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Sample records for hypogonadism

  1. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism revisited.

    PubMed

    Fraietta, Renato; Zylberstejn, Daniel Suslik; Esteves, Sandro C

    2013-01-01

    Impaired testicular function, i.e., hypogonadism, can result from a primary testicular disorder (hypergonadotropic) or occur secondary to hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction (hypogonadotropic). Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism can be congenital or acquired. Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is divided into anosmic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (Kallmann syndrome) and congenital normosmic isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism). The incidence of congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is approximately 1-10:100,000 live births, and approximately 2/3 and 1/3 of cases are caused by Kallmann syndrome (KS) and idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, respectively. Acquired hypogonadotropic hypogonadism can be caused by drugs, infiltrative or infectious pituitary lesions, hyperprolactinemia, encephalic trauma, pituitary/brain radiation, exhausting exercise, abusive alcohol or illicit drug intake, and systemic diseases such as hemochromatosis, sarcoidosis and histiocytosis X. The clinical characteristics of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism are androgen deficiency and a lack/delay/stop of pubertal sexual maturation. Low blood testosterone levels and low pituitary hormone levels confirm the hypogonadotropic hypogonadism diagnosis. A prolonged stimulated intravenous GnRH test can be useful. In Kallmann syndrome, cerebral MRI can show an anomalous morphology or even absence of the olfactory bulb. Therapy for hypogonadotropic hypogonadism depends on the patient's desire for future fertility. Hormone replacement with testosterone is the classic treatment for hypogonadism. Androgen replacement is indicated for men who already have children or have no desire to induce pregnancy, and testosterone therapy is used to reverse the symptoms and signs of hypogonadism. Conversely, GnRH or gonadotropin therapies are the best options for men wishing to have children. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is one of the rare conditions in which specific

  2. Adult-Onset Hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Khera, Mohit; Broderick, Gregory A; Carson, Culley C; Dobs, Adrian S; Faraday, Martha M; Goldstein, Irwin; Hakim, Lawrence S; Hellstrom, Wayne J G; Kacker, Ravi; Köhler, Tobias S; Mills, Jesse N; Miner, Martin; Sadeghi-Nejad, Hossein; Seftel, Allen D; Sharlip, Ira D; Winters, Stephen J; Burnett, Arthur L

    2016-07-01

    In August 2015, an expert colloquium commissioned by the Sexual Medicine Society of North America (SMSNA) convened in Washington, DC, to discuss the common clinical scenario of men who present with low testosterone (T) and associated signs and symptoms accompanied by low or normal gonadotropin levels. This syndrome is not classical primary (testicular failure) or secondary (pituitary or hypothalamic failure) hypogonadism because it may have elements of both presentations. The panel designated this syndrome adult-onset hypogonadism (AOH) because it occurs commonly in middle-age and older men. The SMSNA is a not-for-profit society established in 1994 to promote, encourage, and support the highest standards of practice, research, education, and ethics in the study of human sexual function and dysfunction. The panel consisted of 17 experts in men's health, sexual medicine, urology, endocrinology, and methodology. Participants declared potential conflicts of interest and were SMSNA members and nonmembers. The panel deliberated regarding a diagnostic process to document signs and symptoms of AOH, the rationale for T therapy, and a monitoring protocol for T-treated patients. The evaluation and management of hypogonadal syndromes have been addressed in recent publications (ie, the Endocrine Society, the American Urological Association, and the International Society for Sexual Medicine). The primary purpose of this document was to support health care professionals in the development of a deeper understanding of AOH, particularly in how it differs from classical primary and secondary hypogonadism, and to provide a conceptual framework to guide its diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up. PMID:27343020

  3. Hypogonadism: Its Prevalence and Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ross, Anna; Bhasin, Shalender

    2016-05-01

    Hypogonadism is a clinical syndrome, which results from the failure of the testes to produce physiologic levels of testosterone and a normal number of spermatozoa due to defects at one or more levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Primary hypogonadism results from malfunction at the level of the testes due to a genetic cause, injury, inflammation, or infection. Hypothalamic and/or pituitary failure leads to secondary hypogonadism, most often as a result of genetic defects, neoplasm, or infiltrative disorders. The signs and symptoms of hypogonadism depend on the age of onset, severity of androgen deficiency, and underlying cause of androgen deficiency. PMID:27132573

  4. Hypogonadism in male cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Burney, Basil O; Garcia, Jose M

    2012-09-01

    Prevalence of hypogonadism in men with cancer has been reported between 40% and 90%, which is significantly higher than in the general population. Hypogonadism is likely to affect the quality of life in these patients by contributing to non-specific symptoms, including decreased energy, anorexia, sarcopenia, weight loss, depression, insomnia, fatigue, weakness, and sexual dysfunction. Pathogenesis of hypogonadism in cancer patients is thought to be multi-factorial. Inflammation may play an important role, but leptin, opioids, ghrelin, and high-dose chemotherapy through different mechanisms have all been implicated as the cause. Hypogonadism is also associated with poor survival in cancer patients. Data looking into the treatment of hypogonadal male cancer patients with testosterone are limited. However, improvements in body weight, muscle strength, lean body mass, and quality of life have been shown in hypogonadal men with other chronic diseases on testosterone replacement therapy. Prospective and interventional trials are needed to test the efficacy and safety of testosterone treatment in improving quality of life of these patients. PMID:22528986

  5. Genetics of Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Topaloglu, A Kemal; Kotan, L Damla

    2016-01-01

    Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) often manifests as pubertal delay. A considerable proportion of cases of HH is due to genetic mutations. Recognizing those mutated genes and associated phenotypes may improve our diagnostic capabilities. GNRHR and TACR3 should be the first two genes to be screened in a clinical setting for equivocal cases such as constitutional delay in puberty versus idiopathic HH. In Kallmann syndrome (KS), according to the presence of certain accompanying clinical features, genetic screening for particular gene(s) may be prioritized: synkinesia (KAL1), dental agenesis (FGF8/FGFR1), bony anomalies (FGF8/FGFR1), and hearing loss (CHD7, SOX10). FEZF1 has recently been added to the growing list of KS genes. Also, discovery of mutations in KISS1/KISS1R and TAC3/TACR3 in kisspeptin and neurokinin B signaling, respectively, has provided major advancements in our understanding of the biology of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone pulse generator. Identification of further causative mutations accounting for the HH phenotype, which is now more feasible with the increasing popularity of whole exome sequencing, may provide deeper insight into the biology of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. PMID:26680571

  6. Male hypogonadism and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Naifar, M; Rekik, N; Messedi, M; Chaabouni, K; Lahiani, A; Turki, M; Abid, M; Ayedi, F; Jamoussi, K

    2015-06-01

    The role of androgens in cardiovascular disease is still controversial in men. In this study, we investigated metabolic disorders in Tunisian hypogonadal men compared with healthy controls. Forty hypogonadal men and 80 control subjects were enrolled. Patients with a history of pre-existing panhypopituitarism, thyroid dysfunction or inflammatory disease were excluded. Glycaemia, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), lipid profile, insulin, testosterone and gonadotrophins were measured. Insulin resistance was assessed by homoeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (Homa IR). Waist circumference, body mass index and blood pressure were significantly higher in patients compared with controls. Glycemia, HbA1c, fasting serum insulin and Homa IR were significantly increased among hypogonadal men. In univariate analysis, testosterone levels were inversely correlated with body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, glycaemia, HbA1C, insulin, Homa IR and hsCRP. In multivariate analysis including all significant variables, initial testosterone level was the only independent risk factor for developing dyslipidaemia. With logistic regression, male hypogonadism was an independent risk factor for MS (P < 0.001). We conclude that low testosterone level plays a central role in the development of metabolic syndrome. Further prospective data are required to establish the causative link. PMID:25040289

  7. Leydig cell aging and hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Beattie, M C; Adekola, L; Papadopoulos, V; Chen, H; Zirkin, B R

    2015-08-01

    Leydig cell testosterone (T) production is reduced with age, resulting in reduced serum T levels (hypogonadism). A number of cellular changes have been identified in the steroidogenic pathway of aged Leydig cells that are associated with reduced T formation, including reductions in luteinizing hormone (LH)-stimulated cAMP production, the cholesterol transport proteins steroidogenic acute regulatory (STAR) protein and translocator protein (TSPO), and downstream steroidogenic enzymes of the mitochondria and smooth endoplasmic reticulum. Many of the changes in steroid formation that characterize aged Leydig cells can be elicited by the experimental alteration of the redox environment of young cells, suggesting that changes in the intracellular redox balance may cause reduced T production. Hypogonadism is estimated to affect about 5 million American men, including both aged and young. This condition has been linked to mood changes, worsening cognition, fatigue, depression, decreased lean body mass, reduced bone mineral density, increased visceral fat, metabolic syndrome, decreased libido, and sexual dysfunction. Exogenous T administration is now used widely to elevate serum T levels in hypogonadal men and thus to treat symptoms of hypogonadism. However, recent evidence suggests that men who take exogenous T may face increased risk of stroke, heart attack, and prostate tumorigenesis. Moreover, it is well established that administered T can have suppressive effects on LH, resulting in lower Leydig cell T production, reduced intratesticular T concentration, and reduced spermatogenesis. This makes exogenous T administration inappropriate for men who wish to father children. There are promising new approaches to increase serum T by directly stimulating Leydig cell T production rather than by exogenous T therapy, thus potentially avoiding some of its negative consequences. PMID:25700847

  8. Biochemical endocrinology of the hypogonadal male.

    PubMed

    Belchetz, Paul E; Barth, Julian H; Kaufman, Jean-Marc

    2010-11-01

    Hypogonadism in the male results from inadequate testicular function, especially defects in androgen synthesis and secretion, or action. Androgen action is important throughout normal male development: in the fetus, puberty, adult life and old age. Regulation is by variable activity of the hypothalamo-pituitary axis at different phases of the life span. Clinical aspects include: genetic aspects presenting at birth and pubertal failure/arrest. Aspects in adult life embrace sexuality, somatic symptoms and osteoporosis. Acquired causes of hypogonadism may arise from various forms of testicular damage (primary hypogonadism), pituitary and hypothalamic disorders, as well as aetiologies acting at several sites. Measurement of testosterone (T) is crucial to the diagnosis of hypogonadism and the technologies continue to develop, with recent major advances. A growing problem relates to the diagnosis and treatment of hypogonadism in the ageing male. T therapy is available in several forms, with major improvements in more newly available modalities. PMID:20956400

  9. Evaluation and treatment of male hypogonadism in primary care.

    PubMed

    Pickett, Kim Anne

    2016-08-18

    Male hypogonadism is increasing in prevalence, particularly in the older male population. Signs and symptoms associated with hypogonadism are often nonspecific and may be difficult to categorize. This article discusses parameters for screening patients at risk, reviews how to establish the diagnosis of primary or secondary male hypogonadism, and offers important considerations for treatment of patients with hypogonadism. PMID:27434384

  10. [Androgenic treatment of male hypogonadism].

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Jean-Marc; Prévost, Gaëtan

    2014-02-01

    The diagnosis of male hypogonadism should be clearly established on a clinical and biological basis before considering the initiation of a substitutive treatment with androgens. A careful evaluation of advantages, constraints and limitations of the treatment should be done previously. The potential advantages of an androgenic substitution include an improvement of the symptoms of hypogonadism and the prevention of its bone and metabolic consequences. Absolute (namely prostatic) or relative contraindications should be detected before starting any substitution. The modalities of treatment will be adapted to both the patient's age and the goals to reach. The different available formulations do not induce a similar pattern of plasma testosterone levels. Patches, gel applications and long-acting intramuscular formulations [injected every 3 months] result in stable plasma levels in the physiologic range. The main limitation to their use is linked to a financial aspect as they are not the object of any refund. A careful survey (on clinical, biological and radiological basis) should be established after starting the substitutive treatment with androgens. PMID:24268959

  11. Hypogonadism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Estrogen level (women) FSH level and LH level Testosterone level (men) Other tests may include: Blood tests ... the form of a pill or skin patch. Testosterone is used for boys and men. The medicine ...

  12. Hypogonadism

    MedlinePlus

    ... growth problems. In men the symptoms are: Breast enlargement Muscle loss Decreased interest in sex (low libido) ... care provider if you notice: Breast discharge Breast enlargement (men) Hot flashes (women) Impotence Loss of body ...

  13. Neuroradiological findings in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Salvalaggio, Alessandro; Elefante, Andrea; Manara, Renzo

    2016-06-01

    Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) is a clinical hallmark of a heterogeneous group of acquired and inherited diseases. Patients with HH undergo brain imaging in order to investigate morphological or signal abnormalities at the level of the hypothalamic-pituitary structures. The presence of tumors, lesions or atrophy might be the explanation of the hormone dysfunction. Nonetheless, in most patients both the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland appear normal. In some cases, the presence of ancillary, not necessarily HH-related brain abnormalities might provide significant clues on the underlying condition. We addressed those conditions associated with HH subdividing them into acquired or inherited diseases, highlighting the neuroradiologic features that might help in the diagnosis. PMID:27050382

  14. Treatment of hypogonadism in males.

    PubMed

    Watson, Sara; Fuqua, John S; Lee, Peter A

    2014-02-01

    The treatment of adolescent males with hypogonadism using testosterone is dependent on the underlying diagnosis as well as the patient's and family's preferences. Those with testicular failure, always a pathologic condition, begin lifelong therapy, while short-term therapy is often begun for those who have a delayed puberty. There is a wide variety of testosterone formulations available, with differences in adverse events sometimes associated with the method of administration. The goals of treatment involve stimulating physical puberty, including achievement of virilization, a normal muscle mass and bone mineral density for age, and improvement in psychosocial wellbeing. While androgen therapy results in physical changes of puberty, the potential for fertility must be considered for those with permanent gonadotropin deficiency. in this population, therapy with gonadotropins or gonadotropin releasing hormone may be effective. For those with testicular failure, fertility may be possible but requires assisted reproductive procedures. PMID:24683947

  15. Hypogonadism in the HIV-infected man.

    PubMed

    Rochira, Vincenzo; Guaraldi, Giovanni

    2014-09-01

    Androgen deficiency occurs frequently in men with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Antiretroviral treatments had reduced the prevalence of male hypogonadism. The pathogenesis of testosterone (T) deficiency in HIV is multifactorial. Several mechanisms have been proposed; among them, drugs, fat redistribution, and a poor health status could explain the mechanism leading to gonadotropins inhibition and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The diagnosis of hypogonadism in HIV-infected men should be made based on clinical symptoms and a specific workup including T measurement. The interpretation of the results of biochemical testing is more difficult in men with HIV due to several confounding factors. T treatment should be offered to HIV-infected men with documented clinical hypogonadism and symptoms, especially if they are losing lean mass. PMID:25169563

  16. Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism in a Boy with Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Haq, T; Pathan, M F; Ikhtaire, S

    2016-01-01

    Hypogonadism is seldom seen together with myopathy, although testosterone contributes to muscle strength. We present here a rare case of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with myopathy in a 20 year old male. He had flaccid quadriparesis with raised creatinine phosphokinase. Hormone assays revealed low testosterone as well as low luteinising hormone and follicle stimulating hormone levels. Tests to exclude androgen deficiency should be carried out in male patients with myopathy. PMID:26931274

  17. An update on male hypogonadism therapy

    PubMed Central

    Surampudi, Prasanth; Swerdloff, Ronald S; Wang, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Men who have symptoms associated with persistently low serum total testosterone level should be assessed for testosterone replacement therapy. Areas covered Acute and chronic illnesses are associated with low serum testosterone and these should be recognized and treated. Once the diagnosis of male hypogonadism is made, the benefits of testosterone treatment usually outweigh the risks. Without contraindications, the patient should be offered testosterone replacement therapy. The options of testosterone delivery systems (injections, transdermal patches/gels, buccal tablets, capsules and implants) have increased in the last decade. Testosterone improves symptoms and signs of hypogonadism such as sexual function and energy, increases bone density and lean mass and decreases visceral adiposity. In men who desire fertility and who have secondary hypogonadism, testosterone can be withdrawn and the patients can be placed on gonadotropins. New modified designer androgens and selective androgen receptor modulators have been in preclinical and clinical trials for some time. None of these have been assessed for the treatment of male hypogonadism. Expert opinion Despite the lack of prospective long-term data from randomized, controlled clinical trials of testosterone treatment on prostate health and cardiovascular disease risk, the available evidence suggests that testosterone therapy should be offered to symptomatic hypogonadal men. PMID:24758365

  18. Testosterone nasal gel (Natesto) for hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    2015-05-11

    In one study, Natesto nasal gel administered intranasally 3 times daily was effective in raising low serum testosterone levels into the normal range in patients with hypogonadism. Whether patients will find this method of administration more acceptable than an intramuscular injection every 2-4 weeks or once-daily application to the skin remains to be determined. Based on the lack of convincing evidence of benefit in older men and concerns about its safety, the FDA has warned against using testosterone to treat hypogonadism due solely to aging. PMID:25941957

  19. [Estrogens and male sexuality: efficiency of antiestrogens in case of hypothalamic hypogonadism and late onset hypogonadism].

    PubMed

    Martin-Du Pan, R C

    2011-03-23

    Estrogen treatment in eugonadal men diminishes libido, whereas libido is preserved by estrogens in orchidectomized transsexuals as well as in cases of aromatase deficiency. Hypothalamic hypogonadism can be caused by stress, depression, anorexia or excessive exercise. It may result in erectile dysfunction and decreased libido. A 7 day trial of clomiphen (25 mg/day) can be used to test the responsiveness of the axis and may be continued for up to 6 months as a means to stimulation endogenous LH and testosterone secretion. Other antiestrogens such as raloxifen or anastrazol may have similar effects in obese men and in aging men with late onset hypogonadism (LOH). PMID:21542378

  20. A Rare Presentation of Transfusional Hemochromatosis: Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Ucler, Rifki; Kara, Erdal; Atmaca, Murat; Olmez, Sehmus; Alay, Murat; Dirik, Yaren; Bora, Aydin

    2015-01-01

    Hemochromatosis is a disease caused by extraordinary iron deposition in parenchymal cells leading to cellular damage and organ dysfunction. β-thalassemia major is one of the causes of secondary hemochromatosis due to regular transfusional treatment for maintaining adequate levels of hemoglobin. Hypogonadism is one of the potential complications of hemochromatosis, usually seen in patients with a severe iron overload, and it shows an association with diabetes and cirrhosis in adult patients. We describe a patient with mild transfusional hemochromatosis due to β-thalassemia major, presenting with central hypogonadism in the absence of cirrhosis or diabetes. Our case showed an atypical presentation with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism without severe hyperferritinemia, cirrhosis, or diabetes. With this case, we aim to raise awareness of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in patients with intensive transfused thalassemia major even if not severe hemochromatosis so that hypogonadism related complications, such as osteoporosis, anergia, weakness, sexual dysfunction, and infertility, could be more effectively managed in these patients. PMID:26266058

  1. A Rare Presentation of Transfusional Hemochromatosis: Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Ucler, Rifki; Kara, Erdal; Atmaca, Murat; Olmez, Sehmus; Alay, Murat; Dirik, Yaren; Bora, Aydin

    2015-01-01

    Hemochromatosis is a disease caused by extraordinary iron deposition in parenchymal cells leading to cellular damage and organ dysfunction. β-thalassemia major is one of the causes of secondary hemochromatosis due to regular transfusional treatment for maintaining adequate levels of hemoglobin. Hypogonadism is one of the potential complications of hemochromatosis, usually seen in patients with a severe iron overload, and it shows an association with diabetes and cirrhosis in adult patients. We describe a patient with mild transfusional hemochromatosis due to β-thalassemia major, presenting with central hypogonadism in the absence of cirrhosis or diabetes. Our case showed an atypical presentation with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism without severe hyperferritinemia, cirrhosis, or diabetes. With this case, we aim to raise awareness of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in patients with intensive transfused thalassemia major even if not severe hemochromatosis so that hypogonadism related complications, such as osteoporosis, anergia, weakness, sexual dysfunction, and infertility, could be more effectively managed in these patients. PMID:26266058

  2. Osteoporosis in men with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, J.S.; Klibanski, A.; Neer, R.M.; Greenspan, S.L.; Rosenthal, D.I.; Crowley, W.F. Jr.

    1987-03-01

    To assess the effect of testosterone deficiency on skeletal integrity in men, we determined bone density in 23 hypogonadal men with isolated gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency and compared those values with ones from controls. Cortical bone density, as assessed by single-photon absorptiometry of the nondominant radius, ranged from 0.57 to 0.86 g/cm2 (mean +/- SE, 0.71 +/- 0.02) in patients with fused epiphyses and from 0.57 to 0.67 g/cm2 (mean, 0.61 +/- 0.01) in patients with open epiphyses, both of which were significantly (p less than 0.001) lower than normal. Spinal trabecular bone density, as assessed by computed tomography, was similarly decreased (p less than 0.0001) and ranged from 42 to 177 mg K2HPO4/cm3 (mean, 112 +/- 7). Cortical bone density was at least 2 SD below normal in 16 of 23 men, and 8 men had spinal bone densities below the fracture threshold of 80 to 100 mg K2HPO4/cm3. Osteopenia was equally severe in men with immature and mature bone ages, suggesting that abnormal bone development plays an important role in the osteopenia of men with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

  3. Obesity and late-onset hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Corona, G; Vignozzi, L; Sforza, A; Mannucci, E; Maggi, M

    2015-12-15

    Obesity and male hypogonadism (HG) are often associated, as demonstrated in all cross-sectional studies. Prospective studies have indicated that i) having HG at baseline increases the risk of visceral obesity (and metabolic syndrome) and that ii) obesity induces incident HG. Hence, there is a bidirectional relationship between the two conditions. This is the main topic of this review, along with some pathogenic considerations. Meta-analysis of intervention studies indicates that treating obesity is a very efficient treatment for obesity-induced HG. The mechanism by which obesity induces HG has not yet been completely understood, but dietary-induced hypothalamic inflammation, along with a decreased GnRH release, is plausible. Among patients seeking medical care for obesity, the proportion of HG is relatively high. The prevalence of obesity among patients referring for sexual dysfunction is also elevated. Hence, in symptomatic, obese, hypogonadal subjects, testosterone supplementation (TS) can be considered. Whereas long-term uncontrolled register studies suggest that TS could decrease weight, analysis of controlled studies only support a parallel increase in lean mass and decrease in fat mass, with a resulting null effect on weight. Considering that T induces an increase in muscle mass, it is conceivable that the amount of activity obese people can undertake after TS will increase, allowing a closer adherence to physical exercise programs. Some studies, here meta-analyzed, support this concept. PMID:26143633

  4. Late-Onset Hypogonadism and Testosterone Replacement in Older Men.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Rajib K; Bhattacharya, Shelley B

    2015-11-01

    Late-onset hypogonadism is an underdiagnosed and easily treated condition defined by low serum testosterone levels in men older than 65 years. When treated, a significant improvement in quality of life may be reached in this rapidly rising sector of the population. During the evaluation, laboratory tests and a full medication review should be performed to exclude other illnesses or adverse effects from medications. The major goal of treatment in this population is treating the symptoms related to hypogonadism. There has not been clear evidence supporting universally giving older men with low serum testosterone levels and hypogonadal symptoms testosterone replacement therapy. PMID:26476121

  5. Male acquired hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Salenave, Sylvie; Trabado, Sévérine; Maione, Luigi; Brailly-Tabard, Sylvie; Young, Jacques

    2012-04-01

    Acquired hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (AHH), contrary to congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) is characterized by postnatal onset of disorders that damage or alter the function of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons and/or pituitary gonadotroph cells. AHH thus prevents the establishment of gonadotropin secretion at puberty, or its post-pubertal maintenance. Thus, postnatal AHH may prevent the onset of puberty or appear during pubertal development, but it usually emerges after the normal age of puberty. Although pituitary tumors, particularly prolactinoma, are the most common cause, sellar tumors or cyst of the hypothalamus or infundibulum, infiltrative, vascular, iron overload and other disorders may also cause AHH. Pituitary surgery and head trauma or cranial/pituitary radiation therapy are also usual causes of AHH. The clinical manifestations of AHH depend on age of onset, the degree of gonadotropin deficiency, the rapidity of its onset and the association to other pituitary function deficiencies or excess. Men with AHH have less stamina, decreased libido, erectile dysfunction and strength, and a worsened sense of well being leading to degraded quality of life. The physical examination is usually normal if hypogonadism is of recent onset. Diminished facial, body hair and muscle mass, fine facial wrinkles, gynecomastia, and hypotrophic testes are observed in long-standing and complete AHH. Spermatogenesis is impaired and the volume of ejaculate is decreased only when gonadotropins and testosterone levels are very low. Men with AHH may have normal or low serum LH and FSH concentrations, but normal gonadotropin values are inappropriate when associated with low serum testosterone. In the majority of AHH patients, serum inhibin B is "normal". The decrease of this sertolian hormone indicates a long-standing and severe gonadotropin deficiency. Symptoms, usually associated with significant testosterone deficiency in men with AHH, improve with

  6. MANAGEMENT OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: Reversible hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Andrew A; Raivio, Taneli; Pitteloud, Nelly

    2016-06-01

    Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) is characterized by lack of puberty and infertility. Traditionally, it has been considered a life-long condition yet cases of reversibility have been described wherein patients spontaneously recover function of the reproductive axis following treatment. Reversibility occurs in both male and female CHH cases and appears to be more common (~10-15%) than previously thought. These reversal patients span a range of GnRH deficiency from mild to severe and many reversal patients harbor mutations in genes underlying CHH. However, to date there are no clear factors for predicting reversible CHH. Importantly, recovery of reproductive axis function may not be permanent. Thus, CHH is not always life-long and the incidence of reversal warrants periodic treatment withdrawal with close monitoring and follow-up. Reversible CHH highlights the importance of environmental (epigenetic) factors such as sex steroid treatment on the reproductive axis in modifying the phenotype. This review provides an overview and an update on what is known about this phenomenon. PMID:26792935

  7. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism associated with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia [corrected].

    PubMed

    Scarano, Valentina; Valentina, Scarano; De Santis, Daniele; Daniele, De Santis; Suppressa, Patrizia; Patrizia, Suppressa; Lastella, Patrizia; Patrizia, Lastella; Lenato, Gennaro Mariano; Mariano, Lenato Gennaro; Triggiani, Vincenzo; Vincenzo, Triggiani; Sabbà, Carlo; Carlo, Sabbà

    2013-01-01

    A 65-year-old man was referred to our clinic for the rehabilitation of right hemiparesis caused by ischaemic stroke. Hypertension, postphlebitic syndrome of lower limbs, frequent nose bleeding, and anemia were present in his history; in his adolescence, he was treated for idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Further investigations have revealed also microsomia, suggesting a clinical diagnosis of Kallmann syndrome, that is, an association, possible in males and females, of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with olfactory deficits. A definite diagnosis of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia was made based on clinical criteria and confirmed by genetic analysis. PMID:23710379

  8. Preserving fertility in the hypogonadal patient: an update

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Ranjith; Armstrong, Joseph M; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of young and middle-aged men are seeking treatment for symptoms related to deficient levels of androgens (hypogonadism) including depression, loss of libido, erectile dysfunction, and fatigue. The increase in prevalence of testosterone supplementation in general and anabolic steroid-induced hypogonadism specifically among younger athletes is creating a population of young men who are uniquely impacted by the testicular end-organ negative consequences of exogenous steroid use. Exogenous testosterone therapy can alter the natural regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis leading to impaired spermatogenesis with azoospermia being a serious possible result, thus rendering the individual infertile. For men of reproductive age who suffer from hypogonadal symptoms, preservation of fertility is an important aspect of their treatment paradigm. Treatment with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) has shown the ability not only to reverse azoospermia brought on by testosterone supplementation therapy but also to help maintain elevated intratesticular testosterone levels. In addition, selective estrogen receptor modulators, often used with hCG have been shown both to elevate total testosterone levels and to maintain spermatogenesis in hypogonadal men. PMID:25337850

  9. Clomiphene Citrate Effectively Increases Testosterone in Obese, Young, Hypogonadal Men

    PubMed Central

    Bendre, Sachin V.; Murray, Pamela J.; Basaria, Shehzad

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity has been associated with low testosterone (T) in adult males and in pubertal boys. Therapy for hypogonadism with exogenous T may lead to testicular atrophy and later infertility. Only a few studies have demonstrated that the Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator (SERM) clomiphene citrate (CC), an estrogen receptor antagonist, increases T in obese hypogonadal men while preventing testicular atrophy. No studies to date using CC have been done in younger obese post-pubertal hypogonadal males. Objective To determine whether CC therapy is effective in increasing serum T levels in hypogonadal post-pubertal obese males 18-21 years. Materials and Methods A retrospective chart analysis of records in obese men aged 18-21 years was done. Patients with early morning T level <350 ng/dl were given 25 mg CC on alternate days. Out of 18 patients found to have low T, 11 were analyzed. Baseline serum T, LH, FSH, weight and BMI were compared at baseline and after 3 months of CC treatment. Results Baseline T level was 233 ± 66 ng/dl and increased to 581 ± 161 ng/dl (p<0.0001) after 3 months of CC treatment. Baseline LH levels increased from 3.3 ± 1.6 mIU/mL to 5.7 ± 1.7 mIU/mL (p=0.027). Similarly, baseline FSH levels increased from 2.8 ± 1.5 mIU/mL to 6.2 ± 3 mIU/mL after CC treatment (p=0.026). There was no correlation between baseline or post treatment weight or BMI and the T level, LH, or FSH level. Conclusion This is the first study reporting on CC therapy in obese, hypogonadal post-pubertal men 18-21 years. The SERM CC increased T in obese post-pubertal hypogonadal men, similar to efficacy of CC in adult hypogonadal men over the age 21 years. Larger randomized controlled studies to study the safety and potential use of CC to improve T in young obese HG men are needed. PMID:26844009

  10. [Optimization of modern conservative therapy of micropenis in hypogonadal men].

    PubMed

    Petrovich, R Iu; Sokoll'shchik, M M; Tiuzikov, I A; Konstantinova, I V; Astakhova, M A

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed to the optimization of conservative therapy of micropenis in hypogonadal men using combination of traction therapy and androgen replacment therapy (ART) with injections of prolonged testosterone undecanoate (Nebido) and to evaluatiom of the safety of ART in terms of the risk of prostate cancer against the background of combined treatment of micropenis by both methods within 12 months. The study included 16 men aged 22-62 years with micropenis and hypogonadism. 10 men were diagnosed with primary hypogonadism, 6 men were diagnosed with secondary hypogonadism without reserve gonadal function; therefore, all 16 patients were treated with testosterone undecanoate 1000 mg intramuscularly according to the scheme: the second injection 6 weeks after the first injection, then each injection once a 12 weeks, the course of 12 months. During the first 3 months of ART, hypogonadism in all men was eliminated, but only at 6 month of ART, the length of the penis in the flaccid state at maximum extension increased from 5.8±1.2 to 8.3±1.2 cm (p<0.05), and the length of the erect penis - from 6.8±1.1 to 11.8±0.9 (p<0,05). At the next stage, from the 6th to the 12th month of ART, traction therapy was simultaneously carried out. At the end of the treatment, the length of the penis in the flaccid state at maximum extension increased by 58% of the original length, and in a state of erection - by 114% (p<0.05). During the 12 months of treatment, prostate volume in all men increased from 3.4±1.2 to 16.3±1.2 (p<0.05), which corresponds to the size of the prostate in healthy men. Total blood PSA level increased from 0.72±0.03 to 1.4±0.05 ng/ml (p<0.05), but it was in the acceptable range of reference values for healthy men during whole period of ART in all patients. Start therapy with prolonged testosterone undecanoate for 6 months significantly increases the efficiency of traction therapy in men with hypogonadism and micropenis, but for maintenance of the effect

  11. The Role of Estrogen Modulators in Male Hypogonadism and Infertility.

    PubMed

    Rambhatla, Amarnath; Mills, Jesse N; Rajfer, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Estradiol, normally considered a female hormone, appears to play a significant role in men in a variety of physiologic functions, such as bone metabolism, cardiovascular health, and testicular function. As such, estradiol has been targeted by male reproductive and sexual medicine specialists to help treat conditions such as infertility and hypogonadism. The compounds that modulate estradiol levels in these clinical conditions are referred to as selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) and aromatase inhibitors (AIs). In a certain subset of infertile men, particularly those with hypogonadism, or those who have a low serum testosterone to estradiol ratio, there is some evidence suggesting that SERMs and AIs can reverse the low serum testosterone levels or the testosterone to estradiol imbalance and occasionally improve any associated infertile or subfertile state. This review focuses on the role these SERMs and AIs play in the aforementioned reproductive conditions. PMID:27601965

  12. The Role of Estrogen Modulators in Male Hypogonadism and Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Rambhatla, Amarnath; Mills, Jesse N.; Rajfer, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Estradiol, normally considered a female hormone, appears to play a significant role in men in a variety of physiologic functions, such as bone metabolism, cardiovascular health, and testicular function. As such, estradiol has been targeted by male reproductive and sexual medicine specialists to help treat conditions such as infertility and hypogonadism. The compounds that modulate estradiol levels in these clinical conditions are referred to as selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) and aromatase inhibitors (AIs). In a certain subset of infertile men, particularly those with hypogonadism, or those who have a low serum testosterone to estradiol ratio, there is some evidence suggesting that SERMs and AIs can reverse the low serum testosterone levels or the testosterone to estradiol imbalance and occasionally improve any associated infertile or subfertile state. This review focuses on the role these SERMs and AIs play in the aforementioned reproductive conditions. PMID:27601965

  13. MMACHC gene mutation in familial hypogonadism with neurological symptoms.

    PubMed

    Shi, Changhe; Shang, Dandan; Sun, Shilei; Mao, Chengyuan; Qin, Jie; Luo, Haiyang; Shao, Mingwei; Chen, Zhengguang; Liu, Yutao; Liu, Xinjing; Song, Bo; Xu, Yuming

    2015-12-15

    Recent studies have convincingly documented that hypogonadism is a component of various hereditary disorders and is often recognized as an important clinical feature in combination with various neurological symptoms, yet, the causative genes in a few related families are still unknown. High-throughput sequencing has become an efficient method to identify causative genes in related complex hereditary disorders. In this study, we performed exome sequencing in a family presenting hypergonadotropic hypogonadism with neurological presentations of mental retardation, epilepsy, ataxia, and leukodystrophy. After bioinformatic analysis and Sanger sequencing validation, we identified compound heterozygous mutations: c.482G>A (p.R161Q) and c.609G>A (p.W203X) in MMACHC gene in this pedigree. MMACHC was previously confirmed to be responsible for methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) combined with homocystinuria, cblC type (cblC disease), a hereditary vitamin B12 metabolic disorder. Biochemical and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) examinations in this pedigree further supported the cblC disease diagnosis. These results indicated that hypergonadotropic hypogonadism may be a novel clinical manifestation of cblC disease, but more reports on additional patients are needed to support this hypothesis. PMID:26283149

  14. [The treatment of hypogonadism and maintenance of fertility in men].

    PubMed

    Rabijewski, Michał

    2016-03-01

    In past few years we observed the increasing of population of men, who are treated with testosterone due to hypogonadism associated with aging but the most of them have no indications to testosterone replacement therapy. The classical symptoms of hypogonadism including depression, loss of libido, erectile dysfunction, and fatigue may be related to any others diseases. The increase in prevalence of androgenic anabolic steroids specifically among younger athletes is also observed. Exogenous testosterone and anabolic androgenic steroids can inhibit the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis leading to decreasing of endogenous testosterone synthesis and impaired spermatogenesis. In hypogonadal men who are in reproduction age the goal of therapy should be not only replacement therapy but also achiving and/or maintaining of spermatogenesis. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and selective estrogens receptor modulators (SERM) are efficacy in treatment of clinical signs and symptoms of hypoigonadism, has been shown to reverse spermatogenesis disturbances and can to maintain elevated intratesticular testosterone levels necessary to optimal spermatogenesis. PMID:27088205

  15. [A woman with cerebellar ataxia and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism].

    PubMed

    Wada, Sayoko; Takaoka, Toshio; Kasama, Shuhei; Kimura, Takashi; Kajiyama, Koji; Takeda, Masanaka; Yoshikawa, Hiroo

    2010-01-01

    A 26-year-old woman with primary amenorrhea in association with hypergonadotropinism, and lacking a vagina and uterus, suffered from a gradually progressive gait disturbance in her adolescence. The patient has no family history of ataxia and a chromosome study showed a normal karyotype (46,XX). Using the revised Hasegawa Dementia Scale, her cognitive function was measured as that of a normal adult, however, neurological examination revealed symptoms of scanning speech, horizontal gaze-evoked nystagmus, and ataxia. Bulging eyes, high-arched palate, scoliosis and ventricular septal defect were also observed. A brain MRI showed atrophy of the cerebellum. A 123I-IMP brain SPECT study showed hypoperfusion in the cerebellum. Previous studies show that among patients with cerebellar ataxia and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, some show an autosomal recessive inheritance, while others have no family history. As a cause, a chromosomal abnormality is unlikely because all reported karyotypes were normal. This case is different from other reported cases in that she is not mentally impaired or deaf. The present case indicates that there is a close relationship between cerebellar ataxia and hypogonadism, and that other symptoms such as deafness and mental impairment could be an additional variable in patients with cerebellar ataxia arid hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. PMID:20120350

  16. Exogenous testosterone, aggression, and mood in eugonadal and hypogonadal men.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Daryl B; Archer, John; Hair, W Morton; Wu, Frederick C W

    2002-04-01

    To investigate (1) the effects of exogenous testosterone (T) on self- and partner-reported aggression and mood and (2) the role of trait impulsivity in the T-aggression relationship. Thirty eugonadal men with partners were randomized into two treatment groups to receive: (1) 200 mg im T enanthate weekly for 8 weeks or (2) 200 mg im sodium chloride weekly for 8 weeks. Eight hypogonadal men received 200 mg im T enanthate biweekly for 8 weeks. All groups completed a battery of behavior measures at baseline (Week 0) and at Weeks 4 and 8. Cognitive and motor impulsivity were the only predictors of self-reported total aggression (over and above age and T levels) at Weeks 0, 4, and 8. No significant changes in aggression or mood levels were found in the eugonadal-treated group. Significant reductions in negative mood (tension, anger, and fatigue) followed by an increase in vigor were found in response to T treatment in the hypogonadal group. These results demonstrate that inability to control one's behavior when such control is required by a particular situation (impulsivity) was found to significantly predict levels of aggression over and above age and T level. These data do not support the hypothesis that supraphysiological levels of T (within this range) lead to an increase in self- and partner-reported aggression or mood disturbances. Instead, for the first time, this study has identified the high level of negative affect experienced by hypogonadal patients. These findings have implications for T replacement therapy and male contraception. PMID:12062320

  17. Basic consensus document on late-onset hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Becerra Fernández, Antonio; Enríquez Acosta, Luis

    2008-01-01

    One of the most important elements in men's live is the ability to engage in normal sexual activity; loss of this activity has always been considered especially important. The relationship between sexual activity, as well as other masculine characteristics, and the testicles has been well known since ancient times and has been related to the slow decrease in testosterone secretion with advanced age. Male hypogonadism is one of the most frequent and under-diagnosed endocrine diseases. Several terms have been proposed to refer to clinical situations caused by the age-related decline in male gonadal function; currently, the most widely accepted term is late-onset hypogonadism (LOH). LOH consists of a clinical and biochemical syndrome associated with advanced age (in men), characterized by typical symptoms and reduced serum testosterone concentrations, which can affect multiple organs and systems and reduce quality of life. This syndrome can be treated and the alterations produced can be reversed. To achieve this, a diagnostic protocol that approaches the multiple factors related to the risks and benefits of treatment is required. PMID:22967848

  18. Kallman syndrome versus idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism at MR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Vogl, T.J.; Stemmler, J.; Bergman, C.; Balzer, J.O.; Felix, R.; Heye, B.; Schopohl, J.; Danek, A.

