Science.gov

Sample records for hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis

  1. Hypocomplementemic Urticarial Vasculitis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Jim; McCarty, Morgan

    2012-01-01

    Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome, as opposed to urticarial vasculitis or urticarial vasculitis syndrome, is a rare disease process where the exact pathophysiology remains unknown. This article discusses the case of a 34-year-old Hispanic man with an ongoing history of chronic urticaria comprising episodes induced by low ambient temperatures, emotional stress, and spontaneous occurrences. This article serves as a consolidated reference for specialists to comprehensively review the plethora of systemic manifestations that may accompany urticarial vasculitis and highlights new systemic complications reported in association with this disease which are also observed in this case. PMID:22328958

  2. Urticarial Vasculitis-Associated Intestinal Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Uni; Yfantis, Harris; Xie, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    Urticarial vasculitis (UV) is a rare small vessel vasculitis. UV is often idiopathic but can also present in the context of autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus, drug reactions, infections, or a paraneoplastic syndrome. Extracutaneous complications include intestinal ischemic injuries, in UV patients with nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain and nausea. Prompt recognition and treatment can minimize morbidity and mortality. This paper describes a case of urticarial vasculitis-associated intestinal ischemia. PMID:27190661

  3. Omalizumab for Urticarial Vasculitis: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ghazanfar, Misbah Nasheela; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2015-01-01

    Urticarial vasculitis is characterised by inflamed itching or burning red patches or wheals that resemble urticaria but persist for greater than 24 hours. It is often idiopathic but is sometimes associated with collagen-vascular disease, particularly systemic lupus erythematosus. Treatment options include oral antihistamines, oral corticosteroids, dapsone, colchicine or hydroxychloroquine. We describe a male patient with urticarial vasculitis who was treated with omalizumab (anti-IgE) with convincing results and provide a review of previous reports of patients with urticarial vasculitis treated with omalizumab. PMID:26435858

  4. Urticarial Vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be present for days and result in skin discoloration as they heal. Some patients may also have fevers, joint and abdominal pain, shortness of breath and swollen lymph glands. ... patches in the skin. Sometimes a biopsy is ordered to show inflammation ...

  5. Impact of Vasculitis on Employment and Income

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-26

    Vasculitis; Systemic Vasculitis; Behcet's Disease; CNS Vasculitis; Cryoglobulinemic Vasculitis; Eosinophilic Granulomatosis; Temporal Arteritis; Wegener Granulomatosis; Henoch-Schoenlein Purpura; Microscopic Polyangiitis; Polyarteritis Nodosa (PAN); Takayasu's Arteritis; Urticarial Vasculitis

  6. Vasculitis Pregnancy Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-14

    Vasculitis; Behcet's Disease; CNS Vasculitis; Cryoglobulinemic Vasculitis; Eosinophilic Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (EGPA); Churg-Strauss Syndrome (CSS); Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (GPA); Wegener's Granulomatosis; IgA Vasculitis; Henoch-Schoenlein Purpura (HSP); Microscopic Polyangiitis (MPA); Polyarteritis Nodosa (PAN); Takayasu Arteritis (TAK); Urticarial Vasculitis; Systemic Vasculitis

  7. Vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... are usually the specialists with the most overall knowledge about vasculitis. Thus, they direct the care of patients, particularly those with chronic or severe disease. Patients with vasculitis often benefit from seeing experts in the organ systems that are or might ...

  8. Vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Symptoms of vasculitis can vary, but usually include fever, swelling and a general sense of feeling ill. The main goal of treatment is to stop the inflammation. Steroids and other medicines to stop inflammation are often ...

  9. Hypersensitivity Vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Give United Way Giving GivingTubesday 2015 Campaign a Success Team Brandon Store Home / Resources / Forms of Vasculitis / Hypersensitivity Vasculitis (Leukocytoclastic) Hypersensitivity Vasculitis ( ...

  10. Vasculitis Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... fund the most promising studies. Support the Vasculitis Foundation Donate Now Join VF Team Brandon and Victory ... map feature to find a doctor or Vasculitis Foundation chapter near you. Participate in research Help find ...

  11. Necrotizing vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    Necrotizing vasculitis is a group of disorders that involve inflammation of the blood vessel walls. The size of the ... Necrotizing vasculitis is common with: Polyarteritis nodosa Rheumatoid ... Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly called Wegener ...

  12. [Cryoglobulinemic vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Blank, N; Lorenz, H-M

    2016-04-01

    Cryoglobulinemic vasculitis is a disease of the small arteries and affects the skin, joints, peripheral nerves, kidneys and other organs. Even small amounts of cryoglobulins can lead to severe impairment for the patient but the detection of such low amounts of cryoglobulins can be difficult. The causes of cryoglobulinemic vasculitis include monoclonal hematological diseases, autoimmune diseases and chronic infections. Therapy involves treatment of the underlying disease and glucocorticoids, rituximab and plasmapheresis depending on the severity of the vasculitis. Recognition of typical clinical symptoms is essential in order to initiate appropriate laboratory diagnostic procedures. Sometimes many investigations are necessary. In the absence of clinical trials treatment recommendations can often only be derived from registry data. PMID:27034078

  13. Pediatric Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Singh-Grewal, Davinder; Durkan, Anne Maria

    2016-02-01

    Vasculitis is defined as inflammation of the blood vessels and can result in stenosis or aneurysm, which may in turn lead to occlusion or rupture of the vessel compromising tissue perfusion. The manifestations of these diseases depend on the size and site of the vessels effected. Vasculitis can be secondary to numerous inflammatory and infectious diseases but this review will concentrate on the systemic primary vasculitides and aims to discuss the presentations and approaches to management of a number of these conditions. PMID:26365154

  14. Burning vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Priyanka; Hobday, Dorian; Fitzgerald O'Connor, Edmund; D'Cruz, David

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 69-year-old man who was found collapsed close to a heat source and admitted to hospital for severe sepsis. He was also found to have widespread blistering and ulceration of his right leg; however, a history was unobtainable due to reduced consciousness levels. The leg lesions had the initial appearance of mixed depth burns and a management plan was made to transfer the patient to a burns unit for debridement. It was subsequently noted that the patient had a previous diagnosis of seropositive erosive rheumatoid arthritis. A biopsy of the leg lesion was performed and a diagnosis of rheumatoid vasculitis confirmed. Treatment with systemic steroids, intravenous antibiotics and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for severe hypogammaglobulinaemia was started, and the patient was not transferred for surgical debridement. Rheumatoid vasculitis is a rare and extremely serious complication of rheumatoid arthritis that can manifest in a number of ways, occasionally mimicking other conditions. This case is essential to raise awareness of rare, severe rheumatoid vasculitis and of the potential for its misdiagnosis as a mixed depth burn. PMID:27118745

  15. Pediatric Vasculitis Initiative

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-16

    Wegeners Granulomatosis (Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis); Microscopic Polyangiitis; Churg Strauss Syndrome (Eosinophilic Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis); Polyarteritis Nodosa; Takayasu Arteritis; Primary CNS Vasculitis; Unclassified Vasculitis

  16. Cryoglobulinemia Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Cacoub, Patrice; Comarmond, Cloe; Domont, Fanny; Savey, Léa; Saadoun, David

    2015-09-01

    Cryoglobulinemic vasculitis (CryoVas) is a small-vessel vasculitis involving mainly the skin, the joints, the peripheral nervous system, and the kidneys. Type I CryoVas is single monoclonal immunoglobulins related to an underlying B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. Type II and III cryoglobulins, often referred to as mixed cryoglobulinemia, consist of polyclonal immunoglobulin (Ig)G with or without monoclonal IgM with rheumatoid factor activity. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection represents the main cause of mixed CryoVas. The 10-year survival rates are 63%, 65%, and 87% in HCV-positive mixed CryoVas, HCV-negative mixed CryoVas, and type I CryoVas patients, respectively. In HCV-positive patients, baseline poor prognostic factors include the presence of severe liver fibrosis, and central nervous system, kidney, and heart involvement. Treatment with antivirals is associated with a good prognosis, whereas use of immunosuppressants (including corticosteroids) is associated with a poor outcome. In HCV-negative patients, pulmonary and gastrointestinal involvement, renal insufficiency, and age > 65 years are independently associated with death. Increased risk of lymphoma also should be underlined. Treatment of type I CryoVas is that of the hemopathy; specific treatment also includes plasma exchange, corticosteroids, rituximab, and ilomedine. In HCV-CryoVas with mild-to-moderate disease, an optimal antiviral treatment should be given. For HCV-CryoVas with severe vasculitis (ie, worsening of renal function, mononeuritis multiplex, extensive skin disease, intestinal ischemia…) control of disease with rituximab, with or without plasmapheresis, is required before initiation of antiviral therapy. Other immunosuppressants should be given only in case of refractory forms of CryoVas, frequently associated with underlying B-cell lymphoma. PMID:25837517

  17. Recurrent angioedema and urticaria.

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, P C; Wisnieski, J J; Christensen, J

    1993-01-01

    The case reported here illustrates the life-threatening aspects of angioedema and the need to thoroughly investigate the possible causes of this clinical finding. As discussed, the causes of angioedema are numerous. Commonly implicated in drug-induced angioedema are antihypertensive ACE inhibitor drugs, as was originally thought with this patient. Because of her skin lesions and macrocytic anemia, further studies were done. These studies led to a diagnosis of hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome, an uncommon to rare form of acquired angioedema, urticarial vasculitis, arthritis, and obstructive airway disease associated with the production of autoantibodies to C1q. It is an autoimmune disorder related to but separate from SLE. PMID:8279170

  18. Vasculitis and infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Satta, R; Biondi, G

    2015-04-01

    Vasculitis usually presents without a well-known underline cause (idiopathic vasculitis), nevertheless, it is sometimes possible to find out one or more causative agents (secondary vasculitis). Nowadays, thanks to the increasing amount of precise diagnostic tools, a piece of idiopathic vasculitis is reclassified as associated with probable etiology, which can be set off by several factors, such as infections. Infections are considered to be the most common cause of secondary vasculitis. Virtually, every infectious agent can trigger a vasculitis by different mechanisms which can be divided in two main categories: direct and indirect. In the former, infectious agents destroy directly the vascular wall leading, eventually, to a subsequent inflammatory response. In the latter, indirect form, they stimulate an immune response against blood vessels. Different infectious agents are able to directly damage the vascular wall. Among these, it is possible to recognize Staphylococcus spp, Streptococcus spp, Salmonella spp, Treponema spp, Rickettsia spp, Cytomegalovirus, Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and 2, and many others which have a peculiar tropism for endothelial cells. Conversely, another group of microbial agents, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae, Hepatits B Virus, Human Immunodeficiency Virus and others, trigger vasculitis in the indirect way. This is due to the fact that they can share epitopes with the host or modify self-antigens, thus leading to a cross-self reaction of the immune system. These mechanism, in turn, leads to immunological responses classified as type I-IV by Gell-Coombs. Nevertheless, it is difficult to strictly separate the direct and indirect forms, because most infectious agents can cause vasculitis in both ways (mixed forms). This paper will analyze the link between infectious agents and vasculitis, focusing on direct and indirect secondary vasculitis, and on a group of probable infection-related idiopathic vasculitis, and finally on a group of idiopathic vasculitis with microbiological triggers. Furthermore, a diagnostic and therapeutic approach to vasculitis when an underline infection has been suspected is suggested. PMID:25876145

  19. Central Nervous System Vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the VF E-News HERE A A A Youtube LinkedIn Twitter Facebook Behcet’s Syndrome Webinar + Vasculitis Behcet’s ... Book Vasculitis Terms A – Z VF Medical Consultants YouTube Education Videos YouTube Extraordinary Patient Video Stories – Central ...

  20. Types of Vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... people of all races. Takayasu's arteritis is a systemic disease. A systemic disease is one that affects you in a general ... generally don’t work well to treat Buerger’s disease. The best treatment is ... as a result of a systemic vasculitis. A systemic vasculitis is one that affects ...

  1. Incidence of Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis, 19962010: A Population-Based Study in Olmsted County, Minnesota

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Amrita; Wetter, David A.; Gonzalez-Santiago, Tania M.; Davis, Mark D. P.; Lohse, Christine M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the population-based incidence of leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LCV). Patients and Methods Retrospective population-based study of all Olmsted County, Minnesota, residents with a skin biopsyproven diagnosis of LCV from January 1, 1996, through December 31, 2010. Results A total of 84 patients (mean age at diagnosis, 48.3 years) with newly diagnosed, skin biopsyproven LCV (43 women, 41 men) were identified. The incidence rate (age and sex adjusted to the 2000 US white population) was 4.5 per 100,000 person-years (95% confidence interval, 3.55.4). The incidence of LCV increased significantly with age at diagnosis (P<.001) and did not differ between female and male patients. Subtypes of LCV were cutaneous small-vessel vasculitis (CSVV), 38 patients (45%); IgA vasculitis, 25 (30%); urticarial vasculitis, 10 (12%); cryoglobulinemic vasculitis, 3 (4%); and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)associated vasculitis, 8 (10%). LCV was idiopathic in 29 of 38 CSVV patients (76%) and 24 of 25 IgA vasculitis patients (96%). Thirty-nine of 84 patients (46%) had systemic involvement, with the renal system most commonly involved (17/39; 44%). Twenty-four of 80 patients (30%) with follow-up data available had recurrent disease. Compared with the Minnesota white population, observed survival in the incident LCV cohort was significantly poorer than expected (P<.001), including the subset of patients with idiopathic CSVV (P=.03). Conclusion The incidence of LCV was higher than that in previously published studies. Idiopathic LCV was more common in our population-based cohort than previously described. Overall survival was significantly poorer and should be explored further in future studies. PMID:24981218

  2. Dabigatran Associated Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Potolidis, Evangelos; Mandros, Charalampos; Kotsa, Kalliopi; Mitsiou, Evdoxia; Potolidis, Dimitris; Fanourgiakis, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    Common side effects of dabigatran are bleeding, bruising, nausea, diarrhea, and abdomen discomfort. Skin reactions were not often noted (<0.1%). We report a case of 70-year-old male who developed dabigatran related skin reaction resistant to usual therapy. Skin biopsy revealed leukocytoclastic vasculitis. PMID:26843867

  3. Biomarkers in Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Monach, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Better biomarkers are needed for guiding management of patients with vasculitis. Large cohorts and technological advances had led to an increase in pre-clinical studies of potential biomarkers. Recent findings The most interesting markers described recently include a gene expression signature in CD8+ T cells that predicts tendency to relapse or remain relapse-free in ANCA-associated vasculitis, and a pair of urinary proteins that are elevated in Kawasaki disease but not other febrile illnesses. Both of these studies used “omics” technologies to generate and then test hypotheses. More conventional hypothesis-based studies have indicated that the following circulating proteins have potential to improve upon clinically available tests: pentraxin-3 in giant cell arteritis and Takayasu’s arteritis; von Willebrand factor antigen in childhood central nervous system vasculitis; eotaxin-3 and other markers related to eosinophils or Th2 immune responses in eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss syndrome); and MMP-3, TIMP-1, and CXCL13 in ANCA-associated vasculitis. Summary New markers testable in blood and urine have the potential to assist with diagnosis, staging, assessment of current disease activity, and prognosis. However, the standards for clinical usefulness, in particular the demonstration of either very high sensitivity or very high specificity, have yet to be met for clinically relevant outcomes. PMID:24257367

  4. Vasculitis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Drenkard, C; Villa, A R; Reyes, E; Abello, M; Alarcón-Segovia, D

    1997-01-01

    We studied the frequency, location, clinical and histopathological features, associated manifestations, and prognosis of vasculitides in a cohort of 667 SLE patients. Exclusion of patients with previous vasculitis or insufficient information left 540 patients, 194 of whom has vasculitis (incidence density: 0.053 new cases/person/year, cumulative incidence of 0.051 at one year, 0.232 at 5 years and 0.411 at 10 years). Vasculitis was confirmed by biopsy in 46 cases, by arteriography in five, and by both in three. A single episode of vasculitis occurred in 119 and two or more in 75 patients. Vasculitis was cutaneous in 160, visceral in 24, both in 10. In the first episode of cutaneous vasculitides, 111 had punctuate lesions, 32 palpable purpura, 6 urticaria, 6 ulcers, 8 papules, 5 erythematous plaques or macules confirmed with biopsy, 2 erythema with necrosis, and 1 panniculitis (plus small vessel vasculitis). Of 29 with visceral vasculitis in the first episode, 19 had mononeuritis multiplex, 5 digital necrosis, 3 large artery vasculitis of limbs, one mesenteric, and one coronary, more than one type could appear simultaneously or in subsequent episodes. Patients with vasculitis had longer disease duration and followup, younger age of onset of SLE, and were more frequently males than those without. Lupus manifestations associated with vasculitis in univariate logistic regression included myocarditis, psychosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, serositis, leukopenia, lymphopenia and pleuritis. Vasculitis also associated with the antiphospholipid syndrome. The strength of this association increased when patients with vasculitis confirmed by biopsy and/or arteriography were considered separately. Visceral vasculitis associated with increased mortality when controlled for age of onset and nephropathy. PMID:9104729

  5. [Urticarian vasculitis. A case report after sulfamethoxazoletriméthoprime ingestion].

    PubMed

    Feiza, Ben Ammar; Samy, Fenniche; Asma, Dhaoui; Rym, Benmously; Insaf, Mokhtar

    2005-11-01

    Urticarian vasculitis (UV) is an anatomoclinical disorder characterized by the association of urticarian papules lasting for more than 24 hours with histological cutaneous vasculitis. Several etiologies are associated with the disease. We report the case of a 30-year-old woman with a-two-month history of urticarial purpuric and necrotic cutaneous lesions of the low limbs. These lesions occurred after oral sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprime ingestion, 2 weeks before the skin eruption. Histological examination revealed a leucocytoclasic vasculitis and direct immunofluorescence showed a perivascular IgG and C3 deposits. Immunological, allergological and radiological investigations were normal. The pharmacological enquiry confirmed the imputability of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprime in the onset of skin eruption. Mild cutaneous improvement was observed after 3 months of treatment with prednisone 0,5 mg/Kg/day. Drug induced urticaria constitutes a rare etiology of UV. Sulfaminthoxazole-trimethoprime imputability has not been reported before among the drug responsible for UV. Management of patients is difficult and improvement usually occurs after several months because of the resistance of the skin lesions. PMID:16422373

  6. Increased serum levels of soluble vascular endothelial-cadherin in patients with systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Guo, Zai-Pei; Cao, Na; Qin, Sha; Li, Meng-Meng; Jia, Rui-Zhen

    2014-08-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a commonest systemic vasculitis (SV) in childhood characterized by an inflammatory reaction directed at vessels. Endothelial damage and perivascular leukocyte infiltrates are vital in the development of HSP. Vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin is an endothelial cell-specific adhesion molecule, which plays critical roles in angiogenesis and endothelial integrity. Herein, we investigated the serum levels of soluble VE-cadherin (sVE-cadherin) in patients with HSP and other forms of SV. The serum levels of sVE-cadherin in 30 patients with HSP, together with patients with urticarial vasculitis, allergic vasculitis, Behcet disease, psoriasis vulgaris (PV) and atopic dermatitis (AD) and 26 health controls were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serum levels of sVE-cadherin were significantly increased in patients with HSP in acute stage and patients with other forms of SV but not in patients with PV or AD. Moreover, Serum sVE-cadherin levels in HSP patients were correlated with the severity of this disease and serum concentrations of IgA anticardiolipin antibodies and vascular endothelial growth factor. Taken together, we show firstly that serum sVE-cadherin is abnormally increased in HSP patients. Increased serum levels of sVE-cadherin might be a novel biomarker for evaluating the severity of HSP and useful for identifying the presence of SV in inflammatory skin conditions. PMID:24469639

  7. Vancomycin-induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Felix-Getzik, Erika; Sylvia, Lynne M

    2009-07-01

    Vancomycin is well recognized as causing the nonallergic skin reaction known as red man syndrome; however, it is rarely suspected as causative in the setting of an immune-mediated skin reaction. We describe a 76-year-old Caucasian woman with a history of penicillin and sulfa allergies who was transferred to our medical center while receiving vancomycin for treatment of persistent methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bacteremia. After admission, the patient's pacemaker was explanted; cultures from the pacemaker grew MSSA. Based on the culture data and her allergy to penicillin, vancomycin was continued. On day 4 of therapy, the patient developed a papular rash with small blisters on her distal upper extremities. Furosemide, which she was receiving intermittently to maintain fluid balance, was initially suspected as the likely cause. Furosemide was withheld; however, the rash worsened and spread to her neck and torso. Results of skin biopsy confirmed a severe leukocytoclastic, necrotizing small-cell vasculitis that met the criteria for a hypersensitivity vasculitis associated with drug therapy. Five days after discontinuation of vancomycin, the vasculitis was resolving and continued to resolve throughout the remainder of her hospitalization. Furosemide was readministered without worsening of the vasculitis. Use of the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicated that the likelihood of vancomycin being the cause of the vasculitis was probable (score of 5). Clinicians should be aware of vancomycin as a potential cause of small-vessel vasculitis. PMID:19558258

  8. Cutaneous vasculitis update: small vessel neutrophilic vasculitis syndromes.

    PubMed

    Carlson, J Andrew; Chen, Ko-Ron

    2006-12-01

    A broad and diverse spectrum of vasculitic syndromes exists. These syndromes affect the skin with varying levels of associated systemic manifestations, running the gamut from a self-limited, localized, cutaneous phenomenon to rapidly progressive, multiorgan disease. The majority of cases of cutaneous vasculitis will show a neutrophilic small vessel vasculitis that can be either a primary (idiopathic) disorder (eg, cutaneous leukocytoclastic angiitis) or a secondary disorder that is associated with drugs, infection (eg, streptococcal infection, viral hepatitis), or underlying disease (eg, connective tissue disease, malignancy). Biopsy is the gold standard for the diagnosis of cutaneous vasculitis and also necessary for the detection of cutaneous vascular immune complexes by direct immunofluorescence. Based on the type of vessel disrupted by inflammation (small and/or muscular), the distribution of vasculitis in the dermis and subcutis, and predominate inflammatory cell-type mediating vessel wall damage, a list of relevant differential diagnoses can be generated. This histologic information coupled with extravascular findings such as tissue eosinophilia, tissue neutrophilia, and/or granulomas, plus pathophysiologic markers such as direct immunofluorescent examination for immune complexes and serologic evaluation for antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies allows for more accurate diagnosis of specific vasculitic entities. Herein, we review both primary and secondary vasculitic syndromes that affect the skin and show a small vessel neutrophilic mediated vasculitis. PMID:17122493

  9. The ANCA Vasculitis Questionnaire (AAV-PRO©)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-19

    Eosinophilic Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss) (EGPA); Churg-Strauss Syndrome (CSS); Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (Wegener's) (GPA); Wegener Granulomatosis (WG); Microscopic Polyangiitis (MPA); ANCA-Associated Vasculitis (AAV); Vasculitis

  10. Gastroenterology Cases of Cutaneous Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Arabaci, Elif; Yildiz, Kemal; Cakirca, Mustafa; Cikrikcioglu, Mehmet Ali; Ergun, Fatih; Danalioglu, Ahmet; Kocaman, Orhan; Senturk, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    Rarely, leukocytoclastic vasculitis can result from ischemic colitis, inflammatory bowel disease, and cryoglobulinemia. There is no established standard for the treatment of leukocytoclastic vasculitis associated with gastroenterologic diseases. This paper presents three cases of leukoytoclastic vasculitis, each of which is associated with a different gastroenterologic condition: ischemic colitis, Crohn's disease, and chronic hepatitis C. Each condition went into remission by treatment of leukocytoclastic vasculitis, regardless of the underlying disease. PMID:24250337

  11. Cerebral vasculitis associated with cocaine abuse

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, B.R.; Fainstat, M.

    1987-10-16

    A case of cerebral vasculitis in a previously healthy 22-year-old man with a history of cocaine abuse is described. Cerebral angiograms showed evidence of vasculitis. A search for possible causes other than cocaine produced no results. The authors include cocaine with methamphetamines, heroin, and ephedrine as illicit drugs that can cause cerebral vasculitis.

  12. Enhancement of mite antigen-induced histamine release by deuterium oxide from leucocytes of chronic urticarial patients

    SciTech Connect

    Numata, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamura, T.

    1981-09-01

    The mite antigen-induced histamine release from leucocytes of chronic urticarial patients was enhanced in the presence of deuterium oxide, which stabilizes microtubules. This enhancing effect of deuterium oxide on the histamine release from leucocytes may provide a useful means for the detection of allergens in vitro in chronic urticaria.

  13. Circulating Immune Complexes in Cutaneous Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Mackel, Susan E.; Tappeiner, Gerhard; Brumfield, Hilton; Jordon, Robert E.

    1979-01-01

    To investigate the pathogeneic significance of immune complexes in cutaneous vasculitis, 107 patients with various forms of cutaneous vasculitis, including 59 patients with necrotizing (leukocytoclastic) vasculitis (group 1), and 48 patients with lymphocytic vasculitis, or a predominately lymphocytic perivascular infiltrate (group 2), were studied. Immunoglobulins or complement components in cutaneous blood vessels were detected by direct immunofluorescence in high frequency in both groups (91 and 88%, respectively). Using two radioassays for circulating immune complexes, Clq or monoclonal rheumatoid factor (mRF) reactive material was detected in 68% of the patients with necrotizing vasculitis but only 44% of the patients in the lymphocytic-perivascular group. The mRF radioassay was elevated in 58% of the first group of patients and 41% of the patients in group 2, although Clq binding activity was increased in 54% of the patients with necrotizing vasculitis but only in 9% of the patients with a lymphocytic vasculitis or lymphocytic perivascular infiltrate. By using both sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation and Sepharose 6B gel filtration, the Clq and mRF reactive material detected in some patients with necrotizing vasculitis eluted in high molecular weight fractions that were also anticomplementary. In one patient with necrotizing vasculitis and hepatitis B antigenemia, these heavy molecular weight Clq and mRF reactive fractions contained a two- to three-fold increase in hepatitis B surface antigen when compared with lighter molecular weight fractions. Heavy and light molecular weight mRF reactive material could be detected in selected patients in the lymphocytic-perivascular group as well as in the necrotizing vasculitis group. These studies suggest that cutaneous vasculitis, including acute necrotizing (leukocytoclastic) vasculitis and some forms of lymphocytic vasculitis, and perhaps some diseases characterized by a lymphocytic perivascular infiltrate, may represent cutaneous expressions of immune complex disease. Images PMID:500831

  14. Silica exposure and systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mulloy, Karen B

    2003-01-01

    Work in Department of Energy (DOE) facilities has exposed workers to multiple toxic agents leading to acute and chronic diseases. Many exposures were common to numerous work sites. Exposure to crystalline silica was primarily restricted to a few facilities. I present the case of a 63-year-old male who worked in DOE facilities for 30 years as a weapons testing technician. In addition to silica, other workplace exposures included beryllium, various solvents and heavy metals, depleted uranium, and ionizing radiation. In 1989 a painful macular skin lesion was biopsied and diagnosed as leukocytoclastic vasculitis. By 1992 he developed gross hematuria and dyspnea. Blood laboratory results revealed a serum creatinine concentration of 2.1 mg/dL, ethrythrocyte sedimentation rate of 61 mm/hr, negative cANCA (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody cytoplasmic pattern), positive pANCA (ANCA perinuclear pattern), and antiglomerular basement membrane negative. Renal biopsy showed proliferative (crescentric) and necrotizing glomerulonephritis. The patient's diagnoses included microscopic polyangiitis, systemic necrotizing vasculitis, leukocytoclastic vasculitis, and glomerulonephritis. Environmental triggers are thought to play a role in the development of an idiopathic expression of systemic autoimmune disease. Crystalline silica exposure has been linked to rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and some of the small vessel vasculitides. DOE workers are currently able to apply for compensation under the federal Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program (EEOICP). However, the only diseases covered by EEOICP are cancers related to radiation exposure, chronic beryllium disease, and chronic silicosis. PMID:14644669

  15. Educational Needs of Patients With Systemic Vasculitis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-11

    Behcet's Disease; Churg-Strauss Syndrome; Vasculitis, Central Nervous System; Giant Cell Arteritis; Wegener Granulomatosis; Henoch-Schoenlein Purpura; Microscopic Polyangiitis; Polyarteritis Nodosa; Takayasu's Arteritis

  16. Damage assessment in ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Bhamra, Kuljeet; Luqmani, Raashid

    2012-12-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody associated vasculitis has been transformed from life-threatening conditions to chronic relapsing long-term diseases as a result of significant advances in immunosuppressive therapy. Although mortality still occurs, it is much less frequent, with an average 5-year survival of over 70 %. In the setting of chronic conditions, it becomes increasingly important to monitor the burden of disease in terms of both active inflammation requiring immunosuppression and chronic damage (scarring) from vasculitis and its treatment and associated comorbidity. The damage that accumulates in patients with vasculitis does not respond to immunosuppressive treatment. It is important to distinguish disease activity from disease damage to prevent unnecessary immunosuppression, but it is equally important to recognize damage for what it is, so that it can be addressed appropriately. Damage is an inevitable consequence of long-term vasculitis for over 80 % of patients, which should not surprise us given the severity of the original illness. There is potential value in measuring damage as a means of providing prognostic information. Using a quantified score such as the Vasculitis Damage Index (VDI) allows us to predict mortality. Patients with at least five items of damage on the VDI score have substantially worse mortality (7- to 11-fold worse risk), as compared with those with lesser amounts of damage. These findings should be taken into context when planning the management of patients with vasculitis, as well as in clinical trials of vasculitis. Disease damage is an important surrogate for long-term outcome in vasculitis, and studies should be designed to limit the amount of damage accumulating as a result of therapeutic intervention, rather than simply controlling disease activity, as is currently the aim in recent randomized controlled trials in vasculitis. Furthermore, careful cataloguing of damage, as well as disease activity items, provides much greater detail in describing and observing the long-term natural history of primary systemic vasculitis in patients treated with immunosuppressive agents who survive their initial disease process. PMID:22983618

  17. Biologic agents in systemic vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Charles F; Seo, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of systemic necrotizing vasculitis has made great strides in both efficacy and outcomes. Standard therapies, however, are associated with numerous side effects, and not all patients will respond to conventional immunosuppression. These realities have prompted the search for safer and more efficacious treatments, most notably among biologic agents. For example, the role of TNF-α in the pathophysiology of several vasculitides has led to the investigation of targeted inhibitors of this cytokine, albeit with mixed results. There have been some disappointing results in the area of giant cell arteritis and Wegener’s granulomatosis (granulomatosis with polygiitis), but anti-TNF therapy has shown promise in the treatment of Takayasu’s arteritis, although additional trials to demonstrate its efficacy are required. Anti-B-cell therapy seems to be the most promising advance in the management of these diseases. Complete and partial responses have been seen in both primary and secondary mixed cryoglobulinemic vasculitis. Recent trials have demonstrated that rituximab is effective for the treatment of Wegener’s granulomatosis and microscopic polyangiitis. These trials have, however, raised concerns regarding the long-term safety of these agents. The future holds promise for additional targeted therapies with improved patient response and fewer side effects. PMID:23785387

  18. Localized striated muscle vasculitis in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Zarmeena; Ranganathan, Prabha; Perry, Arie; Gelbart, Michael

    2007-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the most prevalent connective tissue diseases and can be complicated by vasculitis with systemic manifestations. Rheumatoid vasculitis can range in severity from a widespread, life-threatening disease refractory to treatment to a more benign, localized disease responsive to treatment. We describe here a patient with RA who presented with bilateral calf muscle pain secondary to rheumatoid vasculitis. The patient had intractable calf muscle pain which did not respond to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and muscle relaxants. He did not have any other manifestations of rheumatoid vasculitis such as skin ulcers, peripheral neuropathy, or gastrointestinal involvement. A thorough diagnostic work-up concluding with a muscle biopsy revealed a non-necrotizing small vessel vasculitis. The patient's symptoms responded very well to a course of steroids and he required no additional cytotoxic agents. This case illustrates that rheumatoid vasculitis can present as an isolated striated muscle vasculitis characterized by a relatively benign course and prompt resolution with the initiation of steroids. Clinicians need to be aware that such a phenomenon can exist to facilitate early recognition and appropriate treatment. PMID:17278948

  19. New insight into the rheumatoid vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Cojocaru, M; Cohocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Chico, B

    2015-01-01

    Vasculitis in rheumatoid arthritis (rheumatoid vasculitis, RV) has a heterogeneous clinical presentation that includes skin disorders, neuropathy, eye symptoms and systemic inflammation. Rheumatoid vasculitis is an unusual complication of longstanding, severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA). While RA affects the body's joints, vasculitis is a condition in which blood vessels become inflamed. Rheumatoid vasculitis occurs in approximately 2 to 5% of patients who have RA. The blood vessels most often involved are arteries that bring blood to the skin, nerves, and internal organs. Veins can also be involved. Rheumatoid vasculitis is skin condition that is a typical feature of RA, presenting as peripheral vascular lesions that are localized (purpura, cutaneous ulceration, and gangrene of the distal parts of the extremities). The cause of RV is unknown, but given the prominence of immune components and the pathologic changes in involved blood vessels, an autoimmune process is suggested. Compared to other forms of vasculitis, there has been relativejy little research in recent years on the specific entity of RV. There is some evidence that the incidence of RV has decreased over the past several decades, perhaps because of a better treatment of the underlying RA. In the present review, we discuss the clinical features, laboratory tests, the pathogenesis of RV. PMID:26402981

  20. Biotherapies in large vessel vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Ferfar, Y; Mirault, T; Desbois, A C; Comarmond, C; Messas, E; Savey, L; Domont, F; Cacoub, P; Saadoun, D

    2016-06-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) and Takayasu's arteritis (TA) are large vessel vasculitis (LVV) and aortic involvement is not uncommon in Behcet's disease (BD) and relapsing polychondritis (RP). Glucocorticosteroids are the mainstay of therapy in LVV. However, a significant proportion of patients have glucocorticoid dependance, serious side effects or refractory disease to steroids and other immunosuppressive treatments such as cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil and methotrexate. Recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis have resulted in the use of biological agents in patients with LVV. Anti-tumor necrosis factor-α drugs seem effective in patients with refractory Takayasu arteritis and vascular BD but have failed to do so in giant cell arteritis. Preliminary reports on the use of the anti-IL6-receptor antibody (tocilizumab), in LVV have been encouraging. The development of new biologic targeted therapies will probably open a promising future for patients with LVV. PMID:26883459

  1. Systemic vasculitis: a dual diagnosis?

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Eliza; Lutalo, Pamela; D’Cruz, David

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe a 25-year-old male with systemic vasculitis fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology classification criteria for both granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener’s granulomatosis) and polyarteritis nodosa. The patient was diagnosed with granulomatosis with polyangiitis following a mediastinal biopsy which revealed necrotising granulomas of the large airways, a positive cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and high antiproteinase 3 antibody titre. He then developed acute right-sided abdominal and testicular pain as well as areas of hyperaesthesia and parasthesiae on both lower limbs. He was found to have focal crescentic glomerulonephritis and mononeuritis multiplex, in keeping with his diagnosis of granulomatosis with polyangiitis, as well as two areas of infarction in his right testicle and multiple aneurysms of his hepatic and right renal arteries, more typical of polyarteritis nodosa. His symptoms developed 6 weeks after hepatitis B vaccination, which may have played an aetiological role. PMID:22669529

  2. What matters for patients with vasculitis?

    PubMed

    Novakovich, Elaine; Grayson, Peter C

    2015-06-01

    Advances in clinical care for patients with vasculitis have improved survival rates and created new challenges related to the ongoing management of chronic disease. Lack of curative therapies, burden of disease, treatment-related side effects, and fear of relapse contribute to patient-perceived reduction in quality of life. Patient-held beliefs about disease and priorities may differ substantially from the beliefs of their health care providers, and research paradigms are shifting to reflect more emphasis on understanding vasculitis from the patient's perspective. Efforts are ongoing to develop disease outcome measures in vasculitis that better represent the patient experience. Health care providers who care for patients with vasculitis should be sensitive to the substantial burdens of disease commonly experienced by patients living with the disease and should strive to provide comprehensive care directed towards the medical and biopsychological needs of these patients. PMID:25986940

  3. Cutaneous vasculitis presenting on the penis.

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, N P; Sonnex, C; Roberts, S O; Carne, C A

    1993-01-01

    Cutaneous vasculitis is frequently located on the lower limbs. We describe a patient who developed palpable purpura affecting the penis as the presenting sign of more widespread lesions of Henoch-Schönlein purpura. Images PMID:7721294

  4. Recurrent Cutaneous Eosinophilic Vasculitis: A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Riyaz, Najeeba; Sasidharanpillai, Sarita; Hazeena, Cherukattil; Aravindan, Karumathil P; Bindu, Chettithodi Sivasankaran; Silpa, Krishnakumari Nair

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent cutaneous necrotizing eosinophilic vasculitis is a rare entity described by Chen et al. It has a benign course without any systemic involvement. However, often long-term treatment with systemic steroids is required. The exact etiopathogenesis remains unknown. We report a female patient, who presented with recurrent pruritic purpuric papules and plaques affecting different body parts of long duration. Disease was well controlled with low dose systemic steroids, but invariably recurred on its withdrawal. Histology revealed the features of eosinophilic vasculitis. Subsequent detailed evaluation ruled out systemic involvement, underlying diseases, and any precipitating factors. Hence, a diagnosis of recurrent cutaneous eosinophilic vasculitis was made. Patient showed excellent response to prednisolone, and on tapering the drug, it was found that she needed a maintenance dose of 5 mg/day. We did not come across any previous reports of recurrent cutaneous eosinophilic vasculitis from India. PMID:27057046

  5. Epigenetics and Vasculitis: a Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Renauer, Paul; Coit, Patrick; Sawalha, Amr H

    2016-06-01

    Vasculitides represent a group of relatively rare systemic inflammatory diseases of the blood vessels. Despite recent progress in understanding the genetic basis and the underlying pathogenic mechanisms in vasculitis, the etiology and pathogenesis of vasculitis remain incompletely understood. Epigenetic dysregulation plays an important role in immune-mediated diseases, and the contribution of epigenetic aberrancies in vasculitis is increasingly being recognized. Histone modifications in the PR3 and MPO gene loci might be mechanistically involved in the pathogenesis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis. Similarly, other studies revealed important epigenetic contribution to other vasculitides, including Kawasaki disease and IgA vasculitis. More recently, genome-wide epigenomic studies have been performed in several vasculitides. A recent genome-wide DNA methylation study uncovered an important role for epigenetic remodeling of cytoskeleton-related genes in the pathogenesis of Behçet's disease and suggested that reversal of some of these DNA methylation changes associates with disease remission. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling characterized the inflammatory response in temporal artery tissue from patients with giant cell arteritis and showed increased activation of calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) signaling, prompting the suggestion that a specific calcineurin/NFAT inhibitor that is well tolerated and with the added beneficial anti-platelet activity, such as dipyridamole, might be of therapeutic potential in giant cell arteritis. While epigenetic studies in systemic vasculitis are still in their infancy, currently available data clearly indicate that investigating the epigenetic mechanisms underlying these diseases will help to better understand the pathogenesis of vasculitis and provide novel targets for the development of disease biomarkers and new therapies. PMID:26093659

  6. [Pathogenesis of large vessel vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Samson, M; Bonnotte, B

    2016-04-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) and Takayasu's arteritis (TA) are two granulomatous vasculitis affecting large arteries that present specific epidemiological and clinical features. Their pathogenesis is not fully understood but major advances have been obtained during the last years, thus allowing the emergence of new therapeutic strategies. GCA and TA develop on a specific genetic background but share some similarities regarding the immunological pathways involved in their pathogenesis. The trigger of these diseases is not clearly identified but it is thought that an infectious agent could activate and lead to the maturation of dendritic cells that are localized in the adventitia of arteries. Then, the cells of the adaptative immune response are recruited and activated: CD4 T cells that polarize into Th1 and Th17 cells, cytotoxic CD8 T cells and Natural Killer cells. Furthermore, the T regulatory cells (Treg) are decreased both in GCA and TA. Humoral immune response seems also to be involved, especially in TA. Then, the cytokines produced by T lymphocytes (especially IL-17 and IFN-γ) trigger the recruitment and activation of monocytes and their differentiation into macrophages and multinuclear giant cells that produce IL-1β and IL-6 that are responsible for general symptoms of GCA and TA, and cytotoxic mediators and growth factors that trigger the remodeling of the arterial wall leading to aneurysms and ischemic manifestations of GCA an TA. PMID:26620872

  7. Biologic therapy in ANCA-negative vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Loricera, Javier; Blanco, Ricardo; Hernández, José L; Pina, Trinitario; González-Vela, M Carmen; González-Gay, Miguel A

    2015-08-01

    Standard therapeutic schemes for vasculitis are usually associated with numerous side effects and uneven clinical response. However, recent advances in understanding of the pathogenesis of these systemic diseases have resulted in the development of a group of biologic agents potentially useful in patients with vasculitis. Thus, anti-tumor necrosis factor-α drugs may be effective in patients with refractory Kawasaki disease but have failed to do so in giant cell arteritis, and their role in Takayasu arteritis is yet unclear. Preliminary reports on the use of the anti-IL6-receptor antibody, tocilizumab, in large-vessel vasculitis have been encouraging. Interferon alpha has showed positive results in hepatitis B virus-associated polyarteritis nodosa, and hepatitis C virus-induced cryoglobulinemia. Early experience with rituximab in several types of vasculitis has been quite promising, but must be confirmed in ongoing randomized clinical trials. The development of new biologic targeted therapies will probably open a hopeful future for patients with vasculitis. PMID:25828585

  8. [Neuromuscular biopsy and diagnosis of vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Vital, Anne; Vital, Claude

    2006-09-01

    One characteristic histological lesion on biopsy specimens is mandatory to establish the diagnosis of vasculitis. Combined nerve and muscle biopsies, by the same cutaneous incision, improve significantly the percentage of positive results. Nerve fragments should be taken in every patient presenting sensory manifestations. Such vasculitic lesions are present in medium-sized arterioles and/or small vessels, and correspond mainly to 4 necrotizing vasculitis: panarteritis nodosa (PAN), microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), Churg and Strauss syndrome and Wegener granulomatosis. Microvasculitis should be added to these classical entities, because it corresponds to small vessel wall infiltration by inflammatory cells, as observed in PAN and MPA, but without any necrosis. Microvasculitis has to be differentiated from the inflammatory cell infiltrates surrounding small vessels. However, such perivascular inflammatory cell infiltrates enable the diagnosis of probable vasculitis when associated with clusters of neo-vessels, hemosiderin deposits, or a focal damage of nerve fibers. Grossly, one third of vasculitis diagnosis is confirmed on muscle fragments, a second third on nerve fragments, and the last third on both nerve and muscle fragments. Moreover, in the search for vasculitis, an unpredicted diagnosis of lymphoma or amyloidosis is occasionally established on the neuro-muscular biopsy. PMID:17128151

  9. Ischemic Retinal Vasculitis and Its Management

    PubMed Central

    Lightman, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic retinal vasculitis is an inflammation of retinal blood vessels associated with vascular occlusion and subsequent retinal hypoperfusion. It can cause visual loss secondary to macular ischemia, macular edema, and neovascularization leading to vitreous hemorrhage, fibrovascular proliferation, and tractional retinal detachment. Ischemic retinal vasculitis can be idiopathic or secondary to systemic disease such as in Behçet's disease, sarcoidosis, tuberculosis, multiple sclerosis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Corticosteroids with or without immunosuppressive medication are the mainstay treatment in retinal vasculitis together with laser photocoagulation of retinal ischemic areas. Intravitreal injections of bevacizumab are used to treat neovascularization secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus but should be timed with retinal laser photocoagulation to prevent further progression of retinal ischemia. Antitumor necrosis factor agents have shown promising results in controlling refractory retinal vasculitis excluding multiple sclerosis. Interferon has been useful to control inflammation and induce neovascular regression in retinal vasculitis secondary to Behçet's disease and multiple sclerosis. The long term effect of these management strategies in preventing the progression of retinal ischemia and preserving vision is not well understood and needs to be further studied. PMID:24839552

  10. Reproductive Health in Men and Women With Vasculitis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-25

    Giant Cell Arteritis; Takayasu's Arteritis; Polyarteritis Nodosa; Wegener's Granulomatosis; Microscopic Polyangiitis; Churg-Strauss Syndrome; Behcet's Disease; Kawasaki Disease; Henoch-schoenlein Purpura; Vasculitis, Central Nervous System; Drug-induced Necrotizing Vasculitis

  11. HIV diagnosis in a patient presenting with vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Sharif, M; Hameed, S; Akin, I; Natarajan, U

    2016-02-01

    A patient with digital ischaemia and gangrene was treated with iloprost and antiplatelets for two weeks. His vasculitic screen was negative except for a positive HIV test. His vasculitis improved three weeks after treatment with antiretroviral medications. Though vasculitis is well known to be associated with HIV infection, very few cases of HIV present as vasculitis. PMID:25769887

  12. Connective Tissue Disorder-Associated Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aman; Dhooria, Aadhaar; Aggarwal, Ashish; Rathi, Manish; Chandran, Vinod

    2016-06-01

    Vasculitides secondary to connective tissue diseases are classified under the category of 'vasculitis associated with systemic disease' in the revised International Chapel Hill Consensus Conference (CHCC) nomenclature. These secondary vasculitides may affect any of the small, medium or large vessels and usually portend a poor prognosis. Any organ system can be involved and the presentation would vary depending upon that involvement. Treatment depends upon the type and severity of presentation. In this review, we describe secondary vasculitis associated with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, sarcoidosis, relapsing polychondritis, systemic sclerosis, Sjogren's syndrome and idiopathic inflammatory myositis, focusing mainly on recent advances in the past 3 years. PMID:27097818

  13. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis associated with perforated diverticular disease.

    PubMed

    Okpala, Amalachukwu Michael; Joshi, Meera; Andrews, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LV) is a small vessel vasculitis associated with infections, connective tissue disease, malignancies and, rarely, gastrointestinal conditions. An association between LV and acute diverticulitis has not previously been reported. LV may be localised to the skin as a purpuric rash or might manifest with systemic involvement, such as of the joints, gastrointestinal tract or kidneys. Management of LV can be medical or surgical, based on the degree of systemic involvement. We present the case of a 56-year-old man with a 2-year history of a purpuric rash associated with diarrhoea, who presented acutely with abdominal pain. Imaging studies revealed sigmoid diverticulitis with a pericolic collection. Operative findings were purulent peritonitis secondary to perforated diverticular abscess, which was treated with a Hartmann's procedure. Postoperatively, the purpuric rash resolved rapidly on treatment with antibiotics and steroids. Histopathology of the resected bowel and skin punch biopsy confirmed sigmoid diverticulitis and LV, respectively. PMID:26791117

  14. Clinical use of biologics in vasculitis syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Paroli, Marino

    2012-01-01

    Vasculitis syndromes are relative rare conditions but can cause significant mortality and morbidity if not treated adequately. Recent advances in immunosuppressant therapy have radically changed the course of these diseases. However, the standard therapy is not always well tolerated by patients, and some cases are refractory to treatment. New therapeutic possibilities have emerged with the use of so-called “biologics,” a new class of genetically engineered drugs used for inflammatory rheumatic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriatic arthritis. In the present review, summarized are the most recent data on the efficacy and safety of biologics in the treatment of vasculitis syndromes that cannot be treated with standard therapy. PMID:23118526

  15. Rare Case of Vasculitis of the Hepatic Artery

    PubMed Central

    Mali, Padmavathi; Muduganti, Sudheer R.; Goldberg, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    Vasculitis is an accumulation of inflammatory leucocytes in the blood vessels with reactive damage to mural structures. Isolated vasculitis of the gastrointestinal tract without systemic involvement is rare. We report a unique case of a female patient who presented with abdominal pain, and was found, on serology, to have elevated inflammatory markers without autoantibodies. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen and pelvis was suggestive of vasculitis of the hepatic artery. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case, to date, of vasculitis of hepatic artery. PMID:26387709

  16. Immunologic Cerebral Vasculitis and Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis: An Uncommon Association

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiyi; Li, Qian; Zhen, Xiaohan; Liu, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Infection can cause cerebral vasculitis not only by direct invasion of the vessel wall, but by immune complex deposition, or through secondary cryoglobulineamia. There are also two types of cerebral vasculitis associated with tuberculosis (TB). In TB treatment, cerebral vasculitis caused by immunologic injury received little attention than vasculitis due to direct invasion of TB infection. We report a case in a young woman who presented with fever, generalized lymphadenopathy, stroke-like events, movement disorder and coma, which was found to be active, lymph node TB with immunologic cerebral vacuities without tuberculosis meningitis. PMID:26500938

  17. Current status of large and small vessel vasculitis in Japan.

    PubMed

    Toshihiko, N

    1996-08-01

    Recent advances in clinical as well as basic research on large and small vessel vasculitis in Japan were described based upon the investigations performed by the members of the Research Committee of Intractable vasculitis, sponsored by the Japanese Ministry of Health and Welfare. PMID:9119531

  18. Paraneoplastic vasculitis associated to pelvic chondrosarcoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Arvinius, Camilla; González-Pérez, Ana; García-Coiradas, Javier; García-Maroto, Roberto; Cebrián-Parra, Juan Luis

    2016-01-01

    Vasculopathic syndromes have been associated with hematological and solid organ malignancies. The pathogenesis of these syndromes remains largely unknown and there are no biologic markers identified. Whether it is or is not a paraneoplastic syndrome is under discussion, the close temporal relationship of cancer and vasculitis suggests that these vasculitides are a paraneoplastic condition. We report a case of a 45-year-old female patient with pelvic chondrosarcoma who underwent surgical treatment and started to present visual loss, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SRIS), cardiac insufficiency, hepatosplenomegaly, cholestasis as well as pulmonary bleeding suggesting a sarcoma-associated vasculitis. All antibodies were negative as in secondary vasculitis. After corticoideal therapy the vasculitis resolved and at 3-year follow-up the patient had not showed any further medical complications or recurrences of the vasculitis. The parallel evolution of the vasculitis and the solid tumor combined with the resolution of the vasculitis after corticotherapy enhances the likelihood of a paraneoplastic vasculitis associated with a chondrosarcoma according to literature review.

  19. Vasculitis in primary biliary cirrhosis--response to prednisolone.

    PubMed

    Mutimer, D J; Bassendine, M F; Crook, P; James, O F

    1990-05-01

    Immunosuppressive doses of prednisolone were used to treat severe vasculitis in two patients with early primary biliary cirrhosis. Liver-specific blood tests of both patients returned to normal. The response of both the vasculitis and liver disease is discussed and the literature is reviewed. PMID:2388998

  20. The impact of vasculitis on patients’ social participation and friendships

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Delesha M.; Meador, Amy E.; Elstad, Emily A.; Hogan, Susan L.; DeVellis, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Our objective is to explore how vasculitis, affects patients’ friendships and social participation. Methods Vasculitis patients (n=221) completed an online questionnaire that asked if, and how, relationships with friends have changed since receiving a vasculitis diagnosis. Participants’ written responses were imported into Atlas.ti, and two independent researchers used both structured and unstructured coding to identify themes. After reaching 100% consensus on the themes present in each participant’s responses, the coders determined how themes were interrelated across participants. Results Over half of patients (52%) expressed that vasculitis negatively impacted their friendships and 25% noted a negative impact on their social participation. At limes, this negative impact was related to structural changes in patients’ social networks due to loss of friendships. Reduced social participation was also associated with friends’ inability to understand vasculitis and its effects, vasculitis-related fatigue, and lifestyle changes such as not being able to drink alcohol and avoiding infection-prone events. Additionally, patients withdrew from social engagements due to fatigue or because of physical symptoms and side effects. Conclusion The unique circumstances associated with a rare chronic illness like vasculitis can create significant barriers to friendships, including loss of these relationships. Interventions designed to help patients cope with the social impact of vasculitis are implicated, especially if they increase patients’ ability to engage in dialogue about their illness with their friends. PMID:22325346

  1. Peroneal nerve involvement as initial manifestation of primary systemic vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Ripellino, Paolo; Varrasi, Claudia; Maldi, Elena; Cantello, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of two patients with foot drop due to peroneal nerve infarct as early sign of two different forms of primary systemic vasculitides: a predominantly small-vessel p-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive vasculitis (microscopic polyangiitis) and a predominantly medium-vessel vasculitis (polyarteritis nodosa). PMID:24686810

  2. Phenytoin-Associated Granulomatous Pulmonary Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Kheir, Fayez; Daroca, Philip; Lasky, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Phenytoin was introduced in 1938 for the control of seizure disorders and remains widely used today. Since that time, many cases of phenytoin-induced allergic reactions and clinical pulmonary disease have been reported. However, pulmonary vascular pathology from phenytoin use has been only very rarely described. We report a case of phenytoin-associated vasculitis in a 39-year-old African American man presenting with progressive dyspnea and abnormal chest imaging. The importance of reviewing the medication history along with familiarity with the array of drug-associated lung diseases is crucial to recognize and treat pneumotoxicity. PMID:24247101

  3. Update in the diagnosis and management of pulmonary vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Stephen K; Cosgrove, Gregory P; Fischer, Aryeh; Meehan, Richard T; Brown, Kevin K

    2006-02-01

    The term vasculitis encompasses a number of distinct clinicopathologic disease entities, each of which is characterized pathologically by cellular inflammation and destruction of the blood vessel wall, and clinically by the types and locations of the affected vessels. While multiple classification schemes have been proposed to categorize and simplify the approach to these diseases, ultimately their diagnosis rests on the identification of particular patterns of clinical, radiologic, laboratory, and pathologic features. While lung involvement is most commonly seen with the primary idiopathic, small-vessel or antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides of Wegener granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, and Churg-Strauss syndrome, one should remember that medium-vessel vasculitis (ie, classic polyarteritis nodosa), large-vessel vasculitis (ie, Takayasu arteritis), primary immune complex-mediated vasculitis (ie, Goodpasture syndrome), and secondary vasculitis (ie, systemic lupus erythematosus) can all affect the lung. However, for the purpose of this review, we will focus on the ANCA-associated vasculitides. PMID:16478866

  4. [Necrotizing cutaneous vasculitis with massive gastrointestinal bleeding following naproxen treatment].

    PubMed

    Horev, Amir; Etzion, Ohad; Halevy, Sima

    2010-03-01

    Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis is usually induced by an acute infection or exposure to a drug. Cutaneous vasculitis may precede severe systemic involvement, and may end in death. Accordingly, diagnosis of cutaneous vasculitis, identification of etiological factors, follow-up for systemic involvement and treatment are important. The authors present a case study of a 58-year-old male with fever and extensive eruption involving the trunk and extremities which appeared two days after initiation of treatment with oral naproxen. The clinical and histological findings were consistent with cutaneous necrotizing leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Two events of massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding occurred during treatment with systemic corticosteroids. The possible etiological factors and the mechanisms involved in the induction of the vasculitis and the gastrointestinal bleeding are discussed. PMID:20684166

  5. The Spectrum of Type I Cryoglobulinemia Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Terrier, Benjamin; Karras, Alexandre; Kahn, Jean-Emmanuel; Guenno, Guillaume Le; Marie, Isabelle; Benarous, Lucas; Lacraz, Adeline; Diot, Elisabeth; Hermine, Olivier; de Saint-Martin, Luc; Cathébras, Pascal; Leblond, Véronique; Modiano, Philippe; Léger, Jean-Marc; Mariette, Xavier; Senet, Patricia; Plaisier, Emmanuelle; Saadoun, David; Cacoub, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Type I cryoglobulinemia vasculitis (CryoVas) is considered a life-threatening condition; however, data on the characteristics and outcome are scarce. To analyze the presentation, prognosis, and efficacy and safety of treatments of type I CryoVas, we conducted a French nationwide survey that included 64 patients with type I CryoVas between January 1995 and July 2010: 28 patients with monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS) and 36 with hematologic malignancy. Type I monoclonal CryoVas was characterized by severe cutaneous involvement (necrosis and ulcers) in almost half the patients and high serum cryoglobulin levels, contrasting with a lower frequency of glomerulonephritis than expected. The 1-, 3-, 5-, and 10-year survival rates were 97%, 94%, 94%, and 87%, respectively. Compared to MGUS, type I CryoVas related to hematologic malignancy tended to be associated with a poorer prognosis. Therapeutic regimens based on alkylating agents, rituximab, thalidomide or lenalinomide, and bortezomib showed similar efficacy on vasculitis manifestations, with clinical response rates from 80% to 86%. Data from the CryoVas survey show that the prognosis of type I CryoVas does not seem to be as poor as previously suggested. Besides alkylating agents, the use of regimens based on rituximab, thalidomide or lenalinomide, and bortezomib are interesting alternative options, although the exact role of each strategy remains to be defined. PMID:23429354

  6. Localized, single-organ vasculitis: clinical presentation and management.

    PubMed

    Atisha-Fregoso, Yemil; Hinojosa-Azaola, Andrea; Alcocer-Varela, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The term vasculitis usually evokes a systemic disease with catastrophic outcomes; however, vasculitides may also present in a localized form, with a better prognosis when compared with their systemic counterpart. In order to avoid confusion and facilitate classification, the term single-organ vasculitis (SOV) has been proposed. Remarkably, current criteria for the classification of the vasculitis do not include the SOV term, due in part to the lack of appropriate definitions, since most data come from case series; moreover, the scarce information available is also extremely heterogeneous. This review focuses on the epidemiology, clinical course, prognosis, and suggested treatment of the SOV, with emphasis in the most recent information available. PMID:22918493

  7. Recurrent Stenosis of the Ileum Caused by Rheumatoid Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Tago, Masaki; Naito, Yuka; Aihara, Hiroki; Furukawa, Naoko E; Yamashita, Shu-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old man with a 20-year history of rheumatoid arthritis was transferred to our hospital due to a second episode of intestinal obstruction, a fever, and joint pain within the previous 6 months. He had an extremely high rheumatoid factor level and decreased complement levels. Abdominal computed tomography, a small bowel series, and small intestinal endoscopy revealed severe ileal stenosis. Resection of the stenotic lesion was performed, and a histopathological examination revealed vasculitis. Rheumatoid vasculitis was diagnosed, and the patient began treatment with prednisolone and methotrexate, which improved his condition. Rheumatoid vasculitis is a rare, but possible cause of recurrent bowel obstruction. PMID:27041172

  8. The Spectrum of Paraneoplastic Cutaneous Vasculitis in a Defined Population

    PubMed Central

    Loricera, Javier; Calvo-Río, Vanesa; Ortiz-Sanjuán, Francisco; González-López, Marcos A.; Fernández-Llaca, Hector; Rueda-Gotor, Javier; Gonzalez-Vela, Maria C.; Alvarez, Lino; Mata, Cristina; González-Lamuño, Domingo; Martínez-Taboada, Victor M.; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Blanco, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Cutaneous vasculitis may be associated with malignancies, and may behave as a paraneoplastic syndrome. This association has been reported in a variable proportion of patients depending on population selection. We conducted the current study to assess the frequency, clinical features, treatment, and outcome of paraneoplastic vasculitis in a large unselected series of 766 patients with cutaneous vasculitis diagnosed at a single university hospital. Sixteen patients (10 men and 6 women; mean age ± standard deviation, 67.94 ± 14.20 yr; range, 40–85 yr) presenting with cutaneous vasculitis were ultimately diagnosed as having an underlying malignancy. They constituted 3.80% of the 421 adult patients. There were 9 hematologic and 7 solid underlying malignancies. Skin lesions were the initial clinical presentation in all of them, and the median interval from the onset of cutaneous vasculitis to the diagnosis of the malignancy was 17 days (range, 8–50 d). The most frequent skin lesions were palpable purpura (15 patients). Other clinical manifestations included constitutional syndrome (10 patients) and arthralgia and/or arthritis (4 cases). Hematologic cytopenias (11 cases) as well as immature peripheral blood cells (6 cases) were frequently observed in the full blood cell count, especially in those with vasculitis associated with hematologic malignancies. Specific treatment for vasculitis was prescribed in 10 patients; nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (4 patients), corticosteroids (3 patients), chloroquine (1 patient), antihistamines (1 patient), and cyclophosphamide (1 patient). Ten patients died due to the malignancy and 6 patients recovered following malignancy therapy. Patients with paraneoplastic vasculitis were older, more frequently had constitutional syndrome, and less frequently had organ damage due to the vasculitis than the remaining patients with cutaneous vasculitis. In summary, cutaneous paraneoplastic vasculitis is an entity not uncommonly encountered by clinicians. The most common underlying malignancy is generally hematologic. In these cases the presence of cytopenias and immature cells may be red flags for the diagnosis of cancer. In patients with paraneoplastic cutaneous vasculitis, the prognosis depends on the underlying neoplasia. PMID:24145696

  9. Lepra reaction with lucio phenomenon mimicking cutaneous vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Misra, Durga Prasanna; Parida, Jyoti Ranjan; Chowdhury, Abhra Chandra; Pani, Krushna Chandra; Kumari, Niraj; Krishnani, Narendra; Agarwal, Vikas

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy is a disease typically found in the tropics. Patients with leprosy can have varying presentation with constitutional symptoms, joint pains, skin nodules, and rarely a vasculitis-like picture with skin ulcers and neuropathy. We present a young lady who presented with the rare manifestation of skin infarcts mimicking cutaneous vasculitis, diagnosed on histopathology to have Lucio phenomenon on a background of lepromatous leprosy. With increasing migration and widespread use of biologic response modifiers, clinicians all over the world need to be aware of various presentations of leprosy as well as needing to keep an open mind while considering the differential diagnoses of vasculitis. PMID:25580317

  10. Lepra Reaction with Lucio Phenomenon Mimicking Cutaneous Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Durga Prasanna; Parida, Jyoti Ranjan; Chowdhury, Abhra Chandra; Pani, Krushna Chandra; Kumari, Niraj; Krishnani, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy is a disease typically found in the tropics. Patients with leprosy can have varying presentation with constitutional symptoms, joint pains, skin nodules, and rarely a vasculitis-like picture with skin ulcers and neuropathy. We present a young lady who presented with the rare manifestation of skin infarcts mimicking cutaneous vasculitis, diagnosed on histopathology to have Lucio phenomenon on a background of lepromatous leprosy. With increasing migration and widespread use of biologic response modifiers, clinicians all over the world need to be aware of various presentations of leprosy as well as needing to keep an open mind while considering the differential diagnoses of vasculitis. PMID:25580317

  11. Vasculitis: an unusual manifestation in an HIV-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Ana; Victório, Tânia; Gomes, Constança; Martins, Telmo; Dias Neto, António

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive patients may develop vasculitis, either mediated by immunological factors or by direct vascular injury. We describe a patient who developed manifestations suggestive of extremities vasculitis with no identifiable risk factors other than HIV, Epstein Barr and Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) type 1 co-infection. Physicians should be aware that vasculitis may have a heterogeneous presentation and occur associated with HIV infection. Although unusual, this association should be recognized for early proper treatment and prevention of ischemia. PMID:26070539

  12. Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis. Relation to systemic disease.

    PubMed

    Lotti, T M; Comacchi, C; Ghersetich, I

    1999-01-01

    Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis (CNV) is a complex multisystem disease generally involving the skin and mucous membranes, often accompanied by renal, gastrointestinal, pericardial, neurological, and articular signs and symptoms. CNV may be idiopatical or occur in association with a drug, infection, or underlying disease. CNV has been shown in patients with chronic infections (viral, bacterial, protozoa, helminthic), serum sickness, a variety of collagen vascular diseases (systemic lupus erythematous, Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, Behçet's disease) hyperglobulinemic states, cryoglobulinemia, bowel bypass syndrome, ulcerative colitis, cystic fibrosis, primary biliary cirrhosis and HIV infection. Association with malignancies is not frequent. Lymphoproliferative disorders (Hodgkin's disease, mycosis fungoides, lymphosarcoma, adult T-cell leukemia, multiple mieloma) and solid tumors (lung cancer, colon carcinoma, renal, prostate, head and neck cancer and breast cancer) may be associated with CNV. Whenever possible, treatment is directed at the elimination of the cause. In other cases after adequate laboratory screening local and systemic therapy are recommended. PMID:10599332

  13. Lymphocytic enteritis and systemic vasculitis in sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Rae, C A

    1994-01-01

    Lymphocytic enteritis and systemic lymphocytic vasculitis may be a new or previously unrecognized syndrome in sheep suffering from chronic wasting. Seven cases in three separate flocks were seen over an eight-year period at Veterinary Laboratory Services in Brighton, Ontario. Most of the animals were between five and twelve months of age and exhibited weight loss and inappetance, with or without diarrhea. All were Suffolks or crossbred Suffolks. In one of the flocks, there were also several sheep with lymphoma. Postmortem examination of carcasses and ancillary testing did not reveal an etiology; however, the intestinal and vascular lesions resembled those described in certain viral diseases, such as malignant catarrhal fever and Border disease, and immune-mediated diseases, such as polyarteritis nodosa. Submission for necropsy of sheep that exhibit signs of chronic wasting is encouraged, to help establish the etiology of the disease and its significance to the industry. Images Figure 1. PMID:7994703

  14. A 15-year exercise program for rheumatoid vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Marley, W P; Santilli, T F

    1998-01-01

    A rare case of rheumatoid vasculitis and responses to a 15-year supervised exercise program. This patient presented with significant impairment in mobility and physical work capacity. His exercise tolerance improved considerably and he benefited emotionally. PMID:9572643

  15. Innate immune cells in the pathogenesis of primary systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Misra, Durga Prasanna; Agarwal, Vikas

    2016-02-01

    Innate immune system forms the first line of defense against foreign substances. Neutrophils, eosinophils, erythrocytes, platelets, monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, γδ T cells, natural killer and natural killer T cells comprise the innate immune system. Genetic polymorphisms influencing the activation of innate immune cells predispose to development of vasculitis and influence its severity. Abnormally activated innate immune cells cross-talk with other cells of the innate immune system, present antigens more efficiently and activate T and B lymphocytes and cause tissue destruction via cell-mediated cytotoxicity and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These secreted cytokines further recruit other cells to the sites of vascular injury. They are involved in both the initiation as well as the perpetuation of vasculitis. Evidences suggest reversal of aberrant activation of immune cells in response to therapy. Understanding the role of innate immune cells in vasculitis helps understand the potential of therapeutic modulation of their activation to treat vasculitis. PMID:26403285

  16. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Vasculitis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Weight loss Fatigue (tiredness) General aches and pains Organ- or Body System-Specific Signs and Symptoms Vasculitis can affect specific organs and body systems, causing a range of signs and symptoms. Skin ...

