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Sample records for hypervelocity metal jets

  1. High-resolution imaging of hypervelocity metal jets using advanced high-speed photographic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, L.L.; Muelder, S.A.

    1995-08-29

    It is now possible to obtain high resolution sequential photographs of the initial formation and evolution of hypervelocity metal jets formed by shaped charge devices fired in air. Researchers have been frustrated by the high velocity of the jet material and the luminous sheath of hot gases cloaking the jet that made detailed observation of the jet body extremely difficult. The camera system that provides the photographs is a large format multi-frame electro-optic camera, referred to as an IC camera (IC stands for image converter), that utilizes electro-optic shuttering, monochromatic pulsed laser illumination and bandpass filtering to provide sequential pictures (in 3D if desired) with minimal degradation due to luminous air shocks or motion blur. The large format (75mm image plane), short exposure (15 ns minimum), ruby laser illumination and bandpass filtering (monochromatic illumination while excluding extraneous light) produces clear, sharp, images of the detailed surface structure of a metal shaped charge jet during early jet formation, elongation of the jet body, jet tip evolution and subsequent particulation (breakup) of the jet body. By utilizing the new camera system in conjunction with the more traditional rotating mirror high speed cameras, pulsed radiography, and electrical sensors, a maximum amount of, often unique, data can be extracted from a single experiment. This paper was intended primarily as an oral presentation. For purposes of continuity and simplicity in these proceedings, the authors have chosen to concentrate on the development of the IC camera system and its impact on the photography of high speed shaped chargejets.

  2. Dense Hypervelocity Plasma Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Andrew; Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Michael; van Doren, David; Elton, Raymond; Uzun-Kaymak, Ilker

    2007-11-01

    We are developing high velocity dense plasma jets for fusion and HEDP applications. Traditional coaxial plasma accelerators suffer from the blow-by instability which limits the mass accelerated to high velocity. In the current design blow-by is delayed by a combination of electrode shaping and use of a tailored plasma armature created by injection of a high density plasma at a few eV generated by arrays of capillary discharges or sparkgaps. Experimental data will be presented for a complete 32 injector gun system built for driving rotation in the Maryland MCX experiment, including data on penetration of the plasma jet through a magnetic field. We present spectroscopic measurements of plasma velocity, temperature, and density, as well as total momentum measured using a ballistic pendulum. Measurements are in agreement with each other and with time of flight data from photodiodes and a multichannel PMT. Plasma density is above 10^15 cm-3, velocities range up to about 100 km/s. Preliminary results from a quadrature heterodyne HeNe interferometer are consistent with these results.

  3. Dense Hypervelocity Plasma Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Case, Andrew; Phillips, Michael W.

    2006-10-01

    High velocity dense plasma jets are under continued experimental development for a variety of fusion applications including refueling, disruption mitigation, rotation drive, and magnetized target fusion. The technical goal is to accelerate plasma slugs of density >10^17 cm-3 and total mass >100 micrograms to velocities >200 km/s. The approach utilizes symmetrical injection of very high density plasma into a coaxial EM accelerator having a tailored cross-section geometry to prevent formation of the blow-by instability. Injected plasma is generated by electrothermal capillary discharges using either cylindrical capillaries or a newer toroidal spark gap arrangement that has worked at pressures as low as 3.5 x10-6 Torr in bench tests. Experimental plasma data will be presented for a complete 32 injector accelerator system recently built for driving rotation in the Maryland MCX experiment which utilizes the cylindrical capillaries, and also for a 50 spark gap test unit currently under construction.

  4. Dense Hypervelocity Plasma Jets for Fusion Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Thio, Y. C. Francis

    2005-10-01

    High velocity dense plasma jets are being developed for a variety of fusion applications, including refueling, disruption mitigation, High Energy Density Plasmas, magnetized target/magneto-inertial fusion, injection of angular momentum into centrifugally confined mirrors, and others. The technical goal is to accelerate plasma blobs of density >10^17 cm-3 and total mass >100 micrograms to velocities >200 km/s. The approach utilizes symmetrical injection of very high density plasma into a coaxial EM accelerator having a tailored cross-section that prevents formation of the blow-by instability. AFRL MACH2 modeling identified 2 electrode configurations that produce the desired plasma jet parameters. The injected plasma is generated by up to 64 radially oriented capillary discharges arranged uniformly around the circumference of an angled annular injection section. Initial experimental results are presented in which 8 capillaries are fired in parallel with jitter of ˜100 ns. Current focus is on higher voltage operation to reduce jitter to a few 10's of ns, and development of a suite of optical and spectroscopic plasma diagnostics.

  5. Hypervelocity Impact Evaluation of Metal Foam Core Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasensky, John; Christiansen, Eric L.

    2007-01-01

    A series of hypervelocity impact (HVI) tests were conducted by the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HITF) [1], building 267 (Houston, Texas) between January 2003 and December 2005 to test the HVI performance of metal foams, as compared to the metal honeycomb panels currently in service. The HITF testing was conducted at the NASA JSC White Sands Testing Facility (WSTF) at Las Cruces, New Mexico. Eric L. Christiansen, Ph.D., and NASA Lead for Micro-Meteoroid Orbital Debris (MMOD) Protection requested these hypervelocity impact tests as part of shielding research conducted for the JSC Center Director Discretionary Fund (CDDF) project. The structure tested is a metal foam sandwich structure; a metal foam core between two metal facesheets. Aluminum and Titanium metals were tested for foam sandwich and honeycomb sandwich structures. Aluminum honeycomb core material is currently used in Orbiter Vehicle (OV) radiator panels and in other places in space structures. It has many desirable characteristics and performs well by many measures, especially when normalized by density. Aluminum honeycomb does not perform well in Hypervelocity Impact (HVI) Testing. This is a concern, as honeycomb panels are often exposed to space environments, and take on the role of Micrometeoroid / Orbital Debris (MMOD) shielding. Therefore, information on possible replacement core materials which perform adequately in all necessary functions of the material would be useful. In this report, HVI data is gathered for these two core materials in certain configurations and compared to gain understanding of the metal foam HVI performance.

  6. C60-Fullerene Hyper-Velocity High-Density Plasma Jets for MIF and Disruption Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogatu, I. N.; Galkin, S. A.; Kim, J. S.

    2009-06-01

    We present an innovative idea to use hyper-velocity (>30 km/s) high-density (>1017 cm-3) plasma jets of D-T/H and C60-fullerene for magneto-inertial fusion (MIF), high energy density laboratory plasma (HEDLP), and disruption mitigation in magnetic fusion plasma devices. The mass (~1-2 g) of sublimated C60 and hydrogen (or D-T fuel) produced in a pulsed power source is ionized and accelerated as a plasma slug in a coaxial plasma accelerator. For MIF/HEDLP we propose to create a magnetized plasma target by injecting two high-Mach number high-density jets with fuel (D-T) and liner (C60/C) structure along the axis of a pulsed magnetic mirror. The magnetized target fusion (MTF) plasma created by head-on collision and stagnation of jets is compressed radially by a metallic liner (Z-pinch) and axially by the C60/C liner. For disruption mitigation, the C60 plasma jets were shown to be able to provide the required impurity mass (J Fusion Energy 27:6, 2008).

  7. Hypervelocity Impact Test Results for a Metallic Thermal Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Katherine L.; Poteet, Carl C.; Blosser, Max L.

    2003-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests have been performed on specimens representing metallic thermal protection systems (TPS) developed at NASA Langley Research Center for use on next-generation reusable launch vehicles (RLV). The majority of the specimens tested consists of a foil gauge exterior honeycomb panel, composed of either Inconel 617 or Ti-6Al-4V, backed with 2.0 in. of fibrous insulation and a final Ti-6Al-4V foil layer. Other tested specimens include titanium multi-wall sandwich coupons as well as TPS using a second honeycomb sandwich in place of the foil backing. Hypervelocity impact tests were performed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Orbital Debris Simulation Facility. An improved test fixture was designed and fabricated to hold specimens firmly in place during impact. Projectile diameter, honeycomb sandwich material, honeycomb sandwich facesheet thickness, and honeycomb core cell size were examined to determine the influence of TPS configuration on the level of protection provided to the substructure (crew, cabin, fuel tank, etc.) against micrometeoroid or orbit debris impacts. Pictures and descriptions of the damage to each specimen are included.

  8. Hypervelocity impact testing of non-metallic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.

    1990-01-01

    A comparative analysis of impact damage in composite and ceramic specimens and in geometrically similar aluminum specimens is performed to determine the advantages and disadvantages of employing certain composite and ceramic materials in the design of structural wall systems for long-duration spacecraft. A similar analysis of the damage in single panel lexan and multi-plane glass windows shows that glass window systems are rather resilent under hypervelocity impact loadings. It is concluded that thin Kevlar 49, IM6/3501-6 graphite/epoxy, and alumina panels offer no advantage over equivalent aluminum 6061-T6 panels in reducing the penetration threat of hypervelocity projectiles.

  9. Improving Metallic Thermal Protection System Hypervelocity Impact Resistance Through Design of Experiments Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poteet, Carl C.; Blosser, Max L.

    2001-01-01

    A design of experiments approach has been implemented using computational hypervelocity impact simulations to determine the most effective place to add mass to an existing metallic Thermal Protection System (TPS) to improve hypervelocity impact protection. Simulations were performed using axisymmetric models in CTH, a shock-physics code developed by Sandia National Laboratories, and validated by comparison with existing test data. The axisymmetric models were then used in a statistical sensitivity analysis to determine the influence of five design parameters on degree of hypervelocity particle dispersion. Several damage metrics were identified and evaluated. Damage metrics related to the extent of substructure damage were seen to produce misleading results, however damage metrics related to the degree of dispersion of the hypervelocity particle produced results that corresponded to physical intuition. Based on analysis of variance results it was concluded that the most effective way to increase hypervelocity impact resistance is to increase the thickness of the outer foil layer. Increasing the spacing between the outer surface and the substructure is also very effective at increasing dispersion.

  10. Study of Hypervelocity Projectile Impact on Thick Metal Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Shawoon K.; Trabia, Mohamed; O’Toole, Brendan; Hixson, Robert S.; Becker, Steven; Pena, Michael T.; Jennings, Richard; Somasoundaram, Deepak; Matthes, Melissa; Daykin, Edward P.; Machorro, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Hypervelocity impacts generate extreme pressure and shock waves in impacted targets that undergo severe localized deformation within a few microseconds. These impact experiments pose unique challenges in terms of obtaining accurate measurements. Similarly, simulating these experiments is not straightforward. This paper proposed an approach to experimentally measure the velocity of the back surface of an A36 steel plate impacted by a projectile. All experiments used a combination of a two-stage light-gas gun and the photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) technique. The experimental data were used to benchmark and verify computational studies. Two different finite-element methods were used to simulate the experiments: Lagrangian-based smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and Eulerian-based hydrocode. Both codes used the Johnson-Cook material model and the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state. Experiments and simulations were compared based on the physical damage area and the back surface velocity. Finally, the results of this study showed that the proposed simulation approaches could be used to reduce the need for expensive experiments.

  11. Study of hypervelocity projectile impact on thick metal plates

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Shawoon K.; Trabia, Mohamed; O’Toole, Brendan; Hixson, Robert S.; Becker, Steven; Pena, Michael T.; Jennings, Richard; Somasoundaram, Deepak; Matthes, Melissa; Daykin, Edward P.; Machorro, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Hypervelocity impacts generate extreme pressure and shock waves in impacted targets that undergo severe localized deformation within a few microseconds. These impact experiments pose unique challenges in terms of obtaining accurate measurements. Similarly, simulating these experiments is not straightforward. This paper proposed an approach to experimentally measure the velocity of the back surface of an A36 steel plate impacted by a projectile. All experiments used a combination of a two-stage light-gas gun and the photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) technique. The experimental data were used to benchmark and verify computational studies. Two different finite-element methods were used to simulate the experiments: Lagrangian-based smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and Eulerian-based hydrocode. Both codes used the Johnson-Cook material model and the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state. Experiments and simulations were compared based on the physical damage area and the back surface velocity. Finally, the results of this study showed that the proposed simulation approaches could be used to reduce the need for expensive experiments.

  12. Study of hypervelocity projectile impact on thick metal plates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Roy, Shawoon K.; Trabia, Mohamed; O’Toole, Brendan; Hixson, Robert S.; Becker, Steven; Pena, Michael T.; Jennings, Richard; Somasoundaram, Deepak; Matthes, Melissa; Daykin, Edward P.; et al

    2016-01-01

    Hypervelocity impacts generate extreme pressure and shock waves in impacted targets that undergo severe localized deformation within a few microseconds. These impact experiments pose unique challenges in terms of obtaining accurate measurements. Similarly, simulating these experiments is not straightforward. This paper proposed an approach to experimentally measure the velocity of the back surface of an A36 steel plate impacted by a projectile. All experiments used a combination of a two-stage light-gas gun and the photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) technique. The experimental data were used to benchmark and verify computational studies. Two different finite-element methods were used to simulate the experiments:more » Lagrangian-based smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and Eulerian-based hydrocode. Both codes used the Johnson-Cook material model and the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state. Experiments and simulations were compared based on the physical damage area and the back surface velocity. Finally, the results of this study showed that the proposed simulation approaches could be used to reduce the need for expensive experiments.« less

  13. 3D laser scanning microscopy of hypervelocity impact features in metal and aerogel targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, J. K.; Postberg, F.; Price, M. C.; Trieloff, M.; Li, Y. W.; Srama, R.

    2012-09-01

    We present the results of a study into the mapping of hypervelocity impact features using a Keyence VK-X200 3D laser scanning microscope. The impact features observed are impact craters in a variety of different metal targets (Al, Au and Cu) and impact tracks in aerogel targets, similar to those used in the Stardust mission. Differences in crater morphology between different target materials and impact velocities, as well as differences in track depth and diameter in aerogel, for particles of known constant dimensions, are discussed.

  14. SEGUE-2 LIMITS ON METAL-RICH OLD-POPULATION HYPERVELOCITY STARS IN THE GALACTIC HALO

    SciTech Connect

    Kollmeier, Juna A.; Gould, Andrew; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Rockosi, Constance; Beers, Timothy C.; Lee, Young Sun; Knapp, Gillian; Morrison, Heather; Harding, Paul; Weaver, Benjamin A.

    2010-11-01

    We present new limits on the ejection of metal-rich old-population hypervelocity stars (HVSs) from the Galactic center (GC) as probed by the SEGUE-2 survey. Our limits are a factor of 3-10 more stringent than previously reported, depending on stellar type. Compared to the known population of B-star ejectees, there can be no more than 30 times more metal-rich old-population F/G stars ejected from the GC. Because B stars comprise a tiny fraction of a normal stellar population, this places significant limits on the combination of the GC mass function and the ejection mechanism for HVSs. In the presence of a normal GC mass function, our results require an ejection mechanism that is about 5.5 times more efficient at ejecting B stars compared to low-mass F/G stars.

  15. Modeling of the merging, liner formation, implosion of hypervelocity plasma jets for the PLX- α project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassibry, Jason; Hsu, Scott; Schillo, Kevin; Samulyak, Roman; Stoltz, Peter; Beckwith, Kris

    2015-11-01

    A suite of numerical tools will support the conical and 4 π plasma-liner-formation experiments for the PLX- α project. A new Lagrangian particles (LP) method will provide detailed studies of the merging of plasma jets and plasma-liner formation/convergence. A 3d smooth particle hydrodynamic (SPH) code will simulate conical (up to 9 jets) and 4 π spherical (up to 60 jets) liner formation and implosion. Both LP and SPH will use the same tabular EOS generated by Propaceos, thermal conductivity, optically thin radiation and physical viscosity models. With LP and SPH,the major objectives are to study Mach-number degradation during jet merging, provide RMS amplitude and wave number of the liner nonuniformity at the leading edge, and develop scaling laws for ram pressure and liner uniformity as a function of jet parameters. USIM, a 3D multi-fluid plasma code, will be used to perform 1D and 2D simulations of plasma-jet-driven magneto-inertial fusion (PJMIF) to identify initial conditions in which the ``liner gain'' exceeds unity. A brief overview of the modeling program will be provided. Results from SPH modeling to support the PLX- α experimental design will also be presented, including preliminary ram-pressure scaling and non-uniformity characterization.

  16. The techniques of metallic foil electrically exploding driving hypervelocity flyer to more than 10 km/s for shock wave physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guiji; He, Jia; Zhao, Jianheng; Tan, Fuli; Sun, Chengwei; Mo, Jianjun; Xong, Xin; Wu, Gang

    2011-09-01

    Electrical explosion of metallic foil or wire is widely used to the fields of material science (preparation of nao-meter materials), dynamics of materials, and high energy density physics. In this paper, the techniques of gaining hypervelocity flyer driven by electrical explosion of metallic foil were researched, which are used to study dynamics of materials and hypervelocity impact modeling of space debris. Based on low inductance technologies of pulsed storage energy capacitor, detonator switch and parallel plate transmission lines with solid films insulation, two sets of experimental apparatuses with storage energy of 14.4 kJ and 40 kJ were developed for launching hypervelocity flyer. By means of the diagnostic technologies of velocity interferometer system for any reflectors and fibre-optic pins, the hypervelocity polyester (Mylar) flyers were gained. For the apparatus of 14.4 kJ, flyer of diameter ϕ6 ˜ ϕ10 mm and thickness of 0.1 ˜ 0.2 mm was accelerated to the hypervelocity of 10 ˜ 14 km/s. And for the apparatus of 40 kJ, flyer of diameter ϕ20 ˜ 30 mm and thickness of 0.2 mm was launched to the velocity of 5 ˜ 8 km/s. The flatness of the flyer is not more than 34 ns for the flyer with diameter of 20 mm, and less than 22 ns for the flyer with diameter of 10 mm. Based on the Lagrange hydrodynamic code, one dimensional simulation was done by introducing database of equation of states, discharging circuit equation and Joule heat equation, and modifying energy equation. The simulation results are well agreed with the experimental results in accelerating processing. The simulation results can provide good advices in designing new experiments and developing new experimental devices. Finally, some experiments of materials dynamics and hypervelocity impact of space debris were done by using the apparatus above. The results show that the apparatus of metallic foil electrically exploding driving hypervelocity flyer is a good and versatile tool for shock dynamics.

  17. The techniques of metallic foil electrically exploding driving hypervelocity flyer to more than 10 km/s for shock wave physics experiments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guiji; He, Jia; Zhao, Jianheng; Tan, Fuli; Sun, Chengwei; Mo, Jianjun; Xong, Xin; Wu, Gang

    2011-09-01

    Electrical explosion of metallic foil or wire is widely used to the fields of material science (preparation of nao-meter materials), dynamics of materials, and high energy density physics. In this paper, the techniques of gaining hypervelocity flyer driven by electrical explosion of metallic foil were researched, which are used to study dynamics of materials and hypervelocity impact modeling of space debris. Based on low inductance technologies of pulsed storage energy capacitor, detonator switch and parallel plate transmission lines with solid films insulation, two sets of experimental apparatuses with storage energy of 14.4 kJ and 40 kJ were developed for launching hypervelocity flyer. By means of the diagnostic technologies of velocity interferometer system for any reflectors and fibre-optic pins, the hypervelocity polyester (Mylar) flyers were gained. For the apparatus of 14.4 kJ, flyer of diameter φ6 ~ φ10 mm and thickness of 0.1 ~ 0.2 mm was accelerated to the hypervelocity of 10 ~ 14 km/s. And for the apparatus of 40 kJ, flyer of diameter φ20 ~ 30 mm and thickness of 0.2 mm was launched to the velocity of 5 ~ 8 km/s. The flatness of the flyer is not more than 34 ns for the flyer with diameter of 20 mm, and less than 22 ns for the flyer with diameter of 10 mm. Based on the Lagrange hydrodynamic code, one dimensional simulation was done by introducing database of equation of states, discharging circuit equation and Joule heat equation, and modifying energy equation. The simulation results are well agreed with the experimental results in accelerating processing. The simulation results can provide good advices in designing new experiments and developing new experimental devices. Finally, some experiments of materials dynamics and hypervelocity impact of space debris were done by using the apparatus above. The results show that the apparatus of metallic foil electrically exploding driving hypervelocity flyer is a good and versatile tool for shock dynamics

  18. Ram-pressure scaling and non-uniformity characterization of a spherically imploding liner formed by hypervelocity plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassibry, Jason; Dougherty, Jesse; Thompson, Seth; Hsu, Scott; Witherspoon, F. D.; University of AL in Huntsville Team; Los Alamos National Laboratory Team; HyperV Technologies Corp. Team

    2014-10-01

    Three-dimensional modeling of plasma liner formation and implosion is performed using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Code (SPHC) with radiation, thermal transport, and tabular equations of state (EOS), accounting for ionization, in support of a proposed 60-gun plasma liner formation experiment for plasma-jet driven magneto-inertial fusion (PJMIF). Previous SPHC modeling showed that ideal gas law scaling of peak stagnation pressure increased linearly with density and number of jets, quadratically with jet radius and velocity, and inversely with the initial jet length, while results with tabular EOS, thermal transport, and radiation have greater sensitivity to the initial jet distribution. A series of simulations are conducted to study the effects of initial jet conditions on peak ram pressure and liner non-uniformity during plasma liner implosion. The growth rate of large-amplitude density perturbations introduced by the discrete jets are computed and compared with predictions by the Bell-Plesset equation.

  19. Arc jet tests of metallic TPS materials.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centolanzi, F. J.; Zimmerman, N. B.; Probst, H. B.; Lowell, C. E.

    1971-01-01

    Seven thoria dispersed nickel base alloys and one cobalt base alloy, candidates for the Metallic Thermal Protection System for the Space Shuttle Vehicle, were tested simultaneously in an arc jet at a nominal test temperature of 1366 deg K (2000 deg F) and pressure of 0.01 atmospheres. The degradation of the materials after 50 one half-hour cycles in the arc jet simulating Space Shuttle entry conditions was determined utilizing techniques including X-ray diffraction, metallography, and electron beam microprobe.

  20. Hypervelocity Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Warren R.

    2015-08-01

    Hypervelocity stars (HVSs) travel with such extreme velocities that dynamical ejection via gravitational interaction with a massive black hole (MBH) is their most likely origin. Observers have discovered dozens of unbound main-sequence stars since the first in 2005, and the velocities, stellar nature, spatial distribution, and overall numbers of unbound B stars in the Milky Way halo all fit an MBH origin. Theorists have proposed various mechanisms for ejecting unbound stars, and these mechanisms can be tested with larger and more complete samples. HVSs' properties are linked to the nature and environment of the Milky Way's MBH, and, with future proper motion measurements, their trajectories may provide unique probes of the dark matter halo that surrounds the Milky Way.

  1. Magneto-hydrodynamic simulation of hypervelocity neutral plasma jets and their interactions with materials generating extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Vivek; Raja, Laxminarayan; Sitaraman, Hariswaran

    2014-10-01

    The development of a Magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) numerical tool to study high density thermal plasma in a co-axial plasma gun is presented. The MHD governing equations are numerically solved using a matrix free implicit scheme in an unstructured grid finite volume framework. The MHD model is used to characterize the high energy jet which emanates from the accelerator. The solver is then used to predict the conditions created at the surface of a flat plate placed at a fixed distance from the exit of the gun. The model parameters are adjusted so that the energy density of the jet impacting the plate is of the same order of magnitude as that of the Edge Localized Mode (ELM) disruptions in thermonuclear fusion reactors. The idea is to use the pressure and temperature on the plate surface to obtain an estimate of the stress created on the plate due to jet impact. The model is used to quantify damage caused by ELM disruptions on the confining material surface.

  2. Jet-driven redistribution of metal in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsony, Brian J.; Heinz, Sebastian; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2016-04-01

    The ICM in galaxy clusters is metal enriched, typically to about 30% of solar metallicity, out to large radii. However, metals should form mostly in galaxies and remained bound to their progenitor systems. To enrich the ICM, effective mixing of gas needs to occur across large scales. We carry out numerical simulations of mixing driven by AGN jets in dynamical galaxy clusters. These jets lift gas out of the center of the cluster, redistributing metals and adding energy to the ICM. We compare our results to X-ray observations of metallicity in clusters.

  3. Jet-driven redistribution of metal in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsony, Brian; Heinz, Sebastian; Reynolds, Christopher; Ruszkowski, Mateusz; Brueggen, Marcus

    2015-08-01

    The ICM in galaxy clusters is metal enriched, typically to about 30% of solar metallicity, out to large radii. However, metals should form mostly in galaxies and remained bound to their progenitor systems. To enrich the ICM, effective mixing of gas needs to occur across large scales. We carry out numerical simulations of mixing driven by AGN jets in dynamical galaxy clusters. These jets lift gas out of the center of the cluster, redistributing metals and adding energy to the ICM. We compare our results to X-ray observations of metallicity in clusters.

  4. Effects of barrel joints on hypervelocity projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Shahinpoor, M.; Asay, J.R.; Dixon, W.R.; Hawke, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    Development of new hypervelocity launchers is necessary for equation of state (EOS) studies at high impact velocities. The requirements for barrel joint alignment and concentricity at high velocities place severe constraints on fabrication and assembly procedures; small steps or longitudinal direction changes at joints may cause major damage to precision projectiles. Research has been initiated to identify the technical limits of fabrication and assembly tolerances for hypervelocity gun barrels. Numerical and experimental studies have evaluated projectile performance at velocities of 6 to 15 km/s and have identified failure modes for Lexan projectiles with thin metal facings.

  5. Impinging jet separators for liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    In many liquid metal MHD power, cycles, it is necessary to separate the phases of a high-speed liquid-gas flow. The usual method is to impinge the jet at a glancing angle against a solid surface. These surface separators achieve good separation of the two phases at a cost of a large velocity loss due to friction at the separator surface. This report deals with attempts to greatly reduce the friction loss by impinging two jets against each other. In the crude impinging jet separators tested to date, friction losses were greatly reduced, but the separation of the two phases was found to be much poorer than that achievable with surface separators. Analyses are presented which show many lines of attack (mainly changes in separator geometry) which should yield much better separation for impinging jet separators).

  6. Progress in hypervelocity impact and protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoma, K.; Schaefer, F.; Hiermaier, S.; Schneider, E.

    pressure and impact load. Using tools as described before, results on pressure vessels and their failure behaviour under impact are summarized. - The influence of projectile shape (non spherical impactor shapes) on shielding performance: In the majority of the existing work on hypervelocity impact, a spherical shape of the impacting mass was assumed. Using experiments and numerical simulations, we demonstrate the importance of considering impactor shape. Existing engineering formulas for shield design are extended to include shape effects and are described in the paper. - The behaviour of metallic foams under hypervelocity impact : Novel metallic foams seem to possess properties, which allow to design shields with superior protection efficiency and superior structural properties. The usage of such metal foams as a shield component is shown through an experimental analysis.

  7. Thermo Physics Facilities Branch Brochure ARC Jet Complex Fact Sheets, Hypervelocity Free-Flight Aerodynamic Facility Fact Sheets, Ames Vertical Gun Range Fact Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fretter, E. F. (Editor); Kuhns, Jay (Editor); Nuez, Jay (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The Ames Arc Jet Complex has a rich heritage of over 40 years in Thermal Protection System (TPS) development for every NASA Space Transportation and Planetary program, including Apollo, Space Shuttle, Viking, Pioneer-Venus, Galileo, Mars Pathfinder,Stardust, NASP,X-33,X-34,SHARP-B1 and B2,X-37 and Mars Exploration Rovers. With this early TPS history came a long heritage in the development of the arc jet facilities. These are used to simulate the aerodynamic heating that occurs on the nose cap, wing leading edges and on other areas of the spacecraft requiring thermal protection. TPS samples have been run in the arc jets from a few minutes to over an hour,from one exposure to multiple exposures of the same sample, in order t o understand the TPS materials response to a hot gas flow environment (representative of real hyperthermal environments experienced in flight). The Ames Arc l e t Complex is a key enabler for customers involved in the three major areas of TPS development: selection, validation, and qualification. The arc jet data are critical for validating TPS thermal models, heat shield designs and repairs, and ultimately for flight qualification.

  8. Hypervelocity impact physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.; Bean, Alan J.; Darzi, Kent

    1991-01-01

    All large spacecraft are susceptible to impacts by meteoroids and orbiting space debris. These impacts occur at extremely high speed and can damage flight-critical systems, which can in turn lead to a catastrophic failure of the spacecraft. Therefore, the design of a spacecraft for a long-duration mission must take into account the possibility of such impacts and their effects on the spacecraft structure and on all of its exposed subsystems components. The work performed under the contract consisted of applied research on the effects of meteoroid/space debris impacts on candidate materials, design configurations, and support mechanisms of long term space vehicles. Hypervelocity impact mechanics was used to analyze the damage that occurs when a space vehicle is impacted by a micrometeoroid or a space debris particle. An impact analysis of over 500 test specimens was performed to generate by a hypervelocity impact damage database.

  9. Cosmology with hypervelocity stars

    SciTech Connect

    Loeb, Abraham

    2011-04-01

    In the standard cosmological model, the merger remnant of the Milky Way and Andromeda (Milkomeda) will be the only galaxy remaining within our event horizon once the Universe has aged by another factor of ten, ∼ 10{sup 11} years after the Big Bang. After that time, the only extragalactic sources of light in the observable cosmic volume will be hypervelocity stars being ejected continuously from Milkomeda. Spectroscopic detection of the velocity-distance relation or the evolution in the Doppler shifts of these stars will allow a precise measurement of the vacuum mass density as well as the local matter distribution. Already in the near future, the next generation of large telescopes will allow photometric detection of individual stars out to the edge of the Local Group, and may target the ∼ 10{sup 5±1} hypervelocity stars that originated in it as cosmological tracers.