    1994-04-01

    To identify morphologic differences between Kallman syndrome (KS) and idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) and establish a role for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in these disorders. Twenty-eight patients were compared with 10 eugonal male volunteers. Eighteen patients had KS (hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with anosmia) and 10 had IHH. All participants underwent hormone analysis, a sniff-bottle smell test, and gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging. Changes in the hypothalamic-hypophyseal region and the rhinencephalon were evaluated. MR imaging revealed intracranial morphologic changes in all patients on plain T1-weighted sections. Seventeen patients with KS demonstrated aplasia of an olfactory bulb; one olfactory sulcus was absent in six, rudimentary in four, and normal in eight. Olfactory bulbs were present in all 10 IHH patients and three showed one slightly hypoplastic bulb. Ten patients with KS and three with IHH showed an enlarged paranasal sinus system. Further MR findings were similar. MR imaging demonstrates abnormalities of the rhinencephalon present in KS patients and occasionally absent in IHH patients. 18 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Visceral fat dysfunction is positively associated with hypogonadism in Chinese men

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ningjian; Zhai, Hualing; Han, Bing; Li, Qin; Chen, Yi; Chen, Yingchao; Xia, Fangzhen; Lin, Dongping; Lu, Yingli

    2016-01-01

    Visceral adiposity index (VAI) well mirrors visceral fat dysfunction. No study explored the association between low androgen and VAI. We aimed to determine whether VAI was associated with hypogonadism and sex hormones, and also whether it better predicted hypogonadism than other obesity indices. Our data were collected from 16 sites in East China. 2,759 men were enrolled. Hypogonadism was defined as total testosterone < 11.3 nmol/L. VAI was calculated in male: (waist circumference/(39.68 + (1.88 × BMI))) × (triglycerides/1.03) × (1.31/HDL). 484 (17.5%) hypogonadal men had significantly higher VAI. After adjusting for age, smoking, neck and hip circumference, diabetes and hypertension, VAI was inversely associated with total testosterone, estradiol and SHBG (P < 0.01). Higher quartiles of VAI were associated with significantly increasing odds of hypogonadism (P for trend < 0.01). The fully adjusted odds ratio was 5.88 (95 CI% 4.09, 8.46) for the highest quartile compared with the lowest quartile of VAI. Among all the indices investigated, VAI showed the largest area under the curve (P < 0.001). In conclusion, the VAI was significantly associated with a higher prevalence of hypogonadism in Chinese men. VAI also best predicted hypogonadism among obesity indices (waist, hip and neck circumference, BMI, waist-hip ratio and body adiposity index). PMID:26796865

  20. [Early-onset and late-onset male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Okada, Hiroshi; Shin, Takeshi; Kobori, Yoshitomo

    2016-07-01

    Hypogonadism is classified into two major clinical entities, namely early-onset hypogonadism and late-onset hypogonadism. The former is characterized by the malfunction of hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal(testicular)axis or by the primary hypofunction of testes(e.g. Klinefelter's syndrome). The latter is summarized as LOH syndrome which is attributed to the dropped level of bioavailable testosterone. In these diseases testosterone is the key molecule which may cause various symptoms relating not only to physical health but also to mental or psychologic health. In this review issues concerning bone health in these disease are described. PMID:27346312

  1. Recommendations on the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of hypogonadism in men

    PubMed Central

    Lunenfeld, Bruno; Zitzmann, Michael; Arver, Stefan; Kalinchenko, Svetlana; Tishova, Yuliya; Morgentaler, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Hypogonadism or Testosterone Deficiency (TD) in adult men as defined by low levels of serum testosterone accompanied by characteristic symptoms and/or signs as detailed further on can be found in long-recognized clinical entities such as Klinefelter syndrome, Kallmann syndrome, pituitary or testicular disorders, as well as in men with idiopathic, metabolic or iatrogenic conditions that result in testosterone deficiency. These recommendations do not encompass the full range of pathologies leading to hypogonadism (testosterone deficiency), but instead focus on the clinical spectrum of hypogonadism related to metabolic and idiopathic disorders that contribute to the majority of cases that occur in adult men. PMID:25657080

  2. Influence of testosterone gel treatment on spermatogenesis in men with hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    George, Mskhalaya; Yulia, Tishova; Svetlana, Kalinchenko

    2014-10-01

    The prevalence of androgen deficiency in reproductive-aged men is increasing and needs new approach to long-term hypogonadism treatment that can preserve fertility. An open non-controlled pilot study included 18 men with eugonadotropic hypogonadism, who received transdermal testosterone gel treatment for 3 months. Sperm analysis was made before treatment and after 3 month of testosterone therapy. Testosterone level was normalized in all patients, but no negative effect was observed on spermatogenesis. Testosterone gel therapy may be a therapy of choice in hypogonadal men of reproductive age but further studies are needed. PMID:25200823

  3. Hypogonadism and erectile dysfunction as harbingers of systemic disease.

    PubMed

    Chiles, Kelly A

    2016-04-01

    Prescription sales of Testosterone and erectile aids such as phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors are at an all-time high, underscoring the importance of hypogonadism (HG) and erectile dysfunction (ED) to men's health. The effect of these debilitating conditions has a major impact on the quality of men's lives. Some risk factors for HG or ED including aging, obesity, smoking, and a sedentary lifestyle. Notably, these are the same risk factors for several other medical co-morbidities that contribute to significant morbidity and mortality in men. HG and ED often co-exist with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and osteoporosis. This review will explore these three co-morbidities that overlap with HG and ED, and will provide a review of their relationship with each other. PMID:27141446

  4. Hypogonadism and erectile dysfunction as harbingers of systemic disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Prescription sales of Testosterone and erectile aids such as phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors are at an all-time high, underscoring the importance of hypogonadism (HG) and erectile dysfunction (ED) to men’s health. The effect of these debilitating conditions has a major impact on the quality of men’s lives. Some risk factors for HG or ED including aging, obesity, smoking, and a sedentary lifestyle. Notably, these are the same risk factors for several other medical co-morbidities that contribute to significant morbidity and mortality in men. HG and ED often co-exist with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and osteoporosis. This review will explore these three co-morbidities that overlap with HG and ED, and will provide a review of their relationship with each other. PMID:27141446

  5. Current topics in testosterone replacement of hypogonadal men.

    PubMed

    Nieschlag, Eberhard

    2015-01-01

    All forms of hypogonadism - primary, secondary and late-onset - require testosterone substitution. The indication is given when the patient presents with symptoms of androgen deficiency and the serum testosterone levels are below normal. Several testosterone preparations and modes of application are available of which those producing physiologic serum levels should be preferred e.g. preferentially transdermal gels and long-acting intramuscular testosterone undecanoate. Testosterone substitution must be monitored at regular intervals, best at 3, 6 and 12 months after initiation and then annually. Parameters for surveillance include well-being, libido and sexual activity, measurement of serum testosterone levels, haemoglobin and haematocrit, PSA and digital rectal examination, and, biannually, bone mineral density. Testosterone has positive effects on comorbidities such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes type II, cardiovascular diseases and osteoporosis. PMID:25617174

  6. Central Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism: Genetic Complexity of a Complex Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Central hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) is an emerging pathological condition frequently associated with overweight, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and midline defects. The genetic mechanisms involve mutations in at least twenty-four genes regulating GnRH neuronal migration, secretion, and activity. So far, the mechanisms underlying CHH, both in prepubertal and in adulthood onset forms, remain unknown in most of the cases. Indeed, all detected gene variants may explain a small proportion of the affected patients (43%), indicating that other genes or epigenetic mechanisms are involved in the onset of CHH. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on genetic background of CHH, organizing the large amount of data present in the literature in a clear and concise manner, to produce a useful guide available for researchers and clinicians. PMID:25254043

  7. The complex genetic basis of congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Vezzoli, Valeria; Duminuco, Paolo; Bassi, Ivan; Guizzardi, Fabiana; Persani, Luca; Bonomi, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) is a rare disease characterized by delayed/absent puberty and infertility due to an inadequate secretion or action of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH), with an otherwise structurally and functionally normal hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. CHH is genetically heterogeneous but, due to the infertility of affected individuals, most frequently emerges in a sporadic form, though numerous familial cases have also been registered. In around 50-60% of cases, CHH is associated with a variety of non-reproductive abnormalities, most commonly anosmia/hyposmia, which defines Kallmann Syndrome (KS) by its presence. Broadly-speaking, genetic defects that directly impact on hypothalamic secretion, regulation, or action of GnRH result in a pure neuroendocrine phenotype, normosmic CHH (nCHH), whereas genetic defects that impact of embryonic migration of GnRH neurons to the hypothalamus most commonly result in KS, though nCHH can also arise. Hence, the description of several pedigrees, comprising subjects exhibiting KS and others with nCHH. Although more than 24 genes have been described to be involved in CHH, molecular variants of these do not presently explain more than 35-45% of reported cases. Therefore, numerous other unidentified genes (or conceivably, epigenetic mechanisms) remain to be described to fully understand the pathogenesis of CHH, explaining the emergent idea that CHH is a complex genetic disease characterized by variable expressivity and penetrance. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge on the complex genetic basis of congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and aims to be accessible to both researchers and clinicians. PMID:26934720

  8. Spino-Cerebellar Degeneration, Hormonal Disorder, Hypogonadism, Deaf Mutism and Mental Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylvester, P. E.

    1972-01-01

    Post mortem examinations were done on two adult siblings (one female and one male) who had been clinically described as suffering from mental handicap, deaf mutism, ataxia, hypogonadism, and hormonal disorders. (DB)

  9. Familial cerebellar ataxia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: evidence for hypothalamic LHRH deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Berciano, J; Amado, J A; Freijanes, J; Rebollo, M; Vaquero, A

    1982-01-01

    A family with familial cerebellar ataxia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is described. The condition was inherited as an autosomal recessive defect. CT scan in one case revealed cerebellar and brain stem atrophy. Endocrinological tests showed abnormalities only in two patients who were clinically affected. In both cases raised gonadotropic levels were found after repetitive stimulation with luteining hormone-releasing hormone which suggests that the hypogonadism was due to a primary hypothalamic disturbance. Images PMID:6813427

  10. Association of Free Testosterone with Hypogonadal Symptoms in Men with Near-Normal Total Testosterone Levels

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Ranjith; Golan, Ron; Wilken, Nathan; Scovell, Jason M.; Lipshultz, Larry I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between hypogonadal symptoms and free testosterone levels in men with near-normal total testosterone levels (250–350ng/dL) and to determine whether a discriminatory threshold for free testosterone exists below which hypogonadal symptoms become more prevalent. Methods We reviewed the charts of 3,167 men who presented to an outpatient men's health clinic. 231 men had symptoms of “low testosterone” and serum testosterone levels between 250 and 350ng/dL. We evaluated hypogonadal symptoms using the ADAM and qADAM questionnaires. Serum levels of total testosterone and SHBG were collected on the same day that men completed their questionnaires. We used linear regression to determine whether or not a threshold of free testosterone exists for hypogonadal symptoms. We performed univariate and multivariable analyses to evaluate factors that predicted a low free testosterone level. Results The median age was 43.5 y, and the median testosterone and free testosterone levels were 303ng/dL, and 6.3ng/dL respectively. Prevalence and severity of hypogonadal symptoms (ADAM and qADAM) were similar between men with low (<6.4ng/mL) and normal free testosterone levels. There was an association between age and three of the 10 hypogonadal symptoms (decreased enjoyment in life, sadness, and deterioration of work performance) with a low free testosterone on a univariate analysis. Only younger age was positively associated with free testosterone on multivariable analysis. Conclusions We did not observe a relationship between hypogonadal symptoms and free testosterone in men with near-normal testosterone levels. Symptom-specific free testosterone thresholds could not be defined, as age remains an important confounder. PMID:26199166

  11. R31C GNRH1 Mutation and Congenital Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Maione, Luigi; Albarel, Frederique; Bouchard, Philippe; Gallant, Megan; Flanagan, Colleen A.; Bobe, Regis; Cohen-Tannoudji, Joelle; Pivonello, Rosario; Colao, Annamaria; Brue, Thierry; Millar, Robert P.; Lombes, Marc; Young, Jacques; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Bouligand, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    Normosmic congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (nCHH) is a rare reproductive disease leading to lack of puberty and infertility. Loss-of-function mutations of GNRH1 gene are a very rare cause of autosomal recessive nCHH. R31C GNRH1 is the only missense mutation that affects the conserved GnRH decapeptide sequence. This mutation was identified in a CpG islet in nine nCHH subjects from four unrelated families, giving evidence for a putative “hot spot”. Interestingly, all the nCHH patients carry this mutation in heterozygosis that strikingly contrasts with the recessive inheritance associated with frame shift and non-sense mutations. Therefore, after exclusion of a second genetic event, a comprehensive functional characterization of the mutant R31C GnRH was undertaken. Using different cellular models, we clearly demonstrate a dramatic reduction of the mutant decapeptide capacity to bind GnRH-receptor, to activate MAPK pathway and to trigger inositol phosphate accumulation and intracellular calcium mobilization. In addition it is less able than wild type to induce lh-beta transcription and LH secretion in gonadotrope cells. Finally, the absence of a negative dominance in vitro offers a unique opportunity to discuss the complex in vivo patho-physiology of this form of nCHH. PMID:23936060

  12. Hypogonadism and erectile dysfunction associated with soy product consumption.

    PubMed

    Siepmann, Timo; Roofeh, Joseph; Kiefer, Florian W; Edelson, David G

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has focused on the beneficial effects of soy and its active ingredients, isoflavones. For instance, soy consumption has been associated with lower cardiovascular and breast cancer risks. However, the number of reports demonstrating adverse effects of isoflavones due to their estrogenlike properties has increased. We present the case of a 19-y-old type 1 diabetic but otherwise healthy man with sudden onset of loss of libido and erectile dysfunction after the ingestion of large quantities of soy-based products in a vegan-style diet. Blood levels of free and total testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) were taken at the initial presentation for examination and continuously monitored up to 2 y after discontinuation of the vegan diet. Blood concentrations of free and total testosterone were initially decreased, whereas DHEA was increased. These parameters normalized within 1 y after cessation of the vegan diet. Normalization of testosterone and DHEA levels was paralleled by a constant improvement of symptoms; full sexual function was regained 1 y after cessation of the vegan diet. This case indicates that soy product consumption is related to hypogonadism and erectile dysfunction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a combination of decreased free testosterone and increased DHEA blood concentrations after consuming a soy-rich diet. Hence, this case emphasizes the impact of isoflavones in the regulation of sex hormones and associated physical alterations. PMID:21353476

  13. Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: implications of absent mini-puberty.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Andrew A; Jayasena, Channa N; Quinton, Richard

    2016-06-01

    The phenomenon known as "mini-puberty" refers to activation of the neonatal hypothalamo-pituitary axis causing serum concentrations of gonadotrophins and testosterone (T) to approach adult male levels. This early neonatal period is a key proliferative window for testicular germ cells and immature Sertoli cells. Although failure to spontaneously initiate (adolescent) puberty is the most evident consequence of a defective gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurosecretory network, absent mini-puberty is also likely to have a major impact on the reproductive phenotype of men with congenital hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism (CHH). Furthermore, the phase of male mini-puberty represents a key window-of-opportunity to identify congenital GnRH deficiency (either isolated CHH, or as part of combined pituitary hormone deficiency) in childhood. Among male neonates exhibiting "red flag" indicators for CHH (i.e. maldescended testes with or without cryptorchidism) a single serum sample (between 4-8 weeks of life) can pinpoint congenital GnRH deficiency far more rapidly and with much greater accuracy than dynamic tests performed in later childhood or adolescence. Potential consequences for missing absent mini-puberty in a male neonate include the lack of monitoring of pubertal progression/lack of progression, and the missed opportunity for early therapeutic intervention. This article will review our current understanding of the mechanisms and clinical consequences of mini-puberty. Furthermore, evidence for the optimal clinical management of patients with absent mini-puberty will be discussed. PMID:27213784

  14. Congenital Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism and Kallmann Syndrome: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Hyun

    2015-12-01

    The proper development and coordination of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis are essential for normal reproductive competence. The key factor that regulates the function of the HPG axis is gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Timely release of GnRH is critical for the onset of puberty and subsequent sexual maturation. Misregulation in this system can result in delayed or absent puberty and infertility. Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) and Kallmann syndrome (KS) are genetic disorders that are rooted in a GnRH deficiency but often accompanied by a variety of non-reproductive phenotypes such as the loss of the sense of smell and defects of the skeleton, eye, ear, kidney, and heart. Recent progress in DNA sequencing technology has produced a wealth of information regarding the genetic makeup of CHH and KS patients and revealed the resilient yet complex nature of the human reproductive neuroendocrine system. Further research on the molecular basis of the disease and the diverse signal pathways involved will aid in improving the diagnosis, treatment, and management of CHH and KS patients as well as in developing more precise genetic screening and counseling regime. PMID:26790381

  15. Treatment of hypogonadotropic male hypogonadism: Case-based scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Crosnoe-Shipley, Lindsey E; Elkelany, Osama O; Rahnema, Cyrus D; Kim, Edward D

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review four case-based scenarios regarding the treatment of symptomatic hypogonadism in men. The article is designed as a review of published literature. We conducted a PubMed literature search for the time period of 1989-2014, concentrating on 26 studies investigating the efficacy of various therapeutic options on semen analysis, pregnancy outcomes, time to recovery of spermatogenesis, as well as serum and intratesticular testosterone levels. Our results demonstrated that exogenous testosterone suppresses intratesticular testosterone production, which is an absolute prerequisite for normal spermatogenesis. Cessation of exogenous testosterone should be recommended for men desiring to maintain their fertility. Therapies that protect the testis involve human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) therapy or selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), but may also include low dose hCG with exogenous testosterone. Off-label use of SERMs, such as clomiphene citrate, are effective for maintaining testosterone production long-term and offer the convenience of representing a safe, oral therapy. At present, routine use of aromatase inhibitors is not recommended based on a lack of long-term data. We concluded that exogenous testosterone supplementation decreases sperm production. It was determined that clomiphene citrate is a safe and effective therapy for men who desire to maintain fertility. Although less frequently used in the general population, hCG therapy with or without testosterone supplementation represents an alternative treatment. PMID:25949938

  16. Congenital Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism and Kallmann Syndrome: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The proper development and coordination of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis are essential for normal reproductive competence. The key factor that regulates the function of the HPG axis is gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Timely release of GnRH is critical for the onset of puberty and subsequent sexual maturation. Misregulation in this system can result in delayed or absent puberty and infertility. Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) and Kallmann syndrome (KS) are genetic disorders that are rooted in a GnRH deficiency but often accompanied by a variety of non-reproductive phenotypes such as the loss of the sense of smell and defects of the skeleton, eye, ear, kidney, and heart. Recent progress in DNA sequencing technology has produced a wealth of information regarding the genetic makeup of CHH and KS patients and revealed the resilient yet complex nature of the human reproductive neuroendocrine system. Further research on the molecular basis of the disease and the diverse signal pathways involved will aid in improving the diagnosis, treatment, and management of CHH and KS patients as well as in developing more precise genetic screening and counseling regime. PMID:26790381

  17. Homozygous Loss-of-function Mutations in SOHLH1 in Patients With Nonsyndromic Hypergonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Bayram, Yavuz; Gulsuner, Suleyman; Guran, Tulay; Abaci, Ayhan; Yesil, Gozde; Gulsuner, Hilal Unal; Atay, Zeynep; Pierce, Sarah B.; Gambin, Tomasz; Lee, Ming; Turan, Serap; Bober, Ece; Atik, Mehmed M.; Walsh, Tom; Karaca, Ender; Pehlivan, Davut; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Muzny, Donna; Bereket, Abdullah; Buyukgebiz, Atilla; Boerwinkle, Eric; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Hypergonadotropic hypogonadism presents in females with delayed or arrested puberty, primary or secondary amenorrhea due to gonadal dysfunction, and is further characterized by elevated gonadotropins and low sex steroids. Chromosomal aberrations and various specific gene defects can lead to hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Responsible genes include those with roles in gonadal development or maintenance, sex steroid synthesis, or end-organ resistance to gonadotropins. Identification of novel causative genes in this disorder will contribute to our understanding of the regulation of human reproductive function. Objectives: The aim of this study was to identify and report the gene responsible for autosomal-recessive hypergonadotropic hypogonadism in two unrelated families. Design and Participants: Clinical evaluation and whole-exome sequencing were performed in two pairs of sisters with nonsyndromic hypergonadotropic hypogonadism from two unrelated families. Results: Exome sequencing analysis revealed two different truncating mutations in the same gene: SOHLH1 c.705delT (p.Pro235fs*4) and SOHLH1 c.27C>G (p.Tyr9stop). Both mutations were unique to the families and segregation was consistent with Mendelian expectations for an autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance. Conclusions: Sohlh1 was known from previous mouse studies to be a transcriptional regulator that functions in the maintenance and survival of primordial ovarian follicles, but loss-of-function mutations in human females have not been reported. Our results provide evidence that homozygous-truncating mutations in SOHLH1 cause female nonsyndromic hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. PMID:25774885

  18. When is a varicocele repair indicated: the dilemma of hypogonadism and erectile dysfunction?

    PubMed Central

    Dabaja, Ali A; Goldstein, Marc

    2016-01-01

    In the past, the indications for varicocelectomy are primarily for infertility with abnormal semen parameters, testicular hypotrophy/atrophy in adolescents, and/or pain. The surgical treatment of varicocele for hypogonadism is controversial and debated. Recently, multiple reports in the literature have suggested that varicocele is associated with hypogonadism and varicocele repair can increase testosterone levels. Men with hypogonadal symptoms should have at least two serum testosterone levels. Microsurgical varicocelectomy may be beneficial for men with clinically palpable varicoceles with documented hypogonadism. In this review, we summarize the most recent literature linking varicocele to hypogonadism and sexual dysfunction and the impact of repair on serum testosterone levels. We performed a search of the published English literature. The key words used were “varicocele and hypogonadism” and “varicocele surgery and testosterone.” We included published studies after 1998. We, also, evaluated the effect of surgery on the changes in the serum testosterone level regardless of the indication for the varicocele repair. PMID:26696437

  19. Loss of function mutations of the GnRH receptor: a new cause of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    de Roux, N; Young, J; Misrahi, M; Schaison, G; Milgrom, E

    1999-04-01

    The association of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with anosmia defines Kallmann's syndrome. The gene of the X-linked form of this syndrome has been cloned and several mutations described. However, the relatively small number of hypogonadotropic hypogonadic patients with Kallmann's gene defects supports the hypothesis that other genes may be involved. Idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) is not associated with anosmia. The GnRH gene was excluded as a candidate gene in IHH since no abnormality was found in several patients. The action of the GnRH is mediated through a G-protein coupled receptor present in the cell membrane of gonadotropes. The GnRH receptor was thus another candidate gene. Recently, we described the first patient with partial hypogonadotropic hypogonadism without anosmia caused by loss of function mutations of the GnRH receptor. We compare this first family with a new family presenting complete hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and a variable degree of gonadotrope deficiency in the affected kindred, and discuss genotype-phenotype correlation. PMID:10698591

  20. A practical guide to male hypogonadism in the primary care setting

    PubMed Central

    Dandona, P; Rosenberg, M T

    2010-01-01

    There is a high prevalence of hypogonadism in the older adult male population and the proportion of older men in the population is projected to rise in the future. As hypogonadism increases with age and is significantly associated with various comorbidities such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, osteoporosis and metabolic syndrome, the physician is increasingly likely to have to treat hypogonadism in the clinic. The main symptoms of hypogonadism are reduced libido/erectile dysfunction, reduced muscle mass and strength, increased adiposity, osteoporosis/low bone mass, depressed mood and fatigue. Diagnosis of the condition requires the presence of low serum testosterone levels and the presence of hypogonadal symptoms. There are a number of formulations available for testosterone therapy including intramuscular injections, transdermal patches, transdermal gels, buccal patches and subcutaneous pellets. These are efficacious in establishing eugonadal testosterone levels in the blood and relieving symptoms. Restoration of testosterone levels to the normal range improves libido, sexual function, and mood; reduces fat body mass; increases lean body mass; and improves bone mineral density. Testosterone treatment is contraindicated in subjects with prostate cancer or benign prostate hyperplasia and risks of treatment are perceived to be high by many physicians. These risks, however, are often exaggerated and should not outweigh the benefits of testosterone treatment. PMID:20518947

  1. Pharmacologic Therapy in Men's Health: Hypogonadism, Erectile Dysfunction, and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Berkseth, Kathryn E; Thirumalai, Arthi; Amory, John K

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews current pharmacologic treatment options for 3 common men's health concerns: hypogonadism, erectile dysfunction (ED), and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Specific topics addressed include: management of male hypogonadism using testosterone replacement therapy, use of oral phosphodiesterase inhibitors as first-line therapy for men with ED and the utility of intraurethral and intrapenile alprostadil injections for patients who do not respond to oral medications, and the role of alpha1-adrenergic antagonists, 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors, anticholinergic agents, and herbal therapies in the management of BPH. PMID:27235615

  2. Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in females: clinical spectrum, evaluation and genetics.

    PubMed

    Bry-Gauillard, H; Trabado, S; Bouligand, J; Sarfati, J; Francou, B; Salenave, S; Chanson, P; Brailly-Tabard, S; Guiochon-Mantel, A; Young, J

    2010-05-01

    Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadisms (CHH) are a well-known cause of pubertal development failure in women. In a majority of patients, the clinical spectrum results from an insufficient and concomitant secretion of both pituitary gonadotropins LH and FSH that impedes a normal endocrine and exocrine cyclical ovary functioning after the age of pubertal activation of gonadotropic axis. In exceptional but interesting cases, they can result from an elective deficit of one of the gonadotropins follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) or luteinizing hormone (LH) by genetic anomaly of their specific ss sub-unit. CHH prevalence, estimated from teaching hospital series, is considered to be two to five fold less important in women compared to men bearing the disease. This frequency is probably under-estimated in reason of under-diagnosis of forms with partial pubertal development. Isolated or apparently isolated forms (i.e., Kallmann syndrome with anosmia or hyposmia not spontaneously expressed by the patients) of these diseases are most of the time discovered during adolescence or in adulthood in reason of lacking, incomplete or even apparently complete pubertal development, but with almost constant primary amenorrhea. In a minority of cases and mainly in familial forms, genetic autosomal causes have been found. These cases are related to mutations of genes impinging the functioning of the pituitary-hypothalamic pathways involved in the normal secretion of LH and FSH (mutations of GnRHR, GnRH1, KISS1R/GPR54, TAC3, TACR3), which are always associated to isolated non syndromic CHH without anosmia. Some cases of mutations of FGFR1, and more rarely of its ligand FGF8, or of PROKR2 or its ligand PROK2 have been shown in women suffering from Kallmann syndrome or its hyposmic or normosmic variant. In complex syndromic causes (mutations of CHD7, leptin and leptin receptor anomalies, Prader-Willi syndrome, etc.), diagnosis of the CHH cause is most often suspected or set down before

  3. A Florid Case of Iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome Induced by Topical Steroid with Osteoporosis and Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Sahana, Pranab Kumar; Sarma, Nilendu; Sengupta, Nilanjan; Somani, Prashant Subhash

    2015-01-01

    Here we report a case of a young male who developed full blown iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome after use of superpotent clobetasol propionate cream 0.05% for long duration to suppress psoriatic skin lesions. He also developed osteoporosis and hypogonadism. This case demonstrates that injudicious use of topical steroids can have disastrous consequences. PMID:26288430

  4. A Florid Case of Iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome Induced by Topical Steroid with Osteoporosis and Hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Sahana, Pranab Kumar; Sarma, Nilendu; Sengupta, Nilanjan; Somani, Prashant Subhash

    2015-01-01

    Here we report a case of a young male who developed full blown iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome after use of superpotent clobetasol propionate cream 0.05% for long duration to suppress psoriatic skin lesions. He also developed osteoporosis and hypogonadism. This case demonstrates that injudicious use of topical steroids can have disastrous consequences. PMID:26288430

  5. Hypogonadism in male Leprosy patients--a study from rural Uttar pradesh.

    PubMed

    Aggrawal, Kamal; Madhu, S V; Aggrawal, Kireet; Kannan, A T

    2005-09-01

    Hypogonadism in male patients with Leprosy is common and may identify patients with future risk for bone loss and osteoporosis. In the present study, we evaluated gonadal function in 71 male patients with Leprosy both clinically and by estimation of serum testosterone levels. The patients belonged to selected rural areas of Uttar pradesh, with majority aged less than 50 yrs (74.6%), Hindus (66.7%), illiterate (60.9%), and of low socioeconomic status (58% with per capita income < Rs.500 per month). Most patients had multibacillary Leprosy (83.1%), duration less than 2 years (75.4%) and had received antileprosy drugs for less than a year (95.6 %). Seven patients (9.9%) had clinical features of hypogonadism such as gynaecomastia, decreased sexual hair and infertility. Serum testosterone levels, estimated in 31 of the patients, revealed low values in 25.8% (8/31) patients (Mean 4.65+/-3.37 ng/ml). Age, duration of Leprosy and socioeconomic status but not type of Leprosy or treatment duration affected hypogonadism significantly. The results of the present study indicate a high frequency of hypogonadism among rural male Leprosy patients that warrants routine screening to identify patients at risk for osteoporosis and possible prevention with testosterone replacement therapy. PMID:17080706

  6. Waardenburg-like features with cataracts, small head size, joint abnormalities, hypogonadism, and osteosarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Parry, D M; Safyer, A W; Mulvihill, J J

    1978-01-01

    A 32-year-old black man was observed with osteosarcoma and multiple anomalies including deafness, hypopigmentation, cataracts, small head size, hypogonadism, and restricted joint mobility. The birth defects may comprise a new syndrome or combination of syndromes, of which the malignancy may be a part. Images PMID:273099

  7. Risk Factors for Hypogonadism in Male Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Rendong; Cao, Lin; Cao, Wen; Chu, Xiaoqiu; Hu, Yongxin; Zhang, Huifeng; Xu, Juan; Sun, Hongping; Bao, Weiping; Liu, Kemian; Liu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Background. Male hypogonadism is an endocrine disease characterized by low levels of serum testosterone and is closely related to the development of diabetes. The purpose of the present study was to observe the risk factors for hypogonadism in male patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods. A total of 213 patients with type 2 diabetes were enrolled and divided into a low total testosterone (TT) group (=75) and a normal TT group (=138). The patients' blood glucose, blood lipids, serum insulin, and sex hormones were measured. The correlations between the patients' metabolic index and sex hormone levels were analyzed. Results. Compared with the normal TT group, body mass index (BMI), fasting insulin (FINS), and HOMA insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) levels were significantly higher, but the luteinizing hormone (LH) levels were significantly lower in the low TT group (p < 0.05). Correlation analyses found that TT was negatively correlated with BMI, waist circumference (WC), FINS, and HOMA-IR. TT was positively correlated with LH and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Conclusions. Several risk factors of diabetes associated closely with hypogonadism. BMI, metabolic syndrome (MS), HOMA-IR, and LH are independent risk factors for hypogonadism in male patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27006953

  8. A Case of Primary Hypogonadism with Features of Albright’s Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lodh, Moushumi; Mukhopadhyay, Rajarshi

    2016-01-01

    Background: McCune Albright syndrome is rare with an estimated prevalence of 1 in 100,000 to 1 in 1,000,000 persons. The classical clinical triad consists of fibrous dysplasia of the bone, café-au-lait skin spots and precocious puberty. However, in rare cases, there may be primary hypogonadism and amenorrhea. Case Presentation: An eighteen-year-old female presented with amenorrhea. She had a short stature, round face, thick neck, and short fourth metacarpals and metatarsals. The secondary sexual characters were absent. Serum calcium, phosphorus and parathyroid concentrations were normal, but gonadotropin hormones were very low. X-ray examination revealed short fourth and fifth metacarpals, short left metatarsal, and short fibula. Conclusion: These local bony abnormalities along with the biochemical findings helped us to diagnose this case as an unusual presentation of primary hypogonadism with features of McCune Albright’s syndrome where there was amenorrhea rather than preocious puberty. PMID:27478774

  9. Discussion: 'Congenital hypogonadisms impair quality of life and sexual function,' by Ros et al.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Camaryn Chrisman; Wolfe, Morgan; Squires, Kathryn; Jungheim, Emily; Weiner, Linda

    2013-06-01

    In the roundtable that follows, clinicians discuss a study published in this issue of the Journal in light of its methodology, relevance to practice, and implications for future research. Article discussed: Ros C, Alobid I, Balasch J, et al. Turner's syndrome and other forms of congenital hypogonadism impair quality of life and sexual function. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2013;208:484.e1-6. PMID:23571134

  10. Osteopenia and bone fractures in a man with anorexia nervosa and hypogonadism

    SciTech Connect

    Rigotti, N.A.; Neer, R.M.; Jameson, L.

    1986-07-18

    Women with anorexia nervosa have reduced skeletal mass. Both anorexia and osteopenia are less common in men. We describe a 22-year-old man with anorexia nervosa and severe osteopenia involving both cortical and trabecular bone who developed a pelvic fracture and multiple vertebral compression fractures. He was found to have secondary hypogonadotropic hypogonadism that was reversible with weight gain. This case illustrates the need to consider osteopenia as a potential complication of anorexia nervosa in males as well as females.

  11. Two sibs with chorioretinal dystrophy, hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, and cerebellar ataxia: Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Rump, R; Hamel, B C; Pinckers, A J; van Dop, P A

    1997-01-01

    We describe two sibs with chorioretinal dystrophy, hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, and cerebellar ataxia, Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome, a rare but distinct pleiotropic single gene disorder with an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. The cases presented illustrate that this syndrome is still poorly recognised. We provide a review and analysis of previously reported cases and the differential diagnosis, which might aid in the identification of additional cases. Images PMID:9321767

  12. [The "obese" and "old" male patient in dermatological practice. When should hypogonadism be considered?].

