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Sample records for hypoglossal nucleus normal

  1. Revisiting Antagonist Effects in Hypoglossal Nucleus: Brainstem Circuit for the State-Dependent Control of Hypoglossal Motoneurons: A Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Fenik, Victor B.

    2015-01-01

    We reassessed and provided new insights into the findings that were obtained in our previous experiments that employed the injections of combined adrenergic, serotonergic, GABAergic, and glycinergic antagonists into the hypoglossal nucleus in order to pharmacologically abolish the depression of hypoglossal nerve activity that occurred during carbachol-induced rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep-like state in anesthetized rats. We concluded that noradrenergic disfacilitation is the major mechanism that is responsible for approximately 90% of the depression of hypoglossal motoneurons, whereas the remaining 10% can be explained by serotonergic mechanisms that have net inhibitory effect on hypoglossal nerve activity during REM sleep-like state. We hypothesized that both noradrenergic and serotonergic state-dependent mechanisms indirectly control hypoglossal motoneuron excitability during REM sleep; their activities are integrated and mediated to hypoglossal motoneurons by reticular formation neurons. In addition, we proposed a brainstem neural circuit that can explain the new findings. PMID:26648908

  2. MESOPONTINE CHOLINERGIC PROJECTIONS TO THE HYPOGLOSSAL MOTOR NUCLEUS

    PubMed Central

    Rukhadze, Irma; Kubin, Leszek

    2007-01-01

    Mesopontine cholinergic (ACh) neurons have increased discharge during wakefulness, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, or both. Hypoglossal (12) motoneurons, which play an important role in the control of upper airway patency, are postsynaptically excited by stimulation of nicotinic receptors, whereas muscarinic receptors presynaptically inhibit inputs to 12 motoneurons. These data suggest that ACh contributes to sleep/wake-related changes in the activity of 12 motoneurons by acting within the hypoglossal motor nucleus (Mo12), but the origins of ACh projections to Mo12 are not well established. We used retrograde tracers to assess the projections of ACh neurons of the mesopontine pedinculopontine tegmental (PPT) and laterodorsal tegmental (LDT) nuclei to the Mo12. In six Sprague-Dawley rats, Fluorogold or B subunit of cholera toxin, were pressure injected (5-20 nl) into the Mo12. Retrogradely labeled neurons, identified as ACh using nitric oxide synthase (NOS) immunohistochemistry, were found bilaterally in discrete subregions of both PPT and LDT nuclei. Most retrogradely labeled PPT cells (96%) were located in the PPT pars compacta region adjacent to the ventrolateral tip of the superior cerebellar peduncle. In the LDT, retrogradely labeled neurons were located exclusively in its pars alpha region. Over twice as many ACh neurons projecting to the Mo12 were located in the PPT than LDT. The results demonstrate direct mesopontine ACh projections to the Mo12. These projections may contribute to the characteristic of wakefulness and REM sleep increases, as well as REM sleep-related decrements, of 12 motoneuronal activity. PMID:17174027

  3. Transient expression of somatostatin messenger RNA and peptide in the hypoglossal nucleus of the neonatal rat.

    PubMed

    Seroogy, K B; Bayliss, D A; Szymeczek, C L; Hökfelt, T; Millhorn, D E

    1991-06-21

    The postnatal developmental expression of somatostatin mRNA and peptide in the rat hypoglossal nucleus was analyzed using immunocytochemical and in situ hybridization techniques. Both the neuropeptide and its cognate mRNA were found to be transiently present within a subpopulation of hypoglossal motoneurons during the neonatal period. At the day of birth, a large population of perikarya situated in caudal, ventral regions of the hypoglossal nucleus expressed somatostatin. By postnatal day 7, the number of hypoglossal somata which expressed somatostatin had diminished considerably, and by 2 weeks postnatal, only few such cell bodies were found. By 3-4 weeks postnatal, somatostatin peptide- and mRNA-containing hypoglossal motoneurons were rarely observed, and in the adult, they were never detected, despite the use of colchicine. A double-labeling co-localization technique was used to demonstrate that somatostatin, when present perinatally, always coexisted with calcitonin gene-related peptide in hypoglossal motoneurons. The latter peptide, in contrast to somatostatin, was expressed in large numbers of somata throughout the entire hypoglossal nucleus and persisted within the motoneurons throughout development into adulthood. These results demonstrate that somatostatin is transiently expressed in motoneurons of the caudal, ventral tier of the hypoglossal nucleus in the neonatal rat. The developmental disappearance of somatostatin is most likely not due to cell death; hypoglossal somata continue to express calcitonin gene-related peptide, with which somatostatin coexisted perinatally, a high levels throughout development. Thus, it appears that the regulation of somatostatin expression in hypoglossal neurons occurs at the level of gene transcription or mRNA stability/degradation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1680035

  4. TDP-43 in the hypoglossal nucleus identifies amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Halliday, Glenda M; Kiernan, Matthew C; Kril, Jillian J; Mito, Remika; Masuda-Suzukake, Masami; Hasegawa, Masato; McCann, Heather; Bartley, Lauren; Dobson-Stone, Carol; Kwok, John B J; Hornberger, Michael; Hodges, John R; Tan, Rachel H

    2016-07-15

    The hypoglossal nucleus was recently identified as a key brain region in which the presence of TDP-43 pathology could accurately discriminate TDP-43 proteinopathy cases with clinical amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The objective of the present study was to assess the hypoglossal nucleus in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), and determine whether TDP-43 in this region is associated with clinical ALS. Twenty-nine cases with neuropathological FTLD-TDP and clinical bvFTD that had not been previously assessed for hypoglossal TDP-43 pathology were included in this study. Of these 29 cases, 41% (n=12) had a dual diagnosis of bvFTD-ALS at presentation, all 100% (n=12) of which demonstrated hypoglossal TDP-43 pathology. Of the 59% (n=17) cohort that presented with pure bvFTD, 35% (n=6) were identified with hypoglossal TDP-43 pathology. Review of the case files of all pure bvFTD cases revealed evidence of possible or probable ALS in 5 of the 6 hypoglossal-positive cases (83%) towards the end of disease, and this was absent from all cases without such pathology. In conclusion, the present study validates grading the presence of TDP-43 in the hypoglossal nucleus for the pathological identification of bvFTD cases with clinical ALS, and extends this to include the identification of cases with possible ALS at end-stage. PMID:27288806

  5. Serotonergic projections from the caudal raphe nuclei to the hypoglossal nucleus in male and female rats

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Jessica R.; Thomas, Cathy F.; Behan, Mary

    2009-01-01

    The respiratory control system is sexually dimorphic. In many brain regions, including respiratory motor nuclei, serotonin (5HT) levels are higher in females than in males. We hypothesized that there could be sex differences in 5HT input to the hypoglossal nucleus, a region of the brainstem involved in upper airway control. Adult Fischer 344 rats were anesthetized and a retrograde transsynaptic neuroanatomical tracer, Bartha pseudorabies virus (PRV), was injected into the tongue. Sections through the medulla were reacted immunocytochemically for the presence of (i) PRV, (ii) tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH; marker of 5HT neurons), (iii) PRV combined with TPH, and (iv) 5HT. Sex hormone levels were measured in female rats and correlated with TPH immunoreactivity, as hypoglossal 5HT levels vary with the estrous cycle. The number of PRV neurons was comparable in male and female rats. The number and distribution of TPH immunoreactive neurons in the caudal raphe nuclei were similar in male and female rats. The subset of 5HT neurons that innervate hypoglossal motoneurons was also similar in male and female rats. With the exception of the ventrolateral region of the hypoglossal nucleus, 5HT immunoreactivity was similar in male and female rats. These data suggest that sex differences in 5HT modulation of hypoglossal motoneurons in male and female rats are not the result of sex differences in TPH or 5HT, but may result from differences in neurotransmitter release and reuptake, location of 5HT synaptic terminals on hypoglossal motoneurons, pre- and postsynaptic 5HT receptor expression, or the distribution of sex hormone receptors on hypoglossal or caudal raphe neurons. PMID:19073285

  6. Cortical Innervation of the Hypoglossal Nucleus in the Non-Human Primate (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Morecraft, Robert J.; Stilwell-Morecraft, Kimberly S.; Solon-Cline, Kathryn M.; Ge, Jizhi; Darling, Warren G.

    2014-01-01

    The corticobulbar projection to the hypoglossal nucleus was studied from the frontal, parietal, cingulate and insular cortices in the rhesus monkey using high-resolution anterograde tracers and stereology. The hypoglossal nucleus received bilateral input from the face/head region of the primary (M1), ventrolateral pre- (LPMCv), supplementary (M2), rostral cingulate (M3), and caudal cingulate (M4) motor cortices. Additional bilateral corticohypoglossal projections were found from the dorsolateral premotor cortex (LPMCd), ventrolateral proisocortical motor area (ProM), ventrolateral primary somatosensory cortex (S1), rostral insula and pregenual region of the anterior cingulate gyrus (areas 24/32). Dense terminal projections arose from the ventral region of M1, moderate projections from LPMCv and rostral part of M2, with considerably less hypoglossal projections arising from the other cortical regions. These findings demonstrate that extensive regions of the non-human primate cerebral cortex innervate the hypoglossal nucleus. The widespread and bilateral nature of this corticobulbar connection suggests recovery of tongue movement after cortical injury that compromises a subset of these areas, may occur from spared corticohypoglossal projection areas located on the lateral, as well as medial surfaces of both hemispheres. Since functional imaging studies have shown that homologous cortical areas are activated in humans during tongue movement tasks, these corticobulbar projections may exist in the human brain. PMID:24752643

  7. GABAA receptor antagonism at the hypoglossal motor nucleus increases genioglossus muscle activity in NREM but not REM sleep.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Janna L; Sood, Sandeep; Liu, Hattie; Park, Eileen; Nolan, Philip; Horner, Richard L

    2003-04-15

    The pharyngeal muscles, such as the genioglossus (GG) muscle of the tongue, are important for effective lung ventilation since they maintain an open airspace. Rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, however, recruits powerful neural mechanisms that can abolish GG activity, even during strong reflex respiratory stimulation by elevated CO2. In vitro studies have demonstrated the presence of GABAA receptors on hypoglossal motoneurons, and these and other data have led to the speculation that GABAA mechanisms may contribute to the suppression of hypoglossal motor outflow to the GG muscle in REM sleep. We have developed an animal model that allows us to chronically manipulate neurotransmission at the hypoglossal motor nucleus using microdialysis across natural sleep-wake states in rats. The present study tests the hypothesis that microdialysis perfusion of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline into the hypoglossal motor nucleus will prevent the suppression of GG muscle activity in REM sleep during both room-air and CO2-stimulated breathing. Ten rats were implanted with electroencephalogram and neck muscle electrodes to record sleep-wake states, and GG and diaphragm electrodes for respiratory muscle recording. Microdialysis probes were implanted into the hypoglossal motor nucleus for perfusion of artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) or 100 microM bicuculline during room-air and CO2-stimulated breathing (7 % inspired CO2). GABAA receptor antagonism at the hypoglossal motor nucleus increased respiratory-related GG activity during both room-air (P = 0.01) and CO2-stimulated breathing (P = 0.007), indicating a background inhibitory GABA tone. However, the effects of bicuculline on GG activity depended on the prevailing sleep-wake state (P < 0.005), with bicuculline increasing GG activity in non-REM (NREM) sleep and wakefulness both in room air and hypercapnia (P < 0.01), but GG activity was effectively abolished in those REM periods without phasic twitches in the GG muscle

  8. Developmental Nicotine Exposure Alters AMPA Neurotransmission in the Hypoglossal Motor Nucleus and Pre-Bötzinger Complex of Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Stuti J.; Pilarski, Jason Q.; Harrison, Caitlyn M.; Fregosi, Ralph F.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental nicotine exposure (DNE) impacts central respiratory control in neonates born to smoking mothers. We previously showed that DNE enhances the respiratory motor response to bath application of AMPA to the brainstem, although it was unclear which brainstem respiratory neurons mediated these effects (Pilarski and Fregosi, 2009). Here we examine how DNE influences AMPA-type glutamatergic neurotransmission in the pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC) and the hypoglossal motor nucleus (XIIMN), which are neuronal populations located in the medulla that are necessary for normal breathing. Using rhythmic brainstem slices from neonatal rats, we microinjected AMPA into the pre-BötC or the XIIMN while recording from XII nerve rootlets (XIIn) as an index of respiratory motor output. DNE increased the duration of tonic activity and reduced rhythmic burst amplitude after AMPA microinjection into the XIIMN. Also, DNE led to an increase in respiratory burst frequency after AMPA injection into the pre-BötC. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of XII motoneurons showed that DNE increased motoneuron excitability but did not change inward currents. Immunohistochemical studies indicate that DNE reduced the expression of glutamate receptor subunits 2 and 3 (GluR2/3) in the XIIMN and the pre-BötC. Our data show that DNE alters AMPAergic synaptic transmission in both the XIIMN and pre-BötC, although the mechanism by which this occurs is unclear. We suggest that the DNE-induced reduction in GluR2/3 may represent an attempt to compensate for increased cell excitability, consistent with mechanisms underlying homeostatic plasticity. PMID:23392689

  9. Inhibition of the pontine Kölliker-Fuse nucleus abolishes eupneic inspiratory hypoglossal motor discharge in rat.

    PubMed

    Bautista, T G; Dutschmann, M

    2014-05-16

    The pontine Kölliker-Fuse nucleus (KF) has established functions in the regulation of inspiratory-expiratory phase transition and the regulation of upper airway patency via laryngeal valving mechanisms. Here we studied the role of the KF in the gating and modulation of eupneic hypoglossal motor activity (HNA) using the in situ perfused brainstem preparation, which displays robust inspiratory HNA. Microinjection of glutamate into the KF area triggered complex and often biphasic modulation (excitation/inhibition or inhibition/excitation) of HNA. Subsequent transient pharmacological inhibition of KF by unilateral microinjection of GABA-A receptor agonist isoguvacine reduced HNA and while bilateral microinjections completely abolished HNA. Our results indicate that mixed and overlapping KF pre-motor neurons provide eupneic drive for inspiratory HNA and postinspiratory vagal nerve activity. Both motor activities have important functions in the regulation of upper airway patency during eupnea but also during various oro-pharyngeal behaviors. These results have potential implications in the contribution of state-dependent modulation of KF hypoglossal pre-motor neurons during sleep-wake cycle to obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:24603053

  10. Radiation-induced cytochrome c release and the neuroprotective effects of the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk in the hypoglossal nucleus

    PubMed Central

    LI, JIANGUO; WANG, YAN; DU, LIQING; XU, CHANG; CAO, JIA; WANG, QIN; LIU, QIANG; FAN, FEIYUE

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that neuronal cell death occurs via extrinsic (death receptors) and intrinsic (mitochondria) pathways. Radiation induces caspase activation fundamentally via the mitochondrial pathway. To investigate the role of caspase, a cell permeable pan-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk [N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe)-fluoromethylketone], was used to investigate the effects of caspase blockade in vivo following irradiation. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (weight, 250–300 g) underwent irradiation at room temperature with a 4-Gy dose of radiation. Since z-VAD-fmk does not penetrate the blood-brain barrier, it was applied intracerebroventricularly via a bolus injection (0.2 μg/h for 1 h). Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) demonstrated that z-VAD-fmk reduced the numbers of TUNEL-positive cells within the hypoglossal nucleus, suggesting that intervention in the caspase cascade following radiation may have therapeutic applications. The caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk reduced the expression and activation of caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9 in the irradiated rats, indicating that caspase may be a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of brain radiation injury. Treatment with z-VAD-fmk also reduced the appearance of cytochrome c within the cytosolic fraction following radiation. The hypoglossal nucleus may be used as a model of radiation-induced injury in the central nervous system, providing visual information and displaying apoptotic nuclear morphology. PMID:24396410

  11. The Effect of Tongue Exercise on Serotonergic Input to the Hypoglossal Nucleus in Young and Old Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behan, Mary; Moeser, Adam E.; Thomas, Cathy F.; Russell, John A.; Wang, Hao; Leverson, Glen E.; Connor, Nadine P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Breathing and swallowing problems affect elderly people and may be related to age-associated tongue dysfunction. Hypoglossal motoneurons that innervate the tongue receive a robust, excitatory serotonergic (5HT) input and may be affected by aging. We used a rat model of aging and progressive resistance tongue exercise to determine whether…

  12. GAD67-GFP+ neurons in the Nucleus of Roller: a possible source of inhibitory input to hypoglossal motoneurons. I. Morphology and firing properties.

    PubMed

    van Brederode, J F M; Yanagawa, Y; Berger, A J

    2011-01-01

    In this study we examined the electrophysiological and morphological properties of inhibitory neurons located just ventrolateral to the hypoglossal motor (XII) nucleus in the Nucleus of Roller (NR). In vitro experiments were performed on medullary slices derived from postnatal day 5 (P5) to P15 GAD67-GFP knock-in mouse pups. on cell recordings from GFP+ cells in NR in rhythmic slices revealed that these neurons are spontaneously active, although their spiking activity does not exhibit inspiratory phase modulation. Morphologically, GFP+ cells were bi- or multipolar cells with small- to medium-sized cell bodies and small dendritic trees that were often oriented parallel to the border of the XII nucleus. GFP+ cells were classified as either tonic or phasic based on their firing responses to depolarizing step current stimulation in whole cell current clamp. Tonic GFP+ cells fired a regular train of action potentials (APs) throughout the duration of the pulse and often showed rebound spikes after a hyperpolarizing step. In contrast, phasic GFP+ neurons did not fire throughout the depolarizing current step but instead fired fewer than four APs at the onset of the pulse or fired multiple APs, but only after a marked delay. Phasic cells had a significantly smaller input resistance and shorter membrane time constant than tonic GFP+ cells. In addition, phasic GFP+ cells differed from tonic cells in the shape and time course of their spike afterpotentials, the minimum firing frequency at threshold current amplitude, and the slope of their current-frequency relationship. These results suggest that GABAergic neurons in the NR are morphologically and electrophysiologically heterogeneous cells that could provide tonic inhibitory synaptic input to HMs. PMID:21047932

  13. Abrupt changes in pentobarbital sensitivity in preBötzinger complex region, hypoglossal motor nucleus, nucleus tractus solitariius, and cortex during rat transitional period (P10–P15)

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Sara M. F.; Johnson, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    On postnatal days P10–P15 in rat medulla, neurotransmitter receptor subunit composition shifts towards a more mature phenotype. Since medullary GABAARs regulate cardiorespiratory function, abrupt alterations in GABAergic synaptic inhibition could disrupt homeostasis. We hypothesized that GABAARs on medullary neurons become more resistant to positive allosteric modulation during P10–P15. Medullary and cortical slices from P10–P20 rats were used to record spontaneous action potentials in pre-Botzinger Complex (preBötC-region), hypoglossal (XII) motor nucleus, nucleus tractus solitariius (NTS), and cortex during exposure to pentobarbital (positive allosteric modulator of GABAARs). On P14, pentobarbital resistance abruptly increased in preBötC-region and decreased in NTS, but these changes in pentobarbital resistance were not present on P15. Pentobarbital resistance decreased in XII motor nucleus during P11–P15 with a nadir at P14. Abrupt changes in pentobarbital resistance indicate changes in GABAergic receptor composition and function that may compensate for potential increased GABAergic inhibition and respiratory depression that occurs during this key developmental transitional period. PMID:25550216

  14. Isolated unilateral idiopathic transient hypoglossal nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Syed Viqar; Akram, Muhammad Saqub

    2014-01-01

    A 52-year-old Caucasian man presented with sudden onset of difficulty in moving his tongue to the left with preceding left-sided headache with no neck pain. Earlier, he had self-limiting chest infection without rashes or tonsillar enlargement. His medical and surgical history was unremarkable with no recent trauma. Oral examination revealed difficulty in protruding his tongue to the left with muscle bulk loss and fasciculation on the same side, suggesting left hypoglossal nerve palsy. Examination of the rest of the cranial nerves and nervous system was normal. The patient's oropharyngeal and laryngeal examination was unremarkable with no cervical lymphadenopathy. He had normal laboratory investigations and cerebrospinal fluid examination. Extensive imaging of the head, neck and chest failed to reveal any pathology. Further review by an otorhinologist and rheumatologist ruled out any other underlying pathology. He made a good recovery without treatment. English literature search revealed very few cases of idiopathic, transient, unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy. PMID:24969070

  15. Nitrergic innervation of trigeminal and hypoglossal motoneurons in the cat.

    PubMed

    Pose, Ines; Fung, Simon; Sampogna, Sharon; Chase, Michael H; Morales, Francisco R

    2005-04-11

    The present study was undertaken to determine the location of trigeminal and hypoglossal premotor neurons that express neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the cat. Cholera toxin subunit b (CTb) was injected into the trigeminal (mV) or the hypoglossal (mXII) motor nuclei in order to label the corresponding premotor neurons. CTb immunocytochemistry was combined with NADPH-d histochemistry or nNOS immunocytochemistry to identify premotor nitrergic (NADPH-d(+)/CTb(+) or nNOS(+)/ CTb(+) double-labeled) neurons. Premotor trigeminal as well as premotor hypoglossal neurons were located in the ventro-medial medullary reticular formation in a region corresponding to the nucleus magnocellularis (Mc) and the ventral aspect of the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NRGc). Following the injection of CTb into the mV, this region was found to contain a total of 60 +/- 15 double-labeled neurons on the ipsilateral side and 33 +/- 14 on the contralateral side. CTb injections into the mXII resulted in 40 +/- 17 double-labeled neurons in this region on the ipsilateral side and 16 +/- 5 on the contralateral side. Thus, we conclude that premotor trigeminal and premotor hypoglossal nitrergic cells coexist in the same medullary region. They are colocalized with a larger population of nitrergic cells (7200 +/- 23). Premotor neurons in other locations did not express nNOS. The present data demonstrate that a population of neurons within the Mc and the NRGc are the source of the nitrergic innervation of trigeminal and hypoglossal motoneurons. Based on the characteristics of nitric oxide actions and its diffusibility, we postulate that these neurons may serve to synchronize the activity of mV and mXII motoneurons. PMID:15804497

  16. Hypoglossal canal size and hominid speech

    PubMed Central

    DeGusta, David; Gilbert, W. Henry; Turner, Scott P.

    1999-01-01

    The mammalian hypoglossal canal transmits the nerve that supplies the motor innervation to the tongue. Hypoglossal canal size has previously been used to date the origin of human-like speech capabilities to at least 400,000 years ago and to assign modern human vocal abilities to Neandertals. These conclusions are based on the hypothesis that the size of the hypoglossal canal is indicative of speech capabilities. This hypothesis is falsified here by the finding of numerous nonhuman primate taxa that have hypoglossal canals in the modern human size range, both absolutely and relative to oral cavity volume. Specimens of Australopithecus afarensis, Australopithecus africanus, and Australopithecus boisei also have hypoglossal canals that, both absolutely and relative to oral cavity volume, are equal in size to those of modern humans. The basis for the hypothesis that hypoglossal canal size is indicative of speech was the assumption that hypoglossal canal size is correlated with hypoglossal nerve size, which in turn is related to tongue function. This assumption is probably incorrect, as we found no apparent correlation between the size of the hypoglossal nerve, or the number of axons it contains, and the size of the hypoglossal canal in a sample of cadavers. Our data demonstrate that the size of the hypoglossal canal does not reflect vocal capabilities or language usage. Thus the date of origin for human language and the speech capabilities of Neandertals remain open questions. PMID:9990105

  17. Hypocretin (orexin) input to trigeminal and hypoglossal motoneurons in the cat: a double-labeling immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Fung, S J; Yamuy, J; Sampogna, S; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    2001-06-01

    In trigeminal and hypoglossal motor nuclei of adult cats, hypocretin immunoreactive fiber varicosities were observed in apposition to retrogradely labeled motoneuron somata and dendrites. Among those lateral hypothalamus neurons that project to the hypoglossal nucleus some were determined to be hypocretin immunoreactive and were located amongst the single-labeled hypocretinergic neurons. These data suggest that hypocretin may play a role in the synaptic control of these motoneurons. PMID:11382413

  18. Facial-hypoglossal nerve anastomosis using laser nerve welding.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Sun Goo; Kim, Dae Joong

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study is to compare laser nerve welding to microsurgical suturing of hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis (HFA), and a result of immediate to delayed repair, and to evaluate the effect of laser nerve welding on HFA for reanimation of facial palsy. The first group of five rats underwent immediate HFA by microsurgical suturing and the second group of five rats by CO2 laser welding. The third group of five rats underwent delayed HFA by microsurgical suturing, and the fourth group of five rats by laser nerve welding. The fifth group of five rats served as controls, with intact hypoglossal and facial nerve. In all rats of the four different treatment groups, cholera toxin B subunit (CTb) was injected in the epineurium distal to the anastomosis site on the postoperative 6th week and in the normal hypoglossal nerve in the five rats of the control group. Neurons labeled CTb of hypoglossal nuclei were positive immunohistochemically, and the numbers were counted. In the immediate HFA groups, CTb-positive neurons were 751 +/- 247 in the laser welding group (n = 5) and 888 +/- 60 in the microsurgical suturing group (n = 5). There was no significant difference (P = 0.117). In the delayed HFA groups, CTb-positive neurons were 749 +/- 54 in the laser welding group (n = 5) and 590 +/- 169 in the microsurgical suturing group (n = 5). The difference was not significant (P = 0.116). There was no significant difference between immediate and delayed anastomosis in the laser welding group (P = 0.600), but there was significance between immediate and delayed anastomosis in the microsurgical suturing group (P = 0.009). Injected CTb in intact hypoglossal neurons (n = 5) were labeled 1,003 +/- 52. No dehiscence in the laser welding site of nerve anastomosis was seen at the time of re-exploration for injection of CTb in all 10 rats. This study shows that the regeneration of anastomosed hypoglossal-facial nerve was affected similarly by laser welding and microsurgical suturing

  19. Control of hypoglossal motoneurones during naturally occurring sleep and wakefulness in the intact, unanaesthetized cat: a field potential study.

    PubMed

    Fung, Simon J; Chase, Michael H

    2014-08-01

    The present electrophysiological study was designed to determine the discharge threshold of hypoglossal motoneurones during naturally occurring states of sleep and wakefulness in the intact, unanaesthetized cat. The antidromic field potential, which reflects the net level of membrane excitability of motoneurones and therefore their discharge threshold, was recorded in the hypoglossal nucleus following stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve. The amplitude of the antidromic field potential was larger during wakefulness and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep compared with REM sleep. There was no significant difference in the amplitude of the field potential when wakefulness was compared with NREM sleep (P = 0.103, df = 3, t = 2.324). However, there was a 46% reduction in amplitude during REM sleep compared with NREM sleep (P < 0.001, df = 10, t = 6.421) or wakefulness (P < 0.01, df = 4, t = -4.598). These findings indicate that whereas the excitability of motoneurones that comprise the hypoglossal motor pool is relatively constant during wakefulness and NREM sleep, their excitability is significantly reduced during REM sleep. This state-dependent pattern of control of hypoglossal motoneurones during REM sleep is similar to that reported for motoneurones in other motor nuclei at all levels of the neuraxis. The decrease in the evoked response of hypoglossal motoneurones, which reflects a significant increase in the discharge threshold of individual motoneurones, results in atonia of the lingual and related muscles during REM sleep. PMID:24605864

  20. MRI localization of the subthalamic nucleus in normal adults and its relation with age.

    PubMed

    Lv, Huandi; Geng, Zuojun; Zhu, Qingfeng; Wang, Lixin; Song, Zhenhu; Chang, Ruiting; Wang, Ya

    2015-11-11

    The subthalamic nucleus regulates motor and neurocognitive functions. Because of its small size and close proximity to other small subcortical structures, it has been a challenge to localize and visualize it using MRI. Here, we sought to define the optimal MRI scan method and visualization plane for locating the subthalamic nucleus on MRI images and to further delineate the geometric dimensions of the subthalamic nucleus and their correlation with age, laterality, and sex. Healthy volunteers received axial, sagittal, and coronal T2_3D_DRIVE CLEAR, coronal T1-WI, coronal T2FLAIR, coronal T2, and coronal SWI sequence. The coronal T2-3D-DRIVE CLEAR images were compared with the Schaltenbrand-Wahren Atlas for Stereotaxy of the Human Brain for localizing the subthalamic nucleus. The best visualization plane with the largest sectional area and the most distinct outline was obtained and region of interest was delineated manually on the basis of the contours of the bilateral subthalamic nuclei in T2-WI images. T2-3D-DRIVE CLEAR in the coronal view showed optimal visualization of the subthalamic nucleus and indicated that the subthalamic nucleus showed three morphological types: the double convex lens type (172, 64%), the ram's horn type (62, 23%), and the willow leaf type (34, 13%). There were no statistically significant differences because of laterality, sex, and age in the sectional area, and maximal long and short diameter of the subthalamic nucleus. On the basis of our results, the current study has shown that T2-3D-DRIVE CLEAR in the coronal view provides optimal visualization of the subthalamic nucleus, which shows three distinct morphological types on MRI images, and there is no statistically significant difference in the geometric dimensions of the subthalamic nucleus because of laterality, sex, and age in normal individuals. PMID:26379058

  1. Evidence for a trigeminal mesencephalic-hypoglossal nuclei loop involved in controlling vibrissae movements in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mameli, Ombretta; Caria, Marcello Alessandro; Pellitteri, Rosalia; Russo, Antonella; Saccone, Salvatore; Stanzani, Stefania

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies performed in rats showed that the whisker-pad motor innervation involves not only the facial nerve, but also some hypoglossal neurons whose axons travel within the trigeminal infraorbital nerve (ION) and target the extrinsic muscles surrounding the whisker-pad macrovibrissae. Furthermore, the electrical stimulation of the ION induced an increase in the EMG activity of these muscles, while the hypoglossal nucleus stimulation elicited evoked potentials and single motor unit responses. However, the existence of a neural network able to involve the XIIth nucleus in macrovibrissae whisking control was totally unknown until now. Since other recent experiments demonstrated that: (1) the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus (Me5) neurons respond to both spontaneous and artificial movements of macrovibrissae, and (2) the Me5 peripheral terminals provide a monosynaptic sensory innervation to the macrovibrissae, the present study was aimed at analyzing a possible role of the Me5 nucleus as a relay station in the sensory-motor loop that involves the XIIth nucleus neurons in rhythmic whisking control. Two tracers were used in the same animal: Fluoro Gold, which was injected into the whisker pad to retrogradely label the hypoglossal whisker-pad projection neurons, and Dil, which was instead injected into the Me5 to label its projections to these hypoglossal neurons. Results demonstrated that terminals of the Me5 neurons monosynaptically target the hypoglossal whisker-pad projection neurons. The functional role of this sensory-motor connection is discussed, with particular regard to a hypothesized proprioceptive reflex in whisker-pad extrinsic muscles that can be elicited by the activation of the Me5 macrovibrissae receptors. PMID:26645304

  2. Intermittent hypoglossal nerve palsy caused by a calcified persistent hypoglossal artery: an uncommon neurovascular compression syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meila, Dan; Wetter, Axel; Brassel, Friedhelm; Nacimiento, Wilhelm

    2012-12-15

    Neurovascular compression is assumed to cause symptoms like trigeminal neuralgia, hemifacial spasm and vestibular paroxysmia. We present a patient with recurrent episodes of transient dysarthria due to isolated right hypoglossal nerve (HN) palsy. We describe the first case of a calcified persistent hypoglossal artery (PHA) as the putative cause of a hypoglossal neurovascular compression syndrome. Our patient received a daily low-dose medication of carbamazepine resulting in complete relief of symptoms. In conclusion, PHA is not only an anatomic variation but also a possible cause of a neurovascular compression syndrome leading to intermittent HN palsy. PMID:23020989

  3. Trigemino-hypoglossal somatic reflex in the pharmacological studies of nociception in orofacial area.

    PubMed

    Zubrzycki, Marek; Janecka, Anna; Zubrzycka, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Disorders involving the orofacial area represent a major medical and social problem. They are a consequence of central nociceptive processes associated with stimulation of the trigeminal nerve nucleus. A rat model of trigeminal pain, utilizing tongue jerks evoked by electrical tooth pulp stimulation during perfusion of the cerebral ventricles with various neuropeptide solutions, can be used in the pharmacological studies of nociception in orofacial area. The investigated neuropeptides diffuse through the cerebroventricular lining producing an analgesic effect either directly, through the trigemino-hypoglossal reflex arc neurons or indirectly through the periaqueductal central gray, raphe nuclei or locus coeruleus neurons. The aim of this review is to present the effect of pharmacological activity of various neuropeptides affecting the transmission of the sensory information from the orofacial area on the example of trigemino-hypoglossal reflex in rats. PMID:26581382

  4. Hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis in the rabbits using laser welding.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Sun Goo; Kim, Dae Joong

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study is to compare laser nerve welding of hypoglossal-facial nerve to microsurgical suturing and a result of immediate and delayed repair, and to evaluate the effectiveness of laser nerve welding in reanimation of facial paralysis of the rabbit models. The first group of 5 rabbits underwent immediate hypoglossal-facial anastomosis (HFA) by microsurgical suturing and the second group of 5 rabbits by CO2 laser welding. The third group of 5 rabbits underwent delayed HFA by microsurgical suturing and the fourth group of 5 rabbits by laser nerve welding. The fifth group of 5 rabbits sustained intact hypoglossal and facial nerve as control. In all rabbits of the 4 different groups, cholera toxin subunit B (CTb) was injected in the epineurium distal to the anastomosis site on the postoperative sixth week and in normal hypoglossal nerve in the 5 rabbits of control group. Neurons labeled CTb of hypoglossal nuclei were positive immunohistochemically and the numbers were counted. In the immediate HFA groups, CTb positive neurons were 1416 +/- 118 in the laser welding group (n = 5) and 1429 +/- 90 in the microsurgical suturing group (n = 5). There was no significant difference (P = 0.75). In the delayed HFA groups, CTb positive neurons were 1503 +/- 66 in the laser welding group (n = 5) and 1207 +/- 68 in the microsurgical suturing group (n = 5). Difference was significant (P = 0.009). There was no significant difference between immediate and delayed anastomosis in the laser welding group (P = 0.208), but some significant difference was observed between immediate and delayed anastomosis in the microsurgical suturing group (P = 0.016). Injected CTb in intact hypoglossal neurons (n = 5) were labeled 1970 +/- 165. No dehiscence was seen on the laser welding site of nerve anastomosis in all the rabbits as re-exploration was done for injection of CTb. This study shows that regeneration of the anastomosed hypoglossal-facial nerve was affected similarly by either

  5. Subthalamic Nucleus Discharge Patterns during Movement in the Normal Monkey and Parkinsonian Patient

    PubMed Central

    Gale, John T.; Shields, Donald C.; Jain, Felipe A.; Amirnovin, Ramin; Eskandar, Emad N.