  10. Helium atmospheric pressure plasma jets touching dielectric and metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, Seth A.; Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-07-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are being investigated in the context plasma medicine and biotechnology applications, and surface functionalization. The composition of the surface being treated ranges from plastics, liquids, and biological tissue, to metals. The dielectric constant of these materials ranges from as low as 1.5 for plastics to near 80 for liquids, and essentially infinite for metals. The electrical properties of the surface are not independent variables as the permittivity of the material being treated has an effect on the dynamics of the incident APPJ. In this paper, results are discussed from a computational investigation of the interaction of an APPJ incident onto materials of varying permittivity, and their impact on the discharge dynamics of the plasma jet. The computer model used in this investigation solves Poisson's equation, transport equations for charged and neutral species, the electron energy equation, and the Navier-Stokes equations for the neutral gas flow. The APPJ is sustained in He/O2 = 99.8/0.2 flowing into humid air, and is directed onto dielectric surfaces in contact with ground with dielectric constants ranging from 2 to 80, and a grounded metal surface. Low values of relative permittivity encourage propagation of the electric field into the treated material and formation and propagation of a surface ionization wave. High values of relative permittivity promote the restrike of the ionization wave and the formation of a conduction channel between the plasma discharge and the treated surface. The distribution of space charge surrounding the APPJ is discussed.

  11. Hypervelocity microparticle characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Idzorek, G.C.

    1996-11-01

    To protect spacecraft from orbital debris requires a basic understanding of the processes involved in hypervelocity impacts and characterization of detectors to measure the space environment. Both require a source of well characterized hypervelocity particles. Electrostatic acceleration of charged microspheres provides such a source. Techniques refined at the Los Alamos National Laboratory provided information on hypervelocity impacts of particles of known mass and velocity ranging from 20-1000 nm diameter and 1-100 km/s. A Van De Graaff generator operating at 6 million volts was used to accelerate individual carbonyl iron microspheres produced by a specially designed particle source. Standard electrostatic lenses and steering were used to control the particles flight path. Charge sensitive pickoff tubes measured the particle charge and velocity in- flight without disturbing the particle. This information coupled with the measured Van De Graaff terminal voltage allowed calculation of the particle energy, mass, momenta and (using an assumed density) the size. Particles with the desired parameters were then electrostatically directed to a target chamber. Targets used in our experiments included cratering and foil puncture targets, microphone momentum enhancement detectors, triboluminescent detectors, and ``splash`` charge detectors. In addition the system has been used to rapidly characterize size distributions of conductive plastic particles and potentially provide a method of easily sorting microscopic particles by size.

  12. Helium atmospheric pressure plasma jets touching dielectric and metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Norberg, Seth A. Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-07-07

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are being investigated in the context plasma medicine and biotechnology applications, and surface functionalization. The composition of the surface being treated ranges from plastics, liquids, and biological tissue, to metals. The dielectric constant of these materials ranges from as low as 1.5 for plastics to near 80 for liquids, and essentially infinite for metals. The electrical properties of the surface are not independent variables as the permittivity of the material being treated has an effect on the dynamics of the incident APPJ. In this paper, results are discussed from a computational investigation of the interaction of an APPJ incident onto materials of varying permittivity, and their impact on the discharge dynamics of the plasma jet. The computer model used in this investigation solves Poisson's equation, transport equations for charged and neutral species, the electron energy equation, and the Navier-Stokes equations for the neutral gas flow. The APPJ is sustained in He/O{sub 2} = 99.8/0.2 flowing into humid air, and is directed onto dielectric surfaces in contact with ground with dielectric constants ranging from 2 to 80, and a grounded metal surface. Low values of relative permittivity encourage propagation of the electric field into the treated material and formation and propagation of a surface ionization wave. High values of relative permittivity promote the restrike of the ionization wave and the formation of a conduction channel between the plasma discharge and the treated surface. The distribution of space charge surrounding the APPJ is discussed.

  13. Shuttle Hypervelocity Impact Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, James L.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Lear, Dana M.

    2011-01-01

    With three missions outstanding, the Shuttle Hypervelocity Impact Database has nearly 3000 entries. The data is divided into tables for crew module windows, payload bay door radiators and thermal protection system regions, with window impacts compromising just over half the records. In general, the database provides dimensions of hypervelocity impact damage, a component level location (i.e., window number or radiator panel number) and the orbiter mission when the impact occurred. Additional detail on the type of particle that produced the damage site is provided when sampling data and definitive analysis results are available. Details and insights on the contents of the database including examples of descriptive statistics will be provided. Post flight impact damage inspection and sampling techniques that were employed during the different observation campaigns will also be discussed. Potential enhancements to the database structure and availability of the data for other researchers will be addressed in the Future Work section. A related database of returned surfaces from the International Space Station will also be introduced.

  14. Shuttle Hypervelocity Impact Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, James I.; Christiansen, Eric I.; Lear, Dana M.

    2011-01-01

    With three flights remaining on the manifest, the shuttle impact hypervelocity database has over 2800 entries. The data is currently divided into tables for crew module windows, payload bay door radiators and thermal protection system regions, with window impacts compromising just over half the records. In general, the database provides dimensions of hypervelocity impact damage, a component level location (i.e., window number or radiator panel number) and the orbiter mission when the impact occurred. Additional detail on the type of particle that produced the damage site is provided when sampling data and definitive analysis results are available. The paper will provide details and insights on the contents of the database including examples of descriptive statistics using the impact data. A discussion of post flight impact damage inspection and sampling techniques that were employed during the different observation campaigns will be presented. Future work to be discussed will be possible enhancements to the database structure and availability of the data for other researchers. A related database of ISS returned surfaces that are under development will also be introduced.

  15. Oxidation of Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Subjected to Hypervelocity Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Donald M.; Pham, Vuong T.; Norman, Ignacio; Chao, Dennis C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents results from arc jet tests conducted at the NASA Johnson Space Center on reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) samples subjected to hypervelocity impact. The RCC test specimens are representative of RCC components used on the Space Shuttle Orbiter. The arc jet testing established the oxidation characteristics of RCC when hypervelocity projectiles, simulating meteoroid/orbital debris, impact the RCC material. In addition to developing correlations for use in trajectory simulations, we discuss analytical modeling of the increased material oxidation in the impacted area using measured hole growth data. Entry flight simulations are useful in assessing the increased Space Shuttle RCC component degradation as a result of impact damage and the hot gas flow through an enlarging hole into the wing leading-edge cavity.

  16. Conical shaped charge pressed powder, metal liner jet characterization and penetration in aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, M.G.

    1997-05-01

    This work was conducted as part of a Near-wellbore Mechanics program at Sandia National Laboratories. An understanding of the interaction of the perforator jet from an explosive shaped charge with the fluid filled porous sandstone media is of basic importance to the completion of oil wells. Tests were conducted using the five-head Flash X-ray Test Site to measure the jet tip velocities and jet geometry for the OMNI and CAPSULE Conical Shaped Charge (CSC) oil well perforator jets fired into air. These tests were conducted to generate jet velocity and geometry information to be used in validating the CTH hydrocode modeling/simulation development of pressed powder, metal liner jets in air. Ten tests were conducted to determine the CSC jet penetration into 6061-T6 aluminum targets. Five tests were conducted with the OMNI CSC at 0.25, 6.0, and 19 inch standoffs from the target. Five tests were conducted with the CAPSULE CSC at 0.60, 5.0, 10.0, and 19 inch standoffs from the target. These tests were conducted to generate jet penetration into homogeneous target information for use in validating the CTH code modeling/simulation of pressed powder, metal liner jets penetrating aluminum targets. The Flash X-ray radiographs, jet velocities, jet diameters, and jet lengths data for jets fired into air are presented in this report. The jet penetration into aluminum and penetration hole profile data are also presented for the OMNI and CAPSULE perforators. Least Squares fits are presented for the measured jet velocity and jet penetration data.

  17. Intact capture of hypervelocity particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Albee, A. L.

    1986-01-01

    Knowledge of the phase, structure, and crystallography of cosmic particles, as well as their elemental and isotopic compositions, would be very valuable information toward understanding the nature of our solar system. This information can be obtained from the intact capture of large mineral grains of cosmic particles from hypervelocity impacts. Hypervelocity experiments of intact capture in underdense media have indicated realistic potential in this endeaver. The recovery of the thermal blankets and louvers from the Solar Max spacecraft have independently verified this potential in the unintended capture of cosmic materials from hypervelocity impacts. Passive underdense media will permit relatively simple and inexpensive missions to capture cosmic particles intact, either by going to a planetary body or by waiting for the particles to come to the Shuttle or the Space Station. Experiments to explore the potential of using various underdense media for an intact comet sample capture up to 6.7 km/s were performed at NASA Ames Research Center Vertical Gun Range. Explorative hypervelocity experiments up to 7.9 km/s were also made at the Ernst Mach Institute. These experiments have proven that capturing intact particles at hypervelocity impacts is definitely possible. Further research is being conducted to achieve higher capture ratios at even higher hypervelocities for even smaller projectiles.

  18. Intact capture of hypervelocity particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Albee, A. L.

    Knowledge of the phase, structure, and crystallography of cosmic particles, as well as their elemental and isotopic compositions, would be very valuable information toward understanding the nature of our solar system. This information can be obtained from the intact capture of large mineral grains of cosmic particles from hypervelocity impacts. Hypervelocity experiments of intact capture in underdense media have indicated realistic potential in this endeaver. The recovery of the thermal blankets and louvers from the Solar Max spacecraft have independently verified this potential in the unintended capture of cosmic materials from hypervelocity impacts. Passive underdense media will permit relatively simple and inexpensive missions to capture cosmic particles intact, either by going to a planetary body or by waiting for the particles to come to the Shuttle or the Space Station. Experiments to explore the potential of using various underdense media for an intact comet sample capture up to 6.7 km/s were performed at NASA Ames Research Center Vertical Gun Range. Explorative hypervelocity experiments up to 7.9 km/s were also made at the Ernst Mach Institute. These experiments have proven that capturing intact particles at hypervelocity impacts is definitely possible. Further research is being conducted to achieve higher capture ratios at even higher hypervelocities for even smaller projectiles.

  19. Hypervelocity impacts into graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latunde-Dada, S.; Cheesman, C.; Day, D.; Harrison, W.; Price, S.

    2011-03-01

    Studies have been conducted into the characterisation of the behaviour of commercial graphite (brittle) when subjected to hypervelocity impacts by a range of projectiles. The experiments were conducted with a two-stage gas gun capable of launching projectiles of differing density and strength to speeds of about 6kms-1 at right angles into target plates. The damage caused is quantified by measurements of the crater depth and diameters. From the experimental data collected, scaling laws were derived which correlate the crater dimensions to the velocity and the density of the projectile. It was found that for moderate projectile densities the crater dimensions obey the '2/3 power law' which applies to ductile materials.

  20. Ink-jet printing of silver metallization for photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the ink-jet printing program at Purdue University is described. The drop-on-demand printing system was modified to use metallo-organic decomposition (MOD) inks. Also, an IBM AT computer was integrated into the ink-jet printer system to provide operational functions and contact pattern configuration. The integration of the ink-jet printing system, problems encountered, and solutions derived were described in detail. The status of ink-jet printing using a MOD ink was discussed. The ink contained silver neodecanate and bismuth 2-ethylhexanoate dissolved in toluene; the MOD ink decomposition products being 99 wt% AG, and 1 wt% Bi.

  1. Removal of Machine Oil from Metal Surface by Mesoplasma Jet under Open Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Haruki; Shiki, Hajime; Tsujii, Kenichi; Oke, Shinichiro; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Okawa, Takashi; Yamanaka, Shigenobu

    2009-08-01

    An attempt was made to employ the plasma-energized jet (PEN-jet) generated by pulsed arc discharge, one of the atmospheric-pressure mesoplasmas, for removal of machine oil from the surface of electrically-grounded aluminum (Al) alloy substrate under open atmosphere. Three types of nozzle configurations were examined; a metal nozzle, ceramic nozzle, and electrically-floated metal nozzle. Electric input power to the pulsed arc plasma discharge was 700 W constant. First, free-burning of the PEN-jet was observed as a function of air gas flow. When the PEN-jets were irradiated to the clean substrate, the PEN-jet with the metal nozzle caused substrate damage by the arc spot due to transferring arc discharge. Then the PEN-jet with the ceramic nozzle was irradiated to the oily substrate. The adhesion strength of sealant and water contact angle of the treated surface were then measured. As a result, these values of the oily substrate treated by the PEN-jet were almost the same as those of clean substrate. The treated surface was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and reflectance spectroscopy. Their spectral profiles clearly indicated oil removal from the surface by PEN-jet.

  2. Analysis of heat transfer for a normally impinging liquid-metal slot jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1973-01-01

    A two-dimensional liquid-metal slot jet that is impinging normally against a uniformly heated flat plate is analyzed. The distributions of wall temperature and heat-transfer coefficient are obtained as functions of position along the plate. The liquid-metal assumptions are made that the jet is inviscid and that molecular condition is dominating heat diffusion. The solution is obtained by mapping the jet flow region into a potential plane where it occupies a strip of uniform width. The energy equation is transformed into potential coordinates, and an exact solution obtained in the strip region. Conformal mapping is then used to transform the solution into the physical plane.

  3. Hypervelocity impact shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cour-Palais, Burton G. (Inventor); Crews, Jeanne Lee (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A hypervelocity impact shield and method for protecting a wall structure, such as a spacecraft wall, from impact with particles of debris having densities of about 2.7 g/cu cm and impact velocities up to 16 km/s are disclosed. The shield comprises a stack of ultra thin sheets of impactor disrupting material supported and arranged by support means in spaced relationship to one another and mounted to cover the wall in a position for intercepting the particles. The sheets are of a number and spacing such that the impacting particle and the resulting particulates of the impacting particle and sheet material are successively impact-shocked to a thermal state of total melt and/or vaporization to a degree as precludes perforation of the wall. The ratio of individual sheet thickness to the theoretical diameter of particles of debris which may be of spherical form is in the range of 0.03 to 0.05. The spacing between adjacent sheets is such that the debris cloud plume of liquid and vapor resulting from an impacting particle penetrating a sheet does not puncture the next adjacent sheet prior to the arrival thereat of fragment particulates of sheet material and the debris particle produced by a previous impact.

  4. Capacitors Would Help Protect Against Hypervelocity Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David; Hubbs, Whitney; Hovater, Mary

    2007-01-01

    A proposal investigates alternatives to the present bumper method of protecting spacecraft against impacts of meteoroids and orbital debris. The proposed method is based on a British high-voltage-capacitance technique for protecting armored vehicles against shaped-charge warheads. A shield, according to the proposal, would include a bare metal outer layer separated by a gap from an inner metal layer covered with an electrically insulating material. The metal layers would constitute electrodes of a capacitor. A bias potential would be applied between the metal layers. A particle impinging at hypervelocity on the outer metal layer would break apart into a debris cloud that would penetrate the electrical insulation on the inner metal layer. The cloud would form a path along which electric current could flow between the metal layers, thereby causing the capacitor to discharge. With proper design, the discharge current would be large enough to vaporize the particles in the debris cloud to prevent penetration of the spacecraft. The shield design can be mass optimized to be competitive with existing bumper designs. Parametric studies were proposed to determine optimum correction between bias voltage, impacting particle velocity, gap space, and insulating material required to prevent spacecraft penetration.

  5. Metal and polymer melt jet formation by the high-power laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoh, Jack J.; Gojani, Ardian B.

    2010-02-01

    The laser-induced metal and polymer melt jets are studied experimentally. Two classes of physical phenomena of interest are: first, the process of explosive phase change of laser induced surface ablation and second, the hydrodynamic jetting of liquid melts ejected from a beamed spot. We focus on the dynamic link between these two distinct physical phenomena in a framework of forming and patterning of metallic and polymer jets using a high-power Nd:YAG laser. The microexplosion of ablative spot on a target first forms a pocket of hot liquid melt and then it is followed by a sudden volume change of gas-liquid mixture leading to a pressure-induced spray jet ejection into surrounding medium.

  6. Ink jet printing of silver metallization for photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    Progress was made in the continuing development of the ink jet printing system for thick film circuits. The unit being used is a prototype ink jet printer. One of the first tasks completed was the complete documentation of this ink jet printing system as it existed. It was determined that this was an essential step in deciding what modifications were needed to the system and how these modifications would be implemented. Design modification studies were started for electronic, mechanical, and programming aspects of the ystem. The areas needeing improvement were discussed and applicable changes decided upon. Some improvments were completed. Although the general areas needing improving were identified and some changes decided upon, the exact details of how other changes can be implemented are yet been decided.

  7. Three-phase hypervelocity projectile launcher

    DOEpatents

    Fugelso, L. Erik; Langner, Gerald C.; Burns, Kerry L.; Albright, James N.

    1994-01-01

    A hypervelocity projectile launcher for use in perforating borehole casings provides improved penetration into the surrounding rock structure. The launcher includes a first cylinder of explosive material that defines an axial air-filled cavity, a second cylinder of explosive material defining an axial frustum-shaped cavity abutting and axially aligned with the first cylinder. A pliant washer is located between and axially aligned with the first and second cylinders. The frustum shaped cavity is lined with a metal liner effective to form a projectile when the first and second cylinders are detonated. The washer forms a unique intermediate projectile in advance of the liner projectile and enables the liner projectile to further penetrate into and fracture the adjacent rock structure.

  8. X-ray grating interferometry with a liquid-metal-jet source

    SciTech Connect

    Thüring, T.; Rutishauser, S.; Stampanoni, M.; Zhou, T.; Lundström, U.; Burvall, A.; Hertz, H. M.; David, C.

    2013-08-26

    A liquid-metal-jet X-ray tube is used in an X-ray phase-contrast microscope based on a Talbot type grating interferometer. With a focal spot size in the range of a few microns and a photon flux of ∼10{sup 12} photons/s×sr, the brightness of such a source is approximately one order of magnitude higher than for a conventional microfocus source. For comparison, a standard microfocus source was used with the same grating interferometer, showing significantly increased visibility for the liquid-metal-jet arrangement. Together with the increased flux, this results in improved signal-to-noise ratio.

  9. Mod silver metallization: Screen printing and ink-jet printing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, R. W.; Vest, G. M.

    1985-01-01

    Basic material efforts have proven to be very successful. Adherent and conductive films were achieved. A silver neodecanoate/bismuth 2-ethylhexanoate mixture has given the best results in both single and double layer applications. Another effort is continuing to examine the feasibility of applying metallo-organic deposition films by use of an ink jet printer. Direct line writing would result in a saving of process time and materials. So far, some well defined lines have been printed.

  10. Mod silver metallization: Screen printing and ink-jet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vest, R. W.; Vest, G. M.

    1985-06-01

    Basic material efforts have proven to be very successful. Adherent and conductive films were achieved. A silver neodecanoate/bismuth 2-ethylhexanoate mixture has given the best results in both single and double layer applications. Another effort is continuing to examine the feasibility of applying metallo-organic deposition films by use of an ink jet printer. Direct line writing would result in a saving of process time and materials. So far, some well defined lines have been printed.

  11. Removal of metals and ceramics by combined effects of micro liquid jet and laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Daehwan; Seo, Changho; Kim, Dongsik

    2012-12-01

    In this work, we analyze a hybrid laser/liquid jet micromachining process for several metals and ceramics based on the optical breakdown of a microdroplet. In the process, materials are removed by the combined effects of a laser pulse and a high-speed pulsed microjet ejected from the microdroplet. The opto-hydrodynamic phenomena occurring during this process and the interaction of the laser/liquid jet with various materials, including copper, aluminum, stainless steel, alumina, and boron nitride, are investigated experimentally. The results show that the laser/liquid jet can remove the materials with substantially increased removal rates and reduced thermal side effects compared with the conventional pulsed laser ablation process. Visualization of the process reveals that the materials are partially ablated and melted by the laser pulse during the early stage of the process and that the molten material is subsequently eliminated by the hydrodynamic impact of the liquid jet.

  12. Jet formation in cerium metal to examine material strength

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, B. J. Cherne, F. J.; Prime, M. B.; Yeager, J. D.; Ramos, K. J.; Hooks, D. E.; Cooley, J. C.; Dimonte, G.; Fezzaa, K.; Iverson, A. J.; Carlson, C. A.

    2015-11-21

    Examining the evolution of material properties at extreme conditions advances our understanding of numerous high-pressure phenomena from natural events like meteorite impacts to general solid mechanics and fluid flow behavior. Recent advances in synchrotron diagnostics coupled with dynamic compression platforms have introduced new possibilities for examining in-situ, spatially resolved material response with nanosecond time resolution. In this work, we examined jet formation from a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in cerium initially shocked into a transient, high-pressure phase, and then released to a low-pressure, higher-temperature state. Cerium's rich phase diagram allows us to study the yield stress following a shock induced solid-solid phase transition. X-ray imaging was used to obtain images of jet formation and evolution with 2–3 μm spatial resolution. From these images, an analytic method was used to estimate the post-shock yield stress, and these results were compared to continuum calculations that incorporated an experimentally validated equation-of-state (EOS) for cerium coupled with a deviatoric strength model. Reasonable agreement was observed between the calculations and the data illustrating the sensitivity of jet formation on the yield stress values. The data and analysis shown here provide insight into material strength during dynamic loading which is expected to aid in the development of strength aware multi-phase EOS required to predict the response of matter at extreme conditions.

  13. Jet formation in cerium metal to examine material strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, B. J.; Cherne, F. J.; Prime, M. B.; Fezzaa, K.; Iverson, A. J.; Carlson, C. A.; Yeager, J. D.; Ramos, K. J.; Hooks, D. E.; Cooley, J. C.; Dimonte, G.

    2015-11-01

    Examining the evolution of material properties at extreme conditions advances our understanding of numerous high-pressure phenomena from natural events like meteorite impacts to general solid mechanics and fluid flow behavior. Recent advances in synchrotron diagnostics coupled with dynamic compression platforms have introduced new possibilities for examining in-situ, spatially resolved material response with nanosecond time resolution. In this work, we examined jet formation from a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in cerium initially shocked into a transient, high-pressure phase, and then released to a low-pressure, higher-temperature state. Cerium's rich phase diagram allows us to study the yield stress following a shock induced solid-solid phase transition. X-ray imaging was used to obtain images of jet formation and evolution with 2-3 μm spatial resolution. From these images, an analytic method was used to estimate the post-shock yield stress, and these results were compared to continuum calculations that incorporated an experimentally validated equation-of-state (EOS) for cerium coupled with a deviatoric strength model. Reasonable agreement was observed between the calculations and the data illustrating the sensitivity of jet formation on the yield stress values. The data and analysis shown here provide insight into material strength during dynamic loading which is expected to aid in the development of strength aware multi-phase EOS required to predict the response of matter at extreme conditions.

  14. Flash x-ray radiography using imaging plates for the observation of hypervelocity objects

    SciTech Connect

    Mizusako, F.; Ogasawara, K.; Kondo, K.; Saito, F.; Tamura, H.

    2005-02-01

    Flash x-ray radiography was conducted using imaging plates (IP) to observe high-speed thermal spray jets and debris clouds produced from hypervelocity impact. The radiographs of the spray jets or debris cloud shadows on the IPs were analyzed to estimate the distribution of mass per unit area, i.e., Areal mass density, due to the distribution of the intensities of stimulated emissions from the IPs. The wide dynamic range of the IPs led to the detection of an Areal mass density one hundred times as large as the minimum Areal mass density and the very detailed densities. The availability of the IPs for the flash x-ray radiography of a high-speed thermal spray jet and a hypervelocity-impact-produced debris cloud was demonstrated.

  15. Hypervelocity plate acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.P.; Tan, T.H.

    1991-01-01

    Shock tubes have been used to accelerate 1.5-mm-thick stainless steel plates to high velocity while retaining their integrity. The fast shock tubes are 5.1-cm-diameter, 15.2-cm-long cylinders of PBX-9501 explosive containing a 1.1-cm-diameter cylindrical core of low-density polystyrene foam. The plates have been placed directly in contact with one face of the explosive system. Plane-wave detonation was initiated on the opposite face. A Mach disk was formed in the imploding styrofoam core, which provided the impulse required to accelerate the metal plate to high velocity. Parametric studies were made on this system to find the effect of varying plate metal, plate thickness, foam properties, and addition of a barrel. A maximum plate velocity of 9.0 km/s has been observed. 6 refs., 17 figs.

  16. Possibility of Metal Processing Using Ultrasonic Cavitation Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyagi, Ryoji; Fujiwara, Ryuichi; Niita, Tokuo

    2001-05-01

    Utilizing a high-intensity ultrasonic cavitation, a processing experiment was conducted with the aim of performing volumetric flow adjustment of a fuel jet nozzle to be used for a small engine, which cannot be carried out by a method such as machining. At the bottom of the nozzle used for the experiment, which is in the shape of a cup, a nozzle hole with a diameter of 0.15 mm is drilled. In this experiment, we make adjustments in the volumetric flow by grinding and removing the machining burr with the aid of the processing power of ultrasonic cavitation. The processing effect is highly dependent on the ultrasonic cavitation intensity. In the experiment, the processing reservoir was filled with pressurized highly deaerated water to increase the processing force by allowing cavitation with high intensity to be generated. The processing principle is to utilize the effect of a cavitation jet flow passing through the nozzle hole. To restrain the intake of the bubbles into the flow circuits during the pressure reduction cycle of the vibrator, the water flow was discharged into a pressure reduction reservoir. By allowing the horn tip with a diameter of 6 mm at a frequency of 28 kHz to approach the sample, followed by high-intensity ultrasonic irradiation, powerful cavitation was generated. As a result of the evaluation of the processing efficiency made based on the volumetric flow increase and microscopic observation of the nozzle, burrs smaller than 10 μm were almost entirely removed within 15 min of initial irradiation, resulting in a volumetric flow increase of more than 0.4%/min. However, in the case of burrs of more than 10 μm, no force that could remove the burrs was found. It was surprising for the burrs to generate deformation rather than to be removed.

  17. Chunk projectile launch using the Sandia Hypervelocity Launcher Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Trucano, T.G.; Reinhart, W.D.; Hall, C.A.

    1994-07-01

    An experimental technique is described to launch an intact ``chunk,`` i.e. a 0.3 cm thick by 0.6 cm diameter cylindrical titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) flyer, to 10.2 km/s. The ability to launch fragments having such an aspect ratio is important for hypervelocity impact phenomenology studies. The experimental techniques used to accomplish this launch were similar but not identical to techniques developed for the Sandia HyperVelocity Launcher (HVL). A confined barrel impact is crucial in preventing the two-dimensional effects from dominating the loading response of the projectile chunk. The length to diameter ratio of the metallic chunk that is launched to 10.2 km/s is 0.5 and is an order of magnitude larger than those accomplished using the conventional hypervelocity launcher. The multi-dimensional, finite-difference (finite-volume), hydrodynamic code CTH was used to evaluate and assess the acceleration characteristics i.e., the in-bore ballistics of the chunky projectile launch. A critical analysis of the CTH calculational results led to the final design and the experimental conditions that were used in this study. However, the predicted velocity of the projectile chunk based on CTH calculations was {approximately} 6% lower than the measured velocity of {approximately}10.2 km/S.

  18. Characterization of Debris from the DebriSat Hypervelocity Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivero, M.; Kleespies, J.; Patankar, K.; Fitz-Coy, N.; Liou, J.-C.; Sorge, M.; Huynh, T.; Opiela, J.; Krisko, P.; Cowardin, H.

    2015-01-01

    The DebriSat project is an effort by NASA and the DoD to update the standard break-up model for objects in orbit. The DebriSat object, a 56 kg representative LEO satellite, was subjected to a hypervelocity impact in April 2014. For the hypervelocity test, the representative satellite was suspended within a "soft-catch" arena formed by polyurethane foam panels to minimize the interactions between the debris generated from the hypervelocity impact and the metallic walls of the test chamber. After the impact, the foam panels and debris not caught by the panels were collected and shipped to the University of Florida where the project has now advanced to the debris characterization stage. The characterization effort has been divided into debris collection, measurement, and cataloguing. Debris collection and cataloguing involves the retrieval of debris from the foam panels and cataloguing the debris in a database. Debris collection is a three-step process: removal of loose debris fragments from the surface of the foam panels; X-ray imaging to identify/locate debris fragments embedded within the foam panel; extraction of the embedded debris fragments identified during the X-ray imaging process. As debris fragments are collected, they are catalogued into a database specifically designed for this project. Measurement involves determination of size, mass, shape, material, and other physical properties and well as images of the fragment. Cataloguing involves a assigning a unique identifier for each fragment along with the characterization information.

  19. Hypervelocity cutting machine and method

    DOEpatents

    Powell, J.R.; Reich, M.

    1996-11-12

    A method and machine are provided for cutting a workpiece such as concrete. A gun barrel is provided for repetitively loading projectiles therein and is supplied with a pressurized propellant from a storage tank. A thermal storage tank is disposed between the propellant storage tank and the gun barrel for repetitively receiving and heating propellant charges which are released in the gun barrel for repetitively firing projectiles therefrom toward the workpiece. In a preferred embodiment, hypervelocity of the projectiles is obtained for cutting the concrete workpiece by fracturing thereof. 10 figs.

  20. Hypervelocity cutting machine and method

    DOEpatents

    Powell, James R.; Reich, Morris

    1996-11-12

    A method and machine 14 are provided for cutting a workpiece 12 such as concrete. A gun barrel 16 is provided for repetitively loading projectiles 22 therein and is supplied with a pressurized propellant from a storage tank 28. A thermal storage tank 32,32A is disposed between the propellant storage tank 28 and the gun barrel 16 for repetitively receiving and heating propellant charges which are released in the gun barrel 16 for repetitively firing projectiles 22 therefrom toward the workpiece 12. In a preferred embodiment, hypervelocity of the projectiles 22 is obtained for cutting the concrete workpiece 12 by fracturing thereof.

  1. A 24 keV liquid-metal-jet x-ray source for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, D. H.; Takman, P. A. C.; Lundstroem, U.; Burvall, A.; Hertz, H. M.

    2011-12-15

    We present a high-brightness 24-keV electron-impact microfocus x-ray source based on continuous operation of a heated liquid-indium/gallium-jet anode. The 30-70 W electron beam is magnetically focused onto the jet, producing a circular 7-13 {mu}m full width half maximum x-ray spot. The measured spectral brightness at the 24.2 keV In K{sub {alpha}} line is 3 x 10{sup 9} photons/(s x mm{sup 2}x mrad{sup 2}x 0.1% BW) at 30 W electron-beam power. The high photon energy compared to existing liquid-metal-jet sources increases the penetration depth and allows imaging of thicker samples. The applicability of the source in the biomedical field is demonstrated by high-resolution imaging of a mammography phantom and a phase-contrast angiography phantom.