    PubMed

    Varwig-Janßen, D; Ochsendorf, F

    2015-12-01

    Hypogonadism refers to reduced endocrine function of the testicles and leads to testosterone deficiency. It is often observed in older and obese men. Symptoms with the highest predictive value are reduced sexual thoughts, decreased spontaneous erections, and erectile dysfunction. After excluding contraindications (e.g., desire for children), various forms of replacement therapy are available. Studies have shown that testosterone therapy is safe if regularly checked. PMID:26541589

  13. Factors associated with bone metabolism in acromegalic patients: hypogonadism and female gender.

    PubMed

    Tütüncü, N B; Erbaş, T

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the factors associated with bone metabolism in acromegalic patients. Thirty three patients with acromegaly who had been followed on a regular basis in the endocrinology clinic were enrolled for the study. Among the factors acting upon bone metabolism, age, gender, body mass index (BMI), duration and activity of the disease, length of remission, treatment modalities and functional status of the pituitary were evaluated. Their influences on the determinants of bone remodelling and bone mineral density (BMD) were tried to be elucidated. The median age of the 33 acromegalics (19 females, 14 males) was 39.73 +/- 10.1 years. Twenty-three patients (9 males and 14 females) were eugonadal. Ten patients had been diagnosed with history of at least one year of untreated hypogonadism (5 males and 5 females; for 1 - 10 years). The BMD values of the lumbar vertebrae, the femur and the radius were correlated with each other. Patients were grouped according to their T-scores as decreased, normal, and increased BMD. Groups were similar with regard to age, BMI, gender, duration of disease, and remission, GH, IGF-1, IGFBP-3 levels, markers of bone turnover. Presence of hypogonadism and duration of hypogonadism revealed statistically significant difference among the 3 groups (p = 0.005 and p = 0.035, respectively). Hypogonadal acromegalic patients had decreased BMD compared to eugonadal acromegalics and healthy population while the eugonadal female acromegalic patients revealed increased BMD of lumbar vertebrae, femur, and distal radius compared to the sex-matched healthy population. PMID:15216451

  14. Plasma miRNA expression profile in the diagnosis of late-onset hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Nicholas; Grossmann, Mathis

    2016-01-01

    Researchers reporting in the Nature journal Scientific Reports1 have used next generation sequencing and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) technology to profile plasma microRNA (miRNA) expression in cohorts of men with and without late-onset hypogonadism (LOH). The study proposes a panel of three miRNAs as novel biomarkers to aid in the diagnosis of LOH. PMID:27364544

  15. Hypothesis: kisspeptin mediates male hypogonadism in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    George, Jyothis T; Millar, Robert P; Anderson, Richard A

    2010-01-01

    Hypogonadism occurs commonly in men with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and severe obesity. Current evidence points to a decreased secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) from the hypothalamus and thereby decreased secretion of gonadotropins from the pituitary gland as a central feature of the pathophysiology in these men. Hyperglycaemia, inflammation, leptin and oestrogen-related feedback have been proposed to make aetiological contributions to the hypogonadotropic hypogonadism of T2DM. However, the neuroendocrine signals that link these factors with modulation of GnRH neurons have yet to be identified. Kisspeptins play a central role in the modulation of GnRH secretion and, thus, downstream regulation of gonadotropins and testosterone secretion in men. Inactivating mutations of the kisspeptin receptor have been shown to cause hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in man, whilst an activating mutation is associated with precocious puberty. Data from studies in experimental animals link kisspeptin expression with individual factors known to regulate GnRH secretion, including hyperglycaemia, inflammation, leptin and oestrogen. We therefore hypothesise that decreased endogenous kisspeptin secretion is the common central pathway that links metabolic and endocrine factors in the pathology of testosterone deficiency seen in men with obesity and T2DM. We propose that the kisspeptin system plays a central role in integrating a range of metabolic inputs, thus constituting the link between energy status with the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and put forward potential clinical studies to test the hypothesis. PMID:20628262

  16. Hormone replacement therapy in morphine-induced hypogonadic male chronic pain patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In male patients suffering from chronic pain, opioid administration induces severe hypogonadism, leading to impaired physical and psychological conditions such as fatigue, anaemia and depression. Hormone replacement therapy is rarely considered for these hypogonadic patients, notwithstanding the various pharmacological solutions available. Methods To treat hypogonadism and to evaluate the consequent endocrine, physical and psychological changes in male chronic pain patients treated with morphine (epidural route), we tested the administration of testosterone via a gel formulation for one year. Hormonal (total testosterone, estradiol, free testosterone, DHT, cortisol), pain (VAS and other pain questionnaires), andrological (Ageing Males' Symptoms Scale - AMS) and psychological (POMS, CES-D and SF-36) parameters were evaluated at baseline (T0) and after 3, 6 and 12 months (T3, T6, T12 respectively). Results The daily administration of testosterone increased total and free testosterone and DHT at T3, and the levels remained high until T12. Pain rating indexes (QUID) progressively improved from T3 to T12 while the other pain parameters (VAS, Area%) remained unchanged. The AMS sexual dimension and SF-36 Mental Index displayed a significant improvement over time. Conclusions In conclusion, our results suggest that a constant, long-term supply of testosterone can induce a general improvement of the male chronic pain patient's quality of life, an important clinical aspect of pain management. PMID:21332999

  17. High frequency of association of rheumatic/autoimmune diseases and untreated male hypogonadism with severe testicular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Balderas, F Javier; Tapia-Serrano, Rosario; Fonseca, M Eugenia; Arellano, Jorge; Beltran, Arturo; Yañez, Patricia; Camargo-Coronel, Adolfo; Fraga, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    Our goal in the present work was to determine whether male patients with untreated hypogonadism have an increased risk of developing rheumatic/autoimmune disease (RAD), and, if so, whether there is a relation to the type of hypogonadism. We carried out neuroendocrine, genetic, and rheumatologic investigations in 13 such patients and 10 healthy male 46,XY normogonadic control subjects. Age and body mass index were similar in the two groups. Nine of the 13 patients had hypergonadotropic hypogonadism (five of whom had Klinefelter's syndrome [karyotype 47,XXY]) and 4 of the 13 had hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (46,XY). Of these last four, two had Kallmann's syndrome and two had idiopathic cryptorchidism. Eight (61%) of the 13 patients studied had RADs unrelated to the etiology of their hypogonadism. Of these, four had ankylosing spondylitis and histocompatibility B27 antigen, two had systemic lupus erythematosus (in one case associated with antiphospholipids), one had juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, and one had juvenile dermatomyositis. In comparison with the low frequencies of RADs in the general population (about 0.83%, including systemic lupus erythematosus, 0.03%; dermatomyositis, 0.04%; juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, 0.03%; ankylosing spondylitis, 0.01%; rheumatoid arthritis, 0.62%; and other RAD, 0.1%), there were surprisingly high frequencies of such disorders in this small group of patients with untreated hypogonadism (P < 0.001) and very low serum testosterone levels (P = 0.0005). The presence of RADs in these patients was independent of the etiology of their hypogonadism and was associated with marked gonadal failure with very low testosterone levels. PMID:11714390

  18. Testosterone replacement alters the cell size in visceral fat but not in subcutaneous fat in hypogonadal aged male rats as a late-onset hypogonadism animal model

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhamed, Amr; Hisasue, Shin-ichi; Shirai, Masato; Matsushita, Kazuhito; Wakumoto, Yoshiaki; Tsujimura, Akira; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Horie, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) benefit from testosterone replacement by improvement in the parameters of the metabolic syndrome, but fat cell morphology in these patients is still unclear. This study aims to determine the effect of testosterone replacement on the morphology of fat cells in subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue and on erectile function in hypogonadal aged male rats as a model of LOH. Methods Ten male Sprague-Dawley rats aged 20–22 months were randomly allocated to two groups, ie, aged male controls (control group, n=5) and aged males treated with testosterone replacement therapy (TRT group, n=5). Testosterone enanthate 25 mg was injected subcutaneously every 2 weeks for 6 weeks. At 6 weeks, the intracavernous pressure (ICP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) ratio was assessed. Visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue specimens were collected and analyzed using Image-J software. Results Body weight at 2, 4, and 6 weeks after TRT was 800.0±35.4 g, 767.5±46.3 g, and 780±40.4 g, respectively (not statistically significant). The ICP/MAP ratio was 0.341±0.015 in the TRT group and 0.274±0.049 in the control group (not statistically significant). The median subcutaneous fat cell size was 4.85×103 (range 0.85–12.53×103) μm2 in the control group and 4.93×103 (range 6.42–19.7×103) μm2 in the TRT group (not statistically significant). In contrast, median visceral fat cell size was significantly smaller in the TRT group (4.93×103 μm2 [range 0.51–14.88×103]) than in the control group (6.08×103 μm2 [0.77–19.97×103]; P<0.001, Mann-Whitney U test). Conclusion This is the first study clearly indicating that TRT can decrease visceral fat cell size, which is a key modulator in the metabolic syndrome. However, a short course of TRT could not improve the ICP response in hypogonadal aged male rats. Further investigation is necessary to clarify the exact rationale of TRT on the visceral fat cell. PMID:25767790

  19. Management of Hypogonadism in Cardiovascular Patients: What Are the Implications of Testosterone Therapy on Cardiovascular Morbidity?

    PubMed

    Tanna, Monique S; Schwartzbard, Arthur; Berger, Jeffery S; Underberg, James; Gianos, Eugenia; Weintraub, Howard S

    2016-05-01

    Testosterone replacement therapy is recommended for men with clinical androgen deficiency with decades of evidence supporting its use for treatment of sexual, physical, and psychological consequences of male hypogonadism. In this updated review, the authors discuss the implications of testosterone deficiency and conflicting evidence regarding testosterone replacement therapy and its effects on the cardiovascular system. Based on mounting evidence, the authors conclude that testosterone therapy can be safely considered in men with appropriately diagnosed clinical androgen deficiency and concurrent cardiovascular risk factors and even manifest cardiovascular disease after a thorough discussion of potential risks and with guideline-recommended safety monitoring. PMID:27132583

  20. Orchiectomized Fischer 344 male rat models body composition in hypogonadal state.

    PubMed

    Borst, Stephen E; Conover, Christine F

    2006-06-20

    The hypogonadal state in men is accompanied by substantial decreases in muscle and bone mass and by an increase in adiposity. Most of the strains of orchiectomized (ORX) rat that have been used to model this state display substantial losses in bone, but only subtle changes in adiposity and muscle mass. In order to identify a rat model displaying a robust catabolic response to ORX, we studied three strains: Fischer 344 (F344), Brown Norway and Wistar. ORX caused a significant and sustained decrease in weight gained by F344, but only a trend toward reduced weight gain in Brown Norway rats and a modest reduction weight gain in Wistar rats that was significant only after 56days. ORX suppressed food intake in F344 rats, and to a lesser degree in Brown Norway and Wistar rats. ORX reduced muscle mass significantly in F344 rats, but not in Brown Norway or Wistar rats. ORX increased adiposity moderately in F344 rats and substantially in Wistar rats. ORX caused a marked reduction in prostate mass and increase in bone resorption in all three strains. Thus, F344 was the only strain in which ORX produced substantial decreases in food intake, body weight and muscle mass with increased adiposity and increased bone resorption. We conclude that the F344 rat displays a broad range of catabolic effects following ORX and is the best rat model for studying the androgenic pathway and strategies for reversing catabolic changes induced by hypogonadism. PMID:16507309

  1. A syndrome of functional hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and sterility in a male with elevated serum estradiol.

    PubMed

    Valenta, L J

    1977-08-01

    A 36-year-old male complaining of impotence was examined. He was a genotypic male. Phenotypically, he exhibited signs of long-standing estrogen excess, such as feminine body build, gynecomastia, and varicose veins. His testes were soft and borderline small, and his prostate was small and soft. However, he had a normal-sized penis, normal male hair distribution, normal sense of smell, and normal intelligence. The laboratory data were compatible with mild hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Serum estradiol (E2) levels were consistently elevated. The patient had azoospermia and a decreased semen volume. Inappropriately low levels of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone responded normally to gonadotropin-releasing hormone and clomiphene citrate. Levels of both testosterone (T) and E2 increased dramatically after prolonged clomiphene medication and in response to human chorionic gonadotropin. There was no change in either T or E2 levels in response to manipulations of the pituitary-adrenal axis. It is concluded that the elevated E2 level was responsible for suppression of gonadotropins which, in turn, caused mild hypogonadism and sterility in this patient. According to the stimulation tests, the source of the elevated E2 levels was testicular. PMID:69556

  2. Aromatase, adiposity, aging and disease. The hypogonadal-metabolic-atherogenic-disease and aging connection.

    PubMed

    Cohen, P G

    2001-06-01

    In males, aging, health and disease are processes that occur over physiologic time and involve a cascade of hormonal, biochemical and physiological changes that accompany the down-regulation of the hypothalamic-anterior pituitary-testicular axis. As aging progresses there are relative increases of body fat and decreases in muscle mass. The increased adipose tissue mass is associated with the production of a number of newly generated factors. These include aromatase, leptin, PAI-1, insulin resistance, and the dyslipidemias, all of which can lead to tissue damage. Fatty tissue becomes the focal point for study as it represents the intersection between energy storage and mobilization. The increase in adipose tissue is associated with an increase in the enzyme aromatase that converts testosterone to estradiol and leads to diminished testosterone levels that favor the preferential deposition of visceral fat. As the total body fat mass increases, hormone resistance develops for leptin and insulin. Increasing leptin fails to prevent weight gain and the hypogonadal-obesity cycle ensues causing further visceral obesity and insulin resistance. The progressive insulin resistance leads to a high triglyceride-low HDL pattern of dyslipidemia and increased cardiovascular risk. All of these factors eventually contribute to the CHAOS Complex: coronary disease, hypertension, adult-onset diabetes mellitus, obesity and/or stroke as permanent changes unfold. Other consequences of the chronic hypogonadal state include osteopenia, extreme fatigue, depression, insomnia, loss of aggressiveness and erectile dysfunction all of which develop over variable periods of time. PMID:11399122

  3. AB021. What and how should we monitor to diagnose and treat hypogonadism?

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Male hypogonadism is a clinically and biochemically defined the disease of men with serum testosterone (T) levels below the reference ranges of young man and with symptoms of T deficiency (TD). Morbidity and mortality of TD and the method to treat TD are different by the onset age or reserving fertility. Therefore, diagnostic skills and treatment methods should be set the age, desire (fertility or not) and situation of the patient. The main symptom is sexual dysfunction, anemia, reduced muscle mass and strength, metabolic syndrome, reduction of bone density and lessening of general performance, depressed mood, cardiovascular disease and infertility in young man got married. The diagnosis of hypogonadism is based on the presence of symptoms or signs, TD, and serum T levels. Young adult who need fertility should be treated in to both directions to recover fertility and overcome the low T relating diseases. In the patient who has late onset hypogonadism, we have to target the symptoms and signs, change of body composition and morbidity and mortality. We also have to consider the testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) inducing pathophysiological changes such as polycythemia, blood viscosity, and aggravated benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) inducing lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and malignant prostate diseases before and after TRT. I would like to introduce the diagnostic algorithm for the hypogonadal patient before and after TRT. Before TRT for baseline, we have to check anthropometry, CBC, blood chemistry for metabolic syndrome, total T, free T, prostate specific antigen (PSA), transrectal prostate ultrasonography (TRUS), and questionnaires. For the follow-up after TRT, the anthropometry, blood viscosity, in addition CBC, total testosterone, free testosterone, PSA, TRUS, and questionnaires including voiding and erectile status. A semen analysis in the secondary hypogonadal patient who wants fertility has to be considered. I recommend that sample collection for

  4. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism

    MedlinePlus

    ... levels such as FSH, LH, and TSH, prolactin, testosterone and estradiol LH response to GnRH MRI of ... of the problem, but may involve: Injections of testosterone (in males) Slow-release testosterone skin patch (in ...

  5. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism

    MedlinePlus

    ... or infections Certain medical conditions, such as iron overload Kallmann syndrome is an inherited form of HH. ... to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A. ...

  6. Ataxia and Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism with Intrafamilial Variability Caused by RNF216 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Alqwaifly, Mohammed; Bohlega, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Gordon Holmes syndrome (GHS) is a distinct phenotype of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia, characterized by ataxia, dementia, reproductive defects and hypogonadism; it has been recently found to be associated with RNF216 mutation. We performed whole-exome sequencing and filtered the resulting novel variants by the coordinates of the shared autozygome. We identified a novel splicing variant in RNF216 that is likely to abolish the canonical splice site at the junction of exon/intron 13 (NM_207111.3:c.2061G>A). We herein report two patients with GHS caused by a novel RNF216 mutation as the first follow up report on RNF216-related GHS, and show interfamilial variability of phenotype supporting the previously reported RNF216-related cases. PMID:27441066

  7. GnRH, anosmia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism--where are we?

    PubMed

    Forni, Paolo E; Wray, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons originate the nasal placode and migrate into the brain during prenatal development. Once within the brain, these cells become integral components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, essential for reproductive function. Disruption of this system causes hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH). HH associated with anosmia is clinically defined as Kallman syndrome (KS). Recent work examining the developing nasal region has shed new light on cellular composition, cell interactions and molecular cues responsible for the development of this system in different species. This review discusses some developmental aspects, animal models and current advancements in our understanding of pathologies affecting GnRH. In addition we discuss how development of neural crest derivatives such as the glia of the olfactory system and craniofacial structures control GnRH development and reproductive function. PMID:25306902

  8. Treatment preferences and outcome in male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: an Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Sanyal, D; Chatterjee, S

    2016-06-01

    This retrospective study assessed treatment preferences and outcome with testosterone or HCG / HCG-FSH combination in Indian male idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) subjects (n = 31) above 18 years of age. 38.7% of IHH study subjects had no fertility plans and chose 3 monthly intramuscular testosterone undecanoate. 73.7% of subjects with fertility plans chose human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) alone due to cost considerations. Spermatogenesis occurred in 21.4% on HCG alone and 60% of subjects on HCG with follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) combination. Treatment failure is higher than published Western rates. FSH and HCG combination regimen is costly but superior to HCG alone. However, treatment failure still persists, suggesting unknown testicular defect in IHH. PMID:26341841

  9. Ataxia and Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism with Intrafamilial Variability Caused by RNF216 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Alqwaifly, Mohammed; Bohlega, Saeed

    2016-06-15

    Gordon Holmes syndrome (GHS) is a distinct phenotype of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia, characterized by ataxia, dementia, reproductive defects and hypogonadism; it has been recently found to be associated with RNF216 mutation. We performed whole-exome sequencing and filtered the resulting novel variants by the coordinates of the shared autozygome. We identified a novel splicing variant in RNF216 that is likely to abolish the canonical splice site at the junction of exon/intron 13 (NM_207111.3:c.2061G>A). We herein report two patients with GHS caused by a novel RNF216 mutation as the first follow up report on RNF216-related GHS, and show interfamilial variability of phenotype supporting the previously reported RNF216-related cases. PMID:27441066

  10. Critical Update of the 2010 Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guidelines for Male Hypogonadism: A Systematic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Seftel, Allen D; Kathrins, Martin; Niederberger, Craig

    2015-08-01

    "Testosterone Therapy in Men With Androgen Deficiency Syndromes: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline" (Guidelines), published in 2010, serves as an important guide for the treatment of hypogonadal men. Using the Guidelines as a basis, we searched for the most recent level 1 evidence that continues to support the recommendations or provide an impetus to modify all or some of them. We performed a systematic analysis with a PubMed query from January 1, 2010, through March 2, 2015, using the following key words: testosterone/deficiency, testosterone/therapeutic use, cardiovascular, morbidity, mortality, screening, sexual function, lower urinary tract symptoms, obstructive sleep apnea, prostate cancer, fertility, bone mineral density, osteoporosis, quality of life, cognitive, erectile dysfunction, and adverse effects. We identified 17 trials representing level 1 evidence that specifically addressed recommendations made in the Guidelines. Trials examining outcomes of testosterone replacement therapy in men with severe lower urinary tract symptoms and untreated obstructive sleep apnea were identified, potentially refuting the current dogma against treatment in the setting of these conditions. Hypogonadal men with type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome were examined in several trials, demonstrating the beneficial effects of therapy on sexual function and insulin sensitivity. Several trials served as reinforcing evidence for the beneficial effects of testosterone therapy on osteoporosis, muscle strength, and symptoms of frailty. As in the Guidelines, inconsistent effects on quality of life, well-being, and erectile function were also noted in publications. Despite controversies surrounding cardiovascular morbidity and treatment in the setting of prostate cancer, no studies examining these issues as primary end points were identified. The low number of eligible studies since 2010 is a limitation of this analysis. PMID:26205546

  11. [Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and delayed puberty: differential diagnosis using the LH-RH-infusion test].

    PubMed

    Vierhapper, H

    1983-08-26

    Serum concentrations of LH and FSH were determined during an intravenous infusion of LH-RH (200 micrograms, t = 4 hours) in 8 patients (age: 15 to 20 years) with delayed sexual maturation and retarded bone age. Four patients who by clinical criteria were later recognized as suffering from hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) presented during the infusion of LH-RH with only a small response of LH (and, in three cases, of FSH). In 3 patients with HH a deficiency of endogenous LH-RH due to a hypothalamic defect was suggested by an enhanced secretion of LH and FSH during a second LH-RH infusion test performed after priming of the pituitary by pulsatile, subcutaneous infusions of LH-RH (50 micrograms/night for 9 consecutive nights). The fourth patient with HH, who suffered from a pituitary adenoma, failed to display this enhanced secretion of gonadotropins following pituitary priming by intermittent administration of LH-RH. As compared with the patients with HH, 4 patients in whom puberty, although delayed, later occurred spontaneously (pubertas tarda, PT), presented with a considerably more pronounced secretion of LH and FSH during the infusion of LH-RH, and priming by intermittent subcutaneous LH-RH failed to achieve further enhancement of the secretion of LH and FSH during a second infusion test in these patients. The intravenous infusion of LH-RH in combination with a protocol of pituitary priming offers a possibility of distinguishing patients with delayed puberty from those with various forms of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. PMID:6417915

  12. Hypogonadism predisposes males to the development of behavioural and neuroplastic depressive phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Steven R; Lieblich, Stephanie E; Galea, Liisa A M

    2011-10-01

    The incidence of depression is 2-3× higher in women particularly during the reproductive years, an occurrence that has been associated with levels of sex hormones. The age-related decline of testosterone levels in men corresponds with the increased acquisition of depressive symptoms, and hormone replacement therapy can be efficacious in treating depression in hypogonadal men. Although it is not possible to model depression in rodents, it is possible to model some of the symptoms of depression including a dysregulated stress response and altered neuroplasticity. Among animal models of depression, chronic mild unpredictable stress (CMS) is a common paradigm used to induce depressive-like behaviours in rodents, disrupt the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis and decrease hippocampal neuroplasticity. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of hypogonadism, produced by gonadectomy, on the acquisition of depressive-like behaviours and changes in hippocampal neuroplasticity in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. A 21-day unpredictable CMS protocol was used on gonadectomised (GDX) and sham-operated males which produced an attenuation of weight gain in the GDX males receiving CMS treatment (GDX-CMS). Behavioural analysis was carried out to assess anxiety- and depressive-like behaviours. The combination of GDX and CMS produced greater passive behaviours within the forced swim test than CMS exposure alone. Similarly, hippocampal cell proliferation, neurogenesis and the expression of the neuroplastic protein polysialated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) were all significantly reduced in the GDX-CMS group compared to all other treatment groups. These findings indicate that testicular hormones confer resiliency to chronic stress in males therefore reducing the likelihood of developing putative physiological, behavioural or neurological depressive-like phenotypes. PMID:21481538

  13. Prolonged Hypogonadism in Males Following Withdrawal from Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids: an Underrecognized Problem

    PubMed Central

    Kanayama, Gen; Hudson, James I.; DeLuca, James; Isaacs, Stephanie; Baggish, Aaron; Weiner, Rory; Bhasin, Shalender; Pope, Harrison G.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To assess the frequency and severity of hypogonadal symptoms in male long-term anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) misusers who have discontinued AAS use. Design Cross-sectional, naturalistic. Setting Outpatient facility. Participants Twenty-four male former long-term AAS users and 36 non-AAS-using weightlifters, recruited by advertisement in Massachusetts, USA. Five of the former users were currently receiving treatment with physiologic testosterone replacement, leaving 19 untreated users for the numerical comparisons below. Measurements The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, questions regarding history of AAS use, physical examination, serum hormone determinations, and the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF). Findings Compared with the 36 non-AAS-using weightlifters, the 19 untreated former AAS users displayed significantly smaller testicular volumes (estimated difference [95% confidence interval (CI)]: 2.3 [0.1, 4.5] ml; p = 0.042) and lower serum testosterone levels (estimated difference: 131 [25, 227] dL; p = 0.009), with five users showing testosterone levels below 200 ng/dL despite abstinence from AAS for 3–26 months. Untreated former users also displayed significantly lower scores on the IIEF Sexual Desire subscale (estimated difference: 2.4 [1.3, 3.5] points on a 10-point scale; p < 0.001). In the overall group of 24 treated plus untreated former users, 7 (29%) had experienced major depressive episodes during AAS withdrawal; 4 of these had not experienced major depressive episodes at any other time. Two men (8%) had failed to regain normal libidinal or erectile function despite adequate replacement testosterone treatment. Conclusions Among long-term anabolic-androgenic steroid misusers, anabolic-androgenic steroid-withdrawal hypogonadism appears to be common, frequently prolonged, and associated with substantial morbidity. PMID:25598171

  14. Hypoplasia of the nose and eyes, hyposmia, hypogeusia, and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism in two males.

    PubMed

    Bosma, J F; Henkin, R I; Christiansen, R L; Herdt, J R

    1981-01-01

    Two males, 9-11 and 29-31 years of age, with severe hypoplasia of the nose, hypoplasia of the eyes, sensory abnormalities of taste and smell, and hypogonadism were studied. The nasal septum, cribriform plates and foramina of the vomeronasal (vn) nerves were demonstrated in both; the capsule of the vn organ was shown in one. Their nasal skeleton, demonstrated by tomoradiography, had grown in early embryological form. The nose was not patent in either patient. In both, the cranial vaults, orbits, epipharynges, and oral cavities were indented toward the hypoplastic nasal composite and the peripheral dimensions of their faces were normal for their respective ages. Each patient had impaired visual function with cataracts and colobomata. Each was unable to recognize the smell of any vapor (Type I hyposmia), and had severe impairment of recognition of any tastant (recognition hypogeusia); detection of vapors and of tastants were in appropriate anatomical areas. Each was unable orally to recognize standard plastic forms (astereognosis) though each could recognize the forms manually. Each patient had bilateral inguinal hernias, one or two undescended testes, and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. These patients do not fall within the spectrum of arrhinencephaly because of the presence of medial structure of attachment of the falx cerebri and because of their normal intelligence. Distinction of patients with this pattern of abnormalities from arrhinencephaly is important by reason of their potentiality of normal mental development. We hypothesize that their abnormalities resulted from an embryological disruption that occurred in the first trimester of pregnancy. The embryogenesis of the nasal composite is presumed to have been adequate for reciprocal induction of the anlagen of the forebrain. Development of their faces to normal peripheral dimensions indicates that the nasal composite is not essential for gross facial enlargement. PMID:6802865

  15. Argirein alleviates stress-induced and diabetic hypogonadism in rats via normalizing testis endothelin receptor A and connexin 43

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ming; Hu, Chen; Khan, Hussein-hamed; Shi, Fang-hong; Cong, Xiao-dong; Li, Qing; Dai, Yin; Dai, De-zai

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Argirein (rhein-arginine) is a derivative of rhein isolated from Chinese rhubarb (Rheum Officinale Baill.) that exhibits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. In the present study we investigated the effects of argirein on stress-induced (hypergonadotrophic) and diabetic (hypogonadotrophic) hypogonadism in male rats. Methods: Stress-induced and diabetic hypogonadism was induced in male rats via injection of isoproterenol (ISO) or streptozotocin (STZ). ISO-injected rats were treated with argirein (30 mg·kg−1·d−1, po) or testosterone replacement (0.5 mg·kg−1·d−1, sc) for 5 days, and STZ-injected rats were treated with argirein (40–120 mg·kg−1·d−1, po) or aminoguanidine (100 mg·kg−1·d−1, po) for 4 weeks. After the rats were euthanized, blood samples and testes were collected. Serum hormone levels were measured, and the expression of endothelin receptor A (ETA), connexin 43 (Cx43) and other proteins in testes was detected. For in vitro experiments, testis homogenate was prepared from normal male rats, and incubated with ISO (1 μmol/L) or high glucose (27 mmol/L). Results: ISO injection induced hyper-gonadotrophic hypogonadism characterized by low testosterone and high FSH and LH levels in the serum, whereas STZ injection induced hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism as evidenced by low testosterone and low FSH and LH levels in the serum. In the testes of ISO- and STZ-injected rats, the expression of ETA, MMP-9, NADPH oxidase and pPKCε was significantly increased, and the expression of Cx43 was decreased. Administration of argirein attenuated both the abnormal serum hormone levels and the testis changes in ISO- and STZ-injected rats, and aminoguanidine produced similar actions in STZ-injected rats; testosterone replacement reversed the abnormal serum hormone levels, but did not affect the testis changes in ISO-injected rats. Argirein (0.3–3 μmol/L) exerted similar effects in testis homogenate incubated with ISO or high glucose in

  16. Ataxia and hypogonadism caused by the loss of ubiquitin ligase activity of the U box protein CHIP.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chang-He; Schisler, Jonathan C; Rubel, Carrie E; Tan, Song; Song, Bo; McDonough, Holly; Xu, Lei; Portbury, Andrea L; Mao, Cheng-Yuan; True, Cadence; Wang, Rui-Hao; Wang, Qing-Zhi; Sun, Shi-Lei; Seminara, Stephanie B; Patterson, Cam; Xu, Yu-Ming

    2014-02-15

    Gordon Holmes syndrome (GHS) is a rare Mendelian neurodegenerative disorder characterized by ataxia and hypogonadism. Recently, it was suggested that disordered ubiquitination underlies GHS though the discovery of exome mutations in the E3 ligase RNF216 and deubiquitinase OTUD4. We performed exome sequencing in a family with two of three siblings afflicted with ataxia and hypogonadism and identified a homozygous mutation in STUB1 (NM_005861) c.737C→T, p.Thr246Met, a gene that encodes the protein CHIP (C-terminus of HSC70-interacting protein). CHIP plays a central role in regulating protein quality control, in part through its ability to function as an E3 ligase. Loss of CHIP function has long been associated with protein misfolding and aggregation in several genetic mouse models of neurodegenerative disorders; however, a role for CHIP in human neurological disease has yet to be identified. Introduction of the Thr246Met mutation into CHIP results in a loss of ubiquitin ligase activity measured directly using recombinant proteins as well as in cell culture models. Loss of CHIP function in mice resulted in behavioral and reproductive impairments that mimic human ataxia and hypogonadism. We conclude that GHS can be caused by a loss-of-function mutation in CHIP. Our findings further highlight the role of disordered ubiquitination and protein quality control in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disease and demonstrate the utility of combining whole-exome sequencing with molecular analyses and animal models to define causal disease polymorphisms. PMID:24113144

  17. The low density lipoprotein receptor modulates the effects of hypogonadism on diet-induced obesity and related metabolic perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Constantinou, Caterina; Mpatsoulis, Diogenis; Natsos, Anastasios; Petropoulou, Peristera-Ioanna; Zvintzou, Evangelia; Traish, Abdulmaged M.; Voshol, Peter J.; Karagiannides, Iordanes; Kypreos, Kyriakos E.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we investigated how LDL receptor deficiency (Ldlr−/−) modulates the effects of testosterone on obesity and related metabolic dysfunctions. Though sham-operated Ldlr−/− mice fed Western-type diet for 12 weeks became obese and showed disturbed plasma glucose metabolism and plasma cholesterol and TG profiles, castrated mice were resistant to diet-induced obesity and had improved glucose metabolism and reduced plasma TG levels, despite a further deterioration in their plasma cholesterol profile. The effect of hypogonadism on diet-induced weight gain of Ldlr−/− mice was independent of ApoE and Lrp1. Indirect calorimetry analysis indicated that hypogonadism in Ldlr−/− mice was associated with increased metabolic rate. Indeed, mitochondrial cytochrome c and uncoupling protein 1 expression were elevated, primarily in white adipose tissue, confirming increased mitochondrial metabolic activity due to thermogenesis. Testosterone replacement in castrated Ldlr−/− mice for a period of 8 weeks promoted diet-induced obesity, indicating a direct role of testosterone in the observed phenotype. Treatment of sham-operated Ldlr−/− mice with the aromatase inhibitor exemestane for 8 weeks showed that the obesity of castrated Ldlr−/− mice is independent of estrogens. Overall, our data reveal a novel role of Ldlr as functional modulator of metabolic alterations associated with hypogonadism. PMID:24837748

  18. New mutations of DAX-1 genes in two Japanese patients with X-linked congenital adrenal hypoplasia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism

    SciTech Connect

    Yanase, Toshihiko; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Oba, Koichi

    1996-02-01

    Congenital adrenal hypoplasia, an X-linked disorder, is characterized by primary adrenal insufficiency and frequent association with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The X-chromosome gene DAX-1 has been most recently identified and shown to be responsible for this disorder. We analyzed the DAX-1 genes of two unrelated Japanese patients with congenital adrenal hypoplasia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism by using PCR amplification of genomic DNA and its complete exonic sequencing. In a family containing several affected individuals, the proband male patient had a stop codon (TGA) in place of tryptophan (TGG) at amino acid position 171. As expected, his mother was a heterozygous carrier for the mutation, whereas his father and unaffected brother did not carry this mutation. In another male patient with noncontributory family history, sequencing revealed a 1-bp (T) deletion at amino acid position 280, leading to a frame shift and, subsequently a premature stop codon at amino acid position 371. The presence of this mutation in the patients` genome was further confirmed by digestion of genomic PCR product with MspI created by this mutation. Family studies using MspI digestion of genomic PCR products revealed that neither parent of this individual carried the mutation. These results clearly indicate that congenital adrenal hypoplasia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism result from not only inherited but also de novo mutation in the DAX-1 gene. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Effects of gonadotropin and testosterone treatments on plasma leptin levels in male patients with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and Klinefelter's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ozata, M; Ozisik, G; Caglayan, S; Yesilova, Z; Bingöl, N; Saglam, M; Turan, M; Beyhan, Z

    1998-05-01

    Since little is known about the effects of gonadotropin and testosterone treatment on leptin levels in male hypogonadism, we determined fasting plasma leptin levels before and 3 months after treatment in 21 patients with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH), 16 patients with Klinefelter's syndrome and 20 male controls. Patients with IHH were treated with hCG/human menopausal gonadotropin, whereas patients with Klinefelter's syndrome received T treatment. Plasma leptin levels were measured by an RIA with a sensitivity of 0.5 microg/L. Mean leptin levels in patients with IHH before treatment (9.23+/-4.09 microg/L) were not significantly different from those in patients with Klinefelter's syndrome (7.29+/-5.05 microg/L; z=-1.41; P=0.15). Leptin levels in both IHH and Klinefelter's syndrome groups were, however, significantly higher than in the normal men (3.91+/-1.67 microg/L) (P<0.001 and P<0.01, respectively). Mean leptin levels did not change significantly 3 months after the initiation of gonadotropin (11.6+/-6.44 microg/L) or T (8.32+/-5.17 microg/L) treatment in either IHH or Klinefelter's syndrome. Our study demonstrated that mean plasma leptin levels are not influenced by short-term gonadotropin or T treatment in male hypogonadism. PMID:9660087

  20. Natesto™ , a novel testosterone nasal gel, normalizes androgen levels in hypogonadal men.

    PubMed

    Rogol, A D; Tkachenko, N; Bryson, N

    2016-01-01

    Advantages of testosterone nasal gel include ease of administration, low dose, and no risk of secondary transference. The efficacy and safety of testosterone nasal gel was evaluated in hypogonadal males. The ninety-day, randomized, open-label, dose-ranging study, included potential dose titration and sequential safety extensions to 1 year. At 39 US outpatient sites, 306 men (mean age 54.4 years) with two fasting morning total serum testosterone levels <300 ng/dL were randomized (n = 228, b.i.d. dosing; n = 78, t.i.d. dosing). Natesto(™) Testosterone Nasal Gel was self-administered, using a multiple-dose dispenser, as two or three daily doses (5.5 mg per nostril, 11.0 mg single dose). Total daily doses were 22 mg or 33 mg. The primary endpoint was the Percentage of patients with Day-90 serum total testosterone average concentration (C(avg)) value within the eugonadal range (≥300 ng/dL, ≤1050 ng/dL). At Day 90, 200/273 subjects (73%; 95% CI 68, 79) in the intent-to-treat (ITT) population and 180/237 subjects (76%; 71, 81) in the per-protocol (PP) population were in the normal range. Also, in the normal range were 68% (61, 74) of ITT subjects and 70% (63, 77) of PP subjects in the titration arm, as well as, 90% (83, 97) of ITT subjects and 91% (84, 98) of PP subjects in the fixed-dose arm. Natesto(™) 11 mg b.i.d. or 11 mg t.i.d. restores normal serum total testosterone levels in most hypogonadal men. Erectile function, mood, body composition, and bone mineral density improved from baseline. Treatment was well tolerated; adverse event rates were low. Adverse event discontinuation rates were 2.1% (b.i.d.) and 3.7% (t.i.d.). This study lacked a placebo or an active comparator control which limited the ability to adequately assess some measures. PMID:26695758

  1. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and metabolic syndrome: insights from the high-fat diet experimental rabbit animal model.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Annamaria; Vignozzi, Linda; Maggi, Mario

    2016-06-01

    The etiology of metabolic syndrome (MetS) is complex and involves the interplay between environmental, lifestyle and genetic determinants. MetS in men can be associated with a biochemical pattern of partial hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH). A similar pattern has been noted in both men and women with a variety of acute illnesses and chronic diseases, and there is ongoing debate regarding whether this phenomenon might adaptive (e.g. diverting resources from reproduction into survival), or maladaptive (e.g. anemia, sarcopenia, osteopenia and fatigue of androgen-deficiency amplify and widen the adverse consequences of the original disease-trigger). In women with hypothalamic amenorrhea (HA-HH secondary to chronic bioenergetic deficit from dietary restriction and/or intensive exercise), a genetic link to congenital HH (CHH) was recently established; women carrying monoallelic CHH gene mutations will typically not develop CHH, but are significantly more susceptible to HA. However, the male reproductive axis seems to be more resistant to similar environmental insults. In contrast, MetS-associated HH (mHH) is specifically a male phenomenon; the reproductive phenotype of females with MetS tending instead towards hyperandrogenism, rather than hypogonadism. The underlying pathogenic mechanisms responsible for mHH have not been clearly identified and, as yet, there has been no investigation of a potential role for CHH mutation carriage in its etiology. Over the decades, the use of either genetic- or diet-induced obesity and/or MetS animal models has greatly helped to illuminate the complex etiology of metabolic dysregulation, but the strong relationship between obesity/MetS and mHH in males has been largely neglected, with little or no information about the regulation of reproductive function by metabolic factors under conditions of bioenergetic excess. However, the pathogenic link between MetS and HH in males has been recently investigated in an animal model of high fat

  2. An update on the role of testosterone replacement therapy in the management of hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    While US testosterone prescriptions have tripled in the last decade with lower trends in Europe, debate continues over the risks, benefits and appropriate use of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). Some authors blame advertising and the availability of more convenient formulations whilst other have pointed out that the routine testing of men with erectile dysfunction (a significant marker of cardiovascular risk) and those with diabetes would inevitably increase the diagnosis of hypogonadism and lead to an increase in totally appropriate prescribing. They commented that this was merely an appropriate correction of previous underdiagnosis and undertreatment by adherence to evidence-based guidelines. Urologists and primary care physicians are the most frequent initiators of TRT, usually for erectile dysfunction. Benefits are clearly established for sexual function, increase in lean muscle mass and strength, mood and cognitive function, with possible reduction in frailty and osteoporosis. There remains no evidence that TRT is associated with increased risk of prostate cancer or symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia, yet the decision to initiate and continue therapy is often decided by urologists. The cardiovascular issues associated with TRT have been clarified by recent studies showing clearly that therapy associated with clear rise in testosterone levels are associated with reduced mortality. Studies reporting to show increased risk have been subject to flawed designs with inadequate baseline diagnosis and follow-up testing. Effectively they have compared nontreated patients with undertreated or on-compliant subjects involving a range of different therapy regimens. Recent evidence suggests long acting injections may be associated with decreased cardiovascular risk but the transdermal route may be associated with potentially relatively greater risk because of conversion to dihydrotestosterone by the effect of 5α reductase in skin. The multiple effects of TRT

  3. An update on the role of testosterone replacement therapy in the management of hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Geoffrey

    2016-04-01

    While US testosterone prescriptions have tripled in the last decade with lower trends in Europe, debate continues over the risks, benefits and appropriate use of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). Some authors blame advertising and the availability of more convenient formulations whilst other have pointed out that the routine testing of men with erectile dysfunction (a significant marker of cardiovascular risk) and those with diabetes would inevitably increase the diagnosis of hypogonadism and lead to an increase in totally appropriate prescribing. They commented that this was merely an appropriate correction of previous underdiagnosis and undertreatment by adherence to evidence-based guidelines. Urologists and primary care physicians are the most frequent initiators of TRT, usually for erectile dysfunction. Benefits are clearly established for sexual function, increase in lean muscle mass and strength, mood and cognitive function, with possible reduction in frailty and osteoporosis. There remains no evidence that TRT is associated with increased risk of prostate cancer or symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia, yet the decision to initiate and continue therapy is often decided by urologists. The cardiovascular issues associated with TRT have been clarified by recent studies showing clearly that therapy associated with clear rise in testosterone levels are associated with reduced mortality. Studies reporting to show increased risk have been subject to flawed designs with inadequate baseline diagnosis and follow-up testing. Effectively they have compared nontreated patients with undertreated or on-compliant subjects involving a range of different therapy regimens. Recent evidence suggests long acting injections may be associated with decreased cardiovascular risk but the transdermal route may be associated with potentially relatively greater risk because of conversion to dihydrotestosterone by the effect of 5α reductase in skin. The multiple effects of TRT

  4. Adding liraglutide to lifestyle changes, metformin and testosterone therapy boosts erectile function in diabetic obese men with overt hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Giagulli, V A; Carbone, M D; Ramunni, M I; Licchelli, B; De Pergola, G; Sabbà, C; Guastamacchia, E; Triggiani, V