    2009-01-01

    The pathophysiology of Parkinson disease (PD) is characterized by derangements in the discharge rates, bursting patterns, and oscillatory activity of basal ganglia (BG) neurons. In this study, subthalamic nucleus (STN) neuronal activity patterns in humans with PD was compared with that in the normal monkey during performance of similar volitional movements. Single-unit STN recordings were collected while PD patients and animals moved a joystick in the direction of targets presented on a monitor. When discharge rates in all PD human and normal monkey neurons were compared, no significant differences were observed. However, when neurons were classified by peri-movement response type (i.e., excited, inhibited, or unresponsive to movement) statistical differences were demonstrated – most significantly among PD excited neurons. Analysis of burst activity demonstrated inter- and intra-burst activities were greater in the PD human compared to the monkey irrespective of neuronal response type. Moreover, simultaneously recorded neurons in the human demonstrated consistent oscillatory synchronization at restricted frequency bands, whereas synchronized oscillatory neurons in the monkey were not restricted to distinct frequencies. During movement, discharge and burst rates were positively correlated, independent of subject or neuronal response type; however, rates and oscillatory activity were more strongly correlated in the PD human than the normal monkey. Interestingly, across all domains of analysis, STN neurons in PD demonstrated reduced response variability when compared to STN neurons in the normal monkey brain. Thus, the net effect of PD may be a reduction in the physiological degrees of freedom of BG neurons with diminished information carrying capacity. PMID:19167367

  6. Axon reaction in hypoglossal and dorsal motor vagal neurons of adult rat: incorporation of (3H)leucine

    SciTech Connect

    Aldskogius, H.; Barron, K.D.; Regal, R.

    1984-07-01

    Pairs of adult rats received (/sup 3/H)leucine 0.25, 1, and 16 h before killing and zero to 164 days after unilateral cervical vagotomy and hypoglossal neurotomy. Grain counts and morphometric measurements were made on axotomized and uninjured neurons in histoautoradiographs of the medullary nuclei. Axotomized hypoglossal neurons, which largely survive the injury, both enlarged and incorporated increased amounts of tritiated leucine at each labeling interval, 3 through 28 days postoperatively. In the vagal dorsal motor nucleus (DMN), axotomized cells, which frequently die after neurotomy, enlarged slightly through 28 days postoperatively, then atrophied; DMN neurons increased amino acid uptake for a shorter period (days 7 through 14) than hypoglossal neurons. Axotomized DMN neurons did not sustain increased protein synthesis as long as their hypoglossal counterparts and seemed to fail to increase synthesis of structural proteins with long half-lives (16-h labeling interval). The frequently necrobiotic response of axotomized DMN neurons may relate to these phenomena. From these and earlier results, the authors conclude that axon reaction appears to differ fundamentally in peripheral and central neurons. This difference may have significance for research on regeneration in the central nervous system.

  7. Hypoglossal nerve dysfunction and sleep-disordered breathing after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chervin, Ronald D.; Wolfe, James; Hughes, Rebecca; Concannon, MaryAnn; Lisabeth, Lynda D.; Gruis, Kristen L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This cross-sectional study of acute ischemic stroke patients examined relationships between hypoglossal nerve conduction, sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), and its severity. Methods: Patients within 7 days of stroke underwent nocturnal respiratory monitoring with the ApneaLink device and hypoglossal nerve conduction studies. Results: Eighteen of 52 subjects (35% [95% confidence interval: 22%, 49%]) had an abnormal hypoglossal amplitude and 23 (44% [95% confidence interval: 30%, 59%]) had an abnormal hypoglossal latency. No differences were identified in hypoglossal nerve latency or amplitude between those with (n = 26) and without (n = 26) significant SDB, defined by an apnea-hypopnea index ≥15. However, hypoglossal nerve conduction latency was associated (linear regression p < 0.05) with SDB severity as reflected by the apnea-hypopnea index. Conclusions: Acute ischemic stroke patients have a high prevalence of hypoglossal nerve dysfunction. Further studies are needed to explore whether hypoglossal nerve dysfunction may be a cause or consequence of SDB in stroke patients and whether this association can provide further insight into the pathophysiology of SDB in this population. PMID:24587476

  8. The modulation by 5-HT of glutamatergic inputs from the raphe pallidus to rat hypoglossal motoneurones, in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bouryi, Vitali A; Lewis, David I

    2003-01-01

    Decreases in the activity of 5-HT-containing caudal raphe neurones during sleep are thought to be partially responsible for the resultant disfacilitation of hypoglossal motoneurones. Whilst 5-HT has a direct excitatory action on hypoglossal motoneurones as a result of activation of 5-HT2 receptors, microinjection of 5-HT2 antagonists into the hypoglossal nucleus reduces motor activity to a much lesser extent compared to the suppression observed during sleep suggesting other transmitters co-localised in caudal raphe neurones may also be involved. The aim of the present study was therefore to characterise raphe pallidus inputs to hypoglossal motoneurones. Whole cell recordings were made from hypoglossal motoneurones in vitro. 5-HT evoked a direct membrane depolarisation (8.45 ± 3.8 mV, P < 0.001) and increase in cell input resistance (53 ± 40 %, P < 0.001) which was blocked by the 5-HT2 antagonist, ritanserin (2.40 ± 2.7 vs. 7.04 ± 4.6 mV). Stimulation within the raphe pallidus evoked a monosynaptic EPSC that was significantly reduced by the AMPA/kainateantagonist, NBQX (22.8 ± 16 % of control, P < 0.001). In contrast, the 5-HT2 antagonist, ritanserin, had no effect on the amplitude of these EPSCs (106 ± 31 % of control, P = n.s.). 5-HT reduced these EPSCs to 50.0 ± 13 % of control (P < 0.001), as did the 5-HT1A agonist, 8-OH-DPAT (52.5 ± 17 %, P < 0.001) and the 5-HT1B agonist, CP 93129 (40.6 ± 29 %, P < 0.01). 8-OH-DPAT and CP 93129 increased the paired pulse ratio (1.38 ± 0.27 to 1.91 ± 0.54, P < 0.05 & 1.27 ± 0.08 to 1.44 ± 0.13, P < 0.01 respectively) but had no effect on the postsynaptic glutamate response (99 ± 4.4 % and 100 ± 2.5 %, P = n.s.). They also increased the frequency (P < 0.001), but not the amplitude, of miniature glutamatergic EPSCs in hypoglossal motoneurones. These data demonstrate that raphe pallidus inputs to hypoglossal motoneurones are predominantly glutamatergic in nature, with 5-HT decreasing the release of glutamate from

  9. Respiratory-related hypoglossal nerve activity: influence of anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Hwang, J C; St John, W M; Bartlett, D

    1983-09-01

    In decerebrate, vagotomized, paralyzed, and ventilated cats, phrenic and respiratory-related hypoglossal discharges were evident at normocapnic normoxia or hyperoxia. Both increased progressively in hypercapnia or hypoxia. With increasing drive, onset of inspiratory hypoglossal activity began earlier relative to phrenic onset; an early expiratory hypoglossal burst was also observed. Following subanesthetic doses of chloralose, halothane, ketamine, or pentobarbital, hypoglossal activity was depressed much more than phrenic discharge. In moderate hypercapnia or hypoxia, phrenic activity increased more than hypoglossal, whereas, at high drive, the latter rose more sharply in some cats. Electromyograms of the diaphragm and genioglossus were recorded in intact awake cats to determine if their responses and those of decerebrates are comparable. Respiratory-related genioglossal discharge was evident in normocapnia. We conclude that anesthesia suppresses hypoglossal motor activities much more than those of the bulbospinal-phrenic system. Data for decerebrate cats and unanesthetized cats or humans provide no evidence of a differential distribution of chemoreceptor afferents on hypoglossal and bulbospinal-phrenic neurons, as suggested by results in anesthetized animals. PMID:6629915

  10. MID-INFRARED SPECTRAL INDICATORS OF STAR FORMATION AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY IN NORMAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Treyer, Marie; Martin, Christopher D.; Wyder, Ted; Schiminovich, David; O'Dowd, Matt; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Charlot, Stephane; Heckman, Timothy; Martins, Lucimara; Seibert, Mark; Van der Hulst, J. M.

    2010-08-20

    We investigate the use of mid-infrared (MIR) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) bands, the continuum, and emission lines as probes of star formation (SF) and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in a sample of 100 'normal' and local (z {approx} 0.1) emission-line galaxies. The MIR spectra were obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph as part of the Spitzer-SDSS-GALEX Spectroscopic Survey, which includes multi-wavelength photometry from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared and optical spectroscopy. The continuum and features were extracted using PAHFIT, a decomposition code which we find to yield PAH equivalent widths (EWs) up to {approx}30 times larger than the commonly used spline methods. Despite the lack of extreme objects in our sample (such as strong AGNs, low-metallicity galaxies, or ULIRGs), we find significant variations in PAH, continuum, and emission-line properties, and systematic trends between these MIR properties and optically derived physical properties, such as age, metallicity, and radiation field hardness. We revisit the diagnostic diagram relating PAH EWs and [Ne II]12.8 {mu}m/[O IV]25.9 {mu}m line ratios and find it to be in much better agreement with the standard optical SF/AGN classification than when spline decompositions are used, while also potentially revealing obscured AGNs. The luminosity of individual PAH components, of the continuum, and, with poorer statistics, of the neon emission lines and molecular hydrogen lines are found to be tightly correlated to the total infrared (TIR) luminosity, making individual MIR components good gauges of the total dust emission in SF galaxies. Like the TIR luminosity, these individual components can be used to estimate dust attenuation in the UV and in H{alpha} lines based on energy balance arguments. We also propose average scaling relations between these components and dust-corrected, H{alpha}-derived SF rates.

  11. Increases in cytoplasmic dopamine compromise the normal resistance of the nucleus accumbens to methamphetamine neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, David M.; Francescutti-Verbeem, Dina M.; Kuhnt, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a neurotoxic drug of abuse that damages the dopamine (DA) neuronal system in a highly delimited manner. The brain structure most affected by METH is the caudate–putamen (CPu) where long-term DA depletion and microglial activation are most evident. Even damage within the CPu is remarkably heterogenous with lateral and ventral aspects showing the greatest deficits. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) is largely spared of the damage that accompanies binge METH intoxication. Increases in cytoplasmic DA produced by reserpine, L-DOPA or clorgyline prior to METH uncover damage in the NAc as evidenced by microglial activation and depletion of DA, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and the DA transporter. These effects do not occur in the NAc after treatment with METH alone. In contrast to the CPu where DA, TH, and DA transporter levels remain depleted chronically, DA nerve ending alterations in the NAc show a partial recovery over time. None of the treatments that enhance METH toxicity in the NAc and CPu lead to losses of TH protein or DA cell bodies in the substantia nigra or the ventral tegmentum. These data show that increases in cytoplasmic DA dramatically broaden the neurotoxic profile of METH to include brain structures not normally targeted for damage by METH alone. The resistance of the NAc to METH-induced neurotoxicity and its ability to recover reveal a fundamentally different neuroplasticity by comparison to the CPu. Recruitment of the NAc as a target of METH neurotoxicity by alterations in DA homeostasis is significant in light of the important roles played by this brain structure. PMID:19457119

  12. Hypoglossal nerve conduction findings in obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Ramchandren, Sindhu; Gruis, Kirsten L.; Chervin, Ronald D.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.; Concannon, Maryann; Wolfe, James; Albers, James W.; Brown, Devin L.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Denervation of oropharyngeal muscles in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been suggested by needle EMG and muscle biopsy, but little is known about oropharyngeal nerve conduction abnormalities in OSA. We sought to compare hypoglossal nerve conduction studies in patients with and without OSA. Methods Unilateral hypoglossal nerve conduction studies were performed on 20 subjects with OSA and 20 age-matched controls using standard techniques. Results Median age was 48 in OSA subjects and 47 in controls. Hypoglossal compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitudes were significantly reduced (Wilcoxon Signed Rank test, p =0.01), but prolongation of latencies in OSA subjects did not reach significance in comparison to those in controls. Among a subgroup of subjects without polyneuropathy (15 pairs), reduced amplitudes in OSA subjects retained borderline significance (p=0.05). Discussion Hypoglossal nerve conduction abnormalities may distinguish patients with OSA from controls. These abnormalities could potentially contribute to, or arise from, OSA. PMID:20544939

  13. A new technique for hypoglossal-facial nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Atlas, M D; Lowinger, D S

    1997-07-01

    Hypoglossal reinnervation of the facial nerve may be required after a proximal facial nerve injury. The classic hypoglossal-facial graft procedure involves transection of the donor hypoglossal nerve, resulting in hemiglottic paralysis that, in association with paralysis of other cranial nerves, may cause speech and swallowing difficulties. Multiple lower cranial nerve palsies in conjunction with facial paralysis, as may occur after procedures such as skull base surgery, contraindicate the use of such techniques. The successful use of XII-VII "interposition jump grafts" without hemiglossal weakness has been described However, a prolonged recovery period and weaker facial reanimation have been seen. In order to attain maximum facial reinnervation while preserving hypoglossal function, we have developed a new technique of XII-VII repair. This method involves mobilization of the intratemporal portion of the facial nerve remnant, achieving a single anastomosis with the hypoglossal nerve, which has been partially incised. This technique has been used in three patients to date, with 6 to 11 months follow-up. In all cases facial tone and symmetry have been restored and voluntary facial expression accomplished. The authors conclude that by employing the techniques described highly satisfactory cosmetic and functional results may be expected, without compromising hypoglossal nerve function. PMID:9217143

  14. Signaling mechanism underlying the histamine-modulated action of hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zi-Long; Wu, Xu; Luo, Yan-Jia; Wang, Lu; Qu, Wei-Min; Li, Shan-Qun; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2016-04-01

    Histamine, an important modulator of the arousal states of the central nervous system, has been reported to contribute an excitatory drive at the hypoglossal motor nucleus to the genioglossus (GG) muscle, which is involved in the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea. However, the effect of histamine on hypoglossal motoneurons (HMNs) and the underlying signaling mechanisms have remained elusive. Here, whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were conducted using neonatal rat brain sections, which showed that histamine excited HMNs with an inward current under voltage-clamp and a depolarization membrane potential under current-clamp via histamine H1 receptors (H1 Rs). The phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 blocked H1 Rs-mediated excitatory effects, but protein kinase A inhibitor and protein kinase C inhibitor did not, indicating that the signal transduction cascades underlying the excitatory action of histamine on HMNs were H1 R/Gq/11 /phospholipase C/inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3 ). The effects of histamine were also dependent on extracellular Na(+) and intracellular Ca(2+) , which took place via activation of Na(+) -Ca(2+) exchangers. These results identify the signaling molecules associated with the regulatory effect of histamine on HMNs. The findings of this study may provide new insights into therapeutic approaches in obstructive sleep apnea. We proposed the post-synaptic mechanisms underlying the modulation effect of histamine on hypoglossal motoneuron. Histamine activates the H1 Rs via PLC and IP3 , increases Ca(2+) releases from intracellular stores, promotes Na(+) influx and Ca(2+) efflux via the NCXs, and then produces an inward current and depolarizes the neurons. Histamine modulates the excitability of HMNs with other neuromodulators, such as noradrenaline, serotonin and orexin. We think that these findings should provide an important new direction for drug development for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:26811198

  15. A repertoire of rhythmic bursting produced by hypoglossal motoneurons in physiological and pathological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cifra, Alessandra; Nani, Francesca; Sharifullina, Elina; Nistri, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    The brainstem nucleus hypoglossus contains motoneurons that provide the exclusive motor nerve supply to the tongue. In addition to voluntary tongue movements, tongue muscles rhythmically contract during a wide range of physiological activities, such as respiration, swallowing, chewing and sucking. Hypoglossal motoneurons are destroyed early in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disease often associated with a deficit in the transport system of the neurotransmitter glutamate. The present study shows how periodic electrical discharges of motoneurons are mainly produced by a neuronal network that drives them into bursting mode via glutamatergic excitatory synapses. Burst activity is, however, modulated by the intrinsic properties of motoneurons that collectively synchronize their discharges via gap junctions to create ‘group bursters’. When glial uptake of glutamate is blocked, a distinct form of pathological bursting spontaneously emerges and leads to motoneuron death. Conversely, H2O2-induced oxidative stress strongly increases motoneuron excitability without eliciting bursting. Riluzole (the only drug currently licensed for the treatment of ALS) suppresses bursting of hypoglossal motoneurons caused by blockage of glutamate uptake and limits motoneuron death. These findings highlight how different patterns of electrical oscillations of brainstem motoneurons underpin not only certain physiological activities, but also motoneuron death induced by glutamate transporter impairment. PMID:19651651

  16. Synaptic interactions of retrogradely labeled hypoglossal motoneurons with substance P-like immunoreactive nerve terminals in the cat: a dual-labeling electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Gatti, P J; Coleman, W C; Shirahata, M; Johnson, T A; Massari, V J

    1996-07-01

    This study has investigated the synaptic interactions between hypoglossal motoneurons and substance P (SP)-immunoreactive terminals. Cholera toxin B conjugated to horseradish peroxidase was injected into the tip of the tongue on the right side of six ketamine-anesthetized cats. Two to five days later, the animals were killed. Cells containing HRP were labeled with a histochemical reaction utilizing tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) as the chromogen. TMB forms crystalline reaction products that are very distinct at the electron microscopic level. The tissues were then processed for immunocytochemistry using an antiserum against SP. The chromogen used in this case, diaminobenzidine, yields amorphous reaction products. At the light microscopic level, labeled cells were observed primarily ipsilaterally in both intermediate and ventrolateral subdivisions of the hypoglossal nucleus. The majority of these labeled cells were seen at the level of obex. At the electron microscopic level, both asymmetric and symmetric synapses were observed. SP-immunoreactive nerve terminals formed asymmetric synapses with labeled dendrites and symmetric synapses with labeled perikarya. SP-labeled terminals also synapsed on unlabeled dendrites and somata. These are the first ultrastructural studies demonstrating synaptic interactions between hypoglossal motoneurons and SP terminals. These studies demonstrate that hypoglossal motoneurons that innervate intrinsic tongue muscles are modulated by SP and that SP may play a role in the control of fine movements of the tongue. PMID:8836682

  17. Hypoxic response of hypoglossal motoneurones in the in vivo cat.

    PubMed Central

    Pierrefiche, O; Bischoff, A M; Richter, D W; Spyer, K M

    1997-01-01

    1. In current and voltage clamp, the effects of hypoxia were studied on resting and synaptic properties of hypoglossal motoneurones in barbiturate-anaesthetized adult cats. 2. Twenty-nine hypoglossal motoneurones with a mean membrane potential of -55 mV responded rapidly to acute hypoxia with a persistent membrane depolarization of about +17 mV. This depolarization correlated with the development of a persistent inward current of 0.3 nA at holding potentials close to resting membrane potential. 3. Superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) stimulation-evoked EPSPs were reduced in amplitude by, on average, 46% while IPSP amplitude was reduced by 31% SLN stimulation-evoked EPSCs were reduced by 50-70%. 4. Extracellular application of adenosine (10 mM) hyperpolarized hypoglossal motoneurones by, on average, 5.6 mV, from a control value of -62 mV. SLN stimulation-evoked EPSPs decreased by 18% and IPSPs decreased by 46% during adenosine application. 5. Extracellular application of the KATP channel blocker glibenclamide led to a blockade of a persistent outward current and a significant increase of SLN stimulation-evoked EPSCs. 6. We conclude that hypoglossal motoneurones have a very low tolerance to hypoxia. They appear to be under metabolic stress even in normoxia and their capacity to activate protective potassium currents is limited when compared with other brainstem neurones. This may help to explain the rapid disturbance of hypoglossal function during energy depletion. PMID:9457652

  18. Color canals modification with canny edge detection and morphological reconstruction for cell nucleus segmentation and area measurement in normal Pap smear images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riana, Dwiza; Dewi, Dyah Ekashanti Octorina; Widyantoro, Dwi H.; Mengko, Tati Latifah R.

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a cell nucleus segmentation and area measurement of Pap smear images by means of modification of color canals with Canny edge detection and morphological reconstruction methods. Cell nucleus characterization plays an important role for classifying the degree of abnormality in cervical cancer. The aim of this work is to find the matched measurement method with the manual nucleus area measurement. In this work, we utilized pap smear single cell images from Herlev data bank in RGB mode. The cell images were selected from 90 normal class subjects that include: Normal Superficial, Normal Intermediate, and Normal Columnar classes. The nucleus of each cell image was cropped manually to localize from the cytoplasm. The color canals modification was performed on each cropped nucleus image by, first, separating each R, G, B, and grayscale canals, then implementing addition operation based on color canals (R+G+B, R+G, R+B, G+B, and grayscale). The Canny edge detection was applied on those modifications resulting in binary edge images. The nucleus segmentation was implemented on the edge images by performing region filling based on morphological reconstruction. The area property was calculated based on the segmented nucleus area. The nucleus area from the proposed method was verified to the existing manual measurement (ground truth) of the Herlev data bank. Based on thorough observation upon the selected color canals and Canny edge detection. It can be concluded that Canny edge detection with R+G+B canal is the most significant for all Normal classes (r 0,305, p-value 0.05). While for Normal Superficial and Normal Intermediate, Canny edge detection is significant for all RGB modifications with (r 0.414 - 0.817 range, , p-value 0.05), and for Normal Columnar, Canny edge detection is significant for R+B canal (r 0.505, p-value 0.05).

  19. K+-nucleus scattering using K {yields} {mu}{nu} decays as a normalization check

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, R.; Hicks, K.; Bart, S.

    1995-04-01

    Elastic scattering of 720 and 620 MeV/c positive kaons from targets of {sup 12}C and {sup 6}Li has been measured up to laboratory angles of 42{degrees}. Since the magnitude of the cross sections is sensitive to nuclear medium effects, the K{yields}{mu}{nu} decay mode has been used to check the normalization. GEANT has been used to mimic the kaon decays over a path length of 12cm, with a correlated beam structure matching the experimental kaon beam. The corresponding muon distribution has been passed thru Monte Carlo simulations of the moby dick spectrometer. The results are compared with the experimental number of decay muons with good agreement. These results also agree with the normalization found using p-p elastic scattering. The normalized K{sup +} elastic data are compared to recent optical model predictions based on both Klein-Gordon and KDP equations in the impulse approximation.

  20. Nuclear vertex constants and asymptotic normalization coefficients for the tritium nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Babenko, V. A.; Petrov, N. M.

    2009-12-15

    The properties of the nuclear vertex constant for virtual triton decay to a deuteron and a neutron (T {sup {yields}} d + n) are investigated along with the properties of the asymptotic normalization coefficient defined for the triton wave function and related to this constant. These quantities are calculated numerically on the basis of an equation that relates the asymptotic normalization coefficient to the triton effective radius {rho}{sub T}, which was introduced in the present study. The values of G{sub T}{sup 2} = 1.244(68) fm and C{sub T}{sup 2} = 2.958(162) found from our calculations are in good agreement with experimental and theoretical estimates obtained for these quantities in other studies. Physical properties of the triton virtual state are also discussed.

  1. Dumb-bell neurinoma of the hypoglossal nerve1

    PubMed Central

    Bartal, A. D.; Djaldetti, M. M.; Mandel, E. M.; Lerner, M. A.

    1973-01-01

    A unique case of dumb-bell neurinoma of the hypoglossal nerve is presented. The importance of hemiatrophy of the tongue is stressed for early diagnosis of the lesion. The myelocisternogram is the single most important contrast study confirming the intracranial extension of the tumour. Total dissection of the tumour capsule may not be feasible in all cases. Images PMID:4542406

  2. Isolated unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy after minor head trauma.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Vivek; Kelly, Gerard; Richards, Stuart D; Saeed, Shakeel R

    2002-12-01

    Isolated unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy after fracture of the occipital condyle is rare. It usually occurs after major trauma, such as high-speed deceleration injuries following road traffic accidents. We describe a case that resulted from minor trauma. An underlying skull base malformation may have been a predisposing factor. PMID:12445924

  3. Case Report: Intraneural Intracanalicular Ganglion Cyst of the Hypoglossal Nerve Treated by Extradural Transcondylar Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bilgin-Freiert, Arzu; Fugleholm, Kåre; Poulsgaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of an intraneural ganglion cyst of the hypoglossal canal. The patient presented with unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy, and magnetic resonance imaging showed a small lesion in the hypoglossal canal with no contrast enhancement and high signal on T2-weighted imaging. The lesion was assumed to be a cystic schwannoma of the hypoglossal nerve. Stereotactic irradiation was considered, but in accordance with the patient's wishes, surgical exploration was performed. This revealed that, rather than a schwannoma, the patient had an intraneural ganglion cyst, retrospectively contraindicating irradiation as an option. This case illustrates a very rare location of an intraneural ganglion cyst in the hypoglossal nerve. To our knowledge there are no previous reports of an intraneural ganglion cyst confined to the hypoglossal canal. PMID:26251801

  4. Case Report: Intraneural Intracanalicular Ganglion Cyst of the Hypoglossal Nerve Treated by Extradural Transcondylar Approach.

    PubMed

    Bilgin-Freiert, Arzu; Fugleholm, Kåre; Poulsgaard, Lars

    2015-07-01

    We report a case of an intraneural ganglion cyst of the hypoglossal canal. The patient presented with unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy, and magnetic resonance imaging showed a small lesion in the hypoglossal canal with no contrast enhancement and high signal on T2-weighted imaging. The lesion was assumed to be a cystic schwannoma of the hypoglossal nerve. Stereotactic irradiation was considered, but in accordance with the patient's wishes, surgical exploration was performed. This revealed that, rather than a schwannoma, the patient had an intraneural ganglion cyst, retrospectively contraindicating irradiation as an option. This case illustrates a very rare location of an intraneural ganglion cyst in the hypoglossal nerve. To our knowledge there are no previous reports of an intraneural ganglion cyst confined to the hypoglossal canal. PMID:26251801

  5. Glutamate uptake block triggers deadly rhythmic bursting of neonatal rat hypoglossal motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Sharifullina, Elina; Nistri, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    In the brain the extracellular concentration of glutamate is controlled by glial transporters that restrict the neurotransmitter action to synaptic sites and avoid excitotoxicity. Impaired transport of glutamate occurs in many cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a devastating motoneuron disease. Motoneurons of the brainstem nucleus hypoglossus are among the most vulnerable, giving early symptoms like slurred speech and dysphagia. However, the direct consequences of extracellular glutamate build-up, due to uptake block, on synaptic transmission and survival of hypoglossal motoneurons remain unclear and have been studied using the neonatal rat brainstem slice preparation as a model. Patch clamp recording from hypoglossal motoneurons showed that, in about one-third of these cells, inhibition of glutamate transport with the selective blocker dl-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA; 50 μ m) unexpectedly led to the emergence of rhythmic bursting consisting of inward currents of long duration with superimposed fast oscillations and synaptic events. Synaptic inhibition block facilitated bursting. Bursts had a reversal potential near 0 mV, and were blocked by tetrodotoxin, the gap junction blocker carbenoxolone, or antagonists of AMPA, NMDA or mGluR1 glutamate receptors. Intracellular Ca2+ imaging showed bursts as synchronous discharges among motoneurons. Synergy of activation of distinct classes of glutamate receptor plus gap junctions were therefore essential for bursting. Ablating the lateral reticular formation preserved bursting, suggesting independence from propagated network activity within the brainstem. TBOA significantly increased the number of dead motoneurons, an effect prevented by the same agents that suppressed bursting. Bursting thus represents a novel hallmark of motoneuron dysfunction triggered by glutamate uptake block. PMID:16455692

  6. Early Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Patients With Neuropsychological Impairment Are Associated With Increased Fractional Anisotropy in the Anterior Thalamic Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Chieh; Chiang, Shih-Wei; Chi, Chia-Hsing; Liou, Michelle; Kuo, Duen-Pang; Kao, Hung-Wen; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Ma, Hsin I; Peng, Giia-Sheun; Wu, Yu-Te; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the reactive changes in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-derived diffusion metrics of the anterior thalamic nucleus (AN), a relaying center for the Papez circuit, in early idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) patients with memory impairment, as well as its correlation with the patients' neuropsychological performances. In total, 28 probable iNPH patients with symptom onset within 1 year and 17 control subjects were prospectively recruited between 2010 and 2013 for this institutional review board-approved study. Imaging studies including DTI and a neuropsychological assessment battery were performed in all subjects. Diffusion metrics were measured from the region of the AN using tract-deterministic seeding method by reconstructing the mammillo-thalamo-cingulate connections within the Papez circuit. Differences in diffusion metrics and memory assessment scores between the patient and control group were examined via the Mann-Whitney U test. Spearman correlation analyses were performed to examine associations between diffusion metrics of AN and neuropsychological tests within the patient group. We discovered that early iNPH patients exhibited marked elevations in fractional anisotropy, pure diffusion anisotropy, and axial diffusivity (all P < 0.01), as well as lower neuropsychological test scores including verbal and nonverbal memory (all P < 0.05) compared with normal control. Spearman rank correlation analyses did not disclose significant correlations between AN diffusion metrics and neuropsychological test scores in the patient group, whereas ranked scatter plots clearly demonstrated a dichotic sample distribution between patient and control samples. In summary, our study highlighted the potential compensatory role of the AN by increasing thalamocortical connectivity within the Papez circuit because memory function declines in early iNPH when early shunt treatment may potentially reverse the memory deficits

  7. Early Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Patients With Neuropsychological Impairment Are Associated With Increased Fractional Anisotropy in the Anterior Thalamic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yung-Chieh; Chiang, Shih-Wei; Chi, Chia-Hsing; Liou, Michelle; Kuo, Duen-Pang; Kao, Hung-Wen; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Ma, Hsin I.; Peng, Giia-Sheun; Wu, Yu-Te; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we aimed to investigate the reactive changes in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-derived diffusion metrics of the anterior thalamic nucleus (AN), a relaying center for the Papez circuit, in early idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) patients with memory impairment, as well as its correlation with the patients’ neuropsychological performances. In total, 28 probable iNPH patients with symptom onset within 1 year and 17 control subjects were prospectively recruited between 2010 and 2013 for this institutional review board-approved study. Imaging studies including DTI and a neuropsychological assessment battery were performed in all subjects. Diffusion metrics were measured from the region of the AN using tract-deterministic seeding method by reconstructing the mammillo–thalamo–cingulate connections within the Papez circuit. Differences in diffusion metrics and memory assessment scores between the patient and control group were examined via the Mann–Whitney U test. Spearman correlation analyses were performed to examine associations between diffusion metrics of AN and neuropsychological tests within the patient group. We discovered that early iNPH patients exhibited marked elevations in fractional anisotropy, pure diffusion anisotropy, and axial diffusivity (all P < 0.01), as well as lower neuropsychological test scores including verbal and nonverbal memory (all P < 0.05) compared with normal control. Spearman rank correlation analyses did not disclose significant correlations between AN diffusion metrics and neuropsychological test scores in the patient group, whereas ranked scatter plots clearly demonstrated a dichotic sample distribution between patient and control samples. In summary, our study highlighted the potential compensatory role of the AN by increasing thalamocortical connectivity within the Papez circuit because memory function declines in early iNPH when early shunt treatment may potentially reverse the

  8. Clival osteomyelitis and hypoglossal nerve palsy--rare complications of Lemierre's syndrome.

    PubMed

    He, Jingzhou; Lam, Jonathan Chun Leuk; Adlan, Tarig

    2015-01-01

    An increasingly reported entity, Lemierre's syndrome classically presents with a recent oropharyngeal infection, internal jugular vein thrombosis and the presence of anaerobic organisms such as Fusobacterium necrophorum. The authors report a normally fit and well 17-year-old boy who presented with severe sepsis following a 5-day history of a sore throat, myalgia and neck stiffness requiring intensive care admission. Blood cultures grew F. necrophorum and radiological investigations demonstrated left internal jugular vein, cavernous sinus and sigmoid sinus thrombus, left vertebral artery dissection and thrombus within the left internal carotid artery. Imaging also revealed two areas of acute ischaemia in the brain, consistent with septic emboli, skull base (clival) osteomyelitis and an extensive epidural abscess. The patient improved on meropenem and metronidazole and was warfarinised for his cavernous sinus thrombosis. He has an on-going left-sided hypoglossal (XIIth) nerve palsy. PMID:26323975

  9. Surgical and conservative methods for restoring impaired motor function - facial nerve, spinal accessory nerve, hypoglossal nerve (not including vagal nerve or swallowing)

    PubMed Central

    Laskawi, R.; Rohrbach, S.

    2005-01-01

    The present review gives a survey of rehabilitative measures for disorders of the motor function of the mimetic muscles (facial nerve), and muscles innervated by the spinal accessory and hypoglossal nerves. The dysfunction can present either as paralysis or hyperkinesis (hyperkinesia). Conservative and surgical treatment options aimed at restoring normal motor function and correcting the movement disorders are described. Static reanimation techniques are not dealt with. The final section describes the use of botulinum toxin in the therapy of dysphagia. PMID:22073058

  10. Participation of nucleus entopeduncularis in motor instrumental reflex and entopeduncular influences on motor thalamic nuclei in normal and MPTP-treated cats.

