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Sample records for hypertonic saline infusion

  1. Hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Constable, P D

    1999-11-01

    A key feature in the successful resuscitation of dehydrated or endotoxemic ruminants is the total amount of sodium administered. Administration of small volumes of HS and HSD offer major advantages over large volumes of isotonic saline because HS and HSD do not require intravenous catheterization or periodic monitoring, and are therefore suitable for use in the field. Hypertonic saline and HSD exert their beneficial effect by rapidly increasing preload and transiently decreasing afterload. Contrary to early reports, HS and HSD decrease cardiac contractility and do not activate a pulmonary reflex. The osmolality of HS and HSD should be 2400 mOsm/L (7.2% NaCl solution, 8 times normal plasma osmolality). Use of HS and HSD solutions of different osmolality to 2400 mOsm/L should be avoided at all costs, as too low a tonicity removes the main advantages of HS (low cost, decreased infusion time), whereas too high a tonicity may cause rapid vasodilation and decreased cardiac contractility, resulting in death. Rapid administration (> 1 mL/kg-1/min-1) of HS (2400 mOsm/L) should be avoided, as the induced hypotension may be fatal when coupled with a transient decrease in cardiac contractility. For treating dehydrated adult ruminants, HS (2400 mOsm/L, 4-5 mL/kg i.v. over 4-5 minutes) should be administered through the jugular vein and the cow allowed to drink water. This means that 2 L of HS should be administered to adult cattle. HSD should be administered in conjunction with isotonic oral electrolyte solutions to all calves 8% or more dehydrated (eyes recessed > or = 4 mm into the orbit, cervical skin tent duration > 6 seconds) or calves with reduced cardiac output (fetlock temperature < 29 degrees C when housed at 10-24 degrees C). For treating dehydrated calves, HSD (2400 mOsm/L NaCl in 6% dextran-70, 4-5 mL/kg i.v. over 4-5 minutes) should be administered through the jugular vein and the calf allowed to suckle an isotonic oral electrolyte solution. This means that 120

  2. Management of Severe Hyponatremia: Infusion of Hypertonic Saline and Desmopressin or Infusion of Vasopressin Inhibitors?

    PubMed Central

    Tzamaloukas, Antonios H.; Shapiro, Joseph I.; Raj, Dominic S.; Murata, Glen H.; Glew, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Rapid correction of severe hyponatremia carries the risk of osmotic demyelination. Two recently introduced methods of correction of hyponatremia have diametrically opposite effects on aquaresis. Inhibitors of vasopressin V2 receptor (vaptans) lead to the production of dilute urine, whereas infusion of desmopressin causes urinary concentration. Identification of the category of hyponatremia that will benefit from one or the other treatment is critical. In general, vaptans are effective in hyponatremias presenting with concentrated urine and, with the exception of hypovolemic hyponatremia, can be used as their primary treatment. Desmopressin is effective in hyponatremias presenting with dilute urine or developing urinary dilution after saline infusion. In this setting, desmopressin infusion helps prevent overcorrection of the hyponatremia. Monitoring of the changes in serum sodium concentration as a guide to treatment changes is imperative regardless of the initial treatment of severe hyponatremia. PMID:25247759

  3. Hypertonic saline infusion in traumatic brain injury increases the incidence of pulmonary infection.

    PubMed

    Coritsidis, George; Diamond, Nechama; Rahman, Aleef; Solodnik, Paul; Lawrence, Kayode; Rhazouani, Salwa; Phalakornkul, Suganda

    2015-08-01

    We aimed to investigate the incidence of electrolyte abnormalities, acute kidney injury (AKI), deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and infections in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) treated with hypertonic saline (HTS) as osmolar therapy. We retrospectively studied 205 TBI patients, 96 with HTS and 109 without, admitted to the surgical/trauma intensive care unit between 2006 and 2012. Hemodynamics, electrolytes, length of stay (LOS), acute physiological assessment and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II), injury severity scores (ISS) and mortality were tabulated. Infection, mechanical ventilation, DVT and AKI incidence were reviewed. HTS was associated with increased LOS and all infections (p=0.0001). After correction for the Glasgow coma scale (GCS) and ventilator need, pulmonary infections (p=0.001) and LOS remained higher with HTS (p=0.0048). HTS did not result in increased blood pressure, DVT, AKI or neurological benefits. HTS significantly increased the odds for all infections, most specifically pulmonary infections, in patients with GCS<8. Due to these findings, HTS in TBI should be administered with caution regardless of acuity. PMID:26055957

  4. Fluid shifts following 7% hypertonic saline (2400 mosmol/L) infusion.

    PubMed

    Onarheim, H

    1995-05-01

    Small volumes of hyperosmolar saline solutions may rapidly improve MAP and CO in hemorrhagic shock. In the present study, the effects of infusion of 7% NaCl on interstitial fluid volume and intracellular fluid volume were determined. In anesthetized, normovolemic rats either 7% NaCl (1.1 mL/100 g, intravenously), acetated Ringer's solution (10 mL/100 g), or no fluid (controls) were infused and extracellular volume (ECV) and plasma volume were determined in samples from skin, skeletal muscle, small intestine, liver, and lung. Intracellular volume was determined as local tissue water content minus ECV. Extracellular fluid volumes were 21.1 +/- .6 mL/ 100 g(mean +/- SEM; n = 6) (control animals), 26.1 +/- .4 mL/100 g (following 7% NaCl) (p < .05), and 32.8 +/- .5 mL/100 g (following Ringer's) (p < .05). Following 7% NaCl ECV increased by four to five times the infused volume. With 7% NaCl ECV in skin, muscle and intestine increased significantly, whereas cell volume was reduced by 10% in muscle and liver. Skeletal muscle, constituting > 40% of body mass with a large cell volume, was the main source for fluid mobilized by administration of 7% NaCl. PMID:7648336

  5. Variation of pain and vasomotor responses evoked by intramuscular infusion of hypertonic saline in human subjects: influence of gender and its potential neural mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jing; You, Hao-Jun

    2012-04-10

    The aim of current study was to explore role of gender in pain and cutaneous vasomotor responses during the condition of intramuscular (i.m.) hypertonic (HT, 5.8%) saline induced muscle pain. In 20 healthy human subjects (10 females), 2-4.8ml of either HT or isotonic (IT, 0.9%) saline was infused into the left tibialis anterior muscle to elicit muscle pain, during which the intensity and distribution of pain together with skin vasomotor responses were investigated. Cutaneous blood flow was assessed using laser-Doppler flowmetry in 4 different skin areas: ipsilateral infusion area (5cm×5cm), ipsilateral referred pain area (5cm×10cm), contralateral area to the infusion site (5cm×5cm), and contralateral area to the referred pain site (5cm×10cm). Among the different i.m. infusions, 4.8ml HT saline evoked the highest pain intensity, the longest pain duration, and the largest pain distribution area in different subjects (P<0.001). Gender-related differences in pain and skin vasomotor responses were observed following the i.m. HT, but not IT, saline infusion while women exhibited stronger pain intensity and duration (P<0.001), and more expressed vasomotor responses (P<0.05) at the infusion area and contralateral mirror site. Intramuscularly pre-treating the infusion area with 1ml of 2% lidocaine markedly reduced the muscle pain and blocked the increased skin blood flow in both men and women (P<0.05). However, post-treatment with lidocaine significantly reduced the pain intensity and the increased skin blood flow only in men, but not women. The data demonstrate that gender-associated difference exists in HT saline intramuscularly induced local muscle pain and vasomotor responses. Neural mechanisms underlying gender-related differences in vasomotor responses is significantly different, suggesting that local pre-treatment, but not post-treatment, with anesthetic may provide superior analgesia to block sex-associated difference in pain and vasomotor responses. PMID

  6. Saline infusion sonohysterography.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Saline infusion sonohysterography consists of ultrasonographic imaging of the uterus and uterocervical cavity, using real-time ultrasonography during injection of sterile saline into the uterus. When properly performed, saline infusion sonohysterography can provide information about the uterus and endometrium. The most common indication for sonohysterography is abnormal uterine bleeding. sonohysterography should not be performed in a woman who is pregnant or could be pregnant or in a woman with a pelvic infection or unexplained pelvic tenderness. Physicians who perform or supervise diagnostic saline infusion sonohysterograpy should have training, experience, and demonstrated competence in gynecologic ultrasonography and saline infusion sonohysterography. Portions of this document were developed jointly with the American College of Radiology and the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine. PMID:14968760

  7. Therapeutic effects of compound hypertonic saline on rats with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Fang; Chen, Wei; Xu, Liang; Wang, Huabing; Lu, Huizhi

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the major causes of death and is the biggest obstacle preventing improvement of the success rate in curing critical illnesses. Currently, isotonic solutions are used in fluid resuscitation technique. Several studies have shown that hypertonic saline applied in hemorrhagic shock can rapidly increase the plasma osmotic pressure, facilitate the rapid return of interstitial fluid into the blood vessels, and restore the effective circulating blood volume. Here, we established a rat model of sepsis by using the cecal ligation and puncture approach. We found that intravenous injection of hypertonic saline dextran (7.5% NaCl/6% dextran) after cecal ligation and puncture can improve circulatory failure at the onset of sepsis. We found that the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and intracellular adhesion molecule 1 levels in the lung tissue of cecal ligation and puncture rats treated with hypertonic saline dextran were significantly lower than the corresponding levels in the control group. We inferred that hypertonic saline dextran has a positive immunoregulatory effect and inhibits the overexpression of the inflammatory response in the treatment of sepsis. The percentage of neutrophils, lung myeloperoxidase activity, wet to dry weight ratio of lung tissues, histopathological changes in lung tissues, and indicators of arterial blood gas analysis was significantly better in the hypertonic saline dextran-treated group than in the other groups in this study. Hypertonic saline dextran-treated rats had significantly improved survival rates at 9 and 18 h compared to the control group. Our results suggest that hypertonic saline dextran plays a protective role in acute lung injury caused after cecal ligation and puncture. In conclusion, hypertonic/hyperoncotic solutions have beneficial therapeutic effects in the treatment of an animal model of sepsis. PMID:24983672

  8. Rat supraoptic neurones: the effects of locally applied hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Leng, G

    1980-07-01

    1. Extracellular action potentials were recorded from supraoptic neurones in lactating, urethane-anaesthetized rats. A microtap was used to apply a very small volume (about 10(-7) ml.) of hypertonic saline (1-4 M-NaCl) to the immediate neighbourhood of these units over about 1 min.2. Twenty-five of twenty-seven supraoptic neurones were excited by this local osmotic stimulus. The response of individual units was reversible and repeatable. Microtap applications of isotonic saline to supraoptic neurones were without observed effect.3. Continuously firing supraoptic neurones responded to hypertonic saline with a smooth acceleration in firing rate. Phasic neurones showed an increase in the over-all level of activity, and in particular, a prolongation of the active phases. Slow, irregularly firing cells responded either with a smooth acceleration in firing rate, or with phasic behaviour.4. The response to local hypertonic saline appears to be reasonably specific to the supraoptic nucleus. Of thirty-five neurones recorded close to the supraoptic nucleus but which were not antidromically activated from stimulation of the neural stalk, only nine responded to the local application of hypertonic saline.5. Similarities between the manner of response of supraoptic neurones to local application of hypertonic saline and the manner of their response to systemic increases in the osmotic pressure of blood plasma support the hypothesis that supraoptic neurones are osmosensitive. PMID:7441542

  9. Hypertonic saline dextran resuscitation of thermal injury.

    PubMed Central

    Horton, J W; White, D J; Baxter, C R

    1990-01-01

    Burn treatment requires large volumes of crystalloid, which may exacerbate burn-induced cardiopulmonary dysfunction. Small-volume hypertonic saline dextran (HSD) resuscitation has been used for effective treatment of several types of shock. In this study isolated coronary perfused guinea pig hearts were used to determine if HSD improved left ventricular contractile response to burn injuries. Parameters measured included left ventricular pressure (LVP) and maximal rate of LVP rise (+dP/dt max) and fall (-dP/dt max) at a constant preload. Third-degree scald burns comprising 45% of total body surface area (burn groups, N = 75), or 0% for controls (group 1, N = 25) were produced using a template device. In group 2, 25 burned guinea pigs were not fluid resuscitated and served as untreated burns; 20 burns were resuscitated with 4 mL lactated Ringer's (LR) solution/kg/% burn for 24 hours (group 3); additional burn groups were treated with an initial bolus of HSD (4 mL/kg, 2400 mOsm, sodium chloride, 6% dextran 70) followed by either 1, 2, or 4 mL LR/kg/% burn over 24 hours (groups 4, 5, and 6, respectively). Untreated burn injury significantly impaired cardiac function, as indicated by a fall in LVP (from 88 +/- 3 to 68 +/- 4 mmHg; p = 0.01) and +/- dP/dt max (from 1352 +/- 50 to 1261 +/- 90 and from 1150 +/- 35 to 993 +/- 59; p = 0.01, respectively) and a downward shift of LV function curves from those obtained from control hearts. Compared to untreated burns, hearts from burned animals treated with LR alone showed no significant improvement in cardiac function. However hearts from burned animals treated with HSD + 1 mL LR/kg/% burn had significantly higher LVP (79 +/- 4 vs. 68 +/- 4 mmHg, p = 0.01) and +/- dP/dt max (+dP/dt: 1387 +/- 60 vs. 1261 +/- 90 mmHg/sc, p = 0.01; -dP/dt: 1079 +/- 50 vs. 993 +/- 59 mmHg/sc, p = 0.01) than hearts from untreated burned animals and generated left ventricular function curves comparable to those calculated for hearts from control

  10. Effect of hypertonic saline treatment on the inflammatory response after hydrochloric acid-induced lung injury in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Holms, Carla Augusto; Otsuki, Denise Aya; Kahvegian, Marcia; Massoco, Cristina Oliveira; Fantoni, Denise Tabacchi; Gutierrez, Paulo Sampaio; Junior, Jose Otavio Costa Auler

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hypertonic saline has been proposed to modulate the inflammatory cascade in certain experimental conditions, including pulmonary inflammation caused by inhaled gastric contents. The present study aimed to assess the potential anti-inflammatory effects of administering a single intravenous dose of 7.5% hypertonic saline in an experimental model of acute lung injury induced by hydrochloric acid. METHODS: Thirty-two pigs were anesthetized and randomly allocated into the following four groups: Sham, which received anesthesia and were observed; HS, which received intravenous 7.5% hypertonic saline solution (4 ml/kg); acute lung injury, which were subjected to acute lung injury with intratracheal hydrochloric acid; and acute lung injury + hypertonic saline, which were subjected to acute lung injury with hydrochloric acid and treated with hypertonic saline. Hemodynamic and ventilatory parameters were recorded over four hours. Subsequently, bronchoalveolar lavage samples were collected at the end of the observation period to measure cytokine levels using an oxidative burst analysis, and lung tissue was collected for a histological analysis. RESULTS: Hydrochloric acid instillation caused marked changes in respiratory mechanics as well as blood gas and lung parenchyma parameters. Despite the absence of a significant difference between the acute lung injury and acute lung injury + hypertonic saline groups, the acute lung injury animals presented higher neutrophil and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage analysis. The histopathological analysis revealed pulmonary edema, congestion and alveolar collapse in both groups; however, the differences between groups were not significant. Despite the lower cytokine and neutrophil levels observed in the acute lung injury + hypertonic saline group, significant differences were not observed among the treated and non-treated groups. CONCLUSIONS: Hypertonic saline

  11. Neurohypophyseal response to fluid resuscitation with hypertonic saline during septic shock in rats.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Michael Brian; Vieira, Alexandre Antonio; Elias, Lucila L K; Rodrigues, José Antunes; Giusti-Paiva, Alexandre

    2013-02-01

    Septic shock is a serious condition with a consequent drop in blood pressure and inadequate tissue perfusion. Small-volume resuscitation with hypertonic saline (HS) has been proposed to restore physiological haemodynamics during haemorrhagic and endotoxic shock. In the present study, we sought to determine the effects produced by an HS infusion in rats subjected to caecal ligation and perforation (CLP). Male Wistar rats were randomly grouped and submitted to either CLP or sham surgery. Either HS (7.5% NaCl, 4 ml kg(-1) i.v.) or isotonic saline (IS; 0.9% NaCl, 4 ml kg(-1) i.v.) was administered 6 h after CLP. Recordings of mean arterial pressure and heart rate were made during this protocol. Moreover, measurements of electrolyte, vasopressin and oxytocin secretion were analysed after either the HS or the IS treatment. Six hours after CLP, we observed a characteristic decrease in mean arterial pressure that occurs after CLP. The HS infusion in these rats produced a transient elevation of the plasma sodium concentration and osmolality and increased plasma vasopressin and oxytocin levels. Moreover, the HS infusion could restore the mean arterial pressure after CLP, which was completely blunted by the previous injection of the vasopressin but not the oxytocin antagonist. The present study demonstrated that rats subjected to CLP and an infusion of hypertonic saline respond with secretion of neurohypophyseal hormones and a transient increase in blood pressure mediated by the V(1) receptor. PMID:22903979

  12. Oral hypertonic saline causes transient fall of vasopressin in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Seckl, J.R.; Williams, D.M.; Lightman, S.L.

    1986-08-01

    After dehydration, oral rehydration causes a fall in plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) that precedes changes in plasma osmolality. To investigate further the stimulus for this effect, its specificity, and association with thirst, six volunteers were deprived of water for 24 h and given a salt load on two separate occasions. On each study day they then drank rapidly 10 ml/kg of either tap water or hypertonic saline (360 mosmol/kg). There was a significant fall in plasma AVP from 2.0 +/- 0.3 to 1.2 +/- 0.4 pmol/l 5 min after drinking water and from 1.8 +/- 0.3 to 0.9 +/- 0.2 pmol/l after hypertonic saline. Plasma osmolality fell 30-60 min after water and was unchanged after saline. Plasma renin activity, oxytocin, and total protein all remained unchanged. All subjects reported diminished thirst after hypertonic saline. Gargling with water reduced thirst but did not affect plasma AVP. There appears to be a drinking-mediated neuroendocrine reflex that decreases plasma AVP irrespective of the osmolality of the liquid consumed. The sensation of thirst did not correlate with plasma osmolality and was not always related to plasma AVP concentration. AVP was measured by radioimmunoassay.

  13. Comparison of Normal Saline, Hypertonic Saline Albumin and Terlipressin plus Hypertonic Saline Albumin in an Infant Animal Model of Hypovolemic Shock

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In series of cases and animal models suffering hemorrhagic shock, the use of vasopressors has shown potential benefits regarding hemodynamics and tissue perfusion. Terlipressin is an analogue of vasopressin with a longer half-life that can be administered by bolus injection. We have previously observed that hypertonic albumin improves resuscitation following controlled hemorrhage in piglets. The aim of the present study was to analyze whether the treatment with the combination of terlipressin and hypertonic albumin can produce better hemodynamic and tissular perfusion parameters than normal saline or hypertonic albumin alone at early stages of hemorrhagic shock in an infant animal model. Methods Experimental, randomized animal study including 39 2-to-3-month-old piglets. Thirty minutes after controlled 30 ml/kg bleed, pigs were randomized to receive either normal saline (NS) 30 ml/kg (n = 13), 5% albumin plus 3% hypertonic saline (AHS) 15 ml/kg (n = 13) or single bolus of terlipressin 15 μg/kg i.v. plus 5% albumin plus 3% hypertonic saline 15 ml/kg (TAHS) (n = 13) over 30 minutes. Global hemodynamic and tissular perfusion parameters were compared. Results After controlled bleed a significant decrease of blood pressure, cardiac index, central venous saturation, carotid and peripheral blood flow, brain saturation and an increase of heart rate, gastric PCO2 and lactate was observed. After treatment no significant differences in most hemodynamic (cardiac index, mean arterial pressure) and perfusion parameters (lactate, gastric PCO2, brain saturation, cutaneous blood flow) were observed between the three therapeutic groups. AHS and TAHS produced higher increase in stroke volume index and carotid blood flow than NS. Conclusions In this pediatric animal model of hypovolemic shock, albumin plus hypertonic saline with or without terlipressin achieved similar hemodynamics and perfusion parameters than twice the volume of NS. Addition of terlipressin did not

  14. Epinephrine Improves the Efficacy of Nebulized Hypertonic Saline in Moderate Bronchiolitis: A Randomised Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Comino-Vazquez, Paloma; Palma-Zambrano, Encarnación; Bulo-Concellón, Rocio; Santos-Sánchez, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims There is no evidence that the epinephrine-3% hypertonic saline combination is more effective than 3% hypertonic saline alone for treating infants hospitalized with acute bronchiolitis. We evaluated the efficacy of nebulized epinephrine in 3% hypertonic saline. Patients and Methods We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial in 208 infants hospitalized with acute moderate bronchiolitis. Infants were randomly assigned to receive nebulized 3% hypertonic saline with either 3 mL of epinephrine or 3 mL of placebo, administered every four hours. The primary outcome measure was the length of hospital stay. Results A total of 185 infants were analyzed: 94 in the epinephrine plus 3% hypertonic saline group and 91 in the placebo plus 3% hypertonic saline group. Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics were similar in both groups. Length of hospital stay was significantly reduced in the epinephrine group as compared with the placebo group (3.94 ±1.88 days vs. 4.82 ±2.30 days, P = 0.011). Disease severity also decreased significantly earlier in the epinephrine group (P = 0.029 and P = 0.036 on days 3 and 5, respectively). Conclusions In our setting, nebulized epinephrine in 3% hypertonic saline significantly shortens hospital stay in hospitalized infants with acute moderate bronchiolitis compared to 3% hypertonic saline alone, and improves the clinical scores of severity from the third day of treatment, but not before. Trial Registration EudraCT 2009-016042-57 PMID:26575036

  15. Pleuropulmonary hydatid disease treated with thoracoscopic instillation of hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan P, Hari; Musthafa A, Monhammed; Suraj, Kp; Ravidran, C

    2008-01-01

    Hydatid disease is caused by the larval stage of the cestode, Echinococcus granulosus. Man is the intermediate host in its life cycle. The most common organ involved is liver followed by lung. Although surgery remains the definitive treatment for symptomatic lesions, it is associated with considerable morbidity. Other less invasive treatment strategies as an adjunct to medical treatment that have been tried in various case series include percutaneous aspiration, instillation and reaspiration of scolicidal agents (PAIR), and thoracoscopic removal of cysts located subpleurally. Here we report the case of a 58 year old gentleman with hepatic and pleuropulmonary hydatid disease who was subjected to medical thoracoscopy and instillation of hypertonic saline (3%), followed by medical management with albendazole with which complete resolution of the pulmonary cysts was achieved. PMID:20390071

  16. Midtrimester abortion by hypertonic saline instillation experience in Ramathibodi Hospital.

    PubMed

    Suthutvoravut, S; Supacharapongkul, V; Bhiromswasdi, S

    1983-03-01

    A retrospective study of midtrimester abortions using the intraamniotic instillation of hypertonic saline solution was conducted. All 62 cases admitted to the Ramathibodi Hospital in Bangkok, Thailand for midtrimester abortion in 1980 were terminated by intraamniotic hypertonic saline instillation. The pregnancies were unwanted in 32 (51.6%) of the cases because of family problems, poor socioeconomic status, and deteriorated psychological health. 15 cases (24.2%) were preganancy from rape; 9 (14.5%) had rubella infection during the 1st trimester; and 3 cases (4.8%) were mentally retarded. There was 1 case of renal staghorn calculi post nephrostomy, 1 of multiparity with history of hemophilia in the family, and 1 of failed IUD contraception. The women were between 16-25 years of age in 39 cases, aged 15 or under in 4 cases (6.5%), and over age 35 in 4 cases. In 49 cases (79%) abortion was performed during 16-20 weeks gestation, in 12 cases (19.1%) at 21-24 weeks, and in 1 case at 25 weeks of gestation. The time interval from hypertonic saline instillation to abortion was analyzed in order to evaluate the effect of parity, amount of amniotic fluid withdrawn, and oxytocin augmentation. The mean instillation to abortion time (I-A) was 30.19 +or- 11.25 hours. There were 3 cases which did not receive oxytocin and who spontaneously aborted within 24 hours. Among cases which received oxytocin augmentation, there were 9 who received oxytocin immediately after instillation and 50 who received it 18-24 hours later. The I-A time was 31.22 +or- 11.63 hours in the group that received oxytocin immediately and 31.09 +or- 10.68 in the group receiving it later. There was no statistical difference between the 2 groups. Among the 50 cases which received oxytocin augmentation 18-24 hours later, there was no statistical difference between groups of nulliparity and multiparity. There were 46 cases in which the amount of amniotic fluid withdrawn was noted. In the group in which more than

  17. Immunomodulatory effect of hypertonic saline in hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Motaharinia, Javad; Etezadi, Farhad; Moghaddas, Azadeh; Mojtahedzadeh, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and nosocomial infection following trauma-hemorrhage are among the most important causes of mortality in hemorrhagic shock patients. Dysregulation of the immune system plays a central role in MODS and a fluid having an immunomodulatory effect could be advantageous in hemorrhagic shock resuscitation. Hypertonic saline (HS) is widely used as a resuscitation fluid in trauma-hemorrhagic patients. Besides having beneficial effects on the hemodynamic parameters, HS has modulatory effects on various functions of immune cells such as degranulation, adhesion molecules and cytokines expression, as well as reactive oxygen species production. This article reviews clinical evidence for decreased organ failure and mortality in hemorrhagic shock patients resuscitated with HS. Despite promising results in animal models, results from pre-hospital and emergency department administration in human studies did not show improvement in survival, organ failure, or a reduction in nosocomial infection by HS resuscitation. Further post hoc analysis showed some benefit from HS resuscitation for severely-injured patients, those who received more than ten units of blood by transfusion, patients who underwent surgery, and victims of traumatic brain injury. Several reasons are suggested to explain the differences between clinical and animal models. PMID:26437974

  18. Mannitol versus hypertonic saline: Safety and efficacy of mannitol and hypertonic saline in sputum induction and bronchial hyperreactivity assessment.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Puebla, M J; Olaguibel, J M; Almudevar, E; Echegoyen, A A; Vela, C; de Esteban, B

    2015-08-01

    Eosinophilic asthma phenotype predicts good response to corticosteroids and associates to asthmatic exacerbations. Sputum induction by hypertonic saline (HS) inhalation is technically demanding. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) to osmotic agents indirectly mirrors active airway inflammation. We compared the safety and ability of HS and mannitol to induce sputum and measure BHR. We evaluated the stability of inflammatory phenotypes. We studied 35 non-smoking asthmatics randomized to undergo HS and mannitol challenges on 2 days 1 week apart. Sputum was sampled for cell analysis and phenotyped as eosinophilic (≥3% eosinophils) and non-eosinophilic (<3%) asthma. Nineteen subjects had BHR to mannitol and nine of them also had BHR to HS. Drops in forced expiratory volume in 1 s were higher from HS challenge than from mannitol challenge. Adequate sputum samples were obtained from 80% subjects (68% mannitol and 71% HS). Eosinophils and macrophages from both challenges correlated. Neutrophils were higher in sputum from HS. Ninety percent samples were equally phenotyped with HS and mannitol. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide, sputum eosinophils and BHR correlated in both challenges. HS and mannitol showed similar capacity to produce valuable sputum samples. BHR to both osmotic stimuli partially resembled airway eosinophilic inflammation but mannitol was more sensitive than HS to assess BHR. Eosinophilic phenotype remained stable in most patients with both stimuli. PMID:25761367

  19. Hypertonic Saline Dextran Ameliorates Organ Damage in Beagle Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    You, Guo-xing; Wang, Ying; Chen, Gan; Wang, Quan; Zhang, Xi-gang; Zhao, Lian; Zhou, Hong; He, Yue-zhong

    2015-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of hypertonic saline with 6% Dextran-70 (HSD) resuscitation on organ damage and the resuscitation efficiency of the combination of HSD and lactated ringers (LR) in a model of hemorrhage shock in dogs. Methods Beagles were bled to hold their mean arterial pressure (MAP) at 50±5 mmHg for 1 h. After hemorrhage, beagles were divided into three groups (n = 7) to receive pre-hospital resuscitation for 1 h (R1): HSD (4 ml/kg), LR (40 ml/kg), and HSD+LR (a combination of 4 ml/kg HSD and 40 ml/kg LR). Next, LR was transfused into all groups as in-hospital resuscitation (R2). After two hours of observation (R3), autologous blood was transfused. Hemodynamic responses and systemic oxygenation were measured at predetermined phases. Three days after resuscitation, the animals were sacrificed and tissues including kidney, lung, liver and intestinal were obtained for pathological analysis. Results Although the initial resuscitation with HSD was shown to be faster than LR with regard to an ascending MAP, the HSD group showed a similar hemodynamic performance compared to the LR group throughout the experiment. Compared with the LR group, the systemic oxygenation performance in the HSD group was similar but showed a lower venous-to-arterial CO2 gradient (Pv-aCO2) at R3 (p < 0.05). Additionally, the histology score of the kidneys, lungs and liver were significantly lower in the HSD group than in the LR group (p < 0.05). The HSD+LR group showed a superior hemodynamic response but higher extravascular lung water (EVLW) and lower arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) than the other groups (p < 0.05). The HSD+LR group showed a marginally improved systemic oxygenation performance and lower histology score than other groups. Conclusions Resuscitation after hemorrhagic shock with a bolus of HSD showed a similar hemodynamic response compared with LR at ten times the volume of HSD, but HSD showed superior efficacy in organ protection

  20. Common toads (Bufo arenarum) learn to anticipate and avoid hypertonic saline solutions.

    PubMed

    Daneri, M Florencia; Papini, Mauricio R; Muzio, Rubén N

    2007-11-01

    Toads (Bufo arenarum) were exposed to pairings between immersion in a neutral saline solution (i.e., one that caused no significant variation in fluid balance), followed by immersion in a highly hypertonic saline solution (i.e., one that caused water loss). In Experiment 1, solutions were presented in a Pavlovian conditioning arrangement. A group receiving a single neutral-highly hypertonic pairing per day exhibited a greater conditioned increase in heart rate than groups receiving either the same solutions in an explicitly unpaired fashion, or just the neutral solution. Paired toads also showed a greater ability to compensate for water loss across trials than that of the explicitly unpaired group. Using the same reinforcers and a similar apparatus, Experiment 2 demonstrated that toads learn a one-way avoidance response motivated by immersion in the highly hypertonic solution. Cardiac and avoidance conditioning are elements of an adaptive system for confronting aversive situations involving loss of water balance. PMID:18085926

  1. Body water handling in response to hypertonic-saline induced diuresis in fasting northern elephant seal pups (Mirounga angustirostris)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Rudy M.; Wade, Charles E.; Ortiz, C. Leo

    2003-01-01

    During natural fasting conditions in postweaned northern elephant seal (NES) (Mirounga angustirostris) pups, urinary water loss is minimized and percent total body water (TBW) is maintained constant. However, following infusion of hypertonic saline, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and urine output increased in fasting pups. Therefore, we quantified the magnitude of the hypernatremia-induced diuresis relative to the animal's total body water (TBW) pool and the percentage of filtered water reabsorbed. Following a 24 h control period, naturally fasting NES pups (n=7) were infused (4 ml min(-1)) with hypertonic saline (16.7%) at a dose of 3 mmol NaCl kg(-1) body mass. Total body water was estimated prior to infusion by tritium dilution, GFR was estimated by standard creatinine clearance, and urine output (V) was measured for 24 h during the control and post infusion periods. Percentage of filtered water reabsorbed was calculated as (1-(V/GFR))x100. Twenty-four hours following the infusion, GFR (control: 69+/-12 ml min(-1) and post-infusion: 118+/-19 ml min(-1); mean+/-S.E.) increased 77+/-28% above control and the percentage of filtered water reabsorbed was decreased 0.4+/-0.1%. The increase in urine output (control: 218+/-47 ml d(-1) and post-infusion: 883+/-92 ml d(-1)) accounted for 1.7+/-0.2% of the pups' TBW. The hypernatremia-induced diuresis was accompanied by the loss of body water indicating the lack of water retention. Although the 77% increase in GFR was only associated with a 0.4% decrease in the percentage of filtered water reabsorbed, this decrease was significant enough to result in a 4-fold increase in urine output. Despite the observed diuresis, fasting NES pups appear to possess an efficient water recycling mechanism requiring only a small percentage of body water to excrete an excess salt load. This water recycling mechanism may allow pups to avoid negative perturbations in body water as they initiate feeding in a marine environment following the

  2. Median Preoptic Nucleus Mediates the Cardiovascular Recovery Induced by Hypertonic Saline in Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Nathalia Oda; Naves, Lara Marques; Ferreira-Neto, Marcos Luiz; Freiria-Oliveira, André Henrique; Colombari, Eduardo; Reis, Angela Adamski da Silva; Xavier, Carlos Henrique; Pedrino, Gustavo Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Changes in plasma osmolarity, through central and peripheral osmoreceptors, activate the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) that modulates autonomic and neuroendocrine adjustments. The present study sought to determine the participation of MnPO in the cardiovascular recovery induced by hypertonic saline infusion (HSI) in rats submitted to hemorrhagic shock. The recordings of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal vascular conductance (RVC) were carried out on male Wistar rats (250–300 g). Hemorrhagic shock was induced by blood withdrawal over 20 min until the MAP values of approximately 60 mmHg were attained. The nanoinjection (100 nL) of GABAA agonist (Muscimol 4 mM; experimental group (EXP)) or isotonic saline (NaCl 150 mM; control (CONT)) into MnPO was performed 2 min prior to intravenous overload of sodium through HSI (3 M NaCl, 1.8 mL/kg, b.wt.). Hemorrhagic shock reduced the MAP in control (62 ± 1.1 mmHg) and EXP (61 ± 0.4 mmHg) equipotently. The inhibition of MnPO impaired MAP (CONT: 104 ± 4.2 versus EXP: 60 ± 6.2 mmHg) and RVC (CONT: 6.4 ± 11.4 versus EXP: -53.5 ± 10.0) recovery 10 min after HSI. The overall results in this study demonstrated, for the first time, that the MnPO plays an essential role in the HSI induced resuscitation during hypovolemic hemorrhagic shock. PMID:25485300

  3. G-CSF Administration after the Intraosseous Infusion of Hypertonic Hydroxyethyl Starches Accelerating Wound Healing Combined with Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hong; Liu, Jiejie; Hao, Haojie; Tong, Chuan; Ti, Dongdong; Liu, Huiling; Song, Haijing; Jiang, Chaoguang; Fu, Xiaobing; Han, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the therapeutic effects of G-CSF administration after intraosseous (IO) resuscitation in hemorrhagic shock (HS) combined with cutaneous injury rats. Methods. The rats were randomly divided into four groups: (1) HS with resuscitation (blank), (2) HS with resuscitation + G-CSF (G-CSF, 200 μg/kg body weight, subcutaneous injection), (3) HS with resuscitation + normal saline solution injection (normal saline), and (4) HS + G-CSF injection without resuscitation (Unres/G-CSF). To estimate the treatment effects, the vital signs of alteration were first evaluated, and then wound closure rates and homing of MSCs and EPCs to the wound skins and vasculogenesis were measured. Besides, inflammation and vasculogenesis related mRNA expressions were also examined. Results. IO infusion hypertonic hydroxyethyl starch (HHES) exhibited beneficial volume expansion roles and G-CSF administration accelerated wound healing 3 days ahead of other groups under hemorrhagic shock. Circulating and the homing of MSCs and EPCs at wound skins were significantly elevated at 6 h after G-CSF treatment. Inflammation was declined since 3 d while angiogenesis was more obvious in G-CSF treated group on day 9. Conclusions. These results suggested that the synergistical application of HHES and G-CSF has life-saving effects and is beneficial for improving wound healing in HS combined with cutaneous injury rats. PMID:26989687

  4. Inhibition of Neutrophils by Hypertonic Saline Involves Pannexin-1, CD39, CD73, and Other Ectonucleotidases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Bao, Yi; Zhang, Jingping; Woehrle, Tobias; Sumi, Yuka; Ledderose, Stephan; Li, Xiaoou; Ledderose, Carola; Junger, Wolfgang G

    2015-09-01

    Hypertonic saline (HS) resuscitation has been studied as a possible strategy to reduce polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) activation and tissue damage in trauma patients. Hypertonic saline blocks PMNs by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and stimulation of A2a adenosine receptors. Here, we studied the underlying mechanisms in search of possible reasons for the inconsistent results of recent clinical trials with HS resuscitation. Purified human PMNs or PMNs in whole blood were treated with HS to simulate hypertonicity levels found after HS resuscitation (40 mmol/L beyond isotonic levels). Adenosine triphosphate release was measured with a luciferase assay. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil activation was assessed by measuring oxidative burst. The pannexin-1 (panx1) inhibitor panx1 and the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone (CBX) blocked ATP release from PMNs in purified and whole blood preparations, indicating that HS releases ATP via panx1 and gap junction channels. Hypertonic saline blocked N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe-induced PMN activation by 40% in purified PMN preparations and by 60% in whole blood. These inhibitory effects were abolished by panx1 but only partially reduced by CBX, which indicates that panx1 has a central role in the immunomodulatory effects of HS. Inhibition of the ectonucleotidases CD39 and CD73 abolished the suppressive effect of HS on purified PMN cultures but only partially reduced the effect of HS in whole blood. These findings suggest redundant mechanisms in whole blood that may strengthen the immunomodulatory effect of HS in vivo. We conclude that HS resuscitation exerts anti-inflammatory effects that involve panx1, CD39, CD73, and other ectonucleotidases, which produce the adenosine that blocks PMNs by stimulating their A2a receptors. Our findings shed new light on the immunomodulatory mechanisms of HS and suggest possible new strategies to improve the clinical efficacy of hypertonic resuscitation. PMID:26009814

  5. Thermal skin injury: I. Acute hemodynamic effects of fluid resuscitation with lactated Ringer's, plasma, and hypertonic saline (2,400 mosmol/l) in the rat.

    PubMed

    Onarheim, H; Lund, T; Reed, R

    1989-01-01

    Heart rate (HR), central venous pressure (CVP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and cardiac index (CI) were measured in anesthetized rats subjected to a 40% body surface area full-thickness scald burn. Postburn intravenous fluid therapy with lactated Ringer's (5 ml/hr), plasma (2.5 ml/hr), or very hypertonic saline (2,400 mosmol/l) (0.75 ml/hr) was compared to unburned or burned, untreated controls. HR and CVP were not influenced significantly by thermal injury. MAP decreased steadily in the untreated group from 110 mmHg to 80 mmHg at 3 hr postburn. In the fluid-treated groups MAP did not change significantly. During the first 15 min postburn, CI was reduced to 58-71% of control values (P less than 0.01). CI increased during Ringer's and plasma infusion to 74-80% of control values (P less than 0.02 vs. unburned). Despite infusion therapy, hematocrit increased from 48 to 52%, clearly less than in the unresuscitated group (increase from 48 to 58%). Theoretically, the 2,400 mosmol/l saline would expand extracellular volume by five to six times the infused volume. Still, CI was reduced by 55% at 3 hr postburn in the hypertonic saline as well as in the burned, untreated group (P less than 0.001 vs. unburned). The low CI was mainly due to a reduced stroke volume. PMID:2917370

  6. Hypertonic saline monotherapy in children with perennial allergic rhinitis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Barberi, S; D'Auria, E; Bernardo, L; Ferrara, F; Pietra, B; Pinto, F; Ferrero, F; Ciprandi, G

    2016-01-01

    Perennial allergic rhinitis (PAR) is very common in children and has a relevant impact on their families. House dust mites (HDM) are the most relevant cause of PAR. The present pilot study aimed to evaluate whether hypertonic saline (3%) nasal spray as monotherapy is able to improve: nasal symptom severity and parental perception of rhinitis control, sleep, and school performance in HDM-mono-sensitized children with PAR. Globally, 25 children (13 males and 12 females; mean age 9.5±3.1 years) were treated for 3 weeks. They were visited at baseline, at the end of treatment, and after a 2-week follow-up. Hypertonic saline significantly reduced total symptom score, and improved the perception, according to their parents, of rhinitis control, sleep, and school performance. In conclusion, the present pilot study provided the first evidence that 3% hypertonic saline monotherapy was able to relieve nasal symptoms and parental perception of PAR impact as well as being safe and well tolerated. PMID:27049102

  7. Hypertonic Saline for the Treatment of Bronchiolitis in Infants and Young Children: A Critical Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Bronchiolitis, an infection of the lower respiratory tract, is the leading cause of infant and child hospitalization in the United States. Therapeutic options for management of bronchiolitis are limited. Hypertonic saline inhalation therapy has been studied in numerous clinical trials with mixed results. In 2014, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published updated guidelines on the diagnosis and management of bronchiolitis, which include new recommendations on the use of hypertonic saline. We reviewed all published clinical trials mentioned in the 2014 AAP guidelines, as well as additional trials published since the guidelines, and critically evaluated each trial to determine efficacy, safety, and expectations of hypertonic saline inhalation therapy. A total of 2682 infants were studied over the course of 22 clinical trials. Nine trials were carried out in the outpatient/clinic/emergency department and 13 in the inpatient setting. We agree with the AAP guidelines regarding the recommendation to use nebulized hypertonic saline for infants hospitalized with bronchiolitis, with the expectation of reducing bronchiolitis scores and length of stay when it is expected to last more than 72 hours. However, we also believe there might be an advantage for hypertonic saline in reducing admission rates from the emergency department, based on close examination of the results of recent trials. This review also highlights important gaps in the available literature that need to be addressed in order to define the role of inhaled hypertonic saline therapy. PMID:26997926

  8. Pre-Exercise Ingestion of Pickle Juice, Hypertonic Saline, or Water and Aerobic Performance and Thermoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Peikert, Jarett; Miller, Kevin C.; Albrecht, Jay; Tucker, Jared; Deal, James

    2014-01-01

    Context: Ingesting high-sodium drinks pre-exercise can improve thermoregulation and performance. Athletic trainers (19%) give athletes pickle juice (PJ) prophylactically for cramping. No data exist on whether this practice affects aerobic performance or thermoregulation. Objective: To determine if drinking 2 mL/kg body mass of PJ, hypertonic saline, or deionized water (DIW) pre-exercise affects aerobic performance or thermoregulation. Design: Crossover study. Setting: Controlled laboratory study. Patients or Other Participants: Nine euhydrated men (age = 22 ± 3 years, height = 184.0 ± 8.2 cm, mass = 82.6 ± 16.0 kg) completed testing. Intervention(s): Participants rested for 65 minutes. During this period, they ingested 2 mL/kg of PJ, hypertonic saline, or DIW. Next, they drank 5 mL/kg of DIW. Blood was collected before and after ingestion of all fluids. Participants were weighed and ran in the heat (temperature = 38.3°C ± 1°C, relative humidity = 21.1% ± 4.7%) at increasing increments of maximal heart rate (50%, 60%, 70%, 80%, 90%, 95%) until exhaustion or until rectal temperature exceeded 39.5°C. Participants were weighed postexercise so we could calculate sweat volume. Main Outcome Measure(s): Time to exhaustion, rectal temperature, changes in plasma volume, and sweat volume. Results: Time to exhaustion did not differ among drinks (PJ = 77.4 ± 5.9 minutes, hypertonic saline = 77.4 ± 4.0 minutes, DIW = 75.7 ± 3.2 minutes; F2,16 = 1.1, P = .40). Core temperature of participants was similar among drinks (PJ = 38.7°C ± 0.3°C, hypertonic saline = 38.7°C ± 0.4°C, DIW = 38.8°C ± 0.4°C; P = .74) but increased from pre-exercise (36.7°C ± 0.2°C) to postexercise (38.7°C ± 0.4°C) (P < .05). No differences were observed for changes in plasma volume or sweat volume among drinks (P > .05). Conclusions: Ingesting small amounts of PJ or hypertonic saline with water did not affect performance or select thermoregulatory measures. Drinking larger volumes of

  9. Comparative study of midtrimester termination of pregnancy using hypertonic saline, ethacridine lactate, prostaglandin analogue and iodine-saline.

    PubMed

    Allahbadia, G

    1992-09-01

    The study consisted of terminations of 200 cases of second trimester pregnancies ranging from 14 weeks to 20 weeks. Out of these 200 cases, in 50 cases intra-amniotic instillation of 20% hypertonic saline (200 ml) was done after withdrawing 35-200 ml of amniotic fluid. Ethacridine lactate was instilled in 50 cases extra-amniotically. Prostaglandin F2 alpha was injected intramuscularly at regular intervals in 50 cases. Fifty cases of pregnancies were terminated with extra-amniotic instillation of 5% povidone-iodine solution mixed with normal saline. Comparison was made among all the methods regarding instillation-abortion interval, completeness of abortion, failure of the procedure and postoperative complications. Solution of 5% povidone-iodine in normal saline was found to be comparable in all aspects to other methods and above all a much cheaper alternative for poor patients. Success rate was highest with iodine-saline solution (100%) followed by ethacridine lactate (98%), hypertonic saline (96%) and lowest with prostaglandin F2 alpha (90%). PMID:1460314

  10. ROC trials update on prehospital hypertonic saline resuscitation in the aftermath of the US-Canadian trials

    PubMed Central

    Dubick, Michael A; Shek, Pang; Wade, Charles E

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this review are to assess the current state of hypertonic saline as a prehospital resuscitation fluid in hypotensive trauma patients, particularly after the 3 major Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium trauma trials in the US and Canada were halted due to futility. Hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury are the leading causes of death in both military and civilian populations. Prehospital fluid resuscitation remains controversial in civilian trauma, but small-volume resuscitation with hypertonic fluids is of utility in military scenarios with prolonged or delayed evacuation times. A large body of pre-clinical and clinical literature has accumulated over the past 30 years on the hemodynamic and, most recently, the anti-inflammatory properties of hypertonic saline, alone or with dextran-70. This review assesses the current state of hypertonic fluid resuscitation in the aftermath of the failed Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium trials. PMID:23778489

  11. INHALED HYPERTONIC SALINE IN INFANTS AND CHILDREN LESS THAN SIX YEARS OF AGE WITH CYSTIC FIBROSIS: THE ISIS RANDOMIZED TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Margaret; Ratjen, Felix; Brumback, Lyndia; Daniel, Stephen; Rowbotham, Ron; McNamara, Sharon; Johnson, Robin; Kronmal, Richard; Davis, Stephanie D

    2013-01-01

    Context Inhaled hypertonic saline is recommended as therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF) patients 6 years of age and older, but its efficacy has never been evaluated in CF patients <6 years of age. Objective To determine if hypertonic saline reduces the rate of protocol-defined pulmonary exacerbations in CF patients <6 years of age. Design and Setting A multicenter, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial was conducted from April 2009 to October 2011 at 30 CF care centers in the United States and Canada. Participants Participants had an established diagnosis of CF and were 4 to 60 months of age. A total of 344 patients were assessed for eligibility; 321 participants were randomized; 29 (9%) withdrew prematurely. Intervention The active group (n=158) received 7% hypertonic saline and the control group (n=163) received 0.9% isotonic saline nebulized twice daily for 48 weeks. Both groups received albuterol or levalbuterol prior to each study drug dose. Main Outcome Measures the rate of protocol-defined pulmonary exacerbations during the 48 week treatment period treated with oral, inhaled or intravenous antibiotics. Results The mean pulmonary exacerbation rate (events/person-year) was 2.3 (95% CI, 2.0, 2.5) in the hypertonic saline group and 2.3 (95% CI, 2.1, 2.6) in the isotonic saline group; the rate ratio was 0.98 (95% CI, 0.84, 1.14)). Among participants with pulmonary exacerbations, the mean number of total antibiotic treatment days for a pulmonary exacerbation was 60 (95% CI 49, 70) in the hypertonic saline group and 52 (95% CI 43, 61) in the isotonic saline group. There was no significant difference in secondary endpoints including height, weight, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, cough or respiratory symptom scores. Infant pulmonary function testing performed as an exploratory outcome in a subgroup (N=73, with acceptable measurements at 2 visits in 45) did not demonstrate significant differences between groups except for the mean change in forced

  12. Serotonin, glutamate and glycerol are released after the injection of hypertonic saline into human masseter muscles – a microdialysis study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic myalgia is associated with higher muscle levels of certain algesic biomarkers. The aim of this study was to investigate if hypertonic saline-induced jaw myalgia also leads to release of such biomarkers and if there were any sex differences in this respect. Methods Healthy participants, 15 men and 15 aged-matched women (25.7 ± 4.3 years) participated. Intramuscular microdialysis into masseter muscles was performed to sample serotonin (5-HT), glutamate, lactate, pyruvate, glucose and glycerol. After 2 hours 0.2 mL hypertonic saline (58.5 mg/mL) was injected into the masseter on one side and 0.2 mL isotonic saline (9 mg/mL) into the contralateral masseter close to the microdialysis catheter. Microdialysis continued for 1 hour after the injections. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) and pain were assessed before and after injections. Results The median (IQR) peak pain intensity (0–100 visual analogue scale) after hypertonic saline was 52.5 (38.0) and after isotonic saline 7.5 (24.0) (p < 0.05). 5-HT, glutamate and glycerol increased after hypertonic saline injection (p < 0.05). Lactate, pyruvate and glucose showed no change. PPT after microdialysis was reduced on both sides (p < 0.05) but without side differences. Pain after hypertonic saline injection correlated positively to 5-HT (p < 0.05) and negatively to glycerol (p < 0.05). Conclusions 5-HT, glutamate and glycerol increased after a painful hypertonic saline injection into the masseter muscle, but without sex differences. Since increased levels of 5-HT and glutamate have been reported in chronic myalgia, this strengthens the validity of the pain model. Glycerol warrants further investigations. PMID:25519464

  13. Can empirical hypertonic saline or sodium bicarbonate treatment prevent the development of cardiotoxicity during serious amitriptyline poisoning? Experimental research

    PubMed Central

    Sukru Paksu, Muhammet; Zengin, Halit; Uzun, Adem; Ilkaya, Fatih; Guzel, Hasan; Paksu, Sule; Ucar, Durmus; Alacam, Hasan; Duran, Latif; Murat, Naci; Guzel, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective The aim of this experimental study was to investigate whether hypertonic saline or sodium bicarbonate administration prevented the development of cardiotoxicity in rats that received toxic doses of amitriptyline. Method Thirty-six Sprague Dawley rats were used in the study. The animals were divided into six groups. Group 1 received toxic doses of i.p. amitriptyline. Groups 2 and 3 toxic doses of i.p. amitriptyline, plus i.v. sodium bicarbonate and i.v. hypertonic saline, respectively. Group 4 received only i.v. sodium bicarbonate, group 5 received only i.v. hypertonic saline, and group 6 was the control. Electrocardiography was recorded in all rats for a maximum of 60 minutes. Blood samples were obtained to measure the serum levels of sodium and ionised calcium. Results The survival time was shorter in group 1. In this group, the animals’ heart rates also decreased over time, and their QRS and QTc intervals were significantly prolonged. Groups 2 and 3 showed less severe changes in their ECGs and the rats survived for a longer period. The effects of sodium bicarbonate or hypertonic saline treatments on reducing the development of cardiotoxicity were similar. The serum sodium levels decreased in all the amitriptyline-applied groups. Reduction of serum sodium level was most pronounced in group 1. Conclusion Empirical treatment with sodium bicarbonate or hypertonic saline can reduce the development of cardiotoxicity during amitriptyline intoxication. As hypertonic saline has no adverse effects on drug elimination, it should be considered as an alternative to sodium bicarbonate therapy. PMID:25939777

  14. Inhibition of neutrophils by hypertonic saline involves pannexin-1, CD39, CD73, and other ectonucleotidases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Bao, Yi; Zhang, Jingping; Woehrle, Tobias; Sumi, Yuka; Ledderose, Stephan; Li, Xiaoou; Ledderose, Carola; Junger, Wolfgang G.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertonic saline (HS) resuscitation has been studied as a possible strategy to reduce PMN activation and tissue damage in trauma patients. HS blocks PMNs by ATP release and stimulation of A2a adenosine receptors. Here we studied the underlying mechanisms in search of possible reasons for the inconsistent results of recent clinical trials with HS resuscitation. Purified human PMNs or PMNs in whole blood were treated with HS to simulate hypertonicity levels found after HS resuscitation (40 mM beyond isotonic levels). ATP release was measured with a luciferase assay. PMN activation was assessed by measuring oxidative burst. The pannexin-1 (panx1) inhibitor 10panx1 and the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone (CBX) blocked ATP release from PMNs in purified and whole blood preparations, indicating that HS releases ATP via panx1 and gap junction channels. HS blocked fMLP-induced PMN activation by 40% in purified PMN preparations and by 60% in whole blood. These inhibitory effects were abolished by 10panx1 but only partially reduced by CBX, which indicates that panx1 has a central role in the immunomodulatory effects of HS. Inhibition of the ectonucleotidases CD39 and CD73 abolished the suppressive effect of HS on purified PMN cultures but only partially reduced the effect of HS in whole blood. These findings suggest redundant mechanisms in whole blood that may strengthen the immunomodulatory effect of HS in vivo. We conclude that HS resuscitation exerts anti-inflammatory effects that involve panx1, CD39, CD73, and other ectonucleotidases, which produce the adenosine that blocks PMNs by stimulating their A2a receptors. Our findings shed new light on the immunomodulatory mechanisms of HS and suggest possible new strategies to improve the clinical efficacy of hypertonic resuscitation. PMID:26009814

  15. Symptomatic Abdominal Simple Cysts: Is Percutaneous Sclerotherapy with Hypertonic Saline and Bleomycin a Treatment Option?

    PubMed Central

    Souftas, V. D.; Kosmidou, M.; Karanikas, M.; Souftas, D.; Menexes, G.; Prassopoulos, P.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the feasibility of percutaneous sclerotherapy of symptomatic simple abdominal cysts, using hypertonic saline and bleomycin, as an alternative to surgery. Materials and Methods. This study involved fourteen consecutive patients (ten women, four men, mean age: 59.2 y) with nineteen symptomatic simple cysts (liver n = 14, kidney n = 3, and adrenal n = 2) treated percutaneously using a modified method. Initially CT-guided drainage was performed; the next day the integrity of the cyst/exclusion of extravasation or communications was evaluated under fluoroscopy, followed by two injections/reabsorptions of the same quantity of hypertonic NaCl 15% solution and three-time repetition of the same procedure with the addition of bleomycin. The catheter was then removed; the patients were hospitalized for 12 hours and underwent follow-ups on 1st, 3rd, 6th, and 12th months. Cyst's volumes and the reduction rate (%) were calculated in each evaluation. Results. No pain or complications were noted. A significant cyst's volume reduction was documented over time (P < 0.001). On the 12th month 17 cysts disappeared and two displayed a 98.7% and 68.9% reduction, respectively. Conclusion. This percutaneous approach constitutes a very promising nonsurgical alternative for patients with symptomatic simple cyst, without complications under proper precautions, leading to eliminating the majority of cysts. PMID:25878660

  16. Acute inhalation of hypertonic saline does not improve mucociliary clearance in all children with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Little is known of how mucociliary clearance (MCC) in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) and normal pulmonary function compares with healthy adults, or how an acute inhalation of 7% hypertonic saline (HS) aerosol affects MCC in these same children. Methods We compared MCC in 12 children with CF and normal pulmonary function after an acute inhalation of 0.12% saline (placebo), or HS, admixed with the radioisotope 99 mtechnetium sulfur colloid in a double-blind, randomized, cross-over study. Mucociliary clearance on the placebo day in the children was also compared to MCC in 10 healthy, non-CF adults. Mucociliary clearance was quantified over a 90 min period, using gamma scintigraphy, and is reported as MCC at 60 min (MCC60) and 90 min (MCC90). Results Median [interquartile range] MCC60 and MCC90 in the children on the placebo visit were 15.4 [12.4-24.5]% and 19.3 [17.3-27.8%]%, respectively, which were similar to the adults with 17.8 [6.4-28.7]% and 29.6 [16.1-43.5]%, respectively. There was no significant improvement in MCC60 (2.2 [-6.2-11.8]%) or MCC90 (2.3 [-1.2-10.5]%) with HS, compared to placebo. In addition, 5/12 and 4/12 of the children showed a decrease in MCC60 and MCC90, respectively, after inhalation of HS. A post hoc subgroup analysis of the change in MCC90 after HS showed a significantly greater improvement in MCC in children with lower placebo MCC90 compared to those with higher placebo MCC90 (p = 0.045). Conclusions These data suggest that percent MCC varies significantly between children with CF lung disease and normal pulmonary functions, with some children demonstrating MCC values within the normal range and others showing MCC values that are below normal values. In addition, although MCC did not improve in all children after inhalation of HS, improvement did occur in children with relatively low MCC values after placebo. This finding suggests that acute inhalation of hypertonic saline may benefit a subset of children with low MCC

  17. Comparison of Melatonin, Hypertonic Saline, and Hydroxyethyl Starch for Resuscitation of Secondary Intra-Abdominal Hypertension in an Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mingtao; Tang, Hao; Liu, Dong; Li, Yang; Zhang, Lianyang

    2016-01-01

    A variety of agents may have a beneficial effect in reducing injury-induced intestinal edema of fluid, but studies confirming the efficacy and mechanisms of these agents in secondary intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) are lacking. This study was to compare the effectiveness of melatonin, 7.5% hypertonic saline (HS), and hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 (HES) on the resuscitation of secondary IAH in a rat model. Female SD rats were divided into: sham group, shock group, lactated Ringer solution (LR) group, melatonin group, HS group, and HES group. Except for the sham group, all rats underwent a combination of inducing portal hypertension, hemorrhaging to a MAP of 40 mmHg for 2 hr, and using an abdominal restraint device. The collected blood was reinfused and the rats were treated with LR (30ml/h), melatonin (50 mg/kg) + LR, HS (6 ml/kg) + LR, and HES (30 ml/kg) + LR, respectively. The shock group received no fluids. LR was continuously infused for 6hr. The intestinal permeability, immunofluorescence of tight junction proteins, transmission electron microscopy, level of inflammatory mediators (TNF-a, IL-1β, IL-6) and of biochemical markers of oxidative stress (malondialdehyde, myeloperoxidase activity, and glutathione peroxidase) were assessed. Expressions of the protein kinase B (Akt) and of tight junction proteins were detected by Western blot. Compared with LR, HS, and HES, melatonin was associated with less inflammatory and oxidative injury, less intestinal permeability and injury, and lower incidence of secondary IAH in this model. The salutary effect of melatonin in this model was associated with the upregulation of intestinal Akt phosphorylation. PMID:27560478

  18. Comparison of Melatonin, Hypertonic Saline, and Hydroxyethyl Starch for Resuscitation of Secondary Intra-Abdominal Hypertension in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong; Li, Yang; Zhang, Lianyang

    2016-01-01

    A variety of agents may have a beneficial effect in reducing injury-induced intestinal edema of fluid, but studies confirming the efficacy and mechanisms of these agents in secondary intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) are lacking. This study was to compare the effectiveness of melatonin, 7.5% hypertonic saline (HS), and hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 (HES) on the resuscitation of secondary IAH in a rat model. Female SD rats were divided into: sham group, shock group, lactated Ringer solution (LR) group, melatonin group, HS group, and HES group. Except for the sham group, all rats underwent a combination of inducing portal hypertension, hemorrhaging to a MAP of 40 mmHg for 2 hr, and using an abdominal restraint device. The collected blood was reinfused and the rats were treated with LR (30ml/h), melatonin (50 mg/kg) + LR, HS (6 ml/kg) + LR, and HES (30 ml/kg) + LR, respectively. The shock group received no fluids. LR was continuously infused for 6hr. The intestinal permeability, immunofluorescence of tight junction proteins, transmission electron microscopy, level of inflammatory mediators (TNF-a, IL-1β, IL-6) and of biochemical markers of oxidative stress (malondialdehyde, myeloperoxidase activity, and glutathione peroxidase) were assessed. Expressions of the protein kinase B (Akt) and of tight junction proteins were detected by Western blot. Compared with LR, HS, and HES, melatonin was associated with less inflammatory and oxidative injury, less intestinal permeability and injury, and lower incidence of secondary IAH in this model. The salutary effect of melatonin in this model was associated with the upregulation of intestinal Akt phosphorylation. PMID:27560478

  19. Regional suppression by lesions in the anterior third ventricle of c-fos expression induced by either angiotensin II or hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z; Herbert, J

    1995-07-01

    Angiotensin II (250 pmol) infused into the cerebral ventricles of male rats induces the expression of c-fos in the subfornical organ, supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, as well as in the lateral parabrachial nucleus, locus coeruleus and the nucleus of the solitary tract in the brainstem. Electrolytic lesions of the anteroventral third ventricle, principally the subcommissural (ventral) median preoptic nucleus, inhibited the dipsogenic response to i.c.v. angiotensin II and also suppressed c-fos expression in supraoptic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, lateral parabrachial nucleus, locus coeruleus and nucleus of the solitary tract but not in the subfornical organ or dorsal median preoptic nucleus. The stimulating effect of i.c.v. angiotensin II on corticosterone was also reduced. Median preoptic nucleus lesions also suppressed the expression of c-fos following i.v. infusions of 6 micrograms angiotensin II in supraoptic nucleus and paraventricular nucleus but not in subfornical organ, dorsal median preoptic nucleus, lateral parabrachial nucleus, locus coeruleus and nucleus of the solitary tract. Median preoptic nucleus lesions reduced the dipsogenic effects of an intragastric infusion of hypertonic (1.5 M) saline and suppressed c-fos expression in supraoptic nucleus and paraventricular nucleus compared to sham-lesioned rats. However, c-fos expression was unaltered in subfornical organ, dorsal median preoptic nucleus lesions had no effect on the increased corticosterone induced by hypertonic saline. Subfornical organ lesions did not alter dipsogenic responses to i.c.v. angiotensin II, nor was the i.c.v. angiotensin II-induced expression of c-fos suppressed in the basal forebrain. These experiments show that the ventral median preoptic nucleus (but not the subfornical organ), part of the anteroventral third ventricle, is critical for the expression of c-fos in more caudal areas of the brain following i.c.v. angiotensin II. c-fos expression in

  20. Radiofrequency ablation during continuous saline infusion can extend ablation margins

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Toru; Kubota, Tomoyuki; Horigome, Ryoko; Kimura, Naruhiro; Honda, Hiroki; Iwanaga, Akito; Seki, Keiichi; Honma, Terasu; Yoshida, Toshiaki

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether fluid injection during radiofrequency ablation (RFA) can increase the coagulation area. METHODS: Bovine liver (1-2 kg) was placed on an aluminum tray with a return electrode affixed to the base, and the liver was punctured by an expandable electrode. During RFA, 5% glucose; 50% glucose; or saline fluid was infused continuously at a rate of 1.0 mL/min through the infusion line connected to the infusion port. The area and volume of the thermocoagulated region of bovine liver were determined after RFA. The Joule heat generated was determined from the temporal change in output during the RFA experiment. RESULTS: No liquid infusion was 17.3 ± 1.6 mL, similar to the volume of a 3-cm diameter sphere (14.1 mL). Mean thermocoagulated volume was significantly larger with continuous infusion of saline (29.3 ± 3.3 mL) than with 5% glucose (21.4 ± 2.2 mL), 50% glucose (16.5 ± 0.9 mL) or no liquid infusion (17.3 ± 1.6 mL). The ablated volume for RFA with saline was approximately 1.7-times greater than for RFA with no liquid infusion, representing a significant difference between these two conditions. Total Joule heat generated during RFA was highest with saline, and lowest with 50% glucose. CONCLUSION: RFA with continuous saline infusion achieves a large ablation zone, and may help inhibit local recurrence by obtaining sufficient ablation margins. RFA during continuous saline infusion can extend ablation margins, and may be prevent local recurrence. PMID:23483097

  1. Hypertonic saline solutions do not influence the solubility of sputum from secretor and non-secretor cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Barboza, Marcelo A.I.; Brandão de Mattos, Cinara C.; Ferreira, Ana Iara C.; Barja, Paulo R.; Santos de Faria Junior, Newton; de Oliveira, Luís Vicente F.; de Mattos, Luiz C.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Functional alterations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) increase the viscoelasticity of pulmonary secretions of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and require the use of therapeutic aerosols. The biochemical properties of exocrine secretions are influenced by the expression of the FUT2 gene which determine the secretor and non-secretor phenotypes of the ABH glycoconjugates. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of secretor and non-secretor phenotypes by means of photoacoustic analysis, both the typical interaction time (t 0) and the solubilization interval (Δt) of the sputum of secretor and non-secretor CF patients nebulized by hypertonic saline solutions at different concentrations. Material and methods Sputum samples were obtained by spontaneous expectoration from 6 secretor and 4 non-secretor patients with CF. Each sample was nebulized with 3%, 6%, and 7% hypertonic saline solutions in a photoacoustic cell. The values of t 0 and Δt were determined using the Origin 7.5® computer program (Microcal Software Inc.). The t-test was employed using the GraphPad Instat 3.0® computer program to calculate the mean and standard deviation for each parameter. Results For all hypertonic saline solutions tested, the mean values of t 0 and Δt do not show statistically significant differences between secretor and non-secretor patients. Conclusions The secretor and non-secretor phenotypes do not influence the in vitro solubilization of the sputum nebulized by hypertonic saline solutions at different concentrations when analysed by photoacoustic technique. PMID:22291775

  2. Mannitol or hypertonic saline in the setting of traumatic brain injury: What have we learned?

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Myles Dustin; Oren-Grinberg, Achikam; Robinson, Timothy Matthew; Chen, Clark C.; Kasper, Ekkehard M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intracranial hypertension, defined as an intracranial pressure (ICP) >20 mmHg for a period of more than 5 min, worsens neurologic outcome in traumatic brain injury (TBI). While several mechanisms contribute to poor outcome, impaired cerebral perfusion appears to be a highly significant common denominator. Management guidelines from the Brain Trauma Foundation recommend measuring ICP to guide therapy. In particular, hyperosmolar therapy, which includes mannitol or hypertonic saline (HTS), is frequently administered to reduce ICP. Currently, mannitol (20%) is considered the gold standard hyperosmolar agent. However, HTS is increasingly used in this setting. This review sought to compare the efficacy of mannitol to HTS in severe TBI. Methods: The PubMed database was used to systematically search for articles comparing mannitol to HTS in severe TBI. The following medical subject headings were used: HTS, sodium lactate, mannitol, ICP, intracranial hypertension, and TBI. We included both prospective and retrospective randomized controlled studies of adult patients with intracranial hypertension as a result of severe TBI who received hyperosmolar therapy. Results: Out of 45 articles, seven articles were included in our review: 5 were prospective, randomized trials; one was a prospective, nonrandomized trial; and one was a retrospective, cohort study. Conclusions: While all seven studies found that both mannitol and HTS were effective in reducing ICP, there was heterogeneity with regard to which agent was most efficacious. PMID:26673517

  3. Airway responsiveness to hypertonic saline: dose-response slope or PD15?

    PubMed

    de Meer, G; Marks, G B; de Jongste, J C; Brunekreef, B

    2005-01-01

    The result of airway challenge test with hypertonic saline (HS) is expressed as the dose causing a 15% fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1; PD15). A noncensored measure, such as the dose-response slope (DRS), allows the evaluation of the risk of asthma for subjects with a fall in FEV1 <15%. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between airway responsiveness to HS by PD15 or DRS, asthma symptoms and markers of eosinophilic inflammation. Data on current wheeze and airway responsiveness were obtained for 1,107 children (aged 8-13 yrs). Blood eosinophils and serum eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) were assessed in subsets (n = 683 and 485). PD15 was assessed if FEV1 fell > or =15%, and the DRS was calculated for all tests. Graphs were constructed to visualise relationships with current wheeze, blood eosinophils and serum ECP. Odds ratios and Spearman's correlation coefficients were calculated to quantify these relationships. Children with features of asthma had lower PD15 and higher DRS, and separation was most pronounced for DRS. Prevalence of current wheeze increased continuously over the entire range of DRS values. Blood eosinophils were significantly higher only for the highest values of DRS. In conclusion, the continuous relationship between airway responsiveness and asthma symptoms is in favour of a noncensored measure of airway responsiveness, such as the dose-response slope. PMID:15640337

  4. Hypertonic saline activation of p38 MAPK primes the PMN respiratory burst.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, D J; Moore, E E; Biffl, W L; Gonzalez, R J; Moore, H B; Silliman, C C

    2001-10-01

    Investigation of hypertonic saline (HTS) modulation of neutrophils (PMN) cytotoxic responses has generated seemingly contradictory results. Clinically relevant levels of HTS attenuate receptor-mediated p38 MAPK signaling, whereas higher levels activate p38 MAPK. Concurrently, HTS exerts a dose-dependent attenuation of the PMN respiratory burst, most notably at concentrations where p38 MAPK is activated. We hypothesized that HTS-mediated p38 MAPK activation augments the PMN respiratory burst on return to normotonicity. We found that although clinically relevant levels of HTS (Na+ > or = 200 mM) did not activate p38 MAPK, higher concentrations (Na+ > or = 300 mM) resulted in activation comparable with that after PAF stimulation. Transient stimulation with high levels of HTS primed the PMN respiratory burst in response to fMLP and PMA. This effect was attenuated by pretreatment with SB 203580, a p38 MAPK specific inhibitor. We conclude that severe osmotic shock primes the respiratory burst via p38 MAPK signaling, further supporting the role of this signaling cascade in PMN priming. PMID:11580111

  5. Hypertonic saline resuscitation enhances blood pressure recovery and decreases organ injury following hemorrhage in acute alcohol intoxicated rodents

    PubMed Central

    Sulzer, Jesse K.; Whitaker, Annie M.; Molina, Patricia E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute alcohol intoxication (AAI) impairs the hemodynamic and arginine vasopressin (AVP) counter-regulation to hemorrhagic shock (HS) and lactated Ringer’s (LR) fluid resuscitation (FR). The mechanism of AAI-induced suppression of AVP release in response to HS involves accentuated nitric oxide (NO) inhibitory tone. In contrast, AAI does not prevent AVP response to increased osmolarity produced by hypertonic saline (HTS) infusion. We hypothesized that FR with HTS during AAI would enhance AVP release by decreasing PVN NO inhibitory tone subsequently improving mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) and organ perfusion. Methods Male Sprague Dawley rats received a 15h alcohol infusion (2.5g/kg + 0.3 g/kg/h) or dextrose (DEX) prior to HS (40mmHg × 60 min) and FR with HTS (7.5%; 4ml/kg) or LR (2.4 × blood volume removed). Organ blood flow was determined and brains collected for NO content at 2h post-FR. Results HTS improved MABP recovery in AAI (109 vs 80mmHg) and DEX (114 vs 83mmHg) animals compared to LR. This was associated with higher (>60%) circulating AVP levels at 2h post-FR than those detected in LR animals in both groups. Neither AAI alone nor HS in DEX animals resuscitated with LR altered organ blood flow. In AAI animals, HS and FR with LR reduced blood flow to liver (72%), small intestine (65%), and large intestine (67%) compared to shams. FR with HTS improved liver (3-fold) and small intestine (2-fold) blood flow compared to LR in AAI-HS animals. The enhanced MABP response to HTS was prevented by pretreatment with a systemic AVP V1a receptor antagonist. HTS decreased PVN NO content in both groups 2h post-FR. Conclusions These results suggest that FR with HTS in AAI results in removal of central NO inhibition of AVP, restoring AVP levels and improving MABP and organ perfusion in AAI-HS. PMID:23147176

  6. Salt appetite is reduced by a single experience of drinking hypertonic saline in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Michael P; Greenwood, Mingkwan; Paton, Julian F R; Murphy, David

    2014-01-01

    Salt appetite, the primordial instinct to favorably ingest salty substances, represents a vital evolutionary important drive to successfully maintain body fluid and electrolyte homeostasis. This innate instinct was shown here in Sprague-Dawley rats by increased ingestion of isotonic saline (IS) over water in fluid intake tests. However, this appetitive stimulus was fundamentally transformed into a powerfully aversive one by increasing the salt content of drinking fluid from IS to hypertonic saline (2% w/v NaCl, HS) in intake tests. Rats ingested HS similar to IS when given no choice in one-bottle tests and previous studies have indicated that this may modify salt appetite. We thus investigated if a single 24 h experience of ingesting IS or HS, dehydration (DH) or 4% high salt food (HSD) altered salt preference. Here we show that 24 h of ingesting IS and HS solutions, but not DH or HSD, robustly transformed salt appetite in rats when tested 7 days and 35 days later. Using two-bottle tests rats previously exposed to IS preferred neither IS or water, whereas rats exposed to HS showed aversion to IS. Responses to sweet solutions (1% sucrose) were not different in two-bottle tests with water, suggesting that salt was the primary aversive taste pathway recruited in this model. Inducing thirst by subcutaneous administration of angiotensin II did not overcome this salt aversion. We hypothesised that this behavior results from altered gene expression in brain structures important in thirst and salt appetite. Thus we also report here lasting changes in mRNAs for markers of neuronal activity, peptide hormones and neuronal plasticity in supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus following rehydration after both DH and HS. These results indicate that a single experience of drinking HS is a memorable one, with long-term changes in gene expression accompanying this aversion to salty solutions. PMID:25111786

  7. Inhaled hypertonic saline in adults hospitalised for exacerbation of cystic fibrosis lung disease: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Stoltz, David A; Hornick, Douglas B; Durairaj, Lakshmi

    2012-01-01

    Background Inhaled hypertonic saline (HTS) improves quality of life and reduces pulmonary exacerbations when given long term in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). While increasingly being offered for acute pulmonary exacerbations, little is known about the efficacy in this setting. Objectives The authors examined the tolerability and efficacy of HTS use among adult subjects hospitalised with a CF pulmonary exacerbation and hypothesised that use of HTS would improve pulmonary function during the admission. Design Pilot retrospective non-randomised study. Setting Single tertiary care centre. Participants 45 subjects admitted to the inpatient service for acute CF pulmonary exacerbation in 2006–2007. A subset of 18 subjects who were also admitted in 2005 when HTS was not available was included in the comparative study. Primary outcome Change in forced expiratory volume in one second from admission to discharge. Secondary outcomes Change in weight from admission to discharge and time to next exacerbation. Results Mean age was 32.5 years, and mean length of stay was 11.5 days. HTS was offered to 33 subjects and was well tolerated for a total use of 336 days out of 364 days of hospital stay. Baseline demographics, lung function and sputum culture results were comparable in first and second visits. Use of HTS was not associated with an improvement in forced expiratory volume in one second (p=0.1), weight gain (p=0.24) or in the time to next admission (p=0.08). Conclusions These pilot data suggest that HTS is well tolerated during CF pulmonary exacerbation but offers no clear outcome benefits. It is possible that HTS may not have much advantage above and beyond intensive rehabilitation and intravenous antibiotics and may add to hospital costs and treatment burden. PMID:22517980

  8. Ad Libitum Fluid Intake and Plasma Responses After Pickle Juice, Hypertonic Saline, or Deionized Water Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Scott; Miller, Kevin C.; Albrecht, Jay; Garden-Robinson, Julie; Blodgett-Salafia, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Context: Adding sodium (Na+) to drinks improves rehydration and ad libitum fluid consumption. Clinicians (∼25%) use pickle juice (PJ) to treat cramping. Scientists warn against PJ ingestion, fearing it will cause rapid plasma volume restoration and thereby decrease thirst and delay rehydration. Advice about drinking PJ has been developed but never tested. Objective: To determine if drinking small volumes of PJ, hypertonic saline (HS), or deionized water (DIW) affects ad libitum DIW ingestion, plasma variables, or perceptual indicators. Design: Crossover study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Fifteen, euhydrated (urine specific gravity ≤ 1.01) men (age = 22 ± 2 years, height = 178 ± 6 cm, mass = 82.9 ± 8.4 kg). Intervention(s): Participants completed 3 testing days (≥72 hours between days). After a 30-minute rest, a blood sample was collected. Participants completed 60 minutes of hard exercise (temperature = 36 ± 2°C, relative humidity = 16 ± 1%). Postexercise, they rested for 30 minutes; had a blood sample collected; rated thirst, fullness, and nausea; and ingested 83 ± 8 mL of PJ, HS, or DIW. They rated drink palatability (100-mm visual analog scale) and were allowed to drink DIW ad libitum for 60 minutes. Blood samples and thirst, fullness, and nausea ratings (100-mm visual analog scales) were collected at 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes posttreatment drink ingestion. Main Outcome Measure(s): Ad libitum DIW volume, percentage change in plasma volume, plasma osmolality (OSMp,) plasma sodium concentration ([Na+]p), and thirst, fullness, nausea, and palatability ratings. Results: Participants consumed more DIW ad libitum after HS (708.03 ± 371.03 mL) than after DIW (532.99 ± 337.14 mL, P < .05). Ad libitum DIW ingested after PJ (700.35 ± 366.15 mL) was similar to that after HS and DIW (P > .05). Plasma sodium concentration, OSMp, percentage change in plasma volume, thirst, fullness, and nausea did not differ among treatment drinks

  9. Influence of saline infusion on blood-tissue albumin transport.

    PubMed

    Renkin, E M; Rew, K; Wong, M; O'Loughlin, D; Sibley, L

    1989-08-01

    Anesthetized rats were infused with lactated Ringer solution (LR) at constant rate for 30 or 60 min; delivered volume loads ranged from 0.03 to 0.08 ml/g body wt. Controls were given only a sustaining infusion of saline at 0.002 ml.g-1.h-1. Only 7-14% of the LR remained in the plasma at the end of the infusion; 76-88% entered the interstitial compartment, and 7-17% was excreted. The amount of plasma protein lost from the circulation with the extravasated fluid was studied simultaneously by two methods: 1) material balance in the whole animal and 2) changes in 131I-labeled albumin uptake (VA) and water content (VW) in individual tissues. The extravasation of 0.03-0.06 ml fluid/g body wt (75-160% initial plasma volume) did not significantly increase plasma protein extravasation in the whole rat. Nearly all of the sampled tissues of LR-infused rats had higher VW than controls. Tissue VA tended to increase with VW, but the regression slopes (delta VA/delta VW), a measure of the tracer albumin concentration of capillary filtrate relative to plasma, were low; skin, 0.006; paw, 0.018; skeletal muscles, 0.007; heart, 0.057; jejunum, 0.095; ileum, 0.045; cecum, 0.026; and colon, 0.027. These ratios are consistent with the very small loss of total plasma protein observed and attest to high solvent-drag reflection coefficients (sigma approximately equal to 1 - delta VA/delta VW): greater than 0.98 in capillaries of skeletal muscles, skin, and paw and 0.91-0.97 in heart and intestine. PMID:2764135

  10. Temporal profile of arginine vasopressin release from the neurohypophysis in response to hypertonic saline and hypotension measured using a fluorescent fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Yao, Song T; Antunes, Vagner R; Bradley, Peter M J; Kasparov, Sergey; Ueta, Yoichi; Paton, Julian F R; Murphy, David

    2011-09-30

    Methods currently employed to study the release of hormones such as arginine vasopressin (AVP), while sensitive, suffer from a low temporal resolution such that the monitoring of AVP release on a moment-to-moment basis is not possible. Here, we describe a new approach to indirectly monitor the temporal profile of AVP release from the neurohypophysis of transgenic rats expressing an AVP-eGFP fusion gene. Using fibre-optic probes (termed 'optrodes') we were able to indirectly monitor AVP release via a reporter moiety in real-time. This method is a major advance over current methods used to monitor AVP release. Intravenous administration of hypertonic saline (3M NaCl) induced a rapid (latency of 2-3s) increase in fluorescence detected in the neurohypophysis that lasted on average for 60s - a response that was highly reproducible. Infusion of sodium nitroprusside induced a rapid fall in blood pressure accompanied by a rapid, stimulus-locked increase in fluorescent signal that returned to baseline with the recovery of blood pressure to pre-stimulus levels - again this response was highly reproducible. Withdrawal of blood (to simulate haemorrhage) also resulted in a stimulus-locked increase in fluorescence that return to baseline after the withdrawn blood was returned to the animal. In conclusion, we developed a highly sensitive approach that allows the indirect measurement of AVP release via the monitoring of a reporter gene in real-time. This technology can be adapted to permit the study of a whole array of neurohormones/chemicals in transgenic animals expressing a fluorescent reporter construct. PMID:21855574

  11. Long-term improvement of lung clearance index in patients with mild cystic fibrosis lung disease: Does hypertonic saline play a role?