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this retrospective observational study was to evaluate whether adding liraglutide to lifestyle changes, metformin (Met) and testosterone replacement therapy (TRT), by means of improving weight and glycaemic control, could boost erectile function in type 2 diabetic obese men with overt hypogonadism and erectile dysfunction (ED) in a 'real-life setting'. Forty-three obese, diabetic and hypogonadal men (aged 45-59 years) were evaluated because of complaining about the recent onset of ED. They were subdivided into two groups according to whether hypogonadism occurred after puberty (G1; n = 30: 25 with dysfunctional hypogonadism and 5 with acquired hypogonadotropic hypogonadism) or before puberty (G2; n = 13: 10 with Klinefelter's syndrome and 3 with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism). Both G1 and G2 patients were given a combination of testosterone (T) [testosterone undecanoate (TU) 1000 mg/every 12 weeks] and Met (2000-3000 mg/day) for 1 year. In the poor responders (N) to this therapy in terms of glycaemic target (G1N: n = 16; G2N: n = 10), liraglutide (L) (1.2 μg/day) was added for a second year, while the good responders (Y) to T + Met (G1Y: 14/30 and G2Y: 3/13) continued this two drugs regimen therapy for another year. All patients were asked to fill in the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF 15) questionnaire before starting TU plus Met (T1) and after 12 months (T2) and 24 months (T3) of treatment. Patients underwent a clinical examination and a determination of serum sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), total testosterone (T) and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) at T1, T2 and T3. At T2, each patient obtained an improvement of ED (p < 0.01) and of the metabolic parameters without reaching, however, the glycaemic goals [HbA1c = >7.5% (>58 mmol/mol)], while T turned out to be within the range of young men. L added to TU and Met regimen in G1N and G2N allowed these patients to reach not only the glycaemic target [HbA1c = <7.5% (<58 nmol

  5. Expert consensus document: European Consensus Statement on congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism--pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Ulrich; Bouloux, Pierre-Marc; Dattani, Mehul T; de Roux, Nicolas; Dodé, Catherine; Dunkel, Leo; Dwyer, Andrew A; Giacobini, Paolo; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Juul, Anders; Maghnie, Mohamad; Pitteloud, Nelly; Prevot, Vincent; Raivio, Taneli; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Quinton, Richard; Young, Jacques

    2015-09-01

    Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) is a rare disorder caused by the deficient production, secretion or action of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), which is the master hormone regulating the reproductive axis. CHH is clinically and genetically heterogeneous, with >25 different causal genes identified to date. Clinically, the disorder is characterized by an absence of puberty and infertility. The association of CHH with a defective sense of smell (anosmia or hyposmia), which is found in ∼50% of patients with CHH is termed Kallmann syndrome and results from incomplete embryonic migration of GnRH-synthesizing neurons. CHH can be challenging to diagnose, particularly when attempting to differentiate it from constitutional delay of puberty. A timely diagnosis and treatment to induce puberty can be beneficial for sexual, bone and metabolic health, and might help minimize some of the psychological effects of CHH. In most cases, fertility can be induced using specialized treatment regimens and several predictors of outcome have been identified. Patients typically require lifelong treatment, yet ∼10-20% of patients exhibit a spontaneous recovery of reproductive function. This Consensus Statement summarizes approaches for the diagnosis and treatment of CHH and discusses important unanswered questions in the field. PMID:26194704

  6. Multiple Fractures in Patient with Graves' Disease Accompanied by Isolated Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Hyon-Seung; Kim, Ji Min; Ju, Sang Hyeon; Lee, Younghak; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2016-01-01

    Isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) is known to decrease bone mineral density due to deficiency of sex steroid hormone. Graves' disease is also an important cause of secondary osteoporosis. However, IHH does not preclude the development of primary hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease, leading to more severe osteoporosis rapidly. Here, we describe the first case of 35-year-old Asian female patient with IHH accompanied by Graves' disease and osteoporosis-induced multiple fractures. Endocrine laboratory findings revealed preserved anterior pituitary functions except for secretion of gonadotropins and showed primary hyperthyroidism with positive autoantibodies. Sella magnetic resonance imaging showed slightly small sized pituitary gland without mass lesion. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry revealed severe osteoporosis in lumbar spine and femur neck of the patient. Plain film radiography of the pelvis and shoulder revealed a displaced and nondisplaced fracture, respectively. After surgical fixation with screws for the femoral fracture, the patient was treated with antithyroid medication, calcium, and vitamin D until now and has been recovering fairly well. We report a patient of IHH with Graves' disease and multiple fractures that is a first case in Korea. PMID:26981520

  7. Distribution of Gene Mutations Associated with Familial Normosmic Idiopathic Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Gürbüz, Fatih; Kotan, L. Damla; Mengen, Eda; Şıklar, Zeynep; Berberoğlu, Merih; Dökmetaş, Sebila; Kılıçlı, Mehmet Fatih; Güven, Ayla; Kirel, Birgül; Saka, Nurçin; Poyrazoğlu, Şükran; Cesur, Yaşar; Doğan, Murat; Özen, Samim; Özbek, Mehmet Nuri; Demirbilek, Hüseyin; Kekil, M. Burcu; Temiz, Fatih; Önenli Mungan, Neslihan; Yüksel, Bilgin; Topaloğlu, Ali Kemal

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Normosmic idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (nIHH) is characterized by failure of initiation or maintenance of puberty due to insufficient gonadotropin release, which is not associated with anosmia/hyposmia. The objective of this study was to determine the distribution of causative mutations in a hereditary form of nIHH. Methods: In this prospective collaborative study, 22 families with more than one affected individual (i.e. multiplex families) with nIHH were recruited and screened for genes known or suspected to be strong candidates for nIHH. Results: Mutations were identified in five genes (GNRHR, TACR3, TAC3, KISS1R, and KISS1) in 77% of families with autosomal recessively inherited nIHH. GNRHR and TACR3 mutations were the most common two causative mutations occurring with about equal frequency. Conclusions: Mutations in these five genes account for about three quarters of the causative mutations in nIHH families with more than one affected individual. This frequency is significantly greater than the previously reported rates in all inclusive (familial plus sporadic) cohorts. GNRHR and TACR3 should be the first two genes to be screened for diagnostic purposes. Identification of causative mutations in the remaining families will shed light on the regulation of puberty. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:22766261

  8. Hypogonadism Associated with Cyp19a1 (Aromatase) Posttranscriptional Upregulation in Celf1 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, Gaella; Cibois, Marie; Viet, Justine; Fostier, Alexis; Deschamps, Stéphane; Pastezeur, Sylvain; Massart, Catherine; Gschloessl, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    CELF1 is a multifunctional RNA-binding protein that controls several aspects of RNA fate. The targeted disruption of the Celf1 gene in mice causes male infertility due to impaired spermiogenesis, the postmeiotic differentiation of male gametes. Here, we investigated the molecular reasons that underlie this testicular phenotype. By measuring sex hormone levels, we detected low concentrations of testosterone in Celf1-null mice. We investigated the effect of Celf1 disruption on the expression levels of steroidogenic enzyme genes, and we observed that Cyp19a1 was upregulated. Cyp19a1 encodes aromatase, which transforms testosterone into estradiol. Administration of testosterone or the aromatase inhibitor letrozole partly rescued the spermiogenesis defects, indicating that a lack of testosterone associated with excessive aromatase contributes to the testicular phenotype. In vivo and in vitro interaction assays demonstrated that CELF1 binds to Cyp19a1 mRNA, and reporter assays supported the conclusion that CELF1 directly represses Cyp19a1 translation. We conclude that CELF1 downregulates Cyp19a1 (Aromatase) posttranscriptionally to achieve high concentrations of testosterone compatible with spermiogenesis completion. We discuss the implications of these findings with respect to reproductive defects in men, including patients suffering from isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and myotonic dystrophy type I. PMID:26169831

  9. Multiple Fractures in Patient with Graves' Disease Accompanied by Isolated Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hyon-Seung; Kim, Ji Min; Ju, Sang Hyeon; Lee, Younghak; Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Koon Soon

    2016-02-01

    Isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) is known to decrease bone mineral density due to deficiency of sex steroid hormone. Graves' disease is also an important cause of secondary osteoporosis. However, IHH does not preclude the development of primary hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease, leading to more severe osteoporosis rapidly. Here, we describe the first case of 35-year-old Asian female patient with IHH accompanied by Graves' disease and osteoporosis-induced multiple fractures. Endocrine laboratory findings revealed preserved anterior pituitary functions except for secretion of gonadotropins and showed primary hyperthyroidism with positive autoantibodies. Sella magnetic resonance imaging showed slightly small sized pituitary gland without mass lesion. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry revealed severe osteoporosis in lumbar spine and femur neck of the patient. Plain film radiography of the pelvis and shoulder revealed a displaced and nondisplaced fracture, respectively. After surgical fixation with screws for the femoral fracture, the patient was treated with antithyroid medication, calcium, and vitamin D until now and has been recovering fairly well. We report a patient of IHH with Graves' disease and multiple fractures that is a first case in Korea. PMID:26981520

  10. The role of semaphorin signaling in the etiology of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Lettieri, Antonella; Oleari, Roberto; Gimmelli, Jessica; ANDRé, Valentina; Cariboni, Anna

    2016-06-01

    In mammals fertility depends on timely onset and cyclic secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), secreted by scattered hypothalamic neurons (GnRH neurons). These cells originate in the nasal placode and migrate first in the nasal compartment, then through the cribriform plate and finally across the basal forebrain, before they set in their final position in the hypothalamus. This long journey is regulated by many different factors that could be mutated in neuroendocrine syndromes such as congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH), Kallmann Syndrome (KS) and CHARGE syndrome. Recently, semaphorins, a large family of molecules, previously discovered as axon guidance cues, are emerging as key regulators of the neuroendocrine control of GnRH neurons and are acquiring an increasing role in the etiopathogenesis of CHH and KS. Specifically, semaphorins play a multifaceted action in GnRH neuron biology: on one hand regulating their migration and survival during embryonic development and, on the other, controlling the plasticity of the median eminence (ME) in terms of its response to varying sex steroid hormone levels. In this review we will focus our attention on recent studies describing the roles of different semaphorins in the normal and pathological biology of the GnRH neuronal system. PMID:26940457

  11. Reversal and Relapse of Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism: Resilience and Fragility of the Reproductive Neuroendocrine System

    PubMed Central

    Sidhoum, Valerie F.; Chan, Yee-Ming; Lippincott, Margaret F.; Balasubramanian, Ravikumar; Quinton, Richard; Plummer, Lacey; Dwyer, Andrew; Pitteloud, Nelly; Hayes, Frances J.; Hall, Janet E.; Martin, Kathryn A.; Boepple, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: A subset of patients diagnosed with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) later achieves activation of their hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis with normalization of steroidogenesis and/or gametogenesis, a phenomenon termed reversal. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the natural history of reversal and to identify associated phenotypes and genotypes. Design, Setting, and Subjects: This was a retrospective review of clinical, biochemical, and genetic features of patients with IHH evaluated at an academic medical center. Main Outcome Measures: History of spontaneous fertility, regular menses, testicular growth, or normalization of serum sex steroids, LH secretory profiles, brain imaging findings, and sequences of 14 genes associated with IHH were reviewed. Results: Of 308 patients with IHH, 44 underwent reversal. Time-to-event analysis estimated a lifetime incidence of reversal of 22%. There were no differences in the rates of cryptorchidism, micropenis, or partial pubertal development in patients with reversal vs IHH patients without reversal. Fifteen patients with reversal (30%) had Kallmann syndrome (IHH and anosmia); one had undetectable olfactory bulbs on a brain magnetic resonance imaging scan. Subjects with reversal were enriched for mutations affecting neurokinin B signaling compared with a cohort of IHH patients without reversal (10% vs 3%, P = .044), had comparable frequencies of mutations in FGFR1, PROKR2, and GNRHR, and had no mutations in KAL1. Five men did not sustain their reversal and again developed hypogonadotropism. Conclusions: Reversal of IHH may be more widespread than previously appreciated and occurs across a broad range of genotypes and phenotypes. Enrichment for mutations that disrupt neurokinin B signaling in patients who reversed indicates that, despite the importance of this signaling pathway for normal pubertal timing, its function is dispensable later in life. The occurrence of reversal in a

  12. Increases in bone density during treatment of men with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, J.S.; Klibanski, A.; Neer, R.M.; Doppelt, S.H.; Rosenthal, D.I.; Segre, G.V.; Crowley, W.F. Jr. )

    1989-10-01

    To assess the effects of gonadal steroid replacement on bone density in men with osteoporosis due to severe hypogonadism, we measured cortical bone density in the distal radius by 125I photon absorptiometry and trabecular bone density in the lumbar spine by quantitative computed tomography in 21 men with isolated GnRH deficiency while serum testosterone levels were maintained in the normal adult male range for 12-31 months (mean +/- SE, 23.7 +/- 1.1). In men who initially had fused epiphyses (n = 15), cortical bone density increased from 0.71 +/- 0.02 to 0.74 +/- 0.01 g/cm2 (P less than 0.01), while trabecular bone density did not change (116 +/- 9 compared with 119 +/- 7 mg/cm3). In men who initially had open epiphyses (n = 6), cortical bone density increased from 0.62 +/- 0.01 to 0.70 +/- 0.03 g/cm2 (P less than 0.01), while trabecular bone density increased from 96 +/- 13 to 109 +/- 12 mg/cm3 (P less than 0.01). Cortical bone density increased 0.03 +/- 0.01 g/cm2 in men with fused epiphyses and 0.08 +/- 0.02 g/cm2 in men with open epiphyses (P less than 0.05). Despite these increases, neither cortical nor trabecular bone density returned to normal levels. Histomorphometric analyses of iliac crest bone biopsies demonstrated that most of the men had low turnover osteoporosis, although some men had normal to high turnover osteoporosis. We conclude that bone density increases during gonadal steroid replacement of GnRH-deficient men, particularly in men who are skeletally immature.

  13. [Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: new aspects in the regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis].

    PubMed

    Brioude, F; Bouvattier, C-E; Lombès, M

    2010-09-01

    Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) is defined by the absence of sex steroid synthesis associated with the lack of appropriate gonadotrophin secretion. This leads to a variable degree of impuberism, often diagnosed during childhood or adolescence. Genetics of HH involve many genes. However, molecular defects have been identified in only 30 % of patients. Kallmann syndrome (KS) is defined by the association of HH and anosmia. Six genes are involved in KS (KAL1, FGFR1, FGF8, PROK2, PROKR2 and CHD7). However, genetics of KS is complex, because of the variability of the phenotype for a similar molecular defect. Otherwise, heterozygous anomalies are frequently described. Identification in the same patient of several mutations in some of these genes (digenism) could account for this variability. Autosomal recessive transmission is frequently observed in familial cases of HH without anosmia. Molecular alterations have been identified for several neuropeptides or their corresponding receptors, which are involved in the physiology of the gonadotropic axis : GNRHR, KISS1R/GPR54, neurokinin B (TAC3), TACR3 and GNRH1 (and PROK2, PROKR2 and CHD7). Anomalies of leptin or its receptor are also involved in HH cases. A new negative regulating element has been recently identified in humans : RFRP3, which is ortholog of the avian GnIH (gonadotrophin inhibitory hormone). Recent progress about these neuropeptides leads to a new model of comprehension of the gonadotropic axis physiology, from a linear model to a network model, which regulates the central element of regulation of the gonadotropic axis, represented by the GnRH neurons. PMID:21237329

  14. A Shared Genetic Basis for Self-Limited Delayed Puberty and Idiopathic Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jia; Choa, Ruth E.-Y.; Guo, Michael H.; Plummer, Lacey; Buck, Cassandra; Palmert, Mark R.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Seminara, Stephanie B.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Delayed puberty (DP) is a common issue and, in the absence of an underlying condition, is typically self limited. Alhough DP seems to be heritable, no specific genetic cause for DP has yet been reported. In contrast, many genetic causes have been found for idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH), a rare disorder characterized by absent or stalled pubertal development. Objective: The objective of this retrospective study, conducted at academic medical centers, was to determine whether variants in IHH genes contribute to the pathogenesis of DP. Subjects and Outcome Measures: Potentially pathogenic variants in IHH genes were identified in two cohorts: 1) DP family members of an IHH proband previously found to have a variant in an IHH gene, with unaffected family members serving as controls, and 2) DP individuals with no family history of IHH, with ethnically matched control subjects drawn from the Exome Aggregation Consortium. Results: In pedigrees with an IHH proband, the proband's variant was shared by 53% (10/19) of DP family members vs 12% (4/33) of unaffected family members (P = .003). In DP subjects with no family history of IHH, 14% (8/56) had potentially pathogenic variants in IHH genes vs 5.6% (1 907/33 855) of controls (P = .01). Potentially pathogenic variants were found in multiple DP subjects for the genes IL17RD and TAC3. Conclusions: These findings suggest that variants in IHH genes can contribute to the pathogenesis of self-limited DP. Thus, at least in some cases, self-limited DP shares an underlying pathophysiology with IHH. PMID:25636053

  15. Risk of Hypogonadism From Scatter Radiation During Pelvic Radiation in Male Patients With Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yau, Ivan; Vuong, Te Garant, Aurelie; Ducruet, Thierry; Doran, Patrick; Faria, Sergio; Liberman, Sender; Richard, Carole; Letellier, Francois; Charlebois, Patrick; Loungnarath, Rasmy; Stein, Barry; Devic, Slobodan

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: Recent studies have reported fluctuations in sex hormones during pelvic irradiation. The objective of this study was to observe the effects of radiation on hormonal profiles for two treatment modalities: conventional external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) given neoadjuvantly for patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Routine serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and testosterone levels were collected from 119 consecutive male patients receiving either EBRT, using 45.0-50.4 Gy in 25-28 fractions with concurrent 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy or HDRBT using 26 Gy in 4 fractions. Results: Thirty patients with initially abnormal profiles were excluded. Profiles included in this study were collected from 51 patients treated with EBRT and 38 patients treated with HDRBT, all of whom had normal hormonal profiles before treatment. Mean follow-up times were 17 months for the entire patient cohort-14 and 20 months, respectively-for the EBRT and HDRBT arms. Dosimetry results revealed a mean cumulative testicular dose of 1.24 Gy received in EBRT patients compared with 0.27 Gy in the HDRBT group. After treatment, FSH and LH were elevated in all patients but were more pronounced in the EBRT group. The testosterone-to-LH ratio was significantly lower (p = 0.0036) in EBRT patients for tumors in the lower third of the rectum. The 2-year hypogonadism rate observed was 2.6% for HDRBT compared with 17.6% for EBRT (p = 0.09) for tumors in the lower two thirds of the rectum. Conclusion: HDRBT allows better hormonal sparing than EBRT during neoadjuvant treatment of patients with rectal cancer.

  16. Reversal of idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: a cohort study in Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jiang-Feng; Xu, Hong-Li; Duan, Jin; Chen, Rong-Rong; Li, Li; Li, Bin; Nie, Min; Min, Le; Zhang, Hong-Bing; Wu, Xue-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Although idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) has traditionally been viewed as a life-long disease caused by a deficiency of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons, a portion of patients may gradually regain normal reproductive axis function during hormonal replacement therapy. The predictive factors for potential IHH reversal are largely unknown. The aim of our study was to investigate the incidence and clinical features of IHH male patients who had reversed reproductive axis function. In this retrospective cohort study, male IHH patients were classified into a reversal group (n = 18) and a nonreversal group (n = 336). Concentration of gonadotropins and testosterone, as well as testicle sizes and sperm counts, were determined. Of 354 IHH patients, 18 (5.1%) acquired normal reproductive function during treatment. The median age for reversal was 24 years old (range 21-34 years). Compared with the nonreversal group, the reversible group had higher basal luteinizing hormone (LH) (1.0 ± 0.7 IU l -[1] vs 0.4 ± 0.4 IU l-1 , P< 0.05) and stimulated LH (28.3 ± 22.6 IU l-1 vs 1.9 ± 1.1 IU l-1 , P< 0.01) levels, as well as larger testicle size (5.1 ± 2.6 ml vs 1.5 ± 0.3 ml, P< 0.01), at the initial visit. In summary, larger testicle size and higher stimulated LH concentrations are favorite parameters for reversal. Our finding suggests that reversible patients may retain partially active reproductive axis function at initial diagnosis. PMID:25578938

  17. Risks and Benefits of Late Onset Hypogonadism Treatment: An Expert Opinion

    PubMed Central

    Corona, Giovanni; Vignozzi, Linda; Sforza, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) is a syndromic condition that has a well-recognized association with sexual and reproductive failure. LOH is frequently associated with chronic conditions including cardiovascular diseases (CVD), obesity, osteoporosis, HIV infection, renal failure, and obstructive pulmonary diseases. Despite this evidence, in patients with these conditions, LOH is still only rarely investigated and testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) rarely considered. In this paper, we critically reviewed the available evidence on LOH treatment focusing on possible risks and benefits. Medical therapy of LOH should be individualized depending on the etiology of the disease and the patient's expectations. The fear of prostate cancer and the risk of erythrocytosis probably represent the main limitations of TRT in aging men. However, TRT in healthy older men in near physiological doses does not appear to incur serious adverse events, although regular monitoring of prostate-specific antigen and hematocrit levels is required. Available evidence also suggests that TRT might ameliorate central obesity and glycometabolic control in patients with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. In addition, TRT has been associated with an increase in bone mineral density in men with osteoporosis, with an improvement in lean body mass in subjects with human immunodeficiency virus infection or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, as well as with peripheral oxygenation in patients with chronic kidney diseases. Despite this evidence, however, it should be recognized that the results of these trials were heterogeneous and limited by small sample sizes. Hence, further research is required regarding the long-term benefits and adverse effects of TRT in LOH. PMID:24044106

  18. Pregnancy outcome of assisted reproductive technology cycle in patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Pandurangi, Monna; Tamizharasi, M.; Reddy, N. Sanjeeva

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: Ovulation induction in patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) is a challenge to the treating physician. The threshold for ovarian response in HH may differ substantially from that of normal patients. To reach that threshold levels of follicle stimulating hormone, in a step-up protocol longer duration of stimulation is required in some cases so as to prevent multiple pregnancy and to eliminate the risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. AIM: To evaluate the duration of stimulation, quality of oocytes, and embryo, and the pregnancy outcome in the assisted reproductive technology (ART) cycles in patients with HH. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Over the period of 4 years, we had 14 patients with HH in whom 21 cycles of ovulation induction were done. Of these 7 patients underwent oocyte retrieval and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). We present a retrospective study of these 7 patients who underwent ART to evaluate the duration of stimulation, quality of oocytes and embryo, and the pregnancy outcome. RESULTS: In the study group on ovulation induction with gonadotropins, only one patient had the duration of stimulation of the standard 12 days, the remaining 6 patients took ≥12 days to respond to stimulation (maxium being 54 days). Mean ET in these patients was 8.9 mm. Six patients had >70% good quality MII oocytes. One patient responded poorly and had only 2 good quality MII oocytes (50%). After ICSI procedure, resultant embryos were of grade 1 and 2 in all the patients irrespective of the duration of stimulation. Fertilization rate in these patients was 85% (except in one 50% fertilization rate), and the cumulative pregnancy rate was 68.6%. CONCLUSION: In the patients with HH the quality of oocytes and embryos, and the pregnancy rate is not affected even if the duration of stimulation is prolonged. PMID:26538857

  19. Reversal of idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: a cohort study in Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jiang-Feng; Xu, Hong-Li; Duan, Jin; Chen, Rong-Rong; Li, Li; Li, Bin; Nie, Min; Min, Le; Zhang, Hong-Bing; Wu, Xue-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Although idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) has traditionally been viewed as a life-long disease caused by a deficiency of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons, a portion of patients may gradually regain normal reproductive axis function during hormonal replacement therapy. The predictive factors for potential IHH reversal are largely unknown. The aim of our study was to investigate the incidence and clinical features of IHH male patients who had reversed reproductive axis function. In this retrospective cohort study, male IHH patients were classified into a reversal group (n = 18) and a nonreversal group (n = 336). Concentration of gonadotropins and testosterone, as well as testicle sizes and sperm counts, were determined. Of 354 IHH patients, 18 (5.1%) acquired normal reproductive function during treatment. The median age for reversal was 24 years old (range 21–34 years). Compared with the nonreversal group, the reversible group had higher basal luteinizing hormone (LH) (1.0 ± 0.7 IU l-1 vs 0.4 ± 0.4 IU l−1, P < 0.05) and stimulated LH (28.3 ± 22.6 IU l−1 vs 1.9 ± 1.1 IU l−1, P < 0.01) levels, as well as larger testicle size (5.1 ± 2.6 ml vs 1.5 ± 0.3 ml, P < 0.01), at the initial visit. In summary, larger testicle size and higher stimulated LH concentrations are favorite parameters for reversal. Our finding suggests that reversible patients may retain partially active reproductive axis function at initial diagnosis. PMID:25578938

  20. Identifying nutritional, functional, and quality of life correlates with male hypogonadism in advanced cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Fuoco, Domenico; di Tomasso, Jonathan; Boulos, Caroline; Kilgour, Robert D; Morais, Jose A; Borod, Manuel; Vigano, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    With the availability of a potential treatment to reverse male hypogonadism (MH), the primary aim of this case series study was to determine independent relationships between this condition and the nutritional, functional, and quality of life characteristics of advanced cancer patients (ACP). Free testosterone levels were measured in 100 male patients with advanced lung and gastrointestinal (GI) cancer. Routine blood markers of nutrition and inflammation, self-reporting questionnaires for symptom, nutrition, and functional status along with handgrip dynamometry were assessed for all patients at bedside. Almost half of this cohort underwent further assessments (body composition, lower body strength, in depth quality of life and fatigue questionnaires) at the McGill Nutrition and Performance Laboratory (mnupal.mcgill.ca). Multiple regression analyses were performed to identify independent correlations between free testosterone and the above measures. Seventy-six percent of patients were diagnosed with MH. Using multiple linear regression, low free testosterone (31.2 pmol/L) was independently associated with lower albumin (B = –3.8 g/L; 95% confidence interval CI –6.8:–0.8), muscle strength (–11.7 lbs; –20.4: –3.0) and mass in upper limbs (–0.8 kg; –1.4: –0.1), overall performance status (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Scale, ECOG PS 0.6; 0.1:1.1), cancer-related fatigue (Brief Fatigue Inventory, BFI 16.7; 2.0: 31.3), and overall quality of life (MQoL total score –1.42; –2.5: –0.3). Thus MH seems to be highly prevalent in ACP, and it is independently associated with important nutritional, functional, and quality of life characteristics in this patient population. PMID:26316882

  1. Efficacy and Outcome Predictors of Gonadotropin Treatment for Male Congenital Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhaoxiang; Mao, Jangfeng; Wu, Xueyan; Xu, Hongli; Wang, Xi; Huang, Bingkun; Zheng, Junjie; Nie, Min; Zhang, Hongbing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gonadotropin induces masculinization and spermatogenesis in men with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH). However, large cohort studies for the efficacy and reliable predictors of this therapy need to be conducted. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of gonadotropin treatment in a large cohort of male CHH patients and analyze putative predictors for successful spermatogenesis. This retrospective study included 223 CHH azoospermic patients without puberty development treated between 2005 and 2014. All patients received combined human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) and human menopausal gonadotropin (HMG) and were followed up for >6 months (5109 person-months). Serum total testosterone level, testicular size, spermatogenesis, and pregnancy outcome were recorded at each visit. After gonadotropin therapy, testicular size was enlarged from 2.1 ± 1.6 to 8.1 ± 4.6 mL (P < 0.001) and serum total testosterone was elevated from 0.9 ± 0.5 to 15.1 ± 8.2 nmol/L (P < 0.001). Spermatogenesis (>0/mL) occurred at a median period of 15 months (95% confidence interval 13.5–16.5). Larger basal testicular volume (P = 0.012) and noncryptorchidism history (P = 0.028) are independent predictors for earlier sperm appearance. Sixty four percent (143/223) of patients succeeded in producing sperms and the average time for initial sperm detection was 14 ± 8 months. However, their sperm concentrations (11.7 [2.1, 24.4] million/mL) and sperm progressive motility (A + B 36.9% ± 20.2%) are significantly lower than World Health Organization standards. Of the 34 patients who desired for fathering children, 19 patients impregnanted their partners during the treatment. Gonadotropin therapy induces spermatogenesis in male CHH patients. A larger basal testicular size and noncryptorchidism history are favorable indicators for earlier spermatogenesis. PMID:26945370

  2. The reproductive outcome of women with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism undergoing in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Saynur; Ozgu-Erdinc, A Seval; Yumusak, Omer; Kahyaoglu, Serkan; Seckin, Berna; Yilmaz, Nafiye

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reproductive outcome and assisted reproductive technology (ART) outcomes of patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) and to compare the results with male factor (MF) infertility patients. The reproductive outcome of 33 HH patients was evaluated retrospectively and compared with results of 47 patients with mild male factor infertility. For ovulation induction, human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG) was used in HH patients and recFSH was used in MF infertility patients. HH patients were divided into subgroups according to retrieved oocyte numbers and the groups were compared with each other. The main outcome measures were total gonadotropin dose used, duration of stimulation, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) day estradiol level and endometrial thickness, oocyte number retrieved, and rate of clinical pregnancy. ART outcomes and cycle characteristics of 33 HH patients were compared with 47 MF infertility patients. There was no difference in age and body mass index (BMI) between the groups, but mean follicle stimulating hormone FSH and luteinizing hormone LH levels were significantly lower in the HH group (p < 0.001). Duration of stimulation was 12.5 ± 2.06 days in the HH patients and 10.08 ± 1.62 days in the MF infertility patients and the difference was significant (p < 0.001). Total gonadotropin dose used was higher in the HH group than the MF infertility group (p < 0.001). However, there were no differences in hCG day estradiol levels, endometrial thickness on hCG day, total oocyte number retrieved, MII oocyte number, and pregnancy rate. In the HH subgroups, patient ages were significantly lower in the >15 oocyte retrieved group. Although patients with HH have a long-term estrogen deficiency, their response to controlled ovarian hyperstimulation treatment is similar to normal women. However, the HH group is heterogeneous and estimating the ovarian reserve before treatment is not always possible in

  3. Prevalence of Olfactory and Other Developmental Anomalies in Patients with Central Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Della Valle, Elisa; Vezzani, Silvia; Rochira, Vincenzo; Granata, Antonio Raffaele Michele; Madeo, Bruno; Genovese, Elisabetta; Pignatti, Elisa; Marino, Marco; Carani, Cesare; Simoni, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) is a heterogeneous disease caused by mutations in several genes. Based on the presence of hyposmia/anosmia it is distinguished into Kallmann syndrome (KS) and isolated HH. The prevalence of other developmental anomalies is not well established. Methods: We studied 36 patients with HH (31 males, 5 females, mean age 41.5), 9 with familial and 27 with sporadic HH (33 congenital, 3 adult-onset), by physical examination, smell test (BSIT Sensonics), audiometry, renal ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging of the olfactory structures. Results: Based on the smell test, patients were classified as normosmic (n = 21, 58.3%) and hypo/anosmic (n = 15, 41.6%). Hypoplasia/agenesis of olfactory bulbs was found in 40% of patients (10/25; 75% hypo/anosmic, 7.6% normosmic, p < 0.01, Fisher’s test). Remarkably, olfactory structures were normal in two anosmic patients, while one normosmic patient presented a unilateral hypoplastic bulb. Fourteen of 33 patients (42.4%) presented neurosensorial hearing loss of various degrees (28.5% hypo/anosmic, 52.6% normosmic, p = NS). Renal ultrasound revealed 27.7% of cases with renal anomalies (26.6% hypo/anosmic, 28.5% normosmic, p = NS). At least one midline defect was found in 50% of the patients (53.3% hypo/anosmic, 47.6% normosmic, p = NS), including abnormal palate, dental anomalies, pectus excavatum, bimanual synkinesis, iris coloboma, and absent nasal cartilage. Anamnestically 4/31 patients reported cryptorchidism (25% hypo/anosmic, 5.2% normosmic, p = NS). Conclusion: Hypo/anosmia is significantly related to anatomical anomalies of the olfactory bulbs/tracts but the prevalence of other developmental anomalies, especially midline defects and neurosensorial hearing loss, is high both in HH and KS and independent of the presence of anosmia/hyposmia. From the clinical standpoint KS and normosmic HH should be considered as the same complex, developmental

  4. Effects of testosterone replacement therapy withdrawal and re-treatment in hypogonadal elderly men upon obesity, voiding function and prostate safety parameters.

    PubMed

    Yassin, Aksam; Nettleship, Joanne E; Talib, Raidh A; Almehmadi, Yousef; Doros, Gheorge

    2016-01-01

    Whether testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) is a lifelong treatment for men with hypogonadism remains unknown. We investigated long-term TRT and TRT withdrawal on obesity and prostate-related parameters. Two hundred and sixty-two hypogonadal patients (mean age 59.5) received testosterone undecanoate in 12-week intervals for a maximum of 11 years. One hundred and forty-seven men had TRT interrupted for a mean of 16.9 months and resumed thereafter (Group A). The remaining 115 patients were treated continuously (Group B). Prostate volume, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), residual voiding volume, bladder wall thickness, C-reactive protein (CRP), aging male symptoms (AMS), International Index of erectile function - erectile function (IIEF-EF) and International Prostate Symptoms Scores (IPSS) were measured over the study period with anthropometric parameters of obesity, including weight, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference. Prior to interruption, TRT resulted in improvements in residual voiding volume, bladder wall thickness, CRP, AMS, IIEF-EF, IPSS and obesity parameters while PSA and prostate volume increased. TRT interruption reduced total testosterone to hypogonadal levels in Group A and resulted in worsening of obesity parameters, AMS, IPSS, residual voiding volume and bladder wall thickness, IIEF-EF and PSA while CRP and prostate volume were unchanged until treatment resumed whereby these effects were reversed. TRT interruption results in worsening of symptoms. Hypogonadism may require lifelong TRT. PMID:26742589

  5. Genetic analysis of NR0B1 in congenital adrenal hypoplasia patients: identification of a rare regulatory variant resulting in congenital adrenal hypoplasia and hypogonadal hypogonadism without testicular carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Walker, A P; Fowkes, R C; Saleh, F; Kim, S-H; Wilkinson, P; Cabrera-Sharp, V; Talmud, P J; Humphries, S E; Looijenga, L H J; Bouloux, P M G

    2012-01-01

    There have been few testicular histology reports of adult patients with congenital adrenal hypoplasia/hypogonadal hypogonadism (AHC/HH), but Leydig cell hyperplasia has been observed, an indicator of the possibility of malignant transformation. We aimed to define the basis of AHC/HH in 4 pedigrees of different ethnic backgrounds. One patient was elected to have testicular biopsy which was examined for evidence of carcinoma in situ (CIS). NR0B1 mutation analysis was performed by sequence analysis. NR0B1 expression was investigated by RT-PCR. Testicular biopsy sections were stained with HE or immunostained for OCT3/4, an established marker of CIS. We identified NR0B1 variants in the 4 AHC pedigrees: pedigree 1 (United Arab Emirates), c.1130A>G predicting p.(Glu377Gly); pedigree 2 (English Caucasian), c.327C>A predicting p.(Cys109*); pedigree 3 (Oman), a 6-bp deletion of a direct repeat, c.857_862delTGGTGC predicting p.(Leu286_Val287del); pedigree 4 (English Caucasian), c.1168+1G>A, a regulatory variant within the NR0B1 splice donor site. This last male patient, aged 30 years, presented with evidence of HH but incomplete gonadotrophin deficiency, following an earlier diagnosis of Addison's disease at 3 years. Hormonal therapy induced virilisation. Testicular biopsy was performed. The c.1168+1G>A variant abrogated normal splicing of testicular mRNA. Histological examination showed poorly organised testicular architecture and absence of spermatozoa. Morphological analyses and the absence of immunohistochemical staining for OCT3/4 excluded the presence of malignant germ cell cancer and its precursor lesion, CIS. These studies add to the knowledge of the types and ethnic diversity of NR0B1 mutations and their associated phenotypes, and provide insight into the assessment and interpretation of testicular histology in AHC and HH. PMID:23018754

  6. Causes of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism predict response to gonadotropin substitution in adults.

    PubMed

    Rohayem, J; Sinthofen, N; Nieschlag, E; Kliesch, S; Zitzmann, M

    2016-01-01

    Germ cell and Sertoli cell proliferation and maturation in human testes occur in three main waves, during the late fetal and early neonatal period and at early puberty. They are triggered by periods of increased activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. In hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH), these processes are variably disturbed. The objective of this study was to explore whether success of gonadotropin replacement in HH men is predictable by the origin of HH, indicating time of onset and severity of GnRH/gonadotropin deficiency. The data of 51 adult HH patients who had undergone one cycle of hCG/FSH treatment were reviewed. Five groups were established, according to the underlying HH origin. Therapeutic success by final bi-testicular volumes (BTVs) final sperm concentrations (SC) and conception rates were compared and related to baseline parameters, indicative of the degree of HPG-axis disruption. Overall, BTVs rose from 13 ± 15 to 27 ± 15 mL, spermatogenesis was induced in 98%, with mean SCs of 15 ± 30 mill/mL, spontaneous pregnancies in 37% and additional 18% via intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Kallmann syndrome patients had the poorest responses (BTV: 16.9 ± 10 mL; SC: 3.5 ± 5.6 mill/mL), followed by patients with congenital/infancy-acquired multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies (MPHD) and patients with HH+absent puberty (BTV: 21 ± 14/24 ± 9 mL; SC: 5.5 ± 6.5/ 14.5 ± 23.8 mill/mL). HH men with pubertal arrest and with post-pubertally acquired MPHD had the best results (BTV: 36 ± 14/38 ± 16 mL; SC: 25.4 ± 34.2/29.9 ± 50.5 mill/mL). Earlier conception after 20.3 ± 11.5 months (vs. 43.1 ± 43.8; p = 0.047) of gonadotropin treatment with higher pregnancy rates (62% vs. 42%) was achieved in the two post-pubertally acquired HH subgroups, compared to the three pre-pubertally acquired. Therapeutic success was higher in patients without previously undescended testes, with higher baseline BTVs

  7. Acquired Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism (AHH) in Thalassaemia Major Patients: An Underdiagnosed Condition?

    PubMed Central

    De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Elsedfy, Heba; Soliman, Ashraf T; Elhakim, Ihab Zaki; Pepe, Alessia; Kattamis, Christos; Soliman, Nada A.; Elalaily, Rania; El Kholy, Mohamed; Yassin, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In males, acquired hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (AHH) includes all disorders that damage or alter the function of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons and/or pituitary gonadotroph cells. The clinical characteristics of AHH are androgen deficiency and lack, delay or halt of pubertal sexual maturation. AHH lead to decreased libido, impaired erectile function, and strength, a worsened sense of well-being and degraded quality of life (QOL). Patients and methods We studied 11 adult men with thalassemia major (TM) aged between 26 to 54 years (mean ± SD: 34.3 ± 8.8 years) with AHH. Twelve age- and sex-matched TM patients with normal pubertal development were used as a control group. All patients were on regular transfusions and iron chelation therapy. Fasting venous blood samples were collected two weeks after transfusion to measure serum concentrations of IGF-1, free thyroxine (FT4), thyrotropin (TSH), cortisol, luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), total testosterone (TT), prolactin and estradiol (E2), glucose, urea, creatinine and electrolytes (including calcium and phosphate). Liver functions and screening for hepatitis C virus seropositivity (HCVab and HCV-RNA) were performed. Iron status was assessed by measuring serum ferritin levels, and evaluation of iron concentrations in the liver (LIC) and heart using MRI- T2*. Bone mineral density was measured at the lumbar spine (L1–L4) for all patients with AHH by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) using Hologic QDR 4000 machine. Results The mean basal serum LH and FSH concentrations in AHH patients were 2.4 ± 2.2 IU/L and 1.2 ± 0.9 IU/L respectively; these, values were significantly lower compared to the control group. Semen analysis in 5 patients with AHH showed azoospermia in 3 and oligoasthenozoospermia in 2. The percentage of patients with serum ferritin level >2000 ng/ml (severe iron load) was significantly higher in AHH patients compared to controls, 5/11 (45

  8. A duplication of distal Xp associated with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, hypoplastic external genitalia, mental retardation, and multiple congenital abnormalities.

