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Sample records for hypertrophyc cardiomyopathy infrequent

  1. Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiomyopathy? Cardiomyopathy refers to diseases of the heart muscle. These ... many causes, signs and symptoms, and treatments. In cardiomyopathy, the heart muscle becomes enlarged, thick, or rigid. ...

  2. Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... or surgeries may also be used, including: A defibrillator that sends an electrical pulse to stop life- ... failure - overview Heart transplant Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator Peripartum cardiomyopathy Restrictive cardiomyopathy Patient Instructions Heart failure - ...

  3. Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and the most common reason for needing a heart transplant. Cardiomyopathy is so dangerous because it often goes ... damaged by ischemic cardiomyopathy, doctors may recommend a heart transplant. Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia ( ...

  4. Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    Cardiomyopathy is the name for diseases of the heart muscle. These diseases enlarge your heart muscle or ... tissue. Some people live long, healthy lives with cardiomyopathy. Some people don't even realize they have ...

  5. Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    Cardiomyopathy is disease in which the heart muscle becomes weakened, stretched, or has another structural problem. It ... cannot pump or function well. Most people with cardiomyopathy have heart failure .

  6. Pediatric Cardiomyopathies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Pediatric Cardiomyopathies Updated:Oct 22,2015 Patient education material ... oxygen or high blood pressure. According to the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry, one in every 100,000 children ...

  7. Atrioventricular Sequential Pacing for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy During Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Juan; Pai, Sher-Lu; Perry, Dana K; Blackshear, Joseph L; Aniskevich, Stephen

    2015-10-15

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a myocardial disorder that carries an increased risk of morbidity and mortality during liver transplantation. We describe the use of atrioventricular sequential pacing, placed preoperatively, to assist with intraoperative management of a patient with severe refractory hypertrophic cardiomyopathy undergoing orthotopic piggyback liver transplantation. We discuss the pathogenesis and treatment of this infrequent but serious comorbidity. PMID:26466305

  8. Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    El-Hattab, Ayman W.; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform various essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Mitochondria are under dual genome control. Only a small fraction of their proteins are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), whereas more than 99% of them are encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA). Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes result in mitochondrial dysfunction leading to insufficient energy production required to meet the needs for various organs, particularly those with high energy requirements, including the central nervous system, skeletal and cardiac muscles, kidneys, liver, and endocrine system. Because cardiac muscles are one of the high energy demanding tissues, cardiac involvement occurs in mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies being one of the most frequent cardiac manifestations found in these disorders. Cardiomyopathy is estimated to occur in 20–40% of children with mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies can vary in severity from asymptomatic status to severe manifestations including heart failure, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common type; however, mitochondrial cardiomyopathies might also present as dilated, restrictive, left ventricular non-compaction, and histiocytoid cardiomyopathies. Cardiomyopathies are frequent manifestations of mitochondrial diseases associated with defects in electron transport chain complexes subunits and their assembly factors, mitochondrial transfer RNAs, ribosomal RNAs, ribosomal proteins, translation factors, mtDNA maintenance, and coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Other mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies include Barth syndrome, Sengers syndrome, TMEM70-related mitochondrial complex V deficiency, and Friedreich ataxia. PMID:27504452

  9. Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform various essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Mitochondria are under dual genome control. Only a small fraction of their proteins are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), whereas more than 99% of them are encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA). Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes result in mitochondrial dysfunction leading to insufficient energy production required to meet the needs for various organs, particularly those with high energy requirements, including the central nervous system, skeletal and cardiac muscles, kidneys, liver, and endocrine system. Because cardiac muscles are one of the high energy demanding tissues, cardiac involvement occurs in mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies being one of the most frequent cardiac manifestations found in these disorders. Cardiomyopathy is estimated to occur in 20-40% of children with mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies can vary in severity from asymptomatic status to severe manifestations including heart failure, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common type; however, mitochondrial cardiomyopathies might also present as dilated, restrictive, left ventricular non-compaction, and histiocytoid cardiomyopathies. Cardiomyopathies are frequent manifestations of mitochondrial diseases associated with defects in electron transport chain complexes subunits and their assembly factors, mitochondrial transfer RNAs, ribosomal RNAs, ribosomal proteins, translation factors, mtDNA maintenance, and coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Other mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies include Barth syndrome, Sengers syndrome, TMEM70-related mitochondrial complex V deficiency, and Friedreich ataxia. PMID:27504452

  10. [Peripartum cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Fennira, S; Demiraj, A; Khouaja, A; Boujnah, M R

    2006-10-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare and under recognized form of dilated cardiomyopathy, defined as a heart failure in the last month of pregnancy or in the first five months post-partum with absence of determinable cause for cardiac failure and absence of demonstrable heart disease. The incidence of peripartum cardiomyopathy ranges from 1 in 1300 to 1 in 15,000 pregnancy. Advanced maternal age, multiparity, twin births, preeclampsia and black race are known risk factors. The etiology of peripartum cardiomyopathy remains unknown but viral, autoimmune or idiopathic myocarditis are highly suggested. The clinical presentation on patients with peripartum cardiomyopathy is similar to that of patients with systolic heart failure. The treatment is based on drugs for sympyomatic control. Studies in graeter populations are need to determine the role of immunosupressive treatment. About half patients of peripartum cardiomyopathy recover. The left ventricular ejection fraction and the left ventricular end-diastolic diameter are statistically significant prognostic factors. The risk of developing peripartum cardiomyopathy in subsequent pregnancies remains high. The place of dobutamine stress test in counseling the patients who desire pregnancy must be more studied. PMID:17078264

  11. Restrictive cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood returns from the body (diastole). When the disease progresses, the heart may not pump blood strongly. The abnormal heart function can affect the lungs, liver, and other body systems. Restrictive cardiomyopathy may affect either or both of the ...

  12. Dilated cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    Hare JM. The dilated, restrictive, and infiltrative cardiomyopathies. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 68.

  13. What's Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... or more chambers of the heart. Usually, the enlargement begins in one of the two lower pumping ... idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (IHSS) and asymmetrical septal hypertrophy (ASH), non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) The second ...

  14. Restrictive cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood returns from the body (diastole). When the disease progresses, the heart may not pump blood strongly. The abnormal heart function can affect the lungs, liver, and other body systems. Restrictive cardiomyopathy may affect ...

  15. [Peripartum cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Mouquet, Frédéric; Bouabdallaoui, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    The peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare form of dilated cardiomyopathy resulting from alteration of angiogenesis toward the end of pregnancy. The diagnosis is based on the association of clinical heart failure and systolic dysfunction assessed by echocardiography or magnetic resonance imaging. Diagnoses to rule out are myocardial infarction, amniotic liquid embolism, myocarditis, inherited cardiomyopathy, and history of treatment by anthracycline. Risk factors are advance maternal age (>30), multiparity, twin pregnancy, African origin, obesity, preeclampsia, gestational hypertension, and prolonged tocolytic therapy. Treatment of acute phase is identical to usual treatment of acute systolic heart failure. After delivery, VKA treatment should be discussed in case of systolic function <25% because of higher risk of thrombus. A specific treatment by bromocriptine can be initiated on a case-by-case basis. Complete recovery of systolic function is observed in 50% of cases. The mortality risk is low. Subsequent pregnancy should be discouraged, especially if systolic function did not recover. PMID:26160284

  16. Diabetic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Omar; Al-Sunni, Ahmed; Khavandi, Kaivan; Khavandi, Ali; Withers, Sarah; Greenstein, Adam; Heagerty, Anthony M.; Malik, Rayaz A.

    2009-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a distinct primary disease process, independent of coronary artery disease, which leads to heart failure in diabetic patients. Epidemiological and clinical trial data have confirmed the greater incidence and prevalence of heart failure in diabetes. Novel echocardiographic and MR (magnetic resonance) techniques have enabled a more accurate means of phenotyping diabetic cardiomyopathy. Experimental models of diabetes have provided a range of novel molecular targets for this condition, but none have been substantiated in humans. Similarly, although ultrastructural pathology of the microvessels and cardiomyocytes is well described in animal models, studies in humans are small and limited to light microscopy. With regard to treatment, recent data with thiazoledinediones has generated much controversy in terms of the cardiac safety of both these and other drugs currently in use and under development. Clinical trials are urgently required to establish the efficacy of currently available agents for heart failure, as well as novel therapies in patients specifically with diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:19364331

  17. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-del-Árbol, Luis; Serradilla, Regina

    2015-01-01

    During the course of cirrhosis, there is a progressive deterioration of cardiac function manifested by the disappearance of the hyperdynamic circulation due to a failure in heart function with decreased cardiac output. This is due to a deterioration in inotropic and chronotropic function which takes place in parallel with a diastolic dysfunction and cardiac hypertrophy in the absence of other known cardiac disease. Other findings of this specific cardiomyopathy include impaired contractile responsiveness to stress stimuli and electrophysiological abnormalities with prolonged QT interval. The pathogenic mechanisms of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy include impairment of the b-adrenergic receptor signalling, abnormal cardiomyocyte membrane lipid composition and biophysical properties, ion channel defects and overactivity of humoral cardiodepressant factors. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may be difficult to determine due to the lack of a specific diagnosis test. However, an echocardiogram allows the detection of the diastolic dysfunction and the E/e′ ratio may be used in the follow-up progression of the illness. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy plays an important role in the pathogenesis of the impairment of effective arterial blood volume and correlates with the degree of liver failure. A clinical consequence of cardiac dysfunction is an inadequate cardiac response in the setting of vascular stress that may result in renal hypoperfusion leading to renal failure. The prognosis is difficult to establish but the severity of diastolic dysfunction may be a marker of mortality risk. Treatment is non-specific and liver transplantation may normalize the cardiac function. PMID:26556983

  18. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Milani, A; Zaccaria, R; Bombardieri, G; Gasbarrini, A; Pola, P

    2007-06-01

    Decompensated liver cirrhosis is characterized by a peripheral vasodilation with a low-resistance hyperdynamic circulation. The sustained increase of cardiac work load associated with such a condition may result in an inconstant and often subclinical series of heart abnormalities, constituting a new clinical entity known as "cirrhotic cardiomyopathy". Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy is variably associated with baseline increase in cardiac output, defective myocardial contractility and lowered systo-diastolic response to inotropic and chronotropic stimuli, down-regulated beta-adrenergic function, slight histo-morphological changes, and impaired electric "recovery" ability of ventricular myocardium. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy is usually clinically latent or mild, likely because the peripheral vasodilation significantly reduces the left ventricle after-load, thus actually "auto-treating" the patient and masking any severe manifestation of heart failure. In cirrhotic patients, the presence of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may become unmasked and clinically evident by certain treatment interventions that increase the effective blood volume and cardiac pre-load, including surgical or transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunts, peritoneo-venous shunts (LeVeen) and orthotopic liver transplantation. Under these circumstances, an often transient overt congestive heart failure may develop, with increased cardiac output as well as right atrial, pulmonary artery and capillary wedge pressures. PMID:17383244

  19. Alcoholic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Guzzo-Merello, Gonzalo; Cobo-Marcos, Marta; Gallego-Delgado, Maria; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is the most frequently consumed toxic substance in the world. Low to moderate daily intake of alcohol has been shown to have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. In contrast, exposure to high levels of alcohol for a long period could lead to progressive cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. Cardiac dysfunction associated with chronic and excessive alcohol intake is a specific cardiac disease known as alcoholic cardiomyopathy (ACM). In spite of its clinical importance, data on ACM and how alcohol damages the heart are limited. In this review, we evaluate available evidence linking excessive alcohol consumption with heart failure and dilated cardiomyopathy. Additionally, we discuss the clinical presentation, prognosis and treatment of ACM. PMID:25228956

  20. Infiltrative Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Bejar, David; Colombo, Paolo C; Latif, Farhana; Yuzefpolskaya, Melana

    2015-01-01

    Infiltrative cardiomyopathies can result from a wide spectrum of both inherited and acquired conditions with varying systemic manifestations. They portend an adverse prognosis, with only a few exceptions (ie, glycogen storage disease), where early diagnosis can result in potentially curative treatment. The extent of cardiac abnormalities varies based on the degree of infiltration and results in increased ventricular wall thickness, chamber dilatation, and disruption of the conduction system. These changes often lead to the development of heart failure, atrioventricular (AV) block, and ventricular arrhythmia. Because these diseases are relatively rare, a high degree of clinical suspicion is important for diagnosis. Electrocardiography and echocardiography are helpful, but advanced techniques including cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and nuclear imaging are increasingly preferred. Treatment is dependent on the etiology and extent of the disease and involves medications, device therapy, and, in some cases, organ transplantation. Cardiac amyloid is the archetype of the infiltrative cardiomyopathies and is discussed in great detail in this review. PMID:26244036

  1. Reversible Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harsh; Madanieh, Raef; Kosmas, Constantine E; Vatti, Satya K; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies (CMs) have many etiological factors that can result in severe structural and functional dysregulation. Fortunately, there are several potentially reversible CMs that are known to improve when the root etiological factor is addressed. In this article, we discuss several of these reversible CMs, including tachycardia-induced, peripartum, inflammatory, hyperthyroidism, Takotsubo, and chronic illness–induced CMs. Our discussion also includes a review on their respective pathophysiology, as well as possible management solutions. PMID:26052233

  2. SNTEMP (In)frequently asked questions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholow, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    Here, you will find a series of questions and answers resulting from many years of technical assistance with SNTEMP and SSTEMP. These (in)frequently asked questions are presented here so that you may get a feel for the range of questions posed, learn from the questions and their 'answers,' and share in the discussions if you wish. I certainly didn't answer all the questions, nor do I feel like I've got the only answer for them all.

  3. Peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Okeke, Tc; Ezenyeaku, Cct; Ikeako, Lc

    2013-07-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a rare form of unexplained cardiac failure of unknown origin, unique to the pregnant woman with highly variable outcome associated with high morbidity and mortality. PPCM is fraught with controversies in its definition, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management. PPCM is frequently under diagnosed, inadequately treated and without a laid down follow-up regimen, thus, the aim of this review. Publications on PPCM were accessed using Medline, Google scholar and Pubmed databases. Relevant materials on PPCM, selected references from internet services, journals, textbooks, and lecture notes on PPCM were also accessed and critically reviewed. PPCM is multifactorial in origin. It is a diagnosis of exclusion and should be based on classic echocardiographic criteria. The outcome of PPCM is also highly variable with high morbidity and mortality rates. Future pregnancies are not recommended in women with persistent ventricular dysfunction because the heart cannot tolerate increased cardiovascular workload associated with the pregnancy. Although, multiparity is associated with PPCM, there is an increased risk of fetal prematurity and fetal loss. PPCM is a rare form of dilated cardiomyopathy of unknown origin, unique to pregnant women. The pathophysiology is poorly understood. Echocardiography is central to diagnosis of PPCM and effective treatment monitoring in patients of PPCM. The outcome is highly variable and related to reversal of ventricular dysfunction. PMID:24116305

  4. Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Pilichou, Kalliopi; Thiene, Gaetano; Bauce, Barbara; Rigato, Ilaria; Lazzarini, Elisabetta; Migliore, Federico; Perazzolo Marra, Martina; Rizzo, Stefania; Zorzi, Alessandro; Daliento, Luciano; Corrado, Domenico; Basso, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC) is a heart muscle disease clinically characterized by life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias and pathologically by an acquired and progressive dystrophy of the ventricular myocardium with fibro-fatty replacement. Due to an estimated prevalence of 1:2000-1:5000, AC is listed among rare diseases. A familial background consistent with an autosomal-dominant trait of inheritance is present in most of AC patients; recessive variants have also been reported, either or not associated with palmoplantar keratoderma and woolly hair. AC-causing genes mostly encode major components of the cardiac desmosome and up to 50% of AC probands harbor mutations in one of them. Mutations in non-desmosomal genes have been also described in a minority of AC patients, predisposing to the same or an overlapping disease phenotype. Compound/digenic heterozygosity was identified in up to 25% of AC-causing desmosomal gene mutation carriers, in part explaining the phenotypic variability. Abnormal trafficking of intercellular proteins to the intercalated discs of cardiomyocytes and Wnt/beta catenin and Hippo signaling pathways have been implicated in disease pathogenesis.AC is a major cause of sudden death in the young and in athletes. The clinical picture may include a sub-clinical phase; an overt electrical disorder; and right ventricular or biventricular pump failure. Ventricular fibrillation can occur at any stage. Genotype-phenotype correlation studies led to identify biventricular and dominant left ventricular variants, thus supporting the use of the broader term AC.Since there is no "gold standard" to reach the diagnosis of AC, multiple categories of diagnostic information have been combined and the criteria recently updated, to improve diagnostic sensitivity while maintaining specificity. Among diagnostic tools, contrast enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance is playing a major role in detecting left dominant forms of AC, even preceding morpho

  5. Peripartum cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Blauwet, Lori A; Sliwa, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a potentially devastating disease that affects women during the last months of pregnancy or the first months after delivery. The aetiology and pathogenesis of this disease remain unclear, but oxidative stress and the generation of a cardiotoxic fragment of prolactin may play key roles. Diagnosing PPCM remains a challenge, as symptoms may mimic those women experience during normal pregnancy and the peripartum period. A high index of suspicion is thus necessary to make the diagnosis. Patients with PPCM have a varied clinical course, as some patients achieve full recovery while others progress to end-stage heart failure and even death. Standard heart failure treatment is indicated, although special provisions are necessary in pregnant and lactating women. Additional research into the pathophysiology of this disease, including possible genetic contributions, may lead to novel treatment strategies that can improve outcomes.

  6. Children's Cardiomyopathy Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    Search The Children's Cardiomyopathy Foundation (CCF) is a national, non-profit organization focused on pediatric cardiomyopathy, a chronic disease of the heart muscle. CCF is dedicated to accelerating the search for ...

  7. Types of Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... ventricles, making it harder for the heart to pump blood. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy also can cause stiffness of the ... Over time, the heart loses the ability to pump blood effectively. Dilated cardiomyopathy can lead to heart failure , ...

  8. Nutrition in Pediatric Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Tracie L.; Neri, Daniela; Extein, Jason; Somarriba, Gabriel; Strickman-Stein, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies are heterogeneous groups of serious disorders of the heart muscle and are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality among children who have the disease. While enormous improvements have been made in the treatment and survival of children with congenital heart disease, parallel strides have not been made in the outcomes for cardiomyopathies. Thus, ancillary therapies, such as nutrition and nutritional interventions, that may not cure but may potentially improve cardiac function and quality of life, are imperative to consider in children with all types of cardiomyopathy. Growth failure is one of the most significant clinical problems of children with cardiomyopathy with nearly one-third of children with this disorder manifesting some degree of growth failure during the course of their illness. Optimal intake of macronutrients can help improve cardiac function. In addition, several specific nutrients have been shown to correct myocardial abnormalities that often occur with cardiomyopathy and heart failure. In particular, antioxidants that can protect against free radical damage that often occurs in heart failure and nutrients that augment myocardial energy production are important therapies that have been explored more in adults with cardiomyopathy than in the pediatric population. Future research directions should pay particular attention to the effect of overall nutrition and specific nutritional therapies on clinical outcomes and quality of life in children with pediatric cardiomyopathy. PMID:18159216

  9. Rapidly Progressing Chagas Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hollowed, John; McCullough, Matthew; Sanchez, Daniel; Traina, Mahmoud; Hernandez, Salvador; Murillo, Efrain

    2016-04-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the parasiteTrypanosoma cruzi, can cause a potentially life-threatening cardiomyopathy in approximately 10-40% of afflicted individuals. The decline in cardiac function characteristically progresses over the course of many years. We report a case of Chagas disease in which the patient experienced an atypical rapid deterioration to severe cardiomyopathy over the course of 16 months. This case argues the need for increased routine surveillance for patients with confirmedT. cruziinfection, who are determined to be at high-risk for worsening cardiomyopathy. PMID:26856912

  10. How Is Cardiomyopathy Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... arrest Stopping the disease from getting worse Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Your doctor may suggest lifestyle changes to manage a condition that’s causing your cardiomyopathy including: Heart-healthy eating Aiming for a healthy weight Managing stress ...

  11. Sex differences in cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Sven; van der Meer, Peter; van Tintelen, J Peter; van den Berg, Maarten P

    2014-03-01

    Cardiomyopathies are a heterogeneous group of heart muscle diseases with a variety of specific phenotypes. According to the contemporary European Society of Cardiology classification, they are classified into hypertrophic (HCM), dilated (DCM), arrhythmogenic right ventricular (ARVC), restrictive (RCM), and unclassified cardiomyopathies. Each class is aetiologically further categorized into inherited (familial) and non-inherited (non-familial) forms. There is substantial evidence that biological sex is a strong modulator of the clinical manifestation of these cardiomyopathies, and sex-specific characteristics are detectable in all classes. For the clinician, it is important to know the sex-specific aspects of clinical disease expression and the potential modes of inheritance or the hereditary influences underlying the development of cardiomyopathies, since these may aid in diagnosing such diseases in both sexes. PMID:24464619

  12. [Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Arrhythmia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Colín Lizalde, Luis de Jesús

    2003-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a relatively common genetic disorder with heterogeneity in mutations, forms of presentation, prognosis and treatment strategies. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is recognized as the most common cause of sudden cardiac death that occurs in young people, including athletes. The clinical diagnosis is complemented with the ecocardiographic study, in which an abnormal myocardial hypertrophy of the septum can be observed in the absence of a cardiac or systemic disease (arterial systemic hypertension, aortic stenosis). The annual sudden mortality rate is 1% and, in selected populations, it ranges between 3 and 6%. The therapeutic strategies depend on the different subsets of patients according to the morbidity and mortality, sudden cardiac death, obstructive symptoms, heart failure or atrial fibrillation and stroke. High risk patients for sudden death may effectively be treated with the automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. PMID:12966640

  13. Mental Health Status of Infrequent Adolescent Substance Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Robert J.; Zolner, Theresa; Bertrand, Lorne D.; Davis, R. Meghan

    2004-01-01

    Frequent substance use has a strong association with poor mental health. The relationship between infrequent substance use and mental health is less clear. The present study investigated this relationship in a large group (n = 2118) of 12-19-year-olds from Alberta, Canada. Results indicated that adolescents who used tobacco or alcohol once a month…

  14. Development of an Infrequency Index for the CAARS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suhr, Julie A.; Buelow, Melissa; Riddle, Tara

    2011-01-01

    There is a clinical need for measurement of noncredible self-reporting of symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults presenting for ADHD evaluation. The present study describes the development of initial validity data for an Infrequency Index for the Conner's Adult Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Rating Scale (CII).…

  15. Alcoholic cardiomyopathy: Pathophysiologic insights

    PubMed Central

    Piano, Mariann R.; Phillips, Shane A.

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic cardiomyopathy is a specific heart muscle disease found in individuals with a history of long-term heavy alcohol consumption. Alcoholic cardiomyopathy is associated with a number of adverse histological, cellular, and structural changes within the myocardium. Several mechanisms are implicated in mediating the adverse effects of ethanol, including the generation of oxidative stress, apoptotic cell death, impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics/stress, derangements in fatty acid metabolism and transport, and accelerated protein catabolism. In this review, we discuss the evidence for such mechanisms and present the potential importance of drinking patterns, genetic susceptibility, nutritional factors, race, and sex. The purpose of this review is to provide a mechanistic paradigm for future research in the area of alcoholic cardiomyopathy. PMID:24671642

  16. Dystrophin-Deficient Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kamdar, Forum; Garry, Daniel J

    2016-05-31

    Dystrophinopathies are a group of distinct neuromuscular diseases that result from mutations in the structural cytoskeletal Dystrophin gene. Dystrophinopathies include Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy, as well as DMD and BMD female carriers. The primary presenting symptom in most dystrophinopathies is skeletal muscle weakness. However, cardiac muscle is also a subtype of striated muscle and is similarly affected in many of the muscular dystrophies. Cardiomyopathies associated with dystrophinopathies are an increasingly recognized manifestation of these neuromuscular disorders and contribute significantly to their morbidity and mortality. Recent studies suggest that these patient populations would benefit from cardiovascular therapies, annual cardiovascular imaging studies, and close follow-up with cardiovascular specialists. Moreover, patients with DMD and BMD who develop end-stage heart failure may benefit from the use of advanced therapies. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, cardiac involvement, and treatment of cardiomyopathy in the dystrophic patient. PMID:27230049

  17. Heart antibodies in cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed Central

    Trueman, T; Thompson, R A; Cummins, P; Littler, W A

    1981-01-01

    The reported frequency of circulating heart reactive antibodies in cardiomyopathies has varied and their significance is unknown. In this study such antibodies were sought in patients with primary congestive and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies and other heart diseases. Standard "single sandwich" and the more sensitive "double sandwich" indirect immunofluorescence techniques failed to disclose a significant difference between any cardiomyopathic group and controls in repeated experiments. With both techniques results were subject to considerable method-specific artefacts and observer variation. No published work associating heart antibodies detected by immunofluorescence methods with cariomyopathies adequately takes these into account. PMID:7028058

  18. Cardiomyopathy Following Latrodectus Envenomation

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Michael; Canning, Josh; Chase, Robyn; Ruha, Anne-Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Latrodectus envenomations are common throughout the United States and the world. While many envenomations can result in catecholamine release with resultant hypertension and tachycardia, myocarditis is very rare. We describe a case of a 22-year-old male who sustained a Latrodectus envenomation complicated by cardiomyopathy. PMID:21293781

  19. Dispersal Mutualism Incorporated into Large-Scale, Infrequent Disturbances.

    PubMed

    Parker, V Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Because of their influence on succession and other community interactions, large-scale, infrequent natural disturbances also should play a major role in mutualistic interactions. Using field data and experiments, I test whether mutualisms have been incorporated into large-scale wildfire by whether the outcomes of a mutualism depend on disturbance. In this study a seed dispersal mutualism is shown to depend on infrequent, large-scale disturbances. A dominant shrubland plant (Arctostaphylos species) produces seeds that make up a persistent soil seed bank and requires fire to germinate. In post-fire stands, I show that seedlings emerging from rodent caches dominate sites experiencing higher fire intensity. Field experiments show that rodents (Perimyscus californicus, P. boylii) do cache Arctostaphylos fruit and bury most seed caches to a sufficient depth to survive a killing heat pulse that a fire might drive into the soil. While the rodent dispersal and caching behavior itself has not changed compared to other habitats, the environmental transformation caused by wildfire converts the caching burial of seed from a dispersal process to a plant fire adaptive trait, and provides the context for stimulating subsequent life history evolution in the plant host. PMID:26151560

  20. Dispersal Mutualism Incorporated into Large-Scale, Infrequent Disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Parker, V. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Because of their influence on succession and other community interactions, large-scale, infrequent natural disturbances also should play a major role in mutualistic interactions. Using field data and experiments, I test whether mutualisms have been incorporated into large-scale wildfire by whether the outcomes of a mutualism depend on disturbance. In this study a seed dispersal mutualism is shown to depend on infrequent, large-scale disturbances. A dominant shrubland plant (Arctostaphylos species) produces seeds that make up a persistent soil seed bank and requires fire to germinate. In post-fire stands, I show that seedlings emerging from rodent caches dominate sites experiencing higher fire intensity. Field experiments show that rodents (Perimyscus californicus, P. boylii) do cache Arctostaphylos fruit and bury most seed caches to a sufficient depth to survive a killing heat pulse that a fire might drive into the soil. While the rodent dispersal and caching behavior itself has not changed compared to other habitats, the environmental transformation caused by wildfire converts the caching burial of seed from a dispersal process to a plant fire adaptive trait, and provides the context for stimulating subsequent life history evolution in the plant host. PMID:26151560

  1. Factors associated with frequent and infrequent HIV testing.

    PubMed

    Brown, B S; O'Grady, K E; Farrell, E V; Flechner, I S; Nurco, D N

    2001-10-01

    Drug user treatment clients with 5 or more HIV tests (frequent testees N=43) and 0-2 HIV tests (infrequent testees-N = 56) were compared on demographic characteristics, risk behaviors, perceived risk of HIV infection to self, involvement with family members, and psychological functioning. Extreme groups of HIV testees did not differ on any variables other than an index of perceived vulnerability to HIV infection (e.g., " You think that you really could get AIDS"). That measure of felt vulnerability was not correlated significantly with needle or sexual risk behaviors, family involvement, psychological functioning or other measures of perceived risk. It was reasoned that, in a community in which both dangers and protective behaviors are widely understood, frequent testees experience a generalized and heightened concern unrelated to specific behaviors or characteristics. PMID:11758815

  2. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Brian A; Stevens, Gerin R

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a global disease with cases reported in all continents, affecting people of both genders and of various racial and ethnic origins. Widely accepted as a monogenic disease caused by a mutation in 1 of 13 or more sarcomeric genes, HCM can present catastrophically with sudden cardiac death (SCD) or ventricular arrhythmias or insidiously with symptoms of heart failure. Given the velocity of progress in both the fields of heart failure and HCM, we present a review of the approach to patients with HCM, with particular attention to those with HCM and the clinical syndrome of heart failure. PMID:25657602

