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Sample records for hyporheic zone affect

  1. Heat transport model within the hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzadri, Alessandra; Tonina, Daniele; Bellin, Alberto

    2010-05-01

    Temperature is a key quantity in controlling water quality, aquatic habitats and the distribution of aquatic invertebrates within the hyporheic zone. Despite its importance in all processes (e.g., biogeochemical reactions and organism metabolism, growth, movement and migration) occurring within the streambed sediment, only few experimental and numerical works analyzed temperature distribution within the hyporheic zone, while little is known on the control that river morphology exerts on temperature dynamics. In the present work, we analyze the effects of river morphology on the thermal regime of the hyporheic zone from a modelling perspective. Our goal is to identify the dominant processes that affect the hyporheic thermal regime and gradients, which influence the rates of microbial and biogeochemical processes. With this objective in mind, we developed a simplified process-based model, which predicts the temperature pattern within the streambed sediment taking into account the external forcing due to the daily temperature variations of the in-stream water and the hyporheic exchange due to streambed morphology. To simplify the analysis the hydraulic conductivity of the streambed sediment is assumed homogeneous and isotropic, and the hyporheic velocity field is obtained analytically by solving the flow equation with the near-bed piezometric head of the stream flow as the linkage between surface and subsurface flows. Furthermore, we solved the heat transport equation with a Lagrangian approach and by neglecting transverse dispersivity. Our model results show a complex near-bed hyporheic temperature distributions, which vary temporally and are strongly related to the in-stream water residence time into the hyporheic zone and consequently to the bed morphology and flow discharge. We compared the temperature dynamics within the hyporheic zone of both large low-gradient and small steep streams to investigate the effect of stream morphology. Results show that the

  2. Nitrogen processing in the hyporheic zone and its response to stream-groundwater interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Stanley; Azizian, Morvarid; Boano, Fulvio

    2016-04-01

    Modeling and experimental studies have shown that stream-groundwater interactions reduce hyporheic exchange, but the implications of this observation for hyporheic zone function are not yet clear. In this study we develop and test a simple process-based model for nitrate cycling in the hyporheic zone of a gaining or losing stream. Our model reproduces field measurements of nitrate uptake velocity and predicts that stream-groundwater interactions: (1) reduce hyporheic exchange; (2) reduce the residence time of water in the hyporheic zone; (3) slow denitrification; and (4) can cause stream sediments to switch from a net sink to source of nitrate. Stream-groundwater interactions attenuate denitrification across at least two scales of hyporheic exchange (fluvial dunes and riffle-pool bedforms). These results suggest that changes in regional groundwater hydrology (e.g., brought on by climate change) can indirectly affect stream nitrogen budgets by altering the form and function of the hyporheic zone.

  3. Temporal Hyporheic Zone Response to Water Table Fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Malzone, Jonathan M; Anseeuw, Sierra K; Lowry, Christopher S; Allen-King, Richelle

    2016-03-01

    Expansion and contraction of the hyporheic zone due to temporal hydrologic changes between stream and riparian aquifer influence the biogeochemical cycling capacity of streams. Theoretical studies have quantified the control of groundwater discharge on the depth of the hyporheic zone; however, observations of temporal groundwater controls are limited. In this study, we develop the concept of groundwater-dominated differential hyporheic zone expansion to explain the temporal control of groundwater discharge on the hyporheic zone in a third-order stream reach flowing through glacially derived terrain typical of the Great Lakes region. We define groundwater-dominated differential expansion of the hyporheic zone as: differing rates and magnitudes of hyporheic zone expansion in response to seasonal vs. storm-related water table fluctuation. Specific conductance and vertical hydraulic gradient measurements were used to map changes in the hyporheic zone during seasonal water table decline and storm events. Planar and riffle beds were monitored in order to distinguish the cause of increasing hyporheic zone depth. Planar bed seasonal expansion of the hyporheic zone was of a greater magnitude and longer in duration (weeks to months) than storm event expansion (hours to days). In contrast, the hyporheic zone beneath the riffle bed exhibited minimal expansion in response to seasonal groundwater decline compared to storm related expansion. Results indicated that fluctuation in the riparian water table controlled seasonal expansion of the hyporheic zone along the planar bed. This groundwater induced hyporheic zone expansion could increase the potential for biogeochemical cycling and natural attenuation. PMID:26096382

  4. Controls on Mixing-Dependent Denitrification in Hyporheic Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, E. T.; Young, K. I.; Widdowson, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Interaction of surface water and groundwater in hyporheic sediments of river systems is known to create unique biogeochemical conditions that can attenuate contaminants flowing downstream. Oxygen, carbon, and the contaminants themselves (e.g., excess nitrate) often advect together through the hyporheic zone from sources in surface water. However, the ability of the hyporheic zone to attenuate contaminants in upwelling groundwater plumes as they exit to rivers is less known. Such reactions may be more dependent on mixing of carbon and oxygen sources from surface water with contaminants from deeper groundwater. We simulated hyporheic flow cells and upwelling groundwater together with mixing-dependent denitrification of an upwelling nitrate plume in shallow riverbed sediments using MODFLOW and SEAM3D. For our first set of model scenarios, we set biogeochemical boundary conditions to be consistent with situations where only mixing-dependent denitrification occurred within the model domain. This occurred where dissolved organic carbon (DOC) advecting from surface water through hyporheic flow cells meets nitrate upwelling from deeper groundwater. This would be common where groundwater is affected by septic systems which contribute nitrate that upwells into streams that do not have significant nitrate sources from upstream. We conducted a sensitivity analysis that showed that mixing-dependent denitrification increased with parameters that increase mixing itself, such as the degree of heterogeneity of sediment hydraulic conductivity (K). Mixing-dependent denitrification also increased with certain biogeochemical boundary concentrations such as increasing DOC or decreasing dissolved oxygen (DO) advecting from surface water. For our second set of model scenarios, we set biogeochemical boundary conditions to be consistent with common situations where non-mixing-dependent denitrification also occurred within the model domain. For example, when nitrate concentrations are

  5. Effect of enhanced manganese oxidation in the hyporheic zone on basin-scale geochemical mass balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Judson W.; Fuller, Christopher C.