    PubMed

    Ellemunter, Helmut; Eder, Johannes; Fuchs, Susanne; Gappa, Monika; Steinkamp, Gratiana

    2016-01-01

    To assess whether long-term inhalation with hypertonic saline is able to halt the progression of mild CF lung disease, we analysed longitudinal data of lung clearance index (LCI) and spirometry. A total of 34 patients with mild lung disease (FEV1 ≥ 70% of predicted) had at least one LCI result before and ≥2 LCI measurements after start of hypertonic saline (HS) therapy. After a mean follow-up of 39.7 (SD 7.4) months after starting HS, LCI improved significantly from 7.89 (SD 1.35) at baseline to 6.96 (SD 1.03), and 19/34 patients had a normal LCI value at the last measurement. No decrease in mean FEV1 was observed. Thus, ventilation inhomogeneity can improve in patients with mild lung disease. PMID:26190829

  12. Inhaled hypertonic saline for cystic fibrosis: Reviewing the potential evidence for modulation of neutrophil signalling and function

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Emer P; McCarthy, Cormac; McElvaney, Oliver J; Vijayan, Maya Sakthi N; White, Michelle M; Dunlea, Danielle M; Pohl, Kerstin; Lacey, Noreen; McElvaney, Noel G

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multisystem disorder with significantly shortened life expectancy. The major cause of mortality and morbidity is lung disease with increasing pulmonary exacerbations and decline in lung function predicting significantly poorer outcomes. The pathogenesis of lung disease in CF is characterised in part by decreased airway surface liquid volume and subsequent failure of normal mucociliary clearance. This leads to accumulation of viscous mucus in the CF airway, providing an ideal environment for bacterial pathogens to grow and colonise, propagating airway inflammation in CF. The use of nebulised hypertonic saline (HTS) treatments has been shown to improve mucus clearance in CF and impact positively upon exacerbations, quality of life, and lung function. Several mechanisms of HTS likely improve outcome, resulting in clinically relevant enhancement in disease parameters related to increase in mucociliary clearance. There is increasing evidence to suggest that HTS is also beneficial through its anti-inflammatory properties and its ability to reduce bacterial activity and biofilm formation. This review will first describe the use of HTS in treatment of CF focusing on its efficacy and tolerability. The emphasis will then change to the potential benefits of aerosolized HTS for the attenuation of receptor mediated neutrophil functions, including down-regulation of oxidative burst activity, adhesion molecule expression, and the suppression of neutrophil degranulation of proteolytic enzymes. PMID:26261770

  13. Inhaled hypertonic saline for cystic fibrosis: Reviewing the potential evidence for modulation of neutrophil signalling and function.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Emer P; McCarthy, Cormac; McElvaney, Oliver J; Vijayan, Maya Sakthi N; White, Michelle M; Dunlea, Danielle M; Pohl, Kerstin; Lacey, Noreen; McElvaney, Noel G

    2015-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multisystem disorder with significantly shortened life expectancy. The major cause of mortality and morbidity is lung disease with increasing pulmonary exacerbations and decline in lung function predicting significantly poorer outcomes. The pathogenesis of lung disease in CF is characterised in part by decreased airway surface liquid volume and subsequent failure of normal mucociliary clearance. This leads to accumulation of viscous mucus in the CF airway, providing an ideal environment for bacterial pathogens to grow and colonise, propagating airway inflammation in CF. The use of nebulised hypertonic saline (HTS) treatments has been shown to improve mucus clearance in CF and impact positively upon exacerbations, quality of life, and lung function. Several mechanisms of HTS likely improve outcome, resulting in clinically relevant enhancement in disease parameters related to increase in mucociliary clearance. There is increasing evidence to suggest that HTS is also beneficial through its anti-inflammatory properties and its ability to reduce bacterial activity and biofilm formation. This review will first describe the use of HTS in treatment of CF focusing on its efficacy and tolerability. The emphasis will then change to the potential benefits of aerosolized HTS for the attenuation of receptor mediated neutrophil functions, including down-regulation of oxidative burst activity, adhesion molecule expression, and the suppression of neutrophil degranulation of proteolytic enzymes. PMID:26261770

  14. RF tumor ablation with internally cooled electrodes and saline infusion: what is the optimal location of the saline infusion?

    PubMed Central

    Burdío, Fernando; Berjano, Enrique J; Navarro, Ana; Burdío, José M; Güemes, Antonio; Grande, Luis; Sousa, Ramón; Subiró, Jorge; Gonzalez, Ana; Cruz, Ignacio; Castiella, Tomás; Tejero, Eloy; Lozano, Ricardo; de Gregorio, Miguel A

    2007-01-01

    Background Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of tumors by means of internally cooled electrodes (ICE) combined with interstitial infusion of saline may improve clinical results. To date, infusion has been conducted through outlets placed on the surface of the cooled electrode. However, the effect of infusion at a distance from the electrode surface is unknown. Our aim was to assess the effect of perfusion distance (PD) on the coagulation geometry and deposited power during RFA using ICE. Methods Experiments were performed on excised bovine livers. Perfusion distance (PD) was defined as the shortest distance between the infusion outlet and the surface of the ICE. We considered three values of PD: 0, 2 and 4 mm. Two sets of experiments were considered: 1) 15 ablations of 10 minutes (n ≥ 4 for each PD), in order to evaluate the effect of PD on volume and diameters of coagulation; and 2) 20 additional ablations of 20 minutes. The effect of PD on deposited power and relative frequency of uncontrolled impedance rises (roll-off) was evaluated using the results from the two sets of experiments (n ≥ 7 for each PD). Comparisons between PD were performed by analysis of variance or Kruskal-Wallis test. Additionally, non-linear regression models were performed to elucidate the best PD in terms of coagulation volume and diameter, and the occurrence of uncontrolled impedance rises. Results The best-fit least square functions were always obtained with quadratic curves where volume and diameters of coagulation were maximum for a PD of 2 mm. A thirty per cent increase in volume coagulation was observed for this PD value compared to other values (P < 0.05). Likewise, the short coagulation diameter was nearly twenty five per cent larger for a 2 mm PD than for 0 mm. Regarding deposited power, the best-fit least square function was obtained by a quadratic curve with a 2 mm PD peak. This matched well with the higher relative frequency of uncontrolled impedance rises for PD of 0 and 4 mm

  15. Saline Infusion Markedly Reduces Impedance and Improves Efficacy of Pulmonary Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Gananadha, Sivakumar Morris, David Lawson

    2004-08-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a relatively new technique that has been investigated for the treatment of lung tumors. We evaluated for the first time the in vivo use of saline infusion during radiofrequency ablation of sheep lung. We performed RFA on 5 sheep using open and closed chest RFA and the RITA starburst XL and Xli probes using saline infusion with the Xli probe. The impedance and volume of ablation were compared. A total of 16 ablations were produced, 5 percutaneously and 11 open. The impedance during percutaneous and open RFA without saline infusion was 110 {+-} 16.2 and 183.3 {+-} 105.8 O, respectively. With the saline infusion the impedance was 71.3 {+-} 22O and 103.6 {+-} 37.5O. The effect of this was a significantly larger volume of ablation using the saline infusion during percutaneous RFA (90.6 {+-} 23 cm{sup 3} vs 10.47 {+-} 2.9 cm{sup 3}, p = 0.01) and open RFA (107.8 {+-} 25.8 cm{sup 3} vs 24.9 {+-} 19.3 cm{sup 3}, p = 0.0002). Saline infusion during RFA is associated with lower impedance, higher power delivery and larger lesion size.

  16. A Physiologically-Motivated Compartment-Based Model of the Effect of Inhaled Hypertonic Saline on Mucociliary Clearance and Liquid Transport in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Markovetz, Matthew R.; Corcoran, Timothy E.; Locke, Landon W.; Myerburg, Michael M.; Pilewski, Joseph M.; Parker, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cystic Fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterized by liquid hyperabsorption, airway surface dehydration, and impaired mucociliary clearance (MCC). Herein, we present a compartment-based mathematical model of the airway that extends the resolution of functional imaging data. Methods Using functional imaging data to inform our model, we developed a system of mechanism-motivated ordinary differential equations to describe the mucociliary clearance and absorption of aerosolized radiolabeled particle and small molecules probes from human subjects with and without CF. We also utilized a novel imaging metric in vitro to gauge the fraction of airway epithelial cells that have functional ciliary activity. Results This model, and its incorporated kinetic rate parameters, captures the MCC and liquid dynamics of the hyperabsorptive state in CF airways and the mitigation of that state by hypertonic saline treatment. Conclusions We postulate, based on the model structure and its ability to capture clinical patient data, that patients with CF have regions of airway with diminished MCC function that can be recruited with hypertonic saline treatment. In so doing, this model structure not only makes a case for durable osmotic agents used in lung-region specific treatments, but also may provide a possible clinical endpoint, the fraction of functional ciliated airway. PMID:25383714

  17. Abnormal urinary excretion of NKCC2 and AQP2 in response to hypertonic saline in chronic kidney disease: an intervention study in patients with chronic kidney disease and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Renal handling of sodium and water is abnormal in chronic kidney disease (CKD). The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that abnormal activity of the aquaporin-2 water channels (AQP2), the sodium-potassium-2chloride transporter (NKCC2) and/or the epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) contribute to this phenomenon. Methods 23 patients with CKD and 24 healthy controls at baseline and after 3% saline infusion were compared. The following measurements were performed: urinary concentrations of AQP2 (u-AQP2), NKCC2 (u-NKCC2), ENaC (u-ENaCγ), glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimated by 51Cr-EDTA clearance, free water clearance (CH2O), urinary output (UO), fractional excretion of sodium (FENa), plasma concentrations of AVP, renin (PRC), Angiotensin II (ANG II), Aldosterone (Aldo) and body fluid volumes. Results At baseline, GFR was 34 ml/min in CKD patients and 89 ml/ml in controls. There were no significant differences in u-AQP2, u-NKCC2 or u-ENaCγ, but FENa, p-Aldo and p-AVP were higher in CKD patients than controls. In response to hypertonic saline, patients with CKD had an attenuated decrease in CH2O and UO. A greater increase in U-AQP2 was observed in CKD patients compared to controls. Furthermore, u-NKCC2 increased in CKD patients, whereas u-NKCC2 decreased in controls. Body fluid volumes did not significantly differ. Conclusions In response to hypertonic saline, u-NKCC2 increased, suggesting an increased sodium reabsorption via NKCC2 in patients with CKD. U-AQP2 increased more in CKD patients, despite an attenuated decrease in CH2O. Thus, though high levels of p-AVP and p-Aldo, the kidneys can only partly compensate and counteract acute volume expansion due to a defective tubular response. Trial registration Clinical trial no: NCT01623661. Date of trial registration: 18.06.2012. PMID:24970686

  18. Hypertonicity: Pathophysiologic Concept and Experimental Studies.

    PubMed

    Argyropoulos, Christos; Rondon-Berrios, Helbert; Raj, Dominic S; Malhotra, Deepak; Agaba, Emmanuel I; Rohrscheib, Mark; Khitan, Zeid; Murata, Glen H; Shapiro, Joseph I; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in tonicity (effective osmolarity) are the major clinical disorders affecting cell volume. Cell shrinking secondary to hypertonicity causes severe clinical manifestations and even death. Quantitative management of hypertonic disorders is based on formulas computing the volume of hypotonic fluids required to correct a given level of hypertonicity. These formulas have limitations. The major limitation of the predictive formulas is that they represent closed system calculations and have been tested in anuric animals. Consequently, the formulas do not account for ongoing fluid losses during development or treatment of the hypertonic disorders. In addition, early comparisons of serum osmolality changes predicted by these formulas and observed in animals infused with hypertonic solutions clearly demonstrated that hypertonicity creates new intracellular solutes causing rises in serum osmolality higher than those predicted by the formulas. The mechanisms and types of intracellular solutes generated by hypertonicity and the effects of the solutes have been studied extensively in recent times. The solutes accumulated intracellularly in hypertonic states have potentially major adverse effects on the outcomes of treatment of these states. When hypertonicity was produced by the infusion of hypertonic sodium chloride solutions, the predicted and observed changes in serum sodium concentration were equal. This finding justifies the use of the predictive formulas in the management of hypernatremic states. PMID:27382523

  19. Hypertonicity: Pathophysiologic Concept and Experimental Studies

    PubMed Central

    Argyropoulos, Christos; Rondon-Berrios, Helbert; Raj, Dominic S; Malhotra, Deepak; Agaba, Emmanuel I; Rohrscheib, Mark; Khitan, Zeid; Murata, Glen H; Shapiro, Joseph I.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in tonicity (effective osmolarity) are the major clinical disorders affecting cell volume. Cell shrinking secondary to hypertonicity causes severe clinical manifestations and even death. Quantitative management of hypertonic disorders is based on formulas computing the volume of hypotonic fluids required to correct a given level of hypertonicity. These formulas have limitations. The major limitation of the predictive formulas is that they represent closed system calculations and have been tested in anuric animals. Consequently, the formulas do not account for ongoing fluid losses during development or treatment of the hypertonic disorders. In addition, early comparisons of serum osmolality changes predicted by these formulas and observed in animals infused with hypertonic solutions clearly demonstrated that hypertonicity creates new intracellular solutes causing rises in serum osmolality higher than those predicted by the formulas. The mechanisms and types of intracellular solutes generated by hypertonicity and the effects of the solutes have been studied extensively in recent times. The solutes accumulated intracellularly in hypertonic states have potentially major adverse effects on the outcomes of treatment of these states. When hypertonicity was produced by the infusion of hypertonic sodium chloride solutions, the predicted and observed changes in serum sodium concentration were equal. This finding justifies the use of the predictive formulas in the management of hypernatremic states. PMID:27382523

  20. Detailed Description of all Deaths in Both the Shock and Traumatic Brain Injury Hypertonic Saline Trials of the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Tisherman, Samuel A; Schmicker, Robert H.; Brasel, Karen J; Bulger, Eileen M; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Minei, Joseph P; Powell, Judy L; Reiff, Donald A; Rizoli, Sandro B; Schreiber, Martin A

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify causes and timing of mortality in trauma patients to determine targets for future studies. Summary Background Data In trials conducted by the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC) in patients with traumatic hypovolemic shock (shock) or traumatic brain injury (TBI), hypertonic saline failed to improve survival. Selecting appropriate candidates is challenging. Methods Retrospective review of patients enrolled in multicenter, randomized, trials performed 2006–2009. Inclusion criteria were: injured patients, age ≥ 15 years with hypovolemic shock (systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≤ 70 mm Hg or SBP 71–90 mm Hg with heart rate ≥ 108) or severe TBI [Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) ≤8]. Initial fluid administered was 250 mL of either 7.5% saline with 6% dextran 70, 7.5% saline or 0.9% saline. Results 2061 subjects were enrolled (809 shock, 1252 TBI) and 571 (27.7%) died. Survivors were younger than non-survivors [30(IQR 23) vs 42(34)] and had a higher GCS, though similar hemodynamics. Most deaths occurred despite ongoing resuscitation. Forty six percent of deaths in the TBI cohort were within 24 hours, compared with 82% in the shock cohort and 72% in the cohort with both shock and TBI. Median time to death was 29 hours in the TBI cohort, 2 hours in the shock cohort, and 4 hours in patients with both. Sepsis and multiple organ dysfunction accounted for 2% of deaths. Conclusions Most deaths from trauma with shock or TBI occur within 24 hours of from hypovolemic shock or TBI. Novel resuscitation strategies should focus on early deaths, though prevention may have a greater impact. PMID:25072443

  1. Capability of hypertonic saline cough provocation test to predict the response to inhaled corticosteroids in chronic cough: a prospective, open-label study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many patients with chronic cough respond to treatment with inhaled corticosteroids but it is difficult to predict which patients are likely to respond. The primary aim of the present study was to define the capability of hypertonic saline cough provocation test to predict the responsiveness to inhaled corticosteroids in chronic cough. The secondary aim was to assess the ability of the saline test to monitor the healing of cough during corticosteroid treatment. Methods Forty-three patients with chronic cough were recruited. Before therapy, spirometry, ambulatory peak flow monitoring, nitric oxide measurement, histamine airway challenge, and saline test were performed. Those responding to the first saline test repeated it and the nitric oxide measurement during the subsequent visits. The patients used inhaled budesonide, 400 ug twice daily, for twelve weeks. The treatment response was assessed by Leicester Cough Questionnaire at baseline, and at one, four, and twelve weeks. Results Seventy-seven % of the patients demonstrated the minimal important difference in the Leicester Cough Questionnaire indicating a symptomatic response. Neither the response magnitude nor the speed was predicted by the saline test. Histamine challenge showed the strongest predictive ability: The maximal improvement in Leicester Cough Questionnaire total score was 5.08 (3.76 – 6.40) points in the histamine positive and 2.78 (1.55 – 4.01) points in the histamine negative subjects (p = 0.006). Baseline nitric oxide level also associated with the improvement in Leicester Cough Questionnaire total score (p = 0.02). During the treatment, the cough sensitivity to saline gradually decreased among the budesonide responders but not in the non-responders. Nitric oxide levels decreased very rapidly among the responders. Conclusions Saline test cannot predict the responsiveness to inhaled corticosteroids in chronic cough but it may be utilized to monitor the effect of this

  2. High-dose diazepam facilitates core cooling during cold saline infusion in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Hostler, David; Northington, William E; Callaway, Clifton W

    2009-08-01

    Studies have suggested that inducing mild hypothermia improves neurologic outcomes after traumatic brain injury, major stroke, cardiac arrest, or exertional heat illness. While infusion of cold normal saline is a simple and inexpensive method for reducing core temperature, human cold-defense mechanisms potentially make this route stressful or ineffective. We hypothesized that intravenous administration of diazepam during a rapid infusion of 30 mL.kg-1 of cold (4 degrees C) 0.9% saline to healthy subjects would be more comfortable and reduce core body temperature more than the administration of cold saline alone. Fifteen subjects received rapidly infused cold (4 degrees C) 0.9% saline. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive, intravenously, 20 mg diazepam (HIGH), 10 mg diazepam (LOW), or placebo (CON). Main outcomes were core temperature, skin temperature, and oxygen consumption. Data for the main outcomes were analyzed with generalized estimating equations to identify differences in group, time, or a group x time interaction. Core temperature decreased in all groups (CON, 1.0 +/- 0.2 degrees C; LOW, 1.4 +/- 0.2 degrees C; HIGH, 1.5 +/- 0.2 degrees C), while skin temperature was unchanged. Mean (95% CI) oxygen consumption was 315.3 (253.8, 376.9) mL.kg-1.min-1 in the CON group, 317.9 (275.5, 360.3) in the LOW group, and 226.1 (216.4, 235.9) in the HIGH group. Significant time and group x time interaction was observed for core temperature and oxygen consumption (p < 0.001). Administration of high-dose diazepam resulted in decreased oxygen consumption during cold saline infusion, suggesting that 20 mg of intravenous diazepam may reduce the shivering threshold without compromising respiratory or cardiovascular function. PMID:19767791

  3. SGEM Hot Off the Press: hypertonic saline in severe traumatic brain injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Purdy, Eve; Thoma, Brent; Milne, Ken; Bond, Chris

    2016-09-01

    As part of the Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine's (CJEM) developing social media strategy, 1 we are collaborating with the Skeptics' Guide to Emergency Medicine (SGEM) to summarize and critically appraise the current emergency medicine (EM) literature using evidence-based medicine principles. In the "Hot Off the Press" series, we select original research manuscripts published in CJEM to be featured on the SGEM website/podcast and discussed by the study authors and the online EM community. A similar collaboration is under way between the SGEM and Academic Emergency Medicine. What follows is a summary of the selected article, the immediate post-publication synthesis from the SGEM podcast, commentary by the first author, and the subsequent discussion from the SGEM blog and other social media. Through this series, we hope to enhance the value, accessibility, and application of important, clinically relevant EM research. In this, the second SGEM HOP hosted collaboratively with CJEM, we discuss a systematic review evaluating the use of hypertonic saline in the treatment of severe traumatic brain injury. 2. PMID:27618977

  4. Roles of the periaqueductal gray in descending facilitatory and inhibitory controls of intramuscular hypertonic saline induced muscle nociception.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jing; Sun, Tao; Lumb, Bridget M; You, Hao-Jun

    2014-07-01

    Despite the importance of the periaqueductal gray (PAG) in the modulation of nociception and pain, many aspects of the roles of the different columns of the PAG in descending controls: facilitation and inhibition, are not understood. Employing a tonic muscle pain model established by i.m. injection of 5.8% saline into the gastrocnemius muscle, we now report the results of investigations designed to explore any differences in Fos expression in the different functional columns of the PAG in male Sprague-Dawley rats. In a second series of experiments, effects of the PAG on descending control of spinally-organized nociception were assessed by measuring hind paw withdrawal reflexes to noxious mechanical and heat stimulation before and after electrolytic lesion of specific columns of the PAG. Our results show that Fos expression within different columns of the PAG increases significantly and differentially following i.m. injection of 5.8% saline. The mean number of Fos positive neurons in the dorsolateral (dl), lateral (l), dorsomedial (dm) PAG elicited by i.m. injection of 5.8% saline reached a peak at 4h with a gradual decrease over time, whereas the maximum number of Fos-positive neurons in the ventrolateral (vl) PAG was observed 8h after i.m. injection. Contralateral lesion of the dl PAG significantly depressed ipsilateral secondary mechanical hyperalgesia in intramuscularly induced (5.8% saline) nociception (P<0.05), whereas heat hypoalgesia was not affected (P>0.05). By contrast, contralateral lesion of the vl PAG completely blocked the occurrence of ipsilateral heat hypoalgesia (P<0.05), while bilateral mechanical hyperalgesia was unaffected (P>0.05). In conclusion, functions of specific columns of the PAG in the control of spinal nociceptive activities are not homogeneous. It is suggested that, in this muscle pain model, the dl PAG and vl PAG participate in descending facilitation and inhibition of nociception, respectively. PMID:24792920

  5. An equiosmolar study on early intracranial physiology and long term outcome in severe traumatic brain injury comparing mannitol and hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Jagannatha, Aniruddha Tekkatte; Sriganesh, Kamath; Devi, Bhagavatula Indira; Rao, Ganne Sesha Umamaheswara

    2016-05-01

    The impact of hypertonic saline (HTS) on long term control of intracranial hypertension (ICH) is yet to be established. The current prospective randomized controlled study was carried out in 38 patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Over 450 episodes of refractory ICH were treated with equiosmolar boluses of 20% mannitol in 20 patients and 3.0% HTS in 18 subjects. Intracranial pressure (ICP) was monitored for 6days. ICP and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) were comparable between the groups. The mannitol group had a progressive increase in the ICP over the study period (p=0.01). A similar increase was not seen in the HTS group (p=0.1). The percentage time for which the ICP remained below a threshold of 20 mmHg on day6 was higher in the HTS group (63% versus 49%; p=0.3). The duration of inotrope requirement in the HTS group was less compared to the mannitol group (p=0.06). The slope of fall in ICP in response to a bolus dose at a given baseline value of ICP was higher with HTS compared to mannitol (p=0.0001). In-hospital mortality tended to be lower in the HTS group (3 versus 10; p=0.07) while mortality at 6 months was not different between the groups (6 versus 10; p=0.41). Dichotomized Glasgow Outcome Scale scores at 6months were comparable between the groups (p=0.21). To conclude, immediate physiological advantages seen with HTS over mannitol did not translate into long term benefit on ICP/CPP control or mortality of patients with TBI. PMID:26924183

  6. Comparison of water immersion and saline infusion as a means of inducing volume expansion in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, M.; Pins, D. S.; Arrington, R.; Denunzio, A. G.; Engstrom, R.

    1975-01-01

    The study compares the natriuresis induced by head-out water immersion to that of a standard saline infusion and assesses the relative effectiveness of these two techniques as volume determinants of renal sodium and water handling in humans in a seated posture. The data obtained show that the volume stimulus of immersion is identical to that of standard saline-induced extracellular fluid volume expansion (ECVE) in normal seated subjects. The ability of head-out water immersion to induce a natriuresis without a concomitant increase in total blood volume and with a decrease in body weight suggests that water immersion may be preferred as an investigative tool for assessing the effects of ECVE in man.

  7. Efficiency of 7.2% hypertonic saline hydroxyethyl starch 200/0.5 versus mannitol 15% in the treatment of increased intracranial pressure in neurosurgical patients – a randomized clinical trial [ISRCTN62699180

    PubMed Central

    Harutjunyan, Lilit; Holz, Carsten; Rieger, Andreas; Menzel, Matthias; Grond, Stefan; Soukup, Jens

    2005-01-01

    Introduction This prospective randomized clinical study investigated the efficacy and safety of 7.2% hypertonic saline hydroxyethyl starch 200/0.5 (7.2% NaCl/HES 200/0.5) in comparison with 15% mannitol in the treatment of increased intracranial pressure (ICP). Methods Forty neurosurgical patients at risk of increased ICP were randomized to receive either 7.2% NaCl/HES 200/0.5 or 15% mannitol at a defined infusion rate, which was stopped when ICP was < 15 mmHg. Results Of the 40 patients, 17 patients received 7.2% NaCl/HES 200/0.5 and 15 received mannitol 15%. In eight patients, ICP did not exceed 20 mmHg so treatment was not necessary. Both drugs decreased ICP below 15 mmHg (p < 0.0001); 7.2% NaCl/HES 200/0.5 within 6.0 (1.2–15.0) min (all results are presented as median (minimum-maximum range)) and mannitol within 8.7 (4.2–19.9) min (p < 0.0002). 7.2% NaCl/HES 200/0.5 caused a greater decrease in ICP than mannitol (57% vs 48%; p < 0.01). The cerebral perfusion pressure was increased from 60 (39–78) mmHg to 72 (54–85) mmHg by infusion with 7.2% NaCl/HES 200/0.5 (p < 0.0001) and from 61 (47–71) mmHg to 70 (50–79) mmHg with mannitol (p < 0.0001). The mean arterial pressure was increased by 3.7% during the infusion of 7.2% NaCl/HES 200/0.5 but was not altered by mannitol. There were no clinically relevant effects on electrolyte concentrations and osmolarity in the blood. The mean effective dose to achieve an ICP below 15 mmHg was 1.4 (0.3–3.1) ml/kg for 7.2% NaCl/HES 200/0.5 and 1.8 (0.45–6.5) ml/kg for mannitol (p < 0.05). Conclusion 7.2% NaCl/HES 200/0.5 is more effective than mannitol 15% in the treatment of increased ICP. A dose of 1.4 ml/kg of 7.2% NaCl/HES 200/0.5 can be recommended as effective and safe. The advantage of 7.2% NaCl/HES 200/0.5 might be explained by local osmotic effects, because there were no clinically relevant differences in hemodynamic clinical chemistry parameters. PMID:16277715

  8. More on Renal Salt Wasting Without Cerebral Disease: Response to Saline Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Bitew, Solomon; Imbriano, Louis; Miyawaki, Nobuyuki; Fishbane, Steven; Maesaka, John K.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: The existence and prevalence of cerebral salt wasting (CSW) or the preferred term, renal salt wasting (RSW), and its differentiation from syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) have been controversial. This controversy stems from overlapping clinical and laboratory findings and an inability to assess the volume status of these patients. The authors report another case of RSW without clinical cerebral disease and contrast it to SIADH. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Three patients with hyponatremia, hypouricemia, increased fractional excretion (FE) of urate, urine sodium >20 mmol/L, and concentrated urines were infused with isotonic saline after collection of baseline data. Results: One patient with RSW had pneumonia without cerebral disease and showed increased plasma aldosterone and FEphosphate, and two patients with SIADH had increased blood volume, low plasma renin and aldosterone, and normal FEphosphate. The patient with RSW responded to isotonic saline by excretion of dilute urines, prompt correction of hyponatremia, and normal water loading test after volume repletion. Hypouricemia and increased FEurate persisted after correction of hyponatremia. Two patients with SIADH failed to dilute their urines and remained hyponatremic during 48 and 110 h of saline infusion. Conclusions: The authors demonstrate appropriate stimulation of ADH in RSW. Differences in plasma renin and aldosterone levels and FEphosphate can differentiate RSW from SIADH, as will persistent hypouricemia and increased FEurate after correction of hyponatremia in RSW. FEphosphate was the only contrasting variable at baseline. The authors suggest an approach to treat the hyponatremic patient meeting criteria for SIADH and RSW and changing CSW to the more appropriate term, RSW. PMID:19201917

  9. Isotonic saline in elderly men: an open-labelled controlled infusion study of electrolyte balance, urine flow and kidney function.

    PubMed

    Hahn, R G; Isacson, M Nyberg; Fagerström, T; Rosvall, J; Nyman, C R

    2016-02-01

    Isotonic saline is a widely-used infusion fluid, although the associated chloride load may cause metabolic acidosis and impair kidney function in young, healthy volunteers. We wished to examine whether these effects also occurred in the elderly, and conducted a crossover study in 13 men with a mean age of 73 years (range 66-84), who each received intravenous infusions of 1.5 l of Ringer's acetate and of isotonic saline. Isotonic saline induced mild changes in plasma sodium (mean +1.5 mmol.l(-1) ), plasma chloride (+3 mmol.l(-1) ) and standard bicarbonate (-2 mmol.l(-1) ). Three hours after starting the infusions, 68% of the Ringer's acetate and 30% of the infused saline had been excreted (p < 0.01). The glomerular filtration rate increased in response to both fluids, but more after the Ringer's acetate (p < 0.03). Pre-infusion fluid retention, as evidenced by high urinary osmolality (> 700 mOsmol.kg(-1) ) and/or creatinine (> 7 mmol.l(-1) ), was a strong factor governing the responses to both fluid loads. PMID:26669730

  10. [Effect of the continuous epidural saline infusion for patients with postdural puncture headache after pulmonary resection].

    PubMed

    Katayama, Tatsuya; Hirai, Shinji; Hamanaka, Yoshiharu; Fukui, Takayuki; Itou, Shimon; Hatooka, Shunzou; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2011-11-01

    The dual puncture is one of the diseaseful complications at the induction of the epidural anesthesia, which causes severe symptoms of intracranial hypotension such as headache and nausea. The clinical courses of 3 patients with the dual puncture symptoms after pulmonary resections were retrospectively reviewed, and the effect of the continuous epidural saline infusion treatment (CESI) for the dual puncture was evaluated. Pneumococcal empyema developed in 1 patient who had been treated with conservative management. In contrast, the symptoms of the others who were treated with the CESI were quickly recovered or were effectively prevented. This report strongly suggested that the CESI was convenient and effective treatment for dual punctune symptoms by suppressing the cerebrospinal fluid leakage by elevation of the fluid pressure in the extradural space. PMID:22187867

  11. Does the addition of saline infusion sonohysterography to transvaginal ultrasonography prevent unnecessary hysteroscopy in premenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding?

    PubMed

    Short, John; Sharp, Benjamin; Elliot, Nikki; McEwing, Rachael; McGeoch, Graham; Shand, Brett; Holland, Kieran

    2016-08-01

    This observational case series in 65 premenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding evaluated whether transvaginal ultrasound followed by saline infusion sonohysterography (SIS) prevented unnecessary hysteroscopy. Although SIS indicated that hysteroscopy was unnecessary in eight women, this benefit was offset by the invasive nature of the scan, the number of endometrial abnormalities falsely detected by SIS and the cost of the additional investigation. PMID:27363343

  12. Diuretic Agent and Normal Saline Infusion Technique for Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Nephrostomies in Nondilated Pelvicaliceal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yagci, Cemil Ustuner, Evren Atman, Ebru Dusunceli; Baltaci, Sumer; Uzun, Caglar Akyar, Serdar

    2013-04-15

    Percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) in a nondilated pelvicaliceal system is technically challenging. We describe an effective method to achieve transient dilatation of the pelvicaliceal system via induction of diuresis using infusion of a diuretic agent in normal saline, therefore allowing easier access to the pelvicaliceal system. Under real-time ultrasound guidance, the technique had been tested in 22 nephrostomies with nondilated system (a total of 20 patients with 2 patients having bilateral nephrostomies) during a 5-year period. Patients were given 40 mg of furosemide in 250 ml of normal saline solution intravenously by rapid infusion. As soon as maximum calyceal dilatation of more than 5 mm was observed, which is usually 15 min later after the end of rapid infusion, patients were positioned obliquely, and PCN procedure under ultrasound guidance was performed. The procedure was successful in 19 of the nephrostomies in 17 patients with a success rate of 86.36 % per procedure and 85 % per patient in nondilated pelvicaliceal systems. No major nephrostomy-, drug-, or technique-related complications were encountered. The technique failed to work in three patients due to the presence of double J catheters and preexisting calyceal perforation which avoided transient dilation of the pelvicaliceal system with diuresis. Diuretic infusion in saline is a feasible and effective method for PCN in nondilated pelvicaliceal systems.

  13. Suppression of Aldosterone Secretion After Recumbent Saline Infusion Does Not Exclude Lateralized Primary Aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Cornu, Erika; Steichen, Olivier; Nogueira-Silva, Luis; Küpers, Elselien; Pagny, Jean-Yves; Grataloup, Christine; Baron, Stéphanie; Zinzindohoue, Franck; Plouin, Pierre-François; Amar, Laurence

    2016-10-01

    Guidelines recommend suppression tests such as the saline infusion test (SIT) to ascertain the diagnosis of primary aldosteronism (PA) in patients with a high aldosterone:renin ratio. However, suppression tests have only been evaluated in small retrospective series, and some experts consider that they are not helpful for the diagnosis of PA. In this study, we evaluated whether low post-SIT aldosterone concentrations do exclude lateralized PA. Between February 2009 and December 2013, 199 patients diagnosed with PA on the basis of 2 elevated aldosterone:renin ratio results and a high basal plasma or urinary aldosterone level or high post-SIT aldosterone level had a selective adrenal venous sampling. We used a selectivity index of 2 and a lateralization index of 4 to interpret the adrenal venous sampling results. Baseline characteristics of the patients were the following (percent or median): men 63%, 48 years old, office blood pressure 142/88 mm Hg, serum potassium 3.4 mmol/L, aldosterone:renin ratio 113 pmol/mU, plasma aldosterone concentration 588 pmol/L. The proportion of patients with lateralized adrenal venous sampling was 12 of 41 (29%) among those with post-SIT aldosterone <139 pmol/L (5 ng/dL) and 38 of 104 (37%) among those with post-SIT aldosterone <277 pmol/L (10 ng/dL). Post-SIT aldosterone levels were not associated with the blood pressure outcome of adrenalectomy. A low post-SIT aldosterone level cannot rule out lateralized PA, even with a low threshold (139 pmol/L). Adrenal venous sampling should be considered for patients who are eligible for surgery with elevated basal aldosterone levels even if they have low aldosterone concentrations after recumbent saline suppression testing. PMID:27600182

  14. Diagnostic utility of saline infusion doppler sonohysterography in endometrial mass lesions

    PubMed Central

    Ogutcuoglu, Bilge; Karadag, Cihan; Inan, Cihan; Dolgun, Zehra Nihal; Yoldemir, Ahmet Tevfik; Aslanova, Lale

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the importance of saline infusion Doppler sonohysterography (SIS-D) in the assessment of transvaginal ultrasound (TVUSG)-suspected intrauterine mass lesions in women complaining about abnormal uterine bleeding with respect to hysteroscopy (H/S) and pathologic diagnosis. Methods: This study was conducted on patients, who visited to our clinic with abnormal uterine bleeding and whose TVUSGs indicated intrauterine masses. The study covered a total of 100 patients. SIS-D and hysteroscopy were performed on those 100 patients. SIS-D results were compared with hysteroscopy results. The relation between SIS-D findings and pathology results were evaluated. Results: For SIS; specificity was 96%, sensitivity was 60%, positive predictive value (PPV) was 87.8%, negative predictive value (NPV) was 83.3%, and the accuracy rate was 87%. For TVUSG; PPV was 75%. According to SIS-D, 92.2% of the lesions that had single-vessel feeding patterns were endometrial polyps, and this was statistically significant (p<0.0001). 57.1% of the lesions that had multiple-vessel feeding patterns were submucous myomas, and this was statistically significant (p<0.0001). Conclusion: SIS should be performed in patients before hysteroscopy because it will protect a considerable number of patients from unnecessary invasive procedures. SIS-D gives an idea on the histopathology of the mass. PMID:27182224

  15. Anthropomorphic phantoms for assessment of strain imaging methods involving saline-infused sonohysterography.

    PubMed

    Hobson, Maritza A; Madsen, Ernest L; Frank, Gary R; Jiang, Jingfeng; Shi, Hairong; Hall, Timothy J; Varghese, Tomy

    2008-10-01

    Two anthropomorphic uterine phantoms were developed that allow assessment and comparison of strain imaging systems adapted for use with saline-infused sonohysterography (SIS). Tissue-mimicking (TM) materials consist of dispersions of safflower oil in gelatin. TM fibroids are stiffer than the TM myometrium/cervix, and TM polyps are softer. The first uterine phantom has 3-mm-diameter TM fibroids distributed randomly in TM myometrium. The second uterine phantom has a 5-mm and 8-mm spherical TM fibroid, in addition to a 5-mm spherical and a 12.5-mm-long (medicine capsule-shaped) TM endometrial polyp protruding into the endometrial cavity; also, a 10-mm spherical TM fibroid projects from the serosal surface. Strain images using the first phantom show the stiffer 3-mm TM fibroids in the myometrium. Results from the second uterine phantom show that, as expected, parts of inclusions projecting into the uterine cavity will appear very stiff, whether they are stiff or soft. Results from both phantoms show that although there is a five-fold difference in the Young's moduli values, there is not a significant difference in the strain in the transition from the TM myometrium to the TM fat. These phantoms allow for realistic comparison and evolution of SIS strain imaging techniques and can aid clinical personnel to develop skills for SIS strain imaging. PMID:18514999

  16. Tolerability of hypertonic injectables.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei

    2015-07-25

    Injectable drug products are ideally developed as isotonic solutions. Often, hypertonic injectables may have to be marketed for a variety of reasons such as product solubilization and stabilization. A key concern during product formulation development is the local and systemic tolerability of hypertonic products upon injection. This report reviews and discusses the tolerability in terms of local discomfort, irritation, sensation of heat and pain, along with other observed side effects of hypertonicity in both in-vitro systems and in-vivo animal and human models. These side effects clearly depend on the degree of hypertonicity. The sensation of pain among different injection routes seems to follow this order: intramuscular>subcutaneous>intravenous or intravascular. It is recommended that the upper osmolality limit should be generally controlled under 600 mOsm/kg for drug products intended for intramuscular or subcutaneous injection. For drug products intended for intravenous or intravascular injection, the recommended upper limit should be generally controlled under 1,000 mOsm/kg for small-volume injections (≤ 100 mL) and 500 mOsm/kg for large-volume injections (>100mL). Several options are available for minimization of hypertonicity-induced pain upon product administration. PMID:26027488

  17. Changes in Hepatic Blood Flow During Transcatheter Arterial Infusion with Heated Saline in Hepatic VX2 Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Wei; Li Jing; Wu Zhiqun; Zhou Changxi; Liu Xi; Wan Yi; Duan Yunyou

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. This study evaluates the influence of transcatheter arterial infusion with heated saline on hepatic arterial and portal venous blood flows to tumor and normal hepatic tissues in a rabbit VX2 tumor model. Methods. All animal experiments were approved by the institutional animal care and use committee. Twenty rabbits with VX2 liver tumors were divided into the following two groups: (a) the treated group (n = 10), which received a 60 mL transarterial injection of 60 Degree-Sign C saline via the hepatic artery; (b) the control group (n = 10), which received a 60 mL injection of 37 Degree-Sign C saline via the hepatic artery. Using ultrasonography, the blood flows in both the portal vein and hepatic artery were measured, and the changes in the hemodynamic indices were recorded before and immediately after the injection. The changes in the tumor and normal liver tissues of the two groups were histopathologically examined by hematoxylin and eosin staining after the injection. Results. After the transcatheter arterial heated infusion, there was a decrease in the hepatic arterial blood flow to the tumor tissue, a significant decrease in the hepatic artery mean velocity (P < 0.05), and a significant increase in the resistance index (P < 0.05). On hematoxylin and eosin staining, there were no obvious signs of tissue destruction in the normal liver tissue or the tumor tissue after heated perfusion, and coagulated blood plasma was observed in the cavities of intratumoral blood vessels in the treated group. Conclusions. The changes in tumor blood flow in the rabbit VX2 tumor model were presumably caused by microthrombi in the tumor vessels, and the portal vein likely mediated the heat loss in normal liver tissue during the transarterial heated infusion.

  18. Optimization of induction of mild therapeutic hypothermia with cold saline infusion: A laboratory experiment.

    PubMed

    Fluher, Jure; Markota, Andrej; Stožer, Andraž; Sinkovič, Andreja

    2015-01-01

    Cold fluid infusions can be used to induce mild therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Fluid temperature higher than 4°C can increase the volume of fluid needed, prolong the induction phase of hypothermia and thus contribute to complications. We performed a laboratory experiment with two objectives. The first objective was to analyze the effect of wrapping fluid bags in ice packs on the increase of fluid temperature with time in bags exposed to ambient conditions. The second objective was to quantify the effect of insulating venous tubing and adjusting flow rate on fluid temperature increase from bag to the level of an intravenous cannula during a simulated infusion. The temperature of fluid in bags wrapped in ice packs was significantly lower compared to controls at all time points during the 120 minutes observation. The temperature increase from the bag to the level of intravenous cannula was significantly lower for insulated tubing at all infusion rates (median temperature differences between bag and intravenous cannula were: 8.9, 4.8, 4.0, and 3.1°C, for non-insulated and 5.9, 3.05, 1.1, and 0.3°C, for insulated tubing, at infusion rates 10, 30, 60, and 100 mL/minute, respectively). The results from this study could potentially be used to decrease the volume of fluid infused when inducing mild hypothermia with an infusion of cold fluids. PMID:26614854

  19. Thermal skin injury: II. Effects on edema formation and albumin extravasation of fluid resuscitation with lactated Ringer's, plasma, and hypertonic saline (2,400 mosmol/l) in the rat.

    PubMed

    Onarheim, H; Lund, T; Reed, R

    1989-01-01

    Pentobarbital anesthetized rats were subjected to a 40% body surface area full-thickness scald burn. Intravenous fluid therapy was given as lactated Ringer's (5 ml/hr), plasma (2.5 ml/hr), or very hypertonic saline (2,400 mosmol/l) (0.75 ml/hr) and compared to unburned or burned, untreated controls. At 3 hr postburn, skin water and albumin content and extravasation of radiolabelled albumin were determined. Water content in injured skin increased by 35-78% (least in the untreated group, most in the plasma group) compared to unburned controls (P less than 0.05). After lactated Ringer's therapy water content increased even in unburned skin and in muscle (P less than 0.05). Tissue albumin mass increased generally slightly more than the increase in water content, from 37% (lactated Ringer's group) to 126% (plasma group) in burned areas. Extravasation rate of radiolabelled albumin increased 5-80 times in burned areas, most following plasma treatment (equivalent to 0.6-1.0 ml plasma/g dry weight/180 min). A major part of the estimated total fluid loss following therapy by lactated Ringer's took place in noninjured tissue. Plasma therapy gave less fluid accumulation in unburned tissues but more edema in the injured areas than lactated Ringer's. PMID:2917371

  20. Role of thalamic nuclei in the modulation of Fos expression within the cerebral cortex during hypertonic saline-induced muscle nociception.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Y; Lei, J; Ye, G; Xu, H; You, H-J

    2015-09-24

    It has been proposed that thalamic mediodorsal (MD) and ventromedial (VM) nuclei form thalamic 'nociceptive discriminators' in discrimination of nociceptive afferents, and specifically govern endogenous descending facilitation and inhibition. The present study conducted in rats was to explore the role of thalamic MD and VM nuclei in modulation of cerebral neuronal activities by means of detection of spatiotemporal variations of Fos expression within the cerebral cortex. Following a unilateral intramuscular injection of 5.8% saline into the gastrocnemius muscle, Fos expression within the bilateral, different areas of the cerebral cortex except S2 was significantly increased (P<0.05). Particularly, the increases in Fos expression within the cingulate cortex and the insular cortex occurred at 0.5h, 4h and reached the peak level at 4h, 16h, respectively. Electrolytic lesion of the contralateral thalamic MD and VM nuclei significantly blocked the 5.8% saline intramuscularly induced increases in Fos expression within the bilateral cingulate and insular cortices, respectively. Additionally, the 5.8% saline-induced Fos expression in the cingulate cortex and the insular cortex were dose-dependently attenuated by microinjection of μ-opioid antagonist β-funaltrexamine hydrochloride into the thalamic MD and VM nuclei. It is suggested that (1) the neural circuits of 'thalamic MD nucleus - cingulate cortex' and 'thalamic VM nucleus - insular cortex' form two distinct pathways in the endogenous control of nociception, (2) mirror or contralateral pain is hypothesized to be related to cross-talk of neuronal activities within the bilateral cerebral cortices modulated by μ-opioid receptors within the thalamic MD and VM nuclei. PMID:26189794

  1. Out-of-Hospital Hypertonic Resuscitation Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bulger, Eileen M.; May, Susanne; Brasel, Karen J.; Schreiber, Martin; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Tisherman, Samuel A.; Newgard, Craig; Slutsky, Arthur; Coimbra, Raul; Emerson, Scott; Minei, Joseph P.; Bardarson, Berit; Kudenchuk, Peter; Baker, Andrew; Christenson, Jim; Idris, Ahamed; Davis, Daniel; Fabian, Timothy C.; Aufderheide, Tom P.; Callaway, Clifton; Williams, Carolyn; Banek, Jane; Vaillancourt, Christian; van Heest, Rardi; Sopko, George; Hata, J. Steven; Hoyt, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Context Hypertonic fluids restore cerebral perfusion with reduced cerebral edema and modulate inflammatory response to reduce subsequent neuronal injury and thus have potential benefit in resuscitation of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Objective To determine whether out-of-hospital administration of hypertonic fluids improves neurologic outcome following severe TBI. Design, Setting, and Participants Multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial involving 114 North American emergency medical services agencies within the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium, conducted between May 2006 and May 2009 among patients 15 years or older with blunt trauma and a prehospital Glasgow Coma Scale score of 8 or less who did not meet criteria for hypovolemic shock. Planned enrollment was 2122 patients. Intervention A single 250-mL bolus of 7.5% saline/6% dextran 70 (hypertonic saline/dextran), 7.5% saline (hypertonic saline), or 0.9% saline (normal saline) initiated in the out-of-hospital setting. Main Outcome Measure Six-month neurologic outcome based on the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE) (dichotomized as >4 or ≤4). Results The study was terminated by the data and safety monitoring board after randomization of 1331 patients, having met prespecified futility criteria. Among the 1282 patients enrolled, 6-month outcomes data were available for 1087 (85%). Baseline characteristics of the groups were equivalent. There was no difference in 6-month neurologic outcome among groups with regard to proportions of patients with severe TBI (GOSE ≤4) (hypertonic saline/dextran vs normal saline: 53.7% vs 51.5%; difference, 2.2% [95% CI, −4.5% to 9.0%]; hypertonic saline vs normal saline: 54.3% vs 51.5%; difference, 2.9% [95% CI, −4.0% to 9.7%]; P=.67). There were no statistically significant differences in distribution of GOSE category or Disability Rating Score by treatment group. Survival at 28 days was 74.3% with hypertonic saline

  2. Effect of chronic intracerebroventricular angiotensin II infusion on vasopressin release in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, G. H.; Chee, O.; Riggs, R. V.; Keil, L. C.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of the chronic infusion of angiotensin II into the lateral cerebral ventricle on the release of arginine vasopressin in rats are investigated. Rats were subjected to a continuous infusion of angiotensin at a rate of 1 microgram/h for five days, during which they were offered water, isotonic saline or hypertonic saline ad libitum or 40 ml water/day, and fluid intake, changes in body weight, plasma sodium ion concentrations and plasma and pituitary arginine vasopressin levels were measured. Angiotensin II is found to increase the fluid intake of rats given isotonic saline and decrease plasma sodium ion levels with no changes in plasma or pituitary arginine vasopressin in those given water or isotonic saline. However, in rats given hypertonic saline, plasma sodium concentrations remained at control levels while plasma vasopressin increased, and in water-restricted rats the effects of angiotensin II were intermediate. Results thus demonstrate that angiotensin II-stimulated arginine vasopressin release is reduced under conditions in which plasma sodium ion concentration becomes dilute, compatible with a central role of angiotensin in the regulation of salt and water balance.

  3. Out-of-hospital Hypertonic Resuscitation After Traumatic Hypovolemic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Bulger, Eileen M.; May, Susanne; Kerby, Jeffery D.; Emerson, Scott; Stiell, Ian G.; Schreiber, Martin A.; Brasel, Karen J.; Tisherman, Samuel A.; Coimbra, Raul; Rizoli, Sandro; Minei, Joseph P.; Hata, J. Steven; Sopko, George; Evans, David C.; Hoyt, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine whether out-of-hospital administration of hypertonic fluids would improve survival after severe injury with hemorrhagic shock. Background Hypertonic fluids have potential benefit in the resuscitation of severely injured patients because of rapid restoration of tissue perfusion, with a smaller volume, and modulation of the inflammatory response, to reduce subsequent organ injury. Methods Multicenter, randomized, blinded clinical trial, May 2006 to August 2008, 114 emergency medical services agencies in North America within the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium. Inclusion criteria: injured patients, age ≥ 15 years with hypovolemic shock (systolic blood pressure ≤ 70 mm Hg or systolic blood pressure 71–90 mm Hg with heart rate ≥ 108 beats per minute). Initial resuscitation fluid, 250 mL of either 7.5% saline per 6% dextran 70 (hypertonic saline/dextran, HSD), 7.5% saline (hypertonic saline, HS), or 0.9% saline (normal saline, NS) administered by out-of-hospital providers. Primary outcome was 28-day survival. On the recommendation of the data and safety monitoring board, the study was stopped early (23% of proposed sample size) for futility and potential safety concern. Results A total of 853 treated patients were enrolled, among whom 62% were with blunt trauma, 38% with penetrating. There was no difference in 28-day survival—HSD: 74.5% (0.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], −7.5 to 7.8); HS: 73.0% (−1.4; 95% CI, −8.7–6.0); and NS: 74.4%, P = 0.91. There was a higher mortality for the postrandomization subgroup of patients who did not receive blood transfusions in the first 24 hours, who received hypertonic fluids compared to NS [28-day mortality—HSD: 10% (5.2; 95% CI, 0.4–10.1); HS: 12.2% (7.4; 95% CI, 2.5–12.2); and NS: 4.8%, P < 0.01]. Conclusion Among injured patients with hypovolemic shock, initial resuscitation fluid treatment with either HS or HSD compared with NS, did not result in superior 28-day survival. However

  4. Biphasic modulation of synaptic transmission by hypertonicity at the embryonic Drosophila neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Okamoto, Tomonori; Kidokoro, Yoshiaki

    2002-01-01

    Puff-application of hypertonic saline (sucrose added to external saline) causes a transient increase in the frequency of spontaneous miniature synaptic currents (mSCs) at the neuromuscular junctions of Drosophila embryos. The frequency gradually returns to pre-application levels. External Ca2+ is not needed for this response, but it may modify it. At 50 mm added sucrose, for example, enhanced spontaneous release was observed only in the presence of external Ca2+, suggesting that Ca2+ augments the response. In a high-K+ solution, in which the basal mSC frequency was elevated, higher sucrose concentrations produced an increase in mSC frequency that was followed (during and after the hypertonic exposure) by depression, with the magnitude of both effects increasing with hypertonicity between 100 and 500 mm. Evoked release by nerve stimulation showed only depression in response to hypertonicity. We do not believe that the depression of spontaneous or evoked release can be explained by the depletion of releasable quanta, however, since the frequency of quantal release did not reach levels compatible with this explanation and the enhancement and depression could be obtained independent of one another. In a mutant lacking neuronal synaptobrevin, only the depression of mSC frequency was induced by hypertonicity. Conversely, only the enhancing effect was observed in wild-type embryos when the mSC frequency was elevated with forskolin in Ca2+-free saline. In cultured embryonic Drosophila neurons, Ca2+ signals that were induced by high K+ and detected by Fura-2, were reduced by hypertonicity, suggesting that the depressing response is due to a direct effect of hypertonicity on Ca2+ influx. PMID:12433954

  5. Intravenous infusion of H2-saline suppresses oxidative stress and elevates antioxidant potential in Thoroughbred horses after racing exercise

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Masahiko; Kusano, Kanichi; Ishibashi, Toru; Kiuchi, Masataka; Koyama, Katsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Upon intensive, exhaustive exercise, exercise-induced reactive oxygen species may exceed the antioxidant defence threshold, consequently resulting in muscular damage or late-onset chronic inflammation. Recently, the therapeutic antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of molecular hydrogen (H2) for human rheumatoid arthritis have been demonstrated. However, it is also important to clarify the effects of administrating H2 in large animals other than humans, as H2 is thought to reach the target organ by passive diffusion upon delivery from the blood flow, indicating that the distance from the administration point to the target is critical. However, data on the effects of H2 on oxidative stress in real-life exhaustive exercise in large animals are currently lacking. We here investigated 13 Thoroughbred horses administered intravenous 2-L saline with or without 0.6-ppm H2 (placebo, N = 6; H2, N = 7) before participating in a high-intensity simulation race. Intravenous H2-saline significantly suppressed oxidative stress immediately, 3 h, and 24 h after the race, although the antioxidant capability was not affected throughout the study. The serum creatine kinase, lactate, and uric acid levels were increased in both groups. Taken together, these results indicate that intravenous H2-saline can significantly and specifically suppress oxidative stress induced after exhaustive racing in Thoroughbred horses. PMID:26493164

  6. Regional expression of c-fos antigen in the basal forebrain following intraventricular infusions of angiotensin and its modulation by drinking either water or saline.

    PubMed

    Herbert, J; Forsling, M L; Howes, S R; Stacey, P M; Shiers, H M

    1992-12-01

    The expression of c-fos protein was examined in the basal forebrains of male rats 60 min following intracerebroventricular infusions of 250 pmol angiotensin II. Levels of corticosterone and vasopressin were also measured at the same time point. In animals not allowed access to water after infusion, angiotensin II induced intense c-fos expression in a band of neurons extending throughout the anterior region of the third ventricle region, including the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, the median preoptic nucleus (nucleus medianus) and the subfornical organ. There were also high levels of expression in the hypothalamic supraoptic nucleus and the paraventricular nucleus, particularly its lateral (magnocellular) region, though other, parvicellular areas were also affected. No other area of the hypothalamus was altered. There was increased c-fos expression in the central nucleus of the amygdala and the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. Allowing rats to drink during the 60-min survival period modified this pattern of response. c-fos was markedly reduced in the supraoptic nucleus and the paraventricular nucleus but not in the other areas examined, including the anterior region of the third ventricle and the amygdala. When water was withheld for 15 min, but then allowed, rats drank the same total volume but c-fos expression was no longer inhibited in either the supraoptic nucleus or paraventricular nucleus. When rats were given 0.9% saline to drink, they ingested about three times as much as water, but angiotensin II-induced c-fos expression was similar to that in rats denied access to water. The pattern was similar following access to 1.8% saline, though levels in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis were reduced. There was a marked correlation between the number of c-fos-positive neurons in the supraoptic nucleus or paraventricular nucleus and plasma levels of corticosterone 60 min after infusion, but not with arginine-vasopressin levels. These

  7. Correlation of growth of aerobic blood cultures in hypertonic broth with antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Eng, J; Maeland, A

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms by which sucrose improves growth in a hypertonic medium for isolating aerobes from blood. Clinical blood cultures were made routinely in duplicate in plain broth consisting of brain heart infusion broth with sodium polyanetholesulfonate, gelatin, and penicillinase and the same broth with 20% sucrose added. The growth patterns of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterobacteriaceae from plain and from hypertonic broth were correlated with the presence or absence of antimicrobial therapy in patients when the blood cultures were collected. In S. aureus bacteremias, 58.7% of the positive cultures collected during treatment of patients with beta-lactam antibiotics showed earlier growth or growth only in hypertonic broth, compared with 16.7% of the cultures taken during treatment with other antimicrobial agents (P less than 0.05) and 17.6% of the cultures made in antibiotic-free intervals (P less than 0.01). In the group of cultures yielding growth of Enterobacteriaceae, growth occurred earlier or solely in hypertonic broth in 28.9% of the cultures taken during treatment with beta-lactam antibiotics, compared with 15.7% of the cultures taken during treatment with other antimicrobial agents and 21.6% of the cultures collected in antibiotic-free intervals (differences not statistically significant). It is concluded that treatment with beta-lactam antibiotics is an important reason for the improved growth of S. aureus from hypertonic broth, but other factors are also involved. PMID:7153339

  8. Antidiuretic Effect of Eel ANP Infused at Physiological Doses in Conscious, Seawater-Adapted Eels, Anguilla japonica.

    PubMed

    Takei, Y; Kaiya, H

    1998-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is known as a potent natriuretic/diuretic hormone in vertebrates. However, eel ANP infused at doses that did not alter arterial blood pressure (0.3-3.0 pmol/kg/min) decreased urine volume and increased urinary Na concentration in seawater (SW)-adapted eels but not in freshwater (FW)-adapted eels. The renal effects were dose-dependent and disappeared after infusate was switched back to a vehicle (0.9% NaCl). Urinary Na excretion (volume x Na concentration) did not change during ANP infusion. ANP infusion increased plasma ANP concentration, but the increase at the highest dose was still within those observed endogenously after injection of hypertonic saline. Urinary Mg and Ca concentrations increased during ANP infusion in SW eels, but urinary Ca excretion decreased in FW eels. Plasma Na concentration profoundly decreased during ANP infusion only in SW eels, suggesting that ANP stimulates Na extrusion via non-renal routes. These results indicate that ANP is a hormone which specifically extrudes Na ions and thereby promotes SW adaptation in the eel. This is in sharp contrast with mammals where ANP is a volume regulating hormone that extrudes both Na and water. PMID:18466004

  9. Diagnosis of hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dyskinesia

    SciTech Connect

    Varro, V.; Doebroente, Z.; Hajnal, F.; Csernay, L.; Nemessanyi, Z.; Lang, J.; Narai, G.; Szabo, E.

    1983-11-01

    The diagnostic possibility of hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dysfunction was evaluated in 100 cholecystectomized and 28 noncholecystectomized patients. An organic lesion interfering with free bile flow was ruled out in every case. The existence of the syndrome, i.e., the dysfunction of the Oddi's musculature, was verified using the morphine-choleretic test combined with either dynamic hepatobiliary scintigraphy or (in selected cases) percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography. Hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dyskinesia can be regarded as an independent clinical syndrome.

  10. [The influence of an isotonic solution containing benzalkonium chloride and a hypertonic seawater solution on the function of ciliary epithelium from the nasal cavity in vitro].

    PubMed

    Laberko, E L; Bogomil'sky, M R; Soldatsky, Yu L; Pogosova, I E

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of an isotonic saline solution containing benzalconium chloride and of a hypertonic seawater solution on the function of ciliary epithelium in the nasal cavity in vitro. To this effect, we investigated the cytological material obtained from 35 children presenting with adenoid tissue hypertrophy. The tissue samples were taken from the nasal cavity by the standard method. A cellular biopsy obtained from each patient was distributed between three tubes that contained isotonic saline solution supplemented by benzalconium chloride (0.1 mg/ml), a hypertonic seawater solution, and a standard physiological saline solution. It was shown that the number of the viable cells in both isotonic solutions was statistically comparable and significantly higher than in the hypertonic solution (p<0.05). The ciliary beat frequency of the cells embedded in the two isotonic solutions was not significantly different but considerably exceeded that in the hypertonic seawater solution (p<0.05). Thus, the present study has demonstrated the absence of the ciliotoxic influence of isotonic saline solution containing benzalconium chloride at a concentration of 0.1 mg/ml and the strong ciliotoxic effect of the hypertonic seawater solution. This finding gives reason to recommend isotonic solutions for the regular application whereas hypertonic solutions can be prescribed only during infectious and/or inflammatory ENT diseases. PMID:27213656

  11. IT infusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    Infusing IT technology is a perennial challenge. The Technology Infusion and Maturity Assessment approach of Cornford & Hicks is shown applied to an example of IT infusion: moedl-based V&V of spacecraft software.

  12. Hypertonic fluid administration in patients with septic shock: a prospective randomized controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    van Haren, Frank M P; Sleigh, James; Boerma, E Christiaan; La Pine, Mary; Bahr, Mohamed; Pickkers, Peter; van der Hoeven, Johannes G

    2012-03-01

    We assessed the short-term effects of hypertonic fluid versus isotonic fluid administration in patients with septic shock. This was a double-blind, prospective randomized controlled trial in a 15-bed intensive care unit. Twenty-four patients with septic shock were randomized to receive 250 mL 7.2% NaCl/6% hydroxyethyl starch (HT group) or 500 mL 6% hydroxyethyl starch (IT group). Hemodynamic measurements included mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), central venous pressure, stroke volume index, stroke volume variation, intrathoracic blood volume index, gastric tonometry, and sublingual microcirculatory flow as assessed by sidestream dark field imaging. Systolic tissue Doppler imaging velocities of the medial mitral annulus were measured using echocardiography to assess left ventricular contractility. Log transformation of the ratio MAP divided by the norepinephrine infusion rate (log MAP/NE) quantified the combined effect on both parameters. Compared with the IT group, hypertonic solution treatment resulted in an improvement in log MAP/NE (P = 0.008), as well as an increase in systolic tissue Doppler imaging velocities (P = 0.03) and stroke volume index (P = 0.017). No differences between the groups were found for preload parameters (central venous pressure, stroke volume variation, intrathoracic blood volume index) or for afterload parameters (systemic vascular resistance index, MAP). Hypertonic solution treatment decreased the need for ongoing fluid resuscitation (P = 0.046). No differences between groups were observed regarding tonometry or the sublingual microvascular variables. In patients with septic shock, hypertonic fluid administration did not promote gastrointestinal mucosal perfusion or sublingual microcirculatory blood flow in comparison to isotonic fluid. Independent of changes in preload or afterload, hypertonic fluid administration improved the cardiac contractility and vascular tone compared with isotonic fluid. The need for ongoing fluid

  13. Hypertonic saline in the treatment of corneal jellyfish stings.

    PubMed

    Yu Yao, Hsin; Cho, Ta Hsiung; Lu, Ching Hsiang; Lin, Feng Chi; Horng, Chi Ting

    2016-02-01

    A 20-year-old male soldier was hit by the jellyfish. The ophthalmic examination revealed that epithelial keratitis and corneal oedema in the right eye. We prescribed 3% NaCl eyedrops and 0.3% Norfloxacin eyedrops in the treatment of the corneal jellyfish stings. Two weeks later, the cornea in the right eye healed. In this case report, 3% NaCl eyedrops was effective in the treatment of acute phase of jellyfish stings of the cornea. PMID:26883926

  14. Renal Blood Flow Response to Angiotensin 1-7 versus Hypertonic Sodium Chloride 7.5% Administration after Acute Hemorrhagic Shock in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Maryam; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Angiotensin 1-7 (Ang1-7) plays an important role in renal circulation. Hemorrhagic shock (HS) may cause kidney circulation disturbance, and this study was designed to investigate the renal blood flow (RBF) response to Ang1-7 after HS. Methods. 27 male Wistar rats were subjected to blood withdrawal to reduce mean arterial pressure (MAP) to 45 mmHg for 45 min. The animals were treated with saline (group 1), Ang1-7 (300 ng·kg−1 min−1), Ang1-7 in hypertonic sodium chloride 7.5% (group 3), and hypertonic solution alone (group 4). Results. MAP was increased in a time-related fashion (Ptime < 0.0001) in all groups; however, there was a tendency for the increase in MAP in response to hypertonic solution (P = 0.09). Ang1-7, hypertonic solution, or combination of both increased RBF in groups 2-4, and these were significantly different from saline group (P = 0.05); that is, Ang1-7 leads to a significant increase in RBF to 1.35 ± 0.25 mL/min compared with 0.55 ± 0.12 mL/min in saline group (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Although Ang1-7 administration unlike hypertonic solution could not elevate MAP after HS, it potentially could increase RBF similar to hypertonic solution. This suggested that Ang1-7 recovers RBF after HS when therapeutic opportunities of hypertonic solution are limited. PMID:27073699

  15. Pelvic floor hypertonic disorders: identification and management.

    PubMed

    Butrick, Charles W

    2009-09-01

    Patients with hypertonic pelvic floor disorders can present with pelvic pain or dysfunction. Each of the various syndromes will be discussed including elimination disorders, bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC), vulvodynia, vaginismus, and chronic pelvic pain. The symptoms and objective findings on physical examination and various diagnostic studies will be reviewed. Therapeutic options including physical therapy, pharmacologic management, and trigger point injections, as well as botulinum toxin injections will be reviewed in detail. PMID:19932423

  16. Infusion Extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R.

    1988-01-01

    Apparatus and method of removing desirable constituents from an infusible material by infusion extraction, where a piston operating in a first chamber draws a solvent into the first chamber where it may be heated, and then moves the heated solvent into a second chamber containing the infusible material, and where infusion extraction takes place. The piston then moves the solvent containing the extract through a filter into the first chamber, leaving the extraction residue in the second chamber.

  17. Biochemical and histochemical features of human cultured cells (EUE) adapted to hypertonic medium.

    PubMed

    Bolognani, L; Fantin, A M; Conti, A M; Gervaso, M V; Salè, M F

    1978-01-01

    EUE cells from a human heteroploid line cultured in hypertonic medium (0.274 M NaCl) modify their lipid pattern: sulfolipid concentration reaches 86 to 90 microgram/mg protein whilst it ranges between 19 to 32 microgram/mg in cells cultured in isotonic medium. Ganglioside concentration reaches 2.6 nmoles of sialic acid/mg protein (after 75 days) and 13 (after 85 days) in hypertonic saline medium. Whilst it is 0.5 in isotonic medium. Phospholipid concentration does not show any similar change. Cytoenzymatic analysis reveals that dehydrogenases (lactate, G-6-P dehydrogenases, tetrahydrofolate reductase and NADH diaphorase) appear strongly enhanced in cells grown on hypertonic medium. On the contrary higher acid phosphatase and ATPase activity was demonstrable in cells grown on isotonic medium. These results are similar (except for ATPase activity) to those observed in salt secreting glands involved in strong osmotic work. The results are discussed in relation to the problem of energy supply in cells performing osmotic work. PMID:151474

  18. Prehospital Resuscitation of Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock with Hypertonic Solutions Worsens Hypocoagulation and Hyperfibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    Delano, Matthew J; Rizoli, Sandro B; Rhind, Shawn G; Cuschieri, Joseph; Junger, Wolfgang; Baker, Andrew J; Dubick, Michael A; Hoyt, David B; Bulger, Eileen M

    2015-07-01

    Impaired hemostasis frequently occurs after traumatic shock and resuscitation. The prehospital fluid administered can exacerbate subsequent bleeding and coagulopathy. Hypertonic solutions are recommended as first-line treatment of traumatic shock; however, their effects on coagulation are unclear. This study explores the impact of resuscitation with various hypertonic solutions on early coagulopathy after trauma. We conducted a prospective observational subgroup analysis of large clinical trial on out-of-hospital single-bolus (250 mL) hypertonic fluid resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock trauma patients (systolic blood pressure, ≤70 mmHg). Patients received 7.5% NaCl (HS), 7.5% NaCl/6% Dextran 70 (HSD), or 0.9% NaCl (normal saline [NS]) in the prehospital setting. Thirty-four patients were included: 9 HS, 8 HSD, 17 NS. Treatment with HS/HSD led to higher admission systolic blood pressure, sodium, chloride, and osmolarity, whereas lactate, base deficit, fluid requirement, and hemoglobin levels were similar in all groups. The HSD-resuscitated patients had higher admission international normalized ratio values and more hypocoagulable patients, 62% (vs. 55% HS, 47% NS; P < 0.05). Prothrombotic tissue factor was elevated in shock treated with NS but depressed in both HS and HSD groups. Fibrinolytic tissue plasminogen activator and anti-fibrinolytic plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 were increased by shock but not thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor. The HSD patients had the worst imbalance between procoagulation/anticoagulation and profibrinolysis/antifibrinolysis, resulting in more hypocoagulability and hyperfibrinolysis. We concluded that resuscitation with hypertonic solutions, particularly HSD, worsens hypocoagulability and hyperfibrinolysis after hemorrhagic shock in trauma through imbalances in both procoagulants and anticoagulants and both profibrinolytic and antifibrinolytic activities. PMID:25784523

  19. 21 CFR 349.16 - Ophthalmic hypertonicity agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic hypertonicity agent. 349.16 Section 349.16 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Ophthalmic hypertonicity agent. The active ingredient and its concentration in the product is as...

  20. 21 CFR 349.16 - Ophthalmic hypertonicity agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ophthalmic hypertonicity agent. 349.16 Section 349.16 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE OPHTHALMIC DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Active Ingredients § 349.16 Ophthalmic hypertonicity agent. The...

  1. Infusion extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to an apparatus and method of removing desirable constituents from an infusible material by infusion extraction. A piston operating in a first chamber draws a solvent into the first chamber where it may be heated, and then moves the heated solvent into a second chamber containing the infusible material, where infusion extraction takes place. The piston then moves the solvent containing the extract through a filter into the first chamber, leaving the extraction residue in the second chamber. The method is applicable to operation in low or micro-gravity environments.

  2. Hypertonicity-induced transmitter release at Drosophila neuromuscular junctions is partly mediated by integrins and cAMP/protein kinase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Grinnell, Alan D.; Kidokoro, Yoshiaki

    2002-01-01

    The frequency of quantal transmitter release increases upon application of hypertonic solutions. This effect bypasses the Ca(2+) triggering step, but requires the presence of key molecules involved in vesicle fusion, and hence could be a useful tool for dissecting the molecular process of vesicle fusion. We have examined the hypertonicity response at neuromuscular junctions of Drosophila embryos in Ca(2+)-free saline. Relative to wild-type, the response induced by puff application of hypertonic solution was enhanced in a mutant, dunce, in which the cAMP level is elevated, or in wild-type embryos treated with forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, while protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors decreased it. The response was also smaller in a mutant, DC0, which lacks the major subunit of PKA. Thus the cAMP/PKA cascade is involved in the hypertonicity response. Peptides containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), which inhibit binding of integrins to natural ligands, reduced the response, whereas a peptide containing the non-binding sequence Arg-Gly-Glu (RGE) did not. A reduced response persisted in a mutant, myospheroid, which expresses no integrins, and the response in DC0 was unaffected by RGD peptides. These data indicate that there are at lease two components in the hypertonicity response: one that is integrin mediated and involves the cAMP/PKA cascade, and another that is not integrin mediated and does not involve the cAMP/PKA cascade.