  2. Features of deformation of metal body surfaces under impact of a water jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aganin, A. A.; Khismatullina, N. A.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a mathematical model and computational results on dynamics of a perfect elastic-plastic body under the load arising during impact of a high-velocity liquid jet with the hemispherical end. The body is simulated by the isotropic linearly-elastic semi-space, its plastic state is described by the von Mises condition. The dependence of features of the body surface deformation on the body material is studied. The problem is considered in the axisymmetric statement. The axis of symmetry is that of the jet. The loaded domain is a circle with its radius rapidly growing from zero to the jet radius. The pressure in the loaded domain is non-uniform both in time and space. Three metal alloys (aluminium, copper-nickel and steel) are considered as the body material. The loading of the body surface in all the cases corresponds to the impact of a water jet with the radius 100 pm and the velocity 300 m/s. It has been shown that under such impact a nanometer pit arises on the body surface at the center of the domain of the jet action. The profile of the pit and its maximal depth depend on the body material.

  3. Sharp Hypervelocity Aerodynamic Research Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Jeffrey; Kolodziej, Paul; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this flight demonstration is to deploy a slender-body hypervelocity aerodynamic research probe (SHARP) from an orbiting platform using a tether, deorbit and fly it along its aerothermal performance constraint, and recover it intact in mid-air. To accomplish this objective, two flight demonstrations are proposed. The first flight uses a blunt-body, tethered reentry experiment vehicle (TREV) to prove out tethered deployment technology for accurate entries, a complete SHARP electronics suite, and a new soft mid-air helicopter recovery technique. The second flight takes advantage of this launch and recovery capability to demonstrate revolutionary sharp body concepts for hypervelocity vehicles, enabled by new Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs) recently developed by Ames Research Center. Successful demonstration of sharp body hypersonic vehicle technologies could have radical impact on space flight capabilities, including: enabling global reentry cross range capability from Station, eliminating reentry communications blackout, and allowing new highly efficient launch systems incorporating air breathing propulsion and zeroth staging.

  4. Ablative shielding for hypervelocity projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A hypervelocity projectile shield which includes a hollow semi-flexible housing fabricated from a plastic like, or otherwise transparent membrane which is filled with a fluid (gas or liquid) is presented. The housing has a inlet valve, similar to that on a tire or basketball, to introduce an ablating fluid into the housing. The housing is attached by a Velcro mount or double-sided adhesive tape to the outside surface of a structure to be protected. The housings are arrayed in a side-by-side relationship for complete coverage of the surface to be protected. In use, when a hypervelocity projectile penetrates the outer wall of a housing it is broken up and then the projectile is ablated as it travels through the fluid, much like a meteorite 'burns up' as it enters the earth's atmosphere, and the housing is deflated. The deflated housing can be easily spotted for replacement, even from a distance. Replacement is then accomplished by simply pulling a deflated housing off the structure and installing a new housing.

  5. Ink jet assisted metallization for low cost flat plate solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teng, K. F.; Vest, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    Computer-controlled ink-jet-assisted metallization of the front surface of solar cells with metalorganic silver inks offers a maskless alternative method to conventional photolithography and screen printing. This method can provide low cost, fine resolution, reduced process complexity, avoidance of degradation of the p-n junction by firing at lower temperature, and uniform line film on rough surface of solar cells. The metallization process involves belt furnace firing and thermal spiking. With multilayer ink jet printing and firing, solar cells of about 5-6 percent efficiency without antireflection (AR) coating can be produced. With a titanium thin-film underlayer as an adhesion promoter, solar cells of average efficiency 8.08 percent without AR coating can be obtained. This efficiency value is approximately equal to that of thin-film solar cells of the same lot. Problems with regard to lower inorganic content of the inks and contact resistance are noted.

  6. Ink jet printable silver metallization with zinc oxide for front side metallization for micro crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurk, Robert; Fritsch, Marco; Eberstein, Markus; Schilm, Jochen; Uhlig, Florian; Waltinger, Andreas; Michaelis, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Ink jet printable water based inks are prepared by a new silver nanoparticle synthesis and the addition of nanoscaled ZnO particles. For the formation of front side contacts the inks are ink jet printed on the front side of micro crystalline silicon solar cells, and contact the cell directly during the firing step by etching through the wafers’ anti-reflection coating (ARC). In terms of Ag dissolution and precipitation the mechanism of contact formation can be compared to commercial glass containing thick film pastes. This avoids additional processing steps, like laser ablation, which are usually necessary to open the ARC prior to ink jet printing. As a consequence process costs can be reduced. In order to optimize the ARC etching and contact formation during firing, zinc oxide nanoparticles are investigated as an ink additive. By utilization of in situ contact resistivity measurements the mechanism of contacting was explored. Our results show that silver inks containing ZnO particles realize a specific contact resistance below 10 mΩṡcm2. By using a multi-pass ink jet printing and plating process a front side metallization of commercial 6  ×  6 inch2 standard micro crystalline silicone solar cells with emitter resistance of 60 Ω/◽ was achieved and showed an efficiency of 15.7%.

  7. Heat Transfer Between a Plasma Jet and a Metal Surface in a Cut Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veremeichik, A. N.; Sazonov, M. I.; Khvisevich, V. M.; Tsyganov, D. L.

    2015-11-01

    Investigations are presented of the formation of a plasma jet and of the current-density and heat-flux distributions in the process of metal cutting along the cut cavity with direct and reverse polarities of the plasmatron connection. The study of the specific features of heat transfer of the arc with the surface of the cut cavity was carried out on the basis of the developed plasma unit which makes it possible to model the technological process of separating metal cutting. A sectional cut model is proposed which can be used to work out and optimize the methods of determination of cutting parameters.

  8. Hypervelocity High Speed Projectile Imagery and Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Donald J.

    2009-01-01

    This DVD contains video showing the results of hypervelocity impact. One is showing a projectile impact on a Kevlar wrapped Aluminum bottle containing 3000 psi gaseous oxygen. One video show animations of a two stage light gas gun.

  9. Hypervelocity impact simulations of Whipple shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segletes, Steven B.; Zukas, Jonas A.

    1992-01-01

    The problem associated with protecting space vehicles from space debris impact is described. Numerical simulation is espoused as a useful complement to experimentation: as a means to help understand and describe the hypervelocity impact phenomena. The capabilities of a PC-based hydrocode, ZeuS, are described, for application to the problem of hypervelocity impact. Finally, results of ZeuS simulations, as applied to the problem of bumper shield impact, are presented and compared with experimental results.

  10. Hypervelocity Impact (HVI). Volume 1; General Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorman, Michael R.; Ziola, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    During 2003 and 2004, the Johnson Space Center's White Sands Testing Facility in Las Cruces, New Mexico conducted hypervelocity impact tests on the space shuttle wing leading edge. Hypervelocity impact tests were conducted to determine if Micro-Meteoroid/Orbital Debris impacts could be reliably detected and located using simple passive ultrasonic methods. This volume contains an executive summary, overview of the method, brief descriptions of all targets, and highlights of results and conclusions.

  11. Hypervelocity impact technology and applications: 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhart, William Dodd; Chhabildas, Lalit C.

    2008-07-01

    The Hypervelocity Impact Society is devoted to the advancement of the science and technology of hypervelocity impact and related technical areas required to facilitate and understand hypervelocity impact phenomena. Topics of interest include experimental methods, theoretical techniques, analytical studies, phenomenological studies, dynamic material response as related to material properties (e.g., equation of state), penetration mechanics, and dynamic failure of materials, planetary physics and other related phenomena. The objectives of the Society are to foster the development and exchange of technical information in the discipline of hypervelocity impact phenomena, promote technical excellence, encourage peer review publications, and hold technical symposia on a regular basis. It was sometime in 1985, partly in response to the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI), that a small group of visionaries decided that a conference or symposium on hypervelocity science would be useful and began the necessary planning. A major objective of the first Symposium was to bring the scientists and researchers up to date by reviewing the essential developments of hypervelocity science and technology between 1955 and 1985. This Symposia--HVIS 2007 is the tenth Symposium since that beginning. The papers presented at all the HVIS are peer reviewed and published as a special volume of the archival journal International Journal of Impact Engineering. HVIS 2007 followed the same high standards and its proceedings will add to this body of work.

  12. Fragmentation of hypervelocity aluminum projectiles on fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Martin; Schäfer, Frank; Destefanis, Roberto; Faraud, Moreno; Lambert, Michel

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents work performed for a study investigating the ability of different flexible materials to induce fragmentation of a hypervelocity projectile. Samples were chosen to represent a wide range of industrially available types of flexible materials like ceramic, aramid and carbon fabrics as well as a thin metallic mesh. Impact conditions and areal density were kept constant for all targets. Betacloth and multi-layer insulation (B-MLI) are mounted onto the targets to account for thermal system engineering requirements. All tests were performed using the Space light-gas gun facility (SLGG) of the Fraunhofer Institute for High-Speed Dynamics, Ernst-Mach-Institut, EMI. Projectiles were aluminum spheres with 5 mm diameter impacting at approximately 6.3 km/s. Fragmentation was evaluated using a witness plate behind the target. An aramid and a ceramic fabric lead the ranking of fabrics with the best projectile fragmentation and debris cloud dispersion performance. A comparison with an equal-density rigid aluminum plate is presented. The work presented can be applied to optimize the micrometeoroid and space debris (MM/SD) shielding structure of inflatable modules.

  13. Advanced Hypervelocity Aerophysics Facility Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witcofski, Robert D. (Compiler); Scallion, William I. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    The primary objective of the workshop was to obtain a critical assessment of a concept for a large, advanced hypervelocity ballistic range test facility powered by an electromagnetic launcher, which was proposed by the Langley Research Center. It was concluded that the subject large-scale facility was feasible and would provide the required ground-based capability for performing tests at entry flight conditions (velocity and density) on large, complex, instrumented models. It was also concluded that advances in remote measurement techniques and particularly onboard model instrumentation, light-weight model construction techniques, and model electromagnetic launcher (EML) systems must be made before any commitment for the construction of such a facility can be made.

  14. Intact capture of hypervelocity projectiles.

    PubMed

    Tsou, P

    1990-01-01

    The ability to capture projectiles intact at hypervelocities opens new applications in science and technology that would either not be possible or would be very costly by other means. This capability has been demonstrated in the laboratory for aluminum projectiles of 1.6 mm diameter, captured at 6 km/s, in one unmelted piece, and retaining up to 95% of the original mass. Furthermore, capture was accomplished passively using microcellular underdense polymer foam. Another advantage of capturing projectiles in an underdense medium is the ability of such a medium to preserve a record of the projectile's original velocity components of speed and direction. A survey of these experimental results is described in terms of a dozen parameters which characterize the amount of capture and the effect on the projectile due to different capture media. PMID:11538362

  15. Small-animal tomography with a liquid-metal-jet x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, D. H.; Lundström, U.; Westermark, U.; Takman, P. A. C.; Burvall, A.; Arsenian Henriksson, M.; Hertz, H. M.

    2012-03-01

    X-ray tomography of small animals is an important tool for medical research. For high-resolution x-ray imaging of few-cm-thick samples such as, e.g., mice, high-brightness x-ray sources with energies in the few-10-keV range are required. In this paper we perform the first small-animal imaging and tomography experiments using liquid-metal-jet-anode x-ray sources. This type of source shows promise to increase the brightness of microfocus x-ray systems, but present sources are typically optimized for an energy of 9 keV. Here we describe the details of a high-brightness 24-keV electron-impact laboratory microfocus x-ray source based on continuous operation of a heated liquid-In/Ga-jet anode. The source normally operates with 40 W of electron-beam power focused onto the metal jet, producing a 7×7 μm2 FWHM x-ray spot. The peak spectral brightness is 4 × 109 photons / ( s × mm2 × mrad2 × 0.1%BW) at the 24.2 keV In Kα line. We use the new In/Ga source and an existing Ga/In/Sn source for high-resolution imaging and tomography of mice.

  16. On the Nature of Hypervelocity Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsburg, Idan

    2013-12-01

    Hypervelocity stars are stars ejected from the center of the Milky Way, never to return. Since first discovered in 2005, hypervelocity stars have greatly increased our understanding of the kinematics and dynamics at the Galactic Center. In this dissertation we show via gravitational N-body simulations that an encounter between a binary star and the massive black hole at the Galactic Center, Sgr A*, can produce a hypervelocity star for one component of the binary, while the companion star remains in a tight orbit around the black hole. Such an encounter can also result in the coalescence of both stars in a highly-eccentric orbit around the black hole. These mechanisms may explain the surprising appearance of massive stars within 1OEOE of Sgr A*. We further find that the disruption of a triple star system by the massive black hole can produce hypervelocity binaries, which may ultimately coalesce and evolve into unbound blue stragglers. The black hole may also capture a binary star system, or possibly all three stars when a triple system is disrupted. Such captures may lead to collisions between two or all three of the stars and the coalescence may result in the formation of rejuvenated stars. Oursimulations also predict that planets around stars can be ejected from the Galactic Center via the same mechanism that produces hypervelocity stars. However, typical velocities for such runaway planets are higher than their stellar counterparts, with velocities approaching 5% the speed of light in extreme cases. Planets may also collide with their host star and result in an enriched stellar atmosphere. Furthermore, hypervelocity stars may host planets that should have a detectable transit. The discovery of such a transit would have consequences for understanding planetary formation and evolution at the Galactic Center. It is difficult to positively identify hypervelocity stars since at the observed effective temperatures both main-sequence and blue horizontal branch stars

  17. Explosively driven hypervelocity launcher: Second-stage augmentation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    The results are described of a continuing study aimed at developing a two-stage explosively driven hypervelocity launcher capable of achieving projectile velocities between 15 and 20 km/sec. The testing and evaluation of a new cylindrical impact technique for collapsing the barrel of two-stage launcher are reported. Previous two-stage launchers have been limited in ultimate performance by incomplete barrel collapse behind the projectile. The cylindrical impact technique explosively collapses a steel tube concentric with and surrounding the barrel of the launcher. The impact of the tube on the barrel produces extremely high stresses which cause the barrel to collapse. The collapse rate can be adjusted by appropriate variation of the explosive charge and tubing parameters. Launcher experiments demonstrated that the technique did achieve complete barrel collapse and form a second-stage piston. However, jetting occurred in the barrel collapse process and was responsible for severe projectile damage.

  18. PVDF gauge characterization of hypervelocity-impact-generated debris clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Boslough, M.B.; Chhabildas, L.C.; Reinhart, W.D.; Hall, C.A.; Miller, J.M.; Hickman, R.; Mullin, S.A.; Littlefield, D.L.

    1993-08-01

    We have used PVDF gauges to determine time-resolved stresses resulting from interaction between hypervelocity-impact-generated debris clouds and various target gauge blocks. Debris clouds were generated from three different impact configurations: (1) steel spheres impacting steel bumper sheets at 4.5 to 6.0 km/s, (2) aluminum inhibited shaped-charge jets impacting aluminum bumper sheets at 11.4 km/s, and (3) titanium disks impacting titanium bumper sheets at 7.6 to 10.1 km/s. Additional data were collected from the various experiments using flash X-ray radiography, pulsed laser photography, impact flash measurements, time-resolved strain gauge measurements, and velocity interferometry (VISAR). Data from these various techniques are in general agreement with one another and with hydrocode predictions, and provide a quantitative and comprehensive picture of impact-generated debris clouds.

  19. AXAF hypervelocity impact test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Cynthia L.; Rodriguez, Pedro I.

    1997-01-01

    Composite and honeycomb panels are commonly used for spacecraft structural components. The impact test results and analysis of six different composite and honeycomb combinations for use on the advanced X-ray astrophysics facility (AXAF) are reported. The AXAF consists of an X-ray telescope and the associated detecting devices attached to an octagonal spacecraft with an internal propulsion system. The spacecraft's structural panels and optical bench are made of two different graphite fiber reinforced polyimides or composite panels bonded to either side of an aluminum honeycomb. The instrument is required to have at least a 0.92 probability of no failure of any of the critical elements due to meteoroids and debris. In relation to the no-failure probability determination in its low earth orbit environment, hypervelocity impact testing was performed to determine the ballistic limit range and the extent of damage due to impact. The test results for a power and signal cable bundle located behind a panel are presented. Tests planned for a multilayer insulation (MLI) blanket and four types of cable bundles are discussed.

  20. Hypervelocity Capability of the HYPULSE Shock-Expansion Tunnel for Scramjet Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foelsche, Robert O.; Rogers, R. Clayton; Tsai, Ching-Yi; Bakos, Robert J.; Shih, Ann T.

    2001-01-01

    New hypervelocity capabilities for scramjet testing have recently been demonstrated in the HYPULSE Shock-Expansion Tunnel (SET). With NASA's continuing interests in scramjet testing at hypervelocity conditions (Mach 12 and above), a SET nozzle was designed and added to the HYPULSE facility. Results of tests conducted to establish SET operational conditions and facility nozzle calibration are presented and discussed for a Mach 15 (M15) flight enthalpy. The measurements and detailed computational fluid dynamics calculations (CFD) show the nozzle delivers a test gas with sufficiently wide core size to be suitable for free-jet testing of scramjet engine models of similar scale as, those tested in conventional low Mach number blow-down test facilities.

  1. Hypervelocity impact testing of spacecraft optical sensors

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    Hypervelocity tests of spacecraft optical sensors were conducted to determine if the optical signature from an impact inside the optical sensor sunshade resembled signals that have been observed on-orbit. Impact tests were conducted in darkness and with the ejected debris illuminated. The tests were conducted at the Johnson Space Center Hypervelocity Impact Test Facility. The projectile masses and velocities that may be obtained at the facility are most representative of the hypervelocity particles thought to be responsible for a group of anomalous optical sensors responses that have been observed on-orbit. The projectiles are a few micrograms, slightly more massive than the microgram particles thought to be responsible for the signal source. The test velocities were typically 7.3 km/s, which are somewhat slower than typical space particles.

  2. Analysis of oblique hypervelocity impact phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.; Taylor, Roy A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the results of an experimental investigation of phenomena associated with the oblique hypervelocity impact of spherical projectiles on multisheet aluminum structures. A model that can be employed in the design of meteoroid and space debris protection systems for space structures is developed. The model consists of equations that relate crater and perforation damage of a multisheet structure to parameters such as projectile size, impact velocity, and trajectory obliquity. The equations are obtained through a regression analysis of oblique hypervelocity impact test data. This data shows that the response of a multisheet structure to oblique impact is significantly different from its response to normal hypervelocity impact. It was found that obliquely incident projectiles produce ricochet debris that can severely damage panels or instrumentation located on the exterior of a space structure. Obliquity effects of high-speed impact must, therefore, be considered in the design of any structure exposed to a meteoroid or space debris environement.

  3. An investigation of oblique hypervelocity impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.

    1987-01-01

    This report describes the results of an investigation of phenomena associated with the oblique hypervelocity impact of spherical projectiles on multi-sheet aluminum structures. A model to be employed in the design of meteoroid and space debris protection systems for space structures is developed. The model consists of equations relating crater and perforation damage of a multi-sheet structure to parameters such as projectile size, impact velocity, and trajectory obliquity. The equations are obtained through a regression analysis of oblique hypervelocity impact test data. This data shows that the response of a multi-sheet structure to oblique impact is significantly different from its response to normal hypervelocity impact. It was found that obliquely incident projectiles produce ricochet debris that can severely damage panels or instrumentation located on the exterior of a space structure. Obliquity effects of high-speed impact must, therefore, be considered in the design of any structure exposed to the hazardous meteoroid and space debris environment.

  4. Metal shell technology based upon hollow jet instability. [for inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, J. M.; Lee, M. C.; Wang, T. G.

    1982-01-01

    Spherical shells of submillimeter size are sought as ICF targets. Such shells must be dimensionally precise, smooth, of high strength, and composed of a high atomic number material. A technology for the production of shells based upon the hydrodynamic instability of an annular jet of molten metal is described. Shells in the 0.7-2.0 mm size range have been produced using tin as a test material. Specimens exhibit good sphericity, fair concentricity, and excellent finish over most of the surface. Work involving a gold-lead-antimony alloy is in progress. Droplets of this are amorphous and possess superior surface finish. The flow of tin models that of the alloy well; experiments on both metals show that the technique holds considerable promise.

  5. Laser jetting of femto-liter metal droplets for high resolution 3D printed structures

    PubMed Central

    Zenou, M.; Sa’ar, A.; Kotler, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) is employed in a special, high accuracy jetting regime, by adequately matching the sub-nanosecond pulse duration to the metal donor layer thickness. Under such conditions, an effective solid nozzle is formed, providing stability and directionality to the femto-liter droplets which are printed from a large gap in excess of 400 μm. We illustrate the wide applicability of this method by printing several 3D metal objects. First, very high aspect ratio (A/R > 20), micron scale, copper pillars in various configuration, upright and arbitrarily bent, then a micron scale 3D object composed of gold and copper. Such a digital printing method could serve the generation of complex, multi-material, micron-scale, 3D materials and novel structures. PMID:26602432

  6. Laser jetting of femto-liter metal droplets for high resolution 3D printed structures.

    PubMed

    Zenou, M; Sa'ar, A; Kotler, Z

    2015-01-01

    Laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) is employed in a special, high accuracy jetting regime, by adequately matching the sub-nanosecond pulse duration to the metal donor layer thickness. Under such conditions, an effective solid nozzle is formed, providing stability and directionality to the femto-liter droplets which are printed from a large gap in excess of 400 μm. We illustrate the wide applicability of this method by printing several 3D metal objects. First, very high aspect ratio (A/R > 20), micron scale, copper pillars in various configuration, upright and arbitrarily bent, then a micron scale 3D object composed of gold and copper. Such a digital printing method could serve the generation of complex, multi-material, micron-scale, 3D materials and novel structures. PMID:26602432

  7. Laser jetting of femto-liter metal droplets for high resolution 3D printed structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenou, M.; Sa'Ar, A.; Kotler, Z.

    2015-11-01

    Laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) is employed in a special, high accuracy jetting regime, by adequately matching the sub-nanosecond pulse duration to the metal donor layer thickness. Under such conditions, an effective solid nozzle is formed, providing stability and directionality to the femto-liter droplets which are printed from a large gap in excess of 400 μm. We illustrate the wide applicability of this method by printing several 3D metal objects. First, very high aspect ratio (A/R > 20), micron scale, copper pillars in various configuration, upright and arbitrarily bent, then a micron scale 3D object composed of gold and copper. Such a digital printing method could serve the generation of complex, multi-material, micron-scale, 3D materials and novel structures.

  8. Element fracture technique for hypervelocity impact simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-tian; Li, Xiao-gang; Liu, Tao; Jia, Guang-hui

    2015-05-01

    Hypervelocity impact dynamics is the theoretical support of spacecraft shielding against space debris. The numerical simulation has become an important approach for obtaining the ballistic limits of the spacecraft shields. Currently, the most widely used algorithm for hypervelocity impact is the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). Although the finite element method (FEM) is widely used in fracture mechanics and low-velocity impacts, the standard FEM can hardly simulate the debris cloud generated by hypervelocity impact. This paper presents a successful application of the node-separation technique for hypervelocity impact debris cloud simulation. The node-separation technique assigns individual/coincident nodes for the adjacent elements, and it applies constraints to the coincident node sets in the modeling step. In the explicit iteration, the cracks are generated by releasing the constrained node sets that meet the fracture criterion. Additionally, the distorted elements are identified from two aspects - self-piercing and phase change - and are deleted so that the constitutive computation can continue. FEM with the node-separation technique is used for thin-wall hypervelocity impact simulations. The internal structures of the debris cloud in the simulation output are compared with that in the test X-ray graphs under different material fracture criteria. It shows that the pressure criterion is more appropriate for hypervelocity impact. The internal structures of the debris cloud are also simulated and compared under different thickness-to-diameter ratios (t/D). The simulation outputs show the same spall pattern with the tests. Finally, the triple-plate impact case is simulated with node-separation FEM.

  9. Computational design of hypervelocity launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Trucano, T.; Chhabildas, L.

    1993-12-31

    The Sandia Hypervelocity Launcher (HVL) uses impact techniques on a two-stage light-gas gun to launch flier plates to velocities in excess of 10 km/s. An important problem in designing successful third stage techniques for impact launching fliers to such velocities is detailed understanding of the interior ballistic performance of the third stage. This is crucial for preventing melt and fracture of the flier plates during the extraordinary accelerations that they undergo (accelerations on the order of 10{sup 9} g are typical on the HVL). We seek to optimize HVL launch conditions in order to achieve two major goals: first, to maximize the potential launch velocity for a given flier, and second, to allow different flier configurations. One tool that we can apply in studying HVL performance is the use of multi-dimensional wave propagation codes. We have used such codes, particularly the Sandia Eulerian code CTH, to study a variety of interior ballistics issues related to gun performance and launcher development for almost ten years. Recently this work has culminated in a major contribution to HVL design, namely the capability to launch ``chunk`` fliers. `Me initial phases of design development were solely devoted to CTH computations that studied potential designs, identified problems, and posed possible solutions for launching chunk fliers on the HVL. Our computations sufficiently narrowed the design space to the point that systematic experimental progress was possible. Our first experiment resulted in the successful launch of an intact 0.33 gram titanium alloy chunk flier to a velocity of 10.2 km/s. The thickness to diameter ratio of this flier was approximately 0.5.

  10. Crater and cavity depth in hypervelocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadono, T.; Fujiwara, A.

    2003-04-01

    Hypervelocity impact experiments with low-density mediums (e.g., foams) have been so far carried out to develop the instruments for intact capture of interplanetary dust particles. The results show that the impact leads a "cavity", a cylindrical or carrot (spindle) shaped vestige. Its shape depends on the condition of projectiles; when impact velocity is so low that projectiles are intact, the depth increases with impact velocity, while it decreases or is constant with impact velocity when the impact velocity is so high that projectiles are broken (e.g., Kadono, Planet. Space Sci. 47, 305--318, 1999). On the other hand, as described by Summers (NASA TN D-94, 1959), crater shape with high density targets (comparable to projectile density) also changes with impact velocity. At low velocities, the strength of projectile's materials is greater than the dynamic impact pressure and the projectile penetrates the target intact. The crater produced is deep and narrow. With increase in impact velocity, a point is reached at which the impact pressure is sufficient to cause the projectile to fragment into a few large pieces at impact. Then as the impact velocity is increased further, the projectile shatters into numerous small pieces and the penetration actually decreases. Finally a velocity is reached at which the typical fluid impact occurs, the crater formed is nearly hemispherical in shape. It appears that the situation in cavity formation with low density targets is quite similar to that in cratering with high density targets at low impact velocity. This similarity allows us to discuss cavity formation and cratering in a unified view. As described above, the previous experiments clearly suggest that the condition of projectiles plays important roles in both cratering and cavity formation. Hence here, by introducing a parameter that characterizes the condition of projectiles at the instance of impact, cratering processes such as projectile penetration and shock wave

  11. Demonstration of Hazardous Hypervelocity Test Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Karen M.

    1991-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) participated in a joint test program with NASA JSC Hypervelocity Impact Research Laboratory (HIRL) to determine if JSC was capable of performing hypervelocity impact tests on hazardous targets. Seven pressurized vessels were evaluated under hypervelocity impact conditions. The vessels were tested with various combinations of liquids and gasses at various pressures. Results from the evaluation showed that vessels containing 100-percent pressurized gas sustained more severe damage and had a higher potential for damaging nearby equipment, than vessels containing 75-percent liquid, 25-percent inert pressurized gas. Two water-filled test vessels, one of which was placed behind an aluminum shield, failed by bulging and splitting open at the impact point; pressure was relieved without the vessel fragmenting or sustaining internal damage. An additional water-filled test vessel, placed a greater distance behind an aluminum shield, sustained damage that resembled a shotgun blast, but did not bulge or split open; again, pressure was relieved without the vessel fragmenting. Two test vessels containing volatile liquids (nitro methane and hydrazine) also failed by bulging and splitting open; neither liquid detonated under hypervelocity test conditions. A test vessel containing nitrogen gas failed by relieving pressure through a circular entry hole; multiple small penetrations opposite the point of entry provided high velocity target debris to surrounding objects. A high-pressure oxygen test vessel fragmented upon impact; the ensuing fire and high velocity fragments caused secondary damage to surrounding objects. The results from the evaluation of the pressurized vessels indicated that JSC is capable of performing hypervelocity impact tests on hazardous targets.

  12. Simulating plasma production from hypervelocity impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Alex; Close, Sigrid; Mathias, Donovan

    2015-09-01

    Hypervelocity particles, such as meteoroids and space debris, routinely impact spacecraft and are energetic enough to vaporize and ionize themselves and as well as a portion of the target material. The resulting plasma rapidly expands into the surrounding vacuum. While plasma measurements from hypervelocity impacts have been made using ground-based technologies such as light gas guns and Van de Graaff dust accelerators, some of the basic plasma properties vary significantly between experiments. There have been both ground-based and in-situ measurements of radio frequency (RF) emission from hypervelocity impacts, but the physical mechanism responsible and the possible connection to the impact-produced plasma are not well understood. Under certain conditions, the impact-produced plasma can have deleterious effects on spacecraft electronics by providing a new current path, triggering an electrostatic discharge, causing electromagnetic interference, or generating an electromagnetic pulse. Multi-physics simulations of plasma production from hypervelocity impacts are presented. These simulations incorporate elasticity and plasticity of the solid target, phase change and plasma formation, and non-ideal plasma physics due to the high density and low temperature of the plasma. A smoothed particle hydrodynamics method is used to perform a continuum dynamics simulation with these additional physics. By examining a series of hypervelocity impacts, basic properties of the impact produced plasma plume (density, temperature, expansion speed, charge state) are determined for impactor speeds between 10 and 72 km/s. For a large range of higher impact speeds (30-72 km/s), we find the temperature is unvarying at 2.5 eV. We also find that the plasma plume is weakly ionized for impact speeds less than 14 km/s and fully ionized for impact speeds greater than 20 km/s, independent of impactor mass. This is the same velocity threshold for the detection of RF emission in recent Van de Graaff

  13. EROSIVE WEAR OF DUCTILE METALS BY A PARTICLE-LADEN HIGH-VELOCITY LIQUID-JET

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Simon Ka-Keung; Humphrey, Joseph A.C.; Levy, Alan

    1980-12-01

    A liquid-solid particle jet impingement flow apparatus is described and experimental measurements are reported for the accelerated erosion of copper, aluminum and mild steel sheet metal by coal suspensions in kerosene and alumina and silicon carbide suspensions in water. Slurry velocities of up to 130 ft/sec (40 m/sec) and impingement angles ranging from 15 degrees to 90 degrees were investigated. The maximum particle concentration used was 40% by weight. For high velocity the results of this study show two erosion maxima arising at impingement angles of 90 degrees and 40 degrees respectively~ whereas in corresponding gas-solid particle investigations maximum erosion occurs at approximately 20 degrees. In the study both particle concentration and composition were varied. A polynomial regression technique was used to calculate empirical and semi-theoretical correlation constants.