    1998-04-01

    We determined the role of the hyporheic zone (the subsurface zone where stream water and shallow groundwater mix) in enhancing microbially mediated oxidation of dissolved manganese (to form manganese precipitates) in a drainage basin contaminated by copper mining. The fate of manganese is of overall importance to water quality in Pinal Creek Basin, Arizona, because manganese reactions affect the transport of trace metals. The basin-scale role of the hyporheic zone is difficult to quantify because stream-tracer studies do not always reliably characterize the cumulative effects of the hyporheic zone. This study determined cumulative effects of hyporheic reactions in Pinal Creek basin by characterizing manganese uptake at several spatial scales (stream-reach scale, hyporheic-flow-path scale, and sediment-grain scale). At the stream-reach scale a one-dimensional stream-transport model (including storage zones to represent hyporheic flow paths) was used to determine a reach-averaged time constant for manganese uptake in hyporheic zones, 1/λs, of 1.3 hours, which was somewhat faster but still similar to manganese uptake time constants that were measured directly in centimeter-scale hyporheic flow paths (1/λh = 2.6 hours), and in laboratory batch experiments using streambed sediment (1/λ = 2.7 hours). The modeled depths of subsurface storage zones (ds = 4-17 cm) and modeled residence times of water in storage zones (ts = 3-12 min) were both consistent with direct measurements in hyporheic flow paths (dh = 0-15 cm, th = 1-25 min). There was also good agreement between reach-scale modeling and direct measurements of the percentage removal of dissolved manganese in hyporheic flow paths (fs = 8.9%, andfh = 9.3%rpar;. Manganese uptake experiments in the laboratory using sediment from Pinal Creek demonstrated (through comparison of poisoned and unpoisoned treatments) that the manganese removal process was enhanced by microbially mediated oxidation. The cumulative effect of

  6. Determining long time-scale hyporheic zone flow paths in Antarctic streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gooseff, M.N.; McKnight, Diane M.; Runkel, R.L.; Vaughn, B.H.

    2003-01-01

    hyporheic zones, in which slower biogeochemical reaction rates may affect stream-water chemistry at longer time-scales. Copyright ?? 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Determining long time-scale hyporheic zone flow paths in Antarctic streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooseff, Michael N.; McKnight, Diane M.; Runkel, Robert L.; Vaughn, Bruce H.

    2003-06-01

    In the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica, glaciers are the source of meltwater during the austral summer, and the streams and adjacent hyporheic zones constitute the entire physical watershed; there are no hillslope processes in these systems. Hyporheic zones can extend several metres from each side of the stream, and are up to 70 cm deep, corresponding to a lateral cross-section as large as 12 m2, and water resides in the subsurface year around. In this study, we differentiate between the near-stream hyporheic zone, which can be characterized with stream tracer experiments, and the extended hyporheic zone, which has a longer time-scale of exchange. We sampled stream water from Green Creek and from the adjacent saturated alluvium for stable isotopes of D and 18O to assess the significance and extent of stream-water exchange between the streams and extended hyporheic zones over long time-scales (days to weeks). Our results show that water residing in the extended hyporheic zone is much more isotopically enriched (up to 11 D and 2·2 18O) than stream water. This result suggests a long residence time within the extended hyporheic zone, during which fractionation has occurred owing to summer evaporation and winter sublimation of hyporheic water. We found less enriched water in the extended hyporheic zone later in the flow season, suggesting that stream water may be exchanged into and out of this zone, on the time-scale of weeks to months. The transient storage model OTIS was used to characterize the exchange of stream water with the extended hyporheic zone. Model results yield exchange rates () generally an order magnitude lower (10-5 s-1) than those determined using stream-tracer techniques on the same stream. In light of previous studies in these streams, these results suggest that the hyporheic zones in Antarctic streams have near-stream zones of rapid stream-water exchange, where fast biogeochemical reactions may influence water chemistry, and extended hyporheic

  8. Effect of enhanced manganese oxidation in the hyporheic zone on basin-scale geochemical mass balance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, J.W.; Fuller, C.C.

    1998-01-01

    We determined the role of the hyporheic zone (the subsurface zone where stream water and shallow groundwater mix) in enhancing microbially mediated oxidation of dissolved manganese (to form manganese precipitates) in a drainage basin contaminated by copper mining. The fate of manganese is of overall importance to water quality in Pinal Creek Basin, Arizona, because manganese reactions affect the transport of trace metals. The basin-scale role of the hyporheic zone is difficult to quantify because stream-tracer studies do not always reliably characterize the cumulative effects of the hyporheic zone. This study determined cumulative effects of hyporheic reactions in Pinal Creek basin by characterizing manganese uptake at several spatial scales (stream-reach scale, hyporheicflow-path scale, and sediment-grain scale). At the stream-reach scale a one-dimensional stream-transport model (including storage zones to represent hyporheic flow paths) was used to determine a reach-averaged time constant for manganese uptake in hyporheic zones, 1/??(s), of 1.3 hours, which was somewhat faster but still similar to manganese uptake time constants that were measured directly in centimeter-scale hyporheic flow paths (1/??(h) = 2.6 hours), and in laboratory batch experiments using streambed sediment (1/?? = 2.7 hours). The modeled depths of subsurface storage zones (d(s) = 4-17 cm) and modeled residence times of water in storage zones (t(s) = 3-12 min) were both consistent with direct measurements in hyporheic flow paths (d(h) = 0-15 cm, and t(h) = 1-25 min). There was also good agreement between reach-scale modeling and direct measurements of the percentage removal of dissolved manganese in hyporheic flow paths (f(s) = 8.9%, and f(h) = 9.3%). Manganese uptake experiments in the laboratory using sediment from Pinal Creek demonstrated (through comparison of poisoned and unpoisoned treatments) that the manganese removal process was enhanced by microbially mediated oxidation. The

  9. Influence of the Hyporheic Zone on Supersaturated Gas Exposure to Incubating Chum Salmon

    SciTech Connect

    Arntzen, Evan V.; Geist, David R.; Murray, Katherine J.; Vavrinec, John; Dawley, Earl M.; Schwartz, Dennis E.