  17. Anti-TNF-Alpha Therapy and Systemic Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaplanski, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    TNF-α is a pleiotropic cytokine, which plays a major role in the pathogenesis of numerous autoimmune and/or inflammatory systemic diseases. Systemic vasculitis constitutes a group of rare diseases, characterized by inflammation of the arterial or venous vessel wall, causing stenosis and thrombosis. Treatment of the different type of vasculitis mainly relies on steroids and immunosuppressive drugs. In case of refractory or relapsing diseases, however, a second line of treatment may be required. Anti-TNF-α drugs have been used in this setting during the last 15 years with inconsistent results. We reviewed herein the use of anti-TNF-α therapy in different kind of vasculitis and concluded that, except for Behcet's disease, this therapeutic option has not demonstrated significant improvement in the treatment of vasculitis. PMID:24719524

  18. Persistent cryoglobulinemic vasculitis following successful treatment of hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Levine, James W; Gota, Carmen; Fessler, Barri J; Calabrese, Leonard H; Cooper, Sheldon M

    2005-06-01

    There is a well established link between type II mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, and HCV is believed to be the cause of cryoprotein formation and tissue deposition. Successful treatment of HCV infection has resulted in resolution of cryoglobulinemia and vasculitis. We describe 4 patients who had persistent MC and vasculitis despite successful eradication of HCV with antiviral therapy. PMID:15940780

  19. Severe food-induced vasculitis in two children.

    PubMed

    Businco, Luisa; Falconieri, Paola; Bellioni-Businco, Barbara; Bahna, Sami L

    2002-02-01

    Food-induced vasculitis seems to be rare and is considered by some as controversial. The reported cases in the literature are few and mostly on adult patients. Described in this report are two children with severe vasculitis caused by specific foods. They were diagnosed at two separate allergy centers that have a special interest in food allergies. Case 1 was an 8-year-old girl with a 9-month history of cutaneous vasculitis with large joints involvement. Case 2 was a 23-month-old girl with an 8-month history of multiple hospitalizations for recurrent acute severe cutaneous and mucous membrane vasculitis with large joints involvement. In both patients, skin biopsy showed leucocytoclastic vasculitis. In neither of the patients could the symptoms be attributed to drug intake, infection, autoimmunity, or other systemic disease. Case 1 had a moderately elevated serum total immunoglobulin E (IgE) level and strongly positive skin test and radioallergosorbent test (RAST) to cow's milk and hen's egg, both of which were proven to be the cause by elimination-challenge tests. Case 2 had a slightly elevated serum total IgE level, but negative skin tests to foods, including chocolate that was suspected by the mother. Avoidance of chocolate resulted in remission, except following accidental ingestion of cocoa-containing products. These findings support the few previous reports on food-induced vasculitis, an entity that seems rare but may be more common than currently realized. PMID:12000502

  20. Genetically Distinct Subsets within ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Paul A.; Rayner, Tim F.; Trivedi, Sapna; Holle, Julia U.; Watts, Richard A.; Jayne, David R.W.; Baslund, Bo; Brenchley, Paul; Bruchfeld, Annette; Chaudhry, Afzal N.; Tervaert, Jan Willem Cohen; Deloukas, Panos; Feighery, Conleth; Gross, Wolfgang L.; Guillevin, Loic; Gunnarsson, Iva; P, Lorraine Harper M.R.C; Hrušková, Zdenka; Little, Mark A.; Martorana, Davide; Neumann, Thomas; Ohlsson, Sophie; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pusey, Charles D.; Salama, Alan D.; Sanders, Jan-Stephan F.; Savage, Caroline O.; Segelmark, Mårten; Stegeman, Coen A.; Tesař, Vladimir; Vaglio, Augusto; Wieczorek, Stefan; Wilde, Benjamin; Zwerina, Jochen; Rees, Andrew J.; Clayton, David G.; Smith, Kenneth G.C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)–associated vasculitis is a severe condition encompassing two major syndromes: granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly known as Wegener’s granulomatosis) and microscopic polyangiitis. Its cause is unknown, and there is debate about whether it is a single disease entity and what role ANCA plays in its pathogenesis. We investigated its genetic basis. METHODS A genomewide association study was performed in a discovery cohort of 1233 U.K. patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis and 5884 controls and was replicated in 1454 Northern European case patients and 1666 controls. Quality control, population stratification, and statistical analyses were performed according to standard criteria. RESULTS We found both major-histocompatibility-complex (MHC) and non-MHC associations with ANCA-associated vasculitis and also that granulomatosis with polyangiitis and microscopic polyangiitis were genetically distinct. The strongest genetic associations were with the antigenic specificity of ANCA, not with the clinical syndrome. Anti–proteinase 3 ANCA was associated with HLA-DP and the genes encoding α1-antitrypsin (SERPINA1) and proteinase 3 (PRTN3) (P = 6.2×10−89, P = 5.6×10−12, and P = 2.6×10−7, respectively). Anti–myeloperoxidase ANCA was associated with HLA-DQ (P = 2.1×10−8). CONCLUSIONS This study confirms that the pathogenesis of ANCA-associated vasculitis has a genetic component, shows genetic distinctions between granulomatosis with polyangiitis and microscopic polyangiitis that are associated with ANCA specificity, and suggests that the response against the autoantigen proteinase 3 is a central pathogenic feature of proteinase 3 ANCA–associated vasculitis. These data provide preliminary support for the concept that proteinase 3 ANCA–associated vasculitis and myeloperoxidase ANCA–associated vasculitis are distinct autoimmune syndromes. (Funded by the British Heart Foundation and others.) PMID:22808956

  1. Biological Therapy-Induced Systemic Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-González, Luis Arturo

    2016-07-01

    The use of biologics has been associated with the paradoxical development of biologics-induced autoimmune diseases. The purpose of this review was to describe the key immunopathogenic mechanisms involved in the development of these conditions, and to discuss the clinical and laboratory characteristics usually described in the medical literature, reviewing case reports as well as records on national biologic therapies (BIOGEAS, RABBIT, BSRBR-RA, BIOBADAVEN). More than 200 cases have so far been reported, all of them diagnosed on the basis of the histopathology or meeting the ACR/Chapel Hill criteria. Over 75 % of the cases were females with a mean age of 48 ± 5 years. More than 50 % had rheumatoid arthritis. Most of the biologics-associated vasculitis developed in 90 ± 31 days. Complete resolution in almost 75 % of the cases was observed upon treatment discontinuation; however, steroid therapy was indicated for all patients and one death was recorded. The use of cyclophosphamide, rituximab or plasma exchange was reserved for the most severe cases. PMID:27165496

  2. [Usefulness of imaging in large vessel vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Mekinian, A; Djelbani, S; Viry, F; Fain, O; Soussan, M

    2016-04-01

    The imaging is essential for the diagnosis of large vessels arteritis, in order to assess the persistent inflammation of arterial lesions, to evaluate the treatment response and search the vascular complications. In patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA), the aortitis could be suspected in 2 situations: in the presence of general constitutional symptoms or systematic screening of aortitis in patient with confirmed GCA. The frequency of aortitis varies according to the imaging method and could be detected in 40 % of patients with computed tomography and MRI, and approximately in 60 % with FDG-PET/CT. The clinical and prognostic value of systematic detection of aortitis during the GCA remains to be determined. In Takayasu arteritis, imaging is performed to diagnose the large vessels vasculitis, to determine the arterial lesions extension to assess the persistent inflammation of arterial lesions. The persistent vascular inflammation should be suspected in the presence of arterial thickness, of arterial enhancement, a parietal edema and increased arterial FDG uptake (>liver). However, the value of these parameters and the threshold remain to be determined. Thus, the value of FDG-PET/CT and MRI and of parameters used to characterize the persistent arterial inflammation should be further studied. PMID:26880245

  3. Systemic vasculitis: an annual critical digest of the most recent literature.

    PubMed

    Della Rossa, Alessandra; Cioffi, Elisa; Elefante, Elena; Ferro, Francesco; Parma, Alice; Vagelli, Roberta; Talarico, Rosaria

    2014-01-01

    Herewith we provide our annual digest of the recent literature on systemic vasculitis in which we reviewed all the articles published during the last 12 months on large-, medium- and small-vessel vasculitis, and selected the most relevant studies regarding the epidemiology, pathogenesis and management of systemic vasculitis. In particular, we focused the attention on giant cell arteritis, ANCA-associated vasculitis and cryoglobulinaemia. PMID:24854379

  4. A Fatal Case of "Bullous Erysipelas-like" Pseudomonas Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sam Shiyao; Chandran, Nisha Suyien; Huang, Jing Xiang; Tan, Kong-Bing; Aw, Derrick Chen-Wee

    2016-01-01

    Erysipelas is a generally benign superficial bacterial skin infection, and its bullous form constitutes a rare and more severe variant. We describe the first and fatal case of "bullous erysipelas-like" septic vasculitis due to Pseudomonas bacteremi. A 69-year-old Chinese man presenting with diarrhea and septic shock initially began to rapidly develop sharply defined erythematous plaques with non-hemorrhagic bullae over his lower limbs. Culture of the aspirate from the bullae was positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This was also consistent with his blood cultures showing Pseudomonas bacteremia. Histology of the skin lesion showed microthrombi and neutrophilic infiltrates in blood vessels with Gram-negative bacilli extruding from the vessel walls, characteristic of septic vasculitis. The bullous erysipelas-like lesions seen in this patient represents a rare manifestation of both septic vasculitis and Pseudomonas infection. PMID:26955132

  5. Genital vasculitis secondary to all-trans-retinoic-acid.

    PubMed

    Yanamandra, Uday; Khadwal, Alka; Nahar Saikia, Uma; Malhotra, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukaemia is among the most curable haematological malignancies after the introduction of differentiating agents (arsenic trioxide (ATO) and all-trans-retinoic-acid (ATRA)). Despite excellent cure rates, approaching 85-95% in various series, APL is associated with significant early mortality and morbidity. ATRA-related side effects partly contribute to this morbidity, which commonly presents as differentiation syndrome, pseudo tumour cerebri, dermatitis, gastrointestinal disorders, liver dysfunction (raised transaminases) and dryness of skin/eyes. Rarely, ATRA can lead to hypercalcaemia, genital vasculitis, erythaema nodosum and Sweet's syndrome. We present two cases of ATRA-associated genital vasculitis while being managed with a combination of ATO with ATRA therapy. Both patients developed these lesions despite being on prophylactic steroids (0.5 mg/kg). We also discuss the pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, differential diagnosis and treatment of genital vasculitis as a rare adverse event of ATRA. PMID:26791116

  6. Mycoplasmal Upper Respiratory Infection Presenting as Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Mana; Agrawal, Abhinav; Parikh, Manan; Banayat, Rikka; Thomas, Maria Joana; Guo, Tianhua; Lee, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma is a virulent organism that is known to primarily infect the respiratory tract; however, affection of the skin, nervous system, kidneys, heart and bloodstream has been observed in various forms, which include Stevens Johnson syndrome, erythema multiforme, toxic epidermal necrolysis, encephalitis, renal failure, conduction system abnormalities and hemolytic anemia. Small vessel vasculitis is a lesser-known complication of mycoplasma pneumonia infection. We report a case of mycoplasmal upper respiratory tract infection with striking cutaneous lesions as the presenting symptom. Mycoplasmal infection was confirmed by serology testing, skin biopsy was suggestive of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. This case brings forth an uncommon manifestation of mycoplasmal infection with extra-pulmonary affection, namely small vessel vasculitis. PMID:25874067

  7. Interstitial Lung Disease with ANCA-associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Katsumata, Yasuhiro; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    The association between interstitial lung disease (ILD) and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV), particularly microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), has been described in a number of case reports and case series reports in the last 2 decades. In addition, patients with pulmonary fibrosis and ANCA positivity but without other manifestations of systemic vasculitis have also been reported. Pulmonary fibrosis was clinically manifested at the time of diagnosis in the majority of AAV patients that developed this condition. Moreover, ANCA-positive conversion occurs in patients initially diagnosed with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and as a result, other manifestations of systemic vasculitis develop in some of these patients. There is significant predominance of myeloperoxidase (MPO)-ANCA and MPA in patients with AAV and ILD. Radiological and pathological findings generally demonstrate usual interstitial pneumonia (pattern) in the lungs of these patients. In most studies, AAV patients with ILD have a worse prognosis than those without it. PMID:26448696

  8. Isolated Central Nervous System Vasculitis as a Manifestation of Neurosarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Macêdo, Philippe Joaquim Oliveira Menezes; da Silveira, Victor Calil; Ramos, Luíza Tavares; Nóbrega, Felipe Resende; Vasconcellos, Luiz Felipe Rocha

    2016-06-01

    A 62-year-old male presented to our clinic with recurrent fever, skin lesions (petechiae), scleral wounds, and hilar adenomegaly. A diagnosis of sarcoidosis was established, which resolved with corticosteroid treatment. After a few months, the patient developed confusion and behavioral changes, with few objective neurological deficits. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed slight focal meningeal enhancement (prepontine region). The level of angiotensin-converting enzymes was normal in the serum and increased in the cerebrospinal fluid. The patient was diagnosed with neurosarcoidosis, and corticosteroid treatment was prescribed, yielding good clinical response. Nine months later, the patient presented with multiple ischemic strokes, and arteriography demonstrated multiple distal irregularities in all arterial territories, suggesting cerebral vasculitis. Even with corticosteroids, cyclophosphamide, and intravenous immunoglobulin, the patient died. Vasculitis is rarely seen in association with sarcoidosis, and in this case, no systemic manifestation was observed at the time that the patient developed vasculitis. PMID:27083067

  9. A Case of Brucellosis with Recurrent Attacks of Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Pınar; Kıdır, Mehtap; Namdar, Nazlı Dizen; Özmen, Ahmet; Uyar, Cemile; Değer, Ayşe Nur

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis that affects several organs or systems. Skin involvement is nonspecific and it is reported to range between 0,4 and 17% of the patients with brucellosis. Here, we defined a 36-year-old female patient presented to our clinic with a clinical picture of recurrent attacks of vasculitis due to brucellosis for the first time. Skin involvement and vasculitic lesions as a finding of skin involvement are nonspecific in brucellosis. Therefore, in the regions like Turkey where brucellosis is endemic, brucellosis should be kept in mind necessarily in the differential diagnosis of vasculitis. PMID:27042369

  10. Choroidal vasculitis in acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Spaide, R. F.; Yannuzzi, L. A.; Slakter, J.

    1991-01-01

    A 24-year-old Caucasian female presented with acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy (APMPPE) and associated infiltration round some of the larger choroidal blood vessels. This infiltration dissipated as the patient's clinical condition improved and did not induce any permanent alteration of the overlying retinal pigment epithelium. We suggest that the infiltration round the choroidal vessels was due to a choroidal vasculitis. The finding of choroidal inflammation in this case lends support to the hypothesis that choroidal vasculitis is an underlying pathological process in APMPPE. Images PMID:1793461

  11. A Case of Brucellosis with Recurrent Attacks of Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Pınar; Kıdır, Mehtap; Namdar, Nazlı Dizen; Özmen, Ahmet; Uyar, Cemile; Değer, Ayşe Nur

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis that affects several organs or systems. Skin involvement is nonspecific and it is reported to range between 0,4 and 17% of the patients with brucellosis. Here, we defined a 36-year-old female patient presented to our clinic with a clinical picture of recurrent attacks of vasculitis due to brucellosis for the first time. Skin involvement and vasculitic lesions as a finding of skin involvement are nonspecific in brucellosis. Therefore, in the regions like Turkey where brucellosis is endemic, brucellosis should be kept in mind necessarily in the differential diagnosis of vasculitis. PMID:27042369

  12. Ischemic Retinal Vasculitis Associated with Cataract Surgery and Intracameral Vancomycin

    PubMed Central

    Lenci, Lucas T.; Chin, Eric K.; Carter, Christi; Russell, Stephen R.; Almeida, David R. P.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there have been reports suggesting that intracameral vancomycin has been associated with retinal vasculitis; some have described this phenomenon as postoperative hemorrhagic occlusive retinal vasculitis. We present a case of a 65-year-old woman who underwent uncomplicated phacoemulsification and posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation followed by intracameral antibiotic prophylaxis. Unlike prior reports, this report demonstrates a case of mild visual reduction and minimal inflammation with subtle but complete unilateral peripheral retinal ischemia associated with cataract surgery and intracameral vancomycin, suggesting a spectrum of toxicity that may be underrecognized. PMID:26618015

  13. Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis as a manifestation of familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Shigetsuna; Honma, Masaru; Igawa, Satomi; Tsuji, Hitomi; Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi; Migita, Kiyoshi; Ida, Hiroaki; Iizuka, Hajime

    2014-09-01

    Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is a hereditary autoinflammatory disease, which is characterized by recurrent and paroxysmal fever, peritonitis, arthritis, myalgia, and skin rashes. Although various skin lesions such as "erysipelas-like erythema", urticaria, nonspecific purpura, and subcutaneous nodules have been described, cutaneous vasculitis is rare. We report a Japanese case of sporadic FMF accompanied by cutaneous arteritis at the time of febrile attacks of FMF. Gene analysis revealed M694I mutation in a single allele of the MEFV gene, and oral colchicine successfully controlled both periodic fever and subcutaneous nodules of arteritis. Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis repeatedly emerging with febrile attacks should be included among the skin manifestations of FMF. PMID:25109905

  14. Drug-Induced Vasculitis: New Insights and a Changing Lineup of Suspects.

    PubMed

    Grau, Rafael G

    2015-12-01

    An increasing number of therapeutic agents have been associated with a vasculitic syndrome. This usually involves small vessels, primarily capillaries, venules, and arterioles in leukocytoclastic vasculitis, small-vessel disease similar to an antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-related vasculitis, or mid-sized muscular arteries in a polyarteritis-like picture. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies are present in many cases of vasculitis regardless of the size of the vessel involved. Monoclonal antibodies used to treat many autoimmune disorders have become the most common agents associated with drug-induced vasculitis. Important advances in epigenetics, genetics, and neutrophil apoptosis are providing new insights into the pathogenesis of both drug-induced vasculitis and idiopathic vasculitis. Although management has not changed significantly in the past few years where withdrawal of the offending agent is the primary intervention, increasing awareness of drug-induced vasculitis can lead to earlier diagnosis and prevention of severe organ damage and fatalities. PMID:26503355

  15. [Allergic retinal vasculitis following the intramuscular administration of Moldamin].

    PubMed

    Pop, D; Sireteanu, L; Csiszár, A

    2000-01-01

    The authors presents two cases report of allergic retinal vasculitis and allergic optic neuropathy after anaphylactic shock due to the parenteral Moldamin administration. Clinicians should be aware of the possibilities of hypersensitivity ocular reaction in anaphylactic shock, with dramatic consequence on the vision. PMID:11021127

  16. Ten year clinical experience with stroke and cerebral vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Kempster, Peter A; McLean, Catriona A; Phan, Thanh G

    2016-05-01

    Angiitis of the central nervous system (CNS) is difficult to diagnose but potentially fatal. When stroke occurs in a younger individual or is associated with multiple infarcts on imaging, clinicians must decide how far to pursue a possible diagnosis of vasculitis. The aim of this study is to establish the prevalence of primary and secondary cerebral angiitis among patients presenting with stroke. Hospital attendances over a 10year period were surveyed by searching for diagnostic codes and key words specific for cerebral vasculitis/angiitis. Case notes were reviewed by the authors using two sets of criteria for angiitis of the CNS. Thirty-two patients were initially considered likely to have cerebral angiitis by treating physicians. Thirteen had been admitted to hospital with stroke. During this period, there were 7475 admissions for ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke. Six patients had a final diagnosis of vasculitic stroke but only one had definite CNS angiitis with a first presentation as ischaemic stroke (0.02%). Most patients who did have cerebral vasculitis developed multifocal or subacute neurological deficits, or already had an immunological disorder known to be associated with secondary CNS angiitis. Of 19 patients given an alternative final diagnosis, the most common were atherosclerotic/embolic cerebrovascular disease (n=9) and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (n=7). Stroke is rarely the first manifestation of cerebral vasculitis. Our findings suggest that routine screening for angiitis in stroke patients may not be warranted. PMID:26778046

  17. Cutaneous vasculitis overlap with acute generalised exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP).

    PubMed

    Murad, Aizuri; Murphy, Annette

    2014-01-01

    A man in his 40s developed a severe cutaneous adverse reaction following treatment of septic arthritis with flucloxacillin. The eruption had overlap features of cutaneous vasculitis and acute generalised exanthematous pustulosis which was complicated by renal and liver impairment. This case heightens the variation in presentation of a severe drug eruption. PMID:25404248

  18. Vasculitis related to viral and other microbial agents.

    PubMed

    Teng, Gim Gee; Chatham, W Winn

    2015-04-01

    Vasculitis due to infection may occur as a consequence of the inflammation of vessel walls due to direct or contiguous infection, type II or immune complex-mediated reaction, cell-mediated hypersensitivity, or inflammation due to immune dysregulation triggered by bacterial toxin and/or superantigen production. As immunosuppressive therapy administered in the absence of antimicrobial therapy may increase morbidity and fail to effect the resolution of infection-associated vascular inflammation, it is important to consider infectious entities as potential inciting factors in vasculitis syndromes. The causality between infection and vasculitis has been established in hepatitis B-associated polyarteritis nodosa (HBV-PAN) and hepatitis C-associated (cryoglobulinemic) vasculitis (HCV-CV). The review summarizes the recent literature on the pathophysiological mechanisms and the approaches to the management of HBV-PAN and HCV-CV. Roles of other viral and microbial infections, which either manifest as vasculitic syndromes or are implicated in the pathogenesis of primary vasculitides, are also discussed. PMID:26362741

  19. Diagnostic approach and current treatment options in childhood vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Barut, Kenan; Şahin, Sezgin; Adroviç, Amra; Kasapçopur, Özgür

    2015-01-01

    All inflammatory changes in the vessel wall are defined as vasculitis. Pediatric vasculitis may present with different clinical findings. Although Henoch-Schönlein purpura which is the most common pediatric vasculitis generally recovers spontaneously, it should be monitorized closely because of the risk of renal failure. Although Kawasaki disease is easy to diagnose with its classical findings, the diagnosis may be delayed in case of incomplete Kawasaki disease. Kawasaki disease should be considered especially in infants in case of prolonged fever even if the criteria are not fully met and intravenous immunoglobulin treatment should be administered without delay in order to prevent development of coronary artery aneurism. Reaction at the site of administration of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine may be observed as commonly as cervical lymphadenopathy in Kawasaki disease and may be used as a valuable finding in suspicious cases. Although anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitides are rare in children, renal involvement is more common and progression is more severe compared to adults. Hence, efficient and aggressive treatment is required. Takayasu’s arteritis is observed commonly in young adult women and rarely in adolescent girls. Therefore, a careful physical examination and blood pressure measurement should be performed in addition to a detailed history in daily practice. In children with unexplained neurological findings, cerebral vasculitis should be considered in the absence of other systemic vasculitides and necessary radiological investigations should be performed in this regard. This review will provide an insight into the understanding of pediatric vasculitis, current diagnostic approaches and prognosis by the aid of new studies. PMID:26884688

  20. Management of Small Vessel Vasculitides.

    PubMed

    Lopalco, Giuseppe; Rigante, Donato; Venerito, Vincenzo; Emmi, Giacomo; Anelli, Maria Grazia; Lapadula, Giovanni; Iannone, Florenzo; Cantarini, Luca

    2016-06-01

    Inflammation mediated by cells of the immune system and necrosis are the most striking features observed at the histologic level in patients with vasculitides, clinical entities classified according to pathologic findings involving different organs, to etiology, or to size of vessels involved. Small vessel vasculitides (SVV) are a peculiar group of systemic disorders electively involving small intraparenchymal arteries, arterioles, capillaries, or venules and leading to different levels of vascular obstruction, tissue ischemia and risk of infarction; they can be divided into anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitides and immune complex vasculitides. Despite the significant advances in understanding the whole disease process and pathophysiology of SVV, strong efforts are still needed to draft, share and spread guidelines in the therapeutic management of these protean disorders. After an accurate evaluation of different open or double-blind trials and cohort studies in this review, we analyze the actual medical tools suggested for treating granulomatosis with polyangiitis, microscopic polyangiitis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, cryoglobulinemic vasculitis, anti-glomerular basement membrane disease and hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis. PMID:27118389

  1. A Case of Cerebral Vasculitis Associated with Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Naveen; Arkebauer, Matthew; Waters, Barry; Dickinson, Brucha

    2015-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic, debilitating condition characterized by inflammation of the colonic mucosa. It is regarded as a systemic inflammatory disorder that can affect a number of organ systems. Central nervous system disease associated with UC is a rare sequela of inflammatory bowel disease, occurring in less than 5% of cases. These manifestations include arterial and venous thrombosis, leukoencephalitis, seizures, and vasculitis. We present a case of a 61-year-old female with a two-year history of well-controlled ulcerative colitis, who developed altered mental status and weakness. On brain imaging, she was found to have cerebral lesions which were biopsied. Histopathology subsequently revealed coagulative necrosis and inflammation characteristic of vasculitis. Rheumatology serologies were negative, and the patient was started on steroids that dramatically improved her neurological function, with no residual deficits, and led to resolution of the brain lesions. PMID:26557402

  2. Primary Central Nervous System Vasculitis With Optic Nerve Involvement.

    PubMed

    Benson, Christy E; Knezevic, Alexander; Lynch, Shannon C

    2016-06-01

    A 20-year-old woman presented with headache, decreased vision, eye pain, and urinary retention. During her clinical course, visual acuity declined to 20/800, right eye, and 20/50, left eye, associated with bilateral optic disc edema. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed enhancement of the leptomeninges, right optic nerve, and right side of the optic chiasm. Extensive evaluation of the central nervous system (CNS) for an infectious cause was negative. Brain biopsy showed a pattern consistent with vasculitis. The patient was treated with prednisone and cyclophosphamide, resulting in improvement of her vision and systemic symptoms. Primary CNS vasculitis is a rare condition that may affect the anterior visual pathways. PMID:26693942

  3. Dividing the Janus vasculitis? Pathophysiology of eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangitis.

    PubMed

    Chaigne, Benjamin; Terrier, Benjamin; Thieblemont, Nathalie; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique; Mouthon, Luc

    2016-02-01

    Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangitis (EGPA) is a rare small- and medium-sized vessel vasculitis belonging to the group of anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides (AAV). It is commonly divided into two phenotypes depending on the presence of ANCAs targeting myeloperoxidase (MPO). MPO-ANCAs are present in 31% to 38% of patients and are associated with a vasculitis phenotype of the disease, whereas patients without MPO-ANCA are at risk of cardiac involvement. Despite significant advances in understanding the overall pathogenesis of the disease, the explanation for this dichotomy is still unclear. In this review, we synthesize our knowledge of the pathogenesis of EGPA and attempt to i) distinguish EGPA from other diseases including other AAVs, asthma, allergy and hypereosinophilic-associated conditions and ii) speculate about the preponderant mechanisms, which could explain the two disease phenotypes. PMID:26506114

  4. Treatment of renal manifestations of ANCA-associated vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Galesic, Kresimir; Ljubanovic, Danica; Horvatic, Ivica

    2013-01-01

    Context Vasculitis is a clinicopathological entity characterized by inflammation and necrosis of blood vessels. Evidence Acquisitions Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science have been searched. Results Two major autoantigens for ANCA are myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase 3 (PR3), which are proteins in the primary granules of neutrophils and in the lysosomes of monocytes. They are expressed in mature neutrophils of patients with ANCA, while absent in healthy subjects. Conclusions The kidney is the most commonly affected vital organ in ANCA-associated vasculitis, and patient outcomes are largely determined by the severity of renal disease at diagnosis and by its response to treatment. PMID:24475421

  5. Severe Small-Vessel Vasculitis Temporally Associated With Administration of Ustekinumab.

    PubMed

    MacArthur, Kelly M; Merkel, Peter A; Van Voorhees, Abby S; Nguyen, Jennifer; Rosenbach, Misha

    2016-03-01

    Vasculitis may be caused by infection, medications, systemic diseases, malignancy, or occur as an idiopathic condition. In cases of drug-induced vasculitis, it is essential to identify and discontinue the culprit medication. As novel agents are approved through clinical trials, some rare events, including vasculitis, may not become apparent until wider use, and rigorous post-marketing surveillance for new medications is important. Physicians should consider drug-induced vasculitis on the differential for all new vasculitis diagnoses, and if the potential triggering medication is a novel medication, it is essential to rigorously investigate the potential for emerging cases of medication-associated vasculitis in all available scientific literature.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(3):359-362. PMID:26954323

  6. Central Nervous System Vasculitis: Still More Questions than Answers

    PubMed Central

    Alba, Marco A; Espígol-Frigolé, Georgina; Prieto-González, Sergio; Tavera-Bahillo, Itziar; García-Martínez, Ana; Butjosa, Montserrat; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Cid, Maria C

    2011-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) may be involved by a variety of inflammatory diseases of blood vessels. These include primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS), a rare disorder specifically targeting the CNS vasculature, and the systemic vasculitides which may affect the CNS among other organs and systems. Both situations are severe and convey a guarded prognosis. PACNS usually presents with headache and cognitive impairment. Focal symptoms are infrequent at disease onset but are common in more advanced stages. The diagnosis of PACNS is difficult because, although magnetic resonance imaging is almost invariably abnormal, findings are non specific. Angiography has limited sensitivity and specificity. Brain and leptomeningeal biopsy may provide a definitive diagnosis when disclosing blood vessel inflammation and are also useful to exclude other conditions presenting with similar findings. However, since lesions are segmental, a normal biopsy does not completely exclude PACNS. Secondary CNS involvement by systemic vasculitis occurs in less than one fifth of patients but may be devastating. A prompt recognition and aggressive treatment is crucial to avoid permanent damage and dysfunction. Glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide are recommended for patients with PACNS and for patients with secondary CNS involvement by small-medium-sized systemic vasculitis. CNS involvement in large-vessel vasculitis is usually managed with high-dose glucocorticoids (giant-cell arteritis) or glucocorticoids and immunosuppressive agents (Takayasu’s disease). However, in large vessel vasculitis, where CNS symptoms are usually due to involvement of extracranial arteries (Takayasu’s disease) or proximal portions of intracranial arteries (giant-cell arteritis), revascularization procedures may also have an important role. PMID:22379458

  7. Levamisole/Cocaine Induced Systemic Vasculitis and Immune Complex Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Lohit; Gupta, Sagar; Swami, Abhishek; Zhang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Levamisole is an antihelminthic and immunomodulator medication that was banned by the USFDA in 1998. It has been increasingly used to adulterate cocaine due to its psychotropic effects and morphological properties. Adverse reactions including cutaneous vasculitis, thrombocytopenia, and agranulocytosis have been well described. Despite systemic vasculitis in this setting, renal involvement is uncommon. We report here a case of ANCA positive systemic vasculitis with biopsy proven immune complex mediated glomerulonephritis likely secondary to levamisole/cocaine. A 40-year-old Caucasian male with no past medical history presented with 3-week history of fatigue, skin rash, joint pains, painful oral lesions, oliguria, hematuria, worsening dyspnea on exertion, and progressive lower extremity edema. He had a history of regular tobacco and cocaine use. Lab testing revealed severe anemia, marked azotemia, deranged electrolytes, and 4.7 gm proteinuria. Rheumatologic testing revealed hypocomplementemia, borderline ANA, myeloperoxidase antibody, and positive atypical p-ANCA. Infectious and other autoimmune workup was negative. Kidney biopsy was consistent with immune mediated glomerulonephritis and showed mesangial proliferation and immune complex deposition consisting of IgG, IgM, and complement. High dose corticosteroids and discontinuing cocaine use resulted in marked improvement in rash, mucocutaneous lesions, and arthritis. There was no renal recovery and he remained hemodialysis dependent. PMID:26290761

  8. Systemic vasculitis with bilateral perirenal haemorrhage in chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Aslangul-Castier, E.; Papo, T.; Amoura, Z.; Baud, O.; Leblond, V.; Charlotte, F.; Bricaire, F.; Degos, L.; Piette, J.

    2000-01-01

    The cases of two patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia associated with periarteritis nodosa-like, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody negative, systemic vasculitis, are reported.
  A 61 year old man was admitted with fever, diffuse myalgia, and abdominal pain. Blood and bone marrow examination showed chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia. Vasculitis of the gall bladder was responsible for acalculous cholecystitis. A massive spontaneous bilateral perirenal haemorrhage occurred. A 73 year old woman with chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia had been followed up for one year when unexplained fever occurred. Two months after the onset of fever, sudden abdominal pain was ascribed to spontaneous bilateral renal haematoma related to bilateral renal arterial aneurysms. Neuromuscular biopsy showed non-necrotising periarteriolar inflammation.
  To our knowledge, systemic vasculitis has never been reported in chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia. In our two cases a non-random association is suggested because (a) chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia is a rare myelodysplastic syndrome, (b) spontaneous bilateral perirenal haematoma is not a usual feature of periarteritis nodosa.

 PMID:10784523

  9. Cutaneous Small Vessel Vasculitis Accompanied by Pustulosis Palmaris et Plantaris

    PubMed Central

    Kosaka, Motoko; Kato, Tokue; Kawana, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of a 64-year-old woman who has suffered from pustulosis palmaris et plantaris for 10 years. At the first examination, many erythematous lesions with purpura, blood crusts, and blisters were present in the lower legs and dorsum of the feet. Painful swelling in the sternal region and dorsal pain were also noted. Elevation of the CRP and myogenic enzyme levels, and liver and renal dysfunctions were noted on blood testing. Histopathologically, leukocytoclastic vasculitis was noted in small blood vessels in the whole dermal layers, and deposition of IgM and C3 in the vascular wall was detected by the direct immunofluorescence techniques. Based on these findings, cutaneous small vessel vasculitis was diagnosed. Because the patient complained of a toothache during the clinical course, an X-ray examination was performed. On pantomography, a radicular cyst and apical periodontitis were noted. The tooth symptoms changed with exacerbation and remission of the skin symptoms. These findings indicate that odontogenic infection is very likely to be a cause of cutaneous small vessel vasculitis in a manner similar to pustulosis palmaris et plantaris. PMID:22548039

  10. [Treatment of cryoglobulinemic vasculitis associated with hepatitis C virus infection].

    PubMed

    Retamozo, Soledad; Brito-Zerón, Pilar; Ramos-Casals, Manuel

    2015-05-01

    Cryoglobulinemia is a heterogeneous systemic autoimmune disease with a wide variety of causes, symptoms and outcomes, and different etiopathogenic pathways involved in the vasculitic organ damage. The discovery of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) in 1989 changed radically the focus of research of the so-called "essential" cryoglobulinemia. Cryoglobulins can be detected in 25-30% of patients with HCV, overwhelmingly representing mixed cryoglobulins. However, only 10-15% of patients present with cryoglobulinemic vasculitis, with a broad spectrum of symptoms including mild or life-threatening manifestations. Consequently, not all patients can be uniformly treated. The key therapeutic points in HCV+ patients with cryoglobulinemic vasculitis cover different aspects. The first is to treat the underlying cause of cryoglobulinemia whenever possible, hence the use of antiviral therapies must always be considered in these patients. An individualized diagnostic approach to assess the number of organs involved and the severity of organ involvement is also essential in the therapeutic planning. This complex clinical scenario leads to an equally complex therapeutic scenario. There are three main treatment strategies for HCV-associated cryoglobulinemic vasculitis: conventional immunosuppression, antiviral treatment and biological therapies. The most recent studies are suggesting a change from the classical therapeutic approach (monotherapeutic regimens) to combination/sequential regimens, including treatments targeting the virus and those directed against the induced autoimmune disease, with the aim of blocking the various etiopathogenic pathways involved. PMID:24787686

  11. A rheumatology perspective on cutaneous vasculitis: assessment and investigation for the non-rheumatologist.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, Charlotte R; Fremlin, Georgina A; Nash, Julian; Harding, Keith

    2016-02-01

    Vasculitis, by definition, is inflammation of the vasculature. This inflammation can result in either vessel wall destruction causing aneurysm or rupture, or stenosis causing ischaemia or necrosis. This autoimmune response does not always have a clear cause. Vasculitis is a heterogeneous group of disorders that has been categorised not only by primary and secondary causes, but also by the size of the affected vessel. The secondary causes that can trigger vasculitis include infection (particularly hepatitis B and C and haemorrhagic fever);cancer, autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Sjogren's; drugs or allergic reactions. As vasculitis can affect any part of the vasculature, it can result in a wide range of signs and symptoms. However, one of the most common presentations of vasculitis is a rash, due to small vessel vasculitis, which is most common. A vasculitic rash has certain characteristics that are easily identifiable and differentiate it from other rashes. This is a review from a rheumatologist's perspective of how to identify vasculitis skin changes. If cutaneous vasculitis is suspected, this article identifies other areas of skin that can be affected that need identification, in addition to what to screen for in the history and other differential diagnoses to consider. Subsequently, the article addresses the key investigations to request and a brief overview of the treatment principles for primary vasculitis. PMID:25818263

  12. Severe leukocytoclastic vasculitis secondary to the use of a naproxen and requiring amputation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Leukocytoclastic vasculitis (also known as hypersensitivity vasculitis and cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis) can present with various manifestations, which often delays the diagnosis and treatment. In order to show the importance of the early recognition of leukocytoclastic vasculitis, we present a case which occurred secondary to the use of a common pharmaceutical, naproxen. We were unable to find a case of leukocytoclastic vasculitis secondary to naproxen in the literature. Case presentation We present the case of a 33-year-old African American woman with below the knee and bilateral digital gangrene from hypersensitivity vasculitis secondary to the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication naproxen. Conclusion This is an original case report focusing on the rheumatologic management of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. However, other specialties, such as internal medicine, dermatology, infectious disease, general surgery and pathology, can gain valuable information by reviewing this case report. Reporting a case of leukocytoclastic vasculitis secondary to treatment with naproxen will advance our understanding of this disease etiology by adding yet another non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug to the list of potential causes of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. PMID:20594300

  13. The relation of autologous serum and plasma skin test results with urticarial activity score, sex and age in patients with chronic urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Aktar, Sirac; Akdeniz, Necmettin; Calka, Omer; Karadag, Ayse Serap

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Some previous studies reported autoimmunity as an etiologic factor in chronic urticaria (CU), but the results of some autoimmunity tests in these studies are conflicting. Aim To concretize whether there was any relation of autologous serum skin test (ASST) and autologous plasma skin test (APST) results with sex, age and urticarial activity score (UAS) in patients with CU. Material and methods Fifty patients with CU and twenty healthy subjects admitted to our dermatology clinic were included in the present study. The ASST and APST were applied to all individuals. Results The positiveness rates of ASST and APST were significantly higher in the patient group than controls (p = 0.027, p = 0.001, respectively). Among patients, the APST positiveness rate (72%) was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than ASST (46%). It was seen that 48% of patients with negative ASST results had positive APST. However, no patient with negative APST results had positive ASST. There were significant (p < 0.05) relations of the tests’ positiveness rates with sex and old age but with UAS. The diameter of the erythematous papule was remarkably (p < 0.05) larger in APST than ASST and also significantly (p < 0.05) larger in females compared to males in both tests (p < 0.05). It was positively increased with old age (p < 0.05). Conclusions We can suggest that APST is more sensitive than ASST in the assessment of autoimmunity in CU. A high positiveness rate of APST results may be attributed to high numbers of autoantibodies and coagulation factors present in plasma that might probably play a role in etiopathogenesis of CU. PMID:26161057

  14. Correlation between Fluorescein Angiographic Findings and Visual Acuity in Behçet Retinal Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min; Kwon, Hee Jung; Choi, Eun Young; Kim, Sung Soo; Koh, Hyoung Jun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To identify significant fluorescein angiographic (FA) characteristics associated with visual acuity (VA) in Behçet retinal vasculitis. Materials and Methods Retrospective review of 86 eyes of 48 patients (age: 35.6±10.2 years) with Behçet retinal vasculitis were performed. VA and FA findings as well as correlation between them were assessed. Results The mean initial VA of eyes with posterior pole-involved vasculitis (63 eyes; 73.3%) was significantly worse than that of those with peripheral vasculitis (23 eye; 26.7%) (logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution VA: 0.554±0.572 vs. 0.078±0.148; p<0.0001). Subgroup analysis revealed a more severe and diffuse pattern of vascular leakage in posterior pole-involved vasculitis compared to peripheral vasculitis (p<0.0001). Retinal vascular leakage (β=0.345; p<0.0001), optic disc hyperfluorescence (β=0.147; p=0.032), and macular leakage (β=0.107; p=0.047) were significantly associated with worse initial VA. During the follow up (mean: 33.3±17.9 months), the change of leakage showed no significant correlation with change of VA in posterior pole-involved vasculitis (τ=0.199, p=0.092). Conclusion Posterior pole involvement, the degree of retinal vascular leakage, optic disc hyperfluorescence, and macular leakage are significantly associated with VA in Behçet retinal vasculitis. PMID:26069134

  15. Vasculitis as a Presenting Manifestation of Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harpreet; Sukhija, Gagandeep; Kaur, Parminder; Govil, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus is responsible for causing hepatic complications like acute and chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma along with some uncommon immune mediated extrahepatic manifestations. Vasculitis remains an uncommon extrahepatic complication of hepatitis B virus infection. Herein we report a case of hepatitis B infection that presented with leucocytoclastic vasculitis as an initial manifestation and managed successfully with entacavir therapy. PMID:27042512

  16. Recent pathogenetic advances in ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Pendergraft, William F; Nachman, Patrick H

    2015-06-01

    Since the discovery of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA), great strides have been made in elucidating the etiology and pathogenesis of disease. In this article, we review recent published key breakthroughs in understanding the pathogenesis of ANCA vasculitis, including some that may lead to novel therapeutics. These breakthroughs have occurred in multiple areas of investigation. A European genome-wide association study (GWAS) revealed the importance of the genetic contribution of proteinase 3 (PR3) and its endogenous inhibitor, alpha (1)-antitrypsin as well as HLA risk. Epigenetic modification of autoantigen genes appears to contribute to perpetuation of disease and possibly relapse risk. Autoantigen excision, a novel method to detect autoantibody epitopes using mass spectrometry, not only revealed pathogenic epitopes in myeloperoxidase (MPO)-ANCA vasculitis and identified unique MPO-ANCA responsible for the majority of ANCA-negative small vessel vasculitis, but has vast applicability to other autoantibody-mediated diseases. An explosion of biomarker studies has revealed circulating cytokines and alternative complement pathway products that may predict active disease. Interestingly, alternative complement pathway blockade in the murine model of disease is protective and a clinical trial in humans using an oral alternative complement pathway inhibitor is underway. Increasing clarity of the role of B and T cells in disease pathogenesis is ongoing. B cell depleting agents have shown great utility in remission induction and maintenance, and monitoring specific B cell subsets during the disease course may have predictive power for remission maintenance. Despite these substantial advances, more research is needed including, but not limited to, validation of existing discoveries. As additional novel discoveries emerge, so will novel therapies, and it is with great hope that these collective insights will ultimately lead to prevention and cure. PMID:26033562

  17. Cutaneous vasculitis in equines: a retrospective study of 72 cases.

    PubMed

    White, Stephen D; Affolter, Verena K; Dewey, Jennifer; Kass, Philip H; Outerbridge, Catherine; Ihrke, Peter J

    2009-10-01

    Cutaneous vasculitis was identified by histopathological findings in 72 equines. The most frequent clinical findings were crusts/scales and oedema of the legs with the most common underlying disease being photo-aggravated dermatitis. Common laboratory findings were anaemia, neutrophilia, hyperglycaemia and hyperglobulinaemia. Histopathological patterns were most commonly cell-poor and lymphocytic/histiocytic. While statistically supported treatment recommendations could not be made due to the large numbers of confounding factors, trimethoprim-sulfa antibiotics, corticosteroids, and/or resolution or control of the underlying disease process were the most common treatment modalities. PMID:20178500

  18. Nodular Vasculitis That Developed during Etanercept (Enbrel) Treatment in a Patient with Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung-Bae; Chang, In-Kyu; Im, Myung; Lee, Young; Kim, Chang-Deok; Seo, Young-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Nodular vasculitis was introduced by Montgomery for cases of erythema induratum-like lesions that were not associated with tuberculosis. Nodular vasculitis has been associated with both nontuberculous infections and noninfectious conditions. However, there has been no report on the development of nodular vasculitis during tumor necrosis factor-? inhibitor treatment. A 28-year-old man visited our clinic for the treatment of severe psoriasis with a 20-year history. Subcutaneous injection of etanercept (25 mg, twice weekly) was started. One year later, erythematous nodules developed on his lower leg. A skin biopsy showed lobular panniculitis with extensive necrosis and vasculitis. To exclude latent tuberculosis, an assay specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens was performed, with a negative result. After stopping etanercept under the diagnosis of nodular vasculitis associated with etanercept, the lesions gradually disappeared, leaving depressed scars in 3 months. There has been no recurrence after 6 months of follow-up. PMID:26512176

  19. Pathogenesis of ANCA-associated vasculitis: An update.

    PubMed

    Jarrot, Pierre-André; Kaplanski, Gilles

    2016-07-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) constitutes a group of rare diseases characterized by necrotizing inflammation of small blood vessels and the presence of ANCA. Although these autoantibodies were initially used to classify pauci-immune vasculitis, increasing clinical and experimental evidence now supports their pathogenic role, mainly through ANCA-induced activation of primed neutrophils and monocytes leading to destructive vascular necrosis. The mechanisms of ANCA generation remain however unclear. Neutrophils play a central role in the pathophysiological process of AAV since they are both effector cells responsible for endothelial damage and targets of autoimmunity. Another role of neutrophils is due to their ability to generate neutrophil extracellular traps, which support the presentation of ANCA autoantigens, could break immune tolerance and induce autoantibody generation. Alternatively, the ANCA autoimmune response is facilitated by insufficient T-cell and B-cell regulation, and the role of complement alternative pathway has recently been emphasized. This review summarizes the main pathogenesis concepts of AAV as well as the putative mechanisms for the origin of ANCA autoimmune response. PMID:26970490

  20. Posterior Spinal Artery Aneurysm Presenting with Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Tanweer, Omar; Thomas, Cheddhi; Engler, John; Shapiro, Maksim; Becske, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Rupture of isolated posterior spinal artery (PSA) aneurysms is a rare cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) that presents unique diagnostic challenges owing to a nuanced clinical presentation. Here, we report on the diagnosis and management of the first known case of an isolated PSA aneurysm in the context of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. A 53-year-old male presented to an outside institution with acute bilateral lower extremity paralysis 9 days after admission for recurrent cellulitis. Early magnetic resonance imaging was read as negative and repeat imaging 15 days after presentation revealed SAH and a compressive spinal subdural hematoma. Angiography identified a PSA aneurysm at T9, as well as other areas suspicious for inflammatory or post-hemorrhagic reactive changes. The patient underwent a multilevel laminectomy for clot evacuation and aneurysm resection to prevent future hemorrhage and to establish a diagnosis. The postoperative course was complicated by medical issues and led to the diagnosis of leukocytoclastic vasculitis that may have predisposed the patient to aneurysm development. Literature review reveals greater mortality for cervical lesions than thoracolumbar lesions and that the presence of meningitic symptoms portents better functional outcome than symptoms of cord compression. The outcome obtained in this case is consistent with outcomes reported in the literature. PMID:27114966

  1. T CellMacrophage Interactions and Granuloma Formation in Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Hilhorst, Marc; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Berry, Gerald; Goronzy, Jrg J.; Weyand, Cornelia M.

    2014-01-01

    Granuloma formation, bringing into close proximity highly activated macrophages and T cells, is a typical event in inflammatory blood vessel diseases, and is noted in the name of several of the vasculitides. It is not known whether specific properties of the microenvironment in the blood vessel wall or the immediate surroundings of blood vessels contribute to granuloma formation and, in some cases, generation of multinucleated giant cells. Granulomas provide a specialized niche to optimize macrophageT cell interactions, strongly activating both cell types. This is mirrored by the intensity of the systemic inflammation encountered in patients with vasculitis, often presenting with malaise, weight loss, fever, and strongly upregulated acute phase responses. As a sophisticated and highly organized structure, granulomas can serve as an ideal site to induce differentiation and maturation of T cells. The granulomas possibly seed aberrant Th1 and Th17 cells into the circulation, which are known to be the main pathogenic cells in vasculitis. Through the induction of memory T cells, aberrant innate immune responses can imprint the host immune system for decades to come and promote chronicity of the disease process. Improved understanding of T cellmacrophage interactions will redefine pathogenic models in the vasculitides and provide new avenues for immunomodulatory therapy. PMID:25309534

  2. Pauci-Immune Crescentic Glomerulonephritis: An ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Rafeel; Rehman, Amina; Valecha, Gautam; El-Sayegh, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) is a syndrome signified by a precipitous loss of renal function, with features of glomerulonephritis including dysmorphic erythrocyturia and glomerular proteinuria. RPGN is associated with extensive crescent formation, and, thus, the clinical term RPGN is often used interchangeably with the pathologic term crescentic glomerulonephritis (CGN). From an immunopathologic standpoint, primary RPGN is divided into pauci-immune GN (PICG), anti-GBM GN, and immune complex GN. PICG, the most common etiology of primary RPGN, refers to a necrotizing glomerulonephritis with few or no immune deposits by immunofluorescence (IF) or electron microscopy (EM). In most patients, pauci-immune CGN is a component of a systemic small vessel vasculitis such as granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). Approximately 90% of patients with PICG have circulating ANCA antibodies, leading to the nomenclature ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). Recent research has identified several other antibodies associated with PICG, which is now understood to be a complex spectrum of disease with considerable overlap in terms of clinical phenotype and outcomes. In addition, several genetic and environmental factors have recently been implicated in the pathogenesis of this disorder. With new prognostic classifications, enhanced understanding of immunopathologic mechanisms, and novel treatment paradigms, clinical and experimental interest in PICG remains high. PMID:26688808

  3. Eosinophils in vasculitis: characteristics and roles in pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Paneez; Grayson, Peter C.; Klion, Amy D.

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional granular leukocytes that are implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of disorders, including asthma, helminth infection, and rare hypereosinophilic syndromes. Although peripheral and tissue eosinophilia can be a feature of many types of small-vessel and medium-vessel vasculitis, the role of eosinophils has been best studied in eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA), where eosinophils are a characteristic finding in all three clinical stages of the disorder. Whereas numerous studies have demonstrated an association between the presence of eosinophils and markers of eosinophil activation in the blood and tissues of patients with EGPA, the precise role of eosinophils in disease pathogenesis has been difficult to ascertain owing to the complexity of the disease process. In this regard, results of clinical trials using novel agents that specifically target eosinophils are providing the first direct evidence of a central role of eosinophils in EGPA. This Review focuses on the aspects of eosinophil biology most relevant to the pathogenesis of vasculitis and provides an update of current knowledge regarding the role of eosinophils in EGPA and other vasculitides. PMID:25003763

  4. Inflammatory myopathy as the initial presentation of cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Noelia; Rodríguez-Navedo, Yerania; Font, Yvonne M; Vilá, Luis M

    2013-01-01

    Cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis is characterised by immunoglobulin deposition at low temperatures. The most common manifestations are cutaneous involvement, arthralgias, Raynaud's phenomenon, peripheral neuropathy and renal disease. Myopathy is unusual and only a few cases have been reported. Here, we present a 31-year-old woman who developed progressive muscle weakness involving upper and lower extremities, dysphagia, paraesthesias and palpable purpura. Diagnostic studies revealed elevated creatine kinase, diffuse myopathic and sensorimotor axonal neuropathy on electromyography and nerve conduction studies, and inflammatory myopathy on muscle biospsy. Cryoglobulin levels were elevated on two occasions. She responded favourably to cyclophosphamide and high-dose corticosteroids. Cyclophosphamide was continued for 1 year followed by methotrexate. Prednisone was gradually tapered and discontinued 1 year later. She remained in clinical remission after 4 years of follow-up. This case suggests that cryoglobulinaemia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with inflammatory myopathy. PMID:23737595

  5. Mesenteric vasculitis in children with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Fotis, Lampros; Baszis, Kevin W; French, Anthony R; Cooper, Megan A; White, Andrew J

    2016-03-01

    Lupus mesenteric vasculitis (LMV) is a severe and potentially fatal complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although LMV is always a consideration in adolescents and adult patients with SLE, who present with acute abdominal pain, diagnosis and management remain a great challenge. We describe the cases of five patients age 14 to 21 years old diagnosed with LMV. All five patients had active SLE and typical clinical presentation suspicious of LMV. Abdominal CT was the preferred imaging modality and was useful in four patients. Corticosteroids were the mainstay of treatment for all five patients. All five patients survived and complete remission of symptoms was achieved in four out of five patients with the addition of cyclophosphamide and in one out of five with rituximab. A review of the literature was performed including a systemic review of the case reports and case series published in the English literature over the last 20 years. PMID:25687984

  6. A case report: Multaq-induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Suzanne M; Al-Bataineh, Mohammed; Iorfido, Stephen B; Macfarlane, Jarrod

    2014-01-01

    A 71-year-old white male presented to the emergency department complaining of a worsening lower extremity rash. Thirteen days before presentation, the patient was placed on Multaq (dronedarone) for his paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Biopsy-proven leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LV) was diagnosed, and causes for the condition other than drug-induced were investigated and ruled out. Rash has been cited as a possible side effect of Multaq; however, a literature search has revealed this to be the first documented case of likely multaq-induced LV. Other patients on Multaq therapy should be monitored for signs and symptoms of LV and be referred to an acute care setting as indicated. PMID:23011162

  7. Vasculitis in systemic sclerosis: association with Sjögren's syndrome and the CREST syndrome variant.

    PubMed

    Oddis, C V; Eisenbeis, C H; Reidbord, H E; Steen, V D; Medsger, T A

    1987-10-01

    We describe 7 patients with established systemic sclerosis who developed clinical evidence of vasculitis 1 to 33 (mean 12.7) years after the first symptoms of scleroderma. Six had the CREST variant of systemic sclerosis and also had features of Sjögren's syndrome (SS). Five of 6 patients tested had serum anti-SSA (Ro) antibodies. Vasculitis presented primarily as cutaneous lesions with ulceration and/or mononeuritis multiplex, and 6 patients had severe systemic manifestations. Vasculitis was histopathologically documented in 6 cases in biopsies of skin (4 of 4), muscle (2 of 3) and sural nerve (3 of 3). Patients with systemic sclerosis with CREST syndrome and SS appear to be at increased risk to develop vasculitis. PMID:3430523

  8. Cerebral angiography as a guide for therapy in isolated central nervous system vasculitis

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, R.L.; Martino, C.R.; Weinert, D.M.; Hueftle, M.; Kammer, G.M.

    1987-04-24

    The authors present a case of isolated central nervous system vasculitis documented by cerebral arteriography in which remission, using a treatment regimen of prednisone and cyclophosphamide, was guided by serial arteriography during a 15-month period.

  9. Hepatitis C-Associated Mixed Cryoglobulinemic Vasculitis Induces Differential Gene Expression in Peripheral Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sidharthan, Sreetha; Kim, Cheol-Woo; Murphy, Alison A.; Zhang, Xiaozhen; Yang, Jun; Lempicki, Richard A.; Sneller, Michael C.; Kottilil, Shyam

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the distinct gene expression profile of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with chronic hepatitis C infection and mixed cryoglobulinemic (MC) vasculitis. Our DNA microarray analysis indicates that hepatitis C virus (HCV)-associated MC vasculitis is characterized by compromised neutrophil function, impaired chemotaxis, and increased interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) expression, contributing to overall MC pathogenesis and end-organ damage. Increased ISG expression is suggestive of an enhanced endogenous interferon gene signature. PBMC depletion assays demonstrate that this increased expression is likely due to an activation of monocytes and not a direct result of B cell expansion. Notably, this monocyte activation of ISG expression in HCV-associated MC vasculitis suggests a poor predictor status of interferon-based treatment. Further analysis of PBMC gene expression profiles before and after in vivo B cell depletion therapy is critical to completely understanding the mechanisms of MC vasculitis pathogenesis. PMID:24904592

  10. A case of vasculitis, retinitis and macular neurosensory detachment presenting post typhoid fever

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ocular and extraocular immune-mediated phenomena are known to occur following febrile illness. Vasculitis, retinitis and neurosensory detachment are not well-recognized sequelae of typhoid fever. Findings We report a case of vasculitis, retinitis and macular neurosensory detachment presenting post typhoid fever. A 27-year-old female presented with decreased vision in right eye with history of typhoid fever (treated adequately 6 weeks prior). Her best corrected visual acuity in right eye was 20/125, N36. Fundus showed a patch of vasculitis and retinitis superior to the disc associated with macular neurosensory detachment and disc pallor. With oral steroids, the inflammation resolved and visual acuity improved to 20/20 at 6 weeks. Conclusions Immune-mediated vasculitis and retinitis following typhoid fever may respond well to systemic steroids. PMID:25246983

  11. Necrotizing arteritis occurring in an intralobar pulmonary sequestration of a patient without systemic vasculitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Hirotsugu; Hara, Kei; Matsumoto, Jun; Nashiro, Tamaki; Nagano, Masaaki; Kusakabe, Masashi; Kurata, Atsushi; Kuroda, Masahiko; Suzuki, Yoshio; Horiuchi, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing arteritis is a complex lesion of pulmonary hypertension, as are plexiform lesions, and is classically recognized as grade 6 in the Heath and Edwards grading scheme for hypertensive pulmonary vascular disease. The vascular changes observed in intralobar pulmonary sequestration have been reported to be similar to those observed in pulmonary hypertension, such as plexiform lesions. However, necrotizing arteritis occurring in an intralobar sequestration of a patient without systemic vasculitis syndrome has never been reported to our knowledge. Here, we report a case of a 38-year-old woman with pulmonary sequestration detected on a medical checkup. She was treated with surgery, and subsequent pathological analyses revealed necrotizing vasculitis in her sequestrated lung. We suspected systemic vasculitis syndromes, such as Takayasu arteritis, polyarteritis nodosa, and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis. However, physical and blood examination did not show any other abnormalities, and hence, she did not have systemic vasculitis syndrome. Immunohistochemical analyses of the resected specimen showed that inflammatory cells of the arteries were mainly composed of T lymphocytes. T-lymphocytic inflammation with little neutrophil and histiocyte infiltration may be a pathological feature of necrotizing arteritis observed in pulmonary sequestration. This is the first case to our knowledge of necrotizing arteritis in an intralobar pulmonary sequestration of a patient without systemic vasculitis syndrome. PMID:26874730

  12. IL-17 production by CSF lymphocytes as a biomarker for cerebral vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Thom, Vivien; Schmid, Sabrina; Gelderblom, Mathias; Hackbusch, Romy; Kolster, Manuela; Schuster, Simon; Thomalla, Götz; Keminer, Oliver; Pleß, Ole; Bernreuther, Christian; Glatzel, Markus; Wegscheider, Karl; Gerloff, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore the possibility of using interleukin-17 (IL-17) production by CD4+ T cells in the CSF as a potential biomarker for cerebral vasculitis in stroke patients. Methods: In this consecutive case study, we performed prospective analysis of CSF and blood in patients admitted to a university medical center with symptoms of stroke and suspected cerebral vasculitis. Flow cytometry was performed for intracellular detection of inflammatory cytokines in peripheral blood lymphocytes and expanded T cells from CSF. Results: CSF CD4+ lymphocytes from patients with cerebral vasculitis showed significantly higher levels of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-17 compared to patients with stroke not due to vasculitis or with other, noninflammatory neurologic diseases. There was no difference in the production of interferon-γ in the CSF and no overall differences in the relative frequencies of peripheral immune cells. Conclusions: Intracellular IL-17 in CSF cells is potentially useful in discriminating cerebral vasculitis as a rare cause in patients presenting with ischemic stroke. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that an increased proportion of IL-17-producing CD4+ cells in CSF of patients presenting with stroke symptoms is indicative of cerebral vasculitis (sensitivity 73%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 39–94%; specificity 100%, 95% CI 74%–100%). PMID:27144213

  13. D-penicillamine-induced ANA (+) ANCA (+) vasculitis in pediatric patients with Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeonhee; Lee, Sang Taek; Cho, Heeyeon

    2016-05-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are associated with systemic vasculitis. The pathophysiology of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) has not been clearly proven, and drug-induced ANCA-associated vasculitis has been reported. Wilson's disease is an inborn error of copper metabolism caused by a mutation in the copper transporting gene ATP7B, and traditional treatment is based on copper chelation with agents such as D-penicillamine. There have been rare reports that prolonged D-penicillamine therapy might cause adverse renal events such as membranous nephropathy and minimal change disease, but it is questionable if D-penicillamine induces ANCA-associated vasculitis. We describe 2 patients with Wilson's disease treated with D-penicillamine who presented with ANCA (+) vasculitis and renal involvement. The 2 patients also showed positive results for antinuclear antibody (ANA). Their kidney biopsy findings were compatible with crescentic/necrotizing glomerulonephritis, pauci-immune type. After diagnosis of AAV, D-penicillamine was stopped. Patients were then treated with plasmapheresis and immunosuppressants, including methylprednisolone pulse therapy and intravenous cyclophosphamide. One patient progressed to end-stage renal disease and the other showed persistent proteinuria. These cases suggest that D-penicillamine may induce ANA (+) ANCA (+) vasculitis with severe renal involvement in pediatric patients, and plasmapheresis combined with immunosuppressant should be considered. PMID:26784915

  14. Pulmonary Fibrosis in Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies (ANCA)-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Comarmond, Cloé; Crestani, Bruno; Tazi, Abdellatif; Hervier, Baptiste; Adam-Marchand, Sylvain; Nunes, Hilario; Cohen-Aubart, Fleur; Wislez, Marie; Cadranel, Jacques; Housset, Bruno; Lloret-Linares, Célia; Sève, Pascal; Pagnoux, Christian; Abad, Sébastien; Camuset, Juliette; Bienvenu, Boris; Duruisseaux, Michaël; Hachulla, Eric; Arlet, Jean-Benoît; Hamidou, Mohammed; Mahr, Alfred; Resche-Rigon, Matthieu; Brun, Anne-Laure; Grenier, Philippe; Cacoub, Patrice; Saadoun, David

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) is an uncommon manifestation observed in patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV), particularly microscopic polyangiitis (MPA). While patients with PF associated with AAV seem to have a worse prognosis, these patients have been described only in case reports or small retrospective case series. In this retrospective multicenter study, we report the main features and long-term outcomes of patients with PF associated with AAV, fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology criteria and/or Chapel Hill definitions. Forty-nine patients (30 men [61%]; median age at diagnosis of AAV, 68 [interquartile range, 58–73] years) with PF associated with AAV were identified. Forty (81.6%) patients had MPA and 9 (18.4%) had granulomatosis with polyangiitis. The diagnosis of PF preceded the onset of vasculitis in 22 (45%) patients. Usual interstitial pneumonia was the main radiologic pattern (n = 18, 43%). ANCA were mostly of antimyeloperoxidase specificity (88%). All patients were treated with glucocorticoids as induction therapy, combined with cyclophosphamide (CYC) (n = 36, 73.5%) or rituximab (RTX) (n = 1, 2%). Factors associated with mortality included occurrence of chronic respiratory insufficiency (hazard ratio [HR], 7.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6–34.5; p = 0.003), induction therapy with glucocorticoids alone (HR, 2.94; CI, 1.05–8.33; p = 0.04), and initial weigh loss (HR, 2.83; CI, 1.05–7.65; p = 0.041). The 3-year survival rate in patients treated with glucocorticoids alone or combined with an immunosuppressant (CYC or RTX) as induction therapy was 64% (95% CI, 41–99) and 94% (95% CI, 86–100), respectively (p = 0.03). After a median follow-up of 48 months [interquartile range, 14–88 mo], 18 (37%) patients died, including 11 related to respiratory insufficiency. PF is a rare manifestation of AAV with a very poor prognosis. Induction therapy with CYC might improve the outcome. PMID:25500703

  15. Neuroborreliosis-associated cerebral vasculitis: long-term outcome and health-related quality of life.

    PubMed

    Back, Tobias; Grünig, Steffi; Winter, Yaroslav; Bodechtel, Ulf; Guthke, Kersten; Khati, Diana; von Kummer, Rüdiger