  3. Practically Saline.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Jonathan; O'Neal, Catherine; Jagneaux, Tonya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. In December 2014, the Food and Drug Administration issued a recall of all Wallcur simulation products due to reports of their use in clinical practice. We present a case of septic shock and multiorgan failure after the accidental intravenous infusion of a nonsterile Wallcur simulation product. Case. The patient presented with symptoms of rigors and dyspnea occurring immediately after infusion of Wallcur Practi-0.9% saline. Initial laboratory evidence was consistent with severe septic shock and multiorgan dysfunction. His initial lactic acid level was 9 mmol/L (reference range = 0.5-2.2), and he had evidence of acute kidney injury and markers of disseminated intravascular coagulation. All 4 blood culture bottles isolated multidrug-resistant Empedobacter brevis. The patient recovered from his illness and was discharged with ciprofloxacin therapy per susceptibilities. Discussion. This patient represents the first described case of severe septic shock associated with the infusion of a Wallcur simulation product. Intravenous inoculation of a nonsterile fluid is rare and exposes the patient to unusual environmental organisms, toxins, or unsafe fluid characteristics such as tonicity. During course of treatment, we identified the possible culprit to be a multidrug-resistant isolate of Empedobacter brevis. We also discuss the systemic failures that led to this outbreak. PMID:26668812

  4. Practically Saline

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Jonathan; O’Neal, Catherine; Jagneaux, Tonya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. In December 2014, the Food and Drug Administration issued a recall of all Wallcur simulation products due to reports of their use in clinical practice. We present a case of septic shock and multiorgan failure after the accidental intravenous infusion of a nonsterile Wallcur simulation product. Case. The patient presented with symptoms of rigors and dyspnea occurring immediately after infusion of Wallcur Practi-0.9% saline. Initial laboratory evidence was consistent with severe septic shock and multiorgan dysfunction. His initial lactic acid level was 9 mmol/L (reference range = 0.5-2.2), and he had evidence of acute kidney injury and markers of disseminated intravascular coagulation. All 4 blood culture bottles isolated multidrug-resistant Empedobacter brevis. The patient recovered from his illness and was discharged with ciprofloxacin therapy per susceptibilities. Discussion. This patient represents the first described case of severe septic shock associated with the infusion of a Wallcur simulation product. Intravenous inoculation of a nonsterile fluid is rare and exposes the patient to unusual environmental organisms, toxins, or unsafe fluid characteristics such as tonicity. During course of treatment, we identified the possible culprit to be a multidrug-resistant isolate of Empedobacter brevis. We also discuss the systemic failures that led to this outbreak. PMID:26668812

  5. Hypertonicity augments bullfrog taste nerve responses to inorganic salts.

    PubMed

    Beppu, Namie; Higure, Yoko; Mashiyama, Kazunori; Ohtubo, Yoshitaka; Kumazawa, Takashi; Yoshii, Kiyonori

    2012-06-01

    The tonicity of taste stimulating solutions has been usually ignored, though taste substances themselves yielded the tonicity. We investigated the effect of hypertonicity on bullfrog taste nerve responses to inorganic salts by adding nonelectrolytes such as urea and sucrose that elicited no taste nerve responses. Here, we show that hypertonicity alters bullfrog taste nerve-response magnitude and firing pattern. The addition of urea or sucrose enhances the taste nerve-response magnitude to NaCl and shifts the concentration-response curve to the left. The effect of hypertonicity on responses to CaCl(2) is bimodal; hypertonicity suppresses CaCl(2) responses at concentrations less than ~30 mM and enhances them at concentrations greater than ~30 mM. The hypertonicity also enhances response magnitude to other monovalent salts. The extent of the enhancing effects depends on the difference between the mobility of the cation and anion in the salt. We quantitatively suggest that both the enhancing and suppressing effects result from the magnitude and direction of local circuit currents generated by diffusion potentials across tight junctions surrounding taste receptor cells. PMID:22422087

  6. Intraosseous infusion.

    PubMed

    LaRocco, Brian G; Wang, Henry E

    2003-01-01

    Establishing vascular access is vital in the resuscitation of critically-ill children and adults. Intraosseous infusion (IOI) is a viable route for providing vascular access when traditional intravenous methods cannot be accomplished. IOI is relatively easy to perform and is a standard recommended intervention for the resuscitation of both adults and children. The authors review the history, anatomy, technique, and clinical application of IOI. They also highlight the use of IOI in the prehospital setting. PMID:12710793

  7. Phosphoinositolphosphate (PIP) cascade induction by hypertonic stress of plant tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, A.; Jacoby, B. )

    1989-04-01

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) was determined by competition with ({sup 3}H)-IP{sub 3} for binding to an IP{sub 3} specific protein. A hypertonic mannitol, sorbitol or lactose shock induced an increase in the rate of K{sup +} uptake and raised the IP{sub 3} content of Beta vulgaris slices, excised Vigna mungo and Sorghum bicolor roots, as well as attached V. mungo roots. Increased K{sup +} uptake could also be induced by compounds that artificially induce the PIP cascade, or mimic it's products. A hypertonic shock, administered to intact B. vulgaris slices, further enhanced the phosphorylation of a 20 kD protein in the plasmalemma. Maximal IP{sub 3} content was found 10 min after hypertonic induction and maximal K{sup +} uptake was obtained 10 min later. The effect of a continuous hypertonic treatment on IP{sub 3} content, but not on K{sup +} uptake, was transient. Li{sup +} decreased the rate of IP{sub 3} metabolism.

  8. Conditioning Effects of Chronic Infusions of Dobutamine

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chang-Seng; Tuttle, Ronald R.; Hood, William B.; Gavras, Haralambos

    1979-01-01

    We studied the conditioning effects of chronic infusion of dobutamine and exercise training in three groups of chronically instrumented dogs. One group was infused with normal saline, a second group was infused with dobutamine (40 μg/kg per min), and the third group was exercised on a treadmill at 4 mph, up a 10° incline. Each group was either infused or exercised for 2 h a day, 5 d a week for 5 consecutive wk. Resting heart rate and arterial blood lactate concentration, measured at weekly intervals, decreased progressively in the dobutamine and exercise groups, but not in the group that received normal saline infusion. Cardiovascular responses to submaximal treadmill exercise were not changed by 5 wk of normal saline infusion. However, the increases in heart rate, cardiac output, mean aortic blood pressure, arterial blood lactate, plasma renin activity, and norepinephrine concentration during exercise were significantly smaller after 5 wk of conditioning with either dobutamine or exercise training. After conditioning, the increases in arteriovenous oxygen difference during exercise were larger in the latter two groups, but the increases in total body oxygen consumption did not differ before and after conditioning. To assess ventricular function, we intravenously infused methoxamine both before and after conditioning. The slope of the line that related systolic aortic blood pressure and mean left atrial pressure increased in the animals conditioned with either dobutamine or exercise, indicating enhanced myocardial contractility. Left ventricular blood flow was lower in these two groups of animals than it was in the normal saline group. Left ventricular weight did not differ among the three groups. Our results show that chronic infusion of dobutamine produced cardiovascular and metabolic conditioning effects like those produced by exercise training, and further suggest that sympathetic stimulation during exercise plays a role in physical conditioning. PMID:457872

  9. Resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock. Alterations of the intracranial pressure after normal saline, 3% saline and dextran-40.

    PubMed Central

    Gunnar, W P; Merlotti, G J; Barrett, J; Jonasson, O

    1986-01-01

    Resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock by infusion of isotonic (normal) saline (NS) is accompanied by a transient elevation in intracranial pressure (ICP), although cerebral edema, as measured by brain weights at 24 hours, is prevented by adequate volume resuscitation. The transient increase in ICP is not observed during hypertonic saline (HS) resuscitation. The effect of colloid resuscitation on ICP is unknown. Beagles were anesthetized, intubated, and ventilated, maintaining pCO2 between 30-45 torr. Femoral artery, pulmonary artery, and urethral catheters were positioned. ICP was measured with a subarachnoid bolt. Forty per cent of the dog's blood volume was shed and the shock state maintained for 1 hour. Resuscitation was done with shed blood and a volume of either NS (n = 5), 3% HS (n = 5), or 10% dextran-40 (D-40, n = 5) equal to the amount of shed blood. Intravascular volume was then maintained with NS. ICP fell from baseline values (4.7 +/- 3.13 mmHg) during the shock state and increased greatly during initial fluid resuscitation in NS and D-40 groups, to 16.0 +/- 5.83 mmHg and 16.2 +/- 2.68 mmHg, respectively. ICP returned to baseline values of 3.0 +/- 1.73 mmHg in the HS group with initial resuscitation and remained at baseline values throughout resuscitation. NS and D-40 ICP were greater than HS ICP at 1 hour (p less than .001) and 2 hours (p less than .05) after resuscitation. These results demonstrate that NS or colloid resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock elevates ICP and that HS prevents elevated ICP. PMID:2431664

  10. 0.9% saline is neither normal nor physiological

    PubMed Central

    Li, Heng; Sun, Shi-ren; Yap, John Q.; Chen, Jiang-hua; Qian, Qi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to objectively evaluate the biochemical and pathophysiological properties of 0.9% saline (henceforth: saline) and to discuss the impact of saline infusion, specifically on systemic acid-base balance and renal hemodynamics. Studies have shown that electrolyte balance, including effects of saline infusion on serum electrolytes, is often poorly understood among practicing physicians and inappropriate saline prescribing can cause increased morbidity and mortality. Large-volume (>2 L) saline infusion in healthy adults induces hyperchloremia which is associated with metabolic acidosis, hyperkalemia, and negative protein balance. Saline overload (80 ml/kg) in rodents can cause intestinal edema and contractile dysfunction associated with activation of sodium-proton exchanger (NHE) and decrease in myosin light chain phosphorylation. Saline infusion can also adversely affect renal hemodynamics. Microperfusion experiments and real-time imaging studies have demonstrated a reduction in renal perfusion and an expansion in kidney volume, compromising O2 delivery to the renal parenchyma following saline infusion. Clinically, saline infusion for patients post abdominal and cardiovascular surgery is associated with a greater number of adverse effects including more frequent blood product transfusion and bicarbonate therapy, reduced gastric blood flow, delayed recovery of gut function, impaired cardiac contractility in response to inotropes, prolonged hospital stay, and possibly increased mortality. In critically ill patients, saline infusion, compared to balanced fluid infusions, increases the occurrence of acute kidney injury. In summary, saline is a highly acidic fluid. With the exception of saline infusion for patients with hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis and volume depletion due to vomiting or upper gastrointestinal suction, indiscriminate use, especially for acutely ill patients, may cause unnecessary complications and should be avoided. More

  11. 0.9% saline is neither normal nor physiological.

    PubMed

    Li, Heng; Sun, Shi-Ren; Yap, John Q; Chen, Jiang-Hua; Qian, Qi

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to objectively evaluate the biochemical and pathophysiological properties of 0.9% saline (henceforth: saline) and to discuss the impact of saline infusion, specifically on systemic acid-base balance and renal hemodynamics. Studies have shown that electrolyte balance, including effects of saline infusion on serum electrolytes, is often poorly understood among practicing physicians and inappropriate saline prescribing can cause increased morbidity and mortality. Large-volume (>2 L) saline infusion in healthy adults induces hyperchloremia which is associated with metabolic acidosis, hyperkalemia, and negative protein balance. Saline overload (80 ml/kg) in rodents can cause intestinal edema and contractile dysfunction associated with activation of sodium-proton exchanger (NHE) and decrease in myosin light chain phosphorylation. Saline infusion can also adversely affect renal hemodynamics. Microperfusion experiments and real-time imaging studies have demonstrated a reduction in renal perfusion and an expansion in kidney volume, compromising O2 delivery to the renal parenchyma following saline infusion. Clinically, saline infusion for patients post abdominal and cardiovascular surgery is associated with a greater number of adverse effects including more frequent blood product transfusion and bicarbonate therapy, reduced gastric blood flow, delayed recovery of gut function, impaired cardiac contractility in response to inotropes, prolonged hospital stay, and possibly increased mortality. In critically ill patients, saline infusion, compared to balanced fluid infusions, increases the occurrence of acute kidney injury. In summary, saline is a highly acidic fluid. With the exception of saline infusion for patients with hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis and volume depletion due to vomiting or upper gastrointestinal suction, indiscriminate use, especially for acutely ill patients, may cause unnecessary complications and should be avoided. More

  12. Salinization and Saline Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vengosh, A.

    2003-12-01

    One of the most conspicuous phenomena of water-quality degradation, particularly in arid and semi-arid zones, is salinization of water and soil resources. Salinization is a long-term phenomenon, and during the last century many aquifers and river basins have become unsuitable for human consumption owing to high levels of salinity. Future exploitation of thousands of wells in the Middle East and in many other water-scarce regions in the world depends, to a large extent, on the degree and rate of salinization. Moreover, every year a large fraction of agricultural land is salinized and becomes unusable.Salinization is a global environmental phenomenon that affects many different aspects of our life (Williams, 2001a, b): changing the chemical composition of natural water resources (lakes, rivers, and groundwater), degrading the quality of water supply to the domestic and agriculture sectors, contribution to loss of biodiversity, taxonomic replacement by halotolerant species ( Williams, 2001a, b), loss of fertile soil, collapse of agricultural and fishery industries, changing of local climatic conditions, and creating severe health problems (e.g., the Aral Basin). The damage due to salinity in the Colorado River Basin alone, for example, ranges between 500 and 750 million per year and could exceed 1 billion per year if the salinity in the Imperial Dam increases from 700 mg L-1 to 900 mg L-1 (Bureau of Reclamation, 2003, USA). In Australia, accelerating soil salinization has become a massive environmental and economic disaster. Western Australia is "losing an area equal to one football oval an hour" due to spreading salinity ( Murphy, 1999). The annual cost for dryland salinity in Australia is estimated as AU700 million for lost land and AU$130 million for lost production ( Williams et al., 2002). In short, the salinization process has become pervasive.Salinity in water is usually defined by the chloride content (mg L-1) or total dissolved solids content (TDS, mg L-1or g

  13. Controlled aquaporin-2 expression in the hypertonic environment.

    PubMed

    Hasler, Udo

    2009-04-01

    The corticomedullary osmolality gradient is the driving force for water reabsorption occurring in the kidney. In the collecting duct, this gradient allows luminal water to move across aquaporin (AQP) water channels, thereby increasing urine concentration. However, this same gradient exposes renal cells to great osmotic challenges. These cells must constantly adapt to fluctuations of environmental osmolality that challenge cell volume and incite functional change. This implies profound alterations of cell phenotype regarding water permeability. AQP2 is an essential component of the urine concentration mechanism whose controlled expression dictates apical water permeability of collecting duct principal cells. This review focuses on changes of AQP2 abundance and trafficking in hypertonicity-challenged cells. Intracellular mechanisms governing these events are discussed and the biological relevance of altered AQP2 expression by hypertonicity is outlined. PMID:19211910

  14. Salinization and Saline Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vengosh, A.

    2003-12-01

    One of the most conspicuous phenomena of water-quality degradation, particularly in arid and semi-arid zones, is salinization of water and soil resources. Salinization is a long-term phenomenon, and during the last century many aquifers and river basins have become unsuitable for human consumption owing to high levels of salinity. Future exploitation of thousands of wells in the Middle East and in many other water-scarce regions in the world depends, to a large extent, on the degree and rate of salinization. Moreover, every year a large fraction of agricultural land is salinized and becomes unusable.Salinization is a global environmental phenomenon that affects many different aspects of our life (Williams, 2001a, b): changing the chemical composition of natural water resources (lakes, rivers, and groundwater), degrading the quality of water supply to the domestic and agriculture sectors, contribution to loss of biodiversity, taxonomic replacement by halotolerant species ( Williams, 2001a, b), loss of fertile soil, collapse of agricultural and fishery industries, changing of local climatic conditions, and creating severe health problems (e.g., the Aral Basin). The damage due to salinity in the Colorado River Basin alone, for example, ranges between 500 and 750 million per year and could exceed 1 billion per year if the salinity in the Imperial Dam increases from 700 mg L-1 to 900 mg L-1 (Bureau of Reclamation, 2003, USA). In Australia, accelerating soil salinization has become a massive environmental and economic disaster. Western Australia is "losing an area equal to one football oval an hour" due to spreading salinity ( Murphy, 1999). The annual cost for dryland salinity in Australia is estimated as AU700 million for lost land and AU$130 million for lost production ( Williams et al., 2002). In short, the salinization process has become pervasive.Salinity in water is usually defined by the chloride content (mg L-1) or total dissolved solids content (TDS, mg L-1or g

  15. Method of infusion extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus and method of removing desirable constituents from an infusible material by infusion extraction, where a piston operating in a first chamber draws a solvent into the first chamber where it may be heated, and then moves the heated solvent into a second chamber containing the infusible material, and where infusion extraction takes place. The piston then moves the solvent containing the extract through a filter into the first chamber, leaving the extraction residue in the second chamber.

  16. Baclofen into the lateral parabrachial nucleus induces hypertonic sodium chloride intake during cell dehydration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Activation of GABAB receptors with baclofen into the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN) induces ingestion of water and 0.3 M NaCl in fluid replete rats. However, up to now, no study has investigated the effects of baclofen injected alone or combined with GABAB receptor antagonist into the LPBN on water and 0.3 M NaCl intake in rats with increased plasma osmolarity (rats treated with an intragastric load of 2 M NaCl). Male Wistar rats with stainless steel cannulas implanted bilaterally into the LPBN were used. Results In fluid replete rats, baclofen (0.5 nmol/0.2 μl), bilaterally injected into the LPBN, induced ingestion of 0.3 M NaCl (14.3 ± 4.1 vs. saline: 0.2 ± 0.2 ml/210 min) and water (7.1 ± 2.9 vs. saline: 0.6 ± 0.5 ml/210 min). In cell-dehydrated rats, bilateral injections of baclofen (0.5 and 1.0 nmol/0.2 μl) into the LPBN induced an increase of 0.3 M NaCl intake (15.6 ± 5.7 and 21.5 ± 3.5 ml/210 min, respectively, vs. saline: 1.7 ± 0.8 ml/210 min) and an early inhibition of water intake (3.5 ± 1.4 and 6.7 ± 2.1 ml/150 min, respectively, vs. saline: 9.2 ± 1.4 ml/150 min). The pretreatment of the LPBN with 2-hydroxysaclofen (GABAB antagonist, 5 nmol/0.2 μl) potentiated the effect of baclofen on 0.3 M NaCl intake in the first 90 min of test and did not modify the inhibition of water intake induced by baclofen in cell-dehydrated rats. Baclofen injected into the LPBN did not affect blood pressure and heart rate. Conclusions Thus, injection of baclofen into the LPBN in cell-dehydrated rats induced ingestion of 0.3 M NaCl and inhibition of water intake, suggesting that even in a hyperosmotic situation, the blockade of LPBN inhibitory mechanisms with baclofen is enough to drive rats to drink hypertonic NaCl, an effect independent of changes in blood pressure. PMID:23642235

  17. Hypertonic saline reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced mouse brain edema through inhibiting aquaporin 4 expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Three percent sodium chloride (NaCl) treatment has been shown to reduce brain edema and inhibited brain aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in bacterial meningitis induced by Escherichia coli. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main pathogenic component of E. coli. We aimed to explore the effect of 3% NaCl in mouse brain edema induced by LPS, as well as to elucidate the potential mechanisms of action. Methods Three percent NaCl was used to treat cerebral edema induced by LPS in mice in vivo. Brain water content, IL-1β, TNFα, immunoglobulin G (IgG), AQP4 mRNA and protein were measured in brain tissues. IL-1β, 3% NaCl and calphostin C (a specific inhibitor of protein kinase C) were used to treat the primary astrocytes in vitro. AQP4 mRNA and protein were measured in astrocytes. Differences in various groups were determined by one-way analysis of variance. Results Three percent NaCl attenuated the increase of brain water content, IL-1β, TNFα, IgG, AQP4 mRNA and protein in brain tissues induced by LPS. Three percent NaCl inhibited the increase of AQP4 mRNA and protein in astrocytes induced by IL-1β in vitro. Calphostin C blocked the decrease of AQP4 mRNA and protein in astrocytes induced by 3% NaCl in vitro. Conclusions Osmotherapy with 3% NaCl ameliorated LPS-induced cerebral edema in vivo. In addition to its osmotic force, 3% NaCl exerted anti-edema effects possibly through down-regulating the expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and TNFα) and inhibiting the expression of AQP4 induced by proinflammatory cytokines. Three percent NaCl attenuated the expression of AQP4 through activation of protein kinase C in astrocytes. PMID:23036239

  18. Effects of hypertonic buffer composition on lymph node uptake and bioavailability of rituximab, after subcutaneous administration

    PubMed Central

    Fathallah, Anas M.; Turner, Michael R.; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V.

    2015-01-01

    Subcutaneous administration of biologics is highly desirable; however, incomplete bioavailability after sc administration remains a major challenge. In this work we investigated the effects of excipient dependent hyper-osmolarity on lymphatic uptake and plasma exposure of rituximab as a model protein. Using Swiss Webster (SW) mice as our animal model, we compared the effects of NaCl, mannitol and, O-Phospho-L-Serine (OPLS) on plasma concentration of rituximab over 5 days after sc administration. We observed an increase in plasma concentrations in animals administered rituximab in hypertonic buffer solutions, as compared to isotonic buffer. Bioavailability, as estimated by our pharmacokinetic model, increased from 29% in isotonic buffer to 54% in hypertonic buffer containing NaCl, to almost complete bioavailability in hypertonic buffers containing high dose OPLS or mannitol. This improvement in plasma exposure is due to improved lymphatic trafficking as evident from the increase in the fraction of dose trafficked through the lymph node in the presence of hypertonic buffers. The fraction of the dose trafficked through the lymphatic, as estimated by the model, increased from 0.05 % in isotonic buffer to 13% in hyper-tonic buffer containing NaCl to about 30% for hypertonic buffers containing high dose OPLS and mannitol. Our data suggests that hypertonic solutions may be a viable option to improve sc bioavailability. PMID:25377184

  19. Hypertonic stress induces rapid and widespread protein damage in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Burkewitz, Kris; Choe, Keith; Strange, Kevin

    2011-09-01

    Proteostasis is defined as the homeostatic mechanisms that maintain the function of all cytoplasmic proteins. We recently demonstrated that the capacity of the proteostasis network is a critical factor that defines the limits of cellular and organismal survival in hypertonic environments. The current studies were performed to determine the extent of protein damage induced by cellular water loss. Using worm strains expressing fluorescently tagged foreign and endogenous proteins and proteins with temperature-sensitive point mutations, we demonstrate that hypertonic stress causes aggregation and misfolding of diverse proteins in multiple cell types. Protein damage is rapid. Aggregation of a polyglutamine yellow fluorescent protein reporter is observable with <1 h of hypertonic stress, and aggregate volume doubles approximately every 10 min. Aggregate formation is irreversible and occurs after as little as 10 min of exposure to hypertonic conditions. To determine whether endogenous proteins are aggregated by hypertonic stress, we quantified the relative amount of total cellular protein present in detergent-insoluble extracts. Exposure for 4 h to 400 mM or 500 mM NaCl induced a 55-120% increase in endogenous protein aggregation. Inhibition of insulin signaling or acclimation to mild hypertonic stress increased survival under extreme hypertonic conditions and prevented aggregation of endogenous proteins. Our results demonstrate that hypertonic stress causes widespread and dramatic protein damage and that cells have a significant capacity to remodel the network of proteins that function to maintain proteostasis. These findings have important implications for understanding how cells cope with hypertonic stress and other protein-damaging stressors. PMID:21613604

  20. Scanning Electron Microscopy of the Endometrium of Mares Infused with Gentamicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Bagdadi, F. K.; Eilts, B. E.; Richardson, G. F.

    2004-04-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to study the endometrium of nine 1-year-old thoroughbred mares after twice intrauterine infusions of gentamicin, on 2 consecutive days. Five mares were infused on 2 consecutive days with 40 ml gentamicin (50 mg/ml) mixed with 80 ml of normal saline. Four mares served as controls and were infused with 120 ml of saline on 2 consecutive days. Endometrial biopsies were obtained from all mares 3 days after the second intrauterine infusion. Each biopsy was processed for SEM by standard methods. The endometrial epithelium of the gentamicin-infused mares had more cellular perforations than the saline-infused mares. The gentamicin-infused mares had less and shorter microvilli. The ciliated cells were fewer and some ciliated cells had disrupted and some had drooping cilia. The endometrial epithelium of the gentamicin-infused mares had a considerable number of endometrial cells that lost their luminal surfaces and some that lost their microvilli, compared to the saline-infused mares. We suggest that the information gathered in this pilot study should be used as basis for further investigation, on a larger scale basis, of the effects of repeated intrauterine infusion of gentamicin on the endometrial mucosa of mares.

  1. Monitoring the intracellular calcium response to a dynamic hypertonic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaowen; Yue, Wanqing; Liu, Dandan; Yue, Jianbo; Li, Jiaqian; Sun, Dong; Yang, Mengsu; Wang, Zuankai

    2016-03-01

    The profiling of physiological response of cells to external stimuli at the single cell level is of importance. Traditional approaches to study cell responses are often limited by ensemble measurement, which is challenging to reveal the complex single cell behaviors under a dynamic environment. Here we report the development of a simple microfluidic device to investigate intracellular calcium response to dynamic hypertonic conditions at the single cell level in real-time. Interestingly, a dramatic elevation in the intracellular calcium signaling is found in both suspension cells (human leukemic cell line, HL-60) and adherent cells (lung cancer cell line, A549), which is ascribed to the exposure of cells to the hydrodynamic stress. We also demonstrate that the calcium response exhibits distinct single cell heterogeneity as well as cell-type-dependent responses to the same stimuli. Our study opens up a new tool for tracking cellular activity at the single cell level in real time for high throughput drug screening.

  2. Beta-endorphin infusion during exercise in rats does not alter hepatic or muscle glycogen.

    PubMed

    Jamurtas, A Z; Goldfarb, A H; Chung, S C; Hegde, S; Marino, C; Fatouros, I G

    2001-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether beta-endorphin infusion influences liver or muscle glycogen concentration during exercise. Thirty-two rats (Harlan Co., IN, USA) with a body mass of 265-290 g were assigned at random to four groups, each of eight rats: (1) beta-endorphin infusion for 90 min at rest; (2) beta-endorphin infusion for 90 min while running on a rodent treadmill at 22 m x min(-1) and 0% grade; (3) saline infusion (0.9% NaCl) for 90 min at rest; and (4) saline infusion for 90 min while running on a rodent treadmill at 22 m x min(-1) and 0% grade. Beta-endorphin infusion elevated plasma beta-endorphin concentration by 2.5-fold at rest compared with saline infusion at rest, and by two-fold after exercise compared with saline infusion after exercise. Beta-endorphin infusion attenuated exercise-induced glucose concentration but did not alter the fasting hepatic glycogen concentration at rest or after exercise compared with saline infusion. Fasting hepatic glycogen decreased significantly as a result of 90 min of exercise independent of treatment. Deep intermedius muscle glycogen concentration at rest was similar after 90 min of both beta-endorphin and saline infusion and decreased significantly as a result of 90 min of exercise independent of treatment. Our results suggest that liver and muscle glycogenolysis is not responsible for the differences in plasma glucose with beta-endorphin infusion during exercise. PMID:11820687

  3. Tolerance to cocaine in brain stimulation reward following continuous cocaine infusions.

    PubMed

    Pudiak, Cindy M; KuoLee, Rhonda; Bozarth, Michael A

    2014-07-01

    This study examined tolerance to cocaine's threshold-lowering effect in brain stimulation reward (BSR) following continuous cocaine infusions and secondly, used the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) to determine NO's involvement in the development of cocaine tolerance. Animals were continuously infused with saline or cocaine (30 mg/kg per day) via osmotic minipump for 14 days and injected daily with saline or L-NAME (30 mg/kg, i.p.) following BSR testing. Saline-treated animals continuously infused with saline showed stable BSR thresholds across the 14-day infusion period. Saline-treated animals continuously infused with cocaine showed markedly lowered BSR thresholds on Day 1 followed by a progressive increase in BSR thresholds across the infusion period - indicating the development of tolerance. L-NAME-treated animals continuously infused with cocaine showed stimulation thresholds that were not significantly different from saline-treated animals continuously infused with cocaine. A cocaine challenge injection (10 mg/kg, i.p.) administered 3 and again at 10 days following minipump removal revealed that saline-treated animals continuously infused with saline showed lowered BSR thresholds. Saline-treated animals continuously infused with cocaine displayed lowered BSR thresholds that were not significantly different from saline-infused animals. L-NAME treated animals continuously infused with cocaine showed higher BSR thresholds to a challenge 3 days following pump removal. However, stimulation thresholds for this group failed to reach statistical significance on both days (i.e., Days 3 and 10) following pump removal. Results showed that animals continuously infused with cocaine develop robust tolerance to cocaine's threshold-lowering effect during the 14-day infusion period. Tolerance to cocaine's threshold-lowering effect was short-lived and dissipated soon after minipump removal. L-NAME treatment failed to significantly

  4. Hypertonic Dextrose Injection for The Treatment of a Baker’s Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Kibar, Sibel; Balaban, Birol

    2016-01-01

    We present extremely rare and interesting case of a Baker’s cyst treated with hypertonic dextrose injection. A 54-year-old female patient had a Baker’s cyst which was diagnosed by an ultrasonography. After the failure of the two-weekly conservative treatment, we injected hypertonic dextrose (25%) into her right knee joint for the treatment of a Baker’s cyst. Two weeks after the injection, the patient reported improvement in posterior knee pain, and an US showed a resolution of the posterior knee cyst. Certainly hypertonic dextrose injection for the treatment of a Baker’s cyst appears to be a reasonable treatment option. Further studies are needed in order to elucidate the efficacy of hypertonic dextrose injection in the treatment of Baker’s cysts. PMID:27042572

  5. Programmable physiological infusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, W. H.; Young, D. R.; Adachi, R. R. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A programmable physiological infusion device and method are provided wherein a program source, such as a paper tape, is used to actuate an infusion pump in accordance with a desired program. The system is particularly applicable for dispensing calcium in a variety of waveforms.

  6. Combined hormonal infusion simulates the metabolic response to injury.

    PubMed Central

    Bessey, P Q; Watters, J M; Aoki, T T; Wilmore, D W

    1984-01-01

    To investigate the role of hormones as mediators of the metabolic response to injury, nine normal male volunteers received a continuous 74-hour infusion of the three 'stress' hormones: cortisol, glucagon, and epinephrine. As a control, each subject received a saline infusion during another 4-day period. Diets were constant and matched on both occasions. Hormonal infusion achieved hormone concentrations similar to those seen following mild-moderate injury. With this alteration in the endocrine environment significant hypermetabolism, negative nitrogen and potassium balances, glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, sodium retention, and peripheral leukocytosis were observed. Additional studies with single hormone infusions indicated that these responses resulted from both additive and synergistic interactions of the hormones. Triple hormone infusion simulated many of the metabolic responses observed following mild-moderate injury and other catabolic illnesses. PMID:6431917

  7. Monitoring the intracellular calcium response to a dynamic hypertonic environment

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaowen; Yue, Wanqing; Liu, Dandan; Yue, Jianbo; Li, Jiaqian; Sun, Dong; Yang, Mengsu; Wang, Zuankai

    2016-01-01

    The profiling of physiological response of cells to external stimuli at the single cell level is of importance. Traditional approaches to study cell responses are often limited by ensemble measurement, which is challenging to reveal the complex single cell behaviors under a dynamic environment. Here we report the development of a simple microfluidic device to investigate intracellular calcium response to dynamic hypertonic conditions at the single cell level in real-time. Interestingly, a dramatic elevation in the intracellular calcium signaling is found in both suspension cells (human leukemic cell line, HL-60) and adherent cells (lung cancer cell line, A549), which is ascribed to the exposure of cells to the hydrodynamic stress. We also demonstrate that the calcium response exhibits distinct single cell heterogeneity as well as cell-type-dependent responses to the same stimuli. Our study opens up a new tool for tracking cellular activity at the single cell level in real time for high throughput drug screening. PMID:27004604

  8. Biofilm formation by Escherichia coli in hypertonic sucrose media.

    PubMed

    Kawarai, Taketo; Furukawa, Soichi; Narisawa, Naoki; Hagiwara, Chisato; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Yamasaki, Makari

    2009-06-01

    High osmotic environments produced by NaCl or sucrose have been used as reliable and traditional methods of food preservation. We tested, Escherichia coli as an indicator of food-contaminating bacterium, to determine if it can form biofilm in a hyperosmotic environment. E. coli K-12 IAM1264 did not form biofilm in LB broth that contained 1 M NaCl. However, the bacterium formed biofilm in LB broth that contained 1 M sucrose, although the planktonic growth was greatly suppressed. The biofilm, formed on solid surfaces, such as titer-plate well walls and glass slides, solely around the air-liquid interface. Both biofilm forming cells and planktonic cells in the hypertonic medium adopted a characteristic, fat and filamentous morphology with no FtsZ rings, which are a prerequisite for septum formation. Biofilm forming cells were found to be alive based on propidium iodide staining. The presence of 1 M sucrose in the food environment is not sufficient to prevent biofilm formation by E. coli. PMID:19447340

  9. Environmental Hypertonicity Causes Induction of Gluconeogenesis in the Air-Breathing Singhi Catfish, Heteropneustes fossilis

    PubMed Central

    Das, Manas; Banerjee, Bodhisattwa; Choudhury, Mahua G.; Saha, Nirmalendu

    2013-01-01

    The air-breathing singhi catfish (Heteropneustes fossilis) is frequently being challenged by different environmental insults such as hyper-ammonia, dehydration and osmotic stresses in their natural habitats throughout the year. The present study investigated the effect of hyperosmotic stress, due to exposure to hypertonic environment (300 mM mannitol) for 14 days, on gluconeogenesis in this catfish. In situ exposure to hypertonic environment led to significant stimulation of gluconeogenic fluxes from the perfused liver after 7 days of exposure, followed by further increase after 14 days in presence of three different potential gluconeogenic substrates (lactate, pyruvate and glutamate). Environmental hypertonicity also caused a significant increase of activities of key gluconeogenic enzymes, namely phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, fructose 1, 6-bisphosphatase and glucose 6-phosphatase by about 2-6 fold in liver, and 3-6 fold in kidney tissues. This was accompanied by more abundance of enzyme proteins by about 1.8–3.7 fold and mRNAs by about 2.2–5.2 fold in both the tissues with a maximum increase after 14 days of exposure. Hence, the increase in activities of key gluconeogenic enzymes under hypertonic stress appeared to be as a result of transcriptional regulation of genes. Immunocytochemical analysis further confirmed the tissue specific localized expression of these enzymes in both the tissues with the possibility of expressing more in the same localized places. The induction of gluconeogenesis during exposure to environmental hypertonicity possibly occurs as a consequence of changes in hydration status/cell volume of different cell types. Thus, these adaptational strategies related to gluconeogenesis that are observed in this catfish under hypertonic stress probably help in maintaining glucose homeostasis and also for a proper energy supply to support metabolic demands mainly for ion transport and other altered metabolic processes under various

  10. Fluid infusion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Performance testing carried out in the development of the prototype zero-g fluid infusion system is described and summarized. Engineering tests were performed in the course of development, both on the original breadboard device and on the prototype system. This testing was aimed at establishing baseline system performance parameters and facilitating improvements. Acceptance testing was then performed on the prototype system to verify functional performance. Acceptance testing included a demonstration of the fluid infusion system on a laboratory animal.

  11. Salinity Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Walter R.

    1987-01-01

    Discussed are the costs of deriving energy from the earth's natural reserves of salt. Argues that, as fossil fuel supplies become more depleted in the future, the environmental advantages of salinity power may prove to warrant its exploitation. (TW)

  12. Modulation of TonEBP activity by SUMO modification in response to hypertonicity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Ah; Kwon, Mi Jin; Lee-Kwon, Whaseon; Choi, Soo Youn; Sanada, Satoru; Kwon, Hyug Moo

    2014-01-01

    TonEBP is a DNA binding transcriptional enhancer that enables cellular adaptation to hypertonic stress by promoting expression of specific genes. TonEBP expression is very high in the renal medulla because local hypertonicity stimulates its expression. Given the high level of expression, it is not well understood how TonEBP activity is modulated. Here we report that TonEBP is post-translationally modified by SUMO, i.e., sumoylated, in the renal medulla but not in other isotonic organs. The sumoylation is reproduced in cultured cells when switched to hypertonicity. Analyses of site-directed TonEBP mutants reveal that K556 and K603 are independently sumoylated in response to hypertonicity. DNA binding is required for the sumoylation. Functional analyses of non-sumoylated mutants and SUMO-conjugated constructs show that sumoylation inhibits TonEBP in a dose-dependent manner but independent of the site of SUMO conjugation. Sumoylation inhibits transactivation without affecting nuclear translocation or DNA binding. These data suggest that sumoylation modulates the activity of TonEBP in the hypertonic renal medulla to prevent excessive action of TonEBP. PMID:24994984

  13. Hypertonic upregulation of amino acid transport system A in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, J G; Klus, L R; Steenbergen, D K; Kempson, S A

    1994-08-01

    The A10 line of vascular smooth muscle cells has Na+ dependent transport systems for alanine, proline, and Pi, whereas uptake of leucine, myo-inositol and D-glucose is Na+ independent. When A10 cells were incubated for 4 h in medium made hypertonic by addition of sucrose, there was a marked increase in Na(+)-dependent transport of alanine and proline but no change in Na(+)-dependent Pi uptake or Na(+)-independent uptake of leucine and inositol. Intracellular alanine content was increased 61% by the hypertonic treatment. Other nonpenetrating solutes, such as cellobiose and mannitol, reproduced the effect of sucrose, but urea, a penetrating solute, did not. Studies with 2-(methylamino)-isobutyric acid revealed that the upregulation by hypertonicity involved only system A. Increases in alanine and proline uptake also occurred after incubating the cells in isotonic medium containing 0.1 mM ouabain, suggesting that an increase in intracellular Na+ may be part of the intracellular signal for upregulation of system A. Hypertonic upregulation of Na(+)-dependent alanine transport occurred also in primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells. The response was blocked by actinomycin D and cycloheximide, indicating that gene transcription and protein synthesis play important roles in the mechanism leading to increased alanine uptake. We conclude that vascular smooth muscle cells, during prolonged hypertonic stress, activate system A and accumulate specific neutral amino acids which may act as organic osmolytes to help maintain normal cell volume. PMID:8074188

  14. 5'-Untranslated region of heat shock protein 70 mRNA drives translation under hypertonic conditions.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, Laura; Alfieri, Roberta R; Petronini, Pier Giorgio; Montanaro, Lorenzo; Brigotti, Maurizio

    2013-02-01

    In mammalian cells, adaptation to hypertonic conditions leads to the activation of an array of early (cell shrinkage, regulatory volume increase) and late (accumulation of compatible osmolytes) responses and increased level of HSPs (heat shock proteins). Protein synthesis is strongly inhibited few minutes after the hypertonic challenge as demonstrated in whole cells and as reproduced under controlled conditions in cell-free systems. Different mechanisms known to mediate the accumulation of HSP70, such as mRNA transcription and stabilization, require fully active protein synthesis. We show that the 5'-untranslated region of HSP70 messenger drives a hypertonicity-resistant translation (up to 0.425 osmol/kg of water), whereas cap-dependent protein synthesis is almost totally blocked under the same conditions. The results, obtained in cell-free systems and in whole cells, might help to explain why HSP70 is accumulated in cells when total protein synthesis is impaired. We also observed that translation initiated by viral IRES (from Cricket paralysis virus) is highly efficient in cells exposed to hyperosmolarity, suggesting that the resistance to hypertonic conditions is a more general feature of cap-independent translation. The described mechanism may also play a role in the control of translation of other messengers encoding for proteins involved in the adaptation to hypertonicity. PMID:23291172

  15. Investigations in Marine Chemistry: Salinity I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    Presented is a unit designed for curriculum infusion and which relies on the hands-on discovery method as an instructive device. The student is introduced to the theory of a functioning salt water conductivity meter. The student explores the resistance of salt water as salinity increases and he treats the data which he has gathered,…

  16. [Infusion therapy for neonates, infants and children].

    PubMed

    Steurer, M A; Berger, T M

    2011-01-01

    Intravenous administration of fluids, electrolytes and glucose are the most common interventions in hospitalized pediatric patients. Parenteral fluid administration can be life-saving, however, if used incorrectly it also carries substantial risks. Perioperatively, adequate hydration, prevention of electrolyte imbalances and maintenance of normoglycemia are the main goals of parenteral fluid therapy. Conceptionally, the distinction between maintenance requirements, deficits and ongoing loss is helpful. Although the pathophysiological basis for parenteral fluid therapy was clarified in the first half of the 20th century, some aspects still remain controversial. In newborn infants, rational parenteral fluid therapy must take into account large insensible fluid losses, adaptive changes of renal function in the first days of life and the fact that neonates do not tolerate prolonged periods of fasting. In older infants the occurrence of iatrogenic hyponatremia with the use of hypotonic solutions has led to a critical reappraisal of the validity of the Holliday-Segar method for calculating maintenance fluid requirements in the postoperative period. Pragmatically, only isotonic solutions should be used in clinical situations which are known to be associated with increases in antidiuretic hormone (ADH) secretion. In this context, it is important to realize that in contrast to lactated Ringer's solution, the use of normal saline can lead to hyperchloremic acidosis in a dose-dependent fashion. Although there is no convincing evidence that colloids are better than crystalloids, there are clinical situations where the use of the more expensive colloids seems justified. It may be reasonable to choose a solution for fluid replacement which has a composition comparable to the composition of the fluid which must be replaced. Although hypertonic saline can reduce an elevated intracranial pressure, this therapy cannot be recommended as a routine procedure because there is currently

  17. Fluid infusion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    Development of a fluid infusion system was undertaken in response to a need for an intravenous infusion device operable under conditions of zero-g. The initial design approach, pursued in the construction of the first breadboard instrument, was to regulate the pressure of the motive gas to produce a similar regulated pressure in the infusion liquid. This scheme was not workable because of the varying bag contact area, and a major design iteration was made. A floating sensor plate in the center of the bag pressure plate was made to operate a pressure regulator built into the bellows assembly, effectively making liquid pressure the directly controlled variable. Other design changes were made as experience was gained with the breadboard. Extensive performance tests were conducted on both the breadboard and the prototype device; accurately regulated flows from 6 m1/min to 100 m1/min were achieved. All system functions were shown to operate satisfactorily.

  18. Infusion fluids contain harmful glucose degradation products

    PubMed Central

    Bryland, Anna; Broman, Marcus; Erixon, Martin; Klarin, Bengt; Lindén, Torbjörn; Friberg, Hans; Wieslander, Anders; Kjellstrand, Per; Ronco, Claudio; Carlsson, Ola

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Glucose degradation products (GDPs) are precursors of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that cause cellular damage and inflammation. We examined the content of GDPs in commercially available glucose-containing infusion fluids and investigated whether GDPs are found in patients’ blood. Methods The content of GDPs was examined in infusion fluids by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. To investigate whether GDPs also are found in patients, we included 11 patients who received glucose fluids (standard group) during and after their surgery and 11 control patients receiving buffered saline (control group). Blood samples were analyzed for GDP content and carboxymethyllysine (CML), as a measure of AGE formation. The influence of heat-sterilized fluids on cell viability and cell function upon infection was investigated. Results All investigated fluids contained high concentrations of GDPs, such as 3-deoxyglucosone (3-DG). Serum concentration of 3-DG increased rapidly by a factor of eight in patients receiving standard therapy. Serum CML levels increased significantly and showed linear correlation with the amount of infused 3-DG. There was no increase in serum 3-DG or CML concentrations in the control group. The concentration of GDPs in most of the tested fluids damaged neutrophils, reducing their cytokine secretion, and inhibited microbial killing. Conclusions These findings indicate that normal standard fluid therapy involves unwanted infusion of GDPs. Reduction of the content of GDPs in commonly used infusion fluids may improve cell function, and possibly also organ function, in intensive-care patients. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00134-010-1873-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20397009

  19. Early albumin infusion to infants at risk for respiratory distress

    PubMed Central

    Bland, R. D.; Clarke, T. L.; Harden, L. B.; Mayer, Judith L.; Ries, J. P.; Madden, W. A.; Crast, F. W.; Coyer, W. F.; Bass, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    In a randomized prospective study, 100 high-risk infants (selected on the basis of a cord serum protein level of 4·6 g/100 ml or less, gestational age under 37 weeks, birthweight 2500 g or less, and/or arterial pH below 7·25) received 8 ml/kg of either 25% salt-poor albumin or 5% dextrose in water before the age of 2 hours. All infants were then managed supportively with warmth, appropriate oxygen supplementation, isotonic fluid infusion, and close monitoring, without further administration of colloid or hypertonic alkali solutions over the first 4 hours of life. No statistically significant difference was shown between early colloid and early dextrose-water administration for either the incidence of idiopathic respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) or the mortality of high-risk infants, suggesting no apparent advantage of albumin over simple glucose-water infusion to hypoproteinaemic newborns shortly after birth. However, among the infants of 28 weeks' gestation or less admitted to the study, 3 of 4 albumin-treated patients survived, while 5 comparable infants in the dextrose-water group died within 12 hours of birth. For the 100 infants taken together there was a significant improvement in morbidity and mortality from previous experience in the same nursery, indicating that prompt supportive care, including early fluid administration, may be instrumental in reducing the incidence and severity of RDS. PMID:4749684

  20. Effect of hypertonicity on augmentation and potentiation and on corresponding quantal parameters of transmitter release.

    PubMed

    Cheng, H; Miyamoto, M D

    1999-03-01

    Augmentation and (posttetanic) potentiation are two of the four components comprising the enhanced release of transmitter following repetitive nerve stimulation. To examine the quantal basis of these components under isotonic and hypertonic conditions, we recorded miniature endplate potentials (MEPPs) from isolated frog (Rana pipiens) cutaneous pectoris muscles, before and after repetitive nerve stimulation (40 s at 80 Hz). Continuous recordings were made in low Ca2+ high Mg2+ isotonic Ringer solution, in Ringer that was made hypertonic with 100 mM sucrose, and in wash solution. Estimates were obtained of m (no. of quanta released), n (no. of functional release sites), p (mean probability of release), and vars p (spatial variance in p), using a method that employed MEPP counts. Hypertonicity abolished augmentation without affecting potentiation. There were prolonged poststimulation increases in m, n, and p and a marked but transient increase in vars p in the hypertonic solution. All effects were completely reversed with wash. The time constants of decay for potentiation and for vars p were virtually identical. The results are consistent with the notion that augmentation is caused by Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated calcium channels and that potentiation is due to Na+-induced Ca2+ release from mitochondria. The results also demonstrate the utility of this approach for analyzing the dynamics of quantal transmitter release. PMID:10085369

  1. Rejoining and misrejoining of radiation-induced chromatin breaks. III. Hypertonic treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; George, K.; Wu, H. L.; Yang, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that treatment in anisotonic medium modifies rejoining of radiation-induced breaks in interphase chromosomes. In previous work, we have demonstrated that formation of exchanges in human lymphocytes has a slow component (half-time of 1-2 h), but a fraction of exchanges are also observed in samples assayed soon after exposure. In this paper we studied the effect of hypertonic treatment on rejoining and misrejoining of radiation-induced breaks using fluorescence in situ hybridization of prematurely condensed chromosomes in human lymphocytes. Isolated lymphocytes were irradiated with 7 Gy gamma rays, fused to mitotic hamster cells and incubated in hypertonic solution (0.5 M NaCl) for the period normally allowed for interphase chromosome condensation to occur. The data from hypertonic treatment experiments indicate the presence of a class of interphase chromosome breaks that rejoin and misrejoin very quickly (half-time of 5-6 min). The fast misrejoining of these lesions is considered to be responsible for the initial level of exchanges which we reported previously. No significant effect of hypertonic treatment on the yield of chromosome aberrations scored at the first postirradiation mitosis was detected.

  2. In vitro increase of mean corpuscular volume difference (dMCV) as a marker for serum hypertonicity in dogs.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Jennifer M; Yancey, Misty R; Pohlman, Lisa M; Schermerhorn, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Spurious increase in erythrocyte mean corpuscular volume (MCV) on automated cell analyzers is a well-characterized lab error in hypertonic patients. A difference between automated and manual MCV (dMCV) greater than 2 fl has been shown to predict hypertonicity in humans. The purpose of this study was to investigate dMCV as a marker for serum hypertonicity in dogs and to examine the relationship between dMCV and three methods of estimating serum tonicity: measured (OsMM), calculated (OsMC), and calculated effective (OsMCE) osmolalities. OsMC, OsMCE, and dMCV were calculated from routine blood values and OsMM was directly measured in 121 dogs. The dMCV of hypertonic dogs was significantly larger than that of normotonic dogs for all three osmolality methods. dMCV predicted hypertonicity as estimated by OsMM better than it predicted hypertonicity as estimated by OsMC and OsMCE. A cutoff of 2.96 fl yielded the best sensitivity (76%) and specificity (71%) for hypertonicity estimated by OsMM. PMID:24656345

  3. Abnormal Osmotic Avoidance Behavior in C. elegans Is Associated with Increased Hypertonic Stress Resistance and Improved Proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Elaine C.; Kim, Heejung; Ditano, Jennifer; Manion, Dacie; King, Benjamin L.; Strange, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Protein function is controlled by the cellular proteostasis network. Proteostasis is energetically costly and those costs must be balanced with the energy needs of other physiological functions. Hypertonic stress causes widespread protein damage in C. elegans. Suppression and management of protein damage is essential for optimal survival under hypertonic conditions. ASH chemosensory neurons allow C. elegans to detect and avoid strongly hypertonic environments. We demonstrate that mutations in osm-9 and osm-12 that disrupt ASH mediated hypertonic avoidance behavior or genetic ablation of ASH neurons are associated with enhanced survival during hypertonic stress. Improved survival is not due to altered systemic volume homeostasis or organic osmolyte accumulation. Instead, we find that osm-9(ok1677) mutant and osm-9(RNAi) worms exhibit reductions in hypertonicity induced protein damage in non-neuronal cells suggesting that enhanced proteostasis capacity may account for improved hypertonic stress resistance in worms with defects in osmotic avoidance behavior. RNA-seq analysis revealed that genes that play roles in managing protein damage are upregulated in osm-9(ok1677) worms. Our findings are consistent with a growing body of work demonstrating that intercellular communication between neuronal and non-neuronal cells plays a critical role in integrating cellular stress resistance with other organismal physiological demands and associated energy costs. PMID:27111894

  4. Saline Sinus Rinse Recipe

    MedlinePlus

    ... Saline Sinus Rinse Recipe Share | Saline Sinus Rinse Recipe Saline sinus rinses can bring relief to patients ... at a fraction of the cost. Saline Rinse Recipe Ingredients 1. Pickling or canning salt-containing no ...

  5. [A procedure for infusion-transfusion therapy and autohemodilution in severe trauma and shock (apropos the article by B. N. Salamatin et al., The use of the "internal autotransfusion" method in complex shock-control measures at the prehospital stage)].

    PubMed

    Tsybuliak, G N; Nasonkin, O S; Chechëtkin, A V

    1992-05-01

    The infusion of hypertonic solution is thought by the authors to be effective due to its reflectory action for treatment of patients who are in the state of anaphylactic and cardiogenic shock. This method seems to be expedient for massive blood loss under conditions of prehospital medical aid to victims with very low level of arterial pressure, with craniocerebral trauma and critical trauma of the chest. PMID:1302953

  6. Time-dependent expression of hypertonic effects on bullfrog taste nerve responses to salts and bitter substances.

    PubMed

    Mashiyama, Kazunori; Nozawa, Yuhei; Ohtubo, Yoshitaka; Kumazawa, Takashi; Yoshii, Kiyonori

    2014-03-27

    We previously showed that the hypertonicity of taste stimulating solutions modified tonic responses, the quasi-steady state component following the transient (phasic) component of each integrated taste nerve response. Here we show that the hypertonicity opens tight junctions surrounding taste receptor cells in a time-dependent manner and modifies whole taste nerve responses in bullfrogs. We increased the tonicity of stimulating solutions with non-taste substances such as urea or ethylene glycol. The hypertonicity enhanced phasic responses to NaCl>0.2M, and suppressed those to NaCl<0.1M, 1mM CaCl2, and 1mM bitter substances (quinine, denatonium and strychnine). The hypertonicity also enhanced the phasic responses to a variety of 0.5M salts such as LiCl and KCl. The enhancing effect was increased by increasing the difference between the ionic mobilities of the cations and anions in the salt. A preincubation time >20s in the presence of 1M non-taste substances was needed to elicit both the enhancing and suppressing effects. Lucifer Yellow CH, a paracellular marker dye, diffused into bullfrog taste receptor organs in 30s in the presence of hypertonicity. These results agreed with our proposed mechanism of hypertonic effects that considered the diffusion potential across open tight junctions. PMID:24513402

  7. Roles of TauT and system A in cytoprotection of rat syncytiotrophoblast cell line exposed to hypertonic stress.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, T; Sai, Y; Fujii, J; Muta, M; Iizasa, H; Tomi, M; Deureh, M; Kose, N; Nakashima, E

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the cytoprotective mechanism(s) induced in a conditionally immortalized syncytiotrophoblast cell line (TR-TBT 18d-1) exposed to hypertonic conditions. Hypertonicity-induced apoptosis of TR-TBT 18d-1 cells, but this was blocked by addition of 1 mM taurine to the culture medium. TauT-knockdown using siRNA revealed that TauT is a major contributor to taurine uptake by TR-TBT 18d-1 cells, at least under normal conditions. Cellular uptake of [(3)H]taurine and [(14)C]betaine by TR-TBT 18d-1 cells cultured under hypertonic conditions was increased compared to that under normal conditions. TauT, BGT-1, ATA2 and HSP70 mRNAs were upregulated by hypertonicity, while OCTN2, ENT1 and CNT1 mRNAs were downregulated. [(3)H]Taurine uptake was strongly inhibited by TauT inhibitors such as hypotaurine and β-alanine. MeAIB, a system A specific substrate, inhibited hypertonic stress-induced [(14)C]betaine uptake. These results suggest that TauT and system A play cytoprotective roles in syncytiotrophoblasts exposed to hypertonic stress. PMID:20801504

  8. Ionic imbalance, in addition to molecular crowding, abates cytoskeletal dynamics and vesicle motility during hypertonic stress

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Paula; Roth, Isabelle; Meda, Paolo; Féraille, Eric; Brown, Dennis; Hasler, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Cell volume homeostasis is vital for the maintenance of optimal protein density and cellular function. Numerous mammalian cell types are routinely exposed to acute hypertonic challenge and shrink. Molecular crowding modifies biochemical reaction rates and decreases macromolecule diffusion. Cell volume is restored rapidly by ion influx but at the expense of elevated intracellular sodium and chloride levels that persist long after challenge. Although recent studies have highlighted the role of molecular crowding on the effects of hypertonicity, the effects of ionic imbalance on cellular trafficking dynamics in living cells are largely unexplored. By tracking distinct fluorescently labeled endosome/vesicle populations by live-cell imaging, we show that vesicle motility is reduced dramatically in a variety of cell types at the onset of hypertonic challenge. Live-cell imaging of actin and tubulin revealed similar arrested microfilament motility upon challenge. Vesicle motility recovered long after cell volume, a process that required functional regulatory volume increase and was accelerated by a return of extracellular osmolality to isosmotic levels. This delay suggests that, although volume-induced molecular crowding contributes to trafficking defects, it alone cannot explain the observed effects. Using fluorescent indicators and FRET-based probes, we found that intracellular ATP abundance and mitochondrial potential were reduced by hypertonicity and recovered after longer periods of time. Similar to the effects of osmotic challenge, isovolumetric elevation of intracellular chloride concentration by ionophores transiently decreased ATP production by mitochondria and abated microfilament and vesicle motility. These data illustrate how perturbed ionic balance, in addition to molecular crowding, affects membrane trafficking. PMID:26045497

  9. [Intraosseous infusion for adults].

    PubMed

    Leidel, B A; Kirchhoff, C

    2008-04-01

    Intraosseous (IO) infusion methods have been common for emergency treatment in infants and children for years. The role of IO access in adults is however much less clear, but its importance in this patient group is increasing, and different devices are available today. Each device has strengths and weaknesses, but all achieve rapid vascular access even in challenging situations. The potential of IO access regarding both therapeutic and diagnostic options has been shown in several operational studies in and out of hospital. Insertion times require between 1 and 2 min in most cases, while insertion and handling of the IO access devices seem to be easy and reliable. The flow rates of IO access devices for adults are lower than those of large-bore peripheral intravenous catheters, but fluid resuscitation is possible in most cases at least with pressure bag infusion systems. Most drugs administered intravenously can be given intraosseously in equivalent dosages and with the same effects. Nevertheless the limitations and risks of IO access routes need to be considered for each application. Rapid IO access is now possible in all age groups, and the 2005 AHA Guidelines favor it over drug administration via the endotracheal tube. PMID:18250995

  10. Sphingomyelin metabolism is involved in the differentiation of MDCK cells induced by environmental hypertonicity

    PubMed Central

    Favale, Nicolás Octavio; Santacreu, Bruno Jaime; Pescio, Lucila Gisele; Marquez, Maria Gabriela; Sterin-Speziale, Norma Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids (SLs) are relevant lipid components of eukaryotic cells. Besides regulating various cellular processes, SLs provide the structural framework for plasma membrane organization. Particularly, SM is associated with detergent-resistant microdomains. We have previously shown that the adherens junction (AJ) complex, the relevant cell-cell adhesion structure involved in cell differentiation and tissue organization, is located in an SM-rich membrane lipid domain. We have also demonstrated that under hypertonic conditions, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells acquire a differentiated phenotype with changes in SL metabolism. For these reasons, we decided to evaluate whether SM metabolism is involved in the acquisition of the differentiated phenotype of MDCK cells. We found that SM synthesis mediated by SM synthase 1 is involved in hypertonicity-induced formation of mature AJs, necessary for correct epithelial cell differentiation. Inhibition of SM synthesis impaired the acquisition of mature AJs, evoking a disintegration-like process reflected by the dissipation of E-cadherin and β- and α-catenins from the AJ complex. As a consequence, MDCK cells did not develop the hypertonicity-induced differentiated epithelial cell phenotype. PMID:25670801

  11. Acute Hypertonicity Alters Aquaporin-2 Trafficking and Induces a MAPK-dependent Accumulation at the Plasma Membrane of Renal Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Hasler, Udo; Nunes, Paula; Bouley, Richard; Lu, Hua A. J.; Matsuzaki, Toshiyuki; Brown, Dennis

    2008-01-01

    The unique phenotype of renal medullary cells allows them to survive and functionally adapt to changes of interstitial osmolality/tonicity. We investigated the effects of acute hypertonic challenge on AQP2 (aquaporin-2) water channel trafficking. In the absence of vasopressin, hypertonicity alone induced rapid (<10 min) plasma membrane accumulation of AQP2 in rat kidney collecting duct principal cells in situ, and in several kidney epithelial lines. Confocal microscopy revealed that AQP2 also accumulated in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) following hypertonic challenge. AQP2 mutants that mimic the Ser256-phosphorylated and -nonphosphorylated state accumulated at the cell surface and TGN, respectively. Hypertonicity did not induce a change in cytosolic cAMP concentration, but inhibition of either calmodulin or cAMP-dependent protein kinase A activity blunted the hypertonicity-induced increase of AQP2 cell surface expression. Hypertonicity increased p38, ERK1/2, and JNK MAPK activity. Inhibiting MAPK activity abolished hypertonicity-induced accumulation of AQP2 at the cell surface but did not affect either vasopressin-dependent AQP2 trafficking or hypertonicity-induced AQP2 accumulation in the TGN. Finally, increased AQP2 cell surface expression induced by hypertonicity largely resulted from a reduction in endocytosis but not from an increase in exocytosis. These data indicate that acute hypertonicity profoundly alters AQP2 trafficking and that hypertonicity-induced AQP2 accumulation at the cell surface depends on MAP kinase activity. This may have important implications on adaptational processes governing transcellular water flux and/or cell survival under extreme conditions of hypertonicity. PMID:18664568

  12. [Development of smart infusion system].

    PubMed

    Li, Junyang

    2014-01-01

    The free care smart infusion system which has the function of liquid end alarm and automatic stopping has been designed. In addition, the system can send the alarm to the health care staff by Zigbee wireless network. Besides, the database of infusion information has been set up, it can be used for inquiry afterwards. PMID:24839846

  13. Removing the confusion about infusion.

    PubMed

    Bayne, C G

    1997-02-01

    There is more to infusion technology than simply connecting the "pump-du-jour" to the central line. The purpose of infusion technology, its safety products and four categories of devices-elastomeric, mechanical, gas and membrane-are discussed. PMID:9287736

  14. Add-on treatment with nebulized hypertonic saline in a child with plastic bronchitis after the Glenn procedure*, **

    PubMed Central

    Lis, Grzegorz; Cichocka-Jarosz, Ewa; Jedynak-Wasowicz, Urszula; Glowacka, Edyta

    2014-01-01

    Plastic bronchitis (PB), although a rare cause of airway obstruction, has mortality rates up to 50% in children after Fontan-type cardiac surgery. We present the case of an 18-month-old female patient with PB following pneumonia. At 6 months of age, the patient underwent the Glenn procedure due to functionally univentricular heart. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy revealed complete blockage of the left bronchus by mucoid casts. Pharmacotherapy consisted of glucocorticosteroids, azithromycin, and enalapril maleate. The child also received nebulized 3% NaCl solution, which proved to be beneficial. In children submitted to Fontan-type procedures, physicians must be alert for PB, which can be triggered by respiratory tract infection. PMID:24626275

  15. Add-on treatment with nebulized hypertonic saline in a child with plastic bronchitis after the Glenn procedure.

    PubMed

    Lis, Grzegorz; Cichocka-Jarosz, Ewa; Jedynak-Wasowicz, Urszula; Glowacka, Edyta

    2014-01-01

    Plastic bronchitis (PB), although a rare cause of airway obstruction, has mortality rates up to 50% in children after Fontan-type cardiac surgery. We present the case of an 18-month-old female patient with PB following pneumonia. At 6 months of age, the patient underwent the Glenn procedure due to functionally univentricular heart. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy revealed complete blockage of the left bronchus by mucoid casts. Pharmacotherapy consisted of glucocorticosteroids, azithromycin, and enalapril maleate. The child also received nebulized 3% NaCl solution, which proved to be beneficial. In children submitted to Fontan-type procedures, physicians must be alert for PB, which can be triggered by respiratory tract infection. PMID:24626275

  16. Intravenous pamidronate: infusion rate and safety.

    PubMed

    Tyrrell, C J; Collinson, M; Madsen, E L; Ford, J M; Coleman, T

    1994-01-01

    In view of previous animal studies showing that pamidronate (Aredia) can cause renal damage, and human data indicating that pamidronate in doses of 60-90 mg is more effective in the control of tumor-induced hypercalcemia than when given at lower doses, we decided to investigate whether pamidronate 90 mg infused over 60 minutes at weekly intervals had any adverse effects on renal function in patients with bone metastases. Twelve patients, 7 female (all with breast cancer) and 5 male (4 with prostate cancer, 1 with bladder cancer) were entered into the trial. Each patient received weekly intravenous infusions of pamidronate 90 mg in 250 ml normal saline over 60 minutes for 4 weeks. 51Cr-EDTA clearances showed no significant changes in renal function. Urinary N-acetyl-B-D-glucosaminidase/creatinine ratios fluctuated considerably, but no consistent changes were found. No patient with a normal level of urinary beta 2-microglobulin had elevated levels at the end of the trial. Serum creatinine levels did not change significantly, though 1 patient had a corrected serum calcium level of < 2 mmol/L on a single occasion on day 8. No evidence of renal toxicity was detected. However, the possibility that neprohtoxicity would ultimately appear cannot be excluded, and these favourable short-term results cannot be extrapolated to patients with impaired renal function. PMID:7873459

  17. Improvement of Neuroenergetics by Hypertonic Lactate Therapy in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury Is Dependent on Baseline Cerebral Lactate/Pyruvate Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Quintard, Hervé; Patet, Camille; Zerlauth, Jean-Baptiste; Suys, Tamarah; Bouzat, Pierre; Pellerin, Luc; Meuli, Reto; Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Energy dysfunction is associated with worse prognosis after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Recent data suggest that hypertonic sodium lactate infusion (HL) improves energy metabolism after TBI. Here, we specifically examined whether the efficacy of HL (3h infusion, 30–40 μmol/kg/min) in improving brain energetics (using cerebral microdialysis [CMD] glucose as a main therapeutic end-point) was dependent on baseline cerebral metabolic state (assessed by CMD lactate/pyruvate ratio [LPR]) and cerebral blood flow (CBF, measured with perfusion computed tomography [PCT]). Using a prospective cohort of 24 severe TBI patients, we found CMD glucose increase during HL was significant only in the subgroup of patients with elevated CMD LPR >25 (n = 13; +0.13 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08–0.19] mmol/L, p < 0.001; vs. +0.04 [–0.05–0.13] in those with normal LPR, p = 0.33, mixed-effects model). In contrast, CMD glucose increase was independent from baseline CBF (coefficient +0.13 [0.04–0.21] mmol/L when global CBF was <32.5 mL/100 g/min vs. +0.09 [0.04–0.14] mmol/L at normal CBF, both p < 0.005) and systemic glucose. Our data suggest that improvement of brain energetics upon HL seems predominantly dependent on baseline cerebral metabolic state and support the concept that CMD LPR – rather than CBF – could be used as a diagnostic indication for systemic lactate supplementation following TBI. PMID:26421521

  18. Saline Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 Figure 2

    These images of the Saline Valley area, California, were acquired March 30, 2000 and cover a full ASTER scene (60 by 60 km). Each image displays data from a different spectral region, and illustrates the complementary nature of surface compositional information available as a function of wavelength. This image displays visible and near infrared bands 3, 2, and 1 in red, green, and blue (RGB). Vegetation appears red, snow and dry salt lakes are white, and exposed rocks are brown, gray, yellow and blue. Rock colors mainly reflect the presence of iron minerals, and variations in albedo. Figure 1 displays short wavelength infrared bands 4, 6, and 8 as RGB. In this wavelength region, clay, carbonate, and sulfate minerals have diagnostic absorption features, resulting in distinct colors on the image. For example, limestones are yellow-green, and purple areas are kaolinite-rich. Figure 2 displays thermal infrared bands 13, 12 and 10 as RGB. In this wavelength region, variations in quartz content appear as more or less red; carbonate rocks are green, and mafic volcanic rocks are purple. The image is located at 36.8 degrees north latitude and 117.7 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  19. Comparison of the locomotor activating effects of bicuculline infusions into the preoptic area and ventral pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Zahm, Daniel S.; Schwartz, Zachary M.; Lavezzi, Heather N.; Yetnikoff, Leora; Parsley, Kenneth P.

    2013-01-01

    Ambulatory locomotion in the rodent is robustly activated by unilateral infusions into the basal forebrain of type A gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptor antagonists, such as bicuculline and picrotoxin. The present study was carried out to better localize the neuroanatomical substrate(s) underlying this effect. To accomplish this, differences in total locomotion accumulated during a 20 minute test period following bicuculline versus saline infusions in male Sprague-Dawley rats were calculated, rank ordered and mapped on a diagram of basal forebrain transposed from immunoprocessed sections. The most robust locomotor activation was elicited by bicuculline infusions clustered in rostral parts of the preoptic area. Unilateral infusions of bicuculline into the ventral pallidum produced an unanticipatedly diminutive activation of locomotion, which led us to evaluate bilateral ventral pallidal infusions, and these also produced only a small activation of locomotion, and, interestingly, a non-significant trend toward suppression of rearing. Subjects with bicuculline infused bilaterally into the ventral pallidum also exhibited persistent bouts of abnormal movements. Bicuculline infused unilaterally into other forebrain structures, including the bed nucleus of stria terminalis, caudate-putamen, globus pallidus, sublenticular extended amygdala and sublenticular substantia innominata, did not produce significant locomotor activation. Our data identify the rostral preoptic area as the main substrate for the locomotor activating effects of basal forebrain bicuculline infusions. In contrast, slight activation of locomotion and no effect on rearing accompanied unilateral and bilateral ventral pallidal infusions. Implications of these findings for forebrain processing of reward are discussed. PMID:23423460

  20. Hypertonicity increases NO production to modulate the firing rate of magnocellular neurons of the supraoptic nucleus of rats.

    PubMed

    da Silva, M P; Ventura, R R; Varanda, W A

    2013-10-10

    Increases in plasma osmolality enhance nitric oxide (NO) levels in magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs) of the supraoptic nucleus (SON) and modulate the secretion of both vasopressin (VP) and oxytocin (OT). In this paper, we describe the effects of hypertonicity on the electrical properties of MNCs by focusing on the nitrergic modulation of their activity in this condition. Membrane potentials were measured using the patch clamp technique, in the presence of both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission blockers, in coronal brain slices of male Wistar rats. The recordings were first made under a control condition (295 mosm/kg H2O), then in the presence of a hypertonic stimulus (330 mosm/kg H2O) and, finally, with a hypertonic stimulus plus 500 μM L-Arginine or 100 μM N-nitro-L-Arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME). Hypertonicity per se increased the firing frequency of the neurons. L-Arginine prevented the increase in fire frequency induced by hypertonic stimulus, and L-NAME (inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase) induced an additional increase in frequency when applied together with the hypertonic solution. Moreover, L-Arginine hyperpolarizes the resting potential and decreases the peak value of the after-hyperpolarization; both effects were blocked by L-NAME and hypertonicity and/or L-NAME reduced the time constant of the rising phase of the after-depolarization. These results demonstrate that an intrinsic nitrergic system is part of the mechanisms controlling the excitability of MNCs of the SON when the internal fluid homeostasis is disturbed. PMID:23850590

  1. Hepatic portal glucose infusions decrease food intake and increase food preference.

    PubMed

    Tordoff, M G; Friedman, M I

    1986-07-01

    We examined the contribution of experimental factors to the hepatic control of food intake. Rats with either hepatic portal or jugular catheters were infused four times with glucose (4.5 mg/min) and equitonic saline (2 ml/2 h). During the infusions their food contained nonnutritive chocolate or chicken flavor, depending on the infusate received. Hepatic portal glucose decreased food intake relative to saline and no infusion conditions, but jugular glucose did not. When allowed to choose between the flavors associated with each infusate, rats with hepatic portal catheters preferred the flavor eaten during glucose infusion, and rats with jugular catheters showed no preference. These results suggest that a mechanism located in the liver can reduce food intake without producing malaise and that portal glucose can act as an unconditioned stimulus for the acquisition of a learned food preference. Several reports that hepatic portal infusions do not alter feeding behavior may be explained by a failure to control for previous experience in the test situation. PMID:3728707

  2. Effects of gastric distension and infusion of umami and bitter taste stimuli on vagal afferent activity.

    PubMed

    Horn, Charles C; Murat, Chloé; Rosazza, Matthew; Still, Liz

    2011-10-24

    Until recently, sensory nerve pathways from the stomach to the brain were thought to detect distension and play little role in nutritional signaling. Newer data have challenged this view, including reports on the presence of taste receptors in the gastrointestinal lumen and the stimulation of multi-unit vagal afferent activity by glutamate infusions into the stomach. However, assessing these chemosensory effects is difficult because gastric infusions typically evoke a distension-related vagal afferent response. In the current study, we recorded gastric vagal afferent activity in the rat to investigate the possibility that umami (glutamate, 150 mM) and bitter (denatonium, 10 mM) responses could be dissociated from distension responses by adjusting the infusion rate and opening or closing the drainage port in the stomach. Slow infusions of saline (5 ml over 2 min, open port) produced no significant effects on vagal activity. Using the same infusion rate, glutamate or denatonium solutions produced little or no effects on vagal afferent activity. In an attempt to reproduce a prior report that showed distention and glutamate responses, we produced a distension response by closing the exit port. Under this condition, response to the infusion of glutamate or denatonium was similar to saline. In summary, we found little or no effect of gastric infusion of glutamate or denatonium on gastric vagal afferent activity that could be distinguished from distension responses. The current results suggest that sensitivity to umami or bitter stimuli is not a common property of gastric vagal afferent fibers. PMID:21925651

  3. Hypertonicity compromises renal mineralocorticoid receptor signaling through Tis11b-mediated post-transcriptional control.

    PubMed

    Viengchareun, Say; Lema, Ingrid; Lamribet, Khadija; Keo, Vixra; Blanchard, Anne; Cherradi, Nadia; Lombès, Marc

    2014-10-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) mediates the Na(+)-retaining action of aldosterone. MR is highly expressed in the distal nephron, which is submitted to intense variations in extracellular fluid tonicity generated by the corticopapillary gradient. We previously showed that post-transcriptional events control renal MR abundance. Here, we report that hypertonicity increases expression of the mRNA-destabilizing protein Tis11b, a member of the tristetraprolin/ZFP36 family, and thereby, decreases MR expression in renal KC3AC1 cells. The 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTRs) of human and mouse MR mRNA, containing several highly conserved adenylate/uridylate-rich elements (AREs), were cloned downstream of a reporter gene. Luciferase activities of full-length or truncated MR Luc-3'-UTR mutants decreased drastically when cotransfected with Tis11b plasmid, correlating with an approximately 50% shorter half-life of ARE-containing transcripts. Using site-directed mutagenesis and RNA immunoprecipitation, we identified a crucial ARE motif within the MR 3'-UTR, to which Tis11b must bind for destabilizing activity. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments suggested that endogenous Tis11b physically interacts with MR mRNA in KC3AC1 cells, and Tis11b knockdown prevented hypertonicity-elicited repression of MR. Moreover, hypertonicity blunted aldosterone-stimulated expression of glucocorticoid-induced leucine-zipper protein and the α-subunit of the epithelial Na(+) channel, supporting impaired MR signaling. Challenging the renal osmotic gradient by submitting mice to water deprivation, diuretic administration, or high-Na(+) diet increased renal Tis11b and decreased MR expression, particularly in the cortex, thus establishing a mechanistic pathway for osmotic regulation of MR expression in vivo. Altogether, we uncovered a mechanism by which renal MR expression is regulated through mRNA turnover, a post-transcriptional control that seems physiologically relevant. PMID:24700863

  4. Hypertonicity Compromises Renal Mineralocorticoid Receptor Signaling through Tis11b-Mediated Post-Transcriptional Control

    PubMed Central

    Viengchareun, Say; Lema, Ingrid; Lamribet, Khadija; Keo, Vixra; Blanchard, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) mediates the Na+-retaining action of aldosterone. MR is highly expressed in the distal nephron, which is submitted to intense variations in extracellular fluid tonicity generated by the corticopapillary gradient. We previously showed that post-transcriptional events control renal MR abundance. Here, we report that hypertonicity increases expression of the mRNA-destabilizing protein Tis11b, a member of the tristetraprolin/ZFP36 family, and thereby, decreases MR expression in renal KC3AC1 cells. The 3′-untranslated regions (3′-UTRs) of human and mouse MR mRNA, containing several highly conserved adenylate/uridylate-rich elements (AREs), were cloned downstream of a reporter gene. Luciferase activities of full-length or truncated MR Luc-3′-UTR mutants decreased drastically when cotransfected with Tis11b plasmid, correlating with an approximately 50% shorter half-life of ARE-containing transcripts. Using site-directed mutagenesis and RNA immunoprecipitation, we identified a crucial ARE motif within the MR 3′-UTR, to which Tis11b must bind for destabilizing activity. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments suggested that endogenous Tis11b physically interacts with MR mRNA in KC3AC1 cells, and Tis11b knockdown prevented hypertonicity-elicited repression of MR. Moreover, hypertonicity blunted aldosterone-stimulated expression of glucocorticoid-induced leucine-zipper protein and the α-subunit of the epithelial Na+ channel, supporting impaired MR signaling. Challenging the renal osmotic gradient by submitting mice to water deprivation, diuretic administration, or high-Na+ diet increased renal Tis11b and decreased MR expression, particularly in the cortex, thus establishing a mechanistic pathway for osmotic regulation of MR expression in vivo. Altogether, we uncovered a mechanism by which renal MR expression is regulated through mRNA turnover, a post-transcriptional control that seems physiologically relevant. PMID:24700863

  5. Intraosseous infusion in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Neal, C J; McKinley, D F

    1994-01-01

    In traumatically injured or medically unstable pediatric patients requiring resuscitation, gaining intravenous access often is frustrating for the physician and agonizing for the patient. Even when cardiopulmonary resuscitation is performed by trained professionals, cardiac arrests in children in the prehospital setting have a mortality of 79% to 100%. Immediate vascular access such as that obtained by intraosseous infusion improves survival. The intraosseous infusion technique uses the medullary cavity in the tibia as a "noncollapsible vein" for parenteral infusion. It is indicated in a child in shock or cardiac arrest when two attempts to access peripheral vasculature have failed or when more than 2 minutes have elapsed in the attempt to gain access. Epinephrine, bicarbonate, calcium, lidocaine, and volume expanders can be infused via the intraosseous route. Complications rarely occur. The technique described here is gaining acceptance in both prehospital and emergency department settings. PMID:8169160

  6. Proctoclysis: emergency rectal fluid infusion.

    PubMed

    Tremayne, Vincent

    This article describes the use and effectiveness of proctoclysis (rectal fluid infusion) in providing fluid resuscitation in the absence of intravenous access in rural and remote environments. PMID:19856644

  7. [Transitory hyperbilirubinemia and oxytocin infusion].