  3. Genetics of inherited cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, Daniel; McKenna, William J.

    2012-01-01

    During the past two decades, numerous disease-causing genes for different cardiomyopathies have been identified. These discoveries have led to better understanding of disease pathogenesis and initial steps in the application of mutation analysis in the evaluation of affected individuals and their family members. As knowledge of the genetic abnormalities, and insight into cellular and organ biology has grown, so has appreciation of the level of complexity of interaction between genotype and phenotype across disease states. What were initially thought to be one-to-one gene-disease correlates have turned out to display important relational plasticity dependent in large part on the genetic and environmental backgrounds into which the genes of interest express. The current state of knowledge with regard to genetics of cardiomyopathy represents a starting point to address the biology of disease, but is not yet developed sufficiently to supplant clinically based classification systems or, in most cases, to guide therapy to any significant extent. Future work will of necessity be directed towards elucidation of the biological mechanisms of both rare and common gene variants and environmental determinants of plasticity in the genotype–phenotype relationship with the ultimate goal of furthering our ability to identify, diagnose, risk stratify, and treat this group of disorders which cause heart failure and sudden death in the young. PMID:21810862

  4. Calcium Ions in Inherited Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Papoutsidakis, Nikolaos; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Angelidis, Christos; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Bouras, Georgios; Davlouros, Periklis; Panagopoulou, Vasiliki; Goudevenos, John; Cleman, Michael W; Lekakis, John

    2016-01-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathies are a known cause of heart failure, although the pathways and mechanisms leading from mutation to the heart failure phenotype have not been elucidated. There is strong evidence that this transition is mediated, at least in part, by abnormal intracellular Ca(2+) handling, a key ion in ventricular excitation, contraction and relaxation. Studies in human myocytes, animal models and in vitro reconstituted contractile protein complexes have shown consistent correlations between Ca(2+) sensitivity and cardiomyopathy phenotype, irrespective of the causal mutation. In this review we present the available data about the connection between mutations linked to familial hypertrophic (HCM), dilated (DCM) and restrictive (RCM) cardiomyopathy, right ventricular arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D) as well as left ventricular non-compaction and the increase or decrease in Ca(2+) sensitivity, together with the results of attempts to reverse the manifestation of heart failure by manipulating Ca(2+) homeostasis. PMID:26411603

  5. Molecular etiology of idiopathic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Arimura, T; Hayashi, T; Kimura, A

    2007-01-01

    Summary Idiopathic cardiomyopathy (ICM) is a primary cardiac disorder associated with abnormalities of ventricular wall thickness, size of ventricular cavity, contraction, relaxation, conduction and rhythm. Over the past two decades, molecular genetic analyses have revealed that mutations in the various genes cause ICM and such information concerning the genetic basis of ICM enables us to speculate the pathogenesis of this heterogeous cardiac disease. This review focuses on the molecular pathogenesis, i.e., genetic abnormalities and functional alterations due to the mutations especially in sarcomere/cytoskeletal components, in three characteristic features of ICM, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). Understanding the functional abnormalities of the sarcomere/cytoskeletal components, in ICM, has unraveled the function of these components not only as a contractile unit but also as a pivot for transduction of biochemical signals. PMID:18646564

  6. Agents of newly recognized or infrequently encountered mycobacterial diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Wayne, L G; Sramek, H A

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews recent information on the systematics and clinical significance of potentially pathogenic environmental mycobacteria. A short history of these mycobacteria is given. Information on species for which clinical and systematic aspects have already been well documented, i.e., Mycobacterium kansasii, M. marinum, M. scrofulaceum, M. simiae, M. szulgai, M. ulcerans, M. xenopi, and members of the M. fortuitum complex, is updated. Although the M. avium complex was extensively reviewed in earlier literature, major new systematic and clinical information is presented in some detail. Species that have received very limited prior coverage, i.e., M. asiaticum, M. haemophilum, M. malmoense, and M. shimoidei, are the main subjects of this review and are discussed in detail. The rare infections attributed to species that are normally considered nonpathogenic, i.e., M. gastri, M. gordonae, the M. terrae complex, and most of the rapidly growing mycobacteria outside of the M. fortuitum complex, are critically reviewed. Finally, suggestions are offered for practical measures that can minimize the risk of failing to isolate or misidentifying some of the more obscure potentially pathogenic environmental mycobacteria that are only infrequently recognized. PMID:1735092

  7. Normalization of left ventricular function following cardiac resynchronization therapy: left bundle branch block as a potential etiology of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Banyo; Takami, Mistuaki

    2008-06-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (HF) not infrequently present conduction disturbances, which are most commonly exhibited as a left bundle branch block (LBBB). LBBB is associated with intraventricular conduction delay, paradoxical septal motion, and hemodynamic deterioration, indicating an impairment of left ventricular (LV) function. However, there is controversy as to whether dilated cardiomyopathy leading to HF could develop just as a result of conduction disturbances without apparent pre-existing heart disease. We report here 2 cases of patients with non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy and LBBB who had complete reversal of their LV dysfunction and enlargement after cardiac resynchronization therapy, which corrects the LV activation sequence. These cases might support the idea that conduction disturbances themselves can be a principal etiology in the development of dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:18503236

  8. Genetics Home Reference: familial dilated cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Related Dilated Cardiomyopathy Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Primary dilated cardiomyopathy ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (36 links) ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: familial restrictive cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... CARDIOMYOPATHY, FAMILIAL RESTRICTIVE, 3 Sources for This Page Elliott P, Andersson B, Arbustini E, Bilinska Z, Cecchi ... Sebire N, Ashworth M, Deanfield JE, McKenna WJ, Elliott PM. Idiopathic restrictive cardiomyopathy in children is caused ...

  10. Subaortic and midventricular obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with extreme segmental hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Efthimiadis, Georgios K; Giannakoulas, Georgios; Parcharidou, Despina G; Ziakas, Antonios G; Papadopoulos, Christodoulos E; Karoulas, Takis; Pliakos, Christodoulos; Parcharidis, Georgios

    2007-01-01

    Background Subaortic and midventricular hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a patient with extreme segmental hypertrophy exceeding the usual maximum wall thickness reported in the literature is a rare phenomenon. Case Presentation A 19-year-old man with recently diagnosed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) was referred for sudden death risk assessment. The patient had mild exertional dyspnea (New York Heart Association functional class II), but without syncope or chest pain. There was no family history of HCM or sudden death. A two dimensional echocardiogram revealed an asymmetric type of LV hypertrophy; anterior ventricular septum = 49 mm; posterior ventricular septum = 20 mm; anterolateral free wall = 12 mm; and posterior free wall = 6 mm. The patient had 2 types of obstruction; a LV outflow obstruction due to systolic anterior motion of both mitral leaflets (Doppler-estimated 38 mm Hg gradient at rest); and a midventricular obstruction (Doppler-estimated 43 mm Hg gradient), but without apical aneurysm or dyskinesia. The patient had a normal blood pressure response on exercise test and no episodes of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia in 24-h ECG recording. Cardiac MRI showed a gross late enhancement at the hypertrophied septum. Based on the extreme degree of LV hypertrophy and the myocardial hyperenhancement, an implantation of a cardioverter-defibrillator was recommended prophylactically for primary prevention of sudden death. Conclusion Midventricular HCM is an infrequent phenotype, but may be associated with an apical aneurysm and progression to systolic dysfunction (end-stage HCM). PMID:17349063

  11. Peripartum cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy: different at heart

    PubMed Central

    Bollen, Ilse A. E.; Van Deel, Elza D.; Kuster, Diederik W. D.; Van Der Velden, Jolanda

    2015-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a severe cardiac disease occurring in the last month of pregnancy or in the first 5 months after delivery and shows many similar clinical characteristics as dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) such as ventricle dilation and systolic dysfunction. While PPCM was believed to be DCM triggered by pregnancy, more and more studies show important differences between these diseases. While it is likely they share part of their pathogenesis such as increased oxidative stress and an impaired microvasculature, discrepancies seen in disease progression and outcome indicate there must be differences in pathogenesis as well. In this review, we compared studies in DCM and PPCM to search for overlapping and deviating disease etiology, pathogenesis and outcome in order to understand why these cardiomyopathies share similar clinical features but have different underlying pathologies. PMID:25642195

  12. Pathogenesis of Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Asimaki, Angeliki; Kleber, Andre G; Saffitz, Jeffrey E

    2015-11-01

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM) is a primary myocardial disease. It is characterized by frequent ventricular arrhythmias and increased risk of sudden cardiac death typically arising as an early manifestation before the onset of significant myocardial remodelling. Myocardial degeneration, often confined to the right ventricular free wall, with replacement by fibrofatty scar tissue, develops in many patients. ACM is a familial disease but genetic penetrance can be low and disease expression is highly variable. Inflammation might promote disease progression. It also appears that exercise increases disease penetrance and accelerates its development. More than 60% of probands harbour mutations in genes that encode desmosomal proteins, which has raised the possibility that defective cell-cell adhesion might play a role in disease pathogenesis. Recent advances have implicated changes in the canonical wingless-type mouse mammary tumour virus integration site (Wnt)/β-catenin and Hippo signalling pathways and defects in forwarding trafficking of ion channels and other proteins to the intercalated disk in cardiac myocytes. In this review we summarize the current understanding of the pathogenesis of ACM and highlight future research directions. PMID:26199027

  13. Cardiomyopathies in children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy (CMP) is a heterogeneous disease caused by a functional abnormality of the cardiac muscle. CMP is of 2 major types, dilated and hypertrophic, and is further classified as either primary or secondary. Secondary CMP is caused by extrinsic factors, including infection, ischemia, hypertension, and metabolic disorders. Primary CMP is diagnosed when the extrinsic factors of secondary CMP are absent. Furthermore, the World Health Organization, American Heart Association, and European Cardiology Association have different systems for clinically classifying primary CMP. Primary CMP is rare and associated with a family history of the disease, implying that genetic factors might affect its incidence. In addition, the incidence of CMP varies widely according to patient ethnicity. Genetic testing plays an important role in the care of patients with CMP and their families because it confirms diagnosis, determines the appropriate care for the patient, and possibly affects patient prognosis. The diagnosis and genetic identification of CMP in patients' families allow the possibility to identify novel genes that may lead to new treatments. This review focuses on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of CMP, with the aim of providing pediatricians with insights that may be helpful in the early identification and management of idiopathic CMP in children. PMID:23482511

  14. Apoptosis in Anthracycline Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jianjian; Abdelwahid, Eltyeb; Wei, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis is a tightly regulated physiologic process of programmed cell death that occurs in both normal and pathologic tissues. Numerous in vitro or in vivo studies have indicated that cardiomyocyte death through apoptosis and necrosis is a primary contributor to the progression of anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy. There are now several pieces of evidence to suggest that activation of intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways contribute to anthracycline-induced apoptosis in the heart. Novel strategies were developed to address a wide variety of cardiotoxic mechanisms and apoptotic pathways by which anthracycline influences cardiac structure and function. Anthracycline-induced apoptosis provides a very valid representation of cardiotoxicity in the heart, an argument which has implications for the most appropriate animal models of damaged heart plus diverse pharmacological effects. In this review we describe various aspects of the current understanding of apoptotic cell death triggered by anthracycline. Differences in the sensitivity to anthracycline-induced apoptosis between young and adult hearts are also discussed. PMID:22212952

  15. Trileaflet Mitral Valve with Three Papillary Muscles Associated with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Novel Case.

    PubMed

    Rosanio, Salvatore; Simonsen, Cameron J; Starwalt, John; Keylani, Abdul M; Vitarelli, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    Congenital mitral valve (MV) malformations are uncommon, except for MV prolapse. Despite their infrequency, most of them are well-known and defined entities, such as congenital MV stenosis with two papillary muscles, parachute MV, supravalvular mitral ring, hypoplastic MV, isolated cleft in the anterior and/or posterior leaflets, and double-orifice MV. A trileaflet MV with three separate papillary muscles with concordant atrioventricular and ventricle-arterial connections is exceptionally rare. To the best of the authors' knowledge, it has been reported only once in association with subaortic valvular stenosis. We hereby describe a novel case associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. PMID:25809503

  16. Cardiomyopathy, familial dilated

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Matthew RG; Carniel, Elisa; Mestroni, Luisa

    2006-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a heart muscle disease characterized by ventricular dilatation and impaired systolic function. Patients with DCM suffer from heart failure, arrhythmia, and are at risk of premature death. DCM has a prevalence of one case out of 2500 individuals with an incidence of 7/100,000/year (but may be under diagnosed). In many cases the disease is inherited and is termed familial DCM (FDC). FDC may account for 20–48% of DCM. FDC is principally caused by genetic mutations in FDC genes that encode for cytoskeletal and sarcomeric proteins in the cardiac myocyte. Family history analysis is an important tool for identifying families affected by FDC. Standard criteria for evaluating FDC families have been published and the use of such criteria is increasing. Clinical genetic testing has been developed for some FDC genes and will be increasingly utilized for evaluating FDC families. Through the use of family screening by pedigree analysis and/or genetic testing, it is possible to identify patients at earlier, or even presymptomatic stages of their disease. This presents an opportunity to invoke lifestyle changes and to provide pharmacological therapy earlier in the course of disease. Genetic counseling is used to identify additional asymptomatic family members who are at risk of developing symptoms, allowing for regular screening of these individuals. The management of FDC focuses on limiting the progression of heart failure and controlling arrhythmia, and is based on currently accepted treatment guidelines for DCM. It includes general measures (salt and fluid restriction, treatment of hypertension, limitation of alcohol intake, control of body weight, moderate exercise) and pharmacotherapy. Cardiac resynchronization, implantable cardioverter defibrillators and left ventricular assist devices have progressively expanding usage. Patients with severe heart failure, severe reduction of the functional capacity and depressed left ventricular ejection

  17. Current Treatment of Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Massin, Edward K.

    1991-01-01

    Within the last decade, the treatment for patients with dilated cardiomyopathy has changed. Clinical management of these patients is aimed at controlling congestive heart failure, treating arrhythmias, preventing pulmonary and systemic emboli, and managing chest pain. The goals of treatment for patients with dilated cardiomyopathy are to make the patient feel better and live longer. To achieve this, we direct treatment to improving left ventricular function and cardiac output and controlling arrhythmias and thromboemboli. Basic treatment begins with inotropic therapy, preload reduction, and afterload reduction. For patients with symptomatic disease, we recommend diuretics, digoxin, and converting enzyme inhibitors for first-line therapy. Patients with arrhythmias may be treated by the addition of amiodarone, a pacemaker, or an automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator; and most such patients need to be anticoagulated. All patients need close follow-up for possible drug toxicity associated with their regimens. Heart transplantation can be considered for patients refractory to medical treatment. Although the incidence of dilated cardiomyopathy continues to increase, we are learning better ways to treat it. In the future, new drugs with fewer side effects should be available to treat, and perhaps impede, the development of dilated cardiomyopathy. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1991;18:41-9) PMID:15227507

  18. Genetics Home Reference: dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Open All Close All Description Dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia (DCMA) syndrome is an inherited condition characterized by ...

  19. Stress cardiomyopathy: yet another type of neurocardiogenic injury: 'stress cardiomyopathy'.

    PubMed

    Wybraniec, Maciej; Mizia-Stec, Katarzyna; Krzych, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    Tako-tsubo syndrome pertains to rare acquired cardiomyopathies, characterized by left ventricular dyskinesia and symptomatology typical for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Despite its low incidence and relatively benign course, stress cardiomyopathy should be thoroughly differentiated from AMI. The importance of tako-tsubo consists of the fact that its manifestation initially resembles AMI. Despite seemingly low incidence of tako-tsubo, acute coronary syndromes globally constitute a major epidemiological issue and both clinical entities should be accurately differentiated. Many patients present with only mild troponin release, certain extent of regional wall motion abnormalities (RWMA) and absence of hemodynamically significant coronary artery stenosis. In such instances, a careful interview aimed at preceding emotional or physical traumatic event should be undertaken. The subsequent verification of the diagnosis is based upon prompt recovery of contractile function. Although precise diagnostic criteria were formulated, symptomatology of tako-tsubo might be clinically misleading due to the possibility of concomitant coronary vasospasm, atypical pattern of RWMA and presence of non-significant coronary disease. For this reason, its exact rate might be underestimated. Stress cardiomyopathy reflects merely a single aspect of a much wider range of neurocardiogenic injury, which encompasses cardiac dysfunction associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracranial hypertension and cerebral ischemia. Both psychological and physical insult to central nervous system may trigger a disastrous response of sympathetic nervous system, eventually leading to end-organ catecholamine-mediated damage. This review sought to delineate the phenomenon of tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy and deliver evidence for common pathophysiology of the broad spectrum of neurocardiogenic injury. PMID:24462197

  20. Identification of the Syrian hamster cardiomyopathy gene.

    PubMed

    Nigro, V; Okazaki, Y; Belsito, A; Piluso, G; Matsuda, Y; Politano, L; Nigro, G; Ventura, C; Abbondanza, C; Molinari, A M; Acampora, D; Nishimura, M; Hayashizaki, Y; Puca, G A

    1997-04-01

    The BIO14.6 hamster is a widely used model for autosomal recessive cardiomyopathy. These animals die prematurely from progressive myocardial necrosis and heart failure. The primary genetic defect leading to the cardiomyopathy is still unknown. Recently, a genetic linkage map localized the cardiomyopathy locus on hamster chromosome 9qa2.1-b1, excluding several candidate genes. We now demonstrate that the cardiomyopathy results from a mutation in the delta-sarcoglycan gene that maps to the disease locus. This mutation was completely coincident with the disease in backcross and F2 pedigrees. This constitutes the first animal model identified for human sarcoglycan disorders. PMID:9097966

  1. Primary Carnitine Deficiency and Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Lijun; Huang, Meirong

    2013-01-01

    Carnitine is essential for the transfer of long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol into mitochondria for subsequent β-oxidation. A lack of carnitine results in impaired energy production from long-chain fatty acids, especially during periods of fasting or stress. Primary carnitine deficiency (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of mitochondrial β-oxidation resulting from defective carnitine transport and is one of the rare treatable etiologies of metabolic cardiomyopathies. Patients affected with the disease may present with acute metabolic decompensation during infancy or with severe cardiomyopathy in childhood. Early recognition of the disease and treatment with L-carnitine may be life-saving. In this review article, the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of PCD are discussed, with a focus on cardiac involvements. PMID:24385988

  2. Atomoxetine-related Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Naguy, Ahmed; Al-Mutairi, Haya; Al-Tajali, Ali

    2016-05-01

    Many psychotropic medications target norepinephrine receptors, which can have serious cardiovascular implications, especially in the context of overdoses, polypharmacy, and high-risk populations. This article presents the case of a patient with adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder who developed takotsubo cardiomyopathy subsequent to pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between atomoxetine, a selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, and fluoxetine. Clinicians should be mindful of the potential for cardiovascular adverse effects when prescribing agents that target noradrenergic receptors. PMID:27123802

  3. Skeletal muscle involvement in cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Limongelli, Giuseppe; D'Alessandro, Raffaella; Maddaloni, Valeria; Rea, Alessandra; Sarkozy, Anna; McKenna, William J

    2013-12-01

    The link between heart and skeletal muscle disorders is based on similar molecular, anatomical and clinical features, which are shared by the 'primary' cardiomyopathies and 'primary' neuromuscular disorders. There are, however, some peculiarities that are typical of cardiac and skeletal muscle disorders. Skeletal muscle weakness presenting at any age may indicate a primary neuromuscular disorder (associated with creatine kinase elevation as in dystrophinopathies), a mitochondrial disease (particularly if encephalopathy, ocular myopathy, retinitis, neurosensorineural deafness, lactic acidosis are present), a storage disorder (progressive exercise intolerance, cognitive impairment and retinitis pigmentosa, as in Danon disease), or metabolic disorders (hypoglycaemia, metabolic acidosis, hyperammonaemia or other specific biochemical abnormalities). In such patients, skeletal muscle weakness usually precedes the cardiomyopathy and dominates the clinical picture. Nevertheless, skeletal involvement may be subtle, and the first clinical manifestation of a neuromuscular disorder may be the occurrence of heart failure, conduction disorders or ventricular arrhythmias due to cardiomyopathy. ECG and echocardiogram, and eventually, a more detailed cardiovascular evaluation may be required to identify early cardiac involvement. Paediatric and adult cardiologists should be proactive in screening for neuromuscular and related disorders to enable diagnosis in probands and evaluation of families with a focus on the identification of those at risk of cardiac arrhythmia and emboli who may require specific prophylactic treatments, for example, pacemaker, implantable cardioverter-defibrillator and anticoagulation. PMID:24149064

  4. Cardiomyopathies and the Armed Forces.

    PubMed

    Holdsworth, D A; Cox, A T; Boos, C; Hardman, R; Sharma, S

    2015-09-01

    Cardiomyopathies are a group of heterogeneous myocardial diseases that are frequently inherited and are a recognised cause of premature sudden cardiac death in young individuals. Incomplete expressions of disease and the overlap with the physiological cardiac manifestations of regular intensive exercise create diagnostic challenges in young athletes and military recruits. Early identification is important because sudden death in the absence of prodromal symptoms is a common presentation, and there are several therapeutic strategies to minimise this risk. This paper examines the classification and clinical features of cardiomyopathies with specific reference to a military population and provides a detailed account of the optimum strategy for diagnosis, indications for specialist referral and specific guidance on the occupational significance of cardiomyopathy. A 27-year-old Lance Corporal Signaller presents to his Regimental medical officer (RMO) after feeling 'light-headed' following an 8 mile unloaded run. While waiting to see the RMO, the medical sergeant records a 12-lead ECG. The ECG is reviewed by the RMO immediately prior to the consultation and shows voltage criteria for left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and inverted T-waves in II, III, aVF and V1-V3 (Figure 1). This Lance Corporal is a unit physical training instructor and engages in >10 h of aerobic exercise per week. He is a non-smoker and does not have any significant medical history. PMID:26246349

  5. Troponins, intrinsic disorder, and cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Na, Insung; Kong, Min J; Straight, Shelby; Pinto, Jose R; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac troponin is a dynamic complex of troponin C, troponin I, and troponin T (TnC, TnI, and TnT, respectively) found in the myocyte thin filament where it plays an essential role in cardiac muscle contraction. Mutations in troponin subunits are found in inherited cardiomyopathies, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The highly dynamic nature of human cardiac troponin and presence of numerous flexible linkers in its subunits suggest that understanding of structural and functional properties of this important complex can benefit from the consideration of the protein intrinsic disorder phenomenon. We show here that mutations causing decrease in the disorder score in TnI and TnT are significantly more abundant in HCM and DCM than mutations leading to the increase in the disorder score. Identification and annotation of intrinsically disordered regions in each of the troponin subunits conducted in this study can help in better understanding of the roles of intrinsic disorder in regulation of interactomes and posttranslational modifications of these proteins. These observations suggest that disease-causing mutations leading to a decrease in the local flexibility of troponins can trigger a whole plethora of functional changes in the heart. PMID:27074551

  6. [Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy: a specific entity].

    PubMed

    Brondex, A; Arlès, F; Lipovac, A-S; Richecoeur, M; Bronstein, J-A

    2012-04-01

    Cirrhosis is a frequent and severe condition, which is the late stage of numerous chronic liver diseases. It is associated with major hemodynamic alterations characteristic of hyperdynamic circulation and with a series of structural, functional, electrophysiological and biological heart abnormalities termed cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. The pathogenesis of this syndrome is multifactorial. It is usually clinically latent or mild, likely because the peripheral vasodilatation significantly reduces the left ventricle afterload. However, sudden changes of hemodynamic state (vascular filling, surgical or transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunts, peritoneo-venous shunts and orthotopic liver transplantation) or myocardial contractility (introduction of beta-blocker therapy) can unmask its presence, and sometimes convert latent to overt heart failure. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may also contribute to the pathogenesis of hepatorenal syndrome. This entity has been described recently, and its diagnostic criteria are still under debate. To date, current management recommendations are empirical, nonspecific measures. Recognition of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy depends on a high level of awareness for the presence of this syndrome, particularly in patients with advanced cirrhosis who undergo significant surgical, pharmacological or physiological stresses. PMID:22115174

  7. Molecular genetics and pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is defined as a disease of functional impairment in the cardiac muscle and its etiology includes both extrinsic and intrinsic factors. Cardiomyopathy caused by the intrinsic factors is called as primary cardiomyopathy of which two major clinical phenotypes are hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Genetic approaches have revealed the disease genes for hereditary primary cardiomyopathy and functional studies have demonstrated that characteristic functional alterations induced by the disease-associated mutations are closely related to the clinical types, such that increased and decreased Ca(2+) sensitivities of muscle contraction are associated with HCM and DCM, respectively. In addition, recent studies have suggested that mutations in the Z-disc components found in HCM and DCM may result in increased and decreased stiffness of sarcomere, respectively. Moreover, functional analysis of mutations in the other components of cardiac muscle have suggested that the altered response to metabolic stresses is associated with cardiomyopathy, further indicating the heterogeneity in the etiology and pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy. PMID:26178429

  8. Cardiomyopathy in becker muscular dystrophy: Overview.

    PubMed

    Ho, Rady; Nguyen, My-Le; Mather, Paul

    2016-06-26

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder involving mutations of the dystrophin gene. Cardiac involvement in BMD has been described and cardiomyopathy represents the number one cause of death in these patients. In this paper, the pathophysiology, clinical evaluations and management of cardiomyopathy in patients with BMD will be discussed. PMID:27354892

  9. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy in a weimaraner

    PubMed Central

    Eason, Bryan D.; Leach, Stacey B.; Kuroki, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) was diagnosed postmortem in a weimaraner dog. Syncope, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden death in this patient combined with the histopathological fatty tissue infiltration affecting the right ventricular myocardium are consistent with previous reports of ARVC in non-boxer dogs. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy has not been previously reported in weimaraners. PMID:26483577

  10. Cardiomyopathy in becker muscular dystrophy: Overview

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Rady; Nguyen, My-Le; Mather, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder involving mutations of the dystrophin gene. Cardiac involvement in BMD has been described and cardiomyopathy represents the number one cause of death in these patients. In this paper, the pathophysiology, clinical evaluations and management of cardiomyopathy in patients with BMD will be discussed. PMID:27354892

  11. Stem Cell Therapy for Pediatric Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Selem, Sarah M.; Kaushal, Sunjay; Hare, Joshua M.

    2014-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a serious and life-threatening disorder in children. It is the most common form of pediatric cardiomyopathy. Therapy for this condition has varied little over the last several decades and mortality continues to be high. Currently, children with dilated cardiomyopathy are treated with pharmacological agents and mechanical support, but most require heart transplantation and survival rates are not optimal. The lack of common treatment guidelines and inadequate survival rates after transplantation necessitates more therapeutic clinical trials. Stem cell and cell-based therapies offer an innovative approach to restore cardiac structure and function towards normal, possibly reducing the need for aggressive therapies and cardiac transplantation. Mesenchymal stem cells and cardiac stem cells may be the most promising cell types for treating children with dilated cardiomyopathy. The medical community must begin a systematic investigation of the benefits of current and novel treatments such as stem cell therapies for treating pediatric dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:23666883

  12. Cushing's Disease Presented by Reversible Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Aydoğan, Berna İmge; Gerede, Demet Menekşe; Canpolat, Asena Gökçay; Erdoğan, Murat Faik

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Dilated cardiomyopathy is rarely reported among CS patients especially without hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy. Materials and Methods. We hereby report a Cushing's syndrome case presenting with dilated cardiomyopathy. Results. A 48-year-old female patient was admitted to our clinic with severe proximal myopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy without ventricular hypertrophy. Cushing's disease was diagnosed and magnetic-resonance imaging of the pituitary gland revealed a microadenoma. Under diuretic and ketoconazole treatments, she underwent a successful transnasal/transsphenoidal adenomectomy procedure. Full recovery of symptoms and echocardiographic features was achieved after six months of surgery. Conclusion. Cushing's syndrome must be kept in mind as a reversible cause of dilated cardiomyopathy. Recovery of cardiomyopathy is achieved with successful surgery. PMID:26649206

  13. Cushing's Disease Presented by Reversible Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Aydoğan, Berna İmge; Gerede, Demet Menekşe; Canpolat, Asena Gökçay; Erdoğan, Murat Faik

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Dilated cardiomyopathy is rarely reported among CS patients especially without hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy. Materials and Methods. We hereby report a Cushing's syndrome case presenting with dilated cardiomyopathy. Results. A 48-year-old female patient was admitted to our clinic with severe proximal myopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy without ventricular hypertrophy. Cushing's disease was diagnosed and magnetic-resonance imaging of the pituitary gland revealed a microadenoma. Under diuretic and ketoconazole treatments, she underwent a successful transnasal/transsphenoidal adenomectomy procedure. Full recovery of symptoms and echocardiographic features was achieved after six months of surgery. Conclusion. Cushing's syndrome must be kept in mind as a reversible cause of dilated cardiomyopathy. Recovery of cardiomyopathy is achieved with successful surgery. PMID:26649206

  14. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Associated with Severe Hypothyroidism in an Elderly Female.