    2009-12-01

    Supersaturated total dissolved gas (TDG) is elevated seasonally in the lower Columbia River, with surface water concentrations approaching 120% saturation of TDG. Chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) embryos incubating in nearby spawning areas could be affected if depth-compensated TDG concentrations within the hyporheic zone exceed 103% TDG. The objective of this study was to determine if TDG of the hyporheic zone in two chum salmon spawning areas -- one in a side channel near Ives Island, Washington, and another on the mainstem Columbia River near Multnomah Falls, Oregon -- was affected by the elevated TDG of the surface water. Depth-compensated hyporheic TDG did not exceed 103% at the Multnomah Falls site. However, in the Ives Island area, chum salmon redds were exposed to TDG greater than 103% for more than 600 hours. In response to river depth fluctuations, TDG varied significantly in the Ives Island area, suggesting increased interaction between the hyporheic zone and surface water at that site. We conclude from this study that the interaction between surface water and the hyporheic zone affects the concentration of TDG within the hyporheic zone directly via physical mixing as well as indirectly by altering water chemistry and thus dissolved gas solubility. These interactions are important considerations when estimating TDG exposure within egg pocket environments, facilitating improved exposure estimates, and enabling managers to optimize recovery strategies.

  10. Physicochemical characteristics of the hyporheic zone affect redd site selection of chum salmon and fall chinook salmon in the Columbia River

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, David R. ); Hanrahan, Timothy P. ); Arntzen, Evan V. ); McMichael, Geoffrey A. ); Murray, Christopher J. ); Chien, Yi-Ju )

    2002-11-01

    Chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta and fall chinook salmon O. tshawytscha spawned at different locations in the vicinity of Ives Island, Washington, a side channel to the Columbia River downstream of Bonneville Dam. We hypothesized that measurements of water depth, substrate size, and water velocity alone would not explain the separation in spawning areas and began a 2-year investigation of physicochemical characteristics of the hyporheic zone. We found that chum salmon spawned in upwelling water that was significantly warmer than the surrounding river water. In contrast, fall chinook salmon constructed redds at downwelling sites where there was no difference in temperature between the river and its bed. Understanding the specific features that are important for chum salmon and fall chinook salmon redd site selection at Ives Island will be useful to resource managers attempting to maximize available spawning habitat for these species within the constraints imposed by other water resource needs.

  11. Flow regulation effects on the hydrogeochemistry of the hyporheic zone in boreal rivers.

    PubMed

    Siergieiev, D; Widerlund, A; Ingri, J; Lundberg, A; Öhlander, B

    2014-11-15

    River-aquifer interfaces are essential for ecosystem functioning in terms of nutrient exchange and biological habitat, but are greatly threatened world-wide. This study examined geochemical aspects of river-aquifer interaction in one regulated and one unregulated boreal river in Northern Sweden to determine whether the geochemical functioning of the hyporheic zone is affected by hydrological alterations, e.g. regulated river discharge and river-aquifer connectivity. In the unregulated Kalix River, the hyporheic pore water was well-oxygenated with orthogonal fluxes (≈0.6-0.7 m d(-1)) and acted as a sink for Fe, Mn, Al, NH4, and Ca, with fractional losses of 95%, 92%, 45%, 31%, and 15%, respectively. A corresponding elevation in the concentrations of these elements in the hyporheic sediment was observed, with higher saturation indices of Fe-, Mn-, and Al-bearing secondary minerals in hyporheic waters. In the regulated Lule River, hydraulic connectivity at the river-aquifer interface was altered by the presence of a clogging layer (0.04 m d(-1)). In addition, the river discharge oscillated daily, severely reducing exchange flows across the riverbed (<0.01 m d(-1)). As a result, the hyporheic pore water was suboxic, with elevated concentrations of filtered Fe and Mn (fractional increases of ≈3700% and ≈2500%, respectively) and other solutes (NH4, Si, S, Ca). A conceptual model revealed functional differences between geochemical features of the hyporheic zone of regulated and unregulated rivers. Overall, the results showed that hyporheic processes are altered along regulated rivers, with resulting impacts on the geochemistry of riverine, riparian and related marine ecosystems. PMID:25022722

  12. MTBE, TBA, and TAME attenuation in diverse hyporheic zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmeyer, J.E.; Bradley, P.M.; Trego, D.A.; Hale, K.G.; Haas, J.E., II

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater contamination by fuel-related compounds such as the fuel oxygenates methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), and tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME) presents a significant issue to managers and consumers of groundwater and surface water that receives groundwater discharge. Four sites were investigated on Long Island, New York, characterized by groundwater contaminated with gasoline and fuel oxygenates that ultimately discharge to fresh, brackish, or saline surface water. For each site, contaminated groundwater discharge zones were delineated using pore water geochemistry data from 15 feet (4.5 m) beneath the bottom of the surface water body in the hyporheic zone and seepage-meter tests were conducted to measure discharge rates. These data when combined indicate that MTBE, TBA, and TAME concentrations in groundwater discharge in a 5-foot (1.5-m) thick section of the hyporheic zone were attenuated between 34% and 95%, in contrast to immeasurable attenuation in the shallow aquifer during contaminant transport between 0.1 and 1.5 miles (0.1 to 2.4 km). The attenuation observed in the hyporheic zone occurred primarily by physical processes such as mixing of groundwater and surface water. Biodegradation also occurred as confirmed in laboratory microcosms by the mineralization of U- 14C-MTBE and U- 14C-TBA to 14CO2 and the novel biodegradation of U- 14C-TAME to 14CO2 under oxic and anoxic conditions. The implication of fuel oxygenate attenuation observed in diverse hyporheic zones suggests an assessment of the hyporheic zone attenuation potential (HZAP) merits inclusion as part of site assessment strategies associated with monitored or engineered attenuation. ?? 2009 National Ground Water Association.