    PubMed

    Quoss, I

    1978-01-01

    Serum bilirubin levels at 5th day of life was compared between 100 mature newborns with oxytocin infusion to the mother during labour and 100 mature newborns without oxytocin. Newborns, whose mothers received more than 5 IU oxytocin had significant higher bilirubin values than the controll group without oxytocin and the cases with oxytocin administration under 5 U. Hyperbilirubinaemie was also present in babies after vacuum extraction and oxytocin infusion. PMID:645287

  8. Hypertonic conditions trigger transient plasmolysis, growth arrest and blockage of transporter endocytosis in Aspergillus nidulans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bitsikas, Vassilis; Karachaliou, Mayia; Gournas, Christos; Diallinas, George

    2011-01-01

    By using Aspergillus nidulans strains expressing functional GFP-tagged transporters under hypertonic conditions, we noticed the rapid appearance of cortical, relatively static, fluorescent patches (0.5-2.3 μm). These patches do not correspond to transporter microdomains as they co-localize with other plasma membrane-associated molecules, such as the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and the SsoA t-Snare, or the lipophilic markers FM4-64 and filipin. In addition, they do not show characteristics of lipid rafts, MCCs or other membrane microdomains. Deconvoluted microscopic images showed that fluorescent patches correspond to plasma membrane invaginations. Transporters remain fully active during this phenomenon of localized plasmolysis. Plasmolysis was however associated with reduced growth rate and a dramatic blockage in transporter and FM4-64 endocytosis. These phenomena are transient and rapidly reversible upon wash-out of hypertonic media. Based on the observation that block in endocytosis by hypertonic treatment altered dramatically the cellular localization of tropomyosin (GFP-TpmA), although it did not affect the cortical appearance of upstream (SlaB-GFP) or downstream (AbpA-mRFP) endocytic components, we conclude that hypertonicity modifies actin dynamics and thus acts indirectly on endocytosis. This was further supported by the effect of latrunculin B, an actin depolymerization agent, on endocytosis. We show that the phenomena observed in A. nidulans also occur in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that they constitute basic homeostatic responses of ascomycetes to hypertonic shock. Finally, our work shows that hypertonic treatments can be used as physiological tools to study the endocytic down-regulation of transporters in A. nidulans, as non-conditional genetic blocks affecting endocytic internalization are lethal or severely debilitating. PMID:20919858

  9. The Effect of an Amino Acid Infusion on Central Thermoregulatory Control in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Yasufumi; Takamata, Akira; Matsukawa, Takashi; Sessler, Daniel I.; Kitamura, Yoshihiro; Ueno, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yoshifumi; Mizobe, Toshiki

    2005-01-01

    Background Administration of protein or amino acids enhances thermogenesis, presumably by stimulating oxidative metabolism. However, hyperthermia results even when thermoregulatory responses are intact, suggesting that amino acids also alter central thermoregulatory control. We thus tested the hypothesis that amino acid infusion increases the thermoregulatory setpoint. Methods Nine male volunteers each participated on four study days in randomized order: 1) intravenous amino acids infused at 4 kJ·kg−1·hr−1 for 2.5 h combined with skin-surface warming; 2) amino acid infusion combined with cutaneous cooling; 3) a saline infusion combined with skin-surface warming; and, 4) saline infusion combined with cutaneous cooling. Results Amino acid infusion increased resting core temperature by 0.3 ± 0.1°C (mean ± SD) and oxygen consumption by 18 ± 12%. Furthermore, amino acid infusion increased the calculated core temperature threshold (triggering core temperature at a designated mean-skin temperature of 34°C) for active cutaneous vasodilation by 0.3 ± 0.3°C, for sweating by 0.2 ± 0.2°C, for thermoregulatory vasoconstriction by 0.3 ± 0.3°C, and for thermogenesis by 0.4 ± 0.5°C. Amino acid infusion did not alter the incremental response intensity (i.e., gain) of thermoregulatory defenses. Conclusions Amino acid infusion increased the metabolic rate and resting core temperature. However, amino acids also produced a synchronous increase in all major autonomic thermoregulatory defense thresholds; the increase in core temperature was identical to the setpoint increase — even in a cold environment with amble potential to dissipate heat. In subjects with intact thermoregulatory defenses, amino acid-induced hyperthermia appears to result from an elevated setpoint increase rather than increased metabolic rate per se. PMID:15108979

  10. The myth of 0.9% saline: neither normal nor physiological.

    PubMed

    Chen, Leon

    2015-01-01

    Normal saline is the crystalloid of choice for fluid resuscitation with its utility born out of the cholera epidemic of 1832. However, its ubiquitous usage is being challenged because of a growing body of evidence suggesting that a large volume infusion of normal saline does in fact have deleterious effects on multiple body systems. Careful considerations should be given to the physiological effects of using large amounts of normal saline as one would with another pharmacological agents. PMID:26335217

  11. Endocytic response of type I alveolar epithelial cells to hypertonic stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaohua; Singh, Raman Deep; Godin, Lindsay; Pagano, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    We present plasma membrane (PM) internalization responses of type I alveolar epithelial cells to a 50 mosmol/l increase in tonicity. Our research is motivated by interest in ATI repair, for which endocytic retrieval of PM appears to be critical. We validated pharmacological and molecular tools to dissect the endocytic machinery of these cells and used these tools to test the hypothesis that osmotic stress triggers a pathway-specific internalization of PM domains. Validation experiments confirmed the fluorescent analogs of lactosyl-ceramide, transferrin, and dextran as pathway-specific cargo of caveolar, clathrin, and fluid-phase uptake, respectively. Pulse-chase experiments indicate that hypertonic exposure causes a downregulation of clathrin and fluid-phase endocytosis while stimulating caveolar endocytosis. The tonicity-mediated increase in caveolar endocytosis was associated with the translocation of caveolin-1 from the PM and was absent in cells that had been transfected with dominant-negative dynamin constructs. In separate experiments we show that hypertonic exposure increases the probability of PM wound repair following micropuncture from 82 ± 4 to 94 ± 2% (P < 0.01) and that this effect depends on Src pathway activation-mediated caveolar endocytosis. The therapeutic and biological implications of our findings are discussed. PMID:21257731

  12. [Bioregulating therapy and life quality in aged patients with hypertonic angioretinopathy].

    PubMed

    Trofimova, S V; Atakhanova, L E; Akhmedova, E P

    2008-01-01

    The researches data of influence of vascular impair of a retina in aged patients with arterial hypertension (AH) on their life quality (LQ) are given in the article. The questionnaires "The Scale of an estimation of life quality", SF-36 and VF-16 in authors updating were used. Ultrasonic dopplerography of retina vessels in patients with hypertonic angioretinopathy showed the authentic decrease of maximal systolic speeds of a blood-groove of an orbital artery, increase in its index of resistance and decrease of ophthalmic-retinal factor in comparison with normal parameters in the given age group. The studying of the comparative analysis of change of LQ and visual functions of aged patients with hypertonic angioretinopathy under adding to complex hypotensive therapies the Cortexin (the basic group, 28 people) and Actovegin (control group, 30 people) was held. As a result of treatment disappearance or reduction of visual discomfort and improvement of the emotional condition of 61% of patients of the basic group and 36% of patients of control group were marked. Improvement of LQ and subjective quality of eyesight correlated with improvement of visual functions. Thus, the researches enable to include people of elderly and senile age with AH into group of risk with probable decrease in visual functions; inclusion the neuro-protector cortexin in complex treatment of elderly and senile patients with AH and changes in eye-bottom considerably raises and stabilizes LQ and quality of eyesight of these patients. PMID:19432215

  13. Effects of saline loading during head down tilt on ANP and cyclic GMP levels and on urinary fluid excretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummer, C.; Lang, R. E.; Baisch, F.; Blomqvist, G.; Heer, M.; Gerzer, R.

    In the present study the renal and humoral effects of acute saline infusions were investigated in six healthy male volunteers before, during and after a ten day period of -6° head-down-tilt (HDT). During the whole 23-day study period the subjects received a standardized diet including 40 ml water and 125 mg NaCl per kg body weight per day. After the infusion of 0.9% saline (22 ml/kg within 20 minutes) plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) levels were only slightly increased (not significant) at the end of the infusion, while plasma cyclic GMP levels were significantly increased by about 40% (p<0.05) one hour later. No difference was observed in the plasma ANP and cyclic GMP changes between the pre-HDT, the HDT and the post-HDT infusion experiment. Urine flow, sodium excretion and urinary cyclic GMP excretion were significantly increased (p<0.05 and below) by 100 to 300% during the second and third hour after each saline infusion. However, during these short-term periods only 20% of the infused water and less than 20% of the infused sodium were excreted. Furthermore, a significantly increased volume, sodium and cyclic GMP excretion was observed for over 48 hours after each fluid load experiment. These data suggest that HDT does not induce major alterations in the regulation of an acute saline infusion and plasma ANP does not play a major role in the diuretic/natriuretic effects of volume loading.

  14. Measuring Salinity by Conductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapworth, C. J.

    1981-01-01

    Outlines procedures for constructing an instrument which uses an electrode and calibration methods to measure the salinity of waters in environments close to and affected by a saline estuary. (Author/DC)

  15. Hypertonicity sensing in organum vasculosum lamina terminalis neurons: a mechanical process involving TRPV1 but not TRPV4.

    PubMed

    Ciura, Sorana; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Bourque, Charles W

    2011-10-12

    Primary osmosensory neurons in the mouse organum vasculosum lamina terminalis (OVLT) transduce hypertonicity via the activation of nonselective cation channels that cause membrane depolarization and increased action potential discharge, and this effect is absent in mice lacking expression of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (Trpv1) gene (Ciura and Bourque, 2006). However other experiments have indicated that channels encoded by Trpv4 also contribute to central osmosensation in mice (Liedtke and Friedman, 2003; Mizuno et al., 2003). At present, the mechanism by which hypertonicity modulates cation channels in OVLT neurons is unknown, and it remains unclear whether Trpv1 and Trpv4 both contribute to this process. Here, we show that physical shrinking is necessary and sufficient to mediate hypertonicity sensing in OVLT neurons isolated from adult mice. Steps coupling progressive decreases in cell volume to increased neuronal activity were quantitatively equivalent whether shrinking was evoked by osmotic pressure or mechanical aspiration. Finally, modulation of OVLT neurons by tonicity or mechanical stimulation was unaffected by deletion of trpv4 but was abolished in cells lacking Trpv1 or wild-type neurons treated with the TRPV1 antagonist SB366791. Thus, hypertonicity sensing is a mechanical process requiring Trpv1, but not Trpv4. PMID:21994383

  16. AMPK potentiates hypertonicity-induced apoptosis by suppressing NFκB/COX-2 in medullary interstitial cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Qifei; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xue, Rui; Yang, Hang; Zhou, Yunfeng; Kong, Xiaomu; Zhao, Pan; Li, Jing; Yang, Jichun; Zhu, Yi; Guan, Youfei

    2011-10-01

    Cells residing in the hypertonic, hypoxic renal medulla depend on dynamic adaptation mechanisms to respond to changes in energy supply and demand. The serine/threonine kinase 5'-AMP protein kinase (AMPK) is a sensor of cellular energy status, but whether it contributes to the survival of cells in the renal medulla is unknown. Here, hypertonic conditions induced a decrease in AMPK phosphorylation within 12 hours in renal medullary interstitial cells (RMIC), followed by a gradual return to baseline levels. Activation of AMPK markedly increased hypertonicity-induced apoptosis of RMICs and suppressed both hypertonicity-induced NFκB nuclear translocation and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activation; overexpression of COX-2 significantly attenuated these effects. AMPK activation also markedly reduced generation of reactive oxygen species and nuclear expression of tonicity-responsive enhancer-binding protein, which prevented upregulation of osmoprotective genes. In vivo, pharmacologic activation of AMPK led to massive apoptosis of RMICs and renal dysfunction in the setting of water deprivation in mice. Taken together, these results identify a critical role for AMPK in the maintenance of RMIC viability and suggest that AMPK modulates the NFκB-COX-2 survival pathway in the renal medulla. Furthermore, this study raises safety concerns for the development of AMPK activators as anti-diabetic drugs, especially for patients prone to dehydration. PMID:21903993

  17. Hypertonic enhancement of transmitter release from frog motor nerve terminals: Ca2+ independence and role of integrins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashani, A. H.; Chen, B. M.; Grinnell, A. D.

    2001-01-01

    Hyperosmotic solutions cause markedly enhanced spontaneous quantal release of neurotransmitter from many nerve terminals. The mechanism of this enhancement is unknown. We have investigated this phenomenon at the frog neuromuscular junction with the aim of determining the degree to which it resembles the modulation of release by stretch, which has been shown to be mediated by mechanical tension on integrins.The hypertonicity enhancement, like the stretch effect, does not require Ca2+ influx or release from internal stores, although internal release may contribute to the effect. The hypertonicity effect is sharply reduced (but not eliminated) by peptides containing the RGD sequence, which compete with native ligands for integrin bonds.There is co-variance in the magnitude of the stretch and osmotic effects; that is, individual terminals exhibiting a large stretch effect also show strong enhancement by hypertonicity, and vice versa. The stretch and osmotic enhancements also can partially occlude each other.There remain some clear-cut differences between osmotic and stretch forms of modulation: the larger range of enhancement by hypertonic solutions, the relative lack of effect of osmolarity on evoked release, and the reported higher temperature sensitivity of osmotic enhancement. Nevertheless, our data strongly implicate integrins in a significant fraction of the osmotic enhancement, possibly acting via the same mechanism as stretch modulation.

  18. The membrane properties of the smooth muscle of the guinea-pig portal vein in isotonic and hypertonic solutions.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, H; Oshima, K; Sakamoto, Y

    1971-08-01

    The membrane properties of the longitudinal smooth muscle of the guinea-pig portal vein were investigated under various experimental conditions.1. In isotonic Krebs solution, the membrane potential (-48.7 mV), the maximum rates of rise and fall of the spike (4.6 and 2.3 V/sec respectively), the space constant (0.61 mm), the conduction velocity of excitation (0.97 cm/sec) and the time constant of the foot of the propagated spike (18.4 msec) were measured.2. The various parameters of the muscle membrane in the isotonic solution were compared with those in the hypertonic solution prepared by the addition of solid sucrose (twice the normal tonicity).3. When the muscles were perfused with hypertonic solution, marked depolarization of the membrane and increased membrane resistance occurred. These were probably due to reduction of the K permeability, increased internal resistance of the muscle and shrinkage of the muscle fibre.4. The membrane potential in isotonic and hypertonic solutions was analysed into two components, i.e. the metabolic (electrogenic Na-pump) and the ionic (electrical diffusion potential) component in the various environmental conditions.(a) In isotonic and hypertonic solutions, the membrane was depolarized by lowering the temperature or by removal of K ion from the solutions. When the tissues were rewarmed or on readdition of K ion, the membrane was markedly hyperpolarized. These hyperpolarizations of the membrane were suppressed by treatment with ouabain (10(-5) g/ml.), by warming to only 20 degrees C and by K-free solution.(b) The relationships between the membrane potential and the [K](o) in isotonic Krebs, in the hypertonic (sucrose) Krebs, in the Na-free (Tris) Krebs and in the Cl-deficient (C(6)H(5)SO(3)) Krebs were observed. The maximum slopes of the membrane depolarization against tenfold changes of [K](o) were much lower than that expected if it behaved like a K electrode.(c) In Na-free (Tris) solution, the membrane was not depolarized in

  19. Intracellular hypertonicity is responsible for water flux associated with Na+/glucose cotransport.

    PubMed

    Charron, François M; Blanchard, Maxime G; Lapointe, Jean-Yves

    2006-05-15

    Detection of a significant transmembrane water flux immediately after cotransporter stimulation is the experimental basis for the controversial hypothesis of secondary active water transport involving a proposed stoichiometry for the human Na(+)/glucose cotransporter (SGLT1) of two Na(+), one glucose, and 264 water molecules. Volumetric measurements of Xenopus laevis oocytes coexpressing human SGLT1 and aquaporin can be used to detect osmotic gradients with high sensitivity. Adding 2 mM of the substrate alpha-methyl-glucose (alphaMG) created mild extracellular hypertonicity and generated a large cotransport current with minimal cell volume changes. After 20, 40, and 60 s of cotransport, the return to sugar-free, isotonic conditions was accompanied by measurable cell swelling averaging 0.051, 0.061, and 0.077 nl/s, respectively. These water fluxes are consistent with internal hypertonicities of 1.5, 1.7, and 2.2 mOsm for these cotransport periods. In the absence of aquaporin, the measured hypertonicites were 4.6, 5.0, and 5.3 mOsm for the same cotransport periods Cotransport-dependent water fluxes, previously assumed to be water cotransport, could be largely explained by hypertonicities of such amplitudes. Using intracellular Na(+) injection and Na(+)-selective electrode, the intracellular diffusion coefficient for Na(+) was estimated at 0.29 +/- 0.03 x 10(-5) cm(2) s(-1). Using the effect of intracellular alphaMG injection on the SGLT1-mediated outward current, the intracellular diffusion coefficient of alphaMG was estimated at 0.15 +/- 0.01 x 10(-5) cm(2) s(-1). Although these intracellular diffusion coefficients are much lower than in free aqueous solution, a diffusion model for a single solute in an oocyte would require a diffusion coefficient three times lower than estimated to explain the local osmolyte accumulation that was experimentally detected. This suggests that either the diffusion coefficients were overestimated, possibly due to the presence of

  20. Effect of infusion rate on intravenous nicotine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Wing, Victoria C; Shoaib, Mohammed

    2013-09-01

    The reinforcing effects of addictive drugs are thought to be more robust when the onset of the drug's effects is fast. It is unclear whether this concept extends to intravenous self-administration (IVSA) of nicotine. We therefore sought to examine the effects of infusion duration on nicotine IVSA in rats. Male Lister hooded rats (n=8) were given daily 1 h limited access to fixed ratio-3 nicotine IVSA (0.03 mg/kg/infusion). Once nicotine IVSA was established, the effect of infusion duration on nicotine seeking was evaluated at a constant unit dose and volume (0.5, 5.0, and 19.6 s compared with the 1-s training infusion duration). Active responses were significantly reduced when the infusion duration was increased (i.e. 5 or 19.6 s compared with 0.5 and 1 s), and the effect was qualitatively similar to saline substitution. The likelihood of maintaining a reliable IVSA in rats was reduced by increasing the infusion duration. The infusion duration therefore represents an important determinant of nicotine reinforcement in rats. PMID:23907378

  1. A segmental chronic pain syndrome in rats associated with intrathecal infusion of NMDA: evidence for selective action in the dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Zochodne, D W; Murray, M; Nag, S; Riopelle, R J

    1994-02-01

    We explored the effects of chronic lumbar intrathecal NMDA infusion (mini-osmotic pumps) in Sprague-Dawley rats on motor and sensory axon integrity. Several different infusion protocols, each given over a 4 week period were examined: 0.15 M NMDA in phosphate buffered saline; phosphate buffered saline without NMDA; and 0.20 M magnesium sulfate plus 0.15 M NMDA; 0.35 M NMDA. In two additional protocols, 0.15 M NMDA or phosphate buffered saline were infused for a total of 8 weeks. Within 1-2 weeks of the onset of NMDA, but not phosphate buffered saline infusions, the rats exhibited irritability, circling, biting and excessive grooming resulting in loss of hair, and skin ulcerations from autotomy localized to lumbar and sacral innervated dermatomes. Co-infusion of NMDA with magnesium sulfate almost completely prevented these findings. The behavioural changes were not associated with abnormalities of sensory or motor conduction. Intrathecal infusion of NMDA induces a chronic "central" experimental pain disorder in rats, localized to the cord segment with the greatest exposure to the infusion, without involvement of peripheral sensory axons and sparing the axonal integrity of anterior horn cells. PMID:8180899

  2. Hypertonic glucose pleurodesis and surgical diaphragmatic repair for tension hydrothorax complicating continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Gui-Na; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2016-05-01

    We herein describe a case of tension hydrothorax that occurred on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), highlighting the problems of diagnosis and a novel management. A 38-year-old male with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) due to diabetes mellitus developed dyspnea and poor drainage after 13 months of CAPD. Chest X-ray revealed massive right-sided hydrothorax and mediastinal shift. He underwent emergency thoracentesis and pleural fluid showed a high level of glucose. Pleuroperitoneal communication was strongly suspected, although the methylene blue test was negative. We temporarily performed hemodialysis. Two weeks later, PD was resumed but failed with recurrent right-side hydrothorax in 4 months. The pleuroperitoneal leakage was definitively confirmed by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Diaphragmatic repair and pleurodesis with hypertonic glucose were performed. There was no recurrence of hydrothorax after treatment. PMID:26784913

  3. Ultramicroscopic and biochemical changes in ram spermatozoa cryopreserved with trehalose-based hypertonic extenders.

    PubMed

    Aisen, E; Quintana, M; Medina, V; Morello, H; Venturino, A

    2005-06-01

    The ability of a range of extenders to cryopreserve ram spermatozoa was tested. The extenders were modified by the inclusion of citrate, Tris buffer, trehalose, and EDTA. Ejaculates from three Pampinta rams were evaluated and pooled at 30 degrees C. The semen was diluted to contain 1 x 10(9) cells/mL, cooled to 5 degrees C, loaded into 0.25-mL straws, frozen and stored in liquid nitrogen. Evaluation was based on the hypoosmotic swelling test (HOS test), electron microscopy, and biochemical parameters such as lipid peroxidation and reduced and total glutathione levels, all measured after thawing. The HOS test indicated that the percentage of intact plasma membranes after freezing and thawing was significantly higher for the hypertonic extender containing trehalose (T), compared with an extender containing trehalose+EDTA (TE) or an isotonic Tris extender (B) (p < 0.05). Membrane evaluation by ultramicroscopy also indicated better sperm cryopreservation in extender T compared with the others, and there was a significant reduction in the number of damaged membranes (27%, p < 0.0002). The level of reduced glutathione was significantly higher after sperm cryopreservation in either hypertonic diluent (T and TE) with respect to the isotonic extender B, immediately after thawing (12%) and after a 3-h post-thawing thermotolerance test at 37 degrees C (17%, p = 0.007). Total glutathione levels did not show statistical differences among the extenders. After 3h post-thawing incubation at 37 degrees C, lipid peroxide levels in spermatozoa were statistically lower for T than TE (35%) or isotonic extender B (44%) (p = 0.002). Taken together these results indicate a reduction in the oxidative stress provoked by freezing and thawing when semen is cryopreserved in extender T. The antioxidant properties of extender T may be related to its effectiveness in membrane cryopreservation. PMID:15925576

  4. Hypertonic conditions enhance cartilage formation in scaffold-free primary chondrocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Ylärinne, Janne H; Qu, Chengjuan; Lammi, Mikko J

    2014-11-01

    The potential of hypertonic conditions at in vivo levels to promote cartilage extracellular matrix accumulation in scaffold-free primary chondrocyte cultures was investigated. Six million bovine primary chondrocytes were cultured in transwell inserts in low glucose (LG), high glucose (HG), or hypertonic high glucose (HHG) DMEM supplemented with fetal bovine serum, antibiotics, and ascorbate under 5 % or 20 % O2 tension with and without transforming growth factor (TGF)-β3 for 6 weeks. Samples were collected for histological staining of proteoglycans (PGs) and type II collagen, analysis by quantitative reverse transcription plus the polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of mRNA expression of aggrecan and procollagen α1 (II) and of Sox9 and procollagen α2 (I), and quantitation of PGs and PG separation in agarose gels. Cartilage tissues produced at 20 % O2 tension were larger than those formed at 5 % O2 tension. Compared with LG, the tissues grew to larger sizes in HG or HHG medium. Histological staining showed the strongest PG and type II collagen staining in cartilage generated in HG or HHG medium at 20 % O2 tension. Quantitative RT-PCR results indicated significantly higher expression of procollagen α1 (II) mRNA in cartilage generated in HHG medium at 20 % O2 tension compared with that in the other samples. TGF-β3 supplements in the culture medium provided no advantage for cartilage formation. Thus, HHG medium used at 20 % O2 tension is the most beneficial combination of the tested culture conditions for scaffold-free cartilage production in vitro and should improve cell culture for research into cartilage repair or tissue engineering. PMID:25107609

  5. The transport systems of Ventricaria ventricosa: hypotonic and hypertonic turgor regulation.

    PubMed

    Bisson, M A; Beilby, M J

    2002-11-01

    The time course of hypertonic and hypotonic turgor regulation was studied in Ventricaria (Valonia) using pressure probe and I/V(current-voltage) analysis. Of 11 cells, 9 exhibited hypertonic turgor regulation, ranging from 100% regulation in 150 min to 14% regulation (14% recovery of the decrease in turgor) in 314 min. Some cells began regulating immediately, others took up to 90 min to begin. The resting PD (potential difference) became more positive in most cells. The I/V characteristics became more nonlinear with high resistance between -150 and -20 mV and negative conductance region near -70 mV. Prolonged (16 sec) voltage clamps to negative levels (-100 to -150 mV) showed progressively more rapid current turn-off, but subsequent I/V characteristics were not affected. Clamping to +150 mV, however, abolished the high conductance between -50 and +100 mV to yield a uniform high resistance I/V characteristic, similar to that in high [K+]o. Decreasing illumination from 2.02 micromol sec(-1) m(-2) to 0.5 micromol sec(-1)1 m(-2) had a similar effect. Two out of a total of three cells exhibited hypotonic turgor regulation. Both cells started regulating within minutes and achieved near 50% regulation within 50 min. The PD became more negative. The I/V curves exhibited high resistance between +50 and +150 mV. The characteristics were similar to those in cells exposed to low [K+]o. Prolonged voltage clamps to both negative and positive levels showed slow current increase. Decreased illumination increased the membrane resistance. PMID:12422271

  6. The sensitivity of apical Na+ permeability in frog skin to hypertonic stress.

    PubMed

    Zeiske, W; Van Driessche, W

    1984-02-01

    Na+ transport across abdominal skins of the frog species Rana esculenta and Rana pipiens was analyzed by recording short-circuit current (Isc), transepithelial conductance (Gt), and the current noise generated by the random blockage of apical Na+ channels by the diuretic, amiloride. Specific Na+ current (INa) and conductance (GNa), as reflected by the amiloride-sensitive part of Isc and Gt, respectively, were markedly depressed after addition of some osmotically active substances, like sugars or alcohols to the mucosal Na+-Ringer solution. These hypertonicity-induced reactions were fast and fully reversible, even at mucosal osmolarities of 1 Osmol. With mucosal solutions of moderate hyperosmolarity a recovery of INa and GNa was observed in presence of the osmotic gradient. This "regulatory" current showed to be carried by Na+ through the Na+-specific apical channels. Contrary to the fast current drop during the initial phase of hyperosmotic shocks, the "osmoregulation" was considerably slower. The recovery of INa was only complete at smaller osmotic gradients but became more and more suppressed at higher osmolarities. Steady-state analysis of the kinetics of the Na+-specific current revealed that the current depression by osmotic shocks obeys Michaelis-Menten kinetics. This current depression at high osmolarities, as well as during the initial phase before "osmoregulation" with small osmotic gradients, can be described in terms of a non-competitive inhibition. This was also suggested by Na+-concentration jump experiments indicating a reduction of the maximal, apical Na+ permeability as mechanism of the hypertonicity-induced drop in INa. The INa kinetics after complete "osmoregulation" were, however, indistinguishable from the isotonic control condition.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6326045

  7. Infusing Culture in Career Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Nancy; Collins, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces the culture-infused career counselling (CICC) model. Six principles are foundational to a tripartite model emphasizing cultural self-awareness, awareness of client cultural identities, and development of a culturally sensitive working alliance. The core competencies ensure the cultural validity and relevance of career…

  8. Infusing Service Learning into Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrington, Harriette J.; Moore, Sara Delano

    2001-01-01

    Describes how service learning can link to the middle school curriculum to strengthen the learning of various skills and concepts. Presents service learning model involving preparation, action, reflection, and recognition. Includes examples of effective infusion of service learning into units, lessons, and projects. Concludes with recommendations…

  9. Enhancing Instruction through Software Infusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sia, Archie P.

    The presence of the computer in the classroom is no longer considered an oddity; it has become an ordinary resource for teachers to use for the enhancement of instruction. This paper presents an examination of software infusion, i.e., the use of computer software to enrich instruction in an academic curriculum. The process occurs when a chosen…

  10. Epidural diamorphine infusions with and without 0.167% bupivacaine for post-operative analgesia.

    PubMed

    Lowson, S M; Alexander, J I; Black, A M; Bambridge, A D

    1994-09-01

    Forty patients who underwent upper or mid-abdominal surgery were randomly allocated to receive a post-operative epidural infusion of 0.083 mg ml-1 of diamorphine in either 0.167% bupivacaine or 0.9% NaCl solution. The nursing staff, who were unaware of which solution was being infused, managed the patients' pain according to a standardized scheme. They adjusted the epidural infusion rates to 3, 5 or 7 ml h-1 according to the patient's hourly reports of pain on a four point verbal rating scale (none, mild, moderate or severe), aiming to use the lowest allowed infusion rate to prevent or reduce any pain that was more than mild. Additional analgesia was given as diclofenac 75 mg intramuscularly if the patients report moderate pain while on the highest infusion rate. The nurses were instructed to summon anaesthetic help if pain relief was still unsatisfactory after diclofenac, but this was never necessary. Diclofenac was needed by six patients receiving diamorphine in saline and one receiving diamorphine in bupivacaine (P < 0.05). The range of average hourly epidural infusion rates was constrained by design to between 3 and 7 ml h-1 but the median of these values was 5 ml h-1 in the diamorphine-saline group and 3.35 ml h-1 in the diamorphine-bupivacaine group (P < 0.02). In patients receiving diamorphine in saline, a median of 6 (range 0-16) of the 24 h reports were of more than mild pain, whereas in the diamorphine-bupivacaine group, the corresponding figures were 2 (range 0-13) (P < 0.02)).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7988577

  11. 21 CFR 880.5725 - Infusion pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Infusion pump. 880.5725 Section 880.5725 Food and... Infusion pump. (a) Identification. An infusion pump is a device used in a health care facility to pump fluids into a patient in a controlled manner. The device may use a piston pump, a roller pump, or...

  12. Regional blood flow during continuous low-dose endotoxin infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, R.E.; Lang, C.H.; Spitzer, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Escherichia coli endotoxin (ET) was administered to adult rats by continuous IV infusion from a subcutaneously implanted osmotic pump (Alzet). Cardiac output and regional blood flow were determined by the radiolabeled microsphere method after 6 and 30 hr of ET or saline infusion. Cardiac output (CO) of ET rats was not different from time-matched controls, whereas arterial pressure was 13% lower after 30 hr of infusion. After both 6 and 30 hr of ET, pancreatic blood flow and percentage of cardiac output were lower than in controls. Estimated portal venous flow was decreased at each time point, and an increased hepatic arterial flow (significant after 30 hr) resulted in an unchanged total hepatic blood flow. Blood flow to most other tissues, including epididymal fat, muscle, kidneys, adrenals, and gastrointestinal tract, was similar between treatments. Maintenance of blood flow to metabolically important tissues indicates that the previously reported alterations in in vitro cellular metabolism are not due to tissue hypoperfusion. Earlier observations of in vitro myocardial dysfunction, coexistent with the significant impairment in pancreatic flow, raise the possibility that release of a myocardial depressant factor occurs not only in profound shock but also under less severe conditions of sepsis and endotoxemia.

  13. Post-oral infusion sites that support glucose-conditioned flavor preferences in rats.

    PubMed

    Ackroff, Karen; Yiin, Yeh-Min; Sclafani, Anthony

    2010-03-01

    Rats learn to prefer a flavored solution (CS+) paired with a gastrointestinal glucose infusion over an alternate flavor (CS-) paired with a non-caloric infusion. Prior work implicates a post-gastric site of glucose action, which is the focus of this study. In Exp. 1, male rats (8-10/group) were infused in the duodenum (ID), mid-jejunum (IJ), or distal ileum (II) with 8% glucose or water as they drank saccharin-sweetened CS+ and CS- solutions, respectively, in one-bottle 30-min sessions. Two-bottle tests (no infusions) were followed by a second train-test cycle. By the second test, the ID and IJ groups preferred the CS+ (69%, 67%) to the CS- but the II group did not (48%). Satiation tests showed that ID and IJ infusions of glucose reduced intake of a palatable solution similarly, while II infusions were ineffective. In Exp. 2, rats (10/group) drank CS solutions in one-bottle, 30-min sessions and were given 2-h ID or hepatic portal vein (HP) infusions. The CS+ and CS- were paired with 10 ml infusions of 10% glucose and 0.9% saline, respectively. Following 8 training sessions, the ID group preferred the CS+ (67%) to the CS- but the HP group did not (47%) in a two-bottle test. The similar CS+ preferences displayed by ID and IJ, but not II groups implicate the jejunum as a critical site for glucose-conditioned preferences. A pre-absorptive glucose action is indicated by the CS+ preference displayed by ID but not HP rats in Exp. 2. Our data were obtained with non-nutritive CS solutions. HP glucose infusions are reported to condition preferences for a flavored food that itself has pre- and post-absorptive actions. Thus, there may be multiple sites for glucose conditioning with the upper or mid-intestines being the first site of action. PMID:20026145

  14. Hypertonic-induced lamin A/C synthesis and distribution to nucleoplasmic speckles is mediated by TonEBP/NFAT5 transcriptional activator

    SciTech Connect

    Favale, Nicolas O.; Sterin Speziale, Norma B.; Fernandez Tome, Maria C.

    2007-12-21

    Lamin A/C is the most studied nucleoskeletal constituent. Lamin A/C expression indicates cell differentiation and is also a structural component of nuclear speckles, which are involved in gene expression regulation. Hypertonicity has been reported to induce renal epithelial cell differentiation and expression of TonEBP (NFAT5), a transcriptional activator of hypertonicity-induced gene transcription. In this paper, we investigate the effect of hypertonicity on lamin A/C expression in MDCK cells and the involvement of TonEBP. Hypertonicity increased lamin A/C expression and its distribution to nucleoplasm with speckled pattern. Microscopy showed codistribution of TonEBP and lamin A/C in nucleoplasmic speckles, and immunoprecipitation demonstrated their interaction. TonEBP silencing caused lamin A/C redistribution from nucleoplasmic speckles to the nuclear rim, followed by lamin decrease, thus showing that hypertonicity induces lamin A/C speckles through a TonEBP-dependent mechanism. We suggest that lamin A/C speckles could serve TonEBP as scaffold thus favoring its role in hypertonicity.

  15. Temperature responses to infusion of electrolytes during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Kozlowski, S.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.; Nazar, K.; Brzezinska, Z.

    1975-01-01

    Past studies on the influence of various metal ions on heat regulation in mammals are reviewed, and results of a study on the effect of Na and citrate in isotonic and hypertonic concentrations on temperature elevation during exercise in dogs are presented. Hypertonic administration of Na before or during treadmill running and dosis of citrate during treadmill running significantly raised core temperature over controls and isotonic cases. Thus the higher the plasma Na-osmotic concentration, the greater the inhibition of heat dissipation.

  16. Osmotic injury of PC-3 cells by hypertonic NaCl solutions at temperatures above 0 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Zawlodzka, Sylwia; Takamatsu, Hiroshi

    2005-02-01

    Cell injury due to osmotic dehydration, which is regarded as a major cause of injury during freeze-thaw processes, was examined closely using a perfusion microscope. Human prostatic adenocarcinoma cells (PC-3), which were put in a chamber, were subjected to hyperosmotic stresses by perfusing NaCl solutions of varying concentrations into the chamber. Cells were exposed to 2.5 and 4.5M NaCl solutions for 1-60 min by changing the concentrations at 0.2, 1, and 10 M/min. Decrease in cell viability was biphasic: the viability decreased first after the increase in NaCl concentration due to dehydration and then after return to isotonic conditions due to rehydration. Rehydration was substantially more responsible for cell injury than dehydration, which was marked at lower NaCl concentrations and lower temperatures. Injury resulting from contraction was negligible at the 2.5 M NaCl solution. While the hypertonic cell survival, which was determined without a return to isotonic conditions, was almost independent of time of exposure to hyperosmotic concentrations, the post-hypertonic survival after returning to isotonic conditions decreased with increasing exposure time, suggesting that the rehydration-induced injury was a consequence of time-dependent alteration of the plasma membrane. The post-hypertonic survival was lower for higher NaCl concentrations and higher temperatures, which was qualitatively consistent with previous studies. Effects of the rate of concentration change on the post-hypertonic cell survival were observed at 4.5 M; the highest rate of survival was obtained by slower increase and faster decrease in the NaCl concentration. However, the effect was negligible at 2.5 M. PMID:15710370

  17. Opposite effects of oxytocin on water intake induced by hypertonic NaCl or polyethylene glycol administration.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Antonio; Mahía, Javier; Mediavilla, Cristina; Puerto, Amadeo

    2015-03-15

    Oxytocin (OT), a neurohormone, has been related to natriuretic and diuretic effects and also to water intake and sodium appetite. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of subcutaneous OT administration on water intake and urine-related measures induced by the administration of hypertonic NaCl (experiment 1) or polyethylene glycol (PEG) (experiment 2). Experiment 1 showed that OT administration increases the urine volume, urinary sodium concentration, and natriuresis and reduces the water intake, water and sodium balances, and estimated plasma sodium concentration induced by hypertonic NaCl administration. Conversely, experiment 2 showed that OT administration increases the water intake and the antidiuretic response induced by PEG administration. These results show that the opposite effects of OT on the water intake induced by hypertonic NaCl or PEG administration are accompanied by differential regulatory effects, enhancing a natriuretic response in the first experiment and generating an antidiuretic reaction in the second experiment. This study suggests a differential regulatory effect of OT during states of intra- and extracellular thirst. PMID:25617595

  18. Hypertonic NaCl enhances adenosine release and hormonal cAMP production in mouse thick ascending limb.

    PubMed

    Baudouin-Legros, M; Badou, A; Paulais, M; Hammet, M; Teulon, J

    1995-07-01

    Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), accumulated in the presence of adenosine, was measured in medullary portions of mouse thick ascending limbs of Henle's loop, suspended either in classic extracellular buffer or in the presence of added NaCl. Under control conditions (140 mmol/l NaCl), adenosine (< 10(-5) mol/l) and N6-cyclohexyladenosine, an A1 adenosine receptor agonist, inhibit the cAMP accumulation induced by arginine vasopressin (AVP). On the other hand, high concentrations of adenosine and CGS-21680, an A2 adenosine receptor agonist, stimulate cAMP formation. Addition of NaCl (+300 mmol/l) to extracellular buffer stimulates the release of endogenous adenosine. It also enhances A2 receptor-induced cAMP accumulation but suppresses A1 receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. This hypertonic NaCl medium also potentiates the stimulatory action of AVP on adenylyl cyclase. The modifications of tubular responses to both AVP and A1 and A2 agonists, brought about by hypertonic NaCl, were all inhibited by adenosine deaminase, thereby demonstrating the involvement of endogenous adenosine. Adenosine, the release and the effects of which are modulated by hypertonic NaCl, thus appears to act as an endogenous physiological modulator of kidney medulla function. PMID:7631823

  19. Salinity Management in Agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Existing guidelines and standards for reclamation of saline soils and management to control salinity exist but have not been updated for over 25 years. In the past few years a looming water scarcity has resulted in questioning of the long term future of irrigation projects in arid and semi arid regi...

  20. Excretory, secretory, and tissue residues after label and extra-label administration of flunixin meglumine to saline or lipopolysaccharide-exposed dairy cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty lactating dairy cattle were intravenously infused with either lipopolysaccharide (n = 10) or sterile saline (n = 10). Five cattle in each group received 3 doses of flunixin meglumine administered by either IV infusion or IM injection at 24 h intervals. Milk, urine, and tissues were collected....

  1. Measuring soil salinity.

    PubMed

    Hardie, Marcus; Doyle, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Soil salinity is a form of land degradation in which salts accumulate in the soil profile to an extent that plant growth or infrastructure are negatively affected. A range of both field and laboratory procedures exist for measuring soil salinity. In the field, soil salinity is usually inferred from apparent electrical conductivity (EC(a)) using a range of devices, depending on the required depth of analysis, or size of the survey area. Field measurements of EC(a) require calibration to the actual salt content by laboratory analysis. In the laboratory, soil salinity is usually assessed by determining either the total soluble salts by evaporation of a soil water extract (TSS), or by determining the electrical conductivity (EC) of either a 1:5 distilled water:soil dilution, or a saturated paste extract. Although procedures for measuring soil salinity appear relatively straightforward, differences in methodology have considerable influence on measured values and interpretation of results. PMID:22895776

  2. Remote sensing of salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomann, G. C.

    1975-01-01

    The complex dielectric constant of sea water is a function of salinity at 21 cm wavelength, and sea water salinity can be determined by a measurement of emissivity at 21 cm along with a measurement of thermodynamic temperature. Three aircraft and one helicopter experiments using two different 21 cm radiometers were conducted under different salinity and temperature conditions. Single or multiple ground truth measurements were used to calibrate the data in each experiment. It is inferred from these experiments that accuracies of 1 to 2%/OO are possible with a single surface calibration point necessary only every two hours if the following conditions are met--water temperatures above 20 C, salinities above 10%/OO, and level plane flight. More frequent calibration, constraint of the aircraft's orientation to the same as it was during calibration, and two point calibration (at a high and low salinity level) rather than single point calibration may give even better accuracies in some instances.

  3. [Influence of the nitric oxide donors on the microcirculation in infusion therapy of the experimental hemorrhagic shock].

    PubMed

    Remizova, M I; Gerbout, K A; Grishina, G V; Nagornaya, K N

    2014-01-01

    Infusion of the nitric oxide donors L-Arginine (150 mg/kg bolus) and Oxacom (3,2 µM/ kg bolus) with saline solution has been shown improves cardiovascular and metabolic changes in animal model of hemorrhagic shock. As a result improves survival rats. These data made this effect clinically attractive. PMID:25980233

  4. The Safety of Target-Controlled Infusions.

    PubMed

    Schnider, Thomas W; Minto, Charles F; Struys, Michel M R F; Absalom, Anthony R

    2016-01-01

    Target-controlled infusion (TCI) technology has been available in most countries worldwide for clinical use in anesthesia for approximately 2 decades. This infusion mode uses pharmacokinetic models to calculate infusion rates necessary to reach and maintain the desired drug concentration. TCI is computationally more complex than traditional modes of drug administration. The primary difference between TCI and conventional infusions is that TCI decreases the infusion rate at regular intervals to account for the uptake of drug into saturable compartments. Although the calculated infusion rates are consistent with manually controlled infusion rates, there are concerns that TCI administration of IV anesthetics could introduce unique safety concerns. After approximately 2 decades of clinical use, it is appropriate to assess the safety of TCI. Our aim in this article was to describe safety-relevant issues related to TCI, which should have emerged after its use in millions of patients. We collected information from published medical literature, TCI manufacturers, and publicly available governmental Web sites to find evidence of safety issues with the clinical use of TCI. Although many case reports emphasize that IV anesthesia is technically more demanding than inhaled anesthesia, including human errors associated with setting up IV infusions, no data suggest that a TCI mode of drug delivery introduces unique safety issues other than selecting the wrong pharmacokinetic model. This is analogous to the risk of selecting the wrong drug with current infusion pumps. We found no evidence that TCI is not at least as safe as anesthetic administration using constant rate infusions. PMID:26516801

  5. Infusion of branched-chain enriched amino acid solution in patients with hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Freund, H; Dienstag, J; Lehrich, J; Yoshimura, N; Bradford, R R; Rosen, H; Atamian, S; Slemmer, E; Holroyde, J; Fischer, J E

    1982-08-01

    Hospitalized patients with hepatic insufficiency often suffer from severe catabolic states and are in urgent need of nutritional support during their acute illness. Protein intolerence, however, remains a significant problem with respect to the provision of adequate nutrition, either enterally or parenterally. The following report is an anecdotal series of 63 consecutive patients in a large urban hospital treated prospectively with nutritional support using a prototype high branched-chain amino acid solution (FO80) given by technique of total parenteral nutrition by the subclavian or internal jugular route with hypertonic dextrose. Sixty-three patients, of which 42 had chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) with acute decompensation and 17 with acute hepatic injury as well as four with hepatorenal syndrome, are the subject of this report. All required intravenous nutritional support and were either intolerant to commercially available parenteral nutrition solutions or were in hepatic encephalopathy at the time they were initially seen. The cirrhotic patients had been hospitalized for a mean of 14.5 +/- 1.9 days before therapy, had a mean bilirubin of 13 mg/100 ml, and had been in coma for 4.8 +/- 0.7 days despite standard therapy. Patients with acute hepatitis had been in the hospital for 16.2 +/- 4.1 days before therapy, had a mean bilirubin of 25 mg/100 ml, and had been in coma 5.2 +/- 1.6 days before therapy. Routine tests of liver function, blood chemistries, amino acids, EEGs, and complex neurological testing including Reitan trailmaking tests were used in the evaluation of these patients. Up to 120 grams of synthetic amino acid solution with hypertonic dextrose was tolerated in these patients with improvement noted in encephalopathy of at least one grade in 87% of the patients with cirrhosis and 75% of the patients with hepatitis. Nitrogen balance was achieved when 75 to 80 grams of synthetic amino acids were administered. Survival was 45% in the cirrhotic group

  6. NFAT5 in cellular adaptation to hypertonic stress - regulations and functional significance.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Chris Yk; Ko, Ben Cb

    2013-01-01

    The Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells-5 (NFAT5), also known as OREBP or TonEBP, is a member of the nuclear factors of the activated T cells family of transcription factors. It is also the only known tonicity-regulated transcription factor in mammals. NFAT5 was initially known for its role in the hypertonic kidney inner medulla for orchestrating a genetic program to restore the cellular homeostasis. Emerging evidence, however, suggests that NFAT5 might play a more diverse functional role, including a pivotal role in blood pressure regulation and the development of autoimmune diseases. Despite the growing significance of NFAT5 in physiology and diseases, our understanding of how its activity is regulated remains very limited. Furthermore, how changes in tonicities are converted into functional outputs via NFAT5 remains elusive. Therefore, this review aims to summarize our current knowledge on the functional roles of NFAT5 in osmotic stress adaptation and the signaling pathways that regulate its activity. PMID:23618372

  7. Two isoforms of aquaporin 2 responsive to hypertonic stress in the bottlenose dolphin.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Miwa; Wakui, Hitomi; Itou, Takuya; Segawa, Takao; Inoshima, Yasuo; Maeda, Ken; Kikuchi, Kiyoshi

    2016-04-15

    This study investigated the expression of aquaporin 2 (AQP2) and its newly found alternatively spliced isoform (alternative AQP2) and the functions of these AQP2 isoforms in the cellular hyperosmotic tolerance in the bottlenose dolphin, ITALIC! Tursiops truncatus mRNA sequencing revealed that alternative AQP2 lacks the fourth exon and instead has a longer third exon that includes a part of the original third intron. The portion of the third intron, now part of the coding region of alternative AQP2, is highly conserved among many species of the order Cetacea but not among terrestrial mammals. Semi-quantitative PCR revealed that AQP2 was expressed only in the kidney, similar to terrestrial mammals. In contrast, alternative AQP2 was expressed in all organs examined, with strong expression in the kidney. In cultured renal cells, expression of both AQP2 isoforms was upregulated by the addition to the medium of NaCl but not by the addition of mannitol, indicating that the expression of both isoforms is induced by hypersalinity. Treatment with small interfering RNA for both isoforms resulted in a decrease in cell viability in hypertonic medium (500 mOsm kg(-1)) when compared with controls. These findings indicate that the expression of alternatively spliced AQP2 is ubiquitous in cetacean species, and it may be one of the molecules important for cellular osmotic tolerance throughout the body. PMID:26944501

  8. Micropuncture study of hypertonic mannitol diuresis in the proximal and distal tubule of the dog kidney

    PubMed Central

    Seely, John F.; Dirks, John H.

    1969-01-01

    Fractional reabsorption of water, sodium, and potassium at proximal and distal tubular sites within the nephron was studied by recollection-micropuncture experiments on dogs undergoing hypertonic mannitol diuresis. After an initial control hydropenic phase, 16% mannitol in modified Ringer's solution was administered intravenously, resulting in marked increases in fractional excretion of water (28.7%), sodium (12.6%), and potassium (63.9%). Inulin clearance decreased significantly from 35.1 to 25.2 ml/min. Analysis of paired micropuncture data revealed a significant decrease in tubule fluid to plasma (TF:P) inulin ratios in both the proximal tubule (1.63-1.45) and distal tubule (5.38-1.94). There was also a significant decrease in proximal TF:P sodium ratios (0.99-0.93) and potassium ratios (1.05-0.98). Distal TF:P sodium ratios, in contrast, rose significantly (0.38-0.59), while TF:P potassium ratios tended towards unity whether initially greater or less than one. Fractional reabsorption of sodium and water decreased by 5% and 10% respectively in the proximal tubule, but to a lesser extent than the resulting increases in fractional urinary excretion. The nonreabsorbed fraction, however, had increased sharply at the point of distal puncture for water (32%), sodium (26%), and potassium (26%), indicating a large inhibitory effect within the loop of Henle in addition to the smaller proximal effects. PMID:5355344

  9. Stimulation of epithelial cell proliferation of isolated distal colon of rats by continuous colonic infusion of ammonia or short-chain fatty acids is nonadditive.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, H; Sakata, T

    1998-05-01

    Dietary fibers accelerate colonic epithelial cell proliferation at least in part by modulating bacterial metabolism in the large intestine. Ammonia and short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) are major metabolites of hindgut bacteria and are believed to affect epithelial cell kinetics of the colon. However, the effect of luminal ammonia itself and the possible interaction of ammonia with SCFA on colonic epithelial cell proliferation have not yet been studied. The colon of rats was surgically isolated and continuously administered infusates with saline, ammonia, SCFA or both into the isolated colon for 7 d in a two-way factorial design. On d 7, vincrystine sulfate was administered intravenously to cause metaphase arrest. The activity of epithelial cell proliferation in the distal colon was estimated by using a stathmokinetic method and by histologic examination. The crypt size was significantly larger in rats given infusates containing SCFA than in rats given infusates without SCFA. Infusion of ammonia or SCFA significantly stimulated colonic epithelial cell proliferation compared with the saline infusion. Infusion of both ammonia and SCFA resulted in accumulated mitoses per crypt that did not differ from the other three infusions although the value tended to be lower than when SCFA alone were infused. Thus, stimulation of epithelial cell proliferation by ammonia and SCFA is not additive, and the interaction between them should be considered when the effects of dietary fibers on gut epithelial proliferation are investigated. PMID:9566991

  10. Effect of intrauterine infusion of an organic-certified product on uterine health, survival, and fertility of dairy cows with toxic puerperal metritis.

    PubMed

    Pinedo, P J; Velez, J S; Bothe, H; Merchan, D; Piñeiro, J M; Risco, C A

    2015-05-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effect of intrauterine infusion of an organic certified product (Optimum UterFlush, Van Beek Natural Science, Orange City, IA) on uterine health, survival, and fertility of cows affected with toxic puerperal metritis (TPM) in an organic dairy farm. Cows with TPM were defined as having an abnormally enlarged uterus and a fetid watery red-brown vaginal discharge, associated with systemic illness and fever (rectal temperature ≥39.5°C), within 12 d postpartum. Cows diagnosed with TPM (n=220; study d 0) were blocked by parity (1 and ≥2) and randomly assigned into 1 of 2 intrauterine treatments applied every other day for a total of 3 applications: (1) control (CON)=200mL of povidone iodine diluted in 2L of distilled water (n=113); (2) Optimum UterFlush (UF)=3.75mL diluted in 117mL of distilled water (n=107). All enrolled cows received hypertonic saline solution (500mL 7.2% i.v.), dextrose (500mL 50% i.v.), and oral aspirin (5 boluses/d). Outcome variables for treatment efficacy included fever and presence of fetid vaginal discharge at study d 6 and 14, survival at study d 6 and 14 and at 30 and 100 DIM, and reproductive performance. Control variables were parity, BCS at enrollment, calving season, and milk yield. Occurrence of fever at d 6 and 14 was not different between the 2 treatment groups. Presence of fetid vaginal discharge at d 6 and 14 was lower in cows treated with UF compared with cows in the CON group (10.7 vs. 28% and 1.1 vs. 9.1%). The odds (95% confidence interval) for survival and remaining in the farm at study d 6 and 14 and at 30 and 100 DIM for cows in the UF treatment were 4.67 (1.38-15.8), 2.77 (1.25-6.10), 3.13 (1.22-8.02), and 2.82 (1.38-5.71) times the odds of cows in the CON group, respectively. The odds of AI until 150 DIM and the interval from calving to first AI were not different between the 2 treatments. However, pregnancy was affected by treatment; the odds (95% confidence interval) of pregnancy at

  11. Localized infusion of IGF-I results in skeletal muscle hypertrophy in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, G. R.; McCue, S. A.

    1998-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) peptide levels have been shown to increase in overloaded skeletal muscles (G. R. Adams and F. Haddad. J. Appl. Physiol. 81: 2509-2516, 1996). In that study, the increase in IGF-I was found to precede measurable increases in muscle protein and was correlated with an increase in muscle DNA content. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that direct IGF-I infusion would result in an increase in muscle DNA as well as in various measurements of muscle size. Either 0.9% saline or nonsystemic doses of IGF-I were infused directly into a non-weight-bearing muscle of rats, the tibialis anterior (TA), via a fenestrated catheter attached to a subcutaneous miniosmotic pump. Saline infusion had no effect on the mass, protein content, or DNA content of TA muscles. Local IGF-I infusion had no effect on body or heart weight. The absolute weight of the infused TA muscles was approximately 9% greater (P < 0.05) than that of the contralateral TA muscles. IGF-I infusion resulted in significant increases in the total protein and DNA content of TA muscles (P < 0.05). As a result of these coordinated changes, the DNA-to-protein ratio of the hypertrophied TA was similar to that of the contralateral muscles. These results suggest that IGF-I may be acting to directly stimulate processes such as protein synthesis and satellite cell proliferation, which result in skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

  12. Influence of environmental hypertonicity on the induction of ureogenesis and amino acid metabolism in air-breathing walking catfish (Clarias batrachus, Bloch).

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Bodhisattwa; Bhuyan, Gitalee; Saha, Nirmalendu

    2014-07-01

    Effect of environmental hypertonicity, due to exposure to 300 mM mannitol solution for 7 days, on the induction of ureogenesis and also on amino acid metabolism was studied in the air-breathing walking catfish, C. batrachus, which is already known to have the capacity to face the problem of osmolarity stress in addition to other environmental stresses in its natural habitats. Exposure to hypertonic mannitol solution led to reduction of ammonia excretion rate by about 2-fold with a concomitant increase of urea-N excretion rate by about 2-fold. This was accompanied by significant increase in the levels of both ammonia and urea in different tissues and also in plasma. Further, the environmental hypertonicity also led to significant accumulation of different non-essential free amino acids (FAAs) and to some extent the essential FAAs, thereby causing a total increase of non-essential FAA pool by 2-3-fold and essential FAA pool by 1.5-2.0-fold in most of the tissues studied including the plasma. The activities of three ornithine-urea cycle (OUC) enzymes such as carbamoyl phosphate synthetase, argininosuccinate synthetase and argininosuccinate lyase in liver and kidney tissues, and four key amino acid metabolism-related enzymes such as glutamine synthetase, glutamate dehydrogenase (reductive amination), alanine aminotransaminase and aspartate aminotransaminase were also significantly up-regulated in different tissues of the fish while exposing to hypertonic environment. Thus, more accumulation and excretion of urea-N observed during hypertonic exposure were probably associated with the induction of ureogenesis through the induced OUC, and the increase of amino acid pool was probably mainly associated with the up-regulation of amino acid synthesizing machineries in this catfish in hypertonic environment. These might have helped the walking catfish in defending the osmotic stress and to acclimatize better under hypertonic environment, which is very much uncommon among

  13. Infusing PDA technology into nursing education.

    PubMed

    White, Ann; Allen, Patricia; Goodwin, Linda; Breckinridge, Daya; Dowell, Jeffery; Garvy, Ryan

    2005-01-01

    Use of the personal digital assistant (PDA) has been infused into the accelerated baccalaureate program at Duke University to help prepare nursing students for professional practice. The authors provide an overview of the use of PDAs in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical setting. Technical aspects of PDA infusion and steps to ensure regulatory compliance are explored. Benefits of PDA use by both faculty and students in the program and challenges met with the infusion of this technology are also described. PMID:16030450

  14. Design of low cost smart infusion device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saputra, Yohanes David; Purnamaningsih, Retno Wigajatri

    2015-01-01

    We propose design of a smart infusion device suitable for public hospitals in Indonesia. The device comprised of LED, photodiode and DC motor to measure and control the infusion rate, using the principle of LED beam absorption. The infusion rate was identified by using microcontroller and displayed through computer unit. Experiment results for different flow rate level and concentration of Dextrose showed that the device is able to detect, measure, and control the infusion droplets flow rate by the average error rate of 1.0081%.

  15. Renal Intramedullary Infusion of Tempol Normalizes the Blood Pressure Response to Intrarenal Blockade of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Stec, David E.; Juncos, Luis A.; Granger, Joey P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have demonstrated that intramedullary inhibition of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) increases the blood pressure and superoxide production response to angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that increased renal medullary superoxide production contributes to the increase in blood pressure in response to blockade of renal medullary HO-1 in Ang II-induced hypertension. Methods Male C57BL/6J mice (16–24 weeks of age) were implanted with chronic intrarenal medullary interstitial (IRMI) and infused with: saline, Tempol (6mM), the HO-1 inhibitor QC-13 (25 μM), or a combination of tempol + QC-13. Tempol treatment was started 2 days before infusion of QC-13. After 2 days, Ang II was infused subcutaneously at at a rate of 1 μg/kg/min for 10 days. Results Blood pressures on days 7–10 of Ang II infusion alone averaged 150 ± 3 mmHg in mice receiving IRMI infusion of saline. IRMI infusion of QC-13 increased blood pressure in Ang II treated mice to 164 ± 2 (p<0.05). Renal medullary superoxide production in Ang II treated mice was significantly increased by infusion of QC-13 alone. Ang II treated mice receiving IRMI infusion of tempol had a blood pressure of 136 ± 3 mmHg. Ang II treated mice receiving IRMI infusion of tempol and QC-13 had a significantly lower blood pressure (142 ± 2 mmHg, p<0.05) than mice receiving QC-13 alone. The increase in renal medullary superoxide production was normalized by infusion of tempol alone or in combination with QC-13. Conclusion These results demonstrate that renal medullary interstitial blockade of HO-1 exacerbates Ang II-induced hypertension via a mechanism that is dependent on enhanced superoxide generation and highlight the important anti-oxidant function of HO-1 in the renal medulla. PMID:26922123

  16. Sea Surface Salinity

    NASA Video Gallery

    The heat of the sun also forces evaporation at the ocean's surface, which puts water vapor into the atmosphere but leaves minerals and salts behind, keeping the ocean salty. The salinity of the oce...

  17. Infusion of ACTH stimulates expression of adrenal ACTH receptor and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein mRNA in fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Carey, Luke C; Su, Yixin; Valego, Nancy K; Rose, James C

    2006-08-01

    The late-gestation plasma cortisol surge in the sheep fetus is critical for stimulating organ development and parturition. Increased adrenal responsiveness is one of the key reasons for the surge; however, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Our recent studies suggest that ACTH-mediated increased expression of ACTH receptor (ACTH-R) and steroid acute regulatory protein (StAR) may play a role in enhancing responsiveness. Hence, we examined effects of ACTH infusion in fetal sheep on mRNA expression of these two mediators of adrenal responsiveness and assessed the functional consequences of this treatment in vitro. Fetuses of approximately 118 and 138 days of gestational age (dGA) were infused with ACTH-(1-24) for 24 h. Controls received saline infusion. Arterial blood was sampled throughout the infusion. Adrenals were isolated and analyzed for ACTH-R and StAR mRNA, or cells were cultured for 48 h. Cells were stimulated with ACTH, and medium was collected for cortisol measurement. Fetal plasma ACTH and cortisol concentrations increased over the infusion period in both groups. ACTH-R mRNA levels were significantly higher in ACTH-infused fetuses in both the 118 and 138 dGA groups. StAR mRNA increased significantly in both the 118 and 138 dGA groups. Adrenal cells from ACTH-infused fetuses were significantly more responsive to ACTH stimulation in terms of cortisol secretion than those from saline-infused controls. These findings demonstrate that increases in circulating ACTH levels promote increased expression of ACTH-R and StAR mRNA and are coupled to heightened adrenal responsiveness. PMID:16478774

  18. Normal saline wound dressing--is it really normal?

    PubMed

    Lim, J K; Saliba, L; Smith, M J; McTavish, J; Raine, C; Curtin, P

    2000-01-01

    Gauze swabs soaked in normal saline are frequently used as dressing on open wounds. Their exact mechanism of action is not known. This study was designed to assess the hypothesis that normal saline dressings act in part as an osmotic dressing. Ten patients had skin ulcers (n = 10) dressed with normal saline soaked sponges. Acting as controls (n = 10) identical sponges were placed upon intact skin. The sponge fluid osmolarity and electrolyte concentrations were serially assayed to test our hypothesis. In the control group, the osmolarity, sodium and chloride concentrations increased with time as a result of evaporation, altering it from an isotonic to a hypertonic dressing. However, in the ulcer group, the osmolarity, sodium and chloride concentrations in the sponge fluid remained relatively isotonic with time. This result is statistically significant (P< 0.05). We postulate that, as a result of evaporation, the sponge dressing increases its tonicity. This draws fluid from the wound into the dressing so that a dynamic equilibrium occurs and the sponge dressing regains isotonicity. The dressing remains functional provided that the wound fluid is absorbed freely from the wound. This process is terminated when either the dressing completely absorbs the wound fluid or the dressing dries out. The latter often occurs prematurely in a contaminated wound or in a wound where exudate forms a non-permeable barrier which prevents osmosis and allows the remaining water in the dressing to evaporate completely. This correlates with the observation in clinical practice that for maximum efficacy the dressing should be changed regularly. PMID:10657448

  19. Injection of Subphrenic Saline During Radiofrequency Ablation to Minimize Diaphragmatic Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Kapoor, Baljendra S.; Hunter, David W.

    2003-06-15

    An 82-year-old man with a history of colorectal cancer presented with metastatic disease to the liver (Couinaud segment 8). We describe the techniques that we employed to successfully perform radiofrequency ablation of a liver metastasis near the dome of the diaphragm utilizing subphrenic infusion of normal saline. The aim of this technique was to prevent thermal injury of the diaphragm.

  20. Osmotic hypertonicity of the renal medulla during changes in renal perfusion pressure in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Dobrowolski, Leszek; Ba̧dzyńska, Bożena; Walkowska, Agnieszka; Sadowski, Janusz

    1998-01-01

    The relationship between renal perfusion pressure (RPP) and ion concentration in renal medulla was studied in anaesthetized rats. RPP was changed in steps within the pressure range 130–80 mmHg, while tissue electrical admittance (Y, index of interstitial ion concentration) and medullary and cortical blood flow (MBF and CBF; laser Doppler flowmetry) were measured, along with glomerular filtration rate (Cin) and renal excretion. With a RPP reduction from 130 to 120 mmHg, tissue Y remained stable; at 100 and 80 mmHg, Y was 5 and 17 % lower, respectively, than at 120 mmHg. CBF fell less than RPP (partial autoregulation) in the range 130–100 mmHg only. MBF was autoregulated within 120–100 mmHg, but not above or below this range. Each step of RPP reduction was followed by a decrease in sodium and water excretion (UNaV and V). The osmolality of excised inner medulla fragments was similar at 120 and 105 mmHg (586 ± 45 and 618 ± 35 mosmol (kg H2O)−1, respectively) but lower at 80 mmHg (434 ± 31 mosmol (kg H2O)−1, P < 0.01); the ion concentration changed in parallel. The data show that medullary hypertonicity was well preserved during RPP fluctuations within 130–100 mmHg, but not below this range. RPP-dependent changes of UNaV and V were not clearly associated with changes in solute concentration in medullary tissue. PMID:9518743

  1. K(+) channels of squid giant axons open by an osmotic stress in hypertonic solutions containing nonelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Kukita, Fumio

    2011-08-01

    In hypertonic solutions made by adding nonelectrolytes, K(+) channels of squid giant axons opened at usual asymmetrical K(+) concentrations in two different time courses; an initial instantaneous activation (I (IN)) and a sigmoidal activation typical of a delayed rectifier K(+) channel (I (D)). The current-voltage relation curve for I (IN) was fitted well with Goldman equation described with a periaxonal K(+) concentration at the membrane potential above -10 mV. Using the activation-voltage curve obtained from tail currents, K(+) channels for I (IN) are confirmed to activate at the membrane potential that is lower by 50 mV than those for I (D). Both I (IN) and I (D) closed similarly at the holding potential below -100 mV. The logarithm of I (IN)/I (D) was linearly related with the osmolarity for various nonelectrolytes. Solute inaccessible volumes obtained from the slope increased with the nonelectrolyte size from 15 to 85 water molecules. K(+) channels representing I (D) were blocked by open channel blocker tetra-butyl ammonium (TBA) more efficiently than in the absence of I (IN), which was explained by the mechanism that K(+) channels for I (D) were first converted to those for I (IN) by the osmotic pressure and then blocked. So K(+) channels for I (IN) were suggested to be derived from the delayed rectifier K(+) channels. Therefore, the osmotic pressure is suggested to exert delayed-rectifier K(+) channels to open in shrinking rather hydrophilic flexible parts outside the pore than the pore itself, which is compatible with the recent structure of open K(+) channel pore. PMID:21773888

  2. Release of uremic retention solutes from protein binding by hypertonic predilution hemodiafiltration.

    PubMed

    Böhringer, Falko; Jankowski, Vera; Gajjala, Prathibha R; Zidek, Walter; Jankowski, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Protein-bound uremic retention solutes accumulate in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease, and the removal of these solutes by hemodialysis is hampered. Therefore, we developed a dialysis technique where the protein-bound uremic retention solutes are removed more efficiently under high ionic strength. Protein-bound uremic solutes such as phenylacetic acid, indoxyl sulfate, and p-cresyl sulfate were combined with plasma in the presence of increased ionic strength. The protein integrity of proteins and enzymatic activities were analyzed. In vitro dialysis of albumin solution was performed to investigate the clearance of the bound uremic retention solutes. In vitro hemodiafiltrations of human blood were performed to investigate the influence of increased ionic strength on blood cell survival. The protein-bound fraction of phenylacetic acid, indoxyl sulfate, and p-cresyl sulfate was significantly decreased from 59.4% ± 3.4%, 95.7% ± 0.6%, 96.9% ± 1.5% to 36.4% ± 3.7%, 87.8% ± 0.6%, and 90.8% ± 1.3%, respectively. The percentage of phenylacetic acid, indoxyl sulfate, and p-cresyl sulfate released from protein was 23.0% ± 5.7%, 7.9% ± 1.1%, and 6.1% ± 0.2%, respectively. The clearance during in vitro dialysis was increased by 13.1% ± 3.6%, 68.8% ± 15.1%, and 53.6% ± 10.2%, respectively. There was no difference in NaCl concentrations at the outlet of the dialyzer using isotonic and hypertonic solutions. In conclusion, this study forms the basis for establishing a novel therapeutic approach to remove protein-bound retention solutes. PMID:25419832

  3. Effect of saline loading on uranium-induced acute renal failure in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hishida, A.; Yonemura, K.; Ohishi, K.; Yamada, M.; Honda, N.

    1988-05-01

    Studies were performed to examine the effect of saline loading on uranium-induced acute renal failure (ARF) in rats. Forty-eight hours after the i.v. injection of uranyl acetate (UA, 5 mg/kg), inulin clearance rate (Cin) decreased to approximately 43% of the control value in water drinking rats (P less than 0.005). Animals receiving continuous isotonic saline infusion following UA showed higher urine flow and Cin (60% of control, P less than 0.01), and lessened intratubular cast formation when compared with water-drinking ARF rats. A short-term saline infusion following UA did not attenuate the decline in Cin (43% of control). An inverse relationship was found between Cin and the number of casts (r = -0.75, P less than 0.01). Multiple regression analysis showed that standardized partial regression coefficient is statistically significant between Cin and cast formation (-0.69, P less than 0.05), but not between Cin and tubular necrosis (-0.07, P greater than 0.05). Renin depletion caused by DOCA plus saline drinking did not attenuate the decline in Cin in ARF (47% of control). No significant difference was found in urinary uranium excretion between water-drinking and saline-infused ARF rats. The findings suggest that continuous saline infusion following UA attenuates the decline in Cin in ARF rats; and that this beneficial effect of saline loading is associated with lessened cast formation rather than with suppressed renin-angiotensin activity or enhanced urinary-uranium excretion.

  4. The effect of portal infusions of epinephrine on ingestion, plasma glucose and insulin in dogs.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, L L; Williams, F E

    1990-09-01

    Preabsorptive satiety has been hypothesized to occur as the result of food activating oral and gastrointestinal receptors that cause the release of catecholamines in the liver. The catecholamines were then proposed to hyperpolarize hepatic glucoreceptors and produce satiety. In the present study the hepatic portal vein was chronically cannulated in six mongrel dogs. Upon recovery the dogs were infused, over three minutes, with either saline or epinephrine (0.83 and 1.5 micrograms/kg b. wt.). Infusions ended 10 minutes prior to the animals' daily one-hour feeding period. The epinephrine infusions resulted in physiological increases in plasma glucose and insulin, but did not inhibit food consumption. The animals were next prefed 20% of their normal daily food intake 30 minutes prior to infusion of epinephrine at the above noted doses. Again plasma glucose and insulin increased, but food consumption was not affected. These data show that epinephrine infusions which produce physiological changes in plasma glucose and insulin do not alter feeding behavior of mongrel dogs. These findings are in agreement with previous data that question the physiological importance of the preabsorptive catecholamine satiety hypothesis. PMID:2176295

  5. Inositol lipid metabolism in vasopressin stimulated hepatocytes from rats infused with tumor necrosis factor

    SciTech Connect

    Spitzer, J.A.; Rodriguez de Turco, E.B. )

    1989-05-30

    We studied the effect of i.v. infusion of human recombinant tumor necrosis factor alpha (rHuTNF alpha, Cetus, 15 micrograms/100 g bw over 3 h) on vasopressin (VP)-stimulated {sup 32}P-inositol lipid turnover and the release of {sup 3}H-inositol phosphates in isolated rat hepatocytes. The early VP-induced decrease (within 30 s) in {sup 32}P-phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and {sup 32}P-phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate labeling was significantly reduced (-40%) and at the same time the uptake of {sup 32}P into phosphatidic acid was 50% lower than in saline-infused (matched control) rats. Within 5 min of VP-stimulation, lower {sup 32}P phosphatidylinositol (-40%) and higher {sup 32}P-phosphatidic acid (+30%) labeling were observed in rHuTNF alpha-infused rats. Infusion of rHuTNF alpha also affected the VP-induced release of {sup 3}H-inositol phosphates. The accumulation of {sup 3}H-inositol-labeled water soluble products was decreased by 25% and 17% at 30 s and 10 min, respectively. These data show that rHuTNF alpha mimics early perturbations induced by Escherichia coli endotoxin infusion in VP-stimulated inositol lipid metabolism in rat hepatocytes.

  6. Acute hepatitis after amiodarone infusion

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Paulo; Dias, Adelaide; Gonçalves, Helena; Albuquerque, Aníbal; Gama, Vasco

    2015-01-01

    Acute hepatitis is a very rare, but potentially fatal, adverse effect of intravenous amiodarone. We present a case of an 88-year-old man with history of ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy and severely depressed left ventricular function that was admitted to our coronary care unit with diagnosis of decompensated heart failure and non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. A few hours after the beginning of intravenous amiodarone he developed an acute hepatitis. There was a completely recovery within the next days after amiodarone withdrawn and other causes of acute hepatitis have been ruled out. This case highlights the need for close monitoring of hepatic function during amiodarone infusion in order to identify any potential hepatotoxicity and prevent a fatal outcome. Oral amiodarone is, apparently, a safe option in these patients. PMID:26488027

  7. Dependence of intestinal glucose absorption on sodium, studied with a new arterial infusion technique

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, R. B.; Gardner, M. L. G.

    1974-01-01

    1. A new preparation of isolated rat jejunum plus ileum (ca. 100 cm) is described in which a saline infusate is pumped into the superior mesenteric artery, the superior mesenteric vein having been ligated. 2. The arterial infusate washes out the tissue spaces: the lumen is perfused in a single pass with a segmented flow as by Fisher & Gardner (1974). 3. At an arterial infusion rate of 3 ml./min, steady states are set up in the tissue fluid within 10-15 min: the compositions of the fluids bathing both sides of the mucosa can therefore be controlled. 4. The rate of glucose absorption from the lumen falls only gradually when the luminal sodium is replaced by choline abruptly while the tissue fluid sodium is maintained at 144 m-equiv/l. by arterial infusion. 5. The rate of glucose absorption from the lumen is unaffected by replacement of sodium in the arterial infusate by choline. 6. Ouabain (10-4 M) in an arterial infusate containing sodium 144 m-equiv/l. causes inhibition of glucose and water absorption from the lumen. There is no effect of ouabain when the arterial infusate contains sodium, 0 or 72 m-equiv/l. 7. Arterial ouabain does not reverse the effects of depletion of luminal sodium. Simultaneous removal of luminal sodium and application of arterial ouabain causes faster inhibition of glucose absorption than does either treatment alone. 8. Glucose absorption is more likely to depend on rate of efflux of sodium from mucosal cell to tissue fluid than on a sodium gradient at the brush border or on intracellular sodium concentration. PMID:4422318

  8. Infusing Systems Thinking into Career Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Charles W.; Tomlin, James H.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the role of career counselors in infusing systems thinking into occupational advising. The authors conducted a qualitative review and analysis of selected literature on systems thinking and analyzed trends for adaptation to career counseling practice. This analysis suggests that career counselors need to infuse systems…

  9. 21 CFR 880.5725 - Infusion pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Infusion pump. 880.5725 Section 880.5725 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5725 Infusion pump. (a) Identification....

  10. In vivo photoacoustic flowmetry in the optical diffusive regime based on saline injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Poudel, Joemini; Li, Guo; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a saline-injection-based method to quantify blood flow velocity in vivo with acoustic-resolution photoacoustic tomography. By monitoring the saline-blood-interface propagating in the blood vessel, we can resolve the flow velocity. In phantom experiments, a root-mean-squared error of prediction of 0.29 mm/s was achieved. By injecting saline into a mouse tail vein covered with 1 mm chicken tissue, we showed that the flow velocity in the tail vein could be measured at depth, which is especially pertinent to monitoring blood flow velocity in patients undergoing intravenous infusion.

