressive nephropathy and retinopathy similar to the advanced lesions observed in humans with diabetes mellitus. Additionally, inhibitors of the renin–angiotensin system fail to be renoprotective in some individuals with diabetic nephropathy (due in part to aldosterone breakthrough) and in some mouse models of the disease. In this Review, we discuss the clinical and experimental evidence that supports a role for endothelial nitric oxide deficiency and subsequent endothelial dysfunction in the progression of diabetic nephropathy and retinopathy. If endothelial dysfunction is the key factor required for diabetic nephropathy, then agents that improve endothelial function or raise intraglomerular nitric oxide level could be beneficial in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:21045790

  17. Iridocorneal Endothelial Syndrome in a 14-Year-Old Male.

    PubMed

    Aponte, Elisabeth P; Ball, David C; Alward, Wallace L M

    2016-02-01

    The iridocorneal endothelial syndrome is a rare cause of unilateral glaucoma that is almost never seen in children. We report a case of iridocorneal endothelial in a 14-year-old boy who did not yet have ocular hypertension or glaucoma. PMID:26035422

  18. Ionizing Radiation-Induced Endothelial Cell Senescence and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingying; Boerma, Marjan; Zhou, Daohong

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation induces not only apoptosis but also senescence. While the role of endothelial cell apoptosis in mediating radiation-induced acute tissue injury has been extensively studied, little is known about the role of endothelial cell senescence in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced late effects. Senescent endothelial cells exhibit decreased production of nitric oxide and expression of thrombomodulin, increased expression of adhesion molecules, elevated production of reactive oxygen species and inflammatory cytokines and an inability to proliferate and form capillary-like structures in vitro. These findings suggest that endothelial cell senescence can lead to endothelial dysfunction by dysregulation of vasodilation and hemostasis, induction of oxidative stress and inflammation and inhibition of angiogenesis, which can potentially contribute to radiation-induced late effects such as cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). In this article, we discuss the mechanisms by which radiation induces endothelial cell senescence, the roles of endothelial cell senescence in radiation-induced CVDs and potential strategies to prevent, mitigate and treat radiation-induced CVDs by targeting senescent endothelial cells. PMID:27387862

  19. Plasticity of Blood- and Lymphatic Endothelial Cells and Marker Identification

    PubMed Central

    Keuschnigg, Johannes; Karinen, Sirkku; Auvinen, Kaisa; Irjala, Heikki; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Kallioniemi, Olli; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Salmi, Marko

    2013-01-01

    The distinction between lymphatic and blood vessels is biologically fundamental. Here we wanted to rigorously analyze the universal applicability of vascular markers and characteristics of the two widely used vascular model systems human microvascular endothelial cell line-1 (HMEC-1) and telomerase-immortalized microvascular endothelial cell line (TIME). Therefore we studied the protein expression and functional properties of the endothelial cell lines HMEC-1 and TIME by flow cytometry and in vitro flow assays. We then performed microarray analyses of the gene expression in these two cell lines and compared them to primary endothelial cells. Using bioinformatics we then defined 39 new, more universal, endothelial-type specific markers from 47 primary endothelial microarray datasets and validated them using immunohistochemistry with normal and pathological tissues. We surprisingly found that both HMEC-1 and TIME are hybrid blood- and lymphatic cells. In addition, we discovered great discrepancies in the previous identifications of blood- and lymphatic endothelium-specific genes. Hence we identified and validated new, universally applicable vascular markers. Summarizing, the hybrid blood-lymphatic endothelial phenotype of HMEC-1 and TIME is indicative of plasticity in the gene expression of immortalized endothelial cell lines. Moreover, we identified new, stable, vessel-type specific markers for blood- and lymphatic endothelium, useful for basic research and clinical diagnostics. PMID:24058540

  20. In vivo Endothelial Cell Infection by Anaplasma marginale

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaplasma marginale has recently been shown to infect endothelial cells in vitro but it remains unknown as to whether endothelial infection also occurs in vivo. In this report, we demonstrate through dual fluorescence microscopy that A. marginale, detected by the monoclonal antibody, ANAF16C1, co-lo...

