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Sample records for hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis

  1. Hypocomplementemic Urticarial Vasculitis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Jim; McCarty, Morgan

    2012-01-01

    Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome, as opposed to urticarial vasculitis or urticarial vasculitis syndrome, is a rare disease process where the exact pathophysiology remains unknown. This article discusses the case of a 34-year-old Hispanic man with an ongoing history of chronic urticaria comprising episodes induced by low ambient temperatures, emotional stress, and spontaneous occurrences. This article serves as a consolidated reference for specialists to comprehensively review the plethora of systemic manifestations that may accompany urticarial vasculitis and highlights new systemic complications reported in association with this disease which are also observed in this case. PMID:22328958

  2. Urticarial Vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Store Home / Resources / Forms of Vasculitis / Urticarial Vasculitis Urticarial Vasculitis Urticarial vasculitis is a form of vasculitis that ... of complements; it’s called hypocomplementemic vasculitis. What causes Urticarial Vasculitis? The cause of most cases of urticarial vasculitis ...

  3. Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis or systemic lupus erythematosus?

    PubMed

    Trendelenburg, M; Courvoisier, S; Späth, P J; Moll, S; Mihatsch, M; Itin, P; Schifferli, J A

    1999-10-01

    The 2 patients presented here showed the typical signs of hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome (HUVS). During follow-up, there was an inverse correlation between anti-C1q autoantibody titer and C1q antigen concentration in serum in both patients over a period of 2 years. The first patient had nephritis characterized by immune deposits in glomeruli and around the tubules. The histological findings, C1q deposits, and presence of tubuloreticular inclusions in capillary endothelial cells suggested a disease process identical to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The second patient, after a lag phase of 2 years, fulfilled a fourth American College of Rheumatology criteria for SLE when she developed anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies. HUVS and SLE overlap, and the criteria for identifying HUVS as an entity distinct from SLE are lacking. PMID:10516358

  4. [Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome. Successful therapy with intravenous immunoglobulins].

    PubMed

    Staubach-Renz, P; von Stebut, E; Bräuninger, W; Maurer, M; Steinbrink, K

    2007-08-01

    Autoimmune diseases can initially present as chronic urticaria. We describe the course of a patient with hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome (HUVS) as well as his successful treatment with high-dose intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG). HUVS was diagnosed clinically and confirmed by histology and laboratory studies. After only one cycle with IVIG (2 g/kg) all HUVS symptoms were significantly decreased. PMID:17453168

  5. Cutaneous lesions and finger clubbing uncovering hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis and hepatitis C with mixed cryoglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Almeida, Teresa; Caetano, Mónica; Alves, Rosário; Selores, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    Urticarial vasculitis is a rare clinicopathologic entity characterized by urticarial lesions that persist for more than 24 hours and histologic features of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Patients can be divided into normocomplementemic or hypocomplementemic. The authors report the case of a healthy 49-year-old woman with a 1-year history of highly pruritic generalized cutaneous lesions and finger clubbing. Laboratory tests together with histopathologic examination allowed the diagnosis of hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis, chronic hepatitis C and type II mixed cryoglobulinemia. The patient started symptomatic treatment and was referred to a gastroenterologist for management of the hepatitis C, with progressive improvement of the skin condition. The development of hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis in the context of chronic hepatitis C is exceedingly rare and possible pathogenic mechanisms are discussed. PMID:24474109

  6. Hypocomplementemic Urticarial Vasculitis Syndrome in an 8-year-old Boy: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Al Mosawi, Zakiya Saleh Adnan; Al Hermi, Badriya Ebrahim Ahmed

    2013-07-01

    Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome is an immune complex-mediated disease of unknown etiology. The clinical course is characterized by urticaria, conjunctivitis, joint pain, and hypocomplementemia. We here report a case of a child with hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome that progressed to nephritis. Renal biopsy was consistent with diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis with diffuse subendothelial immune deposits. He responded well to a combination of steroid and mofetil micofenolate. PMID:23904922

  7. Inflammatory myositis complicating hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis despite on-going immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Chew, Gary Y J; Gatenby, Paul A

    2007-08-01

    We present a patient with previously diagnosed hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome, with skin, lung, and renal involvement, who presented with congestive cardiac failure. During the course of her hospitalization, she was also found to have profound proximal muscle weakness in both upper and lower limbs associated with raised creatinine kinase levels. A muscle biopsy was performed, which demonstrated evidence of an inflammatory myositis with vasculitis, which had returned despite on-going immunosuppression. This occurrence of a new autoimmune disease may well be an example of the "waste disposal" hypothesis. PMID:16944070

  8. A case of precocious emphysema and lung cancer in a woman with a history of hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Jamison, Suzanna C; Brierre, Stephen; Sweet, Jon; de Boisblanc, Ben

    2008-03-01

    Severe emphysema developed in a white woman with a 26-pack-year history of tobacco use. Serum alpha(1)-antitrypsin levels were normal. A history of autoimmune hemolytic anemia, angioedema, low complement, and recurrent urticaria prompted an immunologic workup that ultimately led to a diagnosis of hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome. Treatment with oral prednisone and inhaled bronchodilators improved symptoms, but 4 months after diagnosis non-small cell lung cancer was discovered and she ultimately died. Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis is an uncommon cause of precocious emphysema and has not previously been reported in a patient with bronchogenic carcinoma. PMID:18321906

  9. Urticarial vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Venzor, Joe; Lee, Wai L; Huston, David P

    2002-10-01

    Urticarial vasculitis is a clinico-pathologic entity typified by recurrent episodes of urticaria that have the histopathologic features of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. The cutaneous features may include painful, burning or pruritic skin lesions, the persistence of individual lesions greater than 24 hours, palpable purpura, pronounced central clearing of lesions, and residual hyperpigmentation following resolution. However, because clinical characteristics of urticarial vasculitis may overlap with those of allergic urticaria, confirmation of the diagnosis requires a lesional skin biopsy. This condition is idiopathic in many patients but can also occur in the context of autoimmune disorders, infections, drug reactions, or as a paraneoplastic syndrome. In idiopathic urticarial vasculitis common laboratory findings are an elevation of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and reduction of serum complement. An association between urticarial vasculitis and systemic lupus erythematosus has been hypothesized as some clinical manifestations of disease overlap and C1q autoantibodies may be present in both diseases. Normo-complementemic patients usually have minimal or no systemic involvement and often have a better prognosis. On-the-other-hand, hypocomplementemic patients have the propensity to have more severe multi-organ involvement. Response to treatment is variable and a wide variety of therapeutic agents may be efficacious. Initial recommendations for treatment of urticarial vasculitis manifest only as non-necrotizing skin lesions include antihistamines, dapsone, colchicine, hydroxychloroquine or indomethacin, but corticosteroids are often required. With necrotizing skin lesions or visceral involvement, corticosteroids are regularly indicated. Cases of severe corticosteroid resistant urticarial vasculitis or where corticosteroid morbidity is evident [table: see text] may require treatment with other immunosuppressive agents such as azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, or

  10. Angioedema in a 47-year-old woman with hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jones, Julie M; Reich, Keith A; Raval, Deena G

    2012-02-01

    Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome (HUVS) is a type III hypersensitivity reaction characterized by urticaria with persistent acquired hypocomplementemia. Although HUVS is uncommon, it is important for physicians to be familiar with this disease, as the initial presentation is often life-threatening angioedema. The author reports the case of a 47-year-old white woman with a history of HUVS. She presented to an outpatient clinic complaining of a rash and difficulty swallowing. Urticaria and angioedema were diagnosed. The patient was given epinephrine in the clinic and then transferred to the hospital. Laboratory testing confirmed urticaria, and the patient was given intravenous methylprednisolone sodium succinate and an additional dose of epinephrine. After 1 week, the patient's angioedema improved. PMID:22331803

  11. EBNA1 expression in a lung transplant recipient with hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Berggren, Malin A M; Heinlen, Latisha; Isaksson, Asa; Nyström, Ulla; Ricksten, Anne

    2007-07-01

    This article describes a transplant recipient with underlying hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome who expressed persistently Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) in peripheral blood. The patient received a bilateral lung transplant and was subsequently followed with monitoring of EBV expression in peripheral blood. Evaluation of viral expression in peripheral blood, serum, and graft tissue was performed with RT-PCR, Q-PCR, indirect immunofluorescence, anti-peptide assays, and in situ hybridization; samples were collected at various time-points up to 91 days post-transplantation. The patient expressed EBNA1 in 8/10 (80%) of the peripheral blood samples tested during the post-transplantation period, and interestingly, even including the day of transplantation. After analyses of indicative EBV mRNA, EBNA1 expression was found mainly to be Qp-initiated EBNA1, known to be important for EBV maintenance. Anti-EBNA1 epitope mapping showed significantly higher and broader antibody responses to EBNA1 epitopes pre-transplantation when compared to normal controls and a matched lung transplant control. Post-transplantation this response was largely diminished but there were still epitopes significantly higher than controls. Our results show the presence of EBV-positive proliferating cells before onset of intensive immunosuppressive treatment. Although no previous connection between EBV and hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome has been reported, it is tempting to speculate that the continuous EBNA1 expression is not caused by immunosuppression or post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, but may be a factor involved in the etiology of the autoimmune disease. PMID:17516536

  12. Serum IgG antibodies to C1q in hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wisnieski, J J; Naff, G B

    1989-09-01

    Urticaria, angioedema, and arthritis are cardinal features of hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome (HUVS). Considered to be an immune complex-mediated disorder, HUVS has been differentiated from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), based on its clinical manifestations and the C1q precipitin (C1q-p) reaction, which is manifested as gel precipitation of C1q by a small percentage of HUVS IgG molecules. This phenomenon has been attributed to an Fc region abnormality, and the responsible IgG molecules are said to possess C1q-p activity. We purified IgG from 4 HUVS patients and confirmed that HUVS IgG contains C1q binding activity. F(ab')2 fragments from these patients also bound to C1q, as measured by 2 different C1q binding methods at physiologic ionic strength; HUVS IgG Fc fragments did not bind to C1q. Preincubation of HUVS F(ab')2 fragments with antibody to human F(ab')2 prevented subsequent binding to C1q. We conclude that IgG antibodies to C1q are present in HUVS serum, and it is likely that these antibodies are C1q-p. Because the clinical manifestations of HUVS and the presence of anti-C1q antibodies have been described in patients with SLE, our findings support the concept that HUVS is an autoimmune syndrome related to SLE. PMID:2528353

  13. Comparison of autoantibodies to the collagen-like region of C1q in hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Wisnieski, J J; Jones, S M

    1992-03-01

    Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome (HUVS) is an apparent autoimmune disorder that resembles SLE. We previously showed that C1q precipitins in HUVS sera are IgG autoantibody to human C1q. We have compared HUVS anti-C1q autoantibody to a similar autoantibody in the serum of some patients with SLE. As with anti-C1q autoantibody in SLE sera, the HUVS autoantibody binds only to the collagen-like region (CLR) of C1q. In both HUVS and SLE, IgG2 is the predominant subclass of IgG autoantibody and IgM autoantibody to C1q is uncommon. In both diseases, anti-C1q autoantibodies bind preferentially to surface-adsorbed C1q or CLR fragments compared to these antigens in solution. Finally, when HUVS or SLE autoantibodies were added to CLR-coated wells already bound, respectively, by SLE or HUVS autoantibodies, no increases in CLR binding were observed, suggesting that HUVS and SLE autoantibodies to C1q bind to the same CLR epitope(s). PMID:1538123

  14. Telmisartan induced urticarial vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Vikram K; Singh, Ravinder; Gupta, Mrinal; Raina, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    A 53-year-old man developed urticarial vasculitis following ingestion of telmisartan and hydrochlorothiazide combination for hypertension. Treatment with prednisolone and cetirizine was curative, but his lesions recurred when he continued telmisartan and hydrochlorothiazide against medical advice. Re-challenge with the same doses of telmisartan precipitated similar lesions with telmisartan and not with hydrochlorothiazide. This uncommon cutaneous adverse reaction of angiotensin II receptor blockers has implication for the clinicians as more such cases may become apparent with their wider use than in premarketing studies. PMID:26600649

  15. Urticarial vasculitis and Schnitzler syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zuberbier, Torsten; Zuberbier, H C Torsten; Maurer, Marcus

    2014-02-01

    Both urticarial vasculitis and Schnitzler syndrome are serious diseases but a recently gained better understanding of their underlying pathomechanism allows better treatment options than only a decade ago. PMID:24262694

  16. Urticarial vasculitis and urticarial autoinflammatory syndromes.

    PubMed

    Marzano, A V; Tavecchio, S; Venturini, M; Sala, R; Calzavara-Pinton, P; Gattorno, M

    2015-02-01

    Urticaria is a frequent disorder classified as acute and chronic forms, which presents with wheals that can be associated with angioedema. Several entities may manifest with urticarial skin lesions, encompassing a heterogeneous group of conditions that have to be differentiated from ordinary urticaria. This review is focused on two of these urticarial syndromes: urticarial vasculitis (UV), which represents the most important differential diagnosis with common urticaria, and autoinflammatory diseases such as cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) and Schnitzler's Syndrome, both rare multisystem forms that may masquerade as common urticaria. UV is a small-vessel vasculitis with predominant skin involvement, characterized by wheals persisting for more than 24 hours, burning rather than itching and resolving with hyperpigmentation as well as by other cutaneous manifestations including purpura, papules, vesicles, bullae and necrotic-ulcerative lesions. Histology shows a classic pattern of leukocytoclastic vasculitis, with possible presence of upper dermal edema. CAPS are classified as three distinct entities: familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome, Muckle-Wells Syndrome and chronic infantile neurological cutaneous and articular syndrome, which represent a spectrum of disorders caused by different mutations in a single gene, NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor 3). This gene encodes for cryopyrin, an inflammasome protein that activates interleukin-1β, leading to an overproduction of this pivotal proinflammatory cytokine. Histologically, urticarial lesions are generally characterized by a perivascular neutrophilic infiltrate. Unlike urticaria, neither UV nor urticarial autoinflammatory syndromes do respond to antihistamines: thus, it is important not to misdiagnose such conditions in order to give the patients specific treatments, potentially preventing serious systemic complications. PMID:25586657

  17. Urticarial vasculitis reveals unsuspected thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Olga; Mota, Alberto; Baudrier, Teresa; Azevedo, Filomena

    2012-01-01

    A 38-year-old woman presented with erythematous, violaceous plaques with a serpiginous and unusual appearance located on the left shoulder, left thigh, and right buttock, evolving for 5 days, which eventually became generalized. A skin biopsy revealed leukocytoclastic vasculitis and a diagnosis of urticarial vasculitis was made. The complete blood count, biochemistry, complement levels, and other immunological test results were unremarkable. However, antithyroid antibody titers were increased. Despite having normal thyroid function tests and an absence of specific symptoms, the patient underwent a thyroid ultrasound, which revealed features of thyroiditis, and was subsequently referred to an endocrinologist. Several diseases can be associated with urticarial vasculitis, namely infections and autoimmune connective-tissue disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren syndrome. Thyroiditis is an uncommon association. PMID:23000939

  18. Urticarial Vasculitis-Associated Intestinal Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Uni; Yfantis, Harris; Xie, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    Urticarial vasculitis (UV) is a rare small vessel vasculitis. UV is often idiopathic but can also present in the context of autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus, drug reactions, infections, or a paraneoplastic syndrome. Extracutaneous complications include intestinal ischemic injuries, in UV patients with nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain and nausea. Prompt recognition and treatment can minimize morbidity and mortality. This paper describes a case of urticarial vasculitis-associated intestinal ischemia. PMID:27190661

  19. Urticarial Vasculitis-Associated Intestinal Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Wong, Uni; Yfantis, Harris; Xie, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    Urticarial vasculitis (UV) is a rare small vessel vasculitis. UV is often idiopathic but can also present in the context of autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus, drug reactions, infections, or a paraneoplastic syndrome. Extracutaneous complications include intestinal ischemic injuries, in UV patients with nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain and nausea. Prompt recognition and treatment can minimize morbidity and mortality. This paper describes a case of urticarial vasculitis-associated intestinal ischemia. PMID:27190661

  20. Autoimmunity in chronic urticaria and urticarial vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Napoli, D C; Freeman, T M

    2001-07-01

    In contrast to acute urticaria, etiology cannot be identified in most cases of chronic urticaria. Recent evidence suggests that a subset of patients with chronic urticaria may have an autoimmune basis for their condition. The demonstration of antithyroid autoantibodies in some patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) provides support for an association. However, the discovery of a positive skin test response to intradermal injection of autologous serum in as many as 60% of patients with CIU led to the identification of autoantibodies to IgE and the alpha-chain of the high-affinity IgE receptor, Fc epsilon RI alpha. Additional studies have demonstrated that some of these autoantibodies are capable of releasing histamine from donor basophils and mast cells. This article reviews the literature that addresses a possible autoimmune etiology in a subset of patients with CIU. Urticarial vasculitis is differentiated from chronic urticaria based on clinical features and biopsy findings of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Most cases of urticarial vasculitis are secondary to an underlying systemic disease. The presence of autoantibodies has also been demonstrated in a subset of patients with primary urticarial vasculitis. This article briefly reviews some of this data. PMID:11892055

  1. Hypocomplementaemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome: a mimicker of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Roy, Krishnendu; Talukdar, Arunansu; Kumar, Bappaditya; Sarkar, Sumanta

    2013-01-01

    A middle aged female patient presented with generalised palpable purpura associated with intense pruritus along with subconjunctival haemorrhage and orbital inflammation. There was extensive dermographism. Other systemic examinations were within normal limits. Haematological profile was normal except raised D-dimer. Skin biopsy revealed the presence of leucocytoclastic vasculitis. Antinuclear antibody was positive in a titre of 1 : 160, but antidouble-stranded DNA was negative. Urine examination revealed haematuria and proteinuria. Complement C3, C4 and C1q levels were decreased with the presence of anti-C1q antibody. There was a diagnostic dilemma between systemic lupus erythematosus and hypocomplementaemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome. However, as the patient did not fulfil the American College of Rheumatology criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus, but fulfilled all the criteria for hypocomplementaemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome, the case was finally diagnosed as hypocomplementaemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome and treated accordingly with favourable outcome. PMID:23704433

  2. Urticarial Reactions: Vascular Erythema, Urticaria, Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Sibbald, R. Gary

    1987-01-01

    Vascular erythemas, including urticaria and vasculitis, represent diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. A careful systemic approach to history and physical examination should be followed by appropriate investigations to rule out systemic disease. Chronic urticaria patients should be physically tested to identify cholinergic, dermagraphic, and cold-induced responses. Food diaries and careful drug history may be important to identify exacerbating factors in chronic urticaria. A skin biopsy is necessary to diagnose vasculitis. Therapy of any underlying cause is supplemented with H1 antihistamines in urticaria patients, while vasculitis requires a different anti-inflammatory approach. PMID:21263956

  3. Urticarial vasculitis in northern Spain: clinical study of 21 cases.

    PubMed

    Loricera, Javier; Calvo-Río, Vanesa; Mata, Cristina; Ortiz-Sanjuán, Francisco; González-López, Marcos A; Alvarez, Lino; González-Vela, M Carmen; Armesto, Susana; Fernández-Llaca, Héctor; Rueda-Gotor, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A; Blanco, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Urticarial vasculitis (UV) is a subset of cutaneous vasculitis (CV), characterized clinically by urticarial skin lesions of more than 24 hours' duration and histologically by leukocytoclastic vasculitis. We assessed the frequency, clinical features, treatment, and outcome of a series of patients with UV. We conducted a retrospective study of patients with UV included in a large series of unselected patients with CV from a university hospital. Of 766 patients with CV, UV was diagnosed in 21 (2.7%; 9 male and 12 female patients; median age, 35 yr; range, 1-78 yr; interquartile range, 5-54 yr). Eight of the 21 cases were aged younger than 20 years old. Potential precipitating factors were upper respiratory tract infections and drugs (penicillin) (n = 4; in all cases in patients aged <20 yr), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (n = 1), and malignancy (n = 1). Besides urticarial lesions, other features such as palpable purpura (n = 7), arthralgia and/or arthritis (n = 13), abdominal pain (n = 2), nephropathy (n = 2), and peripheral neuropathy (n = 1) were observed. Hypocomplementemia (low C4) with low C1q was disclosed in 2 patients. Other abnormal laboratory findings were leukocytosis (n = 7), increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (n = 6), anemia (n = 4), and antinuclear antibody positivity (n = 2). Treatment included corticosteroids (n = 12), antihistaminic drugs (n = 6), chloroquine (n = 4), nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (n = 3), colchicine (n = 2), and azathioprine (n = 1). After a median follow-up of 10 months (interquartile range, 2-38 mo) recurrences were observed in 4 patients. Apart from 1 patient who died because of an underlying malignancy, the outcome was good with full recovery in the remaining patients. In conclusion, our results indicate that UV is rare but not exceptional. In children UV is often preceded by an upper respiratory tract infection. Urticarial lesions and joint manifestations are the most frequent clinical manifestation

  4. A case of hypocomplementaemic urticarial vasculitis with a high serum level of rheumatoid factor.

    PubMed

    Ashida, Atsuko; Murata, Hiroshi; Ohashi, Atsuko; Ogawa, Eisaku; Uhara, Hisashi; Okuyama, Ryuhei

    2013-08-01

    We report a case of hypocomplementaemic urticarial vasculitis with an elevated serum rheumatoid factor level. Hypocomplementaemic urticarial vasculitis is an immune complex-mediated disease characterised by urticarial eruptions. High levels of rheumatoid factor may be associated with hypocomplementaemia due to the consumption of complement, because the rheumatoid factor can form immune complexes with immunoglobulin. It is necessary to pay attention to the amounts of complement in cases of urticarial eruptions with elevated rheumatoid factor level. The eruptions were relieved with a combination of prednisolone and colchicine. PMID:23905981

  5. Omalizumab for Urticarial Vasculitis: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Ghazanfar, Misbah Nasheela; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2015-01-01

    Urticarial vasculitis is characterised by inflamed itching or burning red patches or wheals that resemble urticaria but persist for greater than 24 hours. It is often idiopathic but is sometimes associated with collagen-vascular disease, particularly systemic lupus erythematosus. Treatment options include oral antihistamines, oral corticosteroids, dapsone, colchicine or hydroxychloroquine. We describe a male patient with urticarial vasculitis who was treated with omalizumab (anti-IgE) with convincing results and provide a review of previous reports of patients with urticarial vasculitis treated with omalizumab. PMID:26435858

  6. Urticarial vasculitis: an autoimmune disorder following therapy for Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Strickland, D K; Ware, R E

    1995-09-01

    Immunological abnormalities have been described in patients with Hodgkin's disease, both associated with the malignancy itself and occurring secondary to therapy. These abnormalities often manifest as an immunodeficiency state, but can also present as immune dysregulation and autoimmune disease. We report two young patients with Hodgkin's disease who, following successful therapy, developed urticarial vasculitis (UV), a form of cutaneous autoimmune vasculitis. Both patients also had systemic symptoms including fever, an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and serum copper, and abnormal in vitro studies of lymphocyte enumeration and proliferation. Distinguishing UV from recurrent Hodgkin's disease was especially difficult in one patient, and was possible only by lymph node biopsy. One patient has responded well to immunosuppressive therapy, while the other, who has more profound immune dysfunction, has developed a chronic autoimmune disorder. UV may thus occur in patients after therapy for Hodgkin's disease; we hypothesize that immune dysregulation, either associated with the malignancy or resulting from therapy, is important in the pathogenesis of this autoimmune process. PMID:7623731

  7. Florid urticarial vasculitis heralding a flare up of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Boules, Evon; Lyon, Calum

    2014-01-01

    A 75-year-old man with ulcerative colitis (UC) and diet controlled diabetes mellitus presented with a 3-week history of slightly itchy, red plaques on both lower limbs ascending gradually to cover the trunk and arms. One week later, he developed a flare up of his UC. Routine blood tests showed modest drop in haemoglobin (122 g/L) and C reactive protein (85 mg/L). Serology was remarkable for high antiproteinase 3 (c-ANCA). Serum electrophoresis showed a mildly positive paraprotein band (γ region). Stool culture was negative. Urine analysis showed proteinuria. Skin biopsy showed features of urticarial vasculitis (UV). He underwent a flexible sigmoidoscopy after the flare up showed mildly active UC. The patient was given hydrocortisone for 7 days and then prednisolone. Both rash and UC subsided. Electrophoresis was repeated 4 weeks later showing normal pattern. Prednisolone has been gradually reduced. Although rare, UV can be considered as one of the skin manifestations of UC. PMID:25535230

  8. Impact of Vasculitis on Employment and Income

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-26

    Vasculitis; Systemic Vasculitis; Behcet's Disease; CNS Vasculitis; Cryoglobulinemic Vasculitis; Eosinophilic Granulomatosis; Temporal Arteritis; Wegener Granulomatosis; Henoch-Schoenlein Purpura; Microscopic Polyangiitis; Polyarteritis Nodosa (PAN); Takayasu's Arteritis; Urticarial Vasculitis

  9. A 14-year paraneoplastic rash: urticarial vasculitis and dermal binding bullous pemphigoid secondary to chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Kassim, J M; Igali, L; Levell, N J

    2015-06-01

    A 72-year-old woman with a 14-year history of urticarial vasculitis (UV) and a 13-year history of bullous pemphigoid (BP) presented with associated progressive chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). Both skin conditions responded poorly to treatment, until chemotherapy for CLL was commenced. The skin features showed a clear paraneoplastic course, resolving with chemotherapy and recurring when the CLL relapsed and the lymphocyte count rose above 5 × 10(9)/L. No case of UV secondary to CLL, and very few cases of BP related to CLL have been reported, and no paraneoplastic rash of any type lasting 14 years has been reported previously. PMID:25524180

  10. Allergic vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cutaneous vasculitis Images Vasculitis on the palm Vasculitis Vasculitis, urticarial on the hand References Stone JH. The systemic vasculitides. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. ... small vessel vasculitis. In: Firestein GS, Budd RC, Gabriel SE, McInnes ...

  11. Cutaneous adverse effects of hormonal adjuvant therapy for breast cancer: a case of localised urticarial vasculitis following anastrozole therapy and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bock, Vanessa L; Friedlander, Michael; Waring, Dale; Kossard, Steven; Wood, Glenda K

    2014-11-01

    Hormonal therapy with either tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors is commonly used to treat women with breast cancer in both the adjuvant and recurrent disease setting. Cutaneous adverse reactions to these drugs have been rarely reported in the literature. We report an unusual case of urticarial vasculitis following the aromatase inhibitor anastrozole that localised to the unilateral trunk and mastectomy scar, and review the literature on the cutaneous adverse effects of hormonal therapy for breast cancer. PMID:24575835

  12. Successful use of interleukin 6 antagonist tocilizumab in a patient with refractory cutaneous lupus and urticarial vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Makol, Ashima; Gibson, Lawrence E; Michet, Clement J

    2012-03-01

    Tocilizumab (Actemra; Genentech, Inc) is the first biologic therapy targeting the cytokine interleukin 6 (IL-6). It is a humanized monoclonal immunoglobulin G1 antibody against the α-chain of the IL-6 receptor that prevents the binding of IL-6 to membrane-bound and -soluble IL-6 receptor. It was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in January 2010 for rheumatoid arthritis refractory to other approved therapies and in April 2011 for systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It has been used as an off-label treatment in many autoimmune diseases, where IL-6 plays a major role in pathogenesis. We report a case of refractory systemic lupus erythematosus in a 22-year-old woman with recurrent high-grade fever, polyarthritis, diffuse rash with urticarial vasculitis, and tumid lupus who did not respond to topical corticosteroids, photoprotection, antimalarials, methotrexate, anakinra, mycophenolate mofetil, etanercept, and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. Symptoms recurred after corticosteroid tapers below 10 mg. She was noted to have an elevated IL-6 level, and tocilizumab was started. She responded favorably with remission of fever, arthritis, and skin manifestations and was able to taper corticosteroid therapy successfully. PMID:22334272

  13. Vasculitis Pregnancy Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-08

    Vasculitis; Behcet's Disease; CNS Vasculitis; Cryoglobulinemic Vasculitis; Eosinophilic Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (EGPA); Churg-Strauss Syndrome (CSS); Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (GPA); Wegener's Granulomatosis; IgA Vasculitis; Henoch-Schoenlein Purpura (HSP); Microscopic Polyangiitis (MPA); Polyarteritis Nodosa (PAN); Takayasu Arteritis (TAK); Urticarial Vasculitis; Systemic Vasculitis

  14. Tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis and its receptor fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 are expressed in urticarial vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengmeng; Chen, Tao; Guo, Zaipei; Li, Jingyi; Cao, Na

    2013-11-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK), a member of the TNF family, has been implicated as a pro-inflammatory cytokine in many types of autoimmune and infectious diseases. However, information about TWEAK in dermatological diseases is limited. To date, no studies have investigated the roles of TWEAK in patients with urticarial vasculitis (UV). This study aimed to assess serum TWEAK levels, together with TWEAK and fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14) expressions of skin lesions in patients with UV. Serum TWEAK levels in patients with UV, together with patients with cutaneous leukocytoclastic angiitis (CLA) and healthy controls were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; TWEAK and Fn14 expressions of skin lesions were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Results showed that TWEAK and Fn14 were abundantly expressed in the dermal vessel wall of lesional skin in patients with UV but not healthy controls. Serum TWEAK levels in the acute stage in patients with UV were significantly higher than those in the convalescent stage and healthy controls. Serum TWEAK levels were elevated significantly in patients with CLA compared with those in healthy controls. Our previous study indicated that TWEAK may be an important mediator for the development of vascular inflammation in skin. In addition, we also found that TWEAK blockade substantially reduced vascular damage and perivascular leukocyte infiltrates in lipopolysaccharide-induced cutaneous vasculitis. Our study shows that TWEAK may be associated with the pathogenesis of UV; it is therefore suggested that TWEAK may be a potential therapeutic target for UV and other types of cutaneous vasculitis. PMID:23968277

  15. [Neurophilic urticarial dermatosis].

    PubMed

    Ehrchen, J

    2016-05-01

    Neurophilic urticarial dermatosis (NUD) is a new, important differential diagnosis of urticarial rashes. It is a clinical and histological response pattern that strongly correlates with systemic disease. Both autoinflammatory and autoimmune conditions can be present in patients with NUD. In this article the clinical and histological criteria of NUD, diagnostic considerations and the diseases most frequently associated with NUD are discussed. PMID:27119369

  16. Vasculitis Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... to view full calendar Vasculitis Patient-Powered Research Network The V-PPRN seeks to transform how clinical ... patients with various forms of vasculitis. Join The Network! Latest News Brandon Qualifies for the 1500m Semi- ...

  17. Necrotizing vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23045170 . Stone JH. Classification and epidemiology of systemic vasculitis. In: Firestein GS, ... MedlinePlus Connect for EHRs For Developers U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894 ...

  18. Rheumatoid Vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... RV) is an unusual complication of longstanding, severe rheumatoid arthritis. The active vasculitis associated with rheumatoid disease occurs ... a manifestation of “extra-articular” (beyond the joint)rheumatoid arthritis and involves the small and medium-sized arteries ...