    PubMed Central

    Telvi, L; Ion, A; Carel, J C; Desguerre, I; Piraud, M; Boutin, A M; Feingold, J; Ponsot, G; Fellous, M; McElreavey, K

    1996-01-01

    An unusual familial case of three sibs with a partial duplication of distal Xp sequences is described. The proband, an 18 year old boy, showed mental retardation, severe dysmorphic features, hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism (HHG), and hypoplastic external genitalia. His karyotype was 46,Y,inv dup(X) (p22.11-->p 22.32). The proband has two sisters each with the same inv dup(Xp) chromosome. Both sisters presented with short stature but were otherwise phenotypically normal. The abnormal X chromosome was inactive in the majority of cells examined. Southern blot dosage analysis indicated a duplication of distal Xp sequences. The proximal breakpoint is located between DXS28 and DXS41, and is therefore at least 2 Mb distal to the DSS locus. The relationship between the phenotype and the Xp duplication is discussed. Images PMID:8880579

  9. Loss of lean body and muscle mass correlates with androgen levels in hypogonadal men with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and wasting.

    PubMed

    Grinspoon, S; Corcoran, C; Lee, K; Burrows, B; Hubbard, J; Katznelson, L; Walsh, M; Guccione, A; Cannan, J; Heller, H; Basgoz, N; Klibanski, A

    1996-11-01

    The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) wasting syndrome (AWS) is a devastating complication of human immunodeficiency virus infection characterized by a disproportionate decrease in lean body mass. The pathogenesis of the AWS is unknown, but recent data suggest that endogenous secretion of the potent anabolic hormone, testosterone; is decreased in 30-50% of men with AIDS. However, it is unknown whether decreased androgen levels are associated with decreased lean body mass and/or functional decreases in muscle strength and aerobic capacity in hypogonadal men with the AWS. In addition, testosterone is known to have stimulatory effects on GH secretion, and the loss of these effects on the GH-insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) axis may be an additional mechanism of decreased lean body mass in this population. Twenty hypogonadal subjects (free-testosterone < 12 pg/mL) with weight loss > 10% of preillness weight or absolute weight < 90% ideal body weight (IBW) were enrolled in the study. None of the subjects were receiving Megace. Lean body mass and fat-free mass were determined by potassium-40 isotope analysis (40K) and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, respectively, and analyzed with respect to gonadal function by linear regression analysis. Muscle mass was determined by urinary creatinine excretion, and exercise functional capacity was assessed by a 6-min walk test, a sit-to-stand test, and a timed get-up-and-go test. Results also were compared with gonadal function by regression analysis. IGF-I and mean overnight GH levels, determined from frequent sampling (q20 min from 2000-0800 h), were compared with results obtained from age- and sex-matched normal controls. Subjects were 26-58 yr of age (39 +/- 7 yr, mean +/- SD) with a CD4 cell count of 150 +/- 186 cells/mm3. Serum levels of FSH were elevated in 30% of the subjects. Muscle mass was significantly reduced, compared with expected mass for height (23.3 +/- 5.5 vs. 29.3 +/- 1.7 kg, P = 0.0001) and was

  10. Recombinant human growth hormone and recombinant human insulin-like growth factor I diminish the catabolic effects of hypogonadism in man: metabolic and molecular effects.

    PubMed

    Hayes, V Y; Urban, R J; Jiang, J; Marcell, T J; Helgeson, K; Mauras, N

    2001-05-01

    Severe gonadal androgen deficiency can have profound catabolic effects in man. Hypogonadal men develop a loss of lean body mass, increased adiposity, and decreased muscle strength despite normal GH and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) concentrations. We designed these studies to investigate whether GH or IGF-I administration to male subjects with profound hypogonadism can diminish or abolish the catabolic effects of testosterone deficiency. Moreover, we also examined the nature of the interactions among GH, IGF-I, and androgens in specific genes of the im system. A group of 13 healthy subjects (mean age, 22 +/- 1 yr) was studied at baseline (D1) and 10 weeks after being made hypogonadal using a GnRH analog (GnRHa; D2). At 6 weeks from baseline they were started on either recombinant human (rh) IGF-I (60 microg/kg, sc, twice daily) or rhGH (12.5 microg/kg, sc, daily) for 4 weeks. On each study day subjects had infusions of L-[(13)C]leucine; indirect calorimetry; isokinetic dynamometry of the knee extensors; determination of body composition (dual energy x-ray absortiometry) and hormone and growth factor concentrations, as well as percutaneous muscle biopsies. Their data were compared with those of previously studied male subjects who received only GNRHA: Administration of rhIGF-I and rhGH to the hypogonadal men had similar effects on whole body metabolism, with maintenance of protein synthesis rates, fat oxidation rates, and fat-free mass compared with the eugonadal state, preventing the decline observed with hypogonadism alone. This was further amplified by the molecular assessment of important genes in muscle function. During rhIGF-I treatment, im expression of IGF-I declined, and IGF-binding protein-4 increased, similar to the changes during GnRHa alone. However, rhGH administration was associated with a marked increase in IGF-I and androgen receptor messenger ribonucleic acid concentrations in skeletal muscle with a reciprocal decline in IGF-binding protein

  11. Gut Endotoxin Leading to a Decline IN Gonadal function (GELDING) - a novel theory for the development of late onset hypogonadism in obese men.

    PubMed

    Tremellen, Kelton

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is an increasing public health problem, with two-thirds of the adult population in many Western countries now being either overweight or obese. Male obesity is associated with late onset hypogonadism, a condition characterised by decreased serum testosterone, sperm quality plus diminished fertility and quality of life. In this paper we propose a novel theory underlying the development of obesity related hypogonadism- the GELDING theory (Gut Endotoxin Leading to a Decline IN Gonadal function). Several observational studies have previously reported an association between obesity related hypogonadism (low testosterone) and systemic inflammation. However, for the first time we postulate that the trans-mucosal passage of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from the gut lumen into the circulation is a key inflammatory trigger underlying male hypogonadism. Obesity and a high fat/high calorie diet are both reported to result in changes to gut bacteria and intestinal wall permeability, leading to the passage of bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide- LPS) from within the gut lumen into the circulation (metabolic endotoxaemia), where it initiates systemic inflammation. Endotoxin is known to reduce testosterone production by the testis, both by direct inhibition of Leydig cell steroidogenic pathways and indirectly by reducing pituitary LH drive, thereby also leading to a decline in sperm production. In this paper we also highlight the novel evolutionary benefits of the GELDING theory. Testosterone is known to be a powerful immune-suppressive, decreasing a man's ability to fight infection. Therefore we postulate that the male reproductive axis has evolved the capacity to lower testosterone production during times of infection and resulting endotoxin exposure, decreasing the immunosuppressive influence of testosterone, in turn enhancing the ability to fight infection. While this response is adaptive in times of sepsis, it becomes maladaptive in the setting of "non

  12. Validation of the German version of the 'Hypogonadism Related Symptom Scale' (HRS) in andrological patients with infertility, HIV infection and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alidjanov, J; Wolf, J; Schuppe, H-C; Weidner, W; Diemer, T; Linn, T; Halefeldt, I; Wagenlehner, F; Wiltink, J; Pilatz, A

    2014-12-01

    As commonly used self-reported screening instruments for male hypogonadism demonstrated lack of specificity, a Hypogonadism Related Symptom Scale (HRS) was developed in 2009 as a novel self-rating screening tool. As the questionnaire has not been validated, the purpose of our study was to perform a validation in patients presenting with different disorders (e.g. infertility, HIV infection or metabolic syndrome) and disease-related risk to develop hypogonadism. Two hundred and eighteen patients aged 19-71 years (40.1 ± 9.5) who completed the HRS and other common questionnaires [International Index Of Erectile Function (IIEF), National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), short form (SF)-12] were included. In all patients, blood levels of total testosterone, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, oestradiol and sex hormone-binding globulin were determined and free testosterone was calculated. Cronbach's α for the scale was 0.896, split-half 0.871 for the 1st half and 0.807 for the 2nd half. Spearman-Brown coefficient was 0.767, and Guttman split-half coefficient was 0.759. Consistent correlations were found between HRS and IIEF5 (ρ = 0.57, P < 0.001), and HADS (ρ = -0.6, P < 0.001). In addition, HRS was significantly correlated with total testosterone (ρ = 0.135, P < 0.05), free testosterone (ρ = 0.148, P < 0.05) and oestradiol (ρ = -0.134, P < 0.05). Our validation study confirms the data from the initial development of the HRS questionnaire. Clinicians might have an additional advantage from the HRS when investigating males with suspected hypogonadism. PMID:24387031

  13. Vanishing testes syndrome-related osteoporosis and high cardio-metabolic risk in an adult male with long term untreated hypergonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Carsote, Mara; Capatina, Cristina; Valea, Ana; Dumitrascu, Anda

    2016-02-01

    The male hypogonadism-related bone mass loss is often under diagnosed. Peak bone mass is severely affected if the hypogonadism occurs during puberty and is left untreated. We present an interesting; almost bizarre case of a male with non-functional testes early during childhood and undiagnosed and untreated hypogonadism until his fifth decade of life. Forty six year male is referred for goitre, complaining of back pain. Phenotype suggested intersexuality: gynoid proportions, micropenis, no palpable testes into the scrotum, no facial or truncal hair. His medical history had been unremarkable until the previous year when primary hypothyroidism was diagnosed and levothyroxine replacement was initiated. Later, he was diagnosed with ischemic heart disease, with inaugural unstable angina. On admission, the testosterone was 0.2 ng/mL (normal: 1.7-7.8 ng/mL), FSH markedly increased (56 mUI/mL), with normal adrenal axis, and TSH (under thyroxine replacement). High bone turnover markers, and blood cholesterol, and impaired glucose tolerance were diagnosed. The testes were not present in the scrotum. Abdominal computed tomography suggested bilateral masses of 1.6 cm diameter within the abdominal fat that were removed but no gonadal tissue was confirmed histopathologically. Vanishing testes syndrome was confirmed. The central DXA showed lumbar bone mineral density of 0.905 g/cm2, Z-score of -2.9SD. The spine profile X-Ray revealed multiple thoracic vertebral fractures. Alendronate therapy together with vitamin D and calcium supplements and trans-dermal testosterone were started. Four decades of hypogonadism associate increased cardiac risk, as well as decreased bone mass and high fracture risk. PMID:26909487

  14. Lean tissue mass and energy expenditure are retained in hypogonadal men with spinal cord injury after discontinuation of testosterone replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, William A.; La Fountaine, Michael F.; Cirnigliaro, Christopher M.; Kirshblum, Steven C.; Spungen, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether favorable changes to lean tissue mass (LTM), resting energy expenditure (REE), and testosterone (T) that occurred with 12 months of physiological testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) were retained 6 months after discontinuing treatment. Design Prospective, open-label, controlled drug intervention trial. Setting Metropolitan area hospitals. Subjects Eugonadal (n = 11) and hypogonadal (n = 13) men with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). Interventions Hypogonadal subjects received a 5 or 10 mg transdermal T patch daily for 12 months, with adjustment of the dose to normalize the serum T concentration; TRT was discontinued after 12 months (TRT-12M) and subjects were followed for an additional 6 months and re-evaluated (Post-TRT). Total body dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and blood draws were performed at baseline (BL) prior to TRT, TRT-12M, and Post-TRT. Eugonadal subjects did not receive treatment and were evaluated at comparable time points. Results There were no significant differences between groups prior to TRT at BL for any of the study endpoints. In the hypogonadal group, a significant increase in LTM was observed from BL to TRT-12M (50.2 ± 7.4 vs. 52.9 ± 6.8 kg, P < 0.01), which persisted Post-TRT compared to BL (52.2 ± 7.8 kg, P < 0.05). The increase in REE from BL to TRT-12M (1283 ± 246 vs. 1410 ± 250 kcal/day) was also retained at Post-TRT (1393 ± 220 kcal/day). These sustained improvements in LTM and REE after termination of anabolic hormonal therapy may be associated with persistent beneficial effects on health and physical function of hypogonadal men with chronic SCI. PMID:24968251

  15. [Effect of testosterone on the in vitro proliferation of bone marrow granulocyte-macrophage cells (CFU-GM). II. Observations in hypogonadal subjects].

    PubMed

    De Caro, L; Ghizzi, A

    1989-03-01

    CFU-GM cultures in agar double layers were performed from bone marrow unfractionated cells of four subjects with hypogonadism, before and 24 hours after acute administration of 100 mg of testosterone propionate (Tp). Cell aggregates (CA) of CFU-GM were classified according to their sizes (P1 = 3-10 cells; P2 = 11-30; P3 = 31-50; P4 = over 50 cells) and according to their appearance time in culture (CA-A: appearing at the 7th day; CA-C: appearing only at the 12th day). The total of proliferating progenitors (tPP) also embraces CA present, in the same microscopic field, on both scoring times (CA-B). In all hypogonadal men studied, the treatment with Tp yielded increase of tPP (on the average of 65%) and increase of the total number of cells appeared in culture (TCP, increase on the average of 82%) calculated as product [CA number] x [average size of CA]. These results are in agreement with those already observed by us in CFU-GM cultures of normal subjects. Yet it is interesting to note that, while in normal subjects the exogenous testosterone effect expresses itself with a higher increase of CFU-GM number in the second interval of culture (CA-C), in hypogonadal men the CFU-GM number increase occurs mostly in the first period of the culture (CA-A).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2765242

  16. The Effect of Testosterone Replacement Therapy on Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Levels in Men Being Treated for Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Kang, De-Ying; Li, Hong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Testosterone replacement therapy is used for the treatment of age-related male hypogonadism, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a primary screening tool for prostate cancer. The systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to determine the effect of testosterone replacement therapy on PSA levels. Medline, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases were searched until February 28, 2014, and inclusion criteria were as follows: randomized controlled trial; intervention group received testosterone/androgen replacement therapy; control group did not receive treatment; and no history of prostate cancer. The primary outcome was change of PSA level between before and after treatment. Secondary outcomes were elevated PSA level after treatment, and the number of patients who developed prostate cancer. After initially identifying 511 articles, 15 studies with a total of 739 patients that received testosterone replacement and 385 controls were included. The duration of treatment ranged from 3 to 12 months. Patients treated with testosterone tended to have higher PSA levels, and thus a greater change than those that received control treatments (difference in means of PSA levels = 0.154, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.069 to 0.238, P < 0.001). The difference in means of PSA levels were significant higher for patients that received testosterone intramuscularly (IM) than controls (difference in means of PSA levels = 0.271, 95% CI 0.117–0.425, P = 0.001). Elevated PSA levels after treatment were similar between patients that received treatment and controls (odds ratio [OR] = 1.02, 95% CI 0.48–2.20, P = 0.953). Only 3 studies provided data with respect to the development of prostate cancer, and rates were similar between those that received treatment and controls. Testosterone replacement therapy does not increase PSA levels in men being treated for hypogonadism, except when it is given IM and even the increase with IM administration

  17. Psychosexual Development in Men with Congenital Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism on Long-Term Treatment: A Mixed Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Andrew A; Quinton, Richard; Pitteloud, Nelly; Morin, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) is a rare, genetic, reproductive endocrine disorder characterized by absent puberty and infertility. Limited information is available on the psychosocial impact of CHH and psychosexual development in these patients. Aim The aim of this study was to determine the impact of CHH on psychosexual development in men on long-term treatment. Methods A sequential mixed methods explanatory design was used. First, an online survey (quantitative) was used to quantify the frequency of psychosexual problems among CHH men. Second, patient focus groups (qualitative) were conducted to explore survey findings in detail and develop a working model to guide potential nursing and interdisciplinary interventions. Main Outcome Measures Patient characteristics, frequency of body shame, difficulty with intimate relationships, and never having been sexually active were assessed. Additionally, we collected subjective patient-reported outcomes regarding the impact of CHH on psychological/emotional well-being, intimate relationships, and sexual activity. Results A total of 101 CHH men on long-term treatment (>1 year) were included for the analysis of the online survey (mean age 37 ± 11 years, range 19–66, median 36). Half (52/101, 51%) of the men had been seen at a specialized academic center and 37/101 (37%) reported having had fertility-inducing treatment. A high percentage of CHH men experience psychosexual problems including difficulty with intimate relationships (70%) and body image concerns/body shame (94/101, 93%), and the percentage of men never having been sexually active is five times the rate in a reference group (26% vs. 5.4%, P < 0.001). Focus groups revealed persisting body shame and low self-esteem despite long-term treatment that has lasting impact on psychosexual functioning. Conclusions CHH men frequently experience psychosexual problems that pose barriers to intimate relationships and initiating sexual

  18. A de novo mutation of DAX1 in a boy with congenital adrenal hypoplasia without hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun Lin; Fen, Zhu Wei; Liang, Li

    2014-03-01

    We report the case of a 12-year-old boy with a de novo mutation in the DAX1 gene (for dosage-sensitive sex reversal, congenital adrenal hypoplasia critical region on the X chromosome, gene 1; also called NROB1). He was born at term, Addison's disease was diagnosed at 8 years with a salt-wasting syndrome, and then hydrocortisone substitution was taken; the child continued to develop normally. A reoccurrence of salt-wasting syndrome usually happened after an episode of an abrupt withdrawal of hydrocortisone substitution. Because of adrenal insufficiency without hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, he came to the clinic at 12 years of age and hypoplasia of adrenal glands was found by MRI scans. We proposed the diagnosis of congenital adrenal hypoplasia in this patient and identified a hemizygous mutation (c.999_1000insCTCA, p.Leu335ThrfsX389) in exon 1 of the DAX1 gene. To our knowledge, it is a de novo mutation that leads to a frame-shift, a premature stop codon. In conclusion, it is very important to identify mutation in the DAX1 gene for a boy with adrenal insufficiency of unknown etiology. PMID:24197767

  19. The Relationship between Periodontal Status and Alkaline Phosphatase Levels in Gingival Crevicular Fluid in Men with Hypergonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Saygun, Işıl; Daltaban, Özlem; Bal, Belgin; Bolu, Erol

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this preliminary study was to determine the possible relationship between alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and periodontal disease in men with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism (HH). Materials and Methods A total of 41 patients were divided into four groups. 9 with HH and periodontitis (P/HH), 11 with HH and gingivitis (G/HH), 12 with systemically healthy and periodontally healthy (H/C) and 9 with systemically healthy and periodontitis (P/C). The clinical evaluation of patients was based on the following parameters; the plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), probing depths (PD) and attachment level (AL). The levels of ALP in the GCF were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results No significant difference could be detected in the mean clinical parameter data between the P/HH and P/C groups (p > 0.05). The periodontitis patients in both groups (P/C and P/HH) had higher mean probing depths than the H/C and G/HH patients (p < 0.001). The concentrations and total amounts of ALP in the GCF were significantly higher in both periodontitis groups compared to healthy and gingivitis groups (p < 0.01). The serum ALP levels were significantly higher in the P/HH group when compared to the other groups (p < 0.001). Conclusion The findings of this study suggested that HH could be implicated as a contributing factor to the progress of periodontal disease. PMID:18306472

  20. Changes in Bone Mineral Density and Metabolic Parameters after Pulsatile Gonadorelin Treatment in Young Men with Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chen-Xi; Tang, Song-Tao; Zhang, Qiu

    2015-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of osteoporosis in young men with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) and to investigate the changes of BMD and metabolic parameters, a total of 22 young male patients with HH and 20 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. BMD, biochemical, and hormonal parameters were measured in two groups. Osteoporosis was more prevalent in HH patients (45.45%) than the control subjects (10.00%) (P < 0.001). The patients with HH had lower BMD in lumbar spine 2–4, femoral neck, and total hip (P < 0.001, for all) and higher fasting insulin (P = 0.001), HOMA-IR (P = 0.002), and SHBG (P < 0.001) compared to the controls. After 6 months of pulsatile gonadorelin treatment, BMI (P = 0.021) and BMD in lumbar spine 2–4, femoral neck, and total hip (P = 0.002, P = 0.003, and P = 0.003, resp.) increased dramatically and total cholesterol (P = 0.034), fasting insulin (P = 0.025), HOMA-IR (P = 0.021), and SHBG (P = 0.001) decreased significantly in HH patients. The study shows a higher prevalence of osteoporosis in young men with HH. Long-term pulsatile gonadorelin treatment indicates a positive effect on BMD and metabolic parameters of HH patients. PMID:26417369

  1. A physiological mode of puberty induction in hypogonadal girls by low dose transdermal 17 beta-oestradiol.

    PubMed

    Illig, R; DeCampo, C; Lang-Muritano, M R; Prader, A; Torresani, T; Werder, E A; Willi, U; Schenkel, L

    1990-12-01

    Transdermal 17 beta-oestradiol administration (17 beta-E2), used mainly in menopausal women, allows a continuous 17 beta-E2 delivery through the skin into the systemic circulation, avoiding intestinal and hepatic passage. In order to explore whether transdermal 17 beta-E2 could be used for the induction of puberty, 17 beta-E2 patches with low dose delivery were administered in nine prepubertal girls with Turner syndrome (bone age greater than 10.5 years) for a mean period of 2.2 years. Treatment schedule: 5 micrograms/day for 6-9 months, 10 micrograms/day for 6-9 months, 25 micrograms/day for long-term substitution; addition of cyclic gestagen p.o. after 18-24 months. Breast development started within 3 months of therapy and menstruation occurred after 2 years. Growth rate increased from 3.2 to 5.0 cm/year during the 1st year of therapy, height prediction did not change. Serum oestradiol (E2) and urinary E2 conjugates increased proportionally with 17 beta-E2 doses, serum oestrone (E1) rose much less. The possibility to imitate time course, clinical events and hormonal changes of normal puberty, the absence of adverse drug reactions and the excellent acceptance and easy mode of application suggest that transdermal 17 beta-E2 is optimally suited for hormonal substitution in girls with hypogonadism. PMID:2126236

  2. Successful use of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analog for the treatment of tertiary hypogonadism (GnRH deficiency) in a 5-year-old Belgian Blue bull.

    PubMed

    Contri, Alberto; Gloria, Alessia; Wegher, Laura; Carluccio, Augusto

    2012-01-01

    A bull was referred for a progressive oligoasthenotheratozoospermia that resulted in a unsuitable seminal quality for the cryopreservation. Breeding soundness evaluation results suggested gonadal dysfunction. Because of the lack of normal ranges for these hormones in the bull, in this study, the hypogonadism and the site of the dysfunction (hypothalamus) were diagnosed by the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation test. The evaluation of pituitary and testicular responsiveness by a GnRH stimulating test revealed a responsiveness of the pituitary and testis, thus a secondary hypogonadism (hypothalamic hypogonadism) was postulated and a therapeutic approach based on the subcutaneous administration of GnRH analog was attempted. An increase in semen volume, concentration and sperm characteristics were detected 9 weeks after the start of the treatment, corroborating the hypothalamic origin of the disease and the useful of the GnRH therapy. PMID:22493993

  3. Effects of bariatric surgery on male obesity-associated secondary hypogonadism: comparison of laparoscopic gastric bypass with restrictive procedures.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Berniza; Galdón, Alba; Calañas, Alfonso; Peromingo, Roberto; Galindo, Julio; García-Moreno, Francisca; Rodriguez-Velasco, Gloria; Martín-Hidalgo, Antonia; Vazquez, Clotilde; Escobar-Morreale, Héctor F; Botella-Carretero, José I

    2014-10-01

    Bariatric surgery results in the complete resolution of male obesity-associated secondary hypogonadism (MOSH) in many patients. However, the effects of different bariatric surgical procedures on male sexual hormone profiles and sexual dysfunction have not been compared to date. We compared the pre- and post-operative (at least 6 months after initial surgery) sex hormone profiles of 20 severely obese men submitted to laparoscopic gastric bypass (LGB) with 15 similar patients submitted to restrictive techniques (sleeve gastrectomy in 10 and adjustable gastric banding in 5). We calculated free testosterone (FT) levels from total testosterone (TT) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations. Fasting glucose and insulin levels served for homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMAIR). MOSH was present in 25 and 16 of the 35 patients when considering TT and FT concentrations respectively, resolving after surgery in all but one of them. When considering all obese men as a whole, patients submitted to LGB or restrictive procedures did not differ in terms of excess weight loss, in the decrease of fasting glucose and insulin, HOMAIR and waist circumference, or in the increase of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, TT and FT levels. The improvement in TT correlated with the decrease in fasting glucose (r = -0.390, P = 0.021), insulin (r = -0.425, P = 0.015) and HOMAIR (r = -0.380, P = 0.029), and with the increase in SHBG (r = 0.692, P < 0.001). The increase in FT correlated with the decrease in fasting glucose (r = -0.360, P = 0.034). LGB and restrictive techniques are equally effective in producing a remission of MOSH. PMID:24664512

  4. Identification of late-onset hypogonadism in middle-aged and elderly men from a community of China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Yong; Zhou, Ren-Yuan; Lu, Xin; Zeng, Qin-Song; Wang, Hui-Qing; Li, Zheng; Sun, Ying-Hao

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the essential criteria for late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) syndrome based on the presence of symptoms associated with low testosterone levels in Han Chinese men. Blood tests for total testosterone (TT) and sex hormone–binding globulin (SHBG) were performed, and the aging male symptoms (AMS) questionnaire was conducted in a randomly selected cohort composed of 944 Chinese men aged 40 to 79 years from nine urban communities. Three sexual symptoms (decreased ability/frequency of sexual activity, decreased number of morning erections, and decreased libido) were confirmed to be related to the total and free testosterone levels. The thresholds for TT were approximately 12.55 nmol l−1 for a decreased ability/frequency to perform sex, 12.55 nmol l−1 for decreased frequency of morning erections, and 14.35 nmol l−1 for decreased sexual desire. The calculated free testosterone (CFT) thresholds for these three sexual symptoms were 281.14, 264.90, and 287.21 pmol l−1, respectively. TT <13.21 nmol l−1 (OR = 1.4, 95%CI: 1.0–1.9, P = 0.037) or CFT <268.89 pmol l−1 (OR = 1.5, 95%CI: 1.1–20, P = 0.020) was associated with an increase in the aforementioned three sexual symptoms. The prevalence of LOH was 9.1% under the criteria, including all three sexual symptoms with TT levels <13.21 nmol l−1 and CFT levels <268.89 pmol l−1. Our results may improve the diagnostic accuracy of LOH in older men. PMID:26354142

  5. Identification of late-onset hypogonadism in middle-aged and elderly men from a community of China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Yong; Zhou, Ren-Yuan; Lu, Xin; Zeng, Qin-Song; Wang, Hui-Qing; Li, Zheng; Sun, Ying-Hao

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the essential criteria for late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) syndrome based on the presence of symptoms associated with low testosterone levels in Han Chinese men. Blood tests for total testosterone (TT) and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) were performed, and the aging male symptoms (AMS) questionnaire was conducted in a randomly selected cohort composed of 944 Chinese men aged 40 to 79 years from nine urban communities. Three sexual symptoms (decreased ability/frequency of sexual activity, decreased number of morning erections, and decreased libido) were confirmed to be related to the total and free testosterone levels. The thresholds for TT were approximately 12.55 nmol l-1 for a decreased ability/frequency to perform sex, 12.55 nmol l-1 for decreased frequency of morning erections, and 14.35 nmol l-1 for decreased sexual desire. The calculated free testosterone (CFT) thresholds for these three sexual symptoms were 281.14, 264.90, and 287.21 pmol l-1 , respectively. TT <13.21 nmol l-1 (OR = 1.4, 95%CI: 1.0-1.9, P = 0.037) or CFT <268.89 pmol l-1 (OR = 1.5, 95%CI: 1.1-20, P = 0.020) was associated with an increase in the aforementioned three sexual symptoms. The prevalence of LOH was 9.1% under the criteria, including all three sexual symptoms with TT levels <13.21 nmol l-1 and CFT levels <268.89 pmol l-1 . Our results may improve the diagnostic accuracy of LOH in older men. PMID:26354142

  6. Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism due to a Novel Missense Mutation in the First Extracellular Loop of the Neurokinin B Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bereket, Abdullah; Rocha, Nuno; Porter, Keith; Turan, Serap; Gribble, Fiona M.; Kotan, L. Damla; Akcay, Teoman; Atay, Zeynep; Canan, Husniye; Serin, Ayse; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Reimann, Frank; Semple, Robert K.; Topaloglu, A. Kemal

    2015-01-01

    Context The neurokinin B (NKB) receptor, encoded by TACR3, is widely expressed within the central nervous system, including hypothalamic nuclei involved in regulating GnRH release. We have recently reported two mutations in transmembrane segments of the receptor and a missense mutation in NKB in patients with normosmic isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (nIHH). Patients and Methods We sequenced the TACR3 gene in a family in which three siblings had nIHH. The novel mutant receptor thus identified was studied in a heterologous expression system using calcium flux as the functional readout. Results All affected siblings were homozygous for the His148Leu mutation, in the first extracellular loop of the NKB receptor. The His148Leu mutant receptor exhibited profoundly impaired signaling in response to NKB (EC50 = 3 ± 0.1 nm and >5 μm for wild-type and His148Leu, respectively). The location of the mutation in an extracellular part of the receptor led us also to test whether senktide, a synthetic NKB analog, may retain ability to stimulate the mutant receptor. However, the signaling activity of the His148Leu receptor in response to senktide was also severely impaired (EC50 = 1 ± 1 nm for wild-type and no significant response of His148Leu to 10 μm). Conclusions Homozygosity for the TACR3 His148Leu mutation leads to failure of sexual maturation in humans, whereas signaling by the mutant receptor in vitro in response to either NKB or senktide is severely impaired. These observations further strengthen the link between NKB, the NKB receptor, and regulation of human reproductive function. PMID:19755480

  7. Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with split hand/foot malformation: a clinical entity with a high frequency of FGFR1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Carine; Jacobson-Dickman, Elka; Xu, Cheng; Manouvrier, Sylvie; Dwyer, Andrew A.; Sykiotis, Gerasimos P.; Beenken, Andrew; Liu, Yang; Tommiska, Johanna; Hu, Youli; Tiosano, Dov; Gerard, Marion; Leger, Juliane; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Lefebvre, Hervé; Polak, Michel; Carel, Jean-Claude; Phan-Hug, Franziska; Hauschild, Michael; Plummer, Lacey; Rey, Jean-Pierre; Raivio, Taneli; Bouloux, Pierre; Sidis, Yisrael; Mohammadi, Moosa; de Roux, Nicolas; Pitteloud, Nelly

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) and split hand/foot malformation (SHFM) are two rare genetic conditions. Here we report a clinical entity comprising CHH and SHFM. Methods We identified patients with CHH and SHFM through international collaboration. Probands and available family members underwent phenotyping and screening for FGFR1 mutations. The impact of identified mutations was assessed by sequence- and structure-based predictions, and/or functional assays. Results We identified 8 probands with CHH with (n=3, Kallmann Syndrome) or without anosmia (n=5) and SHFM, 7 of whom (88%) harbor FGFR1 mutations: one individual is homozygous for p.V429E; six individuals are heterozygous for p.G348R, p.G485R, p.Q594*, p.E670A, p.V688L, and p.L712P. All mutations were predicted to be loss-of-function by in silico analysis. Probands with FGFR1 mutations have severe GnRH deficiency (absent puberty and/or cryptorchidism and/or micropenis). SHFM in both hands and feet was only observed in the patient with the homozygous p.V429E mutation; V429 maps to the FRS2α binding domain of FGFR1, and functional studies of the p.V429E mutation demonstrated that it decreased recruitment and phosphorylation of FRS2α to FG FR 1 , thereby resulting in reduced MAPK signaling. Conclusion FGFR1 should be prioritized for genetic testing in patients with CHH and SHFM, because the likelihood of a mutation increases from 10% in the general CHH population to 88%. PMID:25394172

  8. Trial of Recombinant Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Pretreatment for GnRH-Induced Fertility in Patients with Congenital Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Andrew A.; Sykiotis, Gerasimos P.; Hayes, Frances J.; Boepple, Paul A.; Lee, Hang; Loughlin, Kevin R.; Dym, Martin; Sluss, Patrick M.; Crowley, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Context and Objective: The optimal strategy for inducing fertility in men with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) is equivocal. Albeit a biologically plausible approach, pretreatment with recombinant FSH (rFSH) before GnRH/human chorionic gonadotropin administration has not been sufficiently assessed. The objective of the study was to test this method. Design and Setting: This was a randomized, open-label treatment protocol at an academic medical center. Patients and Interventions: GnRH-deficient men (CHH) with prepubertal testes (<4 mL), no cryptorchidism, and no prior gonadotropin therapy were randomly assigned to either 24 months of pulsatile GnRH therapy alone (inducing endogenous LH and FSH release) or 4 months of rFSH pretreatment followed by 24 months of GnRH therapy. Patients underwent serial testicular biopsies, ultrasound assessments of testicular volume, serum hormone measurements, and seminal fluid analyses. Results: rFSH treatment increased inhibin B levels into the normal range (from 29 ± 9 to 107 ± 41 pg/mL, P < .05) and doubled testicular volume (from 1.1 ± 0.2 to 2.2 ± 0.3 mL, P < .005). Histological analysis showed proliferation of both Sertoli cells (SCs) and spermatogonia, a decreased SC to germ cell ratio (from 0.74 to 0.35), and SC cytoskeletal rearrangements. With pulsatile GnRH, the groups had similar hormonal responses and exhibited significant testicular growth. All men receiving rFSH pretreatment developed sperm in their ejaculate (7 of 7 vs 4 of 6 in the GnRH-only group) and showed trends toward higher maximal sperm counts. Conclusions: rFSH pretreatment followed by GnRH is successful in inducing testicular growth and fertility in men with CHH with prepubertal testes. rFSH not only appears to maximize the SC population but also induces morphologic changes, suggesting broader developmental roles. PMID:24037890

  9. Ablation of KNDy Neurons Results in Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism and Amplifies the Steroid-Induced LH Surge in Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Mittelman-Smith, Melinda A; Krajewski-Hall, Sally J; McMullen, Nathaniel T; Rance, Naomi E

    2016-05-01

    In the human infundibular (arcuate) nucleus, a subpopulation of neurons coexpress kisspeptin and neurokinin B (NKB), 2 peptides required for normal reproductive function. A homologous group of neurons exists in the arcuate nucleus of rodents, termed KNDy neurons based on the coexpression of kisspeptin, NKB, and dynorphin. To study their function, we recently developed a method to selectively ablate KNDy neurons using NK3-SAP, a neurokinin 3 receptor agonist conjugated to saporin (SAP). Here, we ablated KNDy neurons in female rats to determine whether these neurons are required for estrous cyclicity and the steroid induced LH surge. NK3-SAP or Blank-SAP (control) was microinjected into the arcuate nucleus using stereotaxic surgery. After monitoring vaginal smears for 3-4 weeks, rats were ovariectomized and given 17β-estradiol and progesterone in a regimen that induced an afternoon LH surge. Rats were killed at the time of peak LH levels, and brains were harvested for NKB and dual labeled GnRH/Fos immunohistochemistry. In ovary-intact rats, ablation of KNDy neurons resulted in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, characterized by low levels of serum LH, constant diestrus, ovarian atrophy with increased follicular atresia, and uterine atrophy. Surprisingly, the 17β-estradiol and progesterone-induced LH surge was 3 times higher in KNDy-ablated rats. Despite the marked increase in the magnitude of the LH surge, the number of GnRH or anterior ventral periventricular nucleus neurons expressing Fos was not significantly different between groups. Our studies show that KNDy neurons are essential for tonic levels of serum LH and estrous cyclicity and may play a role in limiting the magnitude of the LH surge. PMID:26937713

  10. Testosterone replacement therapy improves the health-related quality of life of men diagnosed with late-onset hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Almehmadi, Yousef; Yassin, Aksam A.; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Saad, Farid

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To test the hypothesis that testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) improves the long-term health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of men with late-onset hypogonadism (LOH), as studies have shown that sub-physiological testosterone levels have a negative impact on psychological (e.g. mood, vitality, libido and sexual interest) and physical features (e.g. erectile function and physical strength), all of which contribute to a sense of well-being. Patients and methods In all, 261 patients (mean age 58 years) diagnosed with LOH were treated with long-acting intramuscular testosterone undecanoate (TU) for up to 5 years. Health quality indicators including the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), the five-item version of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5), the Aging Males’ Symptoms (AMS) scale, and the percentage of patients reporting joint and muscle pain were measured at baseline and at each visit. The means were then plotted over time in parallel with mean total testosterone (TT) levels. Results Both the mean IPSS and AMS scores fell significantly within the first 3 months and the mean IIEF-5 score and TT levels increased within the first 3 months. All four parameters continued to improve over the course of the trial. The percentage of patients reporting both joint and muscle pain decreased during TRT. Conclusions This prospective, observational and longitudinal analysis shows a clear improvement in both psychological and physical characteristics as physiological testosterone levels are reached and maintained contributing to an improvement in the HRQoL in men with diagnosed LOH. PMID:26966591

  11. Definitive localization of X-linked Kallman syndrome (hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia) to Xp22.3: close linkage to the hypervariable repeat sequence CRI-S232.

    PubMed Central

    Meitinger, T; Heye, B; Petit, C; Levilliers, J; Golla, A; Moraine, C; Dalla Piccola, B; Sippell, W G; Murken, J; Ballabio, A

    1990-01-01

    Kallmann syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia. Six families in which the disorder followed an X-linked inheritance were investigated by linkage analysis. Diagnostic criteria were uniformly applied and included tests for hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia. Close linkage was found by using the hypervariable repeated sequence CRI-S232 (DXS278) previously mapped to Xp22.3. At a maximum lod score of 6.5, the recombination fraction was calculated as .03. Of 30 fully informative meioses, one recombination between the disease locus and the loci recognized by probe CRI-S232 was observed. When an independent approach is used, these results confirm the X-linked Kallmann syndrome assignment previously made by deletion mapping, and allow definitive localization of the syndrome assignment previously made by deletion mapping, and allow definitive localization of the syndrome to the Xp22.3 region. This opens the way to carrier detection and to the identification of a gene responsible for this disorder. Images Figure 2 PMID:1977309

  12. Pharmacokinetics and drying time of testosterone 2% gel in men with hypogonadism: a multicenter, open-label, single-arm trial.