  13. MTBE, TBA, and TAME attenuation in diverse hyporheic zones.

    PubMed

    Landmeyer, James E; Bradley, Paul M; Trego, Donald A; Hale, Kevin G; Haas, Joseph E

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater contamination by fuel-related compounds such as the fuel oxygenates methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), and tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME) presents a significant issue to managers and consumers of groundwater and surface water that receives groundwater discharge. Four sites were investigated on Long Island, New York, characterized by groundwater contaminated with gasoline and fuel oxygenates that ultimately discharge to fresh, brackish, or saline surface water. For each site, contaminated groundwater discharge zones were delineated using pore water geochemistry data from 15 feet (4.5 m) beneath the bottom of the surface water body in the hyporheic zone and seepage-meter tests were conducted to measure discharge rates. These data when combined indicate that MTBE, TBA, and TAME concentrations in groundwater discharge in a 5-foot (1.5-m) thick section of the hyporheic zone were attenuated between 34% and 95%, in contrast to immeasurable attenuation in the shallow aquifer during contaminant transport between 0.1 and 1.5 miles (0.1 to 2.4 km). The attenuation observed in the hyporheic zone occurred primarily by physical processes such as mixing of groundwater and surface water. Biodegradation also occurred as confirmed in laboratory microcosms by the mineralization of U- (14)C-MTBE and U-(14)C-TBA to (14)CO(2) and the novel biodegradation of U- (14)C-TAME to (14)CO(2) under oxic and anoxic conditions. The implication of fuel oxygenate attenuation observed in diverse hyporheic zones suggests an assessment of the hyporheic zone attenuation potential (HZAP) merits inclusion as part of site assessment strategies associated with monitored or engineered attenuation. PMID:19664047

  14. How do Hyporheic Zones Mediate Stream Solute Loads? Using Antarctic Glacial Melt Streams to Simplify the Problem.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlostowski, A. N.; Gooseff, M. N.; McKnight, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica are one of the coldest and driest places on earth. This polar desert provides a simple hydrologic system, where seasonally intermittent streams convey glacier melt water into closed basin lakes. Streams are underlain by continuous permafrost, but during the flow season a thawed hyporheic zone (<1m) develops around the open channel. The exchange of relatively dilute glacier water with hyporheic sediments facilitates weathering processes that control stream solute loads. This study uses several end-member mixing models to simulate concentration - discharge relationships observed in 14 streams, using over 20 years of hydro chemical data. Results show that (1) streams exhibit chemostatic behavior across daily and annual timescales, indicating a temporally variable flux of solutes from the hyporheic zone; (2) the chemical budgets of longer streams are more influenced by hyporheic zone reactions than shorter streams; and (3) end-member mixing models and naturally occurring tracers allow for the passive modeling of hyporheic exchange processes. This work provides insight into how weathering contributions from hyporheic zones affect catchment ionic budgets in diverse temperate and polar catchments with dilute snow and glacial meltwater sources of streamflow.

  15. Cooling Along Hyporheic Pathlines in a Large River Riparian Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, B. R.; Forshay, K. J.; Brooks, J.; Adeuya, R. K.; Cline, S. P.

    2012-12-01

    Floodplains can contribute to hyporheic cooling and moderation of temperature for rivers, but extent and magnitude are dependent on ground water hydrology. Here we illustrate the controls and dynamics of hyporheic cooling in the ground water of a large river floodplain. We used field data and numerical flow modeling in a region where cooling may influence the formation of coldwater refugia, a valuable ecosystem service for the preservation of salmon habitat. Hyporheic flow and ground water temperature were extensively monitored and characterized along a floodplain section of the Willamette River, Oregon, USA. Numerical flow modeling was done for the strongly contrasting dry and wet season flow patterns. During the warm dry season of our study, we observed significant temperature reduction with distance along most of the pathlines. Examination of particle tracking results indicate that in our site's floodplain areas, hyporheic flow during the wet season often has a locally downward component due to recharge from infiltration of rainfall, although dry season ground water flow also often moves deeper along the longer pathlines. In the dry season, pathlines trend to horizontal. Overall, the observed dry season temperature profiles obeyed the analytical solution to a one-dimensional steady-state governing equation for heat transfer in porous media, with differing thermal Péclet numbers. In one gravel bar, a mean pathline length of about 600 m reduced temperature 18 to 11 degrees Celsius. This cooling occurred over a residence time of 3-4 years before re-emergence, and incorporates the water table fluctuation, and wet season recharge from infiltration of rainfall that produces a locally downward trend of the hyporheic water prior to moving upward and discharging to cutoffs and alcoves. In some of the islands, wet season ground water underwent sufficient mounding to halt or reverse dry season river water that had entered the hyporheic zone. In our floodplain site water

  16. A New Dimensionless Number for Redox Conditions within the Hyporheic Zone: Morphological and Biogeochemical Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzadri, A.; Tonina, D.; Bellin, A.

    2012-12-01

    We introduce a new Damköhler number, Da, to quantify the biogeochemical status of the hyporheic zone and to upscale local hyporheic processes to reach scale. Da is defined as the ratio between the median hyporheic residence time, τup,50, which is a representative time scale of the hyporheic flow, and a representative time scale of biogeochemical reactions, which we define as the time τlim needed to consume dissolved oxygen to a prescribed threshold concentration below which reducing reactions are activated: Da = τup,50/τlim. This approach accounts for streambed topography and surface hydraulics via the hyporheic residence time and biogeochemical reaction via the time limit τlim. Da can readily evaluate the redox status of the hyporheic zone. Values of Da larger than 1 indicate prevailing anaerobic conditions, whereas values smaller than 1 prevailing aerobic conditions. This new Damköhler number can quantify the efficiency of hyporheic zone in transforming dissolved inorganic nitrogen species such as ammonium and nitrate, whose transformation depends on the redox condition of the hyporheic zone. We define a particular value of Da, Das, that indicates when the hyporheic zone is a source or a sink of nitrate. This index depends only on the relative abundance of ammonium and nitrate. The approach can be applied to any hyporheic zone of which the median hyporheic residence time is known. Application to streams with pool-riffle morphology shows that Da increases passing from small to large streams implying that the fraction of the hyporheic zone in anaerobic conditions increases with stream size.

  17. Hyporheic Zone Denitrification: Flow Path Controls and Scaling Consequences for N budgets for the Whole Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J. W.; Bohlke, J. K.; Voytek, M. A.; Scott, D.; Tobias, C. R.