    PubMed

    Brenes-Salazar, Jorge A

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also known as stress cardiomyopathy, is a syndrome that affects predominantly postmenopausal women. Despite multiple described mechanisms, intense, neuroadrenergic myocardial stimulation appears to be the main trigger. Hyperthyroidism, but rarely hypothyroidism, has been described in association with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Herein, we present a case of stress cardiomyopathy in the setting of symptomatic hypothyroidism. PMID:27512537

  15. The Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry: 1995–2007

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, James D.; Sleeper, Lynn A.; Alvarez, Jorge A.; Bublik, Natalya; Lipshultz, Steven E.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a serious disorder of the heart muscle and, although rare, it is potentially devastating in children. Funded by the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute since 1994, the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry (PCMR) was designed to describe the epidemiology and clinical course of selected CMs in patients 18 years old or younger and to promote the development of etiology-specific prevention and treatment strategies. Currently, data from more than 3,000 children with cardiomyopathy have been entered in the PCMR database with annual follow-up continuing until death, heart transplant, or loss-to-follow up. Using PCMR data, the incidence of cardiomyopathy in two large regions of the United States is estimated to be 1.13 cases per 100,000 children. Only 1/3 of children had a known etiology at the time of cardiomyopathy diagnosis. Diagnosis was associated with certain patient characteristics, family history, echocardiographic findings, laboratory testing, and biopsy. Greater incidence was found in boys and infants (<1 yr) for both dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (DCM, HCM) and black race for only DCM. In DCM, prognosis is worse in older children (>1yr), heart failure (HF) at diagnosis or idiopathic etiology. For HCM, worse prognosis is associated with inborn errors of metabolism or combination of HCM and another cardiomyopathy functional type. The best outcomes were observed in children presenting at age >1 yr with idiopathic HCM. PCMR data have enabled analysis of patients with cardiomyopathy and muscular dystrophy, as well as Noonan Syndrome. Currently, collaborations with the Pediatric Heart Transplant Study group and a newly established Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Biologic Specimen Repository at Texas Children’s Hospital will continue to yield important results. The PCMR is the largest and most complete multi-center prospective data resource regarding the etiology, clinical course and outcomes for children with cardiomyopathy. PMID:19343086

  16. Imaging Phenotype vs. Genotype in Non-Hypertrophic Heritable Cardiomyopathies: Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Subha V.; Basso, Cristina; Tandri, Harikrishna; Taylor, Matthew R. G.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in cardiovascular imaging increasingly afford unique insights into heritable myocardial disease. As clinical presentation of genetic cardiomyopathies may range from nonspecific symptoms to sudden cardiac death, accurate diagnosis has implications for individual patients as well as related family members. The initial consideration of genetic cardiomyopathy may occur in the imaging laboratory, where one must recognize the patient with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) among the many with ventricular arrhythmia referred to define myocardial substrate. Accurate diagnosis of the patient presenting with dyspnea and palpitations whose first-degree relatives have lamin A/C cardiomyopathy may warrant genetic testing1, 2 plus imaging of diastolic function and myocardial fibrosis3. As advances in cardiac imaging afford detection of subclinical structural and functional changes, the imaging specialist must be attuned to signatures of specific genetic disorders. With increased availability of both advanced imaging as well as genotyping techniques, this review seeks to provide cardiovascular imaging specialists and clinicians with the contemporary information needed for more precise diagnosis and treatment of heritable myocardial disease. A companion paper in this series covers imaging phenotype and genotype considerations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This review details clinical features, imaging phenotype and current genetic understanding for two of the most common non-HCM conditions that prompt myocardial imaging - dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). While all modalities are considered herein, considerable focus is given to CMR with its unique capabilities for myocardial tissue characterization. PMID:21081743

  17. Ergotamine-Induced Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ozpelit, Ebru; Ozpelit, Mehmet E; Akdeniz, Bahri; Göldeli, Özhan

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) is a recently increasing diagnosed disease showed by transient apical or mid-apical left ventricular dysfunction. It is known as a disease of postmenopausal women, which is usually triggered by emotional or physical stress. Although the trigger is mostly endogenous, some drugs have also been reported as the cause. Published case reports of TC associated with drug usage consist of sympathomimetic drugs, inotropic agents, thyroid hormone, cocaine, and 5-fluorouracil. We present an unusual case of TC in which the possible trigger is ergotamine toxicity. PMID:25099482

  18. [Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: origin and variants].

    PubMed

    Aronov, D M

    2008-01-01

    This literature review is devoted to the " tako-tsubo " cardiomyopathy - rare type of cardiomyopathy characterized by transient myocardial stunning. In acute phase the disease resembles myocardial infarction. However no involvement of coronary arteries is found at angiography. Echocardiography and ventriculography reveal a- or - hypokinesia of various parts of the left ventricle. Classic (initial) variant of the disease is associated with concomitant apical akinesia and hyperkinesis of basal segments. The heart acquires a distinctive configuration with ballooning apex which resembles device used to trap octopus. The author refers to described by him 11 cases of myocardial damage with infarct-like clinic without changes of coronary arteries in healthy men younger than 35 years (D.M.Aronow, 1968, 1974). These cases occurred during severe physical stress and had in their basis hypercatecholaminemia which led to reversible myocardial damage of the myocardium which corresponded to modern concept of myocardial stunning. During exercise tests these patients had 3 times greater increase of urinal epinephrine excretion compared with 61 patients of the same age with atherosclerotic heart disease. PMID:18991836

  19. Inherited cardiomyopathies--Novel therapies.

    PubMed

    Leviner, Dror B; Hochhauser, Edith; Arad, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Cardiomyopathies arising due to a single gene defect represent various pathways that evoke adverse remodeling and cardiac dysfunction. While the gene therapy approach is slowly evolving and has not yet reached clinical "prime time" and gene correction approaches are applicable at the bench but not at the bedside, major advances are being made with molecular and drug therapies. This review summarizes the contemporary drugs introduced or being tested to help manage these unique disorders bearing a major impact on the quality of life and survival of the affected individuals. The restoration of the RNA reading frame facilitates the expression of partly functional protein to salvage or alleviate the disease phenotype. Chaperones are used to prevent the degradation of abnormal but still functional proteins, while other molecules are given for pathogen silencing, to prevent aggregation or to enhance clearance of protein deposits. The absence of protein may be managed by viral gene delivery or protein therapy. Enzyme replacement therapy is already a clinical reality for a series of metabolic diseases. The progress in molecular biology, based on the knowledge of the gene defect, helps generate small molecules and pharmaceuticals targeting the key events occurring in the malfunctioning element of the sick organ. Cumulatively, these tools augment the existing armamentarium of phenotype oriented symptomatic and evidence-based therapies for patients with inherited cardiomyopathies. PMID:26297672

  20. The Incremental Validity and Clinical Utility of the MMPI-2 Infrequency Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Margarita B.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2006-01-01

    The incremental validity and clinical utility of the recently developed Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) Infrequency Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Scale (Fptsd) was examined in relation to the family of MMPI-2 F scales in distinguishing feigned post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from disability claimants with PTSD.…

  1. Inadequate and Infrequent Are Not Alike: ERPs to Deviant Prosodic Patterns in Spoken Sentence Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mietz, Anja; Toepel, Ulrike; Ischebeck, Anja; Alter, Kai

    2008-01-01

    The current study on German investigates Event-Related brain Potentials (ERPs) for the perception of sentences with intonations which are infrequent (i.e. vocatives) or inadequate in daily conversation. These ERPs are compared to the processing correlates for sentences in which the syntax-to-prosody relations are congruent and used frequently…

  2. 40 CFR 1033.535 - Adjusting emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adjusting emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices. 1033.535 Section 1033.535 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS...

  3. 40 CFR 1033.535 - Adjusting emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adjusting emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices. 1033.535 Section 1033.535 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS...

  4. 40 CFR 1033.535 - Adjusting emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adjusting emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices. 1033.535 Section 1033.535 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS...

  5. 40 CFR 1033.535 - Adjusting emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adjusting emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices. 1033.535 Section 1033.535 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS...

  6. 40 CFR 1033.535 - Adjusting emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adjusting emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices. 1033.535 Section 1033.535 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS...

  7. Evolving Approaches to Genetic Evaluation of Specific Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Teo, Loon Yee Louis; Moran, Rocio T; Tang, W H Wilson

    2015-12-01

    The understanding of the genetic basis of cardiomyopathy has expanded significantly over the past 2 decades. The increasing availability, shortening diagnostic time, and lowering costs of genetic testing have provided researchers and physicians with the opportunity to identify the underlying genetic determinants for thousands of genetic disorders, including inherited cardiomyopathies, in effort to improve patient morbidities and mortality. As such, genetic testing has advanced from basic scientific research to clinical application and has been incorporated as part of patient evaluations for suspected inherited cardiomyopathies. Genetic evaluation framework of inherited cardiomyopathies typically encompasses careful evaluation of family history, genetic counseling, clinical screening of family members, and if appropriate, molecular genetic testing. This review summarizes the genetics, current guideline recommendations, and evidence supporting the genetic evaluation framework of five hereditary forms of cardiomyopathy: dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM), and left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC). PMID:26472190

  8. Importance of genetic evaluation and testing in pediatric cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Muhammad; Ware, Stephanie M

    2014-11-26

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies are clinically heterogeneous heart muscle disorders that are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Phenotypes include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. There is substantial evidence for a genetic contribution to pediatric cardiomyopathy. To date, more than 100 genes have been implicated in cardiomyopathy, but comprehensive genetic diagnosis has been problematic because of the large number of genes, the private nature of mutations, and difficulties in interpreting novel rare variants. This review will focus on current knowledge on the genetic etiologies of pediatric cardiomyopathy and their diagnostic relevance in clinical settings. Recent developments in sequencing technologies are greatly impacting the pace of gene discovery and clinical diagnosis. Understanding the genetic basis for pediatric cardiomyopathy and establishing genotype-phenotype correlations may help delineate the molecular and cellular events necessary to identify potential novel therapeutic targets for heart muscle dysfunction in children. PMID:25429328

  9. Recurrent Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Related to Recurrent Thyrotoxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Keval; Griffing, George T.; Hauptman, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, or transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, is characterized by acute left ventricular dysfunction caused by transient wall-motion abnormalities of the left ventricular apex and mid ventricle in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Recurrent episodes are rare but have been reported, and several cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy have been described in the presence of hyperthyroidism. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman who had recurrent takotsubo cardiomyopathy, documented by repeat coronary angiography and evaluations of left ventricular function, in the presence of recurrent hyperthyroidism related to Graves disease. After both episodes, the patient's left ventricular function returned to normal when her thyroid function normalized. These findings suggest a possible role of thyroid-hormone excess in the pathophysiology of some patients who have takotsubo cardiomyopathy. PMID:27127432

  10. Recurrent Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Related to Recurrent Thyrotoxicosis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Keval; Griffing, George T; Hauptman, Paul J; Stolker, Joshua M

    2016-04-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, or transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, is characterized by acute left ventricular dysfunction caused by transient wall-motion abnormalities of the left ventricular apex and mid ventricle in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Recurrent episodes are rare but have been reported, and several cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy have been described in the presence of hyperthyroidism. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman who had recurrent takotsubo cardiomyopathy, documented by repeat coronary angiography and evaluations of left ventricular function, in the presence of recurrent hyperthyroidism related to Graves disease. After both episodes, the patient's left ventricular function returned to normal when her thyroid function normalized. These findings suggest a possible role of thyroid-hormone excess in the pathophysiology of some patients who have takotsubo cardiomyopathy. PMID:27127432

  11. Left Ventricular Noncompaction: A Distinct Genetic Cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed

    Arbustini, Eloisa; Favalli, Valentina; Narula, Nupoor; Serio, Alessandra; Grasso, Maurizia

    2016-08-30

    Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) describes a ventricular wall anatomy characterized by prominent left ventricular (LV) trabeculae, a thin compacted layer, and deep intertrabecular recesses. Individual variability is extreme, and trabeculae represent a sort of individual "cardioprinting." By itself, the diagnosis of LVNC does not coincide with that of a "cardiomyopathy" because it can be observed in healthy subjects with normal LV size and function, and it can be acquired and is reversible. Rarely, LVNC is intrinsically part of a cardiomyopathy; the paradigmatic examples are infantile tafazzinopathies. When associated with LV dilation and dysfunction, hypertrophy, or congenital heart disease, the genetic cause may overlap. The prevalence of LVNC in healthy athletes, its possible reversibility, and increasing diagnosis in healthy subjects suggests cautious use of the term LVNC cardiomyopathy, which describes the morphology but not the functional profile of the cardiomyopathy. PMID:27561770

  12. Genetics Home Reference: familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cardiomyopathy is a heart condition characterized by thickening (hypertrophy) of the heart (cardiac) muscle . Thickening usually occurs ... also lead to symptoms of the condition. Cardiac hypertrophy often begins in adolescence or young adulthood, although ...

  13. Unveiling nonischemic cardiomyopathies with cardiac magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Niti R; Peterson, Tyler J; Young, Phillip M; Araoz, Philip A; Glockner, James; Mankad, Sunil V; Williamson, Eric E

    2014-02-01

    Cardiomyopathy is defined as a heterogeneous group of myocardial disorders with mechanical or electrical dysfunction. Identification of the etiology is important for accurate diagnosis, treatment and prognosis, but continues to be challenging. The ability of cardiac MRI to non-invasively obtain 3D-images of unparalleled resolution without radiation exposure and to provide tissue characterization gives it a distinct advantage over any other diagnostic tool used for evaluation of cardiomyopathies. Cardiac MRI can accurately visualize cardiac morphology and function and also help identify myocardial edema, infiltration and fibrosis. It has emerged as an important diagnostic and prognostic tool in tertiary care centers for work up of patients with non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. This review covers the role of cardiac MRI in evaluation of nonischemic cardiomyopathies, particularly in the context of other diagnostic and prognostic imaging modalities. PMID:24417294

  14. Mechanical aberrations in hypetrophic cardiomyopathy: emerging concepts

    PubMed Central

    Ntelios, Dimitrios; Tzimagiorgis, Georgios; Efthimiadis, Georgios K.; Karvounis, Haralambos

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common monogenic disorder in cardiology. Despite important advances in understanding disease pathogenesis, it is not clear how flaws in individual sarcomere components are responsible for the observed phenotype. The aim of this article is to provide a brief interpretative analysis of some currently proposed pathophysiological mechanisms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, with a special emphasis on alterations in the cardiac mechanical properties. PMID:26347658

  15. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy: A New Perspective in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Marmoush, Fady Y.; Barbour, Mohamad F.; Noonan, Thomas E.; Al-Qadi, Mazen O.

    2015-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM) is an entity of reversible cardiomyopathy known for its association with physical or emotional stress and may mimic myocardial infarction. We report an exceedingly rare case of albuterol-induced TCM with moderate asthma exacerbation. An interesting association that may help in understanding the etiology of TCM in the asthmatic population. Although the prognosis of TCM is excellent, it is crucial to recognize beta agonists as a potential stressor. PMID:26246918

  16. [Lipoprotein lipase and diabetic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang-Yu; Yin, Wei-Dong; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2014-02-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) hydrolyzes plasma triglyceride-rich lipoproteins into free fatty acids (FFA) to provide energy for cardiac tissue. During diabetes, cardiac energy supply is insufficient due to defected utilization of glucose. As a compensation of cardiac energy supply, FFAs are released through the hydrolysis of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and chylomicrons (CM) due to activation of LPL activity. In diabetic patients, activated LPL activity and elevated FFAs result in the intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species and lipids in myocardium and potentially induce the diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM). The present review summarizes the regulatory mechanisms of myocardial LPL and the pathogenesis of DCM induced by LPL and provides novel therapeutic targets and pathways for DCM. PMID:24873138

  17. GENETIC CAUSES OF DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Mestroni, Luisa; Brun, Francesca; Spezzacatene, Anita; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Taylor, Matthew RG

    2014-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a disease of the myocardium characterized by left ventricular dilatation and/or dysfunction, affecting both adult and pediatric populations. Almost half of cases are genetically determined with an autosomal pattern of inheritance. Up to 40 genes have been identified affecting proteins of a wide variety of cellular structures such as the sarcomere, the nuclear envelope, the cytoskeleton, the sarcolemma and the intercellular junction. Novel gene mutations have been recently identified thanks to advances in next-generation sequencing technologies. Genetic screening is an essential tool for early diagnosis, risk assessment, prognostic stratification and, possibly, adoption of primary preventive measures in affected patients and their asymptomatic relatives. The purpose of this article is to review the genetic basis of DCM, the known genotype-phenotype correlations, the role of current genetic sequencing techniques in the discovery of novel pathogenic gene mutations and new therapeutic perspectives. PMID:25584016

  18. Stimulant-related Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Mike; Riguzzi, Christine; Frenkel, Oron; Nagdev, Arun

    2015-03-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) is a rare but increasingly recognized mimic of acute coronary syndrome. Patients present with angina,ST-segment changes on electrocardiogram (both elevations and depressions),and rapid rises in cardiac biomarkers. Many kinds of stressful events have been associated with TC, but only a handful of drug-related cases have previously been reported. We describe the case of a 58-year-old woman who developed TC 2 days after crack cocaine use, a diagnosis first suggested as bedside echocardiography in the emergency department.Recognition of the classic echocardiographic appearance of TC—apical hypokinesis causing “ballooning” of the left ventricle during systole—may greatly assist providers in the early identification of this condition. PMID:25308824

  19. Subaortic membrane mimicking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mark Joseph; Arruda-Olson, Adelaide; Gersh, Bernard; Geske, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    A 34-year-old man was referred for progressive angina and exertional dyspnoea refractory to medical therapy, with a presumptive diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) revealed asymmetric septal hypertrophy without systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve leaflet and with no dynamic left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction. However, the LVOT velocity was elevated at rest as well as with provocation, without the characteristic late peaking obstruction seen in HCM. Focused TTE to evaluate for suspected fixed obstruction demonstrated a subaortic membrane 2.2 cm below the aortic valve. Coronary CT angiography confirmed the presence of the subaortic membrane and was negative for concomitant coronary artery disease. Surgical resection of the subaortic membrane and septal myectomy resulted in significant symptomatic relief and lower LVOT velocities on postoperative TTE. This case reminds the clinician to carefully evaluate for alternative causes of LVOT obstruction, especially subaortic membrane, as a cause of symptoms mimicking HCM. PMID:26538250

  20. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Occurring in the Postoperative Period.

    PubMed

    Deniz, Süleyman; Bakal, Ömer; İnangil, Gökhan; Şen, Hüseyin; Özkan, Sezai

    2015-02-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy simulates acute myocardial infarction, and it is characterised by reversible left ventricular failure. A case of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy diagnosed after emergency angiography performed in a patient with evidence of acute myocardial infarction in the postoperative period will be described in this report. Transurethral resection of a bladder tumour (TUR-BT) was performed in a 92-year-old male patient by the urology clinic. The patient was transferred to the post-anaesthesia care unit after the operation. An echocardiography was performed because of the sudden onset of dyspnoea, tachycardia (140-150 beats per minute, rhythm-atrial fibrillation) and ST-segment elevation on electrocardiography (ECG) at the first postoperative hour, and midapical dyskinesia was detected at the patient. An immediate angiography was performed due to suspicion of acute coronary syndrome. Patent coronary arteries and temporary aneurysmatic dilatation of the apex of the heart were revealed by angiography. As a result of these findings, the patient was diagnosed with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy by the cardiology service. The patient was discharged uneventfully following 10 days in the intensive care unit. Aneurysm of the apex of the left ventricle and normal anatomy of the coronary arteries in the angiography have diagnostic value for Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Diuretics (furosemide) and beta-blockers (metoprolol) are commonly used for the treatment of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Even though Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a rare and benign disease, it should be kept in mind in patients suspected for acute myocardial infarction in the postoperative period. PMID:27366464

  1. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy following lightning strike.

    PubMed

    Dundon, B K; Puri, R; Leong, D P; Worthley, M I

    2008-07-01

    Lightning strike is the most common environmental cause of sudden cardiac death, but may also be associated with a myriad of injuries to various organ systems. Direct myocardial injury may be manifest as electrocardiographic alterations or elevation in cardiac-specific isoenzymes; however, significant electrical cardiac trauma appears uncommon. A case is presented of severe acute cardiomyopathy in a "Takotsubo" distribution causing cardiogenic shock following lightning strike in a previously healthy 37-year-old woman. Although rarely identified in this context, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (also known as "transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome") is characterised by transient cardiac dysfunction, electrocardiographic changes that may mimic acute myocardial infarction and minimal release of cardiac-specific enzymes in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. The condition is associated with a substantial female bias (up to 90% of cases) in reported series, and despite occasionally dramatic presentations recovery of left ventricular function is almost universal over days to weeks. In rare instances, however, the syndrome has been associated with more catastrophic complications such as papillary muscle or cardiac free wall rupture, necessitating emergency surgical intervention to preserve life. In clinical practice, non-lethal lightning strike-induced cardiac injury is frequently associated with small elevations of cardiac isoenzymes without overt clinical sequelae; however, the incidence of silent myocardial mechanical dysfunction remains unknown. Cases such as the one presented highlight the potential for serious, albeit usually transient, cardiac sequelae from lightning strike injury and remind us that our mothers' advice to remain indoors during thunderstorms is probably worth heeding. PMID:18573973

  2. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy following lightning strike.

    PubMed

    Dundon, Benjamin K; Puri, Rishi; Leong, Darryl P; Worthley, Matthew Ian

    2009-01-01

    Lightning strike is the most common environmental cause of sudden cardiac death, but it may also be associated with a myriad of injuries to various organ systems. Direct myocardial injury may be manifest as electrocardiographic alterations or elevation in cardiac-specific isoenzymes; however, significant electrical cardiac trauma appears uncommon. A case is presented of severe acute cardiomyopathy in a "Takotsubo" distribution causing cardiogenic shock following lightning strike in a previously healthy 37-year-old woman. Although rarely identified in this context, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (also known as "transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome") is characterised by transient cardiac dysfunction, electrocardiographic changes that may mimic acute myocardial infarction and minimal release of cardiac-specific enzymes in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. The condition is associated with a substantial female bias (up to 90% of cases) in reported series, and despite occasionally dramatic presentations recovery of left ventricular function is almost universal over days to weeks. In rare instances, however, the syndrome has been associated with more catastrophic complications such as papillary muscle or cardiac free wall rupture, necessitating emergency surgical intervention to preserve life. In clinical practice, non-lethal lightning strike-induced cardiac injury is frequently associated with small elevations of cardiac isoenzymes without overt clinical sequelae; however, the incidence of silent myocardial mechanical dysfunction remains unknown. Cases such as the one presented highlight the potential for serious, albeit usually transient, cardiac sequelae from lightning strike injury and remind us that our mothers' advice to remain indoors during thunderstorms is probably worth heeding. PMID:21686980

  3. Vesicoureteral Reflux in the Child with Lazy Bladder Syndrome: The Infrequent Voider

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Marco; Torelli, Fabrizio; Blanco, Salvatore; Fortuna, Flavio; Baruffi, Marco

    2008-01-01

    The Infrequent Voider Syndrome or Lazy Bladder Syndrome in children is characterized by a large capacity bladder, frequently associated with a significant volume of residual urine. Usually these patients arrive at medical examination with a history of recurrent urinary infections but without anomalies in the upper urinary tract. We report about a young girl affected by one-sided 2° degree vesico-ureteral reflux due to Lazy Bladder Syndrome that had never been diagnosed before. This patient has been submitted to a prompt bladder training and seems presently to have at last gained a physiological micturition after 9 months of follow-up, without actual evidence of vesicoureteral reflux. Therefore we must stress that it is prominently important considering about infrequent micturition in a paediatric case history or a large capacity bladder, possible presence of bladder dysfunction and vesicoureteral reflux too. PMID:18615185

  4. The use of radiofrequency catheter ablation to cure dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, S B; Lobban, J H; Reddy, S; Hoelper, M; Palmer, D L

    1997-01-01

    Incessant supraventricular tachycardia can cause a dilated cardiomyopathy. This article discusses the case of a 55-year-old woman whose cardiomyopathy was reversed when she underwent successful radiofrequency catheter ablation of a unifocal atrial tachycardia. PMID:9197188

  5. Dilated cardiomyopathy associated with chronic overuse of an adrenaline inhaler

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, M J; Fraser, D M; Boon, N

    1992-01-01

    Endogenous catecholamines in excess are known to cause dilated cardiomyopathy. A patient presented with dilated cardiomyopathy after many years of overusing an adrenaline inhaler. Pathological features and a considerable improvement in myocardial function after withdrawal implicated the exogenous catecholamine excess in the pathogenesis of the cardiomyopathy. PMID:1389744

  6. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  7. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia in diabetic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Guanghong; DeMarco, Vincent G.; Sowers, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus and associated hyperinsulinaemia can promote the development of a specific form of cardiomyopathy that is independent of coronary artery disease and hypertension. Termed diabetic cardiomyopathy, this form of cardiomyopathy is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed nations, and the prevalence of this condition is rising in parallel with increases in the incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Of note, female patients seem to be particularly susceptible to the development of this complication of metabolic disease. The diabetic cardiomyopathy observed in insulin-resistant or hyperinsulinaemic states is characterized by impaired myocardial insulin signalling, mitochondrial dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum stress, impaired calcium homeostasis, abnormal coronary microcirculation, activation of the sympathetic nervous system, activation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system and maladaptive immune responses. These pathophysiological changes result in oxidative stress, fibrosis, hypertrophy, cardiac diastolic dysfunction and eventually systolic heart failure. This Review highlights a surge in diabetic cardiomyopathy research, summarizes current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underpinning this condition and explores potential preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26678809

  8. Cardiomyopathy in captive African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Raymond, J T; Garner, M M

    2000-09-01

    From 1994 to 1999, 16 captive African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris), from among 42 necropsy cases, were diagnosed with cardiomyopathy. The incidence of cardiomyopathy in this study population was 38%. Fourteen of 16 hedgehogs with cardiomyopathy were males and all hedgehogs were adult (>1 year old). Nine hedgehogs exhibited 1 or more of the following clinical signs before death: heart murmur, lethargy, icterus, moist rales, anorexia, dyspnea, dehydration, and weight loss. The remaining 7 hedgehogs died without premonitory clinical signs. Gross findings were cardiomegaly (6 cases), hepatomegaly (5 cases), pulmonary edema (5 cases), pulmonary congestion (4 cases), hydrothorax (3 cases), pulmonary infarct (1 case), renal infarcts (1 case), ascites (1 case), and 5 cases showed no changes. Histologic lesions were found mainly within the left ventricular myocardium and consisted primarily of myodegeneration, myonecrosis, atrophy, hypertrophy, and disarray of myofibers. All hedgehogs with cardiomyopathy had myocardial fibrosis, myocardial edema, or both. Other common histopathologic findings were acute and chronic passive congestion of the lungs, acute passive congestion of the liver, renal tubular necrosis, vascular thrombosis, splenic extramedullary hematopoiesis, and hepatic lipidosis. This is the first report of cardiomyopathy in African hedgehogs. PMID:11021439

  9. Diabetic Cardiomyopathy; Summary of 41 Years

    PubMed Central

    Canpolat, Ugur; Aydogdu, Sinan; Abboud, Hanna Emily

    2015-01-01

    Patients with diabetes have an increased risk for development of cardiomyopathy, even in the absence of well known risk factors like coronary artery disease and hypertension. Diabetic cardiomyopathy was first recognized approximately four decades ago. To date, several pathophysiological mechanisms thought to be responsible for this new entity have also been recognized. In the presence of hyperglycemia, non-enzymatic glycosylation of several proteins, reactive oxygen species formation, and fibrosis lead to impairment of cardiac contractile functions. Impaired calcium handling, increased fatty acid oxidation, and increased neurohormonal activation also contribute to this process. Demonstration of left ventricular hypertrophy, early diastolic and late systolic dysfunction by sensitive techniques, help us to diagnose diabetic cardiomyopathy. Traditional treatment of heart failure is beneficial in diabetic cardiomyopathy, but specific strategies for prevention or treatment of cardiac dysfunction in diabetic patients has not been clarified yet. In this review we will discuss clinical and experimental studies focused on pathophysiology of diabetic cardiomyopathy, and summarize diagnostic and therapeutic approaches developed towards this entity. PMID:26240579

  10. Inherited cardiomyopathies caused by troponin mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qun-Wei; Wu, Xiao-Yan; Morimoto, Sachio

    2013-01-01

    Genetic investigations of cardiomyopathy in the recent two decades have revealed a large number of mutations in the genes encoding sarcomeric proteins as a cause of inherited hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), or restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). Most functional analyses of the effects of mutations on cardiac muscle contraction have revealed significant changes in the Ca2+-regulatory mechanism, in which cardiac troponin (cTn) plays important structural and functional roles as a key regulatory protein. Over a hundred mutations have been identified in all three subunits of cTn, i.e., cardiac troponins T, I, and C. Recent studies on cTn mutations have provided plenty of evidence that HCM- and RCM-linked mutations increase cardiac myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity, while DCM-linked mutations decrease it. This review focuses on the functional consequences of mutations found in cTn in terms of cardiac myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity, ATPase activity, force generation, and cardiac troponin I phosphorylation, to understand potential molecular and cellular pathogenic mechanisms of the three types of inherited cardiomyopathy. PMID:23610579

  11. Metabolic imaging of patients with cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Geltman, E.M. )

    1991-09-01

    The cardiomyopathies comprise a diverse group of illnesses that can be characterized functionally by several techniques. However, the delineation of derangements of regional perfusion and metabolism have been accomplished only relatively recently with positron emission tomography (PET). Regional myocardial accumulation and clearance of 11C-palmitate, the primary myocardial substrate under most conditions, demonstrate marked spatial heterogeneity when studied under fasting conditions or with glucose loading. PET with 11C-palmitate permits the noninvasive differentiation of patients with nonischemic from ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy, since patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy demonstrate large zones of intensely depressed accumulation of 11C-palmitate, probably reflecting prior infarction. Patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and Duchenne's muscular dystrophy demonstrate relatively unique patterns of myocardial abnormalities of perfusion and metabolism. The availability of new tracers and techniques for the evaluation of myocardial metabolism (11C-acetate), perfusion (H2(15)O), and autonomic tone (11-C-hydroxyephedrine) should facilitate further understanding of the pathogenesis of the cardiomyopathies.