  11. Implementing and maintaining an infusion alliance.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Britt M

    2010-01-01

    Infusion therapy models are ever changing and growing in modern health care. New technologies and problems arise daily as researchers and clinicians explore our world. As technologies advance, health care costs are also skyrocketing. The vast majority of hospitalized patients will receive some form of infusion therapy during their stay, and many will continue to receive therapy after they are discharged from the inpatient setting. Infusion alliances can aid cost containment by decreasing infusion-related complication rates, affect customer satisfaction, and promote interdisciplinary collaboration. This article discusses the potential benefits of an infusion alliance, details steps for using the performance improvement process when implementing and maintaining an alliance, and outlines the components of a successful business plan. PMID:20841983

  12. Fluid delivery from infusion-pump syringes.

    PubMed

    Carl, J L; Erstad, B L; Murphy, J E; Slack, M K

    1995-07-01

    Fluid-delivery rates of five small-volume infusion-pump syringes were compared. The study consisted of a comparison of the infusion-pump syringes in their respective infusion pumps (1) set for continuous delivery at 1 mL/hr, (2) set for continuous delivery at 3 mL/hr, and (3) set to deliver 1-mL bolus volumes during continuous delivery at 4 mL/hr. The Life-care prefilled 30-mL syringe (Abbott), the DBL 30-mL syringe no. 770205 (DBL Inc.), and the Pump-Jet 30-mL syringe no. 1931 (International Medication Systems) were tested in the Lifecare PCA Plus II infusion pump no. 4100 (Abbott). The 30-mL Pump-Jet syringe no. 1911 (International Medication Systems) and the DBL 30-mL syringe no. 709700 (DBL Inc.) were tested in the Stratofuse PCA infusion pump (Baxter). The infusion pumps were set to deliver fluid continuously at 1 mL/hr for 30 hours, and the solutions were collected separately and weighed. The procedure was repeated with the infusion rate set at 3 mL/hr for 10 hours. For the third part of the study, each syringe was tested to deliver 1-mL boluses with 0, 5, 15, and 25 mL removed from the syringe. The solutions were collected and weighed before and after each bolus was delivered. The volume of solution collected was calculated by using the specific gravity of the solution. The syringes delivered significantly different volumes during the first hour of infusion at both the 1- and 3-mL/hr rates. Differences also existed across time for most of the syringes. Bolus volumes varied greatly after infusion of 0 or 5 mL of fluid but were acceptable for the remainder of the infusions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7671041

  13. Urinary kallikrein in the rat: stimulation with angiotensin infusion but depression with increasing sodium concentration.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, I H; Lee, G; Brownlee, A A

    1994-01-01

    1. The kallikrein response to angiotensin II infusion in the conscious rat was studied to compare it with the response in the dog. 2. Active kallikrein was measured by the aprotinin-suppressible esterase technique in 20 min periods. Angiotensin (5 x 10(-9) to 5 x 10(-2) micrograms min-1) was infused in 10 mM saline in period 10 (group A), or in 90 mM saline in periods 10-12 (group B). 3. In group A, no dose of angiotensin was antinatriuretic. Natriuresis and urinary sodium concentration were dose dependent. 4. Kallikrein excretion was dose dependent with angiotensin (P < 0.0001) and inversely correlated with urinary sodium concentration (P = 0.011). In natriuretic and non-natriuretic rats, kallikrein excretion after angiotensin was inversely correlated with urinary sodium concentration in the preceding period. 5. In group B, natriuresis and urinary sodium concentration were dose dependent. Kallikrein excretion in periods 10-13 was inversely correlated with urinary sodium concentration in the preceding period (P = 0.0001) and inversely correlated with urinary osmolality in periods 9-13. 6. Infusion of angiotensin II at 5 x 10(-6) micrograms min-1 led to antinatriuresis. 7. Formulae were derived which enabled the opposing effects of angiotensin and urinary sodium concentration on kallikrein excretion to be separated. In group A both these effects were statistically significant only in the natriuretic rats (natriuresis > 20 mumols per period). In group B the formulae showed a dose-dependent rise in kallikrein excretion, which was counteracted by the decrease in kallikrein excretion associated with the increasing urinary sodium concentration. 8. With infusions of 0.9% saline, kallikrein excretion in periods 10-13 was inversely correlated with urinary sodium concentration in the preceding period (P = 0.001). 9. The overall effect in the rat differs from that in the dog, where kallikrein increases with angiotensin natriuresis and dilution of the urine occurs. PMID

  14. Adaptations of semen characteristics and sperm motility to harsh salinity: Extreme situations encountered by the euryhaline tilapia Sarotherodon melanotheron heudelotii (Dumeril, 1859).

    PubMed

    Legendre, Marc; Alavi, Sayyed Mohammad Hadi; Dzyuba, Boris; Linhart, Otomar; Prokopchuk, Galina; Cochet, Christophe; Dugué, Rémi; Cosson, Jacky

    2016-09-15

    In most teleost fishes, sperm cells are quiescent in the seminal plasma and are activated by either a drop (fresh water fish) or an increase in osmolality (marine fish) when released in the water. It is most interesting to examine how the mechanisms of sperm motility activation can adapt to a broad range of salinities, as applies to some euryhaline species, and particularly to the tilapia Sarotherodon melanotheron heudelotii, which can reproduce at salinities from 0 up to 120 in the wild. Here, the gonado-somatic index, semen characteristics, and the osmotic and ionic requirements of sperm motility activation were compared in S. m. heudelotii reared in fresh water (FW), sea water (SW), or hypersaline water (HW; salinities of 0, 35, and 70, respectively). No salinity-dependent differences were found in gonado-somatic index or semen characteristics, except for an increase of seminal plasma osmolality with increasing salinity (from 318 to 349 mOsm kg(-1) in FW and HW fish, respectively). The osmolality range allowing the highest percentages of sperm activation broadened and shifted toward higher values with increasing fish ambient salinity (150-300, 300-800, and 500-1200 mOsm kg(-1), for FW, SW, and HW fish, respectively). Nevertheless, at the three fish rearing salinities, sperm could be activated in media that were hypotonic, isotonic, or hypertonic relative to the seminal plasma, at least when some calcium was present above a threshold concentration. The [Ca(2+)] required for the activation of S. m. heudelotii sperm is (1) higher in fish reared at a higher salinity (2) higher in hypertonic than that in hypotonic activation media, whatever the fish rearing salinity, and (3) higher in the presence of Na(+) or K(+), the negative effects of which increased with an increase in fish rearing salinity. The [Ca(2+)]/[Na(+)] ​ ratios allowing for maximal sperm motility in SW or HW fish are close to those observed in natural environments, either in sea or hypersaline

  15. Effect of peri-operative intravenous infusion of lignocaine on haemodynamic responses to intubation, extubation and post-operative analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shruti; Khan, Rashid M

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Lignocaine in intravenous (IV) bolus dose has been used for minimising haemodynamic changes associated with intubation and extubation. Furthermore, IV infusion has been used for post-operative analgesia. We investigated whether IV peri-operative lignocaine (bolus and infusion) would be able to produce both the effects simultaneously in elective laparoscopic cholecystectomies. Methods: In this randomised prospective study, 60 patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly divided into two groups of 30 each. In Group A, patients received 6 ml normal saline as bolus over 10 min followed by 6 ml/h infusion whereas in Group B, patients received preservative free 2% lignocaine 1.5 mg/kg IV bolus (made to a volume of 6 ml with normal saline) administered over a period of 10 min and thereafter an infusion at a rate of 1.5 mg/kg/h (pre-diluted in normal saline made to a volume of 6 ml/h. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The rise in pulse rate (PR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were less in Group B as compared to the Group A (P < 0.05) during intubation as well as during extubation. Furthermore, the Group B had significant longer mean pain-free post-operative period of 5½ h as compared to 54.43 min in the Group A (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Administration of lignocaine infusion attenuates the rise in PR as well as MAP during the peri-intubation and peri-extubation period. Furthermore, infusion of lignocaine significantly increases the mean pain-free period post-operatively. PMID:26195829

  16. Intrahippocampal Infusion of Crotamine Isolated from Crotalus durissus terrificus Alters Plasma and Brain Biochemical Parameters †

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Rithiele; Vargas, Liane S.; Lara, Marcus V. S.; Güllich, Angélica; Mandredini, Vanusa; Ponce-Soto, Luis; Marangoni, Sergio; Dal Belo, Cháriston A.; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela B.

    2014-01-01

    Crotamine is one of the main constituents of the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus. Here we sought to investigate the inflammatory and toxicological effects induced by the intrahippocampal administration of crotamine isolated from Crotalus whole venom. Adult rats received an intrahippocampal infusion of crotamine or vehicle and were euthanized 24 h or 21 days after infusion. Plasma and brain tissue were collected for biochemical analysis. Complete blood count, creatinine, urea, glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT), creatine-kinase (CK), creatine kinase-muscle B (CK-MB) and oxidative parameters (assessed by DNA damage and micronucleus frequency in leukocytes, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyls in plasma and brain) were quantified. Unpaired and paired t-tests were used for comparisons between saline and crotamine groups, and within groups (24 h vs. 21 days), respectively. After 24 h crotamine infusion promoted an increase of urea, GOT, GPT, CK, and platelets values (p ≤ 0.01), while red blood cells, hematocrit and leukocytes values decreased (p ≤ 0.01). Additionally, 21 days after infusion crotamine group showed increased creatinine, leukocytes, TBARS (plasma and brain), carbonyl (plasma and brain) and micronucleus compared to the saline-group (p ≤ 0.01). Our findings show that crotamine infusion alter hematological parameters and cardiac markers, as well as oxidative parameters, not only in the brain, but also in the blood, indicating a systemic pro-inflammatory and toxicological activity. A further scientific attempt in terms of preserving the beneficial activity over toxicity is required. PMID:25380458

  17. Intrahippocampal infusion of crotamine isolated from Crotalus durissus terrificus alters plasma and brain biochemical parameters.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Rithiele; Vargas, Liane S; Lara, Marcus V S; Güllich, Angélica; Mandredini, Vanusa; Ponce-Soto, Luis; Marangoni, Sergio; Dal Belo, Cháriston A; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela B

    2014-11-01

    Crotamine is one of the main constituents of the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus. Here we sought to investigate the inflammatory and toxicological effects induced by the intrahippocampal administration of crotamine isolated from Crotalus whole venom. Adult rats received an intrahippocampal infusion of crotamine or vehicle and were euthanized 24 h or 21 days after infusion. Plasma and brain tissue were collected for biochemical analysis. Complete blood count, creatinine, urea, glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT), creatine-kinase (CK), creatine kinase-muscle B (CK-MB) and oxidative parameters (assessed by DNA damage and micronucleus frequency in leukocytes, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyls in plasma and brain) were quantified. Unpaired and paired t-tests were used for comparisons between saline and crotamine groups, and within groups (24 h vs. 21 days), respectively. After 24 h crotamine infusion promoted an increase of urea, GOT, GPT, CK, and platelets values (p ≤ 0.01), while red blood cells, hematocrit and leukocytes values decreased (p ≤ 0.01). Additionally, 21 days after infusion crotamine group showed increased creatinine, leukocytes, TBARS (plasma and brain), carbonyl (plasma and brain) and micronucleus compared to the saline-group (p ≤ 0.01). Our findings show that crotamine infusion alter hematological parameters and cardiac markers, as well as oxidative parameters, not only in the brain, but also in the blood, indicating a systemic pro-inflammatory and toxicological activity. A further scientific attempt in terms of preserving the beneficial activity over toxicity is required. PMID:25380458

  18. Effect of intrauterine infusion with liquid paraffin on phagocytes migrating to mucus of external os of the cervix in cows.

    PubMed

    Lu, W; Zabuli, J; Kuroiwa, T; Tanaka, T; Kamomae, H

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of intrauterine infusion with liquid paraffin (LP) on phagocytic migration into the uterus of cows. Smears of swab samples of the external os of the cervix and discharges collected inside the vagina were obtained in multiparous dairy cows (n = 10) that had been infused with 50 ml of LP (LP group: n = 5) or physiological saline (PS group: n = 5) on day 10 or 11 after ovulation (day 0: ovulation). The samples were collected for cytological examination 0 (just before), 0.25, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12 and 24 h after LP or PS infusion and then at daily intervals until subsequent ovulation. The number of neutrophils increased significantly (p < 0.05) for 8 days compared with the pre-infusion level in the LP group and for 2 days in the PS group. The average numbers of neutrophils in the LP group were significantly (p < 0.05) greater than those in the PS group on 3, 4, 5 and 8 days after infusion. The number of monocytes from 6 h to 8 days after LP infusion was significantly higher than that before infusion (p < 0.05). The average numbers of monocytes at 4 and 6 h and 1 day after infusion in the LP group were significantly higher than those in the PS group. These findings indicate that LP stimulates phagocytic migration into the uterine lumen in cows and that LP infusion into the uterus might enhance uterine defence mechanisms during uterine infection. PMID:21198968

  19. Overflow cascades in liquid-infused substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobi, I.; Wexler, J. S.; Stone, H. A.

    2015-08-01

    Liquid-infused patterned surfaces offer a promising new platform for generating omniphobic surface coatings. However, the liquid infused in these surfaces is susceptible to shear-driven dewetting. Recent work [Wexler et al., "Shear-driven failure of liquid-infused surfaces," Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 168301 (2015)] has shown how the substrate pattern in these surfaces can be designed to exploit capillary forces in order to retain infused lubricants against the action of an immiscible shear flow. In this study, we explore the behavior of the infused lubricant when external shear causes the lubricant to overflow finite or "dead-end" surface features, resulting in either temporary or permanent lubricant loss. Microfluidic experiments illustrate how both geometry and chemical Marangoni stresses within liquid-infused surfaces generate an overflow cascade in which the lubricant escapes from the substrate and forms droplets on the surface, after which the droplets depin and are washed away by the external shear flow, allowing the overflow to repeat. General guidelines are developed to estimate the onset of the different stages of the cascade with the aim of providing additional robustness criteria for the design of future liquid-infused surfaces.

  20. Infliximab-Related Infusion Reactions: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ron, Yulia; Kivity, Shmuel; Ben-Horin, Shomron; Israeli, Eran; Fraser, Gerald M.; Dotan, Iris; Chowers, Yehuda; Confino-Cohen, Ronit; Weiss, Batia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Administration of infliximab is associated with a well-recognised risk of infusion reactions. Lack of a mechanism-based rationale for their prevention, and absence of adequate and well-controlled studies, has led to the use of diverse empirical administration protocols. The aim of this study is to perform a systematic review of the evidence behind the strategies for preventing infusion reactions to infliximab, and for controlling the reactions once they occur. Methods: We conducted extensive search of electronic databases of MEDLINE [PubMed] for reports that communicate various aspects of infusion reactions to infliximab in IBD patients. Results: We examined full texts of 105 potentially eligible articles. No randomised controlled trials that pre-defined infusion reaction as a primary outcome were found. Three RCTs evaluated infusion reactions as a secondary outcome; another four RCTs included infusion reactions in the safety evaluation analysis; and 62 additional studies focused on various aspects of mechanism/s, risk, primary and secondary preventive measures, and management algorithms. Seven studies were added by a manual search of reference lists of the relevant articles. A total of 76 original studies were included in quantitative analysis of the existing strategies. Conclusions: There is still paucity of systematic and controlled data on the risk, prevention, and management of infusion reactions to infliximab. We present working algorithms based on systematic and extensive review of the available data. More randomised controlled trials are needed in order to investigate the efficacy of the proposed preventive and management algorithms. PMID:26092578

  1. Infusion pump development and implications for nurses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul

    Infusion pumps are commonplace in today's healthcare settings and their design and development has kept pace with technology over the decades. In the 1970s and 1980s infusion pumps began to emerge in the UK market and were basic, mechanical devices with limited functions. Today, infusion pumps have a plethora of functions and features and a range of alarms to help alert the user and the patient that infusions are nearing completion, have ended or their range of sensors has detected that the infusion pump, or patient, requires attention. The role of the nurse in safely managing this ever-changing technology should not be underestimated. This paper reviews the progress made over the past 40 years in the UK healthcare setting and how the nurses have had to keep up to speed with the technology as it develops. It highlights the importance of fully integrating infusion pumps into intravenous (IV) therapy training and assessment. The important role the nurse plays is highlighted as well as exploring how he or she can help organisations better understand infusion pumps in the day-to-day management of patients undergoing intravenous therapy. PMID:26496875

  2. Pharmacokinetics and toxicology of continuously infused nitroimidazoles

    SciTech Connect

    Eifel, P.J.; Brown, J.M.

    1984-08-01

    The pharmacokinetics and toxicology of misonidazole (MISO) and SR-2508 given by continuous intraperitoneal infusion were studied in female C/sub 3/H mice. The survival (time to death) of animals receiving continuous infusions of SR-2508 and MISO was compared and related to plasma concentration, rate of infusion and total amount of drug delivered. Brain and plasma concentrations were determined by HPLC. For SR-2508, plasma concentration was directly proportional to the infusion rate. However, as the infusion rate of MISO was doubled, the plasma concentration of MISO increased approximately 6-fold, reflecting a substantial increase in the apparent half-life. The brain/plasma concentration ratio in animals infused for up to 6 days with SR-2508 remained constant, at approximately 0.09. At plasma concentrations of 0.08-1.5 mM, animals receiving SR-2508 survived approximately 3 times as long as animals exposed to a comparable plasma concentration of MISO. Even at the lowest infusion rates employed in this study, the survival of mice receiving SR-2508 was much shorter than would have been predicted if the toxicity of these two drugs were solely related to the integral brain exposure. The low brain/plasma concentration ratio of SR-2508 was maintained throughout long continuous exposures.

  3. Role of permissive hypotension, hypertonic resuscitation and the global increased permeability syndrome in patients with severe hemorrhage: adjuncts to damage control resuscitation to prevent intra-abdominal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Duchesne, Juan C; Kaplan, Lewis J; Balogh, Zsolt J; Malbrain, Manu L N G

    2015-01-01

    Secondary intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are closely related to fluid resuscitation. IAH causes major deterioration of the cardiac function by affecting preload, contractility and afterload. The aim of this review is to discuss the different interactions between IAH, ACS and resuscitation, and to explore a new hypothesis with regard to damage control resuscitation, permissive hypotension and global increased permeability syndrome. Review of the relevant literature via PubMed search. The recognition of the association between the development of ACS and resuscitation urged the need for new approach in traumatic shock management. Over a decade after wide spread application of damage control surgery damage control resuscitation was developed. DCR differs from previous resuscitation approaches by attempting an earlier and more aggressive correction of coagulopathy, as well as metabolic derangements like acidosis and hypothermia, often referred to as the 'deadly triad' or the 'bloody vicious cycle'. Permissive hypotension involves keeping the blood pressure low enough to avoid exacerbating uncontrolled haemorrhage while maintaining perfusion to vital end organs. The potential detrimental mechanisms of early, aggressive crystalloid resuscitation have been described. Limitation of fluid intake by using colloids, hypertonic saline (HTS) or hyperoncotic albumin solutions have been associated with favourable effects. HTS allows not only for rapid restoration of circulating intravascular volume with less administered fluid, but also attenuates post-injury oedema at the microcirculatory level and may improve microvascular perfusion. Capillary leak represents the maladaptive, often excessive, and undesirable loss of fluid and electrolytes with or without protein into the interstitium that generates oedema. The global increased permeability syndrome (GIPS) has been articulated in patients with persistent systemic inflammation failing

  4. Safety of rapid intravenous of infusion acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous acetaminophen, Ofirmev®, is approved for management of mild to moderate pain, management of moderate to severe pain with adjunctive opioids, and reduction of fever. The product is supplied as a 100 mL glass vial. As stated in the prescribing information, it is recommended to be infused over 15 minutes. This recommendation is related to the formulation propacetamol, the prodrug to acetaminophen, approved in Europe, which caused pain on infusion, and data from the clinical development of acetaminophen. The objective of this retrospective chart review study was to show the lack of side effects of rapidly infusing intravenous acetaminophen. Charts of American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) Class I–III ambulatory surgical patients who received only acetaminophen in the preoperative setting were reviewed for any infusion-related side effects. Using standard binomial proportion analyses and employing SAS/JMP software, all vital signs were analyzed for statistically significant changes between pre- and postinfusion values. One hundred charts were reviewed. Only one patient had pain on infusion, which lasted 10 seconds. No reported side effects or erythema was seen at the injection site. No infusions had to be slowed or discontinued. The median infusion time was 3:41 minutes. Of the vital signs monitored, only the systolic (P < 0.0001) and diastolic (P < 0.0099) blood pressures had statistically significant changes from pre- to postinfusion; however, they were of no clinical relevance. Acetaminophen can be administered as a rapid infusion with no significant infusion-related side effects or complications. PMID:23814378

  5. Safety of rapid intravenous of infusion acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Needleman, Steven M

    2013-07-01

    Intravenous acetaminophen, Ofirmev®, is approved for management of mild to moderate pain, management of moderate to severe pain with adjunctive opioids, and reduction of fever. The product is supplied as a 100 mL glass vial. As stated in the prescribing information, it is recommended to be infused over 15 minutes. This recommendation is related to the formulation propacetamol, the prodrug to acetaminophen, approved in Europe, which caused pain on infusion, and data from the clinical development of acetaminophen. The objective of this retrospective chart review study was to show the lack of side effects of rapidly infusing intravenous acetaminophen. Charts of American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) Class I-III ambulatory surgical patients who received only acetaminophen in the preoperative setting were reviewed for any infusion-related side effects. Using standard binomial proportion analyses and employing SAS/JMP software, all vital signs were analyzed for statistically significant changes between pre- and postinfusion values. One hundred charts were reviewed. Only one patient had pain on infusion, which lasted 10 seconds. No reported side effects or erythema was seen at the injection site. No infusions had to be slowed or discontinued. The median infusion time was 3:41 minutes. Of the vital signs monitored, only the systolic (P < 0.0001) and diastolic (P < 0.0099) blood pressures had statistically significant changes from pre- to postinfusion; however, they were of no clinical relevance. Acetaminophen can be administered as a rapid infusion with no significant infusion-related side effects or complications. PMID:23814378

  6. Fluvoxamine moderates reduced voluntary activity following chronic dexamethasone infusion in mice via recovery of BDNF signal cascades.

    PubMed

    Terada, Kazuki; Izumo, Nobuo; Suzuki, Biora; Karube, Yoshiharu; Morikawa, Tomomi; Ishibashi, Yukiko; Kameyama, Toshiki; Chiba, Koji; Sasaki, Noriko; Iwata, Keiko; Matsuzaki, Hideo; Manabe, Takayuki

    2014-04-01

    Major depression is a complex disorder characterized by genetic and environmental interactions. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) effectively treat depression. Neurogenesis following chronic antidepressant treatment activates brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling. In this study, we analyzed the effects of the SSRI fluvoxamine (Flu) on locomotor activity and forced-swim behavior using chronic dexamethasone (cDEX) infusions in mice, which engenders depression-like behavior. Infusion of cDEX decreased body weight and produced a trend towards lower locomotor activity during darkness. In the forced-swim test, cDEX-mice exhibited increased immobility times compared with mice administered saline. Flu treatment reversed decreased locomotor activity and mitigated forced-swim test immobility. Real-time polymerase chain reactions using brain RNA samples yielded significantly lower BDNF mRNA levels in cDEX-mice compared with the saline group. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated X-box binding protein-1 (XBP1) gene expression was lower in cDEX-mice compared with the saline group. However, marked expression of the XBP1 gene was observed in cDEX-mice treated with Flu compared with mice given saline and untreated cDEX-mice. Expression of 5-HT2A and Sigma-1 receptors decreased after cDEX infusion compared with the saline group, and these decreases normalized to control levels upon Flu treatment. Our results indicate that the Flu moderates reductions in voluntary activity following chronic dexamethasone infusions in mice via recovery of BDNF signal cascades. PMID:24582626

  7. The Evolution of the Clinical Use of Osmotic Therapy in the Treatment of Cerebral Edema.

    PubMed

    Diringer, Michael N

    2016-01-01

    For almost a century, it has been known that hypertonic solutions shrink cerebral tissue. Early attempts used hypertonic solutions of ions (sodium, magnesium) and sugars (glucose, dextrose, sucrose), concentrated albumin, and, later, urea. These early attempts were largely abandoned because the effect was short lived and often followed by a period of rebound edema. This was a result, to a great extent, of the osmotic agent either being metabolized or crossing the cell membrane.Renewed interest in osmotic therapy came in the 1960s, with the introduction of intracranial pressure monitoring in head injury and the use of mannitol as an osmotic agent. In the 1990s, use of hypertonic saline was reintroduced as an alternative to address concerns about mannitol. More recently, administration of hypertonic saline has transitioned from boluses to continuous infusions. The rationale for and data supporting the use of continuous infusions are presented. PMID:26463914

  8. Effect of Atractylodes macrocephala on Hypertonic Stress-Induced Water Channel Protein Expression in Renal Collecting Duct Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Pyo; Lee, Yun Jung; Lee, So Min; Yoon, Jung Joo; Kim, Hye Yoom; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2012-01-01

    Edema is a symptom that results from the abnormal accumulation of fluid in the body. The cause of edema is related to the level of aquaporin (AQP)2 protein expression, which regulates the reabsorption of water in the kidney. Edema is caused by overexpression of the AQP2 protein when the concentration of Na(+) in the blood increases. The rhizome of Atractylodes macrocephala has been used in traditional oriental medicine as a diuretic drug; however, the mechanism responsible for the diuretic effect of the aqueous extract from A. macrocephala rhizomes (AAMs) has not yet been identified. We examined the effect of the AAM on the regulation of water channels in the mouse inner medullary collecting duct (mIMCD)-3 cells under hypertonic stress. Pretreatment of AAM attenuates a hypertonicity-induced increase in AQP2 expression as well as the trafficking of AQP2 to the apical plasma membrane. Tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP) is a transcription factor known to play a central role in cellular homeostasis by regulating the expression of some proteins, including AQP2. Western immunoblot analysis demonstrated that the protein and mRNA expression levels of TonEBP also decrease after AAM treatment. These results suggest that the AAM has a diuretic effect by suppressing water reabsorption via the downregulation of the TonEBP-AQP2 signaling pathway. PMID:23258995

  9. Financial analysis for the infusion alliance.

    PubMed

    Perucca, Roxanne

    2010-01-01

    Providing high-quality, cost-efficient care is a major strategic initiative of every health care organization. Today's health care environment is transparent; very competitive; and focused upon providing exceptional service, safety, and quality. Establishing an infusion alliance facilitates the achievement of organizational strategic initiatives, that is, increases patient throughput, decreases length of stay, prevents the occurrence of infusion-related complications, enhances customer satisfaction, and provides greater cost-efficiency. This article will discuss how to develop a financial analysis that promotes value and enhances the financial outcomes of an infusion alliance. PMID:20841984

  10. Pancreatic enzyme secretion during intravenous fat infusion.

    PubMed

    Burns, G P; Stein, T A

    1987-01-01

    The nutritional support of patients with pancreatic and high gastrointestinal fistulas and severe pancreatitis frequently involves intravenous fat infusion. There are conflicting reports on the effect of intravenous fat on pancreatic exocrine secretion. In 10 dogs with chronic pancreatic fistulas, pancreatic juice was collected during secretin (n = 10) or secretin + cholecystokinin (n = 4) stimulation, with and without intravenous fat infusion (5 g/hr). The hormonal-stimulated secretion of lipase, amylase, trypsin, total protein, bicarbonate, and water was unchanged during fat infusion. This study supports the use of intravenous fat as a nutritional source when it is desirable to avoid stimulation of the pancreas. PMID:2434670

  11. Space Tethers Programmatic Infusion Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonometti, J. A.; Frame, K. L.

    2005-01-01

    Programmatic opportunities abound for space Cables, Stringers and Tethers, justified by the tremendous performance advantages that these technologies offer and the rather wide gaps that must be filled by the NASA Exploration program, if the "sustainability goal" is to be met. A definition and characterization of the three categories are presented along with examples. A logical review of exploration requirements shows how each class can be infused throughout the program, from small experimental efforts to large system deployments. The economics of tethers in transportation is considered along with the impact of stringers for structural members. There is an array of synergistic methodologies that interlace their fabrication, implementation and operations. Cables, stringers and tethers can enhance a wide range of other space systems and technologies, including power storage, formation flying, instrumentation, docking mechanisms and long-life space components. The existing tether (i.e., MXER) program's accomplishments are considered consistent with NASA's new vision and can readily conform to requirements-driven technology development.

  12. Perioperative Continuous Ropivacaine Wound Infusion in Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: A Randomized Controlled Double-blind Trial.

    PubMed

    Fassoulaki, Argyro; Vassi, Emilia; Korkolis, Dimitrios; Zotou, Marianna

    2016-02-01

    Wound infusion with local anesthetics has been used for postoperative pain relief with variable results. This randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial examines the effect of ropivacaine infusion on pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. A total of 110 patients were randomly assigned to 2 groups. After induction of anesthesia a 75-mm catheter was inserted subcutaneously and connected to an elastomeric pump containing either 0.75% ropivacaine (ropivacaine group) or normal saline (control group) for 24 hours postoperatively. Before skin closure, each hole was infiltrated with 2 mL of 0.75% ropivacaine or normal saline according to randomization. Pain at rest, pain during cough, and analgesic consumption were recorded in the postanesthesia care unit and at 2, 4, 8, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively. Analgesic requirements and pain scores were recorded 1 and 3 months after surgery. The ropivacaine group reported less pain during cough (P=0.044) in the postanesthesia care unit (P=0.017) and 4 hours postoperatively (P=0.038). Ropivacaine wound infusion had no effect on late and chronic pain. PMID:26679680

  13. Metabolic cost of osmoregulation in a hypertonic environment in the invasive African clawed frog Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Peña-Villalobos, Isaac; Narváez, Cristóbal; Sabat, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Studies of aquatic invertebrates reveal that salinity affects feeding and growth rates, reproduction, survival, and diversity. Little is known, however, about how salinity impacts the energy budget of vertebrates and amphibians in particular. The few studies focused on this topic in vertebrates suggest that the ingestion of salts and the resulting osmoregulatory activity is energetically expensive. We analyzed the effect of saline acclimation on standard metabolic rates (SMR) and the activities of metabolic enzymes of internal organs and osmoregulatory variables (plasma osmolality and urea plasma level) in females of Xenopus laevis by means of acclimating individuals to an isosmotic (235 mOsm NaCl; ISO group) and hyper-osmotic (340 mOsm NaCl; HYP group) environment for 40 days. After acclimation, we found that total and mass-specific SMR was approximately 80% higher in the HYP group than those found in the ISO group. These changes were accompanied by higher citrate synthase activities in liver and heart in the HYP group than in the ISO group. Furthermore, we found a significant and positive correlation between metabolic rates and plasma urea, and citrate synthase activity in liver and heart. These results support the notion that the cost of osmoregulation is probably common in most animal species and suggest the existence of a functional association between metabolic rates and the adjustments in osmoregulatory physiology, such as blood distribution and urea synthesis. PMID:27334694

  14. Metabolic cost of osmoregulation in a hypertonic environment in the invasive African clawed frog Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Villalobos, Isaac; Narváez, Cristóbal

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Studies of aquatic invertebrates reveal that salinity affects feeding and growth rates, reproduction, survival, and diversity. Little is known, however, about how salinity impacts the energy budget of vertebrates and amphibians in particular. The few studies focused on this topic in vertebrates suggest that the ingestion of salts and the resulting osmoregulatory activity is energetically expensive. We analyzed the effect of saline acclimation on standard metabolic rates (SMR) and the activities of metabolic enzymes of internal organs and osmoregulatory variables (plasma osmolality and urea plasma level) in females of Xenopus laevis by means of acclimating individuals to an isosmotic (235 mOsm NaCl; ISO group) and hyper-osmotic (340 mOsm NaCl; HYP group) environment for 40 days. After acclimation, we found that total and mass-specific SMR was approximately 80% higher in the HYP group than those found in the ISO group. These changes were accompanied by higher citrate synthase activities in liver and heart in the HYP group than in the ISO group. Furthermore, we found a significant and positive correlation between metabolic rates and plasma urea, and citrate synthase activity in liver and heart. These results support the notion that the cost of osmoregulation is probably common in most animal species and suggest the existence of a functional association between metabolic rates and the adjustments in osmoregulatory physiology, such as blood distribution and urea synthesis. PMID:27334694

  15. Particulate contaminants of intravenous medications and infusions.

    PubMed

    Backhouse, C M; Ball, P R; Booth, S; Kelshaw, M A; Potter, S R; McCollum, C N

    1987-04-01

    Particulate contamination in small volume parenteral medications has been studied and compared with that found in a selection of large volume infusions. Particle counts in 39 commonly used small volume medications and 7 large volume infusions were performed by an automated light blockage method (HIAC) or by optical microscopy. Based on these results and a random survey of drug therapy of intensive care patients, it is concluded that the contribution of intravenous medications to the total particle load received by such patients is likely to be many times greater than from infusion fluids. Until firm evidence regarding the harmful systemic effects of drug particles is available and the manufacturing regulations adjusted appropriately, final in-line filtration of infusions immediately proximal to the intravenous cannula should be considered when drugs are being given intravenously. PMID:2884285

  16. Pharmaceutical quality evaluation of lipid emulsions containing PGE1: alteration in the number of large particles in infusion solutions.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Hiroko; Saito, Haruna; Yomota, Chikako; Kawanishi, Toru

    2009-08-13

    There are two generics of a parenteral lipid emulsion of prostaglandin E1 (PGE(1)) (Lipo-PGE(1)) in addition to two innovators. It was reported the change from innovator to generic in clinical practice caused the slowing of drip rate and formation of aggregates in the infusion line. Thus, we investigated the difference of pharmaceutical quality in these Lipo-PGE(1) formulations. After mixing with some infusion solutions, the mean diameter and number of large particles were determined. Although the mean diameter did not change in any infusion solutions, the number of large particles (diameter >1.0 microm) dramatically increased in generics with Hartmann's solution pH 8 or Lactec injection with 7% sodium bicarbonate. Next, we investigated the effect of these infusion solutions on the retention rate of PGE(1) in lipid particles. The retention rate of PGE(1) in these two infusion solutions decreased more quickly than that in normal saline. Nevertheless, there were no significant differences among the formulations tested. Our results suggest that there is no difference between innovators and generics except in mixing with these infusion solutions. Furthermore, that monitoring the number of large particles can be an effective means of evaluating pharmaceutical interactions and/or the stability of lipid emulsions. PMID:19465103

  17. Short-term nonpressor angiotensin II infusion stimulates sodium transporters in proximal tubule and distal nephron

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Mien T X; Han, Jiyang; Ralph, Donna L; Veiras, Luciana C; McDonough, Alicia A

    2015-01-01

    In Sprague Dawley rats, 2-week angiotensin II (AngII) infusion increases Na+ transporter abundance and activation from cortical thick ascending loop of Henle (TALH) to medullary collecting duct (CD) and raises blood pressure associated with a pressure natriuresis, accompanied by depressed Na+ transporter abundance and activation from proximal tubule (PT) through medullary TALH. This study tests the hypothesis that early during AngII infusion, before blood pressure raises, Na+ transporters’ abundance and activation increase all along the nephron. Male Sprague Dawley rats were infused via osmotic minipumps with a subpressor dose of AngII (200 ng/kg/min) or vehicle for 3 days. Overnight urine was collected in metabolic cages and sodium transporters’ abundance and phosphorylation were determined by immunoblotting homogenates of renal cortex and medulla. There were no significant differences in body weight gain, overnight urine volume, urinary Na+ and K+ excretion, or rate of excretion of a saline challenge between AngII and vehicle infused rats. The 3-day nonpressor AngII infusion significantly increased the abundance of PT Na+/H+ exchanger 3 (NHE3), cortical TALH Na-K-2Cl cotransporter 2 (NKCC2), distal convoluted tubule (DCT) Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC), and cortical CD ENaC subunits. Additionally, phosphorylation of cortical NKCC2, NCC, and STE20/SPS1-related proline–alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) were increased; medullary NKCC2 and SPAK were not altered. In conclusion, 3-day AngII infusion provokes PT NHE3 accumulation as well as NKCC2, NCC, and SPAK accumulation and activation in a prehypertensive phase before evidence for intrarenal angiotensinogen accumulation. PMID:26347505

  18. Local anesthetic infusion pumps improve postoperative pain after inguinal hernia repair: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Barry; Waxman, Kenneth; Tatevossian, Raymond; Gamberdella, Marla; Read, Bruce

    2004-11-01

    Pain after an open inguinal hernia repair may be significant. In fact, some surgeons feel that the pain after open repair justifies a laparoscopic approach. The purpose of this study was to determine if the use of local anesthetic infusion pumps would reduce postoperative pain after open inguinal hernia repair. We performed a prospective, double-blind randomized study of 45 open plug and patch inguinal hernia repairs. Patients were randomized to receive either 0.25 per cent bupivicaine or saline solution via an elastomeric infusion pump (ON-Q) for 48 hours, at 2 cc/h. The catheters were placed in the subcutaneous tissue and removed on postoperative day 3. Both groups were prescribed hydrocodone to use in the postoperative period at the prescribed dosage as needed for pain. Interviews were conducted on postoperative days 3 and 7, and patient's questionnaires, including pain scores, amount of pain medicine used, and any complications, were collected accordingly. During the first 5 postoperative days, postoperative pain was assessed using a visual analog scale. Twenty-three repairs were randomized to the bupivicaine group and 22 repairs randomized to the placebo group. In the bupivicaine group, there was a significant decrease in postoperative pain on postoperative days 2 through 5 with P values <0.05. This significant difference continued through postoperative day 5, 2 days after the infusion pumps were removed. Patients who had bupivicaine instilled in their infusion pump had statistically significant lower subjective pain scores on postoperative days 2 through 5. This significant difference continued even after the infusion pumps were removed. Local anesthetic infusion pumps significantly decreased the amount of early postoperative pain. Pain relief persisted for 2 days after catheter and pump removal. PMID:15586515

  19. [Perioperative infusion therapy in children].

    PubMed

    Altemeyer, K H; Kraus, G B

    1990-03-01

    An incorrect fluid therapy can lead to serious complications considerably more rapidly in children, especially in newborns and infants, than in adults. The pediatric patient has a limited range of compensation for maintenance of fluid and electrolyte balance. Precise knowledge of the physiological age-dependent fluid balance, i.e. the large extracellular space, the developing renal function, the increased metabolism, the acid-base state, the electrolyte balance with the relatively higher sodium and chloride requirements must be the basis of an adequate fluid therapy. The basic fluid requirement (normal fluid and electrolyte requirement) varies with age and is influenced considerably by environmental conditions, body temperature and metabolism. For substitution of this basic fluid requirement one-third to one-half strength electrolyte solution in 5% dextrose is used, the amount depending on age. The perioperative fluid requirement, however, has to be calculated with due consideration for the characteristic changes in fluid and electrolyte balance during anaesthesia and surgery, the preoperative fasting period, drug effects of anesthetics, hormonal changes and ventilation; it is higher than the basic fluid requirement (infants 6-8 ml.kg-1.h-1, toddlers 4-6 ml.kg.h-1, schoolchildren 2-4 ml.kg-1.h-1). For intraoperative fluid therapy infusions with an increased sodium concentration (70-100 mmol/l) or Ringer's lactate (Na+ = 130 mmol/l) must be used. On no account must electrolyte-free solutions, e.g., 5-10% glucose, be used intraoperatively, as they can lead to water intoxication. The third-space requirements compensate for the additional losses by drainage, third-space deficits by evaporation and gastric and enteral secretions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2184693

  20. Saline Systems highlights for 2006

    PubMed Central

    DasSarma, Shiladitya

    2007-01-01

    Saline Systems is a journal devoted to both basic and applied studies of saline and hypersaline environments and their biodiversity. Here, I review the reports and commentaries published in the journal in 2006, including some exploring the geochemistry of saline estuaries, lakes, and ponds, others on the ecology and molecular biology of the indigenous halophilic organisms, and still others addressing the environmental challenges facing saline environments. Several studies are relevant to applications in biotechnology and aquaculture. PMID:17244355

  1. Cardiopulmonary Effects of Constant-Rate Infusion of Lidocaine for Anesthesia during Abdominal Surgery in Goats.

    PubMed

    Malavasi, Lais M; Greene, Stephen A; Gay, John M; Grubb, Tammy L

    2016-01-01

    Lidocaine is commonly used in ruminants but has an anecdotal history of being toxic to goats. To evaluate lidocaine's effects on selected cardiopulmonary parameters. Isoflurane-anesthetized adult goats (n = 24) undergoing abdominal surgery received a loading dose of lidocaine (2.5 mg/kg) over 20 min followed by constant-rate infusion of lidocaine (100 μg/kg/min); control animals received saline instead of lidocaine. Data collected at predetermined time points during the 60-min surgery included heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, pO2, and pCO2. According to Welch 2-sample t tests, cardiopulmonary variables did not differ between groups. For example, after administration of the loading dose, goats in the lidocaine group had a mean heart rate of 88 ± 28 bpm, mean arterial blood pressure of 70 ± 19 mm Hg, pCO2 of 65 ± 13 mm Hg, and pO2 of 212 ± 99 mm Hg; in the saline group, these values were 90 ± 16 bpm, 76 ± 12 mm Hg, 61 ± 9 mm Hg, and 209 ± 83 mm Hg, respectively. One goat in the saline group required an additional dose of butorphanol. Overall our findings indicate that, at the dose provided, intravenous lidocaine did not cause adverse cardiopulmonary effects in adult goats undergoing abdominal surgery. Adding lidocaine infusion during general anesthesia is an option for enhancing transoperative analgesia in goats. PMID:27423150

  2. Randomised clinical study comparing the effectiveness and physiological effects of hypertonic and isotonic polyethylene glycol solutions for bowel cleansing

    PubMed Central

    Yamano, Hiro-o; Matsushita, Hiro-o; Yoshikawa, Kenjiro; Takagi, Ryo; Harada, Eiji; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Nakaoka, Michiko; Himori, Ryogo; Yoshida, Yuko; Satou, Kentarou; Imai, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Bowel cleansing is necessary before colonoscopy, but is a burden to patients because of the long cleansing time and large dose volume. A low-volume (2 L) hypertonic polyethylene glycol-ascorbic acid solution (PEG-Asc) has been introduced, but its possible dehydration effects have not been quantitatively studied. We compared the efficacy and safety including the dehydration risk between hypertonic PEG-Asc and isotonic PEG regimens. Design This was an observer-blinded randomised study. Participants (n=310) were allocated to receive 1 of 3 regimens on the day of colonoscopy: PEG-Asc (1.5 L) and water (0.75 L) dosed with 1 split (PEG-Asc-S) or 4 splits (PEG-Asc-M), or PEG-electrolyte solution (PEG-ES; 2.25 L) dosed with no split. Dehydration was analysed by measuring haematocrit (Ht). Results The cleansing time using the hypertonic PEG-Asc-S (3.33±0.48 hours) was significantly longer than that with isotonic PEG-ES (3.05±0.56 hours; p<0.001). PEG-Asc-M (3.00±0.53 hours) did not have this same disadvantage. Successful cleansing was achieved in more than 94% of participants using each of the 3 regimens. The percentage changes in Ht from baseline (before dosing) to the end of dosing with PEG-Asc-S (3.53±3.32%) and PEG-Asc-M (4.11±3.07%) were significantly greater than that with PEG-ES (1.31±3.01%). Conclusions These 3 lower volume regimens were efficacious and had no serious adverse effects. Even patients cleansed with isotonic PEG-ES showed significant physiological dehydration at the end of dosing. The four-split PEG-Asc-M regimen is recommended because of its shorter cleansing time without causing serious nausea. Trial registration number UMIN000013103; Results. PMID:27547443

  3. Subcutaneous insulin infusion: change in basal infusion rate has no immediate effect on insulin absorption rate

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrandt, P.; Birch, K.; Jensen, B.M.; Kuehl, C.

    1986-11-01

    Eight insulin-dependent diabetic patients were simultaneously given subcutaneous infusions (1.12 IU/h each) of /sup 125/I-labeled Actrapid insulin in each side of the abdominal wall. After 24 h of infusion, the size of the infused insulin depots was measured by external counting for 5 h. The basal infusion rate was then doubled in one side and halved in the other for the next 4 h. Finally, 1.12 IU/h of insulin was given in both sides of the abdominal wall for an additional 3 h. The changes in the size of the depots were measured, and the absorption rates for each hour were calculated. During the first 5 h of infusion, the depot size was almost constant (approximately 5 IU) with an absorption rate that equaled the infusion rate. Doubling the infusion rate led to a significant increase in depot size, but the absorption rate remained unchanged for the first 3 h, and only thereafter was a significant increase seen. When the infusion rate was reduced to the initial 1.12 IU/h, the absorption rate remained elevated during the next 3 h. Correspondingly, when the infusion rate was decreased, the depot size also decreased, but the absorption rate remained unchanged for the first 3 h. The results show that a change in the basal insulin infusion rate does not lead to any immediate change in the insulin absorption rate. This should be considered when planning an insulin-infusion program that includes alteration(s) in the basal-rate setting.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of cysteamine bitartrate following gastrointestinal infusion

    PubMed Central

    Fidler, Meredith C; Barshop, Bruce A; Gangoiti, Jon A; Deutsch, Reena; Martin, Michael; Schneider, Jerry A; Dohil, Ranjan

    2007-01-01

    Aims Although cysteamine was first used in the treatment of cystinosis in 1976 and approved by the FDA as cysteamine bitartrate (Cystagon™) in 1994, surprisingly little pharmacological data are available for this compound. Cysteamine and its related drugs are currently being evaluated for the treatment of Huntington’s and Parkinson’s disease. The aim of te study was to understand the pharmacokinetics of cysteamine bitartrate following gastrointestinal infusion. Method Cysteamine bitartrate was delivered through a naso-enteric catheter into the stomach (n = 8), small intestine (n = 8) and caecum (n = 4) of normal subjects. Plasma cysteamine concentrations were determined using LC-MS/MS. Results The rate and extent of drug absorption were assessed by comparing AUC(0, ∞), Cmax and tmax, among the gastrointestinal infusion sites. Total cysteamine exposure, expressed as area under the curve (AUC(0, ∞)) was greatest when the drug was infused into the small intestine (4331.3 ± 1907.6 min × µm) followed by stomach (3901.9 ± 1591.9 min × µm) and caecum (3141.4 ± 1627.6 min × µm). Cysteamine infusion into the small intestine resulted in the most rapid rise to maximal plasma concentrations (tmax = 21 ± 0.56 min); tmax was delayed to 50 ± 26 min and 64 ± 26 min after gastric and caecal infusion, respectively. The maximum cysteamine plasma concentration (Cmax) was reached after infusion of the drug into the small intestine (51 ± 21 µm), which was higher than plasma Cmax concentrations after gastric (39 ± 16 µm) and caecal infusion (23 ± 15 µm). Conclusions The pharmacokinetic data generated help extend our understanding of cysteamine. PMID:17229040

  5. [The cause of polyurethane catheter cracking during constant infusion of etoposide (VP-16) injection].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, H; Aoyama, T; Matsuyama, T; Yamamura, Y; Nakajima, K; Nakamura, K; Sato, H; Kotaki, H; Chiba, S; Hirai, H; Yazaki, Y; Iga, T

    1998-12-01

    We studied the cause of cracking of a clinically used polyurethane (PU) catheter during the constant infusion of etoposide (VP-16) injection (Lastet), administered without dilution to patients as a part of combination high-dose chemotherapy. After VP-16 injection was infused into the PU catheter at a constant infusion rate (30 ml/h) for 24 h, a decrease in the elasticity (36% of untreated) and on increase in the length of the catheter (3.7%) were observed. These changes were significantly higher than those treated with the control saline. The similar changes of the PU catheter were observed after treatment with a basal solution containing polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG 400), polysorbate 80 and ethanol, which is the vehicle of the VP-16 injection, and with ethanol alone. Moreover, obvious degeneration of the internal wall (occurrence of spots like melting) and cutting face (micro-cracking) of the catheter was observed with an electron microscope after treatment with the vehicle. On the other hand, the elasticity or extension of the PU catheter were not changed after treatment with saline or PEG 400. From these findings, it was suggested that the degeneration and subsequent cracking of the PU catheter during the infusion of VP-16 injection was caused by ethanol contained in its injection solution. No cracking or morphological changes of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and silicone catheters were found after treatment with the vehicle solution. However, since it has been reported in previous reports that di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate was leached from PVC bags, the high dose chemotherapy with the dilution-free VP-16 injection should be achieved safely and effectively using a silicon catheter, rather than the PU catheter. PMID:9921266

  6. The safety of intraosseous infusions: risks of fat and bone marrow emboli to the lungs.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, J P; Julius, C J; Petras, R E; Porembka, D T; Gallagher, J M

    1989-10-01

    The technique of intraosseous infusion is a life-saving emergency alternative when IV access is impossible or will be critically delayed. Concerns about its safety remain, especially concerning the risk of bone marrow and fat emboli to the lungs. We examined autopsy pulmonary specimens on two children who had received intraosseous infusions during resuscitation attempts and found an average of 0.23 to 0.71 bone marrow and fat emboli per mm2 of lung. We studied normotensive dogs with intraosseous infusions of emergency drugs and solutions into the distal femur. Three dogs were studied with each of the following emergency drugs or solutions: controls with normal saline (0.9% NaCl), epinephrine 0.01 mg/kg, NaHCO3 1 mEq/kg, CaCl 10 mg/kg, atropine 0.01 mg/kg, hydroxyethyl starch 6% in normal saline 10 mL/kg, 50% dextrose in water 0.25 g/kg, and lidocaine 1 mg/kg. Four hours after infusion, the animals were killed, and representative sections of the lung were examined with oil red-0 and hematoxylin and eosin stains for the presence of fat and bone marrow emboli. Fat and bone marrow emboli were found in all lung sections, varying from 0.11 to 4.48 emboli/mm2 lung (mean, 0.91 emboli/mm2 lung) for the emergency drugs and solutions and 0.06 to 0.53 emboli/mm2 (mean, 0.29 emboli/mm2 lung) for the controls. Analysis of variance revealed no significant difference (P = .07) in mean number of fat and bone marrow emboli per square millimeter of lung among the emergency drugs and compared with controls.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2802282

  7. Hypertonicity-induced p38MAPK activation elicits recovery of corneal epithelial cell volume and layer integrity.

    PubMed

    Bildin, V N; Wang, Z; Iserovich, P; Reinach, P S

    2003-05-01

    In hypertonicity-stressed (i.e., 600 mOsm) SV40-immortalized rabbit and human corneal epithelial cell layers (RCEC and HCEC, respectively), we characterized the relationship between time-dependent changes in translayer resistance, relative cell volume and modulation of MAPK superfamily activities. Sulforhodamine B permeability initially increased by 1.4- and 2-fold in RCEC and HCEC, respectively. Subsequently, recovery to its isotonic level only occurred in RCEC. Light scattering revealed that in RCEC 1) regulatory volume increase (RVI) extent was 20% greater; 2) RVI half-time was 2.5-fold shorter. However, inhibition of Na-K-2Cl cotransporter and Na/K-ATPase activity suppressed the RVI response more in HCEC. MAPK activity changes were as follows: 1) p38 was wave-like and faster as well as larger in RCEC than in HCEC (90- and 18-fold, respectively); 2) increases in SAPK/JNK activity were negligible in comparison to those of p38; 3) Erk1/2 activity declined to 30-40% of their basal values. SB203580, a specific p38 inhibitor, dose dependently suppressed the RVI responses in both cell lines. However, neither U0126, which inhibits MEK, the kinase upstream of Erk, nor SP600125, inhibitor of SAPK/JNK, had any effect on this response. Taken together, sufficient activation of the p38 limb of the MAPK superfamily during a hypertonic challenge is essential for maintaining epithelial cell volume and translayer resistance. On the other hand, Erk1/2 activity restoration seems to be dependent on cell volume recovery. PMID:12879161

  8. A low dose euglycemic infusion of recombinant human insulin-like growth factor I rapidly suppresses fasting-enhanced pulsatile growth hormone secretion in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, M L; Clayton, P E; Johnson, M L; Celniker, A; Perlman, A J; Alberti, K G; Thorner, M O

    1993-01-01

    To determine if insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) inhibits pulsatile growth hormone (GH) secretion in man, recombinant human IGF-I (rhIGF-I) was infused for 6 h at 10 micrograms.kg-1.h-1 during a euglycemic clamp in 10 normal men who were fasted for 32 h to enhance GH secretion. Saline alone was infused during an otherwise identical second admission as a control. As a result of rhIGF-I infusion, total and free IGF-I concentrations increased three- and fourfold, respectively. Mean GH concentrations fell from 6.3 +/- 1.6 to 0.59 +/- 0.07 micrograms/liter after 120 min. GH secretion rates, calculated by a deconvolution algorithm, decreased with a t 1/2 of 16.6 min and remained suppressed thereafter. Suppression of GH secretion rates occurred within 60 min when total and free IGF-I concentrations were 1.6-fold and 2-fold above baseline levels, respectively, and while glucose infusion rates were < 1 mumol.kg-1.min-1. During saline infusion, GH secretion rates remained elevated. Infusion of rhIGF-I decreased the mass of GH secreted per pulse by 84% (P < 0.01) and the number of detectable GH secretory pulses by 32% (P < 0.05). Plasma insulin and glucagon decreased to nearly undetectable levels after 60 min of rhIGF-I. Serum free fatty acids, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and acetoacetate were unaffected during the first 3 h of rhIGF-I but decreased thereafter to 52, 32, and 50% of levels observed during saline. We conclude that fasting-enhanced GH secretion is rapidly suppressed by a low-dose euglycemic infusion of rhIGF-I. This effect of rhIGF-I is likely mediated through IGF-I receptors independently of its insulin-like metabolic actions. PMID:8514857

  9. Effects of salinity on leaf breakdown: Dryland salinity versus salinity from a coalmine.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Felix G; Bundschuh, Mirco; Zubrod, Jochen P; Schäfer, Ralf B; Thompson, Kristie; Kefford, Ben J

    2016-08-01

    Salinization of freshwater ecosystems as a result of human activities represents a global threat for ecosystems' integrity. Whether different sources of salinity with their differing ionic compositions lead to variable effects in ecosystem functioning is unknown. Therefore, the present study assessed the impact of dryland- (50μS/cm to 11,000μS/cm) and coalmine-induced (100μS/cm to 2400μS/cm) salinization on the leaf litter breakdown, with focus on microorganisms as main decomposer, in two catchments in New South Wales, Australia. The breakdown of Eucalyptus camaldulensis leaves decreased with increasing salinity by up to a factor of three. Coalmine salinity, which is characterised by a higher share of bicarbonates, had a slightly but consistently higher breakdown rate at a given salinity relative to dryland salinity, which is characterised by ionic proportions similar to sea water. Complementary laboratory experiments supported the stimulatory impact of sodium bicarbonates on leaf breakdown when compared to sodium chloride or artificial sea salt. Furthermore, microbial inoculum from a high salinity site (11,000μS/cm) yielded lower leaf breakdown at lower salinity relative to inoculum from a low salinity site (50μS/cm). Conversely, inoculum from the high salinity site was less sensitive towards increasing salinity levels relative to inoculum from the low salinity site. The effects of the different inoculum were the same regardless of salt source (sodium bicarbonate, sodium chloride and artificial sea salt). Finally, the microorganism-mediated leaf litter breakdown was most efficient at intermediate salinity levels (≈500μS/cm). The present study thus points to severe implications of increasing salinity intensities on the ecosystem function of leaf litter breakdown, while the underlying processes need further scrutiny. PMID:27393920

  10. Ultrasonographic uterine changes and vaginal discharges following intrauterine infusion of liquid paraffin in cows.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wengeng; Kuroiwa, Takenobu; Zabuli, Jahid; Tanaka, Tomomi; Kamomae, Hideo

    2009-02-01

    This study was conducted to examine uterine changes and uterocervical discharges following intrauterine infusion with liquid paraffin (LP) during the luteal phase by ultrasonic and vaginoscopic examinations in cows. Multiparous dairy cows (n=10) were infused with 50 ml physiological saline (PS group; n=5) or liquid paraffin (LP group; n=5) on day 10 or 11 after ovulation (day 0: ovulation). Vaginoscopic, rectal and ultrasonogaphic examinations were carried out at 0.25, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12 and 24 h after the LP and PS infusion and then at daily intervals until subsequent ovulation after the infusions. The mean volumes of recovered discharges from the vagina within 6 h after infusion were significantly greater (P<0.05) in the LP group than in the PS group (33.0 +/- 9.9 vs.14.0 +/- 13.9 ml). Yellowish-white discharge was first observed at 3.2 +/- 0.5 and 3.6 +/- 0.6 h after infusion and lasted for 12.2 +/- 2.9 and 2.1 +/- 1.5 days for the LP and PS groups, respectively, showing a significant difference (P<0.05) in duration. Subsequently, transparent discharge appeared again 2-3 days before the subsequent ovulation after the treatments in both groups and disappeared on the day prior to or the day of ovulation. During the immediate examination after the infusion, the cavity of the uterine horn appeared anechoic and dilated in the images of both groups. The anechoic images changed to echoic images at 2.2 +/- 0.8 and 2.6 +/- 0.9 h after the infusion in the LP and PS groups, respectively, and the echoic images lasted for 12.2 +/- 2.9 and 2.1 +/- 1.5 days in the LP and PS groups, respectively. These results suggest that the appearance and disappearance of intrauterine anechoic and echoic images reflect the appearance and disappearance of the characteristics of the recovered LP/PS-like liquid and yellowish-white and transparent discharges from the vagina. PMID:18957825

  11. VASCULAR LESIONS AND S-THROMBOMODULIN CONCENTRATIONS FROM AURICULAR ARTERIES OF RABBITS INFUSED WITH MICROBUBBLE CONTRAST AGENT AND EXPOSED TO PULSED ULTRASOUND

    PubMed Central

    Zachary, James F.; Blue, James P.; Miller, Rita J.; O’Brien, William D.

    2007-01-01

    Arterial injury resulting from the interaction of contrast agent (CA) with ultrasound (US) was studied in rabbit auricular arteries and assessed by histopathologic evaluation and s-thrombomodulin concentrations. Three sites on each artery were exposed (2.8 MHz, 5-min exposure duration, 10-Hz pulse repetition frequency, 1.4-μs pulse duration) using one of three in situ peak rarefactional pressures (0.85, 3.9 or 9.5 MPa). Saline, saline/CA, and saline/US infusion groups (n = 28) did not have histopathologic damage. The saline/CA/US infusion group (n = 10) at exposure conditions below the FDA mechanical index limit of 1.9 did not have histopathologic damage, whereas the saline/CA/US infusion group (n = 9) at exposure conditions above the FDA limit did have damage (5 of 9 arteries). Lesions were characteristic of acute coagulative necrosis. Mean s-thrombomodulin concentrations, a marker for endothelial cell injury, were highest in rabbits exposed to US at 0.85 and 3.9 MPa, suggesting that vascular injury may be physiological and not accompanied by irreversible cellular injury. PMID:17112964

  12. Evaluation of platelet deposition at local thrombophlebitis, caused by intravenous infusion of anticancer drug (Bisantrene), with In-111-platelets in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Dewanjee, M.K.; Powis, G.; Chowdhury, S.

    1985-05-01

    Several anticancer drugs produce localized thrombophlebitis (LTP) when infused intravenously and LTP is the dose-limiting factor. LTP was studied in New Zealand albino rabbits by I.V. infusion of Bisantrene (BS: approx. = 40 mg/rabbit, six rabbits via ear veins, five via jugular veins, two control, 0.9% saline). Radioactivity in three sections of each harvested vein was determined with a gamma counter, and the ratio of radioactivity per mg of infused vein and control vein was determined and the results are presented in this paper. Scanning electron micrograph of BS-infused vein lumen revealed plaques of amorphous material (BS) and adherent platelet thrombus. Platelet deposition at BS-induced LTP in jugular and ear veins reached a maximum at four to eight hours. Thus, LTP could be imaged and quantified with In-111-labeled platelets.

  13. Overview of SMOS Salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, R.

    2014-12-01

    While it is well known that the ocean is one of the most important components of the climate system, with a heat capacity 1100 times greater than the atmosphere, the ocean is also the primary reservoir for freshwater transport to the atmosphere and largest component of the global water cycle. Two new satellite sensors, the ESA Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and the NASA Aquarius SAC-D missions are now providing the first space borne measurements of the sea surface salinity (SSS). In this talk, we will present examples demonstrating how SMOS-derived SSS data are being used to better characterize key land-ocean and atmosphere-ocean interaction processes that occur within the marine hydrological cycle. In particular, we shall illustrate how SMOS and its ocean mapping capability provides observations across the world's largest tropical ocean fresh pool regions and we will discuss intra-seasonal to interannual precipitation impacts as well as large-scale river runoff from the Amazon-Orinoco and Congo rivers and its offshore advection. Synergistic multi-satellite analyses of these new surface salinity data sets combined with sea surface temperature, dynamical height and currents from altimetry, surface wind, ocean color, rainfall estimates, and in situ observations will be shown to yield new freshwater budget and ocean circulation insight. Examples of SMOS capabilities of monitoring salt exchanges across the Gulf Stream through meso-scale eddies will be provided. SSS observations from the SMOS and Aquarius/SAC-D sensors are combined to examine the response of the upper ocean to tropical cyclone passage including the potential role that a freshwater-induced upper ocean barrier layer may play in modulating surface cooling and enthalpy flux in tropical cyclone track regions.

  14. Salinity driven oceanographic upwelling

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, David H.

    1986-01-01

    The salinity driven oceanographic upwelling is maintained in a mariculture device that includes a long main duct in the general shape of a cylinder having perforated cover plates at each end. The mariculture device is suspended vertically in the ocean such that one end of the main duct is in surface water and the other end in relatively deep water that is cold, nutrient rich and relatively fresh in comparison to the surface water which is relatively warm, relatively nutrient deficient and relatively saline. A plurality of elongated flow segregating tubes are disposed in the main duct and extend from the upper cover plate beyond the lower cover plate into a lower manifold plate. The lower manifold plate is spaced from the lower cover plate to define a deep water fluid flow path to the interior space of the main duct. Spacer tubes extend from the upper cover plate and communicate with the interior space of the main duct. The spacer tubes are received in an upper manifold plate spaced from the upper cover plate to define a surface water fluid flow path into the flow segregating tubes. A surface water-deep water counterflow is thus established with deep water flowing upwardly through the main duct interior for discharge beyond the upper manifold plate while surface water flows downwardly through the flow segregating tubes for discharge below the lower manifold plate. During such counterflow heat is transferred from the downflowing warm water to the upflowing cold water. The flow is maintained by the difference in density between the deep water and the surface water due to their differences in salinity. The upwelling of nutrient rich deep water is used for marifarming by fertilizing the nutrient deficient surface water.

  15. Salinity driven oceanographic upwelling

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, D.H.

    1984-08-30

    The salinity driven oceanographic upwelling is maintained in a mariculture device that includes a long main duct in the general shape of a cylinder having perforated cover plates at each end. The mariculture device is suspended vertically in the ocean such that one end of the main duct is in surface water and the other end in relatively deep water that is cold, nutrient rich and relatively fresh in comparison to the surface water which is relatively warm, relatively nutrient deficient and relatively saline. A plurality of elongated flow segregating tubes are disposed in the main duct and extend from the upper cover plate beyond the lower cover plate into a lower manifold plate. The lower manifold plate is spaced from the lower cover plate to define a deep water fluid flow path to the interior space of the main duct. Spacer tubes extend from the upper cover plate and communicate with the interior space of the main duct. The spacer tubes are received in an upper manifold plate spaced from the upper cover plate to define a surface water fluid flow path into the flow segregating tubes. A surface water-deep water counterflow is thus established with deep water flowing upwardly through the main duct interior for discharge beyond the upper manifold plate while surface water flows downwardly through the flow segregating tubes for discharge below the lower manifold plate. During such counterflow heat is transferred from the downflowing warm water to the upflowing cold water. The flow is maintained by the difference in density between the deep water and the surface water due to their differences in salinity. The upwelling of nutrient rich deep water is used for marifarming by fertilizing the nutrient deficient surface water. 1 fig.

  16. Influence of Vancomycin Infusion Methods on Endothelial Cell Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Drouet, Maryline; Chai, Feng; Barthélémy, Christine; Lebuffe, Gilles; Debaene, Bertrand; Odou, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral intravenous therapy is frequently used in routine hospital practice and, due to various factors, its most common side effect is phlebitis. The infusion of vancomycin is particularly associated with phlebitis despite its widespread use. French guidelines recommend central intravenous infusion for high concentrations of vancomycin, but peripheral intravenous therapy is often preferred in intensive care units. Methods of vancomycin infusion are either intermittent infusion or continuous infusion. A comparison of these methods under in vitro conditions simulating clinical use could result in better infusion efficacy. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were therefore challenged with clinical doses of vancomycin over a 24- to 72-h period using these infusion methods. Cell death was measured with the alamarBlue test. Concentration-dependent and time-dependent vancomycin toxicity on HUVECs was noted with a 50% lethal dose at 5 mg/ml after 24 h, reaching 2.5 mg/ml after 72 h of infusion, simulating long-term infusion. This toxicity does not seem to be induced by acidic pH. In comparing infusion methods, we observed that continuous infusion induced greater cell toxicity than intermittent infusion at doses higher than 1 g/day. The increasing use of vancomycin means that new guidelines are required to avoid phlebitis. If peripheral intravenous therapy is used to reduce infusion time, along with intermittent infusion, vein irritation and localized phlebitis may be reduced. Further studies have to be carried out to explore the causes of vancomycin endothelial toxicity. PMID:25421476

  17. Placement of tibial intraosseous infusion devices.

    PubMed

    Harcke, H Theodore; Crawley, Geoffrey; Mabry, Robert; Mazuchowski, Edward

    2011-07-01

    Post-mortem preautopsy multidetector computed tomography was used to assess the placement of tibial intraosseous infusion needles in 52 cases of battlefield trauma deaths for which medical intervention included the use of the technique. In 58 (95%) of 61 needles, the tip was positioned in medullary bone. All 3 (5%) unsuccessful placements were in the left leg, and the needle was not directed perpendicular to the medial tibial cortex as recommended. Considering the nature of military trauma and the environmental conditions under which care is rendered, military medical personnel appear to be highly successful in the placement of tibial intraosseous infusion needles. PMID:22128726

  18. Cultural Congruence and Infusion Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Abitz, Tracey L

    2016-01-01

    The importance of cultural competence in every nursing practice setting in today's world cannot be understated. Unconscious bias can have detrimental effects on therapeutic relationships and health outcomes. Nursing models of cultural competence by Purnell, Leininger, and Campinha-Bacote are reviewed. The Kleinman Model and LEARN Model offer questions and guidelines to facilitate assessment of patients' understanding of illness and treatment. The Infusion Nursing Standards of Practice contains elements of diversity and cultural competence throughout. Self-reflection of one's own values, beliefs, biases, and practice as an infusion nurse will promote the development of cultural competence. PMID:26934161

  19. Effects of arterial and venous volume infusion on coronary perfusion pressures during canine CPR.

    PubMed

    Gentile, N T; Martin, G B; Appleton, T J; Moeggenberg, J; Paradis, N A; Nowak, R M

    1991-08-01

    Intraarterial (IA) volume infusion has been reported to be more effective than intravenous (IV) infusion in treating cardiac arrest due to exsanguination. A rapid IA infusion was felt to raise intraaortic pressure and improve coronary perfusion pressure (CPP). The purpose of this study was to determine if IA or IV volume infusion could augment the effect of epinephrine on CPP during CPR in the canine model. Nineteen mongrel dogs with a mean weight of 26.3 +/- 4.2 kg were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Thoracic aortic (Ao), right atrial (RA) and pulmonary artery catheters were placed for hemodynamic monitoring. Additional Ao and central venous catheters were placed for volume infusion. Ventricular fibrillation was induced and Thumper CPR was begun after 5 min (t = 5). At t = 10, all dogs received 45 micrograms/kg IV epinephrine. Six animals received epinephrine alone (EPI). Five dogs received EPI plus a 500 cc bolus of normal saline over 3 min intravenously (EPI/IV). Another group (n = 8) received EPI plus the same fluid bolus through the aortic catheter (EPI/IA). Resuscitation was attempted at t = 18 using a standard protocol. There was a significant increase in CPP over baseline in all groups. The changes in CPP from baseline induced by EPI, EPI/IV and EPI/IA were 20.6 +/- 3.7, 22.8 +/- 4.2 and 22.2 +/- 2.4 mmHg, respectively. Volume loading did not augment the effect of therapeutic EPI dosing. By increasing both preload and afterload, volume administration may in fact be detrimental during CPR. PMID:1658894

  20. Effects of crystalloid and colloid infusions on intracranial pressure and computerized electroencephalographic data in dogs with vasogenic brain edema.

    PubMed

    Tranmer, B I; Iacobacci, R I; Kindt, G W

    1989-08-01

    This experiment was designed to study the effects of intravascular volume expansion with crystalloid and colloid agents on intracranial pressure (ICP) and computerized electroencephalographic (EEG) data in dogs with cerebral vasogenic edema. A liquid nitrogen cold lesion was produced in the right parietal lobes of 30 anesthetized mongrel dogs. ICP data from an intraventricular catheter, hemodynamic data, and EEG power data were recorded continuously during the course of the experiment. Six hours after creation of the liquid nitrogen cold lesion, each dog was infused with one of the following treatments: 1) no treatment (control); 2) 5% dextrose in water (D5W) (30 ml/kg/h); 3) 0.9% NaCl (30 ml/kg/h); 4) hetastarch (10 ml/kg/h); and 5) hetastarch (30 ml/kg/h). The animals were treated for 2 hours, killed, and the brains examined and measured for water content. During the D5W infusion, ICP increased significantly (141%) but the EEG power data did not change. During the normal saline infusion, ICP increased significantly (91%) and the EEG power data showed marked deterioration. Both hetastarch infusions produced no change in ICP and demonstrated an improvement in the EEG power data (P less than 0.001). These data suggest that crystalloid infusions may have profound deleterious effects in the presence of brain edema, but colloids do not, and should be considered in the fluid management of patients with cerebral edema. PMID:2671780

  1. "The home infusion patient": patient profiles for the home infusion therapy market.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, K W; Powers, T

    1999-01-01

    The authors review the relevant literature regarding home health care patient profiles. An empirical analysis is provided from archival data for a home infusion company servicing patients in urban and rural areas. The results are provided as a 2 x 2 matrix for patients in urban and rural areas seeing either a specialist or primary care physicians. A series of moderated regressions indicate that type of treating physician, patient's gender, geographic residence and level of acuity are cogent in predicting the complexity of prescribed infusion therapies. Managerial implications are provided for the home care marketer in segmenting patient markets for infusion services. PMID:10538737

  2. Dexmedetomidine infusion during middle ear surgery under general anaesthesia to provide oligaemic surgical field: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kumkum; Bansal, Manoranjan; Gupta, Prashant K.; Pandey, MN; Agarwal, Salony

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Middle ear surgery requires bloodless surgical field for better operating conditions, deep level of anaesthesia and rapid emergence. Recent studies suggest that α2 agonists could provide desired surgical field, sedation and analgesia. The present study was aimed to evaluate the clinical effects of dexmedetomidine infusion as anaesthetic adjuvant during middle ear surgery using operating microscope. Methods: Sixty four adult patients aged 18-58 years, American Society of Anaesthesiologists Grades I and II, of both gender were randomised into two comparable equal groups of 32 patients each for middle ear surgery under general anaesthesia with standard anaesthetic technique. After induction of general anaesthesia, patients of Group I were given dexmedetomidine infusion of 0.5 μg/kg/h and patients of Group II were given placebo infusion of normal saline. Isoflurane concentration was titrated to achieve a systolic blood pressure 30% below the baseline value. All patients were assessed intra-operatively for bleeding at surgical field, haemodynamic changes, awakening time and post-operative recovery. Results: Statistically significant reduction was observed in the required percentage of isoflurane (0.8 ± 0.6%) to maintain the systolic blood pressure 30% below the baseline values in patients receiving dexmedetomidine infusion when compared to those receiving placebo infusion (1.6 ± 0.7%). Patients receiving dexmedetomidine infusion had statistically significant lesser bleeding at surgical field (P < 0.05). The mean awakening time and recovery from anaesthesia did not show any significant difference between the groups. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine infusion can be safely used to provide oligaemic surgical field for better visualization using operating microscope for middle ear surgery. PMID:25684810

  3. The NASA SARP Software Research Infusion Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Mike; Pressburger, Tom; Markosian, Lawrence; Feather, Martin

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing the NASA Software Assurance Research Program (SARP) research infusion projects is shown. The topics include: 1) Background/Motivation; 2) Proposal Solicitation Process; 3) Proposal Evaluation Process; 4) Overview of Some Projects to Date; and 5) Lessons Learned.

  4. A Telecommunications-Infused Community Action Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    March, Thomas; Puma, Jessica

    1996-01-01

    The Nonprofit Prophets, a telecommunications-infused community action project, was designed for high school students. Students were teamed with a nonprofit organization and produced videoconferences or Web sites for them. Although specific skills were acquired, students also gained confidence and self-esteem as well as a belief that they…

  5. Infusing Earth Systems Concepts throughout the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortner, Rosanne W.; Boyd, Sally

    The Program for Leadership in Earth Systems Education (PLESE), a teacher enhancement program sponsored by the National Science Foundation in 1990-94, was a coordinated effort to infuse Earth Systems concepts throughout the K-12 science curriculum across the United States. Characteristics of the program are reviewed in this paper and the results of…

  6. Multiple Intravenous Infusions Phase 1b

    PubMed Central

    Cassano-Piché, A; Fan, M; Sabovitch, S; Masino, C; Easty, AC

    2012-01-01

    Background Minimal research has been conducted into the potential patient safety issues related to administering multiple intravenous (IV) infusions to a single patient. Previous research has highlighted that there are a number of related safety risks. In Phase 1a of this study, an analysis of 2 national incident-reporting databases (Institute for Safe Medical Practices Canada and United States Food and Drug Administration MAUDE) found that a high percentage of incidents associated with the administration of multiple IV infusions resulted in patient harm. Objectives The primary objectives of Phase 1b of this study were to identify safety issues with the potential to cause patient harm stemming from the administration of multiple IV infusions; and to identify how nurses are being educated on key principles required to safely administer multiple IV infusions. Data Sources and Review Methods A field study was conducted at 12 hospital clinical units (sites) across Ontario, and telephone interviews were conducted with program coordinators or instructors from both the Ontario baccalaureate nursing degree programs and the Ontario postgraduate Critical Care Nursing Certificate programs. Data were analyzed using Rasmussen’s 1997 Risk Management Framework and a Health Care Failure Modes and Effects Analysis. Results Twenty-two primary patient safety issues were identified with the potential to directly cause patient harm. Seventeen of these (critical issues) were categorized into 6 themes. A cause-consequence tree was established to outline all possible contributing factors for each critical issue. Clinical recommendations were identified for immediate distribution to, and implementation by, Ontario hospitals. Future investigation efforts were planned for Phase 2 of the study. Limitations This exploratory field study identifies the potential for errors, but does not describe the direct observation of such errors, except in a few cases where errors were observed. Not all

  7. 21 CFR 526.1590 - Novobiocin infusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... strains of Staphylococcus aureus. (iii) Limitations. Do not milk for at least 6 hours after treatment... is used in dry cows for the treatment of mastitis caused by susceptible strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae. (iii) Limitations. Infuse each quarter at the time of drying...

  8. Infusing Catholic Identity throughout the Campus Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Amata

    2011-01-01

    This article, originally presented as a plenary address at the Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities 2011 Annual Meeting, addresses a bottom-up methodology for infusing the spirit of Catholic identity more deeply throughout a campus community. The author begins with an exploration of some theoretical underpinnings of this approach and…

  9. Tap water versus sterile saline solution in the colonisation of skin wounds.

    PubMed

    Resende, Margarida Mc; Rocha, Cleber A; Corrêa, Nely Fm; Veiga, Renato Rg; Passos, Sandro Jf; Novo, Neil F; Juliano, Yara; Damasceno, Carlos Av

    2016-08-01

    Irrigating wounds with tap water does not increase colonisation, but controlled studies are required for further evidence. Microbial colonisation was assessed in skin wounds, before and after irrigation with tap water, and was compared with irrigation using 0·9% sodium chloride sterile solution. The study included 120 subjects with chronic, traumatic, vascular, pressure or neuropathic wounds. A total of 60 wounds were randomly assigned to be irrigated with tap water (tap water group) and another 60 to be irrigated with 0·9% sodium chloride sterile solution (saline group), at a pressure of 0·46-0·54 PSI. Samples were collected from the centre of each wound using Levine's technique, before and after irrigation, and cultivated in thioglycollate, hypertonic mannitol agar, eosin methylene blue (EMB) agar, blood agar and Sabouraud agar at 37°C for 72 hours. There was concordance (kappa test) and discordance (McNemar test) regarding the count of positive and/or negative samples before and after irrigation in each group. The proportion of reduction of positive samples was similar for both groups in all cultures. Colony-forming unit count before and after irrigation was similar in both groups and in all cultures, except for the culture in hypertonic mannitol agar from the tap water group, for which the count was lower after irrigation (Wilcoxon z = 2·05, P = 0·041). It is concluded that skin wound irrigation with tap water leads to further reduction of Gram-positive bacteria compared with 0·9% sodium chloride sterile solution, with no difference in colonisation of haemolytic bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. PMID:26059709

  10. Cecal infusion of nutrients improves nutritional status of rats.

    PubMed

    Aghdassi, E; Raina, N; Allard, J P

    1995-11-01

    The role of colonic fermentation in providing energy was investigated in rats with small bowel transection (T) or 80% resection (SBR). Rats were randomized to receive for 12 d either saline (S) or the enteral solution (E) through a cecostomy to meet 30% of energy requirement; the rest (70%) was provided by parenteral nutrition. Although SBR-S rats lost weight significantly compared with d 1 of the study, SBR-E rats gained. Significantly greater carcass wet weight and fat were found in SBR-E and T-E rats compared with SBR-S and T-S rats. SBR-E and T-E rats had significantly greater colonic mucosal dry weight and protein compared with SBR-S and T-S rats. Cecal short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) contents were also significantly higher in SBR-E and T-E rats compared with SBR-S and T-S rats. There was no significant effect of surgery (T vs. SBR) on any of the variables studied. These results suggest that the products of fermentation of an enteral solution infused through a cecostomy contribute substantially to energy requirement, maintenance of body composition and nutritional status of rats. PMID:7472670

  11. Substance P-like peptides and vasopressin release from posterior pituitary lobe incubated in situ after intracarotid injections of hypertonic solution in rats.