  14. Observation of Hypervelocity Dust in Dense Supersonic Plasma Flows: Physics and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ticoş, C. M.; Wang, Z.; Wurden, G. A.; Shukla, P. K.

    2008-10-01

    Synthetic diamond and graphite dust powders with a wide range of sizes, from a few to several tens of microns in diameter were accelerated to velocities up to 4 km/s in vacuum by plasma jet produced in a coaxial gun. Some of the key features of the plasma flow are high density, of the order of 1022 m-3, low ion and electron temperatures, of only a few eV, and good collimation over a distance of ≈2 m due to confinement by the self-generated magnetic field. The main features of this plasma-drag acceleration technique are presented and discussed. From basic science point of view hypervelocity dust is useful for studying the physics of dust interaction with energetic plasma flows at microscopic level. In physical applications, it has been proposed to use hypervelocity dust for diagnostic or control of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. In engineering, hypervelocity dusty plasmas are extensively employed in industrial processes involved in the processing of surfaces.

  15. Observation of Hypervelocity Dust in Dense Supersonic Plasma Flows: Physics and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ticos, C. M.; Wang, Z.; Wurden, G. A.; Shukla, P. K.

    2008-10-15

    Synthetic diamond and graphite dust powders with a wide range of sizes, from a few to several tens of microns in diameter were accelerated to velocities up to 4 km/s in vacuum by plasma jet produced in a coaxial gun. Some of the key features of the plasma flow are high density, of the order of 10{sup 22} m{sup -3}, low ion and electron temperatures, of only a few eV, and good collimation over a distance of {approx_equal}2 m due to confinement by the self-generated magnetic field. The main features of this plasma-drag acceleration technique are presented and discussed. From basic science point of view hypervelocity dust is useful for studying the physics of dust interaction with energetic plasma flows at microscopic level. In physical applications, it has been proposed to use hypervelocity dust for diagnostic or control of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. In engineering, hypervelocity dusty plasmas are extensively employed in industrial processes involved in the processing of surfaces.

  16. Experimental Study of Spacecraft Material Ejected upon Hypervelocity Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francesconi, A.; Giacomuzzo, C.; Barilaro, L.; Segato, E.; Sansone, F.

    2013-08-01

    Twenty-eight hypervelocity impact experiments were carried out at CISAS impact facility, with the aim of assessing the amount of ejecta from three different targets representative of spacecraft materials, i.e. simple aluminum-alloy plates, silicon solar cells and simple aluminum-alloy plates covered by MLI blankets. Projectiles having different size (1, 1.5 and 2.3 mm diameter) were launched at speed ranging from 4 to 5.5 km/s and impact angle from 0° to 80° (the impact angle dependence was evaluated for simple aluminium targets only). Experiments pointed out that the number of ejecta produced after HVI is significantly high (order of thousands). Moreover, it was shown that brittle materials produce more fragments than ductile ones, but the environment pollution and the damage potential of particles coming from metals are much more critical, since large and heavy fragments are prevalent in this case.

  17. A research program in magnetogasdynamics utilizing hypervelocity coaxial plasma generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spight, C.

    1976-01-01

    A broadly-gauged research program in magnetogasdynamics utilizing hypervelocity coaxial plasma generators is presented. A complete hypervelocity coaxial plasma generator facility was assembled and tested. Significant progress was made in the direction of understanding the important processes in the interaction of hypervelocity MGD flow with transverse applied fields. It is now proposed to utilize the accumulated experimental capability and theoretical analysis in application to the analysis and design parameterization of pulsed magnetogasdynamic direct energy convertor configurations.

  18. Analysis of hypervelocity impact test data

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1998-01-01

    Experiments conducted by the Department of Defense provide an adequate basis for the determination of the fragment distribution and number from hypervelocity collisions. Models trained on only a portion of the data are shown to bias samples too far from the population to be useful for averaging over debris distributions or estimating fragment production rates. The average fragment production exponent is more appropriate for those purposes.

  19. Experimental observations of the breakup of multiple metal jets in a volatile liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Marciniak, M.J.

    1995-07-01

    A postulated severe loss of coolant accident in a nuclear reactor can lead to significant core damage due to residual heat generation. Subsequently, melted core materials (i.e.; corium) could migrate downward and impinge upon the lower head of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). During this relocation, the complexity of the reactor structure could segregate the molten corium into various flow paths. A perforated flow plate could readily provide the mechanism to segregate the molten corium. The resulting small (a few cm) diameter melt streams, driven by gravity, could then penetrate the remaining coolant in the RPV and cause any of the following events: impingement of the high temperature melt streams on the lower head could breach the RPV; re-agglomeration of the corium melt on the lower head could influence the coolability of the debris bed; {open_quotes}pre-mixing{close_quotes} of the melt streams with the coolant could lead to a vapor explosion; or, sufficient quenching of the melt streams by the coolant could produce a stabilized debris bed. An overview of the thermo-science issues related to core-melt accidents is presented by Theofanous. Thus, insight into the melt stream breakup mechanisms (i.e.; interfacial conditions, fragmentation, and geometric spacing) during the melt-coolant interactions is necessary to evaluate the plausibility, and characteristics, of these events. Molten Fuel Stream Breakup Simulation (MFSBS) experiments have been performed at Argonne National Laboratory in which simulant materials were used to determine a `boiling` jet breakup length correlation and to visualize the melt fragmentation mechanisms during the penetration of a single molten metal jet into a volatile liquid. The goal was to characterize the hydrodynamics of the corium-water interactions in a postulated core melt accident. The present experiment closely follows the procedures of the MFSBS.

  20. NOTE: Survivability of Bacteria in Hypervelocity Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchell, Mark J.; Mann, Jo; Bunch, Alan W.; Brandão, Pedro F. B.

    2001-12-01

    Bacteria belonging to the genus Rhodococcus have been tested for their survivability in hypervelocity impacts at 5.1±0.1 km s -1. This is similar to the martian escape velocity for example but is slower than the mean velocities typical of impacts from space on planets like Mars (typically 14 km s -1) and Earth (typically 20-25 km s -1). The bacteria fired were loaded on a projectile using a two-stage light-gas gun. The targets were plates of nutrient media. Analysis techniques including pyrolysis mass spectrometry and selective growth in acetonitrile confirmed that the bacterium grown on a target plate after a shot was the original strain. The indication is that, if fired on a projectile, bacteria can survive a hypervelocity impact and subsequently grow. This holds implications for the study of possible natural migration of life around the Solar System on minor bodies which end up impacting target planets, thus transferring life if the bacteria can survive the resulting hypervelocity impact.

  1. Numerical Simulation of the Interaction Between Supersonic Oxygen Jets and Molten Slag-Metal Bath in Steelmaking BOF Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Li, Mingming; Kuang, Shibo; Zou, Zongshu

    2015-02-01

    The impinging of multiple jets onto the molten bath in the BOF steelmaking process plays a crucial role in reactor performance but is not clearly understood. This paper presents a numerical study of the interaction between the multiple jets and slag-metal bath in a BOF by means of the three-phase volume of fluid model. The validity of the model is first examined by comparing the numerical results with experimental measurement of time-averaged cavity dimensions through a scaled-down water model. The calculated results are in reasonably good agreement with the experimental data. The mathematical model is then used to investigate the primary transport phenomena of the jets-bath interaction inside a 150-ton commercial BOF under steelmaking conditions. The numerical results show that the cavity profile and interface of slag/metal/gas remain unstable as a result of the propagation of surface waves, which, likely as a major factor, governs the generation of metal droplets and their initial spatiotemporal distribution. The total momentum transferred from the jets into the bath is consumed about a half to drive the movement of slag, rather than fully converted as the stirring power for the metal bath. Finally, the effects of operational conditions and fluid properties are quantified. It is shown that compared to viscosity and surface tension of the melts, operating pressure and lance height have a much more significant impact on the slag-metal interface behavior and cavity shape as well as the fluid dynamics in the molten bath.

  2. Simulating plasma production from hypervelocity impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, Alex Close, Sigrid; Mathias, Donovan

    2015-09-15

    Hypervelocity particles, such as meteoroids and space debris, routinely impact spacecraft and are energetic enough to vaporize and ionize themselves and as well as a portion of the target material. The resulting plasma rapidly expands into the surrounding vacuum. While plasma measurements from hypervelocity impacts have been made using ground-based technologies such as light gas guns and Van de Graaff dust accelerators, some of the basic plasma properties vary significantly between experiments. There have been both ground-based and in-situ measurements of radio frequency (RF) emission from hypervelocity impacts, but the physical mechanism responsible and the possible connection to the impact-produced plasma are not well understood. Under certain conditions, the impact-produced plasma can have deleterious effects on spacecraft electronics by providing a new current path, triggering an electrostatic discharge, causing electromagnetic interference, or generating an electromagnetic pulse. Multi-physics simulations of plasma production from hypervelocity impacts are presented. These simulations incorporate elasticity and plasticity of the solid target, phase change and plasma formation, and non-ideal plasma physics due to the high density and low temperature of the plasma. A smoothed particle hydrodynamics method is used to perform a continuum dynamics simulation with these additional physics. By examining a series of hypervelocity impacts, basic properties of the impact produced plasma plume (density, temperature, expansion speed, charge state) are determined for impactor speeds between 10 and 72 km/s. For a large range of higher impact speeds (30–72 km/s), we find the temperature is unvarying at 2.5 eV. We also find that the plasma plume is weakly ionized for impact speeds less than 14 km/s and fully ionized for impact speeds greater than 20 km/s, independent of impactor mass. This is the same velocity threshold for the detection of RF emission in recent

  3. Additions to compact heat exchanger technology: Jet impingement cooling & flow & heat transfer in metal foam-fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onstad, Andrew J.

    Compact heat exchangers have been designed following the same basic methodology for over fifty years. However, with the present emphasis on energy efficiency and light weight of prime movers there is increasing demand for completely new heat exchangers. Moreover, new materials and mesoscale fabrication technologies offer the possibility of significantly improving heat exchanger performance over conventional designs. This work involves fundamental flow and heat transfer experimentation to explore two new heat exchange systems: in Part I, large arrays of impinging jets with local extraction and in Part II, metal foams used as fins. Jet impingement cooling is widely used in applications ranging from paper manufacturing to the cooling of gas turbine blades because of the very high local heat transfer coefficients that are possible. While the use of single jet impingement results in non-uniform cooling, increased and more uniform mean heat transfer coefficients may be attained by dividing the total cooling flow among an array of smaller jets. Unfortunately, when the spent fluid from the array's central jets interact with the outer jets, the overall mean heat transfer coefficient is reduced. This problem can be alleviated by locally extracting the spent fluid before it is able to interact with the surrounding jets. An experimental investigation was carried out on a compact impingement array (Xn/Djet = 2.34) utilizing local extraction of the spent fluid (Aspent/Ajet = 2.23) from the jet exit plane. Spatially resolved measurements of the mean velocity field within the array were carried out at jet Reynolds numbers of 2300 and 5300 by magnetic resonance velocimetry, MRV. The geometry provided for a smooth transition from the jet to the target surface and out through the extraction holes without obvious flow recirculation. Mean Nusselt number measurements were also carried out for a Reynolds number range of 2000 to 10,000. The Nusselt number was found to increase with the

  4. Thermal Interaction Between Molten Metal and Sodium: Examination of the Fragmentation Mechanism of Molten Jet

    SciTech Connect

    Satoshi Nishimura; Izumi Kinshita; Nobuyuki Ueda; Ken-ichiro Sugiyama; Ryohei Okada

    2002-07-01

    In order to clarify the mechanism of thermal fragmentation of a molten jet dropped into a sodium pool at instantaneous contact interface temperatures below its freezing point, a basic experiment was carried out using molten copper and sodium. Copper was melted in a crucible with an electrical heater and was dropped through a short nozzle into a sodium pool, in the form of a jet column. Thermal fragmentation originating inside the molten copper jet with a solid crust was clearly observed in all runs. It is verified that a small quantity of sodium, which is locally entrained inside the molten jet due to the organized motion between the molten jet and sodium, is vaporized by the sensible heat and the latent heat of molten copper, and the high internal pressure causes the molten jet with a solid crust to fragment. It is also concluded that the thermal fragmentation is more dominant than the hydrodynamic fragmentation, in the present range of Weber number and superheating of molten jet. Furthermore, it can be explained that the thermal fragmentation caused by the molten copper jet - sodium interaction is severer than that caused by the molten uranium alloy jet - sodium interaction, which was reported by Gabor et al., because the latent heat and the thermal diffusivity of molten copper, which are the physical properties that dominate the degree of fragmentation, are much higher than those of molten uranium alloy jets. (authors)

  5. Maximizing power dissipation by impurity seeding on JET with metal plasma facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wischmeier, Marco; Huber, Alexander; Lowry, Christopher; Maggi, Costanza; Reinke, Matthew; JET contributors Team

    2015-11-01

    A reactor such as DEMO will operate at considerably higher total heating power even when compared to ITER. This will require mitigating a much higher power flux density in the Scrape-Off Layer. A highly detached divertor will be required for maximizing the lifetime of the eroding plasma facing components, PFCs, in the divertor as well as for operating within the engineering limits expected for the power handling components. A dissipation of ~ 95% of the total heating power will be needed, with more than 70% being radiation on closed field lines. On JET with metal PFCs highly radiative conditions with N2, Ne, both combined and Ar as radiators were approached in H-mode plasmas. For all seeding species radiative power fractions larger than 70% were achieved under stable discharge conditions with a concentration of the radiation in the X-point region. Detachment along both divertor plates was complete. A degradation of the pedestal profile was compensated by steeper core profiles. See the Appendix of F. Romanelli et al., 25th FEC 2014, Russia, Supported by EUROfusion No 633053.

  6. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of environmental barrier coatings for the inhibition of solid deposit formation from heated jet fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Arun Ram

    Solid deposit formation from jet fuel compromises the fuel handling system of an aviation turbine engine and increases the maintenance downtime of an aircraft. The deposit formation process depends upon the composition of the fuel, the nature of metal surfaces that come in contact with the heated fuel and the operating conditions of the engine. The objective of the study is to investigate the effect of substrate surfaces on the amount and nature of solid deposits in the intermediate regime where both autoxidation and pyrolysis play an important role in deposit formation. A particular focus has been directed to examining the effectiveness of barrier coatings produced by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on metal surfaces for inhibiting the solid deposit formation from jet fuel degradation. In the first part of the experimental study, a commercial Jet-A sample was stressed in a flow reactor on seven different metal surfaces: AISI316, AISI 321, AISI 304, AISI 347, Inconel 600, Inconel 718, Inconel 750X and FecrAlloy. Examination of deposits by thermal and microscopic analysis shows that the solid deposit formation is influenced by the interaction of organosulfur compounds and autoxidation products with the metal surfaces. The nature of metal sulfides was predicted by Fe-Ni-S ternary phase diagram. Thermal stressing on uncoated surfaces produced coke deposits with varying degree of structural order. They are hydrogen-rich and structurally disordered deposits, spherulitic deposits, small carbon particles with relatively ordered structures and large platelets of ordered carbon structures formed by metal catalysis. In the second part of the study, environmental barrier coatings were deposited on tube surfaces to inhibit solid deposit formation from the heated fuel. A new CVD system was configured by the proper choice of components for mass flow, pressure and temperature control in the reactor. A bubbler was designed to deliver the precursor into the reactor

  7. Breakup of metal jets penetrating a volatile liquid. Final report, October 1, 1991--February 28, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.P.

    1995-07-01

    In a loss of coolant accident, the core may become uncovered, causing the fuel pins to melt. The molten fuel would pour onto the plenum and collect on the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head. The RPV internal structure includes one or more perforated plates in the lower plenum which would divide the molten fuel into small diameter streams or jets, which would break up as they penetrate the coolant in the lower plenum. The breakup of these jets would occur in two phases, each dominated by a distinct fragmentation mechanism. As a fuel jet first penetrates the coolant, a stagnation flow develops at its leading edge, causing the column to spread radially and eject molten fuel into the coolant. The jet fluid in the column is fragmented by pressure fluctuations due to the jet/ambient fluid relative motion, so that a steady jet is reduced to a field of falling drops below a critical depth called the breakup length. The present work includes analyses yielding simple correlations for jet breakup length and jet leading edge penetration.

  8. Railgun rail gouging by hypervelocity sliding contact

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, L.M.; Trucano, T.G. ); Susoeff, A.R. )

    1989-01-01

    A description is given of a recently resolved mechanisms of gouging which occurs during hypervelocity sliding contact between two materials. A parameter study based on computer modeling of the gouging mechanism is presented in which gouging velocity thresholds are determined for several combinations of sliding materials. Materials which can gouge each other are found to do so only within a certain range of velocities. Related calculations of gaseous material ahead of railgun projectiles are also presented. Gun bore gouging experience with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory railgun project is reviewed.

  9. Railgun rail gouging by hypervelocity sliding contact

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, L.M.; Trucano, T.G.; Susoeff, A.R.

    1988-01-01

    A description is given of a recently resolved mechanism of gouging which occurs during hypervelocity sliding contact between two materials. A parameter study based on computer modelling of the gouging mechanism is presented in which gouging velocity thresholds are determined for several combinations of sliding materials. Materials which can gouge each other are found to do so only within a certain range of velocities. Related calculations of gaseous material ahead of railgun projectiles are also presented. Gun bore gouging experience with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory railgun project is reviewed.

  10. Hypervelocity Impact of Explosive Transfer Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Michael D.; Christiansen, Eric L.

    2012-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests of 2.5 grains per foot flexible confined detonating chord (FCDC) shielded by a 1 mm thick 2024-T3 aluminum alloy bumper standing off 51 mm from the FCDC were performed. Testing showed that a 6 mm diameter 2017-T4 aluminum alloy ball impacting the bumper at 6.97 km/s and 45 degrees impact angle initiated the FCDC. However, impact by the same diameter and speed ball at 0 degrees angle of impact did not initiate the FCDC. Furthermore, impact at 45 degrees and the same speed by a slightly smaller diameter ball (5.8 mm diameter) also did not initiate the FCDC.

  11. ALE advantage in hypervelocity impact calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Gerassimenko, M.; Rathkopf, J.

    1998-10-01

    The ALE3D code is used to model experiments relevant to hypervelocity impact lethality, carried out in the 4-5 km/s velocity range. The code is run in the Eulerian and ALE modes. Zoning in the calculations is refined beyond the level found in most lethality calculations, but still short of convergence. The level of zoning refinement that produces equivalent results in uniformly zoned Eulerian calculations and ALE ones utilizing specialized zoning, weighting and relaxation techniques is established. It takes 11 times fewer zones and about 60% as many cycles when ALE capabilities are used. Calculations are compared to experimental results.

  12. Hypervelocity impact calculations using CTH: Case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Trucano, T.G.; McGlaun, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the application of CTH, a multi-dimensional Eulerian shock wave physics code, by discussing its application to hypervelocity impact problems. CTH is heavily used for this and other types of applications. We will not attempt to provide a broad discussion of examples and capabilities. Rather, we choose to focus on certain features of CTH that are of interest in gaining understanding of some of the more delicate issues of numerical impact simulations. 14 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Modelling of plasma-edge and plasma-wall interaction physics at JET with the metallic first-wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesen, S.; Groth, M.; Brezinsek, S.; Wischmeier, M.; contributors, JET

    2016-02-01

    An overview is given on the recent progress on edge modelling activities for the JET ITER-like wall using the computational tools like the SOLPS or EDGE2D-EIRENE code. The validation process of these codes on JET with its metallic plasma-facing components is an important step towards predictive studies for ITER and DEMO in relevant divertor operational conditions, i.e., for detached, radiating divertors. With increased quantitative credibility in such codes more reliable input to plasma-wall and plasma-material codes can be warranted, which in turn results in more realistic and physically sound estimates of the life-time expectations and performance of a Be first-wall and a W-divertor, the same materials configuration foreseen for ITER. A brief review is given on the recent achievements in the plasma-wall interaction and material migration studies. Finally, a short summary is given on the availability and development of integrated codes to assess the performance of an JET-ILW baseline scenario also in view of the preparation for a JET DT-campaign.

  14. Metal Foam Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper compares the ballistic performance of metallic foam sandwich structures with honeycomb structures. Honeycomb sandwich structures, consisting of metallic or composite facesheets and honeycomb cores, are often used in spacecraft construction due to their light-weight and structural stiffness. Honeycomb panels, however, are considered rather poor candidates for protection from micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) particles because the honeycomb channels the debris cloud from MMOD impacts on outer facesheet causing a concentrated load on the second facesheet. Sandwich structures with light-weight, open-cell metallic cores and metal or composite facesheets provide improved MMOD protection because channeling does not occur and because the core is more effective at disrupting hypervelocity impacts then honeycomb. This paper describes hypervelocity impact tests on metallic foam sandwich structures (aluminum and titanium) with metallic facesheets, compare them to equivalent mass and thickness honeycomb panels, based on the results of hypervelocity impact tests.

  15. Hypervelocity Dust Injection for Plasma Diagnostic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ticos, Catalin

    2005-10-01

    Hypervelocity micron-size dust grain injection was proposed for high-temperature magnetized plasma diagnosis. Multiple dust grains are launched simultaneously into high temperature plasmas at several km/s or more. The hypervelocity dust grains are ablated by the electron and ion fluxes. Fast imaging of the resulting luminous plumes attached to each grain is expected to yield local magnetic field vectors. Combination of multiple local magnetic field vectors reproduces 2D or even 3D maps of the internal magnetic field topology. Key features of HDI are: (1) a high spatial resolution, due to a relatively small transverse size of the elongated tail, and (2) a small perturbation level, as the dust grains introduce negligible number of particles compared to the plasma particle inventory. The latter advantage, however, could be seriously compromised if the gas load from the accelerator has an unobstructed access to the diagnosed plasma. Construction of a HDI diagnostic for National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), which includes a coaxial plasma gun for dust grain acceleration, is underway. Hydrogen and deuterium gas discharges inside accelerator are created by a ˜ 1 mF capacitor bank pre-charged up to 10 kV. The diagnostic apparatus also comprises a dust dispenser for pre-loading the accelerator with dust grains, and an imaging system that has a high spatial and temporal resolution.

  16. Hypervelocity Impact Studies on Solar Cell Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.; Best, Stevie R.

    2001-01-01

    Space environmental effects have caused severe problems as satellites move toward increased power and operating voltage levels. The greatest unknown, however, is the effect of high velocity micrometeoroid impacts on high voltage arrays (>200V). Understanding such impact phenomena is necessary for the design of future reliable, high voltage solar arrays, especially for Space Solar Power applications. Therefore, the objective of this work was to study the effect of hypervelocity impacts on high voltage solar arrays. Initially, state of the art, 18% efficient GaAs solar cell strings were targeted. The maximum bias voltage on a two-cell string was -200 V while the adjacent string was held at -140 V relative to the plasma potential. A hollow cathode device provided the plasma. Soda lime glass particles 40-120 micrometers in diameter were accelerated in the Hypervelocity Impact Facility to velocities as high as 11.6 km/sec. Coordinates and velocity were obtained for each of the approximately 40 particle impact sites on each shot. Arcing did occur, and both discharging and recharging of arcs between the two strings was observed. The recharging phenomena appeared to stop at approximately 66V string differential. No arcing was observed at 400 V on concentrator cell modules for the Stretched Lens Array.

  17. Ejecta Dynamics during Hypervelocity Impacts into Dry and Wet Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoerth, T.; Schäfer, F.; Thoma, K.; Poelchau, M.; Kenkmann, T.; Deutsch, A.

    2011-03-01

    Hypervelocity impact experiments into dry and water saturated porous Seeberger sandstone were conducted at the two-stage light gas accelerator at the Ernst-Mach-Institute (EMI) and the ejecta dynamics were analyzed.

  18. Subsurface Deformation of Nonporous Rocks Induced by Hypervelocity Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, R.; Poelchau, M. H.; Michalski, C.; Kenkmann, T.

    2015-09-01

    Two hypervelocity impact experiments into quarzite and marble were conducted under similar impact condition. Both experiments show tensile failure; quarzite developed zones of strong grain size reduction, while marble shows intragranular fracturing.

  19. NASA White Sands Test Facility Remote Hypervelocity Test Laboratory

    NASA Video Gallery

    Tour the NASA White Sands Test Facility's Remote Hypervelocity Test Laboratory in Las Cruces, New Mexico. To learn more about White Sands Test Facility, go to http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wstf/home/...

  20. The XLLGG — A Hypervelocity Launcher for Impact Cratering Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lexow, B.; Bückle, A.; Wickert, M.; Hiermaier, S.

    2015-09-01

    Hypervelocity launchers are used to accelerate projectiles that simulate impacting meteoroids or asteroids. The XLLGG (eXtra Large Light Gas Gun) at the EMI (Ernst-Mach-Institute) was used within the MEMIN program.

  1. Thrust Enhancement in Hypervelocity Nozzles by Chemical Catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, D. J.; Carpenter, Mark H.; Drummond, J. P.

    1997-01-01

    In the hypersonic flight regime, the air-breathing supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) has been shown to be a viable propulsion system. The current designs of scramjet engines provide performance benefits only up to a Mach number of 14. Performance losses increase rapidly as the Mach number increases. To extend the applicability of scram'jets beyond Mach 14, research is being conducted in the area of inlet and wave drag reduction, skin-friction and heat-transfer reduction, nozzle loss minimization, low-loss mixing, and combustion enhancement. For high Mach number applications, hydrogen is the obvious fuel choice because of its high energy content per unit mass in comparison with conventional fuels. These flight conditions require engines to operate at supersonic internal velocities, high combustor temperatures, and low static pressures. The high static temperature condition enhances the production of radicals such as H and OH, and the low-pressure condition slows the reaction rates, particularly the recombination reactions. High-temperature and low-pressure constraints, in combination with a small residence time, result in a radical-rich exhaust gas mixture exiting the combustor. At high Mach number conditions (due to low residence time), H and OH do not have enough time to recombine ; thus, a significant amount of energy is lost as these high-energy free radical are exhausted. The objective of the present study is to conduct a flowfield analysis for a typical nozzle geometry for NASP-type vehicle to assess for thrust enhancement in hypervelocity nozzles by substituting small amount of phosphine for hydrogen.

  2. Thermal softening of metallic shaped-charge jets formed by the collapse of shaped-charge liners in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, S. V.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the possibility of increasing the ultimate stretching and penetration capability of metallic shaped-charge jets in the presence of an axial magnetic field in the shaped-charge liner due to heating and thermal softening of the jet material as a result of a sharp increase in the magnetic-field induction in the jet formation region upon liner collapse. This process is studied by numerical simulation in a quasi-two-dimensional formulation taking into account the inertial stretching of the conductive rigid-plastic rod in the presence of a longitudinal magnetic field in it.

  3. Hypervelocity atmospheric flight: Real gas flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, John T.

    1990-01-01

    Flight in the atmosphere is examined from the viewpoint of including real gas phenomena in the flow field about a vehicle flying at hypervelocity. That is to say, the flow field is subject not only to compressible phenomena, but is dominated by energetic phenomena. There are several significant features of such a flow field. Spatially, its composition can vary by both chemical and elemental species. The equations which describe the flow field include equations of state and mass, species, elemental, and electric charge continuity; momentum; and energy equations. These are nonlinear, coupled, partial differential equations that were reduced to a relatively compact set of equations of a self-consistent manner (which allows mass addition at the surface at a rate comparable to the free-stream mass flux). The equations and their inputs allow for transport of these quantities relative to the mass-averaged behavior of the flow field. Thus transport of mass by chemical, thermal, pressure, and forced diffusion; transport of momentum by viscosity; and transport of energy by conduction, chemical considerations, viscosity, and radiative transfer are included. The last of these complicate the set of equations by making the energy equation a partial integrodifferential equation. Each phenomenon is considered and represented mathematically by one or more developments. The coefficients which pertain are both thermodynamically and chemically dependent. Solutions of the equations are presented and discussed in considerable detail, with emphasis on severe energetic flow fields. For hypervelocity flight in low-density environments where gaseous reactions proceed at finite rates, chemical nonequilibrium is considered and some illustrations are presented. Finally, flight where the flow field may be out of equilibrium, both chemically and thermodynamically, is presented briefly.

  4. Hypervelocity atmospheric flight: Real gas flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, John T.

    1989-01-01

    Flight in the atmosphere is examined from the viewpoint of including real gas phenomena in the flow field about a vehicle flying at hypervelocity. That is to say, the flow field is subject not only to compressible phenomena, but is dominated by energetic phenomena. There are several significant features of such a flow field. Spatially, its composition can vary by both chemical and elemental species. The equations which describe the flow field include equations of state and mass, species, elemental, and electric charge continuity; momentum; and energy equations. These are nonlinear, coupled, partial differential equations that have been reduced to a relatively compact set of equations in a self-consistent manner (which allows mass addition at the surface at a rate comparable to the free-stream mass flux). The equations and their inputs allow for transport of these quantities relative to the mass-average behavior of the flow field. Thus transport of mass by chemical, thermal, pressure, and forced diffusion; transport of momentum by viscosity; and transport of energy by conduction, chemical considerations, viscosity, and radiative transfer are included. The last of these complicate the set of equations by making the energy equations a partial integrodifferential equation. Each phenomenon is considered and represented mathematically by one or more developments. The coefficients which pertain are both thermodynamically and chemically dependent. Solutions of the equations are presented and discussed in considerable detail, with emphasis on severe energetic flow fields. Hypervelocity flight in low-density environments where gaseous reactions proceed at finite rates chemical nonequilibrium is considered, and some illustrations are presented. Finally, flight where the flow field may be out of equilibrium, both chemically and thermodynamically, is presented briefly.