  19. [Cryoglobulinemic vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Blank, N; Lorenz, H-M

    2016-04-01

    Cryoglobulinemic vasculitis is a disease of the small arteries and affects the skin, joints, peripheral nerves, kidneys and other organs. Even small amounts of cryoglobulins can lead to severe impairment for the patient but the detection of such low amounts of cryoglobulins can be difficult. The causes of cryoglobulinemic vasculitis include monoclonal hematological diseases, autoimmune diseases and chronic infections. Therapy involves treatment of the underlying disease and glucocorticoids, rituximab and plasmapheresis depending on the severity of the vasculitis. Recognition of typical clinical symptoms is essential in order to initiate appropriate laboratory diagnostic procedures. Sometimes many investigations are necessary. In the absence of clinical trials treatment recommendations can often only be derived from registry data. PMID:27034078

  20. Pediatric Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Singh-Grewal, Davinder; Durkan, Anne Maria

    2016-02-01

    Vasculitis is defined as inflammation of the blood vessels and can result in stenosis or aneurysm, which may in turn lead to occlusion or rupture of the vessel compromising tissue perfusion. The manifestations of these diseases depend on the size and site of the vessels effected. Vasculitis can be secondary to numerous inflammatory and infectious diseases but this review will concentrate on the systemic primary vasculitides and aims to discuss the presentations and approaches to management of a number of these conditions. PMID:26365154

  1. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis in urticaria induced by ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, R B; Horan, D B; Silvers, D N

    1985-09-01

    A 35-year-old woman would develop urticarial lesions over one to four hours after irradiation with sunlight or artificial ultraviolet radiation. Lesions could persist for days before resolving. Although lesions were morphologically typical of solar urticaria, their evolution and resolution were both much slower than expected. Histologically, the lesions showed leukocytoclastic vasculitis. This unexpected finding suggests the possibility that there may be novel mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of some cases of solar urticaria. PMID:4037839

  2. Burning vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Priyanka; Hobday, Dorian; Fitzgerald O'Connor, Edmund; D'Cruz, David

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 69-year-old man who was found collapsed close to a heat source and admitted to hospital for severe sepsis. He was also found to have widespread blistering and ulceration of his right leg; however, a history was unobtainable due to reduced consciousness levels. The leg lesions had the initial appearance of mixed depth burns and a management plan was made to transfer the patient to a burns unit for debridement. It was subsequently noted that the patient had a previous diagnosis of seropositive erosive rheumatoid arthritis. A biopsy of the leg lesion was performed and a diagnosis of rheumatoid vasculitis confirmed. Treatment with systemic steroids, intravenous antibiotics and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for severe hypogammaglobulinaemia was started, and the patient was not transferred for surgical debridement. Rheumatoid vasculitis is a rare and extremely serious complication of rheumatoid arthritis that can manifest in a number of ways, occasionally mimicking other conditions. This case is essential to raise awareness of rare, severe rheumatoid vasculitis and of the potential for its misdiagnosis as a mixed depth burn. PMID:27118745

  3. Pediatric Vasculitis Initiative

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Wegeners Granulomatosis (Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis); Microscopic Polyangiitis; Churg Strauss Syndrome (Eosinophilic Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis); Polyarteritis Nodosa; Takayasu Arteritis; Primary CNS Vasculitis; Unclassified Vasculitis

  4. Cutaneous vasculitis in primary Sjögren syndrome: classification and clinical significance of 52 patients.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; García-Carrasco, Mario; Rosas, José; Bové, Albert; Claver, Gisela; Diaz, Luis-Aurelio; Herrero, Carmen; Font, Josep

    2004-03-01

    To analyze the different clinical and histologic types of cutaneous vasculitis in patients with primary Sjögren syndrome (SS), we investigated the clinical and immunologic characteristics of 558 consecutive patients with primary SS from our units and selected those with clinical evidence of cutaneous lesions, excluding drug reactions and xeroderma. All patients fulfilled 4 or more of the diagnostic criteria for SS proposed by the European Community Study Group in 1993. A total of 89 (16%) patients presented with cutaneous involvement (88 female patients and 1 male; mean age, 51.8 yr). The main cutaneous involvement was cutaneous vasculitis, present in 52 (58%) patients. There were 51 (98%) female patients and 1 (2%) male, with a mean age at diagnosis of cutaneous vasculitis of 51 years (range, 20-80 yr). Fourteen presented with cryoglobulinemic vasculitis, 11 with urticarial vasculitis, and the remaining 26, with cutaneous purpura not associated with cryoglobulins. A skin biopsy specimen was obtained in 38 patients (73%). Involvement of small-sized vessels was observed in 36 (95%) patients (leukocytoclastic vasculitis), while the remaining 2 (5%) presented with medium-sized vessel vasculitis (necrotizing vasculitis). Patients with cutaneous vasculitis had a higher prevalence of articular involvement (50% vs 29%, p = 0.044), peripheral neuropathy (31% vs 4%, p < 0.001), Raynaud phenomenon (40% vs 15%, p = 0.008), renal involvement (10% vs 0%, p = 0.028), antinuclear antibodies (88% vs 60%, p = 0.002), rheumatoid factor (78% vs 48%, p = 0.004), anti-Ro/SS-A antibodies (70% vs 43%, p = 0.011), and hospitalization (25% vs 4%, p = 0.005) compared with SS patients without vasculitis. Six (12%) patients died, all of whom had multisystemic cryoglobulinemia.In conclusion, cutaneous involvement was detected in 16% of patients with primary SS, with cutaneous vasculitis being the most frequent process. The main characteristics of SS-associated cutaneous vasculitis were the

  5. [Vasculitis in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Bély, M; Apáthy, A

    1996-07-21

    The frequency and histopathological characteristics of systemic vasculitis were studied in the autopsy material of 161 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Systemic vasculitis was observed in 36 case (22.4%). In percentage of all cases with systemic vasculitis, the most frequently involved organs were the heart (66.7%), skeletal muscles (54.8%), and peripheral nerves (52%). The skin was involved only in about one third of 36 cases (36%). In most cases the arterioles and the small arteries were affected by vasculitis. Three types of vasculitis (non specific, fibrinoid necrotic, granulomatous) could be observed simultaneously in different vessels or combined in the same vessel. Different stages of inflammation could be found simultaneously, reflecting the relapsing nature of vasculitis. The frequency, the severity, and the recurrence of vasculitis are different aspects of the same phenomenon running usually parallel to each other in different organs and on different vessels. Vasculitis lead to local ischaemia and regressive changes depend on the number and size of the involved vessels. Systemic vasculitis led to death in 19 of 36 cases. Vasculitis was detected clinically in 7 of 36 cases. Exitus lethalis depend on the localization of the involved vessels. Vasculitis in the heart and brain are more life threatening, than that of localized to the skin. PMID:8757068

  6. [ANCA associated vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Ryba, Monika; Hruby, Zbigniew; Witkiewicz, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    Vasculitis is a process caused by inflammation and necrosis of blood vessel walls and results in a variety of disorders. An accepted classification system for vasculitis is categorized by the size or type of the involved blood vessel as large-, medium-, or small-vessel vasculitis. Small-vessel vasculitis is defined as vasculitis that affects vessels smaller than arteries (i.e., arterioles, venules, and capillaries); however, small-vessel vasculitis can also involve medium-sized arteries. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis, Microscopoc polyangiitis, Churg Strauss syndrome and Renal Limited Vasculitis where the kidney is the only organ involved are clasified as a small vesselvasculitis. These disorders are described to be commonly associated with antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA). The etiology is not known and the incidence of vasculitis is incresasing occuring more often in elderly population. These diseases can cause the focal necrotizing lesions witch affect vessels and organs. In the lung it may cause alveolar hemorrhage, in the kidneys crescentic glomerulonephritis with acute renal failure, in the skin purpuric rash and ulcerations. Treatment usually includes corticosteroids, immunosupresive therapy and in some cases plasmapheresis. Advances in clinical management have been achieved during the past few years. PMID:24003670

  7. How Is Vasculitis Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Aneurysm Blood Tests Kawasaki Disease Raynaud's Smoking and Your Heart Send a ... of vasculitis. For example, the standard treatment for Kawasaki disease is high-dose aspirin and immune globulin. ...

  8. Systemic necrotizing vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Gross, W L

    1997-05-01

    The revival of interest in systemic necrotizing vasculitis was initiated by the discovery of its association with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). The close association of certain ANCA subspecificities, for example, proteinase 3 (Pr3) and myeloperxoidase ANCA, with Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis and Churg-Strauss syndrome has led to their designation as 'ANCA-associated vasculitides'. This article describes the common and divergent clinical and immunological features of the members of this 'new' family of systemic necrotizing vasculitis, which continues to grow with the widespread use of ANCA testing. In addition, the 'standard' treatment for systemic necrotizing vasculitis (daily 'low dose' cyclophosphamide plus glucocorticosteroids or 'Fauci's scheme') is compared with new stage and activity adapted therapeutic regimens. PMID:9220078

  9. Rheumatoid vasculitis - Case report.

    PubMed

    Pecly, Inah Maria Drummond; Ocampo, Juan Felipe; Ramirez, Guillermo Pandales; de Oliveira, Hedi Marinho de Melo Guedes; Saud, Claudia Guerra Murad; Arantes, Milton Dos Reis

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory autoimmune disease and its main manifestation is persistent synovitis affecting peripheral joints symmetrically, In spite of its destructive potential, the evolution of RA is highly variable. Some patients may have only a short-term process oligoarticular with minimum lesion, while others suffers a polyarthritis evolving with progressive and continuous involvement of other organ systems such as skin, heart, lungs, muscles and blood vessels rarely leading to rheumatoid vasculitis. The aim of this study was to describe a case of rheumatoid vasculitis a rare and severe condition. PMID:25772654

  10. How Is Vasculitis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... whether vasculitis is affecting your abdominal organs. Computed Tomography Scan A computed tomography (to-MOG-rah-fee) scan, or CT scan, ... that vein or artery. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) identifies areas that show higher glucose ...

  11. Recurrent angioedema and urticaria.

    PubMed

    Bishop, P C; Wisnieski, J J; Christensen, J

    1993-11-01

    The case reported here illustrates the life-threatening aspects of angioedema and the need to thoroughly investigate the possible causes of this clinical finding. As discussed, the causes of angioedema are numerous. Commonly implicated in drug-induced angioedema are antihypertensive ACE inhibitor drugs, as was originally thought with this patient. Because of her skin lesions and macrocytic anemia, further studies were done. These studies led to a diagnosis of hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome, an uncommon to rare form of acquired angioedema, urticarial vasculitis, arthritis, and obstructive airway disease associated with the production of autoantibodies to C1q. It is an autoimmune disorder related to but separate from SLE. PMID:8279170

  12. Vasculitis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Drenkard, C; Villa, A R; Reyes, E; Abello, M; Alarcón-Segovia, D

    1997-01-01

    We studied the frequency, location, clinical and histopathological features, associated manifestations, and prognosis of vasculitides in a cohort of 667 SLE patients. Exclusion of patients with previous vasculitis or insufficient information left 540 patients, 194 of whom has vasculitis (incidence density: 0.053 new cases/person/year, cumulative incidence of 0.051 at one year, 0.232 at 5 years and 0.411 at 10 years). Vasculitis was confirmed by biopsy in 46 cases, by arteriography in five, and by both in three. A single episode of vasculitis occurred in 119 and two or more in 75 patients. Vasculitis was cutaneous in 160, visceral in 24, both in 10. In the first episode of cutaneous vasculitides, 111 had punctuate lesions, 32 palpable purpura, 6 urticaria, 6 ulcers, 8 papules, 5 erythematous plaques or macules confirmed with biopsy, 2 erythema with necrosis, and 1 panniculitis (plus small vessel vasculitis). Of 29 with visceral vasculitis in the first episode, 19 had mononeuritis multiplex, 5 digital necrosis, 3 large artery vasculitis of limbs, one mesenteric, and one coronary, more than one type could appear simultaneously or in subsequent episodes. Patients with vasculitis had longer disease duration and followup, younger age of onset of SLE, and were more frequently males than those without. Lupus manifestations associated with vasculitis in univariate logistic regression included myocarditis, psychosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, serositis, leukopenia, lymphopenia and pleuritis. Vasculitis also associated with the antiphospholipid syndrome. The strength of this association increased when patients with vasculitis confirmed by biopsy and/or arteriography were considered separately. Visceral vasculitis associated with increased mortality when controlled for age of onset and nephropathy. PMID:9104729

  13. [Systemic urticarias].

    PubMed

    Hachulla, E

    2003-05-01

    Systemic urticaria remains a challenge in terms of etiology, investigation and management. Most of cases are urticarial vasculitis consequence of inflammatory injury of capillaries and postcapillary venules in the skin. If hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome is a classical cause, the majority of patients have an underlying systemic disease like systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren's syndrome, mixed cryoglobulinemia, Still disease or cancer. Others systemic urticaria have been reported without clearly evidence of vasculitis like in primary or acquired angioedema, hereditary periodic fever syndromes and in some thyroiditis. Diagnosis needs a step to step procedure. Treatment depends the underlying disease. Some patients respond to nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, some other need corticosteroids or immunosuppression. If urticarial vasculitis seems isolated in the absence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, antihistamines, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, colchicine, dapsone or hydroxychloroquine must be first used. PMID:12843810

  14. Dermal and bronchial hyperreactivity in urticarial dermographism and urticaria factitia.

    PubMed

    Henz, B M; Jeep, S; Ziegert, F S; Niemann, J; Kunkel, G

    1996-03-01

    For investigation of a possible relationship between cutaneous and bronchial hyperreactivity, 74 subjects were grouped according to the presence (n = 33) or absence (n = 41) of urticarial dermographism after application of a standardized shearing pressure with a dermographometer (12.7 x 10(5) Pa). the two groups did not differ in age, sex, smoking habits, presence of urticaria and atopy, or serum IgE levels. Erythema of the dermographic test sites was always significantly greater (P < 0.001) in the group with urticarial dermographism at 2, 4, and 8 min, and cutaneous reactivity with titrated prick tests was significantly increased in this group with low concentrations of histamine, 0.01% and substance P (0.25 mM) (P < 0.05). After bronchial provocation with acetylcholine, 51 of the 74 subjects, 25 with and 26 without urticarial dermographism, exhibited bronchial hyperreactivity. However, significantly more subjects with urticarial dermographism had an increase in airway resistance and a decrease in specific airway conductance (P < 0.05). In the subgroup (n = 9) of subjects with symptomatic urticarial dermographism (urticaria factitia), these differences were even more significant (P < 0.001). These subjects also had larger skin test reactions and significantly higher IgE levels (P < 0.01). Thus, the present data show an association, which may be based on common mechanisms of allergic inflammation, between cutaneous and bronchial hyperreactivity. PMID:8781671

  15. Differential Diagnosis of Retinal Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Abu El-Asrar, Ahmed M.; Herbort, Carl P.; Tabbara, Khalid F.

    2009-01-01

    Retinal vaculitis is a sight-threatening inflammatory eye condition that involves the retinal vessels. Detection of retinal vasculitis is made clinically, and confirmed with the help of fundus fluorescein angiography. Active vascular disease is characterized by exudates around retinal vessels resulting in white sheathing or cuffing of the affected vessels. In this review, a practical approach to the diagnosis of retinal vasculitis is discussed based on ophthalmoscopic and fundus fluorescein angiographic findings. PMID:20404987

  16. Increased serum levels of soluble vascular endothelial-cadherin in patients with systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Guo, Zai-Pei; Cao, Na; Qin, Sha; Li, Meng-Meng; Jia, Rui-Zhen

    2014-08-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a commonest systemic vasculitis (SV) in childhood characterized by an inflammatory reaction directed at vessels. Endothelial damage and perivascular leukocyte infiltrates are vital in the development of HSP. Vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin is an endothelial cell-specific adhesion molecule, which plays critical roles in angiogenesis and endothelial integrity. Herein, we investigated the serum levels of soluble VE-cadherin (sVE-cadherin) in patients with HSP and other forms of SV. The serum levels of sVE-cadherin in 30 patients with HSP, together with patients with urticarial vasculitis, allergic vasculitis, Behcet disease, psoriasis vulgaris (PV) and atopic dermatitis (AD) and 26 health controls were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serum levels of sVE-cadherin were significantly increased in patients with HSP in acute stage and patients with other forms of SV but not in patients with PV or AD. Moreover, Serum sVE-cadherin levels in HSP patients were correlated with the severity of this disease and serum concentrations of IgA anticardiolipin antibodies and vascular endothelial growth factor. Taken together, we show firstly that serum sVE-cadherin is abnormally increased in HSP patients. Increased serum levels of sVE-cadherin might be a novel biomarker for evaluating the severity of HSP and useful for identifying the presence of SV in inflammatory skin conditions. PMID:24469639

  17. Neutrophilic urticarial dermatosis: a variant of neutrophilic urticaria strongly associated with systemic disease. Report of 9 new cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kieffer, Carine; Cribier, Bernard; Lipsker, Dan

    2009-01-01

    We conducted the current study to define within the spectrum of the neutrophilic dermatoses a group of patients with an urticarial rash clinically and a neutrophilic dermatosis histopathologically. We reviewed the literature on neutrophilic urticaria and we report here a series of patients with this unique presentation. We reviewed all cutaneous biopsies submitted to our department between 2000 and 2006 in which histopathologic evaluation was compatible with this entity. We then retrieved the patient medical records and obtained information about follow-up and associated diseases. This allowed us to identify 9 patients with an urticarial eruption that was characterized histopathologically by a perivascular and interstitial neutrophilic infiltrate with intense leukocytoclasia but without vasculitis and without dermal edema. Four patients also had small foci of necrobiotic collagen bundles. The eruption consisted of pale, flat or only slightly raised, nonpruritic macules, papules, or plaques. Elementary lesions resolved within 24 hours. Purpura, angioedema, and facial swelling were not seen, but dermographism was present in 1 patient. Six patients had fever, 7 had polyarthritis, and 6 had leukocytosis. Seven patients had associated systemic diseases: adult-onset Still disease (3 patients), systemic lupus erythematosus (3 patients), and Schnitzler syndrome (1 patient).A similar rash has been reported previously in the literature, mostly in patients with systemic inflammatory diseases, but the majority of patients reported under the undefined designation of "neutrophilic urticaria" did have a different clinicopathologic presentation. Thus, we suggest naming this eruption "neutrophilic urticarial dermatosis," to emphasize that this entity expands the broad group of cutaneous manifestations of neutrophilic aseptic disease. This entity bears important medical significance as it is strongly indicative of an associated systemic disease, mainly Schnitzler syndrome, adult

  18. Urticarial dermographism: clinical features and response to psychosocial stress.

    PubMed

    Wallengren, Joanna; Isaksson, Anders

    2007-01-01

    Studies report that urticarial dermographism is exacerbated by "life events" and emotions. The aim of this study was to determine what aspects of life quality are affected by symptomatic dermographism and whether acute stress is a potential triggering factor. A total of 21 adult patients with urticarial dermographism completed a questionnaire on symptoms and quality of life. Twelve patients agreed to enrol in the study, which involved provocation by prick test and dermographism before and after a standardized psychosocial stress test (Trier Social Stress Test). Seventeen age-matched controls underwent corresponding tests. Of the patients answering the questionnaire, 43% reported that their disease had an impact on their quality of life and 33% that psychosocial stress precipitated the symptoms. However, the dermographic reaction in patients with urticaria factitia was not significantly intensified after the stress test. We conclude that the acute psychosocial stress test does not alter the magnitude of the dermographic reactions. PMID:17989886

  19. The ANCA Vasculitis Questionnaire (AAV-PRO©)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-10

    Eosinophilic Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss) (EGPA); Churg-Strauss Syndrome (CSS); Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (Wegener's) (GPA); Wegener Granulomatosis (WG); Microscopic Polyangiitis (MPA); ANCA-Associated Vasculitis (AAV); Vasculitis

  20. Cerebral vasculitis associated with cocaine abuse

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, B.R.; Fainstat, M.

    1987-10-16

    A case of cerebral vasculitis in a previously healthy 22-year-old man with a history of cocaine abuse is described. Cerebral angiograms showed evidence of vasculitis. A search for possible causes other than cocaine produced no results. The authors include cocaine with methamphetamines, heroin, and ephedrine as illicit drugs that can cause cerebral vasculitis.

  1. Cutaneous small-vessel vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Lotti, T; Ghersetich, I; Comacchi, C; Jorizzo, J L

    1998-11-01

    Cutaneous small-vessel vasculitis (CSVV) refers to a group of disorders usually characterized by palpable purpura; it is caused by leukocytoclastic vasculitis of postcapillary venules. CSVV can be idiopathic or can be associated with a drug, infection, or underlying systemic disease. Initially, the pathogenesis of CSVV is immune complex related, but in its later stages different pathogenetic mechanisms may intensify the reaction and lymphocytes may predominate in the infiltrate. Cure requires elimination of the cause (ie, drugs, chemicals, infections, food allergens) when possible, as well as therapy with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents, corticosteroids, dapsone, potassium iodide, fibrinolytic agents, aminocaproic acid, immunosuppressive agents (ie, cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, methotrexate, cyclosporine) or even monoclonal antibodies, depending on disease severity. PMID:9810883

  2. Silica exposure and systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mulloy, Karen B

    2003-01-01

    Work in Department of Energy (DOE) facilities has exposed workers to multiple toxic agents leading to acute and chronic diseases. Many exposures were common to numerous work sites. Exposure to crystalline silica was primarily restricted to a few facilities. I present the case of a 63-year-old male who worked in DOE facilities for 30 years as a weapons testing technician. In addition to silica, other workplace exposures included beryllium, various solvents and heavy metals, depleted uranium, and ionizing radiation. In 1989 a painful macular skin lesion was biopsied and diagnosed as leukocytoclastic vasculitis. By 1992 he developed gross hematuria and dyspnea. Blood laboratory results revealed a serum creatinine concentration of 2.1 mg/dL, ethrythrocyte sedimentation rate of 61 mm/hr, negative cANCA (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody cytoplasmic pattern), positive pANCA (ANCA perinuclear pattern), and antiglomerular basement membrane negative. Renal biopsy showed proliferative (crescentric) and necrotizing glomerulonephritis. The patient's diagnoses included microscopic polyangiitis, systemic necrotizing vasculitis, leukocytoclastic vasculitis, and glomerulonephritis. Environmental triggers are thought to play a role in the development of an idiopathic expression of systemic autoimmune disease. Crystalline silica exposure has been linked to rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and some of the small vessel vasculitides. DOE workers are currently able to apply for compensation under the federal Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program (EEOICP). However, the only diseases covered by EEOICP are cancers related to radiation exposure, chronic beryllium disease, and chronic silicosis. PMID:14644669

  3. Medium-size-vessel vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Eleftheriou, Despina; Brogan, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Medium-size-artery vasculitides do occur in childhood and manifest, in the main, as polyarteritis nodosa (PAN), cutaneous PAN and Kawasaki disease. Of these, PAN is the most serious, with high morbidity and not inconsequential mortality rates. New classification criteria for PAN have been validated that will have value in epidemiological studies and clinical trials. Renal involvement is common and recent therapeutic advances may result in improved treatment options. Cutaneous PAN is a milder disease characterised by periodic exacerbations and often associated with streptococcal infection. There is controversy as to whether this is a separate entity or part of the systemic PAN spectrum. Kawasaki disease is an acute self-limiting systemic vasculitis, the second commonest vasculitis in childhood and the commonest cause of childhood-acquired heart disease. Renal manifestations occur and include tubulointerstitial nephritis and renal failure. An infectious trigger and a genetic predisposition seem likely. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IV-Ig) and aspirin are effective therapeutically, but in resistant cases, either steroid or infliximab have a role. Greater understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms involved in these three types of vasculitis and better long-term follow-up data will lead to improved therapy and prediction of prognosis. PMID:19946711

  4. Vasculitides with cutaneous expression in children: clinico-pathological correlations.

    PubMed

    Borroni, G; Grassi, S; Carugno, A

    2015-02-01

    The most recent pediatric vasculitis classifications (EULAR/PRINTO/PRES) have proposed the use of an integration of clinical signs and symptoms, laboratory data, imaging and pathologic data. Pediatric vasculitis represent a peculiar clinical-diagnostic model, compared to the corresponding adult pathology chapter, and in particular, dermatopathologic aspects of these diseases identify more specific issues, made contingent by crucial variables such as duration of vasculitis lesion, site of the biopsy, proper biopsy depth, and possibility to correlate histopathological findings with immunopathological results. Possible additional diagnostic difficulties may arise from the fact that, in children, the same systemic disease, such as lupus erythematosus, may present with different clinical manifestations, with histopathological features of a precise type of vasculitis specific for that type of clinical manifestation. Examples are provided by hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis, cryoglobulinemic purpura, lymphocytic vasculitis of livedoid lesions. This paper describes the cutaneous histopathological findings of some vasculitis related pediatric diseases, be they pertaining to a systemic vasculitis with corresponding cutaneous vasculitis, to a systemic vasculitis with sporadic cutaneous vasculitic involvement, and to a systemic vasculitis without cutaneous vasculitic involvement. Type and level of histopathological vasculitic involvement, caliber of the vessel, type of vasculitis associated infiltrate, are likewise reliable integration in the complex diagnostic path of vasculitis in childhood. On the basis of these criteria dermatopathologists should be confident in identifying the type of the vasculitis and relate them to a specific pediatric disease. PMID:25516220

  5. Educational Needs of Patients With Systemic Vasculitis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-11

    Behcet's Disease; Churg-Strauss Syndrome; Vasculitis, Central Nervous System; Giant Cell Arteritis; Wegener Granulomatosis; Henoch-Schoenlein Purpura; Microscopic Polyangiitis; Polyarteritis Nodosa; Takayasu's Arteritis

  6. Damage assessment in ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Bhamra, Kuljeet; Luqmani, Raashid

    2012-12-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody associated vasculitis has been transformed from life-threatening conditions to chronic relapsing long-term diseases as a result of significant advances in immunosuppressive therapy. Although mortality still occurs, it is much less frequent, with an average 5-year survival of over 70 %. In the setting of chronic conditions, it becomes increasingly important to monitor the burden of disease in terms of both active inflammation requiring immunosuppression and chronic damage (scarring) from vasculitis and its treatment and associated comorbidity. The damage that accumulates in patients with vasculitis does not respond to immunosuppressive treatment. It is important to distinguish disease activity from disease damage to prevent unnecessary immunosuppression, but it is equally important to recognize damage for what it is, so that it can be addressed appropriately. Damage is an inevitable consequence of long-term vasculitis for over 80 % of patients, which should not surprise us given the severity of the original illness. There is potential value in measuring damage as a means of providing prognostic information. Using a quantified score such as the Vasculitis Damage Index (VDI) allows us to predict mortality. Patients with at least five items of damage on the VDI score have substantially worse mortality (7- to 11-fold worse risk), as compared with those with lesser amounts of damage. These findings should be taken into context when planning the management of patients with vasculitis, as well as in clinical trials of vasculitis. Disease damage is an important surrogate for long-term outcome in vasculitis, and studies should be designed to limit the amount of damage accumulating as a result of therapeutic intervention, rather than simply controlling disease activity, as is currently the aim in recent randomized controlled trials in vasculitis. Furthermore, careful cataloguing of damage, as well as disease activity items, provides much

  7. [Diagnostic imaging of central nervous system vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Yokota, Hajime; Yamada, Kei

    2015-03-01

    Vasculitis involving the central nervous system presents with infarction and hemorrhage, which are often nonspecific findings. Laboratory examinations are essential for diagnosis of vasculitis in addition to comprehensive and systematic review of the clinical course. Although most findings tend to be nonspecific, enhancement and thickening of the vascular wall indicate vasculitis. Visualization of the vascular wall requires selection of the appropriate imaging modality and mode of image acquisition. Contrast-enhanced CT, MRI, and FDG-PET are useful for visualizing large vessel vasculitis, while CT, MRI, and angiography are effective for medium vessel vasculitis. The use of ultrasound is limited to evaluating vessels on the body surface. Although relatively thick vessels can be demonstrated by angiography, complete survey of small vessels is difficult. Here, we summarize the characteristics of each imaging modality and imaging findings of typical vasculitides-Takayasu arteritis, giant cell arteritis, ANCA-associated vasculitis, Behçet's disease, primary angiitis of the CNS, and vasculitis associated with systemic disease. Differential diagnoses are also shown, including infective endocarditis, tuberculous meningitis, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. PMID:25846439

  8. Vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... American College of Rheumatology Committee on Communications and Marketing. This information is provided for general education only. ... Lists Supporters About Us Leadership Careers at ACR Social Media Newsroom Annual Reports & Financial Statements Policies & Guidelines ...

  9. Systemic paraneoplastic vasculitis secondary to papillary carcinoma of the thyroid.

    PubMed

    Guerouaz, N; Alaoui, M; Raiss, M; Hassam, B; Senouci, K

    2016-08-01

    Systemic vasculitis secondary to thyroid carcinomas is exceptional. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman who presented with systemic vasculitis involving leucocytoclastic cutaneous vasculitis and renal disorders secondary to papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). Her symptoms resolved completely after total thyroidectomy. Other causes of vasculitis were excluded. To our knowledge, this is only the second case reported of systemic vasculitis associated with PTC in a paraneoplastic manner. PMID:27416971

  10. Biotherapies in large vessel vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Ferfar, Y; Mirault, T; Desbois, A C; Comarmond, C; Messas, E; Savey, L; Domont, F; Cacoub, P; Saadoun, D

    2016-06-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) and Takayasu's arteritis (TA) are large vessel vasculitis (LVV) and aortic involvement is not uncommon in Behcet's disease (BD) and relapsing polychondritis (RP). Glucocorticosteroids are the mainstay of therapy in LVV. However, a significant proportion of patients have glucocorticoid dependance, serious side effects or refractory disease to steroids and other immunosuppressive treatments such as cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil and methotrexate. Recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis have resulted in the use of biological agents in patients with LVV. Anti-tumor necrosis factor-α drugs seem effective in patients with refractory Takayasu arteritis and vascular BD but have failed to do so in giant cell arteritis. Preliminary reports on the use of the anti-IL6-receptor antibody (tocilizumab), in LVV have been encouraging. The development of new biologic targeted therapies will probably open a promising future for patients with LVV. PMID:26883459

  11. [Primary central nervous system vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Schuster, S; Magnus, T

    2015-12-01

    Primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS) is a rare disorder. However, it is often considered in the differential diagnosis of vascular or inflammatory CNS diseases. Diagnosis is challenging, as specific biomarkers are lacking and the clinical presentation can be variable. A definitive diagnosis can only be established by biopsy of the inflammatory changes in the vascular wall. Alternatively, the diagnosis of PACNS can also be based on the synopsis of clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings. Different subtypes of PACNS have been described in recent years, depending on the size of the affected vessels or histopathological patterns. Based on selective literature research in the database PubMed on the subject of CNS vasculitis, this article reviews the diagnostic characteristics and differential diagnosis of the condition. We suggest a diagnostic algorithm customized to the size of the affected vessels. Lastly, therapeutic options and the outcome of PACNS are briefly outlined. PMID:26589203

  12. Vasculitis: determinants of disease patterns.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Gary S; Calabrese, Leonard H

    2014-08-01

    The vasculitides are a large group of heterogeneous diseases for which it has been assumed that pathogenesis is largely autoimmune. As clinicians, we distinguish one form of vasculitis from another on the basis of observed patterns of organ injury, the size of the vessels affected and histopathological findings. The terms 'small-vessel', 'medium-vessel' and 'large-vessel' vasculitis are useful clinical descriptors, but fail to inform us about why vessels of a certain calibre are favoured by one disease and not another. Classification based on vessel size also fails to consider that vessels of a specific calibre are not equally prone to injury. Distinct vulnerabilities undoubtedly relate to the fact that same-size vessels in different tissues may not be identical conduits. In fact, vessels become specialized, from the earliest stages of embryonic development, to suit the needs of different anatomical locations. Vessels of the same calibre in different locations and organs are as different as the organ parenchymal cells through which they travel. The dialogue between developing vessels and the tissues they perfuse is designed to meet special local needs. Added to the story of vascular diversity and vulnerability are changes that occur during growth, development and ageing. An improved understanding of the unique territorial vulnerabilities of vessels could form the basis of new hypotheses for the aetiopathogenesis of the vasculitides. This Review considers how certain antigens, including infectious agents, might become disease-relevant and how vascular diversity could influence disease phenotypes and the spectrum of vascular inflammatory diseases. PMID:24934189

  13. [Vasculitis caused by Pseudomonas: a case report].

    PubMed

    Escamilla, Y; Gutiérrez, M; Martínez, T; Bodoque, M; Gómez, J M; Moreno, A

    1996-01-01

    Pseudomona vasculitis is an exceptional disease. Only a few cases have been reported, non with oropharyngeal involvement. The case of a 30-year-old, HIV-positive man who suddenly developed septicemia and necrotizing lesions with tissue destruction of the oropharynx is reported. Histological study confirmed vasculitis. Pseudomona aeruginosa was isolated in peripheral blood and in the biopsy of the palatal lesion. Antibiotic treatment produced satisfactory results. PMID:8991411

  14. Immunohistological comparison of granulated cell proteins in induced immediate urticarial dermographism and delayed pressure urticaria lesions.