    2013-12-01

    Denitrification is thought to be enhanced by hyporheic transport but there is little direct evidence from the field that relates controlling processes to whole-stream consequences for N budgets. To demonstrate at a field site we injected 15 NO3-, Br (conservative tracer) and SF6 (gas exchange tracer) and compared measures of whole-stream denitrification with in situ hyporheic denitrification measurements in both shallow and deeper flow paths of contrasting geomorphic units such as channel thalwegs and side cavities. Hyporheic denitrification accounted for between a few percent and 200% of whole-stream denitrification. The reaction rate constant was positively related to hyporheic exchange rate (which increases substrate delivery), concentrations of substrates DOC and nitrate, microbial denitrifier abundance as indicated by nirS, and measures related to granular surface area and presence of anoxic microzones in otherwise suboxic porewater. Reaction efficiency in individual hyporheic flow paths was quantified as the dimensionless product of reaction rate constant and hyporheic residence time, λhzτhz (also defined as a Damköhler number, Daden-hz). At the stream reach scale the reaction significance was quantified by a dimensionless index Rs that combines the product of Da hz and the proportion of stream discharge passing through the hyporheic zone. Reaction progress was optimal in the subset of hyporheic flow paths where Da den-hz ~ 1, which avoids inefficient transport through very long flow paths after substrates have been used up but also avoids inefficient pathways that require repeated entries and exits through very short hyporheic flow paths to complete the reaction. We conclude that the zone of significant denitrification in the streambed can be substantially less than the full depth of the hyporheic zone, which is one reason previous researchers were not able to explain whole-stream denitrification rates based on total hyporheic-zone metrics such as

  18. Hyporheic zone denitrification: Controls on effective reaction depth and contribution to whole-stream mass balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Judson W.; Böhlke, J. K.; Voytek, Mary A.; Scott, Durelle; Tobias, Craig R.

    2013-10-01

    Stream denitrification is thought to be enhanced by hyporheic transport but there is little direct evidence from the field. To investigate at a field site, we injected 15NO3-, Br (conservative tracer), and SF6 (gas exchange tracer) and compared measured whole-stream denitrification with in situ hyporheic denitrification in shallow and deeper flow paths of contrasting geomorphic units. Hyporheic denitrification accounted for between 1 and 200% of whole-stream denitrification. The reaction rate constant was positively related to hyporheic exchange rate (greater substrate delivery), concentrations of substrates DOC and nitrate, microbial denitrifier abundance (nirS), and measures of granular surface area and presence of anoxic microzones. The dimensionless product of the reaction rate constant and hyporheic residence time, λhzτhz define a Damköhler number, Daden-hz that was optimal in the subset of hyporheic flow paths where Daden-hz ≈ 1. Optimal conditions exclude inefficient deep pathways where substrates are used up and also exclude inefficient shallow pathways that require repeated hyporheic entries and exits to complete the reaction. The whole-stream reaction significance, Rs (dimensionless), was quantified by multiplying Daden-hz by the proportion of stream discharge passing through the hyporheic zone. Together these two dimensionless metrics, one flow-path scale and the other reach-scale, quantify the whole-stream significance of hyporheic denitrification. One consequence is that the effective zone of significant denitrification often differs from the full depth of the hyporheic zone, which is one reason why whole-stream denitrification rates have not previously been explained based on total hyporheic-zone metrics such as hyporheic-zone size or residence time.

  19. Hyporheic zone denitrification: controls on effective reaction depth and contribution to whole-stream mass balance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, Judson W.; Böhlke, John Karl; Voytek, Mary A.; Scott, Durelle; Tobias, Craig R.

    2013-01-01

    Stream denitrification is thought to be enhanced by hyporheic transport but there is little direct evidence from the field. To demonstrate at a field site, we injected 15NO3−, Br (conservative tracer), and SF6 (gas exchange tracer) and compared measured whole-stream denitrification with in situ hyporheic denitrification in shallow and deeper flow paths of contrasting geomorphic units. Hyporheic denitrification accounted for between 1 and 200% of whole-stream denitrification. The reaction rate constant was positively related to hyporheic exchange rate (greater substrate delivery), concentrations of substrates DOC and nitrate, microbial denitrifier abundance (nirS), and measures of granular surface area and presence of anoxic microzones. The dimensionless product of the reaction rate constant and hyporheic residence time, λhzτhz define a Damköhler number, Daden-hz that was optimal in the subset of hyporheic flow paths where Daden-hz ≈ 1. Optimal conditions exclude inefficient deep pathways transport where substrates are used up and also exclude inefficient shallow pathways that require repeated hyporheic entries and exits to complete the reaction. The whole-stream reaction significance, Rs (dimensionless), was quantified by multiplying Daden-hz by the proportion of stream discharge passing through the hyporheic zone. Together these two dimensionless metrics, one flow-path scale and the other reach-scale, quantify the whole-stream significance of hyporheic denitrification. One consequence is that the effective zone of significant denitrification often differs from the full depth of the hyporheic zone, which is one reason why whole-stream denitrification rates have not previously been explained based on total hyporheic-zone metrics such as hyporheic-zone size or residence time.

  20. Controls on mixing-dependent denitrification in hyporheic zones induced by riverbed dunes: A steady state modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, Erich T.; Young, Katie I.; Widdowson, Mark A.

    2014-11-01

    The hyporheic zone is known to attenuate contaminants originating from surface water, yet the ability of the hyporheic zone to attenuate contaminants in upwelling groundwater plumes as they exit to surface water is less understood. We used MODFLOW and SEAM3D to simulate hyporheic flow cells induced by riverbed dunes and upwelling groundwater together with mixing-dependent denitrification of an upwelling nitrate (NO3-) plume. Our base case modeled labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved oxygen (DO) advecting from surface water, and DO and NO3- advecting from groundwater, typical of certain agricultural areas. We conducted sensitivity analyses that showed mixing-dependent denitrification in the hyporheic zone increased with increasing hydraulic conductivity (K), decreasing lower boundary flux, and increasing DOC in surface water or NO3- in groundwater. Surface water DOC, groundwater NO3-, and K were the most sensitive parameters affecting mixing-dependent denitrification. Nonmixing-dependent denitrification also occurred when there was surface water NO3-, and its magnitude was often greater than mixing-dependent denitrification. Nevertheless, mixing-dependent reactions provide functions that nonmixing-dependent reactions cannot, with potential for hyporheic zones to attenuate upwelling NO3- plumes, depending on geomorphic, hydraulic, and biogeochemical conditions. Stream and river restoration efforts may be able to increase mixing-dependent reactions by promoting natural processes that promote bedform creation and augment labile carbon sources.

  1. Hyporheic Zone Management: Nitrate Removal from Treated Wastewater Effluent using an Engineered Hyporheic Zone as a Bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, M.; Herzog, S.; Jones, Z.; Sharp, J.