  12. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia in diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Jia, Guanghong; DeMarco, Vincent G; Sowers, James R

    2016-03-01

    Insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus and associated hyperinsulinaemia can promote the development of a specific form of cardiomyopathy that is independent of coronary artery disease and hypertension. Termed diabetic cardiomyopathy, this form of cardiomyopathy is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed nations, and the prevalence of this condition is rising in parallel with increases in the incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Of note, female patients seem to be particularly susceptible to the development of this complication of metabolic disease. The diabetic cardiomyopathy observed in insulin- resistant or hyperinsulinaemic states is characterized by impaired myocardial insulin signalling, mitochondrial dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum stress, impaired calcium homeostasis, abnormal coronary microcirculation, activation of the sympathetic nervous system, activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and maladaptive immune responses. These pathophysiological changes result in oxidative stress, fibrosis, hypertrophy, cardiac diastolic dysfunction and eventually systolic heart failure. This Review highlights a surge in diabetic cardiomyopathy research, summarizes current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underpinning this condition and explores potential preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26678809

  13. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Cardiac function is energetically demanding, reliant on efficient well-coupled mitochondria to generate adenosine triphosphate and fulfill the cardiac demand. Predictably then, mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with cardiac pathologies, often related to metabolic disease, most commonly diabetes. Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM), characterized by decreased left ventricular function, arises independently of coronary artery disease and atherosclerosis. Dysregulation of Ca2+ handling, metabolic changes, and oxidative stress are observed in DCM, abnormalities reflected in alterations in mitochondrial energetics. Cardiac tissue from DCM patients also presents with altered mitochondrial morphology, suggesting a possible role of mitochondrial dynamics in its pathological progression. Recent Advances: Abnormal mitochondrial morphology is associated with pathologies across diverse tissues, suggesting that this highly regulated process is essential for proper cell maintenance and physiological homeostasis. Highly structured cardiac myofibers were hypothesized to limit alterations in mitochondrial morphology; however, recent work has identified morphological changes in cardiac tissue, specifically in DCM. Critical Issues: Mitochondrial dysfunction has been reported independently from observations of altered mitochondrial morphology in DCM. The temporal relationship and causative nature between functional and morphological changes of mitochondria in the establishment/progression of DCM is unclear. Future Directions: Altered mitochondrial energetics and morphology are not only causal for but also consequential to reactive oxygen species production, hence exacerbating oxidative damage through reciprocal amplification, which is integral to the progression of DCM. Therefore, targeting mitochondria for DCM will require better mechanistic characterization of morphological distortion and bioenergetic dysfunction. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1545–1562. PMID

  14. Autonomic Findings in Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio; Martinez, Jose; Katz, Stuart D; Tully, Lisa; Reynolds, Harmony R

    2016-01-15

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) often occurs after emotional or physical stress. Norepinephrine levels are unusually high in the acute phase, suggesting a hyperadrenergic mechanism. Comparatively little is known about parasympathetic function in patients with TC. We sought to characterize autonomic function at rest and in response to physical and emotional stimuli in 10 women with a confirmed history of TC and 10 age-matched healthy women. Sympathetic and parasympathetic activity was assessed at rest and during baroreflex stimulation (Valsalva maneuver and tilt testing), cognitive stimulation (Stroop test), and emotional stimulation (event recall, patients). Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and measurement of brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilation were also performed. TC women (tested an average of 37 months after the event) had excessive pressor responses to cognitive stress (Stroop test: p <0.001 vs baseline and p = 0.03 vs controls) and emotional arousal (recall of TC event: p = 0.03 vs baseline). Pressor responses to hemodynamic stimuli were also amplified (Valsalva overshoot: p <0.05) and prolonged (duration: p <0.01) in the TC women compared with controls. Plasma catecholamine levels did not differ between TC women and controls. Indexes of parasympathetic (vagal) modulation of heart rate induced by respiration and cardiovagal baroreflex gain were significantly decreased in the TC women versus controls. In conclusion, even long after the initial episode, women with previous episode of TC have excessive sympathetic responsiveness and reduced parasympathetic modulation of heart rate. Impaired baroreflex control may therefore play a role in TC. PMID:26743349

  15. Electrocardiographic predictors of peripartum cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Karaye, Kamilu M; Karaye, Kamilu M; Lindmark, Krister; Henein, Michael Y; Lindmark, Krister; Henein, Michael Y

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective To identify potential electrocardiographic predictors of peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM). Methods: This was a case–control study carried out in three hospitals in Kano, Nigeria. Logistic regression models and a risk score were developed to determine electrocardiographic predictors of PPCM. Results: A total of 54 PPCM and 77 controls were consecutively recruited after satisfying the inclusion criteria. After controlling for confounding variables, a rise in heart rate of one beat/minute increased the risk of PPCM by 6.4% (p = 0.001), while the presence of ST–T-wave changes increased the odds of PPCM 12.06-fold (p < 0.001). In the patients, QRS duration modestly correlated (r = 0.4; p < 0.003) with left ventricular dimensions and end-systolic volume index, and was responsible for 19.9% of the variability of the latter (R2 = 0.199; p = 0.003). A risk score of ≥ 2, developed by scoring 1 for each of the three ECG disturbances (tachycardia, ST–T-wave abnormalities and QRS duration), had a sensitivity of 85.2%, specificity of 64.9%, negative predictive value of 86.2% and area under the curve of 83.8% (p < 0.0001) for potentially predicting PPCM. Conclusion In postpartum women, using the risk score could help to streamline the diagnosis of PPCM with significant accuracy, prior to confirmatory investigations PMID:27213852

  16. Metabolic Dysfunction in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Isfort, Michael; Stevens, Sarah C.W.; Schaffer, Stephen; Jong, Chian Ju; Wold, Loren E.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is defined as cardiac disease independent of vascular complications during diabetes. The number of new cases of DCM is rising at epidemic rates in proportion to newly diagnosed cases of diabetes mellitus (DM) throughout the world. DCM is a heart failure syndrome found in diabetic patients that is characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and reduced diastolic function, with or without concurrent systolic dysfunction, occurring in the absence of hypertension and coronary artery disease. DCM and other diabetic complications are caused in part by elevations in blood glucose and lipids, characteristic of DM. Although there are pathological consequences to hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, the combination of the two metabolic abnormalities potentiates the severity of diabetic complications. A natural competition exists between glucose and fatty acid metabolism in the heart that is regulated by allosteric and feedback control and transcriptional modulation of key limiting enzymes. Inhibition of these glycolytic enzymes not only controls flux of substrate through the glycolytic pathway, but also leads to the diversion of glycolytic intermediate substrate through pathological pathways, which mediate the onset of diabetic complications. The present review describes the limiting steps involved in the development of these pathological pathways and the factors involved in the regulation of these limiting steps. Additionally, therapeutic options with demonstrated or postulated effects on DCM are described. PMID:23443849

  17. The Role of CMR in Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) has made major inroads in the new millenium in the diagnosis and assessment of prognosis for patients with cardiomyopathies. Imaging of left and right ventricular structure and function and tissue characterization with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) as well as T1 and T2 mapping enable accurate diagnosis of the underlying etiology. In the setting of coronary artery disease, either transmurality of LGE or contractile reserve in response to dobutamine can assess the likelihood of recovery of function after revascularization. The presence of scar reduces the likelihood of response to medical therapy and to cardiac resynchronization therapy in heart failure. The presence and extent of LGE relate to overall cardiovascular outcome in cardiomyopathies. An emerging major role for CMR in cardiomyopathies is to identify myocardial scar for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. PMID:26033902

  18. Myocardial gallium-67 imaging in dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, John B.; Henkin, Robert E.

    1985-01-01

    The use of gallium-67, an isotope that is avid for areas of inflammation in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, is described and compared with endomyocardial biopsy in 68 consecutive patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Myocarditis was diagnosed in 8% on biopsy and the likelihood of a positive biopsy when the gallium scan was positive for inflammation, rose to 36%. It is concluded that gallium scanning is a useful adjunct to biopsy in detecting myocarditis in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and in following patients with evidence of myocarditis on biopsy. Disadvantages of gallium-67 imaging include the radiation dose accumulated with multiple scans and 72h delay from initial injection of the isotope to imaging. It is suggested that definitive conclusions regarding the technique should await the results of a large multicentre trial evaluating gallium in comparison with endomyocardial biopsy in the diagnosis of myocarditis. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2

  19. A surprising cause of reversible dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Vlot, Mariska; de Jong, Margriet; de Ronde, Pim; Tukkie, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes two cases of dilated cardiomyopathy due to hypocalcaemia as a result of hypoparathyroidism. Patient A suffered from dilated cardiomyopathy due to secondary hypoparathyroidism as a result of previous neck surgery. Patient B suffered from dilated cardiomyopathy with congestive heart failure due to primary hypoparathyroidism. Hypoparathyroidism can exist for years before being recognised, especially after neck surgery. Besides standard treatment of heart failure, restoration of serum calcium levels with calcium and vitamin D supplementation can lead to rapid improvement of cardiac function and should be continued lifelong. Both patients were responding very well to heart failure therapy and calcium supplementation as ejection fraction improved after restoration of plasma calcium levels. This case report emphasises that hypocalcaemia should be in the differential diagnosis of heart failure. PMID:24879729

  20. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: can hearts really break?

    PubMed

    Farris, Cindy; McEnroe-Petitte, Denise; Kanayama, Tiffanie

    2014-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM), or broken-heart syndrome, is a form of cardiomyopathy (CM) that is significantly different from other common types. This form of CM occurs spontaneously and can be easily reversed. TCM is seen primarily in postmenopausal women with a recent stressful event. Patients with TCM often present with symptoms suggestive of a myocardial infarction. Home health-care and hospice clinicians interact frequently with caregivers and other family members who are living under stressful circumstances. It is important that home care clinicians be familiar with TCM and understand the relationship that may exist between stress, stressful events, triggers, and TCM. PMID:24978575

  1. Primary cardiac lymphoma mimicking infiltrative cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ga Yeon; Kim, Won Seog; Ko, Young-Hyeh; Choi, Jin-Oh; Jeon, Eun-Seok

    2013-05-01

    Primary cardiac lymphoma is a rare malignancy which has been described as thickened myocardium due to the infiltration of atypical lymphocytes and accompanying intracardiac masses. Here, we report a case of a primary cardiac lymphoma without demonstrable intracardiac masses, mimicking infiltrative cardiomyopathy. A 40-year-old male presented with exertional dyspnoea and was diagnosed as having restrictive cardiomyopathy with severely decreased LV systolic function. Endomyocardial biopsy was performed and the diagnosis of primary cardiac lymphoma was confirmed. After appropriate chemotherapy, he recovered his systolic function fully. PMID:23248217

  2. Celiac disease with pulmonary haemosiderosis and cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Işikay, Sedat; Yilmaz, Kutluhan; Kilinç, Metin

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease or pulmonary haemosiderosis can be associated with several distinguished conditions. Pulmonary haemosiderosis is a rare, severe and fatal disease characterised by recurrent episodes of alveolar haemorrhage, haemoptysis and anaemia. Association of pulmonary haemosiderosis and celiac disease is extremely rare. We describe a case of celiac disease presented with dilated cardiomyopathy and pulmonary haemosiderosis without gastrointestinal symptoms of celiac disease. In addition, vitamin A deficiency was detected. This case suggests that celiac disease should be considered in patients with cardiomyopathy and/or pulmonary haemosiderosis regardless of the intestinal symptoms of celiac disease. PMID:23169927

  3. Arrhythmogenic Noncompaction Cardiomyopathy: Is There an Echocardiographic Phenotypic Overlap of Two Distinct Cardiomyopathies?

    PubMed Central

    Aras, Dursun; Cay, Serkan; Ozcan, Firat; Baser, Kazım; Dogan, Umuttan; Unlu, Murat; Demirkan, Burcu; Tufekcioglu, Omac; Topaloglu, Serkan

    2015-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis of right ventricular (RV) cardiomyopathies is often challenging. It is difficult to differentiate the isolated left ventricular (LV) noncompaction cardiomyopathy (NC) from biventricular NC or from coexisting arrhythmogenic ventricular cardiomyopathy (AC). There are currently few established morphologic criteria for the diagnosis other than RV dilation and presence of excessive regional trabeculation. The gross and microscopic changes suggest pathological similarities between, or coexistence of, RV-NC and AC. Therefore, the term arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy is somewhat misleading as isolated LV or biventricular involvement may be present and thus a broader term such as AC should be preferred. We describe an unusual case of AC associated with a NC in a 27-year-old man who had a history of permanent pacemaker 7 years ago due to second-degree atrioventricular block. PMID:26448828

  4. Experimental Therapies in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Marian, Ali J.

    2010-01-01

    The quintessential clinical diagnostic phenotype of human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is primary cardiac hypertrophy. Cardiac hypertrophy is also a major determinant of mortality and morbidity including the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in patients with HCM. Reversal and attenuation of cardiac hypertrophy and its accompanying fibrosis is expected to improve morbidity as well as decrease the risk of SCD in patients with HCM. The conventionally used pharmacological agents in treatment of patients with HCM have not been shown to reverse or attenuate established cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. An effective treatment of HCM has to target the molecular mechanisms that are involved in the pathogenesis of the phenotype. Mechanistic studies suggest that cardiac hypertrophy in HCM is secondary to activation of various hypertrophic signaling molecules and, hence, is potentially reversible. The hypothesis is supported by the results of genetic and pharmacological interventions in animal models. The results have shown potential beneficial effects of angiotensin II receptor blocker losartan, mineralocorticoid receptor blocker spironolactone, 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors simvastatin and atorvastatin, and most recently, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on reversal or prevention of hypertrophy and fibrosis in HCM. The most promising results have been obtained with NAC, which through multiple thiol-responsive mechanisms completely reversed established cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in three independent studies. Pilot studies with losartan and statins in humans have established the feasibility of such studies. The results in animal models have firmly established the reversibility of established cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in HCM and have set the stage for advancing the findings in the animal models to human patients with HCM through conducting large-scale efficacy studies. PMID:20560006

  5. The bacterial flagellar protein export apparatus processively transports flagellar proteins even with extremely infrequent ATP hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Minamino, Tohru; Morimoto, Yusuke V.; Kinoshita, Miki; Aldridge, Phillip D.; Namba, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    For self-assembly of the bacterial flagellum, a specific protein export apparatus utilizes ATP and proton motive force (PMF) as the energy source to transport component proteins to the distal growing end. The export apparatus consists of a transmembrane PMF-driven export gate and a cytoplasmic ATPase complex composed of FliH, FliI and FliJ. The FliI6FliJ complex is structurally similar to the α3β3γ complex of FOF1-ATPase. FliJ allows the gate to efficiently utilize PMF to drive flagellar protein export but it remains unknown how. Here, we report the role of ATP hydrolysis by the FliI6FliJ complex. The export apparatus processively transported flagellar proteins to grow flagella even with extremely infrequent or no ATP hydrolysis by FliI mutation (E211D and E211Q, respectively). This indicates that the rate of ATP hydrolysis is not at all coupled with the export rate. Deletion of FliI residues 401 to 410 resulted in no flagellar formation although this FliI deletion mutant retained 40% of the ATPase activity, suggesting uncoupling between ATP hydrolysis and activation of the gate. We propose that infrequent ATP hydrolysis by the FliI6FliJ ring is sufficient for gate activation, allowing processive translocation of export substrates for efficient flagellar assembly. PMID:25531309

  6. Strength Gains as a Result of Brief, Infrequent Resistance Exercise in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Fisher, James; Steele, James; McKinnon, Pat; McKinnon, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Chronological aging is associated with a decrease in skeletal muscle mass and bone mineral density, an increase in fat mass, frequency of falls and fractures, and the likelihood of obesity, diabetes, and coronary heart disease. Resistance exercise has been shown to counter all of these effects of aging and, in turn, reduce the risk of all-cause mortality. However, variables such as volume and frequency have become contentious issues, with recent publications suggesting that similar physiological adaptations are possible with both high- and low-volume approaches. The aim of this research was to consider strength increases as a result of brief, infrequent resistance exercise. The present study offers data from 33 (14 male and 19 female) older adults (M = 55 years) who underwent brief (<15 minutes per exercise session), infrequent (2×/week), resistance exercise to a high intensity of effort (6-repetition maximum) at a controlled repetition duration (10 seconds concentric : 10 seconds eccentric) on 5 resistance machines (chest press, leg press, pull-down, seated row, and overhead press). Data is presented for training interventions of 12 weeks (male) and 19 weeks (female). Significant strength increases were identified for all exercises. With the detailed health benefits obtainable, the present study suggests that resistance exercise can be efficacious in much smaller volumes than previously considered. PMID:26464894

  7. Biventricular Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Associated with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Namho; Yoon, Byung Woo; Song, Yonggeon; Lee, Chang Kyun; Lee, Tae Yeon

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in an elderly woman after status epilepticus. In an emergency echocardiography, not only left ventricular apical ballooning but also right ventricular apical hypokinesia was observed. After a medical management, the patient's condition was improved and a follow-up echocardiography showed substantial recovery of left and right ventricular apical ballooning. PMID:26755936

  8. Insights into the hereditability of canine cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Meurs, K M

    1998-11-01

    There is evidence for a genetic etiology of dilated cardiomyopathy in at least two breeds, the Doberman pinscher and the Boxer dog. Significant effort toward determining a genetic etiology in these breeds will depend on careful characterization of the disease, determination of criteria for diagnosing asymptomatic affected individuals, determination of a pattern of inheritance, and, eventually, molecular evaluation of the specific gene. PMID:10098247

  9. Pathological features of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Davies, M. J.; Pomerance, Ariela; Teare, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    The macroscopic features of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy are variable. The most easily recognized picture is of disproportionate and asymmetrical left ventricular hypertrophy with a small ventricular volume. Symmetrical ventricular hypertrophy also occurs and dilatation of the ventricular cavity may lead to a configuration more usually associated with congestive cardiomyopathy. Papillary muscle involvement leads to a bullet shape, often retained even when the ventricle dilates. Eighteen of the hearts showed a distinctive band of fibrous thickening below the aortic valve. This was a mirror image of the free edge of the anterior mitral cusp, had the microscopic features of an endocardial friction lesion, and was clearly the morphological expression of the systolic contact between cusp and septum seen on cineangiography. This band is characteristic of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy; it was more common in older patients and is of particular diagnostic value in cases with symmetrical hypertrophy, including those with dilated ventricular cavities. Sudden death was the commonest presentation in the younger cases but in several cases over 60 years at death hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy was an incidental necropsy finding. Images PMID:4472994

  10. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Athletes: Catching a Killer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maron, Barry J.

    1993-01-01

    A leading cause of sudden death among young athletes, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) does not always present cardiac signs and symptoms. Echocardiography offers the most effective means for diagnosis. Some patients require pharmaceutical or surgical intervention. Patients with HCM should not engage in organized competitive sports or…

  11. Aortic biomechanics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Badran, Hala Mahfouz; Soltan, Ghada; Faheem, Nagla; Elnoamany, Mohamed Fahmy; Tawfik, Mohamed; Yacoub, Magdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ventricular-vascular coupling is an important phenomenon in many cardiovascular diseases. The association between aortic mechanical dysfunction and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction is well characterized in many disease entities, but no data are available on how these changes are related in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Aim of the work: This study examined whether HCM alone is associated with an impaired aortic mechanical function in patients without cardiovascular risk factors and the relation of these changes, if any, to LV deformation and cardiac phenotype. Methods: 141 patients with HCM were recruited and compared to 66 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects as control group. Pulse pressure, aortic strain, stiffness and distensibility were calculated from the aortic diameters measured by M-mode echocardiography and blood pressure obtained by sphygmomanometer. Aortic wall systolic and diastolic velocities were measured using pulsed wave Doppler tissue imaging (DTI). Cardiac assessment included geometric parameters and myocardial deformation (strain and strain rate) and mechanical dyssynchrony. Results: The pulsatile change in the aortic diameter, distensibility and aortic wall systolic velocity (AWS') were significantly decreased and aortic stiffness index was increased in HCM compared to control (P < .001) In HCM AWS' was inversely correlated to age(r = − .32, P < .0001), MWT (r = − .22, P < .008), LVMI (r = − .20, P < .02), E/Ea (r = − .16, P < .03) LVOT gradient (r = − 19, P < .02) and severity of mitral regurg (r = − .18, P < .03) but not to the concealed LV deformation abnormalities or mechanical dyssynchrony. On multivariate analysis, the key determinant of aortic stiffness was LV mass index and LVOT obstruction while the role LV dysfunction in aortic stiffness is not evident in this population. Conclusion: HCM is associated with abnormal aortic mechanical properties. The severity of cardiac

  12. Autoimmune Myocarditis, Valvulitis, and Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jennifer M.; Cunningham, Madeleine W.; Fairweather, DeLisa; Huber, Sally A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac myosin-induced autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) is a model of inflammatory heart disease initiated by CD4+ T cells (Smith and Allen 1991; Li, Heuser et al. 2004). It is a paradigm of the immune-mediated cardiac damage believed to play a role in the pathogenesis of a subset of postinfectious human cardiomyopathies (Rose, Herskowitz et al. 1993). Myocarditis is induced in susceptible mice by immunization with purified cardiac myosin (Neu, Rose et al. 1987) or specific peptides derived from cardiac myosin (Donermeyer, Beisel et al. 1995; Pummerer, Luze et al. 1996) (see Basic Protocol 1), or by adoptive transfer of myosin-reactive T cells (Smith and Allen 1991) (see Alternate Protocol). Myocarditis has been induced in Lewis rats by immunization with purified rat or porcine cardiac myosin (Kodama, Matsumoto et al. 1990; Li, Heuser et al. 2004) (see Basic Protocol 2) or S2-16 peptide (Li, Heuser et al. 2004), or by adoptive transfer of T cells stimulated by specific peptides derived from cardiac myosin (Wegmann, Zhao et al. 1994). Myocarditis begins 12 to 14 days after the first immunization, and is maximal after 21 days. Other animal models commonly used to study myocarditis development include the pathogen-induced models in which disease is initiated by viral infection. The first murine model of acute viral myocarditis causes sudden death via viral damage to cardiomyocytes (Huber, Gauntt et al. 1998; Horwitz, La Cava et al. 2000; Fong 2003; Fuse, Chan et al. 2005; Fairweather and Rose 2007; Cihakova and Rose 2008) whereas the second model is based on inoculation with heart-passaged coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) that includes damaged heart proteins (Fairweather, Frisancho-Kiss et al. 2004; Fairweather D 2004; Fairweather and Rose 2007; Cihakova and Rose 2008) In addition to the protocols used to induce EAM in mice and rats, support protocols are included for preparing purified cardiac myosin using mouse or rat heart tissue (see Support Protocol 1), preparing purified

  13. Infective endocarditis in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Fernando; Ramos, Antonio; Bouza, Emilio; Muñoz, Patricia; Valerio, Maricela C.; Fariñas, M. Carmen; de Berrazueta, José Ramón; Zarauza, Jesús; Pericás Pulido, Juan Manuel; Paré, Juan Carlos; de Alarcón, Arístides; Sousa, Dolores; Rodriguez Bailón, Isabel; Montejo-Baranda, Miguel; Noureddine, Mariam; García Vázquez, Elisa; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Infective endocarditis (IE) complicating hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a poorly known entity. Although current guidelines do not recommend IE antibiotic prophylaxis (IEAP) in HCM, controversy remains. This study sought to describe the clinical course of a large series of IE HCM and to compare IE in HCM patients with IE patients with and without an indication for IEAP. Data from the GAMES IE registry involving 27 Spanish hospitals were analyzed. From January 2008 to December 2013, 2000 consecutive IE patients were prospectively included in the registry. Eleven IE HCM additional cases from before 2008 were also studied. Clinical, microbiological, and echocardiographic characteristics were analyzed in IE HCM patients (n = 34) and in IE HCM reported in literature (n = 84). Patients with nondevice IE (n = 1807) were classified into 3 groups: group 1, HCM with native-valve IE (n = 26); group 2, patients with IEAP indication (n = 696); group 3, patients with no IEAP indication (n = 1085). IE episode and 1-year follow-up data were gathered. One-year mortality in IE HCM was 42% in our study and 22% in the literature. IE was more frequent, although not exclusive, in obstructive HCM (59% and 74%, respectively). Group 1 exhibited more IE predisposing factors than groups 2 and 3 (62% vs 40% vs 50%, P < 0.01), and more previous dental procedures (23% vs 6% vs 8%, P < 0.01). Furthermore, Group 1 experienced a higher incidence of Streptococcus infections than Group 2 (39% vs 22%, P < 0.01) and similar to Group 3 (39% vs 30%, P = 0.34). Overall mortality was similar among groups (42% vs 36% vs 35%, P = 0.64). IE occurs in HCM patients with and without obstruction. Mortality of IE HCM is high but similar to patients with and without IEAP indication. Predisposing factors, previous dental procedures, and streptococcal infection are higher in IE HCM, suggesting that HCM patients could benefit from IEAP. PMID:27368014

  14. WiFi Miner: An Online Apriori-Infrequent Based Wireless Intrusion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Ahmedur; Ezeife, C. I.; Aggarwal, A. K.

    Intrusion detection in wireless networks has become a vital part in wireless network security systems with wide spread use of Wireless Local Area Networks (WLAN). Currently, almost all devices are Wi-Fi (Wireless Fidelity) capable and can access WLAN. This paper proposes an Intrusion Detection System, WiFi Miner, which applies an infrequent pattern association rule mining Apriori technique to wireless network packets captured through hardware sensors for purposes of real time detection of intrusive or anomalous packets. Contributions of the proposed system includes effectively adapting an efficient data mining association rule technique to important problem of intrusion detection in a wireless network environment using hardware sensors, providing a solution that eliminates the need for hard-to-obtain training data in this environment, providing increased intrusion detection rate and reduction of false alarms.