  5. Hypervelocity impact survivability experiments for carbonaceous impactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, T. E.; Becker, Luann; Bada, Jeffrey; Macklin, John; Radicatidibrozolo, Filippo; Fleming, R. H.; Erlichman, Jozef

    1993-01-01

    We performed a series of hypervelocity impact experiments using carbon-bearing impactors (diamond, graphite, fullerenes, phthalic acid crystals, and Murchison meteorite) into Al plate at velocities between 4.2 and 6.1 km/s. These tests were made to do the following: (1) determine the survivability of carbon forms and organize molecules in low hypervelocity impact; (2) characterize carbonaceous impactor residues; and (3) determine whether or not fullerenes could form from carbonaceous impactors, under our experimental conditions, or survive as impactors. An analytical protocol of field emission SEM imagery, SEM-EDX, laser Raman spectroscopy, single and 2-stage laser mass spectrometry, and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) found the following: (1) diamonds did not survive impact at 4.8 km/s, but were transformed into various forms of disordered graphite; (2) intact, well-ordered graphite impactors did survive impact at 5.9 km/sec, but were only found in the crater bottom centers; the degree of impact-induced disorder in the graphite increases outward (walls, rims, ejecta); (3) phthalic acid crystals were destroyed on impact (at 4.2 km/s, although a large proportion of phthalic acid molecules did survive impact); (4) fullerenes did not form as products of carbonaceous impactors (5.9 - 6.1 km/s, fullerene impactor molecules mostly survived impact at 5.9 km/s; and (5) two Murchison meteorite samples (launched at 4.8 and 5.9 km/s) show preservation of some higher mass polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) compared with the non-impacted sample. Each impactor type shows unique impactor residue morphologies produced at a given impact velocity. An expanded methodology is presented to announce relatively new analytical techniques together with innovative modifications to other methods that can be used to characterize small impact residues in LDEF craters, in addition to other acquired extraterrestrial samples.

  6. Theory and Observations of Hypervelocity Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsburg, Idan; Loeb, A.; Wegner, G. A.; Brown, W. R.; Perets, H.

    2013-01-01

    Since first discovered in 2005, stars ejected from the Milky Way, so-called hypervelocity stars (HVSs), have greatly increased our understanding of the kinematics and dynamics at the Galactic Center (GC). Using N-body simulations we show that an encounter between a binary star-system and the massive black hole (MBH) at the GC can result in the production of a HVS for one component of the binary, while the companion star remains in a tight orbit around the MBH. Such an encounter can also result in the coalescence of both stars in a highly-eccentric orbit around the MBH. These mechanisms may explain the suprising appearance of massive stars within 1'' of the GC. Continuing with our simulations, we find that the disruption of a triple system by the MBH can produce hypervelocity binaries. Such binaries may evolve into massive blue stragglers, while binaries captured by the MBH may be rejuvenated stars. Our simulations also predict that planets can be ejected from the GC at velocities approaching 5 percent the speed of light. Furthermore, HVSs can house planets that should be detectable as transits. The discovery of such a transit has important consequences for understanding planetary formation and evolution at the GC. We will also present photometry from 11 HVSs, taken February and May 2012, at the WIYN 3.5-meter and Hiltner 2.4-meter telescopes. Our photometry shows that many of the observed HVSs are likely slowly pulsating B stars, which constrains their nature and distance. Ongoing surveys for HVSs, including collaboration with the Australian Sky Mapper survey, as well as Hubble Space Telescope proper motion measurements promise to continue expanding our understanding of HVSs and consequently the dynamics within our galaxy.

  7. Metal-mesh based transparent electrode on a 3-D curved surface by electrohydrodynamic jet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Baekhoon; Yoo, Hyunwoong; Dat Nguyen, Vu; Jang, Yonghee; Ryu, Changkook; Byun, Doyoung

    2014-09-01

    Invisible Ag mesh transparent electrodes (TEs), with a width of 7 μm, were prepared on a curved glass surface by electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing. With a 100 μm pitch, the EHD jet printed the Ag mesh on the convex glass which had a sheet resistance of 1.49 Ω/□. The printing speed was 30 cm s-1 using Ag ink, which had a 10 000 cPs viscosity and a 70 wt% Ag nanoparticle concentration. We further showed the performance of a 3-D transparent heater using the Ag mesh transparent electrode. The EHD jet printed an invisible Ag grid transparent electrode with good electrical and optical properties with promising applications on printed optoelectronic devices.

  8. Removal of diamond-turning signatures on x-ray mandrels and metal optics by fluid-jet polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaucamp, A.; Freeman, R.; Morton, R.; Ponudurai, Karthik; Walker, D. D.

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes a major advance in the post-treatment of diamond-turned surfaces to remove repetitive micro-structure; a result which could have a major beneficial impact on fabrication of Walter-type X-ray mandrels, and metal mirrors. Diamond-turning is highly deterministic and versatile in producing axially-symmetric forms, and through fast-tool servos, non-axially symmetric, free-form and micro-structured surfaces. However, the fine turning marks left in the metal surface limit performance. In this paper, we describe how fluid-jet polishing under CNC control can be used to eliminate these structures, without significantly degrading the surface roughness or form produced by the prior turning operation.

  9. An investigation on co-axial water-jet assisted fiber laser cutting of metal sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhukar, Yuvraj K.; Mullick, Suvradip; Nath, Ashish K.

    2016-02-01

    Water assisted laser cutting has received significant attention in recent times with assurance of many advantages than conventional gas assisted laser cutting. A comparative study between co-axial water-jet and gas-jet assisted laser cutting of thin sheets of mild steel (MS) and titanium (Ti) by fiber laser is presented. Fiber laser (1.07 μm wavelength) was utilised because of its low absorption in water. The cut quality was evaluated in terms of average kerf, projected dross height, heat affected zone (HAZ) and cut surface roughness. It was observed that a broad range process parameter could produce consistent cut quality in MS. However, oxygen assisted cutting could produce better quality only with optimised parameters at high laser power and high cutting speed. In Ti cutting the water-jet assisted laser cutting performed better over the entire range of process parameters compared with gas assisted cutting. The specific energy, defined as the amount of laser energy required to remove unit volume of material was found more in case of water-jet assisted laser cutting process. It is mainly due to various losses associated with water assisted laser processing such as absorption of laser energy in water and scattering at the interaction zone.

  10. Capture of dusts from hypervelocity collision of planetary materials: Implication for dust size distribution in debris discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takasawa, Susumu; Nakamura, Akiko; Kadono, Toshihiko; Arakawa, Masahiko; Dohi, Hirotsugu; Seto, Yusuke; Maeda, Makoto; Shigemori, Keisuke; Hironaka, Yoichiro; Sakaiya, Tatsuhiro; Sano, Takayoshi; Watari, Takeshi; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Ohno, Sohsuke; Takeuchi, Taku; Sangen, Kazuyoshi

    2011-06-01

    In order to examine the size distribution of dust particles from collision of solid bodies, we conducted hypervelocity impact experiments. Sub-mm size metal spheres were accelerated to velocities from 9 to 61 km/s by laser ablation and were shot into rock targets. Dust particles were collected by aerogels and were analyzed by Electron Probe Micro Analyzer (EPMA). We derived the size distributions of ejecta ranging from five to tens of micron in diameter. The slope of cumulative ejecta size distribution was steeper than a purely collisional equilibrium distribution in a collision cascade. This suggests that a steep dust size distribution in a debris disc around an A5V star HD172555 can be due to a hypervelocity impact.

  11. NASA Ames Arc Jets and Range, Capabilities for Planetary Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fretter, Ernest F.

    2005-01-01

    NASA is pursuing innovative technologies and concepts as part of America's Vision for Space Exploration. The rapidly emerging field of nanotechnology has led to new concepts for multipurpose shields to prevent catastrophic loss of vehicles and crew against the triple threats of aeroheating during atmospheric entry, radiation (Solar and galactic cosmic rays) and Micrometorid/Orbital Debris (MMOD) strikes. One proposed concept is the Thermal Radiation Impact Protection System (TRIPS) using carbon nanotubes, hydrogenated carbon nanotubes, and ceramic coatings as a multi-use TPS. The Thermophysics Facilities Branch of the Space Technology Division at NASA Ames Research Center provides testing services for the development and validation of the present and future concepts being developed by NASA and national and International research firms. The Branch operates two key facilities - the Range Complex and the Arc Jets. The Ranges include both the Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) and the Hypervelocity Free Flight (HFF) gas guns best suited for MMOD investigations. Test coupons can be installed in the AVGR or HFF and subjected to particle impacts from glass or metal particles from micron to _ inch (6.35-mm) diameters and at velocities from 5 to 8 kilometers per second. The facility can record high-speed data on film and provide damage assessment for analysis by the Principle Investigator or Ames personnel. Damaged articles can be installed in the Arc Jet facility for further testing to quantify the effects of damage on the heat shield s performance upon entry into atmospheric environments.

  12. Endoscopic transluminal pancreatic necrosectomy using a self-expanding metal stent and high-flow water-jet system

    PubMed Central

    Hritz, István; Fejes, Roland; Székely, András; Székely, Iván; Horváth, László; Sárkány, Ágnes; Altorjay, Áron; Madácsy, László

    2013-01-01

    Walled-off pancreatic necrosis and a pancreatic abscess are the most severe complications of acute pancreatitis. Surgery in such critically ill patients is often associated with significant morbidity and mortality within the first few weeks after the onset of symptoms. Minimal invasive approaches with high success and low mortality rates are therefore of considerable interest. Endoscopic therapy has the potential to offer safe and effective alternative treatment. We report here on 3 consecutive patients with infected walled-off pancreatic necrosis and 1 patient with a pancreatic abscess who underwent direct endoscopic necrosectomy 19-21 d after the onset of acute pancreatitis. The infected pancreatic necrosis or abscess was punctured transluminally with a cystostome and, after balloon dilatation, a non-covered self-expanding biliary metal stent was placed into the necrotic cavity. Following stent deployment, a nasobiliary pigtail catheter was placed into the cavity to ensure continuous irrigation. After 5-7 d, the metal stent was removed endoscopically and the necrotic cavity was entered with a therapeutic gastroscope. Endoscopic debridement was performed via the simultaneous application of a high-flow water-jet system; using a flush knife, a Dormia basket, and hot biopsy forceps. The transluminal endotherapy was repeated 2-5 times daily during the next 10 d. Supportive care included parenteral antibiotics and jejunal feeding. All patients improved dramatically and with resolution of their septic conditions; 3 patients were completely cured without any further complications or the need for surgery. One patient died from a complication of prolonged ventilation severe bilateral pneumonia, not related to the endoscopic procedure. No procedure related complications were observed. Transluminal endoscopic necrosectomy with temporary application of a self-expanding metal stent and a high-flow water-jet system shows promise for enhancing the potential of this endoscopic

  13. Endoscopic transluminal pancreatic necrosectomy using a self-expanding metal stent and high-flow water-jet system.

    PubMed

    Hritz, István; Fejes, Roland; Székely, András; Székely, Iván; Horváth, László; Sárkány, Agnes; Altorjay, Aron; Madácsy, László

    2013-06-21

    Walled-off pancreatic necrosis and a pancreatic abscess are the most severe complications of acute pancreatitis. Surgery in such critically ill patients is often associated with significant morbidity and mortality within the first few weeks after the onset of symptoms. Minimal invasive approaches with high success and low mortality rates are therefore of considerable interest. Endoscopic therapy has the potential to offer safe and effective alternative treatment. We report here on 3 consecutive patients with infected walled-off pancreatic necrosis and 1 patient with a pancreatic abscess who underwent direct endoscopic necrosectomy 19-21 d after the onset of acute pancreatitis. The infected pancreatic necrosis or abscess was punctured transluminally with a cystostome and, after balloon dilatation, a non-covered self-expanding biliary metal stent was placed into the necrotic cavity. Following stent deployment, a nasobiliary pigtail catheter was placed into the cavity to ensure continuous irrigation. After 5-7 d, the metal stent was removed endoscopically and the necrotic cavity was entered with a therapeutic gastroscope. Endoscopic debridement was performed via the simultaneous application of a high-flow water-jet system; using a flush knife, a Dormia basket, and hot biopsy forceps. The transluminal endotherapy was repeated 2-5 times daily during the next 10 d. Supportive care included parenteral antibiotics and jejunal feeding. All patients improved dramatically and with resolution of their septic conditions; 3 patients were completely cured without any further complications or the need for surgery. One patient died from a complication of prolonged ventilation severe bilateral pneumonia, not related to the endoscopic procedure. No procedure related complications were observed. Transluminal endoscopic necrosectomy with temporary application of a self-expanding metal stent and a high-flow water-jet system shows promise for enhancing the potential of this endoscopic

  14. Emission FTIR analyses of thin microscopic patches of jet fuel residues deposited on heated metal surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.; Vogel, P.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship of fuel stability to fuel composition and the development of mechanisms for deposit formation were investigated. Fuel deposits reduce heat transfer efficiency and increase resistance to fuel flow and are highly detrimental to aircraft performance. Infrared emission Fourier transform spectroscopy was chosen as the primary method of analysis because it was sensitive enough to be used in-situ on tiny patches of monolayers or of only a few molecular layers of deposits which generally proved completely insoluble in any nondestructive solvents. Deposits of four base fuels were compared; dodecane, a dodecane/tetralin blend, commercial Jet A fuel, and a broadened-properties jet fuel particularly rich in polynuclear aromatics. Every fuel in turn was provided with and without small additions of such additives as thiophene, furan, pyrrole, and copper and iron naphthenates.

  15. Meteoroids and space debris hypervelocity impact penetrations in LDEF map foils compared with hydrocode simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, W. G.; McDonnell, J. A. M.; Yano, H.; Fitzgerald, H. J.; Gardner, D. J.

    The continued analyses of penetrating impacts on MAP foils of Aluminium and Brass have produced data for several LDEF faces, i.e., Space, West, and East. These data have immediate bearing on the interpretation and design of devices to detect the penetration of a thin metallic film by a dust grain which have been tested both in the laboratory and in space. A crucial component of the analysis has been the theoretical calculation utilizing CTH, a Sandia National Laboratory Hydrodynamic computer code /1/ to assess the parameters of the hypervelocity penetration event. In particular theoretical hydrodynamic calculations have been conducted to simulate the hypervelocity impact event where various cosmic dust grain candidates, e.g., density = 0.998, 2.700, 7.870 (gm/cm^3), and velocities, i.e., 7 - 16 km/s, have been utilized to reproduce the events. Theoretical analyses of hypervelocity impact events will be reported which span an extensive matrix of values for velocity, density and size. Through a comparison between LDEF MAP foil measurements and CTH hydrocode calculations these analyses will provide an interpretation of the most critical parameters measured for space returned materials, i.e., for thin films, the diameter of the penetration hole, D_h, and for semi-infinite targets, the depth-to-diameter ratio of craters, D_c/T_c. An immediate consequence of a comparison of CTH calculations with space exposed materials will be an enhancement of the coherent model developed by UKC-USS researchers to describe penetration dynamics associated with LDEF MAP foils.

  16. Calculations supporting HyperVelocity Launcher development

    SciTech Connect

    Trucano, T.G.; Chhabildas, L.C.

    1993-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a HyperVelocity Launcher (also referred to as HVL) in which a thin flier plate (nominally 1 mm thick) is launched to velocities in excess of 12 km/s. The length to diameter ratio of these launched flier plates varies from 0.02 to 0.06. The launch technique is based upon using structured, time-dependant, high-pressure, high-acceleration pulses to drive the flier plates. Such pulses are achieved by using a graded-density material to impact a stationary flier. A computational and experimental program at Sandia seeks to extend this technique to allow launching thick plates whose length-to-diameter ratio is 10 to 20 times larger than thin plates. Hydrodynamic codes are used to design modifications to the basic technique. The authors have controlled and used these effects to successfully launch a chunk-flier, consisting of 0.33 gm of titanium alloy, 0.3 cm thick by 0.6 cm in diameter, to a velocity of 10.2 km/s. This is the largest chunky size ever launched at this velocity from a gas gun configuration.

  17. Projectile development for railguns using hypervelocity preacceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Susoeff, A.R.; Hawke, R.S.; Sauve, G.L.; Konrad, C.H.; Hickman, R.J.

    1991-02-01

    The STARFIRE Project is a joint Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) effort to achieve hypervelocity projectile launches up to 15 km/s. The apparatus used to achieve this goal is a three stage acceleration system made up of a two-stage light-gas gun (2SLGG) is used as a preaccelerator capable of injecting 2 gram projectiles at velocities of 6 km/s or more. Projectiles used in this environment are subject to many conditions. Some of these which effect projectile design include: acceleration loading, structural response, barrel condition and alignment. Development of a projectile to satisfy the programmatic requirements is underway. This report covers the evolution of design and fabrication for railgun projectiles from previous experience at LLNL to the replenished plasma armature and projectile now used on STARFIRE. Projectile design, development and fabrication methods which use off-the-shelf materials and standard techniques to meet the operational criteria of the experimental program are discussed in this paper. Initial work involving the design and fabrication of skirted projectiles, which are expected to further reduce interaction phenomena between the plasma armature and railgun barrel, is also described.

  18. Projectile development for railguns using hypervelocity preacceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Susoeff, A.R.; Hawke, R.S. ); Ang, J.A.; Asay, J.R.; Hall, C.A.; Konrad, C.H. ); Sauve, G.L. . Rocky Flats Plant); Hickman, R.J. )

    1992-03-20

    The STARFIRE Project is a joint Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) effort to achieve hypervelocity projectile launches up to 15 km/s. The apparatus used to achieve this goal is a three stage acceleration system made up of a two-stage light-gas gun (2SLGG) coupled to a railgun. The 2SLGG is used as a preaccelerator capable of injecting 2 gram projectiles at velocities of 6 km/s or more. Projectiles used in this environment are subject to many conditions. Some of these which effect projectile design include: acceleration loading, structural response, barrel condition and alignment. Development of a projectile to satisfy the programmatic requirements is underway. This report covers the evolution of design and fabrication for railgun projectiles from previous experiment at LLNL to the replenished plasma armature and projectile now used on STARFIRE. Projectile design, development and fabrication methods which use off-the-shelf materials and standard techniques to meet the operational criteria of the experimental program are discussed in this paper. Initial work involving the design and fabrication of skirted projectiles, which are expected to further reduce interaction phenomena between the plasma armature and railgun barrel, is also described.

  19. Simple light gas guns for hypervelocity studies

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, S.K.; Haselton, H.H.; Milora, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    Two-stage light guns are used extensively in hypervelocity research. The applications of this technology include impact studies and special materials development. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed two-stage guns that accelerate small projectiles (4-mm nominal diameter) to velocities of up to {approx}5 km/s. These guns are relatively small and simple (thus, easy to operate), allowing a significant number of test shots to be carried out and data accumulated in a short time. Materials that have been used for projectiles include plastics, frozen isotopes of hydrogen, and lithium hydride. One gun has been used to demonstrate repetitive operation at a rate of 0.7 Hz; and, with a few design improvements, it appears capable of performing at firing frequencies of 1--2 Hz. A schematic of ORNL two-stage device is shown below. Unlike most such devices, no rupture disks are used. Instead, a fast valve (high-flow type) initiates the acceleration process in the first stage. Projectiles can be loaded into the gun breech via the slide mechanism; this action has been automated which allows repetitive firing. Alternatively, the device is equipped with pipe gun'' apparatus in which gas can be frozen in situ in the gun barrel to form the projectile. This equipment operates with high reliability and is well suited for small-scale testing at high velocity. 17 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Orbiter Window Hypervelocity Impact Strength Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Lynda R.

    2011-01-01

    When the Space Shuttle Orbiter incurs damage on its windowpane during flight from particles traveling at hypervelocity speeds, it produces a distinctive damage that reduces the overall strength of the pane. This damage has the potential to increase the risk associated with a safe return to Earth. Engineers at Boeing and NASA/JSC are called to Mission Control to evaluate the damage and provide an assessment on the risk to the crew. Historically, damages like these were categorized as "accepted risk" associated with manned spaceflight, and as long as the glass was intact, engineers gave a "go ahead" for entry for the Orbiter. Since the Columbia accident, managers have given more scrutiny to these assessments, and this has caused the Orbiter window engineers to capitalize on new methods of assessments for these damages. This presentation will describe the original methodology that was used to asses the damages, and introduce a philosophy new to the Shuttle program for assessing structural damage, reliability/risk-based engineering. The presentation will also present a new, recently adopted method for assessing the damage and providing management with a reasonable assessment on the realities of the risk to the crew and vehicle for return.

  1. Characteristics of plasma generated by hypervelocity impact

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Weidong; Li, Jianqiao; Ning, Jianguo

    2013-09-15

    The characteristics of plasma generated by hypervelocity impact were studied through both theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. Based on thermodynamics and statistical physics, a thermal ionization model was proposed to explore the relationships of ionization degree and plasma conductivity to temperature with consideration of the velocity distribution law in the thermodynamic equilibrium state. In order to derive the temperature, internal energy, and density of the plasma generated by the impact for the above relationships, a 3-D model for the impact of an aluminum spherical projectile on an aluminum target was established and five cases with different impact angles were numerically simulated. Then, the temperature calculated from the internal energy and the Thomas Fermi (TF) model, the internal energy and the density of the plasma were put into the function of the ionization degree to study the characteristics of plasma. Finally, based on the experimental data, a good agreement was obtained between the theoretical predictions and the experimental results, and the feasibility of this theoretical model was verified.

  2. Testing of a Plasmadynamic Hypervelocity Dust Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ticos, Catalin M.; Wang, Zhehui; Dorf, Leonid A.; Wurden, G. A.

    2006-10-01

    A plasmadynamic accelerator for microparticles (or dust grains) has been designed, built and tested at Los Alamos National laboratory. The dust grains are expected to be accelerated to hypervelocities on the order of 1-30 km/s, depending on their size. The key components of the plasmadynamic accelerator are a coaxial plasma gun operated at 10 kV, a dust dispenser activated by a piezoelectric transducer, and power and remote-control systems. The coaxial plasma gun produces a high density (10^18 cm-3) and low temperature (˜ 1 eV) plasma in deuterium ejected by J x B forces, which provides drag on the dust particles in its path. Carbon dust particles will be used, with diameters from 1 to 50 μm. The plasma parameters produced in the coaxial gun are presented and their implication to dust acceleration is discussed. High speed dust will be injected in the National Spherical Torus Experiment to measure the pitch angle of magnetic field lines.

  3. Projectile development for railguns using hypervelocity preacceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susoeff, A. R.; Hawke, R. S.; Ang, J. A.; Asay, J. R.; Hall, C. A.; Konrad, C. H.; Sauve, G. L.

    1992-03-01

    The STARFIRE Project is a joint Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) effort to achieve hypervelocity projectile launches up to 15 km/s. The apparatus used to achieve this goal is a three stage acceleration system made up of a two-stage light-gas gun (2SLGG) coupled to a railgun. The 2SLGG is used as a preaccelerator capable of injecting 2 gram projectiles at velocities of 6 km/s or more. Projectiles used in this environment are subject to many conditions. Some of these which effect projectile design include acceleration loading, structural response, barrel condition and alignment. Development of a projectile to satisfy the programmatic requirements is underway. This report covers the evolution of design and fabrication for railgun projectiles from previous experimentation at LLNL to the replenished plasma armature and projectile now used on STARFIRE. Projectile design, development and fabrication methods which use off-the-shelf materials and standard techniques to meet the operational criteria of the experimental program are discussed in this paper. Initial work involving the design and fabrication of skirted projectiles, which are expected to further reduce interaction phenomena between the plasma armature and railgun barrel, is also described.

  4. Electromagnetic Pulses Generated by Hypervelocity Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, S.

    2011-12-01

    Hypervelocity impacts on spacecraft are known to cause mechanical damage, but their electrical effect on spacecraft systems are not well-characterized. We present a theory to explain plasma production and subsequent electric fields occurring when a meteoroid or piece of space debris strikes a spacecraft, ionizing itself and part of the spacecraft. This plasma, with a charge separation commensurate with different species mobilities, can produce a strong electromagnetic pulse (EMP), potentially causing catastrophic damage if the impact is relatively near an area with low shielding or an open umbilical. The plasma density, and hence plasma frequency, sweeps down as the plasma expands ballistically into the vacuum causing a chirp. Subsequent plasma oscillations can also emit significant power and may be responsible for many reported satellite anomalies. The presented theory discusses both a dust-free plasma expansion with coherent electron oscillation and a dusty plasma expansion with macroscopic charge separation. We show that significant RF can be emitted from frequencies ranging from VLF through S-band.

  5. Hydrocode modelling of hypervelocity impacts on ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendyke, S.; Price, M. C.; Burchell, M. J.

    2013-08-01

    Experimental data are now widely available for the size of craters resulting from hypervelocity impacts of millimetre scale projectiles onto water ice targets. At such size scales the bowl shaped crater formed in ductile materials, or in larger scale impacts, is here surrounded by a large spallation zone due to the brittle nature of the ice. Modelling of these impacts therefore has to take account of this spallation. Here we used the iSALE2 hydrocode to simulate such impacts and compared the results to experimental data. We found that it was possible to reproduce the experimental data over a range of speeds (1-7 km s-1) for aluminium and copper projectiles. Initially, to reproduce the large spallation regions around the craters it was assumed that above a certain degree of damage, material was removed by spallation. However this simple one-parameter model failed to model the crater depth adequately. Accordingly, to obtain the best agreement of the simulations with the experimental data, a two-step ice strength was introduced, whereby above a critical amount of damage (0.95), the yield strength reduced from 1 MPa (intact) to 70 kPa (damaged). As a result, experimental data for crater depth and diameter and the results of the simulations agree to within 6% for diameter and 5% for depth over the impact energy range used in the experiments (1-240 J).

  6. Further investigations of oblique hypervelocity impact phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a continuing investigation of the phenomena associated with the oblique hypervelocity impact of spherical projectiles onto multi-sheet aluminum structures are described. A series of equations that quantitatively describes these phenomena is obtained through a regression of experimental data. These equations characterize observed ricoshet and penetration damage phenomena in a multi-sheet structure as functions of the geometric parameters of the structure and the diameter, obliquity, and velocity of the impacting projectile. Crater damage observed on the ricochet witness plates is used to determine the sizes and speeds of the ricochet debris particles that caused the damage. It is shown that, in general, the most damaging ricochet debris particle is approximately 0.25 cm (0.10 in) in diameter and travels at the speed of approximately 2.1 km/sec (6,890 ft/sec). The equations necessary for the design of shielding panels that will protect external systems from such ricochet debris damage are also developed. The dimensions of these shielding panels are shown to be strongly dependent on their inclination and on their circumferential distribution around the spacecraft. It is concluded that obliquity effects of high-speed impacts must be considered in the design of any structure exposed to the meteoroid and space debris environment.

  7. Morphology correlation of craters formed by hypervelocity impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Gary D.; Rose, M. Frank; Zee, Ralph H.

    1993-01-01

    Dust-sized olivine particles were fired at a copper plate using the Space Power Institute hypervelocity facility, simulating micrometeoroid damage from natural debris to spacecraft in low-Earth orbit (LEO). Techniques were developed for measuring crater volume, particle volume, and particle velocity, with the particle velocities ranging from 5.6 to 8.7 km/s. A roughly linear correlation was found between crater volume and particle energy which suggested that micrometeoroids follow standard hypervelocity relationships. The residual debris analysis showed that for olivine impacts of up to 8.7 km/s, particle residue is found in the crater. By using the Space Power Institute hypervelocity facility, micrometeoroid damage to satellites can be accurately modeled.

  8. Penetration and ricochet phenomena in oblique hypervelocity impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.; Taylor, Roy A.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental investigation of phenomena associated with the oblique hypervelocity impact of spherical projectile on multisheet aluminum structures is described. A model that can be employed in the design of meteoroid and space debris protection systems for space structures is developed. The model consists of equations that relate crater and perforation damage of a multisheet structure to parameters such as projectile size, impact velocity, and trajectory obliquity. The equations are obtained through a regression analysis of oblique hypervelocity impact test data. This data shows that the response of a multisheet structure to oblique impact is significantly different from its response to normal hypervelocity impact. It was found that obliquely incident projectiles produce ricochet debris that can severely damage panels or instrumentation located on the exterior of a space structure. Obliquity effects of high-speed impact must, therefore, be considered in the design of any structure exposed to the meteoroid and space debris environment.

  9. Hypervelocity impact cratering - A catastrophic terrestrial geologic process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieve, Richard A. F.

    It is possible to infer a 5.4 x 10 to the 15th/sq km per year terrestrial impact cratering rate for hypervelocity impact structures with diameters greater than 20 km. These craters often contain such shock-metamorphic effects as shatter cones, tectosilicate microscopic planar features, diapleptic solid-state glasses, and impact melting. Impact melt rocks may contain siderophile anomalies indicative of siderophile material admixtures. Hypervelocity impacts have gained recognition as catastrophes with potentially severe biological effects; the cratering record is such as to suggest that the earth may be subjected to periodic cometary showers.

  10. In-flight detection of small hypervelocity particles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. M.; Goad, J. H.; Chu, W. P.

    1973-01-01

    A technique is described in which small (25-micron) hypervelocity (10-km/sec) in-flight particles can be detected in the presence of high background noise. The system is based on a spatial filtering principle whereby spurious noise effects are reduced by use of a beam stop in the entrance aperture of the system and a bandpass filter in the transform plane. A theoretical analysis of the system is presented, and some experimental results are obtained by detecting in-flight hypervelocity particles generated by an exploding lithium wire electrothermal accelerator.

  11. Burst pressure failure of titanium tanks damaged by secondary plumes from hypervelocity impacts on aluminum shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahra, Henry; Ghosn, L.; Christiansen, E.; Davis, B. A.; Keddy, C.; Rodriguez, K.; Miller, J.; Bohl, W.