  1. Ionizing Radiation-Induced Endothelial Cell Senescence and Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingying; Boerma, Marjan; Zhou, Daohong

    2016-08-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation induces not only apoptosis but also senescence. While the role of endothelial cell apoptosis in mediating radiation-induced acute tissue injury has been extensively studied, little is known about the role of endothelial cell senescence in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced late effects. Senescent endothelial cells exhibit decreased production of nitric oxide and expression of thrombomodulin, increased expression of adhesion molecules, elevated production of reactive oxygen species and inflammatory cytokines and an inability to proliferate and form capillary-like structures in vitro. These findings suggest that endothelial cell senescence can lead to endothelial dysfunction by dysregulation of vasodilation and hemostasis, induction of oxidative stress and inflammation and inhibition of angiogenesis, which can potentially contribute to radiation-induced late effects such as cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). In this article, we discuss the mechanisms by which radiation induces endothelial cell senescence, the roles of endothelial cell senescence in radiation-induced CVDs and potential strategies to prevent, mitigate and treat radiation-induced CVDs by targeting senescent endothelial cells. PMID:27387862

  2. Cellular and molecular biology of aging endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Donato, Anthony J; Morgan, R Garrett; Walker, Ashley E; Lesniewski, Lisa A

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and aging is a major risk factor for CVD development. One of the major age-related arterial phenotypes thought to be responsible for the development of CVD in older adults is endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial function is modulated by traditional CVD risk factors in young adults, but advancing age is independently associated with the development of vascular endothelial dysfunction. This endothelial dysfunction results from a reduction in nitric oxide bioavailability downstream of endothelial oxidative stress and inflammation that can be further modulated by traditional CVD risk factors in older adults. Greater endothelial oxidative stress with aging is a result of augmented production from the intracellular enzymes NADPH oxidase and uncoupled eNOS, as well as from mitochondrial respiration in the absence of appropriate increases in antioxidant defenses as regulated by relevant transcription factors, such as FOXO. Interestingly, it appears that NFkB, a critical inflammatory transcription factor, is sensitive to this age-related endothelial redox change and its activation induces transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokines that can further suppress endothelial function, thus creating a vicious feed-forward cycle. This review will discuss the two macro-mechanistic processes, oxidative stress and inflammation, that contribute to endothelial dysfunction with advancing age as well as the cellular and molecular events that lead to the vicious cycle of inflammation and oxidative stress in the aged endothelium. Other potential mediators of this pro-inflammatory endothelial phenotype are increases in immune or senescent cells in the vasculature. Of note, genomic instability, telomere dysfunction or DNA damage has been shown to trigger cell senescence via the p53/p21 pathway and result in increased inflammatory signaling in arteries from older adults. This review will discuss the current state

  3. Morphological study of endothelial cells during freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, A.; Xu, L. X.; Sandison, G. A.; Cheng, S.

    2006-12-01

    Microvascular injury is recognized as a major tissue damage mechanism of ablative cryosurgery. Endothelial cells lining the vessel wall are thought to be the initial target of freezing. However, details of this injury mechanism are not yet completely understood. In this study, ECMatrix™ 625 was used to mimic the tumour environment and to allow the endothelial cells cultured in vitro to form the tube-like structure of the vasculature. The influence of water dehydration on the integrity of this structure was investigated. It was found that the initial cell shape change was mainly controlled by water dehydration, dependent on the cooling rate, resulting in the shrinkage of cells in the direction normal to the free surface. As the cooling was prolonged and temperature was lowered, further cell shape change could be induced by the chilling effects on intracellular proteins, and focal adhesions to the basement membrane. Quantitative analysis showed that the freezing induced dehydration greatly enhanced the cell surface stresses, especially in the axial direction. This could be one of the major causes of the final breaking of the cell junction and cell detachment.

  4. Endothelial Cell Dynamics during Anastomosis in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Santana, Anthony; Shan, Mengrou; Stroock, Abraham D.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anastomosis –the fusion of vessels from two distinct branches of the vascular system – represents a critical step in vascular growth under both healthy and pathological conditions, in vivo, and presents an important target for engineering of vascularized tissues, in vitro. Recent works in animal models have advanced our understanding of the molecular and cellular players in vascular anastomosis, but questions remain related to cellular dynamics and control of this process, in vitro. In this study, we exploited a three-dimensional (3-D) culture platform to examine the dynamics of endothelial cell (EC) during and after vascular anastomosis by allowing angiogenesis and vasculogenesis to proceed in parallel. We show that anastomosis occurs between sprouts formed by angiogenesis from an endothelium and tubes formed by vasculogenesis in the bulk of a 3-D matrix. This fusion leads to highly connected vessels that span from the surface of the matrix into the bulk in a manner that depends on cell density and identity. Further, we observe and analyze intermixing of endothelial cells of distinct origin (surface versus bulk) within the vessels structures that are formed; we provide evidence that the cells migrate along pre-existing vessels segments as part of this intermixing process. We conclude that anastomosis can occur between vessels emerging by angiogenesis and vasculogenesis and that this process may play an important role in contexts such as wound healing. PMID:25790315

  5. [Refractive changes after Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty].