    PubMed

    Voloshin MYa; Shevko, G N; Lukhanina, E P; Kolomiets, B P

    1993-04-01

    Activity of entopeduncular neurons was studied in chronic experiments on cats during performance of instrumental movement: pedal pressing and holding. One-hundred and twenty-four neurons were extracellularly investigated in intact animals and 81 neurons in cats treated with N-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) (5 mg/kg daily, intramuscularly for five days). The mean discharge frequency of nucleus entopeduncularis neurons recorded 48-72 h after the last MPTP injection increased from 12.9 +/- 1.5 to 22.1 +/- 1.4 impulses/s, but dropped to preinjection values within the next ten days. In intact animals and in MPTP-treated cats 23 and 17%, respectively, of neurons changed their activity before or during the movement performance. Along with nucleus entopeduncularis neurons that changed their activity simultaneously with instrumental movement performance, 16% of nucleus entopeduncularis nerve cells in intact cats and 12% in MPTP-treated cats responded 50-800 ms before the myogramme of working forepaw biceps was started. Excitatory responses associated with movement performance in MPTP-exposed cats were more pronounced, indicating enhancement of nucleus entopeduncularis neuronal activity in animals with injured nigrostriatal system. Since nucleus entopeduncularis neurons are inhibitory cells, the increase in their activity had to be accompanied by reinforcement of inhibitory influence on neurons in motor thalamic nuclei. In order to test this hypothesis, two groups of acute experiments were performed on ketamine-anaesthetized and myorelaxine-immobilized cats. Neuronal responses in ventral anterior and ventral lateral thalamic nuclei to nucleus entopeduncularis stimulation were investigated in normal and MPTP-treated animals in doses that were identical to those administered in chronic experiments. In intact cats, 28% of neurons responded to nucleus entopeduncularis stimulation with the latency shorter than 7 ms. In half of the inhibited neurons after the

  11. Transient Ischemic Attack in the Setting of Carotid Atheromatous Disease with a Persistent Primitive Hypoglossal Artery Successfully Treated with Stenting: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Huang, Meng; Moisi, Marc; Zwillman, Michael E; Volpi, John J; Diaz, Orlando; Klucznik, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Fetal brain perfusion is supplied by the primitive dorsal aorta anteriorly, longitudinal neural arteries posteriorly, and anastomotic transverse segmentals. Most notable of these connections are the primitive trigeminal, otic, hypoglossal, and proatlantal arteries. With cranial-cervical circulatory maturation and development of the posterior communicating segments and vertebro-basilar system, these primitive segmental anastomoses normally regress. Anomalous neurovascular development can result in persistence of these anastomoses. Due to its territory of perfusion, the persistent primitive hypoglossal artery (PPHA) is associated with vertebral artery and posterior communicating artery hypoplasia or aplasia. As a consequence, primary blood supply to the hindbrain comes chiefly from this single artery. Although usually clinically silent, PPHA is susceptible to common cerebrovascular disorders including athero-ischemic disease and saccular aneurysmal dilation to name a few. We present a case of transient ischemic attack in a patient with a PPHA and proximal atherosclerotic disease treated by endovascular stenting. PMID:26929891

  12. Transient Ischemic Attack in the Setting of Carotid Atheromatous Disease with a Persistent Primitive Hypoglossal Artery Successfully Treated with Stenting: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Moisi, Marc; Zwillman, Michael E; Volpi, John J; Diaz, Orlando; Klucznik, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Fetal brain perfusion is supplied by the primitive dorsal aorta anteriorly, longitudinal neural arteries posteriorly, and anastomotic transverse segmentals. Most notable of these connections are the primitive trigeminal, otic, hypoglossal, and proatlantal arteries. With cranial-cervical circulatory maturation and development of the posterior communicating segments and vertebro-basilar system, these primitive segmental anastomoses normally regress. Anomalous neurovascular development can result in persistence of these anastomoses. Due to its territory of perfusion, the persistent primitive hypoglossal artery (PPHA) is associated with vertebral artery and posterior communicating artery hypoplasia or aplasia. As a consequence, primary blood supply to the hindbrain comes chiefly from this single artery. Although usually clinically silent, PPHA is susceptible to common cerebrovascular disorders including athero-ischemic disease and saccular aneurysmal dilation to name a few. We present a case of transient ischemic attack in a patient with a PPHA and proximal atherosclerotic disease treated by endovascular stenting.  PMID:26929891

  13. Differential expression of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) in normal and degenerated human nucleus pulposus tissues and cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Weiguo; Fang, Dejian; Ye, Dongping; Zou, Longqiang; Shen, Yan; Dai, Libing; Xu, Jiake

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • ERK5 involved in NP cells. • ERK5 involved in NP tissue. • It was important modulator. - Abstract: Extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and regulates a wide variety of cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, necrosis, apoptosis and degeneration. However, the expression of ERK5 and its role in degenerated human nucleus pulposus (NP) is hitherto unknown. In this study, we observed the differential expression of ERK5 in normal and degenerated human nucleus pulposus tissues by using immunohistochemical staining and Western blot. Treatment of NP cells with Pro-inflammatory cytokine, TNF-α decreased ERK5 gene expression as well as NP marker gene expression; including the type II collagen and aggrecan. Suppression of ERK5 gene expression in NP cells by ERK5 siRNA resulted in decreased gene expression of type II collagen and aggrecan. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK5 activation by BIX02188 (5 μM) decreased the gene expression of type II collagen and aggrecan in NP cells. Our results document the expression of ERK5 in degenerated nucleus pulposus tissues, and suggest a potential involvement of ERK5 in human degenerated nucleus pulposus.

  14. Meningioma arising in the hypoglossal canal: the midline suboccipital subtonsillar approach

    PubMed Central

    Dobrowolski, Samuel; Lepski, Guilherme; Tatagiba, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    Hypoglossal canal meningiomas (HCMs) are extremely rare, and a consensus has yet to be reached regarding the most appropriate treatment approach for these types of tumors. Surgical procedures to the hypoglossal canal are often complex and lengthy, and are often associated with high rates of morbidity. Several approaches have been used to remove such lesions. Most of these approaches have been adapted from methods used for jugular foramen surgery. Our goal is to present an approach that improves visualization of the hypoglossal canal, thus reducing this pathology's risk of morbidity. In this report, we describe one case of HCM in which the tumor was safely and effectively removed by the midline subtonsillar approach, which allows for a direct primary intradural visualization of the hypoglossal canal. There was no postoperative complication in the patient. The length of follow-up was 73 months, and there has been no recurrence of the tumor. PMID:27451423

  15. Meningioma arising in the hypoglossal canal: the midline suboccipital subtonsillar approach.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, Samuel; Lepski, Guilherme; Tatagiba, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    Hypoglossal canal meningiomas (HCMs) are extremely rare, and a consensus has yet to be reached regarding the most appropriate treatment approach for these types of tumors. Surgical procedures to the hypoglossal canal are often complex and lengthy, and are often associated with high rates of morbidity. Several approaches have been used to remove such lesions. Most of these approaches have been adapted from methods used for jugular foramen surgery. Our goal is to present an approach that improves visualization of the hypoglossal canal, thus reducing this pathology's risk of morbidity. In this report, we describe one case of HCM in which the tumor was safely and effectively removed by the midline subtonsillar approach, which allows for a direct primary intradural visualization of the hypoglossal canal. There was no postoperative complication in the patient. The length of follow-up was 73 months, and there has been no recurrence of the tumor. PMID:27451423

  16. Persistent Primitive Hypoglossal Artery (PPHA) - A Rare Anomaly with Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, M R; Vedaraju, K S; Manjappa, B H; Nagaraj, B R

    2016-01-01

    Persistent primitive hypoglossal artery (PPHA) is a rare embryonic carotid vertebrobasilar artery anastomosis. Hypoglossal artery arises from the internal carotid artery (ICA) between the C1 and C2 vertebral levels and traverses through the hypoglossal canal to join the vertebro-basilar system. We present a rare case of an anomalous right sided PPHA as a sole supply to posterior circulation of brain with absent/hypoplastic bilateral vertebral arteries in a two year child who had presented with acute left sided haemiplegia. Three dimensional time of flight magnetic resonance angiography identified an anomalous vessel arising from the right internal carotid artery at the level of axis vertebra and joining the vertebra-basilar arterial system after coursing through the right hypoglossal canal. This anomaly when present may predispose the person to aneurysm formation, ischaemia in the posterior circulation and atherosclerotic disease of the intracranial vessels. PMID:26894148

  17. Persistent Primitive Hypoglossal Artery (PPHA) – A Rare Anomaly with Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Vedaraju, KS; Manjappa, BH; Nagaraj, BR

    2016-01-01

    Persistent primitive hypoglossal artery (PPHA) is a rare embryonic carotid vertebrobasilar artery anastomosis. Hypoglossal artery arises from the internal carotid artery (ICA) between the C1 and C2 vertebral levels and traverses through the hypoglossal canal to join the vertebro-basilar system. We present a rare case of an anomalous right sided PPHA as a sole supply to posterior circulation of brain with absent/hypoplastic bilateral vertebral arteries in a two year child who had presented with acute left sided haemiplegia. Three dimensional time of flight magnetic resonance angiography identified an anomalous vessel arising from the right internal carotid artery at the level of axis vertebra and joining the vertebra-basilar arterial system after coursing through the right hypoglossal canal. This anomaly when present may predispose the person to aneurysm formation, ischaemia in the posterior circulation and atherosclerotic disease of the intracranial vessels. PMID:26894148

  18. Hypoglossal canal size in living hominoids and the evolution of human speech.

    PubMed

    Jungers, William L; Pokempner, Amy A; Kay, Richard F; Cartmill, Matt

    2003-08-01

    The relative size of the hypoglossal canal has been proposed as a useful diagnostic tool for the identification of human-like speech capabilities in the hominid fossil record. Relatively large hypoglossal canals (standardized to oral cavity size) were observed in humans and assumed to correspond to relatively large hypoglossal nerves, the cranial nerve that controls motor function of the tongue. It was suggested that the human pattern of tongue motor innervation and associated speech potential are very different from those of African apes and australopithecines; the modern human condition apparently appeared by the time of Middle Pleistocene Homo. A broader interspecific analysis of hypoglossal canal size in primates conducted in 1999 has rejected this diagnostic and inferences based upon it. In an attempt to resolve these differences of opinion, which we believe are based in part on biased size-adjustments and/or unwarranted assumptions, a new data set was collected and analyzed from 298 extant hominoid skulls, including orangutans, gorillas, chimpanzees, bonobos, siamang, gibbons, and modern humans. Data on the absolute size of the hypoglossal nerve itself were also gathered from a small sample of humans and chimpanzee cadavers. A scale-free index of relative hypoglossal canal size (RHCS) was computed as 100 x (hypoglossal canal area(0.5)/oral cavity volume(0.333)). No significant sexual dimorphism in RHCS was discovered in any species of living hominoid, but there are significant interspecific differences in both absolute and relative sizes of the hypoglossal canal. In absolute terms, humans possess significantly larger canals than any other species except gorillas, but there is considerable overlap with chimpanzees. Humans are also characterized by large values of RHCS, but gibbons possess an even larger average mean for this index; siamang and bonobos overlap appreciably with humans in RHCS. The value of RHCS in Australopithecus afarensis is well within both

  19. Opiate-Induced Suppression of Rat Hypoglossal Motoneuron Activity and Its Reversal by Ampakine Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lorier, Amanda R.; Funk, Gregory D.; Greer, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Hypoglossal (XII) motoneurons innervate tongue muscles and are vital for maintaining upper-airway patency during inspiration. Depression of XII nerve activity by opioid analgesics is a significant clinical problem, but underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Currently there are no suitable pharmacological approaches to counter opiate-induced suppression of XII nerve activity while maintaining analgesia. Ampakines accentuate α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) receptor responses. The AMPA family of glutamate receptors mediate excitatory transmission to XII motoneurons. Therefore the objectives were to determine whether the depressant actions of μ-opioid receptor activation on inspiratory activity includes a direct inhibitory action at the inspiratory premotoneuron to XII motoneuron synapse, and to identify underlying mechanism(s). We then examined whether ampakines counteract opioid-induced depression of XII motoneuron activity. Methodology/Principal Findings A medullary slice preparation from neonatal rat that produces inspiratory-related output in vitro was used. Measurements of inspiratory burst amplitude and frequency were made from XII nerve roots. Whole-cell patch recordings from XII motoneurons were used to measure membrane currents and synaptic events. Application of the μ-opioid receptor agonist, DAMGO, to the XII nucleus depressed the output of inspiratory XII motoneurons via presynaptic inhibition of excitatory glutamatergic transmission. Ampakines (CX614 and CX717) alleviated DAMGO-induced depression of XII MN activity through postsynaptic actions on XII motoneurons. Conclusions/Significance The inspiratory-depressant actions of opioid analgesics include presynaptic inhibition of XII motoneuron output. Ampakines counteract μ-opioid receptor-mediated depression of XII motoneuron inspiratory activity. These results suggest that ampakines may be beneficial in countering opiate-induced suppression of XII motoneuron

  20. Afferent neurons of the hypoglossal nerve of the rat as demonstrated by horseradish peroxidase tracing.

    PubMed

    Neuhuber, W; Mysicka, A

    1980-01-01

    Cell bodies of sensory neurons of the rat's hypoglossal nerve were demonstrated by the somatopetal horseradish peroxidase (HRP) transport technique. Labelled perikarya were found within the second and third cervical spinal ganglia and in the vagal sensory ganglia. After application of HRP to the cut peripheral trunk of the hypoglossal nerve about 200 labelled cell bodies were counted in each animal. The vast majority of the axons from cervical spinal ganglion cells reach the hypoglossal nerve via the descending ramus (N. descendens hypoglossi). However, there may exist an additional pathway, probably via the cervical sympathetic trunk. Application of HPR to the medial and lateral end branches led to a labelling of much fewer spinal ganglion cells while the number of labelled vegal sensory neurons remained unchanged. Thus, it is suggested that the majority of the cervical afferents of the hypoglossal nerve originates within the extrinsic tongue musculature and the geniohyoid muscle, whereas the vagal afferents may perhaps derive exclusively from the intrinsic muslces. Histograms of the mean diameters of labelled cell bodies show a predominance of very small perikarya. This contrasts with the diameter distribution of sensory perikarya labelled after HRP application to nerves supplying other skeletal muscles. It is therefore assumed that the afferent component of the hypoglossal nerve is composed mainly of small-calibre axons. PMID:7356184

  1. Biases for oriented moving bars in lateral geniculate nucleus neurons of normal and stripe-reared cats.

    PubMed

    Daniels, J D; Norman, J L; Pettigrew, J D

    1977-08-31

    Visual receptive fields of 42 LGN cells from normal cats and 110 cells from striped cylinder-reared kittens were studied with the aid of a computer controlled optical system. In the normal cats, ten of the 42 cells were weakly biased for orientation of the visual stimulus when tested with bars swept through the receptive field. Of those ten, eight were classified as transient. The orientation preferences of the ten biased units appeared randomly distributed around the clock. Of the LGN cells from the cylinder-reared group, about half of the transient cells had weak biases for orientation; only 7% of the sustained cells had biases. The orientation preferences of the biased LGN cells in the stripe-reared animals were either parallel to or orthogonal to the stripes each animal saw during its time in the conditioning cylinder. In 16 out of 18 of the biased LGN cells it was found that increasing the velocity of the test target reduced or eliminated the bias apparent at the lower velocity. For some LGN cells special techniques, such as inhibition of activated discharge, were needed to reveal orientation biases. The results described here, considered with data from others, suggest a role for the corticofugal projection in modulating the responses of some LGN cells. PMID:913513

  2. Intrinsic excitability differs between murine hypoglossal and spinal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Tadros, M A; Fuglevand, A J; Brichta, A M; Callister, R J

    2016-05-01

    Motoneurons differ in the behaviors they control and their vulnerability to disease and aging. For example, brain stem motoneurons such as hypoglossal motoneurons (HMs) are involved in licking, suckling, swallowing, respiration, and vocalization. In contrast, spinal motoneurons (SMs) innervating the limbs are involved in postural and locomotor tasks requiring higher loads and lower movement velocities. Surprisingly, the properties of these two motoneuron pools have not been directly compared, even though studies on HMs predominate in the literature compared with SMs, especially for adult animals. Here we used whole cell patch-clamp recording to compare the electrophysiological properties of HMs and SMs in age-matched neonatal mice (P7-P10). Passive membrane properties were remarkably similar in HMs and SMs, and afterhyperpolarization properties did not differ markedly between the two populations. HMs had narrower action potentials (APs) and a faster upstroke on their APs compared with SMs. Furthermore, HMs discharged APs at higher frequencies in response to both step and ramp current injection than SMs. Therefore, while HMs and SMs have similar passive properties, they differ in their response to similar levels of depolarizing current. This suggests that each population possesses differing suites of ion channels that allow them to discharge at rates matched to the different mechanical properties of the muscle fibers that drive their distinct motor functions. PMID:26936988

  3. The hypoglossal canal and the origin of human vocal behavior.

    PubMed

    Kay, R F; Cartmill, M; Balow, M

    1998-04-28

    The mammalian hypoglossal canal transmits the nerve that supplies the muscles of the tongue. This canal is absolutely and relatively larger in modern humans than it is in the African apes (Pan and Gorilla). We hypothesize that the human tongue is supplied more richly with motor nerves than are those of living apes and propose that canal size in fossil hominids may provide an indication about the motor coordination of the tongue and reflect the evolution of speech and language. Canals of gracile Australopithecus, and possibly Homo habilis, fall within the range of extant Pan and are significantly smaller than those of modern Homo. The canals of Neanderthals and an early "modern" Homo sapiens (Skhul 5), as well as of African and European middle Pleistocene Homo (Kabwe and Swanscombe), fall within the range of extant Homo and are significantly larger than those of Pan troglodytes. These anatomical findings suggest that the vocal capabilities of Neanderthals were the same as those of humans today. Furthermore, the vocal abilities of Australopithecus were not advanced significantly over those of chimpanzees whereas those of Homo may have been essentially modern by at least 400,000 years ago. Thus, human vocal abilities may have appeared much earlier in time than the first archaeological evidence for symbolic behavior. PMID:9560291

  4. A case of traumatic bilateral abducens and unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Selçuk, Ferda; Mut, Senem E.

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Female, 47 Final Diagnosis: Traumatic bilateral abducens • unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy Symptoms: Diplopia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: Incidence of unilateral abducens palsy from head trauma has been reported to be as high as 1% to 2.7%, but bilateral abducens nerve palsy is extremely rare. Case Report: We present a case in which bilateral abducens nerve and unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy developed with a high Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) 3 hours after head trauma due to a motor vehicle crash. Conclusions: This case highlights the occurrence and management of posttraumatic bilateral sixth nerve palsy. PMID:23847710

  5. Nociceptive Afferents to the Premotor Neurons That Send Axons Simultaneously to the Facial and Hypoglossal Motoneurons by Means of Axon Collaterals

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yulin; Li, Jinlian; Zhang, Fuxing; Li, Yunqing

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that the brainstem premotor neurons of the facial nucleus and hypoglossal nucleus coordinate orofacial nociceptive reflex (ONR) responses. However, whether the brainstem PNs receive the nociceptive projection directly from the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus is still kept unclear. Our present study focuses on the distribution of premotor neurons in the ONR pathways of rats and the collateral projection of the premotor neurons which are involved in the brainstem local pathways of the orofacial nociceptive reflexes of rat. Retrograde tracer Fluoro-gold (FG) or FG/tetramethylrhodamine-dextran amine (TMR-DA) were injected into the VII or/and XII, and anterograde tracer biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) was injected into the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus (Vc). The tracing studies indicated that FG-labeled neurons receiving BDA-labeled fibers from the Vc were mainly distributed bilaterally in the parvicellular reticular formation (PCRt), dorsal and ventral medullary reticular formation (MdD, MdV), supratrigeminal nucleus (Vsup) and parabrachial nucleus (PBN) with an ipsilateral dominance. Some FG/TMR-DA double-labeled premotor neurons, which were observed bilaterally in the PCRt, MdD, dorsal part of the MdV, peri-motor nucleus regions, contacted with BDA-labeled axonal terminals and expressed c-fos protein-like immunoreactivity which induced by subcutaneous injection of formalin into the lip. After retrograde tracer wheat germ agglutinated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) was injected into VII or XII and BDA into Vc, electron microscopic study revealed that some BDA-labeled axonal terminals made mainly asymmetric synapses on the dendritic and somatic profiles of WGA-HRP-labeled premotor neurons. These data indicate that some premotor neurons could integrate the orofacial nociceptive input from the Vc and transfer these signals simultaneously to different brainstem motonuclei by axonal collaterals. PMID:21980505

  6. Nociceptive afferents to the premotor neurons that send axons simultaneously to the facial and hypoglossal motoneurons by means of axon collaterals.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yulin; Li, Jinlian; Zhang, Fuxing; Li, Yunqing

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that the brainstem premotor neurons of the facial nucleus and hypoglossal nucleus coordinate orofacial nociceptive reflex (ONR) responses. However, whether the brainstem PNs receive the nociceptive projection directly from the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus is still kept unclear. Our present study focuses on the distribution of premotor neurons in the ONR pathways of rats and the collateral projection of the premotor neurons which are involved in the brainstem local pathways of the orofacial nociceptive reflexes of rat. Retrograde tracer Fluoro-gold (FG) or FG/tetramethylrhodamine-dextran amine (TMR-DA) were injected into the VII or/and XII, and anterograde tracer biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) was injected into the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus (Vc). The tracing studies indicated that FG-labeled neurons receiving BDA-labeled fibers from the Vc were mainly distributed bilaterally in the parvicellular reticular formation (PCRt), dorsal and ventral medullary reticular formation (MdD, MdV), supratrigeminal nucleus (Vsup) and parabrachial nucleus (PBN) with an ipsilateral dominance. Some FG/TMR-DA double-labeled premotor neurons, which were observed bilaterally in the PCRt, MdD, dorsal part of the MdV, peri-motor nucleus regions, contacted with BDA-labeled axonal terminals and expressed c-fos protein-like immunoreactivity which induced by subcutaneous injection of formalin into the lip. After retrograde tracer wheat germ agglutinated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) was injected into VII or XII and BDA into Vc, electron microscopic study revealed that some BDA-labeled axonal terminals made mainly asymmetric synapses on the dendritic and somatic profiles of WGA-HRP-labeled premotor neurons. These data indicate that some premotor neurons could integrate the orofacial nociceptive input from the Vc and transfer these signals simultaneously to different brainstem motonuclei by axonal collaterals. PMID:21980505

  7. Hypoglossal Neuropathology and Respiratory Activity in Pompe Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Milapjit S.; Elmallah, Mai K.; Falk, Darin J.; Lane, Michael A.; Reier, Paul J.; Byrne, Barry J.; Fuller, David D.

    2011-01-01

    Pompe disease is a lysosomal storage disorder associated with systemic deficiency of acid α-glucosidase (GAA). Respiratory-related problems in Pompe disease include hypoventilation and upper airway dysfunction. Although these problems have generally been attributed to muscular pathology, recent work has highlighted the potential role of central nervous system (CNS) neuropathology in Pompe motor deficiencies. We used a murine model of Pompe disease to test the hypothesis that systemic GAA deficiency is associated with hypoglossal (XII) motoneuron pathology and altered XII motor output during breathing. Brainstem tissue was harvested from adult Gaa−/− mice and the periodic acid Schiff method was used to examine neuronal glycogen accumulation. Semi-thin (2 μm) plastic sections showed widespread medullary neuropathology with extensive cytoplasmic glycogen accumulation in XII motoneuron soma. We next recorded efferent XII bursting in anesthetized and ventilated Gaa−/− and B6/129 mice both before and after bilateral vagotomy. The coefficient of variation of respiratory cycle duration was greater in Gaa−/− compared to B6/129 mice (p < 0.01). Vagotomy caused a robust increase in XII inspiratory burst amplitude in B6/129 mice (239 ± 44% baseline; p < 0.01) but had little impact on burst amplitude in Gaa−/− mice (130 ± 23% baseline; p > 0.05). We conclude that CNS GAA deficiency results in substantial glycogen accumulation in XII motoneuron cell bodies and altered XII motor output. Therapeutic strategies targeting the CNS may be required to fully correct respiratory-related deficits in Pompe disease. PMID:21747768

  8. Similarities and differences in mechanisms of phrenic and hypoglossal motor facilitation.

    PubMed

    Baker-Herman, Tracy L; Strey, Kristi A

    2011-10-15

    Intermittent hypoxia-induced long-term facilitation (LTF) is variably expressed in the motor output of several inspiratory nerves, such as the phrenic and hypoglossal. Compared to phrenic LTF (pLTF), less is known about hypoglossal LTF (hLTF), although it is often assumed that cellular mechanisms are the same. While fundamental mechanisms appear to be similar, potentially important differences exist in the modulation of pLTF and hLTF. The primary objectives of this paper are to: (1) review similarities and differences in pLTF and hLTF, pointing out knowledge gaps and (2) present new data suggesting that reduced respiratory neural activity elicits differential plasticity in phrenic and hypoglossal output (inactivity-induced phrenic and hypoglossal motor facilitation, iPMF and iHMF), suggesting that these motor pool-specific differences are not unique to LTF. Differences in fundamental mechanisms or modulation of plasticity among motor pools may confer the capacity to mount a complex ventilatory response to specific challenges, particularly in motor pools with different "jobs" in the control of breathing. PMID:21745601

  9. Similarities and differences in mechanisms of phrenic and hypoglossal motor facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Baker-Herman, Tracy L.; Strey, Kristi A.

    2011-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia-induced long-term facilitation (LTF) is variably expressed in the motor output of several inspiratory nerves, such as the phrenic and hypoglossal. Compared to phrenic LTF (pLTF), less is known about hypoglossal LTF (hLTF), although it is often assumed that cellular mechanisms are the same. While fundamental mechanisms appear to be similar, potentially important differences exist in the modulation of pLTF and hLTF. The primary objectives of this paper are to: 1) review similarities and differences in pLTF and hLTF, pointing out knowledge gaps, and 2) present new data suggesting that reduced respiratory neural activity elicits differential plasticity in phrenic and hypoglossal output (inactivity-induced phrenic and hypoglossal motor facilitation, iPMF and iHMF), suggesting that these motor pool specific differences are not unique to LTF. Differences in fundamental mechanisms or modulation of plasticity among motor pools may confer the capacity to mount a complex ventilatory response to specific challenges, particularly in motor pools with different “jobs” in the control of breathing. PMID:21745601

  10. Hypoglossal Nerve Stimulator Implantation in an Adolescent With Down Syndrome and Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Diercks, Gillian R; Keamy, Donald; Kinane, Thomas Bernard; Skotko, Brian; Schwartz, Allison; Grealish, Ellen; Dobrowski, John; Soose, Ryan; Hartnick, Christopher J

    2016-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is more common in children with Down syndrome, affecting up to 60% of patients, and may persist in up to 50% of patients after adenotonsillectomy. These children with persistent moderate to severe OSA require continuous positive airway pressure, which is often poorly tolerated, or even tracheotomy for severe cases. The hypoglossal nerve stimulator is an implantable device that produces an electrical impulse to the anterior branches of the hypoglossal nerve, resulting in tongue protrusion in response to respiratory variation. It is an effective treatment of sleep apnea in select adult patients because it allows for alleviation of tongue base collapse, improving airway obstruction. Herein we describe the first pediatric hypoglossal nerve stimulator implantation, which was performed in an adolescent with Down syndrome and refractory severe OSA (apnea hypopnea index [AHI]: 48.5 events/hour). The patient would not tolerate continuous positive airway pressure and required a long-standing tracheotomy. Hypoglossal nerve stimulator therapy was well tolerated and effective, resulting in significant improvement in the patient's OSA (overall AHI: 3.4 events/hour; AHI: 2.5-9.7 events/hour at optimal voltage settings depending on sleep stage and body position). Five months after implantation, the patient's tracheotomy was successfully removed and he continues to do well with nightly therapy. PMID:27244805

  11. Ceftriaxone attenuates ethanol drinking and restores extracellular glutamate concentration through normalization of GLT-1 in nucleus accumbens of male alcohol-preferring rats.

    PubMed

    Das, Sujan C; Yamamoto, Bryan K; Hristov, Alexandar M; Sari, Youssef

    2015-10-01

    Alteration of glutamatergic-neurotransmission is a hallmark of alcohol dependence. We have previously reported that chronic ethanol-drinking downregulated glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) in nucleus accumbens (NAc) in male P rats in a manner that was reversed by ceftriaxone treatment. However, the effect of ceftriaxone on extracellular glutamate concentrations in NAc after chronic ethanol-drinking has not yet been studied. In the present study, male P rats were treated with ceftriaxone (100 mg/kg/day, i.p.) for five consecutive days following five-weeks of free choice ethanol (15% and 30%) drinking. In vivo microdialysis was performed to measure the extracellular glutamate concentrations in NAc and the effect of blockade of GLT-1 with dihydrokainic acid (DHK) on extracellular glutamate in NAc of ceftriaxone-treated rats was determined. Ceftriaxone treatment attenuated ethanol intake as well as ethanol preference. Extracellular glutamate was significantly higher in NAc after five-weeks of ethanol drinking in saline-treated compared to water control rats. Ceftriaxone treatment blocked the increase extracellular glutamate produced by ethanol intake. Blockade of GLT-1 by DHK reversed the effects of ceftriaxone on glutamate and implicated the role of GLT-1 in the normalization of extracellular glutamate by ceftriaxone. In addition, GLT-1 protein was decreased in ethanol exposed animals and ceftriaxone treatment reversed this deficit. Ceftriaxone treatment also increased glutamine synthetase activity in NAc but not in PFC as compared to ethanol drinking saline-treated rats. Our present study demonstrates that ceftriaxone treatment prevents ethanol drinking in part through normalization of extracellular glutamate concentrations in NAc of male P rats via GLT-1. PMID:26002627

  12. Changes in electrophysiological properties of cat hypoglossal motoneurons during carbachol-induced motor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Fung, S J; Yamuy, J; Xi, M C; Engelhardt, J K; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    2000-12-01

    The control of hypoglossal motoneurons during sleep is important from a basic science perspective as well as to understand the bases for pharyngeal occlusion which results in the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. In the present work, we used intracellular recording techniques to determine changes in membrane properties in adult cats in which atonia was produced by the injection of carbachol into the pontine tegmentum (AS-carbachol). During AS-carbachol, 86% of the recorded hypoglossal motoneurons were found to be postsynaptically inhibited on the basis of analyses of their electrical properties; the electrical properties of the remaining 14% were similar to motoneurons recorded during control conditions. Those cells that exhibited changes in their electrical properties during AS-carbachol also displayed large-amplitude inhibitory synaptic potentials. Following sciatic nerve stimulation, hypoglossal motoneurons which responded with a depolarizing potential during control conditions exhibited a hyperpolarizing potential during AS-carbachol. Both spontaneous and evoked inhibitory potentials recorded during AS-carbachol were comparable to those that have been previously observed in trigeminal and spinal cord motoneurons under similar experimental conditions as well as during naturally occurring active sleep. Calculations based on modeling the changes that we found in input resistance and membrane time constant with a three-compartment neuron model suggest that shunts are present in all three compartments of the hypoglossal motoneuron model. Taken together, these data indicate that postsynaptic inhibitory drives are widely distributed on the soma-dendritic tree of hypoglossal motoneurons during AS-carbachol. These postsynaptic inhibitory actions are likely to be involved in the pathophysiology of obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:11102580

  13. Stent-Assisted Coil Embolization of a Wide-Neck Aneurysm of a Persistent Primitive Hypoglossal Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Baldi, Sebastian Zander, Tobias; Rabellino, Martin; Maynar, Manuel

    2009-03-15

    Persistent primitive hypoglossal artery (PPHA) represents the second most common carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomosis. The association of PPHA with intracranial aneurysms is not unusual. Treatment of aneurysms located on the PPHA itself is challenging due to the increased risk of ischemic complications secondary to the hypoglossal artery often being the sole contributor of flow to the posterior circulation. We report a case of a wide-neck aneurysm in a PPHA successfully treated using a stent-assisted coil embolization technique.