    2012-03-01

    Metallic pressure tanks used in space missions are inherently vulnerable to hypervelocity impacts from micrometeoroids and orbital debris; thereby knowledge of impact damage and its effect on the tank integrity is crucial to a spacecraft risk assessment. This paper describes tests that have been performed to assess the effects of hypervelocity impact (HVI) damage on Titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) pressure vessels burst pressure and characteristics. The tests consisted of a pair of HVI impact tests on water-filled Ti-6Al-4V tanks (water being used as a surrogate to the actual propellant) and subsequent burst tests as well as a burst test on an undamaged control tank. The tanks were placed behind Aluminum (Al) shields and then each was impacted with a 7 km/s projectile. The resulting impact debris plumes partially penetrated the Ti-6Al-4V tank surfaces resulting in a distribution of craters. During the burst tests, the tank that failed at a lower burst pressure did appear to have the failure initiating at a crater site with observed spall cracks. A fracture mechanics analysis showed that the tanks failure at the impact location may have been due to a spall crack that formed upon impact of a fragmentation on the Titanium surface. This result was corroborated with a finite element analysis from calculated Von-Mises and hoop stresses.

  12. Burst Pressure Failure of Titanium Tanks Damaged by Secondary Plumes from Hypervelocity Impacts on Aluminum Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry; Ghosn, Louis; Christiansen, Eric; Davis, B. Alan; Keddy, Chris; Rodriquez, Karen; Miller, Joshua; Bohl, William

    2011-01-01

    Metallic pressure tanks used in space missions are inherently vulnerable to hypervelocity impacts from micrometeoroids and orbital debris; thereby knowledge of impact damage and its effect on the tank integrity is crucial to a spacecraft risk assessment. This paper describes tests that have been performed to assess the effects of hypervelocity impact (HVI) damage on Titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) pressure vessels burst pressure and characteristics. The tests consisted of a pair of HVI impact tests on water-filled Ti-6Al-4V tanks (water being used as a surrogate to the actual propellant) and subsequent burst tests as well as a burst test on an undamaged control tank. The tanks were placed behind Aluminum (Al) shields and then each was impacted with a 7 km/s projectile. The resulting impact debris plumes partially penetrated the Ti-6Al-4V tank surfaces resulting in a distribution of craters. During the burst tests, the tank that failed at a lower burst pressure did appear to have the failure initiating at a crater site with observed spall cracks. A fracture mechanics analysis showed that the tanks failure at the impact location may have been due to a spall crack that formed upon impact of a fragmentation on the Titanium surface. This result was corroborated with a finite element analysis from calculated Von-Mises and hoop stresses.

  13. Burst Pressure Failure of Titanium Tanks Damaged by Secondary Plumes from Hypervelocity Impacts on Aluminum Shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahra, Henry; Ghosn, Louis; Christiansen, Eric; Davis, B. Alan; Keddy, Christopher; Rodriguez, Karen; Miller, Joshua; Bohl, William

    2011-06-01

    Metallic pressure tanks used in space missions are inherently vulnerable to hypervelocity impacts from micrometeoroids and orbital debris; thereby knowledge of impact damage and its effect on the tank integrity is crucial to a spacecraft risk assessment. This paper describes tests that have been performed to assess the effects of hypervelocity impact (HVI) damage on Titanium (Ti) pressure vessels burst pressure and characteristics. The series consists of a pair of HVI impact tests on water-filled Ti tanks (water as a surrogate to the propellant) and subsequent burst tests of these tanks and an undamaged control tank. The tanks were placed behind Aluminum (Al) shields and then each was impacted with a 7 km/s projectile. The resulting impact debris plumes partially penetrated the Ti tank surfaces resulting in a distribution of craters. During the burst tests, the tank that failed at a lower burst pressure did appear to have the failure initiating at a crater site with observed spall cracks. A fracture mechanics analysis that provides insight into how the cracks associated with a spall site initiate a failure cascade is discussed.

  14. The Velocity Distribution of Hypervelocity Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Elena M.; Kobayashi, Shiho; Sari, Re'em

    2014-11-01

    We consider the process of stellar binaries tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole (BH). For highly eccentric orbits, as one star is ejected from the three-body system, the companion remains bound to the BH. Hypervelocity stars (HVSs) observed in the Galactic halo and S-stars observed orbiting the central BH may originate from such mechanism. In this paper, we predict the velocity distribution of the ejected stars of a given mass, after they have traveled out of the Galactic potential. We use both analytical methods and Monte Carlo simulations. We find that each part of the velocity distribution encodes different information. At low velocities <800 km s-1, the Galactic potential universally shapes the observed distribution, which rises toward a peak, related to the Galactic escape velocity. Beyond the peak, the velocity distribution depends on binary mass and separation distributions. Finally, the finite star life introduces a break related to their mass. A qualitative comparison of our models with current observations shows the great potential of HVSs to constrain bulge and Galactic properties. Standard choices for parameter distributions predict velocities below and above ~800 km s-1 with equal probability, while none are observed beyond ~700 km s-1 and the current detections are more clustered at low velocities 300-400 km s-1. These features may indicate that the separation distribution of binaries that reach the tidal sphere is not flat in logarithmic space, as observed in more local massive binaries, but has more power toward larger separations, enhancing smaller velocities. In addition, the binary formation/evolution process or the injection mechanism might also induce a cut-off a min ~ 10 R ⊙ in the separation distribution.

  15. Measurement Techniques for Hypervelocity Impact Test Fragments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Nicole E.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to classify the size and shape of individual orbital debris fragments provides a better understanding of the orbital debris environment as a whole. The characterization of breakup fragmentation debris has gradually evolved from a simplistic, spherical assumption towards that of describing debris in terms of size, material, and shape parameters. One of the goals of the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office is to develop high-accuracy techniques to measure these parameters and apply them to orbital debris observations. Measurement of the physical characteristics of debris resulting from groundbased, hypervelocity impact testing provides insight into the shapes and sizes of debris produced from potential impacts in orbit. Current techniques for measuring these ground-test fragments require determination of dimensions based upon visual judgment. This leads to reduced accuracy and provides little or no repeatability for the measurements. With the common goal of mitigating these error sources, allaying any misunderstandings, and moving forward in fragment shape determination, the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office recently began using a computerized measurement system. The goal of using these new techniques is to improve knowledge of the relation between commonly used dimensions and overall shape. The immediate objective is to scan a single fragment, measure its size and shape properties, and import the fragment into a program that renders a 3D model that adequately demonstrates how the object could appear in orbit. This information would then be used to aid optical methods in orbital debris shape determination. This paper provides a description of the measurement techniques used in this initiative and shows results of this work. The tradeoffs of the computerized methods are discussed, as well as the means of repeatability in the measurements of these fragments. This paper serves as a general description of methods for the measurement and shape analysis of

  16. Dynamic Optical Investigations of Hypervelocity Impact Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberson, Leslie Elise

    One of the prominent threats in the endeavor to develop next-generation space assets is the risk of space debris impact in earth's orbit and micrometeoroid impact damage in near-earth orbit and deep space. To date, there is no study available which concentrates on the analysis of dynamic crack growth from hypervelocity impacts on such structures, resulting in their eventual catastrophic degradation. Experiments conducted using a unique two-stage light-gas gun facility have examined the in situ dynamic fracture of brittle polymers subjected to this high-energy-density event. Optical techniques of caustics and photoelasticity, combined with high-speed photography up to 100 million frames per second, analyze crack growth behavior of Mylar and Homalite 100 thin plates after impact by a 1.8 mm diameter nylon 6-6 right cylindrical slug at velocities ranging from 3 to 7 km/s (7000--15500 mph). Crack speeds in both polymers averaged between 0.2 and 0.47 cR, the Rayleigh wave speed (450--1000 mph). Shadow spots and surrounding caustics reveal time histories of the dynamic stress intensity factor, as well as the energy release rate ahead of the mode-I, or opening, crack tips. Results indicate that even under extreme impact conditions of out of-plane loading, highly localized heating, and energetic impact phenomena involving plasma formation and ejecta, the dynamic fracture process occurs during a deformation regime dominated by in-plane loading. These findings imply that the reliability of impacted, thin-walled, plate and shell space structures, idealized by the experimental configuration investigated, can be predicted by the well defined principles of classical dynamic fracture mechanics.

  17. Emission FTIR analyses of thin microscopic patches of jet fuel residue deposited on heated metal surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.; Vogel, P.

    1984-01-01

    Deposits laid down in patches on metal strips in a high pressure/high temperature fuel system simulator operated with aerated fuel at varying flow rates were analyzed by emission FTIR in terms of functional groups. Significant differences were found in the spectra and amounts of deposits derived from fuels to which small concentrations of oxygen-, nitrogen-, or sulfur-containing heterocyclics or metal naphthenates were added. The spectra of deposits generated on strips by heating fuels and air in a closed container were very different from those of the flowing fluid deposits. One such closed-container dodecane deposit on silver gave a strong surface-enhanced Raman spectrum.

  18. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

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  19. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

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  20. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

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  1. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

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  2. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

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  3. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

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  4. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

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  5. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

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  6. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

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  7. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

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  8. Hypervelocity impact tests on Space Shuttle Orbiter thermal protection material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humes, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests were conducted to simulate the damage that meteoroids will produce in the Shuttle Orbiter leading edge structural subsystem material. The nature and extent of the damage is reported and the probability of encountering meteoroids with sufficient energy to produce such damage is discussed.

  9. Structural Damage Prediction and Analysis for Hypervelocity Impact: Consulting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A portion of the contract NAS8-38856, 'Structural Damage Prediction and Analysis for Hypervelocity Impacts,' from NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), included consulting which was to be documented in the final report. This attachment to the final report contains memos produced as part of that consulting.

  10. SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics) simulations of hypervelocity impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.

    1991-01-24

    The smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method has been used to simulate several cases of hypervelocity impact in an exploratory study to determine the suitability of the method for such problems. The calculations compare favorably with experimental results and with other numerical simulations. We discuss the requirements that must be satisfied for SPH to produce accurate simulations of such problems. 18 refs., 9 figs.

  11. Survey of the hypervelocity impact technology and applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, Lalit Chandra; Orphal, Dennis L.

    2006-05-01

    HVIS 2005 was a clear success. The Symposium brought together nearly two hundred active researchers and students from thirteen countries around the world. The 84 papers presented at HVIS 2005 constitute an ''update'' on current research and the state-of-the-art of hypervelocity science. Combined with the over 7000 pages of technical papers from the eight previous Symposia, beginning in 1986, all published in the International Journal of Impact Engineering, the papers from HVIS 2005 add to the growing body of knowledge and the progressing state-of-the-art of hypervelocity science. It is encouraging to report that even with the limited funding resources compared to two decades ago, creativity and ingenuity in hypervelocity science are alive and well. There is considerable overlap in different disciplines that allows researchers to leverage. Experimentally, higher velocities are now available in the laboratory and are ideally suited for space applications that can be tied to both civilian (NASA) and DoD military applications. Computationally, there is considerable advancement both in computer and modeling technologies. Higher computing speeds and techniques such as parallel processing allow system level type applications to be addressed directly today, much in contrast to the situation only a few years ago. Needless to say, both experimentally and computationally, the ultimate utility will depend on the curiosity and the probing questions that will be incumbent upon the individual researcher. It is quite satisfying that over two dozen students attended the symposium. Hopefully this is indicative of a good pool of future researchers that will be needed both in the government and civilian industries. It is also gratifying to note that novel thrust areas exploring different and new material phenomenology relevant to hypervelocity impact, but a number of other applications as well, are being pursued. In conclusion, considerable progress is still being made that is

  12. High strain rate and high temperature behaviour of metallic materials for jet engine turbine containment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gálvez, F.; Cendón, D.; Enfedaque, A.; Sánchez-Gálvez, V.

    2006-08-01

    This work presents a study on the mechanical characterisation of the materials involved in air jet engine turbines. The final objective is to analyse the phenomenon of a turbine blade off failure, to verify the requirements of the case containment. The materials in the turbine are under high temperatures, ranging from 400circC to 800circC and when the fail of the blade occurs if impacts against the case, reaching strain rates up to 103 s - 1. To obtain the behaviour of the materials, testing at high strain rate and high temperature at one time is necessary. The experimental set-up used was a split Hopkinson pressure bar, with a high temperature furnace adapted. The bars used on the device were high strength nickel alloys with a cooling system to decrease the temperature of the measurement devices. The effect of wave dispersion due to the temperature gradient has been also studied to correct the measurements if necessary. The material tested has been the FV535 stainless steel used on the case. The full stress-strain curves at different temperatures and at strain rates up to 103 s-1 have been obtained. The experimental results show a marked influence of the strain rate and the temperature that cannot be neglected. The Johnson-Cook material model has been used to fit the results of the material tests.

  13. Vapor Explosion of Coolant Jet When Penetrating a Hot Molten Metal

    SciTech Connect

    Perets, Y.; Harari, R.; Sher, E.

    2005-06-15

    The vapor explosion phenomenon is investigated experimentally for a geometrical arrangement in which a cold liquid (water) jet is injected into a hot liquid surface (tin). Medium-scale experiments using 1 kg of molten tin were performed in an open geometry experiment system. In the first phase of the research, the influence of the injection mass flow rate on the likelihood of vapor explosion was investigated in order to map the various relevant regimes. In the second phase, the influence of some selected parameters on the interaction was studied to characterize the relevant parameters of the vapor explosion phenomenon.The range of the initial tin and water temperatures that leads to vapor explosion has been determined in order to define the thermal interaction zone. It is noticed that vapor explosion can occur at high water temperatures even near the saturation point. The delay time for the explosion to occur and the degree of the interaction violence were correlated with the initial tin and water temperatures. We also clarified the triggering point and noted a correlation between the quench temperature and the likelihood of the vapor explosion occurrence.

  14. Hypervelocity Impact Initiation of Explosive Transfer Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Michael D.; Christiansen, Eric L.

    2012-01-01

    The Gemini, Apollo and Space Shuttle spacecraft utilized explosive transfer lines (ETL) in a number of applications. In each case the ETL was located behind substantial structure and the risk of impact initiation by micrometeoroids and orbital debris was negligible. A current NASA program is considering an ETL to synchronize the actuation of pyrobolts to release 12 capture latches in a contingency. The space constraints require placing the ETL 50 mm below the 1 mm thick 2024-T72 Whipple shield. The proximity of the ETL to the thin shield prompted analysts at NASA to perform a scoping analysis with a finite-difference hydrocode to calculate impact parameters that would initiate the ETL. The results suggest testing is required and a 12 shot test program with surplused Shuttle ETL is scheduled for February 2012 at the NASA White Sands Test Facility. Explosive initiation models are essential to the analysis and one exists in the CTH library for HNS I, but not the HNS II used in the Shuttle 2.5 gr/ft rigid shielded mild detonating cord (SMDC). HNS II is less sensitive than HNS I so it is anticipated that these results using the HNS I model are conservative. Until the hypervelocity impact test results are available, the only check on the analysis was comparison with the Shuttle qualification test result that a 22 long bullet would not initiate the SMDC. This result was reproduced by the hydrocode simulation. Simulations of the direct impact of a 7 km/s aluminum ball, impacting at 0 degree angle of incidence, onto the SMDC resulted in a 1.5 mm diameter ball initiating the SMDC and 1.0 mm ball failing to initiate it. Where one 1.0 mm ball could not initiate the SMDC, a cluster of six 1.0 mm diameter aluminum balls striking simultaneously could. Thus the impact parameters that will result in initiating SMDC located behind a Whipple shield will depend on how well the shield fragments the projectile and spreads the fragments. An end-to-end simulation of the impact of an

  15. Hypervelocity nanoparticle impacts on free-standing graphene: A sui generis mode of sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Eller, Michael J.; Della-Negra, Serge; Kim, Hansoo; Young, Amanda E.

    2015-01-28

    The study of the interaction of hypervelocity nano-particles with a 2D material and ultra-thin targets (single layer graphene, multi-layer graphene, and amorphous carbon foils) has been performed using mass selected gold nano-particles produced from a liquid metal ion source. During these impacts, a large number of atoms are ejected from the graphene, corresponding to a hole of ∼60 nm{sup 2}. Additionally, for the first time, secondary ions have been observed simultaneously in both the transmission and reflection direction (with respect to the path of the projectile) from a 2D target. The ejected area is much larger than that predicted by molecular dynamic simulations and a large ionization rate is observed. The mass distribution and characteristics of the emitted secondary ions are presented and offer an insight into the process to produce the large hole observed in the graphene.

  16. Quantitative analysis of toxic metals lead and cadmium in water jet by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cheri, M Sadegh; Tavassoli, S H

    2011-03-20

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to the analysis of toxic metals Pb and Cd in Pb(NO3)2 and Cd(NO3)2.4H2O aqueous solutions, respectively. The plasma is generated by focusing a nanosecond Nd:YAG (λ=1064 nm) laser on the surface of liquid in the homemade liquid jet configuration. With an assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), calibration curves of Pb and Cd were obtained at different delay times between 1 to 5 μs. The temporal behavior of limit of detections (LOD) was investigated and it is shown that the minimum LODs for Pb and Cd are 4 and 68 parts in 10(6) (ppm), respectively. In order to demonstrate the correctness of the LTE assumption, plasma parameters including plasma temperature and electron density are evaluated, and it is shown that the LTE condition is satisfied at all delay times. PMID:21460994

  17. Jet formation in spallation of metal film from substrate under action of femtosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inogamov, N. A.; Zhakhovskii, V. V.; Khokhlov, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that during ablation by an ultrashort laser pulse, the main contribution to ablation of the substance is determined not by evaporation, but by the thermomechanical spallation of the substance. For identical metals and pulse parameters, the type of spallation is determined by film thickness d f . An important gauge is metal heating depth d T at the two-temperature stage, at which electron temperature is higher than ion temperature. We compare cases with d f < d T (thin film) and d f ≫ d T (bulk target). Radius R L of the spot of heating by an optical laser is the next (after d f ) important geometrical parameter. The morphology of film bulging in cases where d f < d T on the substrate (blistering) changes upon a change in radius R L in the range from diffraction limit R L ˜ λ to high values of R L ≫ λ, where λ ˜ 1 μm is the wavelength of optical laser radiation. When d f < d T , R L ˜ λ, and F abs > F m, gold film deposited on the glass target acquires a cupola-shaped blister with a miniature frozen nanojet in the form of a tip on the circular top of the cupola ( F abs and F m are the absorbed energy and the melting threshold of the film per unit surface area of the film). A new physical mechanism leading to the formation of the nanojet is proposed.

  18. Hypervelocity Impact Experiments on Epoxy/Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene Composite Panels Reinforced with Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khatiwada, Suman; Laughman, Jay W.; Armada, Carlos A.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Barrera, Enrique V.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced composites with multi-functional capabilities are of great interest to the designers of aerospace structures. Polymer matrix composites (PMCs) reinforced with high strength fibers provide a lightweight and high strength alternative to metals and metal alloys conventionally used in aerospace architectures. Novel reinforcements such as nanofillers offer potential to improve the mechanical properties and add multi-functionality such as radiation resistance and sensing capabilities to the PMCs. This paper reports the hypervelocity impact (HVI) test results on ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fiber composites reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT). Woven UHMWPE fabrics, in addition to providing excellent impact properties and high strength, also offer radiation resistance due to inherent high hydrogen content. SWCNT have exceptional mechanical and electrical properties. BNNT (figure 1) have high neutron cross section and good mechanical properties that add multi-functionality to this system. In this project, epoxy based UHMWPE composites containing SWCNT and BNNT are assessed for their use as bumper shields and as intermediate plates in a Whipple Shield for HVI resistance. Three composite systems are prepared to compare against one another: (I) Epoxy/UHMWPE, (II) Epoxy/UHMWPE/SWCNT and (III) Epoxy/UHMWPE/SWCNT/BNNT. Each composite is a 10.0 by 10.0 by 0.11 cm3 panel, consisting of 4 layers of fabrics arranged in cross-ply orientation. Both SWCNT and BNNT are 0.5 weight % of the fabric preform. Hypervelocity impact tests are performed using a two-stage light gas gun at Rice University

  19. Jet formation in spallation of metal film from substrate under action of femtosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Inogamov, N. A.; Zhakhovskii, V. V.; Khokhlov, V. A.

    2015-01-15

    It is well known that during ablation by an ultrashort laser pulse, the main contribution to ablation of the substance is determined not by evaporation, but by the thermomechanical spallation of the substance. For identical metals and pulse parameters, the type of spallation is determined by film thickness d{sub f}. An important gauge is metal heating depth d{sub T} at the two-temperature stage, at which electron temperature is higher than ion temperature. We compare cases with d{sub f} < d{sub T} (thin film) and d{sub f} ≫ d{sub T} (bulk target). Radius R{sub L} of the spot of heating by an optical laser is the next (after d{sub f}) important geometrical parameter. The morphology of film bulging in cases where d{sub f} < d{sub T} on the substrate (blistering) changes upon a change in radius R{sub L} in the range from diffraction limit R{sub L} ∼ λ to high values of R{sub L} ≫ λ, where λ ∼ 1 μm is the wavelength of optical laser radiation. When d{sub f} < d{sub T}, R{sub L} ∼ λ, and F{sub abs} > F{sub m}, gold film deposited on the glass target acquires a cupola-shaped blister with a miniature frozen nanojet in the form of a tip on the circular top of the cupola (F{sub abs} and F{sub m} are the absorbed energy and the melting threshold of the film per unit surface area of the film). A new physical mechanism leading to the formation of the nanojet is proposed.

  20. First application of liquid-metal-jet sources for small-animal imaging: High-resolution CT and phase-contrast tumor demarcation

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, Daniel H.; Lundstroem, Ulf; Burvall, Anna; Hertz, Hans M.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Small-animal studies require images with high spatial resolution and high contrast due to the small scale of the structures. X-ray imaging systems for small animals are often limited by the microfocus source. Here, the authors investigate the applicability of liquid-metal-jet x-ray sources for such high-resolution small-animal imaging, both in tomography based on absorption and in soft-tissue tumor imaging based on in-line phase contrast. Methods: The experimental arrangement consists of a liquid-metal-jet x-ray source, the small-animal object on a rotating stage, and an imaging detector. The source-to-object and object-to-detector distances are adjusted for the preferred contrast mechanism. Two different liquid-metal-jet sources are used, one circulating a Ga/In/Sn alloy and the other an In/Ga alloy for higher penetration through thick tissue. Both sources are operated at 40-50 W electron-beam power with {approx}7 {mu}m x-ray spots, providing high spatial resolution in absorption imaging and high spatial coherence for the phase-contrast imaging. Results: High-resolution absorption imaging is demonstrated on mice with CT, showing 50 {mu}m bone details in the reconstructed slices. High-resolution phase-contrast soft-tissue imaging shows clear demarcation of mm-sized tumors at much lower dose than is required in absorption. Conclusions: This is the first application of liquid-metal-jet x-ray sources for whole-body small-animal x-ray imaging. In absorption, the method allows high-resolution tomographic skeletal imaging with potential for significantly shorter exposure times due to the power scalability of liquid-metal-jet sources. In phase contrast, the authors use a simple in-line arrangement to show distinct tumor demarcation of few-mm-sized tumors. This is, to their knowledge, the first small-animal tumor visualization with a laboratory phase-contrast system.

  1. Hypervelocity impact response of aluminum multi-wall structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.; Bean, Alan J.

    1991-01-01

    The results of an investigation in which the perforation resistance of aluminum multiwall structures is analyzed under a variety of hypervelocity impact loading conditions are presented. A comparative analysis of the impact damage in structural systems with two or more bumpers and the damage in single-bumper systems of similar weight is performed to determine the advantages and disadvantages of employing more than one bumper in structural wall systems for long-duration spacecraft. A significant increase in protection against perforation by hypervelocity projectiles can be achieved if a single bumper is replaced by two bumpers of similar weight while the total wall spacing is kept constant. It is found that increasing the number of bumpers beyond two while keeping the total stand-off distance constant does not result in a substantial increase in protection over that offered by two bumpers of similar weight.

  2. Spacecraft outer thermal blankets as hypervelocity impact bumpers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cour-Palais, B. G.

    1996-05-01

    A thermal barrier consisting of a woven fabric outer layer followed by several layers of aluminized mylar insulation has been the primary impact protection against micrometeoroid and orbital impacts for many spacecraft currently in orbit. This paper examines its effectiveness as a hypervelocity "bumper" based on the performance of a NASA space suit. In this case, the thermal barrier consisted of a fabric layer followed by five layers of the aluminized mylar, which shielded either an aluminum rear wall or a rubberized pressure garment. The total areal density of the fabric and mylar layers was 0.052 g/cm2 and the fabric stand-off was 4 mm from the protected surfaces, with the aluminized mylar filling the space. Test results obtained with hypervelocity aluminum projectile impacts up to 8.5 km/s on the thermal barrier and aluminum wall are described, and a semi-empirical equation for this type of shielding is suggested.

  3. Optimum Structure of Whipple Shield against Hypervelocity Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Minhyung

    2013-06-01

    It has been known that the spacecraft protection issues against space debris or meteoroid impact damage are of great importance. Whipple shield structures (double spaced plates) have been investigated and empirical ballistic limit curve (BLCs) are developed. In this paper, we like to investigate an optimum Whipple Shield structure of fixed areal density and space. To do this, a new in-house SPH code has been used. Last 20 years SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics) numerical scheme has been widely applied to the hypervelocity impact problems because of the limited velocity range and cost of test. We first examined the extent of debris spreading which seems to be a key factor to the back plate impact. The debris cloud expansion angle shows a maximum value. Then, a series of hypervelocity impact simulations were conducted to predict the critical impacting sphere diameter. It has been found that there is an optimum thickness ratio of front bumper to real wall.

  4. Hypervelocity supersonic nozzle beam source of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, A.; Unkel, W.; Silver, J.; Kolb, C.

    1984-01-01

    A hypervelocity source of atomic oxygen was developed. Dissociation of molecular oxygen is accomplished by injection into a flow of helium and/or argon which has been heated in a commercial plasma torch. Atomic velocities of up to 4 kms(-1) were produced; recent improvements offer the possibility of even higher velocities. This source was utilized in studies of translational-to-vibrational energy transfer in carbon dioxide and in an investigation of the shuttle glow effect.

  5. A new technique for ground simulation of hypervelocity debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roybal, R.; Shively, J.; Stein, C.; Miglionico, C.; Robertson, R.

    1995-01-01

    A series of hypervelocity damage experiments were preformed on spacecraft materials. These experiments employed a technique which accelerates micro flyer plates simulating space debris traveling at 3 to 8 km/sec. The apparatus used to propel the micro flyer plates was compact and fit well into a space environmental chamber equipped with instrumentation capable of analyzing the vapor ejected from the sample. Mechanical damage to the sample was also characterized using optical and scanning electron microscpopy. Data for this work was obtained from hypervelocity impacts on a polysulfone resin and a graphite polysulfone composite. Polysulfone was selected because it was flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) which spent several years in low earth orbit (LEO). Chemistry of the vapor produced by the impact was analyzed with a time of flight mass spectrometer, (TOFMS). This represents the first time that ejected vapors from hypervelocity collisions were trapped and analyzed with a mass spectrometer. With this approach we are able to study changes in the vapor chemistry as a function of time after impact, obtain a velocity measurement of the vapor, and estimate a temperature of the surface at time of impact using dynamic gas equations. Samples of the vapor plume may be captured and examined by transmission electron microscopy. Studies were also conducted to determine mechanical damage to a graphite polysulfone composite and a polysulfone resin. Impact craters were examined under optical and scanning electron microscopes. The collision craters in the matrix were typical of those shown in conventional shock experiments. However, the hypervelocity collisions with the graphite polysulfone composite were remarkably different than those with the resin.

  6. Skin-friction gauge for use in hypervelocity impulse facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, G. M.; Simmons, J. M.; Paull, A.

    1992-01-01

    A transducer is presented which can measure as rise-time of about 20 microsec, and is thereby applicable to measurements in the high-enthalpy flows associated with hypervelocity impulse facilities. Results are presented which demonstrate the effectiveness of the concept in the case of skin-friction measurements conducted on a flat plate at Mach 3.2. The calibration used was against theoretical skin-friction values in a simple flow.

  7. Hypervelocity impact simulation for micrometeorite and debris shield design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    1992-01-01

    A new capability has been developed for direct computer simulation of hypervelocity impacts on multi-plate orbital debris shields, for combinations of low shield thickness and wide shield spacing which place extreme demands on conventional Eulerian analysis techniques. The modeling methodology represents a novel approach to debris cloud dynamics simulation, a problem of long term interest in the design of space structures. Software implementation of the modeling methodology provides a new design tool for engineering analysis of proposed orbital debris protection systems.

  8. Damage Analysis for Hypervelocity Impact Experiments on Spaceship Windows Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiyun, Y.; Jidong, Z.; Zizheng, G.; Hewei, P.

    2010-06-01

    The hypervelocity impact characteristics in fused silica glass, which is used for the outermost pane of the windshield as the critical part of the thermal protection system of spacecraft, were studied by 37 impact experiments with different millimeter diameter projectiles up to the velocity of 7 km/s launched by two stage light-gas-gun facility. The empirical damage equations were obtained from experiment data by the least square method and they were compared with NASA damage equations.

  9. Experimental hypervelocity impact effects on simulated planetesimal materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tedeschi, W.J.; Schulze, J.F.; Remo, J.L.; Young, R.P. Jr

    1994-08-01

    Experimental results are presented from a series of hypervelocity impact tests on simulated comet and asteroid materials for the purpose of characterizing their response to hypervelocity kinetic energy impacts. Nine tests were conducted at the Air Force Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) S1 Range Facility on ice, rock, and iron target samples using a spherical 2.39 mm diameter aluminum impactor (0.0192 gm) at impact velocities of from 7.6 to 8.4 km/sec. The test objectives were to collect target response phenomenology data on cratering, momentum deposition and enhancement, target fragmentation, and material response under hypervelocity impact loading conditions. A carefully designed ballistic pendulum was used to measure momentum deposition into the targets. Observations and measurements of the impacted samples provide important insights into the response of these materials to kinetic energy impacts, especially in regards to unexpectedly large measured values of momentum enhancement to some of the targets. Such information is required to allow us to successfully deflect or fragment comets or asteroids which might someday be detected on collision trajectories with Earth.