    2013-06-01

    Neuroborreliosis affects the nervous system after systemic infection with the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Previously, cerebral vasculitis has been regarded as an extremely rare complication of neuroborreliosis. The data on the long-term outcome in patients with cerebral vasculitis due to neuroborreliosis are limited. The objective of this study was to perform a longitudinal analysis of cases of neuroborreliosis-associated cerebral vasculitis. We recruited all patients (n = 11) diagnosed with neuroborreliosis-associated in three neurological departments in an East German region. Inclusion criteria were sudden neurological deficits, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings that conform to cerebral ischemia or brain infarction, intrathecal synthesis of borrelia-specific antibodies, and non-atherosclerotic pathology of brain supplying arteries. Vasculitic changes were detected by digital subtraction angiography, MR angiography and/or transcranial Doppler ultrasound. Outcomes were measured by the modified Rankin scale (mRS) and EuroQoL Index. Cerebral vasculitis is a rare complication of Lyme disease (0.3% of all cases in the endemic area). Ten out of 11 patients diagnosed with neuroborreliosis-associated vasculitis cerebral vasculitis using clinical, radiological and immunological criteria developed ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attacks (TIA), 7 patients had recurrent stroke. Vasculitic alterations could be demonstrated in 8 patients that all except one developed ischemic lesions. The median mRS was 3 (range 0-4) at admission and 2 (range 0-6) at discharge. The posterior circulation was affected in 8 of 11 patients; thrombosis of the basilar artery was detected in 2 patients, one died in the acute stage. Neuroborreliosis can cause recurrent stroke or TIA on the basis of cerebral vasculitis. Lumbar puncture is needed for detection of this potentially life-threatening condition. Early recognition and adequate therapy would possibly improve outcome. PMID:23329377

  16. New Features of Disease after Diagnosis in Six Forms of Systemic Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Grayson, Peter C.; Cuthbertson, David; Carette, Simon; Hoffman, Gary S.; Khalidi, Nader A.; Koening, Curry L.; Langford, Carol A.; Maksimowicz-McKinnon, Kathleen; Monach, Paul A.; Seo, Philip; Specks, Ulrich; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Merkel, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To quantify the occurrence of features of vasculitis that initially present after diagnosis in 6 types of primary vasculitis. Methods Standardized collection of data on 95 disease manifestations in 6 vasculitides, including granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's, GPA), microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss, EGPA), polyarteritis nodosa (PAN), giant cell arteritis (GCA), and Takayasu's arteritis (TAK), was performed within a set of multicenter longitudinal, observational cohorts. For each form of vasculitis, the frequency of disease-specific manifestations at diagnosis was compared to the cumulative frequency of each manifestation. The percentage of patients who initially developed severe manifestations after diagnosis, defined as organ- or life-threatening in the small and medium vessel vasculitides (GPA, MPA, EGPA, PAN) and as ischemic/vascular in the large vessel vasculitides (GCA, TAK), was reported. Results Out of 838 patients with vasculitis, 490 (59%) experienced ? 1 new disease manifestation after diagnosis. On average, patients with vasculitis experienced 1.3 new manifestations after diagnosis (GPA - 1.9, MPA - 1.2, EGPA - 1.5, PAN - 1.2, GCA - 0.7, TAK - 1.0). New severe manifestations occurred after diagnosis in 224 (27%) out of 838 patients (GPA - 26%, MPA - 19%, EGPA - 21%, PAN - 23%, GCA - 24%, and TAK - 44%). Timing of onset of new manifestations was not significantly associated with disease duration. Conclusion A majority of patients with vasculitis develop new disease features after diagnosis, including a substantial number of new, severe manifestations. Ongoing assessment of patients with established vasculitis should remain broad in scope. PMID:23908447

  17. Circovirus in Tissues of Dogs with Vasculitis and Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Linlin; McGraw, Sabrina; Zhu, Kevin; Leutenegger, Christian M.; Marks, Stanley L.; Kubiski, Steven; Gaffney, Patricia; Dela Cruz Jr, Florante N.; Wang, Chunlin; Delwart, Eric

    2013-01-01

    We characterized the complete genome of a novel dog circovirus (DogCV) from the liver of a dog with severe hemorrhagic gastroenteritis, vasculitis, and granulomatous lymphadenitis. DogCV was detected by PCR in fecal samples from 19/168 (11.3%) dogs with diarrhea and 14/204 (6.9%) healthy dogs and in blood from 19/409 (3.3%) of dogs with thrombocytopenia and neutropenia, fever of unknown origin, or past tick bite. Co-infection with other canine pathogens was detected for 13/19 (68%) DogCV-positive dogs with diarrhea. DogCV capsid proteins from different dogs varied by up to 8%. In situ hybridization and transmission electron microscopy detected DogCV in the lymph nodes and spleens of 4 dogs with vascular compromise and histiocytic inflammation. The detection of a circovirus in tissues of dogs expands the known tropism of these viruses to a second mammalian host. Our results indicate that circovirus, alone or in co-infection with other pathogens, might contribute to illness and death in dogs. PMID:23628223

  18. Immune Mechanisms in Medium and Large Vessel Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Weyand, Cornelia M.; Goronzy, Jörg J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Vasculitis of the medium and large arteries, most often presenting as giant cell arteritis (GCA), is an infrequent, but potentially fatal type of immune-mediated vascular disease. The site of the aberrant immune reaction, the mural layers of the artery, is strictly defined by vascular dendritic cells, endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts which engage in an interaction with T cells and macrophages to ultimately cause luminal stenosis or aneurysmal wall damage of the vessel. A multitude of effector cytokines, all known as critical mediators in host-protective immunity, has been identified in the vasculitic lesions. Two dominant cytokine clusters, one centering on the IL-6/IL-17 axis, the other on the IL-12/IFN-γ axis, have been connected with disease activity. These two clusters appear to serve different roles in the vasculitic process. The IL-6/IL-17 cluster is highly responsive to standard corticosteroid therapy, whereas the IL-12/IFN-γ cluster is resistant to steroid-mediated immunosuppression. The information exchange between vascular and immune cells and stabilization of the vasculitic process involves members of the NOTCH receptor and ligand family. Focusing on elements in the tissue context of GCA, instead of broadly suppressing host immunity, may allow for a more tailored therapeutic approach and spare patients the unwanted side-effects of aggressive immunosuppression. PMID:24189842

  19. ANCA-Associated Systemic Vasculitis Presenting With Hypertrophic Spinal Pachymeningitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia; Zhao, Jiuliang; Wang, Qian; Fei, Yunyun; Zhao, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Reports of hypertrophic pachymeningitis associated with myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA) localized exclusively in the spine were quite rare. Two cases of ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis (AASV) presenting with hypertrophic spinal pachymeningitis (HSP) causing low back pain and numbness are described. Two patients showed prominent systemic and local inflammatory reactions manifested as fever, elevated levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein, and markedly increased levels of total protein of cerebrospinal fluid. The gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan of spinal cord demonstrated diffuse spinal dura matter thickening. Additionally, simple microscopic hematuria was found in 1 case suggestive of renal involvement and the other 1 complicated with interstitial lung disease. Then, a diagnosis of HSP secondary to AASV was made. Combination therapy of corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide produced a rapid improvement in the clinical symptoms and laboratory parameters. Followed up for 6 months, 1 case relapsed when the dosage of prednisone was tapered to 10 mg daily. Since the patient refused rituximab-based regimen, an immunosuppressive triple-therapy (corticosteroid, cyclophosphamide, and azathioprine) was initiated and brought control of the disease during the subsequent 6 months of follow-up. HSP is a relatively rare form of central nervous system involvement of AASV. Early recognition and intervention are of great significance since the pathogenesis of HSP starts with an inflammatory and fibrosing process. PMID:26579814

  20. B-Cell Mediated Pathogenesis of ANCA-Mediated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Jennette, J. Charles; Falk, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    B cells and their progeny that produce and release anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) are the primary cause for an aggressive form of necrotizing small vessel vasculitis. Cytoplasmic ANCA antigens are released at the surface and in the microenvironment of cytokine-primed neutrophils. Binding of ANCA to ANCA antigens activates neutrophils by both Fc receptor engagement and direct Fab2 binding to antigen on the cell surface. ANCA-activated neutrophils release factors that induce alternative complement pathway activation, which establishes a potent inflammatory amplification loop that causes severe necrotizing vascular inflammation. The origin of the ANCA autoimmune response is unknown but appears to involve genetically determined HLA specificities that allow the autoimmune response to develop. One putative immunogenic mechanisms begins with an immune response to a peptide that is complementary to the autoantigen and evolves through an anti-idiotypic network to produce autoantibodies to the autoantigen. Another putative immunogenic mechanism begins with an immune response to a microbe-derived molecular mimic of the autoantigen resulting in antibodies that cross-react with the autoantigen. Release of neutrophil extracellular traps, apoptosis and increased granule protein expression of ANCA antigens may facilitate the initiation of an ANCA autoimmune response, augment established pathogenic ANCA production, or both. The ANCA B cell autoimmune response is facilitated by quantitatively and qualitatively impaired T cell and B cell suppression, and by release from activated neutrophils of B cell activating factors that enhance B cell proliferation and retard B cell apoptosis. PMID:24777746

  1. Propylthiouracil-induced lupus-like or vasculitis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A 27 year old female with Graves’ disease presented with fever, exertional dyspnea and polyarthralgia. Erythema nodosum had occured three months earlier. The patient declared irregular use of propylthiouracil (PTU) for the last 8 months. Neutropenia and microscopic hematuria developed in the second week of admission. Chest X-ray showed inhomogenous pulmonary opacities, left pleural effusion and cardiomegaly. Computed tomography (CT) revealed multiple subpleural nodules, left pleural effusion, pericardial effusion, enlarged mediastinal and axillary lymph nodes. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cytology demonstrated hemosiderin laden macrophages. Histopathologic examination of the transbronchial biopsy specimen revealed a nonspecific inflammation. Serum was positive for ANA, P-ANCA, MPO-ANCA, PR3-ANCA and negative for anti-ds-DNA, C-ANCA, C3, C4 and anti-histone antibody. All symptoms resolved in two months after PTU withdrawal and starting steroid treatment. The same clinical manifestations recurred when the patient used PTU erronously one month after discharge. This is a case of PTU induced-autoimmune disease in whom the accurate distinction between drug-induced-lupus (DIL) and vasculitis was not possible due to the significant overlap of clinical and laboratory findings causing a significant diagnostic challenge for the chest physician. PMID:22958435

  2. Hepatitis C virus-induced vasculitis: therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Cacoub, Patrice; Terrier, Benjamin; Saadoun, David

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is now well recognised as the main etiologic agent of mixed cryoglobulinaemia vasculitis (cryovas). New opportunities and problems in developing therapy have therefore emerged. Antiviral therapy with pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin (plus protease inhibitor in the case of HCV genotype 1 infection) should be considered as induction therapy for HCV-cryovas with mild to moderate disease severity and activity. An early virologic response to antiviral therapy is correlated with a complete clinical response of HCV-cryovas. In patients presenting with more severe disease (ie, worsening of renal function, mononeuritis multiplex, extensive skin disease including ulcers and distal necrosis), an immunosuppression induction phase is often necessary while awaiting the generally slow response to antiviral treatments. Combination therapy with rituximab plus an optimal antiviral agent is recommended, as it may target the downstream B cell arm of autoimmunity and the viral trigger. Careful monitoring for adverse effects is mandatory, since some manifestations of HCV-cryovas, such as peripheral neuropathy or skin ulcers, may worsen with interferon-based therapy. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of malignant lymphoma when patients develop a relapse of cryovas without virological relapse. Room for other treatment strategies is very limited. Low-dose corticosteroids may help to control minor intermittent inflammatory signs such arthralgia but do not succeed in case of major organ involvement. Other immunosuppressants should be given only in case of refractory forms of HCV-cryovas, which are frequently associated with an underlying B cell lymphoma. PMID:23921995

  3. Are classification criteria for vasculitis useful in clinical practice? Observations and lessons from Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Patarroyo, Paúl Alejandro Méndez; Restrepo, José Félix; Rojas, Samanda Adriana; Rondón, Federico; Matteson, Eric L; Iglesias-Gamarra, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic systemic vasculitis represents a group of clinical entities having non-specific etiology with the common characteristic of acute or chronic inflammatory compromise of the small and large vessels walls, associated with fibrinoid necrosis. Objectives To describe the most common inflammatory vascular diseases in a long historical cohort of patients from San Juan de Dios Hospital located in Bogota, Colombia using two different systems and a clinical histopathological correlation format, and to make a comparison between them. Methods We reviewed all previously ascertained cases of vasculitis confirmed by biopsy processed between 1953 and 1990, and systematically collected data on all new cases of vasculitis from 1991 to 1997 at the Hospital San Juan de Dios (Bogota – Colombia). The cases were classified in accordance with the Chapel Hill Consensus criteria, and the system proposed by J.T. Lie. Results Of 165,556 biopsy tissue specimens obtained during this period from our hospital, 0.18% had vasculitis, perivasculitis or vasculopathy. These included 304 histopathological biopsies from 292 patients. Cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis (64 histological specimens) was the most frequently encountered type of "primary" vasculitis followed by thromboangiitis obliterans (38 specimens), and polyarteritis nodosa (24 specimens). Vasculitis associated with connective tissue diseases (33 specimens) and infection (20 specimens) were the main forms of secondary vasculitis, a category that was omitted from the Chapel Hill consensus report. We found that 65.8% of our histopathological diagnoses could not be classified according to the Chapel Hill classification, and 35.2% could not be classified according to the classification of Lie. Only 8.9% of cases remained unclassified by our system after clinical and histological correlation. Conclusion Current vasculitis classification schemes are designed for classification, rather that diagnosis of disease and do not adequately address some common forms of inflammatory vascular diseases, including those of infectious etiology and unusual etiology seen in clinical practice. Based on our clinical experience, we suggest a classification outline which practitioners can use which emphasizes correlation of the clinical picture to the histopathology findings for diagnosis and therapy, which may promote better clinical practice and standardization for clinical trials. PMID:19250526

  4. Clinical and serological features of severe vasculitis in rheumatoid arthritis: prognostic implications.

    PubMed Central

    Geirsson, A J; Sturfelt, G; Truedsson, L

    1987-01-01

    Sixteen patients with classic rheumatoid arthritis (RA) complicated by severe vasculitis were studied and compared with a matched control group of 16 RA patients without vasculitis. Seven of the patients with vasculitis died within 4 to 120 months (median 32 months) after developing vasculitic symptoms. Gangrene of digits and extremities, bowel ulcers or bowel perforation, or both, and cardiac involvement were more common among the patients who died than among those with a more favourable course. The present data suggest that large vessel vasculitis in RA is associated with high frequency of arteriosclerotic vascular disease. The serum concentrations of complement components C3 and C4 were lower, and concentrations of IgM rheumatoid factor, complement activating rheumatoid factor, and C1q binding immune complexes (C1q solid and C1q fluid phase assay) were significantly higher among vasculitic patients than in the control group. Laboratory data provided little prognostic information with regard to rheumatoid vasculitis, with the exception that IgM and IgG rheumatoid factors were significantly higher among patients with fatal course of disease than in those who achieved remission. PMID:3689000

  5. Genome-Wide Association Study of Hepatitis C Virus- and Cryoglobulin-Related Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Zignego, Anna Linda; Wojcik, Genevieve L.; Cacoub, Patrice; Visentini, Marcella; Casato, Milvia; Mangia, Alessandra; Latanich, Rachel; Charles, Edgar; Gragnani, Laura; Terrier, Benjamin; Piazzola, Valeria; Dustin, Lynn B.; Khakoo, Salim I.; Busch, Michael P.; Lauer, George M.; Kim, Arthur Y.; Alric, Laurent; Thomas, David L.; Duggal, Priya

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The host genetic basis of mixed cryoglobulin vasculitis is not well understood and has not been studied in large cohorts. A genome-wide association study was conducted among 356 HCV RNA positive individuals with cryoglobulin-related vasculitis and 447 ethnically-matched, HCV RNA positive controls. Methods All cases had both serum cryoglobulins as well as a vasculitis syndrome. A total of 899,641 markers from the Illumina HumanOmni1-Quad chip were analyzed using logistic regression adjusted for sex, as well as genetically-determined ancestry. Replication of select single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was conducted using 91 cases and 180 controls, adjusting for sex and country of origin. Results The most significant associations were identified on chromosome 6 near the NOTCH4 and MHC class II genes. A genome-wide significant association was detected on chromosome 6 at SNP rs9461776 (OR= 2.16, p=1.16E-07) between HLA-DRB1 and DQA1: this association was further replicated in additional independent samples (meta-analysis p=7.1×10−9). Conclusions A genome-wide significant association with cryoglobulin related vasculitis was identified with SNPs near NOTCH4 and MHC Class II genes. The two regions are correlated and it is difficult to disentangle which gene is responsible for the association with MC vasculitis in this extended MHC region. PMID:25030430

  6. An Interferon-Induced Digital Vasculitis-Like Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Oksana; Reiser, Jochen; Hasler, Scott

    2014-04-11

    This report describes a patient with chronic hepatitis C undergoing therapy with interferon (IFN) alpha who developed bilateral ischemia of his fingers. We present a 43-year-old man with a failed renal transplant and chronic hepatitis C. He was treated with 6 months of IFN therapy with good reduction of his viral load. He presented with 2 days of pain and swelling in the second digits of both hands. Workup for extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis C was initiated including assessment for vasculitis because of cryoglobulin- and noncryoglobulin-related causes. Extensive assessment with invasive and noninvasive vascular testing was performed. His workup for vasculitis did not reveal any specific reasons for the ischemic changes. Angiography of his fingers showed mild stenotic changes but no evidence of systemic vasculitis. IFN therapy was stopped and over several weeks his symptoms resolved. The ischemic changes were attributed to IFN therapy. The patient in this report is unique because although IFN has been historically reported to cause a variety of vascular syndromes, the reported experience in hepatitis C patients is small. In addition, the likelihood of encountering vasculitis and vasculitis-like syndromes in patients with hepatitis C is significant, and the increasing use of IFN in this population makes drug-induced vascular changes an essential consideration in this subset of patients. PMID:24732907

  7. The Place of Immunotherapy in the Management of HCV-Induced Vasculitis: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Chiche, Laurent; Bataille, Stanislas; Kaplanski, Gilles; Jourde, Noemie

    2012-01-01

    Patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) can develop systemic cryoglobulinemic vasculitis. Combination of pegylated-interferon α and ribavirin is the first-line treatment of this condition. However, in case of severe or life-threatening manifestations, absence of a virological response, or autonomized vasculitis, immunotherapy (alone or in addition to the antiviral regimen) is necessary. Rituximab is to date the only biologic with a sufficient level of evidence to support its use in this indication. Several studies have demonstrated that rituximab is highly effective when cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis is refractory to antiviral regimen, that association of rituximab with antiviral regimen may induce a better and faster clinical remission, and, recently, that rituximab is more efficient than traditional immunosuppressive treatments. Some issues with regard to the optimal dose of rituximab or its use as maintenance treatment remain unsolved. Interestingly, in balance with this anti-inflammatory strategy, a recent pilot study reported the significant expansion of circulating regulatory T lymphocytes with concomitant clinical improvement in patients with refractory HCV-induced cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis using low dose of subcutaneous interleukin-2. This paper provides an updated overview on the place of immunotherapy, especially biologics, in the management of HCV-induced cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis. PMID:22927871

  8. Clinical manifestations of vasculitis in patients with solid tumors. A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kurzrock, R; Cohen, P R; Markowitz, A

    1994-02-14

    Vasculitis is characterized by inflammatory changes and necrosis of blood vessels. Involvement of arteries and veins of diverse sizes throughout the body is possible and results in a multiplicity of clinical manifestations. Primary and secondary forms of vasculitis exist. Secondary vasculitis has been linked to several processes, including infections, drugs, and allergic, rheumatologic, and neoplastic disease. The majority of patients with malignant neoplasm-associated vasculitis who have been described had hematologic neoplasms. We report a patient with adenocarcinoma of the colon and vasculitis and review the 36 cases of vasculitis in patients with solid tumors documented in the world literature. The most common malignant neoplasms were non-small-cell lung cancer and prostate, breast, colon, and renal cancer. Cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis and nerve and muscle microvasculitis were the most frequently observed vasculitic subtypes. Importantly, in 71% of the cases, manifestations of vasculitis appeared before or concurrent with the initial recognition or the relapse of the tumor. Management strategies that met with success in at least half the patients in whom they were used included corticosteroids, cyclophosphamide, and treatment of the underlying cancer. Prognosis may be primarily related to the ability to control the malignant neoplasm, as most of the patients who died did so because of tumor progression. PMID:8297201

  9. Finger necrosis due to cryoglobulinemic vasculitis in association with membranous nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Castro, Carlos E.; Osvaldo, Padilla; Saifuddin, Fátima; Siddiqui, Tariq; Fan, Jerry; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Pema, Kanchan; Abbas, Aamer

    2015-01-01

    Cryoglobulinemic vasculitis is a small vessel vasculitis that has been associated with chronic infections and autoimmune, lymphoproliferative, and neoplastic disorders. When no significant etiological factors are identified, it is called essential mixed cryoglobulinemia. A detailed and thorough laboratory investigation is required to exclude all possible causes of cryoglobulin formation. Although cryoglobulin testing is simple, careful temperature regulation is needed to avoid false-negative results. Consensus diagnosis should be developed and implemented for appropriate cryoglobulin detection and accurate clinical diagnosis for cryoglobulinemic vasculitis. Here we present an interesting, first-ever case report of a 54-year-old Hispanic-American woman with essential mixed cryoglobulinemia presenting with significant digital necrosis in association with membranous nephropathy. PMID:25552807

  10. Systemic Levamisole-Induced Vasculitis in a Cocaine User without Cutaneous Findings: A Consideration in Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Baptiste, Gillian G.; Alexopoulos, Anastasia-Stefania; Masud, Tahsin; Bonsall, Joanna M.

    2015-01-01

    Levamisole is a known immunomodulating agent frequently used as a cutting agent in cocaine consumed in the United States today. Numerous cases of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) vasculitis connected with the use of levamisole-adulterated cocaine have previously been reported in the literature, classically characterized by a retiform purpuric rash. We report a case of a crack-cocaine user without cutaneous abnormalities who developed ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis that progressed to renal failure. This case demonstrates the difficulties in solidifying the diagnosis of levamisole-induced vasculitis in the absence of cutaneous findings and the need to pursue more testing to establish causality in ANCA-associated vasculitis that has potential for severe end-organ damage in patients who continue to use cocaine. PMID:26635879

  11. CMV disease complicating induction immunosuppressive treatment for ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Tollitt, James; O'Riordan, Edmond; Poulikakos, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 71-year-old woman who initially presented with renal-limited antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis. Following standard therapy with cyclophosphamide, steroids and plasma exchange, her renal function began to improve. However, despite appropriate treatment, her renal function subsequently deteriorated and she suffered haemoptysis. Owing to diagnostic uncertainty, bronchoscopy and a repeat renal biopsy were performed. The bronchoscopy washings demonstrated positivity for cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA, and in combination with a positive serum CMV PCR, immunosuppression was withheld. Treatment with ganciclovir was started. Repeat renal biopsy demonstrated active vasculitis and, following successful treatment of CMV disease, immunosuppression was re-started alongside prophylactic valganciclovir. This resulted in a successful outcome for the patient. Pulmonary CMV disease may mimic pulmonary disease associated with vasculitis, posing a diagnostic challenge to clinicians. We recommend a low threshold when testing for CMV in these patients. PMID:26907821

  12. ANCA-associated vasculitis following influenza vaccination: causal association or mere coincidence?

    PubMed

    Birck, Rainer; Kaelsch, Isabelle; Schnuelle, Peter; Flores-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Nowack, Rainer

    2009-09-01

    Whether autoimmune or rheumatic disease may be precipitated after vaccination is controversially discussed among experts. Here we describe 4 cases of new onset or relapsing antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies associated vasculitis occurring in timely association with influenza vaccination. In the literature different subtypes of vasculitis have been repeatedly reported after influenza vaccination. Several trials in patients with preexisting auto-immune disease failed to indicate an increased risk for disease recurrence after influenza vaccination but these investigations might be underpowered to detect this very rare but relevant side effect. Although our report does not prove a causal association between vaccination and vasculitis, it seems possible that in rare cases vaccination might induce vasculitic disease. PMID:19734734

  13. A Fatal Case of “Bullous Erysipelas-like” Pseudomonas Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sam Shiyao; Chandran, Nisha Suyien; Huang, Jing Xiang; Tan, Kong-Bing; Aw, Derrick Chen-Wee

    2016-01-01

    Erysipelas is a generally benign superficial bacterial skin infection, and its bullous form constitutes a rare and more severe variant. We describe the first and fatal case of “bullous erysipelas-like” septic vasculitis due to Pseudomonas bacteremi. A 69-year-old Chinese man presenting with diarrhea and septic shock initially began to rapidly develop sharply defined erythematous plaques with non-hemorrhagic bullae over his lower limbs. Culture of the aspirate from the bullae was positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This was also consistent with his blood cultures showing Pseudomonas bacteremia. Histology of the skin lesion showed microthrombi and neutrophilic infiltrates in blood vessels with Gram-negative bacilli extruding from the vessel walls, characteristic of septic vasculitis. The bullous erysipelas-like lesions seen in this patient represents a rare manifestation of both septic vasculitis and Pseudomonas infection. PMID:26955132

  14. Vasculitic emergencies in the intensive care unit: a special focus on cryoglobulinemic vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Vasculitis is characterized by the infiltration of vessel walls by inflammatory leukocytes with reactive damage and subsequent loss of vessel integrity. The clinical course of systemic vasculitis may be punctuated by acute life-threatening manifestations that require intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Furthermore, the diagnosis may be established in the ICU after admission for a severe inaugural symptom, mostly acute respiratory failure. Among the systemic vasculitides, cryoglobulinemic vasculitis (CV) has been rarely studied in an ICU setting. Severe CV-related complications may involve the kidneys, lungs, heart, gut, and/or central nervous system. The diagnosis of CV in the ICU may be delayed or completely unrecognized. A high level of suspicion is critical to obtain a timely and accurate diagnosis and to initiate appropriate treatment. We describe severe acute manifestations of CV based on six selected patients admitted to our ICU. That all six patients survived suggests the benefit of prompt ICU admission of patients with severe CV. PMID:22812447

  15. Intravascular immunity as a key to systemic vasculitis: a work in progress, gaining momentum

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, G A; Maugeri, N; Sabbadini, M G; Rovere-Querini, P; Manfredi, A A

    2014-01-01

    Vascular inflammation contributes to the defence against invading microbes and to the repair of injured tissues. In most cases it resolves before becoming apparent. Vasculitis comprises heterogeneous clinical entities that are characterized by the persistence of vascular inflammation after it has served its homeostatic function. Most underlying mechanisms have so far remained elusive. Intravascular immunity refers to the surveillance of the vasculature by leucocytes that sense microbial or sterile threats to vessel integrity and initiate protective responses that entail most events that determine the clinical manifestations of vasculitis, such as end-organ ischaemia, neutrophil extracellular traps generation and thrombosis, leucocyte extravasation and degranulation. Understanding how the resolution of vascular inflammation goes awry in patients with systemic vasculitis will facilitate the identification of novel pharmacological targets and bring us a step closer in each patient to the selection of more effective and less toxic treatments. PMID:24128276

  16. An approach to the diagnosis and management of systemic vasculitis revised version with tracked changes removed

    PubMed Central

    Miller, A; Chan, M; Wiik, A; Misbah, S A; Luqmani, R A

    2010-01-01

    The systemic vasculitides are a complex and often serious group of disorders which, while uncommon, require careful management in order to ensure optimal outcome. In most cases there is no known cause. Multi-system disease is likely to be fatal without judicious use of immunosuppression. A prompt diagnosis is necessary to preserve organ function. Comprehensive and repeated disease assessment is a necessary basis for planning therapy and modification of treatment protocols according to response. Therapies typically include glucocorticoids and, especially for small and medium vessel vasculitis, an effective immunosuppressive agent. Cyclophosphamide is currently the standard therapy for small vessel multi-system vasculitis, but other agents are now being evaluated in large randomized trials. Comorbidity is common in patients with vasculitis, including the cumulative effects of potentially toxic therapy. Long-term evaluation of patients is important in order to detect and manage relapses. PMID:20070316

  17. Transduction of a Foreign Histocompatibility Gene into the Arterial Wall Induces Vasculitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabel, Elizabeth G.; Plautz, Gregory; Nabel, Gary J.

    1992-06-01

    Autoimmune vasculitis represents a disease characterized by focal inflammation within arteries at multiple sites in the vasculature. Therapeutic interventions in this disease are empirical and often unsuccessful, and the mechanisms of immune injury are not well-defined. The direct transfer of recombinant genes and their expression in the arterial wall provides an opportunity to explore the pathogenesis and treatment of vascular disease. In this report, an animal model for vasculitis has been developed. Inflammation has been elicited by direct gene transfer of a foreign class I major histocompatibility complex gene, HLA-B7, to specific sites in porcine arteries. Transfer and expression of this recombinant gene was confirmed by a polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, and cytolytic T cells specific for HLA-B7 were detected. These findings demonstrate that expression of a recombinant gene in the vessel wall can induce a focal immune response and suggest that vessel damage induced by cell-mediated immune injury can initiate vasculitis.

  18. Cryoimmunoglobulinemia in rheumatoid arthritis. Significance in serum of patients with rheumatoid vasculitis.

    PubMed Central

    Weisman, M; Zvaifler, N

    1975-01-01

    Cryogloculins were examined in a standardized manner in an unselected group of 35 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 8 patients with RA complicated by cutaneous vasuclitis and neuropathy. Optimum conditions for detection and characterization of cryoglobulins were established; the proportion of resolubilized to total precipitable protein remained constant in an individual patient under these conditions. All 8 vascultis patients and 9 of 35 other patients with RA exhibited cryoglobulins; total protein and immunoglobin content were significantly higher in the cryoglobulins of patients with vasculitis. Immunoglobulins G and M constituted two-thirds and three-quarters of the total protein in the cryoglobulins from uncomplicated rheumatoid and vasculitis patients, respectively. Serum antiglobulin titers were higher, and serum C3 levels were lower, in vasculitis patients compared to rheumatoid patients without vasclitis. Anti-gamma globulin activity was detected in all cryoglobulins from vasculitis patients. Cryoglobulin IgG and IgM were polyclonal. Density gradient analyses demonstrated the majority of the cryoglobulin activity to reside in the 19S IgM fraction. There was no evidence of a light weight (8S) IgM. A monoclonal rheumatoid factor did not detect 7S-ANTI-7S complexes in the cryoprecipitates, but acid eluates from some cryoglobulins absorbed with insoluble IgG revealed an antiglobulin of the IgG class. Serial studies performed on vasculitis patients treated with cyclophosphamide disclosed a relationship between clinical evidence of vasculitis and the presence of cryoglobulins. The antigen (IgG) and antibody (largely IgM rheumatoid factor) nature of these cryglobulins is presented as evidence that the widespread vascular complications of RA are mediated, at least in part, by circulating immune complexes. PMID:169295

  19. Cerebral vasculitis in adults: what are the steps in order to establish the diagnosis? Red flags and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Berlit, P; Kraemer, M

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral vasculitis is a rare cause of juvenile stroke. It may occur as primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS) or as CNS manifestation in the setting of systemic vasculitis. Clinical hints for vasculitis are headache, stroke, seizures, encephalopathy and signs of a systemic inflammatory disorder. Diagnostic work-up includes anamnesis, whole body examination, laboratory and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) studies, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), angiography and brain biopsy. Due to the rarity of the disease, exclusion of more frequent differential diagnoses is a key element of diagnostic work-up. This review summarizes the steps that lead to the diagnosis of cerebral vasculitis and describes the red flags and pitfalls. Despite considering the dilemma of angiography-negative vasculitis and false-negative brain biopsy in some cases, it is important to protect patients from ‘blind’ immunosuppressive therapy in unrecognized non-inflammatory differential diagnosis. PMID:24117125

  20. Etanercept treatment-related c-ANCA-associated large vessel vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, Shira; Rosner, Itzhak; Slobodin, Gleb; Boulman, Nina; Rozenbaum, Michael; Kaly, Lisa; Beyar, Ofrat Katz; Rimar, Doron

    2016-01-01

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents have become central players in the management of autoimmune and rheumatic disease. With the wide use of anti-TNF agents today, we have become aware of rare autoimmune complications as systemic lupus erythematosus and psoriasis, yet rarely has large vessels vasculitis been described. We herein describe a case of cytoplasmic anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (c-ANCA) (with myeloperoxidase (MPO) antibodies)-associated large vessel vasculitis (aortitis) that developed during anti-TNF treatment for ankylosing spondylitis. Awareness of this rare, but serious, adverse event of these commonly used agents in rheumatic diseases is of importance. PMID:26626631

  1. Influenza vaccination induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis and pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Yanai-Berar, N; Ben-Itzhak, O; Gree, J; Nakhoul, F

    2002-09-01

    Influenza vaccination is a widely accepted practice, particularly among the elderly and high-risk individuals. Minor and transitory side effects following the vaccination are common, while systemic complications are infrequently reported. We describe here a case of a patient who presented to the emergency room with arthralgia, myalgias and purpura, following influenza vaccination. Necrotizing vasculitis associated with pauci-immune glomerulonephritis was observed on kidney biopsy. With increasing use of influenza vaccination, attention should be drawn to the possible expression of systemic adverse effects such as vasculitis and glomerulonephritis. PMID:12356192

  2. Secondary Syphilis with Nodular Vasculitis Mimicking Behçet's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Jaemin; Kim, Jae Wang; Kim, Jinseok; Yu, Jung Re

    2013-01-01

    Although, erythema nodosum is a common skin manifestation associated with syphilis, nodular vasculitis is a rare feature. Here, we describe a case of a 22-year-old, human immunedeficiency virus negative, non-immunocompromised man who developed recurrent oral and scrotal ulcers with nodular lesions of the lower extremitie. Behçet's disease was initially suspected, however, his serologic test for syphilis was positive, and he was thus diagnosed with secondary syphilis, with a skin biopsy showing nodular vasculitis. The patient was treated with benzathine penicillin, and the skin lesions disappeared after treatment. PMID:24475361

  3. The use of nerve and muscle biopsy in the diagnosis of vasculitis: a 5 year retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, D L H; Groves, M; Blake, J; Holton, J L; King, R H M; Orrell, R W; Ginsberg, L; Reilly, M M

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Peripheral nerve vasculitis is an important condition which can be diagnostically challenging and is one of the principal current indications for nerve and muscle biopsy. Previous studies have suggested that combined nerve and muscle biopsy (usually of the superficial peroneal nerve and peroneus brevis muscle) produces a higher diagnostic yield than nerve biopsy alone in the investigation of vasculitis. Objective: To determine whether in our two centres combined nerve (usually the sural) and muscle (usually the vastus lateralis) biopsy improved diagnostic yield compared with nerve biopsy alone. Methods: We interrogated our database of all nerve biopsies (usually of the sural nerve) performed at our institutions over 5 years and identified 53 cases of biopsy proven peripheral nerve vasculitis. Clinicopathological and neurophysiological data in these patients were reviewed. Results: The most common clinical presentation was with a painful asymmetric axonal polyneuropathy or mononeuritis multiplex (66% of cases). Nerve biopsy demonstrated definite vasculitis in 36%, probable vasculitis in 62% and no vasculitis in 2% of cases. In 24 patients a muscle biopsy (usually the vastus lateralis) was also performed and vasculitis was demonstrated in 46% of these (in 13% showing definite and 33% probable vasculitis). There was only one patient in whom vasculitis was demonstrated in muscle but not in peripheral nerve. Conclusion: Combined nerve (usually sural) and vastus lateralis muscle biopsy did not significantly increase the diagnostic yield compared with nerve biopsy alone. A sensible approach to the diagnosis of peripheral nerve vasculitis is to choose a nerve to biopsy which is clinically affected and amenable to biopsy. If the sural nerve is chosen, the data suggest that it is not routinely worth doing a vastus lateralis biopsy at the same time, whereas if the superficial peroneal nerve is chosen, it seems appropriate to do a combined superficial peroneal nerve and peroneus brevis biopsy. It is still not known if both the sural and superficial peroneal nerves are involved clinically which one gives the higher yield if biopsied. PMID:18819942

  4. Management of Large-Vessel Vasculitis With FDG-PET

    PubMed Central

    Soussan, Michael; Nicolas, Patrick; Schramm, Catherine; Katsahian, Sandrine; Pop, Gabriel; Fain, Olivier; Mekinian, Arsene

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to clarify the role of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the management of large-vessel vasculitis (LVV), focusing on 3 issues which are as follows: describe and determine the different FDG-PET criteria for the diagnosis of vascular inflammation, the performance of FDG-PET for the diagnosis of large-vessel inflammation in giant cell arteritis (GCA) patients, and the performance of FDG-PET to evaluate the disease inflammatory activity in Takayasu arteritis (TA) patients. MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE database were searched for articles that evaluated the value of FDG-PET in LVV, from January 2000 to December 2013. Inclusion criteria were American College of Rheumatology criteria for GCA or TA, definition PET positivity threshold, and >4 cases included. Sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) of FDG-PET for the diagnosis of large-vessel inflammation were calculated from each included individual study, and then pooled for meta-analysis with a random-effects model. Twenty-one studies (413 patients, 299 controls) were included in the systematic review. FDG-PET showed FDG vascular uptake in 70% (288/413) of patients and 7% (22/299) of controls. Only vascular uptake equal to or higher than the liver uptake was significantly different between GCA/TA patients and controls (P?

  5. Vasculitis with panniculitis following botulinum toxin A injection for cosmetic use

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Nastaran; Robati, Reza M.; Dadkhahfar, Sahar; Shafiee, Anoush; Bidari-Zerehpoush, Farahnaz

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum toxin A injection is performed most frequently for facial rejuvenation all over the world. Some bizarre and severe side effects have been reported after botulinum toxin A injection. Herein, we present a case of vasculitis with panniculitis after a patient underwent a cosmetic procedure that included injection of purported botulinum toxin A. PMID:26937303

  6. Systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid syndrome related retinal vasculitis mimicking ocular cysticercosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chan; Dong, Fang-tian; Chen, You-xin; Wang, Qian; Dai, Rong-ping; Zhang, Hua

    2015-03-01

    Making accurate and timely diagnosis is often challenging when patients with a systemic disease first present with ocular manifestations. The possibility that vasculitis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) can be misdiagnosed as cysticercosis has not been discussed in the literatures. PMID:25837363

  7. Life-threatening ANCA-positive vasculitis associated with rickettsial infection.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Ashley; Marik, Paul Ellis

    2012-01-01

    We present a 47-year-old Caucasian fire fighter who developed multisystem organ failure in the setting of a positive antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (myeloperoxidase) as well as confirmed Rocky Mountain spotted fever by skin biopsy PCR. This case provided a diagnostic challenge, a rare association of a Rickettsia infection and autoimmune vasculitis as well as a unique management approach. PMID:22669870

  8. Hypernephroma Presenting with Cutaneous Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis and Lupus Anticoagulant: Resolution after Nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Nigel P.; Ruíz, Amparo; Reyes, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Hypernephroma can present as a variety of paraneoplastic, nonmetastatic conditions, including vasculitis, and rarely a lupus-type anticoagulant. Nephrectomy leads to the resolution of the systemic complaints. Malignancy, in this case hypernephroma, can present as an immune-mediated paraneoplastic syndrome which resolves after removal of the underlying tumor. PMID:22919534

  9. [Central nervous system vasculitis and of the peripheral nerves in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Boddaert, Jacques; Verny, Marc

    2002-11-01

    Vasculitis of the nervous system are rare in the elderly. When present, they may constitute an urgent diagnosis and a therapeutic emergency. Clinical expression is rich and without specificity. Atypical signs (unusual course of dementia, systemic signs) or atypical laboratory results (inflammatory syndrome) may suggest the diagnosis of vasculitis. However, as multiple comorbidity is the rule in elderly subjects, searching for intercurrent factors (e.g. atrial fibrilation due to infectious disease causing embolic stroke) may be more contributive than searching for proof of a rare disease (vasculitis) with invasive procedures in this population. Giant cell (temporal) arteritis is the only vasculitis specifically related with age; the vital prognosis of vision may be compromised. Corticosterid therapy must be instituted without delay. Periartritis nodosa begins in 30% of cases after 60 years of age. The clinical features are the same as in younger subjects. Other vasculidis are rare in the elderly. In absence of specific studies in this population, therapeutic protocols are the same as in younger subjects but may have to be adjusted. PMID:12598831

  10. IgA vasculitis (Henoch-Shönlein purpura) in adults: Diagnostic and therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Audemard-Verger, Alexandra; Pillebout, Evangeline; Guillevin, Loïc; Thervet, Eric; Terrier, Benjamin

    2015-07-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) vasculitis, formerly called Henoch-Schönlein purpura, is an immune complex vasculitis affecting small vessels with dominant IgA deposits. Clinical manifestations mainly involve cutaneous purpura, arthralgias and/or arthritis, acute enteritis and glomerulonephritis. IgA vasculitis is more common among children than adults, with more severe disease in adults. Gastrointestinal and renal involvements represent the principal causes of morbidity and mortality in adults. Factors associated with long-term end-stage renal disease (ESRD) include baseline renal function impairment and baseline proteinuria >1 or 1.5 g/day, and on renal biopsy degree of interstitial fibrosis, sclerotic glomeruli and fibrinoid necrosis. Management of IgA vasculitis in adults is rendered difficult for clinicians because of the absence of correlation between initial presentation and long-term renal outcome, and the possible occurrence of spontaneous remission in patients with severe presentation or, in contrast, possible evolution to ESRD in patients with mild symptoms. Treatment is often symptomatic because disease course is usually benign. Treatment of severe involvement, including severe gastrointestinal complications or proliferative glomerulonephritis, remains controversial, with no evidence that corticosteroids or immunosuppressive agents improved long-term outcome. Prospective, randomized, controlled trials are thus needed to analyze the benefit-risk ratio of such treatments. PMID:25688001

  11. Epitope specificity determines pathogenicity and detectability in ANCA-associated vasculitis

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) specific for myeloperoxidase (MPO) or proteinase 3 (PR3) are detectable in >90% of patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). ANCA titers do not correlate well with disease activity. In vivo and in vi...

  12. Increased monocyte transcription of the proteinase 3 gene in small vessel vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Ohlsson, S; Hellmark, T; Pieters, K; Sturfelt, G; Wieslander, J; Segelmark, M

    2005-01-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3) is a pleiotropic and destructive serine protease and it is also a major target for autoantibodies in systemic small vessel vasculitis. We have shown recently that patients in stable remission have increased circulating levels of PR3, independent of autoantibody titre, inflammation, neutrophil degranulation and renal function. Here we explore the possibility of increased PR3 gene transcription. RNA was purified from peripheral blood monocytes from vasculitis patients and controls. Specific mRNA was measured by TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The monocyte-like cell lines THP-1 and U937 and human peripheral blod monocytes from healthy controls were stimulated with cytokines and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for different time periods. PR3 protein was measured in plasma with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The median result for PR3 mRNA was 96 (18680) for 22 patients, compared to 1 (0128) for the 15 healthy controls. Elastase expression was also significantly increased, whereas myeloperoxidase and interleukin-8 were not. Stimulation of monocytes with tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-?, interferon (IFN)-? or LPS did not result in any increase of PR3 or elastase transcription, whereas interleukin (IL)-8 transcription was increased 10-fold. Circulating monocytes from patients with systemic vasculitis display increased PR3 gene transcription compared to healthy controls and patients with sytemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This may be important for the development of vasculitis. Our results do not favour a role for cytokines, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) or immunosuppressive medication in the upregulation of PR3 transcription in vasculitis. PMID:15958084

  13. Giant cell vasculitis is a T cell-dependent disease.

    PubMed Central

    Brack, A.; Geisler, A.; Martinez-Taboada, V. M.; Younge, B. R.; Goronzy, J. J.; Weyand, C. M.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a systemic vasculitis that preferentially targets medium-sized and large arteries. The etiopathogenesis of the syndrome is not known, and because of the paucity of information concerning the mechanisms of blood vessel wall damage, treatment options are limited. Clues to pathogenic events in this arteritis may derive from understanding the function of tissue-infiltrating cells. Arterial injury in GCA is associated with the formation of granulomas that are composed of T cells, activated macrophages, and multinucleated giant cells. To examine the role of T cells, we implanted inflamed temporal arteries from patients with GCA into severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice and studied whether the vascular lesions were T cell-dependent. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Temporal artery specimens from patients with GCA were engrafted into SCID mice. The histomorphologic appearance of fresh arteries and grafts retrieved from the mice was compared by two-color immunohistochemistry, and the functional profile of tissue-infiltrating cells was analyzed by semiquantifying cytokine transcription with a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay system. The repertoire of tissue-infiltrating T cells was assessed for the presence of dominant T cell populations by using T cell receptor beta-chain-specific PCR followed by sequencing. To investigate the role of T cells in the activation of tissue-infiltrating macrophages, T cells were depleted from the arterial grafts by treating the mice with T cell-specific antibodies and the production of monokines was monitored. To demonstrate the disease relevance of T cells expanding in the implants, T cells were isolated from tissue segments and adoptively transferred into mice implanted with syngeneic arteries. The in situ production of lymphokines was then determined. RESULTS: The inflammatory infiltrate penetrating all layers of the arterial wall persisted in the xenotransplants, indicating that the inflammatory foci represent independent functional units. Similar quantities of T cell- and macrophage-derived cytokines were detected in fresh and engrafted tissue. However, the diversity of tissue-infiltrating T cells decreased following implantation. T cells with identical T cell receptors were expanded in different mice that had been engrafted with tissue fragments from the same patient, indicating that T cell survival in the arterial wall was a nonrandom process. To confirm the disease relevance of these T cells, T cell depletion and reconstitution experiments were performed. Antibody-mediated elimination of T cells from the xenotransplants resulted in the attenuation of the production of the monokines, IL-1 beta and IL-6. Adoptive transfer of syngeneic tissue-derived T cells, but not of peripheral blood T cells, into engrafted SCID mice enhanced the transcription of IL-2 and IFN-gamma in the implanted arteries. CONCLUSIONS: The vascular lesions of GCA are maintained in human artery-mouse chimeras, indicating that all cellular and noncellular components necessary for the disease are present in the temporal artery. Activation of tissue-infiltrating T cells and macrophages depends upon an infrequent subpopulation of lesional T cells that have a survival advantage in the xenotransplants. The selective proliferation of these T cells in the arteries suggests that there is recognition of a locally expressed antigen. Therefore, these T cells should be candidate targets for the development of novel therapeutic strategies in GCA. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 3 FIG. 5 PMID:9307981

  14. A case of scrotal swelling mimicking testicular torsion preceding Henoch-Schönlein vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Akgun, C

    2012-01-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura, is one of the most common types of multisystemic vasculitis seen in childhood. The major clinical manifestations are cutaneous purpura, arthritis, abdominal pain, gastrointestinal bleeding, and nephritis. Isolated central nervous system vasculitis, seizures, coma and hemorrhage, Guillan--Barré syndrome, ataxia and central and peripheral neuropathy, ocular involvement, orchitis, epididymitis or testicular torsion are medical or surgical complications. In this study, we report a 7-year-old boy with scrotal swelling mimicking testicular torsion with ultrasonographic and clinical findings that the typical clinical features of Henoch-Schönlein purpura including rashes and arthritis were developed after one week of surgery (Ref. 15). PMID:22693978

  15. Acral keratoses and leucocytoclastic vasculitis occurring during treatment of essential thrombocythaemia with hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    Worley, B; Glassman, S J

    2016-03-01

    Hydroxyurea is used in essential thrombocythaemia to lower thromboembolic risk. Cutaneous adverse effects from hydroxyurea are diverse. Small vessel vasculitis has been rarely reported, and the coexistence of several different morphologies has not been described. We report a case of acral keratoses, psoriasiform plaques and leucocytoclastic vasculitis (LCV) in a patient with essential thrombocythaemia. A 69-year-old woman developed a confusing array of skin lesions including keratotic papules, psoriasiform plaques and keratoderma 4 years after commencing hydroxyurea therapy. The initial diagnosis was hand and foot psoriasis, but lesions were resistant to therapy. With an increase in the dose of hydroxyurea, the lesions ulcerated. Skin biopsies taken from different sites indicated different diagnoses, including LCV. Discontinuation of hydroxyurea yielded rapid improvement. Although the most commonly reported cutaneous adverse effect from hydroxyurea is leg ulceration, this can be preceded or accompanied by less dramatic skin lesions. Unless recognized, delayed diagnosis and lesion progression can occur. PMID:26269121

  16. Coexistent granulomatous vasculitis and leukaemia cutis in a patient with resolving herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Elgoweini, M; Blessing, K; Jackson, R; Duthie, F; Burden, A D

    2011-10-01

    An 80-year-old man presented with a 6-month history of indurated tender purple papules. These had coalesced to form plaques with some central scarring and a dermatomal distribution on the left arm, immediately following herpes zoster (HZ) infection at this site. The patient had a 5-year history of small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL), which was being managed conservatively under a 'watch and wait' protocol. On histological examination of a skin biopsy, marked interstitial granulomas and prominent granulomatous vasculitis were seen, supporting the clinical impression of a post-HZ granulomatous reaction. In addition, there was a dense monoclonal small B-cell lymphocytic infiltrate indicating koebnerization by SLL (a finding that has not been reported previously with concurrent postherpetic granulomatous vasculitis). Although benign pseudolymphomas occur in postherpetic cases, this case shows that even in association with benign vasculitic features true lymphomas can occur. Furthermore, this case highlights the importance of immunocytochemistry, molecular studies and clinicopathological correlation. PMID:21883389

  17. [Implication of dexamethasone adjunctive therapy after the onset of cerebral vasculitis in Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis].

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, N; Carre, A-C; Delabranche, X; Guiot, P; Mootien, Y

    2007-02-01

    Few adverse effects have been reported with adjunctive dexamethasone treatment in pneumococcal meningitis. Nevertheless, we report a case of cerebral vasculitis. A 49-year-old man was admitted for fever and altered mental status. Lumbar puncture revealed a high inflammatory response and Streptococcus pneumoniae was identified by culture. Antibacterial therapy and adjunctive dexamethasone treatment were initiated as recommended. The immediate outcome was favorable but due to the onset of focal cerebral abnormalities, a CT scan was performed on the ninth day showing cerebral vasculitis. The patient died on the thirteenth day despite antibacterial therapy and resuscitation. In our case, a secondary neurological worsening appeared when adjunctive dexamethasone treatment was stopped suggesting a rebound effect. Observation of similar cases may lead to modifying adjunctive dexamethasone treatment protocol in bacterial meningitis. PMID:17267155

  18. Risks of treatments and long-term outcomes of systemic ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Flossmann, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) have an increased risk of premature death and organ failure. Treatment strategies with immune-suppressive drugs need to balance disease control and prevention of relapse against the risk of side effects in particular infection and malignancy. The longer-term outcome of patients with AAV who participated in several randomised controlled trials has been published in recent years. The results of these and other newer studies will be the focus of this review. PMID:26009242

  19. Comparability of patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis enrolled in clinical trials or in observational cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Pagnoux, Christian; Carette, Simon; Khalidi, Nader A.; Walsh, Michael; Hiemstra, Thomas F.; Cuthbertson, David; Langford, Carol; Hoffman, Gary S.; Koening, Curry L.; Monach, Paul A.; Moreland, Larry; Mouthon, Luc; Seo, Phil; Specks, Ulrich; Ytterberg, Steven; Westman, Kerstin; Hoglund, Peter; Harper, Lorraine; Flossmann, Oliver; Luqmani, Raashid; Savage, Caroline; Rasmussen, Niels; de Groot, Kirstin; Tesar, Vladimir; Jayne, David; Merkel, Pater A.; Guillevin, Loic

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyse the differences between patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) or microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) entered into randomised clinical trials (RCTs) and those followed in large observational cohorts. Methods The main characteristics and outcomes of patients with generalised and/or severe GPA or MPA with a five-factor score ≥1 enrolled in the French Vasculitis Study Group (FVSG) or the US-Canadian-based Vasculitis Clinical Research Consortium cohorts were compared to those enrolled in one of 2 FVSG clinical RCTs (WEG91, WEGENT) or 3 European Vasculitis Society clinical trials (CYCLOPS, CYCAZAREM, IMPROVE). Results 657 patients (65.3% with GPA) in RCTs were compared to 437 in cohorts (90.6% with GPA). RCT patients were older at diagnosis than the cohort patients (56.6±13.9 vs. 46.8±17.3 years), had higher Birmingham vasculitis activity score (19.5±9.1 vs. 16.9±7.4), and more frequent kidney disease (84.0% vs. 54.9%) but fewer ear, nose, and throat symptoms (56.8% vs. 72.2%). At 56 months post-diagnosis, mortality and relapse rates, adjusted for age and renal function, were higher for patients with GPA in RCTs vs. cohorts (10.7% vs. 2.5% [p=0.001] and 22.5% vs. 15.6% [p=0.03], respectively) but similar for patients with MPA (6.2% vs. 6.6% [p=0.92] and 16.6% vs. 10.1% [p=0.39], respectively). Conclusion Patients with GPA or MPA in RCTs and those in observational cohorts show important differences that should be remembered when interpreting results based on these study populations. PMID:26016754

  20. Bioinspired engineering study of Plantae vascules for self-healing composite structures

    PubMed Central

    Trask, R. S.; Bond, I. P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the first conceptual study into creating a Plantae-inspired vascular network within a fibre-reinforced polymer composite laminate, which provides an ongoing self-healing functionality without incurring a mass penalty. Through the application of a ‘lost-wax’ technique, orthogonal hollow vascules, inspired by the ‘ray cell’ structures found in ring porous hardwoods, were successfully introduced within a carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy polymer composite laminate. The influence on fibre architecture and mechanical behaviour of single vascules (located on the laminate centreline) when aligned parallel and transverse to the local host ply was characterized experimentally using a compression-after-impact test methodology. Ultrasonic C-scanning and high-resolution micro-CT X-ray was undertaken to identify the influence of and interaction between the internal vasculature and impact damage. The results clearly show that damage morphology is influenced by vascule orientation and that a 10 J low-velocity impact damage event is sufficient to breach the vasculature; a prerequisite for any subsequent self-healing function. The residual compressive strength after a 10 J impact was found to be dependent upon vascule orientation. In general, residual compressive strength decreased to 70 per cent of undamaged strength when vasculature was aligned parallel to the local host ply and a value of 63 per cent when aligned transverse. This bioinspired engineering study has illustrated the potential that a vasculature concept has to offer in terms of providing a self-healing function with minimum mass penalty, without initiating premature failure within a composite structure. PMID:19955122

  1. Diffuse dermal angiomatosis: a clinical mimicker of vasculitis associated with calciphylaxis and monoclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Ferreli, C; Atzori, L; Pinna, A L; Pau, M; Aste, N; Ricotti, C; Rongioletti, F

    2015-02-01

    Diffuse dermal angiomatosis is a form of cutaneous reactive angiomatosis characterized clinically by painful erythematous or violaceous lesions with ulcers that may mimic cutaneous vasculitis/vasculopathy. Histologically it shows a benign, diffuse proliferation of endothelial cells with tiny blood vessels in the papillary and reticular dermis. Herein, we report four patients with diffuse dermal angiomatosis in the setting of calciphylaxis and monoclonal gammopathy and review the cases previously published in the literature. Comorbidities and management will also be discussed. PMID:25502367

  2. Isoniazid Induced Cutaneous Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis in Extra Pulmonary Tuberculosis (Pott’s Spine): A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    V, Dharma Rao; Rampure, Dilip; S, Rama Rao

    2014-01-01

    Anti-tuberculosis drugs frequently result in cutaneous adverse reactions but Isoniazid is known to have least toxic potential for cutaneous reactions. We report a rare case of Isoniazid induced cutaneous leucocytoclastic vasculitis. A 64-year-old male was diagnosed to have Pott’s spine with multiple vertebral body involvement (D8-12 vertebrae). Subsequently, he was treated with first line anti-TB drugs i.e., Isoniazid, Rifampicin, Pyrazinamide and Ethambutol. On the fourth day of treatment with Anti Tuberculosis Treatment (ATT), the patient developed an erythematosus rash over right upper limb not associated with itching or pain, non-blanchable macules and papules over bilateral shins on lower limbs, petechiae on both forearms and hyper pigmented, scaly rash over right axilla and buttocks. The skin biopsy report was consistent with cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Although rare, Isoniazid among anti-tuberculosis drugs should be considered as potential cause of drug-induced cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis in the differential diagnosis of erythematosus rash with petechiae. PMID:25302231

  3. Histopathological Characteristics of Post-inflamed Coronary Arteries in Kawasaki Disease-like Vasculitis of Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Maiko; Tanaka, Hideo; Nakamura, Akihiro; Suzuki, Chinatsu; Harada, Yoshinori; Takamatsu, Tetsuro; Hamaoka, Kenji

    2016-02-27

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis in infants that develops predominantly in the coronary arteries. Despite the clinically transient nature of active inflammation in childhood albeit rare complications (e.g., coronary artery aneurysm), KD has recently been suggested to increase the incidence of ischemic heart diseases in young adulthood. However, little is known about the histopathology of the coronary artery long after development of the acute KD vasculitis. To address this, we conducted histological studies of rabbit coronary arteries in adolescent phase after induction of the KD-like vasculitis induced by horse serum administration. After a transmural infiltration of inflammatory cells in acute phase at day 7, the artery exhibited a gradual decrease in the number of inflammatory cells and thickening of the intima during the chronic phase up to day 90, where proteoglycans were distinctly accumulated in the intima with abundant involvement of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)-positive cells, most of which accompanied expression of VCAM-1 and NF-κB. Distinct from classical atherosclerosis, inflammatory cells, e.g., macrophages, were barely detected during the chronic phase. These observations indicate that the KD-like coronary arteritis is followed by intimal thickening via accumulation of proteoglycans and proliferation of α-SMA-positive cells, reflecting aberrant coronary artery remodeling. PMID:27006519

  4. Histopathological Characteristics of Post-inflamed Coronary Arteries in Kawasaki Disease-like Vasculitis of Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Maiko; Tanaka, Hideo; Nakamura, Akihiro; Suzuki, Chinatsu; Harada, Yoshinori; Takamatsu, Tetsuro; Hamaoka, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis in infants that develops predominantly in the coronary arteries. Despite the clinically transient nature of active inflammation in childhood albeit rare complications (e.g., coronary artery aneurysm), KD has recently been suggested to increase the incidence of ischemic heart diseases in young adulthood. However, little is known about the histopathology of the coronary artery long after development of the acute KD vasculitis. To address this, we conducted histological studies of rabbit coronary arteries in adolescent phase after induction of the KD-like vasculitis induced by horse serum administration. After a transmural infiltration of inflammatory cells in acute phase at day 7, the artery exhibited a gradual decrease in the number of inflammatory cells and thickening of the intima during the chronic phase up to day 90, where proteoglycans were distinctly accumulated in the intima with abundant involvement of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)-positive cells, most of which accompanied expression of VCAM-1 and NF-κB. Distinct from classical atherosclerosis, inflammatory cells, e.g., macrophages, were barely detected during the chronic phase. These observations indicate that the KD-like coronary arteritis is followed by intimal thickening via accumulation of proteoglycans and proliferation of α-SMA-positive cells, reflecting aberrant coronary artery remodeling. PMID:27006519

  5. Antigen inhalation as a triggering factor in systemic small-sized-vessel vasculitis. Four cases.

    PubMed

    Mouthon, L; Khaled, M; Cohen, P; Subra, J F; Guillevin, L

    2001-04-01

    In order to identify small-sized-vessel vasculitis occurring immediately after massive inhalation of particles which could be considered antigenic, we performed a retrospective review of patients who consulted our Department of Internal Medicine between 1980 and 1998 and were diagnosed as having small-vessel vasculitis that developed immediately after massive exposure to inhaled particles. Four patients, 27 to 55 years old, presented with small-sized-vessel vasculitis (one with Wegener's granulomatosis and three with Churg-Strauss syndrome) which developed after massive inhalation of particles. Clinical manifestations occurred from a few hours to 10 days after inhalation of diesel fumes, cereal dust, flour or cereal dust and/or pigeon droppings. Three patients remain disease-free 8, 9 and 18 years after discontinuing treatment. One patient remains well after 3 years on low-dose corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide therapy. Our data suggest that primary antigens can cause small-sized-vessel vasculitides. Identifying such etiological factors could improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of systemic vasculitides and prevent relapses due to similar antigenic exposure. PMID:11431572

  6. Predictors of relapses in ANCA-associated small vessel vasculitis with kidney involvement

    PubMed Central

    Iuliana, Andreiana; Simona, Stancu; Andreea, Avram; Ludmila, Taran; Gabriel, Mircescu

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Almost half of the patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) associated small vessel vasculitis relapse and their characteristics are still to be defined Objective: We aimed to evaluate the relapse rate and its determinants in a cohort of patients with ANCA associated vasculitis with severe kidney involvement. Methods and results: This is a retrospective study which included 100 patients consecutively admitted in a Nephrology Department with crescentic pauci-immune glomerulonephritis diagnosed by kidney biopsy. ANCAs were assessed by capture ELISA or indirect immunofluorescence (IFI). Patients were followed for a median period of 3.2 [0.1; 5.5] years. The median age was 61.6 years. The clinical condition at presentation was severe (median BVAS 16 and BVAS over 21 in one quarter of patients), mostly because of general, kidney and lung scores. Median creatinine was 5.7 mg/dL and 17% of the patients needed temporary dialysis. Eight patients relapsed (13.8%): one in the lung and seven in the kidney. The median time to relapse was 11.3 [9.2; 19.9] months. None of the investigated parameters allowed for differentiating patients who relapsed from those who did not, except higher hematuria in those who relapsed. Discussion: In our patients with ANCA vasculitis and severe kidney involvement, the relapse rate is low and hematuria but not ANCA specificity or clinical presentation allows the prediction of relapse.