    PubMed

    Traczyk, W Z; Strumillo-Dyba, E

    1977-01-01

    The experiments were performed on male rats, drinking 2% NaCl solution ad libitum for 12 days instead of tap water. The pituitary gland was exposed by the transpharyngeal approach under urethane-chloralose anaesthesia. The posterior lobe remained in neural and partial vascular connection with the hypothalamus, whereas the anterior lobe was entirely removed. Samples of the outflow medium from the incubated in situ rat posterior pituitary lobe were collected during 30 min intervals. Substance P-like peptides and vasopressin activities were assayed by the biological tests. Injections of hypertonic solution into the internal carotid artery did not change vasopressin release, but induced an increase in Substance P release from the posterior pituitary lobe into the incubation medium. Under conditions of unexcitability of the osmosensitive cells, triggering vasopressin release, the injection of hypertonic solution into the internal carotid artery stimulated the Substance P-like peptides release from the posterior pituitary lobe. PMID:22985

  12. Propofol Infusion Syndrome in Refractory Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Woo Sub; Gwak, Hye Min; Seo, Dae-Won

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Propofol is used for treating refractory status epilepticus, which has high rate of mortality. Propofol infusion syndrome is a rare but often fatal syndrome, characterized by lactic acidosis, lipidemia, and cardiac failure, associated with propofol infusion over prolonged periods of time. We investigated the clinical factors that characterize propofol infusion syndrome to know the risk of them in refractory status epilepticus. Methods: This retrospective observation study was conducted in Samsung medical center from Jan. 2005 to Dec. 2009. Thirty two patients (19 males, 13 females, aged between 16 and 64 years), with refractory status epilepsy were included. Their clinical findings and treatment outcomes were evaluated retrospectively. We divided our patients into established status epilepticus (ESE) and refractory status epilepticus (RSE). And then the patients with RSE was further subdivided into propofol treatment group (RSE-P) and the other anesthetics treatment group (RSE-O). We analyzed the clinical characteristics by comparison of the groups. Results: There were significant differences of hypotension and lipid change between ESE and RSE (p<0.05). However, there was no significant difference between RSE-P and RSE-O groups. The hospital days were longer in RSE than in ESE (p=0.012) and treatment outcome was also worse in RSE than in ESE (p=0.007) but there were no significant differences of hospital stays and treatment outcome between RSE-P and RSE-O. Conclusions: RSE is very critical disease with high mortality, which may show as many clinical changes as propofol infusion syndrome. Therefore propofol infusion syndrome might be considered as one of the clinical manifestations of RSE. PMID:24649467

  13. Intravenous infusions in chronic pain management.

    PubMed

    Kosharskyy, Boleslav; Almonte, Wilson; Shaparin, Naum; Pappagallo, Marco; Smith, Howard

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, millions of Americans are affected by chronic pain, which adds heavily to national rates of morbidity, mortality, and disability, with an ever-increasing prevalence. According to a 2011 report titled Relieving Pain in America: A Blueprint for Transforming Prevention, Care, Education, and Research by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, pain not only exacts its toll on people's lives but also on the economy with an estimated annual economic cost of at least $560 - 635 billion in health care costs and the cost of lost productivity attributed to chronic pain. Intravenous infusions of certain pharmacologic agents have been known to provide substantial pain relief in patients with various chronic painful conditions. Some of these infusions are better, and although not necessarily the first therapeutic choice, have been widely used and extensively studied. The others show promise, however are in need of further investigations. This article will focus on non-opiate intravenous infusions that have been utilized for chronic painful disorders such as fibromyalgia, neuropathic pain, phantom limb pain, post-herpetic neuralgia, complex regional pain syndromes (CRPS), diabetic neuropathy, and central pain related to stroke or spinal cord injuries. The management of patients with chronic pain conditions is challenging and continues to evolve as new treatment modalities are explored and tested. The following intravenous infusions used to treat the aforementioned chronic pain conditions will be reviewed: lidocaine, ketamine, phentolamine, dexmedetomidine, and bisphosphonates. This overview is intended to familiarize the practitioner with the variety of infusions for patients with chronic pain. It will not, however, be able to provide guidelines for their use due to the lack of sufficient evidence. PMID:23703410

  14. Subcutaneous infusion in palliative care: a focus on the neria soft 90 infusion set.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Janice

    2014-11-01

    Subcutaneous administration of medications and/or fluids can play a crucial part in supporting patients at home and thereby avoiding the need for hospitalisation. It is an area of patient care that has received little attention compared with other types of parenteral therapies. However, it is an effective and safe route for continuous administration for individuals requiring palliative care. Technological advancements have led to improved subcutaneous infusion devices, such as fine-gauge cannulae with integral sharps protection, as well as integral hypoallergenic dressings. These design features not only help to increase patient comfort but also minimise the potential for needlestick injuries, as well as providing the health professional with one sterile package containing all of the components needed to establish subcutaneous infusion. However, technological developments alone are insufficient to improve patient outcomes. Knowledge of the individual patient, together with their diagnosis and intended treatment, will influence the choice of subcutaneous infusion device, with the overall aim of minimising the potential for complications and improving comfort. This paper provides an overview of subcutaneous infusion, including the importance of patient assessment and the education and training needs of health professionals, and then focuses on one specific subcutaneous infusion device: the neria soft 90 infusion set. PMID:25426880

  15. Selective response of human airway epithelia to luminal but not serosal solution hypertonicity. Possible role for proximal airway epithelia as an osmolality transducer.

    PubMed Central

    Willumsen, N J; Davis, C W; Boucher, R C

    1994-01-01

    The response of cultured human nasal epithelia to hypertonic bathing solutions was tested using ion-selective microelectrode and quantitative microscopy. Raised luminal, but not serosal, osmolality (+/- 150 mM mannitol) decreased Na+ absorption but did not induce Cl- secretion. Raised luminal osmolality increased cell Cl- activity, Na+ activity, and transepithelial resistance and decreased both apical and basolateral membrane potentials and the fractional resistance of the apical membrane; equivalent circuit analysis revealed increases in apical, basolateral, and shunt resistances. Prolonged exposure (10 min) to 430 mosM luminal solution elicited no regulation of any parameter. Optical measurements revealed a reduction in the thickness of preparations only in response to luminal hypertonic solutions. We conclude that (a) airway epithelial cells exhibit asymmetric water transport properties, with the apical membrane water permeability exceeding that of the basolateral membrane; (b) the cellular response to volume loss is a deactivation of the basolateral membrane K+ conductance and the apical membrane Cl- conductance; (c) luminal hypertonicity slows the rate of Na+ absorption but does not induce Cl- secretion; and (d) cell volume loss increases the resistance of the paracellular path. We speculate that these properties configure human nasal epithelium to behave as an osmotic sensor, transducing information about luminal solutions to the airway wall. Images PMID:8040333

  16. Continuous Infusion of 20-Hydroxyecdysone Increased Mass of Triceps Brachii in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Diana M.; Kutzler, Louis W.; Boler, Dustin D.; Drnevich, Jenny; Killefer, John; Lila, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    Phytoecdysteroids have been attributed with numerous pharmacological properties in animals, including increasing muscle mass, and 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) is one of the most abundant phytoecdysteroids produced by plants. In this study, the physiological and gene expression effects of 20E were analyzed in C57BL/6 mice given a continuous infusion of saline or 20E (5 mg/kg/day) for 5 or 15 d using subcutaneously implanted Alzet® osmotic pumps. The masses of the total body, muscle groups and organs were determined. There was a significant increase (p = 0.01) in the mass of triceps brachii in mice treated with 20E for 5 d (115 +/− 8 mg) compared to mice treated with saline for 5 d (88 +/− 3 mg), however, there were no differences in the other measured parameters. To determine potential mechanisms of 20E in skeletal muscle, Illumina’s Mouse Whole Genome-6 v2.0 Expression BeadChips were used to evaluate changes in gene expression of the triceps brachii after 20E infusion. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis was used to identify genes with the most evidence for differential expression, of which, 16 genes involved in the skeletal and muscular system were identified. Overall, the data suggests that 20E does not have potent anabolic properties, however, a muscle-specific increase was observed and genes were identified to provide an explanation for the muscle accretion. PMID:22495969

  17. Renal intramedullary infusion of tempol normalizes the blood pressure response to intrarenal blockade of heme oxygenase-1 in angiotensin II-dependent hypertension.

    PubMed

    Stec, David E; Juncos, Luis A; Granger, Joey P

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that intramedullary inhibition of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) increases the blood pressure and superoxide production response to angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that increased renal medullary superoxide production contributes to the increase in blood pressure in response to blockade of renal medullary HO-1 in Ang II-induced hypertension. Male C57BL/6J mice (16-24 weeks of age) were implanted with chronic intrarenal medullary interstitial (IRMI) and infused with: saline, tempol (6 mM), the HO-1 inhibitor QC-13 (25 μM), or a combination of tempol + QC-13. Tempol treatment was started 2 days before infusion of QC-13. After 2 days, Ang II was infused subcutaneously at a rate of 1 μg/kg/min for 10 days. Blood pressures on days 7-10 of Ang II infusion alone averaged 150 ± 3 mm Hg in mice receiving IRMI infusion of saline. IRMI infusion of QC-13 increased blood pressure in Ang II-treated mice to 164 ± 2 (P < .05). Renal medullary superoxide production in Ang II-treated mice was significantly increased by infusion of QC-13 alone. Ang II-treated mice receiving IRMI infusion of tempol had a blood pressure of 136 ± 3 mm Hg. Ang II-treated mice receiving IRMI infusion of tempol and QC-13 had a significantly lower blood pressure (142 ± 2 mm Hg,P < .05) than mice receiving QC-13 alone. The increase in renal medullary superoxide production was normalized by infusion of tempol alone or in combination with QC-13. These results demonstrate that renal medullary interstitial blockade of HO-1 exacerbates Ang II-induced hypertension via a mechanism that is dependent on enhanced superoxide generation and highlight the important antioxidant function of HO-1 in the renal medulla. PMID:26922123

  18. 75 FR 21641 - Infusion Pumps; Public Meeting; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Infusion Pumps; Public Meeting; Request for Comments AGENCY... Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public meeting regarding external infusion pumps... infusion pump use, to help the agency identify quality assurance strategies to mitigate these problems,...

  19. [Portable elastomeric infusion system applied to patients with knee prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Soler, Gemma; Quiles, Olga; Nicolau, Agnes; Faura, Teresa; Moreno, Cristina

    2007-03-01

    An LV infuser consists of an infusion pump which can administer medicines via various methods: intravenous, epidural, subdural, o subcutaneous. Its usefulness is based on the administration of medicines such as oncological drugs and/or analgesic by means of a continuous infusion. PMID:17474369

  20. Career Education Infused into the Social Studies Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Patricia; Griggs, Shirley A.

    Social studies teachers can help students develop self- and career awareness by infusing career education into the social studies curriculum. The infusion method of career education is preferred since it can make the content of lessons more relevant for students. In addition, infusion of career education is particularly appropriate in social…

  1. 40 CFR 721.10287 - Infused carbon nanostructures (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Infused carbon nanostructures (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10287 Infused carbon nanostructures (generic). (a) Chemical substance... infused carbon nanostructures (PMN P-11-188) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10706 - Infused carbon nanostructures (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Infused carbon nanostructures (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10706 Infused carbon nanostructures (generic). (a) Chemical substance... infused carbon nanostructures (PMN P-12-576) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10287 - Infused carbon nanostructures (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Infused carbon nanostructures (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10287 Infused carbon nanostructures (generic). (a) Chemical substance... infused carbon nanostructures (PMN P-11-188) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10287 - Infused carbon nanostructures (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Infused carbon nanostructures (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10287 Infused carbon nanostructures (generic). (a) Chemical substance... infused carbon nanostructures (PMN P-11-188) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  5. Preoperative mannitol infusion improves perioperative cerebral oxygen saturation and enhances postoperative recovery after laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Mousa, Wesam F.; Mowafi, Hany A.; Al-Metwalli, Roshdi R.; Al-Ghamdi, Abdulmohsin A.; Al-Gameel, Haytham Z.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To test the effect of preoperative mannitol infusion on perioperative decreased cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO2) during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods: Forty patients scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy were enrolled in this study conducted at Dammam Hospital of the University, Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from December 2013 to June 2014. Patients received either 0.5 g/kg of 20% intravenous mannitol infusion over 10 minutes before induction of anesthesia (group M), or an equal volume of normal saline instead (group C). Primary outcome variable was rSO2. Other variables included extubation time, clinical assessment of consciousness recovery using the Modified Observer’s Assessment of Alertness/Sedation Scale (OAA/S), and the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) for cognitive evaluation. Results: Anesthesia induction increased rSO2 in both groups. Pneumoperitoneum decreased rSO2 in group C, but not in group M. This drop in rSO2 in the group C reached its maximum 30 minutes after extubation, and was significantly less than the preinduction value. Time to extubation in group M was significantly shorter compared to group C (p=0.007). The OAAS in group M at 10 min after extubation was significantly higher compared to group C. No differences were found between the 2 groups in cognitive function as measured by MMSE score. Conclusion: Preoperative mannitol infusion maintains perioperative rSO2 during laparoscopic cholecystectomy and shortens extubation time with earlier resurgence of OAAS. PMID:26446331

  6. Effects of luminal glucose versus nonnutritive infusates on jejunal mass and absorption in the rat.

    PubMed

    Richter, G C; Levine, G M; Shiau, Y F

    1983-11-01

    These studies were designed to better understand the effects of luminal nutrition on intestinal mass and function. Parenterally nourished rats received a midjejunal infusion of either 0.9% saline, 10% glucose, 10% 3-O-methyl glucose, or 30% glucose. A fifth group underwent sham operation. After 7 days, intestinal mass and in vitro glucose and leucine uptake were measured in the intestine just distal to the infusion site. Luminal infusion led to greater intestinal mass in all groups compared to controls, but only the 10% and 30% glucose groups had significantly greater overall glucose uptake. Kinetic analysis revealed a greater apparent maximal transport rate in both glucose groups. The 30% glucose group had a greater apparent maximal transport rate for leucine and permeability for glucose and leucine. These data confirmed that "work load," in addition to luminal nutrition, maintains intestinal mass. However, adaptation of intestinal transport is more specific and appears to be regulated both by substrate metabolism and caloric density. PMID:6413290

  7. Chronic infusion of opiate peptides to rat cerebrospinal fluid with osmotic minipumps.

    PubMed

    Saland, L C; Ortiz, E; Samora, A

    1984-09-01

    Beta-endorphin-related opiate peptides or the opiate antagonist naloxone were chronically infused for periods of 24 to 48 hours to the lateral cerebral ventricle of adult male rats using Alza osmotic minipumps. Previous studies have suggested a "chemotactic"-like effect of opiate peptides for supraependymal macrophages in the region of the third ventricle of the brain. The present study demonstrates a stimulatory effect of beta-endorphin infusion on the appearance of lymphocyte and neutrophil-like cells, in addition to macrophages, in the region of the third ventricle, suggestive of an intracerebral inflammatory response. None of the other molecules, including alpha-endorphin, methionine-enkephalin, naloxone, or sterile saline produced similar cellular responses after infusion, although some of the latter substances may have induced the appearance of supraependymal neuron-like cells in the area. Observations suggest that the chronic presence of beta-endorphin, a biologically active opiate peptide, will interact with cells of the immune system, which have the ability to gain access to the cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:6091499

  8. Circadian continuous chemotherapy of renal cell carcinoma with an implantable, programmable infusion pump.

    PubMed

    Damascelli, B; Marchianò, A; Spreafico, C; Lutman, R; Salvetti, M; Bonalumi, M G; Mauri, M; Garbagnati, F; Del Nero, A; Comeri, G

    1990-07-15

    The authors treated 42 metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients who had received no previous chemotherapy or radiation therapy with circadian venous continuous infusion of 5-fluoro-2-deoxyuridine (FUDR). The drug was delivered by Medtronic Synchromed implantable pump (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN) in 14-day cycles alternating with 14-day intervals of heparinized physiologic saline infusion. In the course of 24 months 444 cycles of therapy have been given for a total of 12449 days of pump function. Of the patients observed for at least 3 months (range, 3 to 23 months; median, 7 months) three showed complete response (7%; 95% confidence interval, 0% to 15%), three partial response (7%; confidence interval, 0% to 15%), 18 stable disease, and 18 showed progression. Eighteen patients, all with advanced disease at the time of implantation, were living 6 months after treatment started. Circadian continuous central venous infusion of FUDR is minimally toxic. The FUDR can be delivered safely and conveniently in this way for long spans. This therapy is as active as any currently available treatment, is administered in an entirely outpatient setting, and is associated with a normal quality of life. PMID:2142443

  9. Cholesterol diet counteracts repeated anesthesia/infusion-induced cognitive deficits in male Brown Norway rats

    PubMed Central

    Hohsfield, Lindsay A.; Ehrlich, Daniela; Humpel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    A variety of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases are associated with alterations in cholesterol levels and metabolism. Moreover, convincing evidence shows that high cholesterol diet can lead to learning and memory impairments. On the other hand, a significant body of research has also demonstrated that learning is improved by elevated dietary cholesterol. Despite these conflicting findings, it is clear that cholesterol plays an important role in these cognitive properties. However, it remains unclear how this blood-brain barrier (BBB)-impenetrable molecule affects the brain and under what circumstances it provides either detrimental or beneficial effects to learning and memory. The aim of this study was to characterize the effects of 5% cholesterol diet on six-month-old inbred Brown Norway rats. More important, we sought to examine the role that cholesterol can play when repeated anesthesia and intravenous infusion disrupts cognitive function. This present study supports previous work showing that enriched cholesterol diet leads to significant alterations in neuroinflammation and BBB disruption. Following repeated anesthesia and intravenous infusion of saline we observe that animals under normal diet conditions exhibit significant deficiencies in spatial learning and cholinergic neuron populations compared to animals under enriched cholesterol diet, which do not show such deficiencies. These findings indicate that cholesterol diet can protect against or counteract anesthesia/infusion-induced cognitive deficits. Ultimately, these results suggest that cholesterol homeostasis serves an important functional role in the brain and that altering this homeostasis can either exert positive or negative effects on cognitive properties. PMID:23973449

  10. [Amelioration of glucose tolerance and correction of reactive hypoglycemias induced by intravenous calcium infusion cannot be explained by modifications in blood glucagon levels].

    PubMed

    Vexiau, P; Cathelineau, G; Luyckx, A; Lefebvre, P

    1986-08-01

    Glucagon is not involved in intravenous calcium-induced improvement in glucose tolerance nor in correction of reactive hypoglycemia. Recent investigations have shown that intravenous (IV) calcium infusion improved blood glucose values in patients with moderately impaired glucose tolerance, and suppressed hypoglycemia in patients with isolated reactive hypoglycemia. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility that these changes were secondary to calcium induced alterations in glucagon (IRG) secretion. Four groups of subjects were studied: group 1: normal controls (n = 7); group 2: patients with isolated hypoglycemia (n = 9); group 3: patients with impaired glucose tolerance without reactive hypoglycemia (n = 9) and group 4: patients with impaired glucose tolerance and reactive hypoglycemia (n = 10). All patients were submitted in randomized order to two 5 hour oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT, 75 g glucose), during a simultaneous infusion, either of saline or of calcium (calcium gluconate 36.3 mEq/5 h.), starting 30 minutes before the OGTT. In none of the groups did calcium infusion influence basal plasma IRG. In group 1 and 3, oral glucose significantly suppressed IRG, and during IV calcium infusion this suppression disappeared. In group 2, glucose ingestion resulted in a paradoxical increase in IRG both during saline and during calcium infusion. In group 4, oral glucose induced a significant drop in plasma IRG and a rebound rise during hypoglycemia, results which were unaffected by IV calcium infusion. These data suggest that glucagon is not involved in the alterations of blood glucose profiles during OGTT observed during intravenous calcium infusion. PMID:3770273

  11. The Development of Recurrent Seizures after Continuous Intrahippocampal Infusion of Methionine Sulfoximine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Zaveri, Hitten P.; Lee, Tih-Shih W; Eid, Tore

    2009-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase is deficient in astrocytes in the epileptogenic hippocampus in human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). To explore the role of this deficiency in the pathophysiology of MTLE, rats were continuously infused with the glutamine synthetase inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (MSO, 0.625 µg/h) or 0.9% NaCl (saline control) unilaterally into the hippocampus. The seizures caused by MSO were assessed by video-intracranial electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring. All (28 of 28) of the MSO-treated animals and none (0 of 12) of the saline-treated animals developed recurrent seizures. Most recurrent seizures appeared in clusters of 2 days’ duration (median; range, 1 to 12 days). The first cluster was characterized by frequent, predominantly Stage I seizures, which presented after the first 9.5 h of infusion (median; range, 5.5 to 31.7 h). Subsequent clusters of less-frequent, mainly partial seizures occurred after a clinically silent interval of 7.1 days (median; range, 1.8 to 16.2 days). The ictal intracranial EEGs shared several characteristics with recordings of partial seizures in humans, such as a distinct evolution of the amplitude and frequency of the EEG signal. The neuropathology caused by MSO had similarities to hippocampal sclerosis in 23.1% of cases, whereas 26.9% of the animals had minimal neuronal loss in the hippocampus. Moderate to severe diffuse neuronal loss was observed in 50% of the animals. In conclusion, the model of intrahippocampal MSO infusion replicates key features of human MTLE and may represent a useful tool for further studies of the cellular, molecular and electrophysiological mechanisms of this disorder. PMID:19747915

  12. Hypertonic dextrose injections (prolotherapy) in the treatment of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sit, Regina Ws; Chung, Vincent Ch; Reeves, Kenneth D; Rabago, David; Chan, Keith Kw; Chan, Dicken Cc; Wu, Xinyin; Ho, Robin St; Wong, Samuel Ys

    2016-01-01

    Hypertonic dextrose injections (prolotherapy) is an emerging treatment for symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) but its efficacy is uncertain. We conducted a systematic review with meta-analysis to synthesize clinical evidence on the effect of prolotherapy for knee OA. Fifteen electronic databases were searched from their inception to September 2015. The primary outcome of interest was score change on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC). Three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of moderate risk of bias and one quasi-randomized trial were included, with data from a total of 258 patients. In the meta-analysis of two eligible studies, prolotherapy is superior to exercise alone by a standardized mean difference (SMD) of 0.81 (95% CI: 0.18 to 1.45, p = 0.012), 0.78 (95% CI: 0.25 to 1.30, p = 0.001) and 0.62 (95% CI: 0.04 to 1.20, p = 0.035) on the WOMAC composite scale; and WOMAC function and pain subscale scores respectively. Moderate heterogeneity exists in all cases. Overall, prolotherapy conferred a positive and significant beneficial effect in the treatment of knee OA. Adequately powered, longer-term trials with uniform end points are needed to better elucidate the efficacy of prolotherapy. PMID:27146849

  13. Ejaculatio praecox, erectio praecox, and detumescentia praecox as symptoms of a hypertonic state in lifelong premature ejaculation: a new hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Waldinger, Marcel D

    2014-06-01

    In the last two decades, in vivo animal research and human neurobiological, genetic and pharmacological research of lifelong premature ejaculation (PE) have much contributed to a better understanding of the role of the central and peripheral nervous systems in mediating ejaculation. Research of genetic polymorphisms in men with lifelong PE and clinical research of the validity of the classification into four PE subtypes have provided a better insight into lifelong PE and its distinction from the three other PE subtypes. Nevertheless, a number of symptoms of lifelong PE and its treatment by SSRIs are still not well understood. In the current article, it will be argued that lifelong PE is characterized not only by early ejaculations (ejaculatio praecox), a diminished control over ejaculation, and negative personal consequences, but also by early erections (erectio praecox) and an immediately occurring detumescence of the penis after ejaculation (detumescentia praecox) as symptoms of an (sub)acute hypertonic or hypererotic physical state when making love. Based on animal research it is postulated that the facilitated erection, facilitated ejaculation and facilitated penile detumescence are associated with centrally and peripherally increased oxytocin release. In addition, it is postulated that mechano- and thermosensory activity of transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels, located in skin receptors of the glans penis, are associated with lifelong PE. Research into the three characteristics of the (sub)acute hypererotic state will presumably contribute to a better phenomenological description of and better neurobiological understanding of lifelong PE and its delineation to the three other PE subtypes. PMID:24333546

  14. Effects of hypertonic stimuli and arginine vasotocin (AVT) on water absorption response in Japanese treefrog, Hyla japonica.

    PubMed

    Maejima, Sho; Yamada, Toshiki; Hamada, Takayuki; Matsuda, Kouhei; Uchiyama, Minoru

    2008-06-01

    Anuran amphibians do not drink orally but absorb water osmotically through the highly permeable ventral skin. In this cutaneous water absorption, roles of the putative cerebral osmoreceptors and functions of arginine vasotocin (AVT) were examined in the central nervous system of the Japanese treefrog, Hyla japonica. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intralymphatic sac (ILS) administration of various hypertonic solutions (NaCl, mannitol and urea) significantly extended the residence time in water in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting facilitation of water absorption in frogs. ICV injection of AVT also increased significantly the residence time in a dose-dependent manner. The water absorption effect of AVT was significantly inhibited by pretreatment of ICV OPC-21268, a vasopressin V(1) receptor antagonist. But pre-ICV injection of OPC-31260, a vasopressin V(2) receptor antagonist, did not block the water absorption effect of AVT. Extension of the residence time induced by hyperosmotic NaCl (1000 mOsm) ICV injection was significantly inhibited by pretreatment of ICV OPC-21268. The present results showed that increases of osmotic pressure in plasma and/or cerebrospinal fluid stimulate water absorption response, suggesting that osmoreceptors are certainly present in the central nervous system and AVT may directly stimulate water absorption in the treefrog. It is also suggested that AVT activates cellular mechanisms via V(1)-like but not V(2)-like receptors in the central nervous system and facilitates water absorption response in the treefrog. PMID:18555070

  15. Hypertonic dextrose injections (prolotherapy) in the treatment of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sit, Regina WS; Chung, Vincent CH; Reeves, Kenneth D.; Rabago, David; Chan, Keith KW; Chan, Dicken CC; Wu, Xinyin; Ho, Robin ST; Wong, Samuel YS

    2016-01-01

    Hypertonic dextrose injections (prolotherapy) is an emerging treatment for symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) but its efficacy is uncertain. We conducted a systematic review with meta-analysis to synthesize clinical evidence on the effect of prolotherapy for knee OA. Fifteen electronic databases were searched from their inception to September 2015. The primary outcome of interest was score change on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC). Three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of moderate risk of bias and one quasi–randomized trial were included, with data from a total of 258 patients. In the meta-analysis of two eligible studies, prolotherapy is superior to exercise alone by a standardized mean difference (SMD) of 0.81 (95% CI: 0.18 to 1.45, p = 0.012), 0.78 (95% CI: 0.25 to 1.30, p = 0.001) and 0.62 (95% CI: 0.04 to 1.20, p = 0.035) on the WOMAC composite scale; and WOMAC function and pain subscale scores respectively. Moderate heterogeneity exists in all cases. Overall, prolotherapy conferred a positive and significant beneficial effect in the treatment of knee OA. Adequately powered, longer-term trials with uniform end points are needed to better elucidate the efficacy of prolotherapy. PMID:27146849

  16. Impact of priming the infusion system on the performance of target-controlled infusion of remifentanil

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Yeop; Moon, Bong-Ki; Lee, Jong Hyuk; Jo, Youn Yi

    2013-01-01

    Background The start-up behavior of syringe and syringe pump is known to be one of the causes of inaccurate intravenous infusion. This study evaluated the method of priming the infusion system (PRIMING), and its impact on the target-controlled infusion (TCI) of two remifentanil diluents. Methods PRIMING was performed using an evacuation of 2.0 ml to the atmosphere prior to TCI. Forty-eight TCI, using 50 µg/ml (Remi50) or 20 µg/ml (Remi20) of diluents, were performed targeting 4.0 ng/ml of effect-site concentration (Ceff), with PRIMING or not. The gravimetrical measurements of the delivered infusates reproduced actual Ceff. The bolus amount and time to reach 95% target were compared. Results Without PRIMING, Remi50 infused less bolus (43 ± 23 %) than Remi20 (19 ± 9 %) (P = 0.003), and showed more delayed increase of Ceff (11.2 ± 4.0 min) than Remi20 (7.4 ± 0.4 min) (P = 0.028). However, PRIMING significantly decreased the deficit of the bolus (2 ± 1%), as well as the delay of the increase of Ceff in Remi50 (1.2 ± 0.2 min) (both P < 0.001). In addition, with PRIMING, the start-up bolus showed minimal difference to the nominal bolus (1 and 2%), and Ceff were increased to 4.0 ± 0.1 ng/ml at the expected time of peak effect, irrespective of the diluents. Conclusions Proper operation of the syringe pump used in the priming of the syringe may be helpful in reduction of the inaccuracy of TCI, particularly during the early phase of infusion, or the infusion of a more concentrated diluent. PMID:23741562

  17. Software Engineering Technology Infusion Within NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelkowitz, Marvin V.

    1996-01-01

    Abstract technology transfer is of crucial concern to both government and industry today. In this paper, several software engineering technologies used within NASA are studied, and the mechanisms, schedules, and efforts at transferring these technologies are investigated. The goals of this study are: 1) to understand the difference between technology transfer (the adoption of a new method by large segments of an industry) as an industry-wide phenomenon and the adoption of a new technology by an individual organization (called technology infusion); and 2) to see if software engineering technology transfer differs from other engineering disciplines. While there is great interest today in developing technology transfer models for industry, it is the technology infusion process that actually causes changes in the current state of the practice.

  18. Comparing the Efficacy of 7%, 3% and 0.9% Saline in Moderate to Severe Bronchiolitis in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Köse, Seçil; Şehriyaroğlu, Ahmet; Esen, Feyza; Özdemir, Ahmet; Kardaş, Zehra; Altuğ, Umut; Karakuş, Esef; Özcan, Alper; Kısaarslan, Ali Fatih; Elmalı, Ferhan; Torun, Yasemin Altuner; Köse, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is no standard treatment option in acute bronchiolitis. 3–7% hypertonic saline (HS) seems to be the effective treatment choice for reducing the hospitalization day. Aims: To compare the effect of nebulized 7% HS/salbutamol and 3% HS/salbutamol to 0.9% saline/salbutamol. The primary outcome measure was the effect of study drugs on the length of hospital stay (LOS). Secondary outcome measures were safety and efficacy in reducing the clinical severity score (CSS) at the 24 hours of the study. Study Design: Prospective, double-blinded randomized clinical study. Methods: The study consists of 104 infants. Groups were constituted according to the treatment they received: These are, group A – 0.9% saline/salbutamol, group B -3% HS/salbutamol and group C-7% HS/salbutamol. Heart beat, Bronchiolitis CSS and oxygen saturation of the patients were determined before and after nebulization. The patients were monitored for adverse reactions. Results: Length of hospital stay in group A, B and C were as follows; 72.0 (20–288) hours in group A, 64.0 (12–168) hours in group B and 60.0 (12–264) hours in group C. No significant differences was observed among three groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: 7% HS and 3% HS does not have any effect to decrease LOS for infants with bronchiolitis. PMID:27403389

  19. Dynamic regulation of the root hydraulic conductivity of barley plants in response to salinity/osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Toshiyuki; Horie, Tomoaki; Nakahara, Yoshiki; Tsuji, Nobuya; Shibasaka, Mineo; Katsuhara, Maki

    2015-05-01

    Salinity stress significantly reduces the root hydraulic conductivity (Lpr) of several plant species including barley (Hordeum vulgare). Here we characterized changes in the Lpr of barley plants in response to salinity/osmotic stress in detail using a pressure chamber. Salt-tolerant and intermediate barley cultivars, K305 and Haruna-nijyo, but not a salt-sensitive cultivar, I743, exhibited characteristic time-dependent Lpr changes induced by 100 mM NaCl. An identical response was evoked by isotonic sorbitol, indicating that this phenomenon was triggered by osmotic imbalances. Further examination of this mechanism using barley cv. Haruna-nijyo plants in combination with the use of various inhibitors suggested that various cellular processes such as protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation and membrane internalization appear to be involved. Interestingly, the three above-mentioned barley cultivars did not exhibit a remarkable difference in root cell sap osmolality under hypertonic conditions, in contrast to the case of Lpr. The possible biological significance of the regulation of Lpr in barley plants upon salinity/osmotic stress is discussed. PMID:25634964

  20. Cerebral Critical Closing Pressure During Infusion Tests.

    PubMed

    Varsos, Georgios V; Czosnyka, Marek; Smielewski, Peter; Garnett, Matthew R; Liu, Xiuyun; Adams, Hadie; Pickard, John D; Czosnyka, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    We studied possible correlations between cerebral hemodynamic indices based on critical closing pressure (CrCP) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compensatory dynamics, as assessed during lumbar infusion tests. Our data consisted of 34 patients with normal-pressure hydrocephalus who undertook an infusion test, in conjunction with simultaneous transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD) monitoring of blood flow velocity (FV). CrCP was calculated from the monitored signals of ICP, arterial blood pressure (ABP), and FV, whereas vascular wall tension (WT) was estimated as CrCP - ICP. The closing margin (CM) expresses the difference between ABP and CrCP. ICP increased during infusion from 6.67 ± 4.61 to 24.98 ± 10.49 mmHg (mean ± SD; p < 0.001), resulting in CrCP rising by 22.93 % (p < 0.001), with WT decreasing by 11.33 % (p = 0.005) owing to vasodilatation. CM showed a tendency to decrease, albeit not significantly (p = 0.070), because of rising ABP (9.12 %; p = 0.005), and was significantly different from zero for the whole duration of the tests (52.78 ± 22.82 mmHg; p < 0.001). CM at baseline correlated inversely with brain elasticity (R = -0.358; p = 0.038). Neither CrCP nor WT correlated with CSF compensatory parameters. Overall, CrCP increases and WT decreases during infusion tests, whereas CM at baseline pressure may act as a characterizing indicator of the cerebrospinal compensatory reserve. PMID:27165909

  1. Irreversible sediment formation in green tea infusions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong-Quan; Chen, Gen-Sheng; Wang, Qiu-Shuang; Yuan, Hai-Bo; Feng, Chun-Hong; Yin, Jun-Feng

    2012-03-01

    The formation of irreversible tea sediment (IRS) and its chemical components in green tea infusions were investigated. The results showed that the amounts of IRS in the green tea infusions from various tea cultivars ranged from 0.10 to 1.47 mg/mL. The amount of IRS was influenced remarkably by the chemical components in the green tea infusion. Principal component analysis and regression analysis indicated that gallated catechins, Mn, Ca, caffeine, Na, and (-)-gallocatechin gallate (GCG) were the principal components. IRS (mg/mL) = -4.226 + 0.275 gallated catechins + 79.551 Na + 7.321 Mn + 21.055 Ca + 0.513 caffeine - 0.129 GCG (R2 = 0.697). The contents of the main chemical components in the reversible tea sediment (RTS) and IRS were markedly different, especially the minerals. Large amount of minerals participated in the formation of irreversible green tea sediment. The amount of IRS increased with the extraction temperature. PMID:22329921

  2. Pancreatic angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 improves glycemia in angiotensin II-infused mice

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Kavaljit H.; Xia, Huijing; Pedersen, Kim Brint; Speth, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    An overactive renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is known to contribute to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Although ACE2 overexpression has been shown to be protective against the overactive RAS, a role for pancreatic ACE2, particularly in the islets of Langerhans, in regulating glycemia in response to elevated angiotensin II (Ang II) levels remains to be elucidated. This study examined the role of endogenous pancreatic ACE2 and the impact of elevated Ang II levels on the enzyme's ability to alleviate hyperglycemia in an Ang II infusion mouse model. Male C57bl/6J mice were infused with Ang II or saline for a period of 14 days. On the 7th day of infusion, either an adenovirus encoding human ACE2 (Ad-hACE2) or a control adenovirus (Ad-eGFP) was injected into the mouse pancreas. After an additional 7–8 days, glycemia and plasma insulin levels as well as RAS components expression and oxidative stress were assessed. Ang II-infused mice exhibited hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic islets compared with control mice. This phenotype was associated with decreased ACE2 expression and activity, increased Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) expression, and increased oxidative stress in the mouse pancreas. Ad-hACE2 treatment restored pancreatic ACE2 expression and compensatory activity against Ang II-mediated impaired glycemia, thus improving β-cell function. Our data suggest that decreased pancreatic ACE2 is a link between overactive RAS and impaired glycemia in T2DM. Moreover, maintenance of a normal endogenous ACE2 compensatory activity in the pancreas appears critical to avoid β-cell dysfunction, supporting a therapeutic potential for ACE2 in controlling diabetes resulting from an overactive RAS. PMID:23462816

  3. Fat embolism with the use of intraosseous infusion during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Fiallos, M; Kissoon, N; Abdelmoneim, T; Johnson, L; Murphy, S; Lu, L; Masood, S; Idris, A

    1997-08-01

    The objective of this prospective study was to assess the incidence and magnitude of fat emboli after cardiopulmonary resuscitation and intraosseous infusions. An animal laboratory at a university center was used to study 33 mixed-breed piglets. The piglets underwent hypoxic cardiac arrest followed by chest compressions and mechanical ventilation for a minimum of 30 minutes. The animals were divided in groups: group 1 (n = 5), which had no intraosseous cannulas, group 2 (n = 6), which had intraosseous cannulas with infusion, groups 3 (n = 6), 4 (n = 6), and 5 (n = 8), which had intraosseous cannulas with infusion of epinephrine, normal saline, and sodium bicarbonate respectively, and group 6 (n = 2), which was a sham group with no intraosseous cannulas and no cardiopulmonary resuscitation. At cessation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, representative lung samples were collected from upper and lower lobes of each lung and observed for fat globules and bone marrow elements. Fat globules were seen in the peribronchial blood vessels and intravascular areas throughout all lung fields of groups 1 through 5. There was no difference in appearance or distribution of fat globules among the 5 treatment groups. Analysis of variance showed no statistical significance (P < 0.05) within or among groups 1 through 5. The use of the intraosseous cannula for infusion of emergency drugs and fluids did not increase the magnitude of fat embolization over cardiopulmonary resuscitation alone in this animal model. The benefits of using this procedure in critically ill children as a means of rapid vascular access for resuscitation is well established. However, the risk of fat embolism in this population needs further study. PMID:9258208

  4. Effect of prolonged intravenous glucose and essential amino acid infusion on nitrogen balance, muscle protein degradation and ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene expression in calves

    PubMed Central

    Sadiq, Fouzia; Crompton, Leslie A; Scaife, Jes R; Lomax, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    Background Intravenous infusions of glucose and amino acids increase both nitrogen balance and muscle accretion. We hypothesised that co-infusion of glucose (to stimulate insulin) and essential amino acids (EAA) would act additively to improve nitrogen balance by decreasing muscle protein degradation in association with alterations in muscle expression of components of the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway. Methods We examined the effect of a 5 day intravenous infusions of saline, glucose, EAA and glucose + EAA, on urinary nitrogen excretion and muscle protein degradation. We carried out the study in 6 restrained calves since ruminants offer the advantage that muscle protein degradation can be assessed by excretion of 3 methyl-histidine and multiple muscle biopsies can be taken from the same animal. On the final day of infusion blood samples were taken for hormone and metabolite measurement and muscle biopsies for expression of ubiquitin, the 14-kDa E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme, and proteasome sub-units C2 and C8. Results On day 5 of glucose infusion, plasma glucose, insulin and IGF-1 concentrations were increased while urea nitrogen excretion and myofibrillar protein degradation was decreased. Co-infusion of glucose + EAA prevented the loss of urinary nitrogen observed with EAA infusions alone and enhanced the increase in plasma IGF-1 concentration but there was no synergistic effect of glucose + EAA on the decrease in myofibrillar protein degradation. Muscle mRNA expression of the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme, 14-kDa E2 and proteasome sub-unit C2 were significantly decreased, after glucose but not amino acid infusions, and there was no further response to the combined infusions of glucose + EAA. Conclusion Prolonged glucose infusion decreases myofibrillar protein degradation, prevents the excretion of infused EAA, and acts additively with EAA to increase plasma IGF-1 and improve net nitrogen balance. There was no evidence of synergistic effects between

  5. Immediate infusion-related adverse reactions to intravenous immunoglobulin in a prospective cohort of 1765 infusions.

    PubMed

    Bichuetti-Silva, Danielli C; Furlan, Fernanda P; Nobre, Fernanda A; Pereira, Camila T M; Gonçalves, Tessa R T; Gouveia-Pereira, Mariana; Rota, Rafael; Tavares, Lusinete; Mazzucchelli, Juliana T L; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz T

    2014-12-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is increasingly recommended for many diseases apart from primary immunodeficiency diseases (PID). Although effective and safe, adverse reactions may occur. We conducted a 2-year prospective observational study in 117 patients with PID who received regular IVIG replacement therapy at a median dose of 600 mg/kg every 3 to 4 weeks to examine IVIG's adverse effects; 1765 infusions were performed (mean=15/patient) in 75 males and 42 females (aged 3 months to 77 years) in 3 groups: ≤ 9 years (34.2%), 10-19 years (26.5%), and ≥ 20 years (39.3%). Fifty patients had common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), 11 had X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA), and 55 had other immune system disorders. The drugs administered were Octagam® (49.1%), Tegeline® (17.3%), Imunoglobulin® (18.6%), Flebogama® (12.9%), Vigam® (1.2%), and Kiovig® (0.4%). Immediate infusion-related adverse reactions occurred in the cases of 38 out 1765 infusions (2.15%, IC95% 1.53%-2.94%), which were classified as mild (81.6%), moderate (10.5%), or severe (7.9%). Time until reaction ranged from 10 to 240 min (mean = 85.7, median = 60). Reaction rates were similar across age groups. The most common reactions were malaise, headache, and abdominal pain. Reported severe events were tightness of the throat and seizure. All symptoms improved with temporary or complete IVIG interruption and symptomatic medications. Sixteen of 38 reactions to infusions occurred in the presence of an acute infection (p=0.09). Tegeline® represented a greater reaction risk factor than Octagam® (p < 0.001). These results indicate that IVIG infusion can be considered a safe procedure. Low reaction incidence and few severe immediate infusion-related adverse reactions were observed. PMID:25257732

  6. Kiovig for primary immunodeficiency: reduced infusion and decreased costs per infusion.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Mark; Simoens, Steven

    2011-09-01

    Kiovig is a ready-to-use 10% liquid immunoglobulin preparation that is medically indicated for the treatment of primary immunodeficiency. This study aims to conduct an economic evaluation which compares the intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) preparations Kiovig, Multigam, and Sandoglobulin from the Belgian societal perspective. As three prospective studies have observed no difference in outcomes, a cost-minimization analysis is considered appropriate to evaluate differences in treatment costs that can arise from IVIgs. A decision-analytic model simulated treatment costs attributed to one infusion. Resource use data were derived from a Dutch costing study. Cost items included immunoglobulin costs, pharmacy administration and nursing costs, mini-forfait for hospital infusion, costs of adverse events, and lost productivity with 2009 as base year. Cost data were identified from published sources and Belgian hospital administrators. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis explored the impact of parameter uncertainty on cost results. Costs per infusion cycle in adult primary immunodeficiency patients were €1,046 (95% confidence interval: €1,006-1,093) with Kiovig; €1,102 (€1,064-1,147) with Multigam; and €1,147 (€1,108-1,193) with Sandoglobulin. The average cost savings per infusion with Kiovig as compared to Multigam and Sandoglobulin amounted to €56 and €101 per infusion. In conclusion, treatment costs with Kiovig were shown to be lower as compared to other IVIgs in Belgium. Reduced costs per infusion were attributed to lower costs associated with treating adverse events and the opportunity cost of nursing time and time off work for working adults. PMID:21570491

  7. Compatibility of carbapenem antibiotics with nafamostat mesilate in arterial infusion therapy for severe acute pancreatitis: stabilities of carbapenem antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Yukihiro; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Miyazawa, Shirou; Kida, Mitsuhiro; Souma, Kazui; Koizumi, Wasaburou; Sunakawa, Keisuke; Kuroyama, Masakazu

    2012-08-01

    The effectiveness of continuous regional arterial infusion therapy using protease inhibitors and antibiotics for severe acute pancreatitis has been previously reported. Carbapenem antibiotics, which have a broad antibacterial spectrum, and nafamostat mesilate are often used for this therapeutic approach. We investigated the compatibility of various carbapenem antibiotics with nafamostat mesilate. Carbapenem antibiotics were dissolved in 30 mL of saline or 5% glucose and the appearance, pH, and stability of the solutions were determined. The changes in each carbapenem antibiotic solution after mixing with nafamostat mesilate were then investigated. Biapenem and doripenem showed a residual rate of > or = 90% at 8 hours after dissolution in saline or 5% glucose and exhibited an appropriate appearance and residual rate (> or = 90%). After mixing with nafamostat mesilate, biapenem maintained a residual rate of > or = 90% for the longest time period (8 hours) and exhibited a slight coloration, followed by doripenem (6 hours) and meropenem dissolved in saline. The other carbapenem antibiotics that were tested exhibited changes in appearance or their residual rate. Biapenem and doripenem, which exert their effects in a time-dependent manner, can be infused for prolonged periods for the treatment of not only severe acute pancreatitis, but also other severe infections. PMID:23259254

  8. Mixing during intravertebral arterial infusions in an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Robert J; Warren, Kathy; Balis, Frank; Patronas, Nicholas; Dedrick, Robert L

    2002-06-01

    Regional delivery of drugs can offer a pharmacokinetic advantage in the treatment of localized tumors. One method of regional delivery is by intra-arterial infusion into the basilar/vertebral artery network that provides local access to infratentorial tumors, which are frequent locations of childhood brain cancers. Proper delivery of drug by infused solutions requires adequate mixing of the infusate at the site of infusion within the artery lumen. Our mixing studies with an in vitro model of the vertebral artery network indicate that streaming of drug solution is likely to occur at low, steady infusion rates of 2 ml/min. Streaming leads to maldistribution of drug to distal perfused brain regions and may result in toxic levels in some regions while concurrently yielding subtherapeutic levels in adjacent regions. According to our model findings, distribution to both brain hemispheres is not likely following infusion into a single vertebral artery even if the infusate is well-mixed at the infusion site. This outcome results from the unique fluid flow properties of two converging channels, which are represented by the left and right vertebral branches converging into the basilar. Fluid in the model remains stratified on the side of the basilar artery served by the infused vertebral artery. Careful thought and planning of the methods of intravertebral drug infusions for treating posterior fossa tumors are required to assure proper distribution of the drug to the desired tissue regions. Improper delivery may be responsible for some noted toxicities or for failure of the treatments. PMID:12164691

  9. Endothelial Cell Toxicity of Vancomycin Infusion Combined with Other Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Drouet, Maryline; Chai, Feng; Barthélémy, Christine; Lebuffe, Gilles; Debaene, Bertrand; Odou, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    French guidelines recommend central intravenous (i.v.) infusion for high concentrations of vancomycin, but peripheral intravenous (p.i.v.) infusion is often preferred in intensive care units. Vancomycin infusion has been implicated in cases of phlebitis, with endothelial toxicity depending on the drug concentration and the duration of the infusion. Vancomycin is frequently infused in combination with other i.v. antibiotics through the same administrative Y site, but the local toxicity of such combinations has been poorly evaluated. Such an assessment could improve vancomycin infusion procedures in hospitals. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were challenged with clinical doses of vancomycin over 24 h with or without other i.v. antibiotics. Cell death was measured with the alamarBlue test. We observed an excess cellular death rate without any synergistic effect but dependent on the numbers of combined infusions when vancomycin and erythromycin or gentamicin were infused through the same Y site. Incompatibility between vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam was not observed in our study, and rinsing the cells between the two antibiotic infusions did not reduce endothelial toxicity. No endothelial toxicity of imipenem-cilastatin was observed when combined with vancomycin. p.i.v. vancomycin infusion in combination with other medications requires new recommendations to prevent phlebitis, including limiting coinfusion on the same line, reducing the infusion rate, and choosing an intermittent infusion method. Further studies need to be carried out to explore other drug combinations in long-term vancomycin p.i.v. therapy so as to gain insight into the mechanisms of drug incompatibility under multidrug infusion conditions. PMID:26055373

  10. Focal adhesion kinase regulates the activity of the osmosensitive transcription factor TonEBP/NFAT5 under hypertonic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Neuhofer, Wolfgang; Küper, Christoph; Lichtnekert, Julia; Holzapfel, Konstantin; Rupanagudi, Khader V.; Fraek, Maria-Luisa; Bartels, Helmut; Beck, Franz-Xaver

    2014-01-01

    TonEBP/NFAT5 is a major regulator of the urinary concentrating process and is essential for the osmoadaptation of renal medullary cells. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a mechanosensitive non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase expressed abundantly in the renal medulla. Since osmotic stress causes cell shrinkage, the present study investigated the contribution of FAK on TonEBP/NFAT5 activation. Osmotic stress induced time-dependent activation of FAK as evidenced by phosphorylation at Tyr-397, and furosemide reduces FAK Tyr-397 phosphorylation in the rat renal medulla. Both pharmacological inhibition of FAK and siRNA-mediated knockdown of FAK drastically reduced TonEBP/NFAT5 transcriptional activity and target gene expression in HEK293 cells. This effect was not mediated by impaired nuclear translocation or by reduced transactivating activity of TonEBP/NFAT5. However, TonEBP/NFAT5 abundance under hypertonic conditions was diminished by 50% by FAK inhibition or siRNA knockdown of FAK. FAK inhibition only marginally reduced transcription of the TonEBP/NFAT5 gene. Rather, TonEBP/NFAT5 mRNA stability was diminished significantly by FAK inhibition, which correlated with reduced reporter activity of the TonEBP/NFAT5 mRNA 3′ untranslated region (3′-UTR). In conclusion, FAK is a major regulator of TonEBP/NFAT5 activity by increasing its abundance via stabilization of the mRNA. This in turn, depends on the presence of the TonEBP/NFAT5 3′-UTR. PMID:24772088

  11. Increased long-latency reflex activity as a sufficient explanation for childhood hypertonic dystonia: a neuromorphic emulation study

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Won J.; Niu, Chuanxin M.; Sanger, Terence D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Childhood dystonia is a movement disorder that interferes with daily movements and can have a devastating effect on quality of life for children and their families. Although injury to basal ganglia is associated with dystonia, the neurophysiological mechanisms leading to the clinical manifestations of dystonia are not understood. Previous work suggested that long-latency stretch reflex (LLSR) is hyperactive in children with hypertonia due to secondary dystonia. We hypothesize that abnormal activity in motor cortices may cause an increase in the long-latency stretch reflex leading to hypertonia. Approach We modelled two possibilities of hyperactive LLSR by either creating a tonic involuntary drive to cortex, or increasing the synaptic gain in cortical neurons. Both models are emulated using programmable Very-Large-Scale-Integrated-circuit (VLSI) hardware to test their sufficiency for producing dystonic symptoms. The emulation includes a joint with two Hill-type muscles, realistic muscle spindles, and 2,304 Izhikevich-type spiking neurons. The muscles are regulated by a monosynaptic spinal pathway with 32ms delay and a long-latency pathway with 64ms loop-delay representing transcortical/supra-spinal connections. Main results When the limb is passively stretched, both models produce involuntary resistance with increased antagonist EMG responses similar to human data; also the muscle relaxation is delayed similar to human data. Both models predict reduced range of motion in voluntary movements. Significance Although our model is a highly simplified and limited representation of reflex pathways, it shows that increased activity of the long-latency stretch reflex is by itself sufficient to cause many of the features of hypertonic dystonia. PMID:25946372

  12. N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate, iso-amyl-2-cyanoacrylate and hypertonic glucose with 72% chromated glycerin in gastric varices

    PubMed Central

    Elwakil, Reda; Montasser, Mohamed Fawzy; Abdelhakam, Sara M; Ibrahim, Wesam A

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate, iso-amyl-2-cyanoacrylate and a mixture of 72% chromated glycerin with hypertonic glucose solution in management of gastric varices. METHODS: Ninety patients with gastric varices presented to Endoscopy Unit of Ain Shams University Hospital were included. They were randomly allocated into three groups; each group included 30 patients treated with intravariceal sclerosant injections in biweekly sessions till complete obturation of gastric varices; Group I (n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate; Histoacryl®), Group II (iso-amyl-2-cyanoacrylate; Amcrylate®) and Group III (mixture of 72% chromated glycerin; Scleremo® with glucose solution 25%). All the procedures were performed electively without active bleeding. Recruited patients were followed up for 3 mo. RESULTS: 26% of Scleremo group had bleeding during puncture vs 3.3% in each of the other two groups with significant difference, (P < 0.05). None of Scleremo group had needle obstruction vs 13.3% in each of the other two groups with no significant difference, (P > 0.05). Rebleeding occurred in 13.3% of Histoacryl and Amcrylate groups vs 0% in Scleremo group with no significant difference. The in hospital mortality was 6.6% in both Histoacryl and Amcrylate groups, while it was 0% in Scleremo group with no significant difference. In the first and second sessions, the amount of Scleremo needed for obturation was significantly high, while the amount of Histoacryl was significantly low. Scleremo was the less costly of the two treatments. CONCLUSION: All used sclerosant substances showed efficacy and success in management of gastric varices with no significant differences except in total amount, cost and bleeding during puncture. PMID:25901221

  13. Increased long-latency reflex activity as a sufficient explanation for childhood hypertonic dystonia: a neuromorphic emulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Won J.; Niu, Chuanxin M.; Sanger, Terence D.

    2015-06-01

    Objective. Childhood dystonia is a movement disorder that interferes with daily movements and can have a devastating effect on quality of life for children and their families. Although injury to basal ganglia is associated with dystonia, the neurophysiological mechanisms leading to the clinical manifestations of dystonia are not understood. Previous work suggested that long-latency stretch reflex (LLSR) is hyperactive in children with hypertonia due to secondary dystonia. We hypothesize that abnormal activity in motor cortices may cause an increase in the LLSR leading to hypertonia. Approach. We modeled two possibilities of hyperactive LLSR by either creating a tonic involuntary drive to cortex, or increasing the synaptic gain in cortical neurons. Both models are emulated using programmable very-large-scale-integrated-circuit hardware to test their sufficiency for producing dystonic symptoms. The emulation includes a joint with two Hill-type muscles, realistic muscle spindles, and 2,304 Izhikevich-type spiking neurons. The muscles are regulated by a monosynaptic spinal pathway with 32 ms delay and a long-latency pathway with 64 ms loop-delay representing transcortical/supra-spinal connections. Main results. When the limb is passively stretched, both models produce involuntary resistance with increased antagonist EMG responses similar to human data; also the muscle relaxation is delayed similar to human data. Both models predict reduced range of motion in voluntary movements. Significance. Although our model is a highly simplified and limited representation of reflex pathways, it shows that increased activity of the LLSR is by itself sufficient to cause many of the features of hypertonic dystonia.

  14. Alfalfa production using saline drainage water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three year study investigated the use of saline (< 6 dS/m) drainage water for irrigation of salt tolerant alfalfa in the presence of shallow saline groundwater. The irrigation treatments included; irrigating twice between cuttings with non-saline water, 2) irrigating with moderately saline water...

  15. Implantable, remotely-programmable insulin infusion system

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, G.A.; Bair, R.E.; Gaona, J.I. Jr.; Love, J.T.; Urenda, R.S.

    1981-10-01

    An implantable, remotely-programmable insulin infusion system is described which has a mass of 280 grams and an implanted lifetime exceeding two years. The system uses a rotary solenoid-driven peristaltic pump controlled by low power CMOS timing circuitry which provides bimodal insulin delivery. Fifteen low rates from 0.39 to 5.9 units/hour and 15 high doses from 0.84 to 12.5 units are available using U100 insulin. The system has been tested in the laboratory, evaluated in diabetic dogs, and implanted in one diabetic human.

  16. Therapeutic Effect of Intravenous Infusion of Perfluorocarbon Emulsion on LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Qi; Yin, Xiaofeng; Song, Jianqi; Landén, Ning Xu; Fan, Haojun

    2014-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and its more severe form, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are the leading causes of death in critical care. Despite extensive efforts in research and clinical medicine, mortality remains high in these diseases. Perfluorocarbon (PFC), a chemical compound known as liquid ventilation medium, is capable of dissolving large amounts of physiologically important gases (mainly oxygen and carbon dioxide). In this study we aimed to investigate the effect of intravenous infusion of PFC emulsion on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced ALI in rats and elucidate its mechanism of action. Forty two Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: 6 rats were treated with saline solution by intratracheal instillation (control group), 18 rats were treated with LPS by intratracheal instillation (LPS group) and the other 18 rats received PFC through femoral vein prior to LPS instillation (LPS+PFC group). The rats in the control group were sacrificed 6 hours later after saline instillation. At 2, 4 and 6 hours of exposure to LPS, 6 rats in the LPS group and 6 rats in LPS+PFC group were sacrificed at each time point. By analyzing pulmonary pathology, partial pressure of oxygen in the blood (PaO2) and lung wet-dry weight ratio (W/D) of each rat, we found that intravenous infusion of PFC significantly alleviated acute lung injury induced by LPS. Moreover, we showed that the expression of pulmonary myeloperoxidase (MPO), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) of endothelial cells and CD11b of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) induced by LPS were significantly decreased by PFC treatment in vivo. Our results indicate that intravenous infusion of PFC inhibits the infiltration of PMNs into lung tissue, which has been shown as the core pathogenesis of ALI/ARDS. Thus, our study provides a theoretical foundation for using intravenous infusion of PFC to prevent and treat ALI/ARDS in clinical practice. PMID:24489970

  17. Therapeutic effect of intravenous infusion of perfluorocarbon emulsion on LPS-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shike; Ding, Hui; Lv, Qi; Yin, Xiaofeng; Song, Jianqi; Landén, Ning Xu; Fan, Haojun

    2014-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and its more severe form, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are the leading causes of death in critical care. Despite extensive efforts in research and clinical medicine, mortality remains high in these diseases. Perfluorocarbon (PFC), a chemical compound known as liquid ventilation medium, is capable of dissolving large amounts of physiologically important gases (mainly oxygen and carbon dioxide). In this study we aimed to investigate the effect of intravenous infusion of PFC emulsion on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced ALI in rats and elucidate its mechanism of action. Forty two Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: 6 rats were treated with saline solution by intratracheal instillation (control group), 18 rats were treated with LPS by intratracheal instillation (LPS group) and the other 18 rats received PFC through femoral vein prior to LPS instillation (LPS+PFC group). The rats in the control group were sacrificed 6 hours later after saline instillation. At 2, 4 and 6 hours of exposure to LPS, 6 rats in the LPS group and 6 rats in LPS+PFC group were sacrificed at each time point. By analyzing pulmonary pathology, partial pressure of oxygen in the blood (PaO2) and lung wet-dry weight ratio (W/D) of each rat, we found that intravenous infusion of PFC significantly alleviated acute lung injury induced by LPS. Moreover, we showed that the expression of pulmonary myeloperoxidase (MPO), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) of endothelial cells and CD11b of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) induced by LPS were significantly decreased by PFC treatment in vivo. Our results indicate that intravenous infusion of PFC inhibits the infiltration of PMNs into lung tissue, which has been shown as the core pathogenesis of ALI/ARDS. Thus, our study provides a theoretical foundation for using intravenous infusion of PFC to prevent and treat ALI/ARDS in clinical practice. PMID:24489970

  18. Role of nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 in regulating hypertonic-mediated secretin receptor expression in kidney collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Chua, Oscar W H; Wong, Kenneth K L; Ko, Ben C; Chung, Sookja K; Chow, Billy K C; Lee, Leo T O

    2016-07-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that secretin (SCT) is an important element in the osmoregulatory pathway. It is interesting to note that both SCT and its receptor (SCTR) gene are activated upon hyperosmolality in the kidney. However, the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of the SCTR gene expression in response to changes in osmolality have yet to be clarified. Detailed DNA sequence analysis of the promoter regions of the SCTR gene reveals the presence of multiple osmotic response elements (ORE). The ORE is the binding site of a key osmosensitive transactivator, namely, the nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 (NFAT5). SCTR and NFAT5 are co-expressed in the kidney cortex and medulla collecting duct cells. We therefore hypothesize that NFAT5 is responsible for modulating SCTR expression in hypertonic environments. In this study, we found hypertonicity stimulates the promoter activities and endogenous gene expression of SCTR in mouse kidney cortex collecting duct cells (M1) and inner medulla collecting duct cells (mIMCD3). The overexpression and silencing of NFAT5 further confirmed it to be responsible for the up-regulation of the SCTR gene under hypertonic conditions. A significant increase in the interaction between NFAT5 and the SCTR promoter was also observed following chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. In vivo, osmotic stress up-regulates the SCTR gene in the kidney cortex and medulla of wild-type mice, but does not do so in NFAT5(+/-) animals. Hence, this study provides comprehensive information on how NFAT5 regulates SCTR expression in different osmotic environments. PMID:27080132

  19. Mutation of a single threonine in the cytoplasmic NH2 terminus disrupts trafficking of renal betaine-GABA transporter 1 during hypertonic stress.

    PubMed

    Schweikhard, Eva S; Kempson, Stephen A; Ziegler, Christine; Burckhardt, Birgitta C

    2014-07-01

    Betaine is an important osmolyte and is, compared with other organs, much more abundant in the kidneys, where it enters cells in the medulla by betaine-GABA transporter 1 (BGT1) to balance osmoregulation in the countercurrent system. In wild-type (wt-)BGT1-expressing oocytes, GABA-mediated currents were diminished by preincubation of oocytes with 100 nM PMA or 5 μM dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol, activators of PKC, whereas the application of staurosporine before the application of dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol restored the response to GABA. Four potential phosphorylation sites on BGT1 were mutated to alanine by site-directed mutagenesis. Three mutants (T235A, S428A, and S564A) evoked GABA currents comparable in magnitude to currents observed in wt-BGT1-expressing oocytes, whereas GABA currents in T40A were barely detectable. Uptake of [(3)H]GABA was also determined in human embryonic kidney-293 cells expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged BGT1 with the same mutations. T235A, S428A, and S564A showed upregulation of GABA uptake after hypertonic stress and downregulation by PMA similar to EGFP-wt-BGT1. In contrast, T40A did not respond to either hypertonicity or PMA. Confocal microscopy of the EGFP-BGT1 mutants expressed in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells revealed that T40A was present in the cytoplasm after 24 h of hypertonic stress. whereas the other mutants and EGFP-wt-BGT1 were in the plasma membrane. All mutants, including T40A, comigrated with wt-BGT1 on Western blots, suggesting that they are full-length proteins. T40A, however, cannot be phosphorylated, as revealed using a specific anti-phosphoantibody, and, therefore, T40 may be important for the trafficking and insertion of BGT1 in the plasma membrane. PMID:24829506

  20. The Effect of Vitamin B12 Infusion on Prevention of Nitrous Oxide-induced Homocysteine Increase: A Double-blind Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kiasari, Alieh Zamani; Firouzian, Abolfazl; Baradari, Afshin Gholipour; Nia, Hamid Sharif; Kiasari, Seyed Hosein Moosavi

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nitrous oxide is a common inhalation anesthetic agent in general anesthesia. While it is widely accepted as a safe anesthetic agent, evidence suggests exposure to this gas, leads to hyperhomocysteinemia. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of single-dose intravenous infusions of vitamin B12, before and after the induction of nitrous oxide anesthesia on homocysteine levels after the surgery. Methods This double-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted on 60 patients who were scheduled for elective surgery under general anesthesia, presumably lasting for more than two hours. The subjects were randomly allocated to three groups of 20. For the first group, vitamin B12 solution (1 mg/100 ml normal saline) and 100 ml of normal saline (placebo), were infused before and after the induction of anesthesia, respectively. The second group received placebo and vitamin B12 infusion before and after the induction of anesthesia, respectively. The third group received placebo infusions at both times. Homocysteine levels were measured before and 24 hours after the surgery. Results The mean homocysteine and vitamin B12 levels were significantly different within the three groups (p<0.001). In patients who had been infused with vitamin B12 before the surgery, homocysteine levels were significantly lower than the other two groups. In the placebo group, homocysteine levels significantly increased after the surgery. Conclusion Nitrous oxide causes hyperhomocysteinemia after general anesthesia. Since vitamin B12 infusion is a safe and inexpensive method to decrease homocysteine levels in these patients, it may be recommended for patients undergoing nitrous oxide anesthesia to be used before induction of anesthesia. PMID:24936269

  1. Effects of large volume, ice-cold intravenous fluid infusion on respiratory function in cardiac arrest survivors.

    PubMed

    Jacobshagen, Claudius; Pax, Anja; Unsöld, Bernhard W; Seidler, Tim; Schmidt-Schweda, Stephan; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Maier, Lars S

    2009-11-01

    International guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation recommend mild hypothermia (32-34 degrees C) for 12-24h in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. To induce therapeutic hypothermia a variety of external and intravascular cooling devices are available. A cheap and effective method for inducing hypothermia is the infusion of large volume, ice-cold intravenous fluid. There are concerns regarding the effects of rapid infusion of large volumes of fluid on respiratory function in cardiac arrest survivors. We have retrospectively studied the effects of high volume cold fluid infusion on respiratory function in 52 resuscitated cardiac arrest patients. The target temperature of 32-34 degrees C was achieved after 4.1+/-0.5h (cooling rate 0.48 degrees C/h). During this period 3427+/-210 mL ice-cold fluid was infused. Despite significantly reduced LV-function (EF 35.8+/-2.2%) the respiratory status of these patients did not deteriorate significantly. On intensive care unit admission the mean PaO(2) was 231.4+/-20.6 mmHg at a F(i)O(2) of 0.82+/-0.03 (PaO(2)/F(i)O(2)=290.0+/-24.1) and a PEEP level of 7.14+/-0.31 mbar. Until reaching the target temperature of saline infusion to achieve a body temperature of 33 degrees C, the F(i)O(2) could be further reduced with unchanged PEEP. The infusion of large volume, ice-cold fluid is an effective and inexpensive method for inducing therapeutic hypothermia. Resuscitation from cardiac arrest is associated with a deterioration in respiratory function. The infusion of large volumes of cold fluid does not cause a statistically significant further deterioration in respiratory function. A larger, randomized and prospective study is required to assess the efficacy and safety of ice-cold fluid infusion for

  2. In situ determination of salinity by PGNAA.

    PubMed

    Borsaru, M; Smith, C; Merritt, J; Aizawa, T; Rojc, A

    2006-05-01

    Salinity is a very important environmental issue all around the world. In many cases salinity was produced from human activities like farming and mining. Different soluble salts contribute to salinity, however, NaCl is the most common salt producing salinity. This work deals with the application of the prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) technique for in situ determination of salinity. The technique is based on the measurement of chlorine, a component of the common salt, by PGNAA. PMID:16448819

  3. Supercritical Fluid Infusion of Iron Additives in Polymeric Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazem, Negin; Taylor, Larry T.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this project was the experimentation to measure preparation of iron nanophases within polymeric matrices via supercritical fluid infusion of iron precursors followed by thermal reduction. Another objective was to determine if supercritical CO2 could infuse into the polymer. The experiment is described along with the materials, and the supercritical fluid infusion and cure procedures. X-ray photoelectron spectra and transmission electron micrographs were obtained. The results are summarized in charts, and tables.

  4. Long Term Surface Salinity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Raymond W.; Brown, Neil L.

    2005-01-01

    Our long-term goal is to establish a reliable system for monitoring surface salinity around the global ocean. Salinity is a strong indicator of the freshwater cycle and has a great influence on upper ocean stratification. Global salinity measurements have potential to improve climate forecasts if an observation system can be developed. This project is developing a new internal field conductivity cell that can be protected from biological fouling for two years. Combined with a temperature sensor, this foul-proof cell can be deployed widely on surface drifters. A reliable in-situ network of surface salinity sensors will be an important adjunct to the salinity sensing satellite AQUARIUS to be deployed by NASA in 2009. A new internal-field conductivity cell has been developed by N Brown, along with new electronics. This sensor system has been combined with a temperature sensor to make a conductivity - temperature (UT) sensor suitable for deployment on drifters. The basic sensor concepts have been proven on a high resolution CTD. A simpler (lower cost) circuit has been built for this application. A protection mechanism for the conductivity cell that includes antifouling protection has also been designed and built. Mr. A.Walsh of our commercial partner E-Paint has designed and delivered time-release formulations of antifoulants for our application. Mr. G. Williams of partner Clearwater Instrumentation advised on power and communication issues and supplied surface drifters for testing.

  5. In vivo study of hepatic oxidative stress and mitochondrial function in rabbits with severe hypotension after propofol prolonged infusion.

    PubMed

    Campos, Sónia; Félix, Luís; Venâncio, Carlos; de Lurdes Pinto, Maria; Peixoto, Francisco; de Pinho, Paula Guedes; Antunes, Luís

    2016-01-01

    In humans, prolonged sedations with propofol or using high doses have been associated with propofol infusion syndrome. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of prolonged high-dose administration of a specific propofol emulsion (Propofol Lipuro) and an improved lipid formulation (SMOFlipid) in liver mitochondrial bioenergetics and oxidative stress of rabbits, comparatively to a saline control. Twenty-one male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly allocated in three groups that were continuously treated for 20 h. Each group of seven animals received separately: NaCl 0.9 % (saline), SMOFlipid (lipid-based emulsion without propofol) and Lipuro 2 % (propofol lipid emulsion). An intravenous propofol bolus of 20 mg kg(-1) was given to the propofol Lipuro group to allow blind orotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. Anesthesia was maintained using infusion rates of: 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 mg kg(-1) h(-1), according to the clinical scale of anesthetic depth and the index of consciousness values. The SMOFlipid and saline groups received the same infusion rate as the propofol Lipuro group, which were infused during 20 consecutive hours. At the end, the animals were euthanized, livers collected and mitochondria isolated by standard differential centrifugation. Mitochondrial respiration, membrane potential, swelling and oxidative stress were evaluated. Data were processed using one-way ANOVA (p < 0.05). The animals revealed a significant decrease in cardiovascular parameters showing bradycardia and severe hypotension. No statistical differences were observed when using pyruvate as substrate, however, when using succinate as respiratory substrate, significant decrease in ADP-stimulated respiration rate was observed for SMOFlipid group (p = 0.002). Lipid peroxides (p < 0.01) and protein carbonyls (p = 0.01) showed a statistically significant difference between propofol Lipuro and the SMOFlipid groups. These results suggest that

  6. Theophylline: constant-rate infusion predictions.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, C A; Sahebjami, H; Imhoff, T; Thomas, J P; Myre, S A

    1984-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate a method of prospectively estimating appropriate aminophylline infusion rates in acutely ill, hospitalized patients with bronchospasm. Steady-state serum theophylline concentrations (Css), clearances (Cl), and half-lives (t1/2) were estimated by the Chiou method using serum concetrantions obtained 1 and 6 h after the start of a constant-rate intravenous aminophylline infusion in 10 male patients averaging 57 years of age. Using an enzyme-multiplied immunoassay (EMIT) system for theophylline analysis, pharmacokinetic estimations were excellent for Css (r = 0.9103, p less than 0.01) and Cl (r = 0.9750, p less than 0.01). The mean estimation errors were 9.4% (range 0.8-21.5) for Css and 12.3% (range 1.3-28.0) for Cl. There was no correlation between patient age and Cl. This method is useful for rapidly individualizing aminophylline therapy in patients with acute bronchospasm. PMID:6740734

  7. Stability of thyroid hormones during continuous infusion.

    PubMed

    Golombek, Sergio G; Alpan, Gad; Frey, Michael; Corbi, Dominick; Lagamma, Edmund F

    2011-07-01

    We investigated the stability of thyroid hormones during a mode of continuous drug infusion via polypropylene tubing using the same conditions that would be applied to treating patients in a hospital setting. The diluted thyroid hormones were prepared using aseptic technique, stored at 2-8°C (36-46°F) and tested within 24 h of preparation for stability and percent recovery from within plastic tubing. Experiments were done in duplicate with triplicate sets of readings for each assay point. Only T(4) prepared with 5% dextrose water (D5W) containing 1 mg/mL albumin remained constant, stable, predictable and accurate over time under various conditions. Other methods of preparation lost drug by adhering to the plastic containers and tubing by as much as 40% of starting concentration. T(3) recovery in the presence of 1 mg/mL of albumin was 107±2% (mean±standard error of the mean) of anticipated drug concentrations. We conclude from this series of experiments that to maintain an accurate and stable dosing of patients receiving intravenous thyroid hormones, 1 mg/mL of albumin must be added to the infusate to prevent lost on the plastic intravenous tubing. PMID:21501101

  8. Implantable Micropump Technologies for Murine Intracochlear Infusions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D. G.; Waldron, M. J.; Frisina, R. D.; Borkholder, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the very small size of the mouse inner ear, 600 nL volume, developing effective, controlled infusion systems is quite challenging. Key technologies have been created to minimize both size and power for an implantable pump for murine intracochlear infusions. A method for coupling fine capillary tubing to microfluidic channels is presented which provides low volume, biocompatible interconnects withstanding pressures as high as 827 kPa (120 psi) and consuming less than 20 nL of volume exiting in-plane with the pump. Surface micromachined resistive bridges integrated into the flow channel for anemometry based flow rate measurement have been optimized for low power operation in the ultra-low flow rate regime. A process for creation of deformable diaphragms over pump chambers with simultaneous coating of the microfluidic channels has been developed allowing integration of a biocompatible fluid flow path. These advances represent enabling capabilities for a drug delivery system suitable for space constrained applications such as subcutaneous implantation in mice. PMID:21096713

  9. Drag reduction using slippery liquid infused surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hultmark, Marcus; Stone, Howard; Smits, Alexander; Jacobi, Ian; Samaha, Mohamed; Wexler, Jason; Shang, Jessica; Rosenberg, Brian; Hellström, Leo; Fan, Yuyang

    2013-11-01

    A new method for passive drag reduction is introduced. A surface treatment inspired by the Nepenthes pitcher plant, previously developed by Wong et al. (2011), is utilized and its design parameters are studied for increased drag reduction and durability. Nano- and micro-structured surfaces infused with a lubricant allow for mobility within the lubricant itself when the surface is exposed to flow. The mobility causes slip at the fluid-fluid interface, which drastically reduces the viscous friction. These new surfaces are fundamentally different from the more conventional superhydrophobic surfaces previously used in drag reduction studies, which rely on a gas-liquid interface. The main advantage of the liquid infused surfaces over the conventional surfaces is that the lubricant adheres more strongly to the surface, decreasing the risk of failure when exposed to turbulence and other high-shear flows. We have shown that these surfaces can reduce viscous drag up to 20% in both Taylor-Couette flow and in a parallel plate rheometer. Supported under ONR Grants N00014-12-1-0875 and N00014-12-1-0962 (program manager Ki-Han Kim).