  10. Theoretical and numerical predictions of hypervelocity impact-generated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianqiao; Song, Weidong Ning, Jianguo

    2014-08-15

    The hypervelocity impact generated plasmas (HVIGP) in thermodynamic non-equilibrium state were theoretically analyzed, and a physical model was presented to explore the relationship between plasma ionization degree and internal energy of the system by a group of equations including a chemical reaction equilibrium equation, a chemical reaction rate equation, and an energy conservation equation. A series of AUTODYN 3D (a widely used software in dynamic numerical simulations and developed by Century Dynamic Inc.) numerical simulations of the impacts of hypervelocity Al projectile on its targets at different incident angles were performed. The internal energy and the material density obtained from the numerical simulations were then used to calculate the ionization degree and the electron temperature. Based on a self-developed 2D smooth particle hydrodynamic (SPH) code and the theoretical model, the plasmas generated by 6 hypervelocity impacts were directly simulated and their total charges were calculated. The numerical results are in good agreements with the experimental results as well as the empirical formulas, demonstrating that the theoretical model is justified by the AUTODYN 3D and self-developed 2D SPH simulations and applicable to predict HVIGPs. The study is of significance for astrophysical and cosmonautic researches and safety.

  11. Hyper-velocity impact risk assessment study for LOFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perinati, Emanuele

    Within the ESA Cosmic Vision programme, the Large Observatory For x-ray Timing (LOFT) mission is one of the candidates for the M3 slot opportunity. LOFT is an x-ray (2-30 keV) experiment with two instruments on-board: the Large Area Detector (LAD) and the Wide Field Monitor (WFM). Both are based on Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs). Due to the design of the instrumental configuration, hyper-velocity impacts of micrometeoroids and orbital debris represent a significant hazard factor. During the three-year assessment phase of LOFT, we performed experimental test campaigns at the MPIK Van de Graaff accelerator to measure the degradation of LOFT SDD prototypes induced by hyper-velocity impacts. For the WFM, to mitigate the impact risk we designed and tested at the TUM plasma accelerator a compact double-wall shield using thin (~10 micron) foils of Kapton and Polypropylene, capable to effectively stop hyper-velocity particles up to 70 micron in size, in a remarkable agreement with simulations performed in ESABASE2. We present the results of these activities in the context of LOFT, and brievly discuss the potential applicability of the SDD as a debris detector.

  12. Impact features tracing hypervelocity airbursts on earth from the atmosphere to the ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courty, M. M.

    2012-12-01

    In the absence of deep craters, impact features have been debated to possibly tracing proximal ejecta from yet undetected structure or airburst debris from a meteorite collision with the terrestrial atmosphere or lithosphere. We examine the possibility for impact features to have originated from the shock layer formed ahead of a hypervelocity collider in the earth atmosphere. This hypothesis is approached by comparing impact features from controlled materials to puzzling geological ones: (1) debris collected at the ground from a high altitude meteor airburst recorded on 2011 August 2nd in Southern France; (2) laboratory experiments performed for defense purposes at the CEA Gramat Center (France) with the Persephone hypervelocity light gas gun; (3) the Zhamanshin impact breccia, the Lybian glass, the Egyptian Dakhleh glass, the Tasmanian Darwin glass, the Australasian tektite strewnfield and the Australian Henbury crater field. The Persephone experiments include collisions from 4.1 to 7.9 km/s by a steel projectile embedded into a polycarbonate holder with a polystyrene separator on to a 40 mm thick aluminum target. The impact features been characterized by coupling Environmental SEM with EDS, Raman micro-spectrometry, XRD, TEM, Tof-SIMS, ICP-MS and isotope analyses. Similar carbonaceous polymorphs that are closely imbricated at meso to nano-scales to the crystallized components (including the metal blebs) and to the glass phases (spherules or matrix) are present in all the impact features studied. They dominantly consist of aliphatic polymers, rare aromatic compounds, with graphite-lonsdaleite inclusions. The Persephone experiments help relating the graphite-lonsdaleite couple to transformed organic residues by the transient high pressure shock (a few tens MPa) and the transient heating (ca 100°C) and the aliphatic polymers to new hydrocarbons that formed from the pulverized polycarbonate and polystyrene. The Persephone experiments provide the controlled situation

  13. Impact of effective volume ratio of a dispersant to silver nano-particles on silicon solar cell efficiency in direct ink-jet metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dong-Youn; Cha, Yong-Kee; Ryu, Han-Hee; Kim, Sang-Ho

    2012-11-01

    In this study, the direct ink-jet metallization of finger electrodes on a multi-crystalline silicon solar cell is attempted and the impact of the silver particle size on solar cell efficiency is investigated using silver nano-inks with two different silver particle sizes. When the silver particle size approaches the nano-metric regime of around 18.1 nm, the solar cell efficiency is as low as 8.6%. On the other hand, the solar cell efficiency increases up to a maximum of 12.1% using silver particles that are around 180 nm in size. It is found that the dependence of the solar cell efficiency on the silver particle size is related to the effective volume ratio of a dispersant to silver. As the effective volume ratio increases, detrimental effects, such as an explosive decomposition of the dispersant and high residual stress due to the high volumetric shrinkage of a direct ink-jet printed finger electrode, result in poor contact formation which eventually leads to poor solar cell efficiency. With these experimental results, potential development directions for an ink-jet printer for the direct metallization of a silicon solar cell are comprehensively discussed.

  14. Deposition in the inner and outer corners of the JET divertor with carbon wall and metallic ITER-like wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beal, J.; Widdowson, A.; Heinola, K.; Baron-Wiechec, A.; Gibson, K. J.; Coad, J. P.; Alves, E.; Lipschultz, B.; Kirschner, A.; Esser, H. G.; Matthews, G. F.; Brezinsek, S.; Contributors, JET

    2016-02-01

    Rotating collectors and quartz microbalances (QMBs) are used in JET to provide time-dependent measurements of erosion and deposition. Rotation of collector discs behind apertures allows recording of the long term evolution of deposition. QMBs measure mass change via the frequency deviations of vibrating quartz crystals. These diagnostics are used to investigate erosion/deposition during JET-C carbon operation and JET-ILW (ITER-like wall) beryllium/tungsten operation. A simple geometrical model utilising experimental data is used to model the time-dependent collector deposition profiles, demonstrating good qualitative agreement with experimental results. Overall, the JET-ILW collector deposition is reduced by an order of magnitude relative to JET-C, with beryllium replacing carbon as the dominant deposit. However, contrary to JET-C, in JET-ILW there is more deposition on the outer collector than the inner. This reversal of deposition asymmetry is investigated using an analysis of QMB data and is attributed to the different chemical properties of carbon and beryllium.

  15. Twin Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Bozak, Rick

    2010-01-01

    Many subsonic and supersonic vehicles in the current fleet have multiple engines mounted near one another. Some future vehicle concepts may use innovative propulsion systems such as distributed propulsion which will result in multiple jets mounted in close proximity. Engine configurations with multiple jets have the ability to exploit jet-by-jet shielding which may significantly reduce noise. Jet-by-jet shielding is the ability of one jet to shield noise that is emitted by another jet. The sensitivity of jet-by-jet shielding to jet spacing and simulated flight stream Mach number are not well understood. The current experiment investigates the impact of jet spacing, jet operating condition, and flight stream Mach number on the noise radiated from subsonic and supersonic twin jets.

  16. Elemental analyses of hypervelocity micro-particle impact sites on interplanetary dust experiment sensor surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Charles G.; Hunter, J. L.; Griffis, D. P.; Misra, V.; Ricks, D. R.; Wortman, Jim J.

    1992-01-01

    The Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) had over 450 electrically active ultra-high purity metal-oxide-silicon impact detectors located on the six primary sides of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Hypervelocity micro-particles that struck the active sensors with enough energy to breakdown the 0.4 to 1.0 micron thick SiO2 insulator layer separating the silicon base (the negative electrode), and the 1000 A thick surface layer of aluminum (the positive electrode) caused electrical discharges that were recorded for the first year of orbit. These discharge features, which include 50 micron diameter areas where the aluminum top layer has been vaporized, facilitate the location of the impacts. The high purity Al-SiO2-Si substrates allow detection of trace (ppm) amounts of hypervelocity impactor residues. After sputtering through a layer of surface contamination, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is used to create two-dimensional elemental ion intensity maps of micro-particle impact sites on the IDE sensors. The element intensities in the central craters of the impacts are corrected for relative ion yields and instrumental conditions and then normalized to silicon. The results are used to classify the particles' origins as 'manmade', 'natural' or 'indeterminate'. The last classification results from the presence of too little impactor residue (a frequent occurrence on leading edge impacts), analytical interference from high background contamination, the lack of information on silicon residue, the limited usefulness of data on aluminum in the central craters, or a combination of these circumstances. Several analytical 'blank' discharges were induced on flight sensors by pressing down on the sensor surface with a pure silicon shard. Analyses of these blank discharges showed that the discharge energy blasts away the layer of surface contamination. Only Si and Al were detected inside the discharge zones, including the central craters, of these features. A

  17. Hypervelocity Launcher for Aerothermodynamic Experiments. Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, Timothy J.; Bauer, David P.

    1995-01-01

    The capability of an Ultra Distributed Energy Store System (UDESS) powered electromagnetic launcher (EM) is experimentally assessed. The UDESS system was developed specifically to address the velocity speed limit seen in plasma armature EM launchers. Metal armature launch packages were also developed and tested to assess the usefulness of the UDESS concept for low velocity applications.

  18. A hypervelocity projectile launcher for well perforation

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, J.N.; Fugelso, L.E.; Lagner, G.C.; Burns, K.L.

    1989-01-01

    Current oil well perforation techniques use low- to medium-velocity gun launchers for completing wells in soft rock. Shaped-charge jets are normally used in harder, more competent rock. A device to create a much higher velocity projectile was designed. This launcher will provide an alternative technique to be used when the conventional devices do not yield the maximum well performance. It is an adaptation of the axial cavity in a high explosive (HE) annulus design, with the axial cavity being filled with a low density foam material. Two configurations were tested; both had an HE annulus filled with organic foam, one had a projectile. Comparison of the two shots was made. A time sequence of Image Intensifier Camera photographs and sequential, orthogonal flash x-ray radiographs provided information on the propagation of the foam fragments, the first shock wave disturbance, the projectile motion and deformation, and the direct shock wave transmission from the main HE charge. DYNA2D calculations were made to assist in the experimental interpretation. 25 refs., 9 figs.

  19. Hypervelocity Impact Performance of Open Cell Foam Core Sandwich Panel Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, S.; Ordonez, E.; Christiansen, E. L.; Lear, D. M.

    2010-01-01

    Open cell metallic foam core sandwich panel structures are of interest for application in spacecraft micrometeoroid and orbital debris shields due to their novel form and advantageous structural and thermal performance. Repeated shocking as a result of secondary impacts upon individual foam ligaments during the penetration process acts to raise the thermal state of impacting projectiles ; resulting in fragmentation, melting, and vaporization at lower velocities than with traditional shielding configurations (e.g. Whipple shield). In order to characterize the protective capability of these structures, an extensive experimental campaign was performed by the Johnson Space Center Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility, the results of which are reported in this paper. Although not capable of competing against the protection levels achievable with leading heavy shields in use on modern high-risk vehicles (i.e. International Space Station modules), metallic foam core sandwich panels are shown to provide a substantial improvement over comparable structural panels and traditional low weight shielding alternatives such as honeycomb sandwich panels and metallic Whipple shields. A ballistic limit equation, generalized in terms of panel geometry, is derived and presented in a form suitable for application in risk assessment codes.

  20. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  1. Status Report for the Hypervelocity Free-Flight Aerodynamic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelison, Charles J.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The Hypervelocity Free-Flight Aerodynamic Facility, located at Ames Research Center, is NASA's only aeroballistic facility. During 1997, its model imaging and time history recording systems were the focus of a major refurbishment effort. Specifically the model detection, spark gap (light source); Kerr cell (high speed shuttering); and interval timer sub-systems were inspected, repaired, modified or replaced as required. These refurbishment efforts have fully restored the HFFAF's capabilities to a much better condition, comparable to what it was 15 years ago. Details of this refurbishment effort along with a brief discussion of future upgrade plans are presented.

  2. Supernovae without host galaxies?. Hypervelocity stars in foreign galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinn, P.-C.; Grunden, P.; Bomans, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Context. Harvesting the SAI supernova catalog, the most complete list of supernovae (SNe) currently available, we search for SNe that apparently do not occur within a distinct host galaxy but lie a great distance (several arcmin) apart from the host galaxy given in the catalog or even show no sign of an identifiable galaxy in their direct vicinity. Aims: We attempt to distinguish between two possible explanations of this host-lessness of a fraction of reported SNe, namely (i) that a host galaxy is too faint (of too low surface brightness) to be detected within the limits of currently available surveys (presumably a low surface brightness galaxy) or (ii) the progenitor of the SN is a hypervelocity star (HVS) that exploded kiloparsecs away from its host galaxy. Methods: We use deep imaging to test the first explanation. If no galaxy is identified within our detection limit of ~27 mag arcsec-2, which is the central surface brightness of the faintest known LSB galaxy so far, we discard this explanation and propose that the SN, after several other checks, had a hypervelocity star progenitor. We focus on observations for which this is the case and give lower limits to the actual space velocities of the progenitors, making them the first hypervelocity stars known in galaxies other than our own Milky Way. Results: Analyzing a selected subsample of five host-less SNe, we find one, SN 2006bx in UGC 5434, is a possible hypervelocity progenitor category with a high probability, exhibiting a projected velocity of ~800 km s-1. SN 1969L in NGC 1058 is most likely an example of a very extended star-forming disk visible only in the far-UV, but not in the optical wavebands. Therefore, this SN is clearly due to in situ star formation. This mechanism may also apply to two other SNe that we investigated (SN 1970L and SN 1997C), but this cannot be determined with certainty. Another SN, SN 2005 nc which is associated with a gamma-ray burst (GRB 050525), is a special case that is not

  3. Hypervelocity impact damage tolerance of fused silica glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, K. S.

    1992-01-01

    A test program was conducted at the NASA/Johnson Space Center (JSC) concerning hypervelocity impact damage in fused silica glass. The objectives of this test program were: to expand the penetration equation data base in the velocity range between 2 and 8 km/s; to determine how much strength remains in a glass pane that has sustained known impact damage; and to develop a relationship between crater measurements and residual strength predictions that can be utilized in the Space Shuttle and Space Station programs. The results and conclusions of the residual strength testing are discussed below. Detailed discussion of the penetration equation studies will follow in future presentations.

  4. Comparative Study of Remote Fiber Laser and Water-Jet Guided Laser Cutting of Thin Metal Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, Klaus; Adelmann, Benedikt; Hellmann, Ralf

    This article presents a comparison between remote laser cutting with a fiber laser and water-jet guided laser cutting using a 532 nm solid state laser. Complex contours are processed in stainless steel and brass sheets (thickness ≤ 100 μm), respectively. Results for achievable quality and productivity as well as possible applications for both systems are shown and discussed. We sustained dross free cuts with almost no heat affected zone and small kerf width for the water-jet guided process, whereas small dross, notable heat affected zone and varying kerf width where observed for remote cutting. However, process times for the water-jet guided process where considerably higher than those for remote cutting.

  5. Modeling of an Implosion Driven Hypervelocity Launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew; Szirti, Daniel; Batchelor, Patrick; Zhang, Fan; Tanguay, Vincent

    2007-06-01

    Modelling work carried out on the implosion driven launcher under concurrent development is presented. The launcher consists of a thin walled metal tube surrounded by explosive which when detonated pinches the tube shut and drives a strong shock into the projectile. The commercial hydrocode LS-DYNA was used to quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate the design parameters of the launcher and their effect on implosion dynamics and performance. These parameters include fill pressure, tube diameter, explosive layer thickness, and explosives tampering. The launcher is primarily modeled using a quasi 2D Arbitrary Langrage Euler formulation. A full 3-D axisymmetric model is also employed. The model is evaluated against experimental data previously collected. Additional developmental work on a second stage launcher taking advantage of a phase velocity between the imploding tube and explosives via the use of angled flyer plates and cones is also carried out.

  6. STARFIRE: Hypervelocity railgun development for high-pressure research

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, R.S.; Susoeff, A.R.; Asay, J.R.; Balk, J.K.; Hall, C.A.; Konrad, C.H.; McDonald, J.M.; Schuler, K.W.; Wellman, G.W.; Hickman, R.J.

    1988-09-20

    STARFIRE, a program based at Sandia National Laboratories, has as its goal the development of a hypervelocity railgun for use as a high-pressure research tool. The program has included efforts to identify and solve the problems that have inhibited reliable attainment of velocities greater than the 8 to 9 km/s attainable with two-stage light-gas guns (2SLGG). Issues studied include: (1) plasma arc formation and stabilization, (2) restrike inhibition, (3) viscous drag, (4) ratio of preload to operating stresses, (5) barrel joint design, and (6) barrel precision requirements. The system uses a 2SLGG as an injector to minimize barrel ablation and armature contamination. Hydrogen is used as the injection gas and will also serve to reduce the probability of forming secondary arcs. A VISAR optical Doppler system is used to continuously and precisely measure the projectile velocity from a standing start in the 2SLGG barrel, through several joints, the HELEOS (Hypervelocity Experimental Launcher for Equation of State) railgun barrel, and post-launch. The STARFIRE program is focused on the combined use of precision diagnostics and new experimental techniques. Results of tests are presented. 24 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Hyper-velocity impact experiments with electrostatic dust accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocker, Anna; Aust, Thomas; Bugiel, Sebastian; Hillier, Jonathan; Hornung, Klaus; Li, Yan-Wei; Strack, Heiko; Ralf, Srama

    2015-06-01

    Hypervelocity impacts (HVI) of micrometer-sized particles play an important role in a variety of fields such as the investigation of matter at extreme pressures and temperatures, shock waves in solid bodies, planetology and cosmic dust. The physical phenomena occurring upon impact are fragmentation and cratering, shock waves, the production of neutral and ionized gas, and light flashes. Advanced analysis techniques promise new insights into short time-scale high-pressure states of matter, requiring the production of high speed projectiles. Electrostatic accelerators act as a source of micrometer and sub-micrometer particles as projectiles for HVI experiments. This paper describes an HVI facility, capable of accelerating particles to over 100 km/s, currently located at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, together with planned improvements. The facility is about to be relocated to the University of Stuttgart. This is an opportunity to enhance the facility to meet the requirements of future experimental campaigns, necessary to better understand the micrometeoroid hypervelocity impact process and develop new in situ dust experiments. We will present the design of the new facility and the planned enhancements, including new diagnostic apparatus.

  8. Axial focusing of energy from a hypervelocity impact on earth

    SciTech Connect

    Boslough, M.B.; Chael, E.P.; Trucano, T.G.; Crawford, D.A.

    1994-12-01

    We have performed computational simulations to determine how energy from a large hypervelocity impact on the Earth`s surface would couple to its interior. Because of the first-order axial symmetry of both the impact energy source and the stress-wave velocity structure of the Earth, a disproportionate amount of energy is dissipated along the axis defined by the impact point and its antipode (point opposite the impact). For a symmetric and homogeneous Earth model, all the impact energy that is radiated as seismic waves into the Earth at a given takeoff angle (ray parameter), independent of azimuthal direction, is refocused (minus attenuation) on the axis of symmetry, regardless of the number of reflections and refractions it has experienced. Material on or near the axis of symmetry experiences more strain cycles with much greater amplitude than elsewhere, and therefore experiences more irreversible heating. The focusing is most intense in the upper mantle, within the asthenosphere, where seismic energy is most effectively converted to heat. For a sufficiently energetic impact, this mechanism might generate enough local heating to create an isostatic instability leading to uplift, possibly resulting in rifting, volcanism, or other rearrangement of the interior dynamics of the planet. These simulations demonstrate how hypervelocity impact energy can be transported to the Earth`s interior, supporting the possibility of a causal link between large impacts on Earth and major internally-driven geophysical processes.

  9. Survival of fossils under extreme shocks induced by hypervelocity impacts.

    PubMed

    Burchell, M J; McDermott, K H; Price, M C; Yolland, L J

    2014-08-28

    Experimental data are shown for survival of fossilized diatoms undergoing shocks in the GPa range. The results were obtained from hypervelocity impact experiments which fired fossilized diatoms frozen in ice into water targets. After the shots, the material recovered from the target water was inspected for diatom fossils. Nine shots were carried out, at speeds from 0.388 to 5.34 km s(-1), corresponding to mean peak pressures of 0.2-19 GPa. In all cases, fragmented fossilized diatoms were recovered, but both the mean and the maximum fragment size decreased with increasing impact speed and hence peak pressure. Examples of intact diatoms were found after the impacts, even in some of the higher speed shots, but their frequency and size decreased significantly at the higher speeds. This is the first demonstration that fossils can survive and be transferred from projectile to target in hypervelocity impacts, implying that it is possible that, as suggested by other authors, terrestrial rocks ejected from the Earth by giant impacts from space, and which then strike the Moon, may successfully transfer terrestrial fossils to the Moon. PMID:25071234

  10. Hypervelocity Impact Testing of Nickel Hydrogen Battery Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frate, David T.; Nahra, Henry K.

    1996-01-01

    Nickel-Hydrogen (Ni/H2) battery cells have been used on several satellites and are planned for use on the International Space Station. In January 1992, the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) conducted hypervelocity impact testing on Ni/H2 cells to characterize their failure modes. The cell's outer construction was a 24 mil-thick Inconel 718 pressure vessel. A sheet of 1.27 cm thick honeycomb was placed in front of the battery cells during testing to simulate the on-orbit box enclosure. Testing was conducted at the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF). The hypervelocity gun used was a 7.6 mm (0.30 caliber) two-stage light gas gun. Test were performed at speeds of 3, 6, and 7 km/sec using aluminum 2017 spherical particles of either 4.8 or 6.4 mm diameter as the projectile. The battery cells were electrically charged to about 75 percent of capacity, then back-filled with hydrogen gas to 900 psi simulating the full charge condition. High speed film at 10,000 frames/sec was taken of the impacts. Impacts in the dome area (top) and the electrode area (middle) of the battery cells were investigated. Five tests on battery cells were performed. The results revealed that in all of the test conditions investigated, the battery cells simply vented their hydrogen gas and some electrolyte, but did not burst or generate any large debris fragments.

  11. Survival of fossils under extreme shocks induced by hypervelocity impacts

    PubMed Central

    Burchell, M. J.; McDermott, K. H.; Price, M. C.; Yolland, L. J.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental data are shown for survival of fossilized diatoms undergoing shocks in the GPa range. The results were obtained from hypervelocity impact experiments which fired fossilized diatoms frozen in ice into water targets. After the shots, the material recovered from the target water was inspected for diatom fossils. Nine shots were carried out, at speeds from 0.388 to 5.34 km s−1, corresponding to mean peak pressures of 0.2–19 GPa. In all cases, fragmented fossilized diatoms were recovered, but both the mean and the maximum fragment size decreased with increasing impact speed and hence peak pressure. Examples of intact diatoms were found after the impacts, even in some of the higher speed shots, but their frequency and size decreased significantly at the higher speeds. This is the first demonstration that fossils can survive and be transferred from projectile to target in hypervelocity impacts, implying that it is possible that, as suggested by other authors, terrestrial rocks ejected from the Earth by giant impacts from space, and which then strike the Moon, may successfully transfer terrestrial fossils to the Moon. PMID:25071234

  12. An Imaging System for Satellite Hypervelocity Impact Debris Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moraguez, Matthew; Patankar, Kunal; Fitz-Coy, Norman; Liou, J.-C.; Cowardin, Heather

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the design of an automated imaging system for size characterization of debris produced by the DebriSat hypervelocity impact test. The goal of the DebriSat project is to update satellite breakup models. A representative LEO satellite, DebriSat, was constructed and subjected to a hypervelocity impact test. The impact produced an estimated 85,000 debris fragments. The size distribution of these fragments is required to update the current satellite breakup models. An automated imaging system was developed for the size characterization of the debris fragments. The system uses images taken from various azimuth and elevation angles around the object to produce a 3D representation of the fragment via a space carving algorithm. The system consists of N point-and-shoot cameras attached to a rigid support structure that defines the elevation angle for each camera. The debris fragment is placed on a turntable that is incrementally rotated to desired azimuth angles. The number of images acquired can be varied based on the desired resolution. Appropriate background and lighting is used for ease of object detection. The system calibration and image acquisition process are automated to result in push-button operations. However, for quality assurance reasons, the system is semi-autonomous by design to ensure operator involvement. This paper describes the imaging system setup, calibration procedure, repeatability analysis, and the results of the debris characterization.

  13. Optimum structure of Whipple shield against hypervelocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M.

    2014-05-01

    Hypervelocity impact of a spherical aluminum projectile onto two spaced aluminum plates (Whipple shield) was simulated to estimate an optimum structure. The Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) code which has a unique migration scheme from a rectangular coordinate to an axisymmetic coordinate was used. The ratio of the front plate thickness to sphere diameter varied from 0.06 to 0.48. The impact velocities considered here were 6.7 km/s. This is the procedure we explored. To guarantee the early stage simulation, the shapes of debris clouds were first compared with the previous experimental pictures, indicating a good agreement. Next, the debris cloud expansion angle was predicted and it shows a maximum value of 23 degree for thickness ratio of front bumper to sphere diameter of 0.23. A critical sphere diameter causing failure of rear wall was also examined while keeping the total thickness of two plates constant. There exists an optimum thickness ratio of front bumper to rear wall, which is identified as a function of the size combination of the impacting body, front and rear plates. The debris cloud expansion-correlated-optimum thickness ratio study provides a good insight on the hypervelocity impact onto spaced target system.

  14. Survivability of bacteria ejected from icy surfaces after hypervelocity impact.

    PubMed

    Burchell, Mark J; Galloway, James A; Bunch, Alan W; Brandão, Pedro F B

    2003-02-01

    Both the Saturnian and Jovian systems contain satellites with icy surfaces. If life exists on any of these icy bodies (in putative subsurface oceans for example) then the possibility exists for transfer of life from icy body to icy body. This is an application of the idea of Panspermia, wherein life migrates naturally through space. A possible mechanism would be that life, here taken as bacteria, could become frozen in the icy surface of one body. If a high-speed impact occurred on that surface, ejecta containing the bacteria could be thrown into space. It could then migrate around the local region of space until it arrived at a second icy body in another high-speed impact. In this paper we consider some of the necessary steps for such a process to occur, concentrating on the ejection of ice bearing bacteria in the initial impact, and on what happens when bacteria laden projectiles hit an icy surface. Laboratory experiments using high-speed impacts with a light gas gun show that obtaining icy ejecta with viable bacterial loads is straightforward. In addition to demonstrating the viability of the bacteria carried on the ejecta, we have also measured the angular and size distribution of the ejecta produced in hypervelocity impacts on ice. We have however been unsuccessful at transferring viable bacteria to icy surfaces from bacteria laden projectiles impacting at hypervelocities. PMID:12967273

  15. Ejecta from Hypervelocity Dust Impacts Based on Light Flash Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Keith; Sternovsky, Z.; Horányi, M.; Kempf, S.; Srama, R.

    2013-10-01

    Ejecta from hypervelocity dust impacts have been shown to depend on the impinging particles’ velocity, mass, composition, etc. (J. Friichtenicht 1965, G. Eichhorn 1976). Ejecta is thought to be responsible for developing rings and dusty atmospheres of moons throughout the solar system. In order for rings to be produced, dust velocities must be greater than the moon’s escape speed. To understand the dust impact yield; impact ejecta parameters (velocities, masses, angular distributions) must be well understood. Laboratory experiments provide direct information about the ejecta production rates and impactor fluxes. Using hypervelocity (1-60km/s) iron dust at the University of Colorado dust accelerator in Boulder, Colorado we measured the time characteristics and intensities of light flashes produced on a quartz disc from primary and secondary impacts. The flashes were measured with a photomultiplier tube at varying distances and angles. By analyzing the light flashes produced by such impacts we show that this method is a viable technique for measuring these parameters. These measurements provide detailed information about the secondary mass and velocity profiles, leading to insights into the formation of dusty rings and atmospheres.

  16. Hypervelocity Impact (HVI). Volume 5; WLE High Fidelity Specimen Fg(RCC)-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorman, Michael R.; Ziola, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    During 2003 and 2004, the Johnson Space Center's White Sands Testing Facility in Las Cruces, New Mexico conducted hypervelocity impact tests on the space shuttle wing leading edge. Hypervelocity impact tests were conducted to determine if Micro-Meteoroid/Orbital Debris impacts could be reliably detected and located using simple passive ultrasonic methods. The objective of Target Fg(RCC)-1 was to study hypervelocity impacts through the reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) panels of the Wing Leading Edge. Fiberglass was used in place of RCC in the initial tests. Impact damage was detected using lightweight, low power instrumentation capable of being used in flight.

  17. Hypervelocity Impact (HVI). Volume 3; WLE Small-Scale Fiberglass Panel Flat Target C-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorman, Michael R.; Ziola, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    During 2003 and 2004, the Johnson Space Center's White Sands Testing Facility in Las Cruces, New Mexico conducted hypervelocity impact tests on the space shuttle wing leading edge. Hypervelocity impact tests were conducted to determine if Micro-Meteoroid/Orbital Debris impacts could be reliably detected and located using simple passive ultrasonic methods. The objective of Target C-1 was to study hypervelocity impacts on the reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) panels of the Wing Leading Edge. Fiberglass was used in place of RCC in the initial tests. Impact damage was detected using lightweight, low power instrumentation capable of being used in flight.

  18. Hypervelocity Impact (HVI). Volume 7; WLE High Fidelity Specimen RCC16R

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorman, Michael R.; Ziola, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    During 2003 and 2004, the Johnson Space Center's White Sands Testing Facility in Las Cruces, New Mexico conducted hypervelocity impact tests on the space shuttle wing leading edge. Hypervelocity impact tests were conducted to determine if Micro-Meteoroid/Orbital Debris impacts could be reliably detected and located using simple passive ultrasonic methods. The objective of Target RCC16R was to study hypervelocity impacts through the reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) panels of the Wing Leading Edge. Impact damage was detected using lightweight, low power instrumentation capable of being used in flight.