  7. [Pulmonary Nocardiosis due to Nocardia asiatica in a Patient with ANCA-associated Vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Suemori, Koichiro; Miyamoto, Hitoshi; Murakami, Shinobu; Yamazaki, Hitoshi; Ishizaki, Jun; Matsumoto, Takuya; Murakami, Yuichi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi; Yasukawa, Masaki

    2015-07-01

    Nocardia asiatica is a rare causative organism responsible for opportunistic infection, and was first reported by Kageyama et al. in 2004. We report herein on a very rare case of N. asiatica infection in a 76-year old male patient with ANCA-associated vasculitis and a history of pulmonary tuberculosis. The patient developed pulmonary nocardiosis due to N. asiatica while receiving glucocorticoid therapy. Chest computed tomography demonstrated multiple granules and cavity formation mainly in the left lower lobe. From the images, we suspected opportunistic infection, possibly pulmonary tuberculosis or pulmonary damage due to ANCA-associated vasculitis. Nocardia sp. was detected from a bronchoalveolar lavage culture and N. asiatica was identified by 16S ribosomal DNA gene sequencing. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed no abnormality. Administration of Doripenem (1.5g/day) and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (4g/day) was started, and the patient's clinical and imaging findings promptly improved. Thereafter, he received sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (2g/day) and prednisolone (10 mg/day) as maintenance therapy for ANCA-associated vasculitis for more than one year, and there has since been no recurrence of the Nocardia infection. PMID:26554223

  8. Valvular involvement in ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated systemic vasculitides have a variety of presentations, but cardiac valvular involvement is rarely diagnosed and its management is not established. Case presentation We report the case of a 44 year old man who presented with an ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis and aortic regurgitation of unusual mechanism. Transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography disclosed septal hypertrophy preventing a complete closure of the aortic valve and thus responsible for a massive aortic regurgitation. After 4 months of immunosuppressive therapy, the valve lesion did not subside and the patient had to undergo aortic valve replacement. This report also reviews the 20 cases of systemic ANCA-associated vasculitis with endocardial valvular involvement previously reported in the English language medical literature. Conclusions Valvular involvement in ANCA-associated systemic vasculitides is rarely reported. Most of these lesions are due to Wegener's granulomatosis and half are present when the diagnosis of vasculitis is made. The valvular lesion is usually isolated, aortic regurgitation being the most frequent type, and often requires valve replacement in the months that follow it's discovery. PMID:21345235

  9. Kidney transplantation for a patient with refractory childhood-onset ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Kaseda, Koji; Marui, Yuji; Suwabe, Tatsuya; Hoshino, Junichi; Sumida, Keiichi; Hayami, Noriko; Mise, Koki; Tanaka, Kiho; Takaichi, Kenmei; Tomikawa, Shinji; Fujii, Takeshi; Ohashi, Kenichi; Ubara, Yoshifumi

    2016-03-01

    A 14-year-old Japanese girl was admitted to our institution for the evaluation of renal dysfunction. Her serum creatinine was 1.1 mg/dL, proteinuria was 1.5 g/day, the urine sediment contained numerous erythrocytes per high-power field, and she was positive for myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA). Proteinuria was first noted at the age of 12 years. Renal biopsy showed crescentic glomerulonephritis with slight immunoglobulin A (IgA) deposition. A diagnosis of ANCA-associated vasculitis was made. Immunosuppressive therapy was initiated, including steroid pulse therapy and intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse therapy, but hemodialysis was required after 6 years. Eight months after the patient became anuric and her MPO-ANCA titer became negative, living-related donor kidney transplantation was done from her mother. ANCA became slightly positive 2 years later, but the patient remains stable without proteinuria or hematuria at 4 years after surgery. This case suggests that kidney transplantation can be performed successfully for a patient with refractory childhood-onset ANCA-associated vasculitis, and that remission of vasculitis associated with ANCA negativity at transplantation may contribute to a better renal prognosis in this patient. PMID:24645722

  10. Progressive outer retinal necrosis associated with occlusive vasculitis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chien-Chi; Chen, San-Ni; Hwang, Jiunn-Feng; Lin, Chun-Ju; Chen, Huan-Sheng

    2015-05-01

    A 45-year-old man, a case of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, received a highly active antiretroviral therapy at the outpatient service for 4 years without regular follow-up. He experienced progressively blurred vision for 6 months and a cutaneous zoster on his back 3 months ago. He was diagnosed with progressive outer retinal necrosis by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism using an aqueous humor sample, which revealed an existence of varicella zoster virus. He was given a combination of systemic, intravitreal antiviral and a highly active antiretroviral therapy. Occlusive vasculitis, an unusual finding for progressive outer retinal necrosis, developed in both eyes 1 week after the secondary intravitreal injection. Unfortunately, his vision deteriorated to no light perception in both eyes within 2 weeks. Progressive outer retinal necrosis is characterized clinically as showing minimal or no inflammation in the aqueous and vitreous humors, absence of retinal vasculitis, and patches of yellowish spots located deep in the retina. Physicians should pay attention to this rare case of progressive outer retinal necrosis associated occlusive vasculitis with very poor prognosis in spite of aggressive treatment. PMID:26002429

  11. A novel immunopathological association of IgG4-RD and vasculitis with Hashimoto's thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Minamino, Hiroto; Ariyasu, Hiroyuki; Furuta, Hiroto; Nishi, Masahiro; Yoshimasu, Takashi; Nishikawa, Akinori; Nakanishi, Masanori; Tsuchihashi, Shigeki; Kojima, Fumiyoshi; Murata, Shin-ichi; Inoue, Gen; Akamizu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Summary A 73-year-old man with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) suffered from purpura on the lower legs. He was diagnosed with IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) with serum IgG4 elevation and dacryo-sialadenitis confirmed histologically. Serum Th2 and Treg cytokines, interleukin 7 (IL7), IL8 and Th2 chemokine levels were elevated, while skewed Th1 balance was seen in fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Therefore, preferential Th1 balance in HT appeared to be followed by IgG4-RD characterized with Th2 and Treg polarization. The commencement of steroid therapy dramatically exacerbated clinical manifestations including IgG4-RD-associated HT. The measurement of cytokine and chemokine levels as well as FACS analysis in the development of IgG4-RD seemed to be beneficial. In conclusion, an innovative association of HT, IgG4-RD and vasculitis was observed. This report also offers novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for IgG4-RD. Learning points Recently, a subtype of HT has been considered to be a thyroid manifestation of IgG4-RD, although the etiology of IgG4-RD is not established yet. Immunologically a close association between HT and vasculitis was reported. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis is a rare skin presentation of IgG4-RD. In the current case, during the course of HT, IgG4-RD and leukocytoclastic vasculitis occurred; thus, innate immunity and acquired immunity seem to be involved in the development of IgG4-RD. The measurement of cytokine and chemokines appeared to be beneficial in the development of IgG4-RD. Remarkably, effectiveness of steroid therapy for HT suggested presence of IgG4-RD-associated HT. Therefore, this report highlights the pathogenesis of IgG4-RD and proposes novel therapeutic mechanisms. Clinicians should pay attention to the development of IgG4-RD and vasculitis during long course of HT. PMID:26966543

  12. Testicular vasculitis: findings differentiating isolated disease from systemic disease in 72 patients.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Tan, Carmela D; Koening, Curry L; Khasnis, Atul; Rodríguez, E René; Hoffman, Gary S

    2012-03-01

    Testicular vasculitis (TV) may be part of systemic (testicular) vasculitis (STV) or may exist as single-organ/isolated (testicular) vasculitis (ITV). In the current study we sought to identify clinical and histologic features that distinguish STV from ITV. The distinction was deemed important because it is already well established that in other forms of single organ vasculitis, surgical therapy alone may be curative. We identified patients with biopsy-proven TV from pathology databases from our institution and from an English-language PubMed search. Patients were included if data were available to determine TV extent confidently. Data recorded included clinical, laboratory, and histologic features; treatment; and clinical follow-up. The study included 72 patients with TV (mean age, 42 yr; range, 4-78 yr) (7 from our institution). About 74% of patients presented with painful testicular swelling/mass, 10% with a painless testicular swelling/mass, and 4% with epididymal swelling/mass. Eleven percent had no testicular complaints and vasculitis was discovered at autopsy or in other surgical interventions. Vasculitis involved the testicle in 80.3% of cases, the epididymis in 44.6%, and the spermatic cord in 30.6%. Thirty-seven (51%) patients had ITV and 35 (49%) had STV. No differences between ITV and STV patients were found in regards to age, presenting testicular features, duration of testicular symptoms, and time of follow-up. Compared to ITV patients, STV patients presented more often with constitutional/musculoskeletal symptoms (74.3% vs. 8.3%, respectively; p = 0.0001), elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (94.7% vs. 16%; p = 0.0001), and anemia (50% vs. 0%; p = 0.0001). Neoplasm was more frequently suspected in ITV than in STV (74.2% vs. 31.6%; p = 0.001), but only occurred in 2 ITV patients. Long-term glucocorticoid therapy was given only to STV patients, and 59.1% of them also received cytotoxic agents. ITV was diagnosed more often by orchiectomy (81.1% vs. 42.9%; p = 0.001) and less frequently by testicular biopsy (2.7% vs. 28.6%; p = 0.003) than STV. Nongranulomatous inflammation affecting medium-sized vessels occurred in most patients with both ITV and STV. Among STV, polyarteritis nodosa was the most frequently diagnosed (63%), followed by Wegener granulomatosis (17%).In summary, TV occurs as ITV in men usually presenting with a testicular mass in the absence of systemic symptoms and normal laboratory results. In most ITV patients, a testicular neoplasm is initially suspected, and TV is an unexpected finding. After surgical removal, ITV does not require systemic therapy. Polyarteritis nodosa is the systemic vasculitis most frequently associated with testicular involvement. PMID:22391469

  13. Patient-reported outcomes in ANCA-associated vasculitis. A comparison between Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score and routine assessment of patient index data 3.

    PubMed

    Annapureddy, Narender; Elsallabi, Osama; Baker, Joshua; Sreih, Antoine G

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) as measured by the "routine assessment of patient index data 3" (RAPID3) and whether RAPID3 is correlated with disease activity as determined by the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score (BVAS). Data from patients at an academic institution vasculitis clinic seen between Jan 2010 and Jan 2012 were collected using chart review. BVAS and RAPID3 scores were calculated at each patient visit. RAPID3 was compared between patients in remission (BVAS = 0) and patients with active disease (BVAS > =1) at all visits for four consecutive visits, when data available, at least 3 months apart during the period mentioned. Robust generalized estimating equations (GEE) in linear regression models evaluated associations between the RAPID3 and BVAS over all available observations, adjusting for intra-subject correlations. Thirty-four patients were included in the study, 26 had granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), five microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), and three eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA). Patients at first visit had impaired HRQoL as measured by RAPID3 [6.8 (3.1-12.6)]. The median RAPID3 scores were higher in patients with active disease as compared to patients in remission (7.0 vs. 3.0, p = 0.115; 8.8 vs. 1.0, p = 0.011; 6.1 vs. 2.0, p = 0.032; and 11.7 vs. 2.0, p = 0.128 for visits 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively). In longitudinal GEE models incorporating all observations there was a strong association between the RAPID3 (per 1 unit) and BVAS (per 1 unit) [β 0.21 (0.10, 0.32) p < 0.001]. RAPID3 can be used to measure HRQoL in patients with AAV. RAPID3 correlated significantly with BVAS. RAPID3 can discriminate between disease states in AAV. This instrument may help document patient experience and add to clinical decisions. PMID:25822996

  14. PUPPP (Pruritic Urticarial Papules Plaques of Pregnancy)

    MedlinePlus

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  15. [Autopsy case of PR3-ANCA-associated vasculitis complicated with rectus muscle hematoma].

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Yusuke; Niihata, Kakuya; Yasuda, Keiko; Shimomura, Akihiro; Uehata, Takuya; Inoue, Kazunori; Kaneko, Tetsuya; Shoji, Tatsuya; Tsubakihara, Yoshiharu; Okada, Noriyuki

    2009-01-01

    A 80-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of coughing, hemosputum and dyspnea. As a chest X-ray showed infiltrates of the right lung, he was diagnosed as bacterial pneumonia and treated with antibiotics. However, after a few days, he exhibited hemoptysis and developed severe dyspnea, while laboratory findings showed rapid elevation of the serum creatinine level (5.55 mg dL). Computed tomography (CT) revealed large areas of ground glass opacity in the right lung, hence the hemoptysis was considered to be due to alveolar hemorrhage. As he had been diagnosed as chronic renal failure a few years before this admission and we also noticed that interstitial pneumonia with a slightly elevated level of C-reactive protein had existed from that time, ANCA-associated vasculitis was suspected to be the underlying pathogenesis. Accordingly, he was started on methylprednisolone pulse therapy and temporary hemodialysis resulted in improvement of dyspnea and renal function. PR3-ANCA was 12.4 EU, so he was diagnosed as PR3-ANCA-associated vasculitis. After a few days, he suddenly complained of abdominal pain, developing hypotension and anemia. Abdominal CT showed an irregular low-density mass in the right muscle, so he was diagnosed as rectus muscle hematoma. Surgery was performed and a massive hematoma was found in the rectus muscle without any ruptures of macroscopic vessels in the abdomen. Bleeding could not be stopped followed by multiple organ failure and the patient died four days postoperatively. Rectus muscle hematoma is an uncommon cause of acute abdomen, and has been reported in about 100 cases in Japan. It occurs because of a tear in epigastric vessels and is usually managed conservatively with a good prognosis, although hemodynamically unstable cases require surgery. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of rectus muscle hematoma complicated with ANCA-associated vasculitis. PMID:19715163

  16. The predictive value of kidney biopsy in renal vasculitis: a multicenter cohort study.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Crespo, Francisco; Villacorta, Javier; Acevedo, Mercedes; Cavero, Teresa; Guerrero, Carmen; García Díaz, Eugenio; Orradre, Juan Luis; Martinez, Miguel Angel; Praga, Manuel; Fernandez-Juarez, Gema

    2016-06-01

    The histopathologic classification of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis has been demonstrated to have prognostic value in small cohorts of patients with pauci-immune extracapillary glomerulonephritis. We aimed to validate this histologic subgrouping system in a large cohort of patients with renal vasculitis from 3 Spanish centers. The additional value of several histologic parameters for predicting renal outcome was investigated. A total of 151 biopsies of patients with renal vasculitis were reviewed and classified as follows: 41% crescentic, 24% mixed, 21% focal, and 14% sclerotic. The cumulative proportions of renal survival at 5 years were 83.2%, 81.2%, 60.5%, and 50.7% for the focal, mixed, crescentic, and sclerotic categories, respectively (P < .05). In the crescentic category, patients with less than 75% of glomeruli showing crescents had better survival at 1 and 5 years compared with those having greater than or equal to 75% of crescents (77.9% and 70.6% versus 51.3% and 45.6%; P = .02). When adjusted by renal function and other histologic parameters, the percentage of extracapillary proliferation and glomerulosclerosis remained as significant predictors for renal survival (hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.05; P = .001, and hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.05; P = .002, respectively). In conclusion, patients with pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis experienced different outcomes depending on the percentage of crescents observed, so that extensive extracapillary proliferation was associated with the poorest renal survival. These findings validate the prognostic utility of the histologic classification scheme in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody positive and negative patients and suggest a subdivision of crescentic category (<75% and ≥75% of crescents) based on the different survival rates observed among these subgroups. PMID:26980047

  17. Septic vasculitis and vasculopathy in some infectious emergencies: the perspective of the histopathologist.

    PubMed

    Tomasini, C

    2015-02-01

    Sepsis is a potentially life-threatening complication of an infection where cutaneous lesions often represent one of the early signs. A myriad of microorganisms including bacteria, fungi, yeasts, viruses, protozoas, helminths and algae can be implicated. A broad spectrum of clinical and histopathologic findings can be observed in the skin and the common denominator is a thrombotic vasculopathy. The pathogenesis of cutaneous septic vasculitis (SV)/vasculopathy is complex and includes five main mechanisms: disseminated intravascular coagulation, direct invasion and occlusion of blood vessel walls by microorganisms, hypersensitivity reaction with immune complex deposition into blood vessel walls, embolism from a distant infectious site and vascular effects of toxins. Herein we describe the clinicopathologic findings of some selected cases of SV recently observed in our hospital, including purpura fulminans, necrotizing fasciitis, cutaneous meningococcemia, malignant syphilis and disseminated alternaria infection. Histopathologically, a wide spectrum of histopathologic changes was observed in skin specimens from the various entities, involving the intensity and composition of the inflammatory infiltrate, the degree of vascular changes and the presence of microorganisms, that ranged from a predominant not inflammatory, thrombotic-occlusive vasculopathy in purpura fulminans to leukocytoclastic vasculitis like changes in cutaneous meningococcemia to a dermal angiomatosis-like pattern in disseminated Alternaria infection. The different pathologic presentations may be related to the microorganism involved, the main pathogenetic mechanism that induced the vascular injury and the individual immunologic burden. Early skin biopsy for histopathologic examination and microbiologic culture is a cornerstone in the diagnosis of life-threatening diseases that present with cutaneous septic vasculitis. Ancillary techniques, such as immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction are additional novel and helpful tools to identify pathogens, leading to definite diagnosis in cases with challenging or ambiguous clinical and/or pathologic findings. PMID:25592669

  18. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies specific for myeloperoxidase cause glomerulonephritis and vasculitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hong; Heeringa, Peter; Hu, Peiqi; Liu, Zhi; Zhao, Minglang; Aratani, Yasuaki; Maeda, Nobuyo; Falk, Ronald J; Jennette, J Charles

    2002-10-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCAs) are identified in the circulation of approximately 80% of patients with pauci-immune necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis and systemic small vessel vasculitis, such as microscopic polyangiitis and Wegener granulomatosis. The most common antigen target for ANCAs is myeloperoxidase (MPO), which is found in neutrophils and monocytes. We report definitive experimental animal evidence that ANCAs are pathogenic. MPO knockout (Mpo(-/-)) mice were immunized with mouse MPO. Splenocytes from these mice or from control mice were injected intravenously into recombinase-activating gene-2-deficient (Rag2(-/-)) mice, which lack functioning B lymphocytes and T lymphocytes. All mice that received splenocytes developed mild to moderate glomerular immune deposits, but only mice that received 1 x 10(8) or 5 x 10(7) anti-MPO splenocytes developed severe necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis, granulomatous inflammation, and systemic necrotizing vasculitis, including necrotizing arteritis and hemorrhagic pulmonary capillaritis. To test the pathogenic potential of antibodies alone, purified anti-MPO IgG or control IgG was injected intravenously into Rag2(-/-) mice and wild-type mice. Mice that received anti-MPO IgG but not mice that received control IgG developed focal necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis with a paucity of glomerular Ig deposition. Thus, anti-MPO IgG alone was able to cause pauci-immune glomerular necrosis and crescent formation in the absence of functional T or B lymphocytes in Rag2(-/-) mice and in the presence of an intact immune system in wild-type C57BL/6J mice. This animal model offers strong support for a direct pathogenic role for ANCA IgG in human glomerulonephritis and vasculitis. PMID:12370273

  19. Dysregulation of Autoantigen Genes in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis Involves Alternative Transcripts and New Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    McInnis, Elizabeth A.; Badhwar, Anshul K.; Muthigi, Akhil; Lardinois, Olivier M.; Allred, S. Colby; Yang, Jiajin; Free, Meghan E.; Jennette, J. Charles; Preston, Gloria A.; Falk, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) are two major autoantigens in patients with vasculitis with ANCA. The genes encoding these autoantigens are abnormally expressed in peripheral granulocytes of patients with active ANCA-associated vasculitis. This study provides evidence that this transcriptional dysregulation results in a variety of mRNA processing events from the PRTN3 gene locus. In addition to elevated levels of PR3 message, leukocyte RNA from patients contained PR3 transcripts with an alternative 3? untranslated region. Furthermore, we detected usage of an alternative transcription start site within intron 1 of the PRTN3 gene locus that coincided with active disease (odds ratio, 3.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.3 to 8.4; P=0.01). This promoter may be developmentally regulated, because it was active in normal human bone marrow, multiple leukemia cell lines, MCF-7 cells, and subjects after GM-CSF treatment but not subjects with a neutrophil left shift. This transcript, which lacks exon 1 of PRTN3, encodes a 24-kD protein (p24PR3/MBN) with a sequence similar to that previously described for myeloblastin. Notably, PR3, p24PR3/MBN, and MPO were synthesized in cultured neutrophils from patients with active ANCA-associated vasculitis, indicating that increased transcription results in newly synthesized autoantigens in peripheral neutrophils of patients. The synthesis of p24PR3/MBN seems to expand the autoantigen repertoire, because immunoblots showed that sera from patients recognized p24PR3/MBN. These findings emphasize the importance of transcriptional dysregulation of the autoantigen in autoimmune disease. PMID:25060059

  20. Cocaine/levamisole-induced systemic vasculitis with retiform purpura and pauci-immune glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Veronese, F.V.; Dode, R.S.O.; Friderichs, M.; Thomé, G.G.; da Silva, D.R.; Schaefer, P.G.; Sebben, V.C.; Nicolella, A.R.; Barros, E.J.G.

    2016-01-01

    Levamisole has been increasingly used as an adulterant of cocaine in recent years, emerging as a public health challenge worldwide. Levamisole-associated toxicity manifests clinically as a systemic vasculitis, consisting of cutaneous, hematological, and renal lesions, among others. Purpura retiform, cutaneous necrosis, intravascular thrombosis, neutropenia, and less commonly crescentic nephritis have been described in association with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) and other autoantibodies. Here we report the case of a 49-year-old male who was a chronic cocaine user, and who presented spontaneous weight loss, arthralgia, and 3 weeks before admission purpuric skin lesions in the earlobes and in the anterior thighs. His laboratory tests on admission showed serum creatinine of 4.56 mg/dL, white blood count 3,800/μL, hemoglobin 7.3 g/dL, urinalysis with 51 white blood cells/μL and 960 red blood cells/μL, and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio 1.20. Serum ANCA testing was positive (>1:320), as well as serum anti-myeloperoxidase and anti-proteinase 3 antibodies. Urine toxicology screen was positive for cocaine and levamisole, with 62.8% of cocaine, 32.2% of levamisole, and 5% of an unidentified substance. Skin and renal biopsies were diagnostic for leukocytoclastic vasculitis and pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis, respectively. The patient showed a good clinical response to cocaine abstinence, and use of corticosteroids and intravenous cyclophosphamide. Last serum creatinine was 1.97 mg/dL, white blood cell count 7,420/μL, and hemoglobin level 10.8 g/dL. In levamisole-induced systemic vasculitis, the early institution of cocaine abstinence, concomitant with the use of immunosuppressive drugs in severe cases, may prevent permanent end organ damage and associate with better clinical outcomes. PMID:27119429

  1. Collapsing glomerulopathy in a case of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody associated vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, N.; Rathi, M.; Nada, R.; Sharma, A.; Goyal, A.; Ramachandran, R.; Kumar, V.; Kohli, H. S.; Gupta, K. L.

    2016-01-01

    Collapsing glomerulopathy (CG) is a pathological entity characterized by collapse and wrinkling of glomerular tuft, podocyte dedifferentiation and hyperplasia. CG may be idiopathic or secondary to other diseases. CG has been described with IgA nephropathy, membranous glomerulopathy, diabetic nephropathy, and lupus nephritis. However, till date there is no report of CG in association with the anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis (AAV). Here, we present a case of CG that developed during follow-up in a case of AAV with biopsy proven pauci-immune glomerulonephritis. PMID:27051140

  2. Vasculitis and long standing ankylosing spondylitis in a patient with familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Taylan, Ali; Yildiz, Yasar; Sari, Ismail; Ozkok, Guliz

    2014-10-01

    Coexistence of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and other inflammatory disorders has been frequently reported, but no specific underlying factor has been identified. We report a patient with FMF who is presented with long-standing ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and cutaneous leukocytoklastic vasculitis (LV) of the lower limbs. It is the first report on combination of FMF with AS and LV. The Mediterranean Fever (MEFV) gene mutation of heterozygote (R202Q/R726A) and HLA-B27 are detected in this case, and are believed to form genetic susceptibility to LV. PMID:25538787

  3. Vasculitis and long standing ankylosing spondylitis in a patient with familial Mediterranean fever

    PubMed Central

    Taylan, Ali; Yildiz, Yasar; Sari, Ismail; Ozkok, Guliz

    2014-01-01

    Coexistence of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and other inflammatory disorders has been frequently reported, but no specific underlying factor has been identified. We report a patient with FMF who is presented with long-standing ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and cutaneous leukocytoklastic vasculitis (LV) of the lower limbs. It is the first report on combination of FMF with AS and LV. The Mediterranean Fever (MEFV) gene mutation of heterozygote (R202Q/R726A) and HLA-B27 are detected in this case, and are believed to form genetic susceptibility to LV. PMID:25538787

  4. Erdheim-Chester Disease: An Unusual Cause of Intracranial Vasculitis and Progressive Leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Sagnier, Sharmila; Debruxelles, Sabrina; Lepreux, Sébastien; Sibon, Igor

    2016-05-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a non-Langerhans histiocytosis affecting multiple organs. Stroke as symptom onset of ECD with intracranial vasculitis is unusual. We report the case of a 64-year-old man who presented with an acute ischemic stroke associated with a moderate leukoencephalopathy and intracranial arteries stenosis. Four years later, he developed movement disorders with dysarthria and cognitive impairment. Neuroradiological findings demonstrated a rapidly progressive and diffuse leukoencephalopathy associated with brain atrophy and infiltration of the intracranial vertebral artery wall. Brain postmortem evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of ECD. This diagnosis should be evoked in patients with cryptogenic stroke, progressive leukoencephalopathy, and infiltration of the arterial wall. PMID:26996751

  5. Large vessel vasculitis in a patient with acute Q-fever: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Baziaka, Fotini; Karaiskos, Ilias; Galani, Lamprini; Barmpouti, Eleftheria; Konstantinidis, Stilianos; Kitas, George; Giamarellou, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Q fever is a zoonosis caused by the rickettsial organism Coxiella burnetii. Infection has an acute course, usually with a self-limited febrile illness and the possibility of the evaluation to a chronic course with endocardial involvement. The presence of autoantibodies and various autoimmune disorders have also been associated with C. burnetii infection. We report a case of acute Q fever in which the patient developed large vessel vasculitis. The FDG-PET/CT scan detected inflammation of the thoracic aortic wall, suggesting an unusual immunologic host response to acute Q fever infection.

  6. Adenocarcinoma of the seminal vesicles complicated by antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody vasculitis: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Adenocarcinoma of the seminal vesicles is a very rare malignancy, with less than 100 cases reported worldwide. It is documented to have a poor prognosis, with the majority of patients developing metastatic disease, most commonly in the prostate, bladder and rectum. Currently there is no standard treatment for metastatic disease and the limited reports of treatment with radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormonal (anti-androgenic) therapy show that they are generally of modest benefit. The association between malignancy and an increased risk of autoimmune vasculitis has been demonstrated in a number of malignancies, but to date there have been no documented cases of adenocarcinoma of the seminal vesicles associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody vasculitis. Case presentation In this report we describe the case of a 55-year-old Caucasian man with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the seminal vesicles. He previously had received chemotherapy treatment for advanced testicular cancer and later presented with hemospermia. He subsequently developed c-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody vasculitis requiring intensive immunosuppression and renal dialysis. Conclusion Adenocarcinoma of the seminal vesicles is a rare diagnosis and our case is more unusual in that our patient previously had chemotherapy treatment for advanced testicular cancer and went on to develop severe antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody vasculitis when diagnosed with metastatic seminal vesicle cancer. This case illustrates that autoimmune vasculitis can occur in any patient with malignancy and an early referral to the renal team combined with renal biopsy can assist in the earlier diagnosis and more successful management of these rare events. This case should be of interest to oncologists, renal physicians, urologists and general physicians who encounter patients presenting with hemospermia or vasculitis. PMID:23452402

  7. A Case of Polyarteritis Nodosa Associated with Vertebral Artery Vasculitis Treated Successfully with Tocilizumab and Cyclophosphamide

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kae; Rajderkar, Dhanashree A.; Modica, Renee F.

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric polyarteritis nodosa is rare systemic necrotizing arteritis involving small- and medium-sized muscular arteries characterized by aneurysmal dilatations involving the vessel wall. Aneurysms associated with polyarteritis nodosa are common in visceral arteries; however intracranial aneurysms have also been reported and can be associated with central nervous system symptoms, significant morbidity, and mortality. To our knowledge extracranial involvement of the vertebral arteries has not been reported but has the potential to be deleterious due to fact that they supply the central nervous system vasculature. We present a case of a 3-year-old Haitian boy with polyarteritis nodosa that presented with extracranial vessel involvement of his vertebral arteries. After thorough diagnostic imaging, including a bone scan, ultrasound, Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Angiography, and Computed Tomography Angiography, he was noted to have vertebral artery vasculitis, periostitis, subacute epididymoorchitis, arthritis, and myositis. He met diagnostic criteria for polyarteritis nodosa and was treated with cyclophosphamide, methylprednisolone, and tocilizumab, which resulted in improvement of his inflammatory markers, radiographic findings, and physical symptoms after treatment. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of vertebral artery vasculitis in polyarteritis nodosa as well as successful treatment of the condition using the combination cyclophosphamide and tocilizumab for this condition. PMID:27018080

  8. [Systemic necrotizing vasculitis presenting as gangrene combined with diabetes insipidus: a case report].

    PubMed

    Huang, Qing; Liu, Yu-lan

    2015-12-18

    The male patient reported here presented as gangrene and central diabetes insipidus (CDI), who had characteristics of vasculitis. The patient complained about polydipsia and polyuria half a year ago, and then developed tingling, pain and blackish discoloration of some fingers and toes 3 month ago. He also had Raynaud's phenomenon. After admission, his laboratory examination showed the rise of erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, immunoglobulin, β2-glycoprotein I and the activity of rheumatoid factors, lupus anticoagulant test. his pituitary gland showed loss of posterior signal on magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, his vasopressin test was active. However, there was no sufficient evidence to diagnose any specific disease; as a consequence the patient was diagnosed as idiopathic systemic necrotizing vasculitis (SNV). For SNV, the patient was treated with glucocorticoid 40 mg/d and impact therapy of cyclophosphamide 0.4 g every 2 weeks. He also received symptomatic treatment for gangrene and CDI. Cutaneous involvement leading to gangrene was widely reported in SNV, however pituitary involvement in SNV leading to CDI was rare. The prognosis of this patient was poor. PMID:26679670

  9. An unexpected cause of acute kidney injury in a patient with ANCA associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, Wajid M; Nori, Uday S; Nadasdy, Tibor; Satoskar, Anjali A

    2016-05-01

    Diagnostic kidney biopsies sometimes yield clinically unsuspected diagnoses. We present a case of a 69-year-old woman with established ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) of 4 years duration who was in clinical remission following cytotoxic therapy and was on maintenance immunosuppression. She presented to the hospital with acute kidney injury (AKI), symptoms suggestive of a systemic vasculitis, and in addition had hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis. A relapse in the AAV was suspected but a diagnostic kidney biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis, patchy interstitial inflammation, and calcium phosphate deposits. It was found that the patient recently started consuming large doses of over-the-counter calcium-containing antacids and vitamin Dcontaining multivitamin supplements. Cessation of these drugs led to improvement of renal function to baseline. This case highlights several teaching points: (1) the kidney biopsy can prove to be critically important even in cases where there appears to be a more obvious clinical diagnosis, (2) AK due to calcium-alkali syndrome has characteristic histopathological changes, and (3) that the triad of hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis, and AKI is exclusively associated with the ingestion of excessive quantities of calcium-containing antacids. The physician should keep this in mind, and pro-actively seek pertinent medication history from the patient. A brief review of calcium-alkali syndrome is given. PMID:26932179

  10. Long-term efficacy and safety of tocilizumab in giant cell arteritis and large vessel vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Jobie; Steel, Lauren; Borg, Frances; Dasgupta, Bhaskar

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a chronic systemic vasculitis affecting large-sized and medium-sized vessels. Glucocorticoids are currently the mainstay of treatment for GCA and associated large vessel vasculitis (LVV) but are associated with frequent adverse events. Methotrexate has only demonstrated a modest benefit while anti-TNF biological agents (infliximab and etanercept) have been inefficacious. Elevated levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a proinflammatory cytokine, has been associated with GCA. Tocilizumab (TCZ), a humanised antihuman IL-6 receptor antibody, has been used successfully in several reports as a treatment for GCA and LVV. We report the potentially long-term successful use of TCZ in 8 cases of refractory LVV. All of our patients achieved a good clinical response to TCZ and C reactive protein reduced from an average of 70.3 to 2.5. In all cases, the glucocorticoid dose was reduced, from an average of 24.6?mg prednisolone prior to TCZ treatment to 4.7?mg, indicating that TCZ may enable a reduction in glucocorticoid-associated adverse events. However, regular TCZ administration was needed for disease control in most cases. TCZ was discontinued in one case due to the development of an empyema indicating the need for careful monitoring of infection when using this treatment. PMID:26819753

  11. [ANCA-associated vasculitis affecting lungs and kidneys: clinical and morphological characteristic, treatment, outcomes].

    PubMed

    Zakharova, E V; Iakovlev, V N; Vinogradova, O V; Sheikh, Zh V; Zhidkova, N V; Alekseev, V G

    2013-01-01

    Up to 80% of all cases of pulmonary-renal syndrome are due to systemic vasculitis associated with antibodies to neutrophil cytoplasm (ANCA). Most patients die within the first year after the onset of the disease but adequate immunosuppressive therapy ensures the 5-year survival rate of 65-75%. We obtained clinical and morphological data for 34 patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis affecting lungs and kidneys treated at S. P. Botkin Hospital in 1994-2012. 16 patients presented with granulomatous polyangiitis (Wegener 's granulomatosis), 11 with microscopic polyangiitis, and 7 with eosinophilicpolyangiitis (Churg-Strauss syndrome). We made the definitive diagnosis in 79% of the cases. Pulmonary lesions were largely in the form offocal, nodular and infiltrative changes, one third of the patients suffered blood spitting/pulmonary hemorrhage and 15% respiratory distress. Most patients had renal dysfunction (16% required emergency hemodialysis), lesions of ENT skin, joints, peripheral nervous system, and eyes. Therapy with corticosteroids and cytostatics increased the total and renal survival rate up to 91 and 82% respectively despite unfavourable prognostic factors in most patients. Duration of observation was 32.5 [0.1;129] months, the survival rate depended on the severity of lung lesions whereas renal problems had no appreciable effect on life prognosis. PMID:24437168

  12. Experimental steroid-induced osteonecrosis in adult rabbits with hypersensitivity vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Matsui, M; Saito, S; Ohzono, K; Sugano, N; Saito, M; Takaoka, K; Ono, K

    1992-04-01

    Osteonecrosis (ON) was experimentally induced in rabbits by employing a combined protocol of hypersensitivity vasculitis and administration of high-dose corticosteroids. Thirty-five adult rabbits were used: five were injected twice with horse serum (Group A), five were injected three times with methylprednisolone acetate (Group B), 20 were treated with a combination of horse serum and methylprednisolone acetate (Group C), and five were used as a control (Group D). Both femurs of each rabbit were obtained one to five weeks after the final treatment and were histologically examined. There was no evidence of ON in Groups A, B, and D, whereas vasculitis was prominent in the femurs of Group A rabbits. In Group C, 14 of 20 specimens (70%) showed histologic evidence of ON in the femoral metaphysis: seven showed marrow necrosis and seven marrow and trabecular necrosis. Intramedullary hemorrhage was detected in eight animals. All specimens that showed ON or marrow necrosis revealed arteriopathy (i.e., severe damage to the vascular wall structure of arterioles). These findings were similar to those observed in early ON of clinical materials. The authors conclude that arteriopathy plays an important role in the pathogenesis of ON. PMID:1555358

  13. Long-term Prognosis of Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Negative Renal Vasculitis: Cohort Study in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Woo; Yu, Mi-Yeon; Baek, Seon Ha; Ahn, Shin-Young; Kim, Sejoong; Na, Ki Young; Chae, Dong-Wan; Chin, Ho Jun

    2016-04-01

    Few studies have reported on the long-term prognosis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-negative renal vasculitis. Between April 2003 and December 2013, 48 patients were diagnosed with renal vasculitis. Their ANCA status was tested using indirect immunofluorescence and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. During a median (interquartile range) follow-up duration of 933.5 (257.5-2,079.0) days, 41.7% of patients progressed to end stage renal disease (ESRD) and 43.8% died from any cause. Of 48 patients, 6 and 42 were ANCA-negative and positive, respectively. The rate of ESRD within 3 months was higher in ANCA-negative patients than in ANCA-positive patients (P = 0.038). In Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, ANCA-negative patients showed shorter renal survival than did ANCA-positive patients (log-rank P = 0.033). In univariate Cox-proportional hazard regression analysis, ANCA-negative patients showed increased risk of ESRD, with a hazard ratio 3.190 (95% confidence interval, 1.028-9.895, P = 0.045). However, the effect of ANCA status on renal survival was not statistically significant in multivariate analysis. Finally, ANCA status did not significantly affect patient survival. In conclusion, long-term patient and renal survival of ANCA-negative renal vasculitis patients did not differ from those of ANCA-positive renal vasculitis patients. Therefore, different treatment strategy depending on ANCA status might be unnecessary. PMID:27051237

  14. Rare type of pancreatitis as the first presentation of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-related vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Tomoya; Adachi, Takeya; Tabeya, Tetsuya; Nakagaki, Suguru; Yabana, Takashi; Goto, Akira; Kondo, Yoshihiro; Kasai, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A pancreatic tumor was suspected on the abdominal ultrasound of a 72-year-old man. Abdominal computed tomography showed pancreatic enlargement as well as a diffuse, poorly enhanced area in the pancreas; endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography failed to provide a definitive diagnosis. Based on the trend of improvement of the pancreatic enlargement, the treatment plan involved follow-up examinations. Later, he was hospitalized with an alveolar hemorrhage and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis; he tested positive for myeloperoxidase-anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) and was diagnosed with ANCA-related vasculitis, specifically microscopic polyangiitis. It appears that factors such as thrombus formation caused by the vasculitis in the early stages of ANCA-related vasculitis cause abnormal distribution of the pancreatic blood flow, resulting in non-uniform pancreatitis. Pancreatic lesions in ANCA-related vasculitis are very rare. Only a few cases have been reported previously. Therefore, we report our case and a review of the literature. PMID:26900301

  15. Rheumatoid Vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment implications for RV are major, any diagnostic uncertainty must be met with definitive approaches to establishing ... treatment implications for RV are major, any diagnostic uncertainty must be met with a definitive approach to ...

  16. Vasculitis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... These purplish spots can be felt in the skin. They do not turn white (blanch) when pressed. As the condition progresses, they may become larger and more bruise-like (ecchymotic), and some may develop central ulceration or necrosis (tissue death).

  17. Rituximab for remission induction in elderly patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Timlin, H.; Lee, S. M.; Manno, R.L.; Seo, P.; Geetha, Duvura

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Advancing age is a risk factor for treatment-related side effects and mortality in AAV patients treated with cyclophosphamide (CYC) and glucocorticoids (GC) for remission induction. The efficacy and safety of rituximab (RTX) in elderly AAV patients has not been well described. Methods We performed a single center retrospective review of 31 consecutive AAV patients aged 60 or more at the time of RTX use for remission induction. All patients received RTX with GC for remission induction. Four patients received concomitant CYC for a mean duration of 52 days. We evaluated clinical and laboratory variables at diagnosis, rates of complete remission defined as Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score/Wegener's Granulomatosis (BVAS/WG) = 0 and patient survival, renal survival, infections requiring hospitalization, and vasculitis relapse 24 months following RTX use. Results Of the 31 patients, 77% were Caucasian, 68% female, mean age was 71 6 years, 58% were MPO ANCA positive, and 42% had relapsing disease. The mean BVAS/WG score entry was 4.4 1.5, 71% had glomerulonephritis (GN) and 10% had alveolar hemorrhage. The mean baseline e-GFR was 40 28 ml/ min/1.73 m2. Thirty patients achieved remission with a mean time to remission of 57 27 days. The single patient with refractory vasculitis responded to CYC. The mean prednisone dose at 6 months was 5.6 4 mg. Remission maintenance therapy was started within 12 months of RTX induction in 6 patients (4 with RTX, 1 with azathioprine, and 1 with mycophenolate mofetil). One patient suffered a limited relapse 10 months post RTX use. Among the 22 patients with GN at baseline, 1 developed ESRD. One-year patient survival among 25 patients with at least 1 year of follow-up was 100%. There were no episodes of infusion reaction or leukopenia. There were 3 episodes of bacterial pneumonia, 1 episode of candida pneumonia, and 1 episode of disseminated cutaneous zoster. Conclusions This study demonstrates that rituximab is effective for remission induction in elderly patients with AAV. Furthermore, we observed a high incidence of infectious complications. Our experience was limited by its retrospective design, and further studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of RTX in elderly AAV patients. PMID:25796088

  18. Non-infectious cryoglobulinemia vasculitis (CryoVas): update on clinical and therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Perez-Alamino, Rodolfo; Espinoza, Luis R

    2014-05-01

    CryoVas is a small vessel vasculitis associated with the presence of circulating cryoglobulins. In the absence of HCV infection, several disorders have been identified in association of CryoVas. Although evidence is limited, a few studies have recently described the clinical presentation, prognosis, and therapeutic management of non-infectious CryoVas. Patients with type I CryoVas, especially associated with hematologic malignancies, have shown a worse clinical presentation. Recent studies have also identified prognostic factors in mixed CryoVas. Therapeutic management in non-infectious CryoVas remains to be defined. Overall, treatment options should be individualized based on severity of involvement. In this setting, new data have emerged regarding the role of biologic therapy in non-infectious CryoVas. Off-label use of rituximab should be highlighted, based on the assessment of benefits and risks, especially infections. PMID:24647999

  19. Pyothorax caused by Nocardia otitidiscaviarum in a patient with rheumatoid vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kazuya; Bandoh, Shuji; Fujita, Jiro; Tokuda, Michiaki; Negayama, Kiyoshi; Ishida, Toshihiko

    2004-07-01

    We report a case of pyothorax caused by Nocardia (N.) otitidiscaviarum infection in a 69-year-old man with rheumatoid vasculitis, who was regularly treated with prednisolone in our hospital. Initially, the patient responded poorly to intravenous imipenem/cilastatin (IPM/CS), minocyclin (MINO), and oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX), but later improved after treatment with levofloxacin (LVFX) and gentamicin sulfate (GM) according to in vitro susceptibility tests. To our knowledge, this is the first description of pyothorax caused by N. otitidiscaviarum infection. It is a rare disease, but recognition of the disease in immunocompromised patients and the prompt initiation of appropriate treatments based on isolation of the pathogen and susceptibility testing can lead to a successful outcome. PMID:15335193

  20. Unusual cause of flare in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Glanville, James Robert William; Penn, Henry

    2016-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman attended for a routine outpatient appointment for follow-up of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive vasculitis. Her disease had relapsed despite appropriate medical management with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), as evidenced by rising acute phase response and antimyeloperoxidase titre with ongoing symptoms. On further questioning, she had been taking oral charcoal as part of a detoxification diet, which we postulate was causing significantly impaired MMF absorption. This case report summarises the presentation and highlights the importance of a thorough drug history, and should prompt the reader to keep an open mind with regard to drug interactions and treatment regimen adherence when treatment is, unexpectedly, seemingly failing. PMID:26746838

  1. Localized chronic fibrosing vasculitis in a tattoo: a unique adverse tattoo reaction.

    PubMed

    Deeken, Audrey; Jefferson, Julie; Hawkinson, Dana; Fraga, Garth R

    2014-04-01

    Decorative tattoos are associated with a variety of adverse cutaneous reactions. We describe a unique fibrosing vasculitic reaction to red tattoo ink. The histopathology was similar to that in localized chronic fibrosing vasculitis (LCFV), but sharply limited to sites of red tattoo ink injection and associated with florid verrucoid epidermal hyperplasia. LCFV has been described in a broad variety of slowly progressive disorders with a firm consistency such as erythema elevatum diutinum, plasma cell granuloma, granuloma faciale, and IgG4-associated sclerosing diseases. It has been hypothesized that LCFV is the result of maladaptive immune reaction with failure to clear the causative antigen. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of LCFV associated with tattoo. We speculate on the implications our case holds for the pathogenesis of LCFV. PMID:24736671

  2. Treatment of vasculitis and dermatitis in a 59-yr-old Nile hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius).

    PubMed

    Spriggs, Maria; Reeder, Chris

    2012-09-01

    A 59-yr-old female Nile hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius) was diagnosed and treated for severe dermatitis. Lesions included large areas of depigmentation, erosions, and ulcerations on glabrous skin areas, limbs, and perineal region. Histopathologic lesions included a markedly edematous, focally eroded, ulcerative to necrotic epidermis; foci of keratinocyte apoptosis; and a mixed suppurative dermatitis. Most of the dermal vessels had variable hyalinized walls with plump endothelial cells and frequent intramural neutrophils, and some vessels had vascular thrombi consistent with vasculitis. Culture of the lesions yielded beta-hemolytic Streptococcus, Morganella morgannii, and Enterococcus sp. The hippopotamus was successfully treated with sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim, amoxicillin, and pentoxifylline for more than 2 mo, and the condition did not recur over the subsequent 16 mo. PMID:23082536

  3. ANCA-associated vasculitis and pauci-immune glomerulonephritis in HIV disease

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Rhys; Gueret-Wardle, Alexander; Edwards, Simon; Salama, Alan

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 51-year-old African woman with longstanding well-controlled HIV who developed relapsing systemic antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis and glomerulonephritis. She presented with an acute kidney injury and heavy proteinuria in the setting of a prolonged history of diffuse arthralgias and transient ocular symptoms. Antimyeloperoxidase (MPO) antibody titre was >100 IU/mL. Subsequent renal biopsy demonstrated a focal necrotising pauci-immune glomerulonephritis and a diagnosis of MPO-ANCA-associated microscopic polyangiitis was made. The patient was treated with tapering glucocorticoids and rituximab with resolution of her acute kidney injury and reduction in her proteinuria. Treatment was complicated by the development of steroid-induced diabetes and one mild clinical relapse, but was otherwise well tolerated without infectious complications or deterioration in her HIV disease. PMID:24692374

  4. Recent advances in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Lazarus, B.; John, G. T.; O’Callaghan, C.; Ranganathan, D.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis is an uncommon inflammatory disease of small to medium-sized vessels that frequently presents with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and renal failure though it can affect any organ system. If untreated, the vast majority of patients will die within a year. Current treatments improve prognosis but affected patients remain at a substantially higher risk of death and adverse outcomes. We review the classification of the disease, our understanding of the pathogenesis and epidemiology, and propose future directions for research. We also evaluate the evidence supporting established treatment regimens and the progress of clinical trials for newer treatments to inform the design of future studies. PMID:27051131

  5. Recent advances in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, B; John, G T; O'Callaghan, C; Ranganathan, D

    2016-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis is an uncommon inflammatory disease of small to medium-sized vessels that frequently presents with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and renal failure though it can affect any organ system. If untreated, the vast majority of patients will die within a year. Current treatments improve prognosis but affected patients remain at a substantially higher risk of death and adverse outcomes. We review the classification of the disease, our understanding of the pathogenesis and epidemiology, and propose future directions for research. We also evaluate the evidence supporting established treatment regimens and the progress of clinical trials for newer treatments to inform the design of future studies. PMID:27051131

  6. [Digoxin-related leukocytoclastic vasculitis in a very elderly woman: A case report].

    PubMed

    Ludwig-Béal, S; Vernier, N; Popitean, L; Levêque, L; Combret, S; Manckoundia, P

    2016-05-01

    Even though digoxin causes many side effects, few cases of skin involvement are recorded in the French Pharmacovigilance Database. We report a case of leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LV) very probably due to digoxin. A 91-year-old woman, hospitalized following a fall, presented cardiac decompensation in a context of rapid atrial fibrillation requiring treatment with digoxin. Eight days later, a rash appeared on her back and trunk. It was neither itchy, nor painful and persisted despite local treatment. There were no other clinical anomalies. After a few days, the rash spread with appearance of bullous lesions, ulcerations and a necrosis on lymphedema of the two legs. Among the complementary examinations, skin biopsy revealed LV with necrosis and subepidermal detachment suggested toxic dermal necrolysis, while direct immunofluorescence was negative. The rash resolved progressively once the digoxin was stopped. The pharmacovigilance department recorded that digoxin was the probable cause. The evidence allowed us to conclude that digoxin was the cause. PMID:26970812

  7. Is Levamisole-Induced Vasculitis a Relegated Diagnostic Possibility? A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Patnaik, Soumya; Balderia, Percy; Vanchhawng, Lisa; Markazi, Peyman; Wykretowicz, Jedrzej; Perloff, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 38 Final Diagnosis: Levamisole induced vasculitis Symptoms: Skin and joint Medication: — Clinical Procedure: None Specialty: Toxicology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Levamisole, a veterinary anti-helminthic, is a common adulterant in cocaine. Levamisole-induced vasculopathy (LIV) is a relatively new entity, and is being increasingly recognized since it was first reported in 2010. Although cutaneous findings, agranulocytosis, and positive antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are characteristic, the full clinical picture and appropriate management remain unclear. Case Report: A 38-year-old woman presented with malaise and a pruritic, painful rash on all extremities, right ankle pain, and effusion and necrosis of the right 2nd and 3rd finger tips. After extensive work-up, we determined that she had LIV. Conclusions: Arthritis-dermatitis syndrome in cocaine users should raise suspicion for LIV. Although some features are characteristic, the full clinical spectrum is yet to be described. Management is supportive. PMID:26406869

  8. Varicella-Zoster Virus Vasculopathy: A Case Report Demonstrating Vasculitis using Black-Blood MRI

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jay; Poonawala, Husain; Keay, Susan K; Serulle, Yafell; Steven, Andrew; Gandhi, Dheeraj; Cole, John W

    2016-01-01

    Infections are rare but important causes of stroke. Among these, varicella zoster virus has been known to cause ischemic stroke. During an attack of herpes zoster ophthalmicus, it has been hypothesized that the virus replicates in the trigeminal ganglion and travels via the trigeminal nerve centrally to cause cerebral vasculopathy. Here we present a case of a 69 year-old Caucasian immunocompromised woman who suffered recurrent ischemic infarcts within the same vascular distribution following an episode of zoster ophthalmicus three months prior. An imaging technique termed black-blood magnetic resonance imaging was utilized to aid in the diagnosis of cerebral vasculitis. The case is used to provide a literature review of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of cerebral varicella zoster vasculopathy. In situations where an isolated unilateral cerebral vasculopathy is identified, neurologists are urged to consider varicella zoster as a treatable etiologic agent, as untreated vasculopathy can lead to further strokes. PMID:27065314

  9. Childhood-onset eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis: a rare childhood vasculitis mimicking anthrax and eosinophilic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Sezgin; Adrovic, Amra; Barut, Kenan; Kasapcopur, Ozgur

    2016-01-01

    A 14-year-old boy previously misdiagnosed as having cutaneous anthrax was referred with a 2-month history of multiple wide and deep ulceronecrotic lesions in the lower extremities, which occurred after contact with animals. Skin biopsy was compatible with vasculitis. Further examination at our hospital elicited eosinophilia and a history of asthma. On the second day of hospitalisation, he developed deep vein thrombosis. A diagnosis of eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA) was established and intravenous methylprednisolone was administered. The patient showed remarkable improvement of the cutaneous lesions. Diagnosis of EGPA is challenging in the vasculitic phase and necessitates a detailed history that specifically questions the patient for an asthma background. This case illustrates a severe cutaneous presentation of EGPA and emphasises the difficulty of diagnosis as a result of overlapped signs and symptoms with cutaneous anthrax and leukaemia. EGPA should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of cutaneous lesions associated with eosinophilia. PMID:26887883

  10. The two-edged sword: vasculitis associated with HIV and hepatitis C coinfection.

    PubMed

    Ojaimi, Samar; Lin, Ming-Wei; Singh, Kasha P; Woolley, Ian

    2014-02-01

    Vasculitis has long been associated with chronic viral infections, thus the twin perils of the infection and the immune response against it that bedevils the specialties of infection and immunity. After HIV was identified, it too became associated with vasculitic syndromes. Later, hepatitis C virus was also isolated, identified and described with its own spectrum of vasculitic diseases, including hepatitis C virus-associated cryoglobulinaemia. With the increasing prevalence of HIV and hepatitis C virus coinfection, there has come an increasing recognition of the range of vasculitides that can occur in this population leading to significant morbidity, diagnostic and treatment challenges. In this review, we examine the epidemiology, pathogenesis and general principles of treatment of these systemic diseases in HIV/hepatitis C virus coinfected individuals. PMID:23970639

  11. Farm Exposure as a Differential Risk Factor in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Willeke, P.; Schlüter, B.; Sauerland, C.; Becker, H.; Reuter, S.; Jacobi, A.; Schotte, H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association of farm exposure and the development of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). Methods One hundred eighty-nine well defined patients with AAV (n = 119 with granulomatosis with polyangiitis [GPA], n = 48 with microscopic polyangiitis [MPA], n = 22 patients with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis [EGPA]) and 190 controls (n = 119 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, n = 71 with large vessel vasculitis) were interrogated using a structured questionnaire. Factors investigated were occupation, farm exposure, contact to different livestock, participation in harvesting, residence next to a farm, MRSA status, and contact to domestic pets at disease onset or ever before. The odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval [95%CI] were calculated for each item. Results Univariate analysis revealed a strong association of AAV with regular farm exposure; OR 3.44 [95%CI 1.43–8.27]. AAV was also associated with regular contact to cattle 4.30 (1.43–8.27), pigs 2.75 (1.12–6.75) and MRSA carriage 3.38 (1.11–10.3). This association was stronger in the subgroup of GPA patients. OR in this group for farm exposure was 4.97; [2.02–12.2], for cattle 6.71 [95% CI 2.19–20.7], for pigs 4.34 [1.75–10.9], and MRSA carriage 5.06 [1.62–15.8]). There was no significant association of MPA or EGPA with these parameters. Conclusion A significant association between farm exposure or farm animal exposure and AAV especially in the subgroup of patients with GPA has been identified. This suggests that these entities are distinct and have different triggers for the immune process. PMID:26339905

  12. Polyarteritis nodosa. Diagnostic challenges in a patient with cutaneous vasculitis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis and pancytopenia: fatal progression after treatment with G-CSF

    PubMed Central

    Jobanputra, Paresh

    2016-01-01

    A 60-year-old man presented with cutaneous vasculitis, leucopenia and psoriasis. He was treated initially with ciclosporin A. On withdrawal of ciclosporin, due to inadequate improvement of cutaneous vasculitis, he developed psoriatic arthritis. Worsening neutropenia and pancytopenia, believed to be immune mediated, developed. He was treated with prednisolone, methotrexate and adalimumab but developed pneumocystis pneumonia. Leucocyte levels improved markedly with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). However, whilst being treated with G-CSF his condition deteriorated. He developed gastrointestinal and neurological symptoms and progressive weight loss. Diagnosis was delayed, but eventually polyarteritis nodosa was diagnosed and he was treated with cyclophosphamide. The patient improved initially but died from small bowel perforation due to vasculitis. Evidence showing a temporal association of his deterioration with use of G-CSF is shown. The use of G-CSF in patients with autoimmune conditions including vasculitis should be undertaken with great caution. PMID:27123310

  13. IgG rheumatoid factor, complement and immune complexes in rheumatoid synovitis and vasculitis: comparative and serial studies during cytotoxic therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, D G; Bacon, P A; Allen, C; Elson, C J; Wallington, T

    1981-01-01

    IgG and IgM rheumatoid factors (IgG-RF and IgM-RF), complement and three assays for immune complexes were measured in 22 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) complicated by either chronic active synovitis or vasculitis. Patients with vasculitis had relatively inactive arthritis but had higher titres of rheumatoid factors, especially IgG-RF, anticomplementary activity (ACA) and lower levels of C4 than those with synovitis. Clq-binding and platelet aggregation (PA) levels were similar in both groups. Serial measurements during cytotoxic therapy showed a close temporal relationship between the clinical features of vasculitis and levels of IgG-RF, ACA and C4 both with remission and with relapse. We suggest that immune complexes containing IgG-RF which activate complement and are detected by ACA are useful markers of rheumatoid vasculitis and may be important in its pathogenesis. PMID:7249394

  14. A Case of Rituximab Use as an Induction and Maintenance of Remission in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Awad, Neveen; Hafiz, Shahd; Albeity, Abdurahman; Almoallim, Hani

    2016-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody- (ANCA-) associated vasculitis (AAV) is a multisystem autoimmune disease affecting mainly microscopic blood vessels due to circulating autoantibodies against neutrophil cytoplasmic antigens. We report a case of a 57-year-old female patient presenting with hemoptysis, sinusitis, and conjunctivitis. Based on lung biopsy, the diagnosis of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody- (ANCA-) associated vasculitis (AAV) was established. She was put on rituximab as induction and maintenance therapy. She responded initially to rituximab as induction therapy but failed to respond in the maintenance course of the drug. Rituximab was stopped and mycophenolate mofetil was administered. She responded as laboratory c-ANCA titers turned negative and symptoms subsided. There are no randomized clinical trials addressing rituximab effect in induction and remission at the same time. This case report doubts the efficacy of the use of rituximab therapy for both induction and maintenance of remission at the same time, waiting for the results of the ongoing trials. PMID:27006851

  15. Novel CFI mutation in a patient with leukocytoclastic vasculitis may redefine the clinical spectrum of Complement Factor I deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bay, Jakob Thaning; Katzenstein, Terese Lea; Kofoed, Kristian; Patel, Dustin; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole; Garred, Peter; Schejbel, Lone

    2015-10-01

    Factor I is an important regulator of the complement system. Lack of Factor I causes uncontrolled activation of the complement system leading to consumption of C3. Complete deficiency of Factor I is a rare condition and only around 40 cases has been reported in the literature. The clinical presentation of Factor I deficiency varies and includes severe recurrent bacterial infections, glomerulonephritis and autoimmune diseases. The patient, a 28-years old woman with consanguineous parents, presented with recurrent leukocytoclastic vasculitis in the lower extremities with no associated systemic involvement, and without increased infection tendency. Initial testing showed low C3 concentration and a detailed complement evaluation absence of complement Factor I. Sequencing revealed a homozygous missense mutation in exon 2 of the CFI gene (SCV000221312). Even though the clinical symptoms of CFI mutations vary among patients sole association with leukocytoclastic vasculitis redefines the clinical spectrum of complete Factor I deficiency. PMID:25988862

  16. PR3ANCA Related Cerebral Vasculitis in Ulcerative Colitis Presenting with Orbital Involvement: A Case Report with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    PR3 ANCA is a classic marker of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). There have been several recent reports of increased prevalence of PR3ANCA in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, the clinical implication of which is not well defined. We are reporting a case of 27-year-old Caucasian male with 14-year history of UC presenting with unilateral proptosis, conjunctival congestion, and chemosis who developed acute hemiparesis within three days of hospital admission, followed by rapid neurological deterioration correlating with brain imaging findings. Serologically he had atypical PANCA with high PR3 antibody titer with a negative infectious workup. His cerebral angiogram was normal but the brain biopsy showed necrotizing vasculitis. He was diagnosed with PR3 ANCA mediated cerebral and orbital vasculitis associated with UC. Treatment was initiated with high dose steroids, plasmapheresis, and cyclophosphamide. He improved significantly with residual left hemiparesis. PMID:25097791

  17. Relapsed Brucellosis Presenting as Neurobrucellosis with Cerebral Vasculitis in a Patient Previously Diagnosed with Brucellar Spondylitis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Jung; Lee, Su Jin; Ahn, Eun Young; Ryu, Dae Gon; Choi, Yu Hee; Kim, Tae Hyun

    2015-12-01

    Brucellosis is a multisystem disease with various clinical symptoms. Neurobrucellosis is a rare but serious manifestation of brucellosis. A 60-year-old man with a previous diagnosis of brucellar spondylitis presented with sudden onset of aphasia and numbness of the right upper extremity. Cerebral angiography showed diffuse narrowing and dilatation on the distal branches of both the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) and the left middle cerebral artery (MCA) which indicated cerebral vasculitis, and the patient's Brucella agglutinin titer was 1:1280. After combined antimicrobial and steroid therapy was started, the patient's condition improved significantly, and he was discharged after 1 month. Antimicrobial therapy was continued for 16 months on an outpatient basis, and the last Brucella agglutinin titer was 1:40. To our knowledge, this is the first case of relapsed neurobrucellosis with vasculitis in Korea to have been treated successfully. PMID:26788412

  18. Relapsed Brucellosis Presenting as Neurobrucellosis with Cerebral Vasculitis in a Patient Previously Diagnosed with Brucellar Spondylitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Eun Young; Ryu, Dae Gon; Choi, Yu Hee; Kim, Tae Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Brucellosis is a multisystem disease with various clinical symptoms. Neurobrucellosis is a rare but serious manifestation of brucellosis. A 60-year-old man with a previous diagnosis of brucellar spondylitis presented with sudden onset of aphasia and numbness of the right upper extremity. Cerebral angiography showed diffuse narrowing and dilatation on the distal branches of both the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) and the left middle cerebral artery (MCA) which indicated cerebral vasculitis, and the patient's Brucella agglutinin titer was 1:1280. After combined antimicrobial and steroid therapy was started, the patient's condition improved significantly, and he was discharged after 1 month. Antimicrobial therapy was continued for 16 months on an outpatient basis, and the last Brucella agglutinin titer was 1:40. To our knowledge, this is the first case of relapsed neurobrucellosis with vasculitis in Korea to have been treated successfully. PMID:26788412

  19. A Case of Rituximab Use as an Induction and Maintenance of Remission in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Hafiz, Shahd; Albeity, Abdurahman; Almoallim, Hani

    2016-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody- (ANCA-) associated vasculitis (AAV) is a multisystem autoimmune disease affecting mainly microscopic blood vessels due to circulating autoantibodies against neutrophil cytoplasmic antigens. We report a case of a 57-year-old female patient presenting with hemoptysis, sinusitis, and conjunctivitis. Based on lung biopsy, the diagnosis of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody- (ANCA-) associated vasculitis (AAV) was established. She was put on rituximab as induction and maintenance therapy. She responded initially to rituximab as induction therapy but failed to respond in the maintenance course of the drug. Rituximab was stopped and mycophenolate mofetil was administered. She responded as laboratory c-ANCA titers turned negative and symptoms subsided. There are no randomized clinical trials addressing rituximab effect in induction and remission at the same time. This case report doubts the efficacy of the use of rituximab therapy for both induction and maintenance of remission at the same time, waiting for the results of the ongoing trials. PMID:27006851

  20. Safety and efficacy of rituximab treatment for vasculitis in hepatitis B virus-associated type II cryoglobulinemia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Systemic B-cell depletion and clinical remission of the systemic effects of cryoglobulins have already been achieved using rituximab in hepatitis C virus-positive immunocompetent patients. Conversely, to the best of our knowledge there are no reports in the literature regarding the use of rituximab in hepatitis B virus-associated cryoglobulinemia. Case presentation We report here the case of a 60-year-old Caucasian man who presented with hepatitis B virus-associated type II cryoglobulinemia with severe multisystem disease, including membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with acute renal failure. The vasculitis was refractory to conventional and antiviral therapy but rituximab use led to a fall in cryoglobulin levels and disease control. The B-cell depletion was safe and efficient to induce a complete remission of the disease. Conclusion Our case highlights the benefit and the efficacy of rituximab in association with antiviral therapy in small vessel vasculitis related to hepatitis B virus-associated mixed cryoglobulinemia. PMID:22284897

  1. Long-term Prognosis of Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Negative Renal Vasculitis: Cohort Study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mi-Yeon; Baek, Seon Ha; Ahn, Shin-Young; Kim, Sejoong; Na, Ki Young; Chae, Dong-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have reported on the long-term prognosis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-negative renal vasculitis. Between April 2003 and December 2013, 48 patients were diagnosed with renal vasculitis. Their ANCA status was tested using indirect immunofluorescence and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. During a median (interquartile range) follow-up duration of 933.5 (257.5–2,079.0) days, 41.7% of patients progressed to end stage renal disease (ESRD) and 43.8% died from any cause. Of 48 patients, 6 and 42 were ANCA-negative and positive, respectively. The rate of ESRD within 3 months was higher in ANCA-negative patients than in ANCA-positive patients (P = 0.038). In Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, ANCA-negative patients showed shorter renal survival than did ANCA-positive patients (log-rank P = 0.033). In univariate Cox-proportional hazard regression analysis, ANCA-negative patients showed increased risk of ESRD, with a hazard ratio 3.190 (95% confidence interval, 1.028–9.895, P = 0.045). However, the effect of ANCA status on renal survival was not statistically significant in multivariate analysis. Finally, ANCA status did not significantly affect patient survival. In conclusion, long-term patient and renal survival of ANCA-negative renal vasculitis patients did not differ from those of ANCA-positive renal vasculitis patients. Therefore, different treatment strategy depending on ANCA status might be unnecessary. PMID:27051237

  2. Long-Term Maintenance Therapy Using Rituximab-Induced Continuous B-Cell Depletion in Patients with ANCA Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Pendergraft, William F.; Cortazar, Frank B.; Wenger, Julia; Murphy, Andrew P.; Rhee, Eugene P.; Laliberte, Karen A.; Niles, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Remission in the majority of ANCA vasculitis patients is not sustained after a single course of rituximab, and risk of relapse warrants development of a successful strategy to ensure durable remission. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A retrospective analysis of ANCA vasculitis patients who underwent maintenance therapy using rituximab-induced continuous B-cell depletion for up to 7 years was performed. Maintenance therapy with rituximab was initiated after achieving remission or converting from other prior maintenance therapy. Continuous B-cell depletion was achieved in all patients by scheduled rituximab administration every 4 months. Disease activity, serologic parameters, adverse events, and survival were examined. Results In the study, 172 patients (mean age=60 years, 55% women, 57% myeloperoxidase–ANCA) treated from April of 2006 to March of 2013 underwent continuous B-cell depletion with rituximab. Median remission maintenance follow-up time was 2.1 years. Complete remission (Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score [BVAS]=0) was achieved in all patients. Major relapse (BVAS≥3) occurred in 5% of patients and was associated with weaning of other immunosuppression drugs. Remission was reinduced in all patients. Survival mirrored survival of a general age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched United States population. Conclusion This analysis provides evidence for long-term disease control using continuous B-cell depletion. This treatment strategy in ANCA vasculitis patients also seems to result in survival rates comparable with rates in a matched reference population. These findings suggest that prospective remission maintenance treatment trials using continuous B-cell depletion are warranted. PMID:24626432

  3. Acute dilated cardiomyopathy in a patient with beriberi and cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis: an unusual potential complication of two rare disorders.

    PubMed

    Tejedor, Ana; Solé, Manel; Prieto-González, Sergio; Alba, Marco Antonio; Grau, Josep Maria; Cid, Maria Cinta; Hernández-Rodríguez, José

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 45-year-old patient who presented with acute dilated cardiomyopathy. During admission the patient was consecutively diagnosed with cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis and beriberi. In both diseases, cardiac involvement may occur as dilated cardiomyopathy. Thiamin deficiency was the final cause for the severe cardiac manifestations (cardiac acute beriberi or Shoshin syndrome), which returned to normal after thiamin supplementation. PMID:24429381

  4. Primary central nervous system vasculitis preceded by granulomatous hypophysitis: Case report with a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Meng; Steele, William J.; Baskin, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Primary central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis is an idiopathic inflammatory process that selectively affects CNS vasculature without a systemic inflammatory response, and causes luminal obstruction with resultant ischemia of recipient tissue. Its varying clinical symptoms and signs depend on the caliber of vessels involved and distribution and location of the affected structures. Granulomatous hypophysitis (GH) is an autoimmune inflammatory process typically affecting women, and usually presents with hypopituitarism, and at times, diabetes insipidus, and/or visual loss. Both entities are rare CNS diseases, which, to our knowledge, have never been previously reported in the same patient. Case Description: We present a unique case of chronic progressive primary CNS vasculitis causing limbic encephalopathy in a 30-year-old male with only a history of medication-controlled hypertension. He initially presented 4 months prior with nonspecific neurological complaints and was found to have a homogenously enhancing and enlarged pituitary, which was biopsy proven to be GH. Conclusion: This rather unique presentation highlights the need to maintain a high index of suspicion for underlying PCNS vasculitis in a patient who does not fit the typical demographic for isolated GH. PMID:26539311

  5. Hepatotropic Viral Infection Associated Systemic Vasculitides—Hepatitis B Virus Associated Polyarteritis Nodosa and Hepatitis C Virus Associated Cryoglobulinemic Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Aman; Sharma, Kusum

    2013-01-01

    Two hepatotropic viruses have been shown to have causal relationship with systemic vasculitis-hepatitis B with classical polyarteritis nodosa and hepatitis C with cryoglobulinemic vasculitis. The present paper provides an updated overview on the clinical presentations and management of these vasculitides. HBV associated PAN patients have higher weight loss, peripheral neuropathy, mononeuritis multiplex, abdominal pain, gastrointestinal manifestations requiring surgery, cardiomyopathy, orchitis, hypertension, and/or elevated transaminase levels. Microaneurysms are also more common in mesenteric artery. Skin manifestations, however are less common. These patients also have a severe disease as suggested by higher five factor score and higher BVAS. Though relapses are less common, mortality is higher in patients with HBV PAN as compared to non HBV PAN. Plasmapheresis has a role in treatment in clearing off immune complexes. The common clinical manifestations of HCV associated cryoglobulinemic vasculitis are skin lesions, peripheral neuropathy, glomerulonephritis, arthritis, and sicca symptoms. Though combination therapy comprising of pegylated interferon α and ribavirin is the first line of management, immunotherapy is needed for severe or life threatening manifestations. Recent randomized trials have shown the efficacy of rituximab in such situations. PMID:25755502

  6. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Rituximab Following Failure of Antiviral Therapy for Hepatitis C-Associated Cryoglobulinemic Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Sneller, Michael C.; Hu, Zonghui; Langford, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To report on the results of a randomized controlled trial of rituximab in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-associated mixed cryoglobulinemic vasculitis. METHODS We conducted an open-label single center randomized controlled trial of rituximab (375 mg/m2 per week for 4 weeks) compared to best available therapy for treatment of patients with HCV-associated cryoglobulinemic vasculitis in whom antiviral therapy failed to induce remission. The primary endpoint was remission at 6 months from study entry. RESULTS A total of 24 patients were enrolled. Baseline disease activity and organ involvement were similar in the two groups. Ten patients in the rituximab group (83%) were in remission at study month 6, compared with 1 patient in the control group (8%), a result that met criterion for stopping the study (P<0.001). The median duration of remission for rituximab-treated patients reaching the primary endpoint was 7 months. No adverse effect of rituximab on HCV plasma viremia or hepatic transaminase levels was observed. CONCLUSIONS Therapy with rituximab was well tolerated and effective treatment for patients with HCV-associated cryoglobulinemic vasculitis in whom antiviral therapy fails to induce remission. PMID:22147444

  7. Static and fatigue tensile properties of cross-ply laminates containing vascules for self-healing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luterbacher, R.; Trask, R. S.; Bond, I. P.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of including hollow channels (vascules) within cross-ply laminates on static tensile properties and fatigue performance is investigated. No change in mechanical properties or damage formation is observed when a single vascule is included in the 0/90 interface, representing 0.5% of the cross sectional area within the specimen. During tensile loading, matrix cracks develop in the 90° layers leading to a reduction of stiffness and strength (defined as the loss of linearity) and a healing agent is injected through the vascules in order to heal them and mitigate the caused degradation. Two different healing agents, a commercial low viscosity epoxy resin (RT151, Resintech) and a toughened epoxy blend (bespoke, in-house formulation) have been used to successfully recover stiffness under static loading conditions. The RT151 system recovered 75% of the initial failure strength, whereas the toughened epoxy blend achieved a recovery of 67%. Under fatigue conditions, post healing, a rapid decay of stiffness was observed as the healed damage re-opened within the first 2500 cycles. This was caused by the high fatigue loading intensity, which was near the static failure strength of the healing resin. However, the potential for ameliorating (via self-healing or autonomous repair) more diffuse transverse matrix damage via a vascular network has been shown.