    PubMed

    Morgentaler, A; McGettigan, J; Xiang, Q; Danoff, T M; Gould, E M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess drying time after application of testosterone 2% gel (Fortesta Gel, Endo Pharmaceuticals), time needed for serum total testosterone (TT) to reach the eugonadal range (⩾ 300 ng dl(-1)), and time to steady-state serum TT. Thirty-four men with primary or secondary hypogonadism were enrolled in the study; 31 men were included in the pharmacokinetics (PKs) population. Testosterone 2% gel (40 mg) was applied once daily in the morning to the front and inner thighs for 14 days. Median gel drying time was 2.4 min (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.7-3.4 min; n = 31). Serum TT concentrations reached the target eugonadal range with a median time of 2.9 h (95% CI, 1.9-4.3 h; n = 24). Median time to steady-state serum TT concentration was 1.1 days (95% CI, 0.7-3.4 days; n = 31). Six patients (17.6%; n = 34) reported treatment-related adverse events; all were mild. The results from this 14-day PK study in men with hypogonadism suggest that testosterone 2% gel dries, on average, in <3 min after application and that testosterone 2% gel rapidly reaches the target eugonadal range and attains steady-state serum TT concentrations in about 1 day. PMID:25056809

  13. The Effect of Metformin and Metformin-Testosterone Combination on Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Men with Late-onset Hypogonadism and Impaired Glucose Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Krysiak, R; Gilowski, W; Okopien, B

    2015-11-01

    No previous study has investigated the effect of metformin, administered alone or together with testosterone, on cardiometabolic risk factors in men with hypogonadism. The study included 30 men with late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) who had been complying with lifestyle intervention. After 12 weeks of metformin treatment (1.7 g daily), the participants were allocated to one of 2 groups treated for the following 12 weeks with oral testosterone undecanoate (120 mg daily, n=15) or not receiving androgen therapy (n=15). Plasma lipids, glucose homeostasis markers, as well as plasma levels of androgens, uric acid, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), homocysteine and fibrinogen were determined before and after 12 and 24 weeks of therapy with the final dose of metformin. Patients with LOH and IGT had higher levels of hsCRP, homocysteine and fibrinogen than subjects with only LOH (n=12) or only IGT (n=15). Metformin administered alone improved insulin sensitivity, as well as reduced 2-h postchallenge plasma glucose and triglycerides. Testosterone-metformin combination therapy decreased also total and LDL cholesterol, uric acid, hsCRP, homocysteine and fibrinogen, as well as increased plasma testosterone. The effect of this combination therapy on testosterone, insulin sensitivity, hsCRP, homocysteine and fibrinogen was stronger than that of metformin alone. The obtained results indicate that IGT men with LOH receiving metformin may gain extra benefits if they are concomitantly treated with oral testosterone. PMID:26600057

  14. Elderly men over 65 years of age with late-onset hypogonadism benefit as much from testosterone treatment as do younger men

    PubMed Central

    Yassin, Aksam; Haider, Ahmad; Doros, Gheorghe; Gooren, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the potential benefits of testosterone administration to elderly men (>65 years) with late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) in comparison with younger men and to assess the safety of testosterone administration to elderly men. Materials and Methods A total of 561 hypogonadal men from two registry studies were divided into age groups of ≤65 years (group Y, n=450; range, 32-65 years) and >65 years (group O, n=111; range, 66-84 years). Following an initial 6-week interval, all men were treated with 3-month injections of parenteral testosterone undecanoate for up to 6 years. Results Over the 6 years, there was a progressive decrease of body weight and waist circumference. Beneficial effects on lipids and other metabolic factors and on psychological and sexual functioning progressed over the first 24 to 42 months and were sustained. Rather than a deterioration, there was an improvement of urinary parameters. Prostate volume and prostate-specific antigen increased moderately. Hematocrit levels increased but remained within safe margins. Conclusions The benefits of restoring serum testosterone in men with LOH were not significantly different between men older than 65 years of age and younger men. There were no indications that side effects were more severe in elderly men. The effects on prostate and urinary function and hematocrit were within safe margins. Age itself need not be a contraindication to testosterone treatment of elderly men with LOH. PMID:25874045

  15. The prevalence of erectile dysfunction among subjects with late-onset hypogonadism: a population-based study in China

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wen-Hao; Zhuang, Xin-Jie; Shu, Ru-Ming; Guan, Di; Ji, Yu-Dang; Zhang, Bao-Long; Wang, Can-Gang; Zhuang, Li-Hua; Yang, Zhuo; Hong, Kai; Ma, Lu-Lin; Jiang, Hui; Zhou, Shan-Jie; Gu, Yi-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The concurrence of chronic diseases and some well-defined risk factors significantly impacts the prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED). Aim: To determine whether late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) impacts the prevalence of ED using investigation reproductive health data of middle-aged and aging males in China. Methods: The reproductive health status of 1498 males, aged 40-69 years, was evaluated using questionnaires of LOH based on the Androgen Deficiency in Aging Males (ADAM) and Aging Male Symptoms scale (AMS), as well as the International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5) assessment. The 10th percentile of serum total testosterone (TT) and calculated free testosterone (cFT) levels of controls were set as cut-off levels of AD. The main outcome measures were used to assess the prevalence of LOH and ED according to different subject characteristics. Results: Of the 1472 subjects who completed the questionnaires who supplied hormone measurements, the prevalence of self-reported ED and identified by the IIEF-5 assessment were 11.28% and 77.85%, respectively. The IIEF-5 assessment revealed a prevalence of ED of 55.34%, 88.20%, and 91.77%, respectively, among those aged 40-49, 50-59, and 60-69 years. AD rates of ED subjects were 13.73% and 40.69% according to the TT and cFT cut-off levels. The prevalence of ED among subjects positive for LOH (ADAM+ and AMS+) were 88.81% and 95.80%, respectively. The prevalence of ED among the AD subjects (TT and cFT cut-off levels) with LOH (ADAM+ and AMS+) were 86.67%/81.82%. And the prevalence of ED among clinical LOH subjects (ADAM+ and AMS+) were 89.51%/98.48%. Conclusions: We found that middle-aged and aging Chinese males were at a relatively high risk of ED. The prevalence of ED among subjects with LOH symptoms was greater than in all recruited subjects. The effect of LOH on the prevalence of ED far outweighed the risk of decreased testosterone levels. PMID:26550346

  16. Treatment situation of male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in pediatrics and proposal of testosterone and gonadotropins replacement therapy protocols.

    PubMed

    Sato, Naoko; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Hasegawa, Yukihiro; Arisaka, Osamu; Ozono, Keiichi; Amemiya, Shin; Kikuchi, Toru; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Harada, Shohei; Miyata, Ichiro; Tanaka, Toshiaki

    2015-04-01

    Male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (MHH), a disorder associated with infertility, is treated with testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) and/or gonadotropins replacement therapy (GRT) (TRT and GRT, together with HRT hormone replacement therapy). In Japan, guidelines have been set for treatment during adolescence. Due to the risk of rapid maturation of bone age, low doses of testosterone or gonadotropins have been used. However, the optimal timing and methods of therapeutic intervention have not yet been established. The objective of this study was to investigate the current situation of treatment for children with MHH in Japan and to review a primary survey involving councilors of the Japanese Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and a secondary survey obtained from 26 facilities conducting HRT. The subjects were 55 patients with MHH who reached their adult height after HRT. The breakdown of the patients is as follows: 7 patients with Kallmann syndrome, 6 patients with isolated gonadotropin deficiency, 18 patients with acquired hypopituitarism due to intracranial and pituitary tumor, 22 patients with classical idiopathic hypopituitarism due to breech delivery, and 2 patients with CHARGE syndrome. The mean age at the start of HRT was 15.7 yrs and mean height was 157.2 cm. The mean age at reaching adult height was 19.4 yrs, and the mean adult height was 171.0 cm. The starting age of HRT was later than the normal pubertal age and showed a significant negative correlation with pubertal height gain, but it showed no correlation with adult height. As for spermatogenesis, 76% of the above patients treated with hCG-rFSH combined therapy showed positive results, though ranging in levels; impaired spermatogenesis was observed in some with congenital MHH, and favorable spermatogenesis was observed in all with acquired MHH. From the above, we propose the establishment of a treatment protocol for the start low-dose testosterone or low-dose gonadotropins by dividing subjects into

  17. Treatment situation of male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in pediatrics and proposal of testosterone and gonadotropins replacement therapy protocols

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Naoko; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Hasegawa, Yukihiro; Arisaka, Osamu; Ozono, Keiichi; Amemiya, Shin; Kikuchi, Toru; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Harada, Shohei; Miyata, Ichiro; Tanaka, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (MHH), a disorder associated with infertility, is treated with testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) and/or gonadotropins replacement therapy (GRT) (TRT and GRT, together with HRT hormone replacement therapy). In Japan, guidelines have been set for treatment during adolescence. Due to the risk of rapid maturation of bone age, low doses of testosterone or gonadotropins have been used. However, the optimal timing and methods of therapeutic intervention have not yet been established. The objective of this study was to investigate the current situation of treatment for children with MHH in Japan and to review a primary survey involving councilors of the Japanese Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and a secondary survey obtained from 26 facilities conducting HRT. The subjects were 55 patients with MHH who reached their adult height after HRT. The breakdown of the patients is as follows: 7 patients with Kallmann syndrome, 6 patients with isolated gonadotropin deficiency, 18 patients with acquired hypopituitarism due to intracranial and pituitary tumor, 22 patients with classical idiopathic hypopituitarism due to breech delivery, and 2 patients with CHARGE syndrome. The mean age at the start of HRT was 15.7 yrs and mean height was 157.2 cm. The mean age at reaching adult height was 19.4 yrs, and the mean adult height was 171.0 cm. The starting age of HRT was later than the normal pubertal age and showed a significant negative correlation with pubertal height gain, but it showed no correlation with adult height. As for spermatogenesis, 76% of the above patients treated with hCG-rFSH combined therapy showed positive results, though ranging in levels; impaired spermatogenesis was observed in some with congenital MHH, and favorable spermatogenesis was observed in all with acquired MHH. From the above, we propose the establishment of a treatment protocol for the start low-dose testosterone or low-dose gonadotropins by dividing

  18. Normosmic Congenital Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism Due to TAC3/TACR3 Mutations: Characterization of Neuroendocrine Phenotypes and Novel Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Voican, Adela; Amazit, Larbi; Trabado, Séverine; Fagart, Jérôme; Meduri, Geri; Brailly-Tabard, Sylvie; Chanson, Philippe; Lecomte, Pierre; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Young, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Context TAC3/TACR3 mutations have been reported in normosmic congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (nCHH) (OMIM #146110). In the absence of animal models, studies of human neuroendocrine phenotypes associated with neurokinin B and NK3R receptor dysfunction can help to decipher the pathophysiology of this signaling pathway. Objective To evaluate the prevalence of TAC3/TACR3 mutations, characterize novel TACR3 mutations and to analyze neuroendocrine profiles in nCHH caused by deleterious TAC3/TACR3 biallelic mutations. Results From a cohort of 352 CHH, we selected 173 nCHH patients and identified nine patients carrying TAC3 or TACR3 variants (5.2%). We describe here 7 of these TACR3 variants (1 frameshift and 2 nonsense deleterious mutations and 4 missense variants) found in 5 subjects. Modeling and functional studies of the latter demonstrated the deleterious consequence of one missense mutation (Tyr267Asn) probably caused by the misfolding of the mutated NK3R protein. We found a statistically significant (p<0.0001) higher mean FSH/LH ratio in 11 nCHH patients with TAC3/TACR3 biallelic mutations than in 47 nCHH patients with either biallelic mutations in KISS1R, GNRHR, or with no identified mutations and than in 50 Kallmann patients with mutations in KAL1, FGFR1 or PROK2/PROKR2. Three patients with TAC3/TACR3 biallelic mutations had an apulsatile LH profile but low-frequency alpha-subunit pulses. Pulsatile GnRH administration increased alpha-subunit pulsatile frequency and reduced the FSH/LH ratio. Conclusion The gonadotropin axis dysfunction associated with nCHH due to TAC3/TACR3 mutations is related to a low GnRH pulsatile frequency leading to a low frequency of alpha-subunit pulses and to an elevated FSH/LH ratio. This ratio might be useful for pre-screening nCHH patients for TAC3/TACR3 mutations. PMID:22031817

  19. Is there a relationship between the severity of erectile dysfunction and the comorbidity profile in men with late onset hypogonadism?

    PubMed Central

    Yassin, Aksam A.; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Almehmadi, Yousef; Yassin, Dany-Jan; El Douaihy, Youssef; Saad, Farid

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the severity of erectile dysfunction (ED) in a man diagnosed with late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) gives information about his metabolic syndrome state, as patients with LOH often have sexual symptoms and associated cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidities, but the role of ED in predicting the prevalence of comorbid disease in men with low levels of testosterone is currently unknown. Patients and methods Men (130) diagnosed with LOH and fulfilling the criteria of a total testosterone level of <3.5 ng/mL (<12 nmol/L), and with an erectile function domain score of <21 on the International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire (IIEF, questions 1–5), were enrolled for a subsequent trial of supplementation with testosterone undecanoate. Demographic data were recorded at baseline. The men completed three standardised questionnaires to assess sexual health, including the International Prostate Symptom Score, Ageing Males Symptoms (AMS) and IIEF Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM). Patients were stratified by the severity of ED, with SHIM scores of 1–7 considered severe, 8–11 moderate, and 12–16 mild to moderate. Levels of serum testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and lipids (total cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density and low-density lipoprotein) were assessed, along with plasma fasting glucose and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. Body weight, body mass index and waist circumference were also recorded. Results There was a significant association between the severity of ED and mean weight (P < 0.001), waist circumference (P < 0.001), triglycerides (P = 0.009), total cholesterol (P = 0.027), HbA1c (P < 0.001), fasting glucose (P = 0.003) and AMS scores (P = 0.043). There were no significant differences in testosterone fractions and SHBG levels between the ED subgroups. There was a positive correlation between the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (type 1 and type 2) and the severity of ED in

  20. Former Abusers of Anabolic Androgenic Steroids Exhibit Decreased Testosterone Levels and Hypogonadal Symptoms Years after Cessation: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Selmer, Christian; Østergren, Peter Busch; Pedersen, Karen Boje; Schou, Morten; Gustafsson, Finn; Faber, Jens; Juul, Anders; Kistorp, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Aims Abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) is highly prevalent among male recreational athletes. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of AAS abuse on reproductive hormone levels and symptoms suggestive of hypogonadism in current and former AAS abusers. Methods This study had a cross-sectional case-control design and involved 37 current AAS abusers, 33 former AAS abusers (mean (95%CI) elapsed duration since AAS cessation: 2.5 (1.7; 3.7) years) and 30 healthy control participants. All participants were aged 18–50 years and were involved in recreational strength training. Reproductive hormones (FSH, LH, testosterone, inhibin B and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH)) were measured using morning blood samples. Symptoms of hypogonadism (depressive symptoms, fatigue, decreased libido and erectile dysfunction) were recorded systematically. Results Former AAS abusers exhibited significantly lower median (25th –75th percentiles) total and free testosterone levels than control participants (total testosterone: 14.4 (11.9–17.7) nmol/l vs. 18.8 (16.6–22.0) nmol/l) (P < 0.01). Overall, 27.2% (13.3; 45.5) of former AAS abusers exhibited plasma total testosterone levels below the lower reference limit (12.1 nmol/l) whereas no control participants exhibited testosterone below this limit (P < 0.01). Gonadotropins were significantly suppressed, and inhibin B and AMH were significantly decreased in current AAS abusers compared with former AAS abusers and control participants (P < 0.01). The group of former AAS abusers had higher proportions of participants with depressive symptoms ((24.2%) (11.1; 42.2)), erectile dysfunction ((27.3%) (13.3; 45.6)) and decreased libido ((40.1%) (23.2; 57.0)) than the other two groups (trend analyses: P < 0.05). Conclusions Former AAS abusers exhibited significantly lower plasma testosterone levels and higher frequencies of symptoms suggestive of hypogonadism than healthy control participants years after AAS cessation

  1. Truncating Homozygous Mutation of Carboxypeptidase E (CPE) in a Morbidly Obese Female with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Intellectual Disability and Hypogonadotrophic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, Jessica L.; Zekavati, Anna; Sosinsky, Alona; Yiorkas, Andrianos M.; Holder, Susan; Klaber, Robert E.; Bridges, Nicola; van Haelst, Mieke M.; le Roux, Carel W.; Walley, Andrew J.; Walters, Robin G.; Mueller, Michael; Blakemore, Alexandra I. F.

    2015-01-01

    Carboxypeptidase E is a peptide processing enzyme, involved in cleaving numerous peptide precursors, including neuropeptides and hormones involved in appetite control and glucose metabolism. Exome sequencing of a morbidly obese female from a consanguineous family revealed homozygosity for a truncating mutation of the CPE gene (c.76_98del; p.E26RfsX68). Analysis detected no CPE expression in whole blood-derived RNA from the proband, consistent with nonsense-mediated decay. The morbid obesity, intellectual disability, abnormal glucose homeostasis and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism seen in this individual recapitulates phenotypes in the previously described fat/fat and Cpe knockout mouse models, evidencing the importance of this peptide/hormone-processing enzyme in regulating body weight, metabolism, and brain and reproductive function in humans. PMID:26120850

  2. WDR11, a WD Protein that Interacts with Transcription Factor EMX1, Is Mutated in Idiopathic Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism and Kallmann Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Goo; Ahn, Jang-Won; Kurth, Ingo; Ullmann, Reinhard; Kim, Hyun-Taek; Kulharya, Anita; Ha, Kyung-Soo; Itokawa, Yasuhide; Meliciani, Irene; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Lee, Deresa; Rosenberger, Georg; Ozata, Metin; Bick, David P.; Sherins, Richard J.; Nagase, Takahiro; Tekin, Mustafa; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Gusella, James F.; Kalscheuer, Vera; Choi, Cheol Yong; Layman, Lawrence C.

    2010-01-01

    By defining the chromosomal breakpoint of a balanced t(10;12) translocation from a subject with Kallmann syndrome and scanning genes in its vicinity in unrelated hypogonadal subjects, we have identified WDR11 as a gene involved in human puberty. We found six patients with a total of five different heterozygous WDR11 missense mutations, including three alterations (A435T, R448Q, and H690Q) in WD domains important for β propeller formation and protein-protein interaction. In addition, we discovered that WDR11 interacts with EMX1, a homeodomain transcription factor involved in the development of olfactory neurons, and that missense alterations reduce or abolish this interaction. Our findings suggest that impaired pubertal development in these patients results from a deficiency of productive WDR11 protein interaction. PMID:20887964

  3. The efficacy, bioavailability and safety of a novel hydroalcoholic testosterone gel 2% in hypogonadal men: results from phase II open-label studies.

    PubMed

    Efros, M; Carrara, D; Neijber, A

    2016-08-01

    Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and safety of a novel hydroalcoholic testosterone gel 2% (TG) were evaluated in phase II sequential dose escalation studies using 3 application sites (thigh, abdomen and shoulder/upper arm) and 2 application methods. Hypogonadal men (n = 40), 18-75 years, with serum testosterone <300 ng dl(-1) were included in both studies. Study 1 evaluated hand-applied multiple doses of TG 1.25, 2.50 and 3.75 ml (23, 46 and 70 mg of testosterone, respectively), once daily for 10 days to shoulder/upper arm. Study 2 evaluated applicator-applied (TG 1.25, 2.50 and 3.75 ml) versus hand-applied (TG 2.5 ml) doses, once daily for 7 days to shoulder/upper arm. Primary endpoint for both studies was responder rate (Cave testosterone levels between 298 and 1050 ng dl(-1) ). In Study 1 following multiple applications, >70% participants in each group were responders. Dose-dependent increase was observed in PK values for total testosterone, free testosterone and DHT. In Study 2, responder rate was dose proportional: 16.7%, 50.0% and 77.8% responders in TG 1.25, 2.50 and 3.75 ml groups respectively. The bioavailability was highest for the shoulder application. There was a significant improvement in almost all the domains of sexual functioning. Applicator-application was preferred over hand-application by majority of the participants. TG was found to be safe and well tolerated in hypogonadal men. PMID:26598279

  4. AB098. Can concomitant dutasteride reduce the effect of testosterone replacement therapy in men with late-onset hypogonadism? A 24-week, randomized, parallel study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Jun; Moon, Du Guen; Park, Nam Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Objectives 5ARIs have sexual side effects, including erectile dysfunction (ED), loss of libido and ejaculatory dysfunction due to their action mechanism which decreases serum DHT levels. We examined whether concomitant dutasteride reduced the efficacy of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) in men with late-onset hypogonadism. Methods This was a 24-week, randomized, parallel study of the clinical outcomes in men age >40 years with symptomatic benign prostatic hypertrophy [BPH; International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) th], prostate volume Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) 300 ng/dL with aging male symptoms, who were taking stable doses of alpha-blockers 4 weeks before participation. Eligible patients received a combination of dutasteride 0.5 mg once daily and a transdermal gel containing 10 g testosterone (T) (DT group, n=30) or the transdermal gel alone (T group, n=30). The primary outcomes were the change in the aging male symptom (AMS) score, sexual desire (question 17, AMS score), and erectile function (International Index of Erectile Function-5). Secondary outcomes were the post-treatment IPSS, peak urinary flow rate, post-void residual urine volume (PVR), and prostate volume. Results Both groups showed significant improvements from baseline in all primary outcome parameters. However, there were no significant differences in the changes in the AMS total score (DT −5.2 vs. T −5.0; P=0.55), sexual desire (DT −2.5 vs. T −2.3; P=0.23), and IIEF-5 score (DT −2.1 vs. T −1.9; P=0.13) between groups. The extent of IPSS improvement from baseline to 24 weeks was the same in both groups (DT −1.2 vs. T −1.0; P=0.64). In addition, the changes in Q(max) and PVR from baseline were very similar in both groups. However, prostate volume decreased significantly (P<0.01) in the DT group (DT −6.1 cc vs. T +0.6 cc). Conclusions Concomitant dutasteride did not reduce the effect of testosterone replacement therapy in men with late-2onset hypogonadism. Otherwise it

  5. Efficacy and safety of testosterone replacement therapy in men with hypogonadism: A meta-analysis study of placebo-controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    GUO, CHANGCHENG; GU, WENYU; LIU, MIN; PENG, BO; YAO, XUDONG; YANG, BIN; ZHENG, JUNHUA

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present meta-analysis was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of testosterone replacement therapy in men with hypogonadism. A search was conducted for appropriate randomized controlled trials and the data from 16 trials were pooled. The intended primary outcome of the present study was to determine the efficacy and safety of testosterone replacement therapy. The current data demonstrated that scores for Aging Male Symptoms (AMS) were significantly reduced following testosterone replacement therapy, with a mean decrease in AMS score of 1.52 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.72 to 2.32; P=0.0002]. Testosterone replacement therapy increased lean body mass [mean difference (MD), 1.22; 95% CI, 0.33 to 2.11; P=0.007], reduced fat mass in a non-significantly manner (MD, −0.85; 95% CI, −1.74 to 0.04; P=0.06) and significantly reduced total cholesterol (MD, −0.16; 95% CI, −0.29 to −0.03; P=0.01). No significant differences were identified in body weight (MD, 0.09; 95% CI, −1.13 to 1.31; P=0.89), body mass index (MD, 0.10; 95% CI, −0.62 to 0.82; P=0.78) or bone mineral density (MD, −0.01; 95% CI, −0.03 to 0.02; P=0.60). Average prostate volume increased (MD, 1.58; 95% CI, 0.6 to 2.56; P=0.002) following testosterone replacement therapy, but the levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) (MD, 0.10; 95% CI, −0.03 to 0.22; P=0.14) and the International Prostate Symptom Scores (MD, 0.01; 95% CI, −0.37 to 0.39; P=0.96) did not change. In conclusion, testosterone replacement therapy improves quality of life, increases lean body mass, significantly decreases total cholesterol, and is well-tolerated and safe for men with hypogonadism who are exhibiting PSA levels of <4 ng/ml. PMID:26998003

  6. The effect of testosterone replacement therapy on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels in men being treated for hypogonadism: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kang, De-Ying; Li, Hong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone replacement therapy is used for the treatment of age-related male hypogonadism, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a primary screening tool for prostate cancer. The systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to determine the effect of testosterone replacement therapy on PSA levels.Medline, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases were searched until February 28, 2014, and inclusion criteria were as follows: randomized controlled trial; intervention group received testosterone/androgen replacement therapy; control group did not receive treatment; and no history of prostate cancer. The primary outcome was change of PSA level between before and after treatment. Secondary outcomes were elevated PSA level after treatment, and the number of patients who developed prostate cancer.After initially identifying 511 articles, 15 studies with a total of 739 patients that received testosterone replacement and 385 controls were included. The duration of treatment ranged from 3 to 12 months. Patients treated with testosterone tended to have higher PSA levels, and thus a greater change than those that received control treatments (difference in means of PSA levels = 0.154, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.069 to 0.238, P < 0.001). The difference in means of PSA levels were significant higher for patients that received testosterone intramuscularly (IM) than controls (difference in means of PSA levels = 0.271, 95% CI 0.117-0.425, P = 0.001). Elevated PSA levels after treatment were similar between patients that received treatment and controls (odds ratio [OR] = 1.02, 95% CI 0.48-2.20, P = 0.953). Only 3 studies provided data with respect to the development of prostate cancer, and rates were similar between those that received treatment and controls.Testosterone replacement therapy does not increase PSA levels in men being treated for hypogonadism, except when it is given IM and even the increase with IM administration is minimal

  7. UGT2B17 Genotype and the Pharmacokinetic Serum Profile of Testosterone during Substitution Therapy with Testosterone Undecanoate. A Retrospective Experience from 207 Men with Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Anne Kirstine; Jørgensen, Niels; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Juul, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Background: Testosterone (T) is mainly excreted in the urine as testosterone glucuronide (TG). This glucuronidation is partly dependent on the UGT2B17 genotype, and TG excretion is therefore lower in men having the UGT2B17 deletion. However, the possible influence of UGT2B17 genotype on serum T during androgen therapy is unknown. We retrospectively investigated the possible association between the UGT2B17 gene polymorphism and serum T levels in hypogonadal men during Testosterone undecanoate (TU) substitution therapy. Subjects and Methods: Two hundred and seven patients treated with TU (Nebido®) were genotyped by quantitative polymerase chain reaction for the UGT2B17 deletion polymorphism. All were given 1000 mg TU per injection at 0, 6, and 18 weeks. Blood samples were taken 2 and 6 weeks after the first and second injection, prior to the third injection, and after 2–3 years of treatment. We analyzed for the levels of T, luteinizing hormone (LH), sex-hormone-binding globulin, estradiol, prostate specific antigen, hematocrit, hemoglobin, and total cholesterol. Results: The UGT2B17 genotype frequency was: ins/ins: 42%, ins/del: 44%, and del/del: 14%. During the initial 18 weeks of TU treatment, large intra- and inter-individual variations in serum T levels were observed. Large peaks in T levels, ranging from 6.7 to 69.5 nmol/l, were noted 2 weeks after injections, regardless of the genotype. T levels did not differ between the three genotypes prior to the third injection, but the del/del group had significantly lower levels of LH. At follow-up after 2–3 years, the injection interval or daily T dosage was not dependent on the UGT2B17 genotype. Conclusion: In conclusion, we found large intra- and inter-individual variations in serum T during standard TU treatment regimen in hypogonadal men. Only subtle differences in serum T and LH were noted according to UGT2B17 genotype, which however suggest that the UGT2B17 genotype exert modest influence on

  8. Mutations in FGF17, IL17RD, DUSP6, SPRY4, and FLRT3 are identified in individuals with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Miraoui, Hichem; Dwyer, Andrew A; Sykiotis, Gerasimos P; Plummer, Lacey; Chung, Wilson; Feng, Bihua; Beenken, Andrew; Clarke, Jeff; Pers, Tune H; Dworzynski, Piotr; Keefe, Kimberley; Niedziela, Marek; Raivio, Taneli; Crowley, William F; Seminara, Stephanie B; Quinton, Richard; Hughes, Virginia A; Kumanov, Philip; Young, Jacques; Yialamas, Maria A; Hall, Janet E; Van Vliet, Guy; Chanoine, Jean-Pierre; Rubenstein, John; Mohammadi, Moosa; Tsai, Pei-San; Sidis, Yisrael; Lage, Kasper; Pitteloud, Nelly

    2013-05-01

    Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) and its anosmia-associated form (Kallmann syndrome [KS]) are genetically heterogeneous. Among the >15 genes implicated in these conditions, mutations in FGF8 and FGFR1 account for ~12% of cases; notably, KAL1 and HS6ST1 are also involved in FGFR1 signaling and can be mutated in CHH. We therefore hypothesized that mutations in genes encoding a broader range of modulators of the FGFR1 pathway might contribute to the genetics of CHH as causal or modifier mutations. Thus, we aimed to (1) investigate whether CHH individuals harbor mutations in members of the so-called "FGF8 synexpression" group and (2) validate the ability of a bioinformatics algorithm on the basis of protein-protein interactome data (interactome-based affiliation scoring [IBAS]) to identify high-quality candidate genes. On the basis of sequence homology, expression, and structural and functional data, seven genes were selected and sequenced in 386 unrelated CHH individuals and 155 controls. Except for FGF18 and SPRY2, all other genes were found to be mutated in CHH individuals: FGF17 (n = 3 individuals), IL17RD (n = 8), DUSP6 (n = 5), SPRY4 (n = 14), and FLRT3 (n = 3). Independently, IBAS predicted FGF17 and IL17RD as the two top candidates in the entire proteome on the basis of a statistical test of their protein-protein interaction patterns to proteins known to be altered in CHH. Most of the FGF17 and IL17RD mutations altered protein function in vitro. IL17RD mutations were found only in KS individuals and were strongly linked to hearing loss (6/8 individuals). Mutations in genes encoding components of the FGF pathway are associated with complex modes of CHH inheritance and act primarily as contributors to an oligogenic genetic architecture underlying CHH. PMID:23643382

  9. Mutations in FGF17, IL17RD, DUSP6, SPRY4, and FLRT3 Are Identified in Individuals with Congenital Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Miraoui, Hichem; Dwyer, Andrew A.; Sykiotis, Gerasimos P.; Plummer, Lacey; Chung, Wilson; Feng, Bihua; Beenken, Andrew; Clarke, Jeff; Pers, Tune H.; Dworzynski, Piotr; Keefe, Kimberley; Niedziela, Marek; Raivio, Taneli; Crowley, William F.; Seminara, Stephanie B.; Quinton, Richard; Hughes, Virginia A.; Kumanov, Philip; Young, Jacques; Yialamas, Maria A.; Hall, Janet E.; Van Vliet, Guy; Chanoine, Jean-Pierre; Rubenstein, John; Mohammadi, Moosa; Tsai, Pei-San; Sidis, Yisrael; Lage, Kasper; Pitteloud, Nelly

    2013-01-01

    Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) and its anosmia-associated form (Kallmann syndrome [KS]) are genetically heterogeneous. Among the >15 genes implicated in these conditions, mutations in FGF8 and FGFR1 account for ∼12% of cases; notably, KAL1 and HS6ST1 are also involved in FGFR1 signaling and can be mutated in CHH. We therefore hypothesized that mutations in genes encoding a broader range of modulators of the FGFR1 pathway might contribute to the genetics of CHH as causal or modifier mutations. Thus, we aimed to (1) investigate whether CHH individuals harbor mutations in members of the so-called “FGF8 synexpression” group and (2) validate the ability of a bioinformatics algorithm on the basis of protein-protein interactome data (interactome-based affiliation scoring [IBAS]) to identify high-quality candidate genes. On the basis of sequence homology, expression, and structural and functional data, seven genes were selected and sequenced in 386 unrelated CHH individuals and 155 controls. Except for FGF18 and SPRY2, all other genes were found to be mutated in CHH individuals: FGF17 (n = 3 individuals), IL17RD (n = 8), DUSP6 (n = 5), SPRY4 (n = 14), and FLRT3 (n = 3). Independently, IBAS predicted FGF17 and IL17RD as the two top candidates in the entire proteome on the basis of a statistical test of their protein-protein interaction patterns to proteins known to be altered in CHH. Most of the FGF17 and IL17RD mutations altered protein function in vitro. IL17RD mutations were found only in KS individuals and were strongly linked to hearing loss (6/8 individuals). Mutations in genes encoding components of the FGF pathway are associated with complex modes of CHH inheritance and act primarily as contributors to an oligogenic genetic architecture underlying CHH. PMID:23643382

  10. The plasma miR-125a, miR-361 and miR-133a are promising novel biomarkers for Late-Onset Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yao-ping; Wang, Ju; Zhao, Kai; Shang, Xue-jun; Wu, Hui-qin; Qing, Xing-rong; Fang, Fang; Zhang, Yan; Shang, Jin; Li, Hong-gang; Zhang, Hui-ping; Guan, Huang-tao; Zhou, Yuan-zhong; Gu, Yi-qun; Wu, Wei-xiong; Xiong, Cheng-liang

    2016-01-01

    Circulating miRNAs have been shown to serve as diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers in cancers and other diseases. However, the role of plasma miRNAs in Late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) diagnosis is still unknown. Using Illumina HiSeq2000 sequencing at discovery phase, and then two-step validated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays in verification phases. We verified that the expression levels of miR-125a-5p, miR-361-5p and miR-133a-3p were significantly altered in LOH group compared to the control group. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) is 0.682, 0.698 and 0.765, respectively. The combination of three miRNAs showed a larger AUC (0.835) that was more efficient for the diagnosis of LOH. Among three miRNAs, miR-133a-3p had the best diagnostic value for LOH with 68.2% sensitivity and 77.3% specificity. Regression analyses show that miR-133a-3p level was negatively associated with the ageing males’ symptoms (AMS) scale. However, miR-361-5p level was positively associated with serum testosterone concentrations. In summary, plasma miRNAs are differentially expressed between LOH and healthy controls. We validated three miRNAs that could act as novel biomarkers for diagnosis of LOH. These miRNAs may be involved in the development of LOH. However, further large and functional studies are warranted to confirm our findings. PMID:27000524

  11. Two Families with Normosmic Congenital Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism and Biallelic Mutations in KISS1R (KISS1 Receptor): Clinical Evaluation and Molecular Characterization of a Novel Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Francou, Bruno; Fagart, Jérôme; Roussel, Ronan; Viengchareun, Say; Combettes, Laurent; Brailly-Tabard, Sylvie; Lombès, Marc; Young, Jacques; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Context KISS1R mutations have been reported in few patients with normosmic congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (nCHH) (OMIM #146110). Objective To describe in detail nCHH patients with biallelic KISS1R mutations belonging to 2 unrelated families, and to functionally characterize a novel KISS1R mutation. Results An original mutant, p.Tyr313His, was found in the homozygous state in 3 affected kindred (2 females and 1 male) from a consanguineous Portuguese family. This mutation, located in the seventh transmembrane domain, affects a highly conserved amino acid, perturbs the conformation of the transmembrane segment, and impairs MAP kinase signaling and intracellular calcium release. In the second family, a French Caucasian male patient with nCHH was found to carry two recurrent mutations in the compound heterozygous state (p.Leu102Pro/Stop399Arg). In this man, pulsatile GnRH (Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone) administration restored pulsatile LH (Luteinizing Hormone) secretion and testicular hormone secretion. Later, long-term combined gonadotropin therapy induced spermatogenesis, enabling 3 successive pregnancies that resulted in 2 miscarriages and the birth of a healthy boy. Conclusion We show that a novel loss-of-function mutation (p.Tyr313His) in the KISS1R gene can cause familial nCHH, revealing the crucial role of this amino acid in KISS1R function. The observed restoration of gonadotropin secretion by exogenous GnRH administration further supports, in humans, the hypothalamic origin of the gonadotropin deficiency in this genetic form of nCHH. PMID:23349759

  12. X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: Identification and in vitro study of a novel small indel in the NR0B1 gene.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tingting; Wang, Jian; Yu, Yongguo; Huang, Xiaodong; Fu, Qihua; Shen, Yiping; Chen, Fuxiang

    2016-05-01

    DAX1 is an orphan nuclear receptor that has a key role in the development and function of the adrenal and reproductive axes. Mutations in NR0B1, the gene encoding DAX1, result in X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HHG). A Chinese pedigree with X-linked AHC and HHG was investigated in the present study. Sequence analysis identified a novel small indel variant, c.195_207delinsTG, in the NR0B1 gene. To determine the effect of this variant on DAX1 expression, reverse‑transcription quantitative PCR and western blot assays were performed. The mRNA expression levels in carriers of mutant NR0B1 were significantly reduced (62% decrease) compared to those in individuals with wild-type NR0B1 (WT). The c.195_207delinsTG mutation was demonstrated to lead to various truncated DAX1 proteins, including the C‑terminal truncated DAX1, which was only detected in the cytoplasm, and the N‑terminal truncated DAX1, which was present in the cytoplasm and nucleus. A luciferase assay was then performed to assess the repressor function of DAX1 in modulating steroidogenic factor 1 (SF‑1)‑mediated transactivation. WT DAX1 significantly suppressed the SF‑1‑mediated promoter activity of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein by 35.5±1.9%. In contrast to other known pathogenic mutations which abolish the repressor function of DAX1, the c.195_207delinsTG mutant proxkduced a higher repressor activity, demonstrating a 49.9±2.6% reduction of promoter activity. These findings suggested that the mutation of NR0B1 in X‑linked AHC with HHG enhanced the function of DAX1 to repress SF-1 activation, while DAX1 is expected to have additional roles in the pathological mechanism. PMID:27035099

  13. Effects of long-term treatment with testosterone on weight and waist size in 411 hypogonadal men with obesity classes I-III: observational data from two registry studies

    PubMed Central

    Saad, F; Yassin, A; Doros, G; Haider, A

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Long-term testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) up to 5 years has been shown to produce progressive and sustainable weight loss (WL) in hypogonadal men. This study investigated effects of long-term TRT up to 8 years in hypogonadal men with different obesity classes. Subjects/Methods: From two independent observational registries we identified a total of 411 obese, hypogonadal men receiving TRT in urological clinics. The effects of TRT on anthropometric as well as metabolic parameters were studied for a maximum duration of 8 years, mean follow-up: 6 years. All men received long-acting injections of testosterone undecanoate in 3-monthly intervals. Results: In all three classes of obesity, T therapy produced significant WL, decrease in waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI). In patients with class I obesity, mean weight decreased from 102.6±6.4 to 84.1±4.9 kg, change from baseline: −17.4±0.5 kg and −16.8±0.4%. WC in this group of patients decreased from 106.8±7.4 to 95.1±5.3 cm, change from baseline: −10.6±0.3 cm. BMI decreased from 32.69±1.4 to 27.07±1.57, change from baseline: −5.52±0.15 kg m−2. In patients with class II obesity, weight decreased from 116.8±6.9 to 91.3±6.3 kg, change from baseline: −25.3±0.5 kg and −21.5±0.4%. WC decreased from 113.5±7.5 to 100.0±5.4 cm, change from baseline: −13.9±0.4 cm. BMI decreased from 37.32±1.45 to 29.49±1.71, change from baseline: −8.15±0.17 kg m−2. In patients with class III obesity, weight decreased from 129.0±5.6 to 98.9±4.8 kg, change from baseline: −30.5±0.7 kg and −23.6±0.5%. WC decreased from 118.5±5.6 to 103.8±4.9 cm, change from baseline: −14.3±0.4 cm. BMI decreased from 41.93±1.48 to 32.46±1.59, change from baseline −9.96±0.29 kg m−2. Conclusions: Testosterone therapy appears to be an effective approach to achieve sustained WL in obese hypogonadal men irrespective of severity of

  14. Inhibin B, AMH, but not INSL3, IGF1 or DHEAS support differentiation between constitutional delay of growth and puberty and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Rohayem, J; Nieschlag, E; Kliesch, S; Zitzmann, M

    2015-09-01

    In pre-pubertal boys ≥ 14 years, the differentiation between constitutional delay of growth and puberty (CDGP) and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) is challenging, as current diagnostic tools have limitations in sensitivity and specificity. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of markers of gonadal activity, growth axis activation and adrenarche in differentiation between pre-pubertal CDGP and HH. This retrospective study was carried out between 2006 and 2015 in an academic out-patient referral centre. The clinical data of 94 boys, aged 13.9-23.2 years and referred for "pubertal delay" were reviewed. Definite diagnoses were established on initial work-up and clinical follow-up: 24 boys were diagnosed with HH, 22 boys with CDGP, pre-pubertal (PP CDGP) at referral and 28 boys with CDGP, early pubertal at referral (EP CDGP), the latter serving as control group. Twenty patients were excluded from evaluation because of previous sex steroid treatment or associated chronic disease. Inhibin B and AMH were measured in all (n = 74); INSL3, IGF1, IGFBP3 and DHEAS in a subset of patients (n = 45) in serum of first presentation. Inhibin B and AMH were higher in boys with PP CDGP than in boys with HH: inhibin B: 87.6 ± 42.5 vs. 19.8 ± 13.9 pg/mL; p < 0.001; AMH: 44.9 ± 27.1 vs. 15.4 ± 8.3 ng/mL; p < 0.001. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) for the diagnosis of PPCDGP vs. HH (inhibin B ≥ 28.5 pg/mL): sensitivity: 95%, specificity: 75%; AUC: 0.955. In combination with an AMH cut-off ≥20 ng/mL the specificity increased to 83%. INSL3, IGF1, IGFBP3 and DHEAS levels were not different. In boys with EP CDGP, inhibin B and IGF1 levels were highest (138.7 ± 59.9 pg/mL/289.7 ± 117 ng/mL), whereas AMH levels were lowest (11.7 ± 9.1 ng/mL). Sertoli cell markers are helpful for establishing a prognosis, whether a boy with pubertal delay will enter puberty spontaneously, whereas Leydig cell, growth and adrenal markers are not

  15. Evaluation of Basal Serum Adrenocorticotropic Hormone and Cortisol Levels and Their Relationship with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Male Patients with Idiopathic Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Bo; She, Fei; Xie, Li-Fang; Yan, Wen-Hua; Ouyang, Jin-Zhi; Wang, Bao-An; Ma, Hang-Yun; Zang, Li; Mu, Yi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prolonged gonadal hormone deficiency in patients with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) may produce adverse effects on the endocrine homeostasis and metabolism. This study aimed to compare basal serum adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol levels between male IHH patients and healthy controls. Moreover, this study compared the basal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in patients with and without nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and also evaluated the relationship between basal HPA axis and NAFLD in male IHH patients. Methods: This was a retrospective case-control study involving 75 Chinese male IHH patients (mean age 21.4 ± 3.8 years, range 17–30 years) and 135 healthy controls after matching for gender and age. All subjects underwent physical examination and blood testing for serum testosterone, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, ACTH, and cortisol and biochemical tests. Results: Higher basal serum ACTH levels (8.25 ± 3.78 pmol/L vs. 6.97 ± 2.81 pmol/L) and lower cortisol levels (366.70 ± 142.48 nmol/L vs. 452.82 ± 141.53 nmol/L) were observed in male IHH patients than healthy subjects (all P <0.05). IHH patients also showed higher metabolism parameters and higher prevalence rate of NAFLD (34.9% vs. 4.4%) than the controls (all P < 0.05). Basal serum ACTH (9.91 ± 4.98 pmol/L vs. 7.60 ± 2.96 pmol/L) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (2123.7 ± 925.8 μg/L vs. 1417.1 ± 498.4 μg/L) levels were significantly higher in IHH patients with NAFLD than those without NAFLD (all P < 0.05). We also found that basal serum ACTH levels were positively correlated with NAFLD (r = 0.289, P <0.05) and triglyceride levels (r = 0.268, P < 0.05) in male IHH patients. Furthermore, NAFLD was independently associated with ACTH levels in male IHH patients by multiple linear regression analysis. Conclusions: The male IHH patients showed higher basal serum ACTH levels and lower cortisol levels than matched healthy

  16. Effects of continuous long-term testosterone therapy (TTh) on anthropometric, endocrine and metabolic parameters for up to 10 years in 115 hypogonadal elderly men: real-life experience from an observational registry study.