  14. Influence of morphine on respiratory activities of phrenic and hypoglossal nerves in cats.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, D; St John, W M

    1986-06-01

    Anesthetic and sedative drugs have been found to diminish the respiratory motor activity of the hypoglossal nerve more than that of the phrenic nerve. This differential depression of motor activity to the upper airway may contribute to the exacerbation of obstructive sleep apnea by sedative drugs. To determine whether morphine has a similar selective action, we recorded phrenic and hypoglossal nerve activities before and after morphine administration in decerebrate, vagotomized cats, paralyzed with gallamine. Morphine diminished the activities of both nerves in most animals, but the responses were highly variable, and no consistent pattern of differential depression was apparent. The variability of the results may reflect the complex nature of opiate actions on the control of breathing. PMID:3738255

  15. Three cases of dural arteriovenous fistula of the anterior condylar vein within the hypoglossal canal.

    PubMed

    Ernst, R; Bulas, R; Tomsick, T; van Loveren, H; Aziz, K A

    1999-01-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) of the anterior condylar vein are an uncommon but important subset of fistulas occurring at the skull base that can be confused with DAVFs of the marginal sinus on angiography. MR angiography source images can document the intraosseous extent and the relationship to the hypoglossal canal of this type of fistula, which can have significant clinical implications. We present the imaging features of angiography, CT, and MR angiography of three cases of DAVFs localized to the anterior condylar vein and within the hypoglossal canal, which were confirmed by source images from MR angiography. Transvenous coil embolization was curative in two of three cases and would seem to be the treatment of choice when venous access is available. PMID:10588137

  16. Hypoglossal nerve palsy following the robotic thyroidectomy for the papillary thyroid carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Suk-Won; Kang, Kyung Ho

    2015-01-01

    Background Endoscopic surgical techniques with robotic system in the thyroid cancer have been reported to show good results and advantages; however the risk of these techniques has not been fully documented. Presentation of the case We experienced an uncommon complicated case of a 20-year-old woman with a papillary thyroid carcinoma. After the robotic thyroidectomy, she complained of the tongue deviation, speech and swallowing difficulties of hypoglossal nerve palsy. Discussion In this case, a few etiologies could be suggested for the development of hypoglossal nerve palsy. It might be associated with direct stretching or entrapment of hypoglossal nerve during tumor resection; lateral placement of the laryngoscope on the tongue base; the hyperinflation of the laryngeal mask airway; and histological disruption of the intraneural connective tissue and blood circulation. Conclusion Although the robotic surgery is a creative technique and has been known to be safe and effective, the risk of this surgery including traumatic nerve injury should be taken into account before surgery. PMID:26275736

  17. Influence of lung volume on phrenic, hypoglossal and mylohyoid nerve activities.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, D; St John, W M

    1988-07-01

    In decerebrate, paralyzed cats, ventilated by a servo-respirator in accordance with phrenic nerve activity, we examined the influence of lung volume on the activities of the phrenic, hypoglossal and mylohyoid nerves. When lung inflation was briefly withheld, the durations of inspiration (TI) and expiration (TE) and the activities of all three nerves increased. The relative increase in hypoglossal activity greatly exceeded that of phrenic activity and was apparent earlier in the course of inspiration. This hypoglossal response was enhanced by hypercapnia and isocapnic hypoxia. The responses of mylohyoid activity were quite variable: withholding lung inflation augmented inspiratory activity in some cats, but expiratory discharge in others. Sustained increases in end-expiratory lung volume were induced by application of 3-4 cm H2O of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Steady-state PEEP did not influence nerve activities or the breathing pattern. Bilateral vagotomy increased TI, TE, and the activities of all three nerves. No response to withoholding lung inflation could be discerned after vagal section. The results provide further definition of the influence of vagally mediated, lung volume dependent reflexes on the control of upper airway muscles. These reflexes are well suited to relieve or prevent upper airway obstruction. PMID:3051235

  18. Intradural extraneural bilobate ganglion cyst of the atlanto-occipital joint compressing the hypoglossal nerve.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Mario; Gerganov, Venelin M; Samii, Amir; Samii, Madjid

    2012-03-01

    Ganglion cysts (ganglia) are benign lesions of the soft tissue arising in the periarticular space. We present a 54-year-old woman with a 5-month history of headache and weakness of the tongue with deviation to the left side who had a rare extraneural intradural bilobate ganglion cyst of the atlanto-occipital joint compressing the hypoglossal nerve. An MRI showed a bilobate cystic lesion in the premedullary cistern on the left side at the level of the hypoglossal canal. This lesion was removed using a lateral suboccipital approach in the semi-sitting position with removal of the C1 hemiarch. The lesion proved to be a ganglion cyst on histopathology. Intracranial juxtafacet (ganglion and synovial) cysts compressing the hypoglossal nerve should be considered in the differential diagnosis with other lesions of this region. Although there was no recurrence at 30-month follow-up, there was no significant improvement of the tongue weakness. We describe our surgical strategy and discuss the pathogenesis of the cyst. PMID:22277565

  19. Developmental nicotine exposure enhances inhibitory synaptic transmission in motor neurons and interneurons critical for normal breathing.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Stuti J; Wollman, Lila Buls; Harrison, Caitlyn M; Pilarski, Jason Q; Fregosi, Ralph F

    2016-03-01

    Nicotine exposure in utero negatively affects neuronal growth, differentiation, and synaptogenesis. We used rhythmic brainstems slices and immunohistochemistry to determine how developmental nicotine exposure (DNE) alters inhibitory neurotransmission in two regions essential to normal breathing, the hypoglossal motor nucleus (XIIn), and preBötzinger complex (preBötC). We microinjected glycine or muscimol (GABAA agonist) into the XIIn or preBötC of rhythmic brainstem slices from neonatal rats while recording from XII nerve roots to obtain XII motoneuron population activity. Injection of glycine or muscimol into the XIIn reduced XII nerve burst amplitude, while injection into the preBötC altered nerve burst frequency. These responses were exaggerated in preparations from DNE animals. Quantitative immunohistochemistry revealed a significantly higher GABAA receptor density on XII motoneurons from DNE pups. There were no differences in GABAA receptor density in the preBötC, and there were no differences in glycine receptor expression in either region. Nicotine, in the absence of other chemicals in tobacco smoke, alters normal development of brainstem circuits that are critical for normal breathing. PMID:26097160

  20. Minimally Invasive Approach to the Lingual and Hypoglossal Nerves in the Adult Rat.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Edward John; Phillips, Grady W; Gratton, Michael Anne; Long, John P; Varvares, Mark A

    2016-06-01

    Surgical manipulation of the sensory and motor nerves of the rat tongue is often employed in studies evaluating the oral cavity functions of mastication and deglutition. A noninvasive, atraumatic approach that will then facilitate sufficient manipulation of these structures is required. In this study, we detail an approach that consistently allows identification of the hypoglossal (motor) and lingual (sensory) nerves of the rat. Six Wistar rats (250-500 g) were anesthetized and dissected either as fresh tissue (N = 3) or following transcardial perfusion with 4% paraformaldehyde (N = 3). Both fixed and non-fixed specimens of the rat head and neck were incised in the right submandibular region. The first animal in each group was used to gain a basic understanding of the regional muscular anatomy with reference to the hypoglossal and lingual nerves. Subsequent animals were used for the development of an efficient and minimally invasive approach to these nerves. The resultant approach begins as an incision through skin and platysma, followed by medial reflection of the digastric muscle. This allows visualization of the hypoglossal nerve in the region of the bifurcation of the common trunk into medial and lateral subdivisions. Next, the lingual nerve dissection is approached by reflection rostrally of the transversus mandibularis muscle and a caudal reflection of the mylohyoid muscle. This dissection reveals the geniohyoid muscle which when separated bluntly using forceps, exposes the lingual nerve. The anatomical approach described and illustrated herein will aid investigators in consistent identification of these two nerves as fundamental methods of their projects. PMID:26633569

  1. Outcomes of Direct Facial-to-Hypoglossal Neurorrhaphy with Parotid Release

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Joel; Rihani, Jordan; Lin, Karen; Miller, Phillip J.; Roland, J. Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Lesions of the temporal bone and cerebellopontine angle and their management can result in facial nerve paralysis. When the nerve deficit is not amenable to primary end-to-end repair or interpositional grafting, nerve transposition can be used to accomplish the goals of restoring facial tone, symmetry, and voluntary movement. The most widely used nerve transposition is the hypoglossal-facial nerve anastamosis, of which there are several technical variations. Previously we described a technique of single end-to-side anastamosis using intratemporal facial nerve mobilization and parotid release. This study further characterizes the results of this technique with a larger patient cohort and longer-term follow-up. The design of this study is a retrospective chart review and the setting is an academic tertiary care referral center. Twenty-one patients with facial nerve paralysis from proximal nerve injury at the cerebellopontine angle underwent facial-hypoglossal neurorraphy with parotid release. Outcomes were assessed using the Repaired Facial Nerve Recovery Scale, questionnaires, and patient photographs. Of the 21 patients, 18 were successfully reinnervated to a score of a B or C on the recovery scale, which equates to good oral and ocular sphincter closure with minimal mass movement. The mean duration of paralysis between injury and repair was 12.1 months (range 0 to 36 months) with a mean follow-up of 55 months. There were no cases of hemiglossal atrophy, paralysis, or subjective dysfunction. Direct facial-hypoglossal neurorrhaphy with parotid release achieved a functional reinnervation and good clinical outcome in the majority of patients, with minimal lingual morbidity. This technique is a viable option for facial reanimation and should be strongly considered as a surgical option for the paralyzed face. PMID:22451794

  2. Outcomes of Direct Facial-to-Hypoglossal Neurorrhaphy with Parotid Release.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Joel; Rihani, Jordan; Lin, Karen; Miller, Phillip J; Roland, J Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Lesions of the temporal bone and cerebellopontine angle and their management can result in facial nerve paralysis. When the nerve deficit is not amenable to primary end-to-end repair or interpositional grafting, nerve transposition can be used to accomplish the goals of restoring facial tone, symmetry, and voluntary movement. The most widely used nerve transposition is the hypoglossal-facial nerve anastamosis, of which there are several technical variations. Previously we described a technique of single end-to-side anastamosis using intratemporal facial nerve mobilization and parotid release. This study further characterizes the results of this technique with a larger patient cohort and longer-term follow-up. The design of this study is a retrospective chart review and the setting is an academic tertiary care referral center. Twenty-one patients with facial nerve paralysis from proximal nerve injury at the cerebellopontine angle underwent facial-hypoglossal neurorraphy with parotid release. Outcomes were assessed using the Repaired Facial Nerve Recovery Scale, questionnaires, and patient photographs. Of the 21 patients, 18 were successfully reinnervated to a score of a B or C on the recovery scale, which equates to good oral and ocular sphincter closure with minimal mass movement. The mean duration of paralysis between injury and repair was 12.1 months (range 0 to 36 months) with a mean follow-up of 55 months. There were no cases of hemiglossal atrophy, paralysis, or subjective dysfunction. Direct facial-hypoglossal neurorrhaphy with parotid release achieved a functional reinnervation and good clinical outcome in the majority of patients, with minimal lingual morbidity. This technique is a viable option for facial reanimation and should be strongly considered as a surgical option for the paralyzed face. PMID:22451794

  3. Beta 1- and beta 2-adrenergic /sup 125/I-pindolol binding sites in the interpeduncular nucleus of the rat: Normal distribution and the effects of deafferentation

    SciTech Connect

    Battisti, W.P.; Artymyshyn, R.P.; Murray, M.

    1989-07-01

    The plasticity of the beta 1- and beta 2-adrenergic receptor subtypes was examined in the interpeduncular nucleus (IPN) of the adult rat. The beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist 125I-pindolol (125I-PIN) was used in conjunction with the selective subtype antagonists ICI 118,551 and ICI 89,406 to determine the subnuclear distribution of beta 1- and beta 2-adrenergic receptors in this nucleus and to correlate the receptor distribution with the distribution of both noradrenergic afferents from the locus coeruleus (LC) and non-noradrenergic afferents from the fasiculus retroflexus (FR). The density of these binding sites was examined following lesions that decreased (LC lesions) or increased (FR lesions) the density of the noradrenergic projection in the IPN. Quantitative radioautography indicated that beta 1-labeled binding sites account for the larger percentage of binding sites in the IPN. The beta 1-binding sites are densest in those subnuclei that receive a noradrenergic projection from the LC: the central, rostral, and intermediate subnuclei. beta 1-binding sites are algo homogeneously distributed throughout the lateral subnuclei, where there is no detectable noradrenergic innervation. beta 2-binding sites have a more restricted distribution. They are concentrated in the ventral half of the lateral subnuclei, where they account for 70% of total 125I-PIN binding sites. beta 2-binding sites are also present along the ventral border of the IPN. Some of this labeling extends into the central and intermediate subnuclei. Bilateral lesions of the LC, which selectively remove noradrenergic innervation to the IPN, result in an increase in the beta 1-binding sites. Bilateral lesions of the FR, which remove the major cholinergic and peptidergic input from the IPN, elicit an increase in noradrenergic projections and a decrease in beta 1-binding sites.

  4. A Case of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor of the Hypoglossal Nerve after Stereotactic Radiosurgery Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tong; Juric-Sekhar, Gordana; Born, Donald; Sekhar, Laligam N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Hypoglossal schwannomas are rare. Surgical resection has been the standard treatment modality. Radiosurgery has been increasingly used for treatment. Radiation-associated secondary malignancy/malignant transformation has not been documented in the literature for the treatment of nonvestibular schwannomas. Setting The patient was a 52-year-old man with an enlarging high cervical/skull base lesion 8.5 years after CyberKnife treatment of a presumed vagal schwannoma. A decision was made for surgical resection, and the tumor was found to originate from the hypoglossal nerve intraoperatively. Final pathology diagnosis was malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor. Results Patient had a gross total resection. Three months after resection, he received fractionated radiation of 50 Gy in 25 fractions and a boost gamma knife radiosurgery of 10 Gy to the 50% isodose surface. He remained tumor free on repeat magnetic resonance imaging 9 months after the resection. Conclusion Although extremely rare, radiation treatment of nonvestibular schwannomas can potentially cause malignant transformation. PMID:25083387

  5. Acute brainstem compression by intratumoral hemorrhages in an intracranial hypoglossal schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiromasa; Nakagawa, Yasuhisa; Ikemura, Mayumi; Usugi, Eri; Kiyofuji, Yuma; Nata, Masayuki

    2013-09-01

    A 77-year-old female in the hospital was found tachycardic and hypothermic by a nurse, and the patient's respiration subsequently ceased. Forensic autopsy revealed an intracranial cystic tumor that would have compressed the brainstem. On microscopic examination, the tumor was diagnosed as an Antoni A schwannoma growth, and recent multiple intratumoral hemorrhages in the intracranial schwannoma were observed, suggesting the sudden enlargement of the intracranial schwannoma due to intratumoral hemorrhaging. Accordingly, we diagnosed the cause of death as brainstem compression induced by the intratumoral hemorrhaging in the intracranial schwannoma. Meanwhile, a rhinopharyngeal tumor was also detected by the autopsy, which was compatible with an antemortem diagnosis of a dumbbell-shaped hypoglossal schwannoma. PMID:23541888

  6. Persistent GABAA/C responses to gabazine, taurine and beta-alanine in rat hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Chesnoy-Marchais, D

    2016-08-25

    In hypoglossal motoneurons, a sustained anionic current, sensitive to a blocker of ρ-containing GABA receptors, (1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid (TPMPA) and insensitive to bicuculline, was previously shown to be activated by gabazine. In order to better characterize the receptors involved, the sensitivity of this atypical response to pentobarbital (30μM), allopregnanolone (0.3μM) and midazolam (0.5μM) was first investigated. Pentobarbital potentiated the response, whereas the steroid and the benzodiazepine were ineffective. The results indicate the involvement of hybrid heteromeric receptors, including at least a GABA receptor ρ subunit and a γ subunit, accounting for the pentobarbital-sensitivity. The effects of the endogenous β amino acids, taurine and β-alanine, which are released under various pathological conditions and show neuroprotective properties, were then studied. In the presence of the glycine receptor blocker strychnine (1μM), both taurine (0.3-1mM) and β-alanine (0.3mM) activated sustained anionic currents, which were partly blocked by TPMPA (100μM). Thus, both β amino acids activated ρ-containing GABA receptors in hypoglossal motoneurons. Bicuculline (20μM) reduced responses to taurine and β-alanine, but small sustained responses persisted in the presence of both strychnine and bicuculline. Responses to β-alanine were slightly increased by allopregnanolone, indicating a contribution of the bicuculline- and neurosteroid-sensitive GABAA receptors underlying tonic inhibition in these motoneurons. Since sustained activation of anionic channels inhibits most mature principal neurons, the ρ-containing GABA receptors permanently activated by taurine and β-alanine might contribute to some of their neuroprotective properties under damaging overexcitatory situations. PMID:27246441

  7. Neutron-proton effective mass splitting in neutron-rich matter at normal density from analyzing nucleon-nucleus scattering data within an isospin dependent optical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Hua; Guo, Wen-Jun; Li, Bao-An; Chen, Lie-Wen; Fattoyev, Farrukh J.; Newton, William G.

    2015-04-01

    The neutron-proton effective mass splitting in asymmetric nucleonic matter of isospin asymmetry δ and normal density is found to be mn-p* ≡ (mn* - mp*) / m = (0.41 ± 0.15) δ from analyzing globally 1088 sets of reaction and angular differential cross sections of proton elastic scattering on 130 targets with beam energies from 0.783 MeV to 200 MeV, and 1161 sets of data of neutron elastic scattering on 104 targets with beam energies from 0.05 MeV to 200 MeV within an isospin dependent non-relativistic optical potential model. It sets a useful reference for testing model predictions on the momentum dependence of the nucleon isovector potential necessary for understanding novel structures and reactions of rare isotopes.

  8. Outcome-dependent coactivation of lip and tongue primary somatosensory representation following hypoglossal-facial transfer after peripheral facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Rottler, Philipp; Schroeder, Henry W S; Lotze, Martin

    2014-02-01

    A hypoglossal-facial transfer is a common surgical strategy for reanimating the face after persistent total hemifacial palsy. We were interested in how motor recovery is associated with cortical reorganization of lip and tongue representation in the primary sensorimotor cortex after the transfer. Therefore, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 13 patients who underwent a hypoglossal-facial transfer after unilateral peripheral facial palsy. To identify primary motor and somatosensory tongue and lip representation sites, we measured repetitive tongue and lip movements during fMRI. Electromyography (EMG) of the perioral muscles during tongue and lip movements and standardized evaluation of lip elevation served as outcome parameters. We found an association of cortical representation sites in the pre- and postcentral gyrus (decreased distance of lip and tongue representation) with symmetry of recovered lip movements (lip elevation) and coactivation of the lip during voluntary tongue movements (EMG-activity of the lip during tongue movements). Overall, our study shows that hypoglossal-facial transfer resulted in an outcome-dependent cortical reorganization with activation of the cortical tongue area for restituded movement of the lip. PMID:23124599

  9. Dilation of the oropharynx via selective stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jingtao; Sahin, Mesut; Durand, Dominique M.

    2005-12-01

    The functional effects of selective hypoglossal nerve (HG) stimulation with a multi-contact peripheral nerve electrode were assessed using images of the upper airways and the tongue in anesthetized beagles. A biphasic pulse train of 50 Hz frequency and 2 s duration was applied through each one of the tripolar contact sets of the nerve electrode while the pharyngeal images were acquired into a computer. The stimulation current was limited to 20% above the activation threshold for maximum selectivity. The images showed that various contact sets could generate several different activation patterns of the tongue muscles resulting in medial and/or lateral dilation and closing of the airways at the tongue root. Some of these patterns translated into an increase in the oropharyngeal size while others did not have any effect. The pharyngeal sizes were not statistically different during stimulation either between the two different positions of the head (30° and 60°), or when the lateral contacts were compared with the medial ones. The contacts that had the least effect generated an average of 53 ± 15% pharyngeal dilation relative to the best contacts, indicating that the results are marginally sensitive to the contact position around the HG nerve trunk. These results suggest that selective HG nerve stimulation can be a useful technique to produce multiple tongue activation patterns that can dilate the pharynx. This may in turn increase the size of the patient population who can benefit from HG nerve stimulation as a treatment method for obstructive sleep apnea.

  10. Dilation of the oropharynx via selective stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingtao; Sahin, Mesut; Durand, Dominique M

    2005-12-01

    The functional effects of selective hypoglossal nerve (HG) stimulation with a multi-contact peripheral nerve electrode were assessed using images of the upper airways and the tongue in anesthetized beagles. A biphasic pulse train of 50 Hz frequency and 2 s duration was applied through each one of the tripolar contact sets of the nerve electrode while the pharyngeal images were acquired into a computer. The stimulation current was limited to 20% above the activation threshold for maximum selectivity. The images showed that various contact sets could generate several different activation patterns of the tongue muscles resulting in medial and/or lateral dilation and closing of the airways at the tongue root. Some of these patterns translated into an increase in the oropharyngeal size while others did not have any effect. The pharyngeal sizes were not statistically different during stimulation either between the two different positions of the head (30 degrees and 60 degrees), or when the lateral contacts were compared with the medial ones. The contacts that had the least effect generated an average of 53 +/- 15% pharyngeal dilation relative to the best contacts, indicating that the results are marginally sensitive to the contact position around the HG nerve trunk. These results suggest that selective HG nerve stimulation can be a useful technique to produce multiple tongue activation patterns that can dilate the pharynx. This may in turn increase the size of the patient population who can benefit from HG nerve stimulation as a treatment method for obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:16317230

  11. Influence of developmental nicotine exposure on spike-timing precision and reliability in hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Powell, Gregory L; Levine, Richard B; Frazier, Amanda M; Fregosi, Ralph F

    2015-03-15

    Smoothly graded muscle contractions depend in part on the precision and reliability of motoneuron action potential generation. Whether or not a motoneuron generates spikes precisely and reliably depends on both its intrinsic membrane properties and the nature of the synaptic input that it receives. Factors that perturb neuronal intrinsic properties and/or synaptic drive may compromise the temporal precision and the reliability of action potential generation. We have previously shown that developmental nicotine exposure (DNE) alters intrinsic properties and synaptic transmission in hypoglossal motoneurons (XIIMNs). Here we show that the effects of DNE also include alterations in spike-timing precision and reliability, and spike-frequency adaptation, in response to sinusoidal current injection. Current-clamp experiments in brainstem slices from neonatal rats show that DNE lowers the threshold for spike generation but increases the variability of spike-timing mechanisms. DNE is also associated with an increase in spike-frequency adaptation and reductions in both peak and steady-state firing rate in response to brief, square wave current injections. Taken together, our data indicate that DNE causes significant alterations in the input-output efficiency of XIIMNs. These alterations may play a role in the increased frequency of obstructive apneas and altered suckling strength and coordination observed in nicotine-exposed neonatal humans. PMID:25552642

  12. Intensity and frequency dependence of laryngeal afferent inputs to respiratory hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Mifflin, S W

    1997-12-01

    Inspiratory hypoglossal motoneurons (IHMs) mediate contraction of the genioglossus muscle and contribute to the regulation of upper airway patency. Intracellular recordings were obtained from antidromically identified IHMs in anesthetized, vagotomized cats, and IHM responses to electrical activation of superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) afferent fibers at various frequencies and intensities were examined. SLN stimulus frequencies <2 Hz evoked an excitatory-inhibitory postsynaptic potential (EPSP-IPSP) sequence or only an IPSP in most IHMs that did not change in amplitude as the stimulus was maintained. During sustained stimulus frequencies of 5-10 Hz, there was a reduction in the amplitude of SLN-evoked IPSPs with time with variable changes in the EPSP. At stimulus frequencies >25 Hz, the amplitude of EPSPs and IPSPs was reduced over time. At a given stimulus frequency, increasing stimulus intensity enhanced the decay of the SLN-evoked postsynaptic potentials (PSPs). Frequency-dependent attenuation of SLN inputs to IHMs also occurred in newborn kittens. These results suggest that activation of SLN afferents evokes different PSP responses in IHMs depending on the stimulus frequency. At intermediate frequencies, inhibitory inputs are selectively filtered so that excitatory inputs predominate. At higher frequencies there was no discernible SLN-evoked PSP temporally locked to the SLN stimuli. Alterations in SLN-evoked PSPs could play a role in the coordination of genioglossal contraction during respiration, swallowing, and other complex motor acts where laryngeal afferents are activated. PMID:9390960

  13. Drive latencies in hypoglossal motoneurons indicate developmental change in the brainstem respiratory network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fietkiewicz, Christopher; Loparo, Kenneth A.; Wilson, Christopher G.

    2011-10-01

    The respiratory rhythm originates and diverges from the brainstem to drive thousands of motoneurons that are responsible for control of the diaphragm, intercostals and upper airway. These motoneurons are known to have a wide range of phase relationships, even within a single motoneuron pool. The proposed source of this rhythm, the preBötzinger complex (preBötC), responds to an array of developmental changes in the first days post-birth, specifically at postnatal day 3 (P3). We hypothesize that such developmental changes in the preBötC have a direct effect on motoneuron phase relationships and should be detectable around age P3. To test our hypothesis, we obtained single- and dual-voltage-clamp recordings of hypoglossal motoneurons in an in vitro slice preparation. We introduce a novel approach to analyzing the phase relationships between motoneurons by using cross-correlation analysis to determine the drive latencies. This analysis reveals that the distribution of drive latencies undergoes a significant change at or before age P3. We use a computational model of the in vitro slice to demonstrate the observed phase differences and hypothesize that network heterogeneity alone may not be sufficient to explain them. Through simulations, we show the effects on the preBötC of different network characteristics such as clustering and common inputs.

  14. Unilateral Multiple Facial Nerve Branch Reconstruction Using “End-to-side Loop Graft” Supercharged by Hypoglossal Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Ryo; Takeuchi, Yuichi; Watanabe, Yorikatsu; Niimi, Yosuke; Sakurai, Hiroyuki; Miyata, Mariko; Yamato, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Background: Extensive facial nerve defects between the facial nerve trunk and its branches can be clinically reconstructed by incorporating double innervation into an end-to-side loop graft technique. This study developed a new animal model to evaluate the technique’s ability to promote nerve regeneration. Methods: Rats were divided into the intact, nonsupercharge, and supercharge groups. Artificially created facial nerve defects were reconstructed with a nerve graft, which was end-to-end sutured from proximal facial nerve stump to the mandibular branch (nonsupercharge group), or with the graft of which other end was end-to-side sutured to the hypoglossal nerve (supercharge group). And they were evaluated after 30 weeks. Results: Axonal diameter was significantly larger in the supercharge group than in the nonsupercharge group for the buccal (3.78 ± 1.68 vs 3.16 ± 1.22; P < 0.0001) and marginal mandibular branches (3.97 ± 2.31 vs 3.46 ± 1.57; P < 0.0001), but the diameter was significantly larger in the intact group for all branches except the temporal branch. In the supercharge group, compound muscle action potential amplitude was significantly higher than in the nonsupercharge group (4.18 ± 1.49 mV vs 1.87 ± 0.37 mV; P < 0.0001) and similar to that in the intact group (4.11 ± 0.68 mV). Retrograde labeling showed that the mimetic muscles were double-innervated by facial and hypoglossal nerve nuclei in the supercharge group. Conclusions: Multiple facial nerve branch reconstruction with an end-to-side loop graft was able to achieve axonal distribution. Additionally, axonal supercharge from the hypoglossal nerve significantly improved outcomes. PMID:25426357

  15. Hypoglossal canal dural arteriovenous fistula embolized under precise anatomical evaluation by selective intra-arterial injection computed tomography angiography

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, Hideyuki; Yagi, Takashi; Wakai, Takuma; Hashimoto, Koji; Fukumoto, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Keiko; Tateoka, Toru; Kazama, Hirofumi; Kinouchi, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) involving the hypoglossal canal is rare but increasingly reported. To achieve complete obliteration without a procedure-related complication, understanding of the precise anatomy of this DAVF is essential. Here, we describe a 72-year-old man who underwent selective intra-arterial injection computed tomography angiography which allowed us to understand the detailed anatomy of the complex DAVF regarding access routes and the target regions for transvenous embolization (TVE). With the aid of this novel neuroimaging technique successful target TVE was achieved safely and completely. PMID:25934781

  16. Melatonin preserves superoxide dismutase activity in hypoglossal motoneurons of adult rats following peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hung-Ming; Huang, Yi-Lun; Lan, Chyn-Tair; Wu, Un-In; Hu, Ming-E; Youn, Su-Chung

    2008-03-01

    Peripheral nerve injury (PNI) produces functional changes in lesioned neurons in which oxidative stress is considered to be the main cause of neuronal damage. As superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an important antioxidative enzyme involved in redox regulation of oxidative stress, the present study determined whether melatonin would exert its beneficial effects by preserving the SOD reactivity following PNI. Adult rats subjected to hypoglossal nerve transection were intraperitoneally injected with melatonin at ones for 3, 7, 14, 30 and 60 days successively. The potential neuroprotective effects of melatonin were quantitatively demonstrated by neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), mitochondrial manganese SOD (Mn-SOD), and cytosolic copper-zinc SOD (Cu/Zn-SOD) immunohistochemistry. The functional recovery of the lesioned neurons was evaluated by choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunohistochemistry along with the electromyographic (EMG) recordings of denervation-induced fibrillation activity. The results indicate that following PNI, the nNOS immunoreactivity was significantly increased in lesioned neurons peaking at 14 days. The up-regulation of nNOS temporally coincided with the reduction of ChAT and SOD in which the Cu/Zn-SOD showed a greater diminution than Mn-SOD. However, following melatonin administration, the nNOS augmentation was successfully suppressed and the activities of Mn-SOD, Cu/Zn-SOD, and ChAT were effectively preserved at all postaxotomy periods. EMG data also showed a decreased fibrillation in melatonin-treated groups, suggesting a potential effect of melatonin in promoting functional recovery. In association with its significant capacity in preserving SOD reactivity, melatonin is suggested to serve as a powerful therapeutic agent for treating PNI-relevant oxidative damage. PMID:18289169

  17. Preinspiratory and inspiratory hypoglossal motor output during hypoxia-induced plasticity in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, David D.

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory-related discharge in the hypoglossal (XII) nerve is composed of preinspiratory (pre-I) and inspiratory (I) activity. Our first purpose was to test the hypothesis that hypoxia-induced plasticity in XII motor output is differentially expressed in pre-I vs. I XII bursting. Short-term potentiation (STP) of XII motor output was induced in urethane-anesthetized, vagotomized, and ventilated rats by exposure to isocapnic hypoxia (PaO2 of ∼35 Torr). Both pre-I and I XII discharge abruptly increased at beginning of hypoxia (i.e., acute hypoxic response), and the relative increase in amplitude was much greater for pre-I (507 ± 46% baseline) vs. I bursting (257 ± 16% baseline; P < 0.01). In addition, STP was expressed in I but not pre-I bursting following hypoxia. Specifically, I activity remained elevated following termination of hypoxia but pre-I bursting abruptly returned to prehypoxia levels. Our second purpose was to test the hypothesis that STP of I XII activity results from recruitment of inactive or “silent” XII motoneurons (MNs) vs. rate coding of active MNs. Single fiber recordings were used to classify XII MNs as I, expiratory-inspiratory, or silent based on baseline discharge patterns. STP of I XII activity following hypoxia was associated with increased discharge frequency in active I and silent MNs but not expiratory-inspiratory MNs. We conclude that the expression of respiratory plasticity is differentially regulated between pre-I and I XII activity. In addition, both recruitment of silent MNs and rate coding of active I MNs contribute to increases in XII motor output following hypoxia. PMID:20150564

  18. Ageing and gonadectomy have similar effects on hypoglossal long-term facilitation in male Fischer rats

    PubMed Central

    Zabka, AG; Mitchell, GS; Behan, M

    2005-01-01

    Long-term facilitation (LTF), a form of serotonin-dependent respiratory plasticity induced by intermittent hypoxia, decreases with increasing age or following gonadectomy in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Ageing is accompanied by decreasing levels of testosterone, which in turn influences serotonergic function. In addition, LTF in young male rats differs among strains. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that LTF is similar in middle-aged and gonadectomized young male rats of an inbred rat strain commonly used in studies on ageing (F344) by comparison with SD rats. We further tested whether the magnitude of LTF correlates with circulating serum levels of testosterone and/or progesterone. Young and middle-aged intact and young gonadectomized (GDX) male Fischer 344 rats were anaesthetized, neuromuscularly blocked and ventilated. Integrated phrenic and hypoglossal (XII) nerve activities were measured before, during and 60 min following three 5-min episodes of isocapnic hypoxia. LTF was observed in phrenic motor output in young and middle-aged intact and young GDX rats. In contrast, XII LTF was observed only in young intact rats. In middle-aged and young GDX rats, XII LTF was significantly lower than in young intact rats (P < 0.05). Furthermore, XII LTF was positively correlated with the testosterone/progesterone ratio. These data show that serotonin-dependent plasticity in upper airway respiratory output is similar in F344 and SD rat strains. Furthermore, LTF is similarly impaired in middle-aged and gonadectomized male rats, suggesting that gonadal hormones play an important role in modulating the capacity for neuroplasticity in upper airway motor control. PMID:15613371

  19. Prenatal nicotine exposure increases apnoea and reduces nicotinic potentiation of hypoglossal inspiratory output in mice

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Dean M; Peebles, Karen C; Kwok, Henry; Adams, Brandon M; Clarke, Lan-Ling; Woollard, Gerald A; Funk, Gregory D

    2002-01-01

    We examined the effects of in utero nicotine exposure on postnatal development of breathing pattern and ventilatory responses to hypoxia (7.4 % O2) using whole-body plethysmography in mice at postnatal day 0 (P0), P3, P9, P19 and P42. Nicotine delayed early postnatal changes in breathing pattern. During normoxia, control and nicotine-exposed P0 mice exhibited a high frequency of apnoea (fA) which declined by P3 in control animals (from 6.7 ± 0.7 to 2.2 ± 0.7 min−1) but persisted in P3 nicotine-exposed animals (5.4 ± 1.3 min−1). Hypoxia induced a rapid and sustained reduction in fA except in P0 nicotine-exposed animals where it fell initially and then increased throughout the hypoxic period. During recovery, fA increased above control levels in both groups at P0. By P3 this increase was reduced in control but persisted in nicotine-exposed animals. To examine the origin of differences in respiratory behaviour, we compared the activity of hypoglossal (XII) nerves and motoneurons in medullary slice preparations. The frequency and variability of the respiratory rhythm and the envelope of inspiratory activity in XII nerves and motoneurons were indistinguishable between control and nicotine-exposed animals. Activation of postsynaptic nicotine receptors caused an inward current in XII motoneurons that potentiated XII nerve burst amplitude by 25 ± 5 % in control but only 14 ± 3 % in nicotine-exposed animals. Increased apnoea following nicotine exposure does not appear to reflect changes in basal activity of rhythm or pattern-generating networks, but may result, in part, from reduced nicotinic modulation of XII motoneurons. PMID:11826179

  20. High energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wosiek, B.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental results on high energy nucleus-nucleus interactions are presented. The data are discussed within the framework of standard super-position models and from the point-of-view of the possible formation of new states of matter in heavy ion collisions.

  1. Inactivity-induced phrenic and hypoglossal motor facilitation are differentially expressed following intermittent vs. sustained neural apnea

    PubMed Central

    Baertsch, N. A.

    2013-01-01

    Reduced respiratory neural activity elicits a rebound increase in phrenic and hypoglossal motor output known as inactivity-induced phrenic and hypoglossal motor facilitation (iPMF and iHMF, respectively). We hypothesized that, similar to other forms of respiratory plasticity, iPMF and iHMF are pattern sensitive. Central respiratory neural activity was reversibly reduced in ventilated rats by hyperventilating below the CO2 apneic threshold to create brief intermittent neural apneas (5, ∼1.5 min each, separated by 5 min), a single brief massed neural apnea (7.5 min), or a single prolonged neural apnea (30 min). Upon restoration of respiratory neural activity, long-lasting (>60 min) iPMF was apparent following brief intermittent and prolonged, but not brief massed, neural apnea. Further, brief intermittent and prolonged neural apnea elicited an increase in the maximum phrenic response to high CO2, suggesting that iPMF is associated with an increase in phrenic dynamic range. By contrast, only prolonged neural apnea elicited iHMF, which was transient in duration (<15 min). Intermittent, massed, and prolonged neural apnea all elicited a modest transient facilitation of respiratory frequency. These results indicate that iPMF, but not iHMF, is pattern sensitive, and that the response to respiratory neural inactivity is motor pool specific. PMID:23493368

  2. Inactivity-induced phrenic and hypoglossal motor facilitation are differentially expressed following intermittent vs. sustained neural apnea.

    PubMed

    Baertsch, N A; Baker-Herman, T L

    2013-05-15

    Reduced respiratory neural activity elicits a rebound increase in phrenic and hypoglossal motor output known as inactivity-induced phrenic and hypoglossal motor facilitation (iPMF and iHMF, respectively). We hypothesized that, similar to other forms of respiratory plasticity, iPMF and iHMF are pattern sensitive. Central respiratory neural activity was reversibly reduced in ventilated rats by hyperventilating below the CO2 apneic threshold to create brief intermittent neural apneas (5, ∼1.5 min each, separated by 5 min), a single brief massed neural apnea (7.5 min), or a single prolonged neural apnea (30 min). Upon restoration of respiratory neural activity, long-lasting (>60 min) iPMF was apparent following brief intermittent and prolonged, but not brief massed, neural apnea. Further, brief intermittent and prolonged neural apnea elicited an increase in the maximum phrenic response to high CO2, suggesting that iPMF is associated with an increase in phrenic dynamic range. By contrast, only prolonged neural apnea elicited iHMF, which was transient in duration (<15 min). Intermittent, massed, and prolonged neural apnea all elicited a modest transient facilitation of respiratory frequency. These results indicate that iPMF, but not iHMF, is pattern sensitive, and that the response to respiratory neural inactivity is motor pool specific. PMID:23493368

  3. Nucleus-nucleus scattering at high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franco, V.; Varma, G. K.

    1977-01-01

    Nucleus-nucleus scattering is treated in the Glauber approximation. The usual optical limit result, generally thought to improve as the number of nucleons in the colliding nuclei increases, is found to be the first term of a series which diverges for large nuclei. Corrections to the optical limit are obtained which provide a means of performing realistic calculations for collisions involving light nuclei. Total cross section predictions agree well with recent measurements.

  4. Dural arteriovenous fistulas of the hypoglossal canal: systematic review on imaging anatomy, clinical findings, and endovascular management.