  8. HCV-related cryoglobulinemic vasculitis: an update on its etiopathogenesis and therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Ferri, C; Giuggioli, D; Cazzato, M; Sebastiani, M; Mascia, M T; Zignego, A L

    2003-01-01

    Cryoglobulinemic vasculitis (CV) is an immune-complex-mediated systemic vasculitis involving small-medium sized vessels. A causative role of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in over 4/5 patients has been definitely established on the basis of epidemiological, pathological, and laboratory studies. There is great geographical heterogeneity in the prevalence of CV as well as other HCV-related immuno-lymphoproliferative disorders. Thus, unknown environmental and/or genetic co-factors should contribute to the pathogenesis of these conditions. Due to the biological properties, HCV genomic sequences cannot be integrated into the host genome; the virus could trigger the immunological alterations only indirectly by exerting a chronic stimulus to the immune system. Recent laboratory observations gave us new important insights on the complex pathogenetic mechanism(s) of HCV-related CV. Firstly, the HCV envelop protein E2, able to bind CD81 molecule expressed on B-lymphocytes, might be involved in the first steps of HCV-driven autoimmune and lymphoproliferative phenomena. The interaction between HCV-E2 and CD81 may increase the frequency of VDJ rearrangement in antigen-reactive B-cell. One possible consequence may be the activation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protoncogene that leads to extended B-cell survival. Interestingly, t(14, 18) translocation along with Bcl-2 activation have been demonstrated in B-lymphocytes of 80% HCV-related CV. The B-lymphocyte expansion is responsible for a wide autoantibody and immune-complex production, including mixed cryoglobulins. CV shows a relatively benign clinical course; however, its cumulative survival is significantly worse if compared to general population. For a correct therapeutic approach to HCV-related CV we must deal with conflicting conditions: HCV infection, autoimmune, and lymphoproliferative alterations. Therapeutic strategy of CV includes etiologic, pathogenetic, and/or symptomatic therapies, which should be tailored for the single patient according to the severity of clinical symptoms. A careful clinical monitoring of patients with HCV-related CV is mandatory in all cases, with particular attention to neoplastic complications. PMID:14740431

  9. Spotlight on rituximab in the treatment of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Moog, Philipp; Thuermel, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    A 54-year-old patient presented to his general practitioner because of strong muscle pain in both thighs. Inflammatory parameters (CRP 16.3 mg/dL) and white blood cells (15 g/L) were elevated. The patient reported a weight loss of 10 kg in 4 weeks. There was no fever or any other specific symptoms. Urine dipstick examination and computed tomography of the chest were unremarkable. Because of increasing symptoms, the patient was referred to our department. Magnetic resonance tomography showed diffuse inflammatory changes of the muscles of both thighs. Neurological examination and electrophysiology revealed axonal sensorimotor neuropathy and ground-glass opacities of both lungs had occurred. Serum creatinine increased to 229 μmol/L within a few days, with proteinuria of 3.3 g/g creatinine. Kidney biopsy showed diffuse pauci-immune proliferative glomerulonephritis. Proteinase 3-specific antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies were markedly increased. Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score was 35. Within 2 days, serum creatinine further increased to 495 μmol/L. Plasma exchange, high-dose glucocorticosteroids, and hemodialysis were started. The patient received cyclophosphamide 1 g twice and rituximab 375 mg/m2 four times according to the RITUXVAS protocol. Despite ongoing therapy, hemodialysis could not be withdrawn and had to be continued over 3 weeks until diuresis normalized. Glucocorticosteroids were tapered to 20 mg after 2 months, and serum creatinine was 133 μmol/L. However, nephritic urinary sediment reappeared. Another dose of 1 g cyclophosphamide was given, and glucocorticosteroids were raised for another 4 weeks. After 6 months, the daily prednisolone dose was able to be tapered to 5 mg. Serum creatinine was 124 μmol/L, proteinuria further decreased to 382 mg/g creatinine, and the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score was 0. Maintenance therapy with rituximab 375 mg/m2 every 6 months was started. At the last visit after 8 months, the patient was still in remission, with only minor persistent dysesthesia of the left foot and a persistent serum creatinine of 133 μmol/L. PMID:26664125

  10. Rapidly progressive IgA nephropathy: a form of vasculitis or a complement-mediated disease?

    PubMed

    Rojas-Rivera, Jorge; Fernndez-Jurez, Gema; Praga, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    A rapidly progressive and crescentic IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is uncommon, but it has a high risk of progression to end-stage renal disease and variable response to immunosuppression. The importance of a positive anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) serology in this group of patients is not fully understood but may have prognostic significance. On the other hand, there is growing evidence of the role of complement in the pathogenesis of IgAN, especially in cases of crescentic IgAN. Therapies directed against the complement system are a potential and rational therapeutic approach. In this issue, two clinical studies of crescentic IgAN are presented. The first work, is a retrospective case-control study describing clinical presentation, histological findings and response to treatment of crescentic IgAN/positive ANCA patients, comparing them with IgAN/negative ANCA patients and ANCA vasculitis patients. The second is a case report showing the effect of eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody that is a terminal cascade complement inhibitor, as salvage therapy for crescentic IgAN resistant to conventional immunosuppression. Both studies broaden our approach to patients with aggressive forms of IgAN. PMID:26413269

  11. Kaposi's sarcoma with HHV8 infection and ANCA-associated vasculitis in a hemodialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Fatma, Lilia Ben; Rais, Lamia; Mebazza, Amel; Azzouz, Haifa; Beji, Somaya; Krid, Madiha; Smaoui, Wided; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Zouaghi, Karim; Zitouna, Moncef; Osmane, Amel Ben; Moussa, Fatma Ben

    2013-11-01

    The association between Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and human herpes virus eight (HHV-8) infection is rarely reported in hemodialysis (HD) patients. We report here the rare association of KS, HHV-8 and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection as well as syphilis in a HD patient. We report the case of a 72-year-old woman who presented with microscopic polyangiitis with alveolar hemorrhage and pauci-immune necrosing and crescentic glomerulonephritis as well as renal failure requiring HD. Biological tests showed positive HCV and syphilis tests. The patient was treated by HD and intravenous pulse, followed by oral corticosteroids and six cyclophosphamide monthly pulses with remission of the alveolar hemorrhage, but without renal functional recovery as the patient remained HD dependent. Five months after the first treatment administration, she developed extensive purpuric lesions on her lower limbs, abdomen face and neck. A skin biopsy showed KS. The HHV-8 test was positive, with positive polymerase chain reaction-HHV8 in the serum and skin. After immunosuppression withdrawal, the KS skin lesions regressed rapidly without relapse after 12 months of follow-up, but alveolar hemorrhage relapsed after 16 months of follow-up. Our case showed that the immunosuppressed state related to multiple factors such as aging, vasculitis, HHV-8, HCV, syphilis, immunosuppressive therapy and HD may all have contributed to the development of KS in our patient. PMID:24231484

  12. Genetic Susceptibility to ANCA-Associated Vasculitis: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Bonatti, Francesco; Reina, Michele; Neri, Tauro Maria; Martorana, Davide

    2014-01-01

    ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) is a group of disorders that is caused by inflammation affecting small blood vessels. Both arteries and veins are affected. AAV includes microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) renamed from Wegeners granulomatosis, and eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA), renamed from ChurgStrauss syndrome. AAV is primarily due to leukocyte migration and resultant damage. Despite decades of research, the mechanisms behind AAV disease etiology are still not fully understood, although it is clear that genetic and environmental factors are involved. To improve the understanding of the disease, the genetic component has been extensively studied by candidate association studies and two genome-wide association studies. The majority of the identified genetic AAV risk factors are common variants. These have uncovered information that still needs further investigation to clarify its importance. In this review, we summarize and discuss the results of the genetic studies in AAV. We also present the novel approaches to identifying the causal variants in complex susceptibility loci and disease mechanisms. Finally, we discuss the limitations of current methods and the challenges that we still have to face in order to incorporate genomic and epigenomic data into clinical practice. PMID:25452756

  13. Relapsing polychondritis with p-ANCA associated vasculitis: Which triggers the other?

    PubMed Central

    File, Ibolya; Trinn, Csilla; Mátyus, Zsolt; Ujhelyi, László; Balla, József; Mátyus, János

    2014-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare autoimmune disease with chronic inflammatory/destructive lesions of the cartilaginous tissues. In one third of the cases it is associated with other autoimmune disorders, mostly with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis (AAV). We report three cases of RP with p-ANCA positive AAV. In the first patient RP developed 1.5 years after the onset of AAV. In the others the signs of RP were present before the onset of severe crescent glomerulonephritis. Patients responded well on steroid and cyclophosphamide. In dialysis dependent cases plasmapheresis was also used successfully. During the 2 and 1.5 years of follow up, they were symptom-free, and had stable glomerular filtration rate. The first patient died after four years of follow-up due to the complications of sudden unset pancytopenia, which raises the possibility of associated hemophagocytic syndrome. In the setting of RP or AAV physicians should always be aware of the possibility of sudden or insidious appearance of the other disease. PMID:25516870

  14. A case of primary central nervous system vasculitis diagnosed by second brain biopsy and treated successfully.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yuri; Shigeto, Hiroshi; Yamada, Takeshi; Maeda, Norihisa; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Kira, Jun-Ichi

    2016-03-30

    We report a case of primary central nervous system vasculitis (PCNSV) diagnosed by second brain biopsy. A 53-year-old man initially presented with left lateral gaze diplopia. Brain MRI revealed multiple enhanced lesions in the bilateral frontal lobe, bilateral basal ganglia, left cerebellum and brainstem. An initial brain biopsy of the right frontal lobe suggested immune-related encephalitis with angiocentric accumulation of chronic inflammatory cells, while malignant lymphoma could not be completely ruled out. The patient deteriorated despite being treated with repeated methylprednisolone pulse therapy, cyclophosphamide, and plasmapheresis. A second brain biopsy of the right temporal lobe was then performed. The biopsied specimens showed vascular wall disruption and fibrinoid necrosis with perivascular inflammatory infiltrates, mainly composed of CD8-positive T cells, and PCNSV was diagnosed. He was treated with high dose corticosteroids, in combination with methotrexate (8 mg/week), which reduced the brain lesions. As brain biopsy is an essential investigation for the histological diagnosis of PCNSV; subsequent biopsies may be required when a histopathological diagnosis has not been obtained by the first biopsy, and further aggressive therapy is being considered. PMID:26960271

  15. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase in B cells of hepatits C virus-related cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Russi, S; Dammacco, F; Sansonno, S; Pavone, F; Sansonno, D

    2015-12-01

    Immunoglobulin variable region heavy chain (IgVH ) somatic gene diversification is instrumental in the transformation process that characterizes hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related B cell lymphoproliferative disorders. However, the extent to which activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), an enzyme essential for IgV gene somatic hypermutation (SHM), is active in cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis (CV) remains unclear. AID mRNA expression in the peripheral blood of 102 chronically hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients (58 with and 44 without CV) and 26 healthy subjects was investigated using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The features of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) protein and mRNA transcripts were explored in liver tissue biopsies and portal tracts isolated using laser capture microdissection. In chronically HCV-infected patients, AID mRNA expression was almost threefold higher in those with than in those without CV and sevenfold higher than in healthy subjects (median-fold: 6.68 versus 2.54, P = 0.03 and versus 0.95, P = 0.0003). AID transcript levels were significantly higher in polyclonal than in clonally restricted B cell preparations in either CV or non-CV patients (median-fold, 15.0 versus 2.70, P = 0.009 and 3.46 versus 1.58, P = 0.02, respectively). AID gene expression was found to be related negatively to age and virological parameters. AID protein was found in portal tracts containing inflammatory cells that, in several instances, expressed AID mRNA transcripts. Our data indicate that the aberrant expression of AID may reflect continuous B cell activation and sustained survival signals in HCV-related CV patients. PMID:26219420

  16. Classification, epidemiology and clinical subgrouping of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Watts, Richard A; Mahr, Alfred; Mohammad, Aladdin J; Gatenby, Paul; Basu, Neil; Flores-Surez, Luis Felipe

    2015-04-01

    It is now 25 years since the first European studies on vasculitis--the anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) standardization project. Over that period of time, there have been major developments in the classification of the vasculitides, which has permitted the conduct of high-quality epidemiology studies. Studying the epidemiology of rare diseases such as the ANCA-associated vasculitides (AAV) poses considerable challenges to epidemiologists. The first is the need for a clear definition of a case with good differentiation from similar disorders. The second is case capture. The vasculitides are rare, and therefore, a large population is required to determine the incidence and prevalence, and this poses questions of feasibility. A large population increases the risk of incomplete case detection but permits a reasonable number of cases to be collected in a practicable time frame, whereas a smaller population requires a much longer time frame to collect the necessary cases, which may also not be feasible. Statistical methods of capture-recapture analysis enable estimates to be made of the number of missing cases. The third is case ascertainment. The AAV are virtually always managed in secondary care, and therefore, hospital-based case ascertainment may be appropriate. Fourthly, the rarity of the conditions makes prospective case-control studies investigating risk factors difficult to conduct because the population size required to achieve statistical confidence is in excess of that which is readily available. Thus, much of the data on risk factors are derived from retrospective studies with inherent potential bias. PMID:25805746

  17. Detection of Anti-Pentraxin-3 Autoantibodies in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Guilpain, Philippe; Jeannin, Pascale; Pignon, Pascale; Blanchard, Simon; Garo, Erwan; Jaillon, Sébastien; Chevailler, Alain; Renier, Gilles; Puéchal, Xavier; Bottazzi, Barbara; Mantovani, Alberto; Delneste, Yves; Augusto, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Pentraxin 3 (PTX3), in common with myeloperoxidase and proteinase 3, is stored in human neutrophil granules and is expressed on apoptotic neutrophil surface. We therefore investigated the presence of anti-PTX3 autoantibodies (aAbs) in the sera of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) patients. Methods Presence of anti-PTX3 autoantibodies was analysed by a specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in sera from 150 patients with microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), and eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA), and in sera of 227 healthy subjects (HS), 40 systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients, and 25 giant cell arteritis patients (GCA). Using indirect immunofluorescence on fixed human neutrophils, we also analyzed the staining pattern associated with the presence of anti-PTX3 aAbs. Results Anti-PTX3 aAbs were detected in 56 of 150 (37.3%) of the AAV patients (versus 12 of 227 (5.3%) of HS, p<0.001) and, interestingly, in 7 of 14 MPO and PR3 ANCA negative AAV patients. Moreover, by indirect immunofluorescence on fixed neutrophils, anti-PTX3 aAbs gave rise to a specific cytoplasmic fluorescence pattern distinct from the classical cytoplasmic (c-ANCA), perinuclear (p-ANCA), and atypical (a-ANCA) pattern. Anti-PTX3 aAbs levels were higher in patients with active AAV as compared to patients with inactive disease. Conclusion Our work suggests that PTX3 is as a novel ANCA antigen. Anti-PTX3 aAbs appear thus as a promising novel biomarker in the diagnosis of AAV, including in patients without detectable MPO and PR3 ANCA. PMID:26797217

  18. Positron Emission Tomography scanning in Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Kemna, Michael J.; Vandergheynst, Frédéric; Vöö, Stefan; Blocklet, Didier; Nguyen, Thomas; Timmermans, Sjoerd A.M.E.G.; van Paassen, Pieter; Cogan, Elie; van Kroonenburgh, Marinus J.P.G.; Tervaert, Jan Willem Cohen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tools for evaluation of disease activity in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) include scoring clinical manifestations, determination of biochemical parameters of inflammation, and obtaining tissue biopsies. These tools, however, are sometimes inconclusive. 2-deoxy-2-[18F]-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) scans are commonly used to detect inflammatory or malignant lesions. Our objective is to explore the ability of PET scanning to assess the extent of disease activity in patients with AAV. Consecutive PET scans made between December 2006 and March 2014 in Maastricht (MUMC) and between July 2008 and June 2013 in Brussels (EUH) to assess disease activity in patients with AAV were retrospectively included. Scans were re-examined and quantitatively scored using maximum standard uptake values (SUVmax). PET findings were compared with C-reactive protein (CRP) and ANCA positivity at the time of scanning. Forty-four scans were performed in 33 patients during a period of suspected active disease. All but 2 scans showed PET-positive sites, most commonly the nasopharynx (n = 22) and the lung (n = 22). Forty-one clinically occult lesions were found, including the thyroid gland (n = 4 patients), aorta (n = 8), and bone marrow (n = 7). The amount of hotspots, but not the highest observed SUVmax value, was higher if CRP levels were elevated. Seventeen follow-up scans were made in 13 patients and showed decreased SUVmax values. FDG PET scans in AAV patients with active disease show positive findings in multiple sites of the body even when biochemical parameters are inconclusive, including sites clinically unsuspected and difficult to assess otherwise. PMID:25997040

  19. High Prevalence of Autoantibodies to hLAMP-2 in Anti–Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody–Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Tadema, Henko; McKinney, Eoin F.; Benharkou, Alexandra; Brandes, Ricarda; Peschel, Andrea; Hubert, Virginie; Feenstra, Tjerk; Sengölge, Gürkan; Stegeman, Coen; Heeringa, Peter; Lyons, Paul A.; Smith, Kenneth G.C.; Kallenberg, Cees; Rees, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    The involvement of autoantibodies to human lysosome-associated membrane protein-2 (hLAMP-2) in anti–neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)–associated vasculitis is controversial because of the absence of confirmatory data subsequent to the initial reports of their high prevalence in this disease. We characterized three assays for anti-hLAMP-2 antibodies: ELISA and Western blotting assays using unglycosylated recombinant hLAMP-2 expressed in Escherichia coli, and an indirect immunofluorescence assay using stably transfected ldlD cells that expressed glycosylated full-length hLAMP-2 on the plasma membrane. The assays detected autoantibodies to hLAMP-2 in human sera reproducibly and with comparable sensitivity and the assays gave the same results in 80.5% of the test panel of 40 selected positive and negative sera. In untreated patients at presentation, the frequencies of autoantibodies to LAMP-2 were 89%, 91%, and 80%, respectively, among three groups of patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis from Vienna, Austria (n=19); Groningen, the Netherlands (n=50) and Cambridge, United Kingdom (n=53). Prevalence of LAMP-2 autoantibodies was similar in both those with myeloperoxidase-ANCA and proteinase 3-ANCA. Furthermore, we detected LAMP-2 autoantibodies in two ANCA-negative patients. LAMP-2 autoantibodies rapidly became undetectable after the initiation of immunosuppressive treatment and frequently became detectable again during clinical relapse. We conclude that when robust assays are used, circulating autoantibodies to hLAMP-2 can be detected in most European patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis. Large-scale prospective studies are now needed to determine whether they are pathogenic or merely an epiphenomenon. PMID:22323643

  20. Peg-IFNα/ribavirin/protease inhibitor combination in hepatitis C virus associated mixed cryoglobulinemia vasculitis: results at week 24

    PubMed Central

    Saadoun, David; Resche Rigon, M; Thibault, V; Longuet, M; Pol, S; Blanc, F; Pialoux, G; Karras, A; Bazin-Karra, D; Cazorla, C; Vittecoq, D; Musset, L; Decaux, O; Ziza, J M; Lambotte, O; Cacoub, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    Background The standard-of-care treatment of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) vasculitis includes pegylated interferon α (PegIFN)-α plus ribavirin and/or rituximab. About 30–40% of patients are non-responders or relapsers to such combination. Objective To analyse the safety and efficacy of Peg-IFNα/ribavirin/protease inhibitor combination in HCV-MC vasculitis. Patients and methods Open-label, prospective, cohort study including 23 patients with HCV-MC vasculitis. Peg-IFNα/ribavirin was associated to telaprevir (375 mg three times daily, for 12 weeks, (n=15)) or boceprevir (800 mg three times daily, for 44 weeks, (n=8)) for 48 weeks. Results The median age was 59 (52.5–66) years, with 48.8% women. Thirteen patients (56.5%) were complete clinical responders, and 10 (43.5%) were partial responders at week 24. The virological response (ie, HCV RNA negativation) was of 69.6% at week 24 (p=0.005). The cryoglobulin level decreased from 0.44 to 0.06 g/l (p=0.0006) and the C4 level increased from 0.09 to 0.15 g/l (p=0.045). Grades 3 and 4 adverse events (mainly anaemia, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia) were observed in 10 cases (43.5%). Twenty patients (87%) received erythropoietin, 9 (39.1%) had red cell transfusion, and 2 (8.7%) had granulocyte stimulating agents. Antiviral therapy discontinuation was required in 8 (34.7%) patients for virological non-response (n=5), virological relapse (n=2) and depression (n=1). Conclusions Peg-IFNα/ribavirin/protease inhibitor combination seems highly effective in HCV-MC. Such therapeutic regimen should be administered cautiously considering the high rate of side effects. PMID:23606708

  1. Cutaneous Vasculitis, Interstitial Pneumonia with Crazy-Paving Appearance, and Positive pANCA in a Patient with Severe Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guang-liang; Wang, Juan; Li, Li-mei; Mo, Han-you; Ye, Shuang

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous vasculitis, interstitial pneumonia with crazy-paving appearance on high-resolution computed tomography, and repeated positive perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCA) are rarely found together in patients with inflammatory bowel disease in the existing literature. We report the case of a Chinese patient previously diagnosed with cutaneous vasculitis and interstitial pneumonia, who presented with acute pain and mass in his right lower quadrant a couple of years later. The terminal ileum biopsy and postoperative pathology confirmed Crohn's disease (CD). PMID:25371834

  2. Trypanosoma cruzi Causes Paralyzing Systemic Necrotizing Vasculitis Driven by Pathogen-Specific Type I Immunity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Roffê, Ester; Marino, Ana Paula M P; Weaver, Joseph; Wan, Wuzhou; de Araújo, Fernanda F; Hoffman, Victoria; Santiago, Helton C; Murphy, Philip M

    2016-04-01

    Infectious agents are often considered potential triggers of chronic inflammatory disease, including autoimmunity; however, direct evidence is usually lacking. Here we show that following control of acute infection of mice with the myotropic Colombiana strain ofTrypanosoma cruzi, parasites persisted in tissue at low levels associated with development of systemic necrotizing vasculitis. Lesions occurred in many but not all organs and tissues, with skeletal muscle arteries being the most severely affected, and were associated with myositis, atrophy, paresis/paralysis, and death. Histopathology showed fibrinoid vascular necrosis, rare amastigote nests within skeletal muscle myocytes, and massive leukocyte infiltrates composed mainly of inflammatory monocytes, F4/80(+)macrophages, andT. cruzitetramer-specific CD8(+)T lymphocytes capable of producing gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) but not interleukin-17 (IL-17).T. cruzi-specific IgG was detected in sera from infected mice, but antibody deposits and neutrophilic inflammation were not features of the lesions. Thus,T. cruziinfection of mice may be a specific infectious trigger of paralyzing systemic necrotizing vasculitis most severely affecting skeletal muscle, driven by pathogen-specific type I immune responses. PMID:26857570

  3. Hereditary leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids: a spectrum of phenotypes from CNS vasculitis to parkinsonism in an adult onset leukodystrophy series

    PubMed Central

    Jaunmuktane, Zane; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Phadke, Rahul; Brandner, Sebastian; Milonas, Ionnis; Dean, Andrew; Bajaj, Nin; McNicholas, Nuala; Costello, Daniel; Cronin, Simon; McGuigan, Chris; Rossor, Martin; Fox, Nick; Murphy, Elaine; Chataway, Jeremy; Houlden, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Background Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with neuroaxonal spheroids (HDLS) is a hereditary, adult onset leukodystrophy which is characterised by the presence of axonal loss, axonal spheroids and variably present pigmented macrophages on pathological examination. It most frequently presents in adulthood with dementia and personality change. HDLS has recently been found to be caused by mutations in the colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R) gene. Methods In this study, we sequenced the CSF1R gene in a cohort of 48 patients from the UK, Greece and Ireland with adult onset leukodystrophy of unknown cause. Results Five pathogenic mutations were found, including three novel mutations. The presentations ranged from suspected central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis to extrapyramidal to cognitive phenotypes. The case histories and imaging are presented here, in addition to neuropathological findings from two cases with novel mutations. Conclusion We estimate that CSF1R mutations account for 10% of idiopathic adult onset leukodystrophies and that genetic testing for CSF1R mutations is essential in adult patients presenting with undefined CNS vasculitis or a leukodystrophy with prominent neuropsychiatric signs or dementia. PMID:25935893

  4. Multidrug-related leukocytoclastic vasculitis raising suspicion of sexual homicide-things are not always what they seem.

    PubMed

    Tattoli, Lucia; Krocker, Klaus; Sautter, Julia; Tsokos, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Ambiguous findings during external examination of a deceased in combination with dubious autopsy findings can raise doubts concerning the manner and cause of death. We report the case of a 35-year-old female deceased who had suffered from a borderline personality and depressive disorder with suicidal ideation. At the death scene, the body showed massive facial swelling accompanied by complete reddening of the skin of the face, with patchy skin abrasions on the forehead and neck, and purple bruise-like discolorations distributed symmetrically over both shoulders, elbows, hands, hips, knees, lower legs, and feet, raising the suspicion of underlying massive external blunt force injury. Police investigators strongly suspected sexual homicide. At autopsy, dissection in layers revealed massive subcutaneous hemorrhages as the cause of the reddish skin discolorations. Toxicological analyses showed fatal levels of lamotrigine with additional proof of zopiclone, zolpidem, diphenhydramine, O-desmethylvenlafaxine, pregabalin, tramadol, and modafinil in venous blood. Histologically, both the macroscopically impressive purple skin changes with underlying bleeding into the subcutaneous tissue and the skin abrasions were due to leukocytoclastic vasculitis, a form of acute hypersensitivity vasculitis that was a reaction to the multiple therapeutic drugs that the woman had taken shortly before death. The manner of death was classified as suicide, and sexual homicide was ruled out. PMID:25957602

  5. Successful outcome of pregnancy in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody-associated small vessel vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Croft, Adam P; Smith, Stuart W; Carr, Sue; Youssouf, Sajeda; Salama, Alan D; Burns, Aine; Pusey, Charles D; Hamilton, Patrick; Brown, Nina; Venning, Michael; Harper, Lorraine; Morgan, Matthew D

    2015-04-01

    Pregnancy in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody-associated vasculitis is reportedly associated with a high risk of fetal and maternal complications. Here we describe the outcome of pregnancies in patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis and microscopic polyangiitis at five centers in the United Kingdom using a retrospective case review of all women who became pregnant following diagnosis. We report 15 pregnancies in 13 women resulting in 15 live births including one twin pregnancy and 13 singleton pregnancies. One patient had an unplanned pregnancy and a first trimester miscarriage while taking methotrexate. All other pregnancies were planned following a minimum of 6 months clinical remission. Eleven successful pregnancies were delivered vaginally at full term, whereas three were delivered by cesarean section. All infants were healthy with no neonatal complications on their initial health check within the first 24 h of delivery and no evidence of neonatal vasculitis. One relapse occurred during pregnancy and was successfully treated with an increased dose of azathioprine and corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, and plasma exchange therapy. One patient developed tracheal crusting and subglottic stenosis of infective etiology in the third trimester requiring tracheal debridement post delivery. No patient had a relapse in the first 12 months postpartum. Thus, successful pregnancy outcomes can occur following planned pregnancy in women in sustained remission on non-teratogenic therapies. PMID:25272233

  6. Life-threatening allergic vasculitis after clipping an unruptured aneurysm: Case report, weighing the risk of nickel allergy

    PubMed Central

    Grande, Andrew; Grewal, Sanjeet; Tackla, Ryan; Ringer, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: This case report represents one of the estimated 17,000 aneurysms clipped annually in the United States, often with nickel-containing clips. The authors highlight the development of life-threatening allergic vasculitis in a 33-year-old woman after aneurysm clipping. Case Description: After suffering subarachnoid hemorrhage, the patient had coil embolization at another facility for rupture of a right internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysm. An incidental finding, an unruptured left posterior communicating artery aneurysm unamenable to coiling, was then successfully clipped via a left pterional craniotomy. Arriving in our emergency department 11 days later, she progressively declined during the next weeks, facing deteriorating clinical status (i.e. seizures) and additional infarctions in the left frontal lobe, midline shift, and new infarctions in the bilateral frontal lobe, right sylvian, right insular regions, and posterior cerebral artery distribution. During decompressive surgery, biopsy findings raised the possibility of lymphocytic vasculitis; consultations with rheumatology, allergy, and immunology specialists identified that our patient had a nickel allergy. After reoperation to replace the nickel-containing clip with one of a titanium alloy, the patient had an uncomplicated postoperative course and was discharged 6 days later to a rehabilitation facility. Conclusions: Nickel-related allergies are more common than appreciated, affecting up to 10% of patients. Fortunately, severe reactions are rare; nevertheless, vascular neurosurgeons should be aware of this potential complication when using cobalt alloy aneurysms clips. The use of titanium alloy clips eliminates this risk. PMID:25071940

  7. An Update of the Mayo Clinic Cohort of Patients With Adult Primary Central Nervous System Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Salvarani, Carlo; Brown, Robert D.; Christianson, Teresa; Miller, Dylan V.; Giannini, Caterina; Huston, John; Hunder, Gene G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Primary central nervous system vasculitis (PCNSV) is an uncommon condition in which lesions are limited to vessels of the brain and spinal cord. Because the clinical manifestations are not specific, the diagnosis is often difficult, and permanent disability and death are frequent outcomes. This study is based on a cohort of 163 consecutive patients with PCNSV who were examined at the Mayo Clinic over a 29-year period from 1983 to 2011. The aim of the study was to define the characteristics of these patients, which represents the largest series in adults reported to date. A total of 105 patients were diagnosed by angiographic findings and 58 by biopsy results. The patients diagnosed by biopsy more frequently had at presentation cognitive dysfunction, greater cerebrospinal fluid total protein concentrations, less frequent cerebral infarcts, and more frequent leptomeningeal gadolinium-enhanced lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), along with less mortality and disability at last follow-up. The patients diagnosed by angiograms more frequently had at presentation hemiparesis or a persistent neurologic deficit or stroke, more frequent infarcts on MRI and an increased mortality. These differences were mainly related to the different size of the vessels involved in the 2 groups. Although most patients responded to therapy with glucocorticoids alone or in conjunction with cyclophosphamide and tended to improve during the follow-up period, an overall increased mortality rate was observed. Relapses occurred in one-quarter of the patients and were less frequent in patients treated with prednisone and cyclophosphamide compared with those treated with prednisone alone. The mortality rate and degree of disability at last follow-up were greater in those with increasing age, cerebral infarctions on MRI, angiographic large vessel involvement, and diagnosis made by angiography alone, but were lower in those with gadolinium-enhanced lesions on MRI and in those with cerebral amyloid angiopathy. The annual incidence rate of PCNSV was estimated at 2.4 cases per 1,000,000 person-years. PCNSV appears to consist of several subsets defined by the size of the vessels involved, the clinical characteristics at presentation, MRI findings, and histopathological patterns on biopsy. Early recognition and treatment may reduce poor outcomes. PMID:26020379

  8. Incidence of Cancer in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Weifeng; Ning, Yong; Xu, Xiu; Li, Menglan; Guo, Shuiming; Han, Min; Zeng, Rui; Ge, Shuwang; Xu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this paper is to examine cancer incidence in patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AASV) derived from population-based cohort studies by means of meta-analysis. Methods Relevant electronic databases were searched for studies characterizing the associated risk of overall malignancy in patients with AASV. Standardized incidence rates (SIRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to evaluate the strength of association. We tested for publication bias and heterogeneity and stratified for site-specific cancers. Results Six studies (n = 2,578) were eventually identified, of which six provided the SIR for overall malignancy, five reported the SIR for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), four for leukemia, five for bladder cancer, three for lymphoma, three for liver cancer, four for lung cancer, three for kidney cancer, four for prostate cancer, four for colon cancer and four for breast cancer. Overall, the pooled SIR of cancer in AASV patients was 1.74 (95%CI = 1.37–2.21), with moderate heterogeneity among these studies (I2 = 65.8%, P = 0.012). In sub-analyses for site-specific cancers, NMSC, leukemia and bladder cancer were more frequently observed in patients with AASV with SIR of 5.18 (95%CI = 3.47–7.73), 4.89 (95%CI = 2.93–8.16) and 3.84 (95%CI = 2.72–5.42) respectively. There was no significant increase in the risk of kidney cancer (SIR = 2.12, 95%CI = 0.66–6.85), prostate cancer (SIR = 1.45, 95%CI = 0.87–2.42), colon cancer (SIR = 1.26, 95%CI = 0.70–2.27), and breast cancer (SIR = 0.95, 95%CI = 0.50–1.79). Among these site-specific cancers, only NMSC showed moderate heterogeneity (I2 = 55.8%, P = 0.06). No publication bias was found by using the Begg’s test and Egger's test. Conclusions This meta-analysis shows that AASV patients treatment with cyclophosphamide (CYC) are at increased risk of late-occurring malignancies, particularly of the NMSC, leukemia and bladder cancer. However, there is no significant association between AASV and kidney cancer, prostate cancer, colon cancer and breast cancer. These findings emphasize monitoring and preventative management in AASV patients after cessation of CYC therapy is momentous. PMID:25973882

  9. Enhanced expression of the soluble form of E-selectin attenuates progression of lupus nephritis and vasculitis in MRL/lpr mice

    PubMed Central

    Nakatani, Kimihiko; Yoshimoto, Shuhei; Asai, Osamu; Sakan, Hirokazu; Terada, Miho; Saito, Yoshihiko; Nose, Masato; Iwano, Masayuki; Konishi, Noboru

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease that causes inflammatory tissue damage, including lupus nephritis and vasculitis. Local generation of adhesion molecules and expression of their ligands on inflammatory cells appears to contribute to the progression of SLE. We found significantly increased E-selectin expression in the glomeruli and renal interstitial microvasculature of MRL/MpJ-lpr/lpr (MRL/lpr) lupus model mice. This was accompanied with infiltration of inflammatory cells, especially macrophages and CD8+ T cells. Similarly, in 21 patients with proliferative lupus nephritis, there was a significant correlation between renal E-selectin levels and macrophage and CD8+ T cell infiltration in the affected kidneys. By contrast, in transgenic MRL/lpr mice exhibiting elevated levels of circulating soluble E-selectin (sE-selectin) protein, which competitively inhibits E- and P-selectin-mediated extravasation of inflammatory cells, the progression of lupus nephritis and vasculitis was significantly suppressed and survival was significantly prolonged. This improvement was accompanied by significant reductions in renal infiltration by macrophages and CD8+ T cells. These results suggest that E-selectin plays a crucial role in lupus nephritis and vasculitis by mediating renal infiltration of inflammatory cells, and that because it inhibits this process, sE-selectin could potentially serve as an effective treatment for lupus nephritis and vasculitis. PMID:25400916

  10. Fibroblasts express OvHV-2 capsid protein in vasculitis lesions of American bison (Bison bison) with experimental sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever (SA-MCF) caused by ovine herpesvirus-2 (OvHV-2), a '-herpesvirus, is an often fatal disease characterized by lymphoproliferation, vasculitis, and mucosal ulceration in American bison (Bison bison), cattle (Bos taurus), and other clinically susceptible speci...

  11. Is there a role for TNF-alpha in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis? Lessons from other chronic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Feldmann, Marc; Pusey, Charles D

    2006-05-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis is the most common cause of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and immune-mediated pulmonary renal syndrome. Now that the acute manifestations of the disease generally can be controlled with immunosuppressive drugs, ANCA-associated vasculitis has become a chronic and relapsing inflammatory disorder. The need to develop safer and more effective treatment has led to great interest in the mediators of chronic inflammation. There are many lessons to be learned from studies of other chronic inflammatory diseases, particularly rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The identification of a TNF-alpha-dependent cytokine cascade in the in vitro cultures of synovium in joints of patients with RA led to studies of TNF blockade in experimental models of arthritis and subsequently to clinical trials. These have culminated in the widespread introduction of anti-TNF therapy not only in RA but also in Crohn disease, ankylosing spondylitis, and several other chronic inflammatory disorders. Following a similar investigative pathway, studies that show the importance of TNF production by leukocytes and intrinsic renal cells in glomerulonephritis have been followed by the demonstration of the effectiveness of TNF blockade in several experimental models of glomerulonephritis and vasculitis. In experimental autoimmune vasculitis, improvement in disease was paralleled by a reduction in leukocyte transmigration, as demonstrated by intravital microscopy. The benefit of infliximab (a mAb to TNF) in ANCA-associated vasculitis was recently reported in a prospective open-label study. However, the use of etanercept (a soluble TNF receptor fusion protein) was not found to be of significant benefit in a randomized, controlled trial in patients with Wegener granulomatosis. Therefore, there is a need for further evaluation of the use of anti-TNF antibodies in patients with ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis. PMID:16624928

  12. Role of Brain Perfusion SPECT with 99mTc HMPAO in the Assessment of Response to Drug Therapy in Patients with Autoimmune Vasculitis: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Liberatore; Manuela, Morreale; Valentina, Megna; Sara, Collorone; Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Maria, Drudi Francesco; Christos, Anagnostou; Liana, Civitelli; Ada, Francia; Maffione, Anna Margherita; Marzola, Maria Cristina; Rubello, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis of vasculitis in the brain remains a quite difficult achievement. To the best of our knowledge, there is no imaging method reported in literature which is capable of reaching to a diagnosis of vasculitis with very high sensitivity. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine whether perfusion brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can be usefully employed in monitoring the treatment of vasculitis, allowing treating only potentially responder patients and avoiding the side effects on patients who do not respond. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients (two males and 18 females) suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; n = 5), Behcet's disease (BD; n = 5), undifferentiated vasculitis (UV; n = 5), and Sjogren's syndrome (SS; n = 5) were included in the study. All patients underwent a wide neurological anamnestic investigation, a complete objective neurological examination and SPECT of the brain with 99mTc-hexamethyl-propylene-aminoxime (HMPAO). The brain SPECT was then repeated after appropriate medical treatment. The neurological and neuropsychiatric follow-up was performed at 6 months after the start of the treatment. Results: Overall, the differences between the scintigraphic results obtained after and before the medical treatment indicated a statistically significant increase of the cerebral perfusion (CP). In 19 out of 200 regions of interest (ROI) studied, the difference between pre- and post treatment percentages had negative sign, indicating a worsening of CP. This latter event has occurred six times (five in the same patients) in the UV, 10 times (eight in the same patients) in the SLE, never in BD, and three times (two in the same patient) in the SS. Conclusion: The reported results seem to indicate the possibility of identifying, by the means of a brain SPECT, responder and nonresponder (unchanged or worsened CP) patients, affected by autoimmune vasculitis, to the therapy. PMID:25973400

  13. Current and emerging treatment options for ANCA-associated vasculitis: potential role of belimumab and other BAFF/APRIL targeting agents

    PubMed Central

    Lenert, Aleksander; Lenert, Petar

    2015-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) comprises several clinical entities with diverse clinical presentations, outcomes, and nonunifying pathogenesis. AAV has a clear potential for relapses, and shows unpredictable response to treatment. Cyclophosphamide-based therapies have remained the hallmark of induction therapy protocols for more than four decades. Recently, B-cell depleting therapy with the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab has proved beneficial in AAV, leading to Food and Drug Administration approval of rituximab in combination with corticosteroids for the treatment of AAV in adults. Rituximab for ANCA-associated vasculitis and other clinical trials provided clear evidence that rituximab was not inferior to cyclophosphamide for remission induction, and rituximab appeared even more beneficial in patients with relapsing disease. This raised hopes that other B-cell-targeted therapies directed either against CD19, CD20, CD22, or B-cell survival factors, B-cell activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF) and a proliferation-inducing ligand could also be beneficial for the management of AAV. BAFF neutralization with the fully humanized monoclonal antibody belimumab has already shown success in human systemic lupus erythematosus and, along with another anti-BAFF reagent blisibimod, is currently undergoing Phase II and III clinical trials in AAV. Local production of BAFF in granulomatous lesions and elevated levels of serum BAFF in AAV provide a rationale for BAFF-targeted therapies not only in AAV but also in other forms of vasculitis such as Behcet’s disease, large-vessel vasculitis, or cryoglobulinemic vasculitis secondary to chronic hepatitis C infection. BAFF-targeted therapies have a very solid safety profile, and may have an additional benefit of preferentially targeting newly arising autoreactive B cells over non-self-reactive B cells. PMID:25609919

  14. Increased circulating levels of proteinase 3 in patients with anti-neutrophilic cytoplasmic autoantibodies-associated systemic vasculitis in remission

    PubMed Central

    Ohlsson, S; Wieslander, J; Segelmark, M

    2003-01-01

    In systemic small vessel vasculitides, patients form autoantibodies against neutrophil granular proteins, anti-neutrophilic cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA). Some correlation is seen between ANCA titre and disease activity, but whether this is cause or effect is still unknown. It has been reported that levels of proteinase 3 (PR3), one of the main ANCA antigens, are increased in patients with active disease. An increased level of circulating antigen could mean a predisposition to autoimmunity. In order to explore this we measured PR3 levels in patients with stable disease. In addition we measured neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) as a specific marker of neutrophil degranulation, cystatin C as a marker of renal function as well as C-reactive protein (CRP), IL-6 and sTNFr1 as markers of inflammation. PR3, NGAL, IL-6 and sTNFr1 were measured in plasma by the ELISA technique. In the PR3 ELISA, we used anti-PR3 monoclonal antibodies as capture-antibodies and affinity-purified rabbit-anti-PR3 antibodies for detection. PR3-ANCA, myeloperoxidase (MPO)-ANCA, CRP and cystatin C were measured by routine methods. PR3 was significantly raised (P < 00001) in vasculitis patients (median 560 g/l, range 1103940, n = 59) compared with healthy blood donors (350 g/l, 110580, n = 30) as well as disease controls (360, 110580, n = 46). No correlation was seen with disease activity, inflammation or renal function. The raised NGAL levels correlated strongly with decreased renal function (r = 08, P < 0001). After correcting for this, slightly increased levels (110, 42340, n = 59) were observed compared with healthy blood donors (81, 38130, n = 25), but not compared with the disease controls (120, 57260, n = 48). In the disease controls, there was a significant correlation between NGAL and proteinase 3 (r = 03, p < 005), but this was not the case in the vasculitis patients. Whether patients had PR3-ANCA or MPO-ANCA was of no significance. In our measurements, we found significantly raised levels of PR3 in plasma from patients with small vessel vasculitis, regardless of ANCA specificity. This was not due to decreased renal function, ongoing inflammation or neutrophil activation. Plausible mechanisms for this include defects in the reticuloendothelial system, genetic factors and selective neutrophil degranulation or leakage. PMID:12605707

  15. Primary malignant lymphoma of the CNS and polyneuropathy in a patient with necrotizing vasculitis treated with immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Jellinger, K; Kothbauer, P; Weiss, R; Sunder-Plassmann, E

    1979-01-01

    A woman, aged 58, who had undergone prolonged treatment with corticosteroids for generalized necrotizing vasculitis, and had received azathioprine (Imurel) for 18 months, 4 years after discontinuing the latter treatment, developed peripheral neuropathy and a rapidly progressing cerebral disorder suggesting a basal meningeal process. CSF cytology suggested malignant lymphoma with meningeal involvement. Immunological studies showed an increase of Null-lymphocytes in the peripheral blood. Autopsy disclosed a primary malignant lymphoma of the CNS with the histological appearance of a multilocular immunoblastoma showing almost ubiquitous meningocerebral involvement. Clinical and postmortem examinations failed to demonstrate any systemic extraneural lymphoproliferative disorder. In addition, there was peripheral polyneuropathy of the axonal type with denervation atrophy of skeletal muscle, but without lymphomatous involvement of the neuromuscular system. The possible relations between primary malignant lymphomas of the CNS and previous immunosuppressive treatment of immunoinflammatory disease are discussed in view of the concept of impaired immunoregulation. The pathogenetic background of peripheral polyneuropathy is unknown. PMID:90135

  16. Sequential occurrence of anti-glomerular basement membrane disease 9 years after anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Pui Shan Julia; Leung, Moon Ho

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of 63-year-old Chinese man, having a history of anti-myeloperoxidase (MPO) antibody anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated pulmonary-renal syndrome 9 years ago, presented with second episode of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) and alveolar haemorrhage compatible with anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) disease. In first presentation, his anti-GBM antibody was negative. This time, anti-MPO antibody was negative, but anti-GBM antibody was positive. The long interval of sequential development of anti-GBM disease after ANCA-associated vasculitis in this patient may provide clues to the potential immunological links between these two distinct conditions. Clinicians should be aware of such double-positive association. PMID:27123311

  17. Is newer safer? Adverse events associated with first-line therapies for ANCA-associated vasculitis and lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Jonathan; Avasare, Rupali; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2014-09-01

    Clinical outcomes in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and lupus nephritis have improved greatly with treatment regimens containing high-dose glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide. However, with the use of these medications come significant adverse events, most notably infections, cytopenias, malignancies, and reproductive abnormalities. Multiple recent randomized controlled trials in AAV and lupus nephritis have compared cyclophosphamide-based regimens with agents such as rituximab, mycophenolate mofetil, and azathioprine, with the hope of providing better clinical outcomes with improved safety profiles. Although some of these newer regimens are now considered first-line treatments of these diseases, their adverse event profiles have been disappointingly similar to those of cyclophosphamide-based protocols. Physicians and patients should consider the adverse event profiles generated by these trials in the context of their extensive use in other patient populations, as well as available measures to prevent such events, when choosing the ideal regimen for an individual patient. PMID:24832093

  18. Neutrophilic Dermatoses in Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis: A French Multicenter Study of 17 Cases and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    de Boysson, Hubert; Martin Silva, Nicolas; de Moreuil, Claire; Néel, Antoine; de Menthon, Mathilde; Meyer, Olivier; Launay, David; Pagnoux, Christian; Guillevin, Loïc; Puéchal, Xavier; Bienvenu, Boris; Aouba, Achille

    2016-03-01

    A few reports suggest combination of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and neutrophilic dermatoses (ND). We aimed to describe the main characteristics of patients presenting with both AAV and ND in a French cohort and through a systematic literature review, and to discuss the possible common pathogenic process involved.We conducted a retrospective study of patients with both conditions. Patients were selected via the French Internal Medicine Society (SNFMI) and the French Vasculitis Study Group (FVSG). A literature review focusing on a combination of both conditions, concentrated only on publications with well-established diagnoses and individual detailed data.Seventeen patients diagnosed with AAV and ND were identified in this cohort. Twelve patients had granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), 4 had microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) and one had eosinophilic GPA (EGPA). Eight patients, all with GPA, displayed pyoderma gangrenosum (PG). Sweet's syndrome was observed in 6 patients (4 with MPA, one with GPA and one with EGPA) and erythema elevatum diutinum in the other three (2 with GPA and 1 with MPA). The literature review identified 33 additional patients with both conditions, including 26 with GPA. Altogether, of the 50 patients (17 from our study and 33 from the literature review), 33 (66%) patients presented with PG associated with GPA in 29 cases (89%). Corticosteroids were the first-line treatment in conjunction with an immunosuppressive agent in most cases. Outcomes were good and a total of 15 patients experienced a relapse. Patients who relapsed were more likely to have ear, nose and throat manifestation than patients who did not [12/15 (80%) relapsing patients vs. 15/35 (43%) non-relapsing patients; p = 0.03)].In our stud, the most frequent association concerned GPA and PG. ND should be considered and specifically researched within the spectrum of cutaneous manifestations observed in AAV. PMID:26986103

  19. Urinary Levels of High Mobility Group Box-1 Are Associated with Disease Activity in Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Autoantibody-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Chang, Dong-Yuan; Zhao, Ming-Hui; Chen, Min

    2015-01-01

    Background High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), a kind of pro-inflammatory mediator, is associated with inflammatory conditions and tissue damage. Our previous study demonstrated that the circulating levels of HMGB1 correlated with disease activity of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV). In the current study, we aimed to measure urinary levels of HMGB1 in AAV patients, correlated them to clinical activity index and analysed the immunohistochemical HMGB1 staining in kidney specimens. Methods 50 patients with AAV in active stage and 56 patients with AAV in remission were recruited. The urinary levels of HMGB1 were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Moreover, renal biopsy specimens from 27 patients with active AAV were randomly collected to evaluate the deposition of HMGB1. Results Urinary HMGB1 levels in AAV patients in active stage were significantly higher than those in AAV patients in remission and healthy controls (1.46 [0.56-3.43] versus 0.38 [0.10-1.35] mg/μmolCr, P=0.001; 1.46 [0.56-3.43] versus 0.48 [0.40-0.60] mg/μmolCr, P=0.000, respectively). Further analysis found that urinary levels of HMGB1 correlated with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (r=0.354, p=0.012), C-reactive protein (r=0.289, p=0.042), and Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score (r=0.350, p=0.013). Renal tissue of active AAV patients showed HMGB1 was mainly expressed in the cytoplasm and the extracellular space. The percentage of HMGB1-negative nuclei in renal tissue of patients with active AAV was significantly higher than that in normal controls (60.6±20.2 % versus 2.7±0.6 %, p<0.01). Conclusion Urinary levels of HMGB1 may be associated with the disease activity in AAV patients. PMID:25884225

  20. Higher Serum Angiotensinogen Is an Indicator of IgA Vasculitis with Nephritis Revealed by Comparative Proteomes Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Jiangwei; Zhao, Peiwei; Yue, Xin; Yu, Chunhua; Laing, Xiaohui; Zhao, YuLan

    2015-01-01

    IgA vasculitis (IgAV), previously named as Henoch–Schönlein purpura, is the most common systematic vasculitis with unknown etiology. Lack of appropriate study system and/or animal model limits the understanding of its molecular pathogenesis and hinders the identification of targets for rational therapy, especially for its long-term complication, IgAV nephritis (IgAVN). In this study, we applied comparative analysis of serum proteomes to obtain an insight about disease pathogenesis. This study has utilized high sensitivity nanoscale ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS/MS) to investigate the alterations in serum proteomic profiles in patients with IgAV (n=6), IgAVN (n=6) and healthy subjects (n=7). The differentially expressed proteins were subjected to functional pathway analysis by PANTHER and DAVID software. We identified 107 differentially expressed proteins among three different groups, and functional analysis suggested that, in addition to earlier reported pathways, such as acute phase response, immune response, complement and blood coagulation pathways, hemostasis and Wnt signaling pathway were probably involved in pathogenesis of IgAV. A few differentially abundant proteins identified, such as C4a, serum amyloid A, angiotensinogen, and kininogen 1, were further validated by ELISA. More importantly, we found that angiotensinogen concentration is correlated with IgAVN and could be used as a potential marker for the progression of IgAV. This is the first report of analyzing the proteomic alterations in IgAV patients and the differentially proteins identified in this study may enhance understanding of the pathology of IgAV and a few of them may be used to monitor disease progression. PMID:26098644

  1. Long-Term Follow-Up of Cyclophosphamide Compared with Azathioprine for Initial Maintenance Therapy in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Faurschou, Mikkel; Berden, Annelies; Flossmann, Oliver; Bajema, Ingeborg; Hoglund, Peter; Smith, Rona; Szpirt, Wladimir; Westman, Kerstin; Pusey, Charles D.; Jayne, David R.W.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Treatment with azathioprine within 3 months of remission induction with cyclophosphamide is a common treatment strategy for patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis. This study comprised patients undergoing long-term follow-up who were randomly allocated to azathioprine after 3–6 months or after 12 months of cyclophosphamide treatment. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Patients from 39 European centers between 1995 and 1997 with a new diagnosis of ANCA-associated vasculitis that involved the kidneys or another vital organ were eligible. At the time of diagnosis, participants were randomly allocated to convert to azathioprine after 3–6 months (the azathioprine group) or after 12 months of cyclophosphamide (the cyclophosphamide group). Patients who did not achieve a remission within 6 months were excluded. This study assessed relapses, ESRD, and death during long-term follow-up. Results Patients were allocated to the azathioprine group (n=71) and the cyclophosphamide group (n=73). Of these patients, 63 (43.8%) developed a relapse, 35 (24.3%) developed a renal relapse, 13 (9.0%) developed ESRD, and 21 (14.6%) died. Although there were worse outcomes in the azathioprine group, none were statistically significant. The subdistribution hazard ratio [sHR] for relapse was 1.63 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.99 to 2.71), the composite of relapse or death hazard ratio [HR] was 1.59 (95% CI, 1.00 to 2.54), the ESRD sHR was 1.71 (95% CI, 0.56 to 5.19), and the death HR was 0.75 (95% CI, 0.32 to 1.79). Conclusions It remains uncertain whether converting to azathioprine after 3–6 months of induction cyclophosphamide therapy is as effective as converting after 12 months. Outcomes are still poor for this group of patients and further research is required to determine the optimal timing of maintenance therapy. PMID:24970876

  2. Higher Serum Angiotensinogen Is an Indicator of IgA Vasculitis with Nephritis Revealed by Comparative Proteomes Analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Xuelian; Yin, Wei; Ding, Yan; Cui, Shu-jian; Luan, Jiangwei; Zhao, Peiwei; Yue, Xin; Yu, Chunhua; Laing, Xiaohui; Zhao, YuLan

    2015-01-01

    IgA vasculitis (IgAV), previously named as Henoch-Schönlein purpura, is the most common systematic vasculitis with unknown etiology. Lack of appropriate study system and/or animal model limits the understanding of its molecular pathogenesis and hinders the identification of targets for rational therapy, especially for its long-term complication, IgAV nephritis (IgAVN). In this study, we applied comparative analysis of serum proteomes to obtain an insight about disease pathogenesis. This study has utilized high sensitivity nanoscale ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS/MS) to investigate the alterations in serum proteomic profiles in patients with IgAV (n=6), IgAVN (n=6) and healthy subjects (n=7). The differentially expressed proteins were subjected to functional pathway analysis by PANTHER and DAVID software. We identified 107 differentially expressed proteins among three different groups, and functional analysis suggested that, in addition to earlier reported pathways, such as acute phase response, immune response, complement and blood coagulation pathways, hemostasis and Wnt signaling pathway were probably involved in pathogenesis of IgAV. A few differentially abundant proteins identified, such as C4a, serum amyloid A, angiotensinogen, and kininogen 1, were further validated by ELISA. More importantly, we found that angiotensinogen concentration is correlated with IgAVN and could be used as a potential marker for the progression of IgAV. This is the first report of analyzing the proteomic alterations in IgAV patients and the differentially proteins identified in this study may enhance understanding of the pathology of IgAV and a few of them may be used to monitor disease progression. PMID:26098644

  3. Successful Treatment of Dual-Positive Anti-Myeloperoxidase and Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Antibody Vasculitis with Pulmonary-Renal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinxian; Wu, Ling; Huang, Xiaoyan; Xie, Yan; Yu, Jinquan; Yang, Jin; Fang, Huiqiong; Zhang, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis and anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) disease are two separate diseases, while sometimes they can coexist together. The exact mechanisms are not clear, but due to the rapid progression and poor prognosis, prompt and aggressive treatment is usually required. We treated with steroids combined with cyclophosphamide and rituximab an 84-year-old man with ANCA-associated vasculitis and anti-GBM disease who had prior pulmonary fibrosis and a coexisting anterosuperior mediastinal mass. Conventional therapy including steroids, plasmapheresis and cyclophosphamide failed to attenuate the anti-GBM disease, yet he responded to an alternative treatment of rituximab. This case suggests the efficacy of steroids and immunosuppressant for the treatment of a dual-positive case with an anterosuperior mediastinal mass. PMID:26889474

  4. Isolation of vascular smooth muscle antigen-reactive CD4(+)αβTh1 clones that induce pulmonary vasculitis in MRL/Mp-Fas(+/+) mice.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yoshimasa; Fujii, Takao; Shimizu, Hironori; Sato, Tomomi; Nakamura, Takuji; Iwao, Haruka; Nakajima, Akio; Miki, Miyuki; Sakai, Tomoyuki; Kawanami, Takafumi; Tanaka, Masao; Masaki, Yasufumi; Fukushima, Toshihiro; Okazaki, Toshiro; Umehara, Hisanori; Mimori, Tsuneyo

    2016-05-01

    Here, we established CD4(+)αβTh1 clones specific for rat vascular smooth muscle antigen (VSMAg) that induced vasculitis lesions in the lungs of MRL/Mp-Fas(+/+) mice following adoptive transfer. Six different T cell clones, MV1b1 (Vβ1), MV1b4 (Vβ4), MV1b8.3 (Vβ8.3), MV1b61 (Vβ6), MV1b62 (Vβ6), and MV1b63 (Vβ6), were isolated from the MV1 T cell line from the regional lymph nodes of immunized MRL/Mp-Fas(+/+) mice; the three (Vβ6) clones had unique CDR3 amino acid sequences. Following stimulation with VSMAg-pulsed antigen presenting cells, MV1b61 and MV1b62 failed to secrete interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α, although the other four clones secreted high levels of both cytokines. In adoptive transfer experiments, MV1b61 and MV1b62 did not induce organ involvement including pulmonary vasculitis. In contrast, MV1b1, MV1b4, MV1b8.3, and MV1b63 induced perivascular mononuclear cell infiltration in pulmonary small arteries. These clones may provide useful tools for investigating the underlying mechanisms of vasculitis syndromes and for developing therapeutic strategies. PMID:27019130

  5. Genetics of ANCA-associated vasculitis in Japan: a role for HLA-DRB1*09:01 haplotype.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Naoyuki

    2013-10-01

    The epidemiology of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) is considerably different between European and Asian populations. Whereas granulomatosis with polyangiitis is the most common form of AAV in northern European populations, microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) accounts for the majority of AAV in Japan. This difference may at least in part derive from the difference in genetic background. In this review, I focus on our observation on HLA, an obvious candidate gene for immune disorders, and discuss its potential implication. In Japanese AAV, significant association was detected with HLA-DRB1*09:01, the carrier frequency of which was increased in MPA [P=0.0087, odds ratio (OR) 1.90, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17-3.08] and in myeloperoxidase (MPO)-ANCA-positive AAV (P=0.0016, OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.31-3.23) when compared with healthy Japanese controls. HLA-DRB1*09:01 is one of the most common HLA-DRB1 alleles in Asians but is rare in Caucasian populations. Interestingly, HLA-DRB1*09:01 has been shown to be associated with multiple autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematosus, suggesting that either HLA-DRB1*09:01 itself or other genes in tight linkage disequilibrium may play a role in a molecular pathway shared by various autoimmune diseases in Japanese and possibly in other Asian populations. PMID:23180035

  6. Mapping of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Core Set for Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody–Associated Vasculitis to the International Classification of Function, Disability and Health

    PubMed Central

    MILMAN, NATALIYA; BOONEN, ANNELIES; MERKEL, PETER A.; TUGWELL, PETER

    2015-01-01

    Objective The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) is a framework and classification of health that describes health along 4 components: body functions, body structures, activities and participation, and contextual factors. This study examined the content of instruments that constitute the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) core set of outcome measures for antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody–associated vasculitis (AAV) by “mapping” them to the ICF. Methods The content of the instruments included in the AAV core set were linked to the ICF by 2 independent investigators according to previously established ICF linkage rules. Results The AAV core set includes 3 measures of disease activity (3 versions of the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score), 1 damage measure (Vasculitis Damage Index), 1 patient-reported outcome (Short Form 36 health survey), and death. Linking these instruments to the ICF revealed comprehensive coverage of the ICF components body functions and body structures, limited coverage of the ICF component activities and participation, and complete absence of coverage of contextual factors. Conclusion ICF was found to be useful for thematic characterization of a heterogeneous group of outcome measures for AAV, i.e., a group of complex medical conditions. Linking of the instruments selected for the OMERACT AAV core set of outcome measures to the ICF classification revealed limitations in the representation of constructs related to life impact of AAV, represented by the ICF components activities and participation and contextual factors. Further research and methods development are needed to better incorporate important aspects of functioning and health relevant to patients into clinical trials of AAV. PMID:25048363

  7. Lung involvement at presentation predicts disease activity and permanent organ damage at 6, 12 and 24 months follow - up in ANCA - associated vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) may present with pulmonary involvement ranging from mild to life-threatening disease such as diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. There is a paucity of information regarding morbidity outcomes for AAV subjects presenting with lung involvement. This study determines the relationship between disease activity and damage in these subjects using the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score v 3 (BVAS 3) and Vasculitis Damage Index (VDI) respectively. Results 151 patients with AAV were included with 59 presenting initially with pulmonary involvement. The initial BVAS scores recorded at time of diagnosis were positively correlated with the final VDI scores at 24 months (p < 0.0001, rs = 0.5871). No differences between BVAS and VDI scores were seen for both groups, however in the lung-involvement group only, BVAS scores were significantly higher at 6, 12 and 24 months whilst the VDI scores were significantly higher at 12 and 24 months. Subjects presenting with pulmonary involvement had an increased likelihood for cardiovascular (OR 1.31, 95% CI 0.89, 1.54; p = 0.032) and renal (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.22, 1.39; p = 0.005) involvement. Subjects presenting with lung involvement with granulomatosis with polyangiitis and microscopic polyangiitis had 24-month VDI scores that were significantly higher (p = 0.027, p = 0.045), and more likely to develop pulmonary fibrosis (OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.48, 2.12; p < 0.001). Conclusion AAV subjects with lung involvement at presentation had a higher disease activity and damage scores at 6, 12 and 24 months follow-up representing a considerable burden of disease despite improvement in overall survival due to the introduction of immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:24884372

  8. Observational Study of the Genetic Architecture of Neutrophil-Mediated Inflammatory Skin Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-11

    Other Specified Inflammatory Disorders of Skin or Subcutaneous Tissue; Pyoderma Gangrenosum; Erosive Pustular Dermatosis of the Scalp; Sweet's Syndrome; Behcet's Disease; Bowel-associated Dermatosis-arthritis Syndrome; Pustular Psoriasis; Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis; Keratoderma Blenorrhagicum; Sneddon-Wilkinson Disease; IgA Pemphigus; Amicrobial Pustulosis of the Folds; Infantile Acropustulosis; Transient Neonatal Pustulosis; Neutrophilic Eccrine Hidradenitis; Rheumatoid Neutrophilic Dermatitis; Neutrophilic Urticaria; Still's Disease; Erythema Marginatum; Unclassified Periodic Fever Syndromes / Autoinflammatory Syndromes; Dermatitis Herpetiformis; Linear IgA Bullous Dermatosis; Bullous Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Inflammatory Epidermolysis Bullosa Aquisita; Neutrophilic Dermatosis of the Dorsal Hands (Pustular Vasculitis); Small Vessel Vasculitis Including Urticarial Vasculitis; Erythema Elevatum Diutinum; Medium Vessel Vasculitis

  9. Rituximab: Recommendations of the French Vasculitis Study Group (FVSG) for induction and maintenance treatments of adult, antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody-associated necrotizing vasculitides.