    PubMed

    Yassin, A A; Nettleship, J; Almehmadi, Y; Salman, M; Saad, F

    2016-09-01

    Subnormal levels of testosterone are associated with significant negative health consequences, with higher risks of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. The numbers of studies reporting on the benefits of normalisation of testosterone is increasing but longer-term data on (elderly) men receiving testosterone treatment are almost nonexistent. In this single-centre, cumulative, prospective, registry study, 115 hypogonadal men (mean age 59.05 years) received injections with testosterone undecanoate in 12-week intervals for up to 10 years. Waist circumference, body weight and mean BMI dropped progressively with statistical significance versus previous year for 7 years and, respectively, 8 years for weight and body mass index. Similarly, fasting glucose displayed a significant decrease after the first year continuing to decrease thereafter. A decline in HbA1c , from 6.4% to 5.6% (mean <6%), was observed from year 2 on, together with a decrease in the ratio of triglycerides:high-density lipoprotein (HDL), a surrogate marker of insulin resistance, with an increase in HDL levels. The total cholesterol:HDL ratio and non-HDL cholesterol declined significantly. A decrease was also observed in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, with a decrease in levels of the inflammation marker C-reactive protein. No major adverse cardiovascular events were observed throughout the study. PMID:26762680

  17. Mutations in CUL4B, Which Encodes a Ubiquitin E3 Ligase Subunit, Cause an X-linked Mental Retardation Syndrome Associated with Aggressive Outbursts, Seizures, Relative Macrocephaly, Central Obesity, Hypogonadism, Pes Cavus, and Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Tarpey, Patrick S. ; Raymond, F. Lucy ; O’Meara, Sarah ; Edkins, Sarah ; Teague, Jon ; Butler, Adam ; Dicks, Ed ; Stevens, Claire ; Tofts, Calli ; Avis, Tim ; Barthorpe, Syd ; Buck, Gemma ; Cole, Jennifer ; Gray, Kristian ; Halliday, Kelly ; Harrison, Rachel ; Hills, Katy ; Jenkinson, Andrew ; Jones, David ; Menzies, Andrew ; Mironenko, Tatiana ; Perry, Janet ; Raine, Keiran ; Richardson, David ; Shepherd, Rebecca ; Small, Alexandra ; Varian, Jennifer ; West, Sofie ; Widaa, Sara ; Mallya, Uma ; Moon, Jenny ; Luo, Ying ; Holder, Susan ; Smithson, Sarah F. ; Hurst, Jane A. ; Clayton-Smith, Jill ; Kerr, Bronwyn ; Boyle, Jackie ; Shaw, Marie ; Vandeleur, Lucianne ; Rodriguez, Jayson ; Slaugh, Rachel ; Easton, Douglas F. ; Wooster, Richard ; Bobrow, Martin ; Srivastava, Anand K. ; Stevenson, Roger E. ; Schwartz, Charles E. ; Turner, Gillian ; Gecz, Jozef ; Futreal, P. Andrew ; Stratton, Michael R. ; Partington, Michael 

    2007-01-01

    We have identified three truncating, two splice-site, and three missense variants at conserved amino acids in the CUL4B gene on Xq24 in 8 of 250 families with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). During affected subjects' adolescence, a syndrome emerged with delayed puberty, hypogonadism, relative macrocephaly, moderate short stature, central obesity, unprovoked aggressive outbursts, fine intention tremor, pes cavus, and abnormalities of the toes. This syndrome was first described by Cazebas et al., in a family that was included in our study and that carried a CUL4B missense variant. CUL4B is a ubiquitin E3 ligase subunit implicated in the regulation of several biological processes, and CUL4B is the first XLMR gene that encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase. The relatively high frequency of CUL4B mutations in this series indicates that it is one of the most commonly mutated genes underlying XLMR and suggests that its introduction into clinical diagnostics should be a high priority. PMID:17236139

  18. Effects of long-term androgen replacement therapy on the physical and mental statuses of aging males with late-onset hypogonadism: a multicenter randomized controlled trial in Japan (EARTH Study).

    PubMed

    Konaka, Hiroyuki; Sugimoto, Kazuhiro; Orikasa, Hideki; Iwamoto, Teruaki; Takamura, Toshinari; Takeda, Yoshiyu; Shigehara, Kazuyoshi; Iijima, Masashi; Koh, Eitetsu; Namiki, Mikio

    2016-01-01

    Androgen replacement therapy (ART) efficacy on late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) has been widely investigated in Western countries; however, it remains controversial whether ART can improve health and prolong active lifestyles. We prospectively assessed long-term ART effects on the physical and mental statuses of aging men with LOH in Japan. The primary endpoint was health-related quality of life assessed by questionnaires. Secondary endpoints included glycemic control, lipid parameters, blood pressure, waist circumference, body composition, muscular strength, International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSS), International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5) scores, and serum prostate-specific antigen levels. Of the 1637 eligible volunteers, 334 patients > 40 years with LOH were randomly assigned to either the ART (n = 169) or control groups (n = 165). Fifty-two weeks after the initial treatment, ART significantly affected the role physical subdomain of the short form-36 health survey (SF-36) scale (P = 0.0318). ART was also associated with significant decreases in waist circumstance (P = 0.002) and serum triglyceride (TG) (P = 0.013) and with significant increases in whole-body and leg muscle mass volumes (P = 0.071 and 0.0108, respectively), serum hemoglobin (P < 0.001), IPSS voiding subscore (P = 0.0418), and the second question on IIEF-5 (P = 0.0049). There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of severe adverse events. In conclusion, in patients with LOH, long-term ART exerted beneficial effects on Role Physical subdomain of the SF-36 scale, serum TG, waist circumstance, muscle mass volume, voiding subscore of IPSS, and the second question of IIEF-5. We hope our study will contribute to the future development of this area. PMID:25761833

  19. Male central hypogonadism secondary to exogenous androgens: a review of the drugs and protocols highlighted by the online community of users for prevention and/or mitigation of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Karavolos, Stamatios; Reynolds, Michael; Panagiotopoulou, Nikoletta; McEleny, Kevin; Scally, Michael; Quinton, Richard

    2015-05-01

    Androgen- or anabolic steroid-induced hypogonadism (ASIH) is no longer confined to professional athletes; its prevalence amongst young men and teenagers using androgens and/or anabolic steroids (AASs) is rising fast, and those affected can experience significant symptoms. Clinicians are increasingly encountering demanding, well-informed men affected by ASIH, yet lacking authoritative information on the subject may struggle to project a credible message. In this article, we overview the methods and drugs that men use in an attempt to counteract ASIH (with a view to either preventing its onset, or reversing it once it has developed) and summarize the scientific evidence underpinning these. The main channel for obtaining these drugs is the Internet, where they can be readily sourced without a valid prescription. An Internet search using relevant terms revealed a huge number of websites providing advice on how to buy and use products to counteract ASIH. Drugs arising repeatedly in our search included human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG), selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) and aromatase inhibitors (AIs). The quality and accuracy of the online information was variable, but review of medical literature also highlighted a lack of scientific data to guide clinical practice. It is important for clinicians to be aware of the AAS user's self-treatment strategies with regard to ASIH side-effect mitigation. By ensuring that they are well-informed, clinicians are more likely to retain the credibility and trust of AAS users, who will in turn likely be more open to engage with appropriate management. PMID:25333666

  20. Effects of long-term androgen replacement therapy on the physical and mental statuses of aging males with late-onset hypogonadism: a multicenter, randomized controlled trial in Japan (EARTH Study)

    PubMed Central

    Konaka, Hiroyuki; Sugimoto, Kazuhiro; Orikasa, Hideki; Iwamoto, Teruaki; Takamura, Toshinari; Takeda, Yoshiyu; Shigehara, Kazuyoshi; Iijima, Masashi; Koh, Eitetsu; Namiki, Mikio

    2016-01-01

    Androgen replacement therapy (ART) efficacy on late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) has been widely investigated in Western countries; however, it remains controversial whether ART can improve health and prolong active lifestyles. We prospectively assessed long-term ART effects on the physical and mental statuses of aging men with LOH in Japan. The primary endpoint was health-related quality of life assessed by questionnaires. Secondary endpoints included glycemic control, lipid parameters, blood pressure, waist circumference, body composition, muscular strength, International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSS), International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5) scores, and serum prostate-specific antigen levels. Of the 1637 eligible volunteers, 334 patients > 40 years with LOH were randomly assigned to either the ART (n = 169) or control groups (n = 165). Fifty-two weeks after the initial treatment, ART significantly affected the role physical subdomain of the short form-36 health survey (SF-36) scale (P = 0.0318). ART was also associated with significant decreases in waist circumstance (P = 0.002) and serum triglyceride (TG) (P = 0.013) and with significant increases in whole-body and leg muscle mass volumes (P = 0.071 and 0.0108, respectively), serum hemoglobin (P < 0.001), IPSS voiding subscore (P = 0.0418), and the second question on IIEF-5 (P = 0.0049). There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of severe adverse events. In conclusion, in patients with LOH, long-term ART exerted beneficial effects on Role Physical subdomain of the SF-36 scale, serum TG, waist circumstance, muscle mass volume, voiding subscore of IPSS, and the second question of IIEF-5. We hope our study will contribute to the future development of this area. PMID:25761833

  1. Vitamin C reverses hypogonadal bone loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidemiologic studies correlate low vitamin C intake with bone loss. The genetic deletion of enzymes involved in de novo vitamin C synthesis in mice, likewise, causes severe osteoporosis. However, very few studies have evaluated a protective role of this dietary supplement on the skeleton. Here, ...

  2. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in mice lacking a functional Kiss1 gene

    PubMed Central

    d'Anglemont de Tassigny, Xavier; Fagg, Lisa A.; Dixon, John P. C.; Day, Kate; Leitch, Harry G.; Hendrick, Alan G.; Zahn, Dirk; Franceschini, Isabelle; Caraty, Alain; Carlton, Mark B. L.; Aparicio, Samuel A. J. R.; Colledge, William H.

    2007-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor GPR54 (AXOR12, OT7T175) is central to acquisition of reproductive competency in mammals. Peptide ligands (kisspeptins) for this receptor are encoded by the Kiss1 gene, and administration of exogenous kisspeptins stimulates hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) release in several species, including humans. To establish that kisspeptins are the authentic agonists of GPR54 in vivo and to determine whether these ligands have additional physiological functions we have generated mice with a targeted disruption of the Kiss1 gene. Kiss1-null mice are viable and healthy with no apparent abnormalities but fail to undergo sexual maturation. Mutant female mice do not progress through the estrous cycle, have thread-like uteri and small ovaries, and do not produce mature Graffian follicles. Mutant males have small testes, and spermatogenesis arrests mainly at the early haploid spermatid stage. Both sexes have low circulating gonadotropin (luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone) and sex steroid (β-estradiol or testosterone) hormone levels. Migration of GnRH neurons into the hypothalamus appears normal with appropriate axonal connections to the median eminence and total GnRH content. The hypothalamic–pituitary axis is functional in these mice as shown by robust luteinizing hormone secretion after peripheral administration of kisspeptin. The virtually identical phenotype of Gpr54- and Kiss1-null mice provides direct proof that kisspeptins are the true physiological ligand for the GPR54 receptor in vivo. Kiss1 also does not seem to play a vital role in any other physiological processes other than activation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis, and loss of Kiss1 cannot be overcome by compensatory mechanisms. PMID:17563351

  3. From Mental Disorder to Iatrogenic Hypogonadism - Dilemmas in Conceptualizing Gender Identity Variants as Psychiatric Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.

    2009-01-01

    The categorization of gender identity variants (GIVs) as “mental disorders” in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) is highly controversial among professionals as well as among persons with GIV. After providing a brief history of GIV categorizations in the DSM, this paper presents some of the major issues of the ongoing debate: GIV as psychopathology versus natural variation; definition of “impairment” and “distress” for GID; associated psychopathology and its relation to stigma; the stigma impact of the mental-disorder label itself; the unusual character of “sex reassignment surgery” as a psychiatric treatment; and the consequences for health and mental-health services if the disorder label is removed. Finally, several categorization options are examined: Retaining the GID category, but possibly modifying its grouping with other syndromes; narrowing the definition to dysphoria and taking “disorder” out of the label; categorizing GID as a neurological or medical rather than a psychiatric disorder; removing GID from both the DSM and the International Classification of Diseases (ICD); and creating a special category for GIV in the DSM. I conclude that--as also evident in other DSM categories--the decision on the categorization of GIVs cannot be achieved on a purely scientific basis, and that a consensus for a pragmatic compromise needs to be arrived at that accommodates both scientific considerations and the service needs of persons with GIVs. PMID:19851856

  4. A randomized trial of transdermal and oral estrogen therapy in adolescent girls with hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Adolescent females with ovarian failure require estrogen therapy for induction of puberty and other important physiologic effects. Currently, health care providers have varying practices without evidence-based standards, thus investigating potential differences between oral and transdermal preparations is essential. The purpose of this study was to compare the differential effects of treatment with oral conjugated equine estrogen (OCEE), oral 17β estradiol (OBE), or transdermal 17β estradiol (TBE) on biochemical profiles and feminization in girls with ovarian failure. Study design 20 prepubertal adolescent females with ovarian failure, ages 12–18 years, were randomized to OCEE (n = 8), OBE (n = 7), or TBE (n = 5) for 24 months. Estrogen replacement was initiated at a low dose (0.15 mg OCEE, 0.25 mg OBE, or 0.0125 mg TBE) and doubled every 6 months to a maximum dose of 0.625 mg/d OCEE, 1 mg/d OBE, or 0.05 mg/d TBE. At 18 months, micronized progesterone was added to induce menstrual cycles. Biochemical markers including sex hormones, inflammatory markers, liver enzymes, coagulation factors, and lipids were obtained at baseline and 6 month intervals. Differences in levels of treatment parameters between the groups were evaluated with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The effect of progesterone on biochemical markers was evaluated with the paired t-test. Results Mean (±SE) estradiol levels at maximum estrogen dose (18 months) were higher in the TBE group (53 ± 19 pg/mL) compared to OCEE (14 ± 5 pg/mL) and OBE (12 ± 5 pg/mL) (p ≤ 0.01). The TBE and OBE groups had more effective feminization (100% Tanner 3 breast stage at 18 months). There were no statistical differences in other biochemical markers between treatment groups at 18 months or after the introduction of progesterone. Conclusions Treatment with transdermal 17β estradiol resulted in higher estradiol levels and more effective feminization compared to oral conjugated equine estrogen but did not result in an otherwise different biochemical profile in this limited number of heterogeneous patients. OBE and TBE provide safe and effective alternatives to OCEE to induce puberty in girls, but larger prospective randomized trials are required. Trial registration Clinical Trials Identifier: NCT01023178. PMID:24982681

  5. Sex Steroid Replacement Therapy in Female Hypogonadism from Childhood to Young Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Norjavaara, Ensio; Ankarberg-Lindgren, Carina; Kriström, Berit

    2016-01-01

    The overall goal of pubertal sex hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in girls is not only about development of secondary sexual characteristics, but also to establish an adult endocrine and metabolic milieu, as well as adult cognitive function. Estradiol (E2) is the first choice for HRT compared to ethinyl estradiol (EE2). E2 is the most potent endogenous estrogen in the circulation, with established levels during spontaneous puberty. Transdermal E2, compared to oral administration, is the first choice to start pubertal HRT. Transdermal application avoids liver exposure to supraphysiologic estrogen concentrations and provides a more physiologic mechanism for hormone delivery. By cutting E2 matrix patches in doses of 0.05-0.07 µg/kg or administrate E2 gel in doses of 0.1 mg/day, serum concentrations of E2 seen in early spontaneous puberty can be obtained. Patches can be removed in the morning and thereby mimic the normal circadian rhythm. For those clinics with access to sensitive E2 determinations methods (extraction followed by radioimmunoassay or mass spectrometry) monitoring the attained E2 serum levels is recommended in order to optimally mimic the levels seen in early puberty as well as growth velocity, breast and uterus development. Mid- and late pubertal HRT is obtained by increased doses of E2, adding cyclic oral or transdermal progestin, as well as testosterone gel over the pubic area if indicated. PMID:26680580

  6. Cognitive dysfunction and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism in a Brazilian patient with mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy and a novel ECGF1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Carod-Artal, F J; Herrero, M D; Lara, M C; López-Gallardo, E; Ruiz-Pesini, E; Martí, R; Montoya, J

    2007-05-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is caused by mutations in the thymidine phosphorylase gene (ECGF1). We present the first detailed report of a Brazilian MNGIE patient, harboring a novel ECGF1 homozygous mutation (C4202A, leading to a premature stop codon, S471X). Multiple deletions and the T5814C change were found in mitochondrial DNA. Together with gastrointestinal symptoms, endocrine involvement and memory dysfunction, not reported in MNGIE to date, were the most preeminent features. PMID:17437622

  7. Androgen-dependent somatotroph function in a hypogonadal adolescent male: evidence for control of exogenous androgens on growth hormone release

    SciTech Connect

    Mauras, N.; Blizzard, R.M.; Rogol, A.D.

    1989-03-01

    A 14(10/12)-year-old white male with primary gonadal failure following testicular irradiation for acute lymphocytic leukemia was evaluated for poor growth. He had received 2400 rad of prophylactic cranial irradiation. The growth velocity had decelerated from 7 to 3.2 cm/yr over 3 years. His bone age was 12(0/12) years (by TW2-RUS), and his peak growth hormone (GH) response to provocative stimuli was 1.4 ng/mL. The 24-hour GH secretion was studied by drawing blood every 20 minutes for 24 hours. The resulting GH profile was analyzed by a computerized pulse detection algorithm, CLUSTER. Timed serum GH samples were also obtained after a 1 microgram/kg IV bolus injection of the GH releasing factor (GRH). The studies showed a flat 24-hour profile and a peak GH response to GRH of 3.9 ng/ml. Testosterone enanthate treatment was started, 100 mg IM every 4 weeks. Ten months after the initiation of therapy the calculated growth rate was 8.6 cm/yr. The 24-hour GH study and GRH responses were repeated at the time, showing a remarkably normal 24-hour GH secretory pattern and a peak GH response to GRH of 14.4 ng/mL. Testosterone therapy was discontinued, and 4 months later similar studies were repeated. A marked decrease in the mean 24-hour GH secretion and mean peak height occurred, but with maintenance of the GH pulse frequency. The GH response to GRH was intermediate, with a peak of 8 ng/mL. There was no further growth during those 4 months despite open epiphyses.

  8. TAC3 and TACR3 Mutations in Familial Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism Reveal a Key Role for Neurokinin B in the Central Control of Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Guclu, Metin; Yalin, Ayse Serap; Kotan, L. Damla; Porter, Keith M; Serin, Ayse; Mungan, Neslihan O; Cook, Joshua R; Imamoglu, Sazi; Akalin, N. Sema; Yuksel, Bilgin; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Semple, Robert K

    2015-01-01

    The timely secretion of gonadal sex steroids is essential for the initiation of puberty, the post-pubertal maintenance of secondary sexual characteristics and the normal perinatal development of male external genitalia. Normal gonadal steroid production requires the actions of the pituitary-derived gonatrophins, LH and FSH. We report four human pedigrees with severe congenital gonadotrophin deficiency and pubertal failure in which all affected individuals are homozygous for loss-of-function mutations in TAC3 (encoding Neurokinin B) or its receptor TACR3 (encoding NK3R). Neurokinin B, a member of the substance P-related tachykinin family, is known to be highly expressed in hypothalamic neurons that also express kisspeptin1, a recently identified regulator of gonadotropin-releasing hormone secretion2. These findings implicate Neurokinin B as a critical central regulator of human gonadal function and suggest novel approaches to the pharmacological control of human reproduction and sex hormone-related diseases. PMID:19079066

  9. A syndrome of female pseudohermaphrodism, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, and multicystic ovaries associated with missense mutations in the gene encoding aromatase (P450arom)

    SciTech Connect

    Conte, F.A.; Grumbach, M.M.; Ito, Y.; Fisher, C.R.; Simpson, E.R.

    1994-06-01

    The authors report the features of a new syndrome of aromatase deficiency due to molecular defects in the CYP19 (P450arom) gene in a 46,XX female. At birth, the patient presented with a nonadrenal form of female pseudohermaphrodism. At 17 months of age, laparotomy revealed normal female internal genital structures; the histological appearance of the ovaries was normal. FSH concentrations were markedly elevated at 9.4 ng/mL LER 869, and estrone and estradiol levels were undetectable (<37 pmol/L). By 14 yr of age, she had failed to exhibit breast development. The clitoris has enlarged to 4 x 2 cm, and pubic hair was Tanner stage IV. The plasma concentration of testosterone was elevated at 3294 pmol/L, as was androstenedione at 9951 pmol/L. Plasma estradiol levels were below 37 pmol/L. ACTH and dexamethasone tests indicated a nonadrenal source of testosterone and androstenedione. Plasma gonadotropin levels were in the castrate range. Pelvic sonography and magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple 4- to 6-cm ovarian cysts bilaterally. Despite increased circulating androgens and clitoral growth, the bone age was 10 yr at chronologic age 14 2/12 yr. Estrogen replacement therapy resulted in a growth spurt, breast development, menarche, suppression of gonadotropin levels, and resolution of the cysts. The clinical findings suggested the diagnosis of P450arom deficiency. Analyses of genomic DNA from ovarian fibroblasts demonstrated two single base changes in the coding region of the P450arom gene, one at 1303 basepairs (C-T), R435C, and the other at 1310 basepairs (G-A), C437Y, in exon 10. The molecular genetic studies indicate that the patient is a compound heterozygote for these mutations. Expression of these mutations showed that the R435C mutation had 1.1% the activity of the wild-type P450arom enzyme, whereas the C437Y mutation demonstrated no activity. 32 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Pseudohypoparathyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... to have other endocrine system problems (such as hypothyroidism and hypogonadism ). Pseudohypoparathyroidism may be connected to other ... 565. Read More Central nervous system Hypogonadism Hypoparathyroidism Hypothyroidism Parathyroid hormone (PTH) blood test Renal Update Date ...

  11. What Are Normal Puberty, Precocious Puberty, and Delayed Puberty?

    MedlinePlus

    ... a long-lasting condition known as hypogonadism (pronounced HI-poe-GO-nad-iz-uhm ) in which the ... Turner syndrome or in individuals with hypogonadotropic (pronounced HI-po-GO-nah-doe-TROH-pik ) hypogonadism, which ...

  12. An open-label, phase 2, single centre, randomized, crossover design bioequivalence study of AndroForte 5 testosterone cream and Testogel 1% testosterone gel in hypogonadal men: study LP101.

    PubMed

    Wittert, G A; Harrison, R W; Buckley, M J; Wlodarczyk, J

    2016-01-01

    We compared a novel 5% testosterone (T) cream (AndroForte 5, Lawley Pharmaceuticals, Australia) with a 1% T gel (Testogel, Besins Healthcare, Australia). Using an open-label crossover design, subjects were randomized to one of two treatment sequences using either the T gel or T cream first in a 1 : 1 ratio. Each treatment period was 30 days with a 7-14 days washout period between them. On Days 1 and 30 of each treatment period blood was sampled at -15, -5 min, 0, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12 and 16 h post study drug administration. Sixteen men with established androgen deficiency aged between 29 and 73 years, who had undertaken a washout from prior testosterone therapy participated in the study. One subject failed to complete both arms and another was excluded post-completion because of a major protocol violation. Bioequivalence was established based on key pharmacokinetic (PK) variables: AUC, C(avg), C(max), T(max), % fluctuation (with and without baseline correction) for the two formulations of testosterone on Day 1 and Day 30. The ratio and 90% CI of AUC 0.99 (0.86-1.14), C(max) 1.02 (0.84-1.24) and C(avg) 0.99 (0.86-1.14) for T cream/T gel were within the predetermined bio-equivalence criteria of 80% to 125% at Day 30. There were no statistically significant differences between secondary biochemical markers: serum dihydrotestosterone (DHT), oestradiol (E2), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), luteinizing hormone (LH) and (FSH). The two testosterone formulations were shown to be bioequivalent. PMID:26754331

  13. An assessment of sex chromosome copy number in a phenotypic female patient with hypergonadtropic hypogonadism, primary amenorrhea and growth retardation by GTG-banding and FISH in peripheral blood and skin tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, I.M.D.; DeMoranville, B.; Grollino, M.G.

    1994-09-01

    The present report describes studies performed on an 18-year-old phenotypic female referred because of primary amenorrhea, hypergonadotropic hypoganadism and growth retardation. The clinical features raised the possibility of a gonadal dysgenesis. The ovaries were not identified on either side. Her testosterone was significantly elevated, with serum level at 48 ng/dl, and her free testosterone at 7 pg/ml. A GTG-banding analysis of 33 peripheral blood leukocytes revealed the modal number of chromosomes to be 46 per cell with a male sex constitution and normal appearing banding patterns (46,XY). In view of the clinical findings, additional cells were scored to rule out low percentage mosaicism. Out of 35 additional GTG-banded cells scored for the sex chromosomes, 4 cells (11.5%) were found to contain only one copy of the X chromosome. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using dual color biotinylated X and Y probes (Imagenetics) was subsequently performed. Out of approximately 500 cells scored, 87% were found to be XY and 9% were found to be positive for the X signal only, versus 7% and 3% X signal only for 2 XY controls, aged 61 and 46, respectively. As loss of the Y chromosome has been reported in elderly males as well as certain males with leukemia, the age of the controls was important to note. To unequivocally establish the presence of mosaicism, a skin biopsy was obtained for fibroblast culture. Out of 388 total cells scored, 286 (74%) were found to be XY and 46 (12%) were found to be X, versus 99% XY and <1% X in controls. GTG-banding analysis of the same fibroblast culture is currently in progress. Preliminary data on this specimen thus far corroborate results of the FISH study. The presence of XY cells, along with an increased testosterone level, raises the distinct possibility of a gonadoblastoma. In view of this increased risk, arrangements are being made for the patient to have a laparoscopy and surgical removal of her presumptive streak gonads.

  14. Bardet-Biedl syndrome in two sisters: A rare incidence

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Chaitanya; Bhat, Ramesh Y.; Bhatt, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by retinitis pigmentosa, obesity, polydactyly, mental retardation and hypogonadism. We present two sisters with this rare genetic condition.

  15. Age-Related Testosterone Decline is due to Waning of Both Testicular and Hypothalamic-Pituitary Function

    PubMed Central

    Golan, Ron; Scovell, Jason M.; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2016-01-01

    Hypogonadism is a condition in which the endogenous secretion of testosterone is either insufficient or inadequate to maintain serum testosterone levels within normal range, and may manifest as a variety of signs and symptoms. Age-related hypogonadism is due to a combination of primary hypogonadism (testicular failure) and secondary hypogonadism (hypothalamic-pituitary axis failure). This review provides insight into the mechanisms resulting in the multifactorial nature of acquired androgen-deficiency, and outlines the current controversy regarding testosterone-replacement therapy in aging males. PMID:26075536

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Kallmann syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Encyclopedia: Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism Encyclopedia: Smell - Impaired Health Topic: Endocrine Diseases Health Topic: Taste and Smell Disorders Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (7 links) ...

  17. Testicular failure following severe diabetic ketoacidosis complicated by hypotensive shock.

    PubMed

    Janem, Waleed; Mastrandrea, Lucy D

    2016-04-01

    The stalling or regression of pubertal development may be the first sign of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism in adolescent males. We report here a case of pediatric hypergonadotropic hypogonadism that likely developed secondary to ischemic injury during severe diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). This case highlights the importance of performing genital exams during all evaluations of pediatric patients. PMID:27099736

  18. GnRH-agonist induced depressive and anxiety symptoms during in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer cycles.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Miki; Azem, Foad; Aharonov, Inbar; Ben Avi, Irit; Yagil, Yaron; Schreiber, Shaul; Amit, Ami; Weizman, Abraham

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether the use of a GnRH agonist inducing a hypogonadic state during IVF-ET cycles induces negative mood symptoms, we conducted a prospective randomized study in 108 women comparing two different controlled ovarian stimulation protocols. A significant phase effect was observed for depression and anxiety symptoms during IVF-ET cycles reflecting an increase in symptoms between the hypogonadal phase and the peak in gonadotropin stimulation; however, the hypogonadal phase induced by the GnRH agonist was not associated with a significant increase in any of the studied mood parameters. PMID:20801439

  19. Could you have low testosterone?

    MedlinePlus

    Male menopause; Andropause; Testosterone deficiency; Androgen deficiency of the aging male; Late-onset hypogonadism ... Testosterone makes a man look and feel like a man. In a man, this hormone helps: Keep ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: CHARGE syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... developmental delay, and an opening in the lip ( cleft lip ) with or without an opening in the roof of the mouth ( cleft palate ). Individuals frequently have hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, which affects ...

  1. Could you have low testosterone?

    MedlinePlus

    ... menopause; Andropause; Testosterone deficiency; Androgen deficiency of the aging male; Late-onset hypogonadism ... Some symptoms may be a normal part of aging. For example, it is normal to feel less ...

  2. Pituitary apoplexy

    MedlinePlus

    ... body's sex glands produce little or no hormones) Hypothyroidism (thyroid gland does not make enough thyroid hormone) ... other missing hormones are not replaced, symptoms of hypothyroidism and hypogonadism may develop.

  3. Testosterone Nasal Gel

    MedlinePlus

    Testosterone nasal gel is used to treat symptoms of low testosterone in men who have hypogonadism (a condition in which the body does not produce enough natural testosterone). Testosterone nasal gel is used only for men ...

  4. Testosterone Buccal

    MedlinePlus

    Testosterone buccal systems are used to treat symptoms of low testosterone in men who have hypogonadism (a condition in which the ... sexual organs and typical male characteristics. Testosterone buccal systems work by replacing testosterone that is normally produced ...

  5. Testosterone Plus Finasteride Treatment After Spinal Cord Injury

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-07

    Spinal Cord Injury; Spinal Cord Injuries; Trauma, Nervous System; Wounds and Injuries; Central Nervous System Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Spinal Cord Diseases; Gonadal Disorders; Endocrine System Diseases; Hypogonadism; Genital Diseases, Male

  6. Bromocriptine

    MedlinePlus

    ... lack of menstrual periods, discharge from the nipples, infertility (difficulty becoming pregnant) and hypogonadism (low levels of ... Parlodel) to treat lack of menstrual periods and infertility caused by hyperprolactinemia, use a method of birth ...

  7. Testosterone deficiency in the aging male

    PubMed Central

    McBride, J. Abram; Carson, Culley C.; Coward, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for hypogonadism is on the rise, particularly in the aging population. Yet treatment in this population represents a unique challenge to clinicians. The physiology of normal aging is complex and often shares the same, often vague, symptoms of hypogonadism. In older men, a highly prevalent burden of comorbid medical conditions and polypharmacy complicates the differentiation of signs and symptoms of hypogonadism from those of normal aging, yet this differentiation is essential to the diagnosis of hypogonadism. Even in older patients with unequivocally symptomatic hypogonadism, the clinician must navigate the potential benefits and risks of treatment that are not clearly defined in older men. More recently, a greater awareness of the potential risks associated with treatment in older men, particularly in regard to cardiovascular risk and mortality, have been appreciated with recent changes in the US Food and Drug Administration recommendations for use of testosterone in aging men. The aim of this review is to provide a framework for the clinician evaluating testosterone deficiency in older men in order to identify correctly and treat clinically significant hypogonadism in this unique population while minimizing treatment-associated harm. PMID:26834840

  8. Pathology or normal variant: what constitutes a delay in puberty?

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Carine; Argente, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Puberty is a complex maturation process that begins during fetal life and persists until the acquisition of reproduction function. The fundamental event that activates puberty occurs in the hypothalamus. A complex neuron network stimulates GnRH secretion, which stimulates pituitary gonadotropin secretion and then gonadal steroid secretion. Pubertal delay is defined as the presentation of clinical signs of puberty 2-2.5 SD later than in the normal population. Three major groups of etiopathogeneses are described: (1) hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, (2) hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, and (3) constitutional delay of puberty (CDP) - the most common cause of delayed puberty in boys. The differential diagnosis between CDP and isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism remains difficult. Mechanisms of pubertal timing are now better understood and genetic or epigenetic causes can explain some pubertal delays. However, there are still unexplained mechanisms. Treatment of delayed puberty is necessary to ensure full pubertal development for the adolescent and in case of hypogonadism, to restore fertility. Finally, precocious diagnosis of hypogonadism is primordial but can be difficult during childhood and in cases of partial hypogonadism. The study of genetic pubertal diseases or of different animal models could help to discover new diagnostic or therapeutic tools. PMID:25011467

  9. Novel Uses for the Anabolic Androgenic Steroids Nandrolone and Oxandrolone in the Management of Male Health.

    PubMed

    Wu, Christopher; Kovac, Jason R

    2016-10-01

    There has recently been renewed interest in novel clinical applications of the anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) testosterone and its synthetic derivatives, particularly given with the rising popularity of testosterone supplementation therapy (TST) for the treatment of male hypogonadism. In this manuscript, we provide a brief review of the history of AAS and discuss clinical applications of two of the more well-known AAS: nandrolone and oxandrolone. Both agents exhibit favorable myotrophic/androgenic ratios and have been investigated for effectiveness in numerous disease states. We also provide a brief synopsis of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) and postulate how these orally active, non-aromatizing, tissue-selective agents might be used in contemporary andrology. Currently, the applications of testosterone alternatives in hypogonadism are limited. However, it is tempting to speculate that these agents may one day become accepted as alternatives, or adjuncts, to the treatment of male hypogonadism. PMID:27535042

  10. 20 years of leptin: role of leptin in human reproductive disorders.