    PubMed

    McEvoy, M T; Peterson, E A; Kobza-Black, A; English, J S; Dover, J S; Murphy, G M; Bhogal, B; Greaves, M W; Winkelmann, R K; Leiferman, K M

    1995-12-01

    Urticarial dermographism and delayed pressure urticaria are two forms of physical urticaria which are well defined clinically and histologically. Previous studies have shown eosinophil granule protein deposition in urticarial reactions, including chronic urticaria, solar urticaria and delayed pressure urticaria. To evaluate and compare the involvement of granulated inflammatory cells in urticarial dermographism and delayed pressure urticaria, we studied sequential biopsies of induced lesions of urticarial dermographism and delayed pressure urticaria by indirect immunofluorescence, to detect eosinophil granule major basic protein (MBP) and neutrophil granule elastase. Biopsies from dermographic lesions at time 0, 5 min, 15 min, 2 h and 24 h, showed few infiltrating eosinophils, with minimal extracellular MBP deposition, and a few infiltrating neutrophils, with minimal neutrophil elastase deposition, throughout the evolution of the lesions. Sequential biopsies of delayed pressure urticaria at time 0, 20 min, 6, 12 and 24 h, showed eosinophil infiltration with extensive MBP deposition beginning at 20 min, and neutrophil infiltration with variable elastase deposition beginning at 20 min. Control tissue specimens from normal volunteers showed neutrophil infiltration and slight degranulation, but no eosinophil infiltration or degranulation. Comparison of urticarial dermographism with delayed pressure urticaria showed marked differences in the patterns of infiltration. Delayed pressure urticaria, with eosinophil and neutrophil degranulation, was strikingly similar to the IgE-mediated late phase reaction. In contrast, eosinophil and neutrophil involvement in urticarial dermographism was minimal. Considering the extent of eosinophil granule protein deposition and the biological activities of the eosinophil granule proteins, the findings in delayed pressure urticaria point to an important pathophysiological role of eosinophils in the disease. PMID:8547035

  15. Epigenetics and Vasculitis: a Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Renauer, Paul; Coit, Patrick; Sawalha, Amr H

    2016-06-01

    Vasculitides represent a group of relatively rare systemic inflammatory diseases of the blood vessels. Despite recent progress in understanding the genetic basis and the underlying pathogenic mechanisms in vasculitis, the etiology and pathogenesis of vasculitis remain incompletely understood. Epigenetic dysregulation plays an important role in immune-mediated diseases, and the contribution of epigenetic aberrancies in vasculitis is increasingly being recognized. Histone modifications in the PR3 and MPO gene loci might be mechanistically involved in the pathogenesis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis. Similarly, other studies revealed important epigenetic contribution to other vasculitides, including Kawasaki disease and IgA vasculitis. More recently, genome-wide epigenomic studies have been performed in several vasculitides. A recent genome-wide DNA methylation study uncovered an important role for epigenetic remodeling of cytoskeleton-related genes in the pathogenesis of Behçet's disease and suggested that reversal of some of these DNA methylation changes associates with disease remission. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling characterized the inflammatory response in temporal artery tissue from patients with giant cell arteritis and showed increased activation of calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) signaling, prompting the suggestion that a specific calcineurin/NFAT inhibitor that is well tolerated and with the added beneficial anti-platelet activity, such as dipyridamole, might be of therapeutic potential in giant cell arteritis. While epigenetic studies in systemic vasculitis are still in their infancy, currently available data clearly indicate that investigating the epigenetic mechanisms underlying these diseases will help to better understand the pathogenesis of vasculitis and provide novel targets for the development of disease biomarkers and new therapies. PMID:26093659

  16. [Neuromuscular biopsy and diagnosis of vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Vital, Anne; Vital, Claude

    2006-09-01

    One characteristic histological lesion on biopsy specimens is mandatory to establish the diagnosis of vasculitis. Combined nerve and muscle biopsies, by the same cutaneous incision, improve significantly the percentage of positive results. Nerve fragments should be taken in every patient presenting sensory manifestations. Such vasculitic lesions are present in medium-sized arterioles and/or small vessels, and correspond mainly to 4 necrotizing vasculitis: panarteritis nodosa (PAN), microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), Churg and Strauss syndrome and Wegener granulomatosis. Microvasculitis should be added to these classical entities, because it corresponds to small vessel wall infiltration by inflammatory cells, as observed in PAN and MPA, but without any necrosis. Microvasculitis has to be differentiated from the inflammatory cell infiltrates surrounding small vessels. However, such perivascular inflammatory cell infiltrates enable the diagnosis of probable vasculitis when associated with clusters of neo-vessels, hemosiderin deposits, or a focal damage of nerve fibers. Grossly, one third of vasculitis diagnosis is confirmed on muscle fragments, a second third on nerve fragments, and the last third on both nerve and muscle fragments. Moreover, in the search for vasculitis, an unpredicted diagnosis of lymphoma or amyloidosis is occasionally established on the neuro-muscular biopsy. PMID:17128151

  17. Reproductive Health in Men and Women With Vasculitis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-25

    Giant Cell Arteritis; Takayasu's Arteritis; Polyarteritis Nodosa; Wegener's Granulomatosis; Microscopic Polyangiitis; Churg-Strauss Syndrome; Behcet's Disease; Kawasaki Disease; Henoch-schoenlein Purpura; Vasculitis, Central Nervous System; Drug-induced Necrotizing Vasculitis

  18. HIV diagnosis in a patient presenting with vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Sharif, M; Hameed, S; Akin, I; Natarajan, U

    2016-02-01

    A patient with digital ischaemia and gangrene was treated with iloprost and antiplatelets for two weeks. His vasculitic screen was negative except for a positive HIV test. His vasculitis improved three weeks after treatment with antiretroviral medications. Though vasculitis is well known to be associated with HIV infection, very few cases of HIV present as vasculitis. PMID:25769887

  19. Connective Tissue Disorder-Associated Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aman; Dhooria, Aadhaar; Aggarwal, Ashish; Rathi, Manish; Chandran, Vinod

    2016-06-01

    Vasculitides secondary to connective tissue diseases are classified under the category of 'vasculitis associated with systemic disease' in the revised International Chapel Hill Consensus Conference (CHCC) nomenclature. These secondary vasculitides may affect any of the small, medium or large vessels and usually portend a poor prognosis. Any organ system can be involved and the presentation would vary depending upon that involvement. Treatment depends upon the type and severity of presentation. In this review, we describe secondary vasculitis associated with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, sarcoidosis, relapsing polychondritis, systemic sclerosis, Sjogren's syndrome and idiopathic inflammatory myositis, focusing mainly on recent advances in the past 3 years. PMID:27097818

  20. Imipenem-cilastatin-induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Reiner, M R; Brunetti, V A

    1997-05-01

    A maculopapular rash has been associated with the administration of imipenem-cilastatin, an antibiotic that was used for treatment of a postoperative infection. This is a first-time association of imipenem with a leukocytoclastic vasculitic reaction. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis has been previously documented with ciprofloxacin, zidovudine, piperazine, and lithium. PMID:9158321

  1. Primary CNS vasculitis presenting as intraventricular bleeding.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Sreeja Hareendranathan; Sreedharan, Sapna Erat; Menon, Girish; Kannoth, Santhosh; Pn, Sylaja

    2016-01-01

    Primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS) is a rare disorder affecting both medium- and small-sized vessels. Intracranial haemorrhages though less reported are in the form of parenchymal haemorrhage and subarachnoid haemorrhage. We report a case of PACNS with intraventricular haemorrhage due to aneurysms secondary to progression of vasculitis. PMID:27570401

  2. Classification, pathogenesis, and treatment of systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Griffith, M E; Gaskin, G; Pusey, C D

    1996-09-01

    Patients with systemic vasculitis (SV), especially Wegener's granulomatosis and microscopic polyangiitis, regularly present with renal involvement. Although considered a rare disease, either the incidence of SV is increasing or it is being increasingly recognized. Accurate classification systems are required to allow comparison of data from different groups investigating and treating these patients. Systemic vasculitis is known to be an autoimmune disease, but the mechanisms of pathogenesis have not been established, despite many studies on this topic in recent years. Most of this work has been done in vitro, although development of animal models is underway. Patient and renal survival have improved with aggressive immunosuppressive treatment, but morbidity is high and controversies remain in establishing the most effective regimens with minimum adverse effects. In this review we discuss the classification of SV, review the current knowledge of pathogenic mechanisms, and consider the relative merits of different treatment protocols. PMID:8903093

  3. Warfarin-induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis and proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Jumean, Khalid; Arqoub, Ahmad Abu; Hawatmeh, Amer; Qaqa, Firas; Bataineh, Ayham; Shaaban, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Warfarin is typically prescribed for patients with thromboembolic diseases and atrial fibrillation. In addition to the complications of bleeding, allergic skin reaction is one of its rare adverse effects. We herein report a case of a 79 year old male patient with leukocytoclastic vasculitis and proteinuria secondary to warfarin. The warfarin was discontinued and oral prednisone therapy was initiated. The cutaneous lesions and the proteinuria resolved thereafter. PMID:27453863

  4. CHILDHOOD CUTANEOUS VASCULITIS: A COMPREHENSIVE APPRAISAL

    PubMed Central

    Palit, Aparna; Inamadar, Arun C

    2009-01-01

    Cutaneous vasculitides in childhood are rare and often present with clinical features distinct from adults. Diagnosis of cutaneous vasculitides in children was difficult because of lack of a satisfactory classification systems for this age group. A new international classification system for childhood vasculitis has been discussed in the following section along with important clinical features, diagnostic modalities, and recent therapeutic developments of important vasculitides in children. PMID:20101304

  5. A Case of Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis Caused by Listeria monocytogenes Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Importance. Infections can cause leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Observations. We report the case of a patient with a left ventricular assist device who presented with acute kidney injury and biopsy proven leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Blood cultures grew Listeria monocytogenes. The patient's rash improved with treatment of the underlying Listeria infection. Conclusion. Clinicians should be aware that there are a number of broad categories of disease associated with the histologic finding of vasculitis, including infection. It is important to keep in mind the risk factors of a particular patient when formulating a differential diagnosis. This is the first reported case of Listeria bacteremia causing leukocytoclastic vasculitis. PMID:27313916

  6. Endoscopic Findings of Upper Gastrointestinal Involvement in Primary Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Eun Jeong; Kim, Do Hoon; Chun, Joo Hyun; Ahn, Ji Yong; Choi, Kwi-Sook; Jung, Kee Wook; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Choi, Kee Don; Song, Ho June; Lee, Gin Hyug; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Kim, Jin Ho; Song, In Hye; Kim, Yong-Gil

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Gastrointestinal involvement in vasculitis may result in life-threatening complications. However, its variable clinical presentations and endoscopic features, and the rarity of the disease, often result in delayed diagnosis. Methods Clinical characteristics, endoscopic features, and histopathological findings were reviewed from medical records. Results Of 6,477 patients with vasculitis, 148 were diagnosed as primary vasculitis with upper gastrointestinal involvement. Of these, 21 cases (14.2%) were classified as large-vessel vasculitis, 17 cases (11.5%) as medium-vessel vasculitis, and 110 cases (74.3%) as small-vessel vasculitis. According to the specific diagnosis, IgA vasculitis (Henoch-Schönlein purpura) was the most common diagnosis (56.8%), followed by Takayasu arteritis (14.1%), microscopic polyangiitis (10.1%), and polyarteritis nodosa (6.8%). Gastrointestinal symptoms were present in 113 subjects (76.4%), with abdominal pain (78.8%) the most common symptom. Erosion and ulcers were striking endoscopic features, and the second portion of the duodenum was the most frequently involved site. Biopsy specimens were obtained from 124 patients, and only eight (5.4%) presented histopathological signs of vasculitis. Conclusions Diagnosis of vasculitis involving the upper gastrointestinal tract is difficult. Because of the widespread use of endoscopy, combining clinical features with endoscopic findings may facilitate making appropriate diagnoses; however, the diagnostic yield of endoscopic biopsy is low. PMID:27226428

  7. A Case of Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis Caused by Listeria monocytogenes Bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Bunker, Daniel R; Sullivan, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Importance. Infections can cause leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Observations. We report the case of a patient with a left ventricular assist device who presented with acute kidney injury and biopsy proven leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Blood cultures grew Listeria monocytogenes. The patient's rash improved with treatment of the underlying Listeria infection. Conclusion. Clinicians should be aware that there are a number of broad categories of disease associated with the histologic finding of vasculitis, including infection. It is important to keep in mind the risk factors of a particular patient when formulating a differential diagnosis. This is the first reported case of Listeria bacteremia causing leukocytoclastic vasculitis. PMID:27313916

  8. Immunologic Cerebral Vasculitis and Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis: An Uncommon Association.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiyi; Li, Qian; Zhen, Xiaohan; Liu, Yuan; Wu, Qi

    2015-09-01

    Infection can cause cerebral vasculitis not only by direct invasion of the vessel wall, but by immune complex deposition, or through secondary cryoglobulineamia. There are also two types of cerebral vasculitis associated with tuberculosis (TB). In TB treatment, cerebral vasculitis caused by immunologic injury received little attention than vasculitis due to direct invasion of TB infection. We report a case in a young woman who presented with fever, generalized lymphadenopathy, stroke-like events, movement disorder and coma, which was found to be active, lymph node TB with immunologic cerebral vacuities without tuberculosis meningitis. PMID:26500938

  9. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Vasculitis: A Current Therapeutic Overview.

    PubMed

    Toubi, Elias; Kessel, Aharon; Bamberger, Ellen; Golan, Theo Dov

    2004-04-01

    The development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) vasculitis is of prognostic value. The earlier the vasculitis is treated, the better the prognosis for SLE. Cutaneous vasculitis is common in SLE, whereas visceral vasculitis is rare. Skin SLE vasculitis is successfully treated with antimalarials, but its discontinuation may result in an SLE flare even among patients in remission. When visceral SLE vasculitis is encountered, or when a disease state is perceived to be life-threatening, a more aggressive therapy is warranted. A combination of medications, plasmapheresis, and intravenous immunoglobulin treatment, along with high-dose steroids and cytotoxic drugs, are typically employed in the treatment of severe SLE vasculitis. Finally, patients with SLE vasculitis may benefit from a number of autoimmune disease therapies currently under investigation, such as switching cytokine responses from Th1 to Th2, and the manipulation of toll-like receptors, chemokines, and FcR receptors. Specific B-cell therapies (eg, anti-Blys, B-cell depletion) may also emerge as potential treatments for SLE vasculitis. PMID:15066237

  10. Immunologic Cerebral Vasculitis and Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis: An Uncommon Association

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiyi; Li, Qian; Zhen, Xiaohan; Liu, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Infection can cause cerebral vasculitis not only by direct invasion of the vessel wall, but by immune complex deposition, or through secondary cryoglobulineamia. There are also two types of cerebral vasculitis associated with tuberculosis (TB). In TB treatment, cerebral vasculitis caused by immunologic injury received little attention than vasculitis due to direct invasion of TB infection. We report a case in a young woman who presented with fever, generalized lymphadenopathy, stroke-like events, movement disorder and coma, which was found to be active, lymph node TB with immunologic cerebral vacuities without tuberculosis meningitis. PMID:26500938

  11. Time to focus on outcome assessment tools for childhood vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Childhood systemic vasculitides are a group of rare diseases with multi-organ involvement and potentially devastating consequences. After establishment of new classification criteria (Ankara consensus conference in 2008), it is now time to establish measures for proper definition of activity and damage in childhood primary vasculitis. By comparison to adult vasculitis, there is no consensus for indices of activity and damage assessment in childhood vasculitis. Assessment of disease activity is likely to become a major area of interest in pediatric rheumatology in the near future. After defining the classification criteria for primary systemic childhood vasculitis, the next step was to perform a validation study using the original Birmingham vasculitis activity score as well as the disease extent index to measure disease activity in childhood vasculitis. Presently, there are efforts in place to develop a pediatric vasculitis activity score. This paper reviews the current understanding about the assessment tools (i.e., clinical features, laboratory tests, radiologic assessments, etc.) widely used for evaluation of the disease activity and damage status of the children with vasculitis. PMID:21943296

  12. Peroneal nerve involvement as initial manifestation of primary systemic vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Ripellino, Paolo; Varrasi, Claudia; Maldi, Elena; Cantello, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of two patients with foot drop due to peroneal nerve infarct as early sign of two different forms of primary systemic vasculitides: a predominantly small-vessel p-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive vasculitis (microscopic polyangiitis) and a predominantly medium-vessel vasculitis (polyarteritis nodosa). PMID:24686810

  13. Paraneoplastic vasculitis associated to pelvic chondrosarcoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Arvinius, Camilla; González-Pérez, Ana; García-Coiradas, Javier; García-Maroto, Roberto; Cebrián-Parra, Juan Luis

    2016-01-01

    Vasculopathic syndromes have been associated with hematological and solid organ malignancies. The pathogenesis of these syndromes remains largely unknown and there are no biologic markers identified. Whether it is or is not a paraneoplastic syndrome is under discussion, the close temporal relationship of cancer and vasculitis suggests that these vasculitides are a paraneoplastic condition. We report a case of a 45-year-old female patient with pelvic chondrosarcoma who underwent surgical treatment and started to present visual loss, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SRIS), cardiac insufficiency, hepatosplenomegaly, cholestasis as well as pulmonary bleeding suggesting a sarcoma-associated vasculitis. All antibodies were negative as in secondary vasculitis. After corticoideal therapy the vasculitis resolved and at 3-year follow-up the patient had not showed any further medical complications or recurrences of the vasculitis. The parallel evolution of the vasculitis and the solid tumor combined with the resolution of the vasculitis after corticotherapy enhances the likelihood of a paraneoplastic vasculitis associated with a chondrosarcoma according to literature review. PMID:27163097

  14. Cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis: classification and clinical and therapeutic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Gerald S; Horster, Sophia; Wagner, Katrin S; Ihrler, Stephan; Schmid, Holger

    2007-01-01

    Cryoglobulinaemia may cause cutaneous vasculitis and glomerulonephritis, potentially leading to end stage renal failure. An important proportion of cryoglobulinaemias are secondary to hepatitis C virus infection. Emerging antiviral treatment options offer a chance for causal therapy of these cases of cryoglobulinaemia. This review summarises the classification and clinical and therapeutic aspects of cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis and glomerulonephritis. PMID:17308210

  15. Monoclonal antibody desensitization in a patient with a generalized urticarial reaction following denosumab administration.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Fernández, D; Cruz, María-Jesús; Foncubierta-Fernández, A; Moreno-Ancillo, A; Fernández-Anguita, M J; Medina-Varo, F; Andres-García, J A

    2015-01-01

    Denosumab is a human monoclonal antibody indicated for the treatment of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women with a high risk of fractures. To our knowledge, no cases of desensitization to this drug have been described in the literature. We report the first case of generalized urticarial reaction and facial angioedema after therapy with denosumab. A subcutaneous desensitization protocol was successfully completed in this patient. Rapid desensitization is a promising method for the delivery of denosumab after a hypersensitivity reaction, and should be considered in osteoporosis treatment when no acceptable therapeutic alternatives are available. PMID:26504466

  16. Catastrophic primary central nervous system vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Salvarani, Carlo; Brown, Robert D; Morris, Jonathan M; Huston, John; Hunder, Gene G

    2014-01-01

    Primary central nervous system vasculitis (PCNSV) is an uncommon condition that affects the brain and the spinal cord. It is heterogeneous in presenting characteristics and outcomes. We report a patient with a catastrophic rapidly progressive course refractory to intensive treatment with pulses of methylprednisolone and iv cyclophosphamide. The condition rapidly deteriorated and the patient died 6 weeks after presentation. Rapidly progressive PCNSV represents the worst end of the clinical spectrum of PCNSV. These patients are characterised by bilateral, multiple, large cerebral vessel lesions on angiograms and multiple bilateral cerebral infarctions. PMID:24854370

  17. Phenytoin-Associated Granulomatous Pulmonary Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Kheir, Fayez; Daroca, Philip; Lasky, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Phenytoin was introduced in 1938 for the control of seizure disorders and remains widely used today. Since that time, many cases of phenytoin-induced allergic reactions and clinical pulmonary disease have been reported. However, pulmonary vascular pathology from phenytoin use has been only very rarely described. We report a case of phenytoin-associated vasculitis in a 39-year-old African American man presenting with progressive dyspnea and abnormal chest imaging. The importance of reviewing the medication history along with familiarity with the array of drug-associated lung diseases is crucial to recognize and treat pneumotoxicity. PMID:24247101

  18. Cerebral large vessel vasculitis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Böckle, B C; Jara, D; Aichhorn, K; Junker, D; Berger, T; Ratzinger, G; Sepp, N T

    2014-11-01

    Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) is defined by involvement of the central nervous system in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), with a wide range of both neurological and psychiatric manifestations. Although its aetiopathogenesis is not fully elucidated, NPSLE seems to be a consequence of cerebral vascular pathology including thromboembolism, small-vessel vasculopathy and, in rare cases, true vasculitis. Cerebral vasculitis is rare, and cerebral large-vessel vasculitis in SLE is even more unusual. We report the case of a female patient with the diagnosis of SLE. She presented with stroke-like symptoms, headache and vertigo, and palpable purpura on her legs. Further investigations revealed that she suffered from both vasculitis of the cerebral large vessels and coexisting cutaneous small-vessel vasculitis. PMID:24969082

  19. Enhancement of mite antigen-induced histamine release by deuterium oxide from leucocytes of chronic urticarial patients

    SciTech Connect

    Numata, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamura, T.

    1981-09-01

    The mite antigen-induced histamine release from leucocytes of chronic urticarial patients was enhanced in the presence of deuterium oxide, which stabilizes microtubules. This enhancing effect of deuterium oxide on the histamine release from leucocytes may provide a useful means for the detection of allergens in vitro in chronic urticaria.

  20. Lepra reaction with lucio phenomenon mimicking cutaneous vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Misra, Durga Prasanna; Parida, Jyoti Ranjan; Chowdhury, Abhra Chandra; Pani, Krushna Chandra; Kumari, Niraj; Krishnani, Narendra; Agarwal, Vikas

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy is a disease typically found in the tropics. Patients with leprosy can have varying presentation with constitutional symptoms, joint pains, skin nodules, and rarely a vasculitis-like picture with skin ulcers and neuropathy. We present a young lady who presented with the rare manifestation of skin infarcts mimicking cutaneous vasculitis, diagnosed on histopathology to have Lucio phenomenon on a background of lepromatous leprosy. With increasing migration and widespread use of biologic response modifiers, clinicians all over the world need to be aware of various presentations of leprosy as well as needing to keep an open mind while considering the differential diagnoses of vasculitis. PMID:25580317

  1. Lepra Reaction with Lucio Phenomenon Mimicking Cutaneous Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Durga Prasanna; Parida, Jyoti Ranjan; Chowdhury, Abhra Chandra; Pani, Krushna Chandra; Kumari, Niraj; Krishnani, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy is a disease typically found in the tropics. Patients with leprosy can have varying presentation with constitutional symptoms, joint pains, skin nodules, and rarely a vasculitis-like picture with skin ulcers and neuropathy. We present a young lady who presented with the rare manifestation of skin infarcts mimicking cutaneous vasculitis, diagnosed on histopathology to have Lucio phenomenon on a background of lepromatous leprosy. With increasing migration and widespread use of biologic response modifiers, clinicians all over the world need to be aware of various presentations of leprosy as well as needing to keep an open mind while considering the differential diagnoses of vasculitis. PMID:25580317

  2. The Spectrum of Paraneoplastic Cutaneous Vasculitis in a Defined Population

    PubMed Central

    Loricera, Javier; Calvo-Río, Vanesa; Ortiz-Sanjuán, Francisco; González-López, Marcos A.; Fernández-Llaca, Hector; Rueda-Gotor, Javier; Gonzalez-Vela, Maria C.; Alvarez, Lino; Mata, Cristina; González-Lamuño, Domingo; Martínez-Taboada, Victor M.; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Blanco, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Cutaneous vasculitis may be associated with malignancies, and may behave as a paraneoplastic syndrome. This association has been reported in a variable proportion of patients depending on population selection. We conducted the current study to assess the frequency, clinical features, treatment, and outcome of paraneoplastic vasculitis in a large unselected series of 766 patients with cutaneous vasculitis diagnosed at a single university hospital. Sixteen patients (10 men and 6 women; mean age ± standard deviation, 67.94 ± 14.20 yr; range, 40–85 yr) presenting with cutaneous vasculitis were ultimately diagnosed as having an underlying malignancy. They constituted 3.80% of the 421 adult patients. There were 9 hematologic and 7 solid underlying malignancies. Skin lesions were the initial clinical presentation in all of them, and the median interval from the onset of cutaneous vasculitis to the diagnosis of the malignancy was 17 days (range, 8–50 d). The most frequent skin lesions were palpable purpura (15 patients). Other clinical manifestations included constitutional syndrome (10 patients) and arthralgia and/or arthritis (4 cases). Hematologic cytopenias (11 cases) as well as immature peripheral blood cells (6 cases) were frequently observed in the full blood cell count, especially in those with vasculitis associated with hematologic malignancies. Specific treatment for vasculitis was prescribed in 10 patients; nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (4 patients), corticosteroids (3 patients), chloroquine (1 patient), antihistamines (1 patient), and cyclophosphamide (1 patient). Ten patients died due to the malignancy and 6 patients recovered following malignancy therapy. Patients with paraneoplastic vasculitis were older, more frequently had constitutional syndrome, and less frequently had organ damage due to the vasculitis than the remaining patients with cutaneous vasculitis. In summary, cutaneous paraneoplastic vasculitis is an entity not uncommonly

  3. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Vasculitis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Vasculitis? The signs and symptoms ... symptoms develop quickly, over days or weeks. Systemic Signs and Symptoms Systemic signs and symptoms are those ...

  4. A 15-year exercise program for rheumatoid vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Marley, W P; Santilli, T F

    1998-01-01

    A rare case of rheumatoid vasculitis and responses to a 15-year supervised exercise program. This patient presented with significant impairment in mobility and physical work capacity. His exercise tolerance improved considerably and he benefited emotionally. PMID:9572643

  5. Innate immune cells in the pathogenesis of primary systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Misra, Durga Prasanna; Agarwal, Vikas

    2016-02-01

    Innate immune system forms the first line of defense against foreign substances. Neutrophils, eosinophils, erythrocytes, platelets, monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, γδ T cells, natural killer and natural killer T cells comprise the innate immune system. Genetic polymorphisms influencing the activation of innate immune cells predispose to development of vasculitis and influence its severity. Abnormally activated innate immune cells cross-talk with other cells of the innate immune system, present antigens more efficiently and activate T and B lymphocytes and cause tissue destruction via cell-mediated cytotoxicity and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These secreted cytokines further recruit other cells to the sites of vascular injury. They are involved in both the initiation as well as the perpetuation of vasculitis. Evidences suggest reversal of aberrant activation of immune cells in response to therapy. Understanding the role of innate immune cells in vasculitis helps understand the potential of therapeutic modulation of their activation to treat vasculitis. PMID:26403285

  6. The long-term outcomes of systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Westman, Kerstin; Flossmann, Oliver; Gregorini, Gina

    2015-04-01

    Patients with generalized ANCA-associated small vessel vasculitis (AAV) have a very poor outcome if the ANCA-associated vasculitis is not diagnosed, evaluated and treated properly. The introduction of treatment with immunosuppressive therapy has improved patient survival dramatically but with considerable side effects. Besides, almost 50% of surviving patients experience a relapse of vasculitis. Since 1995, the European Vasculitis Society (EUVAS) has designed and conducted several clinical trials on patients with AAV independently of pharmaceutical companies. The studies included patients with newly diagnosed AAV and were stratified according to renal function and generalized versus more localized forms. As the immediate patient survival has improved, the longer term outcome has become more important. There are several reports on outcome of patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis, but the patient groups were heterogeneous regarding diagnosis as well as treatment and follow-up. Therefore, EUVAS decided to further evaluate the effect and possible adverse events of the original randomized trials. This review presents an overview on long-term follow-up of patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis, with focus on relapse rate, patient and renal survival and development of cardiovascular disease and malignancy. PMID:25601266

  7. Biological Therapy-Induced Systemic Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-González, Luis Arturo

    2016-07-01

    The use of biologics has been associated with the paradoxical development of biologics-induced autoimmune diseases. The purpose of this review was to describe the key immunopathogenic mechanisms involved in the development of these conditions, and to discuss the clinical and laboratory characteristics usually described in the medical literature, reviewing case reports as well as records on national biologic therapies (BIOGEAS, RABBIT, BSRBR-RA, BIOBADAVEN). More than 200 cases have so far been reported, all of them diagnosed on the basis of the histopathology or meeting the ACR/Chapel Hill criteria. Over 75 % of the cases were females with a mean age of 48 ± 5 years. More than 50 % had rheumatoid arthritis. Most of the biologics-associated vasculitis developed in 90 ± 31 days. Complete resolution in almost 75 % of the cases was observed upon treatment discontinuation; however, steroid therapy was indicated for all patients and one death was recorded. The use of cyclophosphamide, rituximab or plasma exchange was reserved for the most severe cases. PMID:27165496

  8. [Usefulness of imaging in large vessel vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Mekinian, A; Djelbani, S; Viry, F; Fain, O; Soussan, M

    2016-04-01

    The imaging is essential for the diagnosis of large vessels arteritis, in order to assess the persistent inflammation of arterial lesions, to evaluate the treatment response and search the vascular complications. In patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA), the aortitis could be suspected in 2 situations: in the presence of general constitutional symptoms or systematic screening of aortitis in patient with confirmed GCA. The frequency of aortitis varies according to the imaging method and could be detected in 40 % of patients with computed tomography and MRI, and approximately in 60 % with FDG-PET/CT. The clinical and prognostic value of systematic detection of aortitis during the GCA remains to be determined. In Takayasu arteritis, imaging is performed to diagnose the large vessels vasculitis, to determine the arterial lesions extension to assess the persistent inflammation of arterial lesions. The persistent vascular inflammation should be suspected in the presence of arterial thickness, of arterial enhancement, a parietal edema and increased arterial FDG uptake (>liver). However, the value of these parameters and the threshold remain to be determined. Thus, the value of FDG-PET/CT and MRI and of parameters used to characterize the persistent arterial inflammation should be further studied. PMID:26880245

  9. [Vasculitis as a reason of chronic headache].

    PubMed

    Ataia, I; Casaulta, C; von Vigier, R O; Pfammatter, J P; Brekenfeld, C; Sauvain, M J; Steinlin, M

    2008-03-19

    A 13-year-old girl presented to our emergency with a one week history of fever and skin rash and new onset of chorea for the last three days. There was a long standing history of right predominant headache; followed by personality change, fatigue, arthralgia and weight loss over the last few months. Previous investigations by head CT and ophthalmological examination did not explain the symptoms. Further investigations revealed peri- and pancarditis with aortic insufficiency, a renal involvement with elevated creatinin, protein- and hematuria and a hemolytic anemia. Diagnosis of lupus eythematodes was confirmed by high ANA, anti-dsDNS and Anticardiolipin antibodies. Within the first 48 hours after admission there was significant deterioration with reduced vigilance and dysarthria. MRI of the brain and dopplersonography of cerebral vessels showed a complete thrombosis of the right medial cerebral artery with a small net of collaterals, irregularities of the left cerebral artery due to vasculitis and several subacute leftsided ischemias. Immunosuppressive therapy with high-dose corticosteroids and cyclophosphamid together with antithrombotic therapy induced an improvement of neurologic, renal and cardiac function. PMID:18548940

  10. Lung vasculitis and alveolar hemorrhage: pathology.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Gregory A; Fishbein, Michael C

    2011-06-01

    Pulmonary vasculitides are a diverse group of limited and systemic disorders associated with inflammation of pulmonary vessels and parenchyma. These diseases often have distinctive clinical, serological, and histopathological features-extrapulmonary sites of involvement, circulating autoantibodies, predispositions for small or large vessels, and others. Some have characteristic inflammatory lesions; others are characterized by the absence of such lesions. Frequently pathological findings overlap, rendering classification, and diagnosis a challenge. The anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated small-vessel diseases constitute the major pulmonary vasculitides. These include Wegener granulomatosis (WG), Churg Strauss syndrome (CSS), and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA). Less frequently, diseases such as polyarteritis nodosa, Takayasu arteritis, Behçet syndrome, and connective tissue diseases may involve pulmonary vessels, but these entities are better associated with extrapulmonary disease. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a severe manifestation of pulmonary vasculitis. DAH is most commonly seen in small-vessel vasculitides, specifically MPA and WG. Other syndromes associated with DAH include Goodpasture syndrome, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Less commonly, DAH may be secondary to infection or drugs/toxins. Furthermore, in the absence of discernable systemic disease, DAH may be idiopathic-referred to as isolated pulmonary capillaritis (IPC) or idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH), depending on the presence of capillaritis. PMID:21674412

  11. Urinary neopterin in idiopathic retinal vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, H; Giovannoni, G; Stanford, M; Wallace, G; Graham, E

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—To determine whether urinary neopterin:creatinine (UNC) ratios relate to disease activity in idiopathic retinal vasculitis (RV).
METHODS—18 patients with RV were prospectively recruited into a year long longitudinal study. Patients collected first morning urine samples on a weekly basis and on the same day completed a diary which documented their subjective view of RV activity and any concurrent infection. They were examined in clinic on a 6-8 weekly basis and an objective assessment was made of RV disease activity. 14 healthy controls collected urine samples in the same way.
RESULTS—UNC ratios were significantly higher in patients than in controls (p=0.004, Mann-Whitney U test). UNC ratios were significantly higher when, according to their diaries, the patients had a subjective flare up of RV (p=0.001, Mann-Whitney U test). Subjective increased RV activity occurred more often when the patients had a concurrent infection (p<0.0001, χ2 test). There was no significant difference in the UNC ratio between objective clinical relapse and non-relapse of RV. There was moderate agreement between the clinical assessment and patients' subjective impression of RV activity (κ=0.48).
CONCLUSIONS—Higher neopterin levels reflect cell mediated disease that occurs in RV, but UNC ratios are not recommended as a means of monitoring clinical disease activity in RV.