    PubMed

    Charles, Pierre; Bienvenu, Boris; Bonnotte, Bernard; Gobert, Pierre; Godmer, Pascal; Hachulla, Éric; Hamidou, Mohamed; Harlé, Jean-Robert; Karras, Alexandre; Lega, Jean-Christophe; Le Quellec, Alain; Mahr, Alfred D; Mouthon, Luc; Papo, Thomas; Puéchal, Xavier; Pugnet, Gregory; Samson, Maxime; Sibilia, Jean; Terrier, Benjamin; Vandergheynst, Frederick; Guillevin, Loïc

    2013-10-01

    Increasing rituximab prescription for ANCA-associated necrotizing vasculitides justifies the publication of recommendations for clinicians. Rituximab is approved in the United States to induce and maintain remission. In Europe, rituximab was recently approved for remission induction. However, governmental agencies' approvals cannot replace clinical practice guidelines. Herein, the French Vasculitis Study Group Recommendations Committee, comprised of physicians with extensive experience in the treatment of vasculitides, presents its consensus guidelines based on literature analysis, the results of prospective therapeutic trials and personal experience. PMID:24095054

  10. Clozapine-Induced Late Agranulocytosis and Severe Neutropenia Complicated with Streptococcus pneumonia, Venous Thromboembolism, and Allergic Vasculitis in Treatment-Resistant Female Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Voulgari, Christina; Giannas, Raphael; Paterakis, Georgios; Kanellou, Anna; Anagnostopoulos, Nikolaos; Pagoni, Stamata

    2015-01-01

    Clozapine is a second-generation antipsychotic agent from the benzodiazepine group indicated for treatment-resistant schizophrenia and other psychotic conditions. Using clozapine earlier on once a case appears to be refractory limits both social and personal morbidity of chronic psychosis. However treatment with second-generation antipsychotics is often complicated by adverse effects. We present a case of a 33-year-old Caucasian woman with a 25-year history of refractory psychotic mania after switching to a 2-year clozapine therapy. She presented clozapine-induced absolute neutropenia, agranulocytosis, which were complicated by Streptococcus pneumonia and sepsis. Clozapine-induced thromboembolism of the common femoral and right proximal iliac vein, as well as allergic vasculitis, was diagnosed. She achieved full remission on granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and specific antibiotic treatment. Early detection of severe clozapine-induced absolute neutropenia and agranulocytosis enabled the effective treatment of two among its most severe complications. Additional evidence to the previously reported possible causal relation between clozapine and venous thromboembolism is offered. Finally, clozapine-induced allergic vasculitis is confirmed as a late adverse effect of clozapine therapy. PMID:25755670

  11. Circulating Level of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Is Not a Useful Biomarker for Assessing Disease Activity in Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Tian-Tian; Zhang, Lu-Xia; Chen, Min; Zhao, Ming-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) is a group of life-threatening disorders, and frequently affects the kidneys. This study investigated whether the circulating neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) levels were associated with disease activity of AAV. We collected serum samples from 34 patients with AAV in active stage and 62 patients with AAV in remission. Cell free DNA in serum was quantified using the Quant-iT PicoGreen assay. NETs associated MPO-DNA complexes, citrullinated-histone H3-DNA (cit-H3-DNA) complexes and the concentration of deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I) were quantified using ELISA. The activity of DNase I was quantified using radial enzyme-diffusion method. Associations between circulating levels of NETs with clinico-pathological parameters were analyzed. Serum levels of NETs in active AAV patients were significantly higher than those in healthy controls, and the level of cell free DNA correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP). However, no correlation was found between MPO-DNA complexes or cit-H3-DNA complexes level and CRP. Also there was no significant correlation between NETs level and initial serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), crescents formation or Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score (BVAS). Furthermore, there was no significant difference of serum levels of cell free DNA or MPO-DNA complexes between active stage and remission of AAV. In conclusion, circulating levels of NETs cannot be used as a biomarker to assess disease activity in AAV patients. PMID:26840412

  12. Hepatic and Mesenteric Vasculitis as Presenting Manifestation of Mixed Cryoglobulinemia Related to Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection in a Female Patient.

    PubMed

    Calle Toro, Juan S; Davalos, Diana M; Charry, Jose D; Arrunategi, Ana M; Tobon, Gabriel

    2016-06-01

    Approximately 80% of patients with hepatitis C virus infection develop chronic liver disease as cirrhosis, and 40% develop autoimmune complications as mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC). Gastrointestinal involvement in MC is rare, and even more so is hepatic involvement. We report a case of an 87-year-old woman with a 10-year history of blood transfusion-acquired hepatitis C virus infection, without treatment. She consulted the emergency department for diffuse abdominal pain, associated with vomiting. After 2 weeks of hospitalization in the intensive care unit, a diagnosis of MC was made; cirrhosis and secondary mesenteric and hepatic vasculitis were confirmed by a diagnostic laparoscopy. Unfortunately the condition of the patient worsened with sepsis and resulted in death in the fourth week from admission. This case highlights the importance of having in mind gastrointestinal tract vasculitis as a medical cause of abdominal pain in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection and using data laboratory tests, images, and histopathologic studies to aid with the diagnosis. PMID:27219310

  13. Viral RNA in the influenza vaccine may have contributed to the development of ANCA-associated vasculitis in a patient following immunisation.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Lisa S; Nitschke, Jodie; Tervaert, Jan Willem Cohen; Peh, Chen Au; Hurtado, Plinio R

    2016-04-01

    A number of large studies have demonstrated influenza vaccinations to be safe and effective. However, there have been some sporadic case reports, describing a temporal association of influenza vaccination with onset or relapse of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis. The nature of this association, beyond time of occurrence, remains unknown. The presentation of a previously healthy patient who developed ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) shortly after influenza vaccination provided us with the rare opportunity to study the possible mechanisms behind this observation. We tested the ability of different types and batches of influenza vaccines to stimulate proteinase-3 ANCA (PR3-ANCA) production in vitro. We found that only some influenza vaccines stimulated PR3-ANCA production in this patient. We demonstrated that this unusual response was associated with those vaccines that contained viral ribonucleic acid (RNA), the natural ligand for Toll-like receptor-7. Exome sequencing of the patient's DNA did not show any mutation in any of the molecules associated with Toll-like receptor signalling. We propose that hyper-reaction to viral RNA in the influenza vaccine may have contributed to the development of AAV following influenza vaccination in this patient. PMID:26361945

  14. Fibroblasts express OvHV-2 capsid protein in vasculitis lesions of American bison (Bison bison) with experimental sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Danielle D; Taus, Naomi S; Schneider, David A; Cunha, Cristina W; Davis, William C; Brown, Wendy C; Li, Hong; O'Toole, Donal; Oaks, J Lindsay

    2013-10-25

    American bison (Bison bison) are particularly susceptible to developing fatal sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever (SA-MCF) caused by ovine herpesvirus-2 (OvHV-2), a γ-herpesvirus in the Macavirus genus. This generally fatal disease is characterized by lymphoproliferation, vasculitis, and mucosal ulceration in American bison, domestic cattle (Bos taurus), and other clinically susceptible species which are considered non-adapted, dead-end hosts. The pathogenesis and cellular tropism of OvHV-2 infection have not been fully defined. An earlier study detected OvHV-2 open reading frame 25 (ORF25) transcripts encoding the viral major capsid protein in tissues of bison with SA-MCF, and levels of viral transcript expression positively correlated with lesion severity. To further define the cellular tropism and replication of OvHV-2 infection in vascular lesions of bison, immunofluorescence studies were performed to identify cell type(s) expressing ORF25 protein within tissues. Cytoplasmic and not nuclear ORF25 protein was demonstrated in predominantly perivascular fibroblasts in six bison with experimentally-induced SA-MCF, and there was no evidence of immunoreactivity in vascular endothelium, smooth muscle, or infiltrating leukocytes. The cytoplasmic distribution of viral major capsid protein suggests that viral replication in perivascular fibroblasts may be abortive in this dead-end host. These findings provide a novel foundation for defining the pathogenesis of vasculitis in non-adapted hosts with SA-MCF. PMID:23953727

  15. Management of large-vessel vasculitis with FDG-PET: a systematic literature review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Soussan, Michael; Nicolas, Patrick; Schramm, Catherine; Katsahian, Sandrine; Pop, Gabriel; Fain, Olivier; Mekinian, Arsene

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to clarify the role of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the management of large-vessel vasculitis (LVV), focusing on 3 issues which are as follows: describe and determine the different FDG-PET criteria for the diagnosis of vascular inflammation, the performance of FDG-PET for the diagnosis of large-vessel inflammation in giant cell arteritis (GCA) patients, and the performance of FDG-PET to evaluate the disease inflammatory activity in Takayasu arteritis (TA) patients. MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE database were searched for articles that evaluated the value of FDG-PET in LVV, from January 2000 to December 2013. Inclusion criteria were American College of Rheumatology criteria for GCA or TA, definition PET positivity threshold, and >4 cases included. Sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) of FDG-PET for the diagnosis of large-vessel inflammation were calculated from each included individual study, and then pooled for meta-analysis with a random-effects model. Twenty-one studies (413 patients, 299 controls) were included in the systematic review. FDG-PET showed FDG vascular uptake in 70% (288/413) of patients and 7% (22/299) of controls. Only vascular uptake equal to or higher than the liver uptake was significantly different between GCA/TA patients and controls (P < 0.001). The meta-analysis of GCA patients (4 studies, 57 patients) shows that FDG-PET has high Se and Sp for the diagnosis of large-vessel inflammation in GCA patients in comparison to controls, with a pooled Se at 90% (95% confidence interval [CI], 79%-93%) and a pooled Sp at 98% (95% CI, 94%-99%). The meta-analysis of TA patients (7 studies, 191 patients) shows that FDG-PET has a pooled Se at 87% (95% CI, 78%-93%) and Sp at 73% (95% CI, 63%-81%) for the assessment of disease activity in TA, with up to 84% Sp, with studies using National Institutes of Health criteria as the disease activity assessment scale. FDG-PET showed good performances in the diagnosis of large-vessel inflammation, with higher accuracy in GCA patients than in TA patients. Although a vascular uptake equal to or higher than the liver uptake appears to be a good criterion for the diagnosis of vascular inflammation, further studies are needed to define the threshold of significance as well as the clinical significance of the vascular uptake. PMID:25860208

  16. An update of the Mayo Clinic cohort of patients with adult primary central nervous system vasculitis: description of 163 patients.

    PubMed

    Salvarani, Carlo; Brown, Robert D; Christianson, Teresa; Miller, Dylan V; Giannini, Caterina; Huston, John; Hunder, Gene G

    2015-05-01

    Primary central nervous system vasculitis (PCNSV) is an uncommon condition in which lesions are limited to vessels of the brain and spinal cord. Because the clinical manifestations are not specific, the diagnosis is often difficult, and permanent disability and death are frequent outcomes. This study is based on a cohort of 163 consecutive patients with PCNSV who were examined at the Mayo Clinic over a 29-year period from 1983 to 2011. The aim of the study was to define the characteristics of these patients, which represents the largest series in adults reported to date. A total of 105 patients were diagnosed by angiographic findings and 58 by biopsy results. The patients diagnosed by biopsy more frequently had at presentation cognitive dysfunction, greater cerebrospinal fluid total protein concentrations, less frequent cerebral infarcts, and more frequent leptomeningeal gadolinium-enhanced lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), along with less mortality and disability at last follow-up. The patients diagnosed by angiograms more frequently had at presentation hemiparesis or a persistent neurologic deficit or stroke, more frequent infarcts on MRI and an increased mortality. These differences were mainly related to the different size of the vessels involved in the 2 groups. Although most patients responded to therapy with glucocorticoids alone or in conjunction with cyclophosphamide and tended to improve during the follow-up period, an overall increased mortality rate was observed. Relapses occurred in one-quarter of the patients and were less frequent in patients treated with prednisone and cyclophosphamide compared with those treated with prednisone alone. The mortality rate and degree of disability at last follow-up were greater in those with increasing age, cerebral infarctions on MRI, angiographic large vessel involvement, and diagnosis made by angiography alone, but were lower in those with gadolinium-enhanced lesions on MRI and in those with cerebral amyloid angiopathy. The annual incidence rate of PCNSV was estimated at 2.4 cases per 1,000,000 person-years. PCNSV appears to consist of several subsets defined by the size of the vessels involved, the clinical characteristics at presentation, MRI findings, and histopathological patterns on biopsy. Early recognition and treatment may reduce poor outcomes. PMID:26020379

  17. CD8+/perforin+/WC1- gammadelta T cells, CD8+ alphabeta T cells, infiltrate vasculitis lesions of American bison (Bison bison) with experimental sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever (SA-MCF) caused by ovine herpesvirus-2 (OvHV-2) is a fatal disease associated with lymphoproliferation, lymphocytic vasculitis, and mucosal ulceration in clinically susceptible species. SA-MCF is an important threat to American bison (Bison bison) due to th...

  18. How Is Vasculitis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ray A chest x ray is a painless test that creates pictures of the structures inside your chest, such as your heart, lungs, ... lungs deliver oxygen to your blood. Lung function tests can help your doctor ... of the organs and structures in your abdomen. The picture may show whether ...

  19. What is Vasculitis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... disruption in blood flow caused by inflammation can damage the body's organs. Signs and symptoms depend on which organs have been damaged and the extent of the damage. Typical symptoms of inflammation, such as fever and ...

  20. Living with Vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and friends also can help relieve stress and anxiety. Let your loved ones know how you feel and what they can do to help you. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: September 23, 2014 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA ...

  1. Non HCV-related infectious cryoglobulinemia vasculitis: Results from the French nationwide CryoVas survey and systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Terrier, Benjamin; Marie, Isabelle; Lacraz, Adeline; Belenotti, Pauline; Bonnet, Fabrice; Chiche, Laurent; Graffin, Bruno; Hot, Arnaud; Kahn, Jean-Emmanuel; Michel, Catherine; Quemeneur, Thomas; de Saint-Martin, Luc; Hermine, Olivier; Léger, Jean-Marc; Mariette, Xavier; Senet, Patricia; Plaisier, Emmanuelle; Cacoub, Patrice

    2015-12-01

    In patients with infectious cryoglobulinemia vasculitis (CryoVas) in the absence of hepatitis C virus infection, data on presentation, therapeutic management and outcome are lacking. We conducted a nationwide survey that included patients with HCV-negative CryoVas. We describe here the presentation, therapeutic management and outcome of 18 patients with non-HCV infectious CryoVas and 27 additional patients identified form a systematic review of the literature. We included 18 patients, mean age 57.9±13.5 years. Infectious causes were viral infections in 8 patients [hepatitis B virus (HBV) in 4, and cytomegalovirus, Epstein Barr virus, parvovirus B19 and human immunodeficiency virus in one case each], pyogenic bacterial infection in 6 patients, parasitic infection in 2 patients, and leprosy and candidiasis in one case each. Baseline manifestations were purpura (78%), glomerulonephritis (28%), arthralgia (28%), peripheral neuropathy (22%), skin necrosis (22%), cutaneous ulcers (17%), and myalgia (11%). Cryoglobulinemia was type II in 2/3 of cases. Most cases received specific anti-infectious therapy as first-line therapy, sometimes associated with corticosteroids, achieving sustained remission in the majority of cases. Refractory or relapsing patients, frequently related to HBV infection, showed a complete remission after rituximab in addition to antiviral therapy. In contrast, corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressive agents used in the absence of anti-infectious agents were frequently associated with refractory CryoVas. Viral and pyogenic bacterial infections represent the main causes of non-HCV infectious CryoVas. Antimicrobial therapy is commonly associated with sustained remission. Immunosuppressive agents should be considered only as a second-line option in patients with refractory vasculitis. PMID:26320984

  2. Gastric presentation (vasculitis) mimics a gastric cancer as initial symptom in granulomatosis with polyangiitis: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhaohui; Ding, Jin; Li, Xueyi; Wu, Zhenbiao

    2015-11-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), formerly called Wegener's Granulomatosis, is characterized by necrotizing granulomatous inflammation and belongs to the family of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides. The main clinical symptoms of GPA are vasculitis primarily involving upper and lower respiratory tracts, as well as kidneys. Gastrointestinal manifestations of GPA are less common (0-20 %), with gastric presentation mimicking a gastric cancer as an initial symptom. This is a descriptive case report of one patient, together with systematic review of the literature. We described a 31-year-old Chinese woman who presented with complaints of abdominal distention, anorexia for 2 months. Gastroscopy was carried out for three times, and stomach cancer was suspected. However, histopathology of gastric biopsy revealed a chronic inflammation with mucosal ulceration, frequent neutrophils and lymphocytes infiltration, and local granulomatous formation, whereas no sign of stomach carcinoma was observed. In view of the positive cANCA test, a diagnosis of GPA was considered. From the onset of the GPA in the patients, no other organs have been involved in the disease. The patient was successfully treated with corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide. As shown in the report, patients who present only with gastrointestinal manifestations represent challenges to diagnosis. ANCA testing can serve as a decisive diagnostic tool. Although uncommon, GI involvement may be a major feature in GPA, sometimes presenting as gastric tumor-like lesions. Diagnosis should be considered in patients presenting with GI symptoms accompanied by evidence of systemic vasculitis, and ANCA test should be used as a diagnostic measurement to clarify differential diagnosis. PMID:26248531

  3. BRONCHIAL LESIONS OF MOUSE MODEL OF ASTHMA ARE PRECEDED BY IMMUNE COMPLEX VASCULITIS AND INDUCED BRONCHIAL ASSOCIATED LYMPHOID TISSUE (iBALT)

    PubMed Central

    Guest, Ian; Sell, Stewart

    2015-01-01

    We systematically examined by immune-histology the lungs of some widely used mouse models of asthma. These models include sensitization by multiple intraperitoneal injections of soluble ovalbumin (OVA) or of OVA with alum, followed by three intranasal or aerosol challenges 3 days apart. Within 24 hours after a single challenge there is fibrinoid necrosis of arterial walls with deposition of immunoglobulin and OVA and infiltration of eosinophilic polymorphonuclear cells that lasts for about 3 days followed by peribronchial B-cell infiltration and slight reversible goblet cell hypertrophy. After 2 challenges, severe eosinophilic vasculitis is present at 6 hours, increases by 72 hours and then declines; B-cell proliferation and significant goblet cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia (GCHTH) and bronchial smooth muscle hypertrophy recur more prominently. After 3 challenges, there is significantly increased induced bronchus associated lymphoid tissue (iBALT) formation, GCHTH and smooth muscle hypertrophy. Elevated levels of Th2 cytokines: IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13, are present in bronchial lavage fluids. Sensitized mice have precipitating antibody and positive Arthus skin reactions but also develop significant levels IgE antibody to OVA but only 1 week after challenge. We conclude that the asthma like lung lesions induced in these models is preceded by immune complex mediated eosinophilic vasculitis and iBALT formation. There are elevations of Th2 cytokines that most likely produce bronchial lesions that resemble human asthma. However, it is unlikely that mast cell activated atopic mechanisms are responsible as we found only a few presumed mast cells by toluidine blue and metachromatic staining limited to the most proximal part of the main stem bronchus, and none in the remaining main stem bronchus or in the lung periphery. PMID:26006019

  4. High-mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) is increased in antineutrophilic cytoplasmatic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis with renal manifestations.

    PubMed

    Bruchfeld, Annette; Wendt, Mrten; Bratt, Johan; Qureshi, Abdul R; Chavan, Sangeeta; Tracey, Kevin J; Palmblad, Karin; Gunnarsson, Iva

    2011-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear and cytosolic protein that is increasingly recognized as an important proinflammatory mediator actively secreted from monocytes and macrophages and passively released from necrotic cells. In antineutrophilic cytoplasmatic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV), the kidneys are commonly affected vital organs, characterized by focal necrotizing and/or crescentic pauci-immune glomerulonephritis. The aim of the study was to determine whether HMGB1 serum levels are elevated in AAV with renal manifestations. A total of 30 AAV patients (16 female and 14 male; median age 59 years, range 17-82) with Wegener granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis and Churg-Strauss syndrome with available renal biopsies and serum samples were included. In seven cases, serum was also obtained at rebiopsy in remission. HMGB1 was analyzed with Western blot. Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score (BVAS, version 2003), C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), urinanalysis, creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate, sex and age were included in the analysis. Twenty-five episodes of biopsy-proven active disease with BVAS 17.9 4.6 and 13 cases with inactive biopsies and BVAS 2.3 3.7 (P = 0.0001) were identified. CRP, ESR, hematuria and proteinuria were significantly higher in active cases. HMGB1 was significantly elevated (P = 0.01) comparing active with inactive cases (120 48 versus 78 46 ng/mL) and significantly lower in the seven control patients (P = 0.03) at rebiopsy in remission. HMGB1 remained higher in inactive cases compared with historic healthy controls (10.9 10.5 ng/mL). HMGB1 levels did not differ significantly between AAV subgroups. CRP and ESR did not correlate with HMGB1. HMGB1 is significantly increased in AAV with renal involvement. Residual HMGB1 elevation in remission could possibly reflect low-grade inflammatory activity or tissue damage. Future studies may further reveal whether HMGB1 is useful as a marker of disease activity and a predictor of outcome in AAV. PMID:20844833

  5. Leukocyte and serum S100A8/S100A9 expression reflects disease activity in ANCA-associated vasculitis and glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Pepper, Ruth J; Hamour, Sally; Chavele, Konstantia-Maria; Todd, Sarah K; Rasmussen, Niels; Flint, Shaun; Lyons, Paul A; Smith, Kenneth G C; Pusey, Charles D; Cook, H Terence; Salama, Alan D

    2013-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA)–associated vasculitis (AAV) commonly results in glomerulonephritis, in which neutrophils and monocytes have important roles. The heterodimer calprotectin (S100A8/S100A9, mrp8/14) is a Toll-like receptor-4 ligand found in neutrophils and monocytes and is elevated in inflammatory conditions. By immunohistochemistry of renal biopsies, patients with focal or crescentic glomerular lesions were found to have the highest expression of calprotectin and those with sclerotic the least. Serum levels of calprotectin as measured by ELISA were elevated in patients with active AAV and the levels decreased but did not normalize during remission, suggesting subclinical inflammation. Calprotectin levels in patients with limited systemic disease increased following treatment withdrawal and were significantly elevated in patients who relapsed compared with those who did not. As assessed by flow cytometry, patients with AAV had higher monocyte and neutrophil cell surface calprotectin expression than healthy controls, but this was not associated with augmented mRNA expression in CD14+ monocytes or CD16+ neutrophils. Thus, serum calprotectin is a potential disease biomarker in patients with AAV, and may have a role in disease pathogenesis. PMID:23423260

  6. Adverse events and infectious burden, microbes and temporal outline from immunosuppressive therapy in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis with native renal function

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, JulieAnne G.; Negrete-Lopez, Roberto; Poulton, Caroline J.; Kidd, Jason M.; Katsanos, Suzanne L.; Goetz, Lindsey; Hu, Yichun; Nachman, Patrick H.; Falk, Ronald J.; Hogan, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Disease control in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis (AAV) with immunosuppression is effective but burdened by adverse events, especially infections. The study goal was to evaluate risks and types of infections in patients with AAV. Methods Biopsy-proven AAV patients (diagnosed 1/1991–6/2011) followed in an inception cohort were evaluated for adverse events. Severe infections (requiring intravenous antibiotics, intensive care unit, or causing death) were recorded. Infection number was grouped as none, 1–2 or ≥3. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals. Results A total of 489 patients (median age 59; 47% female, 55% myeloperoxidase-ANCA) were followed for 2.8 years (median). At 1, 2 and 5 years cumulative incidence of infection was 51, 58 and 65% and severe infection was 22, 23 and 26%. Pulmonary and upper respiratory infections were most common (42 and 30% ever experienced each, respectively), highest in the first 3 months. Staphylococcus aureus was most frequently seen among positive cultures (41%, 78 S. aureus/192 total positive cultures), and only one Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (6 weeks into treatment). All-cause death in 12 months was associated with infections (% deaths: 0 infections 3%; 1–2 infections 10%, ≥3 infections 13%, P = 0.002). Controlling for age, sex and kidney function, patients with severe infections were 4.2 times more likely to die within 12 months (95% CI 2.0–8.7; P = 0.001). Conclusions More infections increase the risk of a severe infection which increases risk of all-cause mortality. Respiratory and S. aureus infections are dominant. Targeted prophylactic therapy could decrease morbidity. PMID:25805747

  7. A bacterial artificial chromosome transgene with polymorphic Cd72 inhibits the development of glomerulonephritis and vasculitis in MRL-Faslpr lupus mice.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Hisashi; Tsubaki, Takahito; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Ono, Masao; Nose, Masato; Takahashi, Satoru

    2013-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is considered to be under the control of polygenic inheritance, developing according to the cumulative effects of susceptibility genes with polymorphic alleles; however, the mechanisms underlying the roles of polygenes based on functional and pathological genomics remain uncharacterized. In this study, we substantiate that a CD72 polymorphism in the membrane-distal extracellular domain impacts on both the development of glomerulonephritis and vasculitis in a lupus model strain of mice, MRL/MpJ-Fas(lpr), and the reactivity of BCR signal stimulation. We generated mice carrying a bacterial artificial chromosome transgene originating from C57BL/6 (B6) mice that contains the Cd72(b) locus (Cd72(B6) transgenic [tg]) or the modified Cd72(b) locus with an MRL-derived Cd72(c) allele at the polymorphic region corresponding to the membrane-distal extracellular domain (Cd72(B6/MRL) tg). Cd72(B6) tg mice, but not Cd72(B6/MRL) tg mice, showed a significant reduction in mortality following a marked improvement of disease associated with decreased serum levels of IgG3 and anti-dsDNA Abs. The number of splenic CD4(-)CD8(-) T cells in Cd72(B6) tg mice was decreased significantly in association with a reduced response to B cell receptor signaling. These results indicate that the Cd72 polymorphism affects susceptibility to lupus phenotypes and that novel functional rescue by a bacterial artificial chromosome transgenesis is an efficient approach with wide applications for conducting a genomic analysis of polygene diseases. PMID:23365086

  8. A Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Transgene with Polymorphic Cd72 Inhibits the Development of Glomerulonephritis and Vasculitis in MRL-Faslpr Lupus Mice

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, Hisashi; Tsubaki, Takahito; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Ono, Masao

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is considered to be under the control of polygenic inheritance, developing according to the cumulative effects of susceptibility genes with polymorphic alleles; however, the mechanisms underlying the roles of polygenes based on functional and pathological genomics remain uncharacterized. In this study, we substantiate that a CD72 polymorphism in the membrane-distal extracellular domain impacts on both the development of glomerulonephritis and vasculitis in a lupus model strain of mice, MRL/MpJ-Faslpr, and the reactivity of BCR signal stimulation. We generated mice carrying a bacterial artificial chromosome transgene originating from C57BL/6 (B6) mice that contains the Cd72b locus (Cd72B6 transgenic [tg]) or the modified Cd72b locus with an MRL-derived Cd72c allele at the polymorphic region corresponding to the membrane-distal extracellular domain (Cd72B6/MRL tg). Cd72B6 tg mice, but not Cd72B6/MRL tg mice, showed a significant reduction in mortality following a marked improvement of disease associated with decreased serum levels of IgG3 and anti-dsDNA Abs. The number of splenic CD4−CD8− T cells in Cd72B6 tg mice was decreased significantly in association with a reduced response to B cell receptor signaling. These results indicate that the Cd72 polymorphism affects susceptibility to lupus phenotypes and that novel functional rescue by a bacterial artificial chromosome transgenesis is an efficient approach with wide applications for conducting a genomic analysis of polygene diseases. PMID:23365086

  9. Plasma exchange and glucocorticoid dosing in the treatment of anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody associated vasculitis (PEXIVAS): protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA, Wegener’s) and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) are small vessel vasculitides collectively referred to as anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody-associated vasculitis (AAV). AAV is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality due to uncontrolled disease and treatment toxicity. Small randomized trials suggest adjunctive plasma exchange may improve disease control, while observational evidence suggests that current oral glucocorticoid doses are associated with severe infections in patients with AAV. A randomized study of both plasma exchange and glucocorticoids is required to evaluate plasma exchange and oral glucocorticoid dosing in patients with AAV. Methods/design PEXIVAS is a two-by-two factorial randomized trial evaluating adjunctive plasma exchange and two oral glucocorticoid regimens in severe AAV. Five hundred patients are being randomized at centers across Europe, North America, Asia, and Australasia to receive plasma exchange or no plasma exchange, and to receive standard or reduced oral glucocorticoid dosing. All patients receive immunosuppression with either cyclophosphamide or rituximab. The primary outcome is the time to the composite of all-cause mortality and end-stage renal disease. PEXIVAS is funded by the National Institute of Health Research (UK), the Food and Drug Administration (USA), the National Institutes of Health (USA), the Canadian Institute of Health Research (Canada), the National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia), and Assistance Publique (France). Additional in-kind supplies for plasma exchange are provided by industry partners (TerumoBCT, Gambro Australia, and Fresenius Australia). Discussion This is the largest trial in AAV undertaken to date. PEXIVAS will inform the future standard of care for patients with severe AAV. The cooperation between investigators, funding agencies, and industry provides a model for conducting studies in rare diseases. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials: (ISRCTN07757494) and clinicaltrials.gov: (NCT00987389) PMID:23497590

  10. A myelopoiesis gene signature during remission in anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody-associated vasculitis does not predict relapses but seems to reflect ongoing prednisolone therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kurz, T; Weiner, M; Skoglund, C; Basnet, S; Eriksson, P; Segelmark, M

    2014-01-01

    A myelopoiesis gene signature in circulating leucocytes, exemplified by increased myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase 3 (PR3) mRNA levels, has been reported in patients with active anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody-associated vasculitis (AAV), and to a lesser extent during remission. We hypothesized that this signature could predict disease relapse. mRNA levels of PR3, MPO, selected myelopoiesis transcription factors [CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (CEBP-α), CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (CEBP-β), SPI1/PU.1-related transcription factor (SPIB), spleen focus forming virus proviral integration oncogene, PU.1 homologue (SPI1)] and microRNAs (miRNAs) from patient and control peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) were analysed and associated with clinical data. Patients in stable remission had higher mRNA levels for PR3 (PBMC, PMN) and MPO (PBMC). PR3 and SPIB mRNA correlated positively in controls but negatively in patient PBMC. Statistically significant correlations existed between PR3 mRNA and several miRNAs in controls, but not in patients. PR3/MPO mRNA levels were not associated with previous or future relapses, but correlated with steroid treatment. Prednisolone doses were negatively linked to SPIB and miR-155-5p, miR-339-5p (PBMC) and to miR-221, miR-361 and miR-505 (PMN). PR3 mRNA in PBMC correlated with time since last flare, blood leucocyte count and estimated glomerular filtration rate. Our results show that elevated leucocyte PR3 mRNA levels in AAV patients in remission do not predict relapse. The origin seems multi-factorial, but to an important extent explainable by prednisolone action. Gene signatures in patients with AAV undergoing steroid treatment should therefore be interpreted accordingly. PMID:24215168

  11. What Everybody is Doing but No One is Talking About: Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in the ANCA Associated Vasculitis Population

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Elisabeth A.B.; McGregor, JulieAnne G.; Burkart, Madelyn E.; Poulton, Caroline J.; Hu, Yichun; Falk, Ronald J.; Hogan, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    The use and impact of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis (AAV) has not been reported. AAV patients seeking care at our center inquired about CAM, prompting a formal study. Study objectives were to discern how many AAV patients used CAM and its perceived helpfulness in disease management. Methods AAV patients completed a CAM questionnaire between July 2011 and May 2012. Patients were 18 years or older and had biopsy proven and/or clinical evidence of AAV. Medical record abstraction supplemented data. Classification detailed CAM type including Mind or Mind-Body. Perceived helpfulness of CAM was assessed as very, somewhat or not at all/dont know. Results A total of 107 patients participated and were a mean age of 53 (range: 1885), 62% female; 48% proteinase 3 (PR3)-ANCA, 44% myeloperoxidase (MPO)-ANCA and 8% ANCA-negative. Top organs involved included kidney (87%), joints (55%), lung (53%) and upper respiratory (53%). At least one type of CAM treatment or self-help practice was reported by 81% of study participants, with the most frequent being prayer (64%), exercise (27%) and massage therapy (19%). Mind-based practices were used by 28% (excluding prayer) and Mind-Body practices by 14%. Most practices were used to improve wellbeing, and Mind and Mind-Body were deemed very helpful by 83% and 87% respectively. Only 24% of study participants discussed CAM with their physician. Conclusion CAM practices were commonly used to improve well-being and found to be beneficial among AAV patients, but more open discussion is needed about CAM between physicians and patients. PMID:25599078

  12. The CD4 Lymphocyte Count is a Better Predictor of Overall Infection Than the Total Lymphocyte Count in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis Under a Corticosteroid and Cyclophosphamide Regimen

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yi-Yun; Li, Zhi-Ying; Zhao, Ming-Hui; Chen, Min

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody associated vasculitis (AAV) have a high prevalence of infection during immunosuppressive therapy, and the total lymphocyte count (TLC) has been demonstrated to be an independent predictor of infection. The current study investigated the value of the TLC and its subsets, particularly the CD4 count, for predicting infections of AAV in a single Chinese cohort. A total of 124 AAV patients were retrospectively recruited in our department from December 1997 to October 2013. Multivariate Cox models with the CD4 count or TLC measured at three typical time points, that is, at baseline, at the beginning of immunosuppressant dose reduction, and at the last visit before infection or censoring, or with the measurements included as time-varying covariates, were compared to select the most predictive time point for infection. A time-dependent area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC(t)) for the TLC (AUC(t)TLC) and the CD4 count (AUC(t)CD4count) measured at the most predictive time point were calculated and compared. During an average follow-up of 11.5 (range 0.5–142) months, 55 of the 124 patients (44.3%) experienced a microbiologically confirmed infection. Independent predictors of overall infection were initial creatinine clearance (P = 0.02 and 0.04), pulmonary interstitial fibrosis (P = .04 and .05), pulmonary nodule or cavity (P = 0.002 and .002), CD4 count (P < 0.001) or TLC (P = 0.05) from the last visit. The comparison of Cox models fitted at different time points confirmed the last visit to be the most predictive one for overall infection. The predictive value of the CD4 count or TLC from the last visit measured by AUC showed that the AUC(t)CD4count (62.8–70.2%) was almost always higher than AUC(t)TLC (55.2–58.1%) during the first 2 years of immunosuppressive therapy (P = 0.01–0.2). In terms of different pathogens, both the CD4 count and TLC performed well for non-bacterial infection (AUC(t) 69.2–82.7%), and the difference between them was not significant (P > 0.1). The TLC and CD4 count were both independent risk factors of overall infection and non-bacterial infection in AAV patients. The CD4 count had a higher predictive value than the TLC for overall infections, particularly during the first 2 years of immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:25950695

  13. 4. Autoimmunity, vasculitis, and autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Susan J; Kavanaugh, Arthur

    2006-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases are distinct clinical syndromes characterized by various alterations in normal immune responsiveness, such that there is a loss of tolerance to particular host constituents. In most cases, despite years of intense investigation, the etiopathogenic antigens initiating these systemic inflammatory conditions remain undefined. However, a great deal has been learned about the changes in components of the immune response relevant to the propagation and sustenance of these often chronic disorders. In addition, various hormonal, environmental, physiologic, and other influences that affect their expression have been identified. The expression and ultimate clinical outcome of autoimmune diseases usually relate to inflammation-related damage to the target organ with subsequent dysfunction. Certain immune conditions, such as autoimmune thyroid disease, largely affect a single organ, whereas others, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, heterogeneously affect sundry organ systems. Autoantibodies directed against normal host antigens are a common feature of many autoimmune diseases. In some cases they are pathogenic, whereas in others they serve as markers for organ involvement or outcomes. Clinical descriptions of autoimmune diseases date back many decades in some cases. Recent efforts at formulating classification criteria have allowed clearer distinctions and more accurate stratification. Greater understanding of the immunopathogenesis of autoimmune conditions has led to the development and introduction into the clinic of novel immunomodulatory therapies and treatment paradigms that have substantially improved the outcomes for patients affected by these serious conditions. PMID:16455344

  14. Biotherapies in large vessel vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Pazzola, G; Muratore, F; Pipitone, N; Salvarani, C

    2016-04-01

    The mainstay of therapy of large vessel vasculitides (LVV) remains glucocorticoids (GC). Although most patients initially achieve disease remission, relapses and GC dependence are seen in more than two-thirds of cases. Conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) showed little or no steroid sparing effects, while biological agents represent a valid therapeutic option in patients with severe and/or relapsing LVV. PMID:26383765

  15. Blastocystis sp. subtype 2 detection during recurrence of gastrointestinal and urticarial symptoms.

    PubMed

    Vogelberg, Christian; Stensvold, Christen Rune; Monecke, Stefan; Ditzen, Anette; Stopsack, Konrad; Heinrich-Gräfe, Uta; Pöhlmann, Christoph

    2010-09-01

    Blastocystis is a common unicellular intestinal parasite in humans. Its clinical relevance is still subject to discussion with numerous conflicting reports on its ability to cause disease. A remarkable genetic heterogeneity among isolates suggests an association between distinct subtypes (STs) and pathogenicity, although a clear correlation between symptoms and subtype is lacking. Here, we report on a clinical case which possibly links Blastocystis sp. ST2 infection with the simultaneous occurrence of gastrointestinal illness and generalized chronic urticaria. Despite repeated chemotherapy with different antimicrobial drugs, both the gastrointestinal and cutaneous disorders reoccurred after short symptom-free intervals. Eradication of the parasite and permanent resolution of the patient's medical condition was finally achieved with the combined application of metronidazole and paromomycin. PMID:20363362

  16. CD8(+)/perforin(+)/WC1(-) gammadelta T cells, not CD8(+) alphabeta T cells, infiltrate vasculitis lesions of American bison (Bison bison) with experimental sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Danielle D; Davis, William C; Brown, Wendy C; Li, Hong; O'Toole, Donal; Oaks, J Lindsay

    2010-08-15

    Sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever (SA-MCF) caused by ovine herpesvirus-2 (OvHV-2), a gamma-herpesvirus in the Macavirus genus, is a fatal disease associated with lymphoproliferation, lymphocytic vasculitis, and mucosal ulceration in clinically susceptible species. SA-MCF is an important threat to American bison (Bison bison) due to their high susceptibility to this disease. Currently, the pathogenesis of disease in SA-MCF is poorly understood, and the immunophenotype of lymphocytes that infiltrate the vascular lesions of bison and cattle with SA-MCF has been only partially defined. Previous single-color immunohistochemistry studies have demonstrated that CD8(+) cells and CD4(+) cells predominate within vascular infiltrates in cattle and bison. The CD8(+) cells detected in the vascular lesions of cattle and bison were assumed to be cytotoxic alphabeta T lymphocytes. However, polychromatic immunophenotyping analyses in this study showed that CD8(+)/perforin(+) gammadelta T cells, CD4(+)/perforin(-) alphabeta T cells, and B cells infiltrate vascular lesions in the urinary bladder, kidney, and liver of six bison with experimentally-induced SA-MCF. CD8(+) alphabeta T cells and WC1(+) gammadelta T cell cells were only infrequently and inconsistently identified. This study confirmed our hypothesis that the predominant CD8(+) lymphocytes infiltrating the vascular lesions of bison with SA-MCF are cytotoxic lymphocytes of the innate immune system, not CD8(+) alphabeta T cells. Results of the present study support the previous suggestions that MCF is fundamentally a disease of immune dysregulation. PMID:20413164

  17. [If you go looking for trouble you'll find it. Urticarial reactions to insects of our local areas].

    PubMed

    Maitre, Sylvie; Kaeser, Amelie; Di Lucca, Julie; Spertini, François; Ribi, Camillo

    2016-04-01

    Itchy skin rashes are a frequent reason to seek medical advice. The symptoms may be caused by hypersensitivity reactions to arthropod bites, waterborne parasites or setae from moth caterpillars and are sometimes mistaken for spontaneous urticaria or eczema. Some of these pests are resurging in Switzerland and elsewhere and increasingly responsible for emergency consultation. In this article we review itchy skin rashes caused by bed bugs, scabies, lice, cercariae, Pyemotes spp, caterpillars and harvest mites, which may be confounded with urticaria and allergic contact dermatitis. We detail here clinical manifestations, topographical distribution of skin lesions, epidemiology, treatment and preventive measures. PMID:27197324

  18. Epidemiology of ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Ntatsaki, Eleana; Watts, Richard A; Scott, David G I

    2010-08-01

    The epidemiology of the antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides (AAV), comprising Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, and Churg-Strauss syndrome, poses considerable challenges to epidemiologists. These challenges include the difficulty of defining a case with a lack of clear distinction between the different disorders, case capture, and case ascertainment. The AAV are rare and therefore a large population is required to determine the incidence and prevalence, and this poses questions of feasibility. Despite these difficulties a considerable body of data on the epidemiology of the AAV has been built in the past 20 years with an interesting age, geographic, and ethnic tropism gradually being revealed. Most of the data come from White populations of European descent, and the overall annual incidence is estimated at approximately 10-20/million with a peak age of onset in those aged 65 to 74 years. PMID:20688243

  19. Biologics for ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Murgia, Giuseppe; Firinu, Davide; Manconi, Paolo E; Del Giacco, Stefano R

    2014-01-01

    The antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides (AAV) are a group of necrotizing vasculitides with a potential fatal outcome. Conventional therapy is based on the use of glucocorticoids (GCs) and cyclophosphamide (CYC), which is associated with severe toxic effects and is unable to control the disease activity in some refractory and relapsing cases. Several authors focused their efforts on the identification of safe and more efficient drugs, primarily investigating biological agents. Rituximab (RTX) demonstrated to be an alternative to CYC as remission-induction therapy for microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) and granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) in two clinical controlled randomized trials. Contrasting data emerged regarding anti-TNF-? agents, and their use should be limited to some selected refractory or relapsing cases. Mepolizumab (MPZ) and Omalizumab (OMZ) are potentially beneficial treatments for patients with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA). Hereby, we perform a review focused on the use of biological drugs for AAV treatment. PMID:24998311

  20. Neutrophilic Dermatosis Limited to Lipo-Lymphedematous Skin in a Morbidly Obese Woman on Dasatinib Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ainechi, Sanaz; Carlson, John Andrew

    2016-02-01

    Neutrophilic dermatosis (ND) confined to postmastectomy lymphedema, localized Sweet syndrome, is a newly recognized disease. In this study, the authors describe a 44-year-old obese woman with chronic myelogenous leukemia in molecular remission on dasatinib therapy, who presented with a painful urticarial eruption limited to lipo-lymphedematous skin and accompanied by malaise, episodic fever, diarrhea, neutrophilia, and leukocytosis. Initially transient and migratory, the rash became fixed, papular, and vesicular and showed minimal response to corticosteroids. Biopsy demonstrated sparse perivascular and interstitial dermal neutrophilic infiltrates, without vasculitis or significant dermal edema. Aggregates of neutrophils were found within and surrounding lymphangiectases. Biopsy of a new onset papule 3 weeks later demonstrated papillary dermal edema, denser neutrophilic infiltrate, and vasculitis-like changes. These 2 histopathologic patterns of ND, early and late, resemble neutrophilic urticarial dermatitis (also known as neutrophilic dermatitis with systemic inflammation) and Sweet syndrome, respectively. Extensive workup did not reveal evidence of relapsed chronic myelogenous leukemia, infection, or a coexisting systemic inflammatory disease. Dasatinib was discontinued and the eruption gradually resolved over 2.5 months. Still in molecular remission (no detectable BCR-ABL gene fusion), dasatinib therapy was recommenced at 3-month follow-up. After 10 months, she complains of malaise and arthralgia, but no cutaneous symptoms. The evolution and slow resolution of this ND in lipo-lymphedematous skin implicate poor lymphatic clearance of factors, antigenic and/or toxic, involved in the pathogenesis of ND. PMID:26825166

  1. Chronic urticaria.

    PubMed Central

    Burrall, B. A.; Halpern, G. M.; Huntley, A. C.

    1990-01-01

    Urticaria affects 15% to 20% of the population once or more during a lifetime. Chronic urticaria is a frequent recurrent eruption over a period greater than 6 weeks; the cause remains a mystery in more than 75% of cases. Urticaria and angioedema may be produced by immunologic or nonimmunologic means. Urticarial vasculitis, contact urticaria, mastocytosis, physical urticarias, dermatographism, cholinergic urticaria, localized heat urticaria, cold urticaria, aquagenic urticaria, and vibratory angioedema all require specific evaluation and treatment. Chronic idiopathic urticaria is usually controlled by antihistamines; depending on the circadian rhythm of the eruption, sedative or nonsedative antihistamines are prescribed. Some patients will require a combination of H1 and H2 antagonists, or even parenteral corticosteroids. PMID:1970697

  2. Chronic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Burrall, B A; Halpern, G M; Huntley, A C

    1990-03-01

    Urticaria affects 15% to 20% of the population once or more during a lifetime. Chronic urticaria is a frequent recurrent eruption over a period greater than 6 weeks; the cause remains a mystery in more than 75% of cases. Urticaria and angioedema may be produced by immunologic or nonimmunologic means. Urticarial vasculitis, contact urticaria, mastocytosis, physical urticarias, dermatographism, cholinergic urticaria, localized heat urticaria, cold urticaria, aquagenic urticaria, and vibratory angioedema all require specific evaluation and treatment. Chronic idiopathic urticaria is usually controlled by antihistamines; depending on the circadian rhythm of the eruption, sedative or nonsedative antihistamines are prescribed. Some patients will require a combination of H1 and H2 antagonists, or even parenteral corticosteroids. PMID:1970697

  3. Vasculitis Syndromes of the Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems

    MedlinePlus

    ... will develop blindness in one eye, preceded by visual disturbances.Once one eye is affected, three out of four individuals will go on to lose vision in the other eye, most in two weeks or less. The main goal of treatment for temporal arteritis is to prevent blindness. Most ...

  4. Vasculitis presenting as chronic unilateral painful leg swelling.

    PubMed

    Nash, P; Fryer, J; Webb, J

    1988-06-01

    We describe 2 patients who presented with chronic painful indurated swelling of one lower limb, thought at the time of referral to be due to chronic venous insufficiency. Reassessment because of marked periostitis of the tibia and fibula as well as laboratory indices consistent with an inflammatory process revealed acute necrotizing arteritis in one patient and granulomatous arteritis in the other. Clinicians should be aware of this unusual presentation of treatable vasculitic diseases. PMID:3418625

  5. The lung in systemic vasculitis: radiological patterns and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Feragalli, Beatrice; Mantini, Cesare; Sperandeo, Marco; Galluzzo, Michele; Belcaro, Giovanni; Tartaro, Armando; Cotroneo, Antonio R

    2016-05-01

    The respiratory system may be involved in all systemic vasculitides, although with a variable frequency. The aim of our review is to describe radiographic and high-resolution CT (HRCT) findings of pulmonary vasculitides and to correlate radiological findings with pathological results. Lung disease is a common feature of antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated small-vessel vasculitides, including granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's), eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss) and microscopic polyangiitis. Pulmonary involvement is less frequent in immune-complex-mediated small-vessel vasculitides, such as Behçet's disease and Goodpasture's syndrome. Pulmonary involvement associated to large-vessel (gigantocellular arteritis and Takayasu's disease) or medium-vessel (nodose polyarteritis and Kawasaki's disease) vasculitides is extremely rare. The present review describes the main clinical and radiological features of pulmonary vasculitides with major purpose to correlate HRCT findings (solitary or multiple nodules, cavitary lesions, micronodules with centrilobular or peribronchial distribution, airspace consolidations, "crazy paving", tracheobronchial involvement, interstitial disease) with pathological results paying particular attention to the description of acute life-threatening manifestations. A thorough medical history, careful clinical examination and the knowledge of radiological patterns are mandatory for a correct and early diagnosis. PMID:26876879

  6. Extra- and Intracranial Cerebral Vasculitis in Giant Cell Arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Larivière, Delphine; Sacre, Karim; Klein, Isabelle; Hyafil, Fabien; Choudat, Laurence; Chauveheid, Marie-Paule; Papo, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Recognizing giant cell arteritis (GCA) in patients with stroke may be challenging. We aimed to highlight the clinical spectrum and long-term follow-up of GCA-specific cerebrovascular accidents. Medical charts of all patients followed in a French Department of Internal Medicine for GCA between January 2008 and January 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with cerebrovascular accidents at GCA diagnosis were included. Diagnosis of GCA was based on American College of Rheumatology criteria. Transient ischemic attacks and stroke resulting from an atherosclerotic or cardioembolic mechanism were excluded. Clinical features, GCA-diagnosis workup, brain imaging, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) study, treatment, and follow-up data were analyzed. From January 2008 to January 2014, 97 patients have been followed for GCA. Among them, 8 biopsy-proven GCA patients (mean age 70 ± 7.8 years, M/F sex ratio 3/1) had stroke at GCA diagnosis. Six patients reported headache and visual impairment. Brain MR angiography showed involvement of vertebral and/or basilar arteries in all cases with multiple or unique ischemic lesions in the infratentorial region of the brain in all but one case. Intracranial cerebral arteries involvement was observed in 4 cases including 2 cases with cerebral angiitis. Long lasting lesions on diffusion-weight brain MRI sequences were observed in 1 case. All patients received steroids for a mean of 28.1 ± 12.8 months. Side effects associated with long-term steroid therapy occurred in 6 patients. Relapses occurred in 4 patients and required immunosuppressive drugs in 3 cases. After a mean follow-up duration of 36.4 ± 16.4 months, all but 1 patient achieved complete remission without major sequelae. The conjunction of headache with vertebral and basilar arteries involvement in elderly is highly suggestive of stroke associated with GCA. Intracranial cerebral arteries involvement with cerebral angiitis associated with long lasting brain lesions on diffusion-weight brain MRI sequences may occur in GCA. Both frequent relapses and steroid-induced side effects argue for the use of immunosuppressive agents combined with steroids as first-line therapy. PMID:25526454

  7. Central nervous system vasculitis in adults and children.

    PubMed

    Twilt, Marinka; Benseler, Susanne M

    2016-01-01

    Primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS) is an inflammatory brain disease targeting the cerebral blood vessels, leading to a wide spectrum of signs and symptoms, including neurologic deficits, cognitive dysfunction, and psychiatric symptoms. The inflammation could be reversible if diagnosed and treated early. The diagnosis requires the careful consideration and rapid evaluation of systemic underlying conditions and disease mimics. The differential diagnosis is distinctly different for angiography-positive and -negative PACNS subtypes and differs depending on age, so there is childhood PACNS or adult PACNS. Distinct disease subtypes have been described, with characteristic disease course, neuroimaging findings, and histopathologic features. Novel and traditional biomarkers, including von Willebrand factor antigen and cytokine levels, can help diagnose, and define subtype and disease activity. Treatment of PACNS should be tailored to the disease subtypes and clinical symptoms. Beyond immunosuppression it should include medications to control symptoms in order to support and enhance the child's or adult's ability to actively participate in rehabilitation. The mortality of PACNS has decreased; studies determining the morbidity and its determinants are urgently needed. PMID:27112683

  8. Macrophages in Vascular Inflammation – From Atherosclerosis to Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Hilhorst, Marc; Harrison, David G.; Goronzy, Jörg J.; Weyand, Cornelia M.

    2015-01-01

    The spectrum of vascular inflammatory disease ranges from atherosclerosis and hypertension, widespread conditions affecting large proportions of the population, to the vasculitides, rare syndromes leading to fast and irreversible organ failure. Atherosclerosis progresses over decades, inevitably proceeding through multiple phases of disease and causes its major complications when the vessel wall lesion ruptures, giving rise to lumen-occlusive atherothrombosis. Vasculitides of medium and large arteries progress rapidly, causing tissue ischemia through lumen-occlusive intimal hyperplasia. In both disease entities, macrophages play a decisive role in pathogenesis, but function in the context of other immune cells that direct their differentiation and their functional commitments. In atherosclerosis, macrophages are involved in the removal of lipids and tissue debris and make a critical contribution to tissue damage and wall remodeling. In several of the vasculitides, macrophages contribute to granuloma formation, a microstructural platform optimizing macrophage-T cell interactions, antigen containment and inflammatory amplification. By virtue of their versatility and plasticity, macrophages are able to promote a series of pathogenic functions, ranging from the release of cytokines and enzymes, the production of reactive oxygen species, presentation of antigen and secretion of tissue remodeling factors. However, as short-lived cells that lack memory, macrophages are also amendable to reprogramming, making them promising targets for anti-inflammatory interventions. PMID:25811915

  9. Bullous reactions to bed bug bites reflect cutaneous vasculitis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluates bullous cutaneous reactions and sequential histopathology in an individual sensitized to bed bug bites in an effort to better understand the allergic response and histology associated with these bites. There was a progression of the inflammatory response across time ranging from...

  10. Comorbidity and pathogenic links of chronic spontaneous urticaria and systemic lupus erythematosus - a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kolkhir, P; Pogorelov, D; Olisova, O; Maurer, M

    2016-02-01

    Chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) is a common mast cell-driven disease characterized by the development of wheals (hives), angioedema (AE), or both for > 6 weeks. It is thought that autoimmunity is a common cause of CSU, which is often associated with autoimmune thyroiditis, whereas the link to other autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has not been carefully explored. Here, we systematically reviewed the existing literature for information on the prevalence of CSU in SLE (and vice versa) and we examined the possible clinical and pathogenetic relationship between CSU and SLE. The prevalence of CSU and CSU-like rash in SLE was investigated by 42 independent studies and comorbidity in adult patients reportedly ranged from 0% to 21.9% and 0.4% to 27.5%, respectively (urticarial vasculitis: 0-20%). In children with SLE, CSU was reported in 0-1.2% and CSU-like rash in 4.5-12% (urticarial vasculitis: 0-2.2%). In contrast, little information is available on the prevalence of SLE in patients with CSU, and more studies are needed to determine the rate of comorbidity. Recent insights on IgG- and IgE-mediated autoreactivity suggest similarities in the pathogenesis of CSU and SLE linking inflammation and autoimmunity with the activation of the complement and coagulation system. Future studies of patients with either or both conditions could help to better define common pathomechanisms in CSU and SLE and to develop novel targeted treatment options for patients with CSU and SLE. PMID:26545308

  11. [Report of a case of allergic granulomatous vasculitis (Churg-Strauss syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Albert, F; Bertani, E; Carabelli, A; Pavia, G

    1989-03-01

    A 35 year female with a previous history of asthma came to our observation about 10 months ago. She was dyspneic, showed small nodules (2 to 5 mm) in arms, hands and legs and had radiological evidence of pulmonary granulomatosis and pleural effusion. Diagnosis was made by means of cutaneous biopsy showing a necrotic granulomatous vasculitic lesions with eosinophilic infiltration and giant cells, consistent with allergic granulomatosis of Churg-Strauss syndrome. Steroid therapy alone (prednisone 1 mg/kg/die) led to a rapid and complete clinical and humoral remission. The patient is still doing an alternate day prednisone therapy (15 mg) and is well after a 10 months follow-up. PMID:2572542

  12. Non-necrotizing Granulomatous Pulmonary Vasculitis Mimicking Lung Cancer on PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Matthew; Shaw, Jason; Rankin, Linda; Lazzaro, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18FDG-PET) scan has become a valuable resource in the staging of lung cancer. Inflammation is known to cause false positives on 18FDG-PET scan. In the absence of symptoms suggesting a diagnosis of an inflammatory condition, 18FDG-avid lung masses on PET/CT scan is strongly suggestive of a diagnosis of lung cancer, rather than an inflammatory condition. We report the case of a 57-year-old man, with a history of heavy smoking and working in the sandblasting industry, with two suspicious 18FDG-avid nodules in the left lung. Surgical specimens of these nodules revealed findings suspecting giant cell arteritis rather than malignancy. PMID:25360406

  13. Automated interpretation of ANCA patterns - a new approach in the serology of ANCA-associated vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) employing ethanol-fixed neutrophils (ethN) is still the method of choice for assessing antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in ANCA-associated vasculitides (AAV). However, conventional fluorescence microscopy is subjective and prone to high variability. The objective of this study was to evaluate novel pattern recognition algorithms for the standardized automated interpretation of ANCA patterns. Methods Seventy ANCA-positive samples (20 antimyeloperoxidase ANCA, 50 antiproteinase3 ANCA) and 100 controls from healthy individuals analyzed on ethN and formalin-fixed neutrophils (formN) by IIF were used as a 'training set' for the development of pattern recognition algorithms. Sera from 342 patients ('test set') with AAV and other systemic rheumatic and infectious diseases were tested for ANCA patterns using the novel pattern recognition algorithms and conventional fluorescence microscopy. Results Interpretation software employing pattern recognition algorithms was developed enabling positive/negative discrimination and classification of cytoplasmic ANCA (C-ANCA) and perinuclear ANCA (P-ANCA). Comparison of visual reading of the 'test set' samples with automated interpretation revealed Cohen's kappa (κ) values of 0.955 on ethN and 0.929 on formN for positive/negative discrimination. Analysis of the 'test set' with regard to the discrimination between C-ANCA and P-ANCA patterns showed a high agreement for ethN (κ = 0.746) and formN (κ = 0.847). There was no significant difference between visual and automated interpretation regarding positive/negative discrimination on ethN and formN, as well as ANCA pattern recognition (P > 0.05, respectively). Conclusions Pattern recognition algorithms can assist in the automated interpretation of ANCA IIF. Automated reading of ethN and formN IIF patterns demonstrated high consistency with visual ANCA assessment. PMID:23241527

  14. [Renal damage caused by Rhupus syndrome associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies vasculitis and cryoglobulinemia].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin-ju; Wei, Tao; Dong, Bao; Jia, Yuan; Wang, Mei

    2015-10-18

    We analyzed the clinicopathological characteristics of one patient with Rhupus syndrome associated nephropathy in Peking University People's Hospital, and reviewed the related literature. The patient was a middle aged female. She developed rheumatoid arthritis first, and then manifested mild systemic lupus erythematosus together with positive anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) and cryoglobulinemia several years later. The renal biopsy was performed and manifested as lupus nephritis. The transmission electron microscopy revealed cryoglobulinemia associated renal damage. This report shows that the clinicopathological characteristics in patients with Rhupus syndrome associated nephropathy are complicated. The renal pathology can be used as a diagnostic tool. PMID:26474633

  15. Alert cell strategy in SIRS-induced vasculitis: sepsis and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis refers to systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure resulting from infection. Inflammatory receptors (e.g., Toll-like receptors and nucleotide oligomerization domain) recognize bacterial components as inflammatory ligands. These are expressed not only in leukocytes but also in major organs and vascular endothelial cells. "Alert cell" is defined as the cell that expresses the inflammatory receptor and intracellular signaling system to produce inflammatory mediators such as inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, nitric oxide, and prostanoids in organs and the vasculature. NF-κB and AP-1, which are the transcriptional factors of these inflammatory molecules, are important regulators of multiple organ failure in sepsis and systemic inflammation. The vascular endothelial injury would induce multiple organ failure as tissue ischemia and organ death. Drug discovery targeted at alert cells holds a promise for therapy of inflammation including sepsis. PMID:27011790

  16. Vasculitis resulting from a superficial femoral artery angioplasty with a paclitaxel-eluting balloon.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Shannon D; McDonald, Robert R A; Varcoe, Ramon L

    2014-02-01

    Drug-eluting balloons (DEBs) coated with the antiproliferative agent paclitaxel may improve primary patency by reducing recurrent luminal stenosis. A proportion of the active drug and excipient coating are known to embolize distally, but until now, there have been no reports of adverse events resulting from their use. We report an unusual case of a painful nodular, biopsy specimen-proven vasculitic rash that afflicted the ipsilateral lower limb of a patient after superficial femoral artery treatment with a DEB. This adverse event may have implications for the use of DEB in this and other vascular territories. PMID:23642919

  17. Paravascular pathways contribute to vasculitis and neuroinflammation after subarachnoid hemorrhage independently of glymphatic control.