    PubMed

    Röck, T; Bartz-Schmidt, K U; Röck, D; Yoeruek, E

    2014-01-01

    Penetrating keratoplasty has different refractive disadvantages in contrast to posterior lamellar keratoplasty. For example, a decentered corneal trephination and a tilted trephination or unevenly tightened corneal sutures can cause an uncontrolled high astigmatism as well as a refractive change. Also the postoperative refraction may change over time as a result of wound healing, suture loosening or suture removal. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate a possible refractive change after Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK). A total of 139 pseudophakic eyes from 125 patients with endothelial decompensation had undergone DMEK surgery at the Tübingen Eye Clinic. After a mean postoperative time of 13.15 ± 2.98 months after DMEK discreet mean changes in the spherical equivalent of + 0.37 ± 0.87 diopters and the cylinder to - 0.45 ± 0.57 diopters were observed. The mean central corneal thickness decreased from 670 ± 70 µm to 544 ± 55 µm. In conclusion after DMEK a discreet induced hyperopic refractive shift due to the reversal of stromal swelling was observed. PMID:23989219

  6. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Eye Disease

    PubMed Central

    Penn, J.S.; Madan, A.; Caldwell, R.B.; Bartoli, M.; Caldwell, R.W.; Hartnett, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Collectively, angiogenic ocular conditions represent the leading cause of irreversible vision loss in developed countries. In the U.S., for example, retinopathy of prematurity, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration are the principal causes of blindness in the infant, working age and elderly populations, respectively. Evidence suggests that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a 40 kDa dimeric glycoprotein, promotes angiogenesis in each of these conditions, making it a highly significant therapeutic target. However, VEGF is pleiotropic, affecting a broad spectrum of endothelial, neuronal and glial behaviors, and confounding the validity of anti-VEGF strategies, particularly under chronic disease conditions. In fact, among other functions VEGF can influence cell proliferation, cell migration, proteolysis, cell survival and vessel permeability in a wide variety of biological contexts. This article will describe the roles played by VEGF in the pathogenesis of retinopathy of prematurity, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. The potential disadvantages of inhibiting VEGF will be discussed, as will the rationales for targeting other VEGF-related modulators of angiogenesis. PMID:18653375

  7. Simulated microgravity upregulates an endothelial vasoconstrictor prostaglandin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sangha, D. S.; Han, S.; Purdy, R. E.

    2001-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide contributes to the vascular hyporesponsiveness to norepinephrine (NE) observed in carotid arteries from rats exposed to simulated microgravity. The goal of the present study was to determine whether a cyclooxygenase product of arachidonic acid also influences vascular responsiveness in this setting. Microgravity was simulated in rats by hindlimb unweighting (HU). After 20 days of HU, carotid arteries were isolated from control and HU-treated rats, and vascular rings were mounted in tissue baths for the measurement of isometric contraction. Two cyclooxygenase inhibitors, indomethacin and ibuprofen, and the selective thromboxane A(2) prostanoid-receptor antagonist, SQ-29548, had no effect on the contraction to NE in control vessels but markedly reduced contraction to NE in HU vessels. When the endothelium was removed, indomethacin no longer had any effect on the NE-induced contraction in HU vessels. In endothelium-intact vessels in the presence of indomethacin, the addition of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, N(G)-L-nitro-arginine methyl ester, to the medium bathing HU vessels increased the contraction to NE to the level of that of the control vessels. These results indicate that HU treatment induced two endothelial changes in carotid artery that opposed each other. Nitric oxide activity was increased and was responsible for the vascular hyporesponsiveness to NE. The activity of a vasoconstrictor prostaglandin was also increased, and attenuated the vasodilating effect of nitric oxide.