  15. 46 XX pure gonadal dysgenesis: an infrequent cause of primary amenorrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Pertusa, Salvador; Palacios, Ana

    2009-01-01

    Amenorrhoea can be primary or secondary. Primary amenorrhoea is a relatively common problem among teenage girls. They usually consult their paediatrician or family doctor. This condition is present in patients with normal secondary sexual characteristics but no menarche by 16 years of age, or patients who have not had menstrual flow by age 14 and are lacking normal secondary sexual characteristics. Gonadal dysgenesis is an infrequent cause for primary amenorrhoea. In this paper, the case of a 16-year-old girl whose mother consulted their family doctor because of worries about her daughter’s lack of menarche is presented. A blood test showed elevated levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinising hormone (LH) and low levels of oestradiol. An abdominal ultrasound was abnormal. A diagnostic laparoscopy with biopsy of both gonads was performed. Replacement hormonal therapy was applied resulting in normal menstruations after few months. An early diagnosis is extremely important. PMID:21686785

  16. Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy presenting as acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abdin, Amr; Eitel, Ingo; de Waha, Suzanne; Thiele, Holger

    2016-06-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a rare variant of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. It is characterized by a local hypertrophy of the apical segments and displays typical electrocardiographic and imaging patterns. The clinical manifestations are variable and range from an asymptomatic course to sudden cardiac death. The most frequent symptom is chest pain and thus apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can mimic the symptoms and repolarization disturbances indicative of acute coronary syndrome. PMID:26628684

  17. Reversible catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy due to pheochromocytoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Satendra, Milan; de Jesus, Cláudia; Bordalo e Sá, Armando L; Rosário, Luís; Rocha, José; Bicha Castelo, Henrique; Correia, Maria José; Nunes Diogo, António

    2014-03-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a tumor originating from chromaffin tissue. It commonly presents with symptoms and signs of catecholamine excess, such as hypertension, tachycardia, headache and sweating. Cardiovascular manifestations include catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy, which may present as severe left ventricular dysfunction and congestive heart failure. We report a case of pheochromocytoma which was diagnosed following investigation of dilated cardiomyopathy. We highlight the dramatic symptomatic improvement and reversal of cardiomyopathy, with recovery of left ventricular function after treatment. PMID:24684896

  18. Infant with cardiomyopathy: When to suspect inborn errors of metabolism?

    PubMed Central

    Byers, Stephanie L; Ficicioglu, Can

    2014-01-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism are identified in 5%-26% of infants and children with cardiomyopathy. Although fatty acid oxidation disorders, lysosomal and glycogen storage disorders and organic acidurias are well-known to be associated with cardiomyopathies, emerging reports suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction and congenital disorders of glycosylation may also account for a proportion of cardiomyopathies. This review article clarifies when primary care physicians and cardiologists should suspect inborn errors of metabolism in a patient with cardiomyopathy, and refer the patient to a metabolic specialist for a further metabolic work up, with specific discussions of “red flags” which should prompt additional evaluation. PMID:25429327

  19. Cardiomyopathies: Evolution of pathogenesis concepts and potential for new therapies

    PubMed Central

    Sisakian, Hamayak

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are defined as diseases of the myocardium with associated structural and functional abnormalities. Knowledge of these pathologies for a long period was not clear in clinical practice due to uncertainties regarding definition, classification and clinical diagnosis. In recent decades, major advances have been made in the understanding of the molecular and genetic issues, pathophysiology, and clinical and radiological assessment of the diseases. Progress has been made also in management of several types of cardiomyopathy. Advances in the understanding of these diseases show that cardiomyopathies represent complex entities. Here, special attention is given to evolution of classification of cardiomyopathies, with the aim of assisting clinicians to look beyond schematic diagnostic labels in order to achieve more specific diagnosis. Knowledge of the genotype of cardiomyopathies has changed the pathophysiological understanding of their etiology and clinical course, and has become more important in clinical practice for diagnosis and prevention of cardiomyopathies. New approaches for clinical and prognostic assessment are provided based on contemporary molecular mechanisms of contribution in the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathies. The genotype-phenotype complex approach for assessment improves the clinical evaluation and management strategies of these pathologies. The review covers also the important role of imaging methods, particularly echocardiography, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of different types of cardiomyopathies. In summary, this review provides complex presentation of current state of cardiomyopathies from genetics to management aspects for cardiovascular specialists. PMID:24976920

  20. Stress-Induced Cardiomyopathy Presenting as Shock

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Tae Kyung; Lee, Jong-Young; Oh, Sam Sae; Song, Young Seok; Lee, Seung Jae; Ko, Kyung Jin

    2016-01-01

    Stress-induced cardiomyopathy has become a more recognized and reported entity. It can be caused by emotional or physical stress, which causes excessive catecholamine release. Typically, the clinical course is benign with conservative treatment being effective. However, stress-induced cardiomyopathy can be fatal. A 41-year-old female presented with cardiogenic shock followed by sudden back pain. Initial echocardiographic finding showed severely decreased ejection fraction with akinesia at all mid-to-apical walls with relatively preserved basal wall contractility. The coronary artery was intact on coronary angiography. Cardiac resuscitation and extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation was needed to manage the cardiogenic shock. Recovery was complete after 2 weeks. PMID:27081451

  1. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy: Case Series and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Cavayero, Chase; Kar, Pran; Kar, Sunny

    2016-01-01

    Although originally considered to be uncommon, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is becoming increasingly visible, annually comprising an increasing portion of suspected diagnoses of acute coronary syndrome. This condition is characterized by reversible left ventricular akinesis without significant coronary artery obstruction. This case study presents five patients diagnosed with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, as confirmed by echocardiogram and angiography. All of the patients presented with classic myocardial chest pain and elevated troponins. Following diagnosis, they were treated with supportive measures, particularly angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and beta-blockers. All patients made a full recovery. Though the mechanism of Takotsubo has not been fully elucidated, hypotheses suggest it may be related to excessive catecholamine levels causing either myocardial stunning or coronary vasospasm. Recognition and understanding of this unusual pathology are essential because it can lead to improved clinical management. PMID:27446769

  2. What About Tachycardia-induced Cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Ethan R; Josephson, Mark E

    2013-01-01

    Long-standing tachycardia is a well-recognised cause of heart failure and left ventricular dysfunction, and has led to the nomenclature, tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy (TIC). TIC is generally a reversible cardiomyopathy if the causative tachycardia can be treated effectively, either with medications, surgery or catheter ablation. The diagnosis is usually made after demonstrating recovery of left ventricular function with normalisation of heart rate in the absence of other identifiable aetiologies. One hundred years after the first reported case of TIC, our understanding of the pathophysiology of TIC in humans remains limited despite extensive work in animal models of TIC. In this review we will discuss the proposed mechanisms of TIC, the causative tachyarrhythmias and their treatment, outcomes for patients diagnosed with TIC, and future directions for research and clinical care. PMID:26835045

  3. Targets for therapy in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Tardiff, Jil C.; Carrier, Lucie; Bers, Donald M.; Poggesi, Corrado; Ferrantini, Cecilia; Coppini, Raffaele; Maier, Lars S.; Ashrafian, Houman; Huke, Sabine; van der Velden, Jolanda

    2015-01-01

    To date, no compounds or interventions exist that treat or prevent sarcomeric cardiomyopathies. Established therapies currently improve the outcome, but novel therapies may be able to more fundamentally affect the disease process and course. Investigations of the pathomechanisms are generating molecular insights that can be useful for the design of novel specific drugs suitable for clinical use. As perturbations in the heart are stage-specific, proper timing of drug treatment is essential to prevent initiation and progression of cardiac disease in mutation carrier individuals. In this review, we emphasize potential novel therapies which may prevent, delay, or even reverse hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by sarcomeric gene mutations. These include corrections of genetic defects, altered sarcomere function, perturbations in intracellular ion homeostasis, and impaired myocardial energetics. PMID:25634554

  4. What About Tachycardia-induced Cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed

    Ellis, Ethan R; Josephson, Mark E

    2013-11-01

    Long-standing tachycardia is a well-recognised cause of heart failure and left ventricular dysfunction, and has led to the nomenclature, tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy (TIC). TIC is generally a reversible cardiomyopathy if the causative tachycardia can be treated effectively, either with medications, surgery or catheter ablation. The diagnosis is usually made after demonstrating recovery of left ventricular function with normalisation of heart rate in the absence of other identifiable aetiologies. One hundred years after the first reported case of TIC, our understanding of the pathophysiology of TIC in humans remains limited despite extensive work in animal models of TIC. In this review we will discuss the proposed mechanisms of TIC, the causative tachyarrhythmias and their treatment, outcomes for patients diagnosed with TIC, and future directions for research and clinical care. PMID:26835045

  5. A case of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy after chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Malley, Tamir; Watson, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    Here we present the case of a patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma who was admitted to hospital for an elective autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplant after cytotoxic treatment with lomustine, cytarabine, cyclophosphomide and etoposide (LACE). On the final day of chemotherapeutic treatment, she developed sudden onset dyspnoea. Electrocardiography confirmed acute antero-lateral T-wave inversion. She went onto have coronary angiography that demonstrated unobstructed coronary arteries. Left ventriculography demonstrated apical ballooning, consistent with Takotsubo (stress) cardiomyopathy. The link between chemotherapy and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy has become increasingly recognized in recent years, although causality remains to be established and the mechanism of action is not yet fully understood. PMID:27066260

  6. A case of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy after chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Malley, Tamir; Watson, Edmund

    2016-04-01

    Here we present the case of a patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma who was admitted to hospital for an elective autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplant after cytotoxic treatment with lomustine, cytarabine, cyclophosphomide and etoposide (LACE). On the final day of chemotherapeutic treatment, she developed sudden onset dyspnoea. Electrocardiography confirmed acute antero-lateral T-wave inversion. She went onto have coronary angiography that demonstrated unobstructed coronary arteries. Left ventriculography demonstrated apical ballooning, consistent with Takotsubo (stress) cardiomyopathy. The link between chemotherapy and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy has become increasingly recognized in recent years, although causality remains to be established and the mechanism of action is not yet fully understood. PMID:27066260

  7. Neurogenic stress cardiomyopathy associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Pinnamaneni, Sowmya; Dutta, Tanya; Melcer, Joshua; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac manifestations are recognized complications of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Neurogenic stress cardiomyopathy is one complication that is seen in acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. It can present as transient diffuse left ventricular dysfunction or as transient regional wall motion abnormalities. It occurs more frequently with neurologically severe-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage and is associated with increased morbidity and poor clinical outcomes. Managing this subset of patients is challenging. Early identification followed by a multidisciplinary team approach can potentially improve outcomes. PMID:25606704

  8. Alterations in cell adhesion proteins and cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jifen

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesive junction is specialized intercellular structure composed of cell adhesion proteins. They are essential to connect adjacent heart muscle cell and make heart contraction effectively and properly. Clinical and genetic studies have revealed close relationship between cell adhesive proteins and the occurrence of various cardiomyopathies. Here we will review recent development on the disease phenotype, potential cellular and molecular mechanism related to cell adhesion molecules, with particular disease pathogenesis learned from genetic manipulated murine models. PMID:24944760

  9. The broken heart syndrome: Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Peters, Matthew N; George, Praveen; Irimpen, Anand M

    2015-05-01

    First described in 1990, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy consists of a transient systolic dysfunction of localized segments of the left ventricle. Commonly occurring in postmenopausal women, Takotsubo is often associated with intense physical and/or emotional stress. It is traditionally identified by distinctive wall motion patterns on transthoracic echocardiogram and left ventriculography. Further understanding of the disease mechanisms and recognition of at-risk populations has potentially tremendous therapeutic benefit. PMID:25576036

  10. Immersion pulmonary oedema and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ng, Andrew; Edmonds, Carl

    2015-12-01

    A 67-year-old female scuba diver developed a typical immersion pulmonary oedema (IPE), but investigations strongly indicated Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC). The cardiac abnormalities included increased cardiac enzymes, electrocardiographic anomalies and echocardiographic changes, all reverting to normal within days. This case demonstrates a similarity and association between IPE and TC, and the importance of prompt cardiac investigations both in the investigation of IPE and in making the diagnosis of TC. PMID:26687314

  11. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Owl Monkeys (Aotus spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Knowlen, Grant G; Weller, Richard E; Perry, Ruby L; Baer, Janet F; Gozalo, Alfonso S

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a common postmortem finding in owl monkeys. In most cases the animals do not exhibit clinical signs until the disease is advanced, making antemortem diagnosis of subclinical disease difficult and treatment unrewarding. We obtained echocardiograms, electrocardiograms, and thoracic radiographs from members of a colony of owl monkeys that previously was identified as showing a 40% incidence of gross myocardial hypertrophy at necropsy, to assess the usefulness of these modalities for antemortem diagnosis. No single modality was sufficiently sensitive and specific to detect all monkeys with cardiac hypertrophy. Electrocardiography was the least sensitive method for detecting owl monkeys with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Thoracic radiographs were more sensitive than was electrocardiography in this context but cannot detect animals with concentric hypertrophy without an enlarged cardiac silhouette. Echocardiography was the most sensitive method for identifying cardiac hypertrophy in owl monkeys. The most useful parameters suggestive of left ventricular hypertrophy in our owl monkeys were an increased average left ventricular wall thickness to chamber radius ratio and an increased calculated left ventricular myocardial mass. Parameters suggestive of dilative cardiomyopathy were an increased average left ventricular myocardial mass and a decreased average ratio of left ventricular free wall thickness to left ventricular chamber radius. When all 4 noninvasive diagnostic modalities (physical examination, echocardiography, electrocardiography, and thoracic radiography) were used concurrently, the probability of detecting hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in owl monkeys was increased greatly. PMID:23759531

  12. SPARC–Dependent Cardiomyopathy in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Bodmer, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Background— The Drosophila heart is an important model for studying the genetics underpinning mammalian cardiac function. The system comprises contractile cardiomyocytes, adjacent to which are pairs of highly endocytic pericardial nephrocytes that modulate cardiac function by uncharacterized mechanisms. Identifying these mechanisms and the molecules involved is important because they may be relevant to human cardiac physiology. Methods and Results— This work aimed to identify circulating cardiomodulatory factors of potential relevance to humans using the Drosophila nephrocyte–cardiomyocyte system. A Kruppel-like factor 15 (dKlf15) loss-of-function strategy was used to ablate nephrocytes and then heart function and the hemolymph proteome were analyzed. Ablation of nephrocytes led to a severe cardiomyopathy characterized by a lengthening of diastolic interval. Rendering adult nephrocytes dysfunctional by disrupting their endocytic function or temporally conditional knockdown of dKlf15 led to a similar cardiomyopathy. Proteomics revealed that nephrocytes regulate the circulating levels of many secreted proteins, the most notable of which was the evolutionarily conserved matricellular protein Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (SPARC), a protein involved in mammalian cardiac function. Finally, reducing SPARC gene dosage ameliorated the cardiomyopathy that developed in the absence of nephrocytes. Conclusions— The data implicate SPARC in the noncell autonomous control of cardiac function in Drosophila and suggest that modulation of SPARC gene expression may ameliorate cardiac dysfunction in humans. PMID:26839388

  13. Chagas disease cardiomyopathy: immunopathology and genetics.

    PubMed

    Cunha-Neto, Edecio; Chevillard, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is endemic in Latin America and affects ca. 10 million people worldwide. About 30% of Chagas disease patients develop chronic Chagas disease cardiomyopathy (CCC), a particularly lethal inflammatory cardiomyopathy that occurs decades after the initial infection, while most patients remain asymptomatic. Mortality rate is higher than that of noninflammatory cardiomyopathy. CCC heart lesions present a Th1 T-cell-rich myocarditis, with cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and prominent fibrosis. Data suggest that the myocarditis plays a major pathogenetic role in disease progression. Major unmet goals include the thorough understanding of disease pathogenesis and therapeutic targets and identification of prognostic genetic factors. Chagas disease thus remains a neglected disease, with no vaccines or antiparasitic drugs proven efficient in chronically infected adults, when most patients are diagnosed. Both familial aggregation of CCC cases and the fact that only 30% of infected patients develop CCC suggest there might be a genetic component to disease susceptibility. Moreover, previous case-control studies have identified some genes associated to human susceptibility to CCC. In this paper, we will review the immunopathogenesis and genetics of Chagas disease, highlighting studies that shed light on the differential progression of Chagas disease patients to CCC. PMID:25210230

  14. Chagas Disease Cardiomyopathy: Immunopathology and Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Chevillard, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is endemic in Latin America and affects ca. 10 million people worldwide. About 30% of Chagas disease patients develop chronic Chagas disease cardiomyopathy (CCC), a particularly lethal inflammatory cardiomyopathy that occurs decades after the initial infection, while most patients remain asymptomatic. Mortality rate is higher than that of noninflammatory cardiomyopathy. CCC heart lesions present a Th1 T-cell-rich myocarditis, with cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and prominent fibrosis. Data suggest that the myocarditis plays a major pathogenetic role in disease progression. Major unmet goals include the thorough understanding of disease pathogenesis and therapeutic targets and identification of prognostic genetic factors. Chagas disease thus remains a neglected disease, with no vaccines or antiparasitic drugs proven efficient in chronically infected adults, when most patients are diagnosed. Both familial aggregation of CCC cases and the fact that only 30% of infected patients develop CCC suggest there might be a genetic component to disease susceptibility. Moreover, previous case-control studies have identified some genes associated to human susceptibility to CCC. In this paper, we will review the immunopathogenesis and genetics of Chagas disease, highlighting studies that shed light on the differential progression of Chagas disease patients to CCC. PMID:25210230

  15. Evolving molecular diagnostics for familial cardiomyopathies: at the heart of it all

    PubMed Central

    Callis, Thomas E; Jensen, Brian C; Weck, Karen E; Willis, Monte S

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are an important and heterogeneous group of common cardiac diseases. An increasing number of cardiomyopathies are now recognized to have familial forms, which result from single-gene mutations that render a Mendelian inheritance pattern, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy and left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy. Recently, clinical genetic tests for familial cardiomyopathies have become available for clinicians evaluating and treating patients with these diseases, making it necessary to understand the current progress and challenges in cardiomyopathy genetics and diagnostics. In this review, we summarize the genetic basis of selected cardiomyopathies, describe the clinical utility of genetic testing for cardiomyopathies and outline the current challenges and emerging developments. PMID:20370590

  16. Shared Genetic Predisposition in Peripartum and Dilated Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Ware, James S; Li, Jian; Mazaika, Erica; Yasso, Christopher M; DeSouza, Tiffany; Cappola, Thomas P; Tsai, Emily J; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Kamiya, Chizuko A; Mazzarotto, Francesco; Cook, Stuart A; Halder, Indrani; Prasad, Sanjay K; Pisarcik, Jessica; Hanley-Yanez, Karen; Alharethi, Rami; Damp, Julie; Hsich, Eileen; Elkayam, Uri; Sheppard, Richard; Kealey, Angela; Alexis, Jeffrey; Ramani, Gautam; Safirstein, Jordan; Boehmer, John; Pauly, Daniel F; Wittstein, Ilan S; Thohan, Vinay; Zucker, Mark J; Liu, Peter; Gorcsan, John; McNamara, Dennis M; Seidman, Christine E; Seidman, Jonathan G; Arany, Zoltan

    2016-01-21

    Background Peripartum cardiomyopathy shares some clinical features with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, a disorder caused by mutations in more than 40 genes, including TTN, which encodes the sarcomere protein titin. Methods In 172 women with peripartum cardiomyopathy, we sequenced 43 genes with variants that have been associated with dilated cardiomyopathy. We compared the prevalence of different variant types (nonsense, frameshift, and splicing) in these women with the prevalence of such variants in persons with dilated cardiomyopathy and with population controls. Results We identified 26 distinct, rare truncating variants in eight genes among women with peripartum cardiomyopathy. The prevalence of truncating variants (26 in 172 [15%]) was significantly higher than that in a reference population of 60,706 persons (4.7%, P=1.3×10(-7)) but was similar to that in a cohort of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (55 of 332 patients [17%], P=0.81). Two thirds of identified truncating variants were in TTN, as seen in 10% of the patients and in 1.4% of the reference population (P=2.7×10(-10)); almost all TTN variants were located in the titin A-band. Seven of the TTN truncating variants were previously reported in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. In a clinically well-characterized cohort of 83 women with peripartum cardiomyopathy, the presence of TTN truncating variants was significantly correlated with a lower ejection fraction at 1-year follow-up (P=0.005). Conclusions The distribution of truncating variants in a large series of women with peripartum cardiomyopathy was remarkably similar to that found in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. TTN truncating variants were the most prevalent genetic predisposition in each disorder. PMID:26735901

  17. Using naturalistic driving data to identify variables associated with infrequent, occasional, and consistent seat belt use.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Ian J; McClafferty, Julie A; Berlin, Sharon P; Hankey, Jonathan M

    2013-01-01

    Seat belt use is one of the most effective countermeasures to reduce traffic fatalities and injuries. The success of efforts to increase use is measured by road side observations and self-report questionnaires. These methods have shortcomings, with the former requiring a binary point estimate and the latter being subjective. The 100-car naturalistic driving study presented a unique opportunity to study seat belt use in that seat belt status was known for every trip each driver made during a 12-month period. Drivers were grouped into infrequent, occasional, or consistent seat belt users based on the frequency of belt use. Analyses were then completed to assess if these groups differed on several measures including personality, demographics, self-reported driving style variables as well as measures from the 100-car study instrumentation suite (average trip speed, trips per day). In addition, detailed analyses of the occasional belt user group were completed to identify factors that were predictive of occasional belt users wearing their belts. The analyses indicated that consistent seat belt users took fewer trips per day, and that increased average trip speed was associated with increased belt use among occasional belt users. The results of this project may help focus messaging efforts to convert occasional and inconsistent seat belt users to consistent users. PMID:22831496

  18. Infrequent Production of Xanthomegnin by Fungal Strains Recovered from Patients with Ocular Mycoses.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Havva Gül; Kandemir, Hazal; Çürük, Akif; Ilkit, Macit; Seyedmousavi, Seyedmojtaba

    2016-04-01

    Mycotoxins are putative virulence factors of fungi that play an important role in the pathogenesis of fungal infections. Mycotoxin production has been used as a diagnostic marker for the early diagnosis of fungal diseases. Using high-performance liquid chromatography, we investigated whether the fungal strains recovered from eye tissue samples obtained from patients with ocular mycoses produced the mycotoxin xanthomegnin. We tested 62 well-characterized strains of fungi, including Aspergillus spp. (n = 14), Exophiala spp. (n = 9), Fusarium spp. (n = 15), and several molds (n = 24). All isolates were identified to the species level using PCR and DNA sequencing of rRNA genes. We detected xanthomegnin activity (0.02 µg/ml) in one of the three Aspergillus flavus strains. However, we were unable to detect xanthomegnin in any of the other 61 fungal strains. Our result suggests that xanthomegnin production was infrequent in fungal strains recovered from patients with ocular mycoses. PMID:26590579

  19. High morphological variation of vestibular system accompanies slow and infrequent locomotion in three-toed sloths.

    PubMed

    Billet, Guillaume; Hautier, Lionel; Asher, Robert J; Schwarz, Cathrin; Crumpton, Nick; Martin, Thomas; Ruf, Irina

    2012-10-01

    The semicircular canals (SCs), part of the vestibular apparatus of the inner ear, are directly involved in the detection of angular motion of the head for maintaining balance, and exhibit adaptive patterns for locomotor behaviour. Consequently, they are generally believed to show low levels of intraspecific morphological variation, but few studies have investigated this assumption. On the basis of high-resolution computed tomography, we present here, to our knowledge, the first comprehensive study of the pattern of variation of the inner ear with a focus on Xenarthra. Our study demonstrates that extant three-toed sloths show a high level of morphological variation of the bony labyrinth of the inner ear. Especially, the variation in shape, relative size and angles of their SCs greatly differ from those of other, faster-moving taxa within Xenarthra and Placentalia in general. The unique pattern of variation in three-toed sloths suggests that a release of selection and/or constraints on their organ of balance is associated with the observed wide range of phenotypes. This release is coincident with their slow and infrequent locomotion and may be related, among other possible factors, to a reduced functional demand for a precise sensitivity to movement. PMID:22859594

  20. Comparison of the microbial composition of voice prosthesis biofilms from patients requiring frequent versus infrequent replacement.

    PubMed

    Elving, G Jolanda; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J; van Weissenbruch, Ranny; Albers, Frans W J

    2002-03-01

    This study was performed to establish a possible difference in biofilm composition in patients who require frequent versus infrequent prosthesis replacement. Only Groningen button voice prostheses that were removed because of increased airflow resistance or leakage of food or liquids through the prosthesis were considered for this study. These prostheses were selected from a total of 692 failed voice prostheses over a 2-year evaluation period. The failed voice prostheses were subdivided into a short-lifetime group, corresponding to an implantation period of less than 4 months (20 voice prostheses), and an extended-lifetime group, corresponding to an implantation period of greater than 9 months (18 voice prostheses). The biofilm was removed from the valve sides of the prostheses. The bacterial strain Rothia dentocariosa and the yeast strains Candida albicans I and Candida tropicalis were the predominant strains isolated from the biofilms on the voice prostheses in the short-lifetime group, whereas in the extended-lifetime group, R dentocariosa was found with a fourfold lower isolation frequency and C albicans I was found with a twofold lower isolation frequency. Candida tropicalis was absent from the extended-lifetime group. PMID:11915880

  1. "Myo-cardiomyopathy" is commonly associated with the A8344G "MERRF" mutation.

    PubMed

    Catteruccia, Michela; Sauchelli, Donato; Della Marca, Giacomo; Primiano, Guido; Cuccagna, Cristina; Bernardo, Daniela; Leo, Milena; Camporeale, Antonella; Sanna, Tommaso; Cianfoni, Alessandro; Servidei, Serenella

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the study was to better characterize the clinical phenotype associated with the A8344G "MERRF" mutation of mitochondrial DNA. Fifteen mutated patients were extensively investigated. The frequency of main clinical features was: exercise intolerance and/or muscle weakness 67 %, respiratory involvement 67 %, lactic acidosis 67 %, cardiac abnormalities 53 %, peripheral neuropathy 47 %, myoclonus 40 %, epilepsy 40 %, ataxia 13 %. A restrictive respiratory insufficiency requiring ventilatory support was observed in about half of our patients. One patient developed a severe and rapidly progressive cardiomyopathy requiring cardioverter-defibrillator implantation. Five patients died of overwhelming, intractable lactic acidosis. Serial muscle MRIs identified a consistent pattern of muscle involvement and progression. Cardiac MRI showed non-ischemic late gadolinium enhancement in the left ventricle inferolateral part as early sign of myocardial involvement. Brain spectroscopy demonstrated increased peak of choline and reduction of N-acetylaspartate. Lactate was never detected in brain areas, while it could be documented in ventricles. We confirm that muscle involvement is the most frequent clinical feature associated with A8443G mutation. In contrast with previous reports, however, about half of our patients did not develop signs of CNS involvement even in later stages of the disease. The difference may be related to the infrequent investigation of A8344G mutation in 'pure' mitochondrial myo-cardiomyopathy, representing a bias and a possible cause of syndrome's underestimation. Our study highlights the importance of lactic acidosis and respiratory muscle insufficiency as critical prognostic factors. Muscle and cardiac MRI and brain spectroscopy may be useful tools in diagnosis and follow-up of MERRF. PMID:25559684

  2. Left ventricular mass in patients with a cardiomyopathy after treatment with anthracyclines.

    PubMed

    Neilan, Tomas G; Coelho-Filho, Otavio R; Pena-Herrera, Diego; Shah, Ravi V; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Francis, Sanjeev A; Moslehi, Javid; Kwong, Raymond Y

    2012-12-01

    We aimed to describe the cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) findings and determine the prognostic variables in patients with a cardiomyopathy after treatment with anthracyclines. CMR imaging was performed in 91 patients (58% men, mean age 43 ± 18 years, and mean anthracycline dose of 276 ± 82 mg/m(2)) with a reduced ejection fraction after anthracycline-based chemotherapy. Major adverse cardiovascular events were defined as cardiovascular death, appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy, and admission for decompensated heart failure. Patients presented a median of 88 months (interquartile range 37 to 138) after chemotherapy and were followed for 27 months (interquartile range 22 to 38). Late gadolinium enhancement was an uncommon finding (5 patients, 6%) despite a reduced ejection fraction (36 ± 8%). An inverse association was found between the anthracycline dose and the indexed left ventricular (LV) mass by CMR (r = -0.67, p <0.001). A total of 52 adverse cardiac events occurred (event rate of 22%/year). When the patients were grouped according to the presence or absence of a major adverse cardiovascular event, the indexed LV mass and glomerular filtration rate were lower and the anthracycline dose was greater among the patients who experienced an adverse event. In a multivariate model, the indexed LV mass demonstrated the strongest association with major adverse cardiovascular events (hazard ratio 0.89, chi-square 26, p <0.001). In conclusion, myocardial scar by late gadolinium enhancement-CMR is infrequent in patients with anthracycline-cardiomyopathy despite a reduced ejection fraction, the event rate in patients with established anthracycline-cardiotoxicity is high, and indexed LV mass by CMR imaging is a predictor of adverse cardiovascular events. PMID:22917553

  3. End-stage hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a cat

    PubMed Central

    White, Andrew J.M.

    2015-01-01

    A 14-year-old Persian cat was referred for evaluation of the progression of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) after an acute episode of congestive heart failure. The diagnosis of HCM had been made almost 13 years ago. Echocardiography and electrocardiography revealed end-stage hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and multifocal atrial tachycardia. The patient was discharged on medical management with a grave prognosis. PMID:25969586

  4. Anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy in a dog treated with epirubicin

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ye-Rin; Kang, Min-Hee; Park, Hee-Myung

    2015-01-01

    An 8-year-old American cocker spaniel dog was diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy. Four years earlier, the dog had been diagnosed with multicentric lymphoma and had received 4 cycles of multi-agent chemotherapy, including doxorubicin and epirubicin. The total cumulative dose of epirubicin was 168 mg/m2. Dilated cardiomyopathy was considered a consequence of epirubicin toxicity. PMID:26028676

  5. End-stage hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a cat.

    PubMed

    White, Andrew J M

    2015-05-01

    A 14-year-old Persian cat was referred for evaluation of the progression of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) after an acute episode of congestive heart failure. The diagnosis of HCM had been made almost 13 years ago. Echocardiography and electrocardiography revealed end-stage hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and multifocal atrial tachycardia. The patient was discharged on medical management with a grave prognosis. PMID:25969586

  6. Genetics Home Reference: DMD-associated dilated cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2344-7. Review. Citation on PubMed Berko BA, Swift M. X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy. N Engl J ... Gelb B, Zhu XM, Chamberlain JS, McCabe ER, Swift M. X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy. Molecular genetic evidence ...

  7. Biographical and Clinical Variables Related to Frequent vs. Infrequent Visits by Students to a University Counseling and Mental Health Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopper, Allen E.