    PubMed

    Luo, C; Yao, X; Li, J; He, B; Liu, Q; Ren, H; Liang, F; Li, M; Lin, H; Peng, J; Yuan, T F; Pei, Z; Su, H

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating disease with high mortality. The mechanisms underlying its pathological complications have not been fully identified. Here, we investigate the potential involvement of the glymphatic system in the neuropathology of SAH. We demonstrate that blood components rapidly enter the paravascular space following SAH and penetrate into the perivascular parenchyma throughout the brain, causing disastrous events such as cerebral vasospasm, delayed cerebral ischemia, microcirculation dysfunction and widespread perivascular neuroinflammation. Clearance of the paravascular pathway with tissue-type plasminogen activator ameliorates the behavioral deficits and alleviates histological injury of SAH. Interestingly, AQP4(-/-) mice showed no improvements in neurological deficits and neuroinflammation at day 7 after SAH compared with WT control mice. In conclusion, our study proves that the paravascular pathway dynamically mediates the pathological complications following acute SAH independently of glymphatic control. PMID:27031957

  18. Extra- and intracranial cerebral vasculitis in giant cell arteritis: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Larivière, Delphine; Sacre, Karim; Klein, Isabelle; Hyafil, Fabien; Choudat, Laurence; Chauveheid, Marie-Paule; Papo, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Recognizing giant cell arteritis (GCA) in patients with stroke may be challenging. We aimed to highlight the clinical spectrum and long-term follow-up of GCA-specific cerebrovascular accidents. Medical charts of all patients followed in a French Department of Internal Medicine for GCA between January 2008 and January 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with cerebrovascular accidents at GCA diagnosis were included. Diagnosis of GCA was based on American College of Rheumatology criteria. Transient ischemic attacks and stroke resulting from an atherosclerotic or cardioembolic mechanism were excluded. Clinical features, GCA-diagnosis workup, brain imaging, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) study, treatment, and follow-up data were analyzed. From January 2008 to January 2014, 97 patients have been followed for GCA. Among them, 8 biopsy-proven GCA patients (mean age 70±7.8 years, M/F sex ratio 3/1) had stroke at GCA diagnosis. Six patients reported headache and visual impairment. Brain MR angiography showed involvement of vertebral and/or basilar arteries in all cases with multiple or unique ischemic lesions in the infratentorial region of the brain in all but one case. Intracranial cerebral arteries involvement was observed in 4 cases including 2 cases with cerebral angiitis. Long lasting lesions on diffusion-weight brain MRI sequences were observed in 1 case. All patients received steroids for a mean of 28.1±12.8 months. Side effects associated with long-term steroid therapy occurred in 6 patients. Relapses occurred in 4 patients and required immunosuppressive drugs in 3 cases. After a mean follow-up duration of 36.4±16.4 months, all but 1 patient achieved complete remission without major sequelae. The conjunction of headache with vertebral and basilar arteries involvement in elderly is highly suggestive of stroke associated with GCA. Intracranial cerebral arteries involvement with cerebral angiitis associated with long lasting brain lesions on diffusion-weight brain MRI sequences may occur in GCA. Both frequent relapses and steroid-induced side effects argue for the use of immunosuppressive agents combined with steroids as first-line therapy. PMID:25526454

  19. Non-necrotizing Granulomatous Pulmonary Vasculitis Mimicking Lung Cancer on PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Matthew; Shaw, Jason; Rankin, Linda; Lazzaro, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)FDG-PET) scan has become a valuable resource in the staging of lung cancer. Inflammation is known to cause false positives on (18)FDG-PET scan. In the absence of symptoms suggesting a diagnosis of an inflammatory condition, (18)FDG-avid lung masses on PET/CT scan is strongly suggestive of a diagnosis of lung cancer, rather than an inflammatory condition. We report the case of a 57-year-old man, with a history of heavy smoking and working in the sandblasting industry, with two suspicious (18)FDG-avid nodules in the left lung. Surgical specimens of these nodules revealed findings suspecting giant cell arteritis rather than malignancy. PMID:25360406

  20. Acute necrotising pulmonary vasculitis and pulmonary hypertension in a juvenile dog.

    PubMed

    Russell, N J; Irwin, P J; Hopper, B J; Olivry, T; Nicholls, P K

    2008-07-01

    A five-month-old female Jack Russell terrier was presented for investigation of acute lethargy, anorexia, coughing, respiratory distress and weakness. Examination findings included cyanosis, a grade 3 of 6 systolic heart murmur and prolonged capillary refill time. Radiography and echocardiography revealed severe pulmonary hypertension, cor pulmonale and right-sided heart failure. Indirect measurement of the systolic pulmonary artery pressure estimated pressures over 100 mmHg. Despite treatment the patient died. Post-mortem examination did not identify a congenital cardiovascular anomaly. Histopathology confirmed acute necrotising pulmonary arteritis and immunohistochemistry failed to identify any immune complex or complement deposition. PMID:18638059

  1. Rituximab as maintenance therapy for ANCA associated vasculitis: how, when and why?

    PubMed

    Alba, Marco A; Flores-Suárez, Luis Felipe

    2016-01-01

    ANCA-associated vasculitides (AAV) are chronic autoimmune diseases characterized by inflammation and destruction of small vessels. Rituximab is now licensed for use as a remission-induction agent in the treatment of these disorders. During recent years, several non-controlled studies have suggested that rituximab may be of value in maintaining disease remission in AAV. In these series, 3 techniques have been tried: "watch-and-wait", repeated cycles in fixed intervals, or administration based on proposed biomarkers. More importantly, the results of the MAINRITSAN trial showed that this anti-CD20 agent is superior to azathioprine for preventing major relapses in AAV. This review summarizes current information regarding the effectiveness, timing, dosing, duration and safety of rituximab as a valid option for remission maintenance. PMID:26255570

  2. Vasculitis: Wegener granulomatosis, Churg-Strauss syndrome, microscopic polyangiitis, polyarteritis nodosa, and Takayasu arteritis.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Stephen K; Sullivan, Eugene J; Brown, Kevin K

    2002-10-01

    Identification, diagnosis, and management of the primary vasculitides and their attendant complications is a challenging task for the critical care physician. However, with appropriate therapy, the morbidity and mortality of these diseases can be markedly improved and allow the individual patient to return to their previous functional state. PMID:12418444

  3. The kidneys and ANCA-associated vasculitis: from pathogenesis to diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Rowaiye, Olumide Olatubosun; Kusztal, Mariusz; Klinger, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides (AAV) are a group of pauci-immune small vessel vasculitides that often affect the kidneys manifesting as rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Although the exact pathogenesis of AAV is not fully known, evidence from in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies all point to the involvement of ANCA in the pathogenesis of AAV. In this review, we highlight the contributory roles played by various factors (e.g. genetics, environment, B and T-regulatory cells, toll-like receptors, etc.) in the pathogenesis of AAV. Furthermore, we discuss renal involvement in AAV in terms of clinical features and the various histopathological classification patterns, which are also known to be of prognostic importance. We also present information on useful imaging techniques for localizing kidney and other organ system involvement in AAV, and also on novel laboratory methods and assays useful for rapid and more specific determination of patients' ANCA status. Finally, we demonstrate evidence on novel serum biomarkers that have been shown to correlate with disease activity in AAV. PMID:26034600

  4. In vivo approaches to investigate ANCA-associated vasculitis: lessons and limitations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibody (ANCA)-associated diseases are autoimmune conditions characterized by necrotizing inflammation of small blood vessels. The immunogenesis and etiology of these conditions are unknown, but our knowledge of the immunopathogenesis has increased considerably in recent years. In this review, we discuss the animal models currently used to investigate the mechanisms of vascular injury and to test novel therapies. We outline their advantages and limitations and propose potential directions for future research. PMID:21371348

  5. Hypogalactosylation of serum IgG in patients with ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    HOLLAND, M; TAKADA, K; OKUMOTO, T; TAKAHASHI, N; KATO, K; ADU, D; BEN-SMITH, A; HARPER, L; SAVAGE, C O S; JEFFERIS, R

    2002-01-01

    The triad of small vessel vasculitides (SVV) comprise Wegener's granulomatosis (WG), microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) and Churg–Strauss syndrome (CS). All three are associated with presence of circulating IgG antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA) which target autoantigens contained, primarily, within neutrophil azurophilic granules. The widely accepted model of pathogenesis suggests that ANCA activate cytokine-primed neutrophils within the microvasculature, leading to by-stander damage to endothelial cells, and rapid escalation of inflammation with recruitment of mononuclear cells. Activation may be initiated, in vitro, by the coligation of the PR3 or MPO antigen, translocated to the cell surface, and FcγRIIa/FcγRIIIb receptors. This suggests that the IgG subclass profile of ANCA and, possibly, its glycosylation status could influence the inflammatory mechanisms activated. The glycosylation status of total IgG isolated from the sera of patients with WG (13), MPA (6) and CSS (1) was determined by analysis of the released oligosaccharides. A deficit in IgG galactosylation is demonstrated for all patient samples, compared to controls. The mean percentage values for the agalactosylated (G0) oligosaccharides were 57% (SD ± 9·71), 47% (SD ± 4·25) and 28% (SD ± 4·09) for WG, MPO and control samples, respectively. The G0 levels for polyclonal IgG isolated from the sera of both WG and MPA patients were significantly increased compared to controls (P < 0·0001). The major glycoform present therefore is agalactosylated (G0) IgG. In previous studies the G0 glycoform of IgG has been shown to bind and activate mannan binding lectin, and hence to activate the complement cascade, and to facilitate mannose receptor binding and the uptake of IgG complexes by macrophages and dendritic cells. Both of these activities could impact on the processing and presentation of self-antigens in autoimmune disease. PMID:12100039

  6. Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein 1 is a Prognostic Marker in ANCA-Associated Small Vessel Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Ohlsson, Sophie; Bakoush, Omran; Tencer, Jan; Torffvit, Ole; Segelmark, Mrten

    2009-01-01

    Background. The (anti neutrophil cytoplasmatic autoantibody ANCA), associated small vessel vasculitides (ASVV) are relapsing-remitting inflammatory disorders, involving various organs, such as the kidneys. (Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 MCP-1) has been shown to be locally up regulated in glomerulonephritis and recent studies have pointed out MCP-1 as a promising marker of renal inflammation. Here we measure urinary cytokine levels in different phases of disease, exploring the possible prognostic value of MCP-1, together with (interleukin 6 IL-6), (interleukin 8 IL-8) and (immunoglobulin M IgM). Methods. MCP-1, IL-6 and IL-8 were measured using commercially available ELISA kits, whereas IgM in the urine was measured by an in-house ELISA. Results. The MCP-1 levels in urine were significantly higher in patients in stable phase of the disease, compared with healthy controls. Patients in stable phase, with subsequent adverse events; had significantly higher MCP-1 values than patients who did not. MCP-1 and IgM both tended to be higher in patients relapsing within three months, an observation, however, not reaching statistical significance. Urinary levels of IL-6 correlated with relapse tendency, and IL-8 was associated with disease outcome. Conclusions. Patients with ASVV have raised cytokine levels in the urine compared to healthy controls, even during remission. Raised MCP-1 levels are associated with poor prognosis and possibly also with relapse tendency. The association with poor prognosis was stronger for U-MCP-1 than for conventional markers of disease like CRP, BVAS, and ANCA, as well as compared to candidate markers like U-IgM and U-IL-8. We thus consider U-MCP-1 to have promising potential as a prognostic marker in ASVV. PMID:19587833

  7. Paravascular pathways contribute to vasculitis and neuroinflammation after subarachnoid hemorrhage independently of glymphatic control

    PubMed Central

    Luo, C; Yao, X; Li, J; He, B; Liu, Q; Ren, H; Liang, F; Li, M; Lin, H; Peng, J; Yuan, T F; Pei, Z; Su, H

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating disease with high mortality. The mechanisms underlying its pathological complications have not been fully identified. Here, we investigate the potential involvement of the glymphatic system in the neuropathology of SAH. We demonstrate that blood components rapidly enter the paravascular space following SAH and penetrate into the perivascular parenchyma throughout the brain, causing disastrous events such as cerebral vasospasm, delayed cerebral ischemia, microcirculation dysfunction and widespread perivascular neuroinflammation. Clearance of the paravascular pathway with tissue-type plasminogen activator ameliorates the behavioral deficits and alleviates histological injury of SAH. Interestingly, AQP4−/− mice showed no improvements in neurological deficits and neuroinflammation at day 7 after SAH compared with WT control mice. In conclusion, our study proves that the paravascular pathway dynamically mediates the pathological complications following acute SAH independently of glymphatic control. PMID:27031957

  8. Vasculitis with renal involvement in essential mixed cryoglobulinemia: Case report and mini-review.

    PubMed

    Anis, Sabiha; Abbas, Khawar; Mubarak, Mohammad; Ahmed, Ejaz; Bhatti, Sajid; Muzaffar, Rana

    2014-05-16

    The discovery of a strong association between hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) has led to an increasingly rare diagnosis of idiopathic essential MC (EMC). The incidence of EMC is high in regions where there is a comparatively low HCV infection burden and low in areas of high infection prevalence, including HCV. The diagnosis of EMC requires an extensive laboratory investigation to exclude all possible causes of cryoglobulin formation. In addition, although cryoglobulin testing is simple, improper testing conditions will result in false negative results. Here, we present a 46-year-old female patient with a case of EMC with dermatological and renal manifestations, highlighting the importance of extensive investigation to reach a proper diagnosis. We review the need for appropriate laboratory testing, which is often neglected in clinical practice and which can result in false negative results. This review also emphasizes the significance of an extended testing repertoire necessary for better patient management. Despite a strong association of MC with HCV infection and other causes that lead to cryoglobulin formation, EMC remains a separate entity. Correct diagnosis requires proper temperature regulation during sample handling, as well as characterization and quantification of the cryoprecipitate. Inclusion of rheumatoid factor activity and complement levels in the cryoglobulin test-panel promotes better patient management and monitoring. Consensus guidelines should be developed and implemented for cryoglobulin detection and the diagnosis of cryoglobulinemic syndrome, which will reduce variability in inter-laboratory reporting. PMID:24868518

  9. Vasculitides and the Complement System: a Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Chimenti, Maria Sole; Ballanti, Eleonora; Triggianese, Paola; Perricone, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    Systemic vasculitides are a group of rare diseases characterized by inflammation of the arterial or venous vessel wall, causing stenosis or thrombosis. Clinical symptoms may be limited to skin or to other organs or may include multiple manifestations as systemic conditions. The pathogenesis is related to the presence of leukocytes in the vessels and to the IC deposition, which implies the activation of the complement system (CS) and then the swelling and damage of vessel mural structures. The complement system (CS) is involved in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases, including systemic vasculitides. This enzymatic system is a part of the innate immune system, and its function is linked to the modulation of the adaptive immunity and in bridging innate and adaptive responses. Its activation is also critical for the development of natural antibodies and T cell response and for the regulation of autoreactive B cells. Complement triggering contributes to inflammation-driven tissue injury, which occurs during the ischemia/reperfusion processes, vasculitides, nephritis, arthritis, and many others diseases. In systemic vasculitides, a group of uncommon diseases characterized by blood vessel inflammation, the contribution of CS in the development of inflammatory damage has been demonstrated. Treatment is mainly based on clinical manifestations and severity of organ involvement. Evidences on the efficacy of traditional immunosuppressive therapies have been collected as well as data from clinical trials that involve the modulation of the CS. In particular in small-medium-vessel vasculitides, the CS represents an attractive target. Herein, we reviewed the pathogenetic role of CS in these systemic vasculitides as urticarial vasculitis, ANCA-associated vasculitides, anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, cryoglobulinaemic vasculitides, Henoch-Schönlein purpura/IgA nephropathy, and Kawasaki disease and therefore its potential therapeutic use in this context. PMID:25312590

  10. Clinical characteristics of cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Szczęch, Justyna; Rutka, Maja; Samotij, Dominik; Zalewska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lupus erythematosus (LE) shows a wide variety of clinical manifestations, skin involvement being one of the most important. Aim To analyze the clinical presentation of cutaneous variants of lupus erythematosus in terms of skin lesion spectrum and extracutaneous involvement. Material and methods A total of 64 patients with cutaneous LE (CLE) were included. The study was based on the “Core Set Questionnaire” developed by the European Society of Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus (EUSCLE). Clinical severity of skin lesions was evaluated with the Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus Disease Area and Severity Index (CLASI). All results were subjected to statistical analysis. Results Fifteen (23.4%) patients had an acute CLE (ACLE), 26 (40.6%) subacute CLE (SCLE) and 21 (32.8%) chronic CLE (CCLE). Two (3.2%) individuals only demonstrated urticarial vasculitis as a cutaneous manifestation of LE and these patients were excluded. Patients with ACLE were characterized by the earliest onset of the disease (mean age of 31.9 ±15.0 years; p < 0.001). On average, 4.8 ±1.8 criteria of systemic LE were found in the ACLE group compared to 2.7 ±1.3 criteria in SCLE and 2.5 ±1.5 criteria in CCLE (p < 0.001). The highest activity of skin lesions according to CLASI was found in the SCLE group (p = 0.002). On the other hand, the most severe skin damage was observed in CCLE (p < 0.01). Conclusions Each variant of CLE differs significantly from the others in respect of various aspects of clinical manifestations. Due to a number of different variants of LE skin lesions, a unified classification of CLE still remains a challenge. PMID:26985173

  11. The practical usefulness of dermoscopy in general dermatology.

    PubMed

    Errichetti, E; Stinco, G

    2015-10-01

    Beside to traditional use, dermoscopy is more and more used in the assessment of other "general" dermatologic conditions, namely scalp and hair disorders (trichoscopy), nails abnormalities (onychoscopy), skin infections and infestations (entomodermoscopy), and cutaneous inflammatory diseases (inflammoscopy). Among the list of new applications of dermoscopy, the study of inflammatory dermatoses is probably the most promising topic in terms of development and usefulness, considering the large number of such disorders and the frequent problems in their differential diagnosis which the dermatologist encounters in own daily clinical practice. In this paper, we report selected relatively common clinical differential diagnosis issues concerning inflammatory dermatoses (and some clinically related noninflammatory conditions), analysing them by a dermoscopic point of view in order to assist their noninvasive resolution according to the available literature data and our personal experience, including papulosquamous dermatoses (guttate psoriasis, pityriasis lichenoides chronica, pityriasis rosea, lichen planus, lymphomatoid papulosis, classic pityriasis rubra pilaris, papulosquamous sarcoidosis, disseminated forms of porokeratosis and papulosquamous chronic GVHD), dermatoses presenting with erythematous-desquamative patches/plaques (plaque psoriasis, eczematous dermatitis, pityriasis rosea, mycosis fungoides, subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus), palmar psoriasis vs. chronic hand eczema, scalp psoriasis vs. seborrheic dermatitis, erythematous-desquamative disorders typically involving the elbows (psoriasis vulgaris, circumscribed juvenile pityriasis rubra pilaris, dermatomyositis/Gottron's sign), itchy papulonodular dermatoses (hypertrophic lichen planus, prurigo nodularis, nodular scabies and acquired perforating dermatosis), common facial inflammatory skin diseases (rosacea, seborrheic dermatitis and demodicidosis), lichen sclerosus vs. morphea, urticaria vs. urticarial vasculitis and common inflammatory cicatricial alopecia (discoid lupus erythematosus, lichen planopilaris and folliculitis decalvans). PMID:26086412

  12. Intestinal Behçet's Disease: A True Inflammatory Bowel Disease or Merely an Intestinal Complication of Systemic Vasculitis?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a multi-systemic inflammatory disorder of an unknown etiology and shows a chronic recurrent clinical course. When the disease involves the alimentary tract, it is called intestinal BD because of its clinical importance. Intestinal BD is more frequently reported in East Asian countries than in Western or Middle Eastern countries. While any part of the gastrointestinal tract can be involved, the most common location of intestinal BD is the ileocecal area. A few, large, deep ulcerations with discrete border are characteristic endoscopic findings of intestinal BD. Currently, there is no single gold standard test or pathognomonic finding of intestinal BD. However, recently developed novel diagnostic criteria and a disease activity index have helped in assessing intestinal BD. As intestinal BD shares a lot of characteristics with inflammatory bowel disease, including genetic background, clinical manifestations, and therapeutic strategies, distinguishing between the two diseases in clinical practice is quite difficult. However, biologic agents such as anti-tumor necrosis factor α antibody shows a considerable efficacy similar to inflammatory bowel disease cases. It is important to distinguish and treat those two disease entities separately from the standpoint of precise medicine. Clinicians should require comprehensive knowledge regarding the similarities and differences between intestinal BD and inflammatory bowel disease for making an accurate clinical decision. PMID:26632379

  13. Sensitivity to non-acetylated salicylates in a patient with asthma, nasal polyps, and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chudwin, D S; Strub, M; Golden, H E; Frey, C; Richmond, G W; Luskin, A T

    1986-08-01

    A woman experienced exacerbations of bronchial asthma after taking aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for rheumatoid arthritis. On oral challenges, she developed an urticarial reaction after tartrazine; urticarial and bronchospastic reactions after salicylsalicylic acid; and urticarial and bronchospastic reactions after choline magnesium trisalicylate. Non-acetylated salicylates have been recommended for use in aspirin- and/or tartrazine-sensitive patients. The results of sensitivity studies of our patient indicates that such patients may also be sensitive to non-acetylated salicylates. PMID:3740556

  14. Localized heat induced urticaria: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Darling, Matthew; Lambiase, Matthew C; Hodson, Darryl S

    2004-01-01

    Localized heat induced urticaria is a rare clinical entity. Other physical urticarial subtypes include cholinergic, solar, cold, aquagenic, vibratory, and dermatographic. It is characterized by a well-demarcated urticarial lesion provoked by heat in direct contact with the skin. We describe a case of localized heat-induced urticaria in a 49-year-old woman after a heat-challenge test to her forearm. PMID:14964751

  15. Occupational urticaria from welding polyurethane

    SciTech Connect

    Kanerva, L.; Estlander, T.; Jolanki, R.; Laehteenmaeki, M.T.Ke.; Keskinen, H. )

    1991-05-01

    An urticarial reaction associated with high fever developed in a welder on four occasions while he was welding steel profiles filled with polyurethane. The fumes emitted during pyrolysis of polyurethane and inhaled by the patient probably caused the urticarial reaction. Provocation tests with two pyrolysis products, 4,4-diphenylmethane diisocyanate and 4,4-diaminophenylmethane, were negative. This case demonstrates the difficulty in detecting the cause of urticaria induced by airborne chemicals.

  16. Association of Blastocystis hominis genetic subtypes with urticaria.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Dina M Abdel; Hassanin, Omayma M; Zuel-Fakkar, Nehal Mohamed

    2011-03-01

    Although intestinal parasites are a possible cause of skin disorders, there are few case reports concerning the role of Blastocystis hominis in urticaria. To clarify this association, we determined the frequency of B. hominis genetic subtype in urticarial patients by stool culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and evaluated the clinical and parasitological recovery of urticarial patients after treatment with metronidazole. Of 54 urticarial patients (group I), 18 (33.3%) were diagnosed as acute urticaria (group IA) and 36 (66.7%) were diagnosed as chronic (group IB). Thirty-three (61.1%) out of 54 urticarial (group I) patients were Blastocystis positive by stool culture and PCR. Out of these 33 patients, 21 were symptomatic and 12 were asymptomatic. The amoeboid form was found in 20 (95.2%) out of 21 symptomatic Blastocystis urticarial patients assuring their pathogenic potential. Of 50 normal control group (group II), four (8%) Blastocystis isolates were found with no amoeboid form. B. hominis subtype 3 was the only detected genotype in both groups. Of 20 symptomatic Blastocystis urticarial patients, 12 (60%) patients recovered symptomatically and parasitologically after one course of metronidazole. Recovery reached 100% on repeating the treatment for a second course with disappearance of the amoeboid form. It was concluded that acute urticaria of unknown etiology and chronic idiopathic urticaria patients who are resistant to the ordinary regimen of urticaria treatment might be examined for infection with B. hominis, in order to prescribe the proper specific anti-protozoan treatment. PMID:20922413

  17. A man with small vessel vasculitis presenting with brachial diplegia, multiple cranial mononeuropathies and severe orthostatic hypotension in diabetes mellitus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We report a rare case of fulminant vasculitic mononeuropathy resulting in brachial diplegia, with suspected brainstem and autonomic nervous system involvement in a patient with diabetes mellitus. Case presentation A 58-year-old Hispanic Caucasian man with diabetes mellitus presented with a 1-year history of progressive bilateral upper extremity weakness, orthostatic intolerance and progressive memory decline. Diagnostic evaluation including laboratory tests for progressive encephalopathies, systemic inflammatory and non-inflammatory neuropathies, cerebrospinal fluid analyses, electrodiagnostic studies, and nerve biopsy were performed. Clinical examination revealed moderate cognitive deficits on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment scale, bilateral facial weakness and weakness of bilateral shoulder girdle and intrinsic hand muscles. Cerebrospinal fluid analyses revealed elevated protein and an elevated immunoglobulin G synthesis rate, suggesting an immune-mediated process. Further laboratory work up was non-diagnostic. Electrodiagnostic studies demonstrated chronic asymmetric axonal mononeuropathies with ongoing denervation. A superficial radial nerve biopsy showed a chronic vasculitic neuropathy. Glucocorticosteroid treatment, symptomatic pharmacologic and supportive non-pharmacologic therapies resulted in improved clinical outcomes despite challenges with glycemic control. Conclusions This case report emphasizes the importance of a thorough evaluation of atypical or uncommon neuromuscular presentations in diabetic patients without etiological presumptions. This is necessary in order to promptly establish a diagnosis, initiate appropriate therapies and prevent irreversible nerve injury. PMID:24083508

  18. Henoch-Schönlein purpura

    MedlinePlus

    Leukocytoclastic vasculitis; Anaphylactoid purpura; Vascular purpura ... Ardoin SP, Fels E. Vasculitis syndromes. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton B, St. Geme J, Schor N, Behrman RE, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 19th ed. ...

  19. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Savage COS, Harper L. Antineutrophil Cytoplasm Antibody Associated Vasculitis. In: Firestein GS, Budd RC, Gabriel SE, et ... et al. Rituximab versus cyclophosphamide for ANCA-associated vasculitis. N Engl J Med . 2010;363(3):221. ...

  20. Allergic reaction to polyethylene glycol in a painter.

    PubMed

    Antolin-Amerigo, D; Sánchez-González, M J; Barbarroja-Escudero, J; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, M; Álvarez-Perea, A; Alvarez-Mon, M

    2015-08-01

    We report a case of a male painter who visited our outpatient clinic after developing a distinct skin reaction 15 min after the ingestion of a laxative solution containing polyethylene glycol (PEG) prior to colonoscopy. He described suffering from the same skin reaction when he was previously exposed to paints that contained PEG-4000. An exposure challenge test with pure PEG-4000, simulating his workplace conditions, elicited a generalized urticarial reaction. Allergy to PEG should be considered in painters who develop urticarial or other systemic symptoms after handling PEG-containing products. PMID:26048329

  1. Magnesium stearate: an underestimated allergen.

    PubMed

    Tammaro, A; Abruzzese, C; Narcisi, A; Cortesi, G; Persechino, F; Parisella, F R; Persechino, S

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium stearate is a substance often used as a diluent in the manufacture of medical tablets, capsules and powders. Moreover it is usually found as a food additive or pharmaceutical excipient. We report the first case of a 28 years old woman affected by an allergic reaction from this substance with an urticarial manifestation. PMID:23241129

  2. Serum sickness-like reaction to Pamabrom.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Jil K; English, Joseph C

    2006-03-01

    Pamabron is a common over-the-counter diuretic used for relief of menstrual-associated symptoms. An urticarial eruption, with systemic complaints consistent with a serum sickness-like reaction, attributed to Pamabron is described. A review of the literature concerning Pamabron and dermatology is discussed. PMID:16573265

  3. Office dermatologic testing: the scabies preparation.

    PubMed

    Brodell, R T; Helms, S E

    1991-08-01

    Patients with scabies may present with urticarial, eczematous or excoriated papules, eczematous patches or, occasionally, nodules. It is often difficult to differentiate scabies from eczema, folliculitis, drug eruption or lichen planus. The classically described burrows are often not seen. The scabies preparation, as described in this article, will aid in making the proper diagnosis. PMID:1858608

  4. Systemic vasculitides: a critical digest of the most recent literature.

    PubMed

    Stagnaro, C; Cioffi, E; Talarico, R; Della Rossa, A

    2015-01-01

    Herewith we provide our annual digest of the recent literature on systemic vasculitides. In this manuscript, we reviewed all the articles published during the last 12 months on large-, medium- and small-vessel vasculitis and selected the most relevant studies regarding the epidemiology, pathogenesis and management of systemic vasculitis. In particular, we focused the attention on giant cell arteritis, ANCA-associated vasculitis and cryoglobulinaemia. PMID:26016767

  5. Muscle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... dystrophy Inflammation of the muscle Muscular dystrophy Myopathic changes (destruction of the muscle) Necrosis (tissue death) of muscle Necrotizing vasculitis Traumatic muscle damage Polymyositis ...

  6. Pregnancy and Medically Assisted Conception in Rare Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-15

    Rheumatoid Arthritis; Spondyloarthritis; Psoriatic Arthritis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Antiphospholipid Syndrome; Sjogren Syndrome; Scleroderma; Myositis; Vasculitis; Mastocytosis; Various Autoimmune and/or Systemic and/or Rare Diseases

  7. Diagnosis and therapeutic options for peripheral vasculitic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Vasculitis can affect the peripheral nervous system alone (nonsystemic vasculitic neuropathy) or can be a part of primary or secondary systemic vasculitis. In cases of pre-existing systemic vasculitis, the diagnosis can easily be made, whereas suspected vasculitic neuropathy as initial or only manifestation of vasculitis requires careful clinical, neurophysiological, laboratory and histopathological workout. The typical clinical syndrome is mononeuropathia multiplex or asymmetric neuropathy, but distal-symmetric neuropathy can frequently be seen. Standard treatments include steroids, azathioprine, methotrexate and cyclophosphamide. More recently the B-cell antibody rituximab and intravenous immunoglobulins have shown to be effective in some vasculitic neuropathy types. PMID:25829955

  8. A case report of unusual vasculitic reaction after Methocarbamol injection.

    PubMed

    Sahebari, Maryam; Jafarian, Amir Hossein; Abbasi, Bita

    2011-01-01

    Descriptive case report of a 42-year old woman with coetaneous vasculitis, and severe abdominal pain, which was led to diagnostic laparotomy. These presentations are probably as a side effect of Methocarbamol injection. This is the first report according to our literature search (PubMed, google scholar, ISI web of knowledge, ProQuest, MD consult, Science Direct, SCOPUS) about Methocarbamol related vasculitis from 1966 since now. Vasculitis is not a known side effect of Methocarbamol. This case indicates, likely the potential for development of vasculitis with this medication. PMID:21681710

  9. Solar urticaria.

    PubMed

    Goetze, Steven; Elsner, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Solar urticaria is a rare IgE-mediated and chromophore-dependent photodermatosis. In some cases, these chromophores, designated as "serum factor", may be detected in serum or plasma. To date, the exact pathogenesis of solar urticaria has, however, not been elucidated. Typical clinical features include the onset of urticarial lesions within a few minutes after light exposure, which already raises diagnostic suspicion. The most common triggers are UVA and visible light. Determination of the action spectrum as well as the minimal urticarial dose (MDU) is diagnostically crucial. Other photodermatoses such as polymorphic light eruption or porphyrias (especially erythropoietic protoporphyria) have to be ruled out. Apart from sunlight avoidance, which is always required, further therapeutic options used include nonsedating antihistamines as well as light hardening. Newer treatment modalities such as plasmapheresis or the anti-IgE antibody omalizumab are reserved for severe, recalcitrant forms of solar urticaria. PMID:26612794

  10. Urticaria due to polyethylene glycol-3350 and electrolytes for oral solution in a patient with jejunal nodular lymphoid hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongfeng; Henry, Winoah A.; Chen, Lea Ann; Khashab, Mouen A.

    2015-01-01

    Both jejunal nodular lymphoid hyperplasia (NLH) and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-3350 hypersensitivity are extremely rare. We describe a 30-year-old female who had previously taken a PEG-3350 bowel preparation without adverse effects, and presented for evaluation of chronic diarrhea. An upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy, and small bowel series were scheduled. PEG-3350 and electrolytes for oral solution was prescribed for bowel cleansing. During consumption of the bowel preparation she developed urticarial hypersensitivity. An alternative bowel preparation was used. Colonoscopy and upper endoscopy were normal, but small bowel series revealed innumerable sand-like lucencies in the jejunum. NLH was confirmed on biopsy from antegrade enteroscopy. This is the first case report on the pathological jejunal NLH in association with the PEG-3350 urticarial hypersensitivity. The potential pathophysiological etiology of this association is discussed. PMID:25608714

  11. Cryoglobulinemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... the VF E-News HERE A A A Youtube LinkedIn Twitter Facebook Behcet’s Syndrome Webinar + Vasculitis Behcet’s ... Book Vasculitis Terms A – Z VF Medical Consultants YouTube Education Videos YouTube Education Videos produced by Alliance ...

  12. [Jellyfish and poison-producing animals that endanger swimmers].

    PubMed

    Litschauer-Poursadrollah, M; Mayer, D E; Hemmer, W; Jarisch, R

    2010-05-01

    Exposure to fresh water as well as to sea water can cause unpleasant consequences. The water of lakes or biotopes may be the reason for severe itching reactions on exposed skin, caused by cercariae. Exposure to seawater may lead to skin affections including itching or burning urticarial lesions as well as life threatening reactions. The causes for these reactions are especially species of jellyfish. PMID:20486058

  13. Vasculitic neuropathy following exposure to minocycline

    PubMed Central

    Baratta, John M.; Dyck, P. James B.; Brand, Patricio; Thaisetthawatkul, Pariwat; Dyck, Peter J.; Engelstad, JaNean K.; Goodman, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report 3 patients with minocycline-induced autoimmunity resulting in peripheral nerve vasculitis. Methods: We report 3 patients who, during minocycline treatment for acne vulgaris, developed subacute onset of pain and weakness caused by vasculitis in single and multiple mononeuropathy patterns. Results: Each patient underwent either a nerve or muscle biopsy that confirmed vasculitis. One patient additionally developed systemic symptoms (including fever, fatigue, and night sweats) and another had a posterior circulation stroke. Symptoms developed with either early or prolonged use of minocycline. Despite withdrawal of minocycline, patients needed long-term immunotherapy to gain neurologic improvement. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the typical neuropathy associated with minocycline use is painful single or multiple mononeuropathy due to peripheral nerve vasculitis, which may also be accompanied by presumed CNS vasculitis (presenting as stroke). PMID:26601119

  14. Complement breakdown products in plasma from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and patients with membranoproliferative or other glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, L H; Lambert, P H; Miescher, P A

    1975-01-01

    A dynamic estimation of the involvement of the complement system in various diseases was obtained by the direct quantitation of breakdown products of C3 and of properdin factor B. The methods used were based, first on the separation of native and fragmented molecules according to their molecular size through a precipitation with polyethylene glycol and, secondly, on an immunochemical quantitation, using specific antisera for the major antigens of C3 and factor B. The sensitivity and the specificity of these methods were demonstrated by activation of complement in vitro with generation of C3 and factor B fragments. A clinical investigation was carried out in 41 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 31 with membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN), 26 with other types of glomerulonephritis, and 6 with severe alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver. The following observations were made: (a) an elevated plasma level of C3d fragment of C3 was found in 68% of SLE patients, in 87% of MPGN patients, in 62% of patients with other hypocomplementemic nephritis, and in 15% of those with normocomplementemic nephritis, but in only 33% of patients with liver cirrhosis and very low levels of C3; (b) a significant difference was observed between the levels of C3 obtained with either anti-"native" C3 or anti-C3c sera for immunochemical quantitation, in patients with SLE or MPGN, indicating the presence of "altered" or fragmented C3 in plasma; (c) an elevated plasma level of Ba fragment of properdin factor B was found in 46% of SLE patients, in 67% of MPGN patients, in 50% of patients with other hypocomplementemic nephritis, and in 9% of patients with normocomplementemic nephritis, while the level of properdin factor B was only slightly decreased in these diseases; (d) in SLE and MPGN there was an inverse correlation between the levels of C3d and Ba and the level of C3 in plasma. The level of these fragments was directly correlated with the clinical manifestations of SLE; (e) some patients with a normal C3 level exhibited an elevated plasma concentration of C3 and factor B fragments, suggesting the coexistence of an increased synthesis with a hypercatabolism of complement components. Therefore, the quantitation of complement breakdown products by simple immunochemical methods provides additional information concerning the involvement of complement in disease and new features for the evaluation of the intensity of immune reactions during immune complex diseases. Images PMID:1141431

  15. Characterization and analysis of carbon fibre-reinforced polymer composite laminates with embedded circular vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Huang, C.-Y.; Trask, R. S.; Bond, I. P.

    2010-01-01

    A study of the influence of embedded circular hollow vascules on structural performance of a fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite laminate is presented. Incorporating such vascules will lead to multi-functional composites by bestowing functions such as self-healing and active thermal management. However, the presence of off-axis vascules leads to localized disruption to the fibre architecture, i.e. resin-rich pockets, which are regarded as internal defects and may cause stress concentrations within the structure. Engineering approaches for creating these simple vascule geometries in conventional FRP laminates are proposed and demonstrated. This study includes development of a manufacturing method for forming vascules, microscopic characterization of their effect on the laminate, finite element (FE) analysis of crack initiation and failure under load, and validation of the FE results via mechanical testing observed using high-speed photography. The failure behaviour predicted by FE modelling is in good agreement with experimental results. The reduction in compressive strength owing to the embedding of circular vascules ranges from 13 to 70 per cent, which correlates with vascule dimension. PMID:20150337

  16. Hydralazine-induced pauci-immune glomerulonephritis: intriguing case series with misleading diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Babar, Faizan; Posner, Jeffery N.; Obah, Eugene A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydralazine has been used since the 1950s for the management of hypertension. Evidence for hydralazine-associated vasculitis dates to pre-ANCA (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) era. This abstract describes two cases of ANCA-positive pauci-immune glomerulonephritis (GN) in challenging scenarios where diagnosis was misconstrued. A comprehensive literature review was done to understand the pathogenesis of drug-induced pauci-immune GN. We have described key diagnostic features that are helpful in distinguishing idiopathic ANCA vasculitis from drug-induced vasculitis. Additionally, we have also described different treatments meant to provide therapy options with the least side effects. PMID:27124161

  17. Cold hard facts of cryoglobulinemia: updates on clinical features and treatment advances.

    PubMed

    Ghetie, Daniela; Mehraban, Navid; Sibley, Cailin H

    2015-01-01

    Cryoglobulins are immunoglobulins that precipitate at temperatures less than 37°C. They occur secondary to infectious, autoimmune, and malignant processes. In the Brouet classification, type I cryoglobulinemia is caused by hyperviscosity, whereas type II and III manifestations are caused by vasculitis in target organs (primarily skin, peripheral nerves, and kidney). New classification criteria were recently proposed that may help with study and treatment of cryoglobulinemic vasculitis (CryoVas). Hepatitis C virus is the most common cause of CryoVas and treatment with antivirals can be curative in mild cases, whereas rituximab is highly effective in treating active vasculitis in more severe cases. PMID:25399942

  18. Periosteal reaction in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Glickstein, M; Neustadter, L; Dalinka, M; Kricun, M

    1986-01-01

    The authors report three patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and periosteal reaction. Two of the three cases had systemic vasculitis and the third had local ischemia with ischemic necrosis. PMID:3810181

  19. [Pathology of Vasculitic Neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Oka, Nobuyuki

    2016-03-01

    Prompt diagnosis of vasculitis is necessary because neuropathy may be the first symptom of vasculitic syndrome, and it is crucial for the management of patients. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, rheumatoid vasculitis, cryoglobulinemia, Sjogren's syndrome, and non-systemic vasculitic neuropathy are disorders frequently associated with vasculitic neuropathy. Pathological features such as the size of the involved vessels and the type of inflammatory cells, combined with general symptoms and laboratory data, may contribute to the specific diagnosis. ANCA may be involved in the pathogenesis of microscopic polyangiitis, and eosinophilic toxins may injure the nerve fibers in some patients with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis. We detected B-cell follicle-like structures adjacent to the inflamed vessels in rheumatoid vasculitis, which may be associated with the pathogenesis. PMID:27001771

  20. Sequential strokes in a hyperacute stroke unit

    PubMed Central

    Ganesalingam, Jeban; Buddha, Sandeep; Carlton-Jones, Anoma L

    2014-01-01

    Vasculitis is a rare, but treatable condition that can present to hyperacute stroke units. Thrombolysis does not treat the underlying pathology, and a rapidly evolving clinical picture drives clinical decision often before all the investigation results are available. PMID:25289143

  1. Sequential strokes in a hyperacute stroke unit.

    PubMed

    Ganesalingam, Jeban; Buddha, Sandeep; Carlton-Jones, Anoma L; Nicholas, Richard

    2014-08-01

    Vasculitis is a rare, but treatable condition that can present to hyperacute stroke units. Thrombolysis does not treat the underlying pathology, and a rapidly evolving clinical picture drives clinical decision often before all the investigation results are available. PMID:25289143

  2. The CARRA Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-16

    Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Mixed Connective Tissue Disease; Juvenile Ankylosing Spondylitis; Juvenile Dermatomyositis; Localized Scleroderma; Systemic Sclerosis; Vasculitis; Sarcoid; Fibromyalgia, Primary; Auto-inflammatory Disease; Idiopathic Uveitis Idiopathic

  3. White Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePlus

    ... by bacteria and some viruses , less commonly by fungi or parasites Inflammation or inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis , vasculitis or inflammatory bowel disease Leukemia , myeloproliferative neoplasms Conditions that result in tissue ...

  4. THE VASCULAR LESIONS OF A COW AND BISON WITH SHEEP-ASSOCIATED MALIGNANT CATARRHAL FEVER CONTAIN OVINE HERPESVIRUS 2-INFECTED CD8+ T LYMPHOCYTES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a serious herpesviral disease syndrome of certain ruminant species. The microscopic pathology of MCF is characterized by lymphoid proliferation and infiltration, necrotizing vasculitis, and necrosis of lymphoid and epithelial tissues. Previous attempts to detect vi...

  5. Spontaneous ureteral rupture in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, C.H.; Pennebaker, J.B.; Harisdangkul, V.; Songcharoen, S.

    1983-08-01

    A patient with known systemic lupus erythematosus had fever and symptoms of a lower urinary tract infection. Bone scintigraphy showed left ureteral perforation and necrosis with no demonstrable nephrolithiasis. It is speculated that this episode was due to lupus vasculitis.

  6. Methotrexate

    MedlinePlus

    ... You are here: Home / Vasculitis Treatments / Methotrexate (MTX) Methotrexate (MTX) Methotrexate (MTX) is used to treat forms ... your primary care provider. Frequently Asked Questions Regarding Methotrexate How does MTX work? MTX works by dampening ...

  7. Safety and Efficacy of Anti-Pandemic H1N1 Vaccination in Rheumatic Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-06-25

    Rheumatoid Arthritis; Spondyloarthritis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE); Dermatomyositis (DM); DMixed Connective Tissue Disease; Systemic Vasculitis; Systemic Sclerosis (SSc); Sjögren's Syndrome; Antiphospholipid Syndrome; Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis; Juvenile SLE; Juvenile DM

  8. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis and facial palsy: Literature review and insight in the autoimmune pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Iannella, Giannicola; Greco, Antonio; Granata, Guido; Manno, Alessandra; Pasquariello, Benedetta; Angeletti, Diletta; Didona, Dario; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is an autoimmune systemic necrotizing small-vessel vasculitis associated with the presence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). Oto-neurological manifestations of ANCA-associated vasculitis according to PR3-ANCA positivity and MPO-ANCA positivity are usually reported. Facial nerve palsy is usually reported during the clinical course of the disease but it might appear as the presenting sign of GPA. Necrotizing vasculitis of the facial nerve 'vasa nervorum' is nowadays the most widely accepted etiopathogenetic theory to explain facial damage in GPA patients. A central role for PR3-ANCA in the pathophysiology of vasculitis in GPA patients with oto-neurological manifestation is reported. GPA requires prompt, effective management of the acute and chronic manifestations. Once the diagnosis of GPA has been established, clinicians should devise an appropriate treatment strategy for each individual patient, based on current clinical evidence, treatment guidelines and recommendations. PMID:26851550

  9. Behcet's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Behcet's syndrome is a disease that involves vasculitis, which is inflammation of the blood vessels. It causes problems in many parts of the body. The ... National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  10. A Real World, Observational Registry of Chronic Wounds and Ulcers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Diabetic Foot; Varicose Ulcer; Pressure Ulcer; Surgical Wound Dehiscence; Vasculitis; Skin Ulcer; Leg Ulcer; Wounds and Injuries; Pyoderma; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Diabetic Neuropathies; Lymphedema; Venous Insufficiency; Diabetes Complications; Amputation Stump

  11. Multiple strokes associated with herpes simplex virus type-2 infection: case report.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Prajwol

    2016-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) type-2 is known to cause meningitis and usually runs a benign course. Association of such infection with vasculitis of the central nervous system is not well known. Presented here is a case initially diagnosed as aseptic meningitis that subsequently evolved as stroke and exhibited angiographic evidence of widespread vasculitis of the intracranial vessels in association with a positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for HSV-2 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). PMID:26443565

  12. Necrotizing ANCA-Positive Glomerulonephritis Secondary to Culture-Negative Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Van Haare Heijmeijer, Sophie; Wilmes, Dunja; Aydin, Selda; Clerckx, Caroline; Labriola, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) and small-vessel vasculitis may have similar clinical features, including glomerulonephritis. Furthermore the association between IE and ANCA positivity is well documented, making differential diagnosis between IE- and ANCA-associated vasculitis particularly difficult, especially in case of culture-negative IE. We report on one patient with glomerulonephritis secondary to culture-negative IE caused by Bartonella henselae which illustrates this diagnostic difficulty. PMID:26819786

  13. Bilateral renal ischemia after kyphoplasty and clodronate treatment: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The most common adverse effects associated with bisphosphonates are renal toxicity, acute-phase reactions, gastrointestinal toxicity, osteonecrosis of the jaw, transitory fever and uveitis. We report a unique adverse case of vasculitis induced by clodronate. Case presentation A 61-year-old Caucasian woman developed bilateral renal ischemia after kyphoplasty and clodronate treatment for lumbar vertebral fracture. Tests revealed a vasculitis due to clodronate treatment. The antithrombotic and immunosuppressive drugs allowed us to reduce the extent of the renal ischemia. In the following months the increased auto-antibodies returned to the healthy physiological range, but the chronic renal failure persisted. Conclusions Drug-induced vasculitis is an inflammation of blood vessels caused by the use of various pharmaceutical agents. The spectrum of drug-induced vasculitis can range from cutaneous rashes to fatal multi-organ involvement. To the best of our knowledge this is the first documented case of drug-induced vasculitis caused by clodronate in the literature. Previously, it was verified that clodronate injection could increase the pro-apoptotic action on immune cells. Further studies are necessary to clarify the role of bisphosphonates on drug-inducing vasculitis. PMID:24571672

  14. [Vasculitic Peripheral Neuropathies: Clinical Features and Diagnostic Laboratory Tests].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Katsuhisa

    2016-03-01

    Vasculitic peripheral neuropathy (VPN) occurs due to ischemic changes of peripheral nerves, resulting from a deficit of vascular blood supply due to damaged vasa nervorum leading to vasculitis. VPN usually manifests as sensorimotor or sensory disturbances accompanied by pain, presenting as a type of multiple mononeuropathy, with a scattered distribution in distal limbs. VPN may also present as a mononeuropathy, distal symmetric polyneuropathy, plexopathy, or radiculopathy. The rapidity of VPN is variable, ranging from days to months, with symptoms occasionally changing with the appearance of new lesions. Careful history taking and neurological examination provides an exact diagnosis. The most common cause of VPN is primary vasculitis predominantly affecting small vessels, including vasa nervorum, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, and polyarteritis nodosa. Similar vasculitic processes can also result from a systemic collagen disorder or secondary vasculitis. Electrophysiological studies and pathological investigation of biopsied peripheral nerves and muscles are important for diagnosis of vasculitis. Serological tests, including ANCA, are useful for diagnosis of vasculitis. Accurate neurological examinations are essential for diagnosis and evaluation of clinical course. PMID:27001769

  15. [Eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells' syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Cerri, D; Carabelli, A; Bertani, E; Portaluppi, F; Novi, C; Gianotti, R; Gelmetti, C

    1990-09-01

    The Authors report a case of eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells' syndrome). The patient was a 61 year old woman, diabetic, with a cardio-respiratory insufficiency and a maniaco-depressive psycosis. She presented, on the upper arms and trunk, a cutaneous eruption of erythematous-urticarial plaques, that histopathologically were characterized by a dermic leukocyte population, with a prevalence of eosinophils, distributed in the perivascular site. Laboratory tests revealed eosinophilia and circulating immune complexes. The etiopathogenesis of the disease is discussed as is the possible role of immune complexes in eosinophilic cellulitis. PMID:2079351

  16. Familial polymorphous light eruption with aquagenic urticaria: successful treatment with PUVA.

    PubMed

    Juhlin, L; Malmros-Enander, I

    1986-12-01

    A patient is described with both polymorphous light eruption (PLE) and aquagenic urticaria appearing at 29 yr of age. Her father had the same symptoms after exposure to solar irradiation or water. Four to 6 h after 5-15 min sun-exposure, both had symptoms of general malaise and swelling of various joints. The skin symptoms in our patient were initially urticarial and later mainly papular and vesicular. They were elicited by irradiation with low doses of 300-360 nm and also appeared after 400 and 500 nm. Window glass offered little protection. PUVA treatment improved both conditions remarkably. PMID:3588355

  17. Acebrophylline-induced angioedema.

    PubMed

    Kuriachan, Sanitha; Amberkar, Mohan Babu V; Mohan, Manu K; Shahul, Hameed Aboobackar; Kishore, Meenakumari Kamal

    2015-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman visited her physician complaining of acute breathlessness and productive cough. Her medications included budesonide and formoterol for asthma, fixed-dose combination aspirin 150 mg + clopidogrel 75 mg + atorvastatin 20 mg for ischemic heart disease. History revealed that she had allergic rhinitis and was hypersensitive to penicillins. The patient was prescribed acebrophylline (ABP). Six hours after ABP therapy she presented with generalized urticarial lesions, swelling of hands, feet, lips and face, suggestive of angioedema. ABP was stopped immediately, and the patient was treated symptomatically. This case was categorized as probable as per standard causality assessment scale. PMID:25878387

  18. Urticaria multiforme: A report of 5 cases and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sempau, L; Martín-Sáez, E; Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, C; Gutiérrez-Ortega, M C

    2016-01-01

    Urticaria multiforme is a cutaneous disorder that affects infants and small children. It is characterized by large, annular urticarial plaques with a violaceous center and is frequently accompanied by fever. Urticaria multiforme follows a benign, self-limiting course, but the striking appearance of the lesions can cause alarm and considerable anxiety among parents. We present 5 cases of urticaria multiforme seen in our hospital over a period of 18 months. All the cases were preceded by an infection of the upper airways or otitis, and they were all empirically with amoxicillin. It is important to be familiar with this condition to reassure parents and avoid unnecessary hospital admissions and tests. PMID:25843790

  19. Acebrophylline-induced angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Kuriachan, Sanitha; Amberkar, Mohan Babu V; Mohan, Manu K.; Shahul, Hameed Aboobackar; Kishore, Meenakumari Kamal

    2015-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman visited her physician complaining of acute breathlessness and productive cough. Her medications included budesonide and formoterol for asthma, fixed-dose combination aspirin 150 mg + clopidogrel 75 mg + atorvastatin 20 mg for ischemic heart disease. History revealed that she had allergic rhinitis and was hypersensitive to penicillins. The patient was prescribed acebrophylline (ABP). Six hours after ABP therapy she presented with generalized urticarial lesions, swelling of hands, feet, lips and face, suggestive of angioedema. ABP was stopped immediately, and the patient was treated symptomatically. This case was categorized as probable as per standard causality assessment scale. PMID:25878387

  20. Cutaneous Larva Migrans in Early Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Siddalingappa, Karjigi; Murthy, Sambasiviah Chidambara; Herakal, Kallappa; Kusuma, Marganahalli Ramachandra

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous larva migrans or creeping eruptions is a cutaneous dermatosis caused by hookworm larvae, Ancylostoma braziliense. A 2-month-old female child presented with a progressive rash over the left buttock of 4 days duration. Cutaneous examination showed an urticarial papule progressing to erythematous, tortuous, thread-like tract extending a few centimeters from papule over the left gluteal region. A clinical diagnosis of cutaneous larva migrans was considered. Treatment with albendazole led to complete resolution, confirming the diagnosis. This is to the best of our knowledge, the youngest age at which this condition is being reported. PMID:26538729

  1. Is There any Relationship Between Extra-Pulmonary Manifestations of Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Infection and Atopy/Respiratory Allergy in Children?

    PubMed Central

    Poddighe, Dimitri; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a common cause of respiratory infections in children, but sometimes extra-pulmonary diseases can be observed. The immunological mechanisms involved in these extra-respiratory complications are unknown. Here, we report a small case series of Mycoplasma-related diseases including 5 children who developed: i) aseptic meningitis; ii) urticarial rash and pericardial effusion; iii) pleural effusion with severe eosinophilia; iv) Stevens-Johnson syndrome; v) multiform erythema. Interestingly, all children were moderately to highly atopic, as a common immunologic feature. PMID:27114818

  2. Pruritus in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Hagit; Melamed, Nir; Koren, Gideon

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Question Some of my pregnant patients complain about pruritus. Are there conditions in pregnancy that present with pruritus that might put the mother or fetus at risk? Answer Although most cases of pruritus can be attributed to itchy dry skin, there are conditions unique to pregnancy that involve pruritus as a leading symptom. These include pemphigoid gestationis, pruritic urticarial papules and plaques of pregnancy, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, and atopic eruption of pregnancy. These conditions are associated with severe pruritus and some might be associated with adverse fetal outcomes. Clinical history and physical examination are the most important diagnostic clues when evaluating pruritus in pregnancy. PMID:24336540

  3. Advances in understanding and managing bullous pemphigoid

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Cathy Y.; Murrell, Dedee F.

    2015-01-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is the commonest subtype of autoimmune blistering disease in most countries of the world. It occurs most frequently in elderly patients and is characterised clinically by large, tense blisters in the skin preceded by urticarial plaques and pruritus. Immunopathologically, it is characterised by autoantibodies directed against the 180 kD antigen (BP180) and the 230 kD antigen (BP230). New knowledge regarding BP is being continually uncovered. This article reviews the recent advances in BP, including newer diagnostic tests, standardised outcome measures and emerging therapeutic options, as well as the evidence supporting their use. PMID:26918143

  4. Obvious optic disc swelling in a patient with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Mariko; Yoshikawa, Tadanobu; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Heike, Toshio; Takahashi, Kanji

    2013-01-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) is a group of rare hereditary autoinflammatory diseases caused by mutations of the NLRP3 gene, and leads to excessive production of the proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-lβ. A 35-year-old male presented with recurrent symptoms of urticarial-like rash, periodic fever, arthralgia, headache, and eye redness. His best-corrected visual acuity was 1.0 OD and 0.9 OS. Slit-lamp examination showed conjunctival and episcleral injection in both eyes. Ophthalmoscopy revealed obvious bilateral optic disc swelling and retinal vascular sheathing around the optic discs. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography also showed obvious optic disc swelling. Steroid and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs did not improve these symptoms. Genetic testing detected a heterozygous mutation of c.907G>A. Thus, the patient was genetically confirmed with CAPS. Visual acuity did not decrease for 3 years, although the optic discs became white in color. CAPS should therefore be distinguished from other disorders when examining optic disc swelling and/or uveitis patients with urticarial-like rash and periodic fever. PMID:23966762

  5. Role of biologics in intractable urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Andrew; Bulkhi, Adeeb; Casale, Thomas B

    2015-01-01

    Chronic urticaria (CU) is a common condition faced by many clinicians. CU has been estimated to affect approximately 0.5%–1% of the population, with nearly 20% of sufferers remaining symptomatic 20 years after onset. Antihistamines are the first-line therapy for CU. Unfortunately, nearly half of these patients will fail this first-line therapy and require other medication, including immune response modifiers or biologics. Recent advances in our understanding of urticarial disorders have led to more targeted therapeutic options for CU and other urticarial diseases. The specific biologic agents most investigated for antihistamine-refractory CU are omalizumab, rituximab, and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Of these, the anti-IgE monoclonal antibody omalizumab is the best studied, and has recently been approved for the management of CU. Other agents, such as interleukin-1 inhibitors, have proved beneficial for Schnitzler syndrome and cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), diseases associated with urticaria. This review summarizes the relevant data regarding the efficacy of biologics in antihistamine-refractory CU. PMID:25926715

  6. Successful treatment with tocilizumab of pericarditis associated with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shuzo; Takeuchi, Tohru; Sawaki, Hideaki; Imai, Tamaki; Makino, Shigeki; Hanafusa, Toshiaki

    2014-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease often complicated by vasculitis. Pericarditis is a serious complication caused by vasculitis, resulting in retention of pericardial effusion that sometimes induces cardiac tamponade. We report a patient with RA in whom pericarditis improved after tocilizumab administration. A male patient was diagnosed with RA and chronic renal failure in 1980 and was treated with salazosulfapyridine, but disease activity remained high. In January 2012, at the age of 73 years, he developed organizing pneumonia as a complication and was admitted to our hospital. Treatment with prednisolone 30 mg/day was initiated. However, 20 days after initiation of treatment, chest pain and palpitation developed, and chest computed tomography (CT) and echocardiography (ECG) revealed retention of pericardial effusion without cardiac tamponade. Rheumatoid nodules and interstitial pneumonia were also observed, and serum C3 level was decreased. A diagnosis of pericarditis caused by vasculitis was made based on these findings, and tocilizumab 8 mg/kg was administered. His symptoms improved gradually, and chest CT and ECG showed no pericardial effusion after about 3 weeks. No adverse effects of tocilizumab were observed during the clinical course. Although there are only a few reports of the effects of tocilizumab on vasculitis associated with RA, tocilizumab administration appears worthwhile in RA patients with vasculitis who do not respond to conventional treatment. PMID:24517555

  7. Evaluation and therapy in four patients with Takayasu's arteritis.

    PubMed

    Conkar, S; Mir, S; Sözeri, B; Bulut, İ Kaplan; Çınar, C

    2016-01-01

    Takayasu's arteritis (TA) is a large-vessel vasculitis primarily affecting the aorta and its branches. It ranks third among other types of childhood vasculitis, while it is the most common large vessel vasculitis observed in childhood. The diagnosis of TA should be made on the basis of clinical criteria and supported with laboratory findings, while confirming it with the imaging methods. Angioplasty, stent and bypass grafts may be necessary in the case of an irreversible arterial stenosis. Small-vessel involvement in TA and acute phase reactants should be taken into account for the diagnosis of an attack. In this report, treatment choices for four patients with the diagnosis of pediatric TA, their clinical and laboratory findings and their responses to treatment will be discussed. PMID:26787588

  8. Idiopathic Nonviral Cryoglobulinemia Treated Successfully With Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Mahmoud; Thajudeen, Bijin; Bracamonte, Erika; Madhrira, Machaiah

    2016-01-01

    Cryoglobulinemia is a systemic inflammatory syndrome that generally involves small-to-medium vessel vasculitis due to cryoglobulin-containing immune complexes. The therapeutic management of idiopathic cryoglobulinemic vasculitis has yet to be defined because no study has evaluated the best strategies. However, treatment of severe vasculitis is traditionally based on a combination of corticosteroids and immunosuppressants or plasmapheresis, and more recently rituximab. We report a case of 77-year-old female patient diagnosed with idiopathic cryoglobulinemia, treated successfully with 6 months prednisone tapering and 2 doses of rituximab (1 g each dose). After receiving the above-mentioned treatment, her creatinine went back to normal with resolution of proteinuria and hematuria, normalization of serum complements, and significant improvement in her clinical picture. We conclude that rituximab could be an effective treatment for idiopathic cryoglobulnemia. PMID:24914502

  9. [Non-systemic Vasculitic Neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Koike, Haruki

    2016-03-01

    Non-systemic vasculitic neuropathy (NSVN) is a vasculitis confined to the peripheral nervous system. It is one of the most common causes of vasculitic neuropathy, along with microscopic polyangiitis and eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss syndrome). It remains unclear whether this disease is truly an isolated nosological entity, or part of the spectrum of systemic vasculitides. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are negative in NSVN even though the size of affected vessels in this disease is similar to that in ANCA-associated vasculitis. Although the concept of single organ vasculitis was added to the 2012 revised International Chapel Hill Consensus Conference (CHCC) nomenclature of vasculitides, a description of NSVN has not yet been incorporated. Further studies are needed to elucidate the pathogenesis of NSVN, particularly a search for causative antibodies or participation of complement pathways. These studies may help clarify the position of NSVN along the spectrum of vasculitides based on CHCC nomenclature. PMID:27001772

  10. Lucio's phenomenon: report of five cases.

    PubMed

    Curi, Pablo Finucci; Villaroel, Julieta Solis; Migliore, Nora; Albertengo, Adriana; Aquino, María Laura; Ceccato, Federico; Paira, Sergio

    2016-05-01

    The different clinical forms of leprosy are mainly related to the variety of immunological responses to the infection. Several forms of lepromatous leprosy are recognized, including macular, nodular, and diffuse. Lucio's phenomenon is a rare but distinctive skin eruption seen in patients with diffuse lepromatous leprosy. The diffuse lesions of Lucio's phenomenon have a predilection for the extremities, can include nodules, and heal with atrophic stellate scars; histologically, a necrotizing vasculitis accompanied by a nonspecific inflammatory reaction may be seen. Because of its rarity and similarity with some manifestations of the rheumatic disease and other causes of vasculitis, Lucio's phenomenon may not be easily recognized, especially in non-endemic countries, which leads to confusing diagnosis and loss of time for treatment. We report five patients with vasculitis caused by Lucio's phenomenon. PMID:24863848

  11. Clinical management of infectious cerebral vasculitides.

    PubMed

    Carod Artal, Francisco Javier

    2016-02-01

    A wide range of infections (virus, bacteria, parasite and fungi) may cause cerebral vasculitides. Headache, seizures, encephalopathy and stroke are common forms of presentation. Infection and inflammation of intracranial vessels may cause pathological vascular remodelling, vascular occlusion and ischemia. Vasculitis in chronic meningitis may cause ischemic infarctions, and is associated with poor outcome. Appropriate neuroimaging (CT-angiography, MR-angiography, conventional 4-vessel angiography) and laboratory testing (specific antibodies in blood and CSF, CSF culture and microscopy) and even brain biopsy are needed to quickly establish the aetiology. Enhancement of contrast, wall thickening and lumen narrowing are radiological signs pointing to an infectious vasculitis origin. Although corticosteroids and prophylactic antiplatelet therapy have been used in infectious cerebral vasculitis, there are no randomized clinical trials that have evaluated their efficacy and safety. Stable mycotic aneurysms can be treated with specific antimicrobial therapy. Endovascular therapy and intracranial surgery are reserved for ruptured aneurysms or enlarging unruptured aneurysms. PMID:26689107

  12. Vessel involvement in giant cell arteritis: an imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Holm, Pieter W; Sandovici, Maria; Slart, Riemer H; Glaudemans, Andor W; Rutgers, Abraham; Brouwer, Elisabeth

    2016-04-01

    Vasculitis is classified based on the size of the involved vessels. The two major forms are small vessel vasculitis and large vessel vasculitis (LVV). Main forms of LVV are Takayasu arteritis, giant cell arteritis (GCA), isolated aortitis and chronic periaortitis. This manuscript will focus on GCA, named after the presence of giant cells in the artery vessel wall. A positive biopsy of the temporal artery is the gold standard for making a diagnosis of GCA. In the past 10 years the introduction of new imaging techniques in GCA patients has revealed a variable prevalence of extra cranial involvement, challenging the temporal artery biopsy as gold standard. Also, imaging has become important not only for diagnosing GCA but also for assessment of vascular damage in GCA and for the evaluation of treatment. PMID:26756121

  13. Sacroiliitis and Polyarteritis Nodosa in a Patient with Familial Mediterranean Fever

    PubMed Central

    Ugan, Yunus; Doğru, Atalay; Şencan, Hüseyin; Şahin, Mehmet; Ercan Tunç, Şevket

    2016-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autoinflammatory disorder with autosomal recessive inheritance, characterized by recurrent fever and episodes of serositis. The condition is known to be caused by mutations in the MEFV (Mediterranean FeVer) gene, located in the short arm of chromosome 16. While more than 310 sequence variants in the MEFV gene have been described to date, the diagnosis is still established clinically. FMF may be accompanied by sacroiliitis and various forms of vasculitis. The most common forms of associated vasculitis are Henoch-Schonlein purpura and polyarteritis nodosa (PAN). We have presented here a fairly rare case of FMF, accompanied by both sacroiliitis and PAN. PMID:27143975

  14. Giant aortic aneurysm in a child with Takayasu arteritis.

    PubMed

    Halaweish, Ihab; Patel, Himanshu; Si, Ming-Sing

    2016-03-01

    Takayasu arteritis is a chronic, idiopathic, granulomatous vasculitis involving the aorta, its major branches, and occasionally the pulmonary arteries. Although rare in children, it is the third most common vasculitis in the paediatric population. Although aneurysmal disease has been reported in adults with Takayasu arteritis, it is a rare entity in children. We present the case of a 10-year-old boy with a giant ascending and arch aneurysm that necessitated follow-up surgery for a new aneurysm and occlusive disease. This is also the first published case involving endovascular aortic graft placement for the management of vascular sequela of Takayasu arteritis in a child. PMID:26365418

  15. [Pulmonary-renal syndrome].

    PubMed

    Risso, Jorge A; Mazzocchi, Octavio; De All, Jorge; Gnocchi, César A

    2009-01-01

    The pulmonary-renal syndrome is defined as a combination of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and glomerulonephritis. The coexistence of these two clinical conditions is due to diseases with different pathogenic mechanisms. Primary systemic vasculitis and Goodpasture syndrome are the most frequent etiologies. Systemic lupus erythematosus, connective tissue diseases, negative anti neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody vasculitis and those secondary to drugs are far less common causes. An early diagnosis based on clinical, radiologic, laboratory and histologic criteria enables early treatment, thus diminishing its high morbidity-mortality rate. Therapy is based on high doses of corticosteroids, immunosuppressants, tumor necrosis factor inhibitors and plasmapheresis. PMID:20053612

  16. Takayasu's or tuberculous arteritis?

    PubMed

    Moura, Carlos; Aquino, Mauricio Antonio; Rocha Filho, Jose; Santiago, Mittermayer

    2015-01-01

    Takayasu's arteritis (TA) is a large vessel vasculitis of unknown aetiology characterised by involvement of the aorta and its major branches. Tuberculous arteritis of the aorta is an uncommon condition usually secondary to the dissemination of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection from the mediastinum and/or lung to the adjacent aorta; this may mimic TA. We report a case of a 23-year-old woman with cutaneous granulomatous vasculitis and saccular aneurysmal dilation of the aorta and large vessels, and highlight the findings shared by TA and tuberculous arteritis. PMID:26106169

  17. Drug-induced glomerular disease: immune-mediated injury.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Jonathan J; Markowitz, Glen S; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2015-07-01

    Drug-induced autoimmune disease was initially described decades ago, with reports of vasculitis and a lupus-like syndrome in patients taking hydralazine, procainamide, and sulfadiazine. Over the years, multiple other agents have been linked to immune-mediated glomerular disease, often with associated autoantibody formation. Certain clinical and laboratory features may distinguish these entities from their idiopathic counterparts, and making this distinction is important in the diagnosis and management of these patients. Here, drug-induced, ANCA-associated vasculitis, drug-induced lupus, and drug-associated membranous nephropathy are reviewed. PMID:26092827

  18. The first case of Henoch-Schönlein purpura associated with rosuvastatin: colonic involvement coexisting with small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Gonen, Korcan Aysun; Erfan, Gamze; Oznur, Meltem; Erdogan, Cuneyt

    2014-01-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a systemic vasculitis affecting small vessels. It is the most common systemic vasculitis in children, and is rare in adults. Serious gastrointestinal complications are more common in childhood. Infections and drugs are the most prominent factors in the aetiology. Wall thickening in segments of the small intestine is commonly seen in imaging studies in gastrointestinal system (GIS) involvement. Simultaneous involvement of small intestine and colon is rare. An HSP case involving small intestine and colon in an adult patient due to the use of rosuvastatin, an antihyperlipidaemic agent, is presented, and is first of its kind reported in the literature. PMID:24648473

  19. Dyspnea due to pulmonary vessel arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Gilmour, Suzana M; Dominelli, Giulio S; Leipsic, Jonathon A; Levy, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary arteritis is a rare cause of pulmonary hypertension. Causes of pulmonary arteritis can be divided into primary and secondary, as well as classified according to vessel size. Only large vessel vasculitis is associated with pulmonary hypertension; primary forms include Takayasu arteritis and giant cell arteritis. The diagnosis of pulmonary arteritis can be challenging and the associated morbidity is serious without prompt, directed treatment. The authors present a case involving a 48-year-old First Nations man presenting with a six-month history of exertional dyspnea and severe stenosis of the left pulmonary artery, who was ultimately diagnosed with pulmonary arteritis related to large vessel vasculitis. PMID:24524110

  20. [Skin necrosis: report of eleven cases].

    PubMed

    Molgó, Montserrat N; Arriagada, Camila E; Salomone, Claudia B; Vera, Cristián K; Giesen, Laura F; Solar, Antonieta G; González, Sergio B

    2014-01-01

    Skin necrosis must be considered as a syndrome, because it is a clinical manifestation of different diseases. An early diagnosis is very important to choose the appropriate treatment. Therefore, its causes should be suspected and confirmed quickly. We report eleven patients with skin necrosis seen at our Department, caused by different etiologies: Warfarin-induced skin necrosis, loxoscelism, diabetic microangiopathy, ecthyma gangrenosum, disseminated intravascular coagulation, necrotizing vasculitis, paraneoplastic extensive necrotizing vasculitis, livedoid vasculopathy, necrotizing fasciitis, necrosis secondary to the use of vasoactive drugs and necrosis secondary to the use of cocaine. We also report the results of our literature review on the subject. PMID:24861125

  1. Activation of the kallikrein-kinin system in Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Harber, P; Pettit, G W; Wing, D A; Oster, C N

    1978-06-01

    Activation of the kallikrein-kinin system, as indicated by increased plasma kallikrein and depleted plasma kininogen, prekallikrein, and kallikrein inhibitor, was observed in five patients with Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Four of the patients had petechial rashes characteristic of vasculitis. Three patients had alterations in coagulation consistent with disseminated intravascular coagulation, although no hemorrhagic syndrome was found. Our data, along with the known physiologic actions of kinins, suggest a possible role for the kallikrein-kinin system in the pathophysiology of vasculitis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, circulatory shock, and other complications of infection with Rickettsia rickettsii. PMID:307354

  2. CanVasc recommendations for the management of antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides - Executive summary.