 PMID:11133708

  12. Pediatric vasculitis: recognizing multisystemic manifestations at body imaging.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Geetika; Sargar, Kiran; Baszis, Kevin W

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric vasculitides are multisystem diseases that can be diagnostic challenges because of variable clinical manifestations. The clinical manifestation is determined by the size of the affected vessels, organs involved, extent of vascular injury, and underlying pathologic characteristics. Henoch-Schönlein purpura and Kawasaki disease are the two most common subtypes of pediatric vasculitis. Diagnosis of pediatric vasculitis can be difficult, and the outcome can be serious or fatal in the absence of timely intervention. Imaging plays a central role in establishing the diagnosis of vasculitis involving large- and medium-sized vessels, visualizing its vascular and extravascular manifestations, and monitoring the disease course and response to treatment. Although imaging cannot depict the vessel changes of small-vessel vasculitis directly, it can be used to detect tissue damage resulting from vessel inflammation. This article discusses the classification and clinical features of the major pediatric vasculitides. The imaging approach to and nonneurologic findings of major pediatric vasculitis subtypes are reviewed for the pediatric body imager. PMID:25969938

  13. Vessel wall enhancement in herpes simplex virus central nervous system vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Waldo R; Dababneh, Haitham; Hedna, Shushrutha; Johnson, James A; Peters, Keith; Waters, Michael F

    2013-09-01

    Infection is a well-known cause of cerebral vasculopathy and vasculitis. We report a 36-year-old woman with cerebral vasculitis and ischemic stroke secondary to herpes simplex virus (HSV). MRI studies revealed a pontine stroke with basilar artery stenosis and vessel wall gadolinium enhancement. This case demonstrates the ability of HSV to cause a focal brainstem vasculitis and the utility of enhanced MRI in the diagnosis of stroke related to HSV central nervous system vasculitis. PMID:23517674

  14. An approach to the diagnosis and management of systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Miller, A; Chan, M; Wiik, A; Misbah, S A; Luqmani, R A

    2010-05-01

    The systemic vasculitides are a complex and often serious group of disorders which, while uncommon, require careful management in order to ensure optimal outcome. In most cases there is no known cause. Multi-system disease is likely to be fatal without judicious use of immunosuppression. A prompt diagnosis is necessary to preserve organ function. Comprehensive and repeated disease assessment is a necessary basis for planning therapy and modification of treatment protocols according to response. Therapies typically include glucocorticoids and, especially for small and medium vessel vasculitis, an effective immunosuppressive agent. Cyclophosphamide is currently the standard therapy for small vessel multi-system vasculitis, but other agents are now being evaluated in large randomized trials. Comorbidity is common in patients with vasculitis, including the cumulative effects of potentially toxic therapy. Long-term evaluation of patients is important in order to detect and manage relapses. PMID:20070316

  15. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis in a patient with type 1 cryoglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Paul Y; Prete, Pamela E; Kukes, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous manifestations of type 1 cryoglobulinemia are usually related to vascular occlusion by noninflammatory thrombosis; rarely is leukocytoclastic vasculitis seen in type 1 cryoglobulinemia. We report the case of a 64-year-old male who presented with isolated cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis that was initially attributed to essential mixed cryoglobulinemia after thorough diagnostic evaluation. A lack of adequate clinical response to therapy prompted further investigation, including cryoprecipitate electrophoresis and immunofixation, which revealed an IgM kappa monoclonal gammopathy consistent with type 1 cryoglobulinemia. A renewed search for an underlying malignancy led to the discovery of early Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia. Although leukocytoclastic vasculitis is more characteristic of mixed cryoglobulinemia, it can be a presenting manifestation of type 1 cryoglobulinemia. PMID:22937435

  16. A Fatal Case of "Bullous Erysipelas-like" Pseudomonas Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sam Shiyao; Chandran, Nisha Suyien; Huang, Jing Xiang; Tan, Kong-Bing; Aw, Derrick Chen-Wee

    2016-01-01

    Erysipelas is a generally benign superficial bacterial skin infection, and its bullous form constitutes a rare and more severe variant. We describe the first and fatal case of "bullous erysipelas-like" septic vasculitis due to Pseudomonas bacteremi. A 69-year-old Chinese man presenting with diarrhea and septic shock initially began to rapidly develop sharply defined erythematous plaques with non-hemorrhagic bullae over his lower limbs. Culture of the aspirate from the bullae was positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This was also consistent with his blood cultures showing Pseudomonas bacteremia. Histology of the skin lesion showed microthrombi and neutrophilic infiltrates in blood vessels with Gram-negative bacilli extruding from the vessel walls, characteristic of septic vasculitis. The bullous erysipelas-like lesions seen in this patient represents a rare manifestation of both septic vasculitis and Pseudomonas infection. PMID:26955132

  17. Isolated Central Nervous System Vasculitis as a Manifestation of Neurosarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Macêdo, Philippe Joaquim Oliveira Menezes; da Silveira, Victor Calil; Ramos, Luíza Tavares; Nóbrega, Felipe Resende; Vasconcellos, Luiz Felipe Rocha

    2016-06-01

    A 62-year-old male presented to our clinic with recurrent fever, skin lesions (petechiae), scleral wounds, and hilar adenomegaly. A diagnosis of sarcoidosis was established, which resolved with corticosteroid treatment. After a few months, the patient developed confusion and behavioral changes, with few objective neurological deficits. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed slight focal meningeal enhancement (prepontine region). The level of angiotensin-converting enzymes was normal in the serum and increased in the cerebrospinal fluid. The patient was diagnosed with neurosarcoidosis, and corticosteroid treatment was prescribed, yielding good clinical response. Nine months later, the patient presented with multiple ischemic strokes, and arteriography demonstrated multiple distal irregularities in all arterial territories, suggesting cerebral vasculitis. Even with corticosteroids, cyclophosphamide, and intravenous immunoglobulin, the patient died. Vasculitis is rarely seen in association with sarcoidosis, and in this case, no systemic manifestation was observed at the time that the patient developed vasculitis. PMID:27083067

  18. Cutaneous Vasculitis in a Patient with Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Khushboo; Parke, Ann

    2016-02-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is an acquired thrombophilia, caused by autoantibodies to anticardiolipin (aCL), or antibeta 2 glycoprotein I, or the presence of lupus anticoagulant (LA) in plasma. It is characterized by recurrent venous and/or arterial thrombi and/or pregnancy related morbidities. We present the case of a 52-year-old female with long-standing APS, who developed cutaneous vasculitis following a common cold. Most of the cutaneous manifestations of APS have been found to be thrombotic on histopathology without evidence of perivascular inflammation. Vasculitis is usually seen in APS patients with coexistent Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). However, our patient had evidence of vasculitis on skin biopsy and did not have SLE. Though rare, this is a disease process which must be considered in patients with primary APS which must be closely monitored for other vasculitic complications of APS, particularly diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. PMID:27024977

  19. Interstitial Lung Disease with ANCA-associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Katsumata, Yasuhiro; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    The association between interstitial lung disease (ILD) and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV), particularly microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), has been described in a number of case reports and case series reports in the last 2 decades. In addition, patients with pulmonary fibrosis and ANCA positivity but without other manifestations of systemic vasculitis have also been reported. Pulmonary fibrosis was clinically manifested at the time of diagnosis in the majority of AAV patients that developed this condition. Moreover, ANCA-positive conversion occurs in patients initially diagnosed with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and as a result, other manifestations of systemic vasculitis develop in some of these patients. There is significant predominance of myeloperoxidase (MPO)-ANCA and MPA in patients with AAV and ILD. Radiological and pathological findings generally demonstrate usual interstitial pneumonia (pattern) in the lungs of these patients. In most studies, AAV patients with ILD have a worse prognosis than those without it. PMID:26448696

  20. A Case of Brucellosis with Recurrent Attacks of Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Pınar; Kıdır, Mehtap; Namdar, Nazlı Dizen; Özmen, Ahmet; Uyar, Cemile; Değer, Ayşe Nur

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis that affects several organs or systems. Skin involvement is nonspecific and it is reported to range between 0,4 and 17% of the patients with brucellosis. Here, we defined a 36-year-old female patient presented to our clinic with a clinical picture of recurrent attacks of vasculitis due to brucellosis for the first time. Skin involvement and vasculitic lesions as a finding of skin involvement are nonspecific in brucellosis. Therefore, in the regions like Turkey where brucellosis is endemic, brucellosis should be kept in mind necessarily in the differential diagnosis of vasculitis. PMID:27042369

  1. Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis as a manifestation of familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Shigetsuna; Honma, Masaru; Igawa, Satomi; Tsuji, Hitomi; Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi; Migita, Kiyoshi; Ida, Hiroaki; Iizuka, Hajime

    2014-09-01

    Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is a hereditary autoinflammatory disease, which is characterized by recurrent and paroxysmal fever, peritonitis, arthritis, myalgia, and skin rashes. Although various skin lesions such as "erysipelas-like erythema", urticaria, nonspecific purpura, and subcutaneous nodules have been described, cutaneous vasculitis is rare. We report a Japanese case of sporadic FMF accompanied by cutaneous arteritis at the time of febrile attacks of FMF. Gene analysis revealed M694I mutation in a single allele of the MEFV gene, and oral colchicine successfully controlled both periodic fever and subcutaneous nodules of arteritis. Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis repeatedly emerging with febrile attacks should be included among the skin manifestations of FMF. PMID:25109905

  2. Measurement of damage in systemic vasculitis: a comparison of the Vasculitis Damage Index with the Combined Damage Assessment Index

    PubMed Central

    Suppiah, Ravi; Flossmann, Oliver; Mukhtyar, Chetan; Alberici, Federico; Baslund, Bo; Brown, Denise; Hasan, Nadeem; Holle, Julia; Hruskova, Zdenka; Jayne, David; Judge, Andrew; Little, Mark A; Merkel, Peter A; Palmisano, Alessandra; Seo, Philip; Stegeman, Coen; Tesar, Vladimir; Vaglio, Augusto; Westman, Kerstin; Luqmani, Raashid

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare the Vasculitis Damage Index (VDI) with the Combined Damage Assessment Index (CDA) as measures of damage from vasculitis. Methods A total of 283 patients with vasculitis from 11 European centres were evaluated in a cross-sectional study using the VDI and CDA. Results Wegener’s granulomatosis (58.4%) and microscopic polyangiitis (11.0%) were the most common diagnoses. Agreement between VDI and CDA scores (Spearman’s correlation) was 0.90 (95% CI 0.87 to 0.92). There was good correlation between individual comparably evaluated organ systems (Spearman’s correlation 0.70–0.94). Interobserver reliability (assessed by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC)) was 0.94 (95% CI 0.89 to 0.98) for VDI and 0.78 (95% CI 0.63 to 0.93) for CDA. Intraobserver reliability was 0.92 (95% CI 0.83 to 1.00) for VDI and 0.87 (95% CI 0.75 to 1.00) for CDA. A total of 13 items were not used in the VDI compared to 23 in the CDA. Observers agreed that the CDA covered the full spectrum of damage attributable to vasculitis but was more time consuming and thus possibly less feasible for clinical and research purposes. Conclusions The VDI and CDA capture reliable data on damage among patients with vasculitis. The CDA captures more detail but is more complex and less practical than the VDI. Further evolution of damage assessment in vasculitis is likely to include key elements from both instruments. PMID:20736392

  3. Drug-Induced Vasculitis: New Insights and a Changing Lineup of Suspects.

    PubMed

    Grau, Rafael G

    2015-12-01

    An increasing number of therapeutic agents have been associated with a vasculitic syndrome. This usually involves small vessels, primarily capillaries, venules, and arterioles in leukocytoclastic vasculitis, small-vessel disease similar to an antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-related vasculitis, or mid-sized muscular arteries in a polyarteritis-like picture. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies are present in many cases of vasculitis regardless of the size of the vessel involved. Monoclonal antibodies used to treat many autoimmune disorders have become the most common agents associated with drug-induced vasculitis. Important advances in epigenetics, genetics, and neutrophil apoptosis are providing new insights into the pathogenesis of both drug-induced vasculitis and idiopathic vasculitis. Although management has not changed significantly in the past few years where withdrawal of the offending agent is the primary intervention, increasing awareness of drug-induced vasculitis can lead to earlier diagnosis and prevention of severe organ damage and fatalities. PMID:26503355

  4. Epigenomic functional characterization of genetic susceptibility variants in systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Sawalha, Amr H; Dozmorov, Mikhail G

    2016-02-01

    Systemic vasculitides are poorly understood inflammatory diseases of the blood vessels that are frequently associated with significant organ damage. Genetic risk variants contribute to the susceptibility of vasculitis, but functional consequences of these genetic variants are largely unknown. Most genetic risk variants in immune-mediated diseases, including systemic vasculitis, are localized to non-coding genetic regions suggesting they might increase disease risk by influencing regulatory elements within the genome. Long range regulatory interactions pose an additional obstacle in localizing functional consequences associated with risk variants to specific genes or cell types. We used cell-type specific enrichment patterns of histone changes that mark poised, primed, and active enhancers, and DNase hypersensitivity to identify specific immune cells mediating genetic risk in vasculitis. Our data suggest that genetic risk variants in ANCA-associated vasculitis are significantly enriched in enhancer elements in Th17 cells, supporting a role for Th17 cells in this disease. Primed and active enhancer elements in B cells can be potentially affected by genetic risk variants associated with Kawasaki disease. Genetic risk in Behçet's disease and Takayasu arteritis might affect enhancer elements in multiple cell types, possibly explained by influencing enhancers in hematopoietic stem cells. Interestingly, our analyses indicate a role for B cells in Kawasaki disease, Behçet's disease, and Takayasu arteritis, and suggest that further work to characterize the involvement of B cells in these diseases is warranted. PMID:26492816

  5. Cogan syndrome with severe medium and large vessel vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Sevgi, Duriye D.; Sobrin, Lucia; Papaliodis, George N.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cogan syndrome is a rare disease characterized by coexisting audiovestibular and ocular symptoms. Almost half of patients develop systemic manifestations. We report the case of a 38-year-old woman who presented with severe medium and large vessel vasculitis as a systemic manifestation of Cogan syndrome. PMID:27330475

  6. Ten year clinical experience with stroke and cerebral vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Kempster, Peter A; McLean, Catriona A; Phan, Thanh G

    2016-05-01

    Angiitis of the central nervous system (CNS) is difficult to diagnose but potentially fatal. When stroke occurs in a younger individual or is associated with multiple infarcts on imaging, clinicians must decide how far to pursue a possible diagnosis of vasculitis. The aim of this study is to establish the prevalence of primary and secondary cerebral angiitis among patients presenting with stroke. Hospital attendances over a 10year period were surveyed by searching for diagnostic codes and key words specific for cerebral vasculitis/angiitis. Case notes were reviewed by the authors using two sets of criteria for angiitis of the CNS. Thirty-two patients were initially considered likely to have cerebral angiitis by treating physicians. Thirteen had been admitted to hospital with stroke. During this period, there were 7475 admissions for ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke. Six patients had a final diagnosis of vasculitic stroke but only one had definite CNS angiitis with a first presentation as ischaemic stroke (0.02%). Most patients who did have cerebral vasculitis developed multifocal or subacute neurological deficits, or already had an immunological disorder known to be associated with secondary CNS angiitis. Of 19 patients given an alternative final diagnosis, the most common were atherosclerotic/embolic cerebrovascular disease (n=9) and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (n=7). Stroke is rarely the first manifestation of cerebral vasculitis. Our findings suggest that routine screening for angiitis in stroke patients may not be warranted. PMID:26778046

  7. Diagnostic approach and current treatment options in childhood vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Barut, Kenan; Şahin, Sezgin; Adroviç, Amra; Kasapçopur, Özgür

    2015-01-01

    All inflammatory changes in the vessel wall are defined as vasculitis. Pediatric vasculitis may present with different clinical findings. Although Henoch-Schönlein purpura which is the most common pediatric vasculitis generally recovers spontaneously, it should be monitorized closely because of the risk of renal failure. Although Kawasaki disease is easy to diagnose with its classical findings, the diagnosis may be delayed in case of incomplete Kawasaki disease. Kawasaki disease should be considered especially in infants in case of prolonged fever even if the criteria are not fully met and intravenous immunoglobulin treatment should be administered without delay in order to prevent development of coronary artery aneurism. Reaction at the site of administration of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine may be observed as commonly as cervical lymphadenopathy in Kawasaki disease and may be used as a valuable finding in suspicious cases. Although anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitides are rare in children, renal involvement is more common and progression is more severe compared to adults. Hence, efficient and aggressive treatment is required. Takayasu’s arteritis is observed commonly in young adult women and rarely in adolescent girls. Therefore, a careful physical examination and blood pressure measurement should be performed in addition to a detailed history in daily practice. In children with unexplained neurological findings, cerebral vasculitis should be considered in the absence of other systemic vasculitides and necessary radiological investigations should be performed in this regard. This review will provide an insight into the understanding of pediatric vasculitis, current diagnostic approaches and prognosis by the aid of new studies. PMID:26884688

  8. Anti-C1q autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Kallenberg, Cees G M

    2008-09-01

    Autoantibodies to complement components are associated with various diseases. Anti-C1q antibodies are present in all patients with hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis, but also, with varying prevalence, in other conditions. In SLE, these antibodies are neither sensitive nor specific for this condition. They occur, however, more frequently in (proliferative) lupus nephritis, particularly during active disease. Furthermore, levels of anti-C1q rise, in many cases, prior to a relapse of lupus nephritis, suggesting a pathogenic role for the autoantibodies. Indeed, experimental studies strongly support a pathogenic role for anti-C1q in immune complex-mediated renal disease. In addition, anti-C1q may interfere with the clearance of apoptotic cells, so influencing induction and expression of autoimmunity. PMID:18606253

  9. Dividing the Janus vasculitis? Pathophysiology of eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangitis.

    PubMed

    Chaigne, Benjamin; Terrier, Benjamin; Thieblemont, Nathalie; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique; Mouthon, Luc

    2016-02-01

    Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangitis (EGPA) is a rare small- and medium-sized vessel vasculitis belonging to the group of anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides (AAV). It is commonly divided into two phenotypes depending on the presence of ANCAs targeting myeloperoxidase (MPO). MPO-ANCAs are present in 31% to 38% of patients and are associated with a vasculitis phenotype of the disease, whereas patients without MPO-ANCA are at risk of cardiac involvement. Despite significant advances in understanding the overall pathogenesis of the disease, the explanation for this dichotomy is still unclear. In this review, we synthesize our knowledge of the pathogenesis of EGPA and attempt to i) distinguish EGPA from other diseases including other AAVs, asthma, allergy and hypereosinophilic-associated conditions and ii) speculate about the preponderant mechanisms, which could explain the two disease phenotypes. PMID:26506114

  10. A Case of Cerebral Vasculitis Associated with Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Naveen; Arkebauer, Matthew; Waters, Barry; Dickinson, Brucha

    2015-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic, debilitating condition characterized by inflammation of the colonic mucosa. It is regarded as a systemic inflammatory disorder that can affect a number of organ systems. Central nervous system disease associated with UC is a rare sequela of inflammatory bowel disease, occurring in less than 5% of cases. These manifestations include arterial and venous thrombosis, leukoencephalitis, seizures, and vasculitis. We present a case of a 61-year-old female with a two-year history of well-controlled ulcerative colitis, who developed altered mental status and weakness. On brain imaging, she was found to have cerebral lesions which were biopsied. Histopathology subsequently revealed coagulative necrosis and inflammation characteristic of vasculitis. Rheumatology serologies were negative, and the patient was started on steroids that dramatically improved her neurological function, with no residual deficits, and led to resolution of the brain lesions. PMID:26557402

  11. Retinal vasculitis: a novel paradoxical effect of anti-TNFα?

    PubMed

    Ben Abdelghani, Kaouther; Slouma, Maroua; Ben Jalel, Wady; Zakraoui, Leith

    2014-01-01

    Retinal vasculitis (RV) is extremely rare in spondyloarthritis associated with Crohn's disease. Infliximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody to tumour necrosis factor (TNF) α, is efficient in spondyloarthritis, Crohn's disease and RV. We present the case of a 41-year-old man with a known history of spondyloarthritis associated with Crohn's disease. He was under treatment with infliximab. Four days after his 12th infusion of infliximab, he presented with sudden blurred vision. Although his disease was in remission, ophthalmological examination revealed bilateral peripheral retinal occlusive vasculitis. The patient responded positively to the treatment by laser photocoagulation and peribulbar corticosteroid injection. Infliximab was not stopped. There was improvement in his eye disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of new onset of RV occurring under infliximab in a patient with Crohn's related spondyloarthritis. This case illustrates the possibility of a paradoxical effect of this kind of therapy. PMID:25143312

  12. Primary Central Nervous System Vasculitis With Optic Nerve Involvement.

    PubMed

    Benson, Christy E; Knezevic, Alexander; Lynch, Shannon C

    2016-06-01

    A 20-year-old woman presented with headache, decreased vision, eye pain, and urinary retention. During her clinical course, visual acuity declined to 20/800, right eye, and 20/50, left eye, associated with bilateral optic disc edema. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed enhancement of the leptomeninges, right optic nerve, and right side of the optic chiasm. Extensive evaluation of the central nervous system (CNS) for an infectious cause was negative. Brain biopsy showed a pattern consistent with vasculitis. The patient was treated with prednisone and cyclophosphamide, resulting in improvement of her vision and systemic symptoms. Primary CNS vasculitis is a rare condition that may affect the anterior visual pathways. PMID:26693942

  13. Current Status of Outcome Measure Development in Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Merkel, Peter A.; Aydin, Sibel Z.; Boers, Maarten; Cornell, Christina; Direskeneli, Haner; Gebhart, Don; Hatemi, Gulen; Luqmani, Raashid; Matteson, Eric L.; Milman, Nataliya; Robson, Joanna; Seo, Philip; Tomasson, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    The conduct of randomized controlled trials for vasculitis, especially for the antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitides [AAV, granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener’s) and microscopic polyangiitis], has been greatly advanced by the development, use, and acceptance of validated outcome measures. Trials have subsequently provided the opportunity to validate and refine reliable, valid outcome measures for these multisystemic and relapsing rare diseases. The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Vasculitis Working Group was formed in 2004 to foster development of validated and widely accepted outcomes in vasculitis using data-driven analyses, a dedication to building consensus, and adherence to, and guidance by, the principles of the OMERACT approach. This work led to the endorsement by OMERACT of the core set of domains and associated outcome measures for AAV. Next steps for the study of existing outcome tools in AAV include better definition of response criteria through development of more data-driven weighting of the elements of activity and damage assessment. The Working Group is now also embarking on a series of linked projects to develop validated patient-reported outcomes for use in clinical research in vasculitis. Additionally, the Working Group is studying how current methods of disease assessment and plans for new outcomes can be informed by the conceptual framework of the International Classification of Function of the World Health Organization. The success of the Group’s work in AAV has also led to a formal process for developing outcomes for the large vessel vasculitides (Takayasu arteritis and giant cell arteritis) and Behçet disease. PMID:24429177

  14. Cutaneous Small Vessel Vasculitis Accompanied by Pustulosis Palmaris et Plantaris

    PubMed Central

    Kosaka, Motoko; Kato, Tokue; Kawana, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of a 64-year-old woman who has suffered from pustulosis palmaris et plantaris for 10 years. At the first examination, many erythematous lesions with purpura, blood crusts, and blisters were present in the lower legs and dorsum of the feet. Painful swelling in the sternal region and dorsal pain were also noted. Elevation of the CRP and myogenic enzyme levels, and liver and renal dysfunctions were noted on blood testing. Histopathologically, leukocytoclastic vasculitis was noted in small blood vessels in the whole dermal layers, and deposition of IgM and C3 in the vascular wall was detected by the direct immunofluorescence techniques. Based on these findings, cutaneous small vessel vasculitis was diagnosed. Because the patient complained of a toothache during the clinical course, an X-ray examination was performed. On pantomography, a radicular cyst and apical periodontitis were noted. The tooth symptoms changed with exacerbation and remission of the skin symptoms. These findings indicate that odontogenic infection is very likely to be a cause of cutaneous small vessel vasculitis in a manner similar to pustulosis palmaris et plantaris. PMID:22548039

  15. Monitoring Vasculitis with 18F-FDG PET.

    PubMed

    Bucerius, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Whereas in the past the term "vasculitis" was most frequently used in context with systemic vasculitides, such as the large vessel vasculitides (LVV) Takayasa arteritis and giant cell arteritis, characterized by inflammation of blood vessel walls, it nowadays comprises also inflammatory changes of the vessel wall as a substantial part of the atherosclerotic disease process. Implementing non-invasive imaging techniques, such as computed tomography angiography (CTA), magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) as well as positron emission tomography (PET) in the diagnostic algorithm of atherosclerosis and LVV, depicts a promising step towards an earlier detection with a, consecutively, improved therapeutic approach and potentially prognostic benefit in patients suffering from vasculitis. Mainly molecular imaging with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET seems to be promising in offering an early and sensitive identification of inflammatory changes in both, atherosclerosis and LVV. This review will therefore provide an overview on the diagnostic performance and clinical relevance of FDG-PET in monitoring vasculitis in atherosclerosis and LVV, with a focus on LVV. PMID:27280732

  16. Challenges in diagnosis of isolated central nervous system vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Amara, Amy W; Bashir, Khurram; Palmer, Cheryl A; Walker, Harrison C

    2011-01-01

    Isolated central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis is a rare and complicated disorder. Patients typically present with nonspecific neurologic symptoms such as headache and encephalopathy, and have variable progression and severity of the disease. Challenges to definitive diagnosis include the limitations of currently available diagnostic modalities with high likelihood of false-positive or false-negative findings. Imaging, serologic, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) evaluation, and even angiography can fail to establish the diagnosis. Often, brain biopsy is required. In order to illustrate these challenges, we report the case of a patient who presented with subacute cognitive decline and was ultimately diagnosed with isolated CNS eosinophilic vasculitis. Initial work-up included CSF and serologic analyses, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and cerebral angiography, but definitive diagnosis required brain biopsy. Immunosuppressive therapy resulted in clinical improvement and stabilization. To our knowledge, only one other case of isolated CNS eosinophilic vasculitis has been reported in the literature. We discuss the importance of a high index of clinical suspicion in cases of progressive nonspecific neurologic symptoms. PMID:22398982

  17. Ocular disease in patients with ANCA-positive vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Angela S.; Kempen, John H.; Choi, Dongseok; Liesegang, Teresa L.; Pujari, S. S.; Newcomb, Craig; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Rosenbaum, James T.; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Foster, C. Stephen; Jabs, Douglas A.; Levy-Clarke, Grace A.; Suhler, Eric B.

    2009-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-positive vasculitis—the term recently applied to Wegener's granulomatosis—is a rare multi-system inflammation characterized by necrotizing granulomas and vasculitis. We investigated the ocular manifestations of this disease in a group of patients drawn from five inflammatory eye disease clinics across the United States. Of 8,562 persons with ocular inflammation, 59 individuals were diagnosed with ANCA-positive vasculitis; 35 males and 21 females, aged 16 to 96 years, were included in this study. Ocular diagnoses were scleritis (75.0%), uveitis (17.9%), and other ocular inflammatory conditions (33.9%) including peripheral ulcerative keratitis and orbital pseudotumor. Mean duration of ocular disease was 4.6 years. Oral corticosteroids and other systemic immunosuppressive agents were used by 85.7% and 78.5% of patients, respectively. Over time, patients with ANCA-positive vasculitis experienced 2.75-fold higher mortality than other patients with inflammatory eye disease. PMID:20835396

  18. A rheumatology perspective on cutaneous vasculitis: assessment and investigation for the non-rheumatologist.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, Charlotte R; Fremlin, Georgina A; Nash, Julian; Harding, Keith

    2016-02-01

    Vasculitis, by definition, is inflammation of the vasculature. This inflammation can result in either vessel wall destruction causing aneurysm or rupture, or stenosis causing ischaemia or necrosis. This autoimmune response does not always have a clear cause. Vasculitis is a heterogeneous group of disorders that has been categorised not only by primary and secondary causes, but also by the size of the affected vessel. The secondary causes that can trigger vasculitis include infection (particularly hepatitis B and C and haemorrhagic fever);cancer, autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Sjogren's; drugs or allergic reactions. As vasculitis can affect any part of the vasculature, it can result in a wide range of signs and symptoms. However, one of the most common presentations of vasculitis is a rash, due to small vessel vasculitis, which is most common. A vasculitic rash has certain characteristics that are easily identifiable and differentiate it from other rashes. This is a review from a rheumatologist's perspective of how to identify vasculitis skin changes. If cutaneous vasculitis is suspected, this article identifies other areas of skin that can be affected that need identification, in addition to what to screen for in the history and other differential diagnoses to consider. Subsequently, the article addresses the key investigations to request and a brief overview of the treatment principles for primary vasculitis. PMID:25818263

  19. Vasculitis as a Presenting Manifestation of Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harpreet; Sukhija, Gagandeep; Kaur, Parminder; Govil, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus is responsible for causing hepatic complications like acute and chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma along with some uncommon immune mediated extrahepatic manifestations. Vasculitis remains an uncommon extrahepatic complication of hepatitis B virus infection. Herein we report a case of hepatitis B infection that presented with leucocytoclastic vasculitis as an initial manifestation and managed successfully with entacavir therapy. PMID:27042512

  20. Cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis in a child with interleukin-12 receptor beta-1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kutukculer, Necil; Genel, Ferah; Aksu, Guzide; Karapinar, Bulent; Ozturk, Can; Cavusoglu, Cengiz; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Fieschi, Claire

    2006-03-01

    We report a patient with complete interleukin-12 receptor beta-1 deficiency associated with cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis. The patient experienced Bacille Calmette Guérin, Mycobacterium chelonae, and Salmonella enteritidis infection. Vasculitis affecting both small arteries and postcapillary venules due to deposition of immune complexes was probably caused by S. enteritidis and/or M. chelonae infection. PMID:16615980

  1. ANCA-associated vasculitis in Hispanic Americans: an unrecognized severity.

    PubMed

    Sreih, Antoine G; Mandhadi, Ranadeep; Aldaghlawi, Fadi; Khan, Asad; Irshad, Vajiha; Finn, Katherine; Block, Joel A

    2015-05-01

    This study aims to compare the severity and outcomes of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) between Hispanics and Caucasians living in the same geographical area. All patients diagnosed with AAV at two academic institutions in Chicago from January 2006 to December 2012 were retrospectively and prospectively identified. Disease activity was measured with the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score (BVAS), and disease damage was measured with the Vasculitis Damage Index (VDI). Student's t test and chi-square tests were employed; p ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. Seventy patients with AAV were identified; 15 patients were excluded. Fifty-five patients were included in the study: 23 Hispanics and 32 Caucasians, 35 patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's), 12 with microscopic polyangiitis, 7 with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and 1 with renal-limited vasculitis. Compared to Caucasians, Hispanics had a higher BVAS at presentation (16.3 ± 7.6 versus 10.7 ± 7.5, p = 0.006), a higher VDI at presentation (2.90 ± 1.50 versus 2.06 ± 1.30, p = 0.030), and a cumulative VDI (3.90 ± 1.70 versus 2.50 ± 1.90, p = 0.010). Renal involvement was more common among Hispanics (85 % of Hispanics versus 48 % of Caucasians, p = 0.01). Seventy percent of Hispanics had acute renal failure (mean creatinine = 3.37 ± 4.4 mg/dl) of whom seven (50 %) required dialysis, versus 25 % of Caucasians (mean creatinine = 1.78 ± 1.57 mg/dl, p = 0.03) and only two requiring dialysis. Compared to Caucasians, Hispanics with AAV present with more severe disease and higher damage indices. Larger studies are required to confirm these findings and delineate the respective roles of environment and genetics in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:24752347

  2. Etiologies and prognostic factors of leukocytoclastic vasculitis with skin involvement

    PubMed Central

    Bouiller, Kévin; Audia, Sylvain; Devilliers, Hervé; Collet, Evelyne; Aubriot, Marie Hélène; Leguy-Seguin, Vanessa; Berthier, Sabine; Bonniaud, Philippe; Chavanet, Pascal; Besancenot, Jean-François; Vabres, Pierre; Martin, Laurent; Samson, Maxime; Bonnotte, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this study, outcomes of patients with leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LCV) were analyzed focusing on clinical, histopathology and laboratory findings, relapses, and survival. Data from patients with cutaneous vasculitis diagnosed between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2010, at Dijon University Hospital (France) were retrospectively reviewed. LCV was defined as perivascular neutrophilic infiltrate, endothelial cell nuclear swelling, extravasation of red blood cells, and/or fibrin deposition in vessels. Patients were classified according to the 2012 Chapel Hill Consensus Conference. Relapses were defined as the recurrence of vasculitis symptoms after a period of remission >1 month. Time to relapse and/or death was calculated from the date of diagnosis. Univariate and multivariate (Cox model) analyses were performed. A total of 112 patients (57 males and 55 females), with a mean age of 60 ± 19 (18–98) years, were analyzed. Overall follow-up was 61 ± 38 months. At diagnosis, all patients had skin lesions, purpura being the most common (n = 83). Lesions were associated with systemic involvement in 55 (51%) patients. Only 41 (36.6%) patients received specific treatment: glucocorticoids in 29 of 41 (70.7%) and immunosuppressants in 9 of 41 (22%). Sixty-two patients (55%) had LCV due to underlying causes, 29 (25.9%) had single-organ cutaneous small vessel vasculitis (SoCSVV), and 21 (18.8%) had unclassifiable LCV. Twenty patients of the cohort (18%) experienced relapse, 14 ± 13 (1–40) months after the diagnosis of LCV. None of the 29 patients with SoCSVV relapsed. Independent risk factors for relapse were vascular thrombosis in the biopsy [hazard ratio (HR) = 4.9; P = 0.017], peripheral neuropathy (HR = 9.8; P = 0.001), hepatitis (HR = 3.1; P = 0.004), and positive antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA, HR = 5.9 P = 0.005). In contrast, SoCSVV was a protective factor for relapse (HR = 0.12; P = 0.043). The 1-, 3-, and 6-year overall

  3. Use of positron emission tomography (PET) for the diagnosis of large-vessel vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Loricera, J; Blanco, R; Hernández, J L; Martínez-Rodríguez, I; Carril, J M; Lavado, C; Jiménez, M; González-Vela, C; González-Gay, M Á