    In this study, data gathered from the files of students contacting Louisiana State University's Counseling and Mental Health Service during a one year period clearly revealed significant differences between the frequent versus infrequent visitor: (1) student age; (2) previous exposure to psychotherapy; (3) local residence while in college; (4)…

  8. Discriminating Malingered from Genuine Civilian Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Validation of Three MMPI-2 Infrequency Scales (F, Fp, and Fptsd)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elhai, Jon D.; Naifeh, James A.; Zucker, Irene S.; Gold, Steven N.; Deitsch, Sarah E.; Frueh, B. Christopher

    2004-01-01

    The Infrequency-Posttraumatic Stress Disorder scale (Fptsd), recently created for the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2), has demonstrated incremental validity over other MMPI-2 scales in malingered posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) detection. Fptsd was developed with combat-exposed PTSD patients, potentially limiting its…

  9. 40 CFR 1039.525 - How do I adjust emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I adjust emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices? 1039.525 Section 1039.525 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD...

  10. 40 CFR 1042.525 - How do I adjust emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I adjust emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices? 1042.525 Section 1042.525 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE MARINE...

  11. Imaging of Inflammation in Unexplained Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kadkhodayan, Ana; Chareonthaitawee, Panithaya; Raman, Subha V; Cooper, Leslie T

    2016-05-01

    Myocarditis is a recognized but underdiagnosed cause of cardiomyopathy due to its wide clinical spectrum and nonspecific presentation. Accurate diagnosis is important because 25% of patients with acute myocarditis develop cardiomyopathy, and of those, approximately 5% per year require heart transplantation or die. Current guidelines for the recognition and treatment of the inflammatory cardiomyopathies are limited. The gold standard for diagnosis, endomyocardial biopsy, has low sensitivity, and thus, multimodality imaging of inflammation plays a crucial role in defining the cardiac abnormalities and in assisting with diagnosis and management. The literature on inflammatory cardiomyopathies is limited to small studies of selected populations due to the diverse etiologies and inherent difficulties in definitive diagnosis. This review focuses on the current and projected use of various imaging modalities, including echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance, and nuclear imaging to better define inflammatory cardiomyopathies and aid in their management; it specifically focuses on cardiac sarcoidosis, and giant cell, eosinophilic, and lymphocytic myocarditis. PMID:27151523

  12. Patient with Eating Disorder, Carnitine Deficiency and Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Fotino, A Domnica; Sherma, A

    2015-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is characterized by a dilated and poorly functioning left ventricle and can result from several different etiologies including ischemic, infectious, metabolic, toxins, autoimmune processes or nutritional deficiencies. Carnitine deficiency-induced cardiomyopathy (CDIM) is an uncommon cause of dilated cardiomyopathy that can go untreated if not considered. Here, we describe a 30-year-old woman with an eating disorder and recent percutaneous endoscopic gastrotomy (PEG) tube placement for weight loss admitted to the hospital for possible PEG tube infection. Carnitine level was found to be low. Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) revealed ejection fraction 15%. Her hospital course was complicated by sepsis from a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). She was discharged on a beta-blocker and carnitine supplementation. One month later her cardiac function had normalized. Carnitine deficiency-induced myopathy is an unusual cause of cardiomyopathy and should be considered in adults with decreased oral intake or malabsorption who present with cardiomyopathy. PMID:27159507

  13. [Mucinous ovarian neoplasms. Prognostically mostly excellent, infrequently a wolf in sheep's clothing].

    PubMed

    Lax, S; Staebler, A

    2014-07-01

    Mucinous ovarian neoplasms represent the second largest group of epithelial ovarian tumors after serous neoplasms, of which benign cystadenomas constitute more than 80 %. Mucinous cystadenomas and carcinomas cannot be distinguished by the clinical features or the mean age of onset of the disease. They typically occur unilaterally, are confined to the adnexae (FIGO stage I) and clinically present with non-specific abdominal symptoms or are diagnosed by chance. The mean age of disease onset is around 50 years old. The prognosis is excellent. Implants, peritoneal metastases and bilateral occurrence of ovarian mucinous neoplasms should lead to the suspicion of metastasis particularly from a gastrointestinal tumor. Neither microinvasion defined as a maximum extent of invasion of 5 mm, nor intraepithelial carcinoma characterized by high grade atypia without invasion, affect the prognosis of mucinous borderline tumors. Mucinous carcinomas typically show confluent glandular, expansile growth that leads to a labyrinth-like pattern. A destructive infiltrative or nodular growth pattern, however, should lead to the consideration of metastasis. Mural nodules that may reveal a spindle cell sarcomatous or anaplastic carcinomatous pattern occur infrequently in mucinous and do not affect the prognosis. Pax8 positivity is indicative of a primary ovarian neoplasm. In this case, however, mucinous tumors associated with teratomas may show the colonic immunoreaction pattern (CK7-/CK20+/CDX2+). The rare mucinous tumors with endocervical differentiation are now designated as seromucinous tumors and consist of two or more distinct cell types, are frequently associated with endometriosis and seem to show a molecular genetic relationship to endometrioid neoplasms. PMID:24962632

  14. Dilated cardiomyopathy associated with toluene abuse.

    PubMed

    Vural, Mutlu; Ogel, Kultegin

    2006-01-01

    The use of paint thinner and glue to achieve an euphoric state has been associated with serious social and health problems in children and young adults. We present the case of a 21-year-old man with dilated cardiomyopathy occurring following abuse of paint thinner and glue containing toluene as main compound. After cessation of toluene abuse, the patient recovered rapidly and completely. Because of the increasing prevalence of toluene abuse, harmful effects of this volatile agent on the heart are also discussed. PMID:16479101

  15. Dilated cardiomyopathy following use of xenadrine EFX.

    PubMed

    Riccioni, Graziano; Speziale, Giuseppe; Scotti, Luca; Bucciarelli, Valentina; Cappetti, Silvia; Nasso, Giuseppe; Gallina, Sabina; Bucciarelli, Tonino

    2016-03-01

    We describe a case of a 35-year-old man presented at the emergency room of our institution with acute onset of dyspnea and dizziness. He was a body builder and had been using Xenadrine EFX for weight loss reduction. The laboratory analyses were normal. A chest radiograph showed an enlarged cardiac silhouette with clear lung fields. Transtoracic two-dimensional color Doppler echocardiography revealed a diffuse hypokinesia with a marked decreased in systolic function and a high teledyastolic diameter. This case document the possible relation to use of Xenadrine EFX for weight loss and the recurrence of dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:26680256

  16. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy precipitated by delirium tremens.

    PubMed

    Agu, Chidozie Charles; Bakhit, Ahmed; Basunia, Md; Bhattarai, Bikash; Oke, Vikram; Salhan, Divya; Schmidt, Frances

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman presented with alcohol withdrawal symptoms, which later progressed to delirium tremens. During hospitalization, she developed respiratory distress with acute pulmonary edema. Electrocardiogram (ECG) showed diffuse ST elevation with elevated cardiac enzymes. Echocardiogram showed estimated ejection fraction of 20-25% with characteristic apical ballooning. After several days of supportive care, the patient showed significant clinical improvement with normalization of ECG, cardiac enzymes, and echocardiographic findings. Coronary angiogram revealed no coronary abnormalities. Although Takotsubo cardiomyopathy has been associated with diverse forms of physical or emotional stress, only a few cases have been described with delirium tremens in the medical literature. PMID:26653700

  17. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy precipitated by delirium tremens

    PubMed Central

    Agu, Chidozie Charles; Bakhit, Ahmed; Basunia, Md; Bhattarai, Bikash; Oke, Vikram; Salhan, Divya; Schmidt, Frances

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman presented with alcohol withdrawal symptoms, which later progressed to delirium tremens. During hospitalization, she developed respiratory distress with acute pulmonary edema. Electrocardiogram (ECG) showed diffuse ST elevation with elevated cardiac enzymes. Echocardiogram showed estimated ejection fraction of 20–25% with characteristic apical ballooning. After several days of supportive care, the patient showed significant clinical improvement with normalization of ECG, cardiac enzymes, and echocardiographic findings. Coronary angiogram revealed no coronary abnormalities. Although Takotsubo cardiomyopathy has been associated with diverse forms of physical or emotional stress, only a few cases have been described with delirium tremens in the medical literature. PMID:26653700

  18. Autophagy and mitophagy in diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Satoru; Liang, Qiangrong

    2015-02-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a heart muscle-specific disease that increases the risk of heart failure and mortality in diabetic patients independent of vascular pathology. Mitochondria are cellular power plants that generate energy for heart contraction and concurrently produce reactive oxygen species that, if unchecked, may damage the mitochondria and the heart. Elimination of damaged mitochondria by autophagy known as mitophagy is an essential process for maintaining normal cardiac function at baseline and in response to various stress and disease conditions. Mitochondrial structural injury and functional impairment have been shown to contribute to diabetic heart disease. Recent studies have demonstrated an inhibited autophagic flux in the hearts of diabetic animals. Surprisingly, the diminished autophagy appears to be an adaptive response that protects against cardiac injury in type 1 diabetes. This raises several questions regarding the relationship between general autophagy and selective mitophagy in the diabetic heart. However, autophagy may play a different role in the hearts of type 2 diabetic animals. In this review, we will summarize current knowledge in this field and discuss the potential functional roles of autophagy and mitophagy in the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Autophagy and protein quality control in cardiometabolic diseases. PMID:24882754

  19. Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy: Electrical and Structural Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Akdis, Deniz; Brunckhorst, Corinna; Duru, Firat

    2016-01-01

    This overview gives an update on the molecular mechanisms, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and therapy of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM). ACM is mostly hereditary and associated with mutations in genes encoding proteins of the intercalated disc. Three subtypes have been proposed: the classical right-dominant subtype generally referred to as ARVC/D, biventricular forms with early biventricular involvement and left-dominant subtypes with predominant LV involvement. Typical symptoms include palpitations, arrhythmic (pre)syncope and sudden cardiac arrest due to ventricular arrhythmias, which typically occur in athletes. At later stages, heart failure may occur. Diagnosis is established with the 2010 Task Force Criteria (TFC). Modern imaging tools are crucial for ACM diagnosis, including both echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for detecting functional and structural alternations. Of note, structural findings often become visible after electrical alterations, such as premature ventricular beats, ventricular fibrillation (VF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT). 12-lead ECG is important to assess for depolarisation and repolarisation abnormalities, including T-wave inversions as the most common ECG abnormality. Family history and the detection of causative mutations, mostly affecting the desmosome, have been incorporated in the TFC, and stress the importance of cascade family screening. Differential diagnoses include idiopathic right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) VT, sarcoidosis, congenital heart disease, myocarditis, dilated cardiomyopathy, athlete’s heart, Brugada syndrome and RV infarction. Therapeutic strategies include restriction from endurance and competitive sports, β-blockers, antiarrhythmic drugs, heart failure medication, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and endocardial/epicardial catheter ablation. PMID:27617087

  20. Diabetic cardiomyopathy: Pathophysiology, diagnostic evaluation and management

    PubMed Central

    Pappachan, Joseph M; Varughese, George I; Sriraman, Rajagopalan; Arunagirinathan, Ganesan

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes affects every organ in the body and cardiovascular disease accounts for two-thirds of the mortality in the diabetic population. Diabetes-related heart disease occurs in the form of coronary artery disease (CAD), cardiac autonomic neuropathy or diabetic cardiomyopathy (DbCM). The prevalence of cardiac failure is high in the diabetic population and DbCM is a common but underestimated cause of heart failure in diabetes. The pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy is yet to be clearly defined. Hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and inflammation are thought to play key roles in the generation of reactive oxygen or nitrogen species which are in turn implicated. The myocardial interstitium undergoes alterations resulting in abnormal contractile function noted in DbCM. In the early stages of the disease diastolic dysfunction is the only abnormality, but systolic dysfunction supervenes in the later stages with impaired left ventricular ejection fraction. Transmitral Doppler echocardiography is usually used to assess diastolic dysfunction, but tissue Doppler Imaging and Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging are being increasingly used recently for early detection of DbCM. The management of DbCM involves improvement in lifestyle, control of glucose and lipid abnormalities, and treatment of hypertension and CAD, if present. The role of vasoactive drugs and antioxidants is being explored. This review discusses the pathophysiology, diagnostic evaluation and management options of DbCM. PMID:24147202

  1. Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy: Electrical and Structural Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Akdis, Deniz; Brunckhorst, Corinna; Duru, Firat; Saguner, Ardan M

    2016-08-01

    This overview gives an update on the molecular mechanisms, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and therapy of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM). ACM is mostly hereditary and associated with mutations in genes encoding proteins of the intercalated disc. Three subtypes have been proposed: the classical right-dominant subtype generally referred to as ARVC/D, biventricular forms with early biventricular involvement and left-dominant subtypes with predominant LV involvement. Typical symptoms include palpitations, arrhythmic (pre)syncope and sudden cardiac arrest due to ventricular arrhythmias, which typically occur in athletes. At later stages, heart failure may occur. Diagnosis is established with the 2010 Task Force Criteria (TFC). Modern imaging tools are crucial for ACM diagnosis, including both echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for detecting functional and structural alternations. Of note, structural findings often become visible after electrical alterations, such as premature ventricular beats, ventricular fibrillation (VF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT). 12-lead ECG is important to assess for depolarisation and repolarisation abnormalities, including T-wave inversions as the most common ECG abnormality. Family history and the detection of causative mutations, mostly affecting the desmosome, have been incorporated in the TFC, and stress the importance of cascade family screening. Differential diagnoses include idiopathic right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) VT, sarcoidosis, congenital heart disease, myocarditis, dilated cardiomyopathy, athlete's heart, Brugada syndrome and RV infarction. Therapeutic strategies include restriction from endurance and competitive sports, β-blockers, antiarrhythmic drugs, heart failure medication, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and endocardial/epicardial catheter ablation. PMID:27617087

  2. Graves' thyrotoxicosis-induced reversible cardiomyopathy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghamdi, Ahmad S; Aljohani, Naji

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this report is to present a case of Graves' thyrotoxicosis-induced cardiomyopathy. This is a case of a 26 year old woman that presented with severe symptomatic congestive heart failure and was subsequently diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to Graves' disease. Despite an initial left ventricular systolic ejection fraction of 20% on echocardiography, treatment with anti-thyroid agents led to rapid improvement of her clinical status and normalization of her ejection fraction. The proposed mechanisms underlying the development of systolic dysfunction in thyrotoxicosis are discussed and the literature on similar cases previously reported is highlighted. Cardiomyopathy should be considered even in young patients with Graves' thyrotoxicosis. PMID:23645990

  3. Right ventricular obstruction in various types of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Stierle, U; Sheikhzadeh, A; Shakibi, J G; Langbehn, A F; Diederich, K W

    1987-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is most probably a genetically transmitted disease with different clinical and hemodynamic features. In hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) the obstruction is predominantly in the left ventricular outflow tract (IHSS). In a minority of cases the obstruction is strictly located in midventricle (midventricular obstruction, MO). Hypertrophic nonobstructive cardiomyopathy (HNCM) includes asymmetric septal hypertrophy (ASH) and apical hypertrophy (AH). Right ventricular hypertrophic obstruction (RVHO) is an uncommon type of HCM and is almost always combined with other types of left ventricular HCM. We describe in the present report 1 case of RVHO with IHSS, 2 cases with MO and, to our knowledge, the first case with AH. PMID:3599397

  4. Hypothyroid cardiomyopathy in a patient post-doxorubicin chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Silver, Adam Jeffrey; Patel, Hena N; Okwuosa, Tochi

    2016-01-01

    Hypothyroidism may cause decreased cardiac output and heart failure-and when severe, bradycardia and pericardial effusions may develop. Chemotherapies, particularly doxorubicin, are known and often irreversible causes of cardiomyopathy. As such, when cardiomyopathy develops in patients who have been exposed to anthracycline chemotherapy, the importance of ruling out other reversible causes such as hypothyroidism cannot be overstated. We present a case of acute systolic heart failure in a patient post-doxorubicin chemotherapy and radiation therapy for alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, found to have severe hypothyroidism as a reversible cause of cardiomyopathy. PMID:27053539

  5. Chronic respiratory illness as a predictor of survival in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: the Washington, DC, Dilated Cardiomyopathy Study.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, S. A.; Coughlin, S. S.; Metayer, C.; René, A. A.; Hammond, I. W.

    1996-01-01

    Although bronchial asthma and emphysema have been associated with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy in case-control studies, little is known about the prognostic importance of chronic respiratory disease in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. To study this, we examined history of bronchial asthma, emphysema and chronic bronchitis, and respiratory medication use as possible predictors of survival in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy using data from a Washington, DC, population-based study (n = 129). The cumulative survival rates among patients with a history of emphysema or chronic bronchitis were 60% and 48% at 12 and 36 months, respectively, compared with 81.8% and 67.2% among patients without emphysema or chronic bronchitis. The survival rates of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy patients with and without a history of bronchial asthma at the time of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy diagnosis were similar. In multivariate analysis using the proportional hazards model, only ventricular arrhythmias and ejection fraction were found to be statistically significant predictors of survival in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. The adjusted relative risk estimate for emphysema and chronic bronchitis was close to one. Thus, the results of this population-based study do not suggest that history of chronic respiratory illness is an independent predictor of survival in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:8961693

  6. Infrequent or non-response to oral sumatriptan does not predict response to other triptans--review of four trials.

    PubMed

    Dahlöf, C G H

    2006-02-01

    A migraineur can claim to be an infrequent responder ('non-responder') to an oral triptan independent of which triptan he or she is presently using. Four trials of an alternative triptan (zolmitriptan/rizatriptan; eletriptan; naratriptan; almotriptan) in patients with a history of infrequent response to oral sumatriptan were compared and contrasted in terms of study design, patient characteristics, and efficacy and tolerability of the triptan under investigation. Unfortunately, none of the reported studies used an appropriate parallel design, which would have had the non-responding triptan (oral sumatriptan) in one arm and without encapsulation. While the four trials differed in terms of study design (open-label vs. placebo-controlled), definition of sumatriptan 'non-responder' (retrospective vs. prospective) and pain intensity at baseline (30% severe to 70% severe), all four demonstrated that lack of response to sumatriptan did not predict lack of response to an alternative triptan. Changing triptans resulted in 2-h pain-relief rates of 25-81% in patients with a history of poor response to sumatriptan. It can be concluded that migraine patients who respond infrequently to sumatriptan should be switched to a different triptan, as lack of response to one triptan does not predict likelihood of responsiveness to another. A review of the available evidence suggests that almotriptan may be one of the most appropriate choices for an alternative triptan. PMID:16426262

  7. TEXTING WHILE DRIVING: EVALUATION OF GLANCE DISTRIBUTIONS FOR FREQUENT/INFREQUENT TEXTERS AND KEYPAD/TOUCHPAD TEXTERS

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Siby; Pollatsek, Alexander; Fisher, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Summary The threat that cell-phones pose to driving has been a well researched topic. There are fewer studies of the threat that texting creates for drivers, but the risks are obvious and the few existing studies confirm this. What is not obvious is whether frequent texters will expose themselves to the same risks as infrequent texters. This is important to know because many texters, especially teens who text frequently, may consider themselves immune to the dangers of texting while driving. As such, a comparison of frequent and infrequent texters was undertaken on a driving simulator. It is also not immediately clear what effects the different types of interfaces have on driving performance while text messaging. The interfaces under evaluation included keypad or “qwerty” phones (e.g., Blackberries) and touchpad phones (iPhone). It was found that the frequent and infrequent texters were equally likely to glance at least once for more than 2s inside the vehicle while sending a text message. It was also found that touchpad texters had a larger number of glances above the 2s threshold than keypad users, though this difference was not significant. The implications of this for future public policy are discussed. PMID:25279388

  8. [Left ventricular hypertrophy in the cat - "when hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is not hypertrophic cardiomyopathy"].

    PubMed

    Glaus, T; Wess, G

    2010-07-01

    According to WHO classification hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a primary genetic cardiomyopathy. Echocardiographically HCM is characterized by symmetric, asymmetric or focal left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) without recognizable underlying physical cause. However, echocardiographically HCM in cats may not be distinguishable from other causes of a thick appearing left ventricle. Hypovolemia can look like a hypertrophied ventricle but is basically only pseudohypertrophic. Well recognized and logical physical causes of LVH include systemic hypertension and outflow obstruction. LVH similar to HCM may also be found in feline hyperthyroidism. The context of the disease helps to differentiate these physical / physiological causes of LVH. Difficult to distinguish from HCM, particularly when based on a snapshot of a single echocardiographic exam, are myocarditis and . Only the clinical and echocardiographic course allow a reasonably confident etiological diagnosis and the differentiation between HCM and secondary LVH. PMID:20582898

  9. [Ocra Method: development of a new procedure for analysis of multiple tasks subject to infrequent rotation].

    PubMed

    Occhipinti, E; Colombini, Daniela; Occhipinti, M

    2008-01-01

    In the Ocra methods (Ocra index and Ocra Checklist), when computing the final indices (Ocra index or checklist score), in the case of more than one repetitive task a "traditional" procedure was already proposed, the results of which could be defined as "time-weighted average". This approach appears to be appropriate when considering rotations among tasks that are performed very frequently, for instance almost once every hour (or for shorter periods). However, when rotation among repetitive tasks is less frequent (i.e. once every 1 1/2 or more hours), the "time-weighted average" approach could result in an underestimation of the exposure level (as it practically flattens peaks of high exposures). For those scenarios an alternative approach based on the "most stressful task as minimum" might be more realistic. This latter approach has already been included in the NIOSH approach for multiple sequential lifting tasks and, given the recent availability in the Ocra method of more detailed duration multipliers (practically one different Du(M) for each different step of one hour of duration of the repetitive task), it is now possible to define a particular procedure to compute the complex Ocra Multitask Index (cOCRA) and the complex Checklist Score (cCHESCO) for the analysis of two or more repetitive tasks when rotations are infrequent (rotations every 1 1/2 hours or more). The result of this approach will be at least equal to the index of the most stressful task considered for its individual daily duration and at the most equal to the index of the most stressful task when it is (only theoretically) considered as lasting for the overall daily duration of all examined repetitive tasks. The procedure is based on the following formula: Complex Ocra Multitask Index = Ocra(1(Dum1) + (Delta ocra1xK) where 1,2,3,...,N = repetitive tasks ordered by ocra index values (1 = highest; N = lowest) computed considering respective real duration multipliers (Dum(i)). ocra1 = ocra index of

  10. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: A potentially serious trap (Data from the International Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Registry)

    PubMed Central

    Wagdy, Kerolos; ElMaghawry, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is an acute cardiac condition characterized by transient left ventricular dysfunction with wall motion abnormalities, most commonly in the form of apical ballooning. Despite being considered as a generally benign condition, many studies have emphasized potentially sinister outcomes associated with TTC. In this article, we review the most recent results of the International Takotsubo Registry, which investigated the clinical features, prognostic predictors, and outcomes of 1750 patients. PMID:26779527

  11. Dietary Salt Exacerbates Isoproterenol-induced Cardiomyopathy in Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure rats (SHHFs) take far longer to develop compensated heart failure and congestive decompensation than common surgical models of heart failure. Isoproterenol (ISO) infusion can accelerate cardiomyopathy in young SHHFs, while dietary salt loa...

  12. Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM)

    MedlinePlus

    Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2016 BroadcastMed, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM)

    MedlinePlus

    Septal Myectomy Surgery to Treat Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) You must have Javascript enabled in your web browser. View Program Transcript Click Here to view the OR-Live, Inc. Privacy Policy ...

  14. X-Linked Dilated Cardiomyopathy: A Cardiospecific Phenotype of Dystrophinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Akinori

    2015-01-01

    X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLDCM) is a distinct phenotype of dystrophinopathy characterized by preferential cardiac involvement without any overt skeletal myopathy. XLDCM is caused by mutations of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene and results in lethal heart failure in individuals between 10 and 20 years. Patients with Becker muscular dystrophy, an allelic disorder, have a milder phenotype of skeletal muscle involvement compared to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and sometimes present with dilated cardiomyopathy. The precise relationship between mutations in the DMD gene and cardiomyopathy remain unclear. However, some hypothetical mechanisms are being considered to be associated with the presence of some several dystrophin isoforms, certain reported mutations, and an unknown dystrophin-related pathophysiological mechanism. Recent therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the severe dystrophinopathy phenotype, appears promising, but the presence of XLDCM highlights the importance of focusing on cardiomyopathy while elucidating the pathomechanism and developing treatment. PMID:26066469

  15. Treatment of depression in an adolescent with cardiomyopathy and arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Tanidir, Canan; Tanidir, Ibrahim C; Tuzcu, Volkan

    2015-10-01

    Patients with cardiomyopathy have a higher incidence of mood and anxiety disorders, resulting in greater probability for hospitalisation and increased risk for arrhythmia and death. We report a case of a 16-year-old boy with Danon disease, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, who later developed depression and significant weight loss. The patient was successfully treated for his anxiety and depression with mirtazapine without any adverse cardiac effects. PMID:25400066

  16. Primary antiphospholipid syndrome, hypertrophic non-obstructive cardiomyopathy and hypotelorism.

    PubMed

    Kellermair, Joerg; Kammler, Juergen; Laubichler, Peter; Steinwender, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder associated with arterial/venous thrombosis. Cardiac manifestations of APS include valve stenosis/insufficiency, coronary artery disease and myocardial dysfunction presenting as dilated cardiomyopathy. In the following report, we present the case of a man with primary APS, hypertrophic non-obstructive cardiomyopathy and hypotelorism-a combination that has not yet been reported in the literature. PMID:27048398

  17. Tako-tsubo-like cardiomyopathy after EpiPen administration.

    PubMed

    Zubrinich, C M; Farouque, H M Omar; Rochford, S E; Sutherland, M F

    2008-11-01

    Tako-tsubo-like cardiomyopathy is characterized by acute chest pain, electrocardiographic changes and increased cardiac enzymes in the absence of obstructive coronary vessel disease. We describe the development of tako-tsubo-like cardiomyopathy in an elderly woman after the use of an EpiPen for generalized urticaria and angioedema. As adrenaline may participate in the pathogenesis of this condition, the need for careful patient selection and education in the use of adrenaline self-injectors remains imperative. PMID:19120537

  18. Doxorubicin cardiomyopathy in children with left-sided Wilms tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkel, D.; Camitta, B.; Kun, L.; Howarth, C.; Tang, T.

    1982-01-01

    Two children with Wilms tumor of the left kidney experienced severe anthracycline cardiomyopathy after irradiation to the tumor bed and conventional dosage of doxorubicin. The cardiomyopathy is attributed 1) to the fact that radiation fields for left Wilms tumor include the lower portion of the heart and 2) to the interaction of doxorubicin and irradiation on cardiac muscle. It is recommended that doxorubicin dosage be sharply restricted in children with Wilms tumor of the left kidney who receive postoperative irradiation.