    PubMed

    Spittau, Björn; Millán, Diego San; El-Sherifi, Saad; Hader, Claudia; Singh, Tejinder Pal; Motschall, Edith; Vach, Werner; Urbach, Horst; Meckel, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) of the hypoglossal canal (HCDAVFs) are rare and display a complex angiographic anatomy. Hitherto, they have been referred to as various entities (for example, "marginal sinus DAVFs") solely described in case reports or small series. In this in-depth review of HCDAVF, the authors describe clinical and imaging findings, as well as treatment strategies and subsequent outcomes, based on a systematic literature review supplemented by their own cases (120 cases total). Further, the involved craniocervical venous anatomy with variable venous anastomoses is summarized. Hypoglossal canal DAVFs consist of a fistulous pouch involving the anterior condylar confluence and/or anterior condylar vein with a variable intraosseous component. Three major types of venous drainage are associated with distinct clinical patterns: Type 1, with anterograde drainage (62.5%), mostly presents with pulsatile tinnitus; Type 2, with retrograde drainage to the cavernous sinus and/or orbital veins (23.3%), is associated with ocular symptoms and may mimic cavernous sinus DAVF; and Type 3, with cortical and/or perimedullary drainage (14.2%), presents with either hemorrhage or cervical myelopathy. For Types 1 and 2 HCDAVF, transvenous embolization demonstrates high safety and efficacy (2.9% morbidity, 92.7% total occlusion). Understanding the complex venous anatomy is crucial for planning alternative approaches if standard transjugular access is impossible. Transarterial embolization or surgical disconnection (morbidity 13.3%-16.7%) should be reserved for Type 3 HCDAVFs or lesions with poor venous access. A conservative strategy could be appropriate in Type 1 HCDAVF for which spontaneous regression (5.8%) may be observed. PMID:25415064

  5. Mechanics of the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Lammerding, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The nucleus is the distinguishing feature of eukaryotic cells. Until recently, it was often considered simply as a unique compartment containing the genetic information of the cell and associated machinery, without much attention to its structure and mechanical properties. This article provides compelling examples that illustrate how specific nuclear structures are associated with important cellular functions, and how defects in nuclear mechanics can cause a multitude of human diseases. During differentiation, embryonic stem cells modify their nuclear envelope composition and chromatin structure, resulting in stiffer nuclei that reflect decreased transcriptional plasticity. In contrast, neutrophils have evolved characteristic lobulated nuclei that increase their physical plasticity, enabling passage through narrow tissue spaces in their response to inflammation. Research on diverse cell types further demonstrates how induced nuclear deformations during cellular compression or stretch can modulate cellular function. Pathological examples of disturbed nuclear mechanics include the many diseases caused by mutations in the nuclear envelope proteins lamin A/C and associated proteins, as well as cancer cells that are often characterized by abnormal nuclear morphology. In this article, we will focus on determining the functional relationship between nuclear mechanics and cellular (dys-)function, describing the molecular changes associated with physiological and pathological examples, the resulting defects in nuclear mechanics, and the effects on cellular function. New insights into the close relationship between nuclear mechanics and cellular organization and function will yield a better understanding of normal biology and will offer new clues into therapeutic approaches to the various diseases associated with defective nuclear mechanics. PMID:23737203

  6. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for dumbbell-shaped hypoglossal schwannomas: Two cases of long-term follow-up and a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Lou, Jinrong; Qiu, Shujun; Guo, Yutian; Pan, Mianshun

    2016-01-01

    Cases of hypoglossal schwannoma are extremely rare. Historically, microsurgical resection has been the standard treatment, but it may not always be feasible; thus, it is crucial to investigate alternative treatments. We herein present the cases of two patients, both of whom presented with tongue deviation and hemiatrophy, accompanied by headaches. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a dumbbell-shaped tumor originating from the hypoglossal nerve that was adjacent to the cranial base in each patient. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy was used to treat the tumors, with a total dose of 30 Gy in 3-Gy fractions delivered to the planning target volume. Several months later, the tumors had significantly decreased in size and the symptoms of the two patients had gradually improved. PMID:27446582

  7. The Nucleus Introduced

    PubMed Central

    Pederson, Thoru

    2011-01-01

    Now is an opportune moment to address the confluence of cell biological form and function that is the nucleus. Its arrival is especially timely because the recognition that the nucleus is extremely dynamic has now been solidly established as a paradigm shift over the past two decades, and also because we now see on the horizon numerous ways in which organization itself, including gene location and possibly self-organizing bodies, underlies nuclear functions. PMID:20660024

  8. Comparison of changes in the hypoglossal and the phrenic nerve activity in response to increasing depth of anesthesia in cats.

    PubMed

    Nishino, T; Shirahata, M; Yonezawa, T; Honda, Y

    1984-01-01

    The effects of increasing depths of anesthesia on the activities of the hypoglossal nerve (HN) and the phrenic nerve (PN) were investigated in artificially ventilated, vagotomized cats. An abrupt increase in inspired concentration of halothane from 1% to 4% immediately decreased both HN and PN activities, but HN activity decreased more and disappeared much earlier than did PN activity. Steady-state responses of HN and PN activities to changes in end-tidal concentration of halothane showed that halothane depressed both HN and PN activities in a dose-related manner but at different rates, suggesting that respiratory control of the tongue muscles and the diaphragm are in part mediated by different neural pathways. Differential suppression of PN and HN activities also was observed following an acute increase in anesthetic depth with thiopental and diazepam. In contrast, no such differential suppression was observed following ketamine administration. Thus, differential suppression of PN and HN may be associated not only with depth of anesthesia but also with the type of anesthetic used. PMID:6691591

  9. A thalamic input to the nucleus accumbens mediates opiate dependence.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingjie; Wienecke, Carl F R; Nachtrab, Gregory; Chen, Xiaoke

    2016-02-11

    Chronic opiate use induces opiate dependence, which is characterized by extremely unpleasant physical and emotional feelings after drug use is terminated. Both the rewarding effects of a drug and the desire to avoid withdrawal symptoms motivate continued drug use, and the nucleus accumbens is important for orchestrating both processes. While multiple inputs to the nucleus accumbens regulate reward, little is known about the nucleus accumbens circuitry underlying withdrawal. Here we identify the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus as a prominent input to the nucleus accumbens mediating the expression of opiate-withdrawal-induced physical signs and aversive memory. Activity in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus to nucleus accumbens pathway is necessary and sufficient to mediate behavioural aversion. Selectively silencing this pathway abolishes aversive symptoms in two different mouse models of opiate withdrawal. Chronic morphine exposure selectively potentiates excitatory transmission between the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus and D2-receptor-expressing medium spiny neurons via synaptic insertion of GluA2-lacking AMPA receptors. Notably, in vivo optogenetic depotentiation restores normal transmission at these synapses and robustly suppresses morphine withdrawal symptoms. This links morphine-evoked pathway- and cell-type-specific plasticity in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus to nucleus accumbens circuit to opiate dependence, and suggests that reprogramming this circuit holds promise for treating opiate addiction. PMID:26840481

  10. Kaon-nucleus scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Byungsik; Maung, Khin Maung; Wilson, John W.; Buck, Warren W.

    1989-01-01

    The derivations of the Lippmann-Schwinger equation and Watson multiple scattering are given. A simple optical potential is found to be the first term of that series. The number density distribution models of the nucleus, harmonic well, and Woods-Saxon are used without t-matrix taken from the scattering experiments. The parameterized two-body inputs, which are kaon-nucleon total cross sections, elastic slope parameters, and the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the forward elastic scattering amplitude, are presented. The eikonal approximation was chosen as our solution method to estimate the total and absorptive cross sections for the kaon-nucleus scattering.

  11. Convergence of the nucleus-nucleus Glauber multiple scattering series

    SciTech Connect

    Usmani, A.A.; Ahmad, I. )

    1991-05-01

    The Glauber {ital S}-matrix operator for nucleus-nucleus scattering is expressed as a finite series of matrix elements involving Bell's polynomials. Analyzing {alpha}{sup 4}He elastic-scattering data at the incident momentum of 4.32 GeV/{ital c}, we infer that our expansion is appreciably converging. Further, by applying closure over target and projectile states and neglecting a certain class of terms involving intermediate excitations, we arrive at a recurrence relation for nucleus-nucleus multiple scattering series terms, which invites further study as it seems to provide a simple method for calculating the nucleus-nucleus elastic-scattering cross section.

  12. Nucleus Course in Japanese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akiyama, Nobuo; Flamm, Carol S.

    The "Nucleus Course in Japanese," based on the Institute of Modern Languages'"Situational Reinforcement" approach, is designed for 80 to 100 hours of instruction. Each lesson has several sections--Response drills, Appropriate Response Sequence, and Reading. Most of the lessons also include optional sections with Sentences for Repetition or a…

  13. Cell nucleus in context

    SciTech Connect

    Lelievre, Sophie A.; Bissell, Mina J.; Pujuguet, Philippe

    1999-11-11

    The molecular pathways that participate in regulation of gene expression are being progressively unraveled. Extracellular signals, including the binding of extracellular matrix and soluble molecules to cell membrane receptors, activate specific signal transducers that convey information inside the cell and can alter gene products. Some of these transducers when translocated to the cell nucleus may bind to transcription complexes and thereby modify the transcriptional activity of specific genes. However, the basic molecules involved in the regulation of gene expression are found in many different cell and tissue types; thus the mechanisms underlying tissue-specific gene expression are still obscure. In this review, we focus on the study of signals that are conveyed to the nucleus. We propose that the way in which extracellular signals are integrated may account for tissue-specific gene expression. We argue that the integration of signals depends on the structural organization of cells ( i.e., extracellular matrix, cell membrane, cytoskeleton, nucleus) which a particular cell type within a tissue. Putting the nuclei in context allows us to envision gene expression as being regulated not only by the communication between the extracellular environment and the nucleus, but also by the influence of organized assemblies of cells on extracellular-nuclear communications.

  14. Onset of deconfinement in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gazdzicki, M.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Seyboth, P.

    2012-05-15

    The energy dependence of hadron production in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions reveals anomalies-the kink, horn, and step. They were predicted as signals of the deconfinement phase transition and observed by the NA49 Collaboration in central PbPb collisions at the CERN SPS. This indicates the onset of the deconfinement in nucleus-nucleus collisions at about 30 A GeV.

  15. Proton Nucleus Elastic Scattering Data.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-08-18

    Version 00 The Proton Nucleus Elastic Scattering Data file PNESD contains the numerical data and the related bibliography for the differential elastic cross sections, polarization and integral nonelastic cross sections for elastic proton-nucleus scattering.

  16. Hypoglossal-Facial Nerve Reconstruction Using a Y-Tube-Conduit Reduces Aberrant Synkinetic Movements of the Orbicularis Oculi and Vibrissal Muscles in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Yasemin; Ozsoy, Umut; Turhan, Murat; Angelov, Doychin N.; Sarikcioglu, Levent

    2014-01-01

    The facial nerve is the most frequently damaged nerve in head and neck trauma. Patients undergoing facial nerve reconstruction often complain about disturbing abnormal synkinetic movements of the facial muscles (mass movements, synkinesis) which are thought to result from misguided collateral branching of regenerating motor axons and reinnervation of inappropriate muscles. Here, we examined whether use of an aorta Y-tube conduit during reconstructive surgery after facial nerve injury reduces synkinesis of orbicularis oris (blink reflex) and vibrissal (whisking) musculature. The abdominal aorta plus its bifurcation was harvested (N = 12) for Y-tube conduits. Animal groups comprised intact animals (Group 1), those receiving hypoglossal-facial nerve end-to-end coaptation alone (HFA; Group 2), and those receiving hypoglossal-facial nerve reconstruction using a Y-tube (HFA-Y-tube, Group 3). Videotape motion analysis at 4 months showed that HFA-Y-tube group showed a reduced synkinesis of eyelid and whisker movements compared to HFA alone. PMID:25574468

  17. Hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis and rehabilitation in patients with complete facial palsy: cohort study of 30 patients followed up for three years.

    PubMed

    Dalla Toffola, Elena; Pavese, Chiara; Cecini, Miriam; Petrucci, Lucia; Ricotti, Susanna; Bejor, Maurizio; Salimbeni, Grazia; Biglioli, Federico; Klersy, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Our study evaluates the grade and timing of recovery in 30 patients with complete facial paralysis (House-Brackmann grade VI) treated with hypoglossal-facial nerve (XII-VII) anastomosis and a long-term rehabilitation program, consisting of exercises in facial muscle activation mediated by tongue movement and synkinesis control with mirror feedback. Reinnervation after XII-VII anastomosis occurred in 29 patients, on average 5.4 months after surgery. Three years after the anastomosis, 23.3% of patients had grade II, 53.3% grade III, 20% grade IV and 3.3% grade VI ratings on the House-Brackmann scale. Time to reinnervation was associated with the final House-Brackmann grade. Our study demonstrates that patients undergoing XIIVII anastomosis and a long-term rehabilitation program display a significant recovery of facial symmetry and movement. The recovery continues for at Hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis and rehabilitation in patients with complete facial palsy: cohort study of 30 patients followed up for three years least three years after the anastomosis, meaning that prolonged follow-up of these patients is advisable. PMID:25473738

  18. THE SPITZER MID-INFRARED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS SURVEY. I. OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF OBSCURED CANDIDATES AND NORMAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI SELECTED IN THE MID-INFRARED

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, M.; Ridgway, S. E.; Gates, E. L.; Petric, A. O.; Sajina, A.; Urrutia, T.; Cox Drews, S.; Harrison, C.; Seymour, N.; Storrie-Lombardi, L. J.

    2013-10-01

    We present the results of a program of optical and near-infrared spectroscopic follow-up of candidate active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected in the mid-infrared. This survey selects both normal and obscured AGNs closely matched in luminosity across a wide range, from Seyfert galaxies with bolometric luminosities L {sub bol} ∼ 10{sup 10} L {sub ☉} to highly luminous quasars (L {sub bol} ∼ 10{sup 14} L {sub ☉}), all with redshifts ranging from 0 to 4.3. Samples of candidate AGNs were selected with mid-infrared color cuts at several different 24 μm flux density limits to ensure a range of luminosities at a given redshift. The survey consists of 786 candidate AGNs and quasars, of which 672 have spectroscopic redshifts and classifications. Of these, 137 (20%) are type 1 AGNs with blue continua, 294 (44%) are type 2 objects with extinctions A{sub V} ∼> 5 toward their AGNs, 96 (14%) are AGNs with lower extinctions (A{sub V} ∼ 1), and 145 (22%) have redshifts, but no clear signs of AGN activity in their spectra. Of the survey objects 50% have L {sub bol} > 10{sup 12} L {sub ☉}, in the quasar regime. We present composite spectra for type 2 quasars and objects with no signs of AGN activity in their spectra. We also discuss the mid-infrared—emission-line luminosity correlation and present the results of cross correlations with serendipitous X-ray and radio sources. The results show that: (1) obscured objects dominate the overall AGN population, (2) mid-infrared selected AGN candidates exist which lack AGN signatures in their optical spectra but have AGN-like X-ray or radio counterparts, and (3) X-ray and optical classifications of obscured and unobscured AGNs often differ.

  19. Normal faults, normal friction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collettini, Cristiano; Sibson, Richard H.

    2001-10-01

    Debate continues as to whether normal faults may be seismically active at very low dips (δ < 30°) in the upper continental crust. An updated compilation of dip estimates (n = 25) has been prepared from focal mechanisms of shallow, intracontinental, normal-slip earthquakes (M > 5.5; slip vector raking 90° ± 30° in the fault plane) where the rupture plane is unambiguously discriminated. The dip distribution for these moderate-to-large normal fault ruptures extends from 65° > δ > 30°, corresponding to a range, 25° < θr < 60°, for the reactivation angle between the fault and inferred vertical σ1. In a comparable data set previously obtained for reverse fault ruptures (n = 33), the active dip distribution is 10° < δ = θr < 60°. For vertical and horizontal σ1 trajectories within extensional and compressional tectonic regimes, respectively, dip-slip reactivation is thus restricted to faults oriented at θr ≤ 60° to inferred σ1. Apparent lockup at θr ≈ 60° in each dip distribution and a dominant 30° ± 5° peak in the reverse fault dip distribution, are both consistent with a friction coefficient μs ≈ 0.6, toward the bottom of Byerlee's experimental range, though localized fluid overpressuring may be needed for reactivation of less favorably oriented faults.

  20. Analytic optical potentials for nucleon-nucleus nucleus-nucleus collisions involving light and medium nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidasaria, H. B.; Townsend, L. W.

    1982-01-01

    Utilizing an optical model potential approximation to the exact nucleus-nucleus multiple-scattering series, optical potentials for nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions are analytically derived. These expressions are applicable to light and medium cosmic ray nuclei as their single-particle density distributions are analytically determined, without approximation, from their actual harmonic well charge density distributions. Pauli correlation effects are included through the use of a simple Gaussian function to replace the usual expression obtained in the infinite nuclear matter approximation.

  1. Neutrino-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, H.; Garvey, G.; Zeller, G.P.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The study of neutrino oscillations has necessitated a new generation of neutrino experiments that are exploring neutrino-nuclear scattering processes. We focus in particular on charged-current quasi-elastic scattering, a particularly important channel that has been extensively investigated both in the bubble-chamber era and by current experiments. Recent results have led to theoretical reexamination of this process. We review the standard picture of quasi-elastic scattering as developed in electron scattering, review and discuss experimental results, and discuss additional nuclear effects such as exchange currents and short-range correlations that may play a significant role in neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  2. Nucleus from string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Koji; Morita, Takeshi

    2011-08-01

    In generic holographic QCD, we find that baryons are bound to form a nucleus, and that its radius obeys the empirically-known mass-number (A) dependence r∝A1/3 for large A. Our result is robust, since we use only a generic property of D-brane actions in string theory. We also show that nucleons are bound completely in a finite volume. Furthermore, employing a concrete holographic model (derived by Hashimoto, Iizuka, and Yi, describing a multibaryon system in the Sakai-Sugimoto model), the nuclear radius is evaluated as O(1)×A1/3[fm], which is consistent with experiments.

  3. Analysis of subthreshold antiproton production in [ital p]-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions in the relativistic Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck approach

    SciTech Connect

    Teis, S.; Cassing, W.; Maruyama, T.; Mosel, U. )

    1994-07-01

    We calculate the subthreshold production of antiprotons in the Lorentz-covariant relativistic Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (RBUU) approach employing a weighted testparticle method to treat the antiproton propagation and absorption nonperturbatively. We find that the antiproton differential cross sections are highly sensitive to the baryon and antiproton self-energies in the dense baryonic environment. Adopting the baryon scalar and vector self-energies from the empirical optical potential for proton-nucleus elastic scattering and from Dirac-Brueckner calculations at higher density [rho][gt][rho][sub 0] we examine the differential antiproton spectra as a function of the antiproton self-energy. A detailed comparison with the available experimental data for [ital p]-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus reactions shows that the antiproton feels a moderately attractive mean field at normal nuclear matter density [rho][sub 0] which is in line with a dispersive potential extracted from the free annihilation cross section.

  4. Higgs-Boson Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Cross section calculations are presented for the production of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions via two photon fusion. The calculations are performed in position space using Baur's method for folding together the Weizsacker-Williams virtual-photon spectra of the two colliding nuclei. It is found that two photon fusion in nucleus-nucleus collisions is a plausible way of finding intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at the Superconducting Super Collider or the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  5. Higgs-boson production in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    Cross-section calculations are presented for the production of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions via two-photon fusion. The calculations are performed in position space using Baur's method for folding together the Weizsacker-Williams virtual-photon spectra of the two colliding nuclei. It is found that two-photon fusion in nucleus-nucleus collisions is a plausible way of finding intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at the Superconducting Super Collider or the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  6. Networking the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Rajapakse, Indika; Scalzo, David; Tapscott, Stephen J; Kosak, Steven T; Groudine, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The nuclei of differentiating cells exhibit several fundamental principles of self-organization. They are composed of many dynamical units connected physically and functionally to each other—a complex network—and the different parts of the system are mutually adapted and produce a characteristic end state. A unique cell-specific signature emerges over time from complex interactions among constituent elements that delineate coordinate gene expression and chromosome topology. Each element itself consists of many interacting components, all dynamical in nature. Self-organizing systems can be simplified while retaining complex information using approaches that examine the relationship between elements, such as spatial relationships and transcriptional information. These relationships can be represented using well-defined networks. We hypothesize that during the process of differentiation, networks within the cell nucleus rewire according to simple rules, from which a higher level of order emerges. Studying the interaction within and among networks provides a useful framework for investigating the complex organization and dynamic function of the nucleus. PMID:20664641

  7. Electric quadrupole excitations in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1989-01-01

    Calculations are presented for electric quadrupole excitations in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The theoretical results are compared to an extensive data set and it is found that electric quadrupole effects provide substantial corrections to cross sections, especially for heavier nuclei.

  8. Meson multiplicity versus energy in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, T. W.; Freier, P. S.

    1986-01-01

    A systematic study of meson multiplicity as a function of energy at energies up to 100 GeV/u in nucleus-nucleus collisions has been made, using cosmic-ray data in nuclear emulsion. The data are consistent with simple nucleon-nucleon superposition models. Multiplicity per interacting nucleon in AA collisions does not appear to differ significantly from pp collisions.

  9. Scaling phenomenon in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C. Y.; Blankenbecler, R.

    1980-01-01

    New scaling variables for proton and pion production in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions are introduced which are the generalizations of the Feynmann scaling variable. They allow a simple description of the cross sections at forward and backward angles. 2 figures.

  10. Momentum loss in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Ferdous; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1993-01-01

    An optical model description, based on multiple scattering theory, of longitudinal momentum loss in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented. The crucial role of the imaginary component of the nucleon-nucleon transition matrix in accounting for longitudinal momentum transfer is demonstrated. Results obtained with this model are compared with Intranuclear Cascade (INC) calculations, as well as with predictions from Vlasov-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (VUU) and quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations. Comparisons are also made with experimental data where available. These indicate that the present model is adequate to account for longitudinal momentum transfer in both proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions over a wide range of energies.

  11. The Galactic Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melia, Fulvio

    Exciting new broadband observations of the galactic nucleus have placed the heart of the Milky Way under intense scrutiny in recent years. This has been due in part to the growing interest from theorists motivated to study the physics of black hole accretion, magnetized gas dynamics, and unusual star formation. The center of our Galaxy is now known to harbor the most compelling supermassive black hole candidate, weighing in at 3-4 million solar masses. Its nearby environment is comprised of a molecular dusty ring, clusters of evolved and young stars, diffuse hot gas, ionized gas streamers, and several supernova remnants. This chapter will focus on the physical makeup of this dynamic region and the feasibility of actually imaging the black hole's shadow in the coming decade with mm interferometry.

  12. Antiproton-nucleus interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cugnon, J.; Vandermeulen, J.

    The antiproton-nucleus physics is reviewed. On the experimental side, the recent results obtained at the LEAR, BNL and KEK facilities are analyzed. A brief summary of the main pp and pn experimental data is also given. The antiproton-nucleus interaction can lead to elasic, inelastic and charge exchange scattering and to annihilation. The latter is very dominant. The scattering cross-sections are usually analyzed in terms of complex potential models. The relationship between potentials, charge conjugation and Dirac phenomenology is discussed. Much emphasis is put on the dynamics of the antiproton annihilation on nuclei. The energy transfer, pion absorption and target response are analyzed within the intranuclear cascade model. Special interest is devoted to strangeness production, hypernucleus formation and possible annihilation on two nucleons. Signatures for this new process are searched in experimental data. Finally, the highly debated question of quark-gluon formation is analyzed. Cet article constitue une revue de la physique antiproton-noyau. Du point de vue expérimental, cette revue porte particulièrement sur les récents résultats obtenus à LEAR, BNL et KEK. On y a aussi inclus une mise à jour des faits expérimentaux principaux pour pp et pn. L'interaction antiproton-noyau conduit à la diffusion élastique, inélastique et d'xA9change de charge et à des processus d'annihilation. Habituellement, les expériences de diffusion sont analysées en termes de potentiels complexes. La relation entre ces potentiels, la conjugaison de charge et la phénoménologie de Dirac est discutée. On s'est particulièrement intéressé à la dynamique de l'annihilation d'antiprotons sur des noyaux. Le transfert d'énergie, l'absorption de pions et la réponse de la cible sont analysés dans le cadre du modèle de cascade intranucléaire. Certains autres points sont discutés plus en détail: la production d'étrangeté, la formation d'hypernoyaux et l'annihilation sur

  13. The nucleus basalis in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Clark, A W; Parhad, I M; Folstein, S E; Whitehouse, P J; Hedreen, J C; Price, D L; Chase, G A

    1983-10-01

    The nucleus basalis of Meynert (nbM) provides most of the cholinergic input to the cerebral cortex. The loss of cortical choline acetyltransferase (CAT) activity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and senile dementia of the Alzheimer's type (SDAT) appears to be related to a severe depopulation of the nbM in this dementia. In Huntington's disease (HD), by contrast, there is no loss of cortical CAT activity. The present quantitative study indicates that (1) there is no significant loss of neurons from the nbM in HD, and (2) that the previously described cytologic changes in the neurons of this nucleus in HD patients do not differ significantly from controls. These findings are consistent with the working hypothesis that the types of dementia associated with reductions of neocortical CAT activity are characterized by dysfunction or death of neurons in the nbM, but dementing disorders with normal neocortical CAT activity manifest no major abnormalities in this cholinergic nucleus of the basal forebrain. PMID:6225032

  14. Two Neutron Removal in Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Significant discrepancies between theory and experiment have previously been noted for double neutron removal via electromagnetic processes in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The present work examines the cause of these discrepancies and systematically investigates whether the problem might be due to electromagnetic theory, nuclear contributions, or an underestimate of experimental error. Using cross section systematics from other reactions it is found that the discrepancies can be resolved in a plausible manner.

  15. Unexpected doubly-magic nucleus.

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, R. V. F.; Physics

    2009-01-01

    Nuclei with a 'magic' number of both protons and neutrons, dubbed doubly magic, are particularly stable. The oxygen isotope {sup 24}O has been found to be one such nucleus - yet it lies just at the limit of stability.

  16. Cytotoxicity of nucleus-targeting fluorescent gold nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jing-Ya; Cui, Ran; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Mingxi; Xie, Zhi-Xiong; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2014-10-01

    Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with ultra small sizes and unique fluorescence properties have shown promising potential for imaging the nuclei of living cells. However, little is known regarding the potential cytotoxicity of AuNCs after they enter the cell nucleus. The aim of this study is to investigate whether and how nucleus-targeting AuNCs affect the normal functioning of cells. Highly stable, water-soluble and bright fluorescent Au25NCs (the core of each nanocluster is composed of 25 gold atoms) were synthesized. Specific targeting of Au25NCs to the cell nucleus was achieved by conjugating the TAT peptide to the Au25NCs. Cell viability, cell morphology, cell apoptosis/necrosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and mitochondrial membrane potential examinations were performed on different cell lines exposed to the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs. We found that the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs caused cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. A possible mechanism for the cytotoxicity of the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs was proposed as follows: the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs induce the production of ROS, resulting in the oxidative degradation of mitochondrial components, in turn leading to apoptosis via a mitochondrial damage pathway. This work facilitates a better understanding of the toxicity of AuNCs, especially nucleus-targeting AuNCs.Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with ultra small sizes and unique fluorescence properties have shown promising potential for imaging the nuclei of living cells. However, little is known regarding the potential cytotoxicity of AuNCs after they enter the cell nucleus. The aim of this study is to investigate whether and how nucleus-targeting AuNCs affect the normal functioning of cells. Highly stable, water-soluble and bright fluorescent Au25NCs (the core of each nanocluster is composed of 25 gold atoms) were synthesized. Specific targeting of Au25NCs to the cell nucleus was achieved by conjugating the TAT peptide to the Au25NCs. Cell viability, cell

  17. Sensitivity of cross sections for elastic nucleus-nucleus scattering to halo nucleus density distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Alkhazov, G. D.; Sarantsev, V. V.

    2012-12-15

    In order to clear up the sensitivity of the nucleus-nucleus scattering to the nuclear matter distributions in exotic halo nuclei, we have calculated differential cross sections for elastic scattering of the {sup 6}He and {sup 11}Li nuclei on several nuclear targets at the energy of 0.8 GeV/nucleon with different assumed nuclear density distributions in {sup 6}He and {sup 11}Li.

  18. Morphological and morphometric characterisation of Onuf's nucleus in the spinal cord in man

    PubMed Central

    PULLEN, A. H.; TUCKER, D.; MARTIN, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    In the absence of a systematic morphometric study of Onuf's nucleus in man, this investigation defines the limits of variation of segmental position and the range of length and volume of Onuf's nucleus in 6 normal humans displaying no neurological disease (2 males, 4 females). Serial section reconstruction methods in conjunction with the disector method provided information on the numbers, sizes and shapes of the constituent motor neurons of Onuf's nucleus. In contrast to previous descriptions, the cranial origin of Onuf's nucleus occurred in rostral S1 in 50% of subjects, and midcaudal S1 in the remaining subjects. Onuf's nucleus varied in length between 4 and 7 mm, and was 0.2–0.37 mm3 in volume. Differences in length or volume between males or females, or between the left and right side of the cord were not statistically significant. Neurons in Onuf's nucleus varied in diameter between 10 μm and 60 μm (mean 26 μm) and their mean number was 625±137. A higher density of neurons occurred at the cranial and caudal ends of the nucleus relative to the middle. While 37% of neurons were approximately spherical (shape index ∼1), 44% were ellipsoid and 19% fusiform (shape indices varying between 0.26 and 0.8). These findings are compared with previous studies of Onuf's nucleus in man and animals. The results form a basis for further studies on Onuf's nucleus in normality and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:9306197

  19. a Unified Approach to Hadron-Hadron Hadron-Nucleus and Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at High Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin-Nian

    The problem of multiparticle production in high -energy hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions are studied systematically in the framework of the Geometrical Branching Model (GBM). The model is based on the geometrical properties of nucleons and the stochastic nature of the interaction among the soft partons. The eikonal formalism is used to relate the elastic and inelastic cross sections and AGK cutting rule is used in connection with the multiparticle production process. The stochastic process of Furry branching is employed to describe the proliferation and hadronization of partons which lead to the produced particles. The approach describes hh, hA and AA collisions in a unified formalism for c.m. energies less than 100 GeV. The result of multiplicity distribution of produced particles exhibits Koba-Nielsen-Olesen (KNO) scaling. The universality of KNO scaling breaks down due to the different geometrical sizes of the hadron and nuclei. For hA and AA collisions, the formalism of GBM allows the hadron to be broken (to h^') by the first collision; indeed, it is the attention given to h^'h and h ^'h^' collisions that distinguishes this work from other earlier investigations on the subject. All of the calculated results are in good agreement with experiments. A general Monte Carlo simulation of GBM for multiparticle production in hh, hA and AA collisions is also given. The particle productivity in particular is studied in detail and is contrasted from the case where quark-gluon plasma (QGP) is produced in the AA collisions. This work forms a definitive description of hadronic and nuclear collisions that can serve as a basis from which exotic features such as the formation of QGP can be recognized as signatures deviating from the normal background.

  20. Double Nucleus in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mast, Damián; Díaz, Rubén J.; Agüero, M. Paz

    2006-03-01

    M83 is one of the nearest galaxies with enhanced nuclear star formation, and it presents one of the best opportunities to study the kinematics and physical properties of a circumnuclear starburst. Our three-dimensional spectroscopy data in the R band confirm the presence of a secondary nucleus or mass concentration (previously suggested by Thatte and coworkers). We determine the position of this hidden nucleus, which would be more massive than the visible one and was not detected in the optical Hubble Space Telescope images due, probably, to the strong dust extinction. Using a Keplerian approximation, we estimated for the optical nucleus a mass of (5.0+/-0.8)×106 Msolar/sini (r<1.5"), and for the hidden nucleus, located 4''+/-1'' to the northwest (position angle of 271deg+/-15deg) of the optical nucleus, a mass of (1.00+/-0.08)×107 Msolar/sini (r<1.5"). The emission-line ratio map also unveils the presence of a second circumnuclear ring structure, previously discovered by IR imaging (Elmegreen and coworkers). The data allow us to resolve the behavior of the interstellar medium inside the circumnuclear ring and around the binary mass concentration.

  1. Stimulation of the Hypothalamic Paraventricular Nucleus Modulates Cardiorespiratory Responses via Oxytocinergic Innervation of Neurons in Pre-Bötzinger Complex

    PubMed Central

    Mack, S.O.; Wu, M.; Kc, P.; Haxhiu, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Previously we reported that oxytocin (OT)-containing neurons of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) project to the preBötzinger complex (preBötC) region and phrenic motoneurons innervating the diaphragm (D). The aim of these studies was to determine pathways involved in PVN stimulation-induced changes in upper airway and chest wall pumping muscle activity. In addition, we determined the role of OT-containing neurons in the PVN in mediating increased respiratory output elicited by PVN stimulation. Neuroanatomical experiments, using pseudorabies virus (PRV) as a transneuronal tracer in C8 spinalectomized animals showed that PVN neurons project to hypoglossal motoneurons innervating the genioglossus (GG) muscle. Furthermore, microinjection of the PVN with bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, significantly increased (P<0.05) peak electromyographic activity of GG (GGEMG) and of DEMG, frequency discharge, and arterial blood pressure (BP) and heart rate. Prior injection of oxytocin antagonist [d-(CH2)5, Tyr(Me)2,Orn8]-vasotocin(OVT) intracisternally or blockade of oxytocin receptors in the preBötC region with oxytocin antagonist L-368,899, diminished GGEMG and DEMG responses and blunted the increase in BP and heart rate to PVN stimulation. These data show that PVN stimulation affects central regulatory mechanisms via the preBötC region controlling both respiratory and cardiovascular functions. The parallel changes induced by PVN stimulation were mediated mainly through an OT-OT receptor signaling pathway. PMID:16857863

  2. Nucleus management with irrigating vectis.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Aravind

    2009-01-01

    The main objective in modern cataract surgery is to achieve a better unaided visual acuity with rapid post-surgical recovery and minimal surgery-related complications. Early visual rehabilitation and better unaided vision can be achieved only by reducing the incision size. In manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS), incision is between 5.5 to 7 mm. Once the nucleus is prolapsed into the anterior chamber, it can be extracted through the tunnel. Nucleus extraction with an irrigating vectis is a very simple technique, which combines mechanical and hydrostatic forces to express out the nucleus. This technique is time-tested with good results and more than 95% of nuclei in MSICS are extracted in this way offering all the merits of phacoemulsification with the added benefits of having wider applicability, better safety, shorter learning curve and lower cost. PMID:19075403

  3. Cometary nucleus and active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, F. L.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of the icy conglomerate model of cometary nuclei, various observations demonstrate the spotted nature of many or most nuclei, i.e., regions of unusual activity, either high or low. Rotation periods, spin axes and even precession of the axes are determined. The observational evidence for variations in activity over the surfaces of cometary nuclei are listed and discussed. On June 11 the comet IRAS-ARAKI-ALCOCK approached the Earth to a distance of 0.031 AU, the nearest since C/Lexell, 1770 I, providing a unique opportunity for near-nucleus observations. Preliminary analysis of these images establishes the spin axis of the nucleus, with an oblioquity to the orbit plane of approximately 50 deg, and a lag angle of sublimation approximately 35 deg from the solar meridian on the nucleus. Asymmetries of the inner coma suggests a crazy-quilt distribution of ices with differing volatility over the surface of the nucleus. The observations of Comet P/Homes 1892 III, exhibiting two 8-10 magnitude bursts, are carefully analyzed. The grazing encounter produced, besides the first great burst, an active area on the nucleus, which was rotating retrograde with a period of 16.3hr and inclination nearly 180 deg. After the first burst the total magnitude fell less than two magnitudes from November 7 to November 30 (barely naked eye) while the nuclear region remained diffuse or complex, rarely if ever showing a stellar appearance. The fading was much more rapid after the second burst. The grazing encounter distributed a volume of large chunks in the neighborhood of the nucleus, maintaining activity for weeks.