    2015-01-01

    The term vasculitis encompasses a heterogeneous group of diseases that share the presence of inflammatory infiltrates in the vascular wall. The diagnosis of large-vessel vasculitis is often a challenge because the presenting clinical features are nonspecific in many cases and they are often shared by different types of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases including other systemic vasculitides. Moreover, the pathogenesis of large-vessel vasculitis is not fully understood. Nevertheless, the advent of new imaging techniques has constituted a major breakthrough to establish an early diagnosis and a promising tool to monitor the follow-up of patients with largevessel vasculitis. This is the case of the molecular imaging with the combination of positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET/CT) using different radiotracers, especially the (18)F-fluordeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG). In this review we have focused on the contribution of (18)F-FDG PET in the diagnosis of large-vessel vasculitis. PMID:26272121

  4. Nodular Vasculitis That Developed during Etanercept (Enbrel) Treatment in a Patient with Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung-Bae; Chang, In-Kyu; Im, Myung; Lee, Young; Kim, Chang-Deok; Seo, Young-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Nodular vasculitis was introduced by Montgomery for cases of erythema induratum-like lesions that were not associated with tuberculosis. Nodular vasculitis has been associated with both nontuberculous infections and noninfectious conditions. However, there has been no report on the development of nodular vasculitis during tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor treatment. A 28-year-old man visited our clinic for the treatment of severe psoriasis with a 20-year history. Subcutaneous injection of etanercept (25 mg, twice weekly) was started. One year later, erythematous nodules developed on his lower leg. A skin biopsy showed lobular panniculitis with extensive necrosis and vasculitis. To exclude latent tuberculosis, an assay specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens was performed, with a negative result. After stopping etanercept under the diagnosis of nodular vasculitis associated with etanercept, the lesions gradually disappeared, leaving depressed scars in 3 months. There has been no recurrence after 6 months of follow-up. PMID:26512176

  5. Pathogenesis of ANCA-associated vasculitis: An update.

    PubMed

    Jarrot, Pierre-André; Kaplanski, Gilles

    2016-07-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) constitutes a group of rare diseases characterized by necrotizing inflammation of small blood vessels and the presence of ANCA. Although these autoantibodies were initially used to classify pauci-immune vasculitis, increasing clinical and experimental evidence now supports their pathogenic role, mainly through ANCA-induced activation of primed neutrophils and monocytes leading to destructive vascular necrosis. The mechanisms of ANCA generation remain however unclear. Neutrophils play a central role in the pathophysiological process of AAV since they are both effector cells responsible for endothelial damage and targets of autoimmunity. Another role of neutrophils is due to their ability to generate neutrophil extracellular traps, which support the presentation of ANCA autoantigens, could break immune tolerance and induce autoantibody generation. Alternatively, the ANCA autoimmune response is facilitated by insufficient T-cell and B-cell regulation, and the role of complement alternative pathway has recently been emphasized. This review summarizes the main pathogenesis concepts of AAV as well as the putative mechanisms for the origin of ANCA autoimmune response. PMID:26970490

  6. Pauci-Immune Crescentic Glomerulonephritis: An ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Rafeel; Rehman, Amina; Valecha, Gautam; El-Sayegh, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) is a syndrome signified by a precipitous loss of renal function, with features of glomerulonephritis including dysmorphic erythrocyturia and glomerular proteinuria. RPGN is associated with extensive crescent formation, and, thus, the clinical term RPGN is often used interchangeably with the pathologic term crescentic glomerulonephritis (CGN). From an immunopathologic standpoint, primary RPGN is divided into pauci-immune GN (PICG), anti-GBM GN, and immune complex GN. PICG, the most common etiology of primary RPGN, refers to a necrotizing glomerulonephritis with few or no immune deposits by immunofluorescence (IF) or electron microscopy (EM). In most patients, pauci-immune CGN is a component of a systemic small vessel vasculitis such as granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). Approximately 90% of patients with PICG have circulating ANCA antibodies, leading to the nomenclature ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). Recent research has identified several other antibodies associated with PICG, which is now understood to be a complex spectrum of disease with considerable overlap in terms of clinical phenotype and outcomes. In addition, several genetic and environmental factors have recently been implicated in the pathogenesis of this disorder. With new prognostic classifications, enhanced understanding of immunopathologic mechanisms, and novel treatment paradigms, clinical and experimental interest in PICG remains high. PMID:26688808

  7. Posterior Spinal Artery Aneurysm Presenting with Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Tanweer, Omar; Thomas, Cheddhi; Engler, John; Shapiro, Maksim; Becske, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Rupture of isolated posterior spinal artery (PSA) aneurysms is a rare cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) that presents unique diagnostic challenges owing to a nuanced clinical presentation. Here, we report on the diagnosis and management of the first known case of an isolated PSA aneurysm in the context of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. A 53-year-old male presented to an outside institution with acute bilateral lower extremity paralysis 9 days after admission for recurrent cellulitis. Early magnetic resonance imaging was read as negative and repeat imaging 15 days after presentation revealed SAH and a compressive spinal subdural hematoma. Angiography identified a PSA aneurysm at T9, as well as other areas suspicious for inflammatory or post-hemorrhagic reactive changes. The patient underwent a multilevel laminectomy for clot evacuation and aneurysm resection to prevent future hemorrhage and to establish a diagnosis. The postoperative course was complicated by medical issues and led to the diagnosis of leukocytoclastic vasculitis that may have predisposed the patient to aneurysm development. Literature review reveals greater mortality for cervical lesions than thoracolumbar lesions and that the presence of meningitic symptoms portents better functional outcome than symptoms of cord compression. The outcome obtained in this case is consistent with outcomes reported in the literature. PMID:27114966

  8. T Cell–Macrophage Interactions and Granuloma Formation in Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Hilhorst, Marc; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Berry, Gerald; Goronzy, Jörg J.; Weyand, Cornelia M.

    2014-01-01

    Granuloma formation, bringing into close proximity highly activated macrophages and T cells, is a typical event in inflammatory blood vessel diseases, and is noted in the name of several of the vasculitides. It is not known whether specific properties of the microenvironment in the blood vessel wall or the immediate surroundings of blood vessels contribute to granuloma formation and, in some cases, generation of multinucleated giant cells. Granulomas provide a specialized niche to optimize macrophage–T cell interactions, strongly activating both cell types. This is mirrored by the intensity of the systemic inflammation encountered in patients with vasculitis, often presenting with malaise, weight loss, fever, and strongly upregulated acute phase responses. As a sophisticated and highly organized structure, granulomas can serve as an ideal site to induce differentiation and maturation of T cells. The granulomas possibly seed aberrant Th1 and Th17 cells into the circulation, which are known to be the main pathogenic cells in vasculitis. Through the induction of memory T cells, aberrant innate immune responses can imprint the host immune system for decades to come and promote chronicity of the disease process. Improved understanding of T cell–macrophage interactions will redefine pathogenic models in the vasculitides and provide new avenues for immunomodulatory therapy. PMID:25309534

  9. Rapid regression of exudative maculopathy in idiopathic retinitis, vasculitis, aneurysms and neuroretinitis syndrome after intravitreal ranibizumab.

    PubMed

    Marín-Lambíes, Cristina; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto; Salom, David; Navarrete, Javier; Díaz-Llopis, Manuel

    2012-05-01

    The idiopathic retinitis, vasculitis, aneurysms and neuroretinitis syndrome is a rare retinal vascular disorder characterized by multiple leaking aneurysmal dilations, retinal vasculitis, neuroretinitis and peripheral vascular ischemia. Visual loss mainly occurs due to the development of retinal neovascularization and/or exudative maculopathy. Although the treatment of choice has not yet been established, retinal photocoagulation seems to be the best option to control the disease and to prevent its progression. Herein, we report a case of idiopathic retinitis, vasculitis, aneurysms and neuroretinitis syndrome with both retinal neovascularization and macular exudation successfully managed with intravitreal ranibizumab (Lucentis(®)) as adjunctive therapy to retinal photocoagulation. PMID:22949913

  10. Focal cerebral vasculitis associated with circulating immune complexes and brain irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Groothuis, D.R.; Mikhael, M.A.

    1986-06-01

    In this report we describe a patient with a benign glioma treated with surgery and radiation. After a period of stability he developed subacute bacterial endocarditis, and deteriorated neurologically. Computed tomographic scans did not show recurrent tumor. An angiogram showed vasculitis restricted to the previously irradiated area. Secondary to subacute bacterial endocarditis was the presence of high levels of circulating immune complexes. His neurological status was unchanged after antibiotics, but improved after treatment with dexamethasone. We interpret the clinical course as an immune-complex-mediated vasculitis superimposed on a subclinical radiation vasculitis. This case supports the hypothesis that immune mechanisms may be involved in delayed radiation injury to the nervous system.

  11. Disseminated gonococcal infection presenting as vasculitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sangita; Win, Htet Nwe; Chalam, Venkat; Yee, Lian

    2007-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with alcoholic liver disease presented with fever, tenosynovitis, polyarthritis and a vasculitic rash on the hands and feet for 4 days. He had neutrophilia and raised inflammatory markers. He had no history of sore throat, urethral discharge or travel abroad. His initial blood cultures were negative, and he was treated for vasculitis with steroids. The rash and arthritis seemed to improve initially, but he had another episode of fever. Repeat blood cultures grew Neisseria gonorrhoeae,and he received intravenous ceftriaxone followed by oral ciprofloxacin. He had marked improvement in rash, tenosynovitis and arthritis, and the fever dropped. He also had chlamydial urethritis and received azithromycin. The presentation of disseminated gonococcal infection after a presumptive episode of asymptomatic urethral gonorrhoea is highlighted. PMID:17213353

  12. Neutrophilic Dermatoses in Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    de Boysson, Hubert; Martin Silva, Nicolas; de Moreuil, Claire; Néel, Antoine; de Menthon, Mathilde; Meyer, Olivier; Launay, David; Pagnoux, Christian; Guillevin, Loïc; Puéchal, Xavier; Bienvenu, Boris; Aouba, Achille

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A few reports suggest combination of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and neutrophilic dermatoses (ND). We aimed to describe the main characteristics of patients presenting with both AAV and ND in a French cohort and through a systematic literature review, and to discuss the possible common pathogenic process involved. We conducted a retrospective study of patients with both conditions. Patients were selected via the French Internal Medicine Society (SNFMI) and the French Vasculitis Study Group (FVSG). A literature review focusing on a combination of both conditions, concentrated only on publications with well-established diagnoses and individual detailed data. Seventeen patients diagnosed with AAV and ND were identified in this cohort. Twelve patients had granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), 4 had microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) and one had eosinophilic GPA (EGPA). Eight patients, all with GPA, displayed pyoderma gangrenosum (PG). Sweet's syndrome was observed in 6 patients (4 with MPA, one with GPA and one with EGPA) and erythema elevatum diutinum in the other three (2 with GPA and 1 with MPA). The literature review identified 33 additional patients with both conditions, including 26 with GPA. Altogether, of the 50 patients (17 from our study and 33 from the literature review), 33 (66%) patients presented with PG associated with GPA in 29 cases (89%). Corticosteroids were the first-line treatment in conjunction with an immunosuppressive agent in most cases. Outcomes were good and a total of 15 patients experienced a relapse. Patients who relapsed were more likely to have ear, nose and throat manifestation than patients who did not [12/15 (80%) relapsing patients vs. 15/35 (43%) non-relapsing patients; p = 0.03)]. In our stud, the most frequent association concerned GPA and PG. ND should be considered and specifically researched within the spectrum of cutaneous manifestations observed in AAV. PMID:26986103

  13. Rituximab versus Cyclophosphamide for ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Stone, John H.; Merkel, Peter A.; Spiera, Robert; Seo, Philip; Langford, Carol A.; Hoffman, Gary S.; Kallenberg, Cees G.M.; St. Clair, E. William; Turkiewicz, Anthony; Tchao, Nadia K.; Webber, Lisa; Ding, Linna; Sejismundo, Lourdes P.; Mieras, Kathleen; Weitzenkamp, David; Ikle, David; Seyfert-Margolis, Vicki; Mueller, Mark; Brunetta, Paul; Allen, Nancy B.; Fervenza, Fernando C.; Geetha, Duvuru; Keogh, Karina A.; Kissin, Eugene Y.; Monach, Paul A.; Peikert, Tobias; Stegeman, Coen; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Specks, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cyclophosphamide and glucocorticoids have been the cornerstone of remission-induction therapy for severe antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)–associated vasculitis for 40 years. Uncontrolled studies suggest that rituximab is effective and may be safer than a cyclophosphamide-based regimen. METHODS We conducted a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, noninferiority trial of rituximab (375 mg per square meter of body-surface area per week for 4 weeks) as compared with cyclophosphamide (2 mg per kilogram of body weight per day) for remission induction. Glucocorticoids were tapered off; the primary end point was remission of disease without the use of prednisone at 6 months. RESULTS Nine centers enrolled 197 ANCA-positive patients with either Wegener’s granulomatosis or microscopic polyangiitis. Baseline disease activity, organ involvement, and the proportion of patients with relapsing disease were similar in the two treatment groups. Sixty-three patients in the rituximab group (64%) reached the primary end point, as compared with 52 patients in the control group (53%), a result that met the criterion for noninferiority (P<0.001). The rituximab-based regimen was more efficacious than the cyclophosphamide-based regimen for inducing remission of relapsing disease; 34 of 51 patients in the rituximab group (67%) as compared with 21 of 50 patients in the control group (42%) reached the primary end point (P = 0.01). Rituximab was also as effective as cyclophosphamide in the treatment of patients with major renal disease or alveolar hemorrhage. There were no significant differences between the treatment groups with respect to rates of adverse events. CONCLUSIONS Rituximab therapy was not inferior to daily cyclophosphamide treatment for induction of remission in severe ANCA-associated vasculitis and may be superior in relapsing disease. (Funded by the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Genentech, and Biogen; Clinical

  14. Vasculitis in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases: A study of 32 patients and systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Sy, Alice; Khalidi, Nader; Dehghan, Natasha; Barra, Lillian; Carette, Simon; Cuthbertson, David; Hoffman, Gary S.; Koening, Curry L.; Langford, Carol A.; McAlear, Carol; Moreland, Larry; Monach, Paul A.; Seo, Philip; Specks, Ulrich; Sreih, Antoine; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Van Assche, Gert; Merkel, Peter A.; Pagnoux, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background Published small case series suggest that inflammatory bowel disease [IBD; Crohn’s disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC)] and vasculitis co-occur more frequently than would be expected by chance. Objectives To describe this association by an analysis of a large cohort of carefully studied patients and through a systematic literature review. Methods Patients with both IBD and vasculitis enrolled in the Vasculitis Clinical Research Consortium (VCRC) Longitudinal Studies, followed in Canadian Vasculitis research network (CanVasc) centers and/or in the University of Toronto’s IBD clinic were included in this case series. A systematic literature review of patients with IBD and vasculitis involved a PubMed search through February 2014. The main characteristics of patients with Takayasu arteritis (TAK) and IBD were compared to those in patients with TAK without IBD followed in the VCRC. Results The study identified 32 patients with IBD and vasculitis: 13 with large-vessel vasculitis [LVV; 12 with TAK, 1 with giant cell arteritis (GCA); 8 with CD, 5 with UC]; 8 with ANCA-associated vasculitis [AAV; 6 granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), 2 with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA)]; 5 with isolated cutaneous vasculitis; and 6 with other vasculitides. Patients with LVV and AAV were mostly female (18/21). The diagnosis of IBD preceded that of vasculitis in 12/13 patients with LVV and 8/8 patients with AAV. The review of the literature identified 306 patients with IBD and vasculitis: 144 with LVV (133 TAK; 87 with IBD preceding LVV), 19 with AAV [14 GPA, 1 EGPA, 4 microscopic polyangiitis (MPA)], 66 with isolated cutaneous vasculitis, and 77 with other vasculitides. Patients with IBD and TAK were younger and had more frequent headaches, constitutional symptoms, or gastrointestinal symptoms compared to those patients in the VCRC who had TAK without IBD. Conclusions These findings highlight the risk of vasculitis, especially TAK, in patients

  15. Cerebral angiography as a guide for therapy in isolated central nervous system vasculitis

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, R.L.; Martino, C.R.; Weinert, D.M.; Hueftle, M.; Kammer, G.M.

    1987-04-24

    The authors present a case of isolated central nervous system vasculitis documented by cerebral arteriography in which remission, using a treatment regimen of prednisone and cyclophosphamide, was guided by serial arteriography during a 15-month period.

  16. Vasculitis in systemic sclerosis: association with Sjögren's syndrome and the CREST syndrome variant.

    PubMed

    Oddis, C V; Eisenbeis, C H; Reidbord, H E; Steen, V D; Medsger, T A

    1987-10-01

    We describe 7 patients with established systemic sclerosis who developed clinical evidence of vasculitis 1 to 33 (mean 12.7) years after the first symptoms of scleroderma. Six had the CREST variant of systemic sclerosis and also had features of Sjögren's syndrome (SS). Five of 6 patients tested had serum anti-SSA (Ro) antibodies. Vasculitis presented primarily as cutaneous lesions with ulceration and/or mononeuritis multiplex, and 6 patients had severe systemic manifestations. Vasculitis was histopathologically documented in 6 cases in biopsies of skin (4 of 4), muscle (2 of 3) and sural nerve (3 of 3). Patients with systemic sclerosis with CREST syndrome and SS appear to be at increased risk to develop vasculitis. PMID:3430523

  17. D-penicillamine-induced ANA (+) ANCA (+) vasculitis in pediatric patients with Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeonhee; Lee, Sang Taek; Cho, Heeyeon

    2016-05-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are associated with systemic vasculitis. The pathophysiology of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) has not been clearly proven, and drug-induced ANCA-associated vasculitis has been reported. Wilson's disease is an inborn error of copper metabolism caused by a mutation in the copper transporting gene ATP7B, and traditional treatment is based on copper chelation with agents such as D-penicillamine. There have been rare reports that prolonged D-penicillamine therapy might cause adverse renal events such as membranous nephropathy and minimal change disease, but it is questionable if D-penicillamine induces ANCA-associated vasculitis. We describe 2 patients with Wilson's disease treated with D-penicillamine who presented with ANCA (+) vasculitis and renal involvement. The 2 patients also showed positive results for antinuclear antibody (ANA). Their kidney biopsy findings were compatible with crescentic/necrotizing glomerulonephritis, pauci-immune type. After diagnosis of AAV, D-penicillamine was stopped. Patients were then treated with plasmapheresis and immunosuppressants, including methylprednisolone pulse therapy and intravenous cyclophosphamide. One patient progressed to end-stage renal disease and the other showed persistent proteinuria. These cases suggest that D-penicillamine may induce ANA (+) ANCA (+) vasculitis with severe renal involvement in pediatric patients, and plasmapheresis combined with immunosuppressant should be considered. PMID:26784915

  18. IL-17 production by CSF lymphocytes as a biomarker for cerebral vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Thom, Vivien; Schmid, Sabrina; Gelderblom, Mathias; Hackbusch, Romy; Kolster, Manuela; Schuster, Simon; Thomalla, Götz; Keminer, Oliver; Pleß, Ole; Bernreuther, Christian; Glatzel, Markus; Wegscheider, Karl; Gerloff, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore the possibility of using interleukin-17 (IL-17) production by CD4+ T cells in the CSF as a potential biomarker for cerebral vasculitis in stroke patients. Methods: In this consecutive case study, we performed prospective analysis of CSF and blood in patients admitted to a university medical center with symptoms of stroke and suspected cerebral vasculitis. Flow cytometry was performed for intracellular detection of inflammatory cytokines in peripheral blood lymphocytes and expanded T cells from CSF. Results: CSF CD4+ lymphocytes from patients with cerebral vasculitis showed significantly higher levels of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-17 compared to patients with stroke not due to vasculitis or with other, noninflammatory neurologic diseases. There was no difference in the production of interferon-γ in the CSF and no overall differences in the relative frequencies of peripheral immune cells. Conclusions: Intracellular IL-17 in CSF cells is potentially useful in discriminating cerebral vasculitis as a rare cause in patients presenting with ischemic stroke. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that an increased proportion of IL-17-producing CD4+ cells in CSF of patients presenting with stroke symptoms is indicative of cerebral vasculitis (sensitivity 73%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 39–94%; specificity 100%, 95% CI 74%–100%). PMID:27144213

  19. Minocycline-induced polyarteritis nodosa-like vasculitis presenting as brainstem stroke.

    PubMed

    Klaas, James P; Matzke, Thomas; Makol, Ashima; Fulgham, Jimmy R

    2015-05-01

    Minocycline use has been associated with the development of autoimmune disorders, including drug-induced vasculitis. Previously published reports suggest that clinical manifestations are limited to cutaneous, constitutional, or musculoskeletal symptoms. To our knowledge there has been only one reported patient with ischemic stroke in the setting of minocycline-induced vasculitis. We describe a 26-year-old woman, with no vascular risk factors, who had an ischemic pontine stroke in the setting of biopsy-proven minocycline-induced polyarteritis nodosa-like vasculitis. Discontinuation of minocycline resulted in resolution of the vasculitis, and she has not had any recurrent ischemic events. This report shows that ischemic strokes may occur as a result of minocycline-induced vasculitis. While this is likely a rare association, recognition is important given the widespread use of minocycline and the potential for devastating consequences in a young population. Consequently, drug-induced vasculitis should be considered in patients with an ischemic stroke taking minocycline. PMID:25778384

  20. [Pathophysiology and Laboratory Findings in Patients with ANCA-Associated Vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Wada, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    Pathophysiological features and laboratory findings in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) -associated vasculitis are described. In contrast to Western countries, MPO-ANCA-positive microscopic polyangiitis and renal-limited vasculitis is the most common form of ANCA-associated vasculitis in Japanese patients. Oral prednisolone in combination with immunosuppressive agents has improved patient survival in older Japanese patients. However, the recurrence rate has significantly increased in recent years Accumulative evidence supports a direct pathogenic role of ANCA in glomerulonephritis and vasculitis, in which inflammatory processes with the up-regulation of cytokines/chemokines and possible involvement of a neutrophil extracellular trap may play a role. However, whether or not the measurement of ANCA titers reflects disease activity and predicts the onset and/or relapse of ANCA-associated vasculitis remains controversial. Further studies will be required to determine the clinical significance of ANCA in more detail. In addition to ANCA, measurements of novel clinical test items, including anti-erythropoietin receptor antibody, may reveal the possibility of their application as useful biomarkers of the pathophysiology and clinical manifestations in patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis. PMID:26897859

  1. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis in an adolescent with ulcerative colitis: Report of a case and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Butts, G Tyler; Bishop, Phyllis R; Wyatt, Julie P

    2014-01-01

    An adolescent female with long-standing, difficult-to-control ulcerative colitis developed leukocytoclastic vasculitis, a rare cutaneous extra-intestinal manifestation of the inflammatory bowel disease. The authors provide a literature review on leukocytoclastic vasculitis complicating ulcerative colitis. Furthermore, the clinical features of leukocytoclastic vasculitis are compared and contrasted with the more common cutaneous extra-intestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease, erythema nodosum, and pyoderma gangrenosum.

  2. Pulmonary Fibrosis in Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies (ANCA)-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Comarmond, Cloé; Crestani, Bruno; Tazi, Abdellatif; Hervier, Baptiste; Adam-Marchand, Sylvain; Nunes, Hilario; Cohen-Aubart, Fleur; Wislez, Marie; Cadranel, Jacques; Housset, Bruno; Lloret-Linares, Célia; Sève, Pascal; Pagnoux, Christian; Abad, Sébastien; Camuset, Juliette; Bienvenu, Boris; Duruisseaux, Michaël; Hachulla, Eric; Arlet, Jean-Benoît; Hamidou, Mohammed; Mahr, Alfred; Resche-Rigon, Matthieu; Brun, Anne-Laure; Grenier, Philippe; Cacoub, Patrice; Saadoun, David

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) is an uncommon manifestation observed in patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV), particularly microscopic polyangiitis (MPA). While patients with PF associated with AAV seem to have a worse prognosis, these patients have been described only in case reports or small retrospective case series. In this retrospective multicenter study, we report the main features and long-term outcomes of patients with PF associated with AAV, fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology criteria and/or Chapel Hill definitions. Forty-nine patients (30 men [61%]; median age at diagnosis of AAV, 68 [interquartile range, 58–73] years) with PF associated with AAV were identified. Forty (81.6%) patients had MPA and 9 (18.4%) had granulomatosis with polyangiitis. The diagnosis of PF preceded the onset of vasculitis in 22 (45%) patients. Usual interstitial pneumonia was the main radiologic pattern (n = 18, 43%). ANCA were mostly of antimyeloperoxidase specificity (88%). All patients were treated with glucocorticoids as induction therapy, combined with cyclophosphamide (CYC) (n = 36, 73.5%) or rituximab (RTX) (n = 1, 2%). Factors associated with mortality included occurrence of chronic respiratory insufficiency (hazard ratio [HR], 7.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6–34.5; p = 0.003), induction therapy with glucocorticoids alone (HR, 2.94; CI, 1.05–8.33; p = 0.04), and initial weigh loss (HR, 2.83; CI, 1.05–7.65; p = 0.041). The 3-year survival rate in patients treated with glucocorticoids alone or combined with an immunosuppressant (CYC or RTX) as induction therapy was 64% (95% CI, 41–99) and 94% (95% CI, 86–100), respectively (p = 0.03). After a median follow-up of 48 months [interquartile range, 14–88 mo], 18 (37%) patients died, including 11 related to respiratory insufficiency. PF is a rare manifestation of AAV with a very poor prognosis. Induction therapy with

  3. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Söderberg, Daniel; Segelmark, Mårten

    2016-01-01

    A group of pauci-immune vasculitides, characterized by neutrophil-rich necrotizing inflammation of small vessels and the presence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs), is referred to as ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). ANCAs against proteinase 3 (PR3) (PR3-ANCA) or myeloperoxidase (MPO) (MPO-ANCA) are found in over 90% of patients with active disease, and these ANCAs are implicated in the pathogenesis of AAV. Dying neutrophils surrounding the walls of small vessels are a histological hallmark of AAV. Traditionally, it has been assumed that these neutrophils die by necrosis, but neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have recently been visualized at the sites of vasculitic lesions. AAV patients also possess elevated levels of NETs in the circulation. ANCAs are capable of inducing NETosis in neutrophils, and their potential to do so has been shown to be affinity dependent and to correlate with disease activity. Neutrophils from AAV patients are also more prone to release NETs spontaneously than neutrophils from healthy blood donors. NETs contain proinflammatory proteins and are thought to contribute to vessel inflammation directly by damaging endothelial cells and by activating the complement system and indirectly by acting as a link between the innate and adaptive immune system through the generation of PR3- and MPO-ANCA. Injection of NET-loaded myeloid dendritic cells into mice results in circulating PR3- and MPO-ANCA and the development of AAV-like disease. NETs have also been shown to be essential in a rodent model of drug-induced vasculitis. NETs induced by propylthiouracil could not be degraded by DNaseI, implying that disordered NETs might be important for the generation of ANCAs. NET degradation was also highlighted in another study showing that AAV patients have reduced DNaseI activity resulting in less NET degradation. With this in mind, it might be that prolonged exposure to proteins in the NETs due to the overproduction of NETs and/or reduced

  4. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Söderberg, Daniel; Segelmark, Mårten

    2016-01-01

    A group of pauci-immune vasculitides, characterized by neutrophil-rich necrotizing inflammation of small vessels and the presence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs), is referred to as ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). ANCAs against proteinase 3 (PR3) (PR3-ANCA) or myeloperoxidase (MPO) (MPO-ANCA) are found in over 90% of patients with active disease, and these ANCAs are implicated in the pathogenesis of AAV. Dying neutrophils surrounding the walls of small vessels are a histological hallmark of AAV. Traditionally, it has been assumed that these neutrophils die by necrosis, but neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have recently been visualized at the sites of vasculitic lesions. AAV patients also possess elevated levels of NETs in the circulation. ANCAs are capable of inducing NETosis in neutrophils, and their potential to do so has been shown to be affinity dependent and to correlate with disease activity. Neutrophils from AAV patients are also more prone to release NETs spontaneously than neutrophils from healthy blood donors. NETs contain proinflammatory proteins and are thought to contribute to vessel inflammation directly by damaging endothelial cells and by activating the complement system and indirectly by acting as a link between the innate and adaptive immune system through the generation of PR3- and MPO-ANCA. Injection of NET-loaded myeloid dendritic cells into mice results in circulating PR3- and MPO-ANCA and the development of AAV-like disease. NETs have also been shown to be essential in a rodent model of drug-induced vasculitis. NETs induced by propylthiouracil could not be degraded by DNaseI, implying that disordered NETs might be important for the generation of ANCAs. NET degradation was also highlighted in another study showing that AAV patients have reduced DNaseI activity resulting in less NET degradation. With this in mind, it might be that prolonged exposure to proteins in the NETs due to the overproduction of NETs and/or reduced

  5. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Autoantibody Associated Systemic Vasculitis Is Associated with Epstein - Barr virus in the Setting of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mirsaeidi, Mehdi; Syed, Fatima; Jaffe, Elaine S.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction EBV has been a leading candidate as a trigger for several autoimmune diseases. We describe an antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA) -associated systemic vasculitis as the initial presenting illness of AIDS. Case report and results The patient was diagnosed ANCA -associated systemic vasculitis in the setting of HIV infection because of a high level of ANCA level, crescent glomerulonephritis in pathology, and clinical signs and symptoms compatible with systemic vasculitis. He also had HIV associated lymphadenopathy with scattered. EBV-RNA positive cells and reactive germinal centers. Conclusion EBV genome was found in reactive lymph nodes and, therefore, may be associated with the immunopathogenesis of vasculitis. PMID:23483275

  6. Histologic and clinical features of primary and secondary vasculitis: a retrospective study of 42 dogs (2004-2011).

    PubMed

    Swann, James W; Priestnall, Simon L; Dawson, Charlotte; Chang, Yu-Mei; Garden, Oliver A

    2015-07-01

    Inflammation of the blood vessel wall has been reported infrequently in dogs, and it may occur without apparent cause (primary vasculitis) or as a pathologic reaction to a range of initiating insults (secondary vasculitis). The aims of our study were to report histologic, clinical, and survival data from a large series of cases with primary and secondary vasculitis, and to compare the clinical parameters and outcome data between groups. Clinical data was collected retrospectively from the medical records of 42 client-owned dogs with a histologic diagnosis of primary or secondary vasculitis, and follow-up information was obtained. Cases were grouped according to clinical and histologic descriptors, and biochemical, hematologic, and survival data was compared between groups. Several forms of primary vasculitis were observed, and vascular inflammation was observed in conjunction with numerous other diseases. Female dogs were more likely to develop primary vasculitis, and serum globulin concentration was greater in dogs with primary vasculitis compared to those with underlying disease. All dogs with primary vasculitis of the central nervous system died or were euthanized shortly after presentation, but other forms of primary vasculitis could be managed effectively. In conclusion, presentation of clinical cases in this series was variable, and there did not appear to be well-defined vasculitic syndromes as described in people. PMID:26077546

  7. Diffuse endothelial dysfunction is common to ANCA associated systemic vasculitis and polyarteritis nodosa

    PubMed Central

    Filer, A; Gardner-Medwin, J; Thambyrajah, J; Raza, K; Carruthers, D; Stevens, R; Liu, L; Lowe, S; Townend, J; Bacon, P

    2003-01-01

    Background: Excess cardiovascular mortality complicates systemic rheumatic disease, suggesting an accelerated atheromatous process, which it has been proposed relates to the vascular inflammation common in such diseases. Impaired endothelium dependent vasodilatation is an early marker of atheromatous disease. It has previously been shown that such endothelial cell dysfunction (ECD) occurring in the brachial artery can complicate primary systemic necrotising vasculitis (SNV). Objective: To determine if ECD occurs in a wider spectrum of primary SNV, if it is restricted to the major arteries, and whether vasculitis subgroup, ANCA status, or renal involvement influenced the endothelial responses. Methods: Fifty four patients attending the Birmingham vasculitis clinic, including patients with a range of ANCA and non-ANCA associated primary vasculitides, and a group of age matched controls were recruited. The length of patient follow up and disease activity was variable. Disease activity, damage scores, and cardiovascular risk factors were recorded before assessment of flow mediated brachial artery vasodilatation by high resolution ultrasound. Dermal microvascular responses to acetylcholine were also measured in 32 patients and 21 controls by laser Doppler flowmetry. Results: ECD was demonstrated in all primary SNV subgroups of patients with ANCA associated vasculitis and in polyarteritis nodosa, compared with controls. Significant impairment occurred in both vascular beds, regardless of vessel size targeted in the inflammatory vasculitis, ANCA association and titre, or renal involvement. Conclusions: Diffuse endothelial dysfunction, a predictor of atherosclerotic disease, is found extensively in primary systemic vasculitis. Involvement of different vascular beds is independent of target vessel size or ANCA association, and is unrelated to local disease expression. It is suggested that this results from a systemic response that may be a consequence of primary vasculitis

  8. Mast cells contribute to peripheral tolerance and attenuate autoimmune vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Gan, Poh-Yi; Summers, Shaun A; Ooi, Joshua D; O'Sullivan, Kim M; Tan, Diana S Y; Muljadi, Ruth C M; Odobasic, Dragana; Kitching, A Richard; Holdsworth, Stephen R