    2014-12-01

    The hyporheic zone (HZ) is a natural bioreactor within streambed sediments. The dynamic interface of streamwater and groundwater creates a diverse microbial community that has potential to provide substantial contaminant removal. However, insufficient water exchange between the stream and the HZ is often a limiting factor for improved streamwater quality. Modular subsurface hydraulic conductivity (K) modifications with the addition of organic carbon substrates have been proposed as a means to increase hyporheic exchange and enhance natural water treatment via denitrification. Subsurface K modification flow paths are well understood from previous computer modeling and tracer testing studies, but treatment capabilities have yet to be tested in physical systems. This research applied chemical and molecular biological techniques to investigate nitrate removal and microbial community structure in a bench-scale stream simulation with subsurface K and carbon modifications. The system received treated wastewater effluent containing soluble nitrogen primarily in the form of nitrate at concentrations fluctuating from 4-7mg/L. To gain insight into denitrification potential and relative microbial activity along hyporheic flow paths, profiles of nitrate fate, total bacterial presence and the density of the denitrification genes (nirS and nirK) were quantified spatially. Nitrate tests showed a decrease from ~7mg/L in the influent to less than 1mg/L along hyporheic flowpaths. This was accompanied by an increase in 16S rRNA copies (representative of total bacterial biomass) from approximately 200000 gene copies in the influent zone to 630000 gene copies in the effluent zone. Also, the bacterial communities had a greater presence in the upper 6cm of the sediment layer with nirS amplifying 4-5 cycles earlier than nirK in the PCR analysis. The nirS gene concentration was nearly an order of magnitude greater in the effluent zone than the carbon modified zone, suggesting that leached

  2. Mercury and methylmercury dynamics in the hyporheic zone of an Oregon stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkle, Stephen R.; Bencala, Kenneth E.; Wentz, Dennis A.; Krabbenhoft, David P.

    2014-01-01

    The role of the hyporheic zone in mercury (Hg) cycling has received limited attention despite the biogeochemically active nature of this zone and, thus, its potential to influence Hg behavior in streams. An assessment of Hg geochemistry in the hyporheic zone of a coarse-grained island in the Coast Fork Willamette River in Oregon, USA, illustrates the spatially dynamic nature of this region of the stream channel for Hg mobilization and attenuation. Hyporheic flow through the island was evident from the water-table geometry and supported by hyporheic-zone chemistry distinct from that of the bounding groundwater system. Redox-indicator species changed abruptly along a transect through the hyporheic zone, indicating a biogeochemically reactive stream/hyporheic-zone continuum. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total Hg, and methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations increased in the upgradient portion of the hyporheic zone and decreased in the downgradient region. Total Hg (collected in 2002 and 2003) and MeHg (collected in 2003) were correlated with DOC in hyporheic-zone samples: r2=0.63 (total Hg-DOC, 2002), 0.73 (total Hg-DOC, 2003), and 0.94 (MeHg-DOC, 2003). Weaker Hg/DOC association in late summer 2002 than in early summer 2003 may reflect seasonal differences in DOC reactivity. Observed correlations between DOC and both total Hg and MeHg reflect the importance of DOC for Hg mobilization, transport, and fate in this hyporheic zone. Correlations with DOC provide a framework for conceptualizing and quantifying Hg and MeHg dynamics in this region of the stream channel, and provide a refined conceptual model of the role hyporheic zones may play in aquatic ecosystems.

  3. How does subsurface characterization affect simulations of hyporheic exchange?

    PubMed

    Ward, Adam S; Gooseff, Michael N; Singha, Kamini

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the role of increasingly well-constrained geologic structures in the subsurface (i.e., subsurface architecture) in predicting streambed flux and hyporheic residence time distribution (RTD) for a headwater stream. Five subsurface realizations with increasingly resolved lithological boundaries were simulated in which model geometries were based on increasing information about flow and transport using soil and geologic maps, surface observations, probing to depth to refusal, seismic refraction, electrical resistivity (ER) imaging of subsurface architecture, and time-lapse ER imaging during a solute tracer study. Particle tracking was used to generate RTDs for each model run. We demonstrate how improved characterization of complex lithological boundaries and calibration of porosity and hydraulic conductivity affect model prediction of hyporheic flow and transport. Models using hydraulic conductivity calibrated using transient ER data yield estimates of streambed flux that are three orders of magnitude larger than uncalibrated models using estimated values for hydraulic conductivity based on values published for nearby hillslopes (10(-4) vs. 10(-7) m(2)/s, respectively). Median residence times for uncalibrated and calibrated models are 10(3) and 10(0) h, respectively. Increasingly well-resolved subsurface architectures yield wider hyporheic RTDs, indicative of more complex hyporheic flowpath networks and potentially important to biogeochemical cycling. The use of ER imaging to monitor solute tracers informs subsurface structure not apparent from other techniques, and helps to define transport properties of the subsurface (i.e., hydraulic conductivity). Results of this study demonstrate the value of geophysical measurements to more realistically simulate flow and transport along hyporheic flowpaths. PMID:22289021

  4. No evidence of aquatic priming effects in hyporheic zone microcosms.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Mia M; Wagner, Karoline; Burns, Nancy R; Herberg, Erik R; Wanek, Wolfgang; Kaplan, Louis A; Battin, Tom J

    2014-01-01

    The priming effect refers to quantitative changes in microbial decomposition of recalcitrant organic matter upon addition of labile organic matter and is a phenomenon that mainly has been reported and debated in soil science. Recently, priming effects have been indicated in aquatic ecosystems and have received attention due to the potential significance for ecosystem carbon budgets. Headwater stream biofilms, which are important degraders of both allochthonous, presumably recalcitrant, organic matter and labile autochthonous organic matter, may be sites where priming effects are important in aquatic environments. We have experimentally tested for priming effects in stream biofilms within microcosms mimicking the stream hyporheic zone. A (13)C labeled model allochthonous carbon source was used in combination with different carbon sources simulating autochthonous inputs. We did not detect changes in respiration, removal or incorporation of allochthonous organic matter in response to autochthonous treatments, thus not supporting the occurrence of priming effects under the experimental conditions. This study is the first to address priming effects in the hyporheic zone, and one of very few studies quantitatively assessing aquatic priming effects. The results contrast with existing studies, which highlights the need for quantitative approaches to determine the importance of priming effects in aquatic environments. PMID:24898319

  5. Seasonal variation of water quality in a lateral hyporheic zone with response to dam operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Chen, L.; Zhao, J.