  19. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy – a clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Ana María Castillo; Ruiz-Bailén, Manuel; Aguilar, Luis Rucabado

    2011-01-01

    Summary Stress cardiomyopathy is characterised by reversible left ventricular dysfunction. It simulates an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), presenting with precordial pain or dyspnoea, changes of the ST segment, T wave, or QTc interval on electrocardiogram, and raised cardiac enzymes. Typical findings are disturbances of segmental contractility (apical hypokinesia or akinesia), with normal epicardial coronary arteries. The true prevalence is unknown, as the syndrome may be under-diagnosed; it is more common in postmenopausal women. There is usually a trigger in the form of physical or psychological stress. The electrocardiographic, echocardiographic, and ventriculographic changes resolve spontaneously over a variable period of time (from days to months). There are a number of pathophysiological theories, none of which has been shown to be definitive, suggesting that all of them may be involved to some extent. The prognosis is generally favourable, and recurrence is very rare. PMID:21629203

  20. Genetics of Human and Canine Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Siobhan; Edwards, Jennifer; Ferguson-Mignan, Thomas F. N.; Cobb, Malcolm; Mongan, Nigel P.; Rutland, Catrin S.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death in both humans and dogs. Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) accounts for a large number of these cases, reported to be the third most common form of cardiac disease in humans and the second most common in dogs. In human studies of DCM there are more than 50 genetic loci associated with the disease. Despite canine DCM having similar disease progression to human DCM studies into the genetic basis of canine DCM lag far behind those of human DCM. In this review the aetiology, epidemiology, and clinical characteristics of canine DCM are examined, along with highlighting possible different subtypes of canine DCM and their potential relevance to human DCM. Finally the current position of genetic research into canine and human DCM, including the genetic loci, is identified and the reasons many studies may have failed to find a genetic association with canine DCM are reviewed. PMID:26266250

  1. Peripartum cardiomyopathy: current knowledge and future directions.

    PubMed

    Davis, Melinda; Duvernoy, Claire

    2015-07-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a form of heart failure occurring at the end of pregnancy or early in the postpartum period. Women may recover, have persistent cardiac dysfunction or suffer complications and death. Women who are African-American, older, hypertensive or have multiple gestation pregnancies have increased risk. Diagnosis and treatment may be delayed due to similarities between symptoms of normal pregnancy and heart failure. Echocardiography is essential for the diagnosis, and B-type natriuretic peptide can be helpful. Treatment for systolic heart failure must be adjusted during pregnancy, and anticoagulation may be indicated. Even after recovery, subsequent pregnancy confers substantial risk of worsening heart failure. Further investigations into the etiology, duration of treatment and risks for relapse are needed. PMID:26245944

  2. CNS disease triggering Takotsubo stress cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Wahbi, Karim

    2014-12-15

    There are a number of hereditary and non-hereditary central nervous system (CNS) disorders, which directly or indirectly affect the heart (brain-heart disorders). The most well-known of these CNS disorders are epilepsy, stroke, infectious or immunological encephalitis/meningitis, migraine, and traumatic brain injury. In addition, a number of hereditary and non-hereditary neurodegenerative disorders may impair cardiac functions. Affection of the heart may manifest not only as arrhythmias, myocardial infarction, autonomic impairment, systolic dysfunction/heart failure, arterial hypertension, or pulmonary hypertension, but also as stress cardiomyopathy (Takotsubo syndrome, TTS). CNS disease triggering TTS includes subarachnoid bleeding, epilepsy, ischemic stroke, intracerebral bleeding, migraine, encephalitis, traumatic brain injury, PRES syndrome, or ALS. Usually, TTS is acutely precipitated by stress triggered by various different events. TTS is one of the cardiac abnormalities most frequently induced by CNS disorders. Appropriate management of TTS from CNS disorders is essential to improve the outcome of affected patients. PMID:25213573

  3. Constrictive Pericarditis Versus Restrictive Cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed

    Garcia, Mario J

    2016-05-01

    About one-half of the patients with congestive heart failure have preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HFpEF). Although the etiology of HFpEF is most commonly related to long-standing hypertension and atherosclerosis, a significant number of suspected HFpEF patients have a restrictive cardiomyopathy or chronic pericardial disease. Recognizing these syndromes is important because early diagnosis may lead to instituting specific therapy that may prolong survival, improve quality of life, and/or recognize and treat an underlying systemic disorder. Advances in diagnostic imaging, biomarkers, and genetic testing today allow identification of the specific etiology in most cases. Novel pharmacological, immunologic, and surgical therapies are leading to improved quality of life and survival. PMID:27126534

  4. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: Pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Komamura, Kazuo; Fukui, Miho; Iwasaku, Toshihiro; Hirotani, Shinichi; Masuyama, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    In 1990, takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM) was first discovered and reported by a Japanese cardiovascular specialist. Since then, this heart disease has gained worldwide acceptance as an independent disease entity. TCM is an important entity that differs from acute myocardial infarction. It occurs more often in postmenopausal elderly women, is characterized by a transient hypokinesis of the left ventricular (LV) apex, and is associated with emotional or physical stress. Wall motion abnormality of the LV apex is generally transient and resolves within a few days to several weeks. Its prognosis is generally good. However, there are some reports of serious TCM complications, including hypotension, heart failure, ventricular rupture, thrombosis involving the LV apex, and torsade de pointes. It has been suggested that coronary spasm, coronary microvascular dysfunction, catecholamine toxicity and myocarditis might contribute to the pathogenesis of TCM. However, its pathophysiology is not clearly understood. PMID:25068020

  5. The Diagnosis and Evaluation of Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Japp, Alan G; Gulati, Ankur; Cook, Stuart A; Cowie, Martin R; Prasad, Sanjay K

    2016-06-28

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is best understood as the final common response of myocardium to diverse genetic and environmental insults. A rigorous work-up can exclude alternative causes of left ventricular (LV) dilation and dysfunction, identify etiologies that may respond to specific treatments, and guide family screening. A significant proportion of DCM cases have an underlying genetic or inflammatory basis. Measurement of LV size and ejection fraction remain central to diagnosis, risk stratification, and treatment, but other aspects of cardiac remodeling inform prognosis and carry therapeutic implications. Assessment of myocardial fibrosis predicts both risk of sudden cardiac death and likelihood of LV functional recovery, and has significant potential to guide patient selection for cardioverter-defibrillator implantation. Detailed mitral valve assessment is likely to assume increasing importance with the emergence of percutaneous interventions for functional mitral regurgitation. Detection of pre-clinical DCM could substantially reduce morbidity and mortality by allowing early instigation of cardioprotective therapy. PMID:27339497

  6. Characterization of mitochondrial DNA in primary cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Bobba, A; Giannattasio, S; Pucci, A; Lippolis, R; Camaschella, C; Marra, E

    1995-12-29

    With the aim of studying the involvement of the mitochondrial genome in the impairment of heart function, mitochondrial DNA was analyzed by modified primer shift-polymerase chain reaction in a panel of young patients affected by primary cardiomyopathies. Mitochondrial DNA molecules harboring the 7436 bp deletion were specifically found in cardiomyopathic patients as compared with a panel of control subjects. The 4977 bp deletion was commonly detected among the subjects analyzed whereas none of the specific tRNA gene point mutations generally associated with the cardiomyopathic trait were detected. The presence of the 7436 bp deletion as a consequence of a premature aging of the heart muscle, secondary to heart dysfunction, is discussed. PMID:8747493

  7. Female infant with oncocytic cardiomyopathy and microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS): A clue to the pathogenesis of oncocytic cardiomyopathy?

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, L.M.; Krous, H.F.; Eichenfield, L.F.; Swalwell, C.I.; Jones, M.C.

    1994-11-01

    A infant girl had red stellate skin lesions on the cheeks and neck, and mildly short palpebral fissures. Her skin abnormality was typical of microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS), a newly recognized syndrome consisting of congenital linear skin defects and ocular abnormalities in females monosomic for Xp22. She died suddenly and unexpectedly at age 4 months; the cause of death was ascribed to oncocytic cardiomyopathy. Oncocytic cardiomyopathy occurs only in young children, who present with refractory arrhythmias leading to cardiac arrest. The coexistence of two rare conditions, one of which is mapped to the X chromosome, and an excess of affected females with oncocytic cardiomyopathy is also X-linked, with Xp22 being a candidate region. Overlapping manifestations in the two conditions (ocular abnormalities in cases of oncocytic cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias in MLS) offer additional support for this hypothesis. 43 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. A predictive model for canine dilated cardiomyopathy-a meta-analysis of Doberman Pinscher data.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Siobhan; Edwards, Jennifer; Emes, Richard D; Cobb, Malcolm A; Mongan, Nigel P; Rutland, Catrin S

    2015-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a prevalent and often fatal disease in humans and dogs. Indeed dilated cardiomyopathy is the third most common form of cardiac disease in humans, reported to affect approximately 36 individuals per 100,000 individuals. In dogs, dilated cardiomyopathy is the second most common cardiac disease and is most prevalent in the Irish Wolfhound, Doberman Pinscher and Newfoundland breeds. Dilated cardiomyopathy is characterised by ventricular chamber enlargement and systolic dysfunction which often leads to congestive heart failure. Although multiple human loci have been implicated in the pathogenesis of dilated cardiomyopathy, the identified variants are typically associated with rare monogenic forms of dilated cardiomyopathy. The potential for multigenic interactions contributing to human dilated cardiomyopathy remains poorly understood. Consistent with this, several known human dilated cardiomyopathy loci have been excluded as common causes of canine dilated cardiomyopathy, although canine dilated cardiomyopathy resembles the human disease functionally. This suggests additional genetic factors contribute to the dilated cardiomyopathy phenotype.This study represents a meta-analysis of available canine dilated cardiomyopathy genetic datasets with the goal of determining potential multigenic interactions relating the sex chromosome genotype (XX vs. XY) with known dilated cardiomyopathy associated loci on chromosome 5 and the PDK4 gene in the incidence and progression of dilated cardiomyopathy. The results show an interaction between known canine dilated cardiomyopathy loci and an unknown X-linked locus. Our study is the first to test a multigenic contribution to dilated cardiomyopathy and suggest a genetic basis for the known sex-disparity in dilated cardiomyopathy outcomes. PMID:25834770

  9. Indium-doped ZnO nanowires with infrequent growth orientation, rough surfaces and low-density surface traps

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Indium-doped ZnO nanowires have been prepared by vapor transport deposition. With increasing In content, the growth orientation of the nanowires switches from [101_0] to infrequent [022_3] and the surface becomes rough. No surface-related exciton emission is observed in these nanowires. The results indicate that large surface-to-volume ratio, high free electron concentration, and low density of surface traps can be achieved simultaneously in ZnO nanowires via In doping. These unique properties make In-doped ZnO nanowire a potential material for photocatalysis application, which is demonstrated by the enhanced photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B. PMID:24256997

  10. MR Imaging in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: From Magnet to Bedside.

    PubMed

    Bogaert, Jan; Olivotto, Iacopo

    2014-11-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy ( HCM hypertrophic cardiomyopathy ), the most common genetically transmitted cardiac disorder, has been the focus of extensive research over the past 50 years. HCM hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a multifaceted disease with highly heterogeneous genetic background, phenotypic expression, clinical presentation, and long-term outcome. Though most patients have an indolent course with a life expectancy comparable to that of the general population, early diagnosis and accurate risk profiling are essential to identify the sizeable subset at increased risk of sudden cardiac death or disease progression and heart failure-related complications, requiring aggressive management options. Imaging has a central role in the diagnosis and prognostic assessment of HCM hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients, as well as screening of potentially affected family members. In this context, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has recently emerged as an ideal complement to transthoracic echocardiography. Its multiparametric approach, fusing spatial, contrast, and temporal resolution, provides the clinician with detailed characterization of the HCM hypertrophic cardiomyopathy phenotype and assessment of its functional consequences including causes and site of dynamic obstruction, presence and extent of myocardial perfusion abnormalities, and fibrosis. Moreover, MR is key in differentiating HCM hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from "phenocopies"-that is, hearts with similar morphology but profoundly different etiology, such as amyloid or Anderson-Fabry disease. Long term, the incremental information provided by MR is relevant to planning of septal reduction therapies, identification of the early stages of end-stage progression, and stratification of arrhythmic risk. The aim of this review is to depict the increasingly important role of MR imaging in relation to the complexity of HCM hypertrophic cardiomyopathy , highlighting its role in clinical decision making. PMID:25340269

  11. A rare form of cardiomyopathy: left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Goud, Aditya; Padmanabhan, Sriram

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular non-compaction is a recently recognized, rare form of cardiomyopathy. It is based on the arrest of endomyocardial morphogenesis during embryogenesis. It was first described in 1984 by Engberding who described it as isolated ‘sinusoids’ within the LV. Right now its prevalence is estimated at 0.014 to 1.3 and 3–4% in heart failure patients. Its clinical manifestations are highly variable, ranging from no symptoms to disabling congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, and systemic thromboemboli. Doppler Echocardiogram is considered the diagnostic procedure of choice and treatment is symptomatic management of its symptoms and complications. PMID:26908378

  12. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Thiene, Gaetano; Corrado, Domenico; Basso, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D) is a heart muscle disease clinically characterized by life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Its prevalence has been estimated to vary from 1:2,500 to 1:5,000. ARVC/D is a major cause of sudden death in the young and athletes. The pathology consists of a genetically determined dystrophy of the right ventricular myocardium with fibro-fatty replacement to such an extent that it leads to right ventricular aneurysms. The clinical picture may include: a subclinical phase without symptoms and with ventricular fibrillation being the first presentation; an electrical disorder with palpitations and syncope, due to tachyarrhythmias of right ventricular origin; right ventricular or biventricular pump failure, so severe as to require transplantation. The causative genes encode proteins of mechanical cell junctions (plakoglobin, plakophilin, desmoglein, desmocollin, desmoplakin) and account for intercalated disk remodeling. Familiar occurrence with an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance and variable penetrance has been proven. Recessive variants associated with palmoplantar keratoderma and woolly hair have been also reported. Clinical diagnosis may be achieved by demonstrating functional and structural alterations of the right ventricle, depolarization and repolarization abnormalities, arrhythmias with the left bundle branch block morphology and fibro-fatty replacement through endomyocardial biopsy. Two dimensional echo, angiography and magnetic resonance are the imaging tools for visualizing structural-functional abnormalities. Electroanatomic mapping is able to detect areas of low voltage corresponding to myocardial atrophy with fibro-fatty replacement. The main differential diagnoses are idiopathic right ventricular outflow tract tachycardia, myocarditis, dialted cardiomyopathy and sarcoidosis. Only palliative therapy is available and consists of antiarrhythmic drugs, catheter ablation and

  13. Targeting caveolin-3 for the treatment of diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Murfitt, Lucy; Whiteley, Gareth; Iqbal, Mohammad M; Kitmitto, Ashraf

    2015-07-01

    Diabetes is a global health problem with more than 550 million people predicted to be diabetic by 2030. A major complication of diabetes is cardiovascular disease, which accounts for over two-thirds of mortality and morbidity in diabetic patients. This increased risk has led to the definition of a diabetic cardiomyopathy phenotype characterised by early left ventricular dysfunction with normal ejection fraction. Here we review the aetiology of diabetic cardiomyopathy and explore the involvement of the protein caveolin-3 (Cav3). Cav3 forms part of a complex mechanism regulating insulin signalling and glucose uptake, processes that are impaired in diabetes. Further, Cav3 is key for stabilisation and trafficking of cardiac ion channels to the plasma membrane and so contributes to the cardiac action potential shape and duration. In addition, Cav3 has direct and indirect interactions with proteins involved in excitation-contraction coupling and so has the potential to influence cardiac contractility. Significantly, both impaired contractility and rhythm disturbances are hallmarks of diabetic cardiomyopathy. We review here how changes to Cav3 expression levels and altered relationships with interacting partners may be contributory factors to several of the pathological features identified in diabetic cardiomyopathy. Finally, the review concludes by considering ways in which levels of Cav3 may be manipulated in order to develop novel therapeutic approaches for treating diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:25779609

  14. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy after a dancing session: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Stress-induced (Takotsubo) cardiomyopathy is a rare form of cardiomyopathy which presents in a manner similar to that of acute coronary syndrome. This sometimes leads to unnecessary thrombolysis therapy. The pathogenesis of this disease is still poorly understood. We believe that reporting all cases of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy will contribute to a better understanding of this disease. Here, we report a patient who, in the absence of any recent stressful events in her life, developed the disease after a session of dancing. Case presentation A 69-year-old Caucasian woman presented with features suggestive of acute coronary syndrome shortly after a session of dancing. Echocardiography and a coronary angiogram showed typical features of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy and our patient was treated accordingly. Eight weeks later, her condition resolved completely and the results of echocardiography were totally normal. Conclusions Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, though transient, is a rare and serious condition. Although it is commonly precipitated by stressful life events, these are not necessarily present. Our patient was enjoying one of her hobbies (that is, dancing) when she developed the disease. This case has particular interest in medicine, especially for the specialties of cardiology and emergency medicine. We hope that it will add more information to the literature about this rare condition. PMID:22040382

  15. Genetic advances in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Carolyn Y.; Charron, Philippe; Richard, Pascale; Girolami, Francesca; Van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y.; Pinto, Yigal

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies in the 1980s and 1990s led to landmark discoveries that sarcomere mutations cause both hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies. Sarcomere mutations also likely play a role in more complex phenotypes and overlap cardiomyopathies with features of hypertrophy, dilation, diastolic abnormalities, and non-compaction. Identification of the genetic cause of these important conditions provides unique opportunities to interrogate and characterize disease pathogenesis and pathophysiology, starting from the molecular level and expanding from there. With such insights, there is potential for clinical translation that may transform management of patients and families with inherited cardiomyopathies. If key pathways for disease development can be identified, they could potentially serve as targets for novel disease-modifying or disease-preventing therapies. By utilizing gene-based diagnostic testing, we can identify at-risk individuals prior to the onset of clinical disease, allowing for disease-modifying therapy to be initiated early in life, at a time that such treatment may be most successful. In this section, we review the current application of genetics in clinical management, focusing on hypertrophic cardiomyopathy as a paradigm; discuss state-of-the-art genetic testing technology; review emerging knowledge of gene expression in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies; and discuss both the prospects, as well as the challenges, of bringing genetics to medicine. PMID:25634555

  16. Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to chronic cocaine abuse: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cocaine is a potent sympathomimetic agent associated with the development of possible fatal cardiovascular complications. Dysrhythmias, acute myocardial infarction, hypertension and dilated cardiomyopathy are just some of many cardiovascular effects related to the abuse of cocaine. Case presentation A 38-year-old Hispanic male with a past medical history of hypertension presented with a chief complaint of progressive shortness of breath. The patient confessed to the use of cocaine for almost 18 years once per week. On examination he was hypertensive and tachycardic with a systolic murmur over the 5th intercostal space at the level of the left mid-clavicular line. Laboratory workup revealed an elevated Brain natriuretic peptide; urine toxicology was positive for cocaine. 2D-echocardiogram showed dilated cardiomyopathy. Cardiac catheterization excluded angioischemic cause. He was managed medically and subsequently discharged with drug rehabilitation. On follow-up diagnostic evaluation after 5 months of cocaine cessation, his ejection function improved significantly. Conclusion The exact incidence of cocaine related cardiomyopathy is unknown and likely underreported. The clinical course is abrupt and comparatively similar to other types of cardiomyopathy. The management is like other forms of cardiomyopathy; however β-blockers should be avoided. The myocardial dysfunction is reversible with abstaining from additional cocaine ingestion. Non-invasive testing should be performed after several months to re-evaluate the treatment response. PMID:24341463

  17. The Use of Fluoxetine in a Patient With Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Suki K; Catalano, Maria C; Catalano, Glenn

    2016-05-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is an acute coronary syndrome that is believed to be brought on by stress. Symptoms, which are similar to an acute myocardial infarction, include chest pain, shortness of breath, arrhythmias, and cardiogenic shock, and the electrocardiogram often shows ST and T wave changes. Left ventricular wall hypokinesis along with a significantly reduced ejection fraction are seen on echocardiogram. The great majority of these symptoms all occur in the absence of occlusive disease. Many cases have been reported in which the development of takotsubo cardiomyopathy was associated with serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors and tricyclic antidepressants. However, no cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy have been reported involving selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. This article presents the case of a 51-year-old woman receiving stable therapy with fluoxetine who developed takotsubo cardiomyopathy after an acute stress. We also discuss the clinical presentation of takotsubo cardiomyopathy, review possible causes, and discuss the treatment of depressive symptoms in patients who are at increased risk of developing this illness. PMID:27123803

  18. Monoamniotic monochorionic twins discordant for noncompaction cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ng, Dianna; Bouhlal, Yosr; Ursell, Philip C; Shieh, Joseph T C

    2013-06-01

    Occasionally "identical twins" are phenotypically different, raising the question of zygosity and the issue of genetic versus environmental influences during development. We recently noted monochorionic-monoamniotic twins, one of which had an isolated cardiac abnormality, noncompaction cardiomyopathy, a condition characterized by cardiac ventricular hypertrabeculation. We examined the prenatal course and subsequent pathologic correlation since ventricular morphogenesis may depend on early muscular contraction and blood flow. The monochorionic-monoamniotic female twin pair was initially identified since one fetus presented with increased nuchal translucency. Complete heart block was later identified in the fetus with nuchal translucency who did not survive after delivery. In contrast, the unaffected twin had normal cardiac studies both prenatally and postnatally. Pathologic analysis of the affected twin demonstrated noncompaction of the left ventricle with dysplasia of the aortic and pulmonary valves. Dissection of the cardiac conduction system disclosed atrioventricular bundle fibrosis. Maternal lupus studies, amniocentesis with karyotype, and studies for 22q11.2 were normal. To test for zygosity, we performed multiple STR marker analysis and found that all markers were shared even using nonblood tissues from the affected twin. These studies demonstrate that monozygotic twins that are monochorionic monoamniotic can be discordant for cardiac noncompaction. The results suggest further investigation into the potential roles of pathologic fibrosis, contractility, and blood flow in cardiac ventricle development. PMID:23636980

  19. Mendelian bases of myopathies, cardiomyopathies, and neuromyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Piluso, G; Aurino, S; Cacciottolo, M; Del Vecchio Blanco, F; Lancioni, A; Rotundo, IL; Torella, A; Nigro, V

    2010-01-01

    Summary A second genetic revolution is approaching thanks to next-generation DNA sequencing technologies. In the next few years, the 1,000$-genome sequencing promises to reveal every individual variation of DNA. There is, however, a major problem: the identification of thousands of nucleotide changes per individual with uncertain pathological meaning. This is also an ethical issue. In the middle, there is today the possibility to address the sequencing analysis of genetically heterogeneous disorders to selected groups of genes with defined mutation types. This will be cost-effective and safer. We assembled an easy-to manage overview of most Mendelian genes involved in myopathies, cardiomyopathies, and neuromyopathies. This was entirely put together using a number of open access web resources that are listed below. During this effort we realized that there are unexpected countless sources of data, but the confusion is huge. In some cases, we got lost in the validation of disease genes and in the difficulty to discriminate between polymorphisms and disease-causing alleles. In the table are the annotated genes, their associated disorders, genomic, mRNA and coding sizes. We also counted the number of pathological alleles so far reported and the percentage of single nucleotide mutations. PMID:22029103

  20. Treatment of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with verapamil.

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenbach, M; Hopf, R; Kober, G; Bussmann, W D; Keller, M; Petersen, Y

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-two patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy were treated with the calcium inhibitor, verapamil, which was administered in a mean oral dose of 480 mg per day. After an average of 15 months of treatment (4 to 24 months), the QRS amplitude in the electrocardiogram was significantly reduced from 4.2 to 3.8 mV. Heart volume calculated from chest x-ray films in the supine position decreased significantly from 858 to 766 ml per 1.73 m2. In 10 patients, follow-up heart catheterisation showed a decrease in left ventricular muscle mass in 7 patients and a slight increase in 3 patients. Coronary artery diameter decreased in 7 patients, increased in 1, and was unchanged in 2. The reduction in coronary artery diameter is considered to be a consequence of a reduced heart muscle mass. From all available clinical data it is concluded that verapamil treatment is superior to beta-blocker therapy. Images PMID:573129

  1. Management of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Silvano, Maria; Mastella, Giulio; Zorzi, Alessandro; Migliore, Federico; Pilichou, Kalliopi; Bauce, Barbara; Rigato, Ilaria; Perazzolo Marra, Martina; Iliceto, Sabino; Thiene, Gaetano; Basso, Cristina; Corrado, Domenico

    2016-08-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is a genetically determined heart muscle disorder, predisposing to sudden cardiac death (SCD), particularly in young patients and athletes. Pathological features include loss of myocytes and fibrofatty replacement of right ventricular myocardium; a biventricular involvement is often observed. The diagnosis of ARVC (prevalence 1:5.000 in the general population) does not rely on a single gold standard test but is achieved using a scoring system, proposed in 2010 by an International Task Force, which encompasses familial and genetic factors, ECG abnormalities, arrhythmias, and structural/functional ventricular alterations. The main goal of treatment is the prevention of SCD. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is the only proven "lifesaving" therapy; however, it is associated with a significant morbidity due to device-related complications and inappropriate ICD interventions. Other treatment options such as life style changes, antiarrhythmic drugs, beta-blockers and catheter ablation may reduce the arrhythmic burden and alleviate symptoms, without evident impact on prevention of SCD. Selection of patient candidates to ICD implantation is the most challenging issue in the clinical management of ARVC. This article reviews the current perspective on management of ARVC, focusing on clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, risk stratification and therapeutic strategies of affected patients. PMID:27186923

  2. Peripartum cardiomyopathy: A puzzle closer to solution

    PubMed Central

    Fett, James D

    2014-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) represents new heart failure in a previously heart-healthy peripartum patient. It is necessary to rule out all other known causes of heart failure before accepting a diagnosis of PPCM. The modern era for PPCM in the United States and beyond began with the report of the National Institutes of Health PPCM Workshop in 2000, clarifying all then-currently known aspects of the disease. Since then, hundreds of publications have appeared, an indication of how devastating this disease can be to young mothers and their families and the urgent desire to find solutions for its cause and better treatment. The purpose of this review is to highlight the important advances that have brought us nearer to the solution of this puzzle, focusing on what we have learned about PPCM since 2000; and what still remains unanswered. Despite many improvements in outcome, we still do not know the actual triggers that initiate the pathological process; but realize that cardiac angiogenic imbalances resulting from complex pregnancy-related immune system and hormonal changes play a key role. PMID:24669290

  3. Prooxidant Mechanisms in Iron Overload Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ching-Feng; Lian, Wei-Shiung

    2013-01-01

    Iron overload cardiomyopathy (IOC), defined as the presence of systolic or diastolic cardiac dysfunction secondary to increased deposition of iron, is emerging as an important cause of heart failure due to the increased incidence of this disorder seen in thalassemic patients and in patients of primary hemochromatosis. At present, although palliative treatment by regular iron chelation was recommended; whereas IOC is still the major cause for mortality in patient with chronic heart failure induced by iron-overloading. Because iron is a prooxidant and the associated mechanism seen in iron-overload heart is still unclear; therefore, we intend to delineate the multiple signaling pathways involved in IOC. These pathways may include organelles such as calcium channels, mitochondria; paracrine effects from both macrophages and fibroblast, and novel mediators such as thromboxane A2 and adiponectin; with increased oxidative stress and inflammation found commonly in these signaling pathways. With further understanding on these complex and inter-related molecular mechanisms, we can propose potential therapeutic strategies to ameliorate the cardiac toxicity induced by iron-overloading. PMID:24350287

  4. Prooxidant mechanisms in iron overload cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ching-Feng; Lian, Wei-Shiung

    2013-01-01

    Iron overload cardiomyopathy (IOC), defined as the presence of systolic or diastolic cardiac dysfunction secondary to increased deposition of iron, is emerging as an important cause of heart failure due to the increased incidence of this disorder seen in thalassemic patients and in patients of primary hemochromatosis. At present, although palliative treatment by regular iron chelation was recommended; whereas IOC is still the major cause for mortality in patient with chronic heart failure induced by iron-overloading. Because iron is a prooxidant and the associated mechanism seen in iron-overload heart is still unclear; therefore, we intend to delineate the multiple signaling pathways involved in IOC. These pathways may include organelles such as calcium channels, mitochondria; paracrine effects from both macrophages and fibroblast, and novel mediators such as thromboxane A2 and adiponectin; with increased oxidative stress and inflammation found commonly in these signaling pathways. With further understanding on these complex and inter-related molecular mechanisms, we can propose potential therapeutic strategies to ameliorate the cardiac toxicity induced by iron-overloading. PMID:24350287

  5. Current therapeutic concepts in peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Krejci, Jan; Poloczkova, Hana; Nemec, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a relatively rare disease characterized by systolic heart failure occuring towards the end of pregnancy or during the months following birth. It is most often seen in women of African descent, and its incidence seems to be slightly increasing in recent years. Other etiologies of heart failure should be excluded to determine the diagnosis of PPCM. The clinical picture corresponds to systolic heart failure. The rapid onset of the symptoms in relation to pregnancy is striking. The essential diagnostic procedures such as echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and endomyocardial biopsy may be beneficial in certain situations. The etiology of the disease remains unclear. Speculated causes include myocarditis, autoimmune disorders, cardiotropic virus infection, and abnormal responses to hemodynamic and hormonal changes during pregnancy. Particular attention is currently given to the concept of increased oxidative stress inducing production of proapoptotic, angiostatic and proinflammatory mediators. Recovery of left ventricular systolic function occurs in about half of the cases. Mortality has been decreasing in recent years, especially in the United States, but is still between 10-15% in less developed countries where therapeutic possibilities are limited. In addition to standard heart failure therapy, specific treatments (pentoxyfilline, bromocriptine, immunomodulatory therapy) have been tested. Mechanical circulatory support is sometimes needed. Heart transplantation is the therapeutic option for the most severe heart failure and is used in about 10% of the cases. Recurrence in subsequent pregnancy is common and therefore, another pregnancy is not recommended in many cases. PMID:25483952

  6. The embryological basis of subclinical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Captur, Gabriella; Ho, Carolyn Y; Schlossarek, Saskia; Kerwin, Janet; Mirabel, Mariana; Wilson, Robert; Rosmini, Stefania; Obianyo, Chinwe; Reant, Patricia; Bassett, Paul; Cook, Andrew C; Lindsay, Susan; McKenna, William J; Mills, Kevin; Elliott, Perry M; Mohun, Timothy J; Carrier, Lucie; Moon, James C

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is caused by mutations in sarcomeric proteins, the commonest being MYBPC3 encoding myosin-binding protein C. It is characterised by left ventricular hypertrophy but there is an important pre-hypertrophic phenotype with features including crypts, abnormal mitral leaflets and trabeculae. We investigated these during mouse cardiac development using high-resolution episcopic microscopy. In embryonic hearts from wildtype, homozygous (HO) and heterozygous (HET) Mybpc3-targeted knock-out (KO) mice we show that crypts (one or two) are a normal part of wildtype development but they almost all resolve by birth. By contrast, HO and HET embryos had increased crypt presence, abnormal mitral valve formation and alterations in the compaction process. In scarce normal human embryos, crypts were sometimes present. This study shows that features of the human pre-hypertrophic HCM phenotype occur in the mouse. In an animal model we demonstrate that there is an embryological HCM phenotype. Crypts are a normal part of cardiac development but, along with the mitral valve and trabeculae, their developmental trajectory is altered by the presence of HCM truncating Mybpc3 gene mutation. PMID:27323879