    2012-12-01

    Mast cells contribute to the modulation of the immune response, but their role in autoimmune renal disease is not well understood. Here, we induced autoimmunity resulting in focal necrotizing GN by immunizing wild-type or mast cell-deficient (Kit(W-sh/W-sh)) mice with myeloperoxidase. Mast cell-deficient mice exhibited more antimyeloperoxidase CD4+ T cells, enhanced dermal delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to myeloperoxidase, and more severe focal necrotizing GN. Furthermore, the lymph nodes draining the sites of immunization had fewer Tregs and reduced production of IL-10 in mice lacking mast cells. Reconstituting these mice with mast cells significantly increased the numbers of Tregs in the lymph nodes and attenuated both autoimmunity and severity of disease. After immunization with myeloperoxidase, mast cells migrated from the skin to the lymph nodes to contact Tregs. In an ex vivo assay, mast cells enhanced Treg suppression through IL-10. Reconstitution of mast cell-deficient mice with IL-10-deficient mast cells led to enhanced autoimmunity to myeloperoxidase and greater disease severity compared with reconstitution with IL-10-intact mast cells. Taken together, these studies establish a role for mast cells in mediating peripheral tolerance to myeloperoxidase, protecting them from the development of focal necrotizing GN in ANCA-associated vasculitis. PMID:23138486

  9. ANCA-Associated Systemic Vasculitis Presenting With Hypertrophic Spinal Pachymeningitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia; Zhao, Jiuliang; Wang, Qian; Fei, Yunyun; Zhao, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Reports of hypertrophic pachymeningitis associated with myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA) localized exclusively in the spine were quite rare. Two cases of ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis (AASV) presenting with hypertrophic spinal pachymeningitis (HSP) causing low back pain and numbness are described. Two patients showed prominent systemic and local inflammatory reactions manifested as fever, elevated levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein, and markedly increased levels of total protein of cerebrospinal fluid. The gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan of spinal cord demonstrated diffuse spinal dura matter thickening. Additionally, simple microscopic hematuria was found in 1 case suggestive of renal involvement and the other 1 complicated with interstitial lung disease. Then, a diagnosis of HSP secondary to AASV was made. Combination therapy of corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide produced a rapid improvement in the clinical symptoms and laboratory parameters. Followed up for 6 months, 1 case relapsed when the dosage of prednisone was tapered to 10 mg daily. Since the patient refused rituximab-based regimen, an immunosuppressive triple-therapy (corticosteroid, cyclophosphamide, and azathioprine) was initiated and brought control of the disease during the subsequent 6 months of follow-up. HSP is a relatively rare form of central nervous system involvement of AASV. Early recognition and intervention are of great significance since the pathogenesis of HSP starts with an inflammatory and fibrosing process. PMID:26579814

  10. Bartonella henselae aortic valve endocarditis mimicking systemic vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Teoh, Laurence S G; Hart, Hamish H; Soh, May Ching; Christiansen, Jonathan P; Bhally, Hasan; Philips, Martin S; Rai-Chaudhuri, Dominic S

    2010-01-01

    A 28-year-old man with a bicuspid aortic valve presented with facial droop and slurred speech with several months of constitutional symptoms of night sweats, weight loss and productive cough. Examination confirmed aortic regurgitation, palpable spleen and left facial droop. Multiple peripheral blood cultures were negative. Inflammatory markers, cytoplasmic staining antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (cANCA) and anti-PR3 antibody were all elevated. MRI of the brain and CT of the chest and abdomen confirmed embolic infarcts to brain, kidney and spleen. Transoesophageal echocardiogram (ECG) showed valve vegetations and severe aortic regurgitation. Endocardial Wegener's granulomatosis was considered. Aortic valve replacement was performed. Grindings from aortic valve leaflets were analysed for rpoB gene, which confirmed the presence of Bartonella henselae. Serological assays demonstrated B henselae IgM 20 (normal <20) and IgG >2048 (normal < 64). The patient completely recovered after prolonged antibiotic treatment. Culture-negative infective endocarditis may mimic vasculitis and be associated with positive cANCA. Serology and molecular techniques may aid diagnosis. PMID:22791485

  11. Circovirus in Tissues of Dogs with Vasculitis and Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Linlin; McGraw, Sabrina; Zhu, Kevin; Leutenegger, Christian M.; Marks, Stanley L.; Kubiski, Steven; Gaffney, Patricia; Dela Cruz Jr, Florante N.; Wang, Chunlin; Delwart, Eric

    2013-01-01

    We characterized the complete genome of a novel dog circovirus (DogCV) from the liver of a dog with severe hemorrhagic gastroenteritis, vasculitis, and granulomatous lymphadenitis. DogCV was detected by PCR in fecal samples from 19/168 (11.3%) dogs with diarrhea and 14/204 (6.9%) healthy dogs and in blood from 19/409 (3.3%) of dogs with thrombocytopenia and neutropenia, fever of unknown origin, or past tick bite. Co-infection with other canine pathogens was detected for 13/19 (68%) DogCV-positive dogs with diarrhea. DogCV capsid proteins from different dogs varied by up to 8%. In situ hybridization and transmission electron microscopy detected DogCV in the lymph nodes and spleens of 4 dogs with vascular compromise and histiocytic inflammation. The detection of a circovirus in tissues of dogs expands the known tropism of these viruses to a second mammalian host. Our results indicate that circovirus, alone or in co-infection with other pathogens, might contribute to illness and death in dogs. PMID:23628223

  12. Current and emerging techniques for ANCA detection in vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Csernok, Elena; Moosig, Frank

    2014-08-01

    Detection of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) is a well-established diagnostic test used to evaluate suspected necrotizing vasculitis of small blood vessels. Conditions associated with these antibodies, collectively referred to as ANCA-associated vasculitides, include granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly known as Wegener granulomatosis), microscopic polyangiitis, and eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly known as Churg-Strauss syndrome). The diagnostic utility of ANCA testing depends on the type of assay performed and on the clinical setting. Most laboratories worldwide use standard indirect immunofluorescence tests (IFT) to screen for ANCA and then confirm positive IFT results with antigen-specific tests for proteinase 3 (PR3) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). Developments such as automated image analysis of immunofluorescence patterns, so-called third-generation PR3-ANCA and MPO-ANCA ELISA, and multiplex technology have improved the detection of ANCAs. However, challenges in routine clinical practice remain, including methodological aspects of IFT performance, the diverse antigen-specific assays available, the diagnostic value of testing in clinical settings and the prognostic value of serial ANCA monitoring in the prediction of disease relapse. This Review summarizes the available data on ANCA testing, discusses the usefulness of the various ANCA assays and advises on the clinical indications for the use of ANCA testing. PMID:24890776

  13. [Rare forms of hypertension : From pheochromocytoma to vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Haller, H; Limbourg, F; Schmidt, B M; Menne, J

    2015-03-01

    Secondary hypertension affects only 5-10 % of hypertensive patients. Screening is expensive and time-consuming and should be performed only in patients for whom there is a high clinical suspicion of secondary hypertension. Clinical signs of secondary forms of hypertension are new-onset hypertension in patients without other risk factors (i.e., family history, obesity, etc.), sudden increase of blood pressure (BP) in a previously stable patient, increased BP in prepubertal children, resistant hypertension, and severe hypertension or hypertensive emergencies. In adults, renal parenchymal and vascular diseases as well as obstructive sleep apnea are the most common causes of secondary hypertension. Medication-induced hypertension and non-adherence to medication have to be ruled out. Of the endocrine causes associated with hypertension, primary aldosteronism is the most common. Other endocrine causes of hypertension such as thyroid disease (hypo- or hyperthyroidism), hypercortisolism (Cushing's syndrome), hyperparathyroidism, and pheochromocytoma are rare. Monogenetic forms of hypertension are mostly of tubular origin and associated with alterations in mineralocorticoid handling or signaling. Rare causes of hypertension also include inflammatory vascular disease. Acute forms of vasculitis may present as "malignant" hypertension with associated thrombotic microangiopathy and organ damage/failure. It is important to diagnose these rare forms of hypertension in order to prevent acute organ damage in these patients or unnecessary invasive treatment strategies. PMID:25700646

  14. Large Vessel Vasculitis Occurring in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patient under Anti-TNF Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cestelli, Valentina; Spinella, Amelia; Campomori, Federica; Esposito, Carmela; Ciaffi, Sara; Sandri, Gilda; Ferri, Clodoveo

    2014-01-01

    Vasculitis is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by the presence of necrotic inflammatory phenomena and destruction of blood vessels. Vasculitis is classified as primary (idiopathic) or secondary to infections, connective tissue diseases and drugs but can also be considered as a paraneoplastic phenomenon. Evidence shows that the increasing use of biological agents results in a growing number of reports of autoimmune diseases induced by these therapies. An inflammatory articular chronic disease such as rheumatoid arthritis may be complicated by extra-articular manifestations, such as cutaneous or systemic vasculitis. Herewith, we describe the case of a great vessels arteritis in a patient affected by rheumatoid arthritis in therapy with an anti-TNF agent (etanercept). PMID:25544845

  15. Capecitabine-induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis under neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kee, Bryan K.; Tetzlaff, Michael T.; Wolff, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of capecitabine-induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis in a patient with locally advanced rectal cancer under curative neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiation using capecitabine. After 5 days of the initiation of capecitabine the patient developed a pruritic maculopapular rash in her extremities consistent with vasculitis which was confirmed on skin biopsy without any signs of systemic involvement. Capecitabine was held and the rash was treated with topical steroids with complete resolution of both rash and pruritus. Due to a lack of other alternative chemotherapeutic options and the cutaneous-only involvement of vasculitis, the capecitabine was re-introduced. Two days later, the patient developed an identical maculopapular rash with a similar distribution. Prednisone was initiated while the capecitabine was continued with complete resolution of the rash. The patient successfully completed her curative neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy treatment without the need to permanently discontinue the capecitabine. PMID:26029464

  16. Delayed diagnosis of ocular syphilis that manifested as retinal vasculitis and acute posterior multifocal placoid epitheliopathy.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Hoon; Joe, Soo Geun; Yoon, Young Hee

    2013-11-01

    A 55-year-old female presented with bilateral progressive retinal vasculitis. She was on systemic and intravitreal steroids on the basis of uveitis work-up result (negative result including rapid plasma reagin), but her visual acuity continued to deteriorate to light perception only. Ocular examination showed retinal vasculitis, multiple yellow placoid lesions and severe macula edema in both eyes. Repeated work-up revealed positivity of fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorption in serum and subsequently in cerebrospinal fluid. Ocular syphilis was diagnosed. And intravenous penicillin G resulted in rapid resolution of vasculitis and macular edema. To avoid delay in the diagnosis of ocular syphilis, high index of suspicion and repeating serological tests (including both treponemal and non-treponemal tests) are warranted. PMID:24145569

  17. A Fatal Case of “Bullous Erysipelas-like” Pseudomonas Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sam Shiyao; Chandran, Nisha Suyien; Huang, Jing Xiang; Tan, Kong-Bing; Aw, Derrick Chen-Wee

    2016-01-01

    Erysipelas is a generally benign superficial bacterial skin infection, and its bullous form constitutes a rare and more severe variant. We describe the first and fatal case of “bullous erysipelas-like” septic vasculitis due to Pseudomonas bacteremi. A 69-year-old Chinese man presenting with diarrhea and septic shock initially began to rapidly develop sharply defined erythematous plaques with non-hemorrhagic bullae over his lower limbs. Culture of the aspirate from the bullae was positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This was also consistent with his blood cultures showing Pseudomonas bacteremia. Histology of the skin lesion showed microthrombi and neutrophilic infiltrates in blood vessels with Gram-negative bacilli extruding from the vessel walls, characteristic of septic vasculitis. The bullous erysipelas-like lesions seen in this patient represents a rare manifestation of both septic vasculitis and Pseudomonas infection. PMID:26955132

  18. Systemic Levamisole-Induced Vasculitis in a Cocaine User without Cutaneous Findings: A Consideration in Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Baptiste, Gillian G.; Alexopoulos, Anastasia-Stefania; Masud, Tahsin; Bonsall, Joanna M.

    2015-01-01

    Levamisole is a known immunomodulating agent frequently used as a cutting agent in cocaine consumed in the United States today. Numerous cases of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) vasculitis connected with the use of levamisole-adulterated cocaine have previously been reported in the literature, classically characterized by a retiform purpuric rash. We report a case of a crack-cocaine user without cutaneous abnormalities who developed ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis that progressed to renal failure. This case demonstrates the difficulties in solidifying the diagnosis of levamisole-induced vasculitis in the absence of cutaneous findings and the need to pursue more testing to establish causality in ANCA-associated vasculitis that has potential for severe end-organ damage in patients who continue to use cocaine. PMID:26635879

  19. CNS vasculitis and stroke in neonatal lupus erythematosus: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Saini, Arushi G; Sankhyan, Naveen; Bhattad, Sagar; Vyas, Sameer; Saikia, Biman; Singhi, Pratibha

    2014-05-01

    Neonatal lupus erythematosus refers to the clinical spectrum of cardiac, cutaneous and other systemic abnormalities in neonates born to mothers with autoantibodies against Ro/SSA and La/SSB antigens. Isolated central nervous system involvement is very rare and has been described as transient vasculopathy only. We describe a 2-months-old girl who presented with acute ischemic stroke secondary to central nervous system vasculitis without any cardiac, cutaneous or hematological manifestations. The mother was pauci-symptomatic with raised anti-Ro autoantibody titers; the baby was positive for autoantibodies against Ro-antigen. Angiography confirmed vasculitis in cerebral vasculature. Our case highlights that neonatal lupus erythematosus can present with isolated nervous system manifestations and the vascular damage can be permanent in the form of vasculitis. Early recognition will help pediatricians identify such possible permanent complications in newborns with neonatal lupus erythematosus. A review of previously reported central nervous system manifestations of neonatal lupus is also presented. PMID:24508360

  20. Central Retinal Vein Occlusion in a Patient with Retinal Vasculitis and Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Lígia; Rothwell, Renata; Brandão, Arnaldo

    2014-01-01

    The authors report a rare case of a 47-year-old woman with Crohn's disease (CD) who presented with retinal vasculitis and central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) during remission. The patient complained of sudden painless visual loss in her left eye (OS). Ophthalmologic evaluation revealed a best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 20/20 in the right eye and hand movements in OS. Ophthalmoscopy and fluorescein angiography of OS showed signs of nonischemic CRVO and extensive vasculitis. She was treated with oral prednisolone, mercaptopurine, and intravitreal bevacizumab in OS. After 1 month of treatment, VA of OS improved to 5/10 and after 1 year it was 10/10 with complete resolution of retinal vasculitis and nonischemic CRVO. PMID:25506451

  1. Acute ST elevation myocardial infarction in fulminant systemic p-ANCA vasculitis: a rare catastrophic complication.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Kanupriya; Saini, Aditya; Bah, Tonjeh; Katikaneni, Pavan

    2016-01-01

    A 45-year-old Caucasian man presented to the hospital with a 3-month history of fatigue, bilateral upper and lower limb paresthesias and gradually worsening ascending paralysis. A few weeks later, he developed acute renal failure requiring haemodialysis. Investigations revealed presence of myeloperoxidase (MPO) perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). Renal biopsy was conclusive for rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis with crescents. Treatment for ANCA positive vasculitis was initiated with pulsed steroids, cyclophosphamide and plasmapheresis. The hospital course took an unexpected turn when the patient developed acute chest pain with an EKG consistent with inferior ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Urgent left heart catheterisation revealed distal occlusions in multivessel coronary distribution. Coronary involvement is rare in ANCA vasculitis and STEMI has not been reported in MPO-ANCA positive vasculitis, to the best of our knowledge. PMID:27358099

  2. An approach to the diagnosis and management of systemic vasculitis revised version with tracked changes removed

    PubMed Central

    Miller, A; Chan, M; Wiik, A; Misbah, S A; Luqmani, R A

    2010-01-01

    The systemic vasculitides are a complex and often serious group of disorders which, while uncommon, require careful management in order to ensure optimal outcome. In most cases there is no known cause. Multi-system disease is likely to be fatal without judicious use of immunosuppression. A prompt diagnosis is necessary to preserve organ function. Comprehensive and repeated disease assessment is a necessary basis for planning therapy and modification of treatment protocols according to response. Therapies typically include glucocorticoids and, especially for small and medium vessel vasculitis, an effective immunosuppressive agent. Cyclophosphamide is currently the standard therapy for small vessel multi-system vasculitis, but other agents are now being evaluated in large randomized trials. Comorbidity is common in patients with vasculitis, including the cumulative effects of potentially toxic therapy. Long-term evaluation of patients is important in order to detect and manage relapses. PMID:20070316

  3. Mouse models of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Gan, Poh-Yi; Ooi, Joshua D; Kitching, A Richard; Holdsworth, Stephen R

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation of blood vessels (vasculitis) results from many pathological processes and is found in many different diseases. However, in most situations, the pathological processes inducing vasculitis are unknown. The discovery of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCAs) in the 1980s opened the door for studies that eventually led to the description of a new previously undescribed disease, ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). Unravelling the immunopathogenesis of this new disease resulted largely from the development of animal models. The major breakthroughs were the description of ANCA, its association with small vessel vasculitis and the discovery of its target autoantigens (myeloperoxidase and Proteinase 3). Three major disease syndromes comprise the AAVs, microscopic polyangiitis, granulomatosis with polyangiitis and eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA). Recent human studies suggest that proteinase 3 and myeloperoxidase associated vasculitis are two separate but related diseases. The ability to induce murine autoimmunity to myeloperoxidase including ANCA (with the same immune staining patterns as human ANCA) and the capacity of this anti-myeloperoxidase autoimmunity to induce disease with many of the characteristic features of human AAV are well developed. However, the development of animal models of anti-proteinase 3 ANCA and EGPA is much less well developed. Animal models are important in understanding the human disease and in particular in defining potential therapeutic targets and in early stage therapeutic testing of potential drugs. Clearly the relevance of animal models depends on how closely they mimic human diseases. The current status of animal models of vasculitis will be described in detail with reference to these criteria. PMID:25777754

  4. Cerebral vasculitis in adults: what are the steps in order to establish the diagnosis? Red flags and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Berlit, P; Kraemer, M

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral vasculitis is a rare cause of juvenile stroke. It may occur as primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS) or as CNS manifestation in the setting of systemic vasculitis. Clinical hints for vasculitis are headache, stroke, seizures, encephalopathy and signs of a systemic inflammatory disorder. Diagnostic work-up includes anamnesis, whole body examination, laboratory and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) studies, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), angiography and brain biopsy. Due to the rarity of the disease, exclusion of more frequent differential diagnoses is a key element of diagnostic work-up. This review summarizes the steps that lead to the diagnosis of cerebral vasculitis and describes the red flags and pitfalls. Despite considering the dilemma of angiography-negative vasculitis and false-negative brain biopsy in some cases, it is important to protect patients from ‘blind’ immunosuppressive therapy in unrecognized non-inflammatory differential diagnosis. PMID:24117125

  5. Management of Small Vessel Vasculitides.

    PubMed

    Lopalco, Giuseppe; Rigante, Donato; Venerito, Vincenzo; Emmi, Giacomo; Anelli, Maria Grazia; Lapadula, Giovanni; Iannone, Florenzo; Cantarini, Luca

    2016-06-01

    Inflammation mediated by cells of the immune system and necrosis are the most striking features observed at the histologic level in patients with vasculitides, clinical entities classified according to pathologic findings involving different organs, to etiology, or to size of vessels involved. Small vessel vasculitides (SVV) are a peculiar group of systemic disorders electively involving small intraparenchymal arteries, arterioles, capillaries, or venules and leading to different levels of vascular obstruction, tissue ischemia and risk of infarction; they can be divided into anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitides and immune complex vasculitides. Despite the significant advances in understanding the whole disease process and pathophysiology of SVV, strong efforts are still needed to draft, share and spread guidelines in the therapeutic management of these protean disorders. After an accurate evaluation of different open or double-blind trials and cohort studies in this review, we analyze the actual medical tools suggested for treating granulomatosis with polyangiitis, microscopic polyangiitis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, cryoglobulinemic vasculitis, anti-glomerular basement membrane disease and hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis. PMID:27118389

  6. Influenza vaccination induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis and pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Yanai-Berar, N; Ben-Itzhak, O; Gree, J; Nakhoul, F

    2002-09-01

    Influenza vaccination is a widely accepted practice, particularly among the elderly and high-risk individuals. Minor and transitory side effects following the vaccination are common, while systemic complications are infrequently reported. We describe here a case of a patient who presented to the emergency room with arthralgia, myalgias and purpura, following influenza vaccination. Necrotizing vasculitis associated with pauci-immune glomerulonephritis was observed on kidney biopsy. With increasing use of influenza vaccination, attention should be drawn to the possible expression of systemic adverse effects such as vasculitis and glomerulonephritis. PMID:12356192

  7. Vasculitis complicating granulocyte colony stimulating factor treatment of leukopenia and infection in Felty's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Farhey, Y D; Herman, J H

    1995-06-01

    Recombinant myeloid growth factors have been increasingly used in recent years to combat induced and disease associated neutropenia. Their application in the management of Felty's syndrome with intercurrent infection has raised concern that resultant neutrophilia and activation of a diverse array of polymorphonuclear cell functions may have an adverse effect on the rheumatoid disease process. We describe a patient with Felty's syndrome receiving short term treatment with recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF), who then developed acute renal failure in conjunction with leukocytoclastic vasculitis and presumptive gout. We address the issue of "adding fuel to the fire" and review reported implications of GCSF in induction of vasculitis. PMID:7545756

  8. Value of anti-infective chemoprophylaxis in primary systemic vasculitis: what is the evidence?

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Although infections are a major concern in patients with primary systemic vasculitis, actual knowledge about risk factors and evidence concerning the use of anti-infective prophylaxis from clinical trials are scarce. The use of high dose glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide pose a definite risk for infections. Bacterial infections are among the most frequent causes of death, with Staphylococcus aureus being the most common isolate. Concerning viral infections, cytomegalovirus and varicella-zoster virus reactivation represent the most frequent complications. The only prophylactic measure that is widely accepted is trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole to avoid Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia in small vessel vasculitis patients with generalised disease receiving therapy for induction of remission. PMID:19886977

  9. Connective tissue disorders associated with vasculitis and vaso-occlusive disease of the hand.

    PubMed

    Michelotti, Brett; Rizzo, Marco; Moran, Steven L

    2015-02-01

    Hand ischemia caused by vasculitis is a secondary finding in many autoimmune processes. Many of these autoimmune diseases are managed primarily with medications that can prevent the development of occlusive disease, tissue ischemia, and tissue loss. Unfortunately several disease conditions can be recalcitrant to medical management and can result in ischemic changes within the hand, which may require operative intervention. This article briefly reviews the major connective tissue disorders associated with vasculitis and vaso-occlusive disease of the hand, including scleroderma, lupus, and Buerger disease, and their surgical treatment. PMID:25455357

  10. Recurrent erythema nodosum: a red flag sign of hidden systemic vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Monica; Singh, Kamal; Lehl, SS; Bhalla, Mala

    2013-01-01

    Takayasu's arteritis is a rare, systemic vasculitis with varied presentations across multiple medical specialities. Here, we present a young woman who had recurrent episodes of erythema nodosum on the background of a low-grade fever and no vascular manifestations. The presence of a high erythrocyte sedimentation rate generated a high index of suspicion for underlying vasculitis, and radioimaging confirmed the suspicion of Takayasu's arteritis. The patient was found to have type III diseases in the vasculitic stage and was managed with systemic corticosteroids. PMID:23576669

  11. Different pathways leading to cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Sunderkötter, C; Seeliger, S; Schönlau, F; Roth, J; Hallmann, R; Luger, T A; Sorg, C; Kolde, G

    2001-12-01

    To investigate the pathomechanisms of leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LcV) we compared mouse models of LcV with non-vasculitic irritant contact dermatitis (ICD). Criteria for LcV as met by the immune complex-mediated Arthus reaction (Art-r) were also fulfilled by the localized Shwartzman reaction (Shw-r) and by cutaneous Loxoscelism (Lox) (injection of venom from Loxosceles reclusa containing sphingomyelinase D). After depletion of PMN (by gamma-irradiation) vessel damage could not be elicited in these models, distinguishing them from models of direct endothelial insult (necrotizing ICD). Depletion of complement could only delay, but not inhibit the Art-r, and did not change ICD, Lox or the Shw-r. The Shw-r exclusively revealed a sustained local expression of vascular adhesion molecules for 24 h in the preparatory phase (LPS s.c.), not observed in the Art-r, in Lox or ICD. Subsequent challenge with LPS i.p. was associated with upregulation of Mac-1 and ICAM-1 on PMN, but not of VLA-4 or LFA-1 (FACS analysis). Cytokines which were able to replace LPS in priming for LcV in the Shw-r (TNF-alpha and IL-1beta) also induced sustained expression of adhesion molecules, whereas IL-12 and IFN-gamma did neither. Neutralizing IL-12 or IFN-gamma also inhibited neither LcV nor sustained expression of adhesion molecules, whereas anti-TNF-alpha inhibited both. Anti-TNF-alpha had no marked inhibitory effects in the Art-r, in Lox or ICD. Combined (but not separate) neutralization of both E-selectin and VCAM-1 by antibodies suppressed LcV independent from reducing influx of PMN, proving that their sustained expression is decisive for the Shw-r and interferes with normal diapedesis. Since Loxosceles venom is known to dysregulate diapedesis and degranulation of PMN in vitro, since adherent immune complexes activate PMN at the vessel wall, and since adhesion molecules are dysregulated in the Shw-r, we suggest that LcV develops when activation of PMN coincides with vascular alterations

  12. Rapid Growth of Lung Nodules due to Combined Pulmonary Vasculitis, Silicoanthracosis, and Chondrocalcinosis

    PubMed Central

    Distler, Oliver; Kolios, Antonios G. A.; Weder, Walter; Franzen, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background. Silicoanthracosis is a pneumoconiosis due to occupational inhalation of silica and carbon dusts. Clinically, it can be associated with vasculitis or rheumatoid arthritis. In association with these diseases, silicoanthracosis can present within the lung with multiple pulmonary nodules which, as a differential diagnosis, can mimic metastatic disease or multiple abscesses. Case Presentation. We present the case of a 62-year old former pit worker with pulmonary nodules, chondrocalcinosis due to calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD), and a history of renal cancer. Within a short period of time, pulmonary nodules grew rapidly. Thoracoscopically, the resected lung specimen revealed silicoanthracosis associated with small-to-medium-size vasculitis in the presence of antineutrophil cytoplasmatic autoantibodies (c-ANCA). Conclusion. Pulmonary silicoanthracotic lesions on the base of ANCA-associated vasculitis and CPPD arthritis can rapidly grow. A mutual correlation between silicoanthracosis, ANCA-associated vasculitis, and CPPD seems possible. Apart from this, consideration of metastatic disease should be obligatory in patients with a history of cancer at the same time being immunosuppressed. PMID:27478398

  13. Hypernephroma Presenting with Cutaneous Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis and Lupus Anticoagulant: Resolution after Nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Nigel P.; Ruíz, Amparo; Reyes, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Hypernephroma can present as a variety of paraneoplastic, nonmetastatic conditions, including vasculitis, and rarely a lupus-type anticoagulant. Nephrectomy leads to the resolution of the systemic complaints. Malignancy, in this case hypernephroma, can present as an immune-mediated paraneoplastic syndrome which resolves after removal of the underlying tumor. PMID:22919534

  14. Recurrent stroke in a case of left atrial myxoma masquerading vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prashant K; Sureka, R K; Sharma, Anjani K; Bhuyan, Sushant; Gupta, Vikas

    2013-12-01

    We report a case of left atrial myxoma presenting as recurrent neurological deficits with absent peripheral pulses mimicking systemic vasculitis. Due to absence of cardiac signs and symptoms, there was one year delay in diagnosis from initial symptom. Left atrial myxomas are rare but treatable cause of recurrent stroke. PMID:24968552

  15. Epitope specificity determines pathogenicity and detectability in ANCA-associated vasculitis

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) specific for myeloperoxidase (MPO) or proteinase 3 (PR3) are detectable in >90% of patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). ANCA titers do not correlate well with disease activity. In vivo and in vi...

  16. The diagnostic value of perivascular infiltrates in muscle biopsy specimens for the assessment of rheumatoid vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Voskuyl, A.; van Duinen, S. G; Zwinderman, A.; Breedveld, F.; Hazes, J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine the diagnostic value of perivascular infiltrates (PVI) in randomly obtained muscle biopsy specimens for the assessment of rheumatoid vasculitis (RV).
METHODS—The number and size of PVIs, defined as the presence of mononuclear or polymorphonuclear cells around ⩾ 50% of the circumference of a vessel wall, as well as the presence of fibrinoid necrosis were determined in frozen sections of muscle samples of RV patients with histologically confirmed vasculitis in fixed muscle tissue (n=12). The findings were compared with those observed in frozen sections of muscle biopsy specimens of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients not suspected of vasculitis (n=14) and patients with osteoarthritis (OA) (n=11). The presence of PVIs and of fibrinoid necrosis were sought in four frozen sections of the muscle biopsy specimen.
RESULTS—PVIs were observed in 75% of the RV patients, which was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than the frequency found in RA (14%) or OA (18%) patients. PVIs with ⩾ three cell layers were found in 67% of the RV patients and in none of the RA and OA patients (p < 0.05). Fibrinoid necrosis was found in least one of four frozen section in 33% of the RV patients. There was a good intra-observer and inter-observer concordance on the presence of fibrinoid necrosis and of PVIs with ⩾ three cell layers.
CONCLUSIONS—The assessment of PVIs with ⩾ three cell layers in a muscle biopsy specimen is a specific and reliable test in discriminating RV from RA without vasculitis. The demonstration in muscle of PVIs with ⩾ three cell layers is more sensitive than that of fibrinoid necrosis in the diagnosis of RV.

 Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis; vasculitis; diagnosis; histology; perivascular infiltrates PMID:9613342

  17. The wound/burn guidelines - 4: Guidelines for the management of skin ulcers associated with connective tissue disease/vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Manabu; Asano, Yoshihide; Ishii, Takayuki; Ogawa, Fumihide; Kawakami, Tamihiro; Kodera, Masanari; Abe, Masatoshi; Isei, Taiki; Ito, Takaaki; Inoue, Yuji; Imafuku, Shinichi; Irisawa, Ryokichi; Ohtsuka, Masaki; Ohtsuka, Mikio; Kadono, Takafumi; Kawaguchi, Masakazu; Kukino, Ryuichi; Kono, Takeshi; Sakai, Keisuke; Takahara, Masakazu; Tanioka, Miki; Nakanishi, Takeshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Hashimoto, Akira; Hasegawa, Minoru; Hayashi, Masahiro; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Maekawa, Takeo; Matsuo, Koma; Madokoro, Naoki; Yamasaki, Osamu; Yoshino, Yuichiro; Le Pavoux, Andres; Tachibana, Takao; Ihn, Hironobu

    2016-07-01

    The Japanese Dermatological Association prepared guidelines focused on the treatment of skin ulcers associated with connective tissue disease/vasculitis practical in clinical settings of dermatological care. Skin ulcers associated with connective tissue diseases or vasculitis occur on the background of a wide variety of diseases including, typically, systemic sclerosis but also systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), dermatomyositis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), various vasculitides and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS). Therefore, in preparing the present guidelines, we considered diagnostic/therapeutic approaches appropriate for each of these disorders to be necessary and developed algorithms and clinical questions for systemic sclerosis, SLE, dermatomyositis, RA, vasculitis and APS. PMID:26972733

  18. A retrospective analysis of treatment outcomes in patients with hepatitis C related systemic vasculitis receiving intravenous methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Shahin, Amira A; El Desouky, Soha M; Zayed, Hania S

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this work is to describe the outcome of a series of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related vasculitis who were treated with corticosteroids and I.V. cyclophosphamide without receiving any antiviral therapy. The data of 16 patients with HCV infection and vasculitis were retrospectively analyzed for the treatment outcome in the present study. Eleven patients were females (68.8%) with a mean age of 49.6 ± 10.0 years. Nine patients (56.2%) had medium-sized vessel vasculitis (group A) and seven patients (43.8%) had small vessel vasculitis (group B). Disease activity was assessed using the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score (BVAS 2003) and organ damage was assessed by the Vasculitis Damage Index (VDI). HCV infection was confirmed in all patients by the detection of antibodies to HCV in serum by ELISA and HCV RNA using qualitative PCR. Quantitative PCR was done using the branched DNA technique. None of our study patients had received antiviral therapy, but they all received I.V.-pulsed cyclophosphamide monthly for 6 months, then every 3 months for six times if needed, preceded by I.V. methylprednisolone. Twelve patients (75%) had undetectable viral load by the quantitative technique. The drop in mean BVAS recorded at different intervals was highly significant. Although there was a drop in the VDI mean between the first and second reading, it was not statistically significant. All patients responded to treatment. Seven patients (43.8%) had relapse. Two patients died (12.5%). One patient died from renal failure (group B) and another died from sepsis (group A). The treatment outcomes were not statistically significant between the two vasculitis groups. A subset of patients with HCV-related vasculitis and with low levels of viremia can be safely treated with corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide alone. Despite successful treatment, a significant proportion of patients relapse and some develop severe complications and death. PMID:20924628

  19. A case of scrotal swelling mimicking testicular torsion preceding Henoch-Schönlein vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Akgun, C

    2012-01-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura, is one of the most common types of multisystemic vasculitis seen in childhood. The major clinical manifestations are cutaneous purpura, arthritis, abdominal pain, gastrointestinal bleeding, and nephritis. Isolated central nervous system vasculitis, seizures, coma and hemorrhage, Guillan--Barré syndrome, ataxia and central and peripheral neuropathy, ocular involvement, orchitis, epididymitis or testicular torsion are medical or surgical complications. In this study, we report a 7-year-old boy with scrotal swelling mimicking testicular torsion with ultrasonographic and clinical findings that the typical clinical features of Henoch-Schönlein purpura including rashes and arthritis were developed after one week of surgery (Ref. 15). PMID:22693978

  20. Acral keratoses and leucocytoclastic vasculitis occurring during treatment of essential thrombocythaemia with hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    Worley, B; Glassman, S J

    2016-03-01

    Hydroxyurea is used in essential thrombocythaemia to lower thromboembolic risk. Cutaneous adverse effects from hydroxyurea are diverse. Small vessel vasculitis has been rarely reported, and the coexistence of several different morphologies has not been described. We report a case of acral keratoses, psoriasiform plaques and leucocytoclastic vasculitis (LCV) in a patient with essential thrombocythaemia. A 69-year-old woman developed a confusing array of skin lesions including keratotic papules, psoriasiform plaques and keratoderma 4 years after commencing hydroxyurea therapy. The initial diagnosis was hand and foot psoriasis, but lesions were resistant to therapy. With an increase in the dose of hydroxyurea, the lesions ulcerated. Skin biopsies taken from different sites indicated different diagnoses, including LCV. Discontinuation of hydroxyurea yielded rapid improvement. Although the most commonly reported cutaneous adverse effect from hydroxyurea is leg ulceration, this can be preceded or accompanied by less dramatic skin lesions. Unless recognized, delayed diagnosis and lesion progression can occur. PMID:26269121

  1. Cutaneous Necrotizing Vasculitis and Leukopenia in a Cocaine User: Is Levamisole the Culprit?

    PubMed Central

    Zeineddine, Nabil; Felix, Richard; Goldstein, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Levamisole is an antihelminthic drug banned by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2000 because of its dangerous side effects. Over the past few years, it has been identified as an adulterant in cocaine and reported to cause cutaneous vasculitis in cocaine users. The health burden of levamisole is serious since it is estimated that over 5 million Americans use cocaine and that 70% of the cocaine used in the USA contains levamisole. In this paper we report the case of a 23-year-old female cocaine user that presented with purpuric rash and skin necrosis, found to have positive c-ANCA and anti-proteinase 3 antibodies. Her skin biopsy showed fibroconnective tissue with signs of necrosis, acute and chronic inflammation, and thrombus formation. She was diagnosed with levamisole-induced vasculitis and successfully treated with withdrawal of cocaine use and local wound care. PMID:27579207

  2. Stroke-like Phenomena Revealing Multifocal Cerebral Vasculitis in Pediatric Lyme Neuroborreliosis.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Mary; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Vargas, Maria Isabel; Fluss, Joel

    2015-08-01

    Stroke-like presentation in Lyme neuroborreliosis is rare in the pediatric age group. We report a previously healthy 12-year-old boy who presented with acute left hemiparesis and meningeal signs. Neuroimaging failed to reveal any cerebral infarction but demonstrated a multifocal cerebral vasculitis involving small, medium and large-sized vessels affecting both the anterior and posterior circulation. Concentric contrast enhancement of the basilar artery was also observed. Further investigations and laboratory findings were consistent with Lyme neuroborreliosis. A rapidly favorable clinical outcome was obtained with appropriate antibiotic treatment along with antiaggregants and steroids. Lyme neuroborreliosis should be considered in the diagnostic differential, not only in adults but also among children, especially in the context of an unexplained cerebral vasculitis. PMID:25316727

  3. Membranous nephropathy with crescents associated with levamisole-induced MPO-ANCA vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Moinuddin, Irfan; Madhrira, Machaiah; Bracamonte, Erika; Thajudeen, Bijin; Sussman, Amy

    2016-07-01

    ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) is the most common cause of crescentic rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (GN). Levamisole used as an adulterant in cocaine is increasingly recognized as a cause of AAV. We report the case of a 50 year old woman with atypical anti-MPO AAV associated with cocaine use and exposure to levamisole. In addition to the clinical and pathologic findings of crescentic GN, the patient also had biopsy evidence of secondary membranous nephropathy (MN). Although AAV and MN have been reported previously in the same patient and both have been induced by drug exposures, this is the first report of MN in a patient with AAV likely induced by levamisole. We suggest that MPO can cause both pauci-immune vasculitis and secondary membranous nephropathy in some cases, as in cases of levamisole-adulterated cocaine use. PMID:27067665

  4. Juvenile gangrenous vasculitis of the scrotum: Is it a variant of pyoderma gangrenosum?

    PubMed

    Caputo, Ruggero; Marzano, Angelo V; Di Benedetto, Alessandra; Ramoni, Stefano; Cambiaghi, Stefano

    2006-08-01

    Juvenile gangrenous vasculitis of the scrotum was described by Piñol et al in 1974 as a unique variant of scrotal gangrene of unknown origin, occurring exclusively in young individuals. It was characterized by an acute onset of skin ulcers undergoing complete resolution after appropriate therapy, with no relapses. We present a typical case of this extremely rare disease affecting a 16-year-old boy in whom the scrotal ulcerations were preceded by an episode of pharyngitis with fever. The condition promptly regressed after administration of intramuscular betamethasone in combination with oral ciprofloxacin. According to Piñol et al, juvenile gangrenous vasculitis of the scrotum, although poorly known to dermatologists, should be regarded as a distinctive entity within the wide group of scrotal gangrenes. On the other hand, the hypothesis that this condition may well represent a variant of pyoderma gangrenosum is discussed. PMID:16843125

  5. Bioinspired engineering study of Plantae vascules for self-healing composite structures

    PubMed Central

    Trask, R. S.; Bond, I. P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the first conceptual study into creating a Plantae-inspired vascular network within a fibre-reinforced polymer composite laminate, which provides an ongoing self-healing functionality without incurring a mass penalty. Through the application of a ‘lost-wax’ technique, orthogonal hollow vascules, inspired by the ‘ray cell’ structures found in ring porous hardwoods, were successfully introduced within a carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy polymer composite laminate. The influence on fibre architecture and mechanical behaviour of single vascules (located on the laminate centreline) when aligned parallel and transverse to the local host ply was characterized experimentally using a compression-after-impact test methodology. Ultrasonic C-scanning and high-resolution micro-CT X-ray was undertaken to identify the influence of and interaction between the internal vasculature and impact damage. The results clearly show that damage morphology is influenced by vascule orientation and that a 10 J low-velocity impact damage event is sufficient to breach the vasculature; a prerequisite for any subsequent self-healing function. The residual compressive strength after a 10 J impact was found to be dependent upon vascule orientation. In general, residual compressive strength decreased to 70 per cent of undamaged strength when vasculature was aligned parallel to the local host ply and a value of 63 per cent when aligned transverse. This bioinspired engineering study has illustrated the potential that a vasculature concept has to offer in terms of providing a self-healing function with minimum mass penalty, without initiating premature failure within a composite structure. PMID:19955122

  6. Pulmonary fibrosis—an uncommon manifestation of anti-myeloperoxidase-positive systemic vasculitis?

    PubMed Central

    Bhanji, Amir; Karim, Mahzuz

    2010-01-01

    Small vessel vasculitides such as microscopic polyangiitis and Wegener’s granulomatosis commonly involve the kidney and lung, with alveolar haemorrhage being the commonest manifestation of pulmonary involvement. Here we describe a patient who developed acute renal failure and pulmonary haemorrhage with positive autoantibodies against myeloperoxidase 1 year after a diagnosis of usual interstitial pneumonia had been made and we discuss the uncommon association of pulmonary fibrosis and anti-myeloperoxidase positive vasculitis. PMID:20640181

  7. Scabies presenting as a necrotizing vasculitis in the presence of lupus anticoagulant.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, P; Snow, J

    1998-10-01

    A 75-year-old man presented with a progressive eruption of 6 weeks' duration. Purpura and focal areas of cutaneous infarction were present on the legs. There were scabies burrows on the wrists and hands, and a mite was extracted. Histology of a skin biopsy showed a necrotizing leucocytoclastic vasculitis. Circulating lupus anticoagulant was detected. Treatment consisted of topical 5% permethrin cream and systemic steroids. PMID:9892918

  8. Letrozole-induced necrotising leukocytoclastic small vessel vasculitis: First report of a case in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Pathmarajah, Pirunthan; Shah, Karishma; Taghipour, Kathy; Ramachandra, Su; Thorat, Mangesh A; Chaudhry, Ziaullah; Patkar, Vivek; Peters, Francesca; Connor, Thomas; Spurrell, Emma; Tobias, Jeffrey S; Vaidya, Jayant S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Letrozole, an aromatase inhibitor, is a commonly used neo-adjuvant drug to treat hormone-sensitive breast cancer. There have been a few cases of aromatase inhibitor induced vasculitis but the first case of letrozole-induced vasculitis was reported from Switzerland in 2014 (Digklia et al.) [1]. Presentation of case We report the case of a 72-year-old woman with a small breast cancer. She was started on pre-operative letrozole (2.5 mg/d) whilst awaiting surgery. Ten days later she presented with burning pain and purpuric skin lesions which progressed to extensive ischaemic superficial necrosis of the lower limb skin, resolving over 3–4 months after local and systemic steroids. Histologically, it showed leucocytoclasis with evidence of eosinophilia consistent with a diagnosis of cutaneous leukocytoclastic small vessel vasculitis. Discussion The initial clinical presentation was severe burning pain around the ankles and a spreading violaceous rash. Letrozole was stopped. Wide local excision (lumpectomy) and sentinel node biopsy were postponed because of the accompanying pneumonitis and gastrointestinal upset, and were carried out 3.5 months later. Fortunately, the tumour size did not increase, but appeared to reduce, and axillary lymph nodes remained negative, i.e., this patient’s cancer outcome does not seem to have been jeopardized. Conclusion Leukocytoclastic vasculitis is a hypersensitivity reaction that is usually self-resolving, though our case needed systemic steroid treatment. Letrozole is a commonly used drug in clinical practice and prescribers should be aware of this rare side effect, which in our case delayed treatment without any apparent harm and possibly reduced tumour size. PMID:26432999

  9. Bioinspired engineering study of Plantae vascules for self-healing composite structures.

    PubMed

    Trask, R S; Bond, I P

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents the first conceptual study into creating a Plantae-inspired vascular network within a fibre-reinforced polymer composite laminate, which provides an ongoing self-healing functionality without incurring a mass penalty. Through the application of a 'lost-wax' technique, orthogonal hollow vascules, inspired by the 'ray cell' structures found in ring porous hardwoods, were successfully introduced within a carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy polymer composite laminate. The influence on fibre architecture and mechanical behaviour of single vascules (located on the laminate centreline) when aligned parallel and transverse to the local host ply was characterized experimentally using a compression-after-impact test methodology. Ultrasonic C-scanning and high-resolution micro-CT X-ray was undertaken to identify the influence of and interaction between the internal vasculature and impact damage. The results clearly show that damage morphology is influenced by vascule orientation and that a 10 J low-velocity impact damage event is sufficient to breach the vasculature; a prerequisite for any subsequent self-healing function. The residual compressive strength after a 10 J impact was found to be dependent upon vascule orientation. In general, residual compressive strength decreased to 70 per cent of undamaged strength when vasculature was aligned parallel to the local host ply and a value of 63 per cent when aligned transverse. This bioinspired engineering study has illustrated the potential that a vasculature concept has to offer in terms of providing a self-healing function with minimum mass penalty, without initiating premature failure within a composite structure. PMID:19955122

  10. Update on Outcome Measure Development for Large Vessel Vasculitis: Report from OMERACT 12

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Sibel Zehra; Direskeneli, Haner; Sreih, Antoine; Alibaz-Oner, Fatma; Gul, Ahmet; Kamali, Sevil; Hatemi, Gulen; Kermani, Tanaz; Mackie, Sarah L.; Mahr, Alfred; Meara, Alexa; Milman, Nataliya; Nugent, Heidi; Robson, Joanna; Tomasson, Gunnar; Merkel, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The rarity of large vessel vasculitis (LVV) is a major factor limiting randomized controlled trials in LVV, resulting in treatment choices in these diseases that are guided mainly by observational studies and expert opinion. Further complicating trials in LVV is the absence of validated and meaningful outcome measures. The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) vasculitis working group initiated the Large Vessel Vasculitis task force in 2009 to develop data-driven, validated outcome tools for clinical investigation in LVV. This report summarizes the progress that has been made on a disease activity assessment tool and patient-reported outcomes in LVV as well as the group’s research agenda. Methods The OMERACT LVV task force brought an international group of investigators and patient research partners together to work collaboratively on developing outcome tools. The group initially focused on disease activity assessment tools in LVV. Following a systematic literature review, an international Delphi exercise was conducted to obtain expert opinion on principles and domains for disease assessment. The OMERACT vasculitis working group’s LVV task force is also conducting qualitative research with patients, including interviews, focus groups, and engaging patients as research partners, all to ensure that the approach to disease assessment includes measures of patients’ perspectives and that patients have input into the research agenda and process. Results The preliminary results of both the Delphi exercise and the qualitative interviews were discussed at the OMERACT 12 (2014) meeting and the completion of the analyses will produce an initial set of domains and instruments to form the basis of next steps in the research agenda. Conclusion The research agenda continues to evolve, with the ultimate goal of developing an OMERACT-endorsed core set of outcome measures for use in clinical trials of LVV. PMID:26077399

  11. Acute vasculitis resulting in free flap failure: the importance of early recognition and options for management.

    PubMed

    Brennan, P A; Colbert, S; Spedding, A V; Herd, M K; Mellor, T K; Anand, R; McCrae, F

    2012-11-01

    Unusual or unexpected medical causes for free flap failure do occur but are uncommon. We present a rare case of a fibula free flap failure due to an acute vasculitis which was undiagnosed until after the flap had failed. In addition to two successful flap salvages and intravenous heparin, an epoprostenol infusion was commenced but a third salvage was not successful. The vasculitis resulted in marked blood vessel wall thickening, and cutaneous manifestations which presented as late signs. High peri-nuclear anti nuclear cytoplasmic antibody (pANCA) and myeloperoxidase (MOP) titres were subsequently found and histology from several blood vessels showed marked inflammation throughout the wall. A diagnosis of microscopic polyangiitis was made and high dose steroids were subsequently commenced. Interestingly, he had vasculitis several years previously treated with oral steroids but had been discharged from the rheumatology clinic. This rare case illustrates the potential hazards of free flap surgery in the vasculitides and discusses the warning signs and various management options to reduce the likelihood of flap failure in these patients. PMID:22534125

  12. Immunomodulation with eicosapentaenoic acid supports the treatment of autoimmune small-vessel vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Hirahashi, Junichi; Kawahata, Kimito; Arita, Makoto; Iwamoto, Ryo; Hishikawa, Keiichi; Honda, Mie; Hamasaki, Yoshifumi; Tanaka, Mototsugu; Okubo, Koshu; Kurosawa, Miho; Takase, Osamu; Nakakuki, Masanori; Saiga, Kan; Suzuki, Kazuo; Kawachi, Shoji; Tojo, Akihiro; Seki, George; Marumo, Takeshi; Hayashi, Matsuhiko; Fujita, Toshiro

    2014-01-01

    Small-vessel vasculitis is a life-threatening autoimmune disease that is frequently associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs). Conventional immunotherapy including steroids and cyclophosphamide can cause serious adverse events, limiting the efficacy and safety of treatment. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a key component of fish oil, is an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid widely known to be cardioprotective and beneficial for vascular function. We report two elderly patients with systemic ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) in whom the administration of EPA in concert with steroids safely induced and maintained remission, without the use of additioal immunosuppressants. To explore the mechanisms by which EPA enhances the treatment of AAV, we employed SCG/Kj mice as a spontaneous murine model of AAV. Dietary enrichment with EPA significantly delayed the onset of crescentic glomerulonephritis and prolonged the overall survival. EPA-derived anti-inflammatory lipid mediators and their precursors were present in the kidney, plasma, spleen, and lungs in the EPA-treated mice. Furthermore, a decrease in ANCA production and CD4/CD8-double negative T cells, and an increase in Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in the lymph nodes of the kidney were observed in the EPA-treated mice. These clinical and experimental observations suggest that EPA can safely support and augment conventional therapy for treating autoimmune small-vessel vasculitis. PMID:25230773

  13. Cutaneous lymphocytic vasculitis: a definition, a review, and a proposed classification.

    PubMed

    Carlson, J A; Mihm, M C; LeBoit, P E

    1996-02-01

    Lymphocytic vasculitis is not widely accepted as a pathologic mechanism by dermatopathologists, and a comprehensive list of its causes cannot be found in the literature. This state of affairs stems largely from the lack of a rigorous definition. In this report, the authors review past efforts at coming to terms with lymphocytic vasculitis and why those efforts have fallen short. The authors propose that lymphocytic vasculitis can be separated from the ubiquitous perivascular dermatitides in routinely processed specimens by requiring the presence of either acute or chronic damage to the walls of small vessels (eg, fibrin deposition, lamination by pericytes). In the case of muscular vessels, the presence of lymphocytes within the vessel walls is sufficient, because diapedesis of lymphocytes does not occur in arteries or veins. Although lymphocytic infiltrates meeting this definition are uncommon, there are a number of conditions, with both typical and atypical lymphocytes, in which damage to vessels occurs. The authors review these conditions, outline possible pathogenetic mechanisms, ranging from delayed hypersensitivity reactions directed against endothelial cells to direct infection of these cells, and present classifications based on morphological changes and pathogenesis respectively. PMID:8834516

  14. Morphologic features and development of granulomatous vasculitis in feline infectious peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Kipar, A; May, H; Menger, S; Weber, M; Leukert, W; Reinacher, M

    2005-05-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal, coronavirus (CoV)-induced systemic disease in cats, characterized by granulomas in organs and granulomatous vasculitis. This study describes the morphologic features of granulomatous vasculitis in FIP as well as its development in the course of monocyte-associated feline CoV (FCoV) viremia in five naturally infected Domestic Shorthair cats with FIP. Monocyte-associated FCoV viremia was demonstrated by immunohistology, RNA in situ hybridization, and electron micropscopy. Granulomatous phlebitis at different stages of development was observed. Vasculitic processes ranged from attachment and emigration of FCoV-infected monocytes to vascular/perivascular granulomatous infiltrates with destruction of the vascular basal lamina. Monocytes as well as perivascular macrophages were activated because they were strongly positive for CD18 and expressed cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta) and matrix metalloproteinase-9. In addition, general activation of endothelial cells, represented by major histocompatibility complex II upregulation, was observed in all cases. These results confirm FIP as a monocyte-triggered systemic disease and demonstrate the central role of activated monocytes in FIP vasculitis. PMID:15872378

  15. [Pulmonary Nocardiosis due to Nocardia asiatica in a Patient with ANCA-associated Vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Suemori, Koichiro; Miyamoto, Hitoshi; Murakami, Shinobu; Yamazaki, Hitoshi; Ishizaki, Jun; Matsumoto, Takuya; Murakami, Yuichi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi; Yasukawa, Masaki

    2015-07-01

    Nocardia asiatica is a rare causative organism responsible for opportunistic infection, and was first reported by Kageyama et al. in 2004. We report herein on a very rare case of N. asiatica infection in a 76-year old male patient with ANCA-associated vasculitis and a history of pulmonary tuberculosis. The patient developed pulmonary nocardiosis due to N. asiatica while receiving glucocorticoid therapy. Chest computed tomography demonstrated multiple granules and cavity formation mainly in the left lower lobe. From the images, we suspected opportunistic infection, possibly pulmonary tuberculosis or pulmonary damage due to ANCA-associated vasculitis. Nocardia sp. was detected from a bronchoalveolar lavage culture and N. asiatica was identified by 16S ribosomal DNA gene sequencing. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed no abnormality. Administration of Doripenem (1.5g/day) and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (4g/day) was started, and the patient's clinical and imaging findings promptly improved. Thereafter, he received sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (2g/day) and prednisolone (10 mg/day) as maintenance therapy for ANCA-associated vasculitis for more than one year, and there has since been no recurrence of the Nocardia infection. PMID:26554223

  16. A role for mast cells in the development of adjuvant-induced vasculitis and arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, B.; Burns, A. R.; Kubes, P.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the role of mast cells in the development of vasculitis and joint swelling in adjuvant-immunized rats. Leukocyte trafficking within mesenteric venules (rolling and adhesion) and mast cell activation (ruthenium red uptake) were examined in vivo. Elevated leukocyte trafficking was observed by 4 days after immunization, whereas joint swelling developed between days 10 and 12. Perivascular mast cells took up ruthenium red and appeared activated by electron microscopy at 4 but not 12 days after immunization. Treatment with the mast cell stabilizer cromolyn on days 1 to 4 after immunization blocked ruthenium red uptake at day 4 and reduced leukocyte rolling and adhesion by approximately 50%. This treatment also reduced rolling, adhesion, and joint swelling at day 12 by approximately 50%. Cromolyn treatment over days 9 to 12 reduced joint swelling but increased leukocyte emigration into the mesentery. Peritoneal mast cells isolated 4 days after immunization elicited significant neutrophil chemotaxis in vitro, whereas day 12 mast cells did not. Mast cell activation and vasculitis were absent in adjuvant-resistant Fisher/344 rats. These data suggest that mast cells play an early role in the initiation of vasculitis and may function by day 12 to limit infiltration of leukocytes from the vasculature. In the joint, however, mast cells appear to contribute to inflammation at early as well as later time points. Images Figure 2 PMID:9466582

  17. Kidney transplantation for a patient with refractory childhood-onset ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Kaseda, Koji; Marui, Yuji; Suwabe, Tatsuya; Hoshino, Junichi; Sumida, Keiichi; Hayami, Noriko; Mise, Koki; Tanaka, Kiho; Takaichi, Kenmei; Tomikawa, Shinji; Fujii, Takeshi; Ohashi, Kenichi; Ubara, Yoshifumi

    2016-03-01

    A 14-year-old Japanese girl was admitted to our institution for the evaluation of renal dysfunction. Her serum creatinine was 1.1 mg/dL, proteinuria was 1.5 g/day, the urine sediment contained numerous erythrocytes per high-power field, and she was positive for myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA). Proteinuria was first noted at the age of 12 years. Renal biopsy showed crescentic glomerulonephritis with slight immunoglobulin A (IgA) deposition. A diagnosis of ANCA-associated vasculitis was made. Immunosuppressive therapy was initiated, including steroid pulse therapy and intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse therapy, but hemodialysis was required after 6 years. Eight months after the patient became anuric and her MPO-ANCA titer became negative, living-related donor kidney transplantation was done from her mother. ANCA became slightly positive 2 years later, but the patient remains stable without proteinuria or hematuria at 4 years after surgery. This case suggests that kidney transplantation can be performed successfully for a patient with refractory childhood-onset ANCA-associated vasculitis, and that remission of vasculitis associated with ANCA negativity at transplantation may contribute to a better renal prognosis in this patient. PMID:24645722

  18. Histopathological Characteristics of Post-inflamed Coronary Arteries in Kawasaki Disease-like Vasculitis of Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Maiko; Tanaka, Hideo; Nakamura, Akihiro; Suzuki, Chinatsu; Harada, Yoshinori; Takamatsu, Tetsuro; Hamaoka, Kenji

    2016-02-27

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis in infants that develops predominantly in the coronary arteries. Despite the clinically transient nature of active inflammation in childhood albeit rare complications (e.g., coronary artery aneurysm), KD has recently been suggested to increase the incidence of ischemic heart diseases in young adulthood. However, little is known about the histopathology of the coronary artery long after development of the acute KD vasculitis. To address this, we conducted histological studies of rabbit coronary arteries in adolescent phase after induction of the KD-like vasculitis induced by horse serum administration. After a transmural infiltration of inflammatory cells in acute phase at day 7, the artery exhibited a gradual decrease in the number of inflammatory cells and thickening of the intima during the chronic phase up to day 90, where proteoglycans were distinctly accumulated in the intima with abundant involvement of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)-positive cells, most of which accompanied expression of VCAM-1 and NF-κB. Distinct from classical atherosclerosis, inflammatory cells, e.g., macrophages, were barely detected during the chronic phase. These observations indicate that the KD-like coronary arteritis is followed by intimal thickening via accumulation of proteoglycans and proliferation of α-SMA-positive cells, reflecting aberrant coronary artery remodeling. PMID:27006519

  19. [A case of elderly onset loss of consciousness due to bacterial meningitis and subsequent vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Kameno, Mami; Takata, Toshihiro; Yasuda, Hisahumi; Hara, Kenta; Okano, Hiroyuki; Sakurai, Takashi; Nagata, Masao; Yokono, Koichi

    2008-07-01

    We reported an 83-year-old woman, who suffered from bacterial meningitis and subsequent vasculitis. She experienced episodes of loss of consciousness several times in July, 2006. She also had recurrent fever and was admitted to a local hospital. Routine examinations, including brain MRI and electroencephalogram, were negative and urinary tract infection was diagnosed. After successful antibiotic therapy, she was transferred to a rehabilitation hospital. After transfer, she had no headache, but presented fever again, and a reduced level of consciousness. Cerebrospinal fluid test showed that cell counts were high with a predominance of neutrophils, and her glucose level was low. She received antibiotic therapy on her suspicion of bacterial meningitis. Bacterial cultures of CSF and blood were negative, probably due to the previous antibiotic therapy. Repeated CSF analysis showed a decrease in cell counts, but her lower consciousness did not improve. Moreover, neurological symptoms such as left pyramidal tract sign appeared. She was transferred to our hospital on the suspicion of vasculitis. Diffusion MRI showed high intensity in the right middle cerebral artery (MCA) area and CT angiography showed the stenosis of the right MCA at the M3 portion. Two courses of steroid pulse therapy were performed. Her consciousness gradually improved and eventually could talk although cognitive decline remained as a residual deficit. Our patient failed to be diagnosed early because of atypical symptoms of meningitis. Caution seems necessary for elderly cases presenting with atypical initial symptoms of meningitis. Steroid pulse therapy was effective for the subsequent vasculitis, as reported previously. PMID:18753720

  20. A pain in the neck: carotid artery dissection presenting as vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Collamer, Angelique N; Battafarano, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    Spontaneous cervical artery dissection is increasingly recognized as a common cause of ischemic stroke in the young and middle-aged. Noninvasive imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography have widely replaced conventional angiography as the initial diagnostic study of extracranial dissections, allowing greater numbers of patients to be screened and thus leading to increased frequency of the diagnosis. We present a case of spontaneous carotid artery dissection in a previously healthy 48-year-old woman who presented with neck pain and elevated inflammatory markers. Marked gadolinium enhancement of the right extracranial internal carotid artery on magnetic resonance imaging led to an initial diagnosis of vasculitis. This case shows that the vessel injury associated with spontaneous carotid artery dissection is associated with an inflammatory response that can mimic vasculitis on highly sensitive imaging techniques, a phenomenon not well described previously. In this report, we review the nonvasculitic conditions that can mimic vasculitis and present clinicians complex diagnostic challenges. Recognition of these pseudovasculitic syndromes is important to avoid overdiagnosis resulting in unnecessary and potentially harmful immunosuppressive and cytotoxic treatments. PMID:23820364

  1. Successful treatment of cerebral large vessel vasculitis in systemic lupus erythematosus with intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Kato, R; Sumitomo, S; Kawahata, K; Fujio, K; Yamamoto, K

    2015-07-01

    A 39-year-old woman with a six-year history of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was admitted because of a prolonged high fever, discoid rash, and multiple lymphadenopathies. She also developed pericarditis, and was treated with intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy followed by prednisolone 50 mg daily and cyclosporine 100 mg daily. Meanwhile, she had a progressive headache, and a brain MRI revealed right pons infarction, although she did not have any abnormal neurological findings. An MRA revealed obvious irregular narrowing in the basilar, right vertebral and right posterior cerebral artery. There was no evidence of antiphospholipid syndrome. We concluded that the cause of the asymptomatic brain infarction was cerebral large vessel vasculitis associated with neuropsychiatric SLE. Intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse therapy was started, and two months later, we confirmed that the irregular arterial narrowing had markedly ameliorated.Cerebral large vessel vasculitis in neuropsychiatric SLE is very rare, and a marked amelioration has not been reported to date. Here, we present a rare case of cerebral large vessel vasculitis treated successfully with a clear visual presentation. PMID:25661835

  2. Valvular involvement in ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated systemic vasculitides have a variety of presentations, but cardiac valvular involvement is rarely diagnosed and its management is not established. Case presentation We report the case of a 44 year old man who presented with an ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis and aortic regurgitation of unusual mechanism. Transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography disclosed septal hypertrophy preventing a complete closure of the aortic valve and thus responsible for a massive aortic regurgitation. After 4 months of immunosuppressive therapy, the valve lesion did not subside and the patient had to undergo aortic valve replacement. This report also reviews the 20 cases of systemic ANCA-associated vasculitis with endocardial valvular involvement previously reported in the English language medical literature. Conclusions Valvular involvement in ANCA-associated systemic vasculitides is rarely reported. Most of these lesions are due to Wegener's granulomatosis and half are present when the diagnosis of vasculitis is made. The valvular lesion is usually isolated, aortic regurgitation being the most frequent type, and often requires valve replacement in the months that follow it's discovery. PMID:21345235

  3. Antigen inhalation as a triggering factor in systemic small-sized-vessel vasculitis. Four cases.

    PubMed

    Mouthon, L; Khaled, M; Cohen, P; Subra, J F; Guillevin, L

    2001-04-01

    In order to identify small-sized-vessel vasculitis occurring immediately after massive inhalation of particles which could be considered antigenic, we performed a retrospective review of patients who consulted our Department of Internal Medicine between 1980 and 1998 and were diagnosed as having small-vessel vasculitis that developed immediately after massive exposure to inhaled particles. Four patients, 27 to 55 years old, presented with small-sized-vessel vasculitis (one with Wegener's granulomatosis and three with Churg-Strauss syndrome) which developed after massive inhalation of particles. Clinical manifestations occurred from a few hours to 10 days after inhalation of diesel fumes, cereal dust, flour or cereal dust and/or pigeon droppings. Three patients remain disease-free 8, 9 and 18 years after discontinuing treatment. One patient remains well after 3 years on low-dose corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide therapy. Our data suggest that primary antigens can cause small-sized-vessel vasculitides. Identifying such etiological factors could improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of systemic vasculitides and prevent relapses due to similar antigenic exposure. PMID:11431572

  4. [Immunocorrection in combined prevention of early postoperative complications in patients with systemic vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Andrievskikh, I A; Omel'ianiuk, M Iu

    2015-01-01

    The authors studied peculiarities of the immune status in angiosurgical patients with systemic vasculitis, as well as possibilities of immunodiagnosis and immunocorrection in prevention of early coagulopathic and reparative complications after angiosurgical interventions in this cohort of patients. A total of 172 angiosurgical patients presenting with systemic vasculitis were subdivided into two groups depending on the preoperative preparation methods used. In Group One (Study Group) comprising 81 patients preoperative preparation was carried out using immunosuppressive therapy with hormones and cytostatics according to the rheumatologist's indications. In Group Two (n=91) hormones and/or cytostatics were replaced by the proposed four-component immunocorrection including various combinations of correcting the lifestyle, use of antioxidative-activity immunomodulators, plasmapheresis and intravenous administration of immunoglobulins. It was determined that using this method of correction made it possible to achieve a good anti-inflammatory effect in angiosurgical patients with systemic vasculitis, thus avoiding negative aftermaths of immunosuppression. The developed method of immunocorrection makes it possible to decrease the rate of early postoperative coagulopathic and reparative complications in angiosurgical patients as compared to therapy with hormones and/or cytostatics. PMID:26673291

  5. Goodpasture's Syndrome and p-ANCA Associated Vasculitis in a Patient of Silicosiderosis: An Unusual Association

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Amanjit; Das, Ashim; Gupta, Dheeraj; Garg, Mandeep

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Goodpasture's syndrome is a rare clinical entity and is characterized by circulating autoantibodies which are principally directed against the glomerular/alveolar basement membrane. The etiology of Goodpasture's syndrome is still unknown. Lung involvement occurs as a result of lung injury and the exposure of new epitopes to the immune system. Recently, several studies have suggested the role of silica as one of etiological factors in ANCA associated vasculitis and glomerulonephritis. Materials and Methods. We present a case of a 40-year-old welder with silicosiderosis, who developed anti-GBM disease with p-ANCA positivity. Case Report. Patient presented to an emergency with gradually increasing breathlessness along with renal failure and died after short hospital stay. Autopsy pathology findings revealed crescentic glomerulonephritis with linear glomerular basement membrane antibody deposition, splenic vasculitis, pulmonary haemorrhage, and pulmonary silicosiderosis. Conclusion. This case reinforces the role of environmental triggers like exposure to silica, metal dust, and tobacco in pathogenesis of Goodpasture's syndrome and p-ANCA associated vasculitis. PMID:25349763