    2015-12-01

    Aquatic environment of lateral hyporheic zone in a regulated river were investigated seasonally under fluctuated water levels induced by dam operations. Groundwater levels variations in preassembled wells and changes in electronic conductivity (EC), dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration, water temperature and pH in the hyporheic zone were examined as environmental performance indicators for the water quality. Groundwater tables in wells were highly related to the river water levels that showed a hysteresis pattern, and the lag time is associated with the distances from wells to the river bank. The distribution of DO and EC were strongly related to the water temperature, indicating that the cold water released from up-reservoir could determine the biochemistry process in the hyporheic zone. Results also showed that the hyporheic water was weakly alkaline in the study area but had a more or less uniform spatial distribution. Dam release-storage cycles were the dominant factor in changing lateral hyporheic flow and water quality.

  6. Impact of artificial freshet releases on channel hydraulics and the hyporheic zone of a gravel bed river.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbins, C.; Soulsby, C.; Malcolm, I.

    2009-04-01

    The hyporheic zone has been the focus of considerable research and management interest in the last decade. An area of particular interest has been the temporal variability of hyporheic exchange in relation to changing hydrological conditions. Recent studies have shown that the physical and chemical characteristics of the hyporheic zone are highly dynamic, with variations in water chemistry reflecting changing source water contributions in response to changing in-stream hydraulics and water table elevation.. While the implications of natural discharge variability for groundwater-surface water interactions and hyporheic chemistry are increasingly well studied, less attention has been paid to the effects of artificial changes in discharge such as those which occur in regulated rivers. Artificial reservoir releases are now made in many regulated rivers as part of environmental flow regimes. These releases may either be for geomorphic purposes (e.g. to ensure natural geomorphic processes such as sediment transport occur; so-called "flushing flows"), for water quality objectives (controlling stream water temperature or chemistry) or for ecological reasons (e.g. encourage the upstream migration of salmonids). Few studies have assessed whether such releases alter groundwater-surfacewater interactions and hence hyporheic water chemistry in affected reaches. Moreover, it is unclear how changes in post-impoundment sediment transport dynamics affect the physical structure of the hyporheic zone. This paper describes changes in stream hydraulics, hydraulic head and hyporheic water quality that occurred at sites in the River Lyon (Scotland) during an artificial summer freshet release from a HEP dam. The freshet lasted 12 hours and increased river discharge approximately 4-fold (from 1.2 to 5 m3 s-1). The magnitude of associated changes in velocity varied between riffle and pool habitats, with the maximum increase being from 0.2-0.6 m s-1. There were only subtle changes in

  7. Hydrology and Nitrogen Biogeochemistry in the Hyporheic Zone of a Geomorphically Degraded Urban Stream

    EPA Science Inventory

    Few studies have investigated the relationship between hydrology and nitrogen biogeochemistry in hyporheic zones of degraded urban streams despite significant national efforts to restore such streams. We examined relationships between hydrology and biogeochemistry in Minebank Ru...

  8. Hyporheic zone hydrologic science: A historical account of its emergence and a prospectus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, M. Bayani

    2015-05-01

    The hyporheic zone, defined by shallow subsurface pathways through river beds and banks beginning and ending at the river, is an integral and unique component of fluvial systems. It hosts myriad hydrologically controlled processes that are potentially coupled in complex ways. Understanding these processes and the connections between them is critical since these processes are not only important locally but integrate to impact increasingly larger scale biogeochemical functioning of the river corridor up to the river network scale. Thus, the hyporheic zone continues to be a growing research focus for many hydrologists for more than half the history of Water Resources Research. This manuscript partly summarizes the historical development of hyporheic zone hydrologic science as gleaned from papers published in Water Resources Research, from the birth of the concept of the hyporheic zone as a hydrologic black box (sometimes referred to as transient storage zone), to its adolescent years of being torn between occasionally competing research perspectives of interrogating the hyporheic zone from a surface or subsurface view, to its mature emergence as an interdisciplinary research field that employs the wide array of state-of-the-art tools available to the modern hydrologist. The field is vibrant and moving in the right direction of addressing critical fundamental and applied questions with no clear end in sight in its growth. There are exciting opportunities for scientists that are able to tightly link the allied fields of geology, geomorphology, hydrology, geochemistry, and ecology to tackle the many open problems in hyporheic zone science.

  9. Relative Importance of Karst-Conduit Hyporheic Zones Co-occuring at Different Spatial Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, K.; Wilson, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Hyporheic zones at the margin of karst conduits occur at different spatial scales, from those associated with the smallest scales (cm) of conduit-wall topography (e.g., scallops) to large-scale (100 m) conduit sinuosity, and to even larger conduit network patterns. Hyporheic flows are believed to influence the processing of nutrients and dissolved organic carbon from the conduit flow, the evolution of karst-water chemistry, the reaction and sequestration of contaminants, and speleogenesis. Multiple spatial scales of hyporheic interaction lead to a wide distribution of hyporheic flow path lengths, residence times, and opportunities for both abiotic and microbially-mediated reactions of various kinetics. Using mathematical modeling we examine hyporheic flows for a single karst conduit with two different scales of flow disturbance: wall topography at the sub-meter scale and sinuosity at the scale of 10's of meters. By varying the amplitude of each disturbance we examine changes in hyporheic flow magnitude, paths, residence times, and other metrics. We test the hypothesis that while sinuosity-driven hyporheic flow occupies the greatest volume of karst matrix rock, with the longest residence times, the much smaller volume of topographically-driven hyporheic flow is more important because it turns over far more conduit flow and does so with much shorter and possibly more important residence times.

  10. Effect of Rapidly Changing River Stage on Uranium Flux through the Hyporheic Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Brad G.; Arntzen, Evan V.