    PubMed

    McGeoch, Lucy; Twilt, Marinka; Famorca, Leilani; Bakowsky, Volodko; Barra, Lillian; Benseler, Susan; Cabral, David A; Carette, Simon; Cox, Gerald P; Dhindsa, Navjot; Dipchand, Christine; Fifi-Mah, Aurore; Goulet, Michele; Khalidi, Nader; Khraishi, Majed M; Liang, Patrick; Milman, Nataliya; Pineau, Christian A; Reich, Heather; Samadi, Nooshin; Shojania, Kam; Taylor-Gjevre, Regina; Towheed, Tanveer E; Trudeau, Judith; Walsh, Michael; Yacyshyn, Elaine; Pagnoux, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The Canadian Vasculitis research network (CanVasc) is composed of physicians from different medical specialties, including rheumatology and nephrology and researchers with expertise in vasculitis. One of its aims was to develop recommendations for the diagnosis and management of antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides in Canada. This executive summary features the 19 recommendations and 17 statements addressing general AAV diagnosis and management, developed by CanVasc group based on a synthesis of existing international guidelines, other published supporting evidence and expert consensus considering the Canadian healthcare context. PMID:26557369

  3. Life-Threatening Cryoglobulinemic Patients With Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Retamozo, Soledad; Díaz-Lagares, Cándido; Bosch, Xavier; Bové, Albert; Brito-Zerón, Pilar; Gómez, Maria-Eugenia; Yagüe, Jordi; Forns, Xavier; Cid, Maria C.; Ramos-Casals, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Cryoglobulinemia is characterized by a wide range of causes, symptoms, and outcomes. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is detected in 30%–100% of patients with cryoglobulins. Although more than half the patients with cryoglobulinemic vasculitis present a relatively benign clinical course, some may present with potentially life-threatening situations. We conducted the current study to analyze the clinical characteristics and outcomes of HCV patients presenting with life-threatening cryoglobulinemic vasculitis. We evaluated 181 admissions from 89 HCV patients diagnosed with cryoglobulinemic vasculitis consecutively admitted to our department between 1995 and 2010. In addition, we performed a systematic analysis of cases reported to date through a MEDLINE search. The following organ involvements were considered to be potentially life-threatening in HCV patients with cryoglobulinemic vasculitis: cryoglobulinemic, biopsy-proven glomerulonephritis presenting with renal failure; gastrointestinal vasculitis; pulmonary hemorrhage; central nervous system (CNS) involvement; and myocardial involvement. A total of 279 patients (30 from our department and 249 from the literature search) fulfilled the inclusion criteria: 205 presented with renal failure, 45 with gastrointestinal vasculitis, 38 with CNS involvement, 18 with pulmonary hemorrhage, and 3 with myocardial involvement; 30 patients presented with more than 1 life-threatening cryoglobulinemic manifestation. There were 146 (52%) women and 133 (48%) men, with a mean age at diagnosis of cryoglobulinemia of 54 years (range, 25–87 yr) and a mean age at life-threatening involvement of 55 years (range, 25–87 yr). In 232 (83%) patients, life-threatening involvement was the first clinical manifestation of cryoglobulinemia. Severe involvement appeared a mean of 1.2 years (range, 1–11 yr) after the diagnosis of cryoglobulinemic vasculitis. Patients were followed for a mean of 14 months (range, 3–120 mo) after the diagnosis of life-threatening cryoglobulinemia. Sixty-three patients (22%) died. The main cause of death was sepsis (42%) in patients with glomerulonephritis, and cryoglobulinemic vasculitis itself in patients with gastrointestinal, pulmonary, and CNS involvement (60%, 57%, and 62%, respectively). In conclusion, HCV-related cryoglobulinemia may result in progressive (renal involvement) or acute (pulmonary hemorrhage, gastrointestinal ischemia, CNS involvement) life-threatening organ damage. The mortality rate of these manifestations ranges between 20% and 80%. Unfortunately, this may be the first cryoglobulinemic involvement in almost two-thirds of cases, highlighting the complex management and very elevated mortality of these cases. PMID:23974248

  4. Follicular dermographism.

    PubMed

    Shelley, W B; Shelley, E D

    1983-09-01

    Four patients who complained of an inexplicable pruritus of several weeks to several years in duration are presented. General medical studies were unremarkable and the skin was normal except for erythematous papular lesions at sites recently scratched. The skin changes could be reproduced by multiple firm strokes with the broad edge of a tongue blade. The transitory, discrete, follicular, urticarial papules so elicited have been labeled by us as follicular dermographism. It is an entity to be distinguished from cholinergic and aquagenic urticaria. We postulate that follicular dermographism occurs during periods of transient antigenemia. At such times, the frictional force of scratching or the tongue blade test releases antigen from the blood stream to trigger focal urticaria at sites of high density mast cells, namely around the hair follicle. Hydroxyzine is an effective therapy. PMID:6627988

  5. Aquagenic urticaria with extracutaneous manifestations.

    PubMed

    Baptist, Alan P; Baldwin, James L

    2005-01-01

    Aquagenic urticaria (AU) is a rare form of physical urticaria in which contact with water evokes hives. Extracutaneous manifestations of AU have been described but have not been controlled successfully to date. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have not been used previously in the treatment of AU. The aim of this study was to describe a case of AU with extracutaneous manifestations, to describe a novel treatment approach, and to review the literature on AU. Our patient presented with urticarial lesions and migraine-like headaches after contact with any type of water. A variety of prophylactic medications including antihistamines, anticholinergics, and SSRIs, were used and, ultimately, were successful in controlling the patient's symptoms. AU is a rare condition that can have extracutaneous manifestations. Multiple classes of medications, including SSRIs, may be necessary in the treatment and prophylaxis of such patients. Additional research is needed into the pathogenesis of AU. PMID:16119038

  6. Contact urticaria to the MCU-2A/P gas mask.

    PubMed

    Elmer, K B; George, R M

    1999-05-01

    A case of contact urticaria to the silicone rubber in the MCU-2A/P gas mask is presented. Contact urticaria is a type I hypersensitivity reaction mediated by immunoglobulin E that usually manifests as localized erythema, edema, pruritus, and urticarial plaques. It can also cause systemic reactions, including anaphylaxis. Allergic reactions to silicone rubber have been increasingly reported and are of importance in medical and military personnel. The implication of such a diagnosis in an active duty military member is significant because the individual cannot be worldwide-qualified. The correct diagnosis of allergic skin reactions to personal protective gear is critical to maintaining a strong fighting force and protecting military personnel from potentially life-threatening allergic reactions. PMID:10332182

  7. Caterpillars and moths: Part II. Dermatologic manifestations of encounters with Lepidoptera.

    PubMed

    Hossler, Eric W

    2010-01-01

    Caterpillars and moths (order Lepidoptera) are uncommonly recognized causes of adverse cutaneous reactions, such as localized stings, papular dermatitis, and urticarial wheals. These reactions are typically mild and self-limited; however, in South America, the sting of Lonomia caterpillars can cause a potentially fatal hemorrhagic diathesis related to massive fibrinolysis. In addition, ocular inflammation and prominent arthralgias have been reported to be caused by caterpillar exposures. Therapies for mucocutaneous reactions to Lepidoptera are largely empiric, with the exception of antivenin against Lonomia obliqua envenomation. Part II of this two-part series on caterpillars and moths reviews the varied symptoms caused by Lepidopteran exposures, reviews the differential diagnosis, and discusses appropriate treatment algorithms. PMID:20082887

  8. The unusual association of Graves' disease, chronic spontaneous urticaria, and premature ovarian failure: report of a case and HLA haplotype characterization.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Rosaria Maddalena; Vita, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Anna Grazia; Quattrocchi, Paolina; Certo, Rosaria; Benvenga, Salvatore; Cannav, Salvatore; Gangemi, Sebastiano

    2013-12-01

    Chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU), defined as the occurrence of spontaneous wheals for more than six weeks, has been associated with autoimmune diseases. Herein, we report the unusual association of CSU, Graves' disease, and premature ovarian failure. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) studies were performed. A 36-year-old woman presented symptoms and signs of hyperthyroidism for three months. In the same period, the patient complained of widespread urticarial wheals, intensely itchy, and poorly responsive to therapy with antihistaminic agents. Hyperthyroidism was confirmed biochemically, and treatment with methimazole was started. As hyperthyroidism improved, a marked improvement in her urticaria was also observed. However, the patient continued to complain of amenorrhea. Endocrine evaluation, at the age 38, was consistent with premature ovarian failure. This is the first report of coexistence of GD, CSU, and POF. The genetic background of such unusual association is a specific combination of HLA. PMID:24402023

  9. Generalized mid dermal elastolysis

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Maria João; Barros, Ana Margarida; Azevedo, Filomena

    2011-01-01

    Mid-dermal elastolysis (MDE) is a rare skin disorder clinically characterized by the appearance of diffuse fine wrinkling, most often of the trunk and arms. This entity is distinguished from other elastolytic disorders by its characteristic selective loss of elastic fibers of the mid dermis. The aetiopathogenesis of the disease is still unclear as well as the effective treatment. Half of the cases described in the literature are associated with ultraviolet radiation exposure. Other reported triggering conditions such as urticaria, eczema and granuloma annulare suggests different eliciting inflammatory pathways. The authors describe the case of a 38-year-old woman who developed an urticarial eruption during months which progressed to generalized and severe fine wrinkling. PMID:25386304

  10. Skin lesions due to exposure to methyl bromide.

    PubMed

    Hezemans-Boer, M; Toonstra, J; Meulenbelt, J; Zwaveling, J H; Sangster, B; van Vloten, W A

    1988-06-01

    Six patients were occupationally exposed to high concentrations of methyl bromide during a fumigation procedure using adequate airway protection. Within a few hours all patients developed skin lesions, consisting of sharply demarcated erythema with multiple vesicles and large bullae. There was a striking predisposition for parts of the skin that were relatively moist or subject to mechanical pressure, such as axillae, groin, and abdomen. Microscopically, early skin lesions revealed necrosis of keratinocytes, severe edema of the upper dermis, subepidermal blistering, and diffuse infiltration of neutrophils and, to a lesser degree, eosinophils. Two patients developed an urticarial rash approximately one week after the exposure. On histologic examination, these late lesions showed combined features of a spongiotic dermatitis and urticaria. No immunopathologic manifestations were observed. In all patients, the skin returned to normal after four weeks, except for some residual hyperpigmentation. Plasma bromide levels after exposure strongly suggested percutaneous absorption of methyl bromide. PMID:2967677

  11. An Unusual Case of Angiotensin-Converting-Enzyme Inhibitor-Related Penile Angioedema with Evolution to the Oropharynx

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Jonathan G.; Bench, Elias M.; Plantmason, Lee

    2015-01-01

    A 52-year-old African American male with a long history of poorly controlled hypertension presented to the emergency department (ED) with two days of genital edema and pain. During ED work-up, the patient developed sudden onset of non-pitting, non-pruritic, and non-urticarial upper lip edema. Review of his antihypertensive medication list revealed that he normally took benazepril, highly suggestive of a diagnosis of angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor-related angioedema (ACEI-RA). We present the first reported case of penile ACEI-RA that progressed to involve the oropharynx. The ED management of the condition and some of the newer treatment options available for ACEI-RA is also briefly discussed. PMID:26759679

  12. Allergy to Prolene Sutures in a Dural Graft for Chiari Decompression

    PubMed Central

    Cajigas, Iahn; Burks, S. Shelby; Gernsback, Joanna; Fine, Lauren; Moshiree, Baharak; Levi, Allan D.

    2015-01-01

    Allergy to Prolene suture is exceedingly rare with only 5 cases reported in the literature. There have been no such cases associated with neurosurgical procedures. Diagnosis is nearly always delayed in spite of persistent symptomatology. A 27-year-old girl with suspected Ehlers-Danlos, connective tissue disorder, underwent posterior fossa decompression for Chiari Type 1 malformation. One year later, the patient presented with urticarial rash from the neck to chest. Cerebrospinal fluid and blood testing, magnetic resonance imaging, and intraoperative exploration did not suggest allergic reaction. Eventually skin testing proved specific Prolene allergy. After suture material was removed, the patient no longer complained of pruritus or rash. This single case highlights the important entity of allergic reaction to suture material, namely, Prolene, which can present in a delayed basis. Symptomatology can be vague but has typical allergic characteristics. Multidisciplinary approach is helpful with confirmatory skin testing as a vital part of the workup. PMID:26798347

  13. The first account of a bite by the New Zealand native spider Trite planiceps (Araneae: Salticidae).

    PubMed

    Derraik, José G B; Sirvid, Phil J; Rademaker, Marius

    2010-05-14

    New Zealand has very few arthropods that pose a threat to human health. While most New Zealand spiders are considered harmless, the bite effects of most species are unknown. Here, we describe a case of a bite by a native spider, in which a young man was bitten after rolling over in his bed. The spider was collected and identified as Trite planiceps (Salticidae, black headed jumping spider), a native species commonly encountered around homes. The initial reaction was a relatively painful, sting-like, sensation, followed by the appearance of two red puncture marks and an urticarial wheal. Symptoms eventually disappeared after 72 hours, and he has had no further dermatological problems. Trite planiceps is considered to be a rather docile spider with regard to humans, but even a docile species may still bite defensively as a last resort. Notes on this species and on treatment of spider bites are provided. PMID:20581919

  14. Refractory case of adrenergic urticaria successfully treated with clotiazepam.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yukari; Gokita, Mari; Fukunaga, Atsushi; Nishigori, Chikako

    2015-06-01

    Adrenergic urticaria (AU) is a rare type of stress-induced physical urticaria characterized by widespread pruritic urticarial papules. Diagnosis can be made by i.d. injection of adrenaline or noradrenaline, which produces the characteristic rash. Although the lesions of AU typically respond to beta-blockers such as propranolol, the therapeutic options for AU are limited. Here, we report a case of AU that was resistant to beta-blockers and successfully treated with clotiazepam. The clinical picture of AU resembles that of cholinergic urticaria (CU), however, positive noradrenaline test and negative acetylcholine skin test were useful for the differential diagnosis of AU and CU. Although his symptoms were resistant to several therapeutic methods including olopatadine (H1 antagonist), lafutidine (H2 antagonist) and propranolol, the severity and frequency of his attacks and his subjective symptoms were reduced by oral clotiazepam, an anxiolytic benzodiazepine. Dermatologists should be aware that anxiolytic benzodiazepines may be a therapeutic option in AU. PMID:25810001

  15. Primary prevention of latex allergy in healthcare-spectrum of strategies including the European glove standardization.

    PubMed

    Wrangsjö, Karin; Boman, Anders; Lidén, Carola; Meding, Birgitta

    2012-04-01

    IgE-mediated allergy to natural rubber latex was first noted from rubber gloves in 1979. The initial reports in dermatological journals described contact urticarial reactions; later, severe generalized allergic reactions and asthma were documented. A considerable proportion of the people involved in medical and dental care were found to be sensitized to latex. This article describes and surveys a broad range of primary prevention measures at the local and national levels. Examples are given from paediatrics, dental education, and medical care. National strategies and position papers on latex allergy are presented in which medical professionals, manufacturers and public authorities have cooperated. Special reference is paid to the European work to standardize medical gloves, which led to document EN 455:3. PMID:22404191

  16. Allergy to Prolene Sutures in a Dural Graft for Chiari Decompression.

    PubMed

    Cajigas, Iahn; Burks, S Shelby; Gernsback, Joanna; Fine, Lauren; Moshiree, Baharak; Levi, Allan D

    2015-01-01

    Allergy to Prolene suture is exceedingly rare with only 5 cases reported in the literature. There have been no such cases associated with neurosurgical procedures. Diagnosis is nearly always delayed in spite of persistent symptomatology. A 27-year-old girl with suspected Ehlers-Danlos, connective tissue disorder, underwent posterior fossa decompression for Chiari Type 1 malformation. One year later, the patient presented with urticarial rash from the neck to chest. Cerebrospinal fluid and blood testing, magnetic resonance imaging, and intraoperative exploration did not suggest allergic reaction. Eventually skin testing proved specific Prolene allergy. After suture material was removed, the patient no longer complained of pruritus or rash. This single case highlights the important entity of allergic reaction to suture material, namely, Prolene, which can present in a delayed basis. Symptomatology can be vague but has typical allergic characteristics. Multidisciplinary approach is helpful with confirmatory skin testing as a vital part of the workup. PMID:26798347

  17. Bedbugs and Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Véronique; Del Giudice, Pascal; Levy-Bencheton, Anna; Chosidow, Olivier; Marty, Pierre; Brouqui, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Bedbugs are brown and flat hematophagous insects. The 2 cosmopolite species, Cimex lectularius and Cimex hemipterus, feed on humans and/or domestic animals, and recent outbreaks have been reported in occidental countries. Site assessment for bedbug eradication is complex but can be assured, despite emerging insecticide resistance, by hiring a pest-control manager. The common dermatological presentation of bites is an itchy maculopapular wheal. Urticarial reactions and anaphylaxis can also occur. Bedbugs are suspected of transmitting infectious agents, but no report has yet demonstrated that they are infectious disease vectors. We describe 45 candidate pathogens potentially transmitted by bedbugs, according to their vectorial capacity, in the wild, and vectorial competence, in the laboratory. Because of increasing demands for information about effective control tactics and public health risks of bedbugs, continued research is needed to identify new pathogens in wild Cimex species (spp) and insecticide resistance. PMID:21288844

  18. Myocardial infarction associated with eosinophilia and plasma extravasation at multiple sites. A variant of Kounis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gunawardena, Mudalige Don Vajira Malin; Weerasinghe, Anura; Herath, Jagath; Amarasena, Naomali

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial infarction occurring during the course of type I hypersensitivity constitutes Kounis syndrome. We report a case of a 38-year-old man who presented with anterior ST elevation myocardial infarction and peripheral blood eosinophilia. He had rhinitis and malaise for several days prior to presentation. There was no urticarial rash or pruritus to suggest hypersensitivity. Coronary angiogram revealed only mild plaque disease. Blood investigations revealed moderate eosinophilia and elevated IgE levels. CT of the thorax revealed fluid extravasation at multiple sites. Screening for a possible secondary cause for eosinophilia revealed hypersensitivity to multiple antigens. A diagnosis of Kounis syndrome was made. Within days of starting steroids and antihistamines, the patient's eosinophil count returned to normal with improvement of clinical picture. This case differs from classical Kounis syndrome as there was no acute allergic reaction (except atopic rhinitis). Fluid extravasation at multiple sites has not been described in previous cases. PMID:25608982

  19. Immediate skin and mucosal symptoms from pot plants and vegetables in gardeners and greenhouse workers.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, E; Skov, P S; Andersen, K E

    1998-10-01

    Short-lived occupational skin symptoms of irritant or urticarial nature were commonly reported among 253 attendants in a clinical study on occupational dermatitis in Danish gardeners and greenhouse workers. Aimed prick or scratch-patch testing for immediate skin and mucosal symptoms was performed in 105 persons with plants as is. 35 persons (33%) had at least 1 positive reaction and a family history of, or personal, atopy was significantly more prevalent among these compared to attendants with negative reactions. Positive histamine release tests made immunologic etiology probable in Schlumbergera cacti, Stephanotis floribunda, Euphorbia pulcherrima and Gerbera reactions. Other new species implicated in immediate-type reactions included Ficus pumila, Gardenia jasminoides, Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, Campanula, Columnea, Epipremnum aureum, Pelargonium and Primula vulgaris. Because of the high prevalence of short-lived skin symptoms and because contact urticaria may present itself as a dermatitis, it is recommended that one supplement patch tests with tests for immediate reactions. PMID:9817221

  20. Hymenoptera Anaphylaxis and C-kit Mutations: An Unexpected Association.

    PubMed

    Bonadonna, Patrizia; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Lombardo, Carla; Zanotti, Roberta

    2015-08-01

    Clinical manifestations of mastocytosis in adults comprise signs and symptoms linked to mast cell (MC) activation, including anaphylaxis. Depending on MC burden, adults can be diagnosed with systemic mastocytosis, when the WHO criteria are fulfilled, or with other clonal MC disorders, characterized by MC mediator symptoms and demonstration of activating KIT mutations and/or expression of CD25 on MCs. There is a specific link between mastocytosis and hymenoptera venom allergy (HVA): the reported frequency of HVA in mastocytosis is 20-50 % and raises to 60-80 % in patients affected by indolent systemic mastocytosis without skin lesions. The presentation of HVA characterized by severe hypotension in the absence of urticarial or angioedema is typical in patient with an underlying MC disorder, even in the presence of normal baseline serum tryptase levels. PMID:26149588

  1. Wegener’s granulomatosis mimicking inflammatory bowel disease and presenting with chronic enteritis

    PubMed Central

    Shahedi, Kamyar; Hanna, Ramy Magdy; Melamed, Oleg; Wilson, James

    2013-01-01

    Wegener’s granulomatosis, also known as anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, is a small vessel vasculitis with primarily pulmonary, renal, and sinus disease manifestations. The prevalence of Wegener’s granulomatosis is three cases per 100,000 patients. Cardiovascular, neurologic, cutaneous, and joint manifestations have been reported in many case reports and case series. Gastrointestinal manifestations are less noted in Wegener’s granulomatosis, although they have been previously reported in the form of intestinal perforation and intestinal ischemia. Additionally, there are characteristic findings of vasculitis that are noted with active Wegener’s granulomatosis of the small bowel. We report a case of an elderly patient who presented with weight loss, diarrhea, and hematochezia. His symptoms were chronic and had lasted for more than 1 year before diagnosis. Inflammatory bowel disease or chronic enteritis due to Salmonella arizonae because of reptile exposure originally were suspected as etiologies of his presentation. The findings of proteinuria, renal failure, and pauci-immune glomerulonephritis on renal biopsy, in conjunction with an elevated c-ANCA titer, confirmed the diagnosis of Wegener’s granulomatosis with associated intestinal vasculitis. This case demonstrates an atypical presentation of chronic duodenitis and jejunitis secondary to Wegener’s granulomatosis, which mimicked inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:24124396

  2. [What's new in internal medicine?].

    PubMed

    Doutre, M-S

    2013-11-01

    In this paper based on a review of medical articles from September 2012 to September 2013, new data were selected about IgG4-related disease, connections between vitamin D and systemic lupus erythematosus, revised nomenclature of vasculitis, effects of salt on autoimmunity, new autoinflammatory syndromes and some diseases as systemic sclerosis and thrombangiitis obliterans. PMID:24365498

  3. Cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa*

    PubMed Central

    Matteoda, María Alejandra; Stefano, Paola Cecilia; Bocián, Marcela; Katsicas, María Marta; Sala, Josefina; Cervini, Andrea Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa is a rare vasculitis in children characterized by necrotizing inflammation in small and medium size arteries. It is classified into systemic and cutaneous PAN according to the presence of systemic symptoms or visceral involvement. We describe the case of a 14-year-old girl with cutaneous Polyarteritis nodosa with an atypical clinical presentation. PMID:26312712

  4. Behcet's Disease: New Concepts in Cardiovascular Involvements and Future Direction for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Owlia, M. B.; Mehrpoor, G.

    2012-01-01

    Behcet's disease (BD) is the only systemic vasculitis involving both arteries and vein in any sizes. It frequently encounters in rheumatology clinics. It has some major morbidities and even fatal outcomes in some cases. The aim of this paper is to analyze the main concepts on pathophysiology and treatment options in BD, focusing on cardiovascular aspects, thrombosis, and potential future treatment. PMID:22530146

  5. [An unusual course in hairy-cell leukemia with marked abdominal lymphadenopathy, leukemic infiltration of the cornea and skin changes].

    PubMed

    Zák, P; Chrobák, L; Podzimek, K; Hejcmanová, D; Voglová, J; Dulícek, P; Mirová, S

    1996-07-01

    The authors describe a female patient suffering from hairy-cell leukaemia. Already at the onset of the disease, apart from marked splenomegaly, sonography revealed marked retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy. During the subsequent course skin changes developed such as vasculitis and leukaemic infiltrates of the cornea on both eyes. The patient was successfully treated with 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine (2-CdA, Leustatin). PMID:8928422

  6. Takayasu's arteritis presenting with focal periostitis affecting two limbs.

    PubMed

    Kim, J E; Kolh, E M; Kim, D K

    1998-12-31

    Takayasu's arteritis (TA) is a vasculitis of large and medium sized arteries. Involvement of bone in TA is very rare. We report a case of young woman who presented with multiple painful bone lesions which were identified as periostitis with new bone formation associated with TA. Our case is unique in that bony involvement in TA could occur independent of vascular stenosis. PMID:9894711

  7. Cutaneous pseudovasculitis.

    PubMed

    Carlson, J Andrew; Chen, Ko-Ron

    2007-02-01

    Cutaneous pseudovasculitis represents a heterogeneous collection of disorders that are capable of simulating cutaneous vasculitis and can be broadly classified into diseases that produce hemorrhage (petechiae, purpura, and ecchymoses) or vessel occlusion with resultant livedo, cyanosis, ulcers, digital necrosis, and/or gangrene. Overlap is not uncommon, but if present, one mechanism dominates. Hemorrhagic pseudovasculitis is due to vessel wall dysfunction (incompetence), which can be related to diverse factors that include vessel wall deposition of metabolic substances (amyloid, calcium), nutritional deficiencies (scurvy), nonvasculitic inflammatory purpura (pigmented purpuric dermatitis, arthropod, viral and drug reactions), degeneration of the vessel wall and supporting stroma (senile/solar purpura), direct vessel wall invasion of infective organisms, coagulation-fibrinolytic disorders (eg, thrombocytopenia), and vessel wall trauma. Cyanotic-infarctive pseudovasculitis is due vaso-occlusion by emboli, thrombi, or fibrointimal hyperplasia (endarteritis obliterans) and includes varied conditions such as purpura fulminans, Coumadin necrosis, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, cardiac myxoma, cholesterol embolization, calciphylaxis, and radiation arteritis. Delayed and inappropriate diagnosis of pseudovasculitis leads to incorrect management and exposure to potentially deleterious treatment modalities such as corticosteroids and cytotoxic agents. The diagnosis of a pseudovasculitic disorder requires a high index of suspicion and should always be part of the differential diagnosis of vasculitis. Skin biopsy is a crucial step in differentiating pseudovasculitis from authentic vasculitis; absence of histologic evidence of vasculitis, particularly after multiple biopsies, should direct evaluation and diagnosis towards pseudovasculitis. PMID:17284961

  8. Amphetamine abuse and intracranial haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, N; McConachie, N S

    2000-01-01

    Amphetamines taken by any route can cause cerebral vasculitis and intracranial haemorrhage. 8 cases were seen in a neurosurgical unit over 3.5 years. The published work indicates that those who experience these complications, mainly young adults, have poor outcomes. PMID:11089483

  9. Toxocariasis after slug ingestion characterized by severe neurologic, ocular, and pulmonary involvement.

    PubMed

    Fellrath, Jean-Marc; Magnaval, Jean-François

    2014-09-01

    Human toxocariasis is generally a benign, self-curing disease, and neurologic involvement is quite exceptional. In this study, we report a case of toxocariasis caused by ingestion of an unusual transport host, namely live slugs. The clinical picture comprised eosinophilic lung involvement with severe neurologic disorders in relation to vasculitis as well as retinal detachment. PMID:25734133

  10. Atrial myxoma masquerading as Takayasu’s arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Kenneth; Edmondson, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Lesson We describe the case of a 48-year-old woman whose atrial myxoma was mistaken for vasculitis. The case report highlights the reasons why these two disorders may become confused, the dangers of initiating the wrong treatment and a simple means of avoiding misdiagnosis. PMID:25408917

  11. Panniculitis caused by Mycobacterium monacense mimicking erythema induratum: a case in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Romero, J.J.; Herrera, P.; Cartelle, M.; Barba, P.; Tello, S.; Zurita, J.

    2016-01-01

    We report the first case of recently characterized species M. monacense associated with chronic nodular vasculitis, infecting a young woman. This case represents the first isolation of M. monacense from Ecuador. The isolate was identified by conventional and molecular techniques. PMID:26933504

  12. Glomerular disease in 2014: advances in basic science and translational medicine.

    PubMed

    Fervenza, Fernando C; Sethi, Sanjeev

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge of the pathogenesis of glomerular disease and approaches to therapy continued to advance in 2014. Key studies identified thrombospondin type-1 domain-containing protein 7A as an antigenic target in primary membranous nephropathy, and demonstrated efficacy of rituximab as maintenance therapy in relapsing or steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis. PMID:25584803

  13. [The morphological characteristics of the lung lesions in straighteners working with brass-bronze alloys].

    PubMed

    Voznesenskiĭ, N K; Khorobrykh, V G; Chicherina, E N

    1995-01-01

    Morphologic study of lung specimens obtained during diagnostic thoractomy in 6 workers engaged in smelting brass-bronze alloys showed changes typical of exogenous fibrosing alveolitis, namely, terminal bronchiolitis with pseudopolypous growth in the submucous layer, vasculitis (predominantly arteritis) paralleled by secondary recalibration of vessels, arteriolar and venular shunting, and microcirculatory disorders. PMID:8666301

  14. Alopecia areata and humpy-back syndrome in suckling piglets.

    PubMed

    Drolet, Richard; Denicourt, Martine; D'Allaire, Sylvie

    2012-08-01

    This report describes an uncommon variant of humpy-back syndrome associated with multiple rib fractures and multisystemic vasculitis in several nursing piglets and, for the first time, a skin disease in swine consistent with alopecia areata. Both conditions were observed concurrently on the farm and occasionally in the same piglets. PMID:23372194

  15. Giant cell arteritis: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Calvo Romero, J M

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis is the most common primary systemic vasculitis in adults. The condition is granulomatous arteritis of large and medium vessels, which occurs almost exclusively in patients aged 50 years or more. This article reviews the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. PMID:25957859

  16. Etiopathogenesis of Behcet's disease.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Pinto, Claudia; García-Carrasco, Mario; Jiménez-Hernández, Mario; Jiménez Hernández, Cesar; Riebeling-Navarro, Carlos; Nava Zavala, Arnulfo; Vera Recabarren, Mauricio; Espinosa, Gerard; Jara Quezada, Javier; Cervera, Ricard

    2010-02-01

    Bechet's disease (BD) is an inflammatory, multi systemic disease with spontaneous remissions and relapses similar to various autoimmune diseases. BD leads to organ damage, including the eyes, skin, joints, etc., which produces various clinical manifestations. The central histopathologic characteristic is systemic vasculitis with perivascular inflammatory infiltrates. The etiopathogenesis is unknown, although immunological abnormalities, possibly induced by susceptible microbiological pathogens, have been postulated. PMID:19879978

  17. Comparison of PR3-ANCA and MPO-ANCA Epitope Specificity upon Disease Relapse

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND Relapse is a major clinical problem in ANCA vasculitis that causes increased morbidity and mortality. Compared to MPO-ANCA patients, patients with PR3-ANCA run a significantly increased risk of experiencing relapses. We hypothesized that a relapsing patient is produ...

  18. Toxocariasis After Slug Ingestion Characterized by Severe Neurologic, Ocular, and Pulmonary Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Fellrath, Jean-Marc; Magnaval, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Human toxocariasis is generally a benign, self-curing disease, and neurologic involvement is quite exceptional. In this study, we report a case of toxocariasis caused by ingestion of an unusual transport host, namely live slugs. The clinical picture comprised eosinophilic lung involvement with severe neurologic disorders in relation to vasculitis as well as retinal detachment. PMID:25734133

  19. Multiorgan dysfunction syndrome secondary to joint supplement overdosage in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Nobles, Irma J.; Khan, Safdar

    2015-01-01

    A 5-year-old spayed female Bernese mountain dog, with a chief complaint of vomiting and melena ingested approximately 200 nutritional joint supplement tablets. Despite aggressive therapy, the patient developed a coagulopathy, pancreatitis, peritonitis, acute kidney injury, and was euthanized. Postmortem examination revealed myocardial necrosis, pneumonia, centrilobular hemorrhage and necrosis of the liver, vasculitis, and acute tubular necrosis. PMID:25829554

  20. Spinal arachnoiditis and cyst formation with subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Abhinav, Kumar; Bradley, Marcus; Aquilina, Kristian; Patel, Nikunj K

    2012-08-01

    We present the case of a 58-year-old lady with p-ANCA vasculitis who suffered a WFNS grade 1 subarachnoid haemorrhage (Fisher grade 1) secondary to a ruptured left posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm and then developed a rare complication of radiologically progressive spinal arachnoiditis despite maintained clinical response to definitive treatment measures. PMID:22299598

  1. [Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody(ANCA)].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masaharu

    2003-07-01

    ANCA are associated with small sized vessel vasculitis; one subtype is an antibody against myeloperoxidase(MPO), which stains in a perinuclear pattern(P-ANCA) indirect immunofluorescence(IIF) using a neutrophil substrate, and the other subtype is an antibody against proteinase-3(PR-3), which stains in a diffuse granular cytoplasmic pattern ANCA by IIF. PR-3 ANCA is more specific in Wegener's granulomatosis(WG) than the other primary vasculitides. MPO-ANCA can be found in microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), Churg Strauss Syndromes(CSS), drug-induced vasculitis, and environmental factor-induced such as silicosis vasculitis more frequently than WG. The value of the IIF test for ANCA detection can be greatly increased by the addition of a standardized antigen-specific ELISA. The intra-assay and inter-assay CV of the MPO and PR-3 ELISA were 6.6 to 4.8%, respectively. Close ANCA titer correlation was shown between MPO-ANCA ELISA and the activity of ANCA associated vasculitis. Renal manifestations and pulmonary manifestations are observed in 70-90% of AAV as the initial manifestation. The changes in titers of ANCA seem to reflect disease activity in 60-70% of AAV patients. A combination of steroids and immunosuppressive drugs is effective in relieving the clinical symptoms of AAV. PMID:12924248

  2. Textbook of rheumatology

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.A.; Wise, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 23 papers. Some of the titles are: Diagnostic Radiology in the Rheumatic Diseases; Laboratory Testing in Rheumatology; Arthritis Nursing and the Team Approach in the Management of Rheumatic Disease; The Surgical Management of Arthritis; Vasculities; Neoplasms of Bone and Joints; and Rheumatic Disease of Childhood.

  3. Urinary retention secondary to acute vasculitic penile swelling in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Nicholas; Black, John; Gupta, Ashish

    2016-03-01

    Acute urinary retention secondary to vasculitic penile swelling in children is extremely rare. Henoch-Schönlein purpura is a self-limiting IgA-mediated cutaneous vasculitis, which can cause soft tissue edema. Acute urinary retention requires urgent intervention to prevent obstructive uropathy. Suprapubic catheterization provides an effective management strategy in the emergency setting. PMID:27014447

  4. Naturally occurring sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever in North American pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two cases of sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) in pigs were diagnosed on a small farm in New York State, and in Kentucky, U.S.A. In both cases initial diagnosis was based on histopathological changes representing typical lymphoproliferative vasculitis in multiple tissues of the affect...

  5. 38 CFR 4.115b - Ratings of the genitourinary system-diagnoses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitis, or other systemic disease processes. Rate as renal dysfunction... predominant symptoms as renal dysfunction, hypertension or heart disease. If rated under the cardiovascular... removal of one testis as the result of a service-incurred injury or disease, other than an undescended...

  6. Phenomics in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Healthy Volunteer; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Ankylosing Spondylitis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus/Antiphospholipid Syndrome; FMF; Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes /TNF-receptor Associated Periodic Syndrome; Vasculitis; Uveitis; Myositis; Crohn's Disease; Ulcerative Rectocolitis; Type 1 Diabetes; Unclassified IAD Knee and/or Hip Arthritis, Muscular Dystrophy

  7. Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients With Life Threatening Autoimmune Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2005-06-23

    Purpura, Schoenlein-Henoch; Graft Versus Host Disease; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Churg-Strauss Syndrome; Hypersensitivity Vasculitis; Wegener's Granulomatosis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Giant Cell Arteritis; Pure Red Cell Aplasia; Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis; Polyarteritis Nodosa; Autoimmune Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Takayasu Arteritis

  8. Bilateral borderzone brain infarctions in association with heroin abuse.

    PubMed

    Niehaus, L; Meyer, B U

    1998-10-01

    A 25-year-old drug abuser who developed an unusual pattern of cerebral ischemic lesions is presented. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral borderzone infarctions which were attributed to a heroin-associated vasculitis of the basal cerebral arteries. Under probatory corticosteroid medication the mild neurological deficits completely disappeared. PMID:9849803

  9. Anthrax vaccine associated deaths in miniature horses.

    PubMed

    Wobeser, Bruce K

    2015-04-01

    During a widespread anthrax outbreak in Canada, miniature horses were vaccinated using a live spore anthrax vaccine. Several of these horses died from an apparent immune-mediated vasculitis temporally associated with this vaccination. During the course of the outbreak, other miniature horses from different regions with a similar vaccination history, clinical signs, and necropsy findings were found. PMID:25829553

  10. BRIEF REPORT: ODOCOILEUS HEMIONUS DEER ADENOVIRUS IS RELATED TO THE MEMBERS OF ATADENOVIRUS GENUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Odocoileus hemionus deer adenovirus (OdAdV-1) causes systemic and local vasculitis and proves extremely lethal for mule deer. To characterize the virus, part of the genome flanking the fiber gene was cloned and sequenced. The sequence revealed two open-reading frames that mapped to pVIII hexon...

  11. OVINE HERPESVIRUS 2 MRNA EXPRESSION IN CATTLE AND BISON WITH MALIGNANT CATARRHAL FEVER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a fulminant disease of certain susceptible ruminants caused by ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2). The characteristic lesions of MCF include lymphoproliferation, vasculitis and mucosal ulceration. The pathogenesis of these lesions is very poorly understood, but is most ...

  12. Acute-phase response in chronic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Kasperska-Zajac, A

    2012-06-01

    The patterns of acute-phase response (APR) biomarkers differ upon various inflammatory conditions. Little information is available on the systemic inflammatory response in urticaria/angio-oedema. It has been shown that concentrations of circulating APR biomarkers, IL-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP), are elevated more in severe chronic urticaria (CU) than in patients showing milder urticarial symptoms. It is not clear whether the increase of IL-6 and CRP is merely an epiphenomenon or may contribute to the pathogenesis of CU. It is tempting to speculate that mediators of APR may enhance urticarial inflammation. In addition, there is some association between APR and activation of coagulation/fibrinolysis in CU. It is well known that even slight elevation in CRP baseline concentration is enough to produce significant increase in cardiovascular risk. In this light, one should ask whether CU patients, in particular those showing stronger systemic inflammatory response and long-lasting course are more vulnerable to the cardiovascular events. Apart from highly troublesome symptoms and low quality of life, CU may then involve some remote, serious systemic consequences. Taken together, CU can be identified as a mast cell- and basophil-dependent inflammatory disorder of the skin, which is accompanied by APR. Characterization of APR in CU may appear essential for an insight into the activity of this disease and for assessment of the inflammation degree. Moreover, measurement of these biomarkers might be particularly relevant while assessing CU patients demanding an anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive therapy. This review summarizes information regarding APR in the course of urticaria/angio-oedema. PMID:22118494

  13. Churg-Strauss syndrome.

    PubMed

    Greco, Antonio; Rizzo, Maria Ida; De Virgilio, Armando; Gallo, Andrea; Fusconi, Massimo; Ruoppolo, Giovanni; Altissimi, Giancarlo; De Vincentiis, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS), alternatively known as eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA), was first described in 1951 by Churg and Strauss as a rare disease characterized by disseminated necrotizing vasculitis with extravascular granulomas occurring exclusively among patients with asthma and tissue eosinophilia. EGPA is classified as a small-vessel vasculitis associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) and the hypereosinophilic syndromes (HESs) in which vessel inflammation and eosinophilic proliferation are thought to contribute to organ damage. Although still considered an idiopathic condition, EGPA is classically considered a Th2-mediated disease. Emerging clinical observations provide compelling evidence that ANCAs are primarily and directly involved in the pathogenesis of AASVs, although recent evidence implicates B cells and the humoral response as further contributors to EGPA pathogenesis. EGPA has traditionally been described as evolving through a prodromic phase characterized by asthma and rhino-sinusitis, an eosinophilic phase marked by peripheral eosinophilia and organ involvement, and a vasculitic phase with clinical manifestations due to small-vessel vasculitis. The American College of Rheumatology defined the classification criteria to distinguish the different types of vasculitides and identified six criteria for EGPA. When four or more of these criteria are met, vasculitis can be classified as EGPA. The French Vasculitis Study Group has identified five prognostic factors that make up the so-called five-factor score (FFS). Patients without poor prognosis factors (FFS=0) have better survival rates than patients with poor prognosis factors (FFS≥1). The treatment of patients with CSS must be tailored to individual patients according to the presence of poor prognostic factors. A combination of high-dose corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide is still the gold standard for the treatment of severe cases, but the use of biological agents such as rituximab or mepolizumab seems to be a promising therapeutic alternative. PMID:25500434

  14. State of the Art in the Treatment of Systemic Vasculitides

    PubMed Central

    Luqmani, Raashid Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA) are associated with small vessel vasculitides (AASV) affecting the lungs and kidneys. Structured clinical assessment using the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score and Vasculitis Damage Index should form the basis of a treatment plan and be used to document progress, including relapse. Severe disease with organ or life threatening manifestations needs cyclophosphamide or rituximab, plus high dose glucocorticoids, followed by lower dose steroid plus azathioprine, or methotrexate. Additional plasmapheresis is effective for very severe disease, reducing dialysis dependence from 60 to 40% in the first year, but with no effect on mortality or long-term renal function, probably due to established renal damage. In milder forms of ANCA-associated vasculitis, methotrexate, leflunomide, or mycophenolate mofetil are effective. Mortality depends on initial severity: 25% in patients with renal failure or severe lung hemorrhage; 6% for generalized non-life threatening AASV but rising to 30–40% at 5 years. Mortality from GPA is four times higher than the background population. Early deaths are due to active vasculitis and infection. Subsequent deaths are more often due to cardiovascular events, infection, and cancer. We need to improve the long-term outcome, by controlling disease activity but also preventing damage and drug toxicity. By contrast, in large vessel vasculitis where mortality is much less but morbidity potentially greater, such as giant cell arteritis (GCA) and Takayasu arteritis, therapeutic options are limited. High dose glucocorticoid results in significant toxicity in over 80%. Advances in understanding the biology of the vasculitides are improving therapies. Novel, mechanism based therapies such as rituximab in AASV, mepolizumab in eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and tocilizumab in GCA, but the lack of reliable biomarkers remains a challenge to progress in these chronic relapsing diseases. PMID:25352843

  15. The pathology of large-vessel vasculitides.

    PubMed

    Miller, Dylan V; Maleszewski, Joseph J

    2011-01-01

    Vasculitis affecting large elastic arteries, including the aorta and major proximal branches, encompasses various diseases including Takayasu arteritis, giant cell (or temporal) arteritis, and tertiary syphilis, but also may occur as a rare complication of Behçet's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, sarcoidosis, Cogan syndrome, Kawasaki disease, ankylosing spondylitis, systemic lupus erythematosus and Wegener's granulomatosis. Recent reports have also established a link between inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm as well as lymphoplasmacytic thoracic aortitis with an overabundance of IgG4-producing plasma cells and the burgeoning constellation of 'Hyper-IgG4' syndromes. This review focuses on morphologic aspects of large-vessel vasculitis pathology associated with giant cell arteritis, Takayasu arteritis, idiopathic or isolated aortitis, lymphoplasmacytic thoracic and ascending aortitis, and the inflammatory aneurysm/retroperitoneal fibrosis syndrome. PMID:21586202

  16. Utility of FDG PET/CT in inflammatory cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    James, Olga G; Christensen, Jared D; Wong, Terence Z; Borges-Neto, Salvador; Koweek, Lynne M

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory disorders of the cardiovascular system can affect the myocardium, pericardium, or vessel walls. Patients with myocardial and pericardial disease may present with chest pain, palpitations, and shortness of breath, symptoms resembling myocardial ischemia or infarction. The manifestations of vasculitis may include fever, weight loss, and fatigue, mimicking infectious or malignant processes. Because of the difficulty of differentiating these disease processes, patients frequently undergo multiple diagnostic examinations before obtaining a final diagnosis of myocarditis, pericarditis, or vasculitis. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging play important roles in the assessment of structural abnormalities of the cardiovascular system, and combined positron emission tomography (PET) and CT may depict inflammatory processes before structural changes occur. Familiarity with the PET/CT appearances of inflammatory processes in the myocardium, pericardium, and vessels is important for accurate and prompt diagnosis. PMID:21918044

  17. Behçet's pulmonary artery aneurysms treated with infliximab and monitored with the 6-min walk test.

    PubMed

    Kotecha, Jalpa; Kamath, Ajay V; Mukhtyar, Chetan

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary involvement in Behçet's disease (BD) is uncommon; however, it is potentially fatal due to the risk of massive haemoptysis. We describe the case of a 36-year-old male presenting with a 2-month history of worsening dyspnoea, weight loss, haemoptysis, oral ulceration, erythema nodosum and superficial thrombophlebitis. He was diagnosed with pulmonary vasculitis secondary to BD; however, his symptoms were refractory to initial treatment with cyclophosphamide, azathioprine and prednisolone. We therefore trialled infliximab alongside methotrexate, which led to a remarkable improvement in his condition, enabling eventual discontinuation of prednisolone. Whilst not being one of the treatments currently recommended for managing pulmonary involvement in BD, infliximab has previously been successfully used in cases refractory to conventional therapy. We used the 6-min walk test (distance covered and lowest oxygen saturations) to monitor his progress, which correlated with his symptoms. This may represent a useful adjunct in monitoring the activity of pulmonary vasculitis. PMID:27123312

  18. Acute necrotizing large vessel arteritis in a newborn: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hejazi, Arya; Hosseini, Marzieh; Bahrani, Mohammadreza

    2013-06-01

    Acute arteritis of the aorta and the main pulmonary arteries is unusual in a newborn. This type of vasculitis should be described as a separate entity. There are many differences between this entity and polyarteritis nodosa or Takayasu disease. Moreover, neither Takayasu disease nor polyarteritis nodosa and other forms of classic primary large vessels vasculitis have been reported in a neonate until now. The presence of chronic inflammation, fibrosis, and calcification would suggest that this process had been present before birth.We report a 27-day-old newborn with acute necrotizing aortitis. The feature of this entity is not those of any of the classic entities described in infants or children. PMID:23629409

  19. Toe Amputation After Minor Surgery in a Patient with Behçet's Disease: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Özalp, Burhan; Akcay, Cemal; Aydinol, Mustafa; Selçuk, Caferi Tayyar

    2016-01-01

    Behçet's disease is a systemic autoimmune vasculitis. Although various clinical findings can be observed depending on the pathologic features caused by the blood vessels involved, the classic triad of the disease includes oral aphthae, genital ulcers, and uveitis. Although complications involving the aorta or the vena cava inferior can prove fatal, thrombophlebitis in the superficial veins of the lower extremities are more commonly observed. Some patients can remain asymptomatic for a long period after the diagnosis. In patients with positive pathergy test findings, trauma can trigger the inflammatory cascade. This case report presents a patient with vasculitis that occurred subsequent to minor surgery and led to amputation of the great toe in a female patient with a 14-year old history of Behçet's disease. PMID:26483163

  20. ITPKC functional polymorphism associated with Kawasaki disease susceptibility and formation of coronary artery aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Onouchi, Yoshihiro; Gunji, Tomohiko; Burns, Jane C; Shimizu, Chisato; Newburger, Jane W; Yashiro, Mayumi; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Yanagawa, Hiroshi; Wakui, Keiko; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Kishi, Fumio; Hamamoto, Kunihiro; Terai, Masaru; Sato, Yoshitake; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Saji, Tsutomu; Nariai, Akiyoshi; Kaburagi, Yoichi; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Suzuki, Kyoko; Tanaka, Takeo; Nagai, Toshiro; Cho, Hideo; Fujino, Akihiro; Sekine, Akihiro; Nakamichi, Reiichiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Kawasaki, Tomisaku; Nakamura, Yusuke; Hata, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Kawasaki disease is a pediatric systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology for which a genetic influence is suspected. We identified a functional SNP (itpkc_3) in the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate 3-kinase C (ITPKC) gene on chromosome 19q13.2 that is significantly associated with Kawasaki disease susceptibility and also with an increased risk of coronary artery lesions in both Japanese and US children. Transfection experiments showed that the C allele of itpkc_3 reduces splicing efficiency of the ITPKC mRNA. ITPKC acts as a negative regulator of T-cell activation through the Ca2+/NFAT signaling pathway, and the C allele may contribute to immune hyper-reactivity in Kawasaki disease. This finding provides new insights into the mechanisms of immune activation in Kawasaki disease and emphasizes the importance of activated T cells in the pathogenesis of this vasculitis. PMID:18084290

  1. Do neutrophil extracellular traps contribute to the heightened risk of thrombosis in inflammatory diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Ashish N; Kazzaz, Nayef M; Knight, Jason S

    2015-01-01

    Thrombotic events, both arterial and venous, are a major health concern worldwide. Further, autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, and antiphospholipid syndrome, predispose to thrombosis, and thereby push the risk for these morbid events even higher. In recent years, neutrophils have been identified as important players in both arterial and venous thrombosis. Specifically, chromatin-based structures called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) play a key role in activating the coagulation cascade, recruiting platelets, and serving as scaffolding upon which the thrombus can be assembled. At the same time, neutrophils and NETs are emerging as important mediators of pathogenic inflammation in the aforementioned autoimmune diseases. Here, we first review the general role of NETs in thrombosis. We then posit that exaggerated NET release contributes to the prothrombotic diatheses of systemic lupus erythematosus, ANCA-associated vasculitis, and antiphospholipid syndrome. PMID:26730289

  2. ANCA-Negative Wegener's Granulomatosis with Multiple Lower Cranial Nerve Palsies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Hee; Park, Jin; Bae, Jung Ho; Cho, Min-Sun; Park, Kee Duk

    2013-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is a systemic vasculitis affecting small and medium-sized vessels with granulomatous formation. Though it is known for respiratory tract and kidney involvement, neurologic manifestation has been also reported. Herein we report a patient who suffered pansinusitis with multiple lower cranial nerve palsies but reached remission by immunosuppressant after the diagnosis of WG. A 54-yr-old female visited with headache, hearing difficulty, and progressive bulbar symptoms. She experienced endoscopic sinus surgeries due to refractory sinusitis. Neurologic examination revealed multiple lower cranial nerve palsies. Vasculitic markers showed no abnormality. Nasal biopsy revealed granulomatous inflammation and vasculitis involving small vessels. Given cyclophosphamide and prednisolone, her symptoms were prominently improved. WG should be considered in the patient with multiple cranial nerve palsies, especially those with paranasal sinus disease. Because WG can be lethal if delayed in treatment, prompt immunosuppressant is warranted after the diagnostic tissue biopsy. PMID:24265538

  3. Neurorickettsioses: A Rare Presentation with Stroke in a Young Adult

    PubMed Central

    K, Pramod

    2014-01-01

    Acute stroke-like presentations due to rickettsial infections have been sparsely reported in literature. We report a young patient who presented with high grade fever and acute encephalopathy with right hemiplegia. CT head showed left cerebral, bilateral thalamic and midbrain infarcts. The stroke in young work-up for conventional and non-conventional risk factors including few infections known to cause cerebral vasculitis was negative. He did not respond to empirical antimalarials and antibiotics. With a high index of suspicion of his febrile cerebrovasculitis like presentation, serological test for rickettsia was done and found to be positive. He responded to doxycycline. This case expands the spectrum of presentation of neurorickettsioses and highlights the importance of considering rickettsial vasculitis as one of the potentially treatable causes of infections causing stroke. PMID:25478386

  4. Stroke in Henoch-Schönlein purpura associated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septicemia: report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Temkiatvises, Kanya; Nilanont, Yongchai; Poungvarin, Niphon

    2008-08-01

    Neurological involvement in Henoch-SchOnlein purpura (HSP) such as stroke is uncommon manifestiation, particularly in association with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The authors reported a 17-year-old man who developed sudden onset of right hemiparesis while he was admitted in the hospital about his prolonged fever, palpable purpura and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. He also had evidence of MRSA septicemia before the onset of right hemiparesis. Skin biopsy was done and showed that there was leukocytoclastic vasculitis with IgA deposition. He had received completed course of antibiotics and then he was subsequently improved after steroid therapy in the next 2 weeks. Review of case reports from previous English literatures, discovered the association between MRSA infection and HSP which can cause several CNS manifestations including stroke symptoms from cerebral vasculitis. PMID:18788706

  5. Cardiac manifestations in Behcet's disease

    PubMed Central

    Demirelli, Selami; Degirmenci, Husnu; Inci, Sinan; Arisoy, Arif

    2015-01-01

    Summary Behcet's disease (BD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder, with vasculitis underlying the pathophysiology of its multisystemic effects. Venous pathology and thrombotic complications are hallmarks of BD. However, it has been increasingly recognised that cardiac involvement and arterial complications are also important aspects of the course of the disease. Cardiac lesions include pericarditis, endocarditis, intracardiac thrombosis, myocardial infarction, endomyocardial fibrosis, and myocardial aneurysm. Treatment of cardiovascular involvement in BD is largely empirical, and is aimed towards suppressing the vasculitis. The most challenging aspect seems to be the treatment of arterial aneurysms and thromboses due to the associated risk of bleeding. When the prognosis of cardiac involvement in BD is not good, recovery can be achieved through oral anticoagulation, immunosuppressive therapy, and colchicine use. In this review, we summarise the cardiovascular involvement, different manifestations, and treatment of BD. PMID:25984424

  6. Bilateral Facial Palsy in Rapidly Progressive Course of Wegener's Granulomatosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Roszkowska, Anna; Morawska-Kochman, Monika; Temporale, Hanna; Sikorska-?uk, Ma?gorzata; Kr?cicki, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Wegener's granulomatosis belongs to a group of systemic vasculitis diseases, which is characterized by necrotizing vasculitis and presence of granulomas. In a lot of cases, the first symptoms of the disease are observed in the head and neck region, but the bilateral facial nerve palsy occurs very rarely. Objective. The objective of our report was to describe the unusual course of Wegener's granulomatosis with the bilateral facial nerve paralysis, which subsided after application of steroids and immunosuppressive therapy in combination with surgical treatment. Results and Conclusions. Hearing loss may precede other symptoms in Wegener's granulomatosis. Ear pain and otorrhea may suggest the diagnosis of bacterial purulent otitis media and delay the proper diagnosis. In the presented case, considering the clinical course, it was necessary to apply both pharmacological and surgical treatments. PMID:24187641

  7. Henoch Schonlein purpura associated with bee sting: case report.

    PubMed

    Gálvez-Olortegui, José; Álvarez-Vargas, Mayita; Durand-Vergara, Juan; Díaz-Lozano, Marisol; Gálvez-Olortegui, Tomas; Armas-Ramírez, Indira; Hilario-Vargas, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Henoch Schonlein purpura (HSP) is a common childhood vasculitis, characterized by a non-thrombocytopenic palpable purpura and systemic features. It can be triggered by conditions like infections and insect bites. We present the case of a six-year-old girl with palpable maculopapular lesions on the lower limbs, itching, mild pain, swelling of feet, limitation of limb mobility, and a history of bee sting. Thigh skin biopsy was performed, with a report of leucocytoclastic vasculitis, and was diagnosed as HSP. She was prescribed bed rest, and was given oral hydration. The patient outcome was favorable and was discharged after five days. This is the fifth report of a HSP case associated with a bee sting with an uncomplicated course, which is in contrast to previous case reports. PMID:26610057

  8. [Classification of dermatologic manifestations in lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Francs, Camille; Barete, Stphane; Ayoub, Nakhle; Piette, Jean-Charles

    2003-02-01

    Various dermatologic manifestations are observed in the different lupus subsets. Lupus lesions are characterized by a dermo-epidermal dermatitis. Other lesions, vascular or non vascular, are essentially present in association with systemic lupus erythematosus. Acute, subacute and chronic lupus erythematosus are distinguishable according to their clinical aspects, pathological features and evolution. Acute lesions are either localized to the midface or widespread. Subacute lesions may be annular or psoriasiform. Chronic lupus erythematosus includes localized or widespread discoid lupus, lupus tumidus, chilblain lupus and panniculitis. Therapy of cutaneous lupus is mainly based on antimalarials and avoidance of sun irradiation. In refractory cutaneous lupus, no universal guidelines are currently available. Except for acrosyndromes and urticaria-like lesions, vascular lesions may be due to vasculitis or thrombosis. An accurate diagnosis is absolutely necessary since therapy is different in thrombosis and vasculitis. Non vascular and non lupus lesions are numerous, some of them require special treatment such as dapsone for bullous lupus. PMID:12746657

  9. A Clinical Picture of the Visual Outcome in Adamantiades-Behçet's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Figus, Michele; Posarelli, Chiara; Albert, Timothy G.; Talarico, Rosaria; Nardi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Adamantiades-Behçet's disease is a multisystemic vasculitis with multiorgan involvement. Ocular disorders occur often in this syndrome typically in the form of a relapsing-remitting panuveitis and vasculitis and can lead to blindness as one of its most disabling complications if left untreated. There are known risk factors related with the worst visual prognosis, which require early and intensive treatment in order to obtain a rapid suppression of inflammation and to prevent future relapses. The management strategy to avoid vision loss and blindness currently involves the use of local and systemic drugs including steroids and immunosuppressive and biologic agents. This review aims to demonstrate how the introduction and the use of biologic agents improves the visual outcome of patients with Adamantiades-Behçet's disease. PMID:26558256

  10. Detection of circulating immune complexes by Raji cell assay: comparison of flow cytometric and radiometric methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsmore, S.F.; Crockard, A.D.; Fay, A.C.; McNeill, T.A.; Roberts, S.D.; Thompson, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Several flow cytometric methods for the measurement of circulating immune complexes (CIC) have recently become available. We report a Raji cell flow cytometric assay (FCMA) that uses aggregated human globulin (AHG) as primary calibrator. Technical advantages of the Raji cell flow cytometric assay are discussed, and its clinical usefulness is evaluated in a method comparison study with the widely used Raji cell immunoradiometric assay. FCMA is more precise and has greater analytic sensitivity for AHG. Diagnostic sensitivity by the flow cytometric method is superior in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis, and vasculitis patients: however, diagnostic specificity is similar for both assays, but the reference interval of FCMA is narrower. Significant correlations were found between CIC levels obtained with both methods in SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, and vasculitis patients and in longitudinal studies of two patients with cerebral SLE. The Raji cell FCMA is recommended for measurement of CIC levels to clinical laboratories with access to a flow cytometer.

  11. Behçet's pulmonary artery aneurysms treated with infliximab and monitored with the 6-min walk test

    PubMed Central

    Kotecha, Jalpa; Kamath, Ajay V.; Mukhtyar, Chetan

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary involvement in Behçet's disease (BD) is uncommon; however, it is potentially fatal due to the risk of massive haemoptysis. We describe the case of a 36-year-old male presenting with a 2-month history of worsening dyspnoea, weight loss, haemoptysis, oral ulceration, erythema nodosum and superficial thrombophlebitis. He was diagnosed with pulmonary vasculitis secondary to BD; however, his symptoms were refractory to initial treatment with cyclophosphamide, azathioprine and prednisolone. We therefore trialled infliximab alongside methotrexate, which led to a remarkable improvement in his condition, enabling eventual discontinuation of prednisolone. Whilst not being one of the treatments currently recommended for managing pulmonary involvement in BD, infliximab has previously been successfully used in cases refractory to conventional therapy. We used the 6-min walk test (distance covered and lowest oxygen saturations) to monitor his progress, which correlated with his symptoms. This may represent a useful adjunct in monitoring the activity of pulmonary vasculitis. PMID:27123312

  12. Churg-Strauss Syndrome Presented With Hearing Impairment and Facial Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Jeong-Hyun; Lee, Jong-Hoo

    2014-01-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is a rare systemic necrotizing vasculitis. Cranial nerve involvement is very rare in CSS. A 59-year-old woman had complained of both hearing impairments for eight months and left facial palsy for three months. Left facial and cochlear neuropathies were detected in electrodiagnostic studies. Paranasal sinus computed tomography (CT) showed chronic pansinusitis. Chest CT revealed eosinophilic infiltration in the right upper lobe. Tissue biopsy of the right inferior turbinate displayed necrotizing vasculitis with eosinophilic infiltration. She was diagnosed as CSS, based on the presence of eosinophilia, pulmonary infiltration, paranasal sinusitis, and biopsy containing blood vessels with extravascular eosinophils. She was treated with intravenous and oral steroids and azathioprine, showing relatively good prognosis on facial palsy and hearing impairment. We report a very rare case of CSS presented with hearing impairment and facial palsy. PMID:25566487

  13. Disseminated visceral giant cell arteritis: histopathologic description and differentiation from other granulomatous vasculitides.

    PubMed

    Lie, J T

    1978-03-01

    Disseminated visceral giant cell arteristic, a previously unknown entity, was observed in four autopsied patients, all men, aged 33, 67, 59 and 45 years. None of the patients had temporal arteritis, collagen disease, sarcoidosis, hepatitis or other infections, and vasculitis was diagnosed only after death. All had giant cell arteritis of extracranial arteries and arterioles in at least three of the following organs: the heart, lungs, kidneys, liver, pancreas, and stomach in various combinations. Despite some histopathologic similarities, disseminated visceral giant cell arteritis can be distinguished from other necrotizing and granulomatous vasculitides by the type of vessels principally affected and the presence or absence of giant cells, vascular fibrinoid necrosis and eosinophilic infiltrates. The observations suggest that it is a distinctive type of systemic vasculitis. PMID:637044

  14. Progressive Hemifacial Atrophy With Contralateral Uveitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ayyildiz, Onder; Ayyildiz, Simel; Durukan, Ali Hakan; Sobaci, Gungor

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Progressive hemifacial atrophy, known as Parry-Romberg syndrome (PRS), was first described by Parry in 1825. There is a progressive atrophy of facial tissues including skin, bones and muscles. Ophthalmic disorders are common and include keratitis, uveitis, cataract, ipsilateral enophthalmos, optic neuritis, retinal vasculitis and scleral melting. Case Presentation: We describe a patient with progressive hemifacial atrophy at right facial side who developed granulomatous uveitis and periferic retinal vasculitis in his left eye. We started topical and systemic steroid therapy. Uveitic reaction had regressed almost entirely after a 3-month steroid treatment. Conclusions: The individuals should have multidisciplinary approach for the variety of disorders to maintain the appropriate treatment for a better appearance of the patients. PMID:26473067

  15. Structural brain lesions in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Dolapcioglu, Can; Dolapcioglu, Hatice

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) complications or manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease deserve particular attention because symptomatic conditions can require early diagnosis and treatment, whereas unexplained manifestations might be linked with pathogenic mechanisms. This review focuses on both symptomatic and asymptomatic brain lesions detectable on imaging studies, as well as their frequency and potential mechanisms. A direct causal relationship between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and asymptomatic structural brain changes has not been demonstrated, but several possible explanations, including vasculitis, thromboembolism and malnutrition, have been proposed. IBD is associated with a tendency for thromboembolisms; therefore, cerebrovascular thromboembolism represents the most frequent and grave CNS complication. Vasculitis, demyelinating conditions and CNS infections are among the other CNS manifestations of the disease. Biological agents also represent a risk factor, particularly for demyelination. Identification of the nature and potential mechanisms of brain lesions detectable on imaging studies would shed further light on the disease process and could improve patient care through early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26600970

  16. Pulsed-laser therapy (GA-As) in combined treatment of post-traumatic swellings and some dermatological disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipa, Ciprian; Dona, Dumitru; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    1994-02-01

    The effect of a pulsed gallium arsenide infrared laser radiation was studied on 64 patients with post traumatic swellings, allergic vasculitis and varicose crural ulcers, therapy resistant. The soft laser therapy was conducted in combination with classical therapy and was compared with a non irradiated control group of 52 patients treated only by classical therapy. Laser irradiation was directed to the skin damage by laser scanning. Segmental and dermatomic areas of the skin lesions were irradiated by laserpuncture. Therapeutic protocol included an average of nine sessions. The statistical analysis shows a significant difference of the efficiency between Ga-As pulsed laser treated group and the control group, especially in the case of post-traumatic swellings and less in the case of allergic vasculitis. The effects reported by this study are relevant for clinical application of infrared pulsed low lasers in dermatology.

  17. Terminal Ileitis as a Feature of Henoch-Schnlein Purpura Masquerading as Crohn Disease in Adults.

    PubMed

    Sampat, Hemal N; McAllister, Brian P; Gaines, Darryl D; Ostrov, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    Henoch-Schnlein purpura (HSP), more recently termed immunoglobulin A (IgA) vasculitis, is a systemic small-vessel vasculitis characterized by perivascular IgA deposition. This disease manifests clinically as palpable purpura, arthralgia, gastrointestinal symptoms, and renal dysfunction. Although ileitis can be seen in HSP, terminal ileitis is virtually pathognomonic for Crohn disease. We present a comprehensive review of the literature on this association, including 2 cases of our own, to demonstrate the importance of considering HSP in the differential diagnosis of ileitis suggestive of Crohn disease. We review the growing body of literature suggesting a pathophysiologic link between the conditions, possibly through an IgA-mediated mechanism. PMID:26906301

  18. The epidemiology of Kawasaki disease: a global update.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surjit; Vignesh, Pandiarajan; Burgner, David

    2015-11-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a childhood vasculitis and the most frequent cause of paediatric acquired heart disease in North America, Europe and Japan. It is increasingly recognised in rapidly industrialising countries such as China and India where it may replace rheumatic heart disease as the most common cause of acquired heart disease in children. We review the current global epidemiology of KD and discuss some public health implications. PMID:26111818

  19. Atherosclerosis associated with vasculopathic lesions in a golden retriever with hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Boynosky, Nicole A.; Stokking, Laura

    2014-01-01

    A 2-year-old neutered male golden retriever dog presented for lameness secondary to ulcerations of multiple digital paw pads was diagnosed with vasculitis and hypercholesterolemia. Despite treatment, ischemic necrosis progressed to include all distal extremities and the dog eventually expired due to myocardial infarction secondary to severe atherosclerosis. The rapid demise and the dermatologic lesions may have been secondary to cholesterol embolism syndrome which has never before been reported in a dog. PMID:24790237

  20. Small bowel involvement documented by capsule endoscopy in Churg-Strauss syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Beye, Birane; Lesur, Gilles; Claude, Pierre; Martzolf, Lionel; Kieffer, Pierre; Sondag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome is a small and medium vessel vasculitis and is also known as allergic granulomatous angiitis. Gastrointestinal involvement is common in patients with Churg-Strauss syndrome (20-50%). The most common symptoms are abdominal pain, diarrhoea and occasionally gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation. We present a case of Churg-Strauss syndrome with small bowel lesions documented by video capsule endoscopy. PMID:26664542