  6. EULAR/ERA-EDTA recommendations for the management of ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Yates, M; Watts, R A; Bajema, I M; Cid, M C; Crestani, B; Hauser, T; Hellmich, B; Holle, J U; Laudien, M; Little, M A; Luqmani, R A; Mahr, A; Merkel, P A; Mills, J; Mooney, J; Segelmark, M; Tesar, V; Westman, K; Vaglio, A; Yalçındağ, N; Jayne, D R; Mukhtyar, C

    2016-09-01

    In this article, the 2009 European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) have been updated. The 2009 recommendations were on the management of primary small and medium vessel vasculitis. The 2015 update has been developed by an international task force representing EULAR, the European Renal Association and the European Vasculitis Society (EUVAS). The recommendations are based upon evidence from systematic literature reviews, as well as expert opinion where appropriate. The evidence presented was discussed and summarised by the experts in the course of a consensus-finding and voting process. Levels of evidence and grades of recommendations were derived and levels of agreement (strengths of recommendations) determined. In addition to the voting by the task force members, the relevance of the recommendations was assessed by an online voting survey among members of EUVAS. Fifteen recommendations were developed, covering general aspects, such as attaining remission and the need for shared decision making between clinicians and patients. More specific items relate to starting immunosuppressive therapy in combination with glucocorticoids to induce remission, followed by a period of remission maintenance; for remission induction in life-threatening or organ-threatening AAV, cyclophosphamide and rituximab are considered to have similar efficacy; plasma exchange which is recommended, where licensed, in the setting of rapidly progressive renal failure or severe diffuse pulmonary haemorrhage. These recommendations are intended for use by healthcare professionals, doctors in specialist training, medical students, pharmaceutical industries and drug regulatory organisations. PMID:27338776

  7. Histopathological Characteristics of Post-inflamed Coronary Arteries in Kawasaki Disease-like Vasculitis of Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Maiko; Tanaka, Hideo; Nakamura, Akihiro; Suzuki, Chinatsu; Harada, Yoshinori; Takamatsu, Tetsuro; Hamaoka, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis in infants that develops predominantly in the coronary arteries. Despite the clinically transient nature of active inflammation in childhood albeit rare complications (e.g., coronary artery aneurysm), KD has recently been suggested to increase the incidence of ischemic heart diseases in young adulthood. However, little is known about the histopathology of the coronary artery long after development of the acute KD vasculitis. To address this, we conducted histological studies of rabbit coronary arteries in adolescent phase after induction of the KD-like vasculitis induced by horse serum administration. After a transmural infiltration of inflammatory cells in acute phase at day 7, the artery exhibited a gradual decrease in the number of inflammatory cells and thickening of the intima during the chronic phase up to day 90, where proteoglycans were distinctly accumulated in the intima with abundant involvement of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)-positive cells, most of which accompanied expression of VCAM-1 and NF-κB. Distinct from classical atherosclerosis, inflammatory cells, e.g., macrophages, were barely detected during the chronic phase. These observations indicate that the KD-like coronary arteritis is followed by intimal thickening via accumulation of proteoglycans and proliferation of α-SMA-positive cells, reflecting aberrant coronary artery remodeling. PMID:27006519

  8. A novel immunopathological association of IgG4-RD and vasculitis with Hashimoto's thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Minamino, Hiroto; Ariyasu, Hiroyuki; Furuta, Hiroto; Nishi, Masahiro; Yoshimasu, Takashi; Nishikawa, Akinori; Nakanishi, Masanori; Tsuchihashi, Shigeki; Kojima, Fumiyoshi; Murata, Shin-ichi; Inoue, Gen; Akamizu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Summary A 73-year-old man with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) suffered from purpura on the lower legs. He was diagnosed with IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) with serum IgG4 elevation and dacryo-sialadenitis confirmed histologically. Serum Th2 and Treg cytokines, interleukin 7 (IL7), IL8 and Th2 chemokine levels were elevated, while skewed Th1 balance was seen in fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Therefore, preferential Th1 balance in HT appeared to be followed by IgG4-RD characterized with Th2 and Treg polarization. The commencement of steroid therapy dramatically exacerbated clinical manifestations including IgG4-RD-associated HT. The measurement of cytokine and chemokine levels as well as FACS analysis in the development of IgG4-RD seemed to be beneficial. In conclusion, an innovative association of HT, IgG4-RD and vasculitis was observed. This report also offers novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for IgG4-RD. Learning points Recently, a subtype of HT has been considered to be a thyroid manifestation of IgG4-RD, although the etiology of IgG4-RD is not established yet. Immunologically a close association between HT and vasculitis was reported. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis is a rare skin presentation of IgG4-RD. In the current case, during the course of HT, IgG4-RD and leukocytoclastic vasculitis occurred; thus, innate immunity and acquired immunity seem to be involved in the development of IgG4-RD. The measurement of cytokine and chemokines appeared to be beneficial in the development of IgG4-RD. Remarkably, effectiveness of steroid therapy for HT suggested presence of IgG4-RD-associated HT. Therefore, this report highlights the pathogenesis of IgG4-RD and proposes novel therapeutic mechanisms. Clinicians should pay attention to the development of IgG4-RD and vasculitis during long course of HT. PMID:26966543

  9. Testicular vasculitis: findings differentiating isolated disease from systemic disease in 72 patients.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Tan, Carmela D; Koening, Curry L; Khasnis, Atul; Rodríguez, E René; Hoffman, Gary S

    2012-03-01

    Testicular vasculitis (TV) may be part of systemic (testicular) vasculitis (STV) or may exist as single-organ/isolated (testicular) vasculitis (ITV). In the current study we sought to identify clinical and histologic features that distinguish STV from ITV. The distinction was deemed important because it is already well established that in other forms of single organ vasculitis, surgical therapy alone may be curative. We identified patients with biopsy-proven TV from pathology databases from our institution and from an English-language PubMed search. Patients were included if data were available to determine TV extent confidently. Data recorded included clinical, laboratory, and histologic features; treatment; and clinical follow-up. The study included 72 patients with TV (mean age, 42 yr; range, 4-78 yr) (7 from our institution). About 74% of patients presented with painful testicular swelling/mass, 10% with a painless testicular swelling/mass, and 4% with epididymal swelling/mass. Eleven percent had no testicular complaints and vasculitis was discovered at autopsy or in other surgical interventions. Vasculitis involved the testicle in 80.3% of cases, the epididymis in 44.6%, and the spermatic cord in 30.6%. Thirty-seven (51%) patients had ITV and 35 (49%) had STV. No differences between ITV and STV patients were found in regards to age, presenting testicular features, duration of testicular symptoms, and time of follow-up. Compared to ITV patients, STV patients presented more often with constitutional/musculoskeletal symptoms (74.3% vs. 8.3%, respectively; p = 0.0001), elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (94.7% vs. 16%; p = 0.0001), and anemia (50% vs. 0%; p = 0.0001). Neoplasm was more frequently suspected in ITV than in STV (74.2% vs. 31.6%; p = 0.001), but only occurred in 2 ITV patients. Long-term glucocorticoid therapy was given only to STV patients, and 59.1% of them also received cytotoxic agents. ITV was diagnosed more often by orchiectomy (81.1% vs

  10. Fiber optic LDF to monitor vascular dynamics of urticarial dermographism in pressure-tested patients before and after treatment with antihistamines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eikje, Natalja Skrebova; Arase, Seiji

    2008-02-01

    The local microcirculatory dynamics underlying phenomenon of urticarial dermographism (UD) are not yet sufficiently elucidated in dermatological patients. A fiber optic laser Doppler flowmeter (LDF) was used to monitor skin blood flow (SBF) changes on the back of the patients with UD before and after application of the series of pressure stimuli (9.8×10 4, 14.7×10 4, 19.6×10 4 and 24.5×10 4 Pa). All patients acted as self-controls to assess their disease activity by means of SBF values based on response to pressure stimuli before and after treatment with antihistamines, when compared to baseline SBF. Throughout 30 minutes evaluation inter-subject SBF values at pressure-tested sites were noticeably distinguished as high, moderate and low. By LDF we could differentiate the highest development of vascular dynamics after 5 minutes, coming back to normal within about 30 minutes in one group of patients, and the vascular dynamics reaching its maximum in 15 minutes, but with no fade after 30 minutes, in another group of patients. All treatment regimens in both groups of patients by LDF produced a measurable reduction already during 1-2 days of therapy, accompanied by a reduction in SBF baseline values in patients with severe and moderate symptoms of UD.

  11. Histopathology of the Inner Ear in a Case With Recent Onset of Cogan's Syndrome: Evidence for Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Jung, David H; Nadol, Joseph B; Folkerth, Rebecca D; Merola, Joseph F

    2016-01-01

    The association of sensorineural hearing loss and vertigo with inflammatory eye disease, usually interstitial keratitis, has been called Cogan's syndrome. The pathogenesis of Cogan's syndrome is unknown, but it has been assumed to be an immune mediated disorder with vasculitis. The histopathology of the inner ear in Cogan's syndrome has been described in 6 case reports. Although common pathologic findings in these reports include degeneration of the auditory and vestibular neuroepithelium, endolymphatic hydrops, fibrosis, and new bone formation, direct pathologic evidence of a vasculitis has not been published. A possible reason for this failure to identify vasculitis was a substantial delay (range, 4-40 years) between the onset of symptoms and examination of the otopathology. In the current case report, the patient had both auditory and vestibular symptoms and interstitial keratitis with a time delay of only 2 to 4 weeks between symptoms and death. Evidence of a vasculitis as a possible underlying etiology included H&E histopathology and anti-CD45 immunostaining of vessels both in the auditory and vestibular systems, supporting the hypothesis of a vasculitis as a mechanism in this disorder. PMID:26195577

  12. Dysregulation of Autoantigen Genes in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis Involves Alternative Transcripts and New Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    McInnis, Elizabeth A.; Badhwar, Anshul K.; Muthigi, Akhil; Lardinois, Olivier M.; Allred, S. Colby; Yang, Jiajin; Free, Meghan E.; Jennette, J. Charles; Preston, Gloria A.; Falk, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) are two major autoantigens in patients with vasculitis with ANCA. The genes encoding these autoantigens are abnormally expressed in peripheral granulocytes of patients with active ANCA-associated vasculitis. This study provides evidence that this transcriptional dysregulation results in a variety of mRNA processing events from the PRTN3 gene locus. In addition to elevated levels of PR3 message, leukocyte RNA from patients contained PR3 transcripts with an alternative 3′ untranslated region. Furthermore, we detected usage of an alternative transcription start site within intron 1 of the PRTN3 gene locus that coincided with active disease (odds ratio, 3.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.3 to 8.4; P=0.01). This promoter may be developmentally regulated, because it was active in normal human bone marrow, multiple leukemia cell lines, MCF-7 cells, and subjects after GM-CSF treatment but not subjects with a neutrophil left shift. This transcript, which lacks exon 1 of PRTN3, encodes a 24-kD protein (p24PR3/MBN) with a sequence similar to that previously described for myeloblastin. Notably, PR3, p24PR3/MBN, and MPO were synthesized in cultured neutrophils from patients with active ANCA-associated vasculitis, indicating that increased transcription results in newly synthesized autoantigens in peripheral neutrophils of patients. The synthesis of p24PR3/MBN seems to expand the autoantigen repertoire, because immunoblots showed that sera from patients recognized p24PR3/MBN. These findings emphasize the importance of transcriptional dysregulation of the autoantigen in autoimmune disease. PMID:25060059

  13. Cocaine/levamisole-induced systemic vasculitis with retiform purpura and pauci-immune glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Veronese, F.V.; Dode, R.S.O.; Friderichs, M.; Thomé, G.G.; da Silva, D.R.; Schaefer, P.G.; Sebben, V.C.; Nicolella, A.R.; Barros, E.J.G.

    2016-01-01

    Levamisole has been increasingly used as an adulterant of cocaine in recent years, emerging as a public health challenge worldwide. Levamisole-associated toxicity manifests clinically as a systemic vasculitis, consisting of cutaneous, hematological, and renal lesions, among others. Purpura retiform, cutaneous necrosis, intravascular thrombosis, neutropenia, and less commonly crescentic nephritis have been described in association with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) and other autoantibodies. Here we report the case of a 49-year-old male who was a chronic cocaine user, and who presented spontaneous weight loss, arthralgia, and 3 weeks before admission purpuric skin lesions in the earlobes and in the anterior thighs. His laboratory tests on admission showed serum creatinine of 4.56 mg/dL, white blood count 3,800/μL, hemoglobin 7.3 g/dL, urinalysis with 51 white blood cells/μL and 960 red blood cells/μL, and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio 1.20. Serum ANCA testing was positive (>1:320), as well as serum anti-myeloperoxidase and anti-proteinase 3 antibodies. Urine toxicology screen was positive for cocaine and levamisole, with 62.8% of cocaine, 32.2% of levamisole, and 5% of an unidentified substance. Skin and renal biopsies were diagnostic for leukocytoclastic vasculitis and pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis, respectively. The patient showed a good clinical response to cocaine abstinence, and use of corticosteroids and intravenous cyclophosphamide. Last serum creatinine was 1.97 mg/dL, white blood cell count 7,420/μL, and hemoglobin level 10.8 g/dL. In levamisole-induced systemic vasculitis, the early institution of cocaine abstinence, concomitant with the use of immunosuppressive drugs in severe cases, may prevent permanent end organ damage and associate with better clinical outcomes. PMID:27119429

  14. The predictive value of kidney biopsy in renal vasculitis: a multicenter cohort study.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Crespo, Francisco; Villacorta, Javier; Acevedo, Mercedes; Cavero, Teresa; Guerrero, Carmen; García Díaz, Eugenio; Orradre, Juan Luis; Martinez, Miguel Angel; Praga, Manuel; Fernandez-Juarez, Gema

    2016-06-01

    The histopathologic classification of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis has been demonstrated to have prognostic value in small cohorts of patients with pauci-immune extracapillary glomerulonephritis. We aimed to validate this histologic subgrouping system in a large cohort of patients with renal vasculitis from 3 Spanish centers. The additional value of several histologic parameters for predicting renal outcome was investigated. A total of 151 biopsies of patients with renal vasculitis were reviewed and classified as follows: 41% crescentic, 24% mixed, 21% focal, and 14% sclerotic. The cumulative proportions of renal survival at 5 years were 83.2%, 81.2%, 60.5%, and 50.7% for the focal, mixed, crescentic, and sclerotic categories, respectively (P < .05). In the crescentic category, patients with less than 75% of glomeruli showing crescents had better survival at 1 and 5 years compared with those having greater than or equal to 75% of crescents (77.9% and 70.6% versus 51.3% and 45.6%; P = .02). When adjusted by renal function and other histologic parameters, the percentage of extracapillary proliferation and glomerulosclerosis remained as significant predictors for renal survival (hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.05; P = .001, and hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.05; P = .002, respectively). In conclusion, patients with pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis experienced different outcomes depending on the percentage of crescents observed, so that extensive extracapillary proliferation was associated with the poorest renal survival. These findings validate the prognostic utility of the histologic classification scheme in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody positive and negative patients and suggest a subdivision of crescentic category (<75% and ≥75% of crescents) based on the different survival rates observed among these subgroups. PMID:26980047

  15. Circulating Markers of Vascular Injury and Angiogenesis in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Monach, Paul A; Tomasson, Gunnar; Specks, Ulrich; Stone, John H; Cuthbertson, David; Krischer, Jeffrey; Ding, Linna; Fervenza, Fernando C; Fessler, Barri J; Hoffman, Gary S; Ikle, David; Kallenberg, Cees GM; Langford, Carol A; Mueller, Mark; Seo, Philip; St.Clair, E William; Spiera, Robert; Tchao, Nadia; Ytterberg, Steven R; Gu, Yi-Zhong; Snyder, Ronald D; Merkel, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    Objective To identify biomarkers that distinguish between active ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and remission in a manner superior or complementary to established markers of systemic inflammation. Methods Markers of vascular injury and angiogenesis were measured before and after treatment in a large clinical trial in AAV. 163 subjects enrolled in the Rituximab in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis (RAVE) trial were studied. Serum levels of E-selectin, ICAM-3, MMP1, MMP3, MMP9, P-selectin, thrombomodulin, and VEGF were measured at study screening (time of active disease) and at month 6. ESR and CRP levels had been measured at the time of the clinical visit. The primary outcome was the difference in marker level between screening and month 6 among patients in remission (BVAS/WG score of 0) at month 6. Results All subjects had severe active vasculitis (mean BVAS/WG score 8.6 +/− 3.2 SD) at screening. Among the 123 subjects clinically in remission at month 6, levels of all markers except E-selectin showed significant declines. MMP3 levels were also higher among the 23 subjects with active disease at month 6 than among the 123 subjects in remission. MMP3 levels correlated weakly with ESR and CRP. Conclusion Many markers of vascular injury and angiogenesis are elevated in severe active AAV and decline with treatment, but MMP3 appears to distinguish active AAV from remission better than the other markers studied. Further study of MMP3 is warranted to determine its clinical utility in combination with conventional markers of inflammation and ANCA titers. PMID:21953143

  16. Traumatic endophthalmitis presenting as isolated retinal vasculitis and white-centered hemorrhages: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Relhan, Nidhi; Jalali, Subhadra; Nalamada, Suma; Dave, Vivek; Mathai, Annie

    2012-01-01

    The article reports a case and review of the literature of endophthalmitis presenting as isolated retinal vasculitis. A 26-year-old male was observed to have white-centered retinal hemorrhages and retinal vasculitis following an occult scleral perforation. At presentation, the visual acuity was 20/60. With clinical suspicion of early endophthalmitis, he underwent wound exploration, scleral tear repair, vitreous biopsy and administration of intravitreal antibiotics. Microbiology evaluation revealed significant presence of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococcus epidermidis. Final visual acuity improved to 20/20 at 6 weeks postoperatively. Literature search revealed eight similar cases, all of them due to Staphylococcus species. Retinal vasculitis and white-centered retinal hemorrhages can be a presenting sign of early endophthalmitis, especially with non-fulminant pathogens like S. epidermidis. PMID:22824604

  17. Collapsing glomerulopathy in a case of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody associated vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, N.; Rathi, M.; Nada, R.; Sharma, A.; Goyal, A.; Ramachandran, R.; Kumar, V.; Kohli, H. S.; Gupta, K. L.

    2016-01-01

    Collapsing glomerulopathy (CG) is a pathological entity characterized by collapse and wrinkling of glomerular tuft, podocyte dedifferentiation and hyperplasia. CG may be idiopathic or secondary to other diseases. CG has been described with IgA nephropathy, membranous glomerulopathy, diabetic nephropathy, and lupus nephritis. However, till date there is no report of CG in association with the anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis (AAV). Here, we present a case of CG that developed during follow-up in a case of AAV with biopsy proven pauci-immune glomerulonephritis. PMID:27051140

  18. Severe meningeal fibrinoid vasculitis associated with Theileria taurotragi infection in two short-horned Zebu cattle.

    PubMed

    Biasibetti, Elena; Sferra, Chiara; Lynen, Godelieve; Di Giulio, Giuseppe; De Meneghi, Daniele; Tomassone, Laura; Valenza, Federico; Capucchio, Maria Teresa

    2016-08-01

    The Authors describe a severe vasculitis with fibrinoid necrosis of the meningeal arteries observed in two brains of indigenous short-horn zebu (Bos indicus) cattle, with bovine cerebral theileriosis (BCT) caused by a tick-transmitted hemoprotozoan, Theileria taurotragi, from Northern Tanzania. In the Author's opinion, the role of T. taurotragi infection in the angiocentric and angiodestructive detected features remains to be evaluated. A possible immunopathologic cancerous mechanism, secondary to the lymphoid deregulation, could be involved. This report suggests further studies to better characterize the lymphoid cell involvement in the pathogenesis of the meningeal vascular lesions by T. taurotragi. PMID:27145963

  19. Sarcoid Pericarditis and Large Vessel Vasculitis Detected on FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Patel, Darshan; Xie, Karen; Sweiss, Nadera J; Lu, Yang

    2016-08-01

    A 65-year-old woman with history of sarcoidosis, hypertension, and peripheral vascular disease presented with lower extremity claudication and low left ventricular ejection fraction of 45% on echocardiogram. Further FDG PET/CT revealed hypermetabolic bilateral chest lymphadenopathy and pulmonary nodules in a butterfly-shaped distribution pattern, which was typically seen in patients with sarcoidosis. In addition, abnormal increased radiotracer uptake was present in pericardium, and along the walls of inferior vena cava, aorta, and pulmonary artery, which correlated with delayed enhancement on further cardiac MRI. These findings were suggestive of sarcoid-related pericarditis and great vessel vasculitis. PMID:27280907

  20. Levamisole adulterated cocaine and pulmonary vasculitis: Presentation of two lethal cases and brief literature review.

    PubMed

    Karch, Steven B; Busardò, Francesco Paolo; Vaiano, Fabio; Portelli, Francesca; Zaami, Simona; Bertol, Elisabetta

    2016-08-01

    The first case reports of levamisole-related disease in cocaine users were published in 2010, although levamisole adulteration of cocaine was first recognized several years earlier. Currently, more than 70% of street cocaine seizures, in the US and the EU, contain levamisole, which could potentially be converted to aminorex, though the reasons for this practice still remain obscure. Here we report two fatal cases of isolated pulmonary vasculitis in abusers of levamisole-adulterated cocaine, where a complete autopsy, full toxicological analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) using a previously published method of Karch et al. and histological examination were performed. A control group composed of 11 cases of cocaine related deaths, where the presence of levamisole was excluded in blood, urine and hair, was used. Recent literature on the human pharmacokinetics of levamisole and aminorex is also reviewed. The toxicological analysis revealed positive qualitative and quantitative results for cocaine, benzoylecgonine and levamisole in both cases. In case 1 levamisole was found at the concentration of 13.5 and 61.3mg/L in blood and urine respectively, whereas in case 2 at 17.9 and 70.2mg/L. The histological examination highlighted in case 1 in heart samples microscopic evidence of the typical remodeling changes associated with chronic stimulant abuse, whereas lungs showed numerous lymphocytes surrounding and infiltrating the wall of small pulmonary vessels and a perivascular fibrosis with transforming fibroblasts. In case 2, the myocardial samples showed wide fields of myocardial necrosis characterized by hypercontraction of the myocytes with thickened Z-lines and short sarcomeres, whereas lung samples showed a significant intimal thickening of arteriole walls and lymphocytic infiltration of the wall and edema. Moreover, there were also numerous perivascular lymphocytic infiltrates. Although the pathological cardiac findings have allowed us to establish

  1. Studies of epitope restriction on myeloperoxidase (MPO), an important antigen in systemic vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    SHORT, A K; LOCKWOOD, C M

    1997-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies are important components of the inflammatory response in patients with systemic vasculitis. Their role in the pathogenesis of these conditions remains incompletely defined. Several antigens have been identified, and MPO is one of the most important. To gain more understanding of the immune mechanisms involved, we were keen to see if the antibody response to MPO was restricted, or whether there was a general loss of tolerance to the whole surface of the molecule. To study the epitopes we employed both ELISA and biosensor technology, and were able to demonstrate restriction both in the number and localization of the epitopes being recognized. PMID:9367412

  2. Hemorrhagic Occlusive Retinal Vasculitis After First Eye Cataract Surgery Without Subsequent Second Eye Involvement.

    PubMed

    Balducci, Nicole; Savini, Giacomo; Barboni, Piero; Ducoli, Pietro; Ciardella, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    A case of monocular postoperative hemorrhagic occlusive retinal vasculitis (HORV) after uncomplicated bilateral cataract surgery is described. HORV is a severe syndrome that leads to painless visual loss after uncomplicated cataract surgery. The same surgical procedure was adopted in both eyes except for the use of intracameral vancomycin, which was injected only in the eye that developed HORV. Diffuse retinal ischemia with vascular sheathing and intraretinal hemorrhages were detected during the fourth postoperative day. Despite treatment, the patient developed severe neovascular glaucoma. This case supports the causative role of vancomycin in the pathogenesis of HORV and suggests avoiding it for chemoprophylaxis. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:764-766.]. PMID:27548454

  3. Erdheim-Chester Disease: An Unusual Cause of Intracranial Vasculitis and Progressive Leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Sagnier, Sharmila; Debruxelles, Sabrina; Lepreux, Sébastien; Sibon, Igor

    2016-05-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a non-Langerhans histiocytosis affecting multiple organs. Stroke as symptom onset of ECD with intracranial vasculitis is unusual. We report the case of a 64-year-old man who presented with an acute ischemic stroke associated with a moderate leukoencephalopathy and intracranial arteries stenosis. Four years later, he developed movement disorders with dysarthria and cognitive impairment. Neuroradiological findings demonstrated a rapidly progressive and diffuse leukoencephalopathy associated with brain atrophy and infiltration of the intracranial vertebral artery wall. Brain postmortem evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of ECD. This diagnosis should be evoked in patients with cryptogenic stroke, progressive leukoencephalopathy, and infiltration of the arterial wall. PMID:26996751

  4. A case report and DSA findings of cerebral hemorrhage caused by syphilitic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xia; Xiao, Guo-Dong; Xu, Xing-Shun; Zhang, Chun-Yuan; Liu, Chun-Feng; Cao, Yong-Jun

    2012-12-01

    Syphilis is now rare and easily misdiagnosed because of the wide use of antibiotics in the clinical. We report a case of cerebral hemorrhage in a patient with hypertension who was first diagnosed as hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage. However, treponema pallidum particle agglutination and rapid plasma regain tests of cerebrospinal fluid revealed the existence of neurosyphilis. Interestingly, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) showed severe stenosis in both middle cerebral arteries and right anterior cerebral artery. The case reminded us to pay attention to syphilitic vasculitis in patients with cryptogenic stroke. DSA sometimes may play a critical role in differential diagnosis of neurosyphilis. PMID:22198645

  5. Angiooedema due to acquired deficiency of C1-esterase inhibitor associated with leucocytoclastic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Farkas, H; Szongoth, M; Bély, M; Varga, L; Fekete, B; Karádi, I; Füst, G

    2001-01-01

    A hereditary and an acquired type of C1-esterase inhibitor deficiency have been described. Manifestations characteristic of both forms include recurrent subcutaneous and submucosal angiooedema. Acquired C1-esterase inhibitor deficiency has been observed in association with lymphoproliferative disorders, malignancy, autoimmune diseases and infections. We report on a case with the acquired form of the disease accompanied by leucocytoclastic vasculitis. Treatment with antimalarial agents resulted in complete resolution of symptoms and signs. Furthermore, C1-esterase inhibitor concentration and activity, as well as C1 levels, all returned to normal. PMID:11720182

  6. Possible implication of disordered neutrophil extracellular traps in the pathogenesis of MPO-ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Daigo; Tomaru, Utano; Ishizu, Akihiro

    2013-10-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are characterized by the presence of extracellular DNA fibers studded with antimicrobial proteins, including myeloperoxidase (MPO). Although NETs play an important role in the innate immune system, the scattered extracellular enzymes, such as MPO, pose risks to the host. Therefore, NETs are strictly regulated by DNase I in the serum, which prevents them from persisting. Recent studies have demonstrated that dysregulation of NETs could be involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus. In this review, we interpret the association of disordered NETs with autoimmune diseases, especially propylthiouracil-induced MPO-ANCA-associated vasculitis. PMID:23224024

  7. Complement C3 is expressed by mast cells in cutaneous vasculitis and is degraded by chymase.

    PubMed

    Lipitsä, Tiina; Naukkarinen, Anita; Laitala, Joel; Harvima, Ilkka T

    2016-10-01

    The complement factor C3 and chymase released from tryptase(+), chymase(+) mast cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis. To study whether mast cells contain C3 in vasculitis and whether chymase interacts with C3, cryosections from vasculitis biopsies were double-stained histochemically for C3c in tryptase(+) mast cells, as well as for chymase and vessel wall C3c, or they were treated with 5 µg/ml rh-chymase for 24 h followed by immunofluorescence (IF) analysis of C3c, IgG, IgM and IgA. The effect of rh-chymase on purified human C3, C3a and IgG was studied using SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and LAD2 mast cell cultures. The results show that 34.2 ± 17.9, 37.4 ± 15.5 and 43.4 ± 18.6 % (mean ± SD) of the mast cells express C3c immunoreactivity in the healthy skin, initial petechial (IP) and palpable purpura (PP) lesions, respectively. About 9.4-12.1 % of the chymase(+) mast cells were in apparent contact with C3c(+) vessels in IP and PP. The treatment of cryosections with rh-chymase decreased the IF staining of C3c, but not that of immunoglobulins. In SDS-PAGE, 1-10 µg/ml rh-chymase degraded the alpha- and beta-chains of C3, but did not degrade IgG. Unexpectedly, the rh-chymase treatment of C3 produced fragments that resulted in the release of tryptase and histamine from LAD2 cells. However, rh-chymase degraded C3a and consequently inhibited C3a activity on LAD2. In conclusion, mast cells can be one source for C3 in the early and late phases of vasculitis pathogenesis. However, rh-chymase degraded native C3, vessel wall C3c, and biologically active C3a. Therefore, chymase may control C3-related pathology. PMID:27465068

  8. Large vessel vasculitis in a patient with acute Q-fever: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Baziaka, Fotini; Karaiskos, Ilias; Galani, Lamprini; Barmpouti, Eleftheria; Konstantinidis, Stilianos; Kitas, George; Giamarellou, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Q fever is a zoonosis caused by the rickettsial organism Coxiella burnetii. Infection has an acute course, usually with a self-limited febrile illness and the possibility of the evaluation to a chronic course with endocardial involvement. The presence of autoantibodies and various autoimmune disorders have also been associated with C. burnetii infection. We report a case of acute Q fever in which the patient developed large vessel vasculitis. The FDG-PET/CT scan detected inflammation of the thoracic aortic wall, suggesting an unusual immunologic host response to acute Q fever infection. PMID:26952153

  9. [VASCULITIDES IN CHILDHOOD: A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY IN A PERIOD FROM 2002 TO 2012 AT THE DEPARTMENT OF PAEDIATRICS, UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL CENTRE ZAGREB].

    PubMed

    Jelusić, Marija; Kostić, Lucija; Frković, Marijan; Davidović, Masa; Malcić, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to analyze clinical features, laboratory findings, treatment, course and outcome of different types of vasculitis in children. All children aged up to 18 years that have been diagnosed with a vasculitis disorder from 2002. to 2012. at the Department of Paediatric, University Hospital Centre Zagreb according to EULAR/PRES/PRINTO criteria were included in the study. Vasculitis was diagnosed in 180 children, 101 girls and 79 boys, mean age 7.19 ± 3.7 years, with an average follow-up of 5.58 ± 3.28 years. Most of the children (155 or 86%) were diagnosed with Henoch-Shönlein purpura (HSP), polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) was diagnosed in 6 children (3.3%), isolated cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis in 5 (2.8%), Takayasu arteritis (TA) and Kawasaki disease in 2 (1.1%) respectively, hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis in one patient (0.5%) and other types of vasculitis in 10 (5.5%) patients (vasculitides in systemic connective tissue disorders in 7 and unclassified vasculitides in 3 patients). All patients had elevated inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate). Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmatic antibodies (ANCA) were positive only in one patient, suffering from microscopic polyangiitis. Treatment modality in most patients were NSAIDs, while children with kidney or gastrointestinal system affection were treated with glucocorticoids and/or immunosuppresive drugs. Biological therapy (anti-CD20, rituximab) was used in patients with most severe symptoms. One child (0.56%), suffering from microscopic polyangiitis, died due to kidney failure during the follow-up. Forty patients (22.6%) had one disease relapse, while 6 (3.4%) had two relapses. In conclusion, we found some differences in laboratory parameters (e.g. lower incidence of elevated antistreptolysin O titer in HSP) and epidemiological data (e.g. higher prevalence of PAN in female children) in comparison to data from available studies, while other clinical

  10. The relation of autologous serum and plasma skin test results with urticarial activity score, sex and age in patients with chronic urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Aktar, Sirac; Akdeniz, Necmettin; Calka, Omer; Karadag, Ayse Serap

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Some previous studies reported autoimmunity as an etiologic factor in chronic urticaria (CU), but the results of some autoimmunity tests in these studies are conflicting. Aim To concretize whether there was any relation of autologous serum skin test (ASST) and autologous plasma skin test (APST) results with sex, age and urticarial activity score (UAS) in patients with CU. Material and methods Fifty patients with CU and twenty healthy subjects admitted to our dermatology clinic were included in the present study. The ASST and APST were applied to all individuals. Results The positiveness rates of ASST and APST were significantly higher in the patient group than controls (p = 0.027, p = 0.001, respectively). Among patients, the APST positiveness rate (72%) was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than ASST (46%). It was seen that 48% of patients with negative ASST results had positive APST. However, no patient with negative APST results had positive ASST. There were significant (p < 0.05) relations of the tests’ positiveness rates with sex and old age but with UAS. The diameter of the erythematous papule was remarkably (p < 0.05) larger in APST than ASST and also significantly (p < 0.05) larger in females compared to males in both tests (p < 0.05). It was positively increased with old age (p < 0.05). Conclusions We can suggest that APST is more sensitive than ASST in the assessment of autoimmunity in CU. A high positiveness rate of APST results may be attributed to high numbers of autoantibodies and coagulation factors present in plasma that might probably play a role in etiopathogenesis of CU. PMID:26161057