  4. Ultrastructural observations on the progress of nerve degeneration and regeneration at the suture site following vagal-hypoglossal nerve coaptation in cats.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ming-E; Tyan, Yeu-Sheng; Hsu, Peng-Wei; Hsu, Jee-Ching; Chang, Hung-Ming; Ling, Eng-Ang; Lan, Chyn-Tair

    2009-01-01

    Nerve degeneration and regeneration have been investigated at the suture site following proximal-to-distal vagal-hypoglossal nerve coaptation (VHC) in cats at different time points (from 3 to 315 days postoperatively; dpo). Massive axonal degeneration and myelin breakdown and removal of degraded neural debris were observed during the first 2 weeks postoperatively. This was followed by active Schwann cell multiplication and inflammatory cell invasion at 14 dpo. Schwann cells appeared mobile, and were guided to the newly developed growth cones, dividing them into axonal sprout clusters. At 18 dpo, the migrating Schwann cells were confined to the preexisting basal lamina scaffolds, forming bands of Bungner. It is suggested that the latter may play a key role in navigating the regenerating axons to their newly acquired target organ at 22 dpo. Remyelination of axons was not observed till 46 dpo. Compared with the rapid axonal reaction in other models of nerve injury, the degeneration process in VHC was protracted and, furthermore, regeneration and remyelination were delayed. The subtle remodeling of the nerve in cross-coaptation may be far greater than previously recognized, and this may have clinical importance since patients undergoing nerve crossover microsurgery exhibit delayed motor rehabilitation, apparently as a direct result of a change in target innervation. Defining the mechanisms underlying the neuroplastic program could thus potentially improve the prognosis of crossover of two different peripheral nerves. PMID:19494480

  5. Pre- and postsynaptic modulations of hypoglossal motoneurons by α-adrenoceptor activation in wild-type and Mecp2−/Y mice

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiao-Tao; Cui, Ningren; Zhong, Weiwei; Jin, Xin; Wu, Zhongying

    2013-01-01

    Hypoglossal motoneurons (HNs) control tongue movement and play a role in maintenance of upper airway patency. Defects in these neurons may contribute to the development of sleep apnea and other cranial motor disorders including Rett syndrome (RTT). HNs are modulated by norepinephrine (NE) through α-adrenoceptors. Although postsynaptic mechanisms are known to play a role in this effect, how NE modulates the synaptic transmissions of HNs remains poorly understood. More importantly, the NE system is defective in RTT, while how the defect affects HNs is unknown. Believing that information of NE modulation of HNs may help the understanding of RTT and the design of new therapeutical interventions to motor defects in the disease, we performed these studies in which glycinergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents and intrinsic membrane properties were examined in wild-type and Mecp2−/Y mice, a mouse of model of RTT. We found that activation of α1-adrenoceptor facilitated glycinergic synaptic transmission and excited HNs. These effects were mediated by both pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms. The latter effect involved an inhibition of barium-sensitive G protein-dependent K+ currents. The pre- and postsynaptic modulations of the HNs by α1-adrenoceptors were not only retained in Mecp2-null mice but also markedly enhanced, which appears to be a compensatory mechanism for the deficiencies in NE and GABAergic synaptic transmission. The existence of the endogenous compensatory mechanism is an encouraging finding, as it may allow therapeutical modalities to alleviate motoneuronal defects in RTT. PMID:23986203

  6. Stenting for Internal Carotid Artery Stenosis Associated with Persistent Primitive Hypoglossal Artery Using Proximal Flow Blockade and Distal Protection System: A Technical Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Murai, Satoshi; Kusaka, Noboru; Umakoshi, Michiari; Itami, Hisakazu; Otsuka, Shinji; Nishiura, Tsukasa; Ogihara, Kotaro

    2016-06-01

    We report a very rare case of internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis associated with persistent primitive hypoglossal artery (PPHA) treated by stenting using a proximal flow blockade and distal filter protection system. A 77-year-old man with a medical history of repeated cerebral infarction was referred to our hospital for treatment of progressive ICA stenosis. Cerebral angiography revealed that the degree of stenosis was 50% and the PPHA branched just distal to the stenosis at the C2 vertebral level. Black-blood magnetic resonance imaging indicated vulnerable plaque. The stenosis was at a high location, so carotid artery stenting was employed. Under the proximal flow blockade system with occlusion of the external and common carotid artery, distal filter protection was placed in the ICA to prevent distal embolization. A self-expanding stent was successfully deployed and the patient was discharged without any neurological deficits. In stenting for the ICA stenosis associated with PPHA, the combination of a proximal flow blockade and distal protection system is reasonable and safe. PMID:27105567

  7. Formin' actin in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Baarlink, Christian; Grosse, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Many if not most proteins can, under certain conditions, change cellular compartments, such as, for example, shuttling from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Thus, many proteins may exert functions in various and very different subcellular locations, depending on the signaling context. A large amount of actin regulatory proteins has been detected in the mammalian cell nucleus, although their potential roles are much debated and are just beginning to emerge. Recently, members of the formin family of actin nucleators were also reported to dynamically localize to the nuclear environment. Here we discuss our findings that specific diaphanous-related formins can promote nuclear actin assembly in a signal-dependent manner. PMID:24637338

  8. Acridine: a versatile heterocyclic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ramesh; Kaur, Mandeep; Kumari, Meena

    2012-01-01

    Acridine is a heterocyclic nucleus. It plays an important role in various medicines. A number of therapeutic agents are based on acridine nucleus such as quinacrine (antimalarial), acriflavine and proflavine (antiseptics), ethacridine (abortifacient), amsacrine and nitracine (anticancer), and tacrine. Acridine is obtained from high boiling fraction of coal tar. It is also obtained in nature from plant and marine sources. Acridine undergoes a number of reactions such as nucleophilic addition, electrophilic substitution, oxidation, reduction, reductive alkylation and photoalkylation. The present review article summarizes the synthesis, reaction, literature review and pharmaceutical importance of acridine. PMID:22574501

  9. Functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Wemmer, David E.; Spence, Megan; Rubin, Seth

    2003-11-25

    A functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor that selectively associates with one or more target species, and a method for assaying and screening for one or a plurality of target species utilizing one or a plurality of functionalized active-nucleus complexes with at least two of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes having an attraction affinity to different corresponding target species. The functionalized active-nucleus complex has an active-nucleus and a targeting carrier. The method involves functionalizing an active-nucleus, for each functionalized active-nucleus complex, by incorporating the active-nucleus into a macromolucular or molecular complex that is capable of binding one of the target species and then bringing the macromolecular or molecular complexes into contact with the target species and detecting the occurrence of or change in a nuclear magnetic resonance signal from each of the active-nuclei in each of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes.

  10. Suprachiasmatic Nucleus: Cell Autonomy and Network Properties

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, David K.; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Kay, Steve A.

    2013-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the primary circadian pacemaker in mammals. Individual SCN neurons in dispersed culture can generate independent circadian oscillations of clock gene expression and neuronal firing. However, SCN rhythmicity depends on sufficient membrane depolarization and levels of intracellular calcium and cAMP. In the intact SCN, cellular oscillations are synchronized and reinforced by rhythmic synaptic input from other cells, resulting in a reproducible topographic pattern of distinct phases and amplitudes specified by SCN circuit organization. The SCN network synchronizes its component cellular oscillators, reinforces their oscillations, responds to light input by altering their phase distribution, increases their robustness to genetic perturbations, and enhances their precision. Thus, even though individual SCN neurons can be cell-autonomous circadian oscillators, neuronal network properties are integral to normal function of the SCN. PMID:20148688

  11. Higgs and Particle Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhe

    We apply a diagrammatic approach to study Higgs boson, a color-neutral heavy particle, pro- duction in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the saturation framework without quantum evolution. We assume the strong coupling constant much smaller than one. Due to the heavy mass and colorless nature of Higgs particle, final state interactions are absent in our calculation. In order to treat the two nuclei dynamically symmetric, we use the Coulomb gauge which gives the appropriate light cone gauge for each nucleus. To further eliminate initial state interactions we choose specific prescriptions in the light cone propagators. We start the calculation from only two nucleons in each nucleus and then demonstrate how to generalize the calculation to higher orders diagrammatically. We simplify the diagrams by the Slavnov-Taylor-Ward identities. The resulting cross section is factorized into a product of two Weizsacker-Williams gluon distributions of the two nuclei when the transverse momentum of the produced scalar particle is around the saturation momentum. To our knowledge this is the first process where an exact analytic formula has been formed for a physical process, involving momenta on the order of the saturation momentum, in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the quasi-classical approximation. Since we have performed the calculation in an unconventional gauge choice, we further confirm our results in Feynman gauge where the Weizsacker-Williams gluon distribution is interpreted as a transverse momentum broadening of a hard gluons traversing a nuclear medium. The transverse momentum factorization manifests itself in light cone gauge but not so clearly in Feynman gauge. In saturation physics there are two different unintegrated gluon distributions usually encountered in the literature: the Weizsacker-Williams gluon distribution and the dipole gluon distribution. The first gluon distribution is constructed by solving classical Yang-Mills equation of motion in the Mc

  12. Otic artery: a review of normal and pathological features.

    PubMed

    Vasović, Ljiljana; Arsić, Stojanka; Vlajković, Slobodan; Jovanović, Ivan; Jovanović, Predrag; Ugrenović, Sladjana; Andjelković, Zlatibor

    2010-05-01

    Three primitive arteries - the trigeminal, otic and hypoglossal take the names according to their close relation with the V, VIII and XII cranial nerves, while at the cervical level, the first segmental artery is named the primitive proatlantal intersegmental artery. When the human embryo is 4 mm long, these arteries serve as transitory anastomoses between primitive internal carotid arteries and bilateral longitudinal neural arterial plexus, which is the precursor of future basilar artery. Normal and/or abnormal morphofunctional aspects of the prenatal and postnatal forms of the otic artery are described according to the personal and literature data. Many (ab) normal arteries are also noted in differential diagnosis of the otic artery. Postnatally, individual incidence rates of the carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses have been found to be inversely related to their order of disappearance. The persistent trigeminal artery has a reported incidence from 0.06-0.6%, whereas the persistent primitive otic artery has been convincingly documented only in minor rates. Persistent carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses between the anterior and posterior cranial circulation are important to recognize during angiography for endovascular and surgical planning. Most frequently, the otic artery was an incidental finding. PMID:20424561

  13. Analysis of relativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions in emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Stephen C.

    1987-01-01

    The development of a computer-assisted method is reported for the determination of the angular distribution data for secondary particles produced in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in emulsions. The method is applied to emulsion detectors that were placed in a constant, uniform magnetic field and exposed to beams of 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon O-16 ions at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) of the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN). Linear regression analysis is used to determine the azimuthal and polar emission angles from measured track coordinate data. The software, written in BASIC, is designed to be machine independent, and adaptable to an automated system for acquiring the track coordinates. The fitting algorithm is deterministic, and takes into account the experimental uncertainty in the measured points. Further, a procedure for using the track data to estimate the linear momenta of the charged particles observed in the detectors is included.

  14. Single nucleon emission in relativistic nucleus-nucleus reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1992-01-01

    Significant discrepancies between theory and experiment have previously been noted for nucleon emission via electromagnetic processes in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The present work investigates the hypothesis that these discrepancies have arisen due to uncertainties about how to deduce the experimental electromagnetic cross section from the total measured cross section. An optical-model calculation of single neutron removal is added to electromagnetic cross sections and compared to the total experimental cross sections. Good agreement is found thereby resolving some of the earlier noted discrepancies. A detailed comparison to the recent work of Benesh, Cook, and Vary is made for both the impact parameter and the nuclear cross section. Good agreement is obtained giving an independent confirmation of the parameterized formulas developed by those authors.

  15. Dynamical nucleus-nucleus potential at short distances

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Yongying; Wang Ning; Li Zhuxia; Scheid, Werner

    2010-04-15

    The dynamical nucleus-nucleus potentials for fusion reactions {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca, {sup 48}Ca+{sup 208}Pb, and {sup 126}Sn+{sup 130}Te are studied with the improved quantum molecular dynamics model together with the extended Thomas-Fermi approximation for the kinetic energies of nuclei. The obtained fusion barrier for {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca is in good agreement with the extracted fusion barrier from the measured fusion excitation function, and the depths of the fusion pockets are close to the results of time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations. The energy dependence of the fusion barrier is also investigated. The fusion pocket becomes shallow for a heavy fusion system and almost disappears for heavy nearly symmetric systems, and the obtained potential at short distances is higher than the adiabatic potential.

  16. Azimuthal correlation and collective behavior in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Mali, P.; Mukhopadhyay, A. Sarkar, S.; Singh, G.

    2015-03-15

    Various flow effects of nuclear and hadronic origin are investigated in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Nuclear emulsion data collected from {sup 84}Kr + Ag/Br interaction at an incident energy of 1.52 GeV per nucleon and from {sup 28}Si + Ag/Br interaction at an incident energy of 14.5 GeV per nucleon are used in the investigation. The transverse momentum distribution and the flow angle analysis show that collective behavior, like a bounce-off effect of the projectile spectators and a sidesplash effect of the target spectators, are present in our event samples. From an azimuthal angle analysis of the data we also see a direct flow of the projectile fragments and of the produced charged particles. On the other hand, for both data samples the target fragments exhibit a reverse flow, while the projectile fragments exhibit an elliptic flow. Relevant flow parameters are measured.

  17. Hummingbird Comet Nucleus Analysis Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel; Carle, Glenn C.; Lasher, Larry E.

    2000-01-01

    Hummingbird is a highly focused scientific mission, proposed to NASA s Discovery Program, designed to address the highest priority questions in cometary science-that of the chemical composition of the cometary nucleus. After rendezvous with the comet, Hummingbird would first methodically image and map the comet, then collect and analyze dust, ice and gases from the cometary atmosphere to enrich characterization of the comet and support landing site selection. Then, like its namesake, Hummingbird would carefully descend to a pre-selected surface site obtaining a high-resolution image, gather a surface material sample, acquire surface temperature and then immediately return to orbit for detailed chemical and elemental analyses followed by a high resolution post-sampling image of the site. Hummingbird s analytical laboratory contains instrumentation for a comprehensive molecular and elemental analysis of the cometary nucleus as well as an innovative surface sample acquisition device.

  18. Multivariate normality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crutcher, H. L.; Falls, L. W.

    1976-01-01

    Sets of experimentally determined or routinely observed data provide information about the past, present and, hopefully, future sets of similarly produced data. An infinite set of statistical models exists which may be used to describe the data sets. The normal distribution is one model. If it serves at all, it serves well. If a data set, or a transformation of the set, representative of a larger population can be described by the normal distribution, then valid statistical inferences can be drawn. There are several tests which may be applied to a data set to determine whether the univariate normal model adequately describes the set. The chi-square test based on Pearson's work in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries is often used. Like all tests, it has some weaknesses which are discussed in elementary texts. Extension of the chi-square test to the multivariate normal model is provided. Tables and graphs permit easier application of the test in the higher dimensions. Several examples, using recorded data, illustrate the procedures. Tests of maximum absolute differences, mean sum of squares of residuals, runs and changes of sign are included in these tests. Dimensions one through five with selected sample sizes 11 to 101 are used to illustrate the statistical tests developed.

  19. Photoproduction of lepton pairs in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC energies

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, B. D.; Goncalves, V. P.; De Santana Amaral, J. T.

    2013-03-25

    In this contribution we study coherent interactions as a probe of the nonlinear effects in the Quantum Electrodynamics (QED). In particular, we study the multiphoton effects in the production of leptons pairs for proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions for heavy nuclei. In the proton-nucleus we assume the ultrarelativistic proton as a source of photons and estimate the photoproduction of lepton pairs on nuclei at RHIC and LHC energies considering the multiphoton effects associated to multiple rescattering of the projectile photon on the proton of the nucleus. In nucleus - nucleus colllisions we consider the two nuclei as a source of photons. As each scattering contributes with a factor {alpha}Z to the cross section, this contribution must be taken into account for heavy nuclei. We consider the Coulomb corrections to calculate themultiple scatterings and estimate the total cross section for muon and tau pair production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC energies.

  20. Normalizing Rejection.

    PubMed

    Conn, Vicki S; Zerwic, Julie; Jefferson, Urmeka; Anderson, Cindy M; Killion, Cheryl M; Smith, Carol E; Cohen, Marlene Z; Fahrenwald, Nancy L; Herrick, Linda; Topp, Robert; Benefield, Lazelle E; Loya, Julio

    2016-02-01

    Getting turned down for grant funding or having a manuscript rejected is an uncomfortable but not unusual occurrence during the course of a nurse researcher's professional life. Rejection can evoke an emotional response akin to the grieving process that can slow or even undermine productivity. Only by "normalizing" rejection, that is, by accepting it as an integral part of the scientific process, can researchers more quickly overcome negative emotions and instead use rejection to refine and advance their scientific programs. This article provides practical advice for coming to emotional terms with rejection and delineates methods for working constructively to address reviewer comments. PMID:26041785

  1. Comet nucleus sample return mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A comet nucleus sample return mission in terms of its relevant science objectives, candidate mission concepts, key design/technology requirements, and programmatic issues is discussed. The primary objective was to collect a sample of undisturbed comet material from beneath the surface of an active comet and to preserve its chemical and, if possible, its physical integrity and return it to Earth in a minimally altered state. The secondary objectives are to: (1) characterize the comet to a level consistent with a rendezvous mission; (2) monitor the comet dynamics through perihelion and aphelion with a long lived lander; and (3) determine the subsurface properties of the nucleus in an area local to the sampled core. A set of candidate comets is discussed. The hazards which the spacecraft would encounter in the vicinity of the comet are also discussed. The encounter strategy, the sampling hardware, the thermal control of the pristine comet material during the return to Earth, and the flight performance of various spacecraft systems and the cost estimates of such a mission are presented.

  2. Normal development.

    PubMed

    Girard, Nadine; Koob, Meriam; Brunel, Herv

    2016-01-01

    Numerous events are involved in brain development, some of which are detected by neuroimaging. Major changes in brain morphology are depicted by brain imaging during the fetal period while changes in brain composition can be demonstrated in both pre- and postnatal periods. Although ultrasonography and computed tomography can show changes in brain morphology, these techniques are insensitive to myelination that is one of the most important events occurring during brain maturation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is therefore the method of choice to evaluate brain maturation. MRI also gives insight into the microstructure of brain tissue through diffusion-weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Metabolic changes are also part of brain maturation and are assessed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Understanding and knowledge of the different steps in brain development are required to be able to detect morphologic and structural changes on neuroimaging. Consequently alterations in normal development can be depicted. PMID:27430460

  3. Role of the RVM in Descending Pain Regulation Originating from the Cerebrospinal Fluid-Contacting Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Fei, Yan; Wang, Xin; Chen, Songsong; Zhou, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Chao; Li, Ying; Sun, Lihong; Zhang, Licai

    2016-07-01

    Evidence has suggested that cerebrospinal fluid-contacting nucleus (CSF-contacting nucleus) is correlated with the development and recurrence of pain. A recent research showed that the CSF-contacting nucleus acts as a component of the descending 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) system and plays a role in descending pain inhibition. However, limited studies are conducted to investigate the relationship between the CSF-contacting nucleus and pain. In present study, we explored the effect of CSF-contacting nucleus on nociceptive behaviors in both normal and neuropathic rats via targeted ablation of the CSF-contacting nucleus in the brainstem, using cholera toxin subunit B-saporin (CB-SAP), a cytotoxin coupled to cholera toxin subunit B. The CB-SAP-treated rats showed aggravated thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Also, results from immunohistochemical experiments showed that rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) received fiber projection from the CSF-contacting nucleus, which disappeared after ablation of the CSF-contacting nucleus, and the CB-SAP treated rats showed downregulation of c-Fos expression in the RVM as compared with the rats receiving i.c.v. injection of phosphate buffer saline (PBS). A significant downregulation of 5-HT-labeled neurons and tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) as the marker of 5-HT cells in the RVM, and 5-HT expression in spinal dorsal horn in both normal and chronic constriction injury (CCI) rats after i.c.v. injection of CB-SAP was observed. These results suggested that RVM may be involved in descending pain modulation originating from the CSF-contacting nucleus. PMID:26961890

  4. Theoretical antideuteron-nucleus absorptive cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, W. W.; Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Antideuteron-nucleus absorptive cross sections for intermediate to high energies are calculated using an ion-ion optical model. Good agreement with experiment (within 15 percent) is obtained in this same model for (bar p)-nucleus cross sections at laboratory energies up to 15 GeV. We describe a technique for estimating antinucleus-nucleus cross sections from NN data and suggest that further cosmic ray studies to search for antideuterons and other antinuclei be undertaken.

  5. The identification of musical instruments through nucleus cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Grasmeder, M L; Lutman, M E

    2006-09-01

    In this study, self-reported ability to recognize musical instruments was investigated by means of a questionnaire, which was sent to a group of adult Nucleus cochlear implant users and a group of normally hearing subjects. In addition, spectrograms and electrodograms were produced and analysed for samples of music played on 10 different musical instruments. Self-reported ability to recognize some instruments was poor in the group of implant users, particularly for the saxophone, tuba and clarinet. Electrodograms showed that these instruments could only be identified using distorted spectral information or reduced temporal information. Other instruments, such as the drum and piano, could be identified using temporal information. Limited spectral resolution makes the recognition of musical instruments difficult for Nucleus implant users. PMID:18792382

  6. Nucleus Accumbens Invulnerability to Methamphetamine Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Donald M.; Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Thomas, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (Meth) is a neurotoxic drug of abuse that damages neurons and nerve endings throughout the central nervous system. Emerging studies of human Meth addicts using both postmortem analyses of brain tissue and noninvasive imaging studies of intact brains have confirmed that Meth causes persistent structural abnormalities. Animal and human studies have also defined a number of significant functional problems and comorbid psychiatric disorders associated with long-term Meth abuse. This review summarizes the salient features of Meth-induced neurotoxicity with a focus on the dopamine (DA) neuronal system. DA nerve endings in the caudate-putamen (CPu) are damaged by Meth in a highly delimited manner. Even within the CPu, damage is remarkably heterogeneous, with ventral and lateral aspects showing the greatest deficits. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) is largely spared the damage that accompanies binge Meth intoxication, but relatively subtle changes in the disposition of DA in its nerve endings can lead to dramatic increases in Meth-induced toxicity in the CPu and overcome the normal resistance of the NAc to damage. In contrast to the CPu, where DA neuronal deficiencies are persistent, alterations in the NAc show a partial recovery. Animal models have been indispensable in studies of the causes and consequences of Meth neurotoxicity and in the development of new therapies. This research has shown that increases in cytoplasmic DA dramatically broaden the neurotoxic profile of Meth to include brain structures not normally targeted for damage. The resistance of the NAc to Meth-induced neurotoxicity and its ability to recover reveal a fundamentally different neuroplasticity by comparison to the CPu. Recruitment of the NAc as a target of Meth neurotoxicity by alterations in DA homeostasis is significant in light of the numerous important roles played by this brain structure. PMID:23382149

  7. Inhibition of the pontine Kölliker-Fuse nucleus reduces genioglossal activity elicited by stimulation of the retrotrapezoid chemoreceptor neurons.

    PubMed

    Silva, Josiane N; Lucena, Elvis V; Silva, Talita M; Damasceno, Rosélia S; Takakura, Ana C; Moreira, Thiago S

    2016-07-22

    The Kölliker-Fuse (KF) region, located in the dorsolateral pons, projects to several brainstem areas involved in respiratory regulation, including the chemoreceptor neurons within the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN). Several lines of evidence indicate that the pontine KF region plays an important role in the control of the upper airways for the maintenance of appropriate airflow to and from the lungs. Specifically, we hypothesized that the KF region is involved in mediating the response of the hypoglossal motor activity to central respiratory chemoreflex activation and to stimulation of the chemoreceptor neurons within the RTN region. To test this hypothesis, we combined immunohistochemistry and physiological experiments. We found that in the KF, the majority of biotinylated dextran amine (BDA)-labeled axonal varicosities contained detectable levels of vesicular glutamate transporter-2 (VGLUT2), but few contained glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 (GAD67). The majority of the RTN neurons that were FluorGold (FG)-immunoreactive (i.e., projected to the KF) contained hypercapnia-induced Fos, but did not express tyrosine hydroxylase. In urethane-anesthetized sino-aortic denervated and vagotomized male Wistar rats, hypercapnia (10% CO2) or N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) injection (0.1mM) in the RTN increased diaphragm (DiaEMG) and genioglossus muscle (GGEMG) activities and elicited abdominal (AbdEMG) activity. Bilateral injection of muscimol (GABA-A agonist; 2mM) into the KF region reduced the increase in DiaEMG and GGEMG produced by hypercapnia or NMDA into the RTN. Our data suggest that activation of chemoreceptor neurons in the RTN produces a significant increase in the genioglossus muscle activity and the excitatory pathway is dependent on the neurons located in the dorsolateral pontine KF region. PMID:27126558

  8. Actomyosin contractility rotates the cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Abhishek; Maitra, Ananyo; Sumit, Madhuresh; Ramaswamy, Sriram; Shivashankar, G. V.

    2014-01-01

    The cell nucleus functions amidst active cytoskeletal filaments, but its response to their contractile stresses is largely unexplored. We study the dynamics of the nuclei of single fibroblasts, with cell migration suppressed by plating onto micro-fabricated patterns. We find the nucleus undergoes noisy but coherent rotational motion. We account for this observation through a hydrodynamic approach, treating the nucleus as a highly viscous inclusion residing in a less viscous fluid of orientable filaments endowed with active stresses. Lowering actin contractility selectively by introducing blebbistatin at low concentrations drastically reduced the speed and coherence of the angular motion of the nucleus. Time-lapse imaging of actin revealed a correlated hydrodynamic flow around the nucleus, with profile and magnitude consistent with the results of our theoretical approach. Coherent intracellular flows and consequent nuclear rotation thus appear to be an intrinsic property of cells. PMID:24445418

  9. The multifunctional lateral geniculate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Weyand, Theodore G

    2016-02-01

    Providing the critical link between the retina and visual cortex, the well-studied lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) has stood out as a structure in search of a function exceeding the mundane 'relay'. For many mammals, it is structurally impressive: Exquisite lamination, sophisticated microcircuits, and blending of multiple inputs suggest some fundamental transform. This impression is bolstered by the fact that numerically, the retina accounts for a small fraction of its input. Despite such promise, the extent to which an LGN neuron separates itself from its retinal brethren has proven difficult to appreciate. Here, I argue that whereas retinogeniculate coupling is strong, what occurs in the LGN is judicious pruning of a retinal drive by nonretinal inputs. These nonretinal inputs reshape a receptive field that under the right conditions departs significantly from its retinal drive, even if transiently. I first review design features of the LGN and follow with evidence for 10 putative functions. Only two of these tend to surface in textbooks: parsing retinal axons by eye and functional group and gating by state. Among the remaining putative functions, implementation of the principle of graceful degradation and temporal decorrelation are at least as interesting but much less promoted. The retina solves formidable problems imposed by physics to yield multiple efficient and sensitive representations of the world. The LGN applies context, increasing content, and gates several of these representations. Even if the basic concentric receptive field remains, information transmitted for each LGN spike relative to each retinal spike is measurably increased. PMID:26479339

  10. Music and the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Mavridis, Ioannis N

    2015-03-01

    Music is a universal feature of human societies over time, mainly because it allows expression and regulation of strong emotions, thus influencing moods and evoking pleasure. The nucleus accumbens (NA), the most important pleasure center of the human brain (dominates the reward system), is the 'king of neurosciences' and dopamine (DA) can be rightfully considered as its 'crown' due to the fundamental role that this neurotransmitter plays in the brain's reward system. Purpose of this article was to review the existing literature regarding the relation between music and the NA. Studies have shown that reward value for music can be coded by activity levels in the NA, whose functional connectivity with auditory and frontal areas increases as a function of increasing musical reward. Listening to music strongly modulates activity in a network of mesolimbic structures involved in reward processing including the NA. The functional connectivity between brain regions mediating reward, autonomic and cognitive processing provides insight into understanding why listening to music is one of the most rewarding and pleasurable human experiences. Musical stimuli can significantly increase extracellular DA levels in the NA. NA DA and serotonin were found significantly higher in animals exposed to music. Finally, passive listening to unfamiliar although liked music showed activations in the NA. PMID:25102783

  11. The retrotrapezoid nucleus and breathing.

    PubMed

    Guyenet, Patrice G; Stornetta, Ruth L; Abbott, Stephen B G; Depuy, Seth D; Kanbar, Roy

    2012-01-01

    The retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) is located in the rostral medulla oblongata close to the ventral surface and consists of a bilateral cluster of glutamatergic neurons that are non-aminergic and express homeodomain transcription factor Phox2b throughout life. These neurons respond vigorously to increases in local pCO(2) via cell-autonomous and paracrine (glial) mechanisms and receive additional chemosensory information from the carotid bodies. RTN neurons exclusively innervate the regions of the brainstem that contain the respiratory pattern generator (RPG). Lesion or inhibition of RTN neurons largely attenuates the respiratory chemoreflex of adult rats whereas their activation increases respiratory rate, inspiratory amplitude and active expiration. Phox2b mutations that cause congenital central hypoventilation syndrome in humans prevent the development of RTN neurons in mice. Selective deletion of the RTN Phox2b-VGLUT2 neurons by genetic means in mice eliminates the respiratory chemoreflex in neonates.In short, RTN Phox2b-VGLUT2 neurons are a major nodal point of the CNS network that regulates pCO(2) via breathing and these cells are probable central chemoreceptors. PMID:23080151

  12. Nucleus accumbens stimulation in pathological obesity.

    PubMed

    Harat, Marek; Rudaś, Marcin; Zieliński, Piotr; Birska, Julita; Sokal, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    One of the potential treatment methods of obesity is deep brain stimulation (DBS) of nucleus accumbens. We describe the case of 19 years old woman with hypothalamic obesity. She weighted 151.4 kg before DBS and the non-surgical methods proved to be inefficient. She was treated with implantation of DBS electrode to nucleus accumbens bilaterally. Results were measured with body mass index and neuropsychological tests. Follow-up was 14 months. Fourteen months after surgery weight was 138 kg, BMI was 48.3. Neuropsychological test results were intact. The presented case supports the thesis of treatment of obesity with nucleus accumbens stimulation. PMID:27154450

  13. Dynamic risk control by human nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Nachev, Parashkev; Lopez-Sosa, Fernando; Gonzalez-Rosa, Javier Jesus; Galarza, Ana; Avecillas, Josue; Pineda-Pardo, Jose Angel; Lopez-Ibor, Juan José; Reneses, Blanca; Barcia, Juan Antonio; Strange, Bryan

    2015-12-01

    Real-world decisions about reward often involve a complex counterbalance of risk and value. Although the nucleus accumbens has been implicated in the underlying neural substrate, its criticality to human behaviour remains an open question, best addressed with interventional methodology that probes the behavioural consequences of focal neural modulation. Combining a psychometric index of risky decision-making with transient electrical modulation of the nucleus accumbens, here we reveal profound, highly dynamic alteration of the relation between probability of reward and choice during therapeutic deep brain stimulation in four patients with treatment-resistant psychiatric disease. Short-lived phasic electrical stimulation of the region of the nucleus accumbens dynamically altered risk behaviour, transiently shifting the psychometric function towards more risky decisions only for the duration of stimulation. A critical, on-line role of human nucleus accumbens in dynamic risk control is thereby established. PMID:26428667

  14. Volumes of cochlear nucleus regions in rodents.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Donald A; Lee, Augustine C; Hamilton, Walter D; Benjamin, Louis C; Vishwanath, Shilpa; Simo, Hermann; Godfrey, Lynn M; Mustapha, Abdurrahman I A A; Heffner, Rickye S

    2016-09-01

    The cochlear nucleus receives all the coded information about sound from the cochlea and is the source of auditory information for the rest of the central auditory system. As such, it is a critical auditory nucleus. The sizes of the cochlear nucleus as a whole and its three major subdivisions - anteroventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN), posteroventral cochlear nucleus (PVCN), and dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) - have been measured in a large number of mammals, but measurements of its subregions at a more detailed level for a variety of species have not previously been made. Size measurements are reported here for the summed granular regions, DCN layers, AVCN, PVCN, and interstitial nucleus in 15 different rodent species, as well as a lagomorph, carnivore, and small primate. This further refinement of measurements is important because the granular regions and superficial layers of the DCN appear to have some different functions than the other cochlear nucleus regions. Except for DCN layers in the mountain beaver, all regions were clearly identifiable in all the animals studied. Relative regional size differences among most of the rodents, and even the 3 non-rodents, were not large and did not show a consistent relation to their wide range of lifestyles and hearing parameters. However, the mountain beaver, and to a lesser extent the pocket gopher, two rodents that live in tunnel systems, had relative sizes of summed granular regions and DCN molecular layer distinctly larger than those of the other mammals. Among all the mammals studied, there was a high correlation between the size per body weight of summed granular regions and that of the DCN molecular layer, consistent with other evidence for a close relationship between granule cells and superficial DCN neurons. PMID:27435005

  15. Testing string dynamics in lepton nucleus reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulassy, M.; Pluemer, M.

    1989-10-01

    The sensitivity of nuclear attenuation of 10-100 GeV lepton nucleus ({ell}A) reactions to space-time aspects of hadronization is investigated within the context of the Lund string model. We consider two mechanisms for attenuation in a nucleus: final state cascading and string flip excitations. Implications for the evolution of the energy density in nuclear collisions are discussed. 16 refs., 10 figs.