  19. Hypervelocity Impact (HVI). Volume 6; WLE High Fidelity Specimen Fg(RCC)-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorman, Michael R.; Ziola, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    During 2003 and 2004, the Johnson Space Center's White Sands Testing Facility in Las Cruces, New Mexico conducted hypervelocity impact tests on the space shuttle wing leading edge. Hypervelocity impact tests were conducted to determine if Micro-Meteoroid/Orbital Debris impacts could be reliably detected and located using simple passive ultrasonic methods. The objective of Target Fg(RCC)-2 was to study hypervelocity impacts through the reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) panels of the Wing Leading Edge. Fiberglass was used in place of RCC in the initial tests. Impact damage was detected using lightweight, low power instrumentation capable of being used in flight.

  20. A Plasma Drag Hypervelocity Particle Accelerator (HYPER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Best, Steve R.; Rose, M. Frank

    1998-01-01

    Current debris models are able to predict the growth of the space debris problem and suggest that spacecraft must employ armor or bumper shields for some orbital altitudes now and that the problem will become worse as a function of time. The practical upper limit to the velocity distribution is on the order of 40 km/s and is associated with the natural environment. The velocity distribution of the man-made component peaks at 9-10 km/s with maximum velocity in the 14-16 km/s range. Experience in space has verified that the "high probability of impact" particles are in the microgram to milligram range. These particles can have very significant effects on coatings, insulators, and thin metallic layers. The surface of thick materials becomes pitted and the local debris component is enhanced by ejecta from the impact events. In this paper, the HYPER facility is described which produces a reasonable simulation of the man-made space debris spectrum in a controlled environment. The facility capability is discussed in terms of drive geometry, energetics, velocity distribution, diagnostics, and projectile/debris loading. The facility has been used to study impact phenomena on Space Station Freedom's solar array structure, the calibration of space debris collectors, other solar array materials, potential structural materials for use in space, electrical breakdown in the space environment, and as a means of clarifying or duplicating the impact phenomena on surfaces which have been exposed in space.

  1. Hypervelocity Impact Performance of Open Cell Foam Core Sandwich Panel Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Shannon; Christiansen, Eric; Lear, Dana

    2009-01-01

    Metallic foams are a relatively new class of materials with low density and novel physical, mechanical, thermal, electrical and acoustic properties. Although incompletely characterized, they offer comparable mechanical performance to traditional spacecraft structural materials (i.e. honeycomb sandwich panels) without detrimental through-thickness channeling cells. There are two competing types of metallic foams: open cell and closed cell. Open cell foams are considered the more promising technology due to their lower weight and higher degree of homogeneity. Leading micrometeoroid and orbital debris shields (MMOD) incorporate thin plates separated by a void space (i.e. Whipple shield). Inclusion of intermediate fabric layers, or multiple bumper plates have led to significant performance enhancements, yet these shields require additional non-ballistic mass for installation (fasteners, supports, etc.) that can consume up to 35% of the total shield weight [1]. Structural panels, such as open cell foam core sandwich panels, that are also capable of providing sufficient MMOD protection, represent a significant potential for increased efficiency in hypervelocity impact shielding from a systems perspective through a reduction in required non-ballistic mass. In this paper, the results of an extensive impact test program on aluminum foam core sandwich panels are reported. The effect of pore density, and core thickness on shielding performance have been evaluated over impact velocities ranging from 2.2 - 9.3 km/s at various angles. A number of additional tests on alternate sandwich panel configurations of comparable-weight have also been performed, including aluminum honeycomb sandwich panels (see Figure 1), Nomex honeycomb core sandwich panels, and 3D aluminum honeycomb sandwich panels. A total of 70 hypervelocity impact tests are reported, from which an empirical ballistic limit equation (BLE) has been derived. The BLE is in the standard form suitable for implementation in

  2. Hypervelocity impact effects on solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, M. Frank

    1992-01-01

    One of the space hazards of concern is the problem of natural matter and space debris impacting spacecraft. In addition to mechanical damage, impact velocities greater than 5 km/sec can produce shock induced ionization effects with resultant surface charging and complex chemical interactions. The upper limit of the velocity distribution for these particles is on the order of 70 km/sec. The second source of particulate matter is due to the presence of man and the machinery needed to place satellites in orbit. This 'man made' component of the space debris consists of waste, rocket exhaust, and debris caused by satellite break-up. Most of the particles are small. However as the size increases, debris purposefully thrown overboard such as garbage and human waste, combined with paint chips, plastic, wire fragments, bolts, etc., become formidable hazards which completely dominate the distribution function for some orbits. These larger fragments can produce penetration and spalling of the thick metallic structures associated with spacecraft. The particles most often encountered are aluminum oxide, associated with fuel residue, and paint chips. These debris types can have a wide range of particle sizes. It has been stated that the design of spacecraft will have to take the debris evolution into account and provide additional suitable armor for key components in the near future. The purpose of this work was to subject samples from solar power arrays, one of the key components of any spacecraft, to a debris flux typical of what might be found in space, and measure the degradation of the power panels after impact.

  3. Hypervelocity Impact Testing of International Space Station Meteoroid/Orbital Debris Shielding Using an Inhibited Shaped Charge Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, Justin H.; Grosch, Donald

    2001-01-01

    Engineers at the NASA Johnson Space Center have conducted hypervelocity impact (HVI) performance evaluations of spacecraft meteoroid and orbital debris (M/OD) shields at velocities in excess of 7 km/s. The inhibited shaped charge launcher (ISCL), developed by the Southwest Research Institute, launches hollow, circular, cylindrical jet tips to approximately 11 km/s. Since traditional M/OD shield ballistic limit performance is defined as the diameter of sphere required to just perforate or spall a spacecraft pressure wall, engineers must decide how to compare ISCL derived data with those of the spherical impactor data set. Knowing the mass of the ISCL impactor, an equivalent sphere diameter may be calculated. This approach is conservative since ISCL jet tips are more damaging than equal mass spheres. A total of 12 tests were recently conducted at the Southwest Research Institute (SWRI) on International Space Station M/OD shields. Results of these tests are presented and compared to existing ballistic limit equations. Modification of these equations is suggested based on the results.

  4. Physics of debris clouds from hypervelocity impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zee, Ralph

    1993-01-01

    The protection scheme developed for long duration space platforms relies primarily upon placing thin metal plates or 'bumpers' around flight critical components. The effectiveness of this system is highly dependent upon its ability to break up and redistribute the momentum of any particle which might otherwise strike the outer surface of the spacecraft. Therefore it is of critical importance to design the bumpers such that maximum dispersion of momentum is achieved. This report is devoted to an in-depth study into the design and development of a laboratory instrument which would permit the in-situ monitoring of the momentum distribution as the impact event occurs. A series of four designs were developed, constructed and tested culminating with the working instrument which is currently in use. Each design was individually tested using the Space Environmental Effects Facility (SEEF) at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Along with the development of the device, an experimental procedure was developed to assist in the investigation of various bumper materials and designs at the SEEF. Preliminary results were used to compute data which otherwise were not experimentally obtainable. These results were shown to be in relative agreement with previously obtained values derived through other methods. The results of this investigation indicated that momentum distribution could in fact be measured in-situ as the impact event occurred thus giving a more accurate determination of the effects of experimental parameters on the momentum spread. Data produced by the instrument indicated a Gaussian-type momentum distribution. A second apparatus was developed and it was placed before the shield in the line of travel utilized a plate to collect impact debris scattered backwards. This plate had a passage hole in the center to allow the particle to travel through it and impact the proposed shield material. Applying the law of conservation of angular momentum a

  5. Characterization of Orbital Debris via Hyper-Velocity Ground-Based Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowardin, Heather

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the DebriSat project is to replicate a hyper-velocity fragmentation event using modern-day spacecraft materials and construction techniques to better improve the existing DoDand NASA breakup models.

  6. MEMIN Project: The Search for Suitable Projectile Material in Meso-Scale Hypervelocity Cratering Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domke, I.; Deutsch, A.; Hecht, L.; Kenkmann, T.

    2010-03-01

    We report textural and geochemical data (EMP, LA-ICP-MS) for different types of steel and the iron meteorites Arispe (IC) and Campo del Cielo (IAB) that are evaluated as projectile materials in hypervelocity cratering experiments .

  7. MEMIN: Chemical Modification of Projectile Spheres, Target Melts and Shocked Quartz in Hypervelocity Impact Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, M.; Hecht, L.; Deutsch, A.; Kenkmann, T.

    2011-03-01

    We present results of hypervelocity cratering experiments using iron meteorite as projectile and a sandstone target. The ejecta show shock features (melting, PDFs, lechatelierite) and physical as well as chemical mixing between projectile and target.

  8. Real-Time Observation of Early Stage Damage During Hypervelocity Impacts into Basalt Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimberley, J.; Ramesh, K. T.

    2012-03-01

    Hypervelocity impacts were conducted on basalt targets bonded to glass allowing for the early stages of damage accumulation to be observed in real time. Results show that significant damage accumulates before the arrival of tensile wave reflections.

  9. Ink jet printing of silver metallization for photovoltaics. Quarterly technical report, October 1, 1984-December 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Vest, R.W.

    1985-01-25

    During this quarter, significant progess was made in the continuing development of the ink jet printing system for thick film circuits. The unit being used in this research is a prototype ink jet printer developed on a contract with the Naval Avionics Center. One of the first tasks completed early in the quarter was the complete documentation of this ink jet printing system as it existed. It was determined that this was an essential step in deciding what modifications were needed to the system and how these modifications would be implemented. After this initial step was completed, design modification studies were started for electronic, mechanical, and programming aspects of the system. These studies were completed at the end of the second month. The areas needing improvement were discussed and applicable changes decided upon. Some of these improvements were completed during this quarter and others have only been started. It should be noted that, although the general areas needing improvement have been identified and some changes decided upon, the exact details of how other changes will be implemented have not yet been decided. During the next months, these details will be discussed further and the modifications put in place accordingly.

  10. Elemental analyses of hypervelocity microparticle impact sites on Interplanetary Dust Experiment sensor surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Charles G.; Hunter, J. L.; Griffis, D. P.; Misra, V.; Ricks, D. A.; Wortman, Jim J.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1993-01-01

    The Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) had over 450 electrically active ultra-high purity metal-oxide-silicon impact detectors located on the six primary sides of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Hypervelocity microparticles (approximately 0.2 to approximately 100 micron diameter) that struck the active sensors with enough energy to break down the 0.4 or 1.0 micron thick SIO2 insulator layer separating the silicon base (the negative electrode), and the 1000 A thick surface layer of aluminum (the positive electrode) caused electrical discharges that were recorded for the first year of orbit. The high purity Al-SiO2-Si substrates allowed detection of trace (ppm) amounts of hypervelocity impactor residues. After sputtering through a layer of surface contamination, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used to create two-dimensional elemental ion intensity maps of microparticle impact sites on the IDE sensors. The element intensities in the central craters of the impacts were corrected for relative ion yields and instrumental conditions and then normalized to silicon. The results were used to classify the particles' origins as 'manmade,' 'natural,' or 'indeterminate.' The last classification resulted from the presence of too little impactor residue, analytical interference from high background contamination, the lack of information on silicon and aluminum residues, or a combination of these circumstances. Several analytical 'blank' discharges were induced on flight sensors by pressing down on the sensor surface with a pure silicon shard. Analyses of these blank discharges showed that the discharge energy blasts away the layer of surface contamination. Only Si and Al were detected inside the discharge zones, including the central craters of these features. Thus far a total of 79 randomly selected microparticle impact sites from the six primary sides of the LDEF have been analyzed: 36 from tray C-9 (Leading (ram), or East, side), 18 from tray C-3

  11. Elemental Analyses of Hypervelocity Microparticle Impact Sites on Interplanetary Dust Experiment Sensor Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, C. G.; Hunter, J. L.; Griffis, D. P.; Misra, V.; Ricks, D. A.; Wortman, J. J.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    The Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) had over 450 electrically active ultra-high purity metal-oxide-silicon impact detectors located on the six primary sides of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Hypervelocity microparticles (approximately 0.2 to approximately 100 micron diameter) that struck the active sensors with enough energy to breakdown the 0.4 or 1.0 micron thick SiO2 insulator layer separating the silicon base (the negative electrode), and the 1000 A thick surface layer of aluminum (the positive electrode) caused electrical discharges that were recorded for the first year of orbit. The high purity Al-SiO2-Si substrates allowed detection of trace (ppm) amounts of hypervelocity impactor residues. After sputtering through a layer of surface contamination, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used to create two-dimensional elemental ion intensity maps of microparticle sites on the IDE sensors. The element intensities in the central craters of the impacts were corrected for relative ion yields and instrumental conditions and then normalized to silicon. The results classification resulted from the particles' origins as 'manmade', 'natural', or 'indeterminate'. The last classification resulted from the presence of too little impactor residue, analytical interference from high background contamination, the lack of information on silicon and aluminum residues, or a combination of these circumstances. Several analytical 'blank' discharges were induced on flight sensors by pressing down on the sensor surface with a pure silicon shard. Analyses of these blank discharges showed that the discharge energy blasts away the layer of surface contamination. Only Si and Al were detected inside the discharge zones, including the central craters, of these features. Thus far, a total of 79 randomly selected microparticle impact sites from the six primary sides of the LDEF were analyzed: 36 from tray C-9 (Leading (ram), or east, side), 18 from tray C-3 (Trailing

  12. Numerical Simulation of Interaction of Hypervelocity Particle Stream with a Target

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, I; Liu, B; Georgevich, V; Antoun, T

    2007-07-31

    We present results of direct numerical simulations of impact of hypervelocity particle stream with a target. The stream of interest consists of submillimeter (30-300 micron) brittle ceramic particles. Current supercomputer capabilities make it possible to simulate a realistic size of streams (up to 20 mm in diameter and 500 mm in length) while resolving each particle individually. Such simulations make possible to study the damage of the target from synergistic effects of individual impacts. In our research we fixed the velocity distribution along the axis of the stream (1-4 km/s) and volume fraction of the solid material (1-10%) and study effects of particle size variation, particle and target material properties and surrounding air properties. We ran 3D calibration simulations with up to 10 million individual particles and conducted sensitivity studies with 2D cylindrically symmetric simulations. We used an Eulerian Godunov hydrocode with adaptive mesh refinement. The particles, target material and air are represented with volume-of-fluid approach. Brittle particle and target material has been simulated with pressure-dependent yield strength and Steinberg model has been used for metal targets. Simulations demonstrated penetration depth and a hole diameter similar to experimental observations and can explain the influence of parameters of the stream on the character of the penetration.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Interaction of Hypervelocity Particle Stream with a Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomov, Ilya; Liu, Benjamin; Georgevich, Vlad; Antoun, Tarabay

    2007-12-01

    We present results of direct numerical simulations of impact of hypervelocity particle stream with a target. The stream of interest consists of submillimeter (30-300 micron) brittle ceramic particles. Current supercomputer capabilities make it possible to simulate a realistic size of streams (up to 20 mm in diameter and 500 mm in length) while resolving each particle individually. Such simulations make possible to study the damage of the target from synergistic effects of individual impacts. In our research we fixed the velocity distribution along the axis of the stream (1-4 km/s) and volume fraction of the solid material (1-10%) and study effects of particle size variation, particle and target material properties and surrounding air properties. We ran 3D calibration simulations with up to 10 million individual particles and conducted sensitivity studies with 2D cylindrically symmetric simulations. We used an Eulerian Godunov hydrocode with adaptive mesh refinement. The particles, target material and air are represented with volume-of-fluid approach. Brittle particle and target material has been simulated with pressure-dependent yield strength and Steinberg model has been used for metal targets. Simulations demonstrated penetration depth and a hole diameter similar to experimental observations and can explain the influence of parameters of the stream on the character of the penetration.

  14. Numerical simulation of interaction of hypervelocity particle stream with a target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomov, Ilya; Liu, Benjamin; Georgevich, Vlad; Antoun, Tarabay

    2007-06-01

    We present results of direct numerical simulations of impact of hypervelocity particle stream with a target. The stream of interest consists of submillimeter (30-300 micron) brittle ceramic particles. Current supercomputer capabilities make it possible to simulate a realistic size of streams (up to 20 mm in diameter and 500 mm in length) while resolving each particle individually. Such simulations make possible to study the damage of the target from synergistic effects of individual impacts. In our research we fixed the velocity distribution along the axis of the stream (1-4 km/s) and volume fraction of the solid material (1-10%) and study effects of particle size variation, particle and target material properties and surrounding air properties. We ran 3D calibration simulations with up to 10 million individual particles and conducted sensitivity studies with 2D cylindrically symmetric simulations. We used an Eulerian Godunov hydrocode with adaptive mesh refinement. The particles, target material and air are represented with volume-of-fluid approach. Brittle particle and target material has been simulated with pressure-dependent yield strength and Steinberg model has been used for metal targets. Simulations demonstrated penetration depth and a hole diameter similar to experimental observations and can explain the influence of parameters of the stream on the character of the penetration.

  15. Study of hypervelocity meteoroid impact on orbital space stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimbach, K. R.; Prozan, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Structural damage resulting in hypervelocity impact of a meteorite on a spacecraft is discussed. Of particular interest is the backside spallation caused by such a collision. To treat this phenomenon two numerical schemes were developed in the course of this study to compute the elastic-plastic flow fracture of a solid. The numerical schemes are a five-point finite difference scheme and a four-node finite element scheme. The four-node finite element scheme proved to be less sensitive to the type of boundary conditions and loadings. Although further development work is needed to improve the program versatility (generalization of the network topology, secondary storage for large systems, improving of the coding to reduce the run time, etc.), the basic framework is provided for a utilitarian computer program which may be used in a wide variety of situations. Analytic results showing the program output are given for several test cases.

  16. Design of orbital debris shields for oblique hypervelocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    1994-02-01

    A new impact debris propagation code was written to link CTH simulations of space debris shield perforation to the Lagrangian finite element code DYNA3D, for space structure wall impact simulations. This software (DC3D) simulates debris cloud evolution using a nonlinear elastic-plastic deformable particle dynamics model, and renders computationally tractable the supercomputer simulation of oblique impacts on Whipple shield protected structures. Comparison of three dimensional, oblique impact simulations with experimental data shows good agreement over a range of velocities of interest in the design of orbital debris shielding. Source code developed during this research is provided on the enclosed floppy disk. An abstract based on the work described was submitted to the 1994 Hypervelocity Impact Symposium.

  17. Structural Damage Prediction and Analysis for Hypervelocity Impacts: Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elfer, N. C.

    1996-01-01

    This handbook reviews the analysis of structural damage on spacecraft due to hypervelocity impacts by meteoroid and space debris. These impacts can potentially cause structural damage to a Space Station module wall. This damage ranges from craters, bulges, minor penetrations, and spall to critical damage associated with a large hole, or even rupture. The analysis of damage depends on a variety of assumptions and the area of most concern is at a velocity beyond well controlled laboratory capability. In the analysis of critical damage, one of the key questions is how much momentum can actually be transfered to the pressure vessel wall. When penetration occurs without maximum bulging at high velocity and obliquities (if less momentum is deposited in the rear wall), then large tears and rupture may be avoided. In analysis of rupture effects of cylindrical geometry, biaxial loading, bending of the crack, a central hole strain rate and R-curve effects are discussed.

  18. Theoretical model for plasma expansion generated by hypervelocity impact

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Qingming Zhang, Dongjiang; Long, Renrong; Chen, Li; Huang, Fenglei; Gong, Zizheng

    2014-09-15

    The hypervelocity impact experiments of spherical LY12 aluminum projectile diameter of 6.4 mm on LY12 aluminum target thickness of 23 mm have been conducted using a two-stage light gas gun. The impact velocity of the projectile is 5.2, 5.7, and 6.3 km/s, respectively. The experimental results show that the plasma phase transition appears under the current experiment conditions, and the plasma expansion consists of accumulation, equilibrium, and attenuation. The plasma characteristic parameters decrease as the plasma expands outward and are proportional with the third power of the impact velocity, i.e., (T{sub e}, n{sub e}) ∝ v{sub p}{sup 3}. Based on the experimental results, a theoretical model on the plasma expansion is developed and the theoretical results are consistent with the experimental data.

  19. Thermodynamics analysis of aluminum plasma transition induced by hypervelocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhixiang; Zhang, Qingming; Ju, Yuanyuan

    2016-02-01

    The production of plasmas during hypervelocity meteoroid and space debris impact has been proposed to explain the presence of paleomagnetic fields on the lunar surface, and also the electromagnetic damage to spacecraft electronic devices. Based on Gibbs' ensemble theory, we deduce Saha equation of state and figure out the ionization degree; further, by using the derivation of Clausius-Clapeyron equation, we obtain the entropy increase and latent heat of plasma transition after vaporization; finally, we analyze the conversion efficiency of kinetic energy into internal energy, present two key contradictions, and revise them with the entropy increase, latent heat, and conversion efficiency. We analyze the aluminum plasma transition from multiple perspectives of the equation of state, latent heat of phase transition, and conversion efficiency and propose the internal energy and impact velocity criterion, based on the laws of thermodynamics.

  20. Plasmadynamic hypervelocity dust injector for the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ticoş, Cǎtǎlin M.; Wang, Zhehui; Dorf, Leonid A.; Wurden, Glen A.

    2006-10-01

    The design and construction of a plasmadynamic device to accelerate dust to hypervelocities is presented. High speed dust will be used to measure magnetic field lines in the National Spherical Torus Experiment. The plasma gun produces a high density (ne≈1018cm-3) and low temperature (a few eV) deuterium plasma, ejected by J ×B forces which provide drag on the dust particles in its path. The dust will be entrained by the plasma to velocities of 1-30km/s, depending on the dust mass. Carbon dust particles will be used, with diameters from 1to50μm. The key components of the plasmadynamic accelerator are a coaxial plasma gun operated at 10kV (with an estimated discharge current of 200kA), a dust dispenser activated by a piezoelectric transducer, and power and remote-control systems.

  1. Time-resolved temperature measurements in hypervelocity dust impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collette, A.; Drake, K.; Mocker, A.; Sternovsky, Z.; Munsat, T.; Horanyi, M.

    2013-12-01

    We present time-resolved temperature measurements of the debris cloud generated by hypervelocity dust impact. Micron- and submicron-sized iron grains were accelerated to speeds of 1-32 km/s using the 3 MV electrostatic dust accelerator at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies, and impacted on a tungsten target. The resulting light flashes were analyzed by an array of photomultiplier tubes equipped with narrowband interference filters to determine the blackbody temperature and radiant power of the impact-generated cloud as a function of time. We find time-averaged temperatures in the range of 2500-5000 K, increasing with velocity over the range studied; initial temperatures up to approximately twice the time averaged temperature persisting on short timescales (<1μs) compared to the 20μs duration of the flash; and that the temperature falls in a manner consistent with radiative cooling.

  2. Design of orbital debris shields for oblique hypervelocity impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    1994-01-01

    A new impact debris propagation code was written to link CTH simulations of space debris shield perforation to the Lagrangian finite element code DYNA3D, for space structure wall impact simulations. This software (DC3D) simulates debris cloud evolution using a nonlinear elastic-plastic deformable particle dynamics model, and renders computationally tractable the supercomputer simulation of oblique impacts on Whipple shield protected structures. Comparison of three dimensional, oblique impact simulations with experimental data shows good agreement over a range of velocities of interest in the design of orbital debris shielding. Source code developed during this research is provided on the enclosed floppy disk. An abstract based on the work described was submitted to the 1994 Hypervelocity Impact Symposium.

  3. Multi-Dimensional Hydrocode Analyses of Penetrating Hypervelocity Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessette, G. C.; Lawrence, R. J.; Chhabildas, L. C.; Reinhart, W. D.; Thornhill, T. F.; Saul, W. V.

    2004-07-01

    The Eulerian hydrocode, CTH, has been used to study the interaction of hypervelocity flyer plates with thin targets at velocities from 6 to 11 km/s. These penetrating impacts produce debris clouds that are subsequently allowed to stagnate against downstream witness plates. Velocity histories from this latter plate are used to infer the evolution and propagation of the debris cloud. This analysis, which is a companion to a parallel experimental effort, examined both numerical and physics-based issues. We conclude that numerical resolution and convergence are important in ways we had not anticipated. The calculated release from the extreme states generated by the initial impact shows discrepancies with related experimental observations, and indicates that even for well-known materials (e.g., aluminum), high-temperature failure criteria are not well understood, and that non-equilibrium or rate-dependent equations of state may be influencing the results.

  4. Multi-dimensional hydrocode analyses of penetrating hypervelocity impacts.

    SciTech Connect

    Saul, W. Venner; Reinhart, William Dodd; Thornhill, Tom Finley, III; Lawrence, Raymond Jeffery Jr.; Chhabildas, Lalit Chandra; Bessette, Gregory Carl

    2003-08-01

    The Eulerian hydrocode, CTH, has been used to study the interaction of hypervelocity flyer plates with thin targets at velocities from 6 to 11 km/s. These penetrating impacts produce debris clouds that are subsequently allowed to stagnate against downstream witness plates. Velocity histories from this latter plate are used to infer the evolution and propagation of the debris cloud. This analysis, which is a companion to a parallel experimental effort, examined both numerical and physics-based issues. We conclude that numerical resolution and convergence are important in ways we had not anticipated. The calculated release from the extreme states generated by the initial impact shows discrepancies with related experimental observations, and indicates that even for well-known materials (e.g., aluminum), high-temperature failure criteria are not well understood, and that non-equilibrium or rate-dependent equations of state may be influencing the results.

  5. Effects of oblique impact on hypervelocity shield performance

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, E.D.; Hendrich, W.R.; Thomas, D.G.; Smith, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    As part of the Advanced Shield Phenomenology Program, conducted from 1987 to 1989, a study of the effects of oblique impact on hypervelocity shield damage was performed. The specific threat used was an aluminum cylinder with a mass of 1.75 grams and a length to diameter ratio of one. Incidence angles of 30{degree}, 60{degree}, and 90{degree} were studied. The same layered shield assembly was tested at the different incidence angles. Testing was performed at the Arnold Engineering Development Center, Arnold Air Force Base, Tullahoma, Tennessee. Hydrocode analysis of the interaction of the projectile with the front plate was performed for each of the different incidence angles. 10 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. X-ray grating interferometry for 9.25 keV design energy at a liquid-metal-jet source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balles, A.; Fella, Ch.; Dittmann, J.; Wiest, W.; Zabler, S.; Hanke, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a grating interferometer setup with a liquid-metal-jet source and a high resolution detector. It will be shown that this source is suitable for interferometer setups as it delivers a sufficient spatial coherence that makes a source grating unnecessary. This is confirmed twice by the results of an interferometer setup and a single grating setup, respectively. Both show comparable information on the samples. Furthermore, it was possible to measure the Talbot effect due to the self-built high resolution detector with an effective pixel size of 0.67 µm and due to the coherence of the source, thanks to a small spot size of a few microns. The information on the absorption of a nylon fiber is observed to include inline phase contrast effects. The dark-field signal of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) is not quite well understood because of its inhomogeneity.

  7. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis of hypervelocity microparticle impact sites on LDEF surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, C. G.; Buonaquisti, A. J.; Batchelor, D. A.; Hunter, J. L.; Griffis, D. P.; Misra, V.; Ricks, D. R.; Wortman, J. J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Best, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    Two dimensional elemental ion maps have been recorded for hundreds of microparticle impact sites and contamination features on LDEF surfaces. Since the majority of the analyzed surfaces were metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) impact detectors from the Interplanetary Dust Experiment, a series of 'standard' and 'blank' analyses of these surfaces are included. Hypervelocity impacts of forsterite olivine microparticles on activated flight sensors served as standards while stylus and pulsed laser simulated 'impacts' served as analytical blanks. Results showed that despite serious contamination issues, impactor residues can be identified in greater than 1/3 of the impact sites. While aluminum oxide particles could not be detected on aluminum surfaces, they were detected on germanium surfaces from row 12. Remnants of manmade debris impactors consisting of paint chips and bits of metal were identified on surfaces from LDEF Rows 3 (west or trailing side), 6 (south), 9 (ram or leading side), 12 (north) and the space end. Higher than expected ratios of manmade microparticle impacts to total microparticle impacts were found on the space end and the trailing side. These results were consistent with time-tagged and time-segregated microparticle impact data from the IDE and other LDEF experiments. A myriad of contamination interferences were identified and their effects on impactor debris identification mitigated during the course of this study. These interferences include pre-, post and inflight deposited surface contaminants as well as indigenous heterogeneous material contaminants. Non-flight contaminations traced to human origins, including spittle and skin oils, contributed significant levels of alkali-rich carbonaceous interferences. A ubiquitous layer of in-flight deposited silicaceous contamination varied in thickness with location on LDEF, even on a micro scale. In-flight deposited (low velocity) contaminants include urine droplets and bits of metal film from eroded thermal

  8. Fuzzy jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets. To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets, are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.

  9. Fuzzy jets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Here, collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets . To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets , are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet taggingmore » variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.« less

  10. Jet propagation through energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pincosy, P; Poulsen, P

    2004-01-08

    In applications where jets propagate through energetic materials, they have been observed to become sufficiently perturbed to reduce their ability to effectively penetrate subsequent material. Analytical calculations of the jet Bernoulli flow provides an estimate of the onset and extent of such perturbations. Although two-dimensional calculations show the back-flow interaction pressure pulses, the symmetry dictates that the flow remains axial. In three dimensions the same pressure impulses can be asymmetrical if the jet is asymmetrical. The 3D calculations thus show parts of the jet having a significant component of radial velocity. On the average the downstream effects of this radial flow can be estimated and calculated by a 2D code by applying a symmetrical radial component to the jet at the appropriate position as the jet propagates through the energetic material. We have calculated the 3D propagation of a radio graphed TOW2 jet with measured variations in straightness and diameter. The resultant three-dimensional perturbations on the jet result in radial flow, which eventually tears apart the coherent jet flow. This calculated jet is compared with jet radiographs after passage through the energetic material for various material thickness and plate thicknesses. We noted that confinement due to a bounding metal plate on the energetic material extends the pressure duration and extent of the perturbation.