  8. Endothelial dysfunction in adipose triglyceride lipase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Schrammel, Astrid; Mussbacher, Marion; Wölkart, Gerald; Stessel, Heike; Pail, Karoline; Winkler, Sarah; Schweiger, Martina; Haemmerle, Guenter; Al Zoughbi, Wael; Höfler, Gerald; Lametschwandtner, Alois; Zechner, Rudolf; Mayer, Bernd

    2014-06-01

    Systemic knockout of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the pivotal enzyme of triglyceride lipolysis, results in a murine phenotype that is characterized by progredient cardiac steatosis and severe heart failure. Since cardiac and vascular dysfunction have been closely related in numerous studies we investigated endothelium-dependent and -independent vessel function of ATGL knockout mice. Aortic relaxation studies and Langendorff perfusion experiments of isolated hearts showed that ATGL knockout mice suffer from pronounced micro- and macrovascular endothelial dysfunction. Experiments with agonists directly targeting vascular smooth muscle cells revealed the functional integrity of the smooth muscle cell layer. Loss of vascular reactivity was restored ~50% upon treatment of ATGL knockout mice with the PPARα agonist Wy14,643, indicating that this phenomenon is partly a consequence of impaired cardiac contractility. Biochemical analysis revealed that aortic endothelial NO synthase expression and activity were significantly reduced in ATGL deficiency. Enzyme activity was fully restored in ATGL mice treated with the PPARα agonist. Biochemical analysis of perivascular adipose tissue demonstrated that ATGL knockout mice suffer from perivascular inflammatory oxidative stress which occurs independent of cardiac dysfunction and might contribute to vascular defects. Our results reveal a hitherto unrecognized link between disturbed lipid metabolism, obesity and cardiovascular disease. PMID:24657704

  9. Arsenic, reactive oxygen, and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ellinsworth, David C

    2015-06-01

    Human exposure to drinking water contaminated with arsenic is a serious global health concern and predisposes to cardiovascular disease states, such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and microvascular disease. The most sensitive target of arsenic toxicity in the vasculature is the endothelium, and incubation of these cells with low concentrations of arsenite, a naturally occurring and highly toxic inorganic form of arsenic, rapidly induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation via activation of a specific NADPH oxidase (Nox2). Arsenite also induces ROS accumulation in vascular smooth muscle cells, but this is relatively delayed because, depending on the vessel from which they originate, these cells often lack Nox2 and/or its essential regulatory cytosolic subunits. The net effect of such activity is attenuation of endothelium-dependent conduit artery dilation via superoxide anion-mediated scavenging of nitric oxide (NO) and inhibition and downregulation of endothelial NO synthase, events that are temporally matched to the accumulation of oxidants across the vessel wall. By contrast, ROS induced by the more toxic organic trivalent arsenic metabolites (monomethylarsonous and dimethylarsinous acids) may originate from sources other than Nox2. As such, the mechanisms through which vascular oxidative stress develops in vivo under continuous exposure to all three of these potent arsenicals are unknown. This review is a comprehensive analysis of the mechanisms that mediate arsenic effects associated with Nox2 activation, ROS activity, and endothelial dysfunction, and also considers future avenues of research into what is a relatively poorly understood topic with major implications for human health. PMID:25788710

  10. An "All-laser" Endothelial Transplant.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Francesca; Canovetti, Annalisa; Malandrini, Alex; Lenzetti, Ivo; Pini, Roberto; Menabuoni, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The "all laser" assisted endothelial keratoplasty is a procedure that is performed with a femtosecond laser used to cut the donor tissue at an intended depth, and a near infrared diode laser to weld the corneal tissue. The proposed technique enables to reach the three main goals in endothelial keratoplasty: a precise control in the thickness of the donor tissue; its easy insertion in the recipient bed and a reduced risk of donor lenticule dislocation. The donor cornea thickness is measured in the surgery room with optical coherence tomography (OCT), in order to correctly design the donor tissue dimensions. A femtosecond laser is used to cut the donor cornea. The recipient eye is prepared by manual stripping of the descemetic membrane. The donor endothelium is inserted into a Busin-injector, the peripheral inner side is stained with a proper chromophore (a water solution of Indocyanine Green) and then it is pulled in the anterior chamber. The transplanted tissue is placed in the final and correct location and then diode laser welding is induced from outside the eyeball. The procedure has been performed on more than 15 patients evidencing an improvement in surgery performances, with a good recovery of visual acuity and a reduced donor lenticule dislocation event. PMID:26167711