  7. The embryological basis of subclinical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Captur, Gabriella; Ho, Carolyn Y.; Schlossarek, Saskia; Kerwin, Janet; Mirabel, Mariana; Wilson, Robert; Rosmini, Stefania; Obianyo, Chinwe; Reant, Patricia; Bassett, Paul; Cook, Andrew C.; Lindsay, Susan; McKenna, William J.; Mills, Kevin; Elliott, Perry M.; Mohun, Timothy J.; Carrier, Lucie; Moon, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is caused by mutations in sarcomeric proteins, the commonest being MYBPC3 encoding myosin-binding protein C. It is characterised by left ventricular hypertrophy but there is an important pre-hypertrophic phenotype with features including crypts, abnormal mitral leaflets and trabeculae. We investigated these during mouse cardiac development using high-resolution episcopic microscopy. In embryonic hearts from wildtype, homozygous (HO) and heterozygous (HET) Mybpc3-targeted knock-out (KO) mice we show that crypts (one or two) are a normal part of wildtype development but they almost all resolve by birth. By contrast, HO and HET embryos had increased crypt presence, abnormal mitral valve formation and alterations in the compaction process. In scarce normal human embryos, crypts were sometimes present. This study shows that features of the human pre-hypertrophic HCM phenotype occur in the mouse. In an animal model we demonstrate that there is an embryological HCM phenotype. Crypts are a normal part of cardiac development but, along with the mitral valve and trabeculae, their developmental trajectory is altered by the presence of HCM truncating Mybpc3 gene mutation. PMID:27323879

  8. In-hospital and long-term mortality in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: a community hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    Vriz, Olga; Brosolo, Gabriele; Martina, Stefano; Pertoldi, Franco; Citro, Rodolfo; Mos, Lucio; Ferrara, Francesco; Bossone, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is characterized by reversible left ventricular dysfunction, frequently precipitated by a stressful event. Despite the favorable course and good long-term prognosis, a variety of complications may occur in the acute phase of the disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in-hospital and long-term outcomes of a cohort of TTC patients. Methods Fifty-five patients (mean age 68.1±12 years) were prospectively followed for a mean of 69.6±32.2 months (64,635 days). In-hospital (death, heart failure, arrhythmias) and long-term events (death and recurrences) were recorded. Results Patients were predominantly women (87.3%) who experienced a recent stressful event (emotional or physical) and were admitted to hospital for chest pain. Eleven patients (20%) had a diagnosis of depressive disorder, and arterial hypertension was the most frequent cardiovascular risk factor. The ECG revealed ST-segment elevation in 43.6% of patients. At angiography, seven cases (12.7%) had at least one significant (≥50%) coronary artery stenosis and four patients (7.3%) had myocardial bridging of the left anterior descending artery. During hospitalization, three patients died (one from cardiac causes) and cardiovascular complications occurred in 12 patients. During follow-up, five patients died (none from cardiac causes), six patients had recurrences within the first year. Two patients had two recurrences: one after 114 days, triggered by an asthma attack as the first event, and the other after 1,850 days. Conclusions In TTC patients, in-hospital and long-term mortality is primarily due to non-cardiovascular causes. Recurrences are not infrequent and coronary artery disease is not an uncommon finding. PMID:27406446

  9. Defective insulin signaling and mitochondrial dynamics in diabetic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Westermeier, Francisco; Navarro-Marquez, Mario; López-Crisosto, Camila; Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; Quiroga, Clara; Bustamante, Mario; Verdejo, Hugo E.; Zalaquett, Ricardo; Ibacache, Mauricio; Parra, Valentina; Castro, Pablo F.; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Hill, Joseph A.; Lavandero, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a common consequence of longstanding type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and encompasses structural, morphological, functional, and metabolic abnormalities in the heart. Myocardial energy metabolism depends on mitochondria, which must generate sufficient ATP to meet the high energy demands of the myocardium. Dysfunctional mitochondria are involved in the pathophysiology of diabetic heart disease. A large body of evidence implicates myocardial insulin resistance in the pathogenesis of DCM. Recent studies show that insulin signaling influences myocardial energy metabolism by impacting cardiomyocyte mitochondrial dynamics and function under physiological conditions. However, comprehensive understanding of molecular mechanisms linking insulin signaling and changes in the architecture of the mitochondrial network in diabetic cardiomyopathy is lacking. This review summarizes our current understanding of how defective insulin signaling impacts cardiac function in diabetic cardiomyopathy and discusses the potential role of mitochondrial dynamics. PMID:25686534

  10. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy and Catatonia in the Setting of Benzodiazepine Withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Peng, Teng J; Patchett, Nicholas D; Bernard, Sheilah A

    2016-01-01

    We report two serious and unusual complications of benzodiazepine withdrawal in a single patient: takotsubo cardiomyopathy and catatonia. This 61-year-old female patient was brought to the emergency department with lethargy and within hours had declined into a state of catatonia. Although there was never a complaint of chest pain, ECG showed deep anterior T-wave inversions and cardiac enzymes were elevated. An echocardiogram was consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy. She later received 1 mg of midazolam and within minutes had resolution of catatonic symptoms. Careful history revealed that she had omitted her daily dose of lorazepam for 3 days prior to admission. To our knowledge, the case presented herein is the first report of simultaneous catatonia and takotsubo cardiomyopathy in the setting of benzodiazepine withdrawal. The pathogenesis of both conditions is poorly understood but may be indirectly related to the sudden decrease in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signaling during benzodiazepine withdrawal. PMID:27547472

  11. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy and Catatonia in the Setting of Benzodiazepine Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Teng J.

    2016-01-01

    We report two serious and unusual complications of benzodiazepine withdrawal in a single patient: takotsubo cardiomyopathy and catatonia. This 61-year-old female patient was brought to the emergency department with lethargy and within hours had declined into a state of catatonia. Although there was never a complaint of chest pain, ECG showed deep anterior T-wave inversions and cardiac enzymes were elevated. An echocardiogram was consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy. She later received 1 mg of midazolam and within minutes had resolution of catatonic symptoms. Careful history revealed that she had omitted her daily dose of lorazepam for 3 days prior to admission. To our knowledge, the case presented herein is the first report of simultaneous catatonia and takotsubo cardiomyopathy in the setting of benzodiazepine withdrawal. The pathogenesis of both conditions is poorly understood but may be indirectly related to the sudden decrease in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signaling during benzodiazepine withdrawal. PMID:27547472

  12. Familial spontaneous complete heart block in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Louie, E K; Maron, B J

    1986-01-01

    Two siblings with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy developed spontaneous complete heart block requiring permanent pacemaker implantation at similar ages (29 and 33 years). The clinical, morphological, and haemodynamic expressions of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy differed considerably in these two patients. The sister had severe functional limitation due to dyspnoea, pronounced and diffuse left ventricular hypertrophy (maximum ventricular septal thickness of 41 mm), and left ventricular outflow obstruction (peak subaortic gradient of 75 mm Hg under basal conditions). In contrast the brother was symptom free, had only modest left ventricular hypertrophy which was confined to the anterior ventricular septum (maximal thickness of 16 mm), and had no echocardiographic evidence of subaortic obstruction. These dissimilar findings in siblings with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy suggest that the predisposition to develop complete heart block was probably genetically transmitted, although it was unrelated to the phenotypic and clinical expression of the disease. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3707787

  13. Transient Reverse Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Following a Spider Bite in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Alexakis, Lykourgos-Christos; Arapi, Sophia; Stefanou, Ioannis; Gargalianos, Panagiotis; Astriti, Myrto

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Black widow spider is endemic in the Mediterranean area and although envenomations are rare, may occasionally lead to death. We present a case of a 64-year-old female developing a rare variant of takotsubo, stress-induced, cardiomyopathy after a spider bite. This resulted in acute heart failure within 24 hours of the bite. With medical treatment and supportive care, the patient's clinical condition improved. Reverse takotsubo cardiomyopathy was diagnosed by echocardiography, which was transient. Clinical and echocardiographic findings have been completely resolved on follow-up 46 days later. Reverse takotsubo cardiomyopathy has not been yet described following a spider bite. Doctors in the emergency department of endemic countries should be familiar with this potential complication. PMID:25654384

  14. Rare case of stress cardiomyopathy due to intramuscular epinephrine administration.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Salik; Melnick, Stephen; Lohani, Saroj; Lloyd, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 37-year-old woman who presented to our hospital with retrosternal chest pain following intramuscular administration of epinephrine due to presumed anaphylaxis. On arrival, she was found to have ST segment depression in the anterolateral leads on ECG and elevated cardiac troponins. She was diagnosed with stress cardiomyopathy based on left ventricle dysfunction and angiographically normal coronary arteries on cardiac catheterisation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the third reported case of takotsubo cardiomyopathy following appropriately dosed intramuscular administration of epinephrine for anaphylaxis. This case highlights the importance of considering stress cardiomyopathy in patients presenting with chest pain syndrome following systemic administration of epinephrine. PMID:27268785

  15. Pediatric cardiomyopathies: causes, epidemiology, clinical course, preventive strategies and therapies

    PubMed Central

    Lipshultz, Steven E; Cochran, Thomas R; Briston, David A; Brown, Stefanie R; Sambatakos, Peter J; Miller, Tracie L; Carrillo, Adriana A; Corcia, Liat; Sanchez, Janine E; Diamond, Melissa B; Freundlich, Michael; Harake, Danielle; Gayle, Tamara; Harmon, William G; Rusconi, Paolo G; Sandhu, Satinder K; Wilkinson, James D

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies, which are rare but serious disorders of the muscles of the heart, affect at least one in every 100,000 children in the USA. Approximately 40% of children with symptomatic cardiomyopathy undergo heart transplantation or die from cardiac complications within 2 years. However, a significant number of children suffering from cardiomyopathy are surviving into adulthood, making it an important chronic illness for both pediatric and adult clinicians to understand. The natural history, risk factors, prevalence and incidence of this pediatric condition were not fully understood before the 1990s. Questions regarding optimal diagnostic, prognostic and treatment methods remain. Children require long-term follow-up into adulthood in order to identify the factors associated with best clinical practice including diagnostic approaches, as well as optimal treatment approaches. In this article, we comprehensively review current research on various presentations of this disease, along with current knowledge about their causes, treatments and clinical outcomes. PMID:24180540

  16. Diagnostic approaches for diabetic cardiomyopathy and myocardial fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Maya, Lisandro; Villarreal, Francisco J.

    2009-01-01

    In diabetes mellitus, alterations in cardiac structure/function in the absence of ischemic heart disease, hypertension or other cardiac pathologies is termed diabetic cardiomyopathy. In the United States, the prevalence of diabetes mellitus continues to rise and the disease currently affects about 8% of the general population. Hence, it is imperative the use of appropriate diagnostic strategies for diabetic cardiomyopathy, which may help correctly identify the disease at early stages and implement suitable corrective therapies. Currently, there is no single diagnostic method for the identification of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Diabetic cardiomyopathy is known to induce changes in cardiac structure such as, myocardial hypertrophy, fibrosis and fat droplet deposition. Early changes in cardiac function are typically manifested as abnormal diastolic function that with time leads to loss of contractile function. Echocardiography based methods currently stands as the preferred diagnostic approach for diabetic cardiomyopathy, due to its wide availability and economical use. In addition to conventional techniques, magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy along with contrast agents are now leading new approaches in the diagnosis of myocardial fibrosis, and cardiac and hepatic metabolic changes. These strategies can be complemented with serum biomarkers so they can offer a clear picture as to diabetes-induced changes in cardiac structure/function even at very early stages of the disease. This review article intends to provide a summary of experimental and routine tools currently available to diagnose diabetic cardiomyopathy induced changes in cardiac structure/function. These tools can be reliably used in either experimental models of diabetes or for clinical applications. PMID:19595694

  17. Hypothyroid cardiomyopathy complicated by a left ventricular laminar thrombus.

    PubMed

    Van Treeck, Benjamin J; Masoud, Amgad G

    2014-01-01

    Clinical hypothyroidism is the most common hormone deficiency in the United States and is found in 0.3% of the U.S. population. It is associated with characteristic symptoms that can be readily identified by a careful history and physical examination. Hypothyroidism affects many bodily systems; in particular the cardiovascular system is impacted via multiple mechanisms.3 Occasionally hypothyroidism leads to transient left ventricular systolic dysfunction, termed hypothyroid cardiomyopathy. A rare sequela of this condition is a left ventricular thrombus, which has been described in two case reports thus far. Here we report a third case of reversible hypothyroid cardiomyopathy complicated by a left ventricular laminar thrombus. PMID:25438369

  18. Lactic acidosis associated with cerebellar vermal atrophy and cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Challa, V R; Markesbery, W R; Baumann, R J; Noonan, J A

    1978-08-01

    The association of fluctuating neurological signs and congestive cardiomyopathy with chronic lactic acidosis is described in a 5 1/2 year-old-boy who ultimately succumbed to congestive heart failure. The autopsy findings included severe atrophy of the anterior cerebellar vermis and a hypertrophied heart with left sided endocardial fibroelastosis. Skeletal and cardial muscle calcification was prominent and probably due to the effect of intracellular metabolic alterations associated with lactic acidosis. A review of the literature shows that the combination of cardiomyopathy, isolated atrophy of cerebellar vermis and muscle fiber calcification have not been reported in association with idiopathic lactic acidosis previously. PMID:152418

  19. Trimetazidine therapy prevents obesity-induced cardiomyopathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Ussher, John R; Fillmore, Natasha; Keung, Wendy; Mori, Jun; Beker, Donna L; Wagg, Cory S; Jaswal, Jagdip S; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2014-08-01

    Obesity is a significant risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease. Inhibiting fatty acid oxidation has emerged as a novel approach for the treatment of ischemic heart disease. Our aim was to determine whether pharmacologic inhibition of 3-ketoacyl-coenzyme A thiolase (3-KAT), which catalyzes the final step of fatty acid oxidation, could improve obesity-induced cardiomyopathy. A 3-week treatment with the 3-KAT inhibitor trimetazidine prevented obesity-induced reduction in both systolic and diastolic function. Therefore, targeting cardiac fatty acid oxidation may be a novel therapeutic approach to alleviate the growing burden of obesity-related cardiomyopathy. PMID:25064584

  20. Non-compaction cardiomyopathy in an asymptomatic athlete.

    PubMed

    Manus, Margaret Kapor; Roy, Satyajeet; Stag, Rosemarie; Hyman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Prevention of sudden cardiac death in athletes requires the screening and recognition of pathologies that often remain clinically silent for years until provoked by a physiologic stressor. This can result in the manifestation of disease and even death. Left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC), newly classified as a distinct entity arising in the adult population, is a cardiomyopathy that at initial presentation can manifest as a wide spectrum of symptoms from asymptomatic to ventricular arrhythmias, systemic embolism and even sudden cardiac death. We present the case of an asymptomatic athlete found to have LVNC and discuss the implications this finding may have on sports participation. PMID:27535732

  1. Isolated Right Ventricular Dilated Cardiomyopathy: An Early Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Briongos Figuero, Sem; Acena Navarro, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Because of an incomplete right bundle branch block, a severe right ventricular dilatation with no left ventricular cardiomyopathy was found in a 44-year-old man. Magnetic resonance and transesophageal echocardiography confirmed the finding and these tests also failed to find any potential cause. A pulmonary hemodynamic study and a coronary angiography were strictly normal. Lastly pulmonary function tests and a pulmonary angiography were performed, which did not find any lung disease causing the right ventricular dilatation. The patient was catalogued as an early stage of an idiopathic form of right ventricular dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:26346826

  2. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Coexisting with Acute Pericarditis and Myocardial Bridge

    PubMed Central

    Sezavar, Seyed Hashem; Riahi Beni, Hassan; Ghanavati, Reza; Hajahmadi, Marjan

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM) is a stress-induced cardiomyopathy that occurs primarily in postmenopausal women. It mimics clinical picture of acute coronary syndrome with nonobstructive coronary arteries and a characteristic transient left (or bi-) ventricular apical ballooning at angiography. The exact pathogenesis of TCM is not well recognized. Hereby we present an unusual case of TCM that presents with signs and symptoms of acute pericarditis and was also found to have a coexisting coronary muscle bridge on coronary angiography. We discuss the impact of these associations in better understanding of the pathogenesis of TCM. PMID:27437150

  3. Infrequent Breakfast Consumption Is Associated with Higher Body Adiposity and Abdominal Obesity in Malaysian School-Aged Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Nurul-Fadhilah, Abdullah; Teo, Pey Sze; Huybrechts, Inge; Foo, Leng Huat

    2013-01-01

    Unhealthy dietary pattern increases the risk of obesity and metabolic disorders in growing children and adolescents. However, the way the habitual pattern of breakfast consumption influences body composition and risk of obesity in adolescents is not well defined. Thus, the aim of the present study was to assess any associations between breakfast consumption practices and body composition profiles in 236 apparently healthy adolescents aged 12 to 19 years. A self-administered questionnaire on dietary behaviour and lifestyle practices and a dietary food frequency questionnaire were used. Body composition and adiposity indices were determined using standard anthropometric measurement protocols and dual energy χ-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Mean age of the participants was 15.3±1.9 years. The majority of participants (71.2%) fell in the normal body mass index (BMI) ranges. Breakfast consumption patterns showed that only half of the participants (50%) were consuming breakfast daily. Gender-specific multivariate analyses (ANCOVA) showed that in both boys and girls, those eating breakfast at least 5 times a week had significantly lower body weight, body mass index (BMI), BMI z-scores, waist circumference, body fat mass and percent body fat (%BF) compared to infrequent breakfast eaters, after adjustment for age, household income, pubertal status, eating-out and snacking practices, daily energy intakes, and daily physical activity levels. The present findings indicate that infrequent breakfast consumption is associated with higher body adiposity and abdominal obesity. Therefore, daily breakfast consumption with healthy food choices should be encouraged in growing children and adolescents to prevent adiposity during these critical years of growth. PMID:23520556

  4. Infrequent breakfast consumption is associated with higher body adiposity and abdominal obesity in Malaysian school-aged adolescents.

    PubMed

    Nurul-Fadhilah, Abdullah; Teo, Pey Sze; Huybrechts, Inge; Foo, Leng Huat

    2013-01-01

    Unhealthy dietary pattern increases the risk of obesity and metabolic disorders in growing children and adolescents. However, the way the habitual pattern of breakfast consumption influences body composition and risk of obesity in adolescents is not well defined. Thus, the aim of the present study was to assess any associations between breakfast consumption practices and body composition profiles in 236 apparently healthy adolescents aged 12 to 19 years. A self-administered questionnaire on dietary behaviour and lifestyle practices and a dietary food frequency questionnaire were used. Body composition and adiposity indices were determined using standard anthropometric measurement protocols and dual energy χ-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Mean age of the participants was 15.3±1.9 years. The majority of participants (71.2%) fell in the normal body mass index (BMI) ranges. Breakfast consumption patterns showed that only half of the participants (50%) were consuming breakfast daily. Gender-specific multivariate analyses (ANCOVA) showed that in both boys and girls, those eating breakfast at least 5 times a week had significantly lower body weight, body mass index (BMI), BMI z-scores, waist circumference, body fat mass and percent body fat (%BF) compared to infrequent breakfast eaters, after adjustment for age, household income, pubertal status, eating-out and snacking practices, daily energy intakes, and daily physical activity levels. The present findings indicate that infrequent breakfast consumption is associated with higher body adiposity and abdominal obesity. Therefore, daily breakfast consumption with healthy food choices should be encouraged in growing children and adolescents to prevent adiposity during these critical years of growth. PMID:23520556

  5. Urinary excretion of 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabinoids in frequent and infrequent drug users.

    PubMed

    Smith-Kielland, A; Skuterud, B; Mørland, J

    1999-09-01

    Urinary excretion of 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) and cannabinoids was monitored in prison inmates. Urinary specimens were collected up to five times per day. EMIT (cutoff 20 ng/mL; EMIT20) and gas chromatography (GC) (cutoff 10.3 ng/mL, LOD 1.4 ng/mL) were used for cannabinoid screening and THCCOOH confirmation, respectively. Urinary creatinine concentrations were recorded. Of the samples with positive EMIT screens, 78% were confirmed by GC analysis. The plotting of THCCOOH/creatinine ratios (THCCOOH/C) versus time gave smoother excretion curves than THCCOOH concentrations alone. Based on THCCOOH/C the first 5 days after the last reported intake, the mean urinary excretion half-life was 1.3 days in infrequent users, and a median of 1.4 days was found in frequent users. In the latter group, apparent terminal urinary excretion half-lives up to 10.3 days were observed. The last positive specimens were found after 4 days for THCCOOH with cutoff 15.0 ng/mL (NIDA/SAMSHA), 5 days for THCCOOH with cutoff 10.3 ng/mL, and 12 days for cannabinoids (EMIT20) in infrequent users and after 17, 22, and 27 days, respectively, in frequent users. Increases in urinary cannabinoids were sometimes found without concomitant increase in THCCOOH or THCCOOH/C. One subject admitted new cannabis intake, after which marked increases in THCCOOH and THCCOOH/C were observed. In others, new intake was suspected. Considerable variations between consecutive specimens were also observed in THCCOOH concentration and THCCOOH/C ratio without suspicion of a new intake. PMID:10488918

  6. CINRG Duchenne Natural History Study demonstrates insufficient diagnosis and treatment of cardiomyopathy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Spurney, Christopher; Shimizu, Reiko; Hache, Lauren P.; Kolski, Hanna; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Clemens, Paula R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cardiomyopathy is a common cause of morbidity and death in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Methods A cross-sectional analysis of clinical data from a multi-institutional, international CINRG DMD Natural History Study of 340 DMD patients aged 2 to 28 years. Cardiomyopathy was defined as shortening fraction (SF) <28% or ejection fraction (EF) <55%. Results 231 participants reported a prior clinical echocardiogram study, and 174 had data for SF or EF. The prevalence of cardiomyopathy was 27% (47/174), and it was significantly associated with age and clinical stage. The association of cardiomyopathy with age and clinical stage was not changed by glucocorticoid use as a covariate (P>0.68). In patients with cardiomyopathy, 57 % (27/47) reported not taking any cardiac medications. Cardiac medications were used in 12% (15/127) of patients without cardiomyopathy. Discussion Echocardiograms were underutilized, and cardiomyopathy was undertreated in this DMD natural history cohort. PMID:24395289

  7. Cardiomyopathy in a Harris hawk (Parabuteo unicinctus).

    PubMed

    Brandão, João; Reynolds, Caryn A; Beaufrère, Hugues; Serio, Jacqueline; Blair, Robert V; Gaschen, Lorrie; Johnson, James G; Del Piero, Fabio; Barker, Steven A; Nevarez, Javier G; Tully, Thomas N

    2016-07-15

    CASE DESCRIPTION An adult sexually intact female Harris hawk (Parabuteo unicinctus) housed at a wildlife hospital was evaluated because of acute collapse during an educational exhibition. CLINICAL FINDINGS Physical examination and hematologic analysis revealed no abnormalities; radiography revealed findings consistent with a previous tibiotarsal fracture. Coelioscopy with histologic examination and fungal culture of lung and air sac samples revealed anthracosis but no fungal infection. The hawk was discharged and temporarily removed from the education program; 1 month later, upon reintroduction into the program, it collapsed again. Physical examination and hematologic findings were similar to those after the first episode. Transcoelomic and transesophageal echocardiography and CT angiocardiography findings were consistent with cardiomyopathy. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Initial cardiac treatment included furosemide (0.5 mg/kg [0.23 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h) and pimobendan (10 mg/kg [4.5 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h). After 10 days of treatment, peak and trough plasma concentrations of pimobendan were measured at 25, 196 and 715.97 ng/mL, respectively; the dosage was decreased to 0.25 mg/kg (0.11 mg/lb), PO, every 12 hours. No overt signs of toxicosis were detected. A sample was collected to reevaluate plasma pimobendan concentration after 30 days of treatment; results were not obtained prior to the patient's death but revealed a peak concentration of 16.8 ng/mL, with an undetectable trough concentration. The hawk was found dead 6 months after initial evaluation. Necropsy revealed cardiomegaly, but histologic examination did not reveal an inciting cause of cardiac dysfunction. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Cardiac disease in raptors may be underreported. Transcoelomic and transesophageal echocardiography and CT angiography provided useful information for the diagnosis of cardiac disease in the hawk of this report. PMID:27379599

  8. Intraventricular vortex properties in nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Benito, Yolanda; Alhama, Marta; Yotti, Raquel; Martínez-Legazpi, Pablo; del Villar, Candelas Pérez; Pérez-David, Esther; González-Mansilla, Ana; Santa-Marta, Cristina; Barrio, Alicia; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco; del Álamo, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Vortices may have a role in optimizing the mechanical efficiency and blood mixing of the left ventricle (LV). We aimed to characterize the size, position, circulation, and kinetic energy (KE) of LV main vortex cores in patients with nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDCM) and analyze their physiological correlates. We used digital processing of color-Doppler images to study flow evolution in 61 patients with NIDCM and 61 age-matched control subjects. Vortex features showed a characteristic biphasic temporal course during diastole. Because late filling contributed significantly to flow entrainment, vortex KE reached its maximum at the time of the peak A wave, storing 26 ± 20% of total KE delivered by inflow (range: 1–74%). Patients with NIDCM showed larger and stronger vortices than control subjects (circulation: 0.008 ± 0.007 vs. 0.006 ± 0.005 m2/s, respectively, P = 0.02; KE: 7 ± 8 vs. 5 ± 5 mJ/m, P = 0.04), even when corrected for LV size. This helped confining the filling jet in the dilated ventricle. The vortex Reynolds number was also higher in the NIDCM group. By multivariate analysis, vortex KE was related to the KE generated by inflow and to chamber short-axis diameter. In 21 patients studied head to head, Doppler measurements of circulation and KE closely correlated with phase-contract magnetic resonance values (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.82 and 0.76, respectively). Thus, the biphasic nature of filling determines normal vortex physiology. Vortex formation is exaggerated in patients with NIDCM due to chamber remodeling, and enlarged vortices are helpful for ameliorating convective pressure losses and facilitating transport. These findings can be accurately studied using ultrasound. PMID:24414062

  9. Phonoechocardiography and intracardiac phonocardiography in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Shaver, J. A.; Alvares, R. F.; Reddy, P. S.; Salerni, R.

    1986-01-01

    The salient phonoechocardiographic features of patients having hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) with or without left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) gradients are reviewed. Intracardiac sound and pressure recordings from high fidelity catheter-tipped micromanometers have documented that the precordial murmur is the summation of both the systolic ejection murmur (SEM) arising from the LVOT, as well as the mitral regurgitant murmur recorded from the left atrium. The intensity of the precordial murmur varies directly with the LVOT gradient, which in turn is determined primarily by the contractility and loading conditions of the left ventricle. Reversed splitting of the second heart sound (S2) with paradoxical respiratory movement is a common finding in HCM, and when present, almost always denotes a significant LVOT gradient. It is due to marked lengthening of the left ventricular ejection time secondary to prolongation of the contraction and relaxation phases of left ventricular systole. The presence of a fourth heart sound (S4) is the rule in HCM when normal sinus rhythm is present, and is a reflection of a forceful left atrial contraction into a hypertrophied noncompliant left ventricle. A third heart sound (S3) is also common in HCM, and often the initial vibrations occur before the 0 point of the apexcardiogram (ACG) and continue giving the auscultatory impression of a diastolic rumble. When associated with a loud S1, which is frequently present, the clinical presentation may mimic mitral stenosis. This is particularly true when the patient has chronic atrial fibrillation. Careful attention to evidence of marked left ventricular hypertrophy as well as the typical echocardiographic findings of HCM preclude this diagnosis. In conclusion, phonoechocardiography is a simple non-invasive technique which almost always makes the definitive diagnosis of HCM. PMID:3774689

  10. Predictors and prevention of diabetic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chavali, Vishalakshi; Tyagi, Suresh C; Mishra, Paras K

    2013-01-01

    Despite our cognizance that diabetes can enhance the chances of heart failure, causes multiorgan failure,and contributes to morbidity and mortality, it is rapidly increasing menace worldwide. Less attention has been paid to alert prediabetics through determining the comprehensive predictors of diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) and ameliorating DCM using novel approaches. DCM is recognized as asymptomatic progressing structural and functional remodeling in the heart of diabetics, in the absence of coronary atherosclerosis and hypertension. The three major stages of DCM are: (1) early stage, where cellular and metabolic changes occur without obvious systolic dysfunction; (2) middle stage, which is characterized by increased apoptosis, a slight increase in left ventricular size, and diastolic dysfunction and where ejection fraction (EF) is <50%; and (3) late stage, which is characterized by alteration in microvasculature compliance, an increase in left ventricular size, and a decrease in cardiac performance leading to heart failure. Recent investigations have revealed that DCM is multifactorial in nature and cellular, molecular, and metabolic perturbations predisposed and contributed to DCM. Differential expression of microRNA (miRNA), signaling molecules involved in glucose metabolism, hyperlipidemia, advanced glycogen end products, cardiac extracellular matrix remodeling, and alteration in survival and differentiation of resident cardiac stem cells are manifested in DCM. A sedentary lifestyle and high fat diet causes obesity and this leads to type 2 diabetes and DCM. However, exercise training improves insulin sensitivity, contractility of cardiomyocytes, and cardiac performance in type 2 diabetes. These findings provide new clues to diagnose and mitigate DCM. This review embodies developments in the field of DCM with the aim of elucidating the future perspectives of predictors and prevention of DCM. PMID:23610527