  16. Commissural axons of the mouse cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Brown, M Christian; Drottar, Marie; Benson, Thane E; Darrow, Keith

    2013-05-01

    The axons of commissural neurons that project from one cochlear nucleus to the other were studied after labeling with anterograde tracer. Injections were made into the dorsal subdivision of the cochlear nucleus in order to restrict labeling only to the group of commissural neurons that gave off collaterals to, or were located in, this subdivision. The number of labeled commissural axons in each injection was correlated with the number of labeled radiate multipolar neurons, suggesting radiate neurons as the predominant origin of the axons. The radiate commissural axons are thick and myelinated, and they exit the dorsal acoustic stria of the injected cochlear nucleus to cross the brainstem in the dorsal half, near the crossing position of the olivocochlear bundle. They enter the opposite cochlear nucleus via the dorsal and ventral acoustic stria and at its medial border. Reconstructions of single axons demonstrate that terminations are mostly in the core and typically within a single subdivision of the cochlear nucleus. Extents of termination range from narrow to broad along both the dorsoventral (i.e., tonotopic) and the rostrocaudal dimensions. In the electron microscope, labeled swellings form synapses that are symmetric (in that there is little postsynaptic density), a characteristic of inhibitory synapses. Our labeled axons do not appear to include excitatory commissural axons that end in edge regions of the nucleus. Radiate commissural axons could mediate the broadband inhibition observed in responses to contralateral sound, and they may balance input from the two ears with a quick time course. PMID:23124982

  17. Improved Cloud Condensation Nucleus Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leu, Ming-Taun

    2010-01-01

    An improved thermal-gradient cloud condensation nucleus spectrometer (CCNS) has been designed to provide several enhancements over prior thermal- gradient counters, including fast response and high-sensitivity detection covering a wide range of supersaturations. CCNSs are used in laboratory research on the relationships among aerosols, supersaturation of air, and the formation of clouds. The operational characteristics of prior counters are such that it takes long times to determine aerosol critical supersaturations. Hence, there is a need for a CCNS capable of rapid scanning through a wide range of supersaturations. The present improved CCNS satisfies this need. The improved thermal-gradient CCNS (see Figure 1) incorporates the following notable features: a) The main chamber is bounded on the top and bottom by parallel thick copper plates, which are joined by a thermally conductive vertical wall on one side and a thermally nonconductive wall on the opposite side. b) To establish a temperature gradient needed to establish a supersaturation gradient, water at two different regulated temperatures is pumped through tubes along the edges of the copper plates at the thermally-nonconductive-wall side. Figure 2 presents an example of temperature and supersaturation gradients for one combination of regulated temperatures at the thermally-nonconductive-wall edges of the copper plates. c) To enable measurement of the temperature gradient, ten thermocouples are cemented to the external surfaces of the copper plates (five on the top plate and five on the bottom plate), spaced at equal intervals along the width axis of the main chamber near the outlet end. d) Pieces of filter paper or cotton felt are cemented onto the interior surfaces of the copper plates and, prior to each experimental run, are saturated with water to establish a supersaturation field inside the main chamber. e) A flow of monodisperse aerosol and a dilution flow of humid air are introduced into the main

  18. Comet 19P/Borrelly in Three Dimensions: Coma and Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderblom, L. A.

    2002-12-01

    On September 22, 2001 the ion propulsion-powered NASA-JPL Deep Space 1 (DS1) spacecraft passed 2171 km from the nucleus of 19P/Borrelly with a relative velocity of 16.5 km/sec. The advanced technology Miniature Integrated Camera and Spectrometer (MICAS) aboard DS1, collected 25 high resolution images of the coma, jets and nucleus of the Jupiter-family short-period comet. These images were acquired at over a wide range of phase angles allowing detailed characterization of the surface topography of the nucleus, the three-dimensional characteristics of the coma, and the relationships between the two. The very low albedo, elongate nucleus exhibits large albedo variations and complex geology. Observations starting a few days before and extending up to encounter show a prominent jet emanating roughly normal to long axis of nucleus from a broad central depression into a direction about 35 degrees from the sun line (RA: 223 degrees and DEC: -15 degrees). Both fan-like and highly collimated jets are observed in the near-nucleus coma. The collimated jets have cylindrical cores (about 0.5 km x 5 km in dimension) and bubble-shaped bright bases; two are traceable to darker circular patches on the nucleus. The main jet is evidently co-aligned with the rotation axis. This places the sub-solar point only 30 degrees from the pole and, therefore, the pole is in constant sunlight around perihelion. Such an orientation for the pole would also represent a stable rotation of the nucleus around its short axis.

  19. Effects of aging on nitrergic neurons in human striatum and subthalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Santos-Lobato, Bruno Lopes dos; Del-Bel, Elaine Aparecida; Pittella, José Eymard Homem; Tumas, Vitor

    2015-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a major neurotransmitter associated with motor control in basal ganglia. Movement disorders, as essential tremor and Parkinson's disease, are more prevalent on aged individuals. We investigated the effects of aging on neuronal density and diameter/area of nitrergic neurons in samples of striatum (caudate and putamen) and subthalamic nucleus of 20 human brains from normal subjects, stained by histochemistry for NADPH-diaphorase and immunohistochemistry for neuronal NO synthase. Our data showed aging does not modify the neuronal density and size of nitrergic neurons in striatum and subthalamic nucleus. These findings suggest a lack of association between aging and morphologic changes on nitrergic neurons. PMID:26352497

  20. Computer program for parameterization of nucleus-nucleus electromagnetic dissociation cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Badavi, Forooz F.

    1988-01-01

    A computer subroutine parameterization of electromagnetic dissociation cross sections for nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented that is suitable for implementation in a heavy ion transport code. The only inputs required are the projectile kinetic energy and the projectile and target charge and mass numbers.

  1. A Model of Comet Nucleus Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, H. U.; Jorda, L.; Rickman, H.; Thomas, N.

    2000-10-01

    Modelling cometary rotation is of particular interest for the preparation of space missions to comets. For example, the mapping phase during the ROSETTA mission must be planned keeping in mind that, unlike most asteroids, the rotational state of most short-period comets might be complex (excited). The modelling of cometary nucleus rotation can also provide us with important parameters that are needed to interpret coma structures or to build time-dependent thermal models of the nucleus. We combine a general three-dimensional model for the nucleus shape, surface properties, and insolation with a simplified thermal model to calculate the local time-dependent activity and consequently the non-gravitational forces acting on the nucleus. The torque of this force is then used to numerically solve the forced Euler equations for a homogeneously outgassing irregularly-shaped cometary nucleus. We will discuss the results of our model for comets 46P/Wirtanen, the target of the ROSETTA mission, and 19P/Borrelly, the target of DEEP-SPACE 1 and derive some generalized inferences.

  2. Antibodies to human caudate nucleus neurons in Huntington's chorea.

    PubMed Central

    Husby, G; Li, L; Davis, L E; Wedege, E; Kokmen, E; Williams, R C

    1977-01-01

    Antibodies reacting with neuronal cytoplasmic antigens present in normal human caudate and subthalamic nuclei were detected in 37 of 80 probands afflicted with Huntington's disease (HD). IgG antibodies were detected by immunofluorescence using frozen sections of unfixed normal human and rat brain. Specificity of IgG binding was confirmed using pepsin F(ab')2 fragments of IgG isolated from positive sera. In vitro complement fixation of IgG antibody was detected in 22 of 31 sera tested. Neuronal cytoplasmic antigens reacting with positive HD sera were diminished after trypsin or RNAase treatment of tissue sections but were not removed by DNAase, neuraminidase, EDTA, or dithiothreitol treatment. Antibody staining of neurons could be removed after absorption with isolated caudate nucleus neurons or by using perchloroacetic acid extracts of caudate nucleus. Prevalence of antibody reacting with neuronal cytoplasm was 3% in 60 normal controls and 6% among a wide variety of patients with diverse neurological disorders. However, one-third of 33 patients with Parkinson's disease showed presence of antineuronal antibody. Among patients with HD, a significant association was noted between duration of clinical disease greater than 7 yr and titers of antibody of 1:2 or greater (P less than 0.001). When 115 family members of HD probands were tested, 30% of unaffected spouses showed presence of antineuronal antibody. 23.2% of first-degree relatives at risk for developing HD was also positive (P less than 0.001). 10.5% of second-degree relatives showed presence of antineuronal antibody. These data may support an environmental or infectious factor somehow involved in the ultimate expression of HD. Images PMID:140183

  3. The vasopressinergic innervation of the brain in normal and castrated rats.

    PubMed

    DeVries, G J; Buijs, R M; Van Leeuwen, F W; Caffé, A R; Swaab, D F

    1985-03-01

    A detailed description is given of the distribution of vasopressin-immunoreactive structures in the brain of intact adult male rats. By application of a modified immunocytochemical procedure, vasopressin-immunoreactive fibers were detected in many new areas. In adult male rats which were castrated 15 weeks before death, vasopressin-immunoreactive cell bodies had disappeared from the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the medial amygdaloid nucleus. No obvious changes were found in vasopressin-immunoreactive cell bodies in other areas. Furthermore, a very strong reduction was seen in the density of vasopressin-immunoreactive fibers in the olfactory tubercle, nucleus of the diagonal band and its immediate surroundings, ventral pallidum, basal nucleus of Meynert, lateral septum, septofimbrial nucleus, ventral hippocampal formation, amygdaloid area, pre- and supramammillary nucleus, supramammillary decussation, (inter)dorsomedial, parafascicular, and ventral aspect of paraventricular thalamic nuclei, zona incerta, lateral habenular nucleus, ventral tegmental area, substantia nigra, periventricular gray, dorsal and median raphe nucleus, and locus coeruleus. No changes were observed in other areas containing vasopressin-immunoreactive fibers. These changes following gonadectomy were not observed in castrated rats which had been treated with testosterone. The results suggest that vasopressin projections from the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and possibly from the medial amygdaloid nucleus require the presence of gonadal hormones for their normal appearance. This is in contrast to pathways arising from the hypothalamic vasopressin-producing nuclei, which fail to show obvious changes following castration. PMID:3882778

  4. Protein quality control in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ramon D; Gardner, Richard G

    2016-06-01

    The nucleus is the repository for the eukaryotic cell's genetic blueprint, which must be protected from harm to ensure survival. Multiple quality control (QC) pathways operate in the nucleus to maintain the integrity of the DNA, the fidelity of the DNA code during replication, its transcription into mRNA, and the functional structure of the proteins that are required for DNA maintenance, mRNA transcription, and other important nuclear processes. Although we understand a great deal about DNA and RNA QC mechanisms, we know far less about nuclear protein quality control (PQC) mechanisms despite that fact that many human diseases are causally linked to protein misfolding in the nucleus. In this review, we discuss what is known about nuclear PQC and we highlight new questions that have emerged from recent developments in nuclear PQC studies. PMID:27015023

  5. Interpretive monitoring in the caudate nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Yanike, Marianna; Ferrera, Vincent P

    2014-01-01

    In a dynamic environment an organism has to constantly adjust ongoing behavior to adapt to a given context. This process requires continuous monitoring of ongoing behavior to provide its meaningful interpretation. The caudate nucleus is known to have a role in behavioral monitoring, but the nature of these signals during dynamic behavior is still unclear. We recorded neuronal activity in the caudate nucleus in monkeys during categorization behavior that changed rapidly across contexts. We found that neuronal activity maintained representation of the identity and context of a recently categorized stimulus, as well as interpreted the behavioral meaningfulness of the maintained trace. The accuracy of this cognitive monitoring signal was highest for behavior for which subjects were prone to make errors. Thus, the caudate nucleus provides interpretive monitoring of ongoing behavior, which is necessary for contextually specific decisions to adapt to rapidly changing conditions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03727.001 PMID:25415238

  6. Uncovering the Nucleus Candidate for NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günthardt, G. I.; Agüero, M. P.; Camperi, J. A.; Díaz, R. J.; Gomez, P. L.; Bosch, G.; Schirmer, M.

    2015-11-01

    NGC 253 is the nearest spiral galaxy with a nuclear starburst that becomes the best candidate for studying the relationship between starburst and active galactic nucleus activity. However, this central region is veiled by large amounts of dust, and it has been so far unclear which is the true dynamical nucleus to the point that there is no strong evidence that the galaxy harbors a supermassive black hole co-evolving with the starburst as was supposed earlier. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, especially NIR emission line analysis, could be advantageous in shedding light on the true nucleus identity. Using Flamingos-2 at Gemini South we have taken deep K-band spectra along the major axis of the central structure and through the brightest infrared source. In this work, we present evidence showing that the brightest NIR and mid-infrared source in the central region, already known as radio source TH7 and so far considered just a large stellar supercluster, in fact presents various symptoms of a genuine galactic nucleus. Therefore, it should be considered a valid nucleus candidate. Mentioning some distinctive aspects, it is the most massive compact infrared object in the central region, located at 2.″0 of the symmetry center of the galactic bar, as measured in the K-band emission. Moreover, our data indicate that this object is surrounded by a large circumnuclear stellar disk and it is also located at the rotation center of the large molecular gas disk of NGC 253. Furthermore, a kinematic residual appears in the H2 rotation curve with a sinusoidal shape consistent with an outflow centered in the candidate nucleus position. The maximum outflow velocity is located about 14 pc from TH7, which is consistent with the radius of a shell detected around the nucleus candidate, observed at 18.3 μm (Qa) and 12.8 μm ([Ne ii]) with T-ReCS. Also, the Brγ emission line profile shows a pronounced blueshift and this emission line also has the highest equivalent width at this

  7. Sigma-nucleus potential in A=28.

    PubMed

    Noumi, H; Saha, P K; Abe, D; Ajimura, S; Aoki, K; Bhang, H C; Endo, T; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, T; Guo, H C; Imai, K; Hashimoto, O; Hotchi, H; Kim, E H; Kim, J H; Kishimoto, T; Krutenkova, A; Maeda, K; Nagae, T; Nakamura, M; Outa, H; Sekimoto, M; Saito, T; Sakaguchi, A; Sato, Y; Sawafta, R; Shimizu, Y; Takahashi, T; Tang, L; Tamura, H; Tanida, K; Watanabe, T; Xia, H H; Zhou, S H; Zhu, L H; Zhu, X F

    2002-08-12

    We have studied the (pi(-),K+) reaction on a silicon target to investigate the sigma-nucleus potential. The inclusive spectrum was measured at a beam momentum of 1.2 GeV/c with an energy resolution of 3.3 MeV (FWHM) by employing the superconducting kaon spectrometer system. The spectrum was compared with theoretical calculations within the framework of the distorted-wave impulse approximation, which demonstrates that a strongly repulsive sigma-nucleus potential with a nonzero size of the imaginary part reproduces the observed spectrum. PMID:12190516

  8. Nucleus model for periodic Comet Tempel 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Zdenek

    1991-01-01

    Observational data obtained primarily during 1988 are analyzed and synthesized to develop a comprehensive physical model for the nucleus of Periodic Comet Tempel 2, one of the best studied members of Jupiter's family of short-period comets. It is confirmed that a previous investigation provided reliable information on the comet's spin-axis orientation, which implies and obliquity of 54 degrees of the orbit plane to the equatorial plane and which appears to have varied little - if at all - with time. This conclusion is critical for fitting a triaxial ellipsoid to approximate the figure of the nucleus.

  9. Hydrated nucleus pulposus herniation in seven dogs.

    PubMed

    Manunta, M L; Evangelisti, M A; Bergknut, N; Grinwis, G C M; Ballocco, I; Meij, B P

    2015-03-01

    The clinical signs, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, treatment and follow-up in seven dogs with hydrated nucleus pulposus extrusion (HNPE) are reported. All dogs had tetraparesis or tetraplegia. T2-weighted MRI revealed extradural hyperintense homogeneous material compressing the cervical spinal cord. After conservative treatment (five dogs) or surgical decompression (two dogs), all dogs returned to ambulatory function within 1 month. Follow-up MRI in conservatively treated dogs revealed complete disappearance of the extruded material. Histopathological examination of surgical specimens confirmed that the retrieved material was extruded nucleus pulposus with evidence of early degeneration. PMID:25599897

  10. Aberrant DNA Polymerase α Is Excluded from the Nucleus by Defective Import and Degradation in the Nucleus*

    PubMed Central

    Eichinger, Christian S.; Mizuno, Takeshi; Mizuno, Keiko; Miyake, Yasuyuki; Yanagi, Ken-ichiro; Imamoto, Naoko; Hanaoka, Fumio

    2009-01-01

    DNA polymerase α is essential for the onset of eukaryotic DNA replication. Its correct folding and assembly within the nuclear replication pre-initiation complex is crucial for normal cell cycle progression and genome maintenance. Due to a single point mutation in the largest DNA polymerase α subunit, p180, the temperature-sensitive mouse cell line tsFT20 exhibits heat-labile DNA polymerase α activity and S phase arrest at restrictive temperature. In this study, we show that an aberrant form of endogenous p180 in tsFT20 cells (p180tsFT20) is strictly localized in the cytoplasm while its wild-type counterpart enters the nucleus. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy with enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged or photoactivatable green fluorescent protein-tagged p180tsFT20 variants and inhibitor analysis revealed that the exclusion of aberrant p180tsFT20 from the nucleus is due to two distinct mechanisms: first, the inability of newly synthesized (cytoplasmic) p180tsFT20 to enter the nucleus and second, proteasome-dependent degradation of nuclear-localized protein. The nuclear import defect seems to result from an impaired association of aberrant de novo synthesized p180tsFT20 with the second subunit of DNA polymerase α, p68. In accordance, we show that RNA interference of p68 results in a decrease of the overall p180 protein level and in a specific increase of cytoplasmic localized p180 in NIH3T3 cells. Taken together, our data suggest two mechanisms that prevent the nuclear expression of aberrant DNA polymerase α. PMID:19726690

  11. IMACULAT — An Open Access Package for the Quantitative Analysis of Chromosome Localization in the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Basuthkar J.

    2013-01-01

    The alteration in the location of the chromosomes within the nucleus upon action of internal or external stimuli has been implicated in altering genome function. The effect of stimuli at a whole genome level is studied by using two-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to delineate whole chromosome territories within a cell nucleus, followed by a quantitative analysis of the spatial distribution of the chromosome. However, to the best of our knowledge, open access software capable of quantifying spatial distribution of whole chromosomes within cell nucleus is not available. In the current work, we present a software package that computes localization of whole chromosomes - Image Analysis of Chromosomes for computing localization (IMACULAT). We partition the nucleus into concentric elliptical compartments of equal area and the variance in the quantity of any chromosome in these shells is used to determine its localization in the nucleus. The images are pre-processed to remove the smudges outside the cell boundary. Automation allows high throughput analysis for deriving statistics. Proliferating normal human dermal fibroblasts were subjected to standard a two-dimensional FISH to delineate territories for all human chromosomes. Approximately 100 images from each chromosome were analyzed using IMACULAT. The analysis corroborated that these chromosome territories have non-random gene density based organization within the interphase nuclei of human fibroblasts. The ImageMagick Perl API has been used for pre-processing the images. The source code is made available at www.sanchak.com/imaculat.html. PMID:23577217

  12. Shape and Size of the Fission Yeast Nucleus are governed by Equilibrium Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Gerald; Huber, Greg; Miller, Jonathan; Sazer, Shelley

    2006-03-01

    Nuclear morphogenesis in the asexual reproduction of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast) consists of two stages: (i) volume-doubling growth, in which a round nucleus inflates uniformly, and (ii) division, in which the nucleus undergoes shape changes from round to oblong to peanut to dumbbell before it resolves into two smaller, round daughter nuclei, driven by the formation and elongation of a microtubule-based spindle within the nucleus. The combined volume of the daughter nuclei immediately after division is the same as the volume of the single nucleus at the onset of division. Consequently, the nuclear envelope (NE) area must increase by 26% during division. We are developing a model in order to determine the mechanics governing these shape and size changes. It is based on current knowledge of the nuclear structure, insight from normal and abnormal nuclei, and concepts from the mechanics governing lipid-bilayer membranes. We predict that (a) the NE prefers to be flat, (b) the NE is under tension, (c) the nucleus has an internal pressure, (d) nuclear growth is governed by the Law of Laplace, and (e) some abnormal nuclei behave like vesicles with encapsulated microtubules.

  13. Projections of the sensory trigeminal nucleus in a percomorph teleost, tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Xue, Hao-Gang; Yamamoto, Naoyuki; Yang, Chun-Ying; Kerem, Gulnisa; Yoshimoto, Masami; Sawai, Nobuhiko; Ito, Hironobu; Ozawa, Hitoshi

    2006-03-20

    The sensory trigeminal nucleus of teleosts is the rostralmost nucleus among the trigeminal sensory nuclear group in the rhombencephalon. The sensory trigeminal nucleus is known to receive the somatosensory afferents of the ophthalmic, maxillar, and mandibular nerves. However, the central connections of the sensory trigeminal nucleus remain unclear. Efferents of the sensory trigeminal nucleus were examined by means of tract-tracing methods, in a percomorph teleost, tilapia. After tracer injections to the sensory trigeminal nucleus, labeled terminals were seen bilaterally in the ventromedial thalamic nucleus, periventricular pretectal nucleus, medial part of preglomerular nucleus, stratum album centrale of the optic tectum, ventrolateral nucleus of the semicircular torus, lateral valvular nucleus, prethalamic nucleus, tegmentoterminal nucleus, and superior and inferior reticular formation, with preference for the contralateral side. Labeled terminals were also found bilaterally in the oculomotor nucleus, trochlear nucleus, trigeminal motor nucleus, facial motor nucleus, facial lobe, descending trigeminal nucleus, medial funicular nucleus, and contralateral sensory trigeminal nucleus and inferior olive. Labeled terminals in the oculomotor nucleus and trochlear nucleus showed similar densities on both sides of the brain. However, labelings in the trigeminal motor nucleus, facial motor nucleus, facial lobe, descending trigeminal nucleus, and medial funicular nucleus showed a clear ipsilateral dominance. Reciprocal tracer injection experiments to the ventromedial thalamic nucleus, optic tectum, and semicircular torus resulted in labeled cell bodies in the sensory trigeminal nucleus, with a few also in the descending trigeminal nucleus. PMID:16440296

  14. Nucleus-nucleus interactions between 20 and 65 GeV per nucleon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W. F.; Meegan, C. A.; Parnell, T. A.; Roberts, F. E.; Watts, J. W.; Oda, H.; Takahashi, Y.; Jones, W. V.

    1987-01-01

    A hybrid electronic-counter/emulsion-chamber instrument was exposed to high-energy cosmic rays on a balloon. The data on 105 nucleus-nucleus collisions in the energy range 20-65 GeV/nucleon and for incident nuclear charges Zp in the range of 22 to 28 are presented. Inclusive characteristics of particle production on different targets (plastic, emulsion, and lead) are shown and compared with models based on the superposition of nucleon-nucleus interactions. Features of a subset of the more central collisions with a plastic target and some characteristics of individual events with the highest multiplicity of produced particles are described.

  15. Coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholberg, Kate

    2015-05-01

    I describe physics potential and experimental prospects for coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEvNS), a process which has not yet been observed. Germanium- based detectors represent a promising technology for CEvNS experiments. I focus primarily on stopped-pion neutrino sources.

  16. Compound nucleus studies withy reverse kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.

    1985-06-01

    Reverse kinematics reactions are used to demonstrate the compound nucleus origin of intermediate mass particles at low energies and the extension of the same mechanism at higher energies. No evidence has appeared in our energy range for liquid-vapor equilibrium or cold fragmentation mechanisms. 11 refs., 12 figs.

  17. Nucleon-nucleus interactions from JACEE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Iwai, J.; Jones, W. V.; Jurak, A.; Lord, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    Results on hadron-nucleus interactions from the Japanese-American Cooperation Emulsion Experiment experiment are presented. Angular distributions for charged particles, and angular and transverse momentum spectra for photons have been measured for a sample of events with sigma epsilon sub gamma. Results on central rapidity density and transverse energy flow are discussed.

  18. Transport model of nucleon-nucleus reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    1986-01-01

    A simplified model of nucleon-nucleus reaction is developed and some of its properties are examined. Comparisons with proton production measured for targets of Al-27, Ni-58, Zr-90, and Bi-209 show some hope for developing an accurate model for these complex reactions. It is suggested that binding effects are the next step required for further development.

  19. The Checkerboard Model of the Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Theodore

    2015-04-01

    The Checker Board Model (CBM) of the nucleus and the associated extended standard model predicts that nature has 5 generations of quarks not 3 and that Nucleus is 2 dimensional. The CBM theory began with an insight into the structure of the He nucleus around the year 1989. Details of how this theory evolved which took many years, and is found on my web site (http://checkerboard.dnsalias.net) or in the following references One independent check of this model is that the wavelength of the ``up'' quark orbiting inside the proton at 84.8123% the speed of light (around the ``dn'' quark in the center of the proton) turns out to be exactly one de Broglie wavelength something determined after the mass and speed of the up quark were determined by other means. This theory explains the mass of the proton and neutron and their magnetic moments and this along with the beautiful symmetric 2D structure of the He nucleus led to the evolution of this theory. When this theory was first presented at Argonne in 1996, it was the first time that anyone had predicted the quarks orbited inside the proton at relativistic speeds and it was met with skepticism.

  20. The Nucleus and the Simple Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Brian J.

    1982-01-01

    The 150th anniversary of the naming of the nucleus by Robert Brown in 1831 was commemorated by re-creating some of his most important observations using two of his microscopes. Comments on Brown's career and the microtechnique employed during his time are provided. (Author/JN)

  1. The Double Nucleus and Central Black Hole of M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormendy, John; Bender, Ralf

    1999-09-01

    parameters are tweaked so that the orbital eccentricity is made larger and the orientation of the orbits is made to point more nearly at us. (3) The model rotation curve is asymmetric; at perfect resolution, V is 60 km s-1 higher on the P2 side than on the P1 side. At σ*=0.27", we observe an asymmetry of 54+/-4 km s-1 after bulge subtraction. We regard this as confirmation of the model's essential idea that stellar orbits are eccentric and coherently aligned. (4) The model predicts that P1 and P2 should have the same stellar population. We confirm this: P1 is more similar to P2 than it is to the bulge or to a globular cluster or to M32. This makes it unlikely that P1 consists of accreted stars. (5) Our observation that there is cold light on both sides of the center implies, if the nucleus is an eccentric disk, that some stars have escaped from the P1-P2 alignment and have phase-mixed around the galaxy's center. The dispersion peak coincides with a cluster of ultraviolet-bright stars seen in Hubble Space Telescope images. We propose that the BH is in this cluster. Its center is displaced by 0.068"+/-0.010" from the bulge center. If we put a 3.3×107 Msolar dark object in the UV cluster and adopt the dynamically determined mass-to-light ratio of the stars, then the center of mass (COM) of the bulge, nucleus, and dark object coincides with the bulge center to within 0.017"+/-0.016". The COM also agrees with the velocity center of the bulge and outer nucleus. Therefore, the asymmetry of the stars in the double nucleus supports our suggestion that the BH is in the UV cluster. If the stars have a normal mass-to-light ratio, then the location of the COM also confirms the mass of the BH, largely independent of dynamical models. Tremaine's model implies that any dark cluster alternative to a BH is less than 0.13"+/-0.03"=0.49 pc in radius. The observed mass-to-light ratio is M/LV~=300 in a cylinder of radius r=0.13" and M/LV~=2200 in a sphere of radius r=0.13". This is much larger

  2. Heavy-flavour dynamics in proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardi, M.; Beraudo, A.; De Pace, A.; Monteno, M.; Prino, F.

    2016-01-01

    We present recent results for heavy-quark observables in nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC energies, obtained by the POWLANG transport setup. The initial creation of c c ¯ and b b ¯ pairs is simulated with a perturbative QCD approach (POWHEG+PYTHIA) and validated through comparison to experimental data of proton-proton collisions. In the nucleus-nucleus case, the propagation of the heavy quarks in the plasma is studied with the relativistic Langevin equation, here solved using weak-coupling transport-coefficients. Successively, the heavy quarks hadronize in the medium. We compute the nuclear modification factor RAA and the elliptic flow v2 of the final D mesons, as well as D - h correlations, and compare our results to experimental data from the ALICE and CMS Collaborations.

  3. Average transverse momentum and energy density in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Iwai, J.; Jones, W. V.; Jurak, A.; Lord, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Emulsion chambers were used to measure the transverse momenta of photons or pi(0) mesons produced in high-energy cosmic-ray nucleus-nucleus collisions. A group of events having large average transverse momenta has been found which apparently exceeds the expected limiting values. Analysis of the events at early interaction times, of the order of 1 fm/c, indicates that the observed transverse momentum increases with both rapidity density and energy density.

  4. Results on ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions from balloon-borne emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W.; Meegan, C. A.; Takahashi, Y.; Watts, J. W.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.

    1985-01-01

    The results of balloon-borne emulsion-chamber measurements on high-energy cosmic-ray nuclei (Burnett et al., 1983) are summarized in tables and graphs and briefly characterized. Special consideration is given to seven nucleus-nucleus interaction events at energy in excess of 1 TeV/A with multiplicity greater than 400, and to Fe interactions (53 with CHO, 10 with emulsion, and 14 with Pb) at 20-60 GeV/A.

  5. Applicability of fluid-dynamical modeling of nucleus-nucleus collisions at relativistic energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazineh, Dean; Auvinen, Jussi; Nahrgang, Marlene; Bass, Steffen

    2015-10-01

    At sufficiently high temperatures and densities, similar to the conditions found in the early universe, QCD matter forms a deconfined state called the quark gluon plasma (QGP). This state of matter can be created in collisions of ultra-relativistic heavy-ions, and RHIC data suggests that this QGP behaves similar to an ideal fluid. Viscous relativistic fluid dynamics therefore is one of the preferred theoretical tools to model the time-evolution and properties of the QGP. As the collision energy or the system size is decreased, the range of applicability of viscous fluid dynamics becomes smaller as the length scale of the interaction among the basic constituents is similar to the overall scale of the collision system itself. In order to investigate the validity of fluid-dynamical modeling of proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC and RHIC, we conduct an analysis of the spatial and temporal evolution of the Knudsen number, i.e. the ratio of the microscopic mean free path to the macroscopic length scale of the system. We show results for large and small collision systems, as a function of the specific shear viscosity, and discuss the range of applicability of fluid-dynamical modeling in relativistic proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at different energies.

  6. Nucleus-nucleus total reaction cross sections, and the nuclear interaction radius

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Ibrahim, Badawy

    2011-04-15

    We study the nucleus-nucleus total reaction cross sections for stable nuclei, in the energy region from 30A MeV to about 1A GeV, and find them to be in proportion to ({radical}({sigma}{sub pp}{sup tot}Z{sub 1}{sup 2/3}+{sigma}{sub pn}{sup tot}N{sub 1}{sup 2/3})+{radical}({sigma}{sub pp}{sup tot}Z{sub 2}{sup 2/3}+{sigma}{sub pn}{sup tot}N{sub 2}{sup 2/3})) {sup 2} in the mass range 8 to 100. Also, we find a parameter-free relation that enables us to predict a total reaction cross section for any nucleus-nucleus within 10% uncertainty at most, using the experimental value of the total reaction cross section of a given nucleus-nucleus. The power of the relation is demonstrated by several examples. The energy dependence of the nuclear interaction radius is deduced; it is found to be almost constant in the energy range from about 200A MeV to about 1A GeV; in this energy range and for nuclei with N=Z, R{sub I}(A)=(1.14{+-}0.02)A{sup 1/3} fm.

  7. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Information Page Synonym(s): Hydrocephalus - Normal Pressure Table ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus? Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is an abnormal ...

  8. Collateral projections from the lateral parabrachial nucleus to the paraventricular thalamic nucleus and the central amygdaloid nucleus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shao-Hua; Yin, Jun-Bin; Sun, Yi; Bai, Yang; Zhou, Kai-Xiang; Zhao, Wen-Jun; Wang, Wei; Dong, Yu-Lin; Li, Yun-Qing

    2016-08-26

    Combined the retrograde double tracing with immunofluorescence histochemical staining, we examined the neurons in the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPB) sent collateral projections to the paraventricular thalamic nucleus (PVT) and central amygdaloid nucleus (CeA) and their roles in the nociceptive transmission in the rat. After the injection of Fluoro-gold (FG) into the PVT and tetramethylrhodamine-dextran (TMR) into the CeA, respectively, FG/TMR double-labeled neurons were observed in the LPB. The percentages of FG/TMR double-labeled neurons to the total number of FG- or TMR-labeled neurons were 6.18% and 9.09%, respectively. Almost all of the FG/TMR double-labeled neurons (95%) exhibited calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) immunoreactivity. In the condition of neuropathic pain, 94% of these neurons showed FOS immunoreactivity. The present data indicates that some of CGRP-expressing neurons in the LPB may transmit nociceptive information toward the PVT and CeA by way of axon collaterals. PMID:27423318

  9. Cell Nucleus-Targeting Zwitterionic Carbon Dots

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yun Kyung; Shin, Eeseul; Kim, Byeong-Su

    2015-01-01

    An innovative nucleus-targeting zwitterionic carbon dot (CD) vehicle has been developed for anticancer drug delivery and optical monitoring. The zwitterionic functional groups of the CDs introduced by a simple one-step synthesis using β-alanine as a passivating and zwitterionic ligand allow cytoplasmic uptake and subsequent nuclear translocation of the CDs. Moreover, multicolor fluorescence improves the accuracy of the CDs as an optical code. The CD-based drug delivery system constructed by non-covalent grafting of doxorubicin, exhibits superior antitumor efficacy owing to enhanced nuclear delivery in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo, resulting in highly effective tumor growth inhibition. Since the zwitterionic CDs are highly biocompatible and effectively translocated into the nucleus, it provides a compelling solution to a multifunctional nanoparticle for substantially enhanced nuclear uptake of drugs and optical monitoring of translocation. PMID:26689549

  10. Macromolecular transport in synapse to nucleus communication.

    PubMed

    Panayotis, Nicolas; Karpova, Anna; Kreutz, Michael R; Fainzilber, Mike

    2015-02-01

    Local signaling events at synapses or axon terminals must be communicated to the nucleus to elicit transcriptional responses. The lengths of neuronal processes pose a significant challenge for such intracellular communication. This challenge is met by mechanisms ranging from rapid signals encoded in calcium waves to slower macromolecular signaling complexes carried by molecular motors. Here we summarize recent findings on macromolecular signaling from the synapse to the nucleus, in comparison to those employed in injury signaling along axons. A number of common themes emerge, including combinatorial signal encoding by post-translational mechanisms such as differential phosphorylation and proteolysis, and conserved roles for importins in coordinating signaling complexes. Neurons may integrate ionic flux with motor-transported signals as a temporal code for synaptic plasticity signaling. PMID:25534890

  11. Core-nucleus distortation in hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1995-08-01

    We are completing a study of the effects of the spherical distortion of the {open_quotes}core{close_quotes} nucleus by the {Lambda} in a hypernucleus. The response of the core was determined by an appropriately chosen energy-density functional which depends, in particular, on the nuclear compressibility. The forcing action of the A is determined by the nuclear density dependence of the {Lambda} binding in nuclear matter which is obtained from our work on the {Lambda} single-particle energies. Because of the strongly repulsive {Lambda}NN forces, this {Lambda} binding {open_quotes}saturates{close_quotes} at a density close to the central density of nuclei, and results in a reduced core-nucleus distortion much less than would otherwise be obtained. The effects of the core distortion then turn out to be very small even for quite light hypernuclei. This result justifies the assumption that spherical core nuclei are effectively undistorted in a hypernucleus.

  12. Dropped nucleus following phacoemulsification cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Tajunisah, I; Reddy, S C

    2007-12-01

    Twenty two cases of dropped nucleus following 1,196 phacoemulsification procedures in cataract surgery were examined retrospectively to determine the incidence, predisposing factors and visual outcomes of this dreaded complication. All the cases underwent pars plana vitrectomy and the lens fragments were removed with phacofragmotome, vitrectomy cutter or delivered through limbus. The incidence of dropped nucleus was 1.84%. The predisposing factors were hard cataracts (13.6%), polar cataracts (9.1%), previously vitrectomized eyes (4.5%) and high myopia (4.5%). The final visual outcome was > or = 6/12 in 10 eyes (45.5%); complications were seen in 5 eyes (22.7%). The interval between initial surgery and vitrectomy, the method of fragment removal and the type of lens implanted, did not influence the final visual outcome. PMID:18705466

  13. Coherency in neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerman, S.; Sharma, V.; Deniz, M.; Wong, H. T.; Chen, J.-W.; Li, H. B.; Lin, S. T.; Liu, C.-P.; Yue, Q.; Texono Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering provides a unique laboratory to study the quantum mechanical coherency effects in electroweak interactions, towards which several experimental programs are being actively pursued. We report results of our quantitative studies on the transitions towards decoherency. A parameter (α ) is identified to describe the degree of coherency, and its variations with incoming neutrino energy, detector threshold, and target nucleus are studied. The ranges of α that can be probed with realistic neutrino experiments are derived, indicating complementarity between projects with different sources and targets. Uncertainties in nuclear physics and in α would constrain sensitivities in probing physics beyond the standard model. The maximum neutrino energies corresponding to α >0.95 are derived.