    PubMed

    Chou, Sharon H; Mantzoros, Christos

    2014-10-01

    Leptin, as a key hormone in energy homeostasis, regulates neuroendocrine function, including reproduction. It has a permissive role in the initiation of puberty and maintenance of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. This is notable in patients with either congenital or acquired leptin deficiency from a state of chronic energy insufficiency. Hypothalamic amenorrhea is the best-studied, with clinical trials confirming a causative role of leptin in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Implications of leptin deficiency have also emerged in the pathophysiology of hypogonadism in type 1 diabetes. At the other end of the spectrum, hyperleptinemia may play a role in hypogonadism associated with obesity, polycystic ovarian syndrome, and type 2 diabetes. In these conditions of energy excess, mechanisms of reproductive dysfunction include central leptin resistance as well as direct effects at the gonadal level. Thus, reproductive dysfunction due to energy imbalance at both ends can be linked to leptin. PMID:25056118

  11. Hypotestosteronaemia in the aging male: should we treat it?

    PubMed

    Christe, Nora; Meier, Christoph A

    2015-01-01

    The term male hypogonadism is defined as the failure to maintain physiological concentrations of testosterone, a physiological quantity of sperm or the combination of both. Aetiologically, androgen deficiency can originate from the testes (primary hypogonadism) or from the hypothalamic-pituitary regulation of the testicular function (secondary hypogonadism). The causes of hypogonadism are very diverse and may be genetically determined (e.g. Klinefelter's syndrome) or acquired (tumours, infections, haemochromatosis). Classical hypogonadism linked to an underlying disease, such as a pituitary tumour, is a distinct indication for androgen substitution. But how about the aging male? It is known that there is a highly variable age-related decline in testosterone levels; whether this represents a variation of normality or has a true disease value requiring therapy has been disputed over more than a decade. The key questions surrounding this debate concern not only the age-dependent threshold for serum testosterone but, more importantly, the risks and benefits of testosterone replacement therapy in the aging male. We searched the literature for randomised controlled trials of testosterone administration in aging males with a size of at least 100 patients and a follow-up of at least 6 months, and identified eight studies. These studies mostly tried to evaluate the effect of testosterone on bone density, muscle strength and body composition, rather than clinically meaningful endpoints. Moreover, these trials have provided evidence for relevant cardiovascular adverse events in elderly men. This supports the need for further studies to define the treatment threshold for testosterone levels in the aging male, as well as with regard to the long-term risks and relevant benefits of testosterone therapy in this population. Until we have more solid data in aging males, testing for testosterone deficiency and testosterone replacement should remain reserved for patients with

  12. Men with testosterone deficiency and a history of cardiovascular diseases benefit from long-term testosterone therapy: observational, real-life data from a registry study

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Ahmad; Yassin, Aksam; Haider, Karim Sultan; Doros, Gheorghe; Saad, Farid; Rosano, Giuseppe MC

    2016-01-01

    Background/objectives Long-term testosterone therapy (TTh) in men with hypogonadism has been shown to improve all components of the metabolic syndrome. In this study, we investigated the effects of long-term TTh up to 8 years in hypogonadal men with a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Patients and methods In two urological clinics observational registries, we identified 77 hypogonadal men receiving TTh who also had a history of CVD. The effects of TTh on anthropometric and metabolic parameters were investigated for a maximum duration of 8 years. Any occurrence of major adverse cardiovascular events was reported. All men received long-acting injections of testosterone undecanoate at 3-monthly intervals. Results In 77 hypogonadal men with a history of CVD who received TTh, we observed a significant weight loss and a decrease in waist circumference and body mass index. Mean weight decreased from 114±13 kg to 91±9 kg, change from baseline: −24±1 kg and −20.2%±0.5%. Waist circumference decreased from 112±8 cm to 99±6 cm, change from baseline: −13±0.3 cm. Body mass index decreased from 37±4 to 29±3, change from baseline: −8±0.2 kg/m2. Cardio-metabolic parameters such as lipid pattern, glycemic control, blood pressure, heart rate, and pulse pressure all improved significantly and sustainably. No patient suffered a major adverse cardiovascular event during the full observation time. Conclusion In men with hypogonadism, TTh appears to be effective in achieving sustained improvements in all cardiometabolic risk factors and may be effective as an add-on measure in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular events in hypogonadal men with a history of CVD. PMID:27366080

  13. Kallmann's syndrome: clues to clinical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    John, H; Schmid, C

    2000-04-01

    Hypogonadotropic patients may visit pediatricians, general practitioners, endocrinologists or urologists, presenting with microphallus, cryptochidism or pubertas tarda and delayed bone maturation. Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is characterized, apart from small testes, by the constellation of low serum levels of testosterone, LH and FSH. Kallman's syndrome is characterized by congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with midline defects such as anosmia (a deficiency of the sense of smell). The first case report dates back to 1856, and genetic defects causing the syndrome have been recently described. The diagnosis can be clinically suspected and is established by confirming hormonal studies. PMID:11052640

  14. Testosterone and Male Infertility.

    PubMed

    Ohlander, Samuel J; Lindgren, Mark C; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2016-05-01

    Hypogonadism and its therapies have a significant impact on male fertility potential. It is necessary to determine the etiology to treat and counsel the patient appropriately on therapeutic options. For the hypogonadal male on exogenous testosterone, management should begin with cessation of the exogenous testosterone and supplemental subcutaneous human chorionic gonadotropin and an oral follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-inducing agent to allow reestablishment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and spermatogenesis. Further supplemental therapy with recombinant FSH in some patients may be necessary to achieve optimal semen parameters. PMID:27132576

  15. Testosterone deficiency and quality of life in Australasian testicular cancer survivors: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    O'Carrigan, B; Fournier, M; Olver, I N; Stockler, M R; Whitford, H; Toner, G C; Thomson, D B; Davis, I D; Hanning, F; Singhal, N; Underhill, C; Clingan, P; McDonald, A; Boland, A; Grimison, P

    2014-08-01

    This is the first prospective study in a contemporary Australian/New Zealand population to determine the prevalence of testosterone deficiency in testicular cancer survivors at 12 months from treatment, and any association with poorer quality of life. Hormone assays from 54 evaluable patients in a prospective cohort study revealed biochemical hypogonadism in 18 patients (33%) and low-normal testosterone in 13 patients (24%). We found no association between testosterone levels and quality of life (all P > 0.05). Hypogonadal patients should be considered for testosterone replacement to prevent long-term morbidity. PMID:25081047

  16. Alternatives to testosterone replacement: testosterone restoration

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The European Male Aging Study has demonstrated that the hypogonadism of male aging is predominantly secondary. Theoretically with appropriate stimulation from the pituitary, the aging testis should be able to produce eugonadal levels of testosterone. The strategies for the treatment of late onset hypogonadism (LOH) have focused on replacement with exogenous testosterone versus restoration of endogenous production. The purpose of this article is to review existing peer-reviewed literature supporting the concept of restoration of endogenous testosterone in the treatment of LOH. PMID:25578932

  17. [Pathologic manifestations of hormonal receptor mutations].

    PubMed

    Milgrom, E

    2000-01-01

    Mutations of receptor genes are involved in various aspects of thyroid and gonadal pathology. Activating mutations of TSH and LH receptors are associated with hyperthyroidism and premature puberty. These mutations are dominant and lead to the synthesis of a constitutive receptor, i.e. a receptor active even in the absence of hormone. Inactivating mutations of TSH, gonadotropin and GnRH receptors are recessive. They determine either a hypothyroidism or a hypogonadism. In the case of alterations of gonadotropin receptors the hypogonadism is hypergonadotrophic. It is hypogonadotrophic in the case of mutations of the GnRH receptor. PMID:10989556

  18. A comprehensive approach to the spectrum of abnormal pubertal development.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, Heather; Malhotra, Shilpa

    2012-04-01

    Puberty is the biological transition from childhood to adulthood. The process involves the coordination of hormonal, physical, psychosocial, and cognitive systems to result in physiologic change. Precocious puberty is defined as pubertal development beginning earlier than expected based on normal standards. Gonadotropin dependent precocious puberty is caused by premature activation of the hypothalamus resulting in pulsatile secretion of GnRH. Gonadotropin independent precocious puberty is caused by excess sex hormones from peripheral or external sources. Treatment with GnRH agonists should be offered to prevent early fusion of the epiphyseal plates to avoid unnecessary short stature and should not be based on perceived psychosocial consequences of early puberty. Delayed puberty is the absence of or incomplete development of secondary sexual characteristics. Hypergonadotropic hypogonadism or primary hypogonadism may result from genetic mutation syndromes or can be acquired from antiovarian antibodies, exposure to radiation or chemotherapy, inflammatory insult, or surgical removal of the gonads. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism or secondary hypogonadism is due to hypothalamic dysfunction resulting in impaired secretion of GnRH. The long-term goal for patients with inadequate estrogen stimulation is to maintain the serum concentration of sex steroids within the normal adult range to promote the development of secondary sexual characteristics, prevent premature bone loss, and ultimately to induce fertility when indicated. PMID:22764552

  19. Basal cell carcinomas in a young woman with Steinert's disease.

    PubMed

    Miraglia, E; Cantisani, C; Giustini, S; Ambrifi, M; Soda, G; Calvieri, S

    2014-08-01

    Steinert's disease or Myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by myotonia, muscular dystrophy, cataracts, hypogonadism, frontal balding, and electrocardiographic alterations.Several tumors have been associated with DM1 such as pilomatricoma, thymomas and insulinomas. Herein, we describe the unusual onset of multiple basal cell carcinomas in a young woman with DM1. PMID:25148278

  20. Visual-Motor Integration in Children with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, S. T.; Collin, P. J. L.; Hokken-Koelega, A. C. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is characterised by hypotonia, hypogonadism, short stature, obesity, behavioural problems, intellectual disability, and delay in language, social and motor development. There is very limited knowledge about visual-motor integration in children with PWS. Method: Seventy-three children with PWS aged 7-17 years…

  1. Cognitive, Emotional, Physical and Social Effects of Growth Hormone Treatment in Adults with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoybye, C; Thoren, M.; Bohm, B.

    2005-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a multisystem genetic disorder characterized by short stature, muscular hypotonia, hyperphagia, obesity, maladaptive behaviour, hypogonadism and partial growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD). Severe GHD of other aetiologies has been shown to affect mood and quality of life negatively, and there are reports of…

  2. Testosterone deficiency myopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Orrell, R W; Woodrow, D F; Barrett, M C; Press, M; Dick, D J; Rowe, R C; Lane, R J

    1995-01-01

    Testosterone is recognized to have a positive effect on nitrogen balance and muscle development in hypogonadal men, but significantly myopathy secondary to testosterone deficiency has been reported only rarely. We describe a patient who presented with a myopathy associated with testosterone deficiency, and who demonstrated a significant functional and myometric response to treatment. PMID:7562829

  3. Quality of Life and Psychological Well-Being in GH-Treated, Adult PWS Patients: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertella, L.; Mori, I.; Grugni, G.; Pignatti, R.; Ceriani, F.; Molinari, E.; Ceccarelli, A.; Sartorio, A.; Vettor, R.; Semenza, C.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a congenital alteration of chromosome pair 15. It is characterized by short stature, muscular hypotonia, hyperphagia, obesity, behavioural and emotional disturbances, hypogonadism and partial Growth Hormone (GH) deficiency. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term effect of GH treatment on the…

  4. An unusual case of adolescent type 2 diabetes mellitus: Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Basheer, Riyas; Jalal, Muhammed Jasim Abdul; Gomez, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a complex genetic disorder, characterized by neonatal hypotonia, developmental delay, short stature, childhood obesity, hypogonadism, and characteristic facial features. Here we report a 21-year-old male who presented with uncontrolled glycemic status. He was diagnosed to have diabetes mellitus at the age of 15 with osmotic symptoms - polyuria, polydipsia, and polyphagia. In the early period, after diagnosis, his blood sugars were reasonably controlled with oral hypoglycemic agents. However, a year back, he was switched onto insulin therapy due to secondary OHA failure. On examination, his body mass index was 36 kg/m(2). He had bilateral gynecomastia, decreased biparietal diameter, almond shaped eyes with esotropia. He had hypogonadism and also had mild cognitive impairment. He did not have any proximal myopathy or other focal neurological deficits. Hormonal evaluation showed low testosterone and inappropriately normal fluorescence in situ hybridization suggestive of central hypogonadism. With fetal and neonatal hypotonia, delayed developmental milestones, hypogonadism, and early onset diabetes, he fulfilled the clinical criteria for the diagnosis of PWS. Multidisciplinary approach of clinicians together with family and social support are essential to bring out the optimal outcome for such syndromic cases. PMID:27453871

  5. [In Process Citation].

    PubMed

    Bucher, Julie; Christ, Emanuel R

    2014-04-01

    Diagnosis and therapy of male hypogonadism is still a challenge because of the unspecific clinical signs and symptoms. The clinical presentation of a androgen deficiency is age-related. In the adult men, one can often observe fatigue, decrease in physical capacity, loss of libido and erectile dysfunction. At the physical examination, genitalia have always to be assessed in search of a testes/penis atrophy. Two fasting measurements of total testosterone concentrations by a reliable assay are needed to confirm the diagnosis. By assessing gonadotropines the origin of hypogonadism can be determined (central/secondary or peripheral/primary). Exogenous administration of androgens should be considered in young, sportive, healthy and muscular males. Patients with metabolic syndrome should only be screened for hypogonadism in the presence of suggestive symptoms. Prostate disease, hematocrit higher than 50 %, uncontrolled heart failure and severe obstructive sleep apnea are contraindications of a testosterone replacement therapy. Patients with metabolic-syndrome-associated low testosterone levels should firstly benefit from a lifestyle intervention that can normalize clinical and biochemical hypogonadism. So far, there is no clear evidence for a possible benefit of testosterone therapy in patients with the metabolic syndrome. Similarly, in patients with PADAM (partial androgen deficiency of the aging male) testosterone therapy is not established or recommended. PMID:24670603

  6. Pituitary Disorders and Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Jawiarczyk-Przybyłowska, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Various hormonal disorders can influence bone metabolism and cause secondary osteoporosis. The consequence of this is a significant increase of fracture risk. Among pituitary disorders such effects are observed in patients with Cushing's disease, hyperprolactinemia, acromegaly, and hypopituitarism. Severe osteoporosis is the result of the coexistence of some of these disorders and hypogonadism at the same time, which is quite often. PMID:25873948

  7. Prevalence of Pituitary Hormone Dysfunction, Metabolic Syndrome, and Impaired Quality of Life in Retired Professional Football Players: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Chaloner, Charlene; Evans, Diana; Mathews, Amy; Cohan, Pejman; Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald; Sim, Myung-Shin; Lee, Jihey; Wright, Mathew J.; Kernan, Claudia; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Yuen, Kevin C.J.; Guskiewicz, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hypopituitarism is common after moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Herein, we address the association between mild TBI (mTBI) and pituitary and metabolic function in retired football players. Retirees 30–65 years of age, with one or more years of National Football League (NFL) play and poor quality of life (QoL) based on Short Form 36 (SF-36) Mental Component Score (MCS) were prospectively enrolled. Pituitary hormonal and metabolic syndrome (MetS) testing was performed. Using a glucagon stimulation test, growth hormone deficiency (GHD) was defined with a standard cut point of 3 ng/mL and with a more stringent body mass index (BMI)-adjusted cut point. Subjects with and without hormonal deficiency (HD) were compared in terms of QoL, International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) scores, metabolic parameters, and football career data. Of 74 subjects, 6 were excluded because of significant non-football-related TBIs. Of the remaining 68 subjects (mean age, 47.3±10.2 years; median NFL years, 5; median NFL concussions, 3; mean BMI, 33.8±6.0), 28 (41.2%) were GHD using a peak GH cutoff of <3 ng/mL. However, with a BMI-adjusted definition of GHD, 13 of 68 (19.1%) were GHD. Using this BMI-adjusted definition, overall HD was found in 16 (23.5%) subjects: 10 (14.7%) with isolated GHD; 3 (4.4%) with isolated hypogonadism; and 3 (4.4%) with both GHD and hypogonadism. Subjects with HD had lower mean scores on the IIEF survey (p=0.016) and trended toward lower scores on the SF-36 MCS (p=0.113). MetS was present in 50% of subjects, including 5 of 6 (83%) with hypogonadism, and 29 of 62 (46.8%) without hypogonadism (p=0.087). Age, BMI, median years in NFL, games played, number of concussions, and acknowledged use of performance-enhancing steroids were similar between HD and non-HD groups. In summary, in this cohort of retired NFL players with poor QoL, 23.5% had HD, including 19% with GHD (using a BMI-adjusted definition), 9% with hypogonadism, and

  8. Prevalence of pituitary hormone dysfunction, metabolic syndrome, and impaired quality of life in retired professional football players: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Daniel F; Chaloner, Charlene; Evans, Diana; Mathews, Amy; Cohan, Pejman; Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald; Sim, Myung-Shin; Lee, Jihey; Wright, Mathew J; Kernan, Claudia; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Yuen, Kevin C J; Guskiewicz, Kevin

    2014-07-01

    Hypopituitarism is common after moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Herein, we address the association between mild TBI (mTBI) and pituitary and metabolic function in retired football players. Retirees 30-65 years of age, with one or more years of National Football League (NFL) play and poor quality of life (QoL) based on Short Form 36 (SF-36) Mental Component Score (MCS) were prospectively enrolled. Pituitary hormonal and metabolic syndrome (MetS) testing was performed. Using a glucagon stimulation test, growth hormone deficiency (GHD) was defined with a standard cut point of 3 ng/mL and with a more stringent body mass index (BMI)-adjusted cut point. Subjects with and without hormonal deficiency (HD) were compared in terms of QoL, International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) scores, metabolic parameters, and football career data. Of 74 subjects, 6 were excluded because of significant non-football-related TBIs. Of the remaining 68 subjects (mean age, 47.3±10.2 years; median NFL years, 5; median NFL concussions, 3; mean BMI, 33.8±6.0), 28 (41.2%) were GHD using a peak GH cutoff of <3 ng/mL. However, with a BMI-adjusted definition of GHD, 13 of 68 (19.1%) were GHD. Using this BMI-adjusted definition, overall HD was found in 16 (23.5%) subjects: 10 (14.7%) with isolated GHD; 3 (4.4%) with isolated hypogonadism; and 3 (4.4%) with both GHD and hypogonadism. Subjects with HD had lower mean scores on the IIEF survey (p=0.016) and trended toward lower scores on the SF-36 MCS (p=0.113). MetS was present in 50% of subjects, including 5 of 6 (83%) with hypogonadism, and 29 of 62 (46.8%) without hypogonadism (p=0.087). Age, BMI, median years in NFL, games played, number of concussions, and acknowledged use of performance-enhancing steroids were similar between HD and non-HD groups. In summary, in this cohort of retired NFL players with poor QoL, 23.5% had HD, including 19% with GHD (using a BMI-adjusted definition), 9% with hypogonadism, and 50% had Met

  9. 48,XXYY, 48,XXXY and 49,XXXXY syndromes: not just variants of Klinefelter syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglia, Nicole; Ayari, Natalie; Howell, Susan; D’Epagnier, Cheryl; Zeitler, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Sex chromosome tetrasomy and pentasomy conditions occur in 1:18 000–1:100 000 male births. While often compared with 47,XXY/Klinefelter syndrome because of shared features including tall stature and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, 48,XXYY, 48,XXXY and 49,XXXXY syndromes are associated with additional physical findings, congenital malformations, medical problems and psychological features. While the spectrum of cognitive abilities extends much higher than originally described, developmental delays, cognitive impairments and behavioural disorders are common and require strong treatment plans. Future research should focus on genotype–phenotype relationships and the development of evidence-based treatments. Conclusion The more complex physical, medical and psychological phenotypes of 48,XXYY, 48,XXXY and 49,XXXXY syndromes make distinction from 47,XXY important; however, all of these conditions share features of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and the need for increased awareness, biomedical research and the development of evidence-based treatments. PMID:21342258

  10. Metabolic Syndrome in Childhood: Rare Case of Alstrom Syndrome with Blindness.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Afzal; D'Souza, Benedicta; Yadav, Charu; Agarwal, Ashish; Kumar, Anand; Nandini, M; D'Souza, Vivian; Poornima, A M; Kamath, Nutan

    2016-10-01

    Alstrom's syndrome (AS) is a rare autosomal recessive ciliopathic condition affecting 1:10,00,000 children. It's a single gene disorder of ALMS1 on chromosome 2 with multisystem involvement with cone-rod retinal dystrophy causing juvenile blindness, obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 Diabetes mellitus, hypogonadism and sensorineural hearing loss. Till now only 800 patients with this disorder has been identified so far. In this report, we describe the case of a 9-year old male boy from south India. He had been initially referred for polyphagia, polyuria, polydipsia, generalized weakness from 1 weeks. On examination he was demonstrated features suggestive of AS, including blindness, obesity, type 2 diabetes, altered lipid profile, hypogonadism, acanthosis nigricans, seborrheic dermatitis, right ear discharge and episodes of respiratory tract infections. So, diagnosis of AS is critical as it can easily be overlooked because of the many features associated with metabolic syndrome starting at age 7, a relatively early age. PMID:27605748

  11. Modifying Risk Factors in the Management of Erectile Dysfunction: A Review

    PubMed Central

    DeLay, Kenneth J; Haney, Nora

    2016-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is prevalent among men and its presence is often an indicator of systemic disease. Risk factors for ED include cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), tobacco use, hyperlipidemia, hypogonadism, lower urinary tract symptoms, metabolic syndrome, and depression. Addressing the modifiable risk factors frequently improves a patient's overall health and increases lifespan. The literature suggests that smoking cessation, treatment of hyperlipidemia, and increasing physical activity will improve erectile function in many patients. How the treatment of DM, depression, and hypogonadism impacts erectile function is less clear. Clinicians need to be aware that certain antihypertensive agents can adversely impact erectile function. The treatment of men with ED needs to address the underlying risk factors to ameliorate the disease process. PMID:27574592

  12. Modifying Risk Factors in the Management of Erectile Dysfunction: A Review.

    PubMed

    DeLay, Kenneth J; Haney, Nora; Hellstrom, Wayne Jg

    2016-08-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is prevalent among men and its presence is often an indicator of systemic disease. Risk factors for ED include cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), tobacco use, hyperlipidemia, hypogonadism, lower urinary tract symptoms, metabolic syndrome, and depression. Addressing the modifiable risk factors frequently improves a patient's overall health and increases lifespan. The literature suggests that smoking cessation, treatment of hyperlipidemia, and increasing physical activity will improve erectile function in many patients. How the treatment of DM, depression, and hypogonadism impacts erectile function is less clear. Clinicians need to be aware that certain antihypertensive agents can adversely impact erectile function. The treatment of men with ED needs to address the underlying risk factors to ameliorate the disease process. PMID:27574592

  13. Early onset of puberty in an obese boy with Klinefelter syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Byoung-Wook; Kwon, Seung-Eun; Kim, Soon-Ki; Lee, Taek; Han, Jee-Young

    2016-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is one of the most common disease entities characterized by X-chromosomal aberration causing the primary hypogonadism in adult men. Patients with KS seem to be typically characterized by tall, slender bodies with delayed puberty and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. However, it has been known that they have a broad spectrum of phenotype ranging from almost normal external appearances to typical phenotype. Only 25% KS Patients are ever diagnosed because KS remains unrecognized. Also, boys with KS have an onset of pubertal development within the normal range, not delayed onset of puberty. Adolescents with KS are generally diagnosed as having the lack of pubertal progress. Early detection of KS can be difficult without awareness. We report an unusual case of early onset of puberty in obese boy with KS who presented with a unilateral non-hormone secreting testicular teratoma. PMID:27104178

  14. Familial cytomegalic adrenocortical hypoplasia: an X-linked syndrome of pubertal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Hay, I D; Smail, P J; Forsyth, C C

    1981-01-01

    Five boys with familial cytomegalic adrenocortical hypoplasia have been followed up for an average of 19 years. Despite treatment with replacement corticosteroids, all 5 failed to show a spontaneous onset of puberty and, when assessed at ages 13 to 19 years, all had both sexual infantilism and skeletal immaturity. Hypogonadism was confirmed by low levels of plasma testosterone, and pituitary reserve of gonadotrophin was shown to be inadequate by testing with gonadotrophin-releasing hormone. Two boys, both with adequate testosterone output on human chorionic gonadotrophin stimulation, were given gonadotrophin therapy, whereas the other 3 were treated with parenterally administered testosterone. With treatment, all 5 patients showed advances in pubertal staging. Although the mechanism of the hypogonadotropism remains unclear, the association of hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism with familial cytomegalic adrenocortical hypoplasia appears to be a constant one and may be considered as a treatable inherited syndrome of pubertal failure. PMID:7197507

  15. Androgen function in the pathophysiology and treatment of male Huntington's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Ransome, M I

    2012-10-01

    Low concentrations of circulating testosterone have been associated with dementia manifesting with advancing age and in neurodegenerative conditions. Huntington's disease (HD) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease with an invariably fatal outcome. Severe motor symptoms, psychosis and dementia are symptomatic hallmarks of the progression of HD that result from the dysfunction and death of neocortical and basal ganglia neurones. Treatments are directed toward manifest symptoms, although they are largely ineffectual in slowing or preventing disease progression. Emerging data have identified hypothamic pathologies in HD that result in endocrine disturbances. Clinically defined primary or secondary hypogonadism elicit low circulating testosterone concentrations and have been linked to the development of Alzheimer's disease in men. Examining similar neuroendocrine dysfunction in HD including the nature of manifest hypogonadism in male patients could allow an elucidation of the complex pathophysiology of HD and provide an impetus for hitherto untested testosterone replacement therapy. PMID:22672384

  16. Operative considerations for late-presenting persistent Müllerian duct syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ark, Jacob T; Moses, Kelvin A

    2016-01-01

    Persistent Müllerian duct syndrome (PMDS) is a condition in which a 46, XY male displays masculine external genitalia, but internally retains developed Müllerian duct structures (uterus, fallopian tubes, and upper two-thirds vagina). Thoughtful operative consideration is needed to maximize the therapeutic benefit while minimizing the risk of hypogonadism, infertility, and erectile dysfunction. We report a 53-year-old male with a pelvic mass incidentally discovered on routine ultrasound, intra-operatively discovered to be PMDS. PMDS is a rare condition that may present late in life. The primary operative consideration is performing orchiopexy for cancer surveillance or orchiectomy if orchiopexy is not possible. Additional considerations include surveillance and counseling of infertility, hypogonadism, and assessment of the potential need for involvement of psychiatry. Removal of Müllerian remnants is a subject to debate. If possible, discuss with the patient their risks and options in the preoperative setting to guide operative planning. PMID:27453663

  17. Subcutaneous pellet testosterone replacement therapy: the "first steps" in treating men with spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Gray, Kendra M; Derosa, Angela

    2013-12-01

    The authors describe the case of a 36-year-old man who presented with hormone level concerns 6 months after a rock climbing accident that resulted in paraplegia. Hypogonadism was diagnosed, and the patient received subcutaneous pellet testosterone replacement therapy. Within 6 months, the patient had substantial improvement in muscle function and was able to take several steps with the assistance of crutches or a walker. This case highlights the potential improvement in quality of life and overall prognosis resulting from the subcutaneous pellet form of testosterone when used as part of the overall treatment plan in such patients. Considering the overwhelming preponderance of hypogonadism in men with spinal cord injuries, the standard of care for such patients should include screening, laboratory hormone evaluation, and prompt treatment for testosterone deficiency. PMID:24285035

  18. The unsolved case of "bone-impairing analgesics": the endocrine effects of opioids on bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Coluzzi, Flaminia; Pergolizzi, Joseph; Raffa, Robert B; Mattia, Consalvo

    2015-01-01

    The current literature describes the possible risks for bone fracture in chronic analgesics users. There are three main hypotheses that could explain the increased risk of fracture associated with central analgesics, such as opioids: 1) the increased risk of falls caused by central nervous system effects, including sedation and dizziness; 2) reduced bone mass density caused by the direct opioid effect on osteoblasts; and 3) chronic opioid-induced hypogonadism. The impact of opioids varies by sex and among the type of opioid used (less, for example, for tapentadol and buprenorphine). Opioid-associated androgen deficiency is correlated with an increased risk of osteoporosis; thus, despite that standards have not been established for monitoring and treating opioid-induced hypogonadism or hypoadrenalism, all patients chronically taking opioids (particularly at doses ≥100 mg morphine daily) should be monitored for the early detection of hormonal impairment and low bone mass density. PMID:25848298

  19. The unsolved case of “bone-impairing analgesics”: the endocrine effects of opioids on bone metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Coluzzi, Flaminia; Pergolizzi, Joseph; Raffa, Robert B; Mattia, Consalvo

    2015-01-01

    The current literature describes the possible risks for bone fracture in chronic analgesics users. There are three main hypotheses that could explain the increased risk of fracture associated with central analgesics, such as opioids: 1) the increased risk of falls caused by central nervous system effects, including sedation and dizziness; 2) reduced bone mass density caused by the direct opioid effect on osteoblasts; and 3) chronic opioid-induced hypogonadism. The impact of opioids varies by sex and among the type of opioid used (less, for example, for tapentadol and buprenorphine). Opioid-associated androgen deficiency is correlated with an increased risk of osteoporosis; thus, despite that standards have not been established for monitoring and treating opioid-induced hypogonadism or hypoadrenalism, all patients chronically taking opioids (particularly at doses ≥100 mg morphine daily) should be monitored for the early detection of hormonal impairment and low bone mass density. PMID:25848298

  20. Opioid-Induced Androgen Deficiency (OPIAD): Diagnosis, Management, and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Timothy K; Wosnitzer, Matthew S

    2016-10-01

    Opioid-induced androgen deficiency (OPIAD) was initially recognized as a possible consequence of opioid use roughly four decades ago. Long-acting opioid use carries risks of addiction, tolerance, and systemic side effects including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with consequent testosterone depletion leading to multiple central and peripheral effects. Hypogonadism is induced through direct inhibitory action of opioids on receptors within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axes as well as testosterone production within the testes. Few studies have systematically investigated hormonal changes induced by long-term opioid administration or the effects of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) in patients with OPIAD. Clomiphene citrate, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), is a testosterone enhancement treatment which upregulates endogenous hypothalamic function. This review will focus on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of OPIAD, including summary of literature evaluating OPIAD treatment with TRT, and areas of future investigation. PMID:27586511

  1. Progressive hearing loss associated with a unique cervical node due to a homozygous SLC29A3 mutation: a very mild phenotype.

    PubMed

    Jonard, Laurence; Couloigner, Vincent; Pierrot, Sébastien; Louha, Malek; Gherbi, Souad; Denoyelle, Françoise; Marlin, Sandrine

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, SLC29A3 has been implicated in a syndromic form of genodermatosis: H syndrome. The major features encountered in H syndrome are Hearing loss, Hyperglycaemia, Heart anomalies, Hypertrichosis, Hyperpigmentation, Hepatomegaly and Hypogonadism. More recently, SLC29A3 mutations have been described in families presenting syndromes associating generalized histiocytosis to systemic progressive features: severe camptodactyly, hearing loss, hypogonadism, hepatomegaly, heart defects and skin hyperpigmentation. We have identified a homozygous missense SLC29A3 mutation in a patient presenting with only a progressive sensorineural hearing impairment and a single cervical node (Rosai Dorfman). SLC29A3 mutations appear to be involved in a large phenotypic continuum which should prompt physicians to study this gene even in mild clinical presentations. PMID:21888995

  2. Operative considerations for late-presenting persistent Müllerian duct syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ark, Jacob T.; Moses, Kelvin A.

    2016-01-01

    Persistent Müllerian duct syndrome (PMDS) is a condition in which a 46, XY male displays masculine external genitalia, but internally retains developed Müllerian duct structures (uterus, fallopian tubes, and upper two-thirds vagina). Thoughtful operative consideration is needed to maximize the therapeutic benefit while minimizing the risk of hypogonadism, infertility, and erectile dysfunction. We report a 53-year-old male with a pelvic mass incidentally discovered on routine ultrasound, intra-operatively discovered to be PMDS. PMDS is a rare condition that may present late in life. The primary operative consideration is performing orchiopexy for cancer surveillance or orchiectomy if orchiopexy is not possible. Additional considerations include surveillance and counseling of infertility, hypogonadism, and assessment of the potential need for involvement of psychiatry. Removal of Müllerian remnants is a subject to debate. If possible, discuss with the patient their risks and options in the preoperative setting to guide operative planning. PMID:27453663

  3. From the gut to the strut: where inflammation reigns, bone abstains.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Jameel; Yuen, Tony; Sun, Li; Zaidi, Mone

    2016-06-01

    In this issue of the JCI, Li et al. show that germ-free mice, when chemically castrated, do not lose bone - a finding that unequivocally establishes a role of gut microbiota in mediating hypogonadal bone loss. Additionally and not unexpectedly, probiotics reversed hypogonadal osteopenia in sex steroid-deficient mice by preventing the disruption of gut barrier function and dampening cytokine-induced inflammation. The authors propose that TNFα is a key mediator; however, it is very likely that other molecules - including IL-1, IL-6, IL-17, RANKL, OPG, and CCL2 - modulate probiotic action. The results of this study highlight the potential for repurposing probiotics for the therapy of osteoporosis. Future placebo-controlled clinical trials will be required to establish safety and efficacy of probiotics in reducing fracture risk in people. PMID:27111233

  4. A summary of the controversy surrounding off-label medications in men's health.

    PubMed

    Parker, Adam; Bruha, Matthew; Akinola, Oluwaseun; Welliver, Charles

    2016-04-01

    While there are common and accepted practices in men's health, barriers exist to treatment of these disorders with Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved medications. In male factor infertility, these barriers include studies that are often underpowered for desired outcomes. This has led to the use of medications previously examined in females in an off-label fashion for treatment of male infertility. Issues surrounding the treatment of hypogonadism in men are more complex, becoming increasingly so in the last few years. Drug companies have developed compounds for treatment of hypogonadism for particular subgroups of men. However, the indicated groups for these medications are narrow leading to these medications being regularly used for an indication the FDA considers to be part of "normal aging". This work will examine the controversy surrounding the use of off-label medications in men's health and how factors like pharma advertising, FDA regulation and difficulties in creating adequate studies has affected the current paradigm. PMID:27141447

  5. Osteoporotic fracture healing: potential use of medicinal plants from the tropics.

    PubMed

    Abdul Jalil, Mohd Azri; Shuid, Ahmad Nazrun; Muhammad, Norliza

    2013-12-01

    With improvements in living standards and healthcare, life expectancy has been increasing dramatically in most parts of the world. These situations lead to the increase in the reported cases of geriatrics-related diseases such as hypogonadal osteoporosis with skeletal fracture being the ultimate outcome, which eventually causes significant morbidity and mortality. The deficient gonadal hormones, which are the main cause of hypogonadal osteoporosis, could be substituted with hormone replacement therapy to hinder bone loss. However, the artificial hormonal therapy has been linked to grievous conditions such as breast and prostate cancers. In view of the various adverse effects associated with conventional treatment, many researchers are now focusing on finding alternative remedies from nature. This article explores the possibilities of certain medicinal plants native to Malaysia that possess androgenic and antioxidant properties to potentially be used in the treatment of fracture due to osteoporosis in ageing people. PMID:24354586

  6. Early onset of puberty in an obese boy with Klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cho, Byoung-Wook; Kwon, Seung-Eun; Kim, Soon-Ki; Lee, Taek; Han, Jee-Young; Lee, Ji-Eun

    2016-03-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is one of the most common disease entities characterized by X-chromosomal aberration causing the primary hypogonadism in adult men. Patients with KS seem to be typically characterized by tall, slender bodies with delayed puberty and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. However, it has been known that they have a broad spectrum of phenotype ranging from almost normal external appearances to typical phenotype. Only 25% KS Patients are ever diagnosed because KS remains unrecognized. Also, boys with KS have an onset of pubertal development within the normal range, not delayed onset of puberty. Adolescents with KS are generally diagnosed as having the lack of pubertal progress. Early detection of KS can be difficult without awareness. We report an unusual case of early onset of puberty in obese boy with KS who presented with a unilateral non-hormone secreting testicular teratoma. PMID:27104178

  7. Testosterone therapy in the new era of Food and Drug Administration oversight

    PubMed Central

    Desroches, Bethany; Kohn, Taylor P.; Welliver, Charles; Pastuszak, Alexander W.

    2016-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) introduced changes in labeling and indications for use to testosterone products in 2015 due to a possible increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) events. This decision was made based on six clinical studies—some that supported an increased CV risk, and some that did not. Since this decision, additional studies have been published examining the interplay between hypogonadism, CV risk, and testosterone, demonstrating that the risk may be lower than originally estimated. Clinicians are placed in a difficult position, as studies support an increased mortality risk in hypogonadal men, but also an increased risk of CV events in men on testosterone therapy. As a result, many clinicians will be more selective in their prescribing of testosterone. In this review, we examine how these new guidelines arose and how they may affect prescribing habits. PMID:27141448

  8. [48,XXYY men with azoospermia: how to manage infertility?].

    PubMed

    Roche, C; Sonigo, C; Benmiloud-Tandjaoui, N; Boujenah, J; Benzacken, B; Poncelet, C; Hugues, J-N

    2014-01-01

    48,XXYY syndrome is a rare form of sex chromosomal aneuploidy. Usually considered as a variant of Klinefelter syndrome because of shared features (azoospermia, tall stature, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism), it is a separate entity because diagnostic is currently made in prepubertal boy with neuro-psychological disorders. We here report the case of a 48,XXYY patient consulting for adult infertility and the indication to perform testicular sperm extraction is discussed. PMID:24934769

  9. [A report of 2 cases of Turner's syndrome with a ring X chromosome].

    PubMed

    Migliori, M V; Bartolotta, E; Maurizi, M; Bonazzi, P; Cardinale, G; Manunza, V

    1991-09-01

    The authors report two cases of Turner syndrome with clinical evidence of only primitive hypogonadism and short stature. Karyotype analysis showed X ring mosaicism which is present only in 5% of cases of Turner syndrome. The authors agree with the hypothesis suggesting no relationship between break points on the X chromosome and phenotypical aspect. An earlier diagnosis is auspicious so that, using correct therapy, final height should be improved. PMID:1758399

  10. Can Serum Testosterone Be Used as a Marker of Overall Health?

    PubMed Central

    Mederos, Michael A; Bernie, Aaron M; Scovell, Jason M; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2015-01-01

    Low serum testosterone has been associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and atherosclerosis. Individuals with these comorbidities are at increased risk of premature death and other adverse health effects. Clinical data portend low testosterone as a risk factor for developing these conditions which are supported by the hypogonadal-obesity-adipocytokine hypothesis. The authors support comprehensive evaluation for these comorbid conditions in men found to have low serum testosterone. PMID:26839520