  10. Fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia and maternal intravenous immunoglobulin infusion

    PubMed Central

    Giers, Günther; Wenzel, Folker; Stockschläder, Markus; Riethmacher, Regina; Lorenz, Horst; Tutschek, Boris

    2010-01-01

    Background Different therapeutic approaches have been used in fetal-neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, but many centers administer immunoglobulin G infusions to the pregnant woman. We studied the effect of maternal antenatal immunoglobulin infusions on fetal platelet counts in pregnancies with fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia. Design and Methods We retrospectively analyzed the clinical courses of fetuses with fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia whose mothers were treated with immunoglobulin G infusions in a single center between 1999 and 2005. In a center-specific protocol, weekly maternal immunoglobulin G infusions were given to 25 pregnant women with previously affected neonates and four women with strong platelet antibodies, but no previous history of fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia; before each infusion diagnostic fetal blood sampling was performed to determine fetal platelet counts and immunoglobulin G levels. Results There were 30 fetuses with fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, confirmed by initial fetal blood sampling showing fetal platelet counts between 4×109/L and 130×109/L and antibody-coated fetal platelets using a glycoprotein specific assay. Despite weekly antenatal maternal immunoglobulin G infusions fetal platelet counts did not change significantly. Maternal and fetal immunoglobulin G levels, measured before every infusion, increased significantly with the number of maternal immunoglobulin G infusions. Conclusions In this group of fetuses with fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia no consistent increase of fetal platelets was achieved as a result of regular maternal immunoglobulin G infusions. PMID:20534698

  11. Broadening infusion specialization as an adjunct to organizational sustainability.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Britt M

    2014-01-01

    As changes in reimbursement structures create a stringent focus on the prevention of infection and other infusion-related complications that predispose to infection, it becomes important to examine the impact of vascular access and infusion specialty practices and procedures on overall organization sustainability and to implement strategies for disseminating infusion expertise to a broader contingent of nurses. This article discusses infusion nursing practice as it impacts the organization as a whole and details a performance improvement initiative for implementing a novel peripherally inserted central catheter tip determination technology that encompasses many of the goals of the industry standards. PMID:24384884

  12. A Series of Cerebral Venous Sinus Thromboses Treated with Intra-Arterial tPA infused over Ten Hours with a 0.027-inch Catheter and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Ziu, Endrit; Haley, O'Hara; Ibrahimi, Muhammad; Simon, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) can have devastating results, with mortality reported in 44% of cases. No randomized trials exist in order to define what qualifies as failure of conservative therapy, and there is no specific intervention to date which is considered safe and effective. Case series suggest that thrombolysis infusion is safer than thrombectomy, but methods of administration, dose, and duration of therapy tend to vary widely. We present three consecutive CVST patients treated with heparin who suffered both clinical and radiographic deterioration, and went on to have endovascular therapy. Each patient was successfully recanalized by placing a 0.027-inch microcatheter at the proximal portion of the thrombus and infusing 20 mg of alteplase dissolved in 1 liter of normal saline infused at 100 ml per hour for an infusion of 2 mg of alteplase per hour for ten hours.  PMID:27462480

  13. Glycemic increase induced by intravenous glucose infusion fails to affect hunger, appetite, or satiety following breakfast in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Schultes, Bernd; Panknin, Ann-Kristin; Hallschmid, Manfred; Jauch-Chara, Kamila; Wilms, Britta; de Courbière, Felix; Lehnert, Hendrik; Schmid, Sebastian M

    2016-10-01

    Meal-dependent fluctuations of blood glucose and corresponding endocrine signals such as insulin are thought to provide important regulatory input for central nervous processing of hunger and satiety. Since food intake also triggers the release of numerous gastrointestinal signals, the specific contribution of changes in blood glucose to appetite regulation in humans has remained unclear. Here we tested the hypothesis that inducing glycemic fluctuations by intravenous glucose infusion is associated with concurrent changes in hunger, appetite, and satiety. In a single blind, counter-balanced crossover study 15 healthy young men participated in two experimental conditions on two separate days. 500 ml of a solution containing 50 g glucose or 0.9% saline, respectively, was intravenously infused over a 1-h period followed by a 1-h observation period. One hour before start of the respective infusion subjects had a light breakfast (284 kcal). Blood glucose and serum insulin concentrations as well as self-rated feelings of hunger, appetite, satiety, and fullness were assessed during the entire experiment. Glucose as compared to saline infusion markedly increased glucose and insulin concentrations (peak glucose level: 9.7 ± 0.8 vs. 5.3 ± 0.3 mmol/l; t(14) = -5.159, p < 0.001; peak insulin level: 370.4 ± 66.5 vs. 109.6 ± 21.5 pmol/l; t(14) = 4.563, p < 0.001) followed by a sharp decline in glycaemia to a nadir of 3.0 ± 0.2 mmol/l (vs. 3.9 ± 0.1 mmol/l at the corresponding time in the control condition; t(14) = -3.972, p = 0.001) after stopping the infusion. Despite this wide glycemic fluctuation in the glucose infusion condition subjective feelings of hunger, appetite satiety, and fullness did not differ from the control condition throughout the experiment. These findings clearly speak against the notion that fluctuations in glycemia and also insulinemia represent major signals in the short-term regulation of hunger and satiety. PMID

  14. Epidural infusions of sufentanil with and without bupivacaine: comparison with diamorphine-bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Black, A M; Wolf, A; McKenzie, I M; Tonkin, P A; Inglis, S T; Prys-Roberts, C

    1994-07-01

    The requirements for supplementary 3 ml epidural injections of bupivacaine 0.5% (top-ups) were used in a randomized double-blind study to compare the effects of five types of thoracic epidural infusions given at 2.5 ml h-1 for the first 24 h after major surgery to the upper abdomen in 99 patients and the lower abdomen in 72. The infusions were: bupivacaine 0.167% alone; diamorphine 0.167 mg ml-1 (0.417 mg h-1) in bupivacaine 0.167%; sufentanil 2 micrograms ml-1 (5 micrograms h-1) in 0.167% bupivacaine; sufentanil 4 micrograms ml-1 (10 micrograms h-1) in 0.167% bupivacaine; and sufentanil 4 micrograms ml-1 (10 micrograms h-1) in normal saline. The patients who had upper abdominal surgery were on average older than those having lower abdominal surgery and a larger proportion of them were female. They received on average fewer top-ups. After both upper and lower abdominal surgery, epidural infusions of bupivacaine alone required the most frequent supplementation (inter-quartile range 6-14 top-ups in 24 h) and the two sufentanil-bupivacaine mixtures required the fewest (interquartile range 0-12 top-ups in 24 h). The infusions of sufentanil without bupivacaine were significantly less effective than the sufentanil-bupivacaine mixtures after upper (but not lower) abdominal surgery. Although the two sufentanil-bupivacaine mixtures were indistinguishable in analgesic effectiveness after either upper or lower abdominal surgery, the lower (5 micrograms h-1) dose rate of sufentanil gave a significantly higher average breathing rate and lower average PaCO2 for the first 24 h after lower (but not upper) abdominal surgery. Blood samples were taken (as an afterthought) from 11 patients receiving sufentanil 10 micrograms h-1, just before the epidural infusion was stopped. The concentrations were mostly above the range for systemic analgesia, but below the values that would have been expected if a steady state had been achieved. PMID:7925334

  15. Activity of hepatic but not skeletal muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase enzyme is depressed by intravenous glucose infusions in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Al-Trad, B; Wittek, T; Gäbel, G; Fürll, M; Reisberg, K; Aschenbach, J R

    2010-12-01

    A positive energy balance in dairy cows pre-partum may decrease hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) enzyme activity, which might contribute to disturbances of lipid metabolism post-partum. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether skeletal muscle CPT activity can also be downregulated during positive energy balance. Mid-lactating dairy cows were maintained on intravenous infusion of either saline (control) or glucose solutions that increased linearly over 24 days, remained at the 24-day level until day 28 and were suspended thereafter. Liver and skeletal muscle biopsies, as well as four diurnal blood samples, were taken on days 0, 8, 16, 24, and 32, representing infusion levels equivalent to 0%, 10%, 20%, 30% and 0% of the net energy for lactation (NE(L)) requirement respectively. Glucose infusion increased serum insulin concentrations on day 16 and 24 while plasma glucose levels were increased at only a single time point on day 24. Serum beta-hydroxybutyric acid concentrations decreased between day 8 and 24; whereas changes in non-esterified fatty acids were mostly insignificant. Total lipid contents of liver and skeletal muscle were not affected by treatment. Hepatic CPT activity decreased with glucose infusion (by 35% on day 24) and remained decreased on day 32. Hepatic expression levels of CPT-1A and CPT-2 mRNA were not significantly altered but tended to reflect the changes in enzyme activity. In contrast to the liver, no effect of glucose infusion was observed on skeletal muscle CPT activity. We conclude that suppression of CPT activity by positive energy balance appears to be specific for the liver in mid-lactating dairy cows. PMID:20546068

  16. Temporal changes in the involvement of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in muscle lactate accumulation during lipopolysaccharide infusion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Alamdari, N; Constantin-Teodosiu, D; Murton, A J; Gardiner, S M; Bennett, T; Layfield, R; Greenhaff, P L

    2008-01-01

    A characteristic manifestation of sepsis is muscle lactate accumulation. This study examined any putative (causative) association between pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) inhibition and lactate accumulation in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle of rats infused with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and explored the involvement of increased transcription of muscle-specific pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) isoenzymes. Conscious, male Sprague–Dawley rats were infused i.v. with saline (0.4 ml h−1, control) or LPS (150 μg kg−1 h−1) for 2 h, 6 h or 24 h (n = 6–8). Muscle lactate concentration was elevated after 2, 6 and 24 h LPS infusion. Muscle PDC activity was the same at 2 h and 6 h, but was 65% lower after 24 h of LPS infusion (P < 0.01), when there was a 47% decrease in acetylcarnitine concentration (P < 0.05), and a 24-fold increase in PDK4 mRNA expression (P < 0.001). These changes were preceded by marked increases in tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 mRNA expression at 2 h. The findings indicate that the early (2 and 6 h) elevation in muscle lactate concentration during LPS infusion was not attributable to limited muscle oxygen availability or ATP production (evidenced by unchanged ATP and phosphocreatine (PCr) concentrations) or to PDC inhibition, whereas after 24 h, muscle lactate accumulation appears to have resulted from PDC activation status limiting pyruvate flux, most probably due to cytokine-mediated up-regulation of PDK4 transcription. PMID:18218678

  17. Infused polymers for cell sheet release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juthani, Nidhi; Howell, Caitlin; Ledoux, Haylea; Sotiri, Irini; Kelso, Susan; Kovalenko, Yevgen; Tajik, Amanda; Vu, Thy L.; Lin, Jennifer J.; Sutton, Amy; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-05-01

    Tissue engineering using whole, intact cell sheets has shown promise in many cell-based therapies. However, current systems for the growth and release of these sheets can be expensive to purchase or difficult to fabricate, hindering their widespread use. Here, we describe a new approach to cell sheet release surfaces based on silicone oil-infused polydimethylsiloxane. By coating the surfaces with a layer of fibronectin (FN), we were able to grow mesenchymal stem cells to densities comparable to those of tissue culture polystyrene controls (TCPS). Simple introduction of oil underneath an edge of the sheet caused it to separate from the substrate. Characterization of sheets post-transfer showed that they retain their FN layer and morphology, remain highly viable, and are able to grow and proliferate normally after transfer. We expect that this method of cell sheet growth and detachment may be useful for low-cost, flexible, and customizable production of cellular layers for tissue engineering.

  18. Infused polymers for cell sheet release

    PubMed Central

    Juthani, Nidhi; Howell, Caitlin; Ledoux, Haylea; Sotiri, Irini; Kelso, Susan; Kovalenko, Yevgen; Tajik, Amanda; Vu, Thy L.; Lin, Jennifer J.; Sutton, Amy; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering using whole, intact cell sheets has shown promise in many cell-based therapies. However, current systems for the growth and release of these sheets can be expensive to purchase or difficult to fabricate, hindering their widespread use. Here, we describe a new approach to cell sheet release surfaces based on silicone oil-infused polydimethylsiloxane. By coating the surfaces with a layer of fibronectin (FN), we were able to grow mesenchymal stem cells to densities comparable to those of tissue culture polystyrene controls (TCPS). Simple introduction of oil underneath an edge of the sheet caused it to separate from the substrate. Characterization of sheets post-transfer showed that they retain their FN layer and morphology, remain highly viable, and are able to grow and proliferate normally after transfer. We expect that this method of cell sheet growth and detachment may be useful for low-cost, flexible, and customizable production of cellular layers for tissue engineering. PMID:27189419

  19. Infused polymers for cell sheet release.

    PubMed

    Juthani, Nidhi; Howell, Caitlin; Ledoux, Haylea; Sotiri, Irini; Kelso, Susan; Kovalenko, Yevgen; Tajik, Amanda; Vu, Thy L; Lin, Jennifer J; Sutton, Amy; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering using whole, intact cell sheets has shown promise in many cell-based therapies. However, current systems for the growth and release of these sheets can be expensive to purchase or difficult to fabricate, hindering their widespread use. Here, we describe a new approach to cell sheet release surfaces based on silicone oil-infused polydimethylsiloxane. By coating the surfaces with a layer of fibronectin (FN), we were able to grow mesenchymal stem cells to densities comparable to those of tissue culture polystyrene controls (TCPS). Simple introduction of oil underneath an edge of the sheet caused it to separate from the substrate. Characterization of sheets post-transfer showed that they retain their FN layer and morphology, remain highly viable, and are able to grow and proliferate normally after transfer. We expect that this method of cell sheet growth and detachment may be useful for low-cost, flexible, and customizable production of cellular layers for tissue engineering. PMID:27189419

  20. Determining Salinity by Simple Means.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This paper describes the construction and use of a simple salinometer. The salinometer is composed, mainly, of a milliammeter and a battery and uses the measurement of current flow to determine the salinity of water. A complete list of materials is given, as are details of construction and operation of the equipment. The use of the salinometer in…

  1. Mycelial bacteria of saline soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvyagintsev, D. G.; Zenova, G. M.; Oborotov, G. V.

    2008-10-01

    The actinomycetal complexes of saline soils comprise the representatives of the Streptomyces and Micromonospora genera, the number of which are hundreds and thousands of CFU/g soil. Complexes of mycelial bacteria in saline soils are poorer in terms of number (by 1-3 orders of magnitude) and taxonomic composition than the complexes of the zonal soil types. A specific feature of the actinomycetal complexes of saline soils is the predominance of halophilic, alkaliphilic, and haloalkaliphilic streptomycetes that well grow at pH 8-9 and concentrations of NaCl close to 5%. Actinomycetes in saline soils grow actively, and the length of their mycelium reaches 140 m in 1 gram of soil. The haloalkaliphilic streptomycetes grow fast and inhibit the formation of spores at pH 9 and high concentrations of salts (Na2SO4 and MgCl2, 5%) as compared to their behavior on a neutral medium with a salt concentration of 0.02%. They are characterized by the maximal radial growth rate of colonies on an alkaline medium with 5% NaCl.

  2. Aortic Input Impedance during Nitroprusside Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Pepine, Carl J.; Nichols, W. W.; Curry, R. C.; Conti, C. Richard

    1979-01-01

    Beneficial effects of nitroprusside infusion in heart failure are purportedly a result of decreased afterload through “impedance” reduction. To study the effect of nitroprusside on vascular factors that determine the total load opposing left ventricular ejection, the total aortic input impedance spectrum was examined in 12 patients with heart failure (cardiac index <2.0 liters/min per m2 and left ventricular end diastolic pressure >20 mm Hg). This input impedance spectrum expresses both mean flow (resistance) and pulsatile flow (compliance and wave reflections) components of vascular load. Aortic root blood flow velocity and pressure were recorded continuously with a catheter-tip electromagnetic velocity probe in addition to left ventricular pressure. Small doses of nitroprusside (9-19 μg/min) altered the total aortic input impedance spectrum as significant (P < 0.05) reductions in both mean and pulsatile components were observed within 60-90 s. With these acute changes in vascular load, left ventricular end diastolic pressure declined (44%) and stroke volume increased (20%, both P < 0.05). Larger nitroprusside doses (20-38 μg/min) caused additional alteration in the aortic input impedance spectrum with further reduction in left ventricular end diastolic pressure and increase in stroke volume but no additional changes in the impedance spectrum or stroke volume occurred with 39-77 μg/min. Improved ventricular function persisted when aortic pressure was restored to control values with simultaneous phenylephrine infusion in three patients. These data indicate that nitroprusside acutely alters both the mean and pulsatile components of vascular load to effect improvement in ventricular function in patients with heart failure. The evidence presented suggests that it may be possible to reduce vascular load and improve ventricular function independent of aortic pressure reduction. PMID:457874

  3. The half-life of infusion fluids

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Robert G.; Lyons, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of the half-life (T1/2) of infused fluids can help prevent iatrogenic problems such as volume overload and postoperative interstitial oedema. Simulations show that a prolongation of the T1/2 for crystalloid fluid increases the plasma volume and promotes accumulation of fluid in the interstitial fluid space. The T1/2 for crystalloids is usually 20 to 40 min in conscious humans but might extend to 80 min or longer in the presence of preoperative stress, dehydration, blood loss of <1 l or pregnancy. The longest T1/2 measured amounts to between 3 and 8 h and occurs during surgery and general anaesthesia with mechanical ventilation. This situation lasts as long as the anaesthesia. The mechanisms for the long T1/2 are only partly understood, but involve adrenergic receptors and increased renin and aldosterone release. In contrast, the T1/2 during the postoperative period is usually short, about 15 to 20 min, at least in response to new fluid. The commonly used colloid fluids have an intravascular persistence T1/2 of 2 to 3 h, which is shortened by inflammation. The fact that the elimination T1/2 of the infused macromolecules is 2 to 6 times longer shows that they also reside outside the bloodstream. With a colloid, fluid volume is eliminated in line with its intravascular persistence, but there is insufficient data to know if this is the same in the clinical setting. PMID:27058509

  4. Infusing the Workplace into General ABE/GED/ESL Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thistlethwaite, Linda

    2000-01-01

    This paper explains how adult educators involved in the development and delivery of general adult basic education (ABE), General Educational Development (GED) certificate, and English-as-a-second-language (ESL) programs can infuse the workplace into their programs. The paper begins with a brief overview of the rationale for infusing the workplace…

  5. Cerebral arterial air embolism in a child after intraosseous infusion

    PubMed Central

    Knoester, H.; Maes, A.; van der Wal, A. C.; Kubat, B.

    2008-01-01

    Cerebral arterial air embolism (CAAE) has been reported as a rare complication of medical intervention. There has been one reported case of CAAE after the use of an intraosseous infusion (IO) system. We report on a case of CAAE after tibial IO infusion in a 7-month-old girl during resuscitation. PMID:18247071

  6. 21 CFR 529.1044a - Gentamicin solution for infusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gentamicin solution for infusion. 529.1044a... Gentamicin solution for infusion. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of solution contains 50 or 100 milligrams gentamicin sulfate. (b) Sponsors. See Nos. 000061, 000859, 054628, 054771, 057561, 058005,...

  7. Silos to Symphonies? Hopes and Challenges Implementing Multicultural Programme Infusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Laura B.; Milman, Natalie B.

    2013-01-01

    The need to infuse multicultural education (ME) across teacher preparation programmes is well documented by research, yet institutions are at very different stages in this endeavour. While most programmes demonstrate a segregated approach to ME, confining diversity to specialty courses, ME programme infusion places diversity, equity and social…

  8. 21 CFR 526.1130 - Hetacillin potassium for intramammary infusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hetacillin potassium for intramammary infusion... Hetacillin potassium for intramammary infusion. (a) Specifications. Each 10 milliliter syringe contains hetacillin potassium equivalent of 62.5 milligrams of ampicillin. (b) Sponsor. See No. 000010 in §...

  9. 21 CFR 526.1130 - Hetacillin potassium for intramammary infusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hetacillin potassium for intramammary infusion... § 526.1130 Hetacillin potassium for intramammary infusion. (a) Specifications. Each 10 milliliter syringe contains hetacillin potassium equivalent of 62.5 milligrams of ampicillin. (b) Sponsor. See...

  10. 21 CFR 526.1130 - Hetacillin potassium for intramammary infusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hetacillin potassium for intramammary infusion... § 526.1130 Hetacillin potassium for intramammary infusion. (a) Specifications. Each 10 milliliter syringe contains hetacillin potassium equivalent of 62.5 milligrams of ampicillin. (b) Sponsor. See...

  11. 21 CFR 526.1130 - Hetacillin potassium for intramammary infusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hetacillin potassium for intramammary infusion... § 526.1130 Hetacillin potassium for intramammary infusion. (a) Specifications. Each 10 milliliter syringe contains hetacillin potassium equivalent of 62.5 milligrams of ampicillin. (b) Sponsor. See...

  12. Energy Management for School Administrators: Curriculum Infusion Facilities Audit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Service Center Region 7, Kilgore, TX.

    Presented are the state guidelines and framework for the infusion of energy education into the Texas public school curriculum. Designed to assist teachers, administrators, and other school personnel in the process of infusing energy education concepts, this guide focuses on the basic concerns and needs of the people as related to energy and…

  13. 21 CFR 870.1800 - Withdrawal-infusion pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Withdrawal-infusion pump. 870.1800 Section 870.1800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... pump. (a) Identification. A withdrawal-infusion pump is a device designed to inject accurately...

  14. 21 CFR 870.1800 - Withdrawal-infusion pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Withdrawal-infusion pump. 870.1800 Section 870.1800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... pump. (a) Identification. A withdrawal-infusion pump is a device designed to inject accurately...

  15. 21 CFR 870.1800 - Withdrawal-infusion pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Withdrawal-infusion pump. 870.1800 Section 870.1800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... pump. (a) Identification. A withdrawal-infusion pump is a device designed to inject accurately...

  16. 21 CFR 870.1800 - Withdrawal-infusion pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Withdrawal-infusion pump. 870.1800 Section 870.1800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... pump. (a) Identification. A withdrawal-infusion pump is a device designed to inject accurately...

  17. 21 CFR 870.1800 - Withdrawal-infusion pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Withdrawal-infusion pump. 870.1800 Section 870.1800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... pump. (a) Identification. A withdrawal-infusion pump is a device designed to inject accurately...

  18. ArtsIN: Arts Integration and Infusion Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartle, Lynn C.; Pinciotti, Patricia; Gorton, Rebecca L.

    2015-01-01

    Teaching to meet the diverse learning needs of twenty-first century, global learners can be challenging, yet a growing body of research points to the proved successes of arts-infused and integrated curricula, especially for building capacity for learning and motivation. This article presents the ArtsIN: Arts Integration and Infusion framework, a…

  19. Constant infusion transpulmonary thermodilution for the assessment of cardiac output in exercising humans.

    PubMed

    Calbet, J A L; Mortensen, S P; Munch, G D W; Curtelin, D; Boushel, R

    2016-05-01

    To determine the accuracy and precision of constant infusion transpulmonary thermodilution cardiac output (CITT-Q) assessment during exercise in humans, using indocyanine green (ICG) dilution and bolus transpulmonary thermodilution (BTD) as reference methods, cardiac output (Q) was determined at rest and during incremental one- and two-legged pedaling on a cycle ergometer, and combined arm cranking with leg pedaling to exhaustion in 15 healthy men. Continuous infusions of iced saline in the femoral vein (n = 41) or simultaneously in the femoral and axillary (n = 66) veins with determination of temperature in the femoral artery were used for CITT-Q assessment. CITT-Q was linearly related to ICG-Q (r = 0.82, CITT-Q = 0.876 × ICG-Q + 3.638, P < 0.001; limits of agreement ranging from -1.43 to 3.07 L/min) and BTD-Q (r = 0.91, CITT-Q = 0.822 × BTD + 4.481 L/min, P < 0.001; limits of agreement ranging from -1.01 to 2.63 L/min). Compared with ICG-Q and BTD-Q, CITT-Q overestimated cardiac output by 1.6 L/min (≈ 10% of the mean ICG and BTD-Q values, P < 0.05). For Q between 20 and 28 L/min, we estimated an overestimation < 5%. The coefficient of variation of 23 repeated CITT-Q measurements was 6.0% (CI: 6.1-11.1%). In conclusion, cardiac output can be precisely and accurately determined with constant infusion transpulmonary thermodilution in exercising humans. PMID:25919489

  20. The analgesic efficacy of continuous presternal bupivacaine infusion through a single catheter after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nasr, Dalia Abdelhamid; Abdelhamid, Hadeel Magdy; Mohsen, Mai; Aly, Ahmad Helmy

    2015-01-01

    Background: Median sternotomy, sternal spreading, and sternal wiring are the main causes of pain during the early recovery phase following cardiac surgery. Aim: This study was designed to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of continuous presternal bupivacaine infusion through a single catheter after parasternal block following cardiac surgery. Materials and Methods: The total of 40 patients (American Society of Anesthesiologist status II, III), 45–60 years old, undergoing coronary – artery bypass grafting were enrolled in this prospective, randomized, double-blind study. A presternal catheter was inserted with continuous infusion of 5 mL/h bupivacaine 0.25% (Group B) or normal saline (Group C) during the first 48 postoperative hrs. Primary outcomes were postoperative morphine requirements and pain scores, secondary outcomes were extubation time, postoperative respiratory parameters, incidence of wound infection, Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and hospital stay duration, and bupivacaine level in blood. Statistical Methods: Student's t-test was used to analyze the parametric data and Chi-square test for categorical variables. Results: During the postoperative 48 h, there was marked reduction in morphine requirements in Group B compared to Group C, (8.6 ± 0.94 mg vs. 18.83 ± 3.4 mg respectively, P = 0.2), lower postoperative pain scores, shorter extubation time (117 ± 10 min vs. 195 ± 19 min, respectively, P = 0.03), better respiratory parameters (PaO2/FiO2, PaCO2 and pH), with no incidence of wound infection, no differences in ICU or hospital stay duration. The plasma concentration of bupivacaine remained below the toxic threshold (at T24, 1.2 ug/ml ± 0.3 and T48 h 1.7 ± 0.3 ug/ml). Conclusion: Continuous presternal bupivacaine infusion has resulted in better postoperative analgesia, reduction in morphine requirements, shorter time to extubation, and better postoperative respiratory parameters than the control group. PMID:25566704

  1. [Vasopressin intravenous infusion causes dose dependent adverse cardiovascular effects in anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Martins, Luiz Cláudio; Sabha, Maricene; Paganelli, Maria Ondina; Coelho, Otávio Rizzi; Ferreira-Melo, Silvia Elaine; Moreira, Marcos Mello; Cavalho, Adriana Camargo de; Araujo, Sebastião; Moreno Junior, Heitor

    2010-01-15

    BACKGROUND: Arginine vasopressin (AVP) has been broadly used in the management of vasodilatory shock. However, there are many concerns regarding its clinical use, especially in high doses, as it can be associated with adverse cardiovascular events. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the cardiovascular effects of AVP in continuous IV infusion on hemodynamic parameters in dogs. METHODS: Sixteen healthy mongrel dogs, anesthetized with pentobarbital were intravascularly catheterized, and randomly assigned to: control (saline-placebo; n=8) and AVP (n=8) groups. The study group was infused with AVP for three consecutive 10-minute periods at logarithmically increasing doses (0.01; 0.1 and 1.0U/kg/min), at them 20-min intervals. Heart rate (HR) and intravascular pressures were continuously recorded. Cardiac output was measured by the thermodilution method. RESULTS: No significant hemodynamic effects were observed during 0.01U/kg/min of AVP infusion, but at higher doses (0.1 and 1.0U/kg/min) a progressive increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) were observed, with a significant decrease in HR and the cardiac index (CI). A significant increase in the pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI) was also observed with the 1.0U/kg/min dose, mainly due to the decrease in the CI. CONCLUSION: AVP, when administered at doses between 0.1 and 1.0U/kg/min, induced significant increases in MAP and SVRI, with negative inotropic and chronotropic effects in healthy animals. Although these doses are ten to thousand times greater than those routinely used for the management of vasodilatory shock, our data confirm that AVP might be used carefully and under strict hemodynamic monitoring in clinical practice, especially if doses higher than 0.01 U/kg/min are needed. Martins, LC et al. PMID:20084333

  2. Brain oxygenation and CNS oxygen toxicity after infusion of perfluorocarbon emulsion.

    PubMed

    Demchenko, Ivan T; Mahon, Richard T; Allen, Barry W; Piantadosi, Claude A

    2012-07-01

    Intravenous perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions, administered with supplemental inspired O(2), are being evaluated for their ability to eliminate N(2) from blood and tissue prior to submarine escape, but these agents can increase the incidence of central nervous system (CNS) O(2) toxicity, perhaps by enhancing O(2) delivery to the brain. To assess this, we infused a PFC emulsion (Oxycyte, 6 ml/kg iv) into anesthetized rats and measured cerebral Po(2) and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus, and striatum with 100% O(2) at 1, 3, or 5 atmospheres absolute (ATA). At 1 ATA, brain Po(2) stabilized at >20 mmHg higher in animals infused with PFC emulsion than in control animals infused with saline, and rCBF fell by ~10%. At 3 ATA, PFC emulsion raised brain Po(2) >70 mmHg above control levels, and rCBF decreased by as much as 25%. At 5 ATA, brain Po(2) was ≥159 mmHg above levels in control animals for the first 40 min but then rose sharply; rCBF showed a similar profile, reflecting vasoconstriction followed by hyperemia. Conscious rats were also pretreated with PFC emulsion at 3 or 6 ml/kg iv and exposed to 100% O(2) at 5 ATA. At the lower dose, 80% of the animals experienced seizures by 33 min compared with 50% of the control animals. At the higher dose, seizures occurred in all rats within 25 min. At these doses, administration of PFC emulsion poses a clear risk of CNS O(2) toxicity in conscious rats exposed to hyperbaric O(2) at 5 ATA. PMID:22556400

  3. Bulk Moisture and Salinity Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurge, Mark; Monje, Oscar; Prenger, Jessica; Catechis, John

    2013-01-01

    Measurement and feedback control of nutrient solutions in plant root zones is critical to the development of healthy plants in both terrestrial and reduced-gravity environments. In addition to the water content, the amount of fertilizer in the nutrient solution is important to plant health. This typically requires a separate set of sensors to accomplish. A combination bulk moisture and salinity sensor has been designed, built, and tested with different nutrient solutions in several substrates. The substrates include glass beads, a clay-like substrate, and a nutrient-enriched substrate with the presence of plant roots. By measuring two key parameters, the sensor is able to monitor both the volumetric water content and salinity of the nutrient solution in bulk media. Many commercially available moisture sensors are point sensors, making localized measurements over a small volume at the point of insertion. Consequently, they are more prone to suffer from interferences with air bubbles, contact area of media, and root growth. This makes it difficult to get an accurate representation of true moisture content and distribution in the bulk media. Additionally, a network of point sensors is required, increasing the cabling, data acquisition, and calibration requirements. measure the dielectric properties of a material in the annular space of the vessel. Because the pore water in the media often has high salinity, a method to measure the media moisture content and salinity simultaneously was devised. Characterization of the frequency response for capacitance and conductance across the electrodes was completed for 2-mm glass bead media, 1- to 2-mm Turface (a clay like media), and 1- to 2-mm fertilized Turface with the presence of root mass. These measurements were then used to find empirical relationships among capacitance (C), the dissipation factor (D), the volumetric water content, and the pore water salinity.

  4. Insulin Infusion Set: The Achilles Heel of Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lutz; Krinelke, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion from an insulin pump depends on reliable transfer of the pumped insulin to the subcutaneous insulin depot by means of an insulin infusion set (IIS). Despite their widespread use, the published knowledge about IISs and related issues regarding the impact of placement and wear time on insulin absorption/insulin action is relatively small. We also have to acknowledge that our knowledge is limited with regard to how often patients encounter issues with IISs. Reading pump wearer blogs, for instance, suggests that these are a frequent source of trouble. There are no prospective clinical studies available on current IIS and insulin formulations that provide representative data on the type and frequency of issues with infusion sets. The introduction of new IISs and patch pumps may foster a reassessment of available products and of patient problems related to their use. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge and recommendations about IISs and to highlight potential directions of IIS development in order to make insulin absorption safer and more efficient. PMID:22920824

  5. Multiple Intravenous Infusions Phase 2b: Laboratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinkney, Sonia; Fan, Mark; Chan, Katherine; Koczmara, Christine; Colvin, Christopher; Sasangohar, Farzan; Masino, Caterina; Easty, Anthony; Trbovich, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Background Administering multiple intravenous (IV) infusions to a single patient via infusion pump occurs routinely in health care, but there has been little empirical research examining the risks associated with this practice or ways to mitigate those risks. Objectives To identify the risks associated with multiple IV infusions and assess the impact of interventions on nurses’ ability to safely administer them. Data Sources and Review Methods Forty nurses completed infusion-related tasks in a simulated adult intensive care unit, with and without interventions (i.e., repeated-measures design). Results Errors were observed in completing common tasks associated with the administration of multiple IV infusions, including the following (all values from baseline, which was current practice): setting up and programming multiple primary continuous IV infusions (e.g., 11.7% programming errors) identifying IV infusions (e.g., 7.7% line-tracing errors) managing dead volume (e.g., 96.0% flush rate errors following IV syringe dose administration) setting up a secondary intermittent IV infusion (e.g., 11.3% secondary clamp errors) administering an IV pump bolus (e.g., 11.5% programming errors) Of 10 interventions tested, 6 (1 practice, 3 technology, and 2 educational) significantly decreased or even eliminated errors compared to baseline. Limitations The simulation of an adult intensive care unit at 1 hospital limited the ability to generalize results. The study results were representative of nurses who received training in the interventions but had little experience using them. The longitudinal effects of the interventions were not studied. Conclusions Administering and managing multiple IV infusions is a complex and risk-prone activity. However, when a patient requires multiple IV infusions, targeted interventions can reduce identified risks. A combination of standardized practice, technology improvements, and targeted education is required. PMID:26316919

  6. Multiple Intravenous Infusions Phase 2a: Ontario Survey

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Mark; Koczmara, Christine; Masino, Caterina; Cassano-Piché, Andrea; Trbovich, Patricia; Easty, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Background Research conducted in earlier phases of this study prospectively identified a number of concerns related to the safe administration of multiple intravenous (IV) infusions in Ontario hospitals. Objective To investigate the potential prevalence of practices or policies that may contribute to the patient safety risks identified in Phase 1b of this study. Data Sources and Review Methods Sixty-four survey responses were analyzed from clinical units where multiple IV infusions may occur (e.g., adult intensive care units). Survey questions were organized according to the topics identified in Phase 1b as potential contributors to patient harm (e.g., labelling practices, patient transfer practices, secondary infusion policies). Results Survey results indicated suboptimal practices and policies in some clinical units, and variability in a number of infusion practices. Key areas of concern included the following: use of primary IV tubing without back check valves when administering secondary infusions administration of secondary infusions with/as high-alert continuous IV medications potential confusion about how IV tubing should be labelled to reflect replacement date and time interruptions to IV therapy due to IV pump and/or tubing changes when patients are transferred between clinical units coadministration of continuous or intermittent infusions on central venous pressure monitoring ports variability in respondents’ awareness of the infusion pump's bolus capabilities Limitations Due to the limited sample size, survey responses may not be representative of infusion practices across Ontario. Answers to some questions indicated that the intent of the questions might have been misunderstood. Due to a design error, 1 question about bolus administration methods was not shown to as many respondents as appropriate. Conclusions The Ontario survey revealed variability in IV infusion practice across the province and potential opportunities to improve safety. PMID

  7. Avoiding Infusion Confusion Kindergarten through 3rd Grade. A Practical Handbook for Infusing Environmental Activities into Your Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Harvey; And Others

    To some educators, infusing environmental education into different subject areas at different levels may seem like an insurmountable task. This handbook was developed to take the guesswork out of this process and alleviate the fear and confusion that may result. It was designed to assist with infusing awareness and attitude activities into the…

  8. Avoiding Infusion Confusion 4th through 6th Grades. A Practical Handbook for Infusing Environmental Activities into Your Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Harvey; And Others

    To some educators, infusing environmental education into different subject areas at different levels may seem like an insurmountable task. This handbook was developed to take the guesswork out of this process and alleviate the fear and confusion that may result. It was designed to assist with infusing knowledge and attitude activities into the…

  9. Avoiding Infusion Confusion 7th through 9th Grades. A Practical Handbook for Infusing Environmental Activities into Your Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Harvey; And Others

    To some educators, infusing environmental education into different subject areas at different levels may seem like an insurmountable task. This handbook was developed to take the guesswork out of this process and alleviate the fear and confusion that may result. It was designed to assist with infusing knowledge, skill and attitude activities into…

  10. Effects of site-specific infusions of methionine sulfoximine on the temporal progression of seizures in a rat model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Dhaher, Roni; Wang, Helen; Gruenbaum, Shaun E; Tu, Nathan; Lee, Tih-Shih W; Zaveri, Hitten P; Eid, Tore

    2015-09-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) in astrocytes is critical for metabolism of glutamate and ammonia in the brain, and perturbations in the anatomical distribution and activity of the enzyme are likely to adversely affect synaptic transmission. GS is deficient in discrete regions of the hippocampal formation in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE), a disorder characterized by brain glutamate excess and recurrent seizures. To investigate the role of site-specific inhibition of GS in MTLE, we chronically infused the GS inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (MSO) into one of the following areas of adult laboratory rats: (1) the angular bundle, n=6; (2) the deep entorhinal cortex (EC), n=7; (3) the stratum lacunosum-moleculare of CA1, n=7; (4) the molecular layer of the subiculum, n=10; (5) the hilus of the dentate gyrus, n=6; and (6) the lateral ventricle, n=6. Twelve animals were infused with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) into the same areas to serve as controls. All infusions were unilateral, and animals were monitored by continuous video-intracranial EEG recordings for 3 weeks to capture seizure activity. All animals infused with MSO into the entorhinal-hippocampal area exhibited recurrent seizures that were particularly frequent during the first 3 days of infusion and that continued to recur for the entire 3 week recording period. Only a fraction of animals infused with MSO into the lateral ventricle had recurrent seizures, which occurred at a lower frequency compared with the other MSO infused group. Infusion of MSO into the hilus of the dentate gyrus resulted in the highest total number of seizures over the 3-week recording period. Infusion of MSO into all brain regions studied, with the exception of the lateral ventricle, led to a change in the composition of seizure severity over time. Low-grade (stages 1-3) seizures were more prevalent early during infusion, while severe (stages 4-5) seizures were more prevalent later. Thus, the site of GS inhibition within

  11. INTEGRATING DESALINATION AND AGRICULTURAL SALINITY CONTROL ALTERNATIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cost-effectiveness relationships for various agricultural and desalination alternatives for controlling salinity in irrigation return flows are developed. Selection of optimal salinity management strategies on a river basin scale is described as a problem of integrating optim...

  12. Effects of adrenaline infusion on plasma lipids and noradrenaline levels in rabbits with adriamycin-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Minatoguchi, S; Uno, Y; Seishima, M; Koshiji, M; Kakami, M; Yokoyama, H; Ito, H; Fujiwara, H

    1997-07-01

    1. We investigated the acute effects of adrenaline infusion on plasma lipid levels in vehicle- and adriamycin-treated rabbits. Lipids were measured before and 30 and 60 min after the commencement of continuous intravenous administration of adrenaline (0.06 microgram/kg per min) or saline in pentobarbital-anaesthetized rabbits. 2. Adrenaline infusion significantly increased plasma free fatty acid (P < 0.05) and noradrenaline (NA) levels (P < 0.05) in vehicle-treated control rabbits, but not in adriamycin-treated rabbits. However, adrenaline had no effect on plasma total cholesterol, free cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, triglyceride or phospholipid levels. 3. Pretreatment with propranolol almost completely inhibited increased plasma free fatty acid and NA levels associated with adrenaline infusion, suggesting that adrenaline increases plasma free fatty acid and NA levels via the stimulation of beta-adrenoceptors in vehicle-treated rabbits. 4. It is suggested that both the production of plasma free fatty acids and the release of NA via the activation of beta-adrenoceptors is reduced in rabbits with adriamycin-induced cardiomyopathy. This may be related to the down-regulation of beta-adrenoceptors caused by elevated plasma NA levels induced by cardiac failure. PMID:9248663

  13. Needle infusion avoids using sutures and prevents hypotony in the 23 gauge sutureless vitrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yingjie; Zhu, Dongqing; Zhou, Jibo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of needle infusion on preventing wound leakage and hypotony in sutureless vitrectomy. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 230 consecutive eyes of 23-gauge pars plana vitrectomy with or without needle infusion, and further measured the wound leakage and intraocular pressure (IOP) without using a suture. Results: In the eyes with primary needle infusion inserted before infusion cannula removal, IOP was stable during and after infusion cannula removal. No suture was needed in the procedure. Postoperative hypotony did not occurred in all eyes with needle infusion either. Conclusion: Needle infusion inserted before infusion cannula removal can avoid using sutures and prevent hypotony intraoperatively and postoperatively. PMID:26770552

  14. Pre-rigor infusion with kiwifruit juice improves lamb tenderness.

    PubMed

    Han, J; Morton, J D; Bekhit, A E D; Sedcole, J R

    2009-07-01

    The ability of pre-rigor infusion of kiwifruit juice to improve the tenderness of lamb was investigated. Lamb carcasses were infused (10% body weight) with fresh kiwifruit juice (Ac), water (W) and a non-infusion control (C) treatment. Infusion treatment had no effect on lamb hot carcass weight, cold carcass weight and chilling evaporative losses. The infused treatment carcasses of Ac and W had lower (P<0.05) pH values than C carcasses during the initial 12h post-mortem. The LD muscles from Ac carcasses were more tender with significantly lower shear force (P<0.001) compared with C and W carcasses during the six days following infusion with the kiwifruit juice. The enhanced proteolytic activity (P=0.002) resulting from the infused kiwifruit juice in Ac carcasses was associated with significant degradation of the myofibrillar proteins, appearance of new peptides and activation of m-calpain during post-mortem ageing. Thus, kiwifruit juice is powerful and easily prepared meat tenderizer, which could contribute efficiently and effectively to the meat tenderization process. PMID:20416722

  15. Induction of ovulation in the acyclic postpartum ewe following continuous, low-dose subcutaneous infusion of GnRH.

    PubMed

    Fray, M D; Lamming, G E; Haresign, W

    1995-04-15

    Pituitary and ovarian responses to subcutaneous infusion of GnRH were investigated in acyclic, lactating Mule ewes during the breeding season. Thirty postpartum ewes were split into 3 equal groups; Group G received GnRH (250 ng/h) for 96 h; Group P + G was primed with progestagen for 10 d then received GnRH (250 ng/h) for 96 h; and Group P received progestagen priming and saline vehicle only. The infusions were delivered via osmotic minipumps inserted 26.6 +/- 0.45 d post partum (Day 0 of the study). Blood samples were collected for LH analysis every 15 min from 12 h before until 8 h after minipump insertion, then every 2 h for a further 112 h. Daily blood samples were collected for progesterone analysis on Days 1 to 10 following minipump insertion, then every third day for a further 25 d. In addition, the reproductive tract was examined by laparoscopy on Day -5 and Day +7 and estrous behavior was monitored between Day -4 and Day +7. Progestagen priming suppressed (P < 0.05) plasma LH levels (0.27 +/- 0.03 vs 0.46 +/- 0.06 ng/ml) during the preinfusion period, but the GnRH-induced LH release was similar for Group G and Group P + G. The LH surge began significantly (P < 0.05) earlier (32.0 +/- 3.0 vs 56.3 +/- 4.1 h) and was of greater magnitude (32.15 +/- 3.56 vs 18.84 +/- 4.13 ng/ml) in the unprimed than the primed ewes. None of the ewes infused with saline produced a preovulatory LH surge. The GnRH infusion induced ovulation in 10/10 unprimed and 7/9 progestagen-primed ewes, with no significant difference in ovulation rate (1.78 +/- 0.15 and 1.33 +/- 0.21, respectively). Ovulation was followed by normal luteal function in 4/10 Group-G ewes, while the remaining 6 ewes had short luteal phases. In contrast, each of the 7 Group-P + G ewes that ovulated secreted progesterone for at least 10 d, although elevated plasma progesterone levels were maintained in 3/7 unmated ewes for >35 d. Throughout the study only 2 ewes (both from Group P + G) displayed estrus. These data

  16. Effects of cholic acid infusion in fetal lambs.

    PubMed

    Campos, G A; Guerra, F A; Israel, E J

    1986-01-01

    The effects of prolonged intravenous infusions of cholic acid into fetal lambs are described in this study. The ewes (n = 10, 11 fetuses) were operated on at 114 days of gestation (term = 150 days) by placing plastic catheters in maternal and fetal vessels and in the amniotic cavity. Gestational ages were confirmed after delivery by radiographic examination of the ossification centers of the fetal legs. Infusions of cholic acid (1.6 mumoles/min-1) started 8 to 10 days after surgery in 5 fetuses (including one twin). The remaining 6 fetuses (also including one twin) were infused with 5% dextrose in water. Total plasma bile acids at the beginning of the experiment were similar in both groups (23.8 +/- 6.6 vs. 24.3 +/- 5.7 microM). No significant changes in fetal heart rate, blood pressure, blood gases or pH were detected during the infusion. Meconium-stained amniotic fluid was observed during the third day of infusion in all the fetuses infused with cholic acid and in one control fetus. Fetuses infused with cholic acid were delivered alive 19-26 days before term. The concentration of plasma bile acids in the experimental group at delivery was 829 +/- 305 microM, i.e. significantly higher than that of the control group (24.4 +/- 5.7 microM). Control fetuses (except one twin) were delivered at term. We concluded that cholic acid, even at the high dose infused, is neither lethal nor severely harmful for the fetus. Meconium passage of the fetuses infused with cholic acid, in our experiment, appeared to be related to the stimulatory effect of cholic acid on fetal colonic motility rather than to fetal hypoxia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3716776

  17. The Aquarius Salinity Retrieval Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meissner, Thomas; Wentz, Frank; Hilburn, Kyle; Lagerloef, Gary; Le Vine, David

    2012-01-01

    The first part of this presentation gives an overview over the Aquarius salinity retrieval algorithm. The instrument calibration [2] converts Aquarius radiometer counts into antenna temperatures (TA). The salinity retrieval algorithm converts those TA into brightness temperatures (TB) at a flat ocean surface. As a first step, contributions arising from the intrusion of solar, lunar and galactic radiation are subtracted. The antenna pattern correction (APC) removes the effects of cross-polarization contamination and spillover. The Aquarius radiometer measures the 3rd Stokes parameter in addition to vertical (v) and horizontal (h) polarizations, which allows for an easy removal of ionospheric Faraday rotation. The atmospheric absorption at L-band is almost entirely due to molecular oxygen, which can be calculated based on auxiliary input fields from numerical weather prediction models and then successively removed from the TB. The final step in the TA to TB conversion is the correction for the roughness of the sea surface due to wind, which is addressed in more detail in section 3. The TB of the flat ocean surface can now be matched to a salinity value using a surface emission model that is based on a model for the dielectric constant of sea water [3], [4] and an auxiliary field for the sea surface temperature. In the current processing only v-pol TB are used for this last step.

  18. In vivo photoacoustic flowmetry at depths of the diffusive regime based on saline injection

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yong; Poudel, Joemini; Li, Guo; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. We propose a saline injection-based method to quantify blood flow velocity in vivo with acoustic-resolution photoacoustic tomography. By monitoring the saline–blood interface propagating in the blood vessel, the flow velocity can be resolved. We first demonstrated our method in phantom experiments, where a root mean square error of prediction of 0.29  mm/s was achieved. By injecting saline into a mouse tail vein covered with 1 mm chicken tissue, we showed that the flow velocity in the tail vein could be measured at depths, which is especially pertinent to monitoring blood flow velocity in patients undergoing intravenous infusion. PMID:26267364

  19. Single ketamine infusion and neurocognitive performance in bipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Permoda-Osip, A; Kisielewski, J; Bartkowska-Sniatkowska, A; Rybakowski, J K

    2015-03-01

    We estimated neurocognitive performance using the trail making test (TMT) and the Stroop color-word interference test before, and on the 3(rd) day after a single infusion of ketamine, in 18 bipolar depressed patients receiving mood-stabilizing drugs. The performance on all tests significantly improved on the 3(rd) day after ketamine infusion which correlated positively with baseline intensity of neuropsychological impairment and was not associated either with baseline intensity of depression or reduction of depressive symptoms after 3 or 7 days. The results suggest that in such population of patients, single ketamine infusion may improve neuropsychological performance independently of antidepressant effect. PMID:25347227

  20. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy in patients receiving hepatic artery infusion chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Housholder, D.F.; Hynes, H.E.; Dakhil, S.R.; Marymont, J.V.

    1985-05-01

    Hepatic artery infusion chemotherapy is used in the treatment of certain selected hepatic tumors, especially metastatic adenocarcinoma of the colon. Chemical cholecystitis has been recognized recently as a complication of hepatic artery infusion chemotherapy. The authors performed hepatobiliary scans on ten patients receiving hepatic artery infusion chemotherapy. All ten patients had abnormal hepatobiliary scintigraphy. They present case reports of three patients with abnormal hepatobiliary scans who have required cholecystectomy for symptoms of chemical cholecystitis to illustrate the clinical, scintigraphic, and pathologic findings in these patients.

  1. [The development of multifunction intravenous infusion quantitative packaging device].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shufang; Li, Ruihua; Shen, Lianhong

    2012-11-01

    Aimed at tackling the compatibility issues arising from the drug reaction in intravenous infusion tube, we developed a simple, suitable and multi-function intravenous infusion tube for the special use for rescuing critical patients, the elderly, children etc. Each drug in a transfusion process can be filtered to realize quantitative packet and packet delivery. Thus, the drugs in the infusion tube are prevented from meeting with each other. No overlap, no particle pollution occurred. Stable performance and accurate dosage are maintained. As a result safety is ensured during drug delivery. PMID:23461118

  2. Acid-Base Homeostasis: Overview for Infusion Nurses.

    PubMed

    Masco, Natalie A

    2016-01-01

    Acid-base homeostasis is essential to normal function of the human body. Even slight alterations can significantly alter physiologic processes at the tissue and cellular levels. To optimally care for patients, nurses must be able to recognize signs and symptoms that indicate deviations from normal. Nurses who provide infusions to patients-whether in acute care, home care, or infusion center settings-have a responsibility to be able to recognize the laboratory value changes that occur with the imbalance and appreciate the treatment options, including intravenous infusions. PMID:27598068

  3. Cardiovascular and endocrine responses to acute hypoxaemia during and following dexamethasone infusion in the ovine fetus

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Andrew J W; Gardner, David S; Edwards, C Mark B; Fowden, Abigail L; Giussani, Dino A

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of fetal treatment with dexamethasone on ovine fetal cardiovascular defence responses to acute hypoxaemia, occurring either during or 48 h following the period of glucocorticoid exposure. To address the mechanisms underlying these responses, chemoreflex function and plasma concentrations of catecholamines, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and vasopressin were measured. Under general halothane anaesthesia, 26 Welsh Mountain sheep fetuses were surgically prepared for long-term recording at between 117 and 120 days of gestation (dGA; term is ∼145 days) with vascular catheters and a Transonic flow probe around a femoral artery. Following at least 5 days of recovery, fetuses were randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups. After 48 h of baseline recording, at 125 ± 1 dGA, half of the fetuses (n = 13) were continuously infused i.v. with dexamethasone for 48 h at a rate of 2.06 ± 0.13 μg kg−1 h−1. The remaining 13 fetuses were infused with heparinized saline at the same rate (controls). At 127 ± 1 dGA, 2 days from the onset of infusions, seven fetuses from each group were subjected to 1 h of acute hypoxaemia. At 129 ± 1 dGA, 2 days after the end of infusions, six fetuses from each group were subjected to 1 h of acute hypoxaemia. Similar reductions in fetal partial pressure of arterial oxygen occurred in control and dexamethasone-treated fetuses during the acute hypoxaemia protocols. In control fetuses, acute hypoxaemia led to transient bradycardia, femoral vasoconstriction and significant increases in plasma concentrations of catecholamines, vasopressin and NPY. In fetuses subjected to acute hypoxaemia during dexamethasone treatment, the increase in plasma NPY was enhanced, the bradycardic response was prolonged, and the plasma catecholamine and vasopressin responses were diminished. In fetuses subjected to acute hypoxaemia 48 h following dexamethasone treatment, femoral vasoconstriction and plasma catecholamine and vasopressin

  4. Pain and Gaps in IT Infusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatland, D. R.; van Ingen, C.; Beran, B.; Heavner, M.; Habermann, M.; Berner, L.

    2008-12-01

    The process of adopting a new information technology 'X' within geoscience research projects is hindered by two strong barriers: The pain associated with learning about, adopting and adapting to X, and corresponding gaps in the 'ease-of-adoption' process left by the builders of X. As builders and providers of two such X's we discuss several lessons learned from two distinct points along the data pipeline (data acquisition, storage, retrieval, archival, cleaning, provenance, browsing and analysis). We begin with work at Microsoft Research to generalize the CUAHSI Observations Data Model to a "next generation" Environmental Data Model (EDM) with the idea of supporting trans-disciplinary information across remote sensing, in situ, sample analysis, archival, and model data spaces. We then turn to an in situ sensor network microserver developed through NASA support for harsh environment data acquisition. The primary 'IT infusion' candidate research project here is SEAMONSTER, the Southeast Alaska Monitoring Network for Science, Telecommunications, Education and Research. We trace the adoption pathway, including gaps and pain, from deployment through to data registration on an EDM data catalog server. We discuss architecture, documentation and technical support in terms of an end-result success metric: How easily can this project's open data results be discovered and used?

  5. [Clinical experimental studies of postoperative infusion analgesia].

    PubMed

    Dick, W; Knoche, E; Grundlach, G; Klein, I

    1983-06-01

    30 postoperative patients, who had undergone abdominal gynaecological surgery with standard general anaesthesia were randomly divided into three groups and received, in the recovery ward, a continuous infusion of either pentazocine, piritramid, or ketamine. The patients rated their pain on a 15 cm pain analogue score. Group I pentazocine: Mean dosage on the day of operation 0.12 mg/kg/h, 0.1 mg/kg/h on the first and only 0.07 mg/kg/h on the second postoperative day. Pentazocine blood levels were on average 50 micrograms/l. Group II piritramid: Mean dosage on the day of operation 0.038 mg/kg/h, 0.024 mg/kg/h on the first and 0.019 mg/kg/h on the second postoperative day. Blood levels of piritramid were not determined because there is no satisfactory assay available. Group III ketamine: mean dosage on the day of operation 0.32 mg/kg/h, 0.28 mg/kg/h on the first and 0.29 mg/kg/h on the second postoperative day. Ketamine blood levels lay between 120 and 180 micrograms/l. The three analgesics did not cause any important haemodynamic or respiratory side effects. Pentazocine and piritramid were the most effective analgesics, ketamine was the least effective with a high incidence of side effects. PMID:6412586

  6. Clinical experimental studies of postoperative infusion analgesia.

    PubMed

    Knoche, E; Dick, W; Bowdler, I; Gundlach, G

    1983-01-01

    Thirty postoperative patients, after undergoing abdominal hysterectomy and standard general anesthesia, were randomly allocated to three groups and received, in the recovery ward, a continuous infusion of either pentazocine, piritramide, or ketamine. The patients rated their pain on a 15-cm visual analog scale. Patients in group 1 received pentazocine. Mean dosage was 0.12 mg/kg/hr on the day of operation, 0.1 mg/kg/hr on the first postoperative day, and only 0.07 mg/kg/hr on the second postoperative day. Pentazocine blood levels averaged 50 micrograms/L. Patients in group 2 received piritramide. Mean dosage was 0.038 mg/kg/hr on the day of operation, 0.024 mg/kg/hr on the first postoperative day, and 0.019 mg/kg/hr on the second postoperative day. Blood levels of piritramide were not determined because no satisfactory assay is available. Patients in group 3 received ketamine. Mean dosage was 0.32 mg/kg/hr on the day of operation, 0.28 mg/kg/hr on the first postoperative day, and 0.29 mg/kg/hr on the second postoperative day. Ketamine blood levels ranged between 120 and 180 micrograms/L. None of the three analgesics caused any important hemodynamic or respiratory side effects. Pentazocine and piritramide were more effective analgesics than ketamine was. Ketamine also had a higher incidence of side effects. PMID:6627285

  7. Drag reduction on liquid infused superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Rothstein, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    The drag reduction on liquid infused superhydrophobic surfaces was measured through a microchannel. The microfluidic device consisted of two halves, a superhydrophobic surface and a microchannel, respectively. The superhydrophobic surface was created from a silicon wafer with ridge patterns 30 to 60 microns in width and spacing generated by a standard photolithography. A low viscosity, immiscible, incompressible silicone oil was filled to the gaps of the superhydrophobic surfaces. Several microchannels varying in size from 100 to 200 microns were fabricated from PDMS with an inlet, outlet and two pressure ports. After flow coating the superhydrophobic surface with a uniform film of oil, the two halves were aligned and clamped together and the pressure drop measured. A systematic study on drag reduction and slip length was performed by varying the viscosity ratio between the water and oil phase between 0 to 50. Several aqueous glycerin solutions with different viscosity were prepared. The slip length, pressure drop, and longevity of the oil phase were studied as a function of surface geometry, capillary number and the dispense volume. NSF CBET-1334962.

  8. The Variable Rate Intravenous Insulin Infusion Protocol.

    PubMed

    Collard, Benjamin; Sturgeon, Jonathan; Patel, Natasha; Asharia, Shabbar

    2014-01-01

    Insulin use among inpatients is high and associated with severe and regular medication errors. An initial baseline audit showed a wide variation in the prescription of intravenous insulin within the trust. These included variation in the choice of fluid prescribed, electrolyte levels not consistently checked, handwritten illegible prescriptions, and varying parameters set for adjustment of the prescription. A Variable Rate Intravenous Insulin Infusion protocol (VRIII)) was introduced to standardize intravenous insulin prescription throughout the trust by all members of the clinical team. We looked at and measured uptake and effects of the VRIII protocol in improving standardization of insulin prescription for inpatients on insulin at St George's NHS trust. The protocol was uploaded to the intranet to allow access 24 hours a day and the staff educated about it. The VRIII protocol was routinely used successfully throughout the trust. Any initial problems were addressed through education of clinical staff. The protocol has shown decreased prescribing and administrative errors, whilst demonstrating good glucose and electrolyte control. Use of a standardized protocol helps reduce medication errors and demonstrates good glycaemic control. Regular and continued education of clinical staff is necessary to maintain its efficacy. PMID:26734228

  9. Intraosseous infusions in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Parrish, G A; Turkewitz, D; Skiendzielewski, J J

    1986-01-01

    For most emergency physicians and pediatricians, the frustrations encountered when obtaining intravenous access in infants involved in traumatic or medical emergencies are well known. Although it is rare that parenteral access is absolutely unobtainable in a pediatric patient, minutes and sometimes hours are often lost as futile attempts are made to cannulate a collapsed vein of such a patient. Many alternatives to such a crisis situation, including the intratracheal, intracardiac, and sublingual routes of administration, have been proposed and efficaciously used. Disadvantages to these alternatives, however, include the inability to administer volume-expanding colloids or crystalloids, and a relatively narrow spectrum of useful medications. One relatively safe, well-proven, and technically easy method for giving replacement fluids, blood products, and numerous resuscitative drugs is infusion by the intraosseous route. Although not recommended as a replacement for current modes of intravascular access, we feel it has definite utility in selected situations and warrants the awareness of emergency physicians. The value, historical aspects, technique, and complications of this procedure are discussed. PMID:3947434

  10. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion: practical issues

    PubMed Central

    Saboo, Banshi D.; Talaviya, Praful A.

    2012-01-01

    The growing number of individuals with diabetes mellitus has prompted new way of treating these patients, continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) or insulin pump therapy is an increasingly form of intensive insulin therapy. An increasing number of individuals with diabetes mellitus individuals of all ages have started using insulin pump therapy. Not everyone is a good candidate for insulin pump therapy, and the clinician needs to be able to determine which patients are able to master the techniques required and to watch for the adverse reactions that may develop. Insulin pump increases quality of life of patient with diabetes mellitus with increasing satisfaction with treatment and decrease impact of diabetes mellitus. Manual errors by insulin pump users may lead to hypo or hyperglycemia, resulting into diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) sometimes. Some of practical aspect is associated with insulin pump therapy such as selection of candidates, handling of pump and selection of site, and pump setting, henceforth this review is prepared to explore and solve the practical problems or issues associated with pump therapy. PMID:23565394

  11. Current Status of Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Obi, Shuntaro; Sato, Shinpei; Kawai, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) is frequently used to treat advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in Asian countries. However, there is a lack of evidence supporting the use of HAIC. Summary Many studies report high response rates in patients with advanced HCC receiving HAIC, and clinical responses translate to survival benefits. Therefore, prediction of an antitumor response is important in selecting appropriate treatments. There are no proven post-sorafenib therapeutic measures or procedures for HCC patients with poor liver function, and HAIC is one of the few options for patients in these situations. Despite studies showing its effectiveness, the use of HAIC for treatment of advanced HCC is unclear because convincing data from large-scale randomized clinical trials are lacking. For HAIC to become a standard treatment for HCC, such trials must establish its efficacy compared with other HCC therapies; prediction of antitumor response in HAIC may aid trial design, and a multi-center, open-labelled, randomized clinical trial of HAIC in advanced HCC is currently in progress. Optimization of HCC treatment protocols and regimens is also required. Key message We think that both HAIC and sorafenib are effective treatments for advanced HCC, and this review presents evidence supporting this contention. PMID:26674592

  12. Up-regulation of hypertonicity-activated myo-inositol transporter SMIT1 by the cell volume-sensitive protein kinase SGK1.

    PubMed

    Klaus, F; Palmada, M; Lindner, R; Laufer, J; Jeyaraj, S; Lang, F; Boehmer, C

    2008-03-15

    Mechanisms of regulatory cell volume increase following cell shrinkage include accumulation of organic osmolytes such as betaine, taurine, sorbitol, glycerophosphorylcholine (GPC) and myo-inositol. Myo-inositol is taken up by the sodium-myo-inositol-transporter SMIT1 (SLC5A3) expressed in a wide variety of cell types. Hypertonicity induces the transcription of the SMIT1 gene upon binding of the transcription factor tonicity enhancer binding protein (TonEBP) to tonicity responsive enhancers (TonE) in the SMIT1 promoter region. However, little is known about post-translational regulation of the carrier protein. In this study we show that SMIT1 is modulated by the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase SGK1, a protein genomically up-regulated by hypertonicity. As demonstrated by two-electrode voltage-clamp in the Xenopus oocyte expression system, SMIT1-mediated myo-inositol-induced currents are up-regulated by coexpression of wild type SGK1 and constitutively active (S422D)SGK1 but not by inactive (K127N)SGK1. The increase in SMIT1 activity is due to an elevated cell surface expression of the carrier while its kinetic properties remain unaffected. According to the decay of SMIT1 activity in the presence of brefeldin A, SGK1 stabilizes the SMIT1 protein in the plasma membrane. The SGK isoforms SGK2, SGK3 and the closely related protein kinase B (PKB) are similarly capable of activating SMIT1 activity. SMIT1-mediated currents are decreased by coexpression of the ubiquitin-ligase Nedd4-2, an effect counteracted by additional coexpression of SGK1. In conclusion, the present observations disclose SGK isoforms and protein kinase B as novel regulators of SMIT1 activity. PMID:18202099

  13. Fluid deprivation increases isotonic NaCl intake, but not hypertonic salt intake, under normal and heated conditions in obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Omouessi, S T; Lemamy, G J; Kiki-Mvouaka, S; Fernette, B; Falconetti, C; Ndeboko, B; Mouecoucou, J; Thornton, S N

    2016-02-01

    In the course of exposure to fluid deprivation and heated environment, mammals regulate their hydromineral balance and body temperature by a number of mechanisms including sweating, water and salt intakes. Here we challenged obese Zucker rats, known to have a predisposition to hypertension, with 0.9%NaCl alone or with 2%NaCl solution + water to drink under fluid deprivation and heated conditions. Food and fluid intakes, body weight, diuresis and natriuresis were measured daily throughout. Serum aldosterone levels and Na(+) concentration were also analyzed. Data showed that obese and lean rats presented similar baseline measurements of food, 0.9%NaCl and fluid intakes, diuresis and fluid balance; whereas hypertonic 2%NaCl consumption was almost absent. Before and during fluid deprivation animals increased isotonic but not hypertonic NaCl intake; the obese showed significant increases in diuresis and Na(+) excretion, whereas, total fluid intake was similar between groups. Heat increased isotonic NaCl intake and doubled natriuresis in obese which were wet on their fur and displayed a paradoxical increase of fluid gain. Fluid deprivation plus heat produced similar negative fluid balance in all groups. Body weight losses, food intake and diuresis reductions were amplified under the combined conditions. Animals exposed to 2%NaCl showed higher circulating levels of aldosterone and obese were lower than leans. In animals which drank 0.9%NaCl, obese showed higher serum levels of Na(+) than leans. We conclude that in spite of their higher sensitivity to high salt and heat obese Zucker rats can control hydromineral balance in response to fluid deprivation and heat by adjusting isotonic NaCl preference with sodium balance and circulating levels of aldosterone. This suggests a key hormonal role in the mechanisms underlying thermoregulation, body fluid homeostasis and sodium intake. PMID:26621332

  14. Infusing Personal Responsibility into the Curriculum and Cocurriculum: Campus Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    This chapter highlights good practices and lessons learned for infusing personal responsibility--striving for excellence, cultivating academic integrity, and developing competence in ethical and moral reasoning and action--as outcomes of college.

  15. The selection and infusion of autonomy for Mars rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woerner, D. F.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the process MSL in using to infuse autonomy into a rover, and describes attributes, and evaluation criteria and their use pertinent to autonomy technologies for Mars rovers in general.

  16. The Infusion of Multicultural Teaching in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Esther Lee

    1984-01-01

    Multicultural education can be infused into the existing curriculum to help students become less ethnocentric and more cosmopolitan. Multicultural lessons dealing with numerals, abacus, calendars, and money exchange that were implemented successfully into a mathematics unit are discussed. (DF)

  17. Robust liquid-infused surfaces through patterned wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wexer, Jason; Grosskopf, Abigail; Chow, Melissa; Fan, Yuyang; Jacobi, Ian; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    Liquid-infused surfaces display advantageous properties that are normally associated with conventional gas-cushioned superhydrophobic surfaces. However, the surfaces can lose their novel properties if the infused liquid drains from the surface. We explore how drainage due to gravity or due to an external flow can be prevented through the use of chemical patterning. A small area of the overall surface is chemically treated to be preferentially wetted by the external fluid rather than the infused liquid. These sacrificial regions disrupt the continuity of the infused liquid, thereby preventing the liquid from draining from the texture. If the regions are patterned with the correct periodicity, drainage can be prevented entirely. The chemical patterns are created using spray-coating or deep-UV exposure, two economical techniques that are scalable to generate large-scale failure-resistant surfaces.

  18. Robust liquid-infused surfaces through patterned wettability.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Jason S; Grosskopf, Abigail; Chow, Melissa; Fan, Yuyang; Jacobi, Ian; Stone, Howard A

    2015-07-01

    Liquid-infused surfaces display advantageous properties that are normally associated with conventional gas-cushioned superhydrophobic surfaces. However, the surfaces can lose their novel properties if the infused liquid drains from the surface. We explore how drainage due to gravity or due to an external flow can be prevented through the use of chemical patterning. A small area of the overall surface is chemically treated to be preferentially wetted by the external fluid rather than the infused liquid. These sacrificial regions disrupt the continuity of the infused liquid, thereby preventing the liquid from draining from the texture. If the regions are patterned with the correct periodicity, drainage can be prevented entirely. The chemical patterns are created using spray-coating or deep-UV exposure, two facile techniques that are scalable to generate large-scale failure-resistant surfaces. PMID:26014378

  19. Infusing Social Responsibility into the Curriculum and Cocurriculum: Campus Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reason, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter highlights good practices and lessons learned for infusing social responsibility--contributing to the larger community and taking seriously the perspectives of others--as outcomes of college.

  20. Metabolic and antioxidant profiles of herbal infusions and decoctions.

    PubMed

    Fotakis, Charalambos; Tsigrimani, Diamantina; Tsiaka, Thalia; Lantzouraki, Dimitra Z; Strati, Irini F; Makris, Constantinos; Tagkouli, Dimitra; Proestos, Charalampos; Sinanoglou, Vassilia J; Zoumpoulakis, Panagiotis

    2016-11-15

    This study implements NMR metabolomics and spectrophotometric studies (Folin-Ciocalteu, FRAP, ABTS) to infusions and decoctions of ten plant species in order to assess and compare the metabolic and antioxidant profiles for each botanical family. Multivariate and univariate data analyses highlighted the differences among the samples and pinpointed specific classes of compounds for each plant species as well as infusions and decoctions. The identified phenolic compounds by NMR, as well as the antioxidant profile, framed a trend of increased values in infusions compared to the decoctions. Moreover, the infusion procedure positively affected the extractability of the phenolic compounds compared to decoctions. The highest total phenolic content was found in Mentha spicata, while the lowest in Matricaria chamomilla preparations, irrespective of the preparation method. The preparation time for the decoctions was examined showing that the 15min preparations were generally found richer in phenolics and of higher antioxidant capacity. PMID:27283718

  1. COMPENSATORY CHANGES IN THE HIPPOCAMPUS FOLLOWING INTRADENTATE INFUSION OF COLCHICINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Direct infusion of colchicine into the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus kills granule cells and elicits compensatory behavioral, neurochemical and neuroanatomical changes. olchicine-treated rats are less sensitive to the behavioral effects of cholinergic muscarinic receptor antag...

  2. Infusing Multicultural Counseling Competencies into Counselor Training Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Danica G.

    Multicultural counseling competencies have become an increasingly important component of counselor training. This article presents rationale for infusing multicultural competencies into select CACREP course areas, which are assessment, helping relationships, professional identity, and career development. Concrete activities that encompass proposed…

  3. Shear-Driven Failure of Liquid-Infused Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wexler, Jason S.; Jacobi, Ian; Stone, Howard A.

    2015-04-01

    Rough or patterned surfaces infused with a lubricating liquid display many of the same useful properties as conventional gas-cushioned superhydrophobic surfaces. However, liquid-infused surfaces exhibit a new failure mode: the infused liquid film may drain due to an external shear flow, causing the surface to lose its advantageous properties. We examine shear-driven drainage of liquid-infused surfaces with the goal of understanding and thereby mitigating this failure mode. On patterned surfaces exposed to a known shear stress, we find that a finite length of the surface remains wetted indefinitely, despite the fact that no physical barriers prevent drainage. We develop an analytical model to explain our experimental results, and find that the steady-state retention results from the ability of patterned surfaces to wick wetting liquids, and is thus analogous to capillary rise. We establish the geometric surface parameters governing fluid retention and show how these parameters can describe even random substrate patterns.

  4. Efficacy of Continuous S(+)-Ketamine Infusion for Postoperative Pain Control: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Miziara, Luiz Eduardo de Paula Gomes; Simoni, Ricardo Francisco; Esteves, Luís Otávio; Cangiani, Luis Henrique; Grillo-Filho, Gil Fernando Ribeiro; Paula, Anderson Garcia Lima e

    2016-01-01

    Aim. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was designed to evaluate the efficacy of continuous intraoperative infusion of S(+)-ketamine under intravenous anesthesia with target-controlled infusion of remifentanil and propofol for postoperative pain control. Methods. Forty-eight patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were assigned to receive continuous S(+)-ketamine infusion at a rate of 0.3 mg·kg−1·h−1 (n = 24, intervention group) or an equivalent volume of saline at the same rate (n = 24, placebo group). The same target-controlled intravenous anesthesia was induced in both groups. Pain was assessed using a 0 to 10 verbal numeric rating scale during the first 12 postoperative hours. Pain scores and morphine consumption were recorded in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) and at 4 and 12 hours after surgery. Results. Pain scores were lower in the intervention group at all time points. Morphine consumption did not differ significantly between groups during PACU stay, but it was significantly lower in the intervention group at each time point after PACU discharge (P = 0.0061). At 12 hours after surgery, cumulative morphine consumption was also lower in the intervention group (5.200 ± 2.707) than in the placebo group (7.525 ± 1.872). Conclusions. Continuous S(+)-ketamine infusion during laparoscopic cholecystectomy under target-controlled intravenous anesthesia provided better postoperative pain control than placebo, reducing morphine requirement. Trial Registration. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02421913. PMID:26949390

  5. Efficacy of Continuous S(+)-Ketamine Infusion for Postoperative Pain Control: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Miziara, Luiz Eduardo de Paula Gomes; Simoni, Ricardo Francisco; Esteves, Luís Otávio; Cangiani, Luis Henrique; Grillo-Filho, Gil Fernando Ribeiro; Paula, Anderson Garcia Lima E

    2016-01-01

    Aim. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was designed to evaluate the efficacy of continuous intraoperative infusion of S(+)-ketamine under intravenous anesthesia with target-controlled infusion of remifentanil and propofol for postoperative pain control. Methods. Forty-eight patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were assigned to receive continuous S(+)-ketamine infusion at a rate of 0.3 mg·kg(-1)·h(-1) (n = 24, intervention group) or an equivalent volume of saline at the same rate (n = 24, placebo group). The same target-controlled intravenous anesthesia was induced in both groups. Pain was assessed using a 0 to 10 verbal numeric rating scale during the first 12 postoperative hours. Pain scores and morphine consumption were recorded in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) and at 4 and 12 hours after surgery. Results. Pain scores were lower in the intervention group at all time points. Morphine consumption did not differ significantly between groups during PACU stay, but it was significantly lower in the intervention group at each time point after PACU discharge (P = 0.0061). At 12 hours after surgery, cumulative morphine consumption was also lower in the intervention group (5.200 ± 2.707) than in the placebo group (7.525 ± 1.872). Conclusions. Continuous S(+)-ketamine infusion during laparoscopic cholecystectomy under target-controlled intravenous anesthesia provided better postoperative pain control than placebo, reducing morphine requirement. Trial Registration. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02421913. PMID:26949390

  6. Prolonged blood pressure elevation following continuous infusion of angiotensin II-a baroreflex study in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Sayk, Friedhelm; Wobbe, Isabel; Twesten, Christoph; Meusel, Moritz; Wellhöner, Peter; Derad, Inge; Dodt, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    ANG II interacts with the sympathetic nervous system at central nervous blood pressure-regulating structures, including the baroreflex. It is unknown whether prolonged BP elevation mediated by high ANG II plasma levels could induce a persistent shift of the central nervous baroreflex setpoint, lasting beyond the short ANG II plasmatic half time of a few seconds, thereby consolidating elevated BP and/or increased SNA in healthy humans. In a blinded crossover design, ANG II or placebo (saline) was infused for a 6-h period in 12 resting normotensive students (6 males, 6 females) raising BP to borderline hypertensive levels. Between 60 and 120 min after the infusion period, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was assessed microneurographically and correlated with oscillometric BP measurements and heart rate at supine rest (baseline) and during pharmacologic baroreceptor challenge. Infusion of ANG II increased BP to borderline-hypertensive levels, as intended, whereas heart rate remained unaltered. At baroreflex assessment (i.e., 60-120 min after end of infusion period), systolic BP was significantly higher compared with placebo (Δ8.4 ± 3.1 mmHg; P < 0.05), whereas diastolic values were nearly equal between conditions. Baseline MSNA was neither decreased nor increased, and baroreflex sensitivity to vasoactive drug challenge was not altered. Our results show that elevation of ANG II plasma levels over 6 h was able to increase systolic, but not diastolic, BP far beyond blood-mediated ANG II effects. MSNA or heart rate did not counter-regulate this BP elevation, indicating that ANG II had sustainably reset the central nervous BP threshold of sympathetic baroreflex function to accept elevated BP input signals without counter-regulatory response. PMID:26400183

  7. Infusing Software Engineering Technology into Practice at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pressburger, Thomas; Feather, Martin S.; Hinchey, Michael; Markosia, Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    We present an ongoing effort of the NASA Software Engineering Initiative to encourage the use of advanced software engineering technology on NASA projects. Technology infusion is in general a difficult process yet this effort seems to have found a modest approach that is successful for some types of technologies. We outline the process and describe the experience of the technology infusions that occurred over a two year period. We also present some lessons from the experiences.