  14. Finite nucleus effects on relativistic energy corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyall, Kenneth G.; Faegri, Knut, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of using a finite nucleus model in quantum-chemical calculations is examined. Relativistic corrections from the first order Foldy-Wouthuysen terms are affected indirectly by the change in wavefunction, but also directly as a result of revised expressions for the Darwin and spin-orbit terms due to the change in nuclear potential. A calculation for the Rn atom indicates that the mass-velocity and Darwin corrections are much more sensitive to the finite nucleus than the non-relativistic total energy, but that the total contribution for these two terms is quite stable provided the revised form of the Darwin term is used. The spin-orbit interaction is not greatly affected by the choice of nuclear model.

  15. Neurofibromin is actively transported to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, Ina; Van Oostveldt, Patrick; Coene, Elisabeth; De Paepe, Anne; Messiaen, Ludwine

    2004-02-27

    Mutations in the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) tumor suppressor gene predispose individuals to a variety of benign and malignant tumors. Many tumor suppressors 'shuttle' between the nucleus and the cytoplasm, thus regulating their function. By expressing different NF1 constructs in COS-7 cells (encompassing exons 28-49 and fused to the green fluorescent protein), we identified a functional nuclear localization signal (NLS) in exon 43. Mutation of the NLS completely abolishes the nuclear entry of the NF1-derivative fusion protein. A highly expressed splice variant that lacks this NLS controls the localization and hence the function of neurofibromin. The localization of neurofibromin in the nucleus may provide novel clues to unknown functions for NF1. PMID:14988005

  16. The fast Ice Nucleus chamber FINCH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundke, U.; Nillius, B.; Jaenicke, R.; Wetter, T.; Klein, H.; Bingemer, H.

    2008-11-01

    We present first results of our new developed Ice Nucleus (IN) counter FINCH from the sixth Cloud and Aerosol Characterization Experiment (CLACE 6) campaign at Jungfraujoch station, 3571 m asl. Measurements were made at the total and the ICE CVI inlet. Laboratory measurements of ice onset temperatures by FINCH are compared to those of the static diffusion chamber FRIDGE (FRankfurt Ice Deposition Freezing Experiment). Within the errors of both new instruments the results compare well to published data.

  17. Parity violation in the compound nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G. E.; Crawford, B. E.; Grossmann, C. A.; Lowie, L. Y.; Bowman, J. D.; Knudson, J.; Penttilae, S.; Seestrom, S. J.; Smith, D. A.; Yen, Yi-Fen; Yuan, V. W.; Delheij, P. P. J.; Haseyama, T.; Masaike, A.; Matsuda, Y.; Postma, H.; Roberson, N. R.; Sharapov, E. I.; Stephenson, S. L.

    1999-06-10

    Measurements have been performed on the helicity dependence of the neutron resonance cross section for many nuclei by our TRIPLE Collaboration. A large number of parity violations are observed. Generic enhancements amplify the signal for symmetry breaking and the stochastic properties of the compound nucleus permit the strength of the symmetry-breaking interaction to be determined without knowledge of the wave functions of individual states. A total of 15 nuclei have been analyzed with this statistical approach. The results are summarized.

  18. Comet nucleus impact probe feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    A top level listing of the comet nucleus impact probe (CNIP) feasibility experiments requirements are presented. A conceptual configuration which shows that the feasibility of engineering the experiment is possible and describes the candidate hardware is discussed. The design studies required in order to design the operating experiment are outlined. An overview of a program plan used to estimate a rough order of magnitude cost for the CNIP experiment is given.

  19. Revisiting the supratrigeminal nucleus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Fujio, T; Sato, F; Tachibana, Y; Kato, T; Tomita, A; Higashiyama, K; Ono, T; Maeda, Y; Yoshida, A

    2016-06-01

    The supratrigeminal nucleus (Vsup), originally proposed as a premotoneuron pool in the trigeminal reflex arc, is a key structure of jaw movement control. Surprisingly, however, the location of the rat Vsup has not precisely been defined. In light of our previous cat studies, we made two hypotheses regarding the rat Vsup: (1) the Vsup is cytoarchitectonically distinguishable from its surrounding structures; (2) the Vsup receives central axon terminals of the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus (Vmes) neurons which are primary afferents innervating muscle spindles of jaw-closing muscles and periodontal ligaments around the teeth. To test the first hypothesis, we examined the cytoarchitecture of the rat Vsup. The Vsup was identified as an area medially adjacent to the dorsomedial part of trigeminal principal sensory nucleus (Vp), and extended from the level just rostral to the caudal two-thirds of the trigeminal motor nucleus (Vmo) to the level approximately 150μm caudal to the Vmo. Our rat Vsup was much smaller and its location was considerably different in comparison to the Vsup reported previously. To evaluate the second hypothesis, we tested the distribution patterns of Vmes primary afferent terminals in the cytoarchitectonically identified Vsup. After transganglionic tracer applications to the masseter, deep temporal, and medial pterygoid nerves, a large number of axon terminals were observed in all parts of Vsup (especially in its medial part). After applications to the inferior alveolar, infraorbital, and lingual nerves, a small number of axon terminals were labeled in the caudolateral Vsup. The Vsup could also be identified electrophysiologically. After electrical stimulation of the masseter nerve, evoked potentials with slow negative component were isolated only in the Vsup. The present findings suggest that the rat Vsup can be cytoarchitectonically and electrophysiologically identified, receives somatotopic termination of the trigeminal primary afferents, and

  20. Physical Properties of Cometary Nucleus Candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewitt, David; Hillman, John (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    In this proposal we aim to study the physical properties of the Centaurs and the dead comets, these being the precursors to, and the remnants from, the active cometary nuclei. The nuclei themselves are very difficult to study, because of the contaminating effects of near-nucleus coma. Systematic investigation of the nuclei both before they enter the zone of strong sublimation and after they have depleted their near-surface volatiles should neatly bracket the properties of these objects, revealing evolutionary effects.

  1. Development of a Mobile Ice Nucleus Counter

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, Gregory; Kulkarni, Gourihar

    2014-07-10

    An ice nucleus counter has been constructed. The instrument uses built-in refrigeration systems for wall cooling. A cascade refrigeration system will allow the cold wall to operate as low as -70 deg C, and a single stage system can operate the warm wall at -45 deg C. A unique optical particle counter has been constructed using polarization detection of the scattered light. This allows differentiation of the particles exiting the chamber to determine if they are ice or liquid.

  2. Activation of the dentate nucleus in a verb generation task: A 7T MRI study.

    PubMed

    Thürling, M; Küper, M; Stefanescu, R; Maderwald, S; Gizewski, E R; Ladd, M E; Timmann, D

    2011-08-01

    There is increasing evidence of a topographic organization within the human cerebellar cortex for motor and non-motor functions. Likewise, a subdivision of the dentate nucleus in a more dorsal and rostral motor domain and a more ventral and caudal non-motor domain has been proposed by Dum and Strick (2003) based on anatomical studies in monkey. In humans, however, very little is known about topographic organization within the dentate nucleus. Activation of the dentate nucleus in a verb generation task was examined in young and healthy subjects using ultra-highfield 7T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with its increase in signal-to-noise ratio. Data of 17 subjects were included in statistical analysis. Subjects were asked to (i) read words (nouns) aloud presented on a screen, (ii) silently read the same nouns, (iii) silently generate the appropriate verbs to the same nouns and (iv) to silently repeat the names of the months. A block design was used. For image processing, a recently developed region of interest (ROI) driven normalization method of the dentate nuclei was applied. Activation related to motor speech (contrast aloud reading minus silent reading) was strongest in the rostral parts of the dentate nucleus. Dorsorostral activations were present bilaterally. Activation related to verb generation (contrast verb generation minus silent reading) was found in the ventrocaudal parts of the dentate nucleus on the right. The present findings are in good accordance with the anatomical data in monkeys and suggest that the human dentate nucleus can be subdivided into a rostral and more dorsal motor domain and a ventrocaudal non-motor domain. PMID:21640191

  3. Comet nucleus and asteroid sample return missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Three Advanced Design Projects have been completed this academic year at Penn State. At the beginning of the fall semester the students were organized into eight groups and given their choice of either a comet nucleus or an asteroid sample return mission. Once a mission had been chosen, the students developed conceptual designs. These were evaluated at the end of the fall semester and combined into three separate mission plans, including a comet nucleus same return (CNSR), a single asteroid sample return (SASR), and a multiple asteroid sample return (MASR). To facilitate the work required for each mission, the class was reorganized in the spring semester by combining groups to form three mission teams. An integration team consisting of two members from each group was formed for each mission so that communication and information exchange would be easier among the groups. The types of projects designed by the students evolved from numerous discussions with Penn State faculty and mission planners at the Johnson Space Center Human/Robotic Spacecraft Office. Robotic sample return missions are widely considered valuable precursors to manned missions in that they can provide details about a site's environment and scientific value. For example, a sample return from an asteroid might reveal valuable resources that, once mined, could be utilized for propulsion. These missions are also more adaptable when considering the risk to humans visiting unknown and potentially dangerous locations, such as a comet nucleus.

  4. Comet nucleus and asteroid sample return missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-06-01

    Three Advanced Design Projects have been completed this academic year at Penn State. At the beginning of the fall semester the students were organized into eight groups and given their choice of either a comet nucleus or an asteroid sample return mission. Once a mission had been chosen, the students developed conceptual designs. These were evaluated at the end of the fall semester and combined into three separate mission plans, including a comet nucleus same return (CNSR), a single asteroid sample return (SASR), and a multiple asteroid sample return (MASR). To facilitate the work required for each mission, the class was reorganized in the spring semester by combining groups to form three mission teams. An integration team consisting of two members from each group was formed for each mission so that communication and information exchange would be easier among the groups. The types of projects designed by the students evolved from numerous discussions with Penn State faculty and mission planners at the Johnson Space Center Human/Robotic Spacecraft Office. Robotic sample return missions are widely considered valuable precursors to manned missions in that they can provide details about a site's environment and scientific value. For example, a sample return from an asteroid might reveal valuable resources that, once mined, could be utilized for propulsion. These missions are also more adaptable when considering the risk to humans visiting unknown and potentially dangerous locations, such as a comet nucleus.

  5. Functional morphology of the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Ibata, Y; Okamura, H; Tanaka, M; Tamada, Y; Hayashi, S; Iijima, N; Matsuda, T; Munekawa, K; Takamatsu, T; Hisa, Y; Shigeyoshi, Y; Amaya, F

    1999-07-01

    In mammals, the biological clock (circadian oscillator) is situated in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), a small bilaterally paired structure just above the optic chiasm. Circadian rhythms of sleep-wakefulness and hormone release disappear when the SCN is destroyed, and transplantation of fetal or neonatal SCN into an arrhythmic host restores rhythmicity. There are several kinds of peptide-synthesizing neurons in the SCN, with vasoactive intestinal peptide, arginine vasopressin, and somatostatine neurons being most prominent. Those peptides and their mRNA show diurnal rhythmicity and may or may not be affected by light stimuli. Major neuronal inputs from retinal ganglion cells as well as other inputs such as those from the lateral geniculate nucleus and raphe nucleus are very important for entrainment and shift of circadian rhythms. In this review, we describe morphological and functional interactions between neurons and glial elements and their development. We also consider the expression of immediate-early genes in the SCN after light stimulation during subjective night and their role in the mechanism of signal transduction. The reciprocal interaction between the SCN and melatonin, which is synthesized in the pineal body under the influence of polysynaptic inputs from the SCN, is also considered. Finally, morphological and functional characteristics of clock genes, particularly mPers, which are considered to promote circadian rhythm, are reviewed. PMID:10433864

  6. Efficient nucleus detector in histopathology images.

    PubMed

    Vink, J P; Van Leeuwen, M B; Van Deurzen, C H M; De Haan, G

    2013-02-01

    In traditional cancer diagnosis, (histo)pathological images of biopsy samples are visually analysed by pathologists. However, this judgment is subjective and leads to variability among pathologists. Digital scanners may enable automated objective assessment, improved quality and reduced throughput time. Nucleus detection is seen as the corner stone for a range of applications in automated assessment of (histo)pathological images. In this paper, we propose an efficient nucleus detector designed with machine learning. We applied colour deconvolution to reconstruct each applied stain. Next, we constructed a large feature set and modified AdaBoost to create two detectors, focused on different characteristics in appearance of nuclei. The proposed modification of AdaBoost enables inclusion of the computational cost of each feature during selection, thus improving the computational efficiency of the resulting detectors. The outputs of the two detectors are merged by a globally optimal active contour algorithm to refine the border of the detected nuclei. With a detection rate of 95% (on average 58 incorrectly found objects per field-of-view) based on 51 field-of-view images of Her2 immunohistochemistry stained breast tissue and a complete analysis in 1 s per field-of-view, our nucleus detector shows good performance and could enable a range of applications in automated assessment of (histo)pathological images. PMID:23252774

  7. Quantitative analyses of axonal endings in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus and distribution of 3H-labeling after injections in the dorsal cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Oliver, D L

    1985-07-15

    Quantitative analyses of electron microscopic (EM) autoradiographs were used to identify the afferents from the dorsal cochlear nucleus in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (IC) in the cat. In order to localize the sources of radioactivity, material from axonal transport experiments was analyzed by means of a hypothetical grain procedure which takes the cross-scatter of beta particles into account. Measurements of the synaptic vesicles in axonal endings and a cluster analysis were used to identify different groups of endings. In order to determine which types of endings arise in the dorsal cochlear nucleus, axonal endings labeled after axonal transport and unlabeled endings were characterized and compared to the groups defined by the cluster analysis. Axonal endings with round synaptic vesicles were labeled with more than 2 grains/micron2 which was about 30% of the radioactivity in the central nucleus of the IC. This was six to seven times greater than if the radioactivity had been randomly distributed. Other tissue compartments usually had less radioactivity. Some myelinated and unmyelinated axons were labeled, but, as a group they had lower amounts of radioactivity than predicted by random labeling. In most cases, only low levels of activity were found in glial and postsynaptic structures. Five groups of axonal endings in the medial part of the central nucleus were identified by an analysis which clustered similar types of endings. The variance of the longest axis, the mean diameter, the variance of area, and the mean area of the synaptic vesicles were the variables most useful in distinguishing these five groups. Axonal endings with round synaptic vesicles were classified as either small, or large, or very large, while endings with pleomorphic vesicles were either large or small. Using measurements of the cross-sectional diameter of dendritic microtubules, samples of digitized axonal endings from normal and experimental cases were normalized and

  8. Low P sub T hadron-nucleus interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holynski, R.; Wozniak, K.

    1985-01-01

    The possibility of describing hadron-nucleus (hA) interactions is discussed in terms of a number of independent collisions of the projectile inside the target nucleus. This multiple rescattering may occur on a particle or quark parton level. To investigate the characteristics of hA interactions as a function of antineutrinos advantage is taken of the correlation between the average number antineutrinos of collisions of the projectile inside the nucleus and the number Ng of fast protons ejected from the struck nucleus. The relation antineutrinos vs Ng obtained in antineutrinos was used. For a given target nucleus this allows the selection of interactions occurring at different impact parameters.

  9. Intrinsic properties and neuropharmacology of midline paraventricular thalamic nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kolaj, Miloslav; Zhang, Li; Hermes, Michael L. H. J.

    2014-01-01

    Neurons in the midline and intralaminar thalamic nuclei are components of an interconnected brainstem, limbic and prefrontal cortex neural network that is engaged during arousal, vigilance, motivated and addictive behaviors, and stress. To better understand the cellular mechanisms underlying these functions, here we review some of the recently characterized electrophysiological and neuropharmacological properties of neurons in the paraventricular thalamic nucleus (PVT), derived from whole cell patch clamp recordings in acute rat brain slice preparations. PVT neurons display firing patterns and ionic conductances (IT and IH) that exhibit significant diurnal change. Their resting membrane potential (RMP) is maintained by various ionic conductances that include inward rectifier (Kir), hyperpolarization-activated nonselective cation (HCN) and TWIK-related acid sensitive (TASK) K+ channels. Firing patterns are regulated by high voltage-activated (HVA) and low voltage-activated (LVA) Ca2+ conductances. Moreover, transient receptor potential (TRP)-like nonselective cation channels together with Ca2+- and Na+-activated K+ conductances (KCa; KNa) contribute to unique slow afterhyperpolarizing potentials (sAHPs) that are generally not detectable in lateral thalamic or reticular thalamic nucleus neurons. The excitability of PVT neurons is also modulated by activation of neurotransmitter receptors associated with afferent pathways to PVT and other thalamic midline nuclei. We report on receptor-mediated actions of GABA, glutamate, monoamines and several neuropeptides: arginine vasopressin, gastrin-releasing peptide, thyrotropin releasing hormone and the orexins (hypocretins). This review represents an initial survey of intrinsic and transmitter-sensitive ionic conductances that are deemed to be unique to this population of midline thalamic neurons, information that is fundamental to an appreciation of the role these thalamic neurons may play in normal central nervous system

  10. Is My Penis Normal?

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Is My Penis Normal? KidsHealth > For Teens > Is My Penis Normal? Print A A A Text Size en ... any guy who's ever worried about whether his penis is a normal size. There's a fairly wide ...

  11. Cold breakup of spectator residues in nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aichelin, J.; Hüfner, J.; Ibarra, R.

    1984-07-01

    Inclusive data from fragmentation reactions of the type AP+AT-->Z+X are analyzed and a reaction mechanism is proposed. A projectile AP (p, He, α, or Ne) collides with a target nucleus AT (Au) and one fragment with charge Z and energy E is observed at a solid angle Ω. Projectile energies vary between 84A MeV and several A GeV. We propose a parametrization for the triple differential cross section d3σdΩ dE dZ with six free parameters. The parametrization generalizes the two-vector model which is often used to describe spallation products in proton-nucleus collisions. By fitting data from various experiments we establish a systematics of the six parameters. The experimental values of the parameters can be quantitatively understood in a model where the target nucleus breaks into several fragments similar to the shattering of glass.

  12. Nuclear radii calculations in various theoretical approaches for nucleus-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Merino, C.; Novikov, I. S.; Shabelski, Yu.

    2009-12-15

    The information about sizes and nuclear density distributions in unstable (radioactive) nuclei is usually extracted from the data on interaction of radioactive nuclear beams with a nuclear target. We show that in the case of nucleus-nucleus collisions the values of the parameters depend somewhat strongly on the considered theoretical approach and on the assumption about the parametrization of the nuclear density distribution. The obtained values of root-mean-square radii (R{sub rms}) for stable nuclei with atomic weights A=12-40 vary by approximately 0.1 fm when calculated in the optical approximation, in the rigid target approximation, and using the exact expression of the Glauber theory. We present several examples of R{sub rms} radii calculations using these three theoretical approaches and compare these results with the data obtained from electron-nucleus scattering.

  13. The orientation of nucleus, nucleus-associated body and protruding nucleolus in aggregating Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Sameshima, M

    1985-02-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum growing or developing on cellulose dialysis membranes were fixed with acrolein vapour for electron microscopy. In interphase amoebae, nucleoli began to protrude from the nuclei. The percentage of cells with protruding nucleoli increased during aggregation by a value approximately twice as high in aggregation streams as in centers. Cells in pseudoplasmodia showed only a low percentage and protrusions disappeared at early culmination stage. The protrusions did not reappear when cells from dissociated pseudoplasmodia migrated toward cAMP. Thus the formation of the protrusions did not depend solely on chemotaxis; rather, it was specific to the aggregation stage. In aggregation streams, the nucleus was anterior in the cell, with the protrusion at its anterior periphery. In contrast, the nucleus associated body (NAB) was evident at the cell's mid-point. This orientation of nucleus and NAB in the aggregating slime mould amoeba is contrary to that seen in human neutrophils or cultured mouse 3T3 cells. PMID:2981691

  14. Do normal hips dislocate?

    PubMed

    Alshameeri, Zeiad; Rehm, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    There have been a small number of case reports describing late normal-hip dislocations in children who were later diagnosed with developmental dysplasia of the hip. Here, we contest the assumption that normal hips can dislocate. We argue that (as in our case) the ultrasound scans in all published case reports on late dislocated normal hips did not show results that were entirely normal and therefore, so far, there has been no convincing evidence of a dislocation of a normal hip. We also want to highlight the importance of meticulous ultrasound and clinical assessments of high-risk children by an experienced orthopaedic surgeon. PMID:25144883

  15. High energy factorization in nucleus-nucleus collisions. II. Multigluon correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Gelis, Francois; Lappi, Tuomas

    2008-09-01

    We extend previous results from the preceding paper on factorization in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions by computing the inclusive multigluon spectrum to next-to-leading order. The factorization formula is strictly valid for multigluon emission in a slice of rapidity of width {delta}Y{<=}{alpha}{sub s}{sup -1}. Our results shows that often neglected disconnected graphs dominate the inclusive multigluon spectrum, and are crucial in order to achieve factorization for this quantity. These results provide a dynamical framework for the Glasma flux tube picture of the striking ''ridge''-like correlation seen in heavy ion collisions.

  16. Electromagnetic processes in nucleus-nucleus collisions relating to space radiation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Most of the papers within this report deal with electromagnetic processes in nucleus-nucleus collisions which are of concern in the space radiation program. In particular, the removal of one and two nucleons via both electromagnetic and strong interaction processes has been extensively investigated. The theory of relativistic Coulomb fission has also been developed. Several papers on quark models also appear. Finally, note that the theoretical methods developed in this work have been directly applied to the task of radiation protection of astronauts. This has been done by parameterizing the theoretical formalism in such a fashion that it can be used in cosmic ray transport codes.

  17. The effect of the relative nuclear size on the nucleus-nucleus interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erofeeva, I. N.; Murzin, V. S.; Sivoklokov, S. Y.; Smirnova, L. N.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental data on the interactions of light nuclei (d, He(4), C(12)) at the momentum 4.2 GeV/cA with the carbon nuclei were taken in the 2-m propane bubble chamber. The distributions in the number of interacting nucleons, the spectra of protons, the mean energies of secondary pions and protons, the mean fractions of energy transferred to the pion and nucleon components are presented. The results of the investigation of the mechanism of nucleus-nucleus interactions can be used to calculate the nuclear cascades in the atmosphere.

  18. Pion and Kaon Lab Frame Differential Cross Sections for Intermediate Energy Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2008-01-01

    Space radiation transport codes require accurate models for hadron production in intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. Codes require cross sections to be written in terms of lab frame variables and it is important to be able to verify models against experimental data in the lab frame. Several models are compared to lab frame data. It is found that models based on algebraic parameterizations are unable to describe intermediate energy differential cross section data. However, simple thermal model parameterizations, when appropriately transformed from the center of momentum to the lab frame, are able to account for the data.

  19. Observation of direct hadronic pairs in nucleus-nucleus collisions in JACEE emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Jurak, A.; Hayashi, T.; Iwai, J.; Jones, W. V.

    1985-01-01

    In a number of high energy ( or = 1 TeV/amu) nucleus-nucleus collisions observed in Japanese-American Cooperative Emulsion Experiment (JACEE) emulsion chambers, nonrandom spatial association of produced charged particles, mostly hadronic pairs, are observed. Similar narrow pairs are observed in about 100 events at much low energy (20 to 60 GeV/amu). Analysis shows that 30 to 50% of Pair abundances are understood by the Hambury-Brown-Twiss effect, and the remainder seems to require other explanations.

  20. Bicervical Normal Uterus with Normal Vagina

    PubMed Central

    Okeke, CE; Anele, TI; Onyejelam, CC

    2014-01-01

    This is a report of the form of uterine anomaly involving a dual cervical canal in a side-by-side disposition with normal uterine cavity and normal vagina. It portrays a form of congenital uterine anomaly not explicable by the existing classical theory of mullerian anomalies. However, there has been a proposed reclassification of mullerian anomalies, which includes this type of anomaly under Type IIIc. The patient was a 31-year-old woman being managed for “secondary infertility.” To report a case of uterine anomaly that is not explicable by the existing classical theory of mullerian anomalies. To the best of our knowledge, only few cases of bicervical normal uterus with normal vagina exist in the literature; one of the cases had an anterior-posterior disposition. This form of uterine abnormality is not explicable by the existing classical theory of mullerian anomalies and suggests that a complex interplay of events beyond the classical postulate gives rise to the female genital tract. PMID:25364608

  1. The Checkerboard Model of the Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Theodore

    2014-03-01

    The Lach Checker Board Model (CBM) of the nucleus and the associated ESM predicts that nature has 5 generations of quarks not 3. The heaviest generation in the Extended Standard Model (ESM) has a t' quark of mass 65 GeV and a b' quark of 42.4 GeV. The lepton in this generation has a mass of 27 GeV. Part of this theory evolved because it appears that the quarks and lepton of each generation have masses related by the geometric mean. The Geometric mean of 65 and 27 is 42. Charge is conserved (+2/3 and -1 is -1/3). Details of how this theory evolved is found on my web site (http://checkerboard.dnsalias.net) or in the following references [T.M. Lach, Checkerboard Structure of the Nucleus, Infinite Energy, Vol. 5, issue 30, (2000); T.M. Lach, Masses of the Sub-Nuclear Particles, nucl-th/0008026, @http://xxx.lanl.gov/] One independent check of this CB model is that the wavelength of the ``up'' quark orbiting inside the proton at 84.8123% the speed of light around the ``dn'' quark in the center turns out to be exactly one DeBroglie wavelength. This explains the mass of the proton and neutron and their magnetic moments. This along with the beautiful symmetric 2D structure of the He nucleus led to the evolution of this theory. One would expect a t'-anti t' meson of mass of about 130 GeV.

  2. The bare nucleus of comet Neujmin 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campins, Humberto; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Mcfadden, Lucy-Ann

    1987-01-01

    Simultaneous visible and infrared observations of comet P/Neujmin 1 1984c are presented which show that the comet has a large (mean radius 10 km), dark (geometric albedo 2-3 percent) nucleus with a surface which is mostly inert material but which still shows a low level of gaseous activity. This is the first physical evidence that cometary nuclei can leave behind an inert body after the coma activity ceases. No asteroid or asteroid class has been found to match the reflectance and albedo of this comet except possibly some D asteroids.

  3. The Subthalamic Nucleus, oscillations and conflict

    PubMed Central

    Zavala, Baltazar; Zaghloul, Kareem; Brown, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN), which is currently the most common target for deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease, has received increased attention over the past few years for the roles it may play in functions beyond simple motor control. In this article we will highlight several of the theoretical, interventional, and electrophysiological studies that have implicated the STN in response inhibition. Most influential amongst this evidence has been the reported effect of STN deep brain stimulation in increasing impulsive responses in the laboratory setting. Yet, how this relates to pathological impulsivity in patient’s everyday lives remains uncertain. PMID:25688872

  4. Parity violation in the compound nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G.E.; Crawford, B.E.; Grossmann, C.A.; Lowie, L.Y.; Bowman, J.D.; Knudson, J.; Penttilae, S.; Seestrom, S.J.; Smith, D.A.; Yen, Y.; Yuan, V.W.; Delheij, P.P.; Haseyama, T.; Masaike, A.; Matsuda, Y.; Postma, H.; Roberson, N.R.; Sharapov, E.I.; Stephenson, S.L.

    1999-06-01

    Measurements have been performed on the helicity dependence of the neutron resonance cross section for many nuclei by our TRIPLE Collaboration. A large number of parity violations are observed. Generic enhancements amplify the signal for symmetry breaking and the stochastic properties of the compound nucleus permit the strength of the symmetry-breaking interaction to be determined without knowledge of the wave functions of individual states. A total of 15 nuclei have been analyzed with this statistical approach. The results are summarized. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Angular distributions of neutron-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Tapan; Lahiri, Joydev; Basu, D. N.

    2011-06-15

    We derive the total and the differential cross sections with respect to angle for neutron-induced reactions from an analytical model having a simple functional form to demonstrate the quantitative agreement with the measured cross sections. The energy dependence of the neutron-nucleus interaction cross sections are estimated successfully for energies ranging from 5 to 600 MeV. In this work, the effect of the imaginary part of the nuclear potential is treated more appropriately compared to our earlier work. The angular distributions for neutron scattering also agree reasonably well with the experimental data at forward angles.

  6. Unveiling the nucleus of NGC 7172

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smajić, S.; Fischer, S.; Zuther, J.; Eckart, A.

    2012-08-01

    Aims: We present the results of near-infrared (NIR) H + K European Southern Observatory SINFONI integral field spectroscopy (IFS) of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 7172. We investigate the central 800 pc, concentrating on excitation conditions, morphology, and stellar content. NGC 7172 was selected from a sample of the ten nearest Seyfert 2 galaxies from the Veron-Cetty & Veron catalogue. All objects were chosen as test cases for adaptive optics (AO) assisted observations that allow a detailed study (at high spatial and spectral resolution) of the nuclear and host environments. NGC 7172 has a prominent dustlane crossing the central galaxy region from east to west, which makes it an ideal candidate to investigate the effect of obscuration by strong galactic extinction on (active) galaxies and their classification. Methods: The NIR is less influenced by dust extinction than optical light and is sensitive to the mass-dominating stellar populations. SINFONI integral field spectroscopy combines NIR imaging and spectroscopy and provides us with the opportunity to analyze several emission and absorption lines to investigate the stellar populations and ionization mechanisms over the 4″ × 4″ field of view (FOV). Results: We present emission and absorption line measurements in the central 800 pc of NGC 7172. The detection of [Si vi] and broad Paα and Brγ components are clear signs of an accreting super-massive black hole hiding behind the prominent dustlane at visible wavelengths. Hot temperatures of about 1300 K are indicative of a dusty torus in the nuclear region. Narrow components of Paα and Brγ enable us to make an extinction measurement. Our measures of the molecular hydrogen lines, hydrogen recombination lines, and [Fe ii] indicate that the excitation of these lines is caused by an active galactic nucleus. The central region of the galactic disk is predominantly inhabited by gas, dust, and an old K-M type giant stellar population. The gaseous, molecular, and

  7. Paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus: axonal projections to the brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Geerling, Joel C.; Shin, Jung-Won; Chimenti, Peter C.; Loewy, Arthur D.

    2010-01-01

    The paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVH) contains many neurons that innervate the brainstem, but information regarding their target sites remains incomplete. Here, we labeled neurons in the rat PVH with an anterograde axonal tracer, Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (PHAL) and studied their descending projections in reference to specific neuronal subpopulations throughout the brainstem. While many of their target sites were identified previously, numerous new observations were made. Major findings include: (1) In the midbrain, the PVH projects lightly to the ventral tegmental area, Edinger-Westphal nucleus, ventrolateral periaqueductal gray matter, reticular formation, pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus, and dorsal raphe nucleus. (2) In the dorsal pons, the PVH projects heavily to the pre-locus coeruleus, yet very little to the catecholamine neurons in the locus coeruleus, and selectively targets the viscerosensory subregions of the parabrachial nucleus; (3) In the ventral medulla, the superior salivatory nucleus, retrotrapezoid nucleus, compact and external formations of the nucleus ambiguus, A1 and caudal C1 catecholamine neurons, and caudal pressor area receive dense axonal projections, generally exceeding the PVH projection to the rostral C1 region; (4) The medial nucleus of the solitary tract (including A2 noradrenergic and aldosterone-sensitive neurons) receives the most extensive projections of the PVH, substantially more than the dorsal vagal nucleus or area postrema. Our findings suggest that the PVH may modulate a range of homeostatic functions, including cerebral and ocular blood flow, corneal and nasal hydration, ingestive behavior, sodium intake, and glucose metabolism, as well as cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and respiratory activities. PMID:20187136

  8. On M31's Double Nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Smith, B. F.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The recent HST discovery of a double nucleus in M31 brings into prominence the question how long, a second core can survive within the nuclear regions of a galaxy. Physical conditions in the nuclear regions of a typical galaxy help a second core survive, so it can orbit for a long time. possibly for thousands of orbits. Given the nearly uniform mass density in a core, tidal forces within a core radius are compressive in all directions and help the core survive the buffeting it takes as it orbits near the center of the galaxy. We use numerical experiments to illustrate these physical principles. Our method allows the full power of the experiments to be concentrated on the nuclear regions. Spatial resolution of about 0.2 pc comfortably resolves detail within the 1.4 parsec core radius of the second, but brighter core (P1) in M31. We use these physical principles to discuss M31's double nucleus, but they apply to other galaxies as well. and in other astronomical situations such as dumbbell galaxies. galaxies orbiting near the center of a galaxy cluster, and subclustering in galaxy clusters. The experiments also illustrate that galaxy encounters and merging are quite sensitive to external tidal forces, such as those produced by the gravitational potential in a group or cluster of galaxies.

  9. Comet Borrelly Nucleus Found to the Side

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Deep Space 1 flew by comet Borrelly on September 22, 2001 and took these measurements with its plasma instruments between 90,000 kilometers (56,000 miles) and 2,000 kilometers (1,200 miles) away. These data show that the flow of ions around the comet's rocky, icy nucleus (the center of the deep V-shaped feature) is not centered on the comet's nucleus as scientists expected before the Borrelly flyby. Ions in the turbulent flow are heated to about 1 million Kelvin (2 million degrees Fahrenheit) causing the bands of ions to appear broad and jagged compared to the solar wind.

    Deep Space 1 completed its primary mission testing ion propulsion and 11 other advanced, high-risk technologies in September 1999. NASA extended the mission, taking advantage of the ion propulsion and other systems to undertake this chancy but exciting, and ultimately successful, encounter with the comet. More information can be found on the Deep Space 1 home page at http://nmp.jpl.nasa.gov/ds1/ .

    Deep Space 1 was launched in October 1998 as part of NASA's New Millennium Program, which is managed by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The California Institute of Technology manages JPL for NASA.

  10. Comet nucleus and asteroid sample return missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melton, Robert G.; Thompson, Roger C.; Starchville, Thomas F., Jr.; Adams, C.; Aldo, A.; Dobson, K.; Flotta, C.; Gagliardino, J.; Lear, M.; McMillan, C.

    During the 1991-92 academic year, the Pennsylvania State University has developed three sample return missions: one to the nucleus of comet Wild 2, one to the asteroid Eros, and one to three asteroids located in the Main Belt. The primary objective of the comet nucleus sample return mission is to rendezvous with a short period comet and acquire a 10 kg sample for return to Earth. Upon rendezvous with the comet, a tethered coring and sampler drill will contact the surface and extract a two-meter core sample from the target site. Before the spacecraft returns to Earth, a monitoring penetrator containing scientific instruments will be deployed for gathering long-term data about the comet. A single asteroid sample return mission to the asteroid 433 Eros (chosen for proximity and launch opportunities) will extract a sample from the asteroid surface for return to Earth. To limit overall mission cost, most of the mission design uses current technologies, except the sampler drill design. The multiple asteroid sample return mission could best be characterized through its use of future technology including an optical communications system, a nuclear power reactor, and a low-thrust propulsion system. A low-thrust trajectory optimization code (QuickTop 2) obtained from the NASA LeRC helped in planning the size of major subsystem components, as well as the trajectory between targets.