  8. Litigation risks for infusion specialists. Understanding the issues.

    PubMed

    Collins, S E

    2001-01-01

    The legal aspects of caring for patients and the fear of disciplinary actions or malpractice suits understandably are matters of great concern for infusion specialists. This article is intended to be a broad overview of some of the legal causes of action that may arise through the rendering of professional nursing care, as well as an introduction to patients' rights to self-determination, informed consent, and informed refusal as a special area of litigation risk for the infusion specialist. PMID:11758262

  9. Intraarterial pelvic infusion chemotherapy in advanced gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lifshitz, S; Railsback, L D; Buchsbaum, H J

    1978-10-01

    Fourteen patients with advanced localized gynecologic cancer were treated with 44 courses of intraarterial pelvic infusion chemotherapy. All patients received methotrexate with folinic acid rescue; 9 patients also received vincristine. Tumor regression was observed in 3 of 14 patients (21.4%). In 5 patients there were major complications related to 28 intraarterial catheter placements. Two patients developed leukopenia following chemotherapy. The value of intraarterial infusion chemotherapy in gynecologic cancer is limited. Its use in gynecologic oncology is discussed. PMID:309571

  10. Herbal infusions used for induced abortion.

    PubMed

    Ciganda, Carmen; Laborde, Amalia

    2003-01-01

    Plants and herbs have been used to induce abortions but there is very little published information describing the commonly used ones. The purpose of this report is to describe the herbal products used to induce abortions, and to enhance awareness and understanding of their toxic effects. A descriptive retrospective survey was conducted on the calls received by the Montevideo Poison Centre between 1986 and 1999 concerning the ingestion of herbal infusions with abortive intent. A total of 86 cases involving 30 different plant species were identified. The species most frequently involved were ruda (Ruta chalepensis/graveolens), cola de quirquincho (Lycopodium saururus), parsley (Petroselinum hortense), and an over-the-counter herbal product named Carachipita. The components of Carachipita are pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium), yerba de la perdiz (Margiricarpus pinnatus), oregano (Origanum vulgare), and guaycuri (Statice brasiliensis). Abortion occurred in 23 cases after the ingestion of parsley, ruda, Carachipita, celery, Cedron, francisco alvarez, floripon, espina colorada. Out of the 23 cases, 15 involved the only the ingestion of plants, 4 cases used injected drugs (presumably hormones), and in 4 cases there was associated self-inflicted instrumental manipulation. Multiple organ system failure occurred in those patients who had ingested ruda (alone or in combination with parsley or fennel), Carachipita, arnica, or bardana. Deaths occurred in one case of Carachipita ingestion and in 4 cases of ruda ingestion (2 cases of ruda alone, 2 cases of ruda with parsley and fennel). Self-inflicted instrumental manipulations were found in 4 of the patients with multiple organ system failure and in one of those who died. The results of this report are not conclusive, but it appears that the ingestion of plants to induce abortion involves the risk of severe morbidity and mortality. PMID:12807304

  11. Effects of ANF infusion on the renal responses to lower-body negative pressure in humans.

    PubMed

    Mauran, P; Pham, I; Sediame, S; Jolly, D; Chabrier, P E; Carayon, A; Andrivet, P; Adnot, S

    1998-05-01

    To investigate the role of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) in renal responses to a decrease in central blood volume, we examined the effects of ANF infusion on renal function and hormones during prolonged lower-body negative pressure (LBNP). Ten healthy volunteers participated in two experimental sequences, each comprising a 120-min baseline period followed by the application of -20 mm Hg LBNP for 90 min. During one of the two sequences, ANF was infused throughout LBNP application at the constant rate of 2.5 ng/kg/min. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) were measured by using inulin and p-aminohippuric acid clearance techniques. LBNP induced a significant decrease in ERPF (534 +/- 28 to 457 +/- 26 ml/min; p < 0.05), GFR (120 +/- 2.5 to 112 +/- 2.5 ml/min; p < or = 0.01), in urine excretion (12 +/- 0.9 to 5.6 +/- 0.5 ml/min; p < 0.001), in sodium excretion (0.36 +/- 0.03 to 0.30 +/- 0.02 mmol/min; p < 0.05), and in plasma ANF (19 +/- 3 to 11 +/- 2 pg/ml; p = 0.001) concomitant with an increase in plasma renin activity (PRA; 0.48 +/- 0.09 to 0.87 +/- 0.16 ng/ml/h; p = 0.01) and of forearm vascular resistance (FVR; p < 0.05). The combination of ANF infusion with LBNP led to a slight increase in plasma ANF from baseline (from 20 +/- 2 to 28 +/- 3 pg/ml; p < 0.05). Compared with values obtained during LBNP with saline vehicle infusion, values obtained during LBNP with ANF infusion were similar for ERPF (463 +/- 23 vs. 457 +/- 26 ml/min), for GFR (111 +/- 2 vs. 112 +/- 2 ml/min), and for urine excretion (7 +/- 0.6 vs. 5.6 +/- 0.5 ml/min; p = 0.07), but greater for fractional excretion of sodium (2.38 +/- 0.25% vs. 1.91 +/- 0.11%; p < 0.05) and FVR (p < 0.05), and smaller for PRA (0.49 +/- 0.1 vs. 0.87 +/- 0.16 ng/ml/h; p < 0.01). These data show that ANF infusion attenuates the antinatriuretic effect of low-level LBNP and its PRA-increasing effects without altering renal hemodynamic responses to LBNP, although there is a decrease in

  12. Drop impact dynamics on liquid-infused superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Rothstein, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    In this talk, we present a series of experiments investigating the drop impact dynamics on hydrophobic, air-infused and lubricant-infused superhydrophobic surfaces. To create the superhydrophobic surfaces, smooth Teflon (PTFE) surfaces were roughened by a 240-grit sandpaper. The immiscible and incompressible silicone oils with different viscosities were infused into features of the superhydrophobic surfaces by a skim coating technique. The spreading and retraction dynamics on a series of the tested surfaces will be presented. We will show that the maximal deformation of the drops on lubricant-infused surfaces grows with increasing viscosity ratio between a water drop and the infused oil. We will show that this increase in the maximal deformation with the viscosity ratio is consistent with increasing the velocity and the viscosity of the drops but the rims of the drops destabilize with increasing the drop velocity. Finally, we will demonstrate that increasing the viscosity of the infused oil induces higher viscous force at the contact line, resulting in reduction in the movement of the drops during retraction and corresponding increase in the final drop size.

  13. Electro-osmotic infusion for joule heating soil remediation techniques

    DOEpatents

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Nitao, John J.

    1999-01-01

    Electro-osmotic infusion of ground water or chemically tailored electrolyte is used to enhance, maintain, or recondition electrical conductivity for the joule heating remediation technique. Induced flows can be used to infuse electrolyte with enhanced ionic conductivity into the vicinity of the electrodes, maintain the local saturation of near-electrode regions and resaturate a partially dried out zone with groundwater. Electro-osmotic infusion can also tailor the conductivity throughout the target layer by infusing chemically modified and/or heated electrolyte to improve conductivity contrast of the interior. Periodic polarity reversals will prevent large pH changes at the electrodes. Electro-osmotic infusion can be used to condition the electrical conductivity of the soil, particularly low permeability soil, before and during the heating operation. Electro-osmotic infusion is carried out by locating one or more electrodes adjacent the heating electrodes and applying a dc potential between two or more electrodes. Depending on the polarities of the electrodes, the induced flow will be toward the heating electrodes or away from the heating electrodes. In addition, electrodes carrying a dc potential may be located throughout the target area to tailor the conductivity of the target area.

  14. Lipolytic response to glucose infusion in human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, R.R.; Peters, E.J.

    1987-02-01

    The authors have determined the effect of various rates of glucose infusion on the rates of release of glycerol (R/sub a/ glycerol), free fatty acids (R/sub a/ FFA), and on energy metabolism in normal human volunteers. Plasma kinetics were determined with use of the stable isotopic tracers D-5-glycerol and (1- TC)palmitate, and energy metabolism was determined by indirect calorimetry. The effect of glucose infusion on R/sub a/ glycerol and R/sub a/ FFA was dose-dependent. At 4 mg x kg x min , both R/sub a/ glycerol and R/sub a/ FFA were suppressed; at 8 mg x kg x min , R/sub a/ FFA was even more depressed, but R/sub a/ glycerol was similar to the value during the 4 mg x kg x min infusion. At all infusion rates tested, the amount of potential energy available from the sum of the glucose infusion and endogenously mobilized fat was always greater than when no glucose was infused. Glucose decreased fat mobilization by both inhibiting lipolysis and stimulating reesterification, thus causing a significant increase in triglyceride-fatty acid substrate cycling within the adipose tissue. Plasma insulin was determined by radioimmunoassay.

  15. Female Patients Require a Higher Propofol Infusion Rate for Sedation.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Shigeru; Tomoyasu, Yumiko; Higuchi, Hitoshi; Honda, Yuka; Ishii-Maruhama, Minako; Miyawaki, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Sedation may minimize physiologic and behavioral stress responses. In our facility, the infusion rate of propofol is adjusted according to the bispectral index (BIS) in all cases of implant-related surgery; multivariate analysis of retrospective data enabled us to extract independent factors that affect the dose of propofol in sedation that are considered useful indicators for achieving adequate sedation. The study population comprised all patients undergoing implant-related surgery under intravenous sedation in Okayama University Hospital from April 2009 to March 2013. The infusion rate of propofol was adjusted to maintain the BIS value at 70-80. The outcome was the average infusion rate of propofol, and potential predictor variables were age, sex, body weight, treatment time, and amount of midazolam. Independent variables that affected the average infusion rate of propofol were extracted with multiple regression analysis. One hundred twenty-five subjects were enrolled. In the multiple regression analysis, female sex was shown to be significantly associated with a higher average infusion rate of propofol. Females may require a higher infusion rate of propofol than males to achieve adequate sedation while undergoing implant-related surgery. PMID:27269663

  16. Investigation of the Volatile Fraction of Rosemary Infusion Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Tschiggerl, Christine; Bucar, Franz

    2010-01-01

    The relative proportions of chemical classes (hydrocarbons, oxides, alcohols, ketones, esters) in the essential oil of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L., Lamicaeae) and in the volatile fraction of the infusion extracts were examined and showed remarkable differences. The volatile compounds of the infusion were isolated by two different methods, hydrodistillation and solid phase extraction (SPE). The main constituents of the volatile fraction of the infusion were (hydrodistillation/SPE): 1,8-cineole (42.4%/44.7%), camphor (31.4%/31.8%), α-terpineol (8.6%/8.1%) and borneol (8.3%/7.8%). The qualitative and quantitative composition of the volatile compounds of the infusion was compared to the essential oil isolated by hydrodistillation directly from the leaves. The major constituents of the essential oil of the leaves were 1,8-cineole (41.6%), camphor (17.0%), α-pinene (9.9%), α-terpineol (4.9%) and borneol (4.8%). Comparison of the total essential oil yield quantified by hydrodistillation of the infusion (0.36% v/w) with the essential oil yield of the leaves (1.84% v/w) revealed that only 19.6% of the initial oil could be extracted by infusion. PMID:21179360

  17. Estuarine turbidity, flushing, salinity, and circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of estuarine turbidity, flushing, salinity, and circulation on the ecology of the Chesapeake Bay are discussed. The sources of fresh water, the variations in salinity, and the circulation patterns created by temperature and salinity changes are analyzed. The application of remote sensors for long term observation of water temperatures is described. The sources of sediment and the biological effects resulting from increased sediments and siltation are identified.

  18. Salinity gradient power: utilizing vapor pressure differences.

    PubMed

    Olsson, M; Wick, G L; Isaacs, J D

    1979-10-26

    By utilizing the vapor pressure difference between high-salinity and lowsalinity wvater, one can obtain power from the gradients of salinity. This scheme eliminates the major problems associated with conversion methods in which membranes are used. The method we tested gave higher conversion efficiencies than membrane methods. Furthermore, hardware and techniques being developed for ocean thermal energy conversion may be applied to this approach to salinity gradient energy conversion. PMID:17809370

  19. Impact of glucose infusion on the structural and functional characteristics of adipose tissue and on hypothalamic gene expression for appetite regulatory neuropeptides in the sheep fetus during late gestation

    PubMed Central

    Mühlhäusler, BS; Adam, CL; Marrocco, EM; Findlay, PA; Roberts, CT; McFarlane, JR; Kauter, KG; McMillen, IC

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, our aim was to determine whether intrafetal glucose infusion increases fetal adiposity, synthesis and secretion of leptin and regulates gene expression of the ‘appetite regulatory’ neuropeptides neuropepetide Y (NPY), agouti-related peptide (AGRP), pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) and receptors (leptin receptor (OB-Rb) and melancortin 3 receptor (MC3R)) within the fetal hypothalamus. Glucose (50% dextrose in saline) or saline was infused (7.5 ml h−1) into fetal sheep between 130 and 140 days gestation (term = 150 ± 3 days gestation). Glucose infusion increased circulating glucose and insulin concentrations, mean lipid locule size (532.8 ± 3.3 μm2 versus 456.7 ± 14.8 μm2) and total unilocular fat mass (11.7 ± 0.6 g versus 8.9 ± 0.6 g) of the perirenal fat depot. The expression of OB-Rb mRNA was higher in the ventromedial nucleus compared to the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus in both glucose and saline infused fetuses (F= 8.04; P < 0.01) and there was a positive correlation between expression of OB-Rb and MC3R mRNA in the arcuate nucleus (r= 0.81; P < 0.005). Glucose infusion increased mRNA expression for POMC, but not for the anorectic neuropeptide CART, or the orexigenic neuropeptides NPY and AGRP, in the arcuate nucleus of the fetal hypothalamus. These findings demonstrate that increased circulating glucose and insulin regulate gene expression of the neuropeptides within the fetal hypothalamus that are part of the neural network regulating energy balance in adult life. PMID:15661821

  20. Planetary Science Technology Infusion Study: Findings and Recommendations Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David J.; Sandifer, Carl E., II; Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.; Vento, Daniel M.; Zakrajsek, June F.

    2014-01-01

    The Planetary Science Division (PSD) within the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations (NASA) Science Mission Directorate (SMD) at NASA Headquarters sought to understand how to better realize a scientific return on spacecraft system technology investments currently being funded. In order to achieve this objective, a team at NASA Glenn Research Center was tasked with surveying the science and mission communities to collect their insight on technology infusion and additionally sought inputs from industry, universities, and other organizations involved with proposing for future PSD missions. This survey was undertaken by issuing a Request for Information (RFI) activity that requested input from the proposing community on present technology infusion efforts. The Technology Infusion Study was initiated in March 2013 with the release of the RFI request. The evaluation team compiled and assessed this input in order to provide PSD with recommendations on how to effectively infuse new spacecraft systems technologies that it develops into future competed missions enabling increased scientific discoveries, lower mission cost, or both. This team is comprised of personnel from the Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program and the In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) Program staff.The RFI survey covered two aspects of technology infusion: 1) General Insight, including: their assessment of barriers to technology infusion as related to infusion approach; technology readiness; information and documentation products; communication; integration considerations; interaction with technology development areas; cost-capped mission areas; risk considerations; system level impacts and implementation; and mission pull. 2) Specific technologies from the most recent PSD Announcements of Opportunities (AOs): The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), aerocapture and aeroshell hardware technologies, the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion propulsion system, and the

  1. Soil Salinity Mapping Using Multitemporal Landsat Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azabdaftari, A.; Sunar, F.

    2016-06-01

    Soil salinity is one of the most important problems affecting many areas of the world. Saline soils present in agricultural areas reduce the annual yields of most crops. This research deals with the soil salinity mapping of Seyhan plate of Adana district in Turkey from the years 2009 to 2010, using remote sensing technology. In the analysis, multitemporal data acquired from LANDSAT 7-ETM+ satellite in four different dates (19 April 2009, 12 October 2009, 21 March 2010, 31 October 2010) are used. As a first step, preprocessing of Landsat images is applied. Several salinity indices such as NDSI (Normalized Difference Salinity Index), BI (Brightness Index) and SI (Salinity Index) are used besides some vegetation indices such as NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index), RVI (Ratio Vegetation Index), SAVI (Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index) and EVI (Enhamced Vegetation Index) for the soil salinity mapping of the study area. The field's electrical conductivity (EC) measurements done in 2009 and 2010, are used as a ground truth data for the correlation analysis with the original band values and different index image bands values. In the correlation analysis, two regression models, the simple linear regression (SLR) and multiple linear regression (MLR) are considered. According to the highest correlation obtained, the 21st March, 2010 dataset is chosen for production of the soil salinity map in the area. Finally, the efficiency of the remote sensing technology in the soil salinity mapping is outlined.

  2. Relating river discharges to salinity changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, X.; Liu, W. T.

    2014-12-01

    New river discharge data are brought together with spacebased sea surface salinity measurements by Aquarius and SMOS to demonstrate the role of river discharge in salinity changes near three river mouths: the Mississippi, the Ganges, and the Amazon. The characteristics of the seasonal cycle and the year-to-year changes of the river runoff are described. Various versions of the satellite salinity data are compared. The relative roles of river discharge, surface water flux, and horizontal advection in changing surface salinity in regions near the river mouths are examined. Satellite measurements of SSS clearly track movements of the fresh water from river discharges. Besides the river discharge, E-P plays an important role in the seasonal salinity variation near the Ganges and Irrawaddy River mouths. For the Mississippi and Amazon river mouths, central and eastern ITCZ, E-P contributes very little to the salinity seasonal change. In the central and eastern ITCZ, contribution of advection to the salinity tendency is clearly identified. Both salinity and salinity tendency are dominated by semi-annual cycle in the Atlantic ITCZ between 5ºN to 9ºN, whereas annual cycle dominates at other latitudes.

  3. Soil salinity detection from satellite image analysis: an integrated approach of salinity indices and field data.

    PubMed

    Morshed, Md Manjur; Islam, Md Tazmul; Jamil, Raihan

    2016-02-01

    This paper attempts to detect soil salinity from satellite image analysis using remote sensing and geographic information system. Salinity intrusion is a common problem for the coastal regions of the world. Traditional salinity detection techniques by field survey and sampling are time-consuming and expensive. Remote sensing and geographic information system offer economic and efficient salinity detection, monitoring, and mapping. To predict soil salinity, an integrated approach of salinity indices and field data was used to develop a multiple regression equation. The correlations between different indices and field data of soil salinity were calculated to find out the highly correlated indices. The best regression model was selected considering the high R (2) value, low P value, and low Akaike's Information Criterion. About 20% variation was observed between the field data and predicted EC from the satellite image analysis. The precision of this salinity detection technique depends on the accuracy and uniform distribution of field data. PMID:26815557

  4. Appearance of infused zinc ( sup 70 Zn) and oral zinc ( sup 68 Zn) in breast milk

    SciTech Connect

    Moser-Veillon, P.B.; Patterson, K.Y.; Mangels, A.R.; Wallace, G.F.; Veillon, C. Dept. of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD Perkin-Elmer Corp., Rockville, MD )

    1991-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to monitor the appearance of a simultaneous intravenous (IV) dose and oral dose of stable isotopes, {sup 70}Zn and {sup 68}Zn, respectively, in breast milk. Three lactating subjects, 2-3 months postpartum were fed a controlled diet which contained an average of 7.8 mg Zn/day. Subjects collected milk samples at the beginning of each feeding for a 24 hour period on the fifth day of the controlled diet. On day 7 of the controlled diet, a 160 ug IV dose of {sup 70}Zn as zinc chloride in saline was infused into each subject. The subjects also received 2 mg of {sup 68 }Zn as zinc chloride in 50 ml of orange juice. Following the stable isotope doses, subjects collected milk samples at the beginning of each feeding for 48 hours, weighing their infants before and after each feeding. The amount of natural Zn, {sup 70}Zn and {sup 68}Zn tracers in the milk was measured by isotope dilution mass spectrometry. The cumulative {sup 70}Zn excretion into breast milk over 48 hours was approximately 1% of the infused dose and the cumulative {sup 68}Zn excretion was smaller still. Thus, only a small fraction of a physiological IV or oral dose of zinc comes out in the milk. The small fraction of {sup 70}Zn and {sup 68}Zn appearing in the milk suggests that circulating zinc and dietary zinc are not rapidly or directly incorporated into breast milk in appreciable amounts.

  5. Combined effects of cadmium and salinity on juvenile Takifugu obscurus: cadmium moderates salinity tolerance; salinity decreases the toxicity of cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Zhu, Xuexia; Huang, Xin; Gu, Lei; Chen, Yafen; Yang, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Obscure puffer Takifugu obscurus, a species of anadromous fish, experiences several salinity changes in its lifetime. Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic heavy metal that can potentially induce oxidative stress in fish. The present study aimed to detect the combined effects of Cd (0, 5, 10, 20 and 50 mg L−1) and salinity (0, 15 and 30 ppt) on juvenile T. obscurus. Results showed the juveniles could survive well under different salinities; however, with Cd exposure, the survival rates significantly decreased at 0 and 30 ppt. At 15 ppt, tolerance to Cd increased. Cd exposure clearly induced oxidative stress, and the responses among different tissues were qualitatively similar. Salinity acted as a protective factor which could reduce the reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde levels. In addition, salinity could enhance the antioxidant defense system, including superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione. Na+/K+–ATPase activity significantly decreased under Cd exposure in gill, kidney and intestine. These findings indicated that Cd could moderate the adaptability of juvenile T. obscurus to high salinity and low salinity played a protective role upon Cd exposure. Thus, the role of salinity should be considered when evaluating the effect of heavy metals on anadromous and estuarine fishes. PMID:27487764

  6. Combined effects of cadmium and salinity on juvenile Takifugu obscurus: cadmium moderates salinity tolerance; salinity decreases the toxicity of cadmium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Zhu, Xuexia; Huang, Xin; Gu, Lei; Chen, Yafen; Yang, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Obscure puffer Takifugu obscurus, a species of anadromous fish, experiences several salinity changes in its lifetime. Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic heavy metal that can potentially induce oxidative stress in fish. The present study aimed to detect the combined effects of Cd (0, 5, 10, 20 and 50 mg L(-1)) and salinity (0, 15 and 30 ppt) on juvenile T. obscurus. Results showed the juveniles could survive well under different salinities; however, with Cd exposure, the survival rates significantly decreased at 0 and 30 ppt. At 15 ppt, tolerance to Cd increased. Cd exposure clearly induced oxidative stress, and the responses among different tissues were qualitatively similar. Salinity acted as a protective factor which could reduce the reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde levels. In addition, salinity could enhance the antioxidant defense system, including superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione. Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity significantly decreased under Cd exposure in gill, kidney and intestine. These findings indicated that Cd could moderate the adaptability of juvenile T. obscurus to high salinity and low salinity played a protective role upon Cd exposure. Thus, the role of salinity should be considered when evaluating the effect of heavy metals on anadromous and estuarine fishes. PMID:27487764

  7. Intra-arrest Hypothermia: Both Cold Liquid Ventilation with Perfluorocarbons and Cold Intravenous Saline Rapidly Achieve Hypothermia, but Only Cold Liquid Ventilation Improves Resumption of Spontaneous Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Riter, Henry G.; Brooks, Leonard A.; Pretorius, Andrew M.; Ackermann, Laynez W.; Kerber, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    Background Rapid intra-arrest induction of hypothermia using total liquid ventilation (TLV) with cold perfluorocarbons improves resuscitation outcome from ventricular fibrillation (VF). Cold saline intravenous infusion during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a simpler method of inducing hypothermia. We compared these 2 methods of rapid hypothermia induction for cardiac resuscitation. Methods Three groups of swine were studied: cold preoxygenated TLV (TLV, n=8), cold intravenous saline infusion (S, n=8), and control (C, n=8). VF was electrically induced. Beginning at 8 minutes of VF, TLV and S animals received 3 minutes of cold TLV or rapid cold saline infusion. After 11 minutes of VF, all groups received standard air ventilation and closed chest massage. Defibrillation was attempted after 3 minutes of CPR (14 minutes of VF). The end point was resumption of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Results Pulmonary arterial (PA) temperature decreased after 1 minute of CPR from 37.2°C to 32.2°C in S and from 37.1°C to 34.8°C in TLV (S or TLV vs. C p<0.0001). Coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) was higher in TLV than S animals during the initial 3 minutes of CPR. Arterial pO2 was higher in the preoxygenated TLV animals. ROSC was achieved in 7 of 8 TLV, 2 of 8 S, and 1 of 8 C (TLV vs. C, p=0.03). Conclusions Moderate hypothermia was achieved rapidly during VF and CPR using both cold saline infusion and cold TLV, but ROSC was higher than control only in cold TLV animals, probably due to better CPP and pO2. The method by which hypothermia is achieved influences ROSC. PMID:19249149

  8. Aquarius Instrument and Salinity Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    Aquarius has been designed to map the surface salinity field of the global ocean from space a parameter important for understanding ocean circulation and its relationship to climate and the global water cycle. Salinity is measured remotely from space by measuring the thermal emission from the ocean surface. This is done at the low frequency end of the microwave spectrum (e.g. 1.4 GHz) where the emission is sufficiently sensitive to changes in salinity to be detected with sophisticated radiometers. The goal is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean by providing maps on a monthly basis with a spatial resolution of 150 km and an accuracy of 0.2 psu. These are challenging requirements that have led to some unique features of the instrument. These include: a) The addition of a co-located scatterometer to help provide a correction for roughness; b) The addition of a polarimetric channel (third Stokes parameter) to the radiometer to help correct for Faraday rotation; c) Asun-synchronous orbit with a 6 pm ascending equatorial crossing to minimize Faraday rotation and with the antennas looking away from the sun toward the nighttime side to minimize contamination by radiation from the sun; and d) An antenna designed to limit side lobes in the direction of rays from the sun. In addition, achieving the accuracy goal of 0.2 psu requires averaging over one month and to do this requires a highly stable radiometer. Aquarius has three separate radiometers that image in pushbroom fashion with the three antenna beams looking across track. The antenna is a 2.5-m diameter, offset parabolic reflector with three feed horns and the three beams are arranged to image with the boresight aligned to look across track, roughly perpendicular to the spacecraft heading and pointing away from the Sun. The three beams point at angles of theta = 25.8 deg., 33.8 deg. and 40.3 deg. with respect to the spacecraft

  9. Platelet functional and transcriptional changes induced by intralipid infusion.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Lea M; Vitseva, Olga; Tanriverdi, Kahraman; Kucukural, Alper; Mick, Eric; Hamburg, Naomi; Vita, Joseph; Freedman, Jane E

    2016-06-01

    Multiple studies have shown the effects of long-term exposure to high-fat or western diets on the vascular system. There is limited knowledge on the acute effects of high circulating fat levels, specifically on platelets, which have a role in many processes, including thrombosis and inflammation. This study investigated the effects of acute, high-fat exposure on platelet function and transcript profile. Twenty healthy participants were given an intravenous infusion of 20% Intralipid emulsion and heparin over 6 hours. Blood samples were taken prior to and the day after infusion to measure platelet function and transcript expression levels. Platelet aggregation was not significantly affected by Intralipid infusion, but, when mitochondria function was inhibited by carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) or oligomycin, platelet aggregation was higher in the post-infusion state compared to baseline. Through RNA sequencing, and verified by RT-qPCR, 902 miRNAs and 617 mRNAs were affected by Intralipid infusion. MicroRNAs increased include miR-4259 and miR-346, while miR-517b and miR-517c are both decreased. Pathway analysis identified two clusters significantly enriched, including cell motility. In conclusion, acute exposure to high fat affects mitochondrial-dependent platelet function, as well as the transcript profile. PMID:26940969

  10. In-Use Contamination of Intravenous Infusion Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Dennis G.; Anderson, Roger L.; Shulman, Jonas A.

    1974-01-01

    During the 1970 to 1971 nationwide epidemic of septicemias caused by Enterobacter cloacae and Enterobacter agglomerans traced to intrinsic contamination of Abbott intravenous infusion products, 94 infusion systems manufactured by Baxter Laboratories were studied microbiologically and epidemiologically during hospital use. Intravenous fluid from 10 systems (11%) contained microorganisms, usually Staphylococcus or Bacillus species; one infusion was heavily contaminated with Klebsiella pneumoniae. No national epidemic organisms, E. cloacae or E. agglomerans (formerly Erwinia), were recovered, suggesting that during this period frequent contamination with these organisms was unique to Abbott's infusion products. Contamination in this study appeared to be extrinsic in origin (introduced during clinical use) and related to the duration of continuous intravenous therapy. Nine of 61 systems (15%) that had been used longer than 48 h were contaminated, whereas only 1 of 33 used less than 48 h (3%) contained microorganisms. This study and the recent national outbreak indicate that contamination of infusion fluid, both from intrinsic and extrinsic sources, must be recognized as an additional risk of intravenous therapy; however, a once-daily replacement of the delivery apparatus can significantly diminish this hazard. PMID:4613269

  11. High-technology i.v. infusion devices.

    PubMed

    Kwan, J W

    1989-02-01

    Some of the newer high-technology infusion devices commercially available or under development are described. The range of infusion devices includes both controllers and pumps; pumps can be classified by mechanism of operation (peristaltic, syringe, cassette, elastomeric reservoir), frequency or type of drug delivery (continuous or intermittent infusion, bolus dosing, single- or multiple-solution delivery), or therapeutic application (such as the patient-controlled analgesia, or PCA, pump). Advances in infusion technology and computer technology have led to the development of devices with extremely sophisticated drug-delivery capabilities (multiple-rate or multiple-solution programming, operation as pump or controller, or both, and interchangeable applications and settings). Current research in infusion-device technology is focusing on implantable pumps, pumps with chronobiological applications, osmotic-pressure devices, and open- and closed-loop systems. Pharmacists need to keep abreast of the rapidly changing intravenous device marketplace to provide clinical expertise and leadership in the review and evaluation of high-technology drug delivery systems. PMID:2653027

  12. High-technology i.v. infusion devices.

    PubMed

    Kwan, J W

    1991-10-01

    Some of the newer high-technology infusion devices commercially available or under development are described. The range of infusion devices includes both controllers and pumps; pumps can be classified by mechanism of operation (peristaltic, syringe, cassette, elastomeric reservoir), frequency or type of drug delivery (continuous or intermittent infusion, bolus dosing, single- or multiple-solution delivery), or therapeutic application (such as the patient-controlled analgesia, or PCA, pump). Advances in infusion technology and computer technology have led to the development of devices with extremely sophisticated drug-delivery capabilities (multiple-rate or multiple-solution programming, operation as pump or controller, or both, and interchangeable applications and settings). Current research in infusion-device technology is focusing on implantable pumps, pumps with chronobiological applications, osmotic-pressure devices, and open- and closed-loop systems. Pharmacists need to keep abreast of the rapidly changing intravenous device marketplace to provide clinical expertise and leadership in the review and evaluation of high-technology drug delivery systems. PMID:1772112

  13. Local distribution and toxicity of prolonged hippocampal infusion of muscimol

    PubMed Central

    Heiss, John D.; Walbridge, Stuart; Morrison, Paul; Hampton, Robert R.; Sato, Susumu; Vortmeyer, Alexander; Butman, John A.; O’Malley, James; Vidwan, Param; Dedrick, Robert L.; Oldfield, Edward H.

    2014-01-01

    Object The activity of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter, is reduced in the hippocampus in patients with complex partial seizures from mesial temporal sclerosis. To provide preliminary safety and distribution data on using convection-enhanced delivery of agents to treat complex partial seizures and to test the efficacy and safety of regional selective neuronal suppression, the authors infused muscimol, a GABA-A receptor agonist, directly into the hippocampus of nonhuman primates using an integrated catheter electrode. Methods Ten rhesus monkeys were divided into three groups: 1) use of catheter electrode alone (four monkeys); 2) infusion of escalating concentrations of muscimol followed by vehicle (three monkeys); and 3) infusion of vehicle and subsequent muscimol mixed with muscimol tracer (three monkeys). Infusions were begun 5 days after catheter electrode placement and continued for 5.6 days before switching to the other agent. Head magnetic resonance (MR) images and electroencephalography recordings were obtained before and during the infusions. Brain histological studies and quantitative autoradiography were performed. Neurological function was normal in controls and when muscimol concentrations were 0.125 mM or less, whereas higher concentrations (0.5 and 1 mM) produced reversible apathy and somnolence. Fluid distribution was demonstrated on MR images and muscimol distribution was demonstrated on autoradiographs throughout the hippocampus and adjacent white matter. Conclusions Targeted modulation of neuronal activity is a reasonable research strategy for the investigation and treatment of medically intractable epilepsy. PMID:16381190

  14. [Optimization of infusion therapy in patients with ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Tumanyan, S V; Yartseva, D V

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the clinical observations and the results of a comprehensive survey of 70 patients with ovarian cancer stage III-IV aged 30 to 70 years with the presence of endotoxemia. Integral assessment of prognosis and severity of the condition was performed according to SAPS II and SOFA. Infusion program included a preliminary correction of hypovolemia prior to surgery on the operating table in equal parts, HES and balanced crystalloid solutions, with in- creased infusion of 15% of blood volume based on the method of anesthesia. In the early postoperative period, infusion programs were complemented by various embodiments of metabolic correction. Patients of group-1 (n = 35) received remaxol in a dose of 800 mI/day. Patients of group-2 (n = 35) received ademethionine (heptral) 800 mg/day. Analysis of the results revealed that premorbid background in patients with ovarian cancer stage III-IV was characterized by hypovolemia, phenomena hepatopathy, and endotoxemia, and mixed forms of hypoxia of varying severity. Differentiated approach to the choice of pathogenesis-based perioperative infusion according to premorbid condition, anesthesia and blood loss contributed to the elimination of hypovolemia, favored efficient oxygen delivery and consumption, the ade- quacy of tissue oxygenation. Remaxol inclusion in the perioperative infusion programs in patients with ovarian cancer enhanced their clinical efficiency, reduced cytolytic and cholestatic syndromes, recovered of protein and synthetic liver function, reduced the appearance of mixedforms of hypoxia and endogenous intoxication. PMID:26027227

  15. Tocilizumab infusion therapy normalizes inflammation in sporadic ALS patients

    PubMed Central

    Fiala, Milan; Mizwicki, Mathew T; Weitzman, Rachel; Magpantay, Larry; Nishimoto, Norihiro

    2013-01-01

    Patients with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (sALS) show inflammation in the spinal cord and peripheral blood. The inflammation is driven by stimulation of macrophages by aggregated superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) through caspase1, interleukin 1 (IL1), IL6 and chemokine signaling. Inflammatory gene activation is inhibited in vitro by tocilizumab, a humanized antibody to IL6 receptor (IL6R). Tocilizumab inhibits global interleukin-6 (IL6) signaling, a key mechanism in chronic rheumatoid disorders. Here we studied in vivo baseline inflammatory gene transcription in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 10 sALS patients, and the effects of tocilizumab (ActemraR) infusions. At baseline, one half of ALS subjects had strong inflammatory activation (Group 1) (8 genes up regulated >4-fold, P<0.05 vs. controls) and the other half (Group 2) had weak activation. All patients showed greater than four-fold up regulation of MMP1, CCL7, CCL13 and CCL24. Tocilizumab infusions in the Group 1 patients resulted in down regulation of inflammatory genes (in particular IL1β), whereas in the Group 2 patients in up regulation of inflammatory genes. Post-infusion serum and CSF concentrations of tocilizumab inhibited caspase1 activation in vitro. Three of 5 patients receiving tocilizumab infusions showed time-limited attenuation of clinical progression. In conclusion, inflammation of sALS patients at baseline is up- or down-regulated in comparison to controls, but is partially normalized by tocilizumab infusions. PMID:23844337

  16. Bolus intravenous 0.9% saline, but not 4% albumin or 5% glucose, causes interstitial pulmonary edema in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Bihari, Shailesh; Wiersema, Ubbo F; Schembri, David; De Pasquale, Carmine G; Dixon, Dani-Louise; Prakash, Shivesh; Lawrence, Mark D; Bowden, Jeffrey J; Bersten, Andrew D

    2015-10-01

    Rapid intravenous (iv) infusion of 0.9% saline alters respiratory mechanics in healthy subjects. However, the relative cardiovascular and respiratory effects of bolus iv crystalloid vs. colloid are unknown. Six healthy male volunteers were given 30 ml/kg iv 0.9% saline, 4% albumin, and 5% glucose at a rate of 100 ml/min on 3 separate days in a double-blinded, randomized crossover study. Impulse oscillometry, spirometry, lung volumes, diffusing capacity (DLCO), and blood samples were measured before and after fluid administration. Lung ultrasound B-line score (indicating interstitial pulmonary edema) and Doppler echocardiography indices of cardiac preload were measured before, midway, immediately after, and 1 h after fluid administration. Infusion of 0.9% saline increased small airway resistance at 5 Hz (P = 0.04) and lung ultrasound B-line score (P = 0.01) without changes in Doppler echocardiography measures of preload. In contrast, 4% albumin increased DLCO, decreased lung volumes, and increased the Doppler echocardiography mitral E velocity (P = 0.001) and E-to-lateral/septal e' ratio, estimated blood volume, and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (P = 0.01) but not lung ultrasound B-line score, consistent with increased pulmonary blood volume without interstitial pulmonary edema. There were no significant changes with 5% glucose. Plasma angiopoietin-2 concentration increased only after 0.9% saline (P = 0.001), suggesting an inflammatory mechanism associated with edema formation. In healthy subjects, 0.9% saline and 4% albumin have differential pulmonary effects not attributable to passive fluid filtration. This may reflect either different effects of these fluids on active signaling in the pulmonary circulation or a protective effect of albumin. PMID:26228998

  17. Repeated intrauterine infusions of lipopolysaccharide alter gene expression and lifespan of the bovine corpus luteum.

    PubMed

    Lüttgenau, J; Lingemann, B; Wellnitz, O; Hankele, A K; Schmicke, M; Ulbrich, S E; Bruckmaier, R M; Bollwein, H

    2016-08-01

    Inflammation of the uterus is associated with disturbed ovarian function and reduced reproductive performance in dairy cows. To investigate the influence of endometritis on the bovine corpus luteum, 8 heifers received intrauterine infusions with either phosphate-buffered saline (PBS; 9mL) or Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 3µg/kg of body weight diluted in 9mL of PBS) at 6-h intervals from 12h before and until 9d after ovulation during 2 cycles in a random order (ovulation=d 1). An untreated cycle was examined before and after PBS and LPS cycles, and the mean values from both untreated cycles were used as control. In all cycles, blood sampling and ultrasonography of the ovaries were performed on d 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 12, 15, 18, and then every 2d until ovulation. Endometrial cells were collected for cytology and quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR on d 0, 6, and 9, and on d 0 and 6, respectively, and luteal tissue was collected for quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR on d 6 and 9. Both, PBS and LPS infusions induced subclinical endometritis, which was accompanied by increased endometrial mRNA abundance of proinflammatory cytokines IL1β, IL8, and tumor necrosis factor α. Additionally, LPS challenge induced premature luteolysis, which was characterized by increased plasma concentrations of PGF2α metabolite, decreased plasma progesterone concentrations, and reduced luteal size and blood flow compared with the control. The luteal mRNA expression of the LPS receptor TLR4, PGE synthase, and the apoptosis-related factor CASP3 were higher, and those of steroidogenic factors STAR and HSD3B, the PGF receptor, and the angiogenic factor VEGFA121 were lower after LPS challenge compared with the control. In conclusion, repeated intrauterine LPS infusions during the first 9d of the estrous cycle alter gene expression and shorten the lifespan of the bovine corpus luteum. PMID:27179870

  18. Developing Pedotransfer Functions for Saline and Saline-Alkali Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramezani, Meysam; Ghanbarian-Alavijeh, Behzad; Liaghat, Abdolmajid

    2010-05-01

    Soil moisture curve is one of the soil hydraulic properities which its direct measurement is time consuming and expensive. Therefore, indirect methods such as developing pedotransfer functions have been used to predict this characteristic from soil readily available or easily measurable data. In this study, multiple linear regression method was used to develop point pedotransfer functions (PTFs) for saline and saline-alkali soils of Iran. For this purpose, 68 soil samples which their EC values were greater than 4 ds/m, and more than half of them had ESP values greater than 15% were selected. Using Jackknife method, the random splitting of data into the development and validation subsets was repeated 10 times. A ratio of 3:1 was used to split data into development and validation sets in each replication. In the SPSS software, parameters such as geometric standard deviation (δg), geometric mean diameter (dg), sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), electrical conductivity (EC), carbonate calcium (CaCO3), bulk density (BD), organic matter (OM), and clay and silt content were applied as the independent variables, and volumetric water content was determined at matric potentials of -10, -33, -100 , -300, -500, -1000, -1500 kPa. The derived PTFs were compared with the H3 model of Rosetta software for 10 splits of validation data set. Comparison of the mean RMSE and R2 values showed that the developed PTFs resulted in more accurate estimation than the Rosetta software at matric potentials of -100 , -300, -500, -1000, -1500 kPa. Whereas, Rosetta model resulted in slightly better estimation than derived PTFs at matric potentials of -10, -33 kPa. For the PTFs developed in this study, the RMSE and R2 values ranged from 0.12 to 0.35 (cm3.cm-3) and 0.64 to 0.83, respectively. While for the Rosetta model, RMSE and R2 values ranged from 0.22 to 0.33 (cm3.cm-3) and 0.37 to 0.74, respectively.

  19. Hydrogen-rich saline injection into the subarachnoid cavity within 2 weeks promotes recovery after acute spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-long; Zhang, Qing-shan; Zhu, Kai-di; Sun, Jian-feng; Zhang, Ze-peng; Sun, Jian-wen; Zhang, Ke-xiang

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen can relieve tissue-damaging oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis. Injection of hydrogen-rich saline is an effective method for transporting molecular hydrogen. We hypothesized that hydrogen-rich saline would promote the repair of spinal cord injury induced by Allen's method in rats. At 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 hours after injury, then once daily for 2 weeks, 0.25 mL/kg hydrogen-rich saline was infused into the subarachnoid space through a catheter. Results at 24 hours, 48 hours, 1 week and 2 weeks after injury showed that hydrogen-rich saline markedly reduced cell death, inflammatory cell infiltration, serum malondialdehyde content, and caspase-3 immunoreactivity, elevated serum superoxide dismutase activity and calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactivity, and improved motor function in the hindlimb. The present study confirms that hydrogen-rich saline injected within 2 weeks of injury effectively contributes to the repair of spinal cord injury in the acute stage. PMID:26199614

  20. Salinity change impairs pipefish immune defence.

    PubMed

    Birrer, Simone C; Reusch, Thorsten B H; Roth, Olivia

    2012-12-01

    Global change is associated with fast and severe alterations of environmental conditions. Superimposed onto existing salinity variations in a semi-enclosed brackish water body such as the Baltic Sea, a decrease in salinity is predicted due to increased precipitation and freshwater inflow. Moreover, we predict that heavy precipitation events will accentuate salinity fluctuations near shore. Here, we investigated how the immune function of the broad-nosed pipefish (Syngnathus typhle), an ecologically important teleost with sex-role reversal, is influenced by experimentally altered salinities (control: 18 PSU, lowered: 6 PSU, increased: 30 PSU) upon infection with bacteria of the genus Vibrio. Salinity changes resulted in increased activity and proliferation of immune cells. However, upon Vibrio infection, individuals at low salinity were unable to mount specific immune response components, both in terms of monocyte and lymphocyte cell proliferation and immune gene expression compared to pipefish kept at ambient salinities. We interpret this as resource allocation trade-off, implying that resources needed for osmoregulation under salinity stress are lacking for subsequent activation of the immune defence upon infection. Our data suggest that composition of small coastal fish communities may change due to elevated environmental stress levels and the incorporated consequences thereof. PMID:22982326

  1. Investigations in Marine Chemistry: Salinity II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    Presented is a science activity in which the student investigates methods of calibration of a simple conductivity meter via a hands-on inquiry technique. Conductivity is mathematically compared to salinity using a point slope formula and graphical techniques. Sample solutions of unknown salinity are provided so that the students can sharpen their…

  2. Assessing patient preference for two types of elastomeric infusion device.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Susan

    Home administration of antibiotic therapy to cystic fibrosis patients is one of many applications for the use of elastomeric infusion devices. Patient acceptability can significantly affect adherence to complex drug regimens with concordance being a concern in this patient population. While patient acceptance is often cited as a factor in pump selection, patient preference has not been assessed within a particular class of infusion device. The objective of this study was to assess patient preference for one type of elastomeric infusion device (Baxter Intermate--hard-shelled design) or another (Fresenius Kabi Eclipse--soft-shelled design). Twenty-four patients entered the study. 20/24 (83%) patients expressed a preference for the Eclipse, while 4/24 (17%) stated no preference for either device. The Eclipse device was found to be much more favourable in terms of comfort and discreetness. Patient preference should therefore be given significant consideration in order to maximize concordance with drug regimens. PMID:18026019

  3. Improving the sweet aftertaste of green tea infusion with tannase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying-Na; Yin, Jun-Feng; Chen, Jian-Xin; Wang, Fang; Du, Qi-Zhen; Jiang, Yong-Wen; Xu, Yong-Quan

    2016-02-01

    The present study aims to improve the sweet aftertaste and overall acceptability of green tea infusion by hydrolyzing (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG) with tannase. The results showed that the intensity of the sweet aftertaste and the score of overall acceptability of the green tea infusion significantly increased with the extension of the hydrolyzing treatment. (-)-Epigallocatechin (EGC) and (-)-epicatechin (EC) were found to be the main contributors for the sweet aftertaste, based on a trial compatibility with EGCG, ECG, EGC, and EC monomers, and a synergistic action between EGC and EC to sweet aftertaste was observed. A 2.5:1 (EGC/EC) ratio with a total concentration of 3.5 mmol/L gave the most satisfying sweet aftertaste, and the astringency significantly inhibited the development of the sweet aftertaste. These results can help us to produce a tea beverage with excellent sweet aftertaste by hydrolyzing the green tea infusion with tannase. PMID:26304374

  4. Platelet activation during angiotensin II infusion in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Larsson, P T; Schwieler, J H; Wallén, N H

    2000-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of an intravenous infusion of angiotensin II (10 ng/kg per min) on platelet function and coagulation in vivo in 18 healthy males. The infusion increased mean arterial pressure by 23+/-2 mm Hg. Plasma beta-thromboglobulin levels, reflecting platelet secretion, increased by 66+/-24% during the infusion, as did also platelet surface expression of P-selectin as measured by flow cytometry. Platelet fibrinogen binding increased, whereas platelet aggregability, assessed by ex vivo filtragometry, was unaltered. Angiotensin II caused mild activation of the coagulation cascade with increases in plasma levels of thrombin-antithrombin complex and prothrombin fragment F1 + 2. In conclusion, angiotensin II has mild platelet-activating effects in vivo and also enhances coagulation. Markers of platelet secretion are significantly increased, whereas markers of platelet aggregability are less affected. The clinical relevance of these findings remains to be clarified. PMID:10691100

  5. The content of artemisinin in the Artemisia annua tea infusion.

    PubMed

    van der Kooy, Frank; Verpoorte, Robert

    2011-10-01

    The traditional use of the medicinal plant Artemisia annua for the treatment of malaria entails the preparation of a tea infusion. In the scientific literature there have been some discrepancies on the quantity of the active principle, artemisinin, in the tea infusion. Due to these discrepancies, we decided to quantify artemisinin in tea infusions prepared according to different methods. We also studied the water solubility of pure artemisinin at room temperature and at 100  °C and compared it to the solubility of artemisinin from the plant material. We found that the extraction efficiency is very sensitive to temperature and that efficiencies of above 90 % can be reached. We also showed that the solubility of artemisinin is not improved by other components in the extract but that a supersaturated solution of artemisinin might be formed, which is stable for at least 24 hours. PMID:21544776

  6. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Lung Ablation Combined with Transbronchial Saline Injection: An Experimental Study in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, T. Kaminou, T. Sugiura, K.; Hashimoto, M.; Ohuchi, Y.; Adachi, A.; Fujioka, S.; Ito, H.; Nakamura, K.; Ihaya, T.; Ogawa, T.

    2010-02-15

    To evaluate the efficacy of radiofrequency lung ablation with transbronchial saline injection. The bilateral lungs of eight living swine were used. A 13-gauge bone biopsy needle was inserted percutaneously into the lung, and 1 ml of muscle paste was injected to create a tumor mimic. In total, 21 nodules were ablated. In the saline injection group (group A), radiofrequency ablation (RFA) was performed for 11 nodules after transbronchial saline injection under balloon occlusion with a 2-cm active single internally cooled electrode. In the control group (group B), conventional RFA was performed for 10 nodules as a control. The infused saline liquid showed a wedge-shaped and homogeneous distribution surrounding a tumor mimic. All 21 RFAs were successfully completed. The total ablation time was significantly longer (13.4 {+-} 2.8 min vs. 8.9 {+-} 3.5 min; P = 0.0061) and the tissue impedance was significantly lower in group A compared with group B (73.1 {+-} 8.8 {Omega} vs. 100.6 {+-} 16.6 {Omega}; P = 0.0002). The temperature of the ablated area was not significantly different (69.4 {+-} 9.1{sup o}C vs. 66.0 {+-} 7.9{sup o}C; P = 0.4038). There was no significant difference of tumor mimic volume (769 {+-} 343 mm{sup 3} vs. 625 {+-} 191 mm{sup 3}; P = 0.2783). The volume of the coagulated area was significantly larger in group A than in group B (3886 {+-} 1247 mm{sup 3} vs. 2375 {+-} 1395 mm{sup 3}; P = 0.0221). Percutaneous radiofrequency lung ablation combined with transbronchial saline injection can create an extended area of ablation.

  7. Composition of antioxidants and amino acids in Stevia leaf infusions.

    PubMed

    Periche, Angela; Koutsidis, Georgios; Escriche, Isabel

    2014-03-01

    Stevia, a non-caloric natural sweetener with beneficial properties and considerable antioxidants and amino acids, is increasingly consumed as an infusion. This work evaluates the influence of the conditions (temperature: 50, 70 or 90 °C and time: 1, 5, 20 or 40 min) applied to obtain Stevia infusions, on antioxidants (total phenols, flavonoids and antioxidant activity) and amino acids. The total concentration of the eleven amino acids found was 11.70 mg/g in dried leaves and from 6.84 to 9.11 mg/g per gram of Stevia in infusions. However, infusions showed higher levels of certain amino acids (alanine, asparagine, leucine and proline), and greater values of the three antioxidant parameters in comparison with dry leaves. Temperature had more influence (minimum values at 50 °C and maximum at 90 °C) than time in the case of antioxidants. At 90 °C there were no important increases in the extraction of antioxidant compounds after 5 min; each gram of Stevia had 117 mg trolox (total antioxidant activity), 90 mg gallic acid (total phenols) and 56 mg catechin equivalents (flavonoids). Varying the temperature and time conditions no notable differences were observed in the concentrations of the majority of amino acids. However, the infusion treatment at 90 °C for 5 min was the best, as it gave the highest yield of 8 of the 11 amino acids. Therefore, with respect to the compounds analyzed in this study, the best way to obtain Stevia leaf infusions is the same as the domestic process, almost boiling water for a short time. PMID:24293005

  8. Reconstructing Past Ocean Salinity ((delta)18Owater)

    SciTech Connect

    Guilderson, T P; Pak, D K

    2005-11-23

    Temperature and salinity are two of the key properties of ocean water masses. The distribution of these two independent but related characteristics reflects the interplay of incoming solar radiation (insolation) and the uneven distribution of heat loss and gain by the ocean, with that of precipitation, evaporation, and the freezing and melting of ice. Temperature and salinity to a large extent, determine the density of a parcel of water. Small differences in temperature and salinity can increase or decrease the density of a water parcel, which can lead to convection. Once removed from the surface of the ocean where 'local' changes in temperature and salinity can occur, the water parcel retains its distinct relationship between (potential) temperature and salinity. We can take advantage of this 'conservative' behavior where changes only occur as a result of mixing processes, to track the movement of water in the deep ocean (Figure 1). The distribution of density in the ocean is directly related to horizontal pressure gradients and thus (geostrophic) ocean currents. During the Quaternary when we have had systematic growth and decay of large land based ice sheets, salinity has had to change. A quick scaling argument following that of Broecker and Peng [1982] is: the modern ocean has a mean salinity of 34.7 psu and is on average 3500m deep. During glacial maxima sea level was on the order of {approx}120m lower than present. Simply scaling the loss of freshwater (3-4%) requires an average increase in salinity a similar percentage or to {approx}35.9psu. Because much of the deep ocean is of similar temperature, small changes in salinity have a large impact on density, yielding a potentially different distribution of water masses and control of the density driven (thermohaline) ocean circulation. It is partly for this reason that reconstructions of past salinity are of interest to paleoceanographers.

  9. Pharmacogenomics: Overview of Applications and Relation to Infusion Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kisor, David F; Bright, David R; Manion, Chelsea R; Smith, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacogenomics (PGx) describes the relationship between an individual's genes and his or her response to drug therapy. Data are accumulating that indicate that PGx has application in the clinical setting for drugs across therapeutic categories, including drugs that are administered intravenously and are of greater familiarity to infusion nurses. This article provides an overview of the science and presents common examples of PGx as it relates to drug and/or drug dose selection. Additionally, there are brief summaries of the role infusion nurses can play relative to toxicity monitoring, patient education, and other aspects of PGx. PMID:27074990

  10. Resin film infusion mold tooling and molding method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, Roger (Inventor); Grossheim, Brian (Inventor); Mouradian, Karbis (Inventor); Thrash, Patrick J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A mold apparatus and method for resin film infusion molding including an outer mold tool having a facing sheet adapted to support a resin film and preform assembly. The facing sheet includes attachment features extending therefrom. An inner mold tool is positioned on the facing sheet to enclose the resin film and preform assembly for resin film infusion molding. The inner mold tool includes a plurality of mandrels positioned for engagement with the resin film and preform assembly. Each mandrel includes a slot formed therein. A plurality of locating bars cooperate with the slots and with the attachment features for locating the mandrels longitudinally on the outer mold tool.

  11. Professional ethics. A case study of infusion nurse consultants.

    PubMed

    Adams, J

    2000-01-01

    As the healthcare system continues to reform, opportunities exist for infusion nurses to expand their practice into the business world. Traditionally, biomedical ethics have been used in nursing education as a framework for identifying and responding to ethical dilemmas. However, in the business world, professional ethics may be more subtle and insidious. A case study of ten infusion nurse consultants and their experiences with professional ethical issues is presented. Data were obtained using interviews, and content analysis revealed emergent themes of integrity and intuitive knowing with related categories. PMID:11847709

  12. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: A Focus on Infused Prostacyclins.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Traci

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by vasoconstriction and cell proliferation in the pulmonary vasculature. Guideline-driven interventions with infused prostacyclin treatment are the mainstay for patients with advanced symptoms. Infused prostacyclin therapy is complex. It is critical to manage prostacyclin therapy with precision because boluses or interruptions can be fatal. Education of patients and inpatient staff nurses is necessary to prevent negative outcomes. Nurses are an essential part of the multidisciplinary team caring for patients with PAH. The diagnostic evaluation and treatment of PAH are reviewed here, and challenges associated with the care of patients on prostacyclin therapy are discussed. PMID:27598071

  13. Temporary elimination of orthostatic hypotension by norepinephrine infusion.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, David S; Sewell, LaToya; Holmes, Courtney; Pechnik, Sandra; Diedrich, André; Robertson, David

    2012-12-01

    A cardinal manifestation of chronic autonomic failure is neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (OH), which often is associated with supine hypertension, posing a therapeutic dilemma. We report here success in a first step toward development of a "prosthetic baroreceptor system" to maintain blood pressure during orthostasis without worsening supine hypertension. In all of four patients with neurogenic OH, titrated i.v. NE infusion kept directly recorded intra-arterial pressure at or above baseline during progressive head-up tilt. We conclude that titrated i.v. NE infusion temporarily eliminates OH. PMID:22983778

  14. [Ecophysiological adaptability of tropical water organisms to salinity changes].

    PubMed

    Chung, K S

    2001-03-01

    Physiological response of tropical organisms to salinity changes was studied for some marine, estuarine and freshwater fishes (Astyanax bimaculatus, Petenia karussii, Cyprinodon dearborni, and Oreochromis mossambicus), marine and freshwater crustaceans (Penaeus brasiliensis, Penaeus schmitti and Macrobrachium carcinus), and marine bivalves (Perna perna, Crassostrea rhizophorae, and Arca zebra) collected from Northeast Venezuela. They were acclimated for four weeks at various salinities, and (1) placed at high salinities to determine mean lethal salinity, (2) tested by increasing salinity 5@1000 per day to define upper lethal salinity tolerance limit, or (3) observed in a saline gradient tank to determine salinity preference. Acclimation level was the most significant factor. This phenomenon is important for tropical aquatic organisms in shallow waters, where they can adapt to high salinity during the dry season and cannot lose their acclimation level at low salinity during abrupt rain. For saline adaptation of tropical organisms, this behavior will contribute to their proliferation and distribution in fluctuating salinity environments. PMID:11795174

  15. Inhibition of natriuresis in median eminence polydipsia: effects after intake of diets with different osmolalities and after hypertonic NaCl administration.

    PubMed

    Mahía, Javier; Bernal, Antonio; Puerto, Amadeo

    2013-01-01

    Lesions in the hypothalamic median eminence (ME) induce polydipsia and polyuria in male rats. A first experiment was designed to examine the effect of salt consumption (standard 0.25 percent Na+ vs. low-salt 0.04 percent Na+ diet) on the fluid-electrolytic balance (plasma sodium, urinary sodium excretion, urine osmolality) and water intake of ME polydipsic animals. In the first 6 h post-surgery, the natriuretic response was higher in ME-lesioned animals than in control groups. At 24 h post-surgery, however, less sodium was excreted by ME rats fed with a standard salt diet (ME/SS), despite showing no decrease in salt intake, and they evidenced an increase in plasma sodium concentration and water intake. Urine osmolality was significantly higher in control animals than in either ME-lesioned group. In experiment 2, hypertonic NaCl administration (2 ml/2M) increased the polydipsic behavior of ME-lesioned but not control rats (day 2). Animals deprived of food/salt showed a significant reduction (on day 2) in the initial (day 1) polydipsia, which increased on day 3 when the animals had access to a standard-salt diet. These results suggest that the reduced natriuretic response and the consequent sodium retention observed in ME animals may exacerbate the hydromineral imbalance of this polydipsic syndrome. PMID:24129482

  16. Chronic Infusion of Sterile Peritoneal Dialysis Solution Abrogates Enhanced Peritoneal Gene Expression Responses to Chronic Peritoneal Catheter Presence

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, El Rasheid; Matheson, Paul J.; Hurt, Ryan T.; Garrison, Richard N.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic exposure to sterile peritoneal dialysis (PD) solutions is associated with microvascular and interstitial changes within the blood–peritoneal barrier (peritoneum). These changes are commonly linked to loss of peritoneal function over time, presumably because of angiogenesis-related increased vascular area. However, the effects on peritoneal microvascular function of chronic peritoneal exposure to PD solutions are unknown. The present study examined peritoneal microvascular function after chronic exposure to sterile PD solution. Six rats underwent permanent catheter insertion under anesthesia. Three rats were treated with approximately 16 mL conventional PD solution daily for 6 weeks; catheter insertion controls received 1 mL saline daily. At 6 weeks, visceral peritoneal microvascular function was assessed in vivo using intravital microscopy. Endothelial cell functions were assessed using messenger RNA (mRNA) gene microarray analysis. In both groups, significant angiogenesis was seen, predominantly in the base of the mesentery. Sensitivity and reactivity of the intestinal visceral peritoneal pre-capillary arterioles (A3 arterioles, 8 – 15μm in diameter) were decreased in the catheter controls, but not in the chronic PD infusion rats. Chronic catheter presence increased the expression of 18 genes in the controls as compared with 12 genes in the chronic infusion rats. In both groups, expression of fibronectin, integrin-β, integrin-α5, collagen type XVIII-α1, and matrix metalloproteinase was enhanced. Endothelial expression of proinflammatory genes (interleukin-1β tissue pathway inhibitor, chemokine ligand 2) was enhanced by chronic catheter insertion, but not after chronic PD fluid infusion. Increased expression of genes encoding proteins involved in inflammation and tissue remodeling results from peritoneal catheter–related endothelial cell activation. Chronic exposure of the nonuremic peritoneum to sterile PD solutions overrides the catheter

  17. Effects of intravenously infused lidocaine on analgesia and gastrointestinal function of patients receiving laparoscopic common bile duct exploration

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Hu, Wei-Lan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of intravenously infused lidocaine on analgesia and gastrointestinal function of patients receiving laparoscopic common bile duct exploration. Methods: Seventy-eight patients with cholelithiasis were randomly divided into a treatment group and a control group (n=39) that all had laparoscopic common bile duct exploration. The treatment group was intravenously infused with 1.5 mg/kg lidocaine by using a venous pump under anesthesia induction at the speed of 2 mg·kg-1 ·h-1 until the end of surgery, while the control group was given normal saline with the same volume. Results: All patients successfully completed the surgery, with similar surgical time, incision length and intraoperative blood loss. The required lidocaine concentrations of the treatment group were 2.64±1.23 μg/ml, 1.14±0.4 μg/ml and 0.93±0.32 μg/ml respectively 2 hour, 12 hour and 48 hour after surgery. Pain score of the treatment group, which was significantly lower than that of the control group at the postoperative 2 hour (P<0.05), was similar to those of the control group at the postoperative 12 hour and 48 hour. With extended time, the pain score significantly decreased (P<0.05). The treatment group had significantly shorter first anal exhaust time and first defecation time than those of the control group (P<0.05). Adverse reactions, such as nausea and vomiting, dizziness, headache, subcutaneous emphysema and fat liquefaction of incision, occurred similarly in the two groups, which were alleviated by symptomatic treatment. Conclusion: Laparoscopic common bile duct exploration is a promising minimally invasive surgery for patients with cholelithiasis, during which intravenously infused lidocaine can rapidly recover the gastrointestinal function and exert short-term analgesic effects, with mild adverse reactions also. PMID:26648989

  18. Mercury 203 distribution in pregnant and nonpregnant rats following systemic infusions with thiol-containing amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Aschner, M.; Clarkson, T.W.

    1987-12-01

    Near-term pregnant (gestational day 17) and nonpregnant Long-Evans female rats were continuously infused into the external jugular vein with 0.1 mmole/hour L-cysteine, 0.1 mmole/hour L-leucine, or saline. At 24, 48, and 72 hours, 50 mumole/hour (/sup 203/Hg)-MeHgCl was administered over 1 hour. Total /sup 203/Hg body burden, brain, kidney, liver, and blood /sup 203/Hg concentrations were determined at 96 hours by gamma scintillation spectrometry. Despite significantly greater /sup 203/Hg whole body retention in the pregnant animals /sup 203/Hg concentrations in blood, brain, kidney, and liver were higher in nonpregnant rats. In addition, brain /sup 203/Hg concentrations in both pregnant and virgin rats were significantly higher in L-cysteine-treated rats compared with controls. These results suggest that the fetus may act as a sink for MeHg, thus decreasing /sup 203/Hg concentrations in maternal blood, brain, kidney, and liver. Furthermore, the data indicate that brain uptake of methylmercury in both pregnant and nonpregnant rats is enhanced by chronic L-cysteine infusion, lending support to the hypothesis that methylmercury in the rat may be translocated across the blood-brain barrier by the neutral amino acid carrier transport system.

  19. Early effects of Escherichia coli endotoxin infusion on vasopressin-stimulated breakdown and metabolism of inositol lipids in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez de Turco, E.B.; Spitzer, J.A.

    1988-08-30

    The turnover of vasopressin-stimulated 32P-phosphoinositides and 32P-phosphatidic acid and accumulation of (2-3H)-inositol phosphates were examined in hepatocytes from rats infused i.v. with saline and E. coli endotoxin for 3 hrs. Within 60s of VP stimulation the decrease in phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate labeling as well as the increased uptake of 32P into phosphatidic acid were similar in both groups. However, at a later time (300s) the 32P-phosphatidylinositol turnover was greatly decreased concomitantly with a higher labeling of phosphatidic acid. The accumulation of (2-3H)-inositol phosphates in ET-cells was significantly decreased both at 30s and 600s after VP addition. The distribution of (2-3H)-inositol labeling accumulated in the different inositol phosphate fractions over the first 30s of VP stimulation showed a tendency to lower accumulation of inositol trisphosphate, and a significantly lower accumulation of inositol bisphosphate simultaneously with a higher labeling of the inositol tetrakisphosphate fraction. These observations reflect an early effect of ET-infusion on VP-stimulated inositol lipid turnover and on the subsequent metabolism of the released inositol phosphates.

  20. A theoretical alternative intraosseous infusion site in severely hypovolemic children

    PubMed Central

    van Schoor, Albert-Neels; Bosman, Marius C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that the venous system tends to collapse during hypovolemic shock. The use of the bone marrow space for infusions is an effective alternative, with the tibial insertion site being the norm. Objectives This study was conducted to determine a quick intraosseous infusion method that could be an alternative to the tibial route in neonates during emergency situations. Method A sample of 30 neonatal cadavers was dissected to explore a possible alternative to the tibial insertion site. The needle was inserted in the superolateral aspect of the humerus. The needle infusion site was then dissected to determine possible muscular and neurovascular damage that might occur during the administration of this procedure, with the greatest concern being the posterior circumflex humeral artery and axillary nerve exiting the quadrangular space. The distance of the needle insertion site was measured in relation to the soft tissue as well as to bony landmarks. Results The calculated 95% confidence interval shows that the needle can be safely inserted into the intraosseous tissue at the greater tubercle of the humerus 9.5 mm – 11.1 mm from the acromion. This is about a little finger’s width from the acromioclavicular joint. Conclusion Anatomically, the described site is suggested to offer a safe alternative access point for emergency infusion in severely hypovolemic newborns and infants, without the risk of damage to any anatomical structures. PMID:26245618

  1. Technology Infusion in a Chinese Middle School: A Comparative Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lan, Jiang; He, Shujia; Ouyang, John Ronghua; Zhonghai, Qiu; Bao, Qiu

    This paper reports on an investigation of technology infusion at QiBao Middle School, one of the leading secondary schools in Shanghai (China). Major focuses of the study are models of professional development for teachers and how teachers enlist the help of their students. Results are presented related to: technology infrastructure; technology…

  2. An Infusion Curriculum for the Heritage Speaker of Spanish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Pino, Barbara

    2000-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the literature on program models for teaching Spanish to heritage speakers, noting definitions, intake and placement procedures, typical offerings, and effective approaches, and covering a proficiency orientation, infusion of subculture materials, study of sociolinguists, community involvement, and cooperative…

  3. Infusing Creativity into Eastern Classrooms: Evaluations from Student Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Vivian M. Y.

    2011-01-01

    Infusing creativity elements into regular classroom was an important movement in recent Asian educational reforms. A large-scale research study was conducted in Hong Kong to explore the possibilities, outcomes and difficulties of this kind of curriculum change from students' perspectives. Based mainly on Western creativity literature, this study…

  4. Assessing Infusion of Social Justice in Rehabilitation Counselor Education Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Shengli; Ethridge, Glacia; Rodgers-Bonaccorsy, Roe; Oire, Spalatin N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the extent to which rehabilitation counselor educators understand and are committed to infusing social justice in the rehabilitation counseling curricula. Method: The authors used a quantitative descriptive research design to examine the level and extent of integrating social justice into rehabilitation counseling curricular.…

  5. Career Education in Higher Education. [An Infusion Model.] Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Charles W.; And Others

    This document is one of three volumes (CE 018 033 and ED 143 814) which contain career education instructional units developed by college teachers to be infused in university-level courses. (See CE 018 030 for the report of inservice and curriculum development activities.) Chapter 1 of this document discusses career education philosophy and…

  6. Development of a Multidisciplinary Middle School Mathematics Infusion Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Maria; Hecht, Deborah; Burghardt, M. David; Hacker, Michael; Saxman, Laura

    2011-01-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) funded project "Mathematics, Science, and Technology Partnership" (MSTP) developed a multidisciplinary instructional model for connecting mathematics to science, technology and engineering content areas at the middle school level. Specifically, the model infused mathematics into middle school curriculum…

  7. Infusing Quantitative Approaches throughout the Biological Sciences Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Katerina V.; Cooke, Todd J.; Fagan, William F.; Gulick, Denny; Levy, Doron; Nelson, Kären C.; Redish, Edward F.; Smith, Robert F.; Presson, Joelle

    2013-01-01

    A major curriculum redesign effort at the University of Maryland is infusing all levels of our undergraduate biological sciences curriculum with increased emphasis on interdisciplinary connections and quantitative approaches. The curriculum development efforts have largely been guided by recommendations in the National Research Council's…

  8. Multicultural Infusion in the Counselor Education Curriculum: A Preliminary Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ametrano, Irene Mass; Callaway, Yvonne L.; Stickel, Sue A.

    Counselor educators agree on the necessity of preparing counselors in training to work in a diverse society. Traditional training programs have no special accommodations and are characterized by unawareness of the impact of cultural factors in counseling. This paper describes how one university has been working activity to infuse multicultural…

  9. Improving Middle School Students' Science Literacy through Reading Infusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fang, Zhihui; Wei, Youhua

    2010-01-01

    Despite recent calls for border crossing between reading and science, few studies have examined the impact of reading infusion in the science curriculum on students' science literacy. In this quasi-experimental study, the authors investigated the effects of an inquiry-based science curriculum that integrated explicit reading strategy instruction…

  10. Curriculum Infusion as College Student Mental Health Promotion Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Sharon L.; Darrow, Sherri A.; Haggerty, Melinda; Neill, Thomas; Carvalho, Amana; Uschold, Carissa

    2012-01-01

    This article describes efforts to increase faculty involvement in suicide prevention and mental health promotion via curriculum infusion. The participants were faculty, staff, and 659 students enrolled in classes of a large eastern university from Fall 2007-Spring 2011. Counselors, health educators, and medical providers recruited faculty from a…

  11. Doing Business with China: Curriculum Internationalisation through an Infusion Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Byoungho; Swinney, Jane; Cao, Huantian; Muske, Glenn; Nam, Jinhee; Kang, Ji Hye

    2011-01-01

    The US apparel and textiles industry operates within an interdependent global system, necessitating workforces competent for day-to-day operations. The US workforce lacks preparedness in working globally; this study tests an infusion method of curriculum internationalisation to enhance students' global understanding. Four cognitive and…

  12. Evaluation of Service-Learning-Infused Courses with Refugee Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midgett, Aida; Doumas, Diana M.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact of service-learning-infused courses on multicultural competence and social justice advocacy skills among counseling students. The project, in which students acted as job coaches for refugee families, was integrated into 1st- and 2nd-year counseling courses. Results indicated an increase in multicultural knowledge…

  13. Tissue Blood Flow During Remifentanil Infusion With Carbon Dioxide Loading.

    PubMed

    Kanbe, Hiroaki; Matsuura, Nobuyuki; Kasahara, Masataka; Ichinohe, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of changes in end-tidal carbon dioxide tension (ETCO2) during remifentanil (Remi) infusion on oral tissue blood flow in rabbits. Eight male tracheotomized Japan White rabbits were anesthetized with sevoflurane under mechanical ventilation. The infusion rate of Remi was 0.4 μg/kg/min. Carbon dioxide was added to the inspired gas to change the inspired CO2 tension to prevent changes in the ventilating condition. Observed variables were systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), common carotid artery blood flow (CCBF), tongue mucosal blood flow (TBF), mandibular bone marrow tissue blood flow (BBF), masseter muscle tissue blood flow (MBF), upper alveolar tissue blood flow (UBF), and lower alveolar tissue blood flow (LBF). The CCBF, TBF, BBF, UBF, and LBF values were increased, while MBF was decreased, under hypercapnia, and vice versa. The BBF, UBF, and LBF values were increased, while the MBF value was decreased, under hypercapnia during Remi infusion, and vice versa. The BBF, MBF, UBF, and LBF values, but not the CCBF and TBF values, changed along with ETCO2 changes during Remi infusion. PMID:26061573

  14. Jumping off the Couch: Infusing Creativity into Counselor Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    This study infused key elements of creativity into the process of counselor education, exposing students in a counseling skills and techniques course to a curriculum designed to promote tolerance for ambiguity, appropriate risk-taking behaviors, and improvisational skills. Employing a phenomenological strategy of inquiry, the researcher sought to…

  15. The Angiotensin Infusion Test and Peripheral Venous Renin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Silah, J. G.; Strong, C. G.; Nowaczynski, W.; Genest, J.

    1967-01-01

    Forty hypertensive patients were studied to examine the assumption that the angiotensin pressor dose reflects endogenous renin activity. Peripheral renin activity was assayed by the method of Boucher et al.4 Sensitivity to the infusion of synthetic angiotensin II was determined as suggested by Kaplan and Silah.1 Sixteen patients with essential hypertension with normal renal angiography required 3.8 ng. angiotensin/kg./min. to raise the diastolic pressure 20 mm. Hg. All but one were sensitive to angiotensin infusion of less than 5 ng./kg./min. Renin activity was normal in all except in one sensitive subject. Angiotensin infusion response and mean renin activity in 13 patients with essential hypertension with abnormal renal angiography were similar to that of the first group. The pressor dose in 11 renovascular hypertensives was 9.8 ng./kg./min. All but three had elevated plasma renin activity. Our results suggest that: (1) the angiotensin infusion test is suitable for differentiating patients with true renovascular hypertension from those with essential hypertension with or without associated renal artery disease; (2) the angiotensin pressor dose correlates with the level of peripheral venous renin activity (p < 0.01). PMID:4290836

  16. The angiotensin infusion test and peripheral venous renin activity.

    PubMed

    Silah, J G; Strong, C G; Nowaczynski, W; Genest, J

    1967-05-27

    Forty hypertensive patients were studied to examine the assumption that the angiotensin pressor dose reflects endogenous renin activity. Peripheral renin activity was assayed by the method of Boucher et al.(4) Sensitivity to the infusion of synthetic angiotensin II was determined as suggested by Kaplan and Silah.(1)Sixteen patients with essential hypertension with normal renal angiography required 3.8 ng. angiotensin/kg./min. to raise the diastolic pressure 20 mm. Hg. All but one were sensitive to angiotensin infusion of less than 5 ng./kg./min. Renin activity was normal in all except in one sensitive subject. Angiotensin infusion response and mean renin activity in 13 patients with essential hypertension with abnormal renal angiography were similar to that of the first group. The pressor dose in 11 renovascular hypertensives was 9.8 ng./kg./min. All but three had elevated plasma renin activity.OUR RESULTS SUGGEST THAT: (1) the angiotensin infusion test is suitable for differentiating patients with true renovascular hypertension from those with essential hypertension with or without associated renal artery disease; (2) the angiotensin pressor dose correlates with the level of peripheral venous renin activity (p < 0.01). PMID:4290836

  17. Temperature responses of exercizing dogs to infusion of electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Kozlowski, S.; Nazar, K.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.; Brzezinska, Z.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of infusions with solutions of various ionic and osmotic composition on exercise temperature responses was studied in dogs who do not regulate their temperature by sweating. The results suggest an association between plasma Na+ and Ca++ level within the normal physiological range and the control of body temperature during exercise.

  18. Infusing Social Emotional Learning into the Teacher Education Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waajid, Badiyyah; Garner, Pamela W.; Owen, Julie E.

    2013-01-01

    Research supports the importance of policies and interventions to infuse social emotional curricula in schools. The role of teachers in supporting young children's social and emotional readiness for classroom learning has been recognized, but instruction in children's well-being and social emotional competence is a low priority in teacher…

  19. Spontaneously recovered severe thrombocytopaenia following zoledronic acid infusion for osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Pooja; Cushman, Terra; Donthireddy, Vijayalakshmi; Rao, Sudhaker

    2016-01-01

    Zoledronic acid is widely used for the treatment of various skeletal disorders. While acute phase reactions are commonly seen, hypocalcaemia, femoral shaft fractures, osteonecrosis of the jaw and renal failure are rare. Two cases of fatal thrombocytopaenic purpura have been reported following zoledronic acid infusion. We report a case of non-fatal thrombocytopaenia with spontaneous recovery. A 70-year woman with osteoporosis participated in a research study. Complete blood and platelet counts prior to zoledronic acid infusion were normal (138 000/µL), but had declined slightly from 185 000/µL 2 years ago. One year after the first zoledronic acid infusion, her platelet count declined to 50 000/µL without any clinical manifestations, and rose slowly returning to normal (156 000/µL) over the next 1 year. Extensive evaluation did not reveal any specific abnormalities, and the pathogenesis of her transient severe thrombocytopaenia after two infusions of zoledronic acid remains unclear. PMID:26843222

  20. Technology Infusion Challenges from a Decision Support Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adumitroaie, V.; Weisbin, C. R.

    2009-01-01

    In a restricted science budget environment and increasingly numerous required technology developments, the technology investment decisions within NASA are objectively more and more difficult to make such that the end results are satisfying the technical objectives and all the organizational constraints. Under these conditions it is rationally desirable to build an investment portfolio, which has the highest possible technology infusion rate. Arguably the path to infusion is subject to many influencing factors, but here only the challenges associated with the very initial stages are addressed: defining the needs and the subsequent investment decision-support process. It is conceivable that decision consistency and possibly its quality suffer when the decision-making process has limited or no traceability. This paper presents a structured decision-support framework aiming to provide traceable, auditable, infusion- driven recommendations towards a selection process in which these recommendations are used as reference points in further discussions among stakeholders. In this framework addressing well-defined requirements, different measures of success can be defined based on traceability to specific selection criteria. As a direct result, even by using simplified decision models the likelihood of infusion can be probed and consequently improved.