    2007-11-01

    At the Hanford Site, the flux of uranium contaminated groundwater into the Columbia River varies according to the dynamic changes in hydraulic gradient caused by fluctuating river stage. The river stage changes in response to operations of dams on the Columbia River. Piezometers were installed in the hyporheic zone to facilitate long term, high frequency measurement of water and uranium fluxes into the Columbia River in response to fluctuating river stage. In addition, measurement of the water level in the near shore unconfined aquifer enhanced the understanding of the relationship between fluctuating river stage and uranium flux. The changing river stage caused head fluctuations in the unconfined aquifer, and resulted in fluctuating hydraulic gradient in the hyporheic zone. Further, influx of river water into the unconfined aquifer caused reduced uranium concentration in near shore groundwater as a result of dilution. Calculated water flux through the hyporheic zone ranged between 0.3 and -0.5 L/min/m2. The flux of uranium through the hyporheic zone exceeded 30 ug/min/m2 during some time periods, but was generally on the order of 3 to 5 ug/min/m2 over the course of this study. It was also found that at this location, the top 20 cm of the hyporheic zone constituted the most restrictive portion of the aquifer, and controlled the flux of water through the hyporheic zone.

  11. Selenium biogeochemical cycling and fluxes in the hyporheic zone of a mining-impacted stream.

    PubMed

    Oram, Libbie L; Strawn, Daniel G; Morra, Matthew J; Möller, Gregory

    2010-06-01

    The influence of hyporheic exchange on selenium (Se) biogeochemistry and mobility in sediments is unknown. A multiscale investigation of Se biogeochemistry in the hyporheic zone of East Mill Creek (EMC), southeastern Idaho, USA, was performed using in situ surface water and pore water geochemical measurements, a field-based stream tracer test, and energy-dependent micro synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (mu-SXRF) measurements of Se speciation in sediments. The active hyporheic zone was determined to be 12 +/- 3 cm. Pore water redox profiles indicated that a transition to suboxic conditions begins at approximately 6 cm. Modeling pore water Se and solid phase analysis suggested Se uptake is occurring. Micro-SXRF analysis of sediments showed reduced elemental Se or selenides throughout the profile and selenite in surface sediments. Field geochemical measurements and microscale analysis both support the hypothesis that reduction in the hyporheic zone promotes sequestration of surface water Se. PMID:20443593

  12. Cooling Along Hyporheic Pathlines in a Large River Riparian Zone

    EPA Science Inventory

    Floodplains can contribute to hyporheic cooling and moderation of temperature for rivers, but extent and magnitude are dependent on ground water hydrology. Here we illustrate the controls and dynamics of hyporheic cooling in the ground water of a large river floodplain with field...

  13. Effect of Vertical Flow Exchange on Biogeochemical Processes in Hyporheic Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Lee, S.; Shin, D.; Hyun, Y.; Lee, K.

    2008-12-01

    Biogeochemical processes in hyporheic zones are of great interest because they make the hyporheic zones highly productive and complex environments. When contaminants or polluted water pass through hyporheic zones, in particular, biogeochemical processes play an important role in removing contaminants or attenuating contamination under certain conditions. The study site, a reach of Munsan stream (Paju-si, South Korea), exhibits severe contamination of surface water by nitrate released from Water Treatment Plant (WTP) nearby. The objectives of this study are to investigate the hydrologic and biogeochemical processes at the riparian area of the site which may contribute to natural attenuation of surface water driven nitrate, and analyze the effect of vertical (hyporheic) flow exchange on the biogeochemical processes in the area. To examine hydraulic mixing or dilution processes, vertical hydraulic gradients were measured at several depth levels using minipiezometers, and then soil temperatures were measured by using i-buttons installed inside the minipiezometers. The microbial analyses by means of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-cloning methods were also done in order to identify the denitrification process in soil samples. In addition, correlation between vertical flow exchange, temperature data, and denitrifying bacteria activity was also investigated so as to examine the effects on one another. The results showed that there were significant effects of vertical flow exchange and hyporheic soil temperature on the biogeochemical processes of the site. This study found strong support for the idea that the biogeochemical function of hyporheic zone is a predictable outcome of the interaction between microbial activity and flow exchange.

  14. Comparing the Biogeochemical Potential of Hyporheic Zones Driven by Different River Morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, J. D.; Harvey, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Channel morphology controls the hydrodynamics of hyporheic exchange and its residence times. As a result, it also constrains the hyporheic zone's biogeochemical processes that transform carbon, nutrients, metals, and contaminants and the hyporheic zone's net effect at the local, reach and watershed scales. Previous studies of different morphologies (e.g., meanders, bars, and smaller bedforms such as dunes) have mainly focused on the amount of exchange or, if biogeochemistry was involved, have been specific to a particular morphology. In this work, we present a quantitative intercomparison of the amount of exchange, residence time distributions (RTDs), and biogeochemical potential for four channel morphologies: ripples, dunes, bars, and meander bends. To this end, simple two-dimensional conceptualizations and semi-analytical solutions for the hyporheic zone's flow and transport are used. In general, all morphologies are characterized by heavy-tail RTDs, implying long-term memory to solute inputs. We hypothesize that even though meander bends induce larger hyporheic exchange per unit length of channel and longer residence times, substrate limitations result in less biogeochemical processing when compared with the cumulative effect of multiple bedforms. The models presented are a function of geometric and physical properties easily measured or constrained with field or remote sensing data. The simplicity of this approach allows for practical calculations of the hyporheic zone's exchange and biogeochemical potential over a broad range of scenarios and morphologies, making it a useful tool for experimental design, sampling, and watershed scale assessment.

  15. Reshaping of the hyporheic zone beneath river restoration structures: Flume and hydrodynamic experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tian; Endreny, Theodore A.

    2013-08-01

    In-channel stream restoration structures readjust surface water hydraulics, streambed pressure, and subsurface hyporheic exchange characteristics. In this study, we conducted flume experiments (pool-riffle amplitude of 0.03 m and wavelengths of 0.5 m) and computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations to quantify how restoration structures impacted hyporheic penetration depth, Dp, and hyporheic vertical discharge rate, Qv. Restoration structures were channel-spanning vanes with subsurface footers placed in the gravel bed at each riffle. Hyporheic vertical discharge rate was estimated by analyzing solute concentration decay data, and maximum hyporheic penetration depth was measured as the interface between hyporheic water and groundwater using dye tracing experiments. The CFD was verified with literature-based flume hydraulic data and with Dp and Qz observations, and the CFD was then used to document how Dp and Qz varied with flume discharge, Q, ranging from 1 to 15 L/s (3E + 03 < Re < 5E + 04). Flume experiments and CFD simulations showed that restoration structures increased Qz and decreased Dp, creating a shallower but higher flux hyporheic zone. Qz had a positive linear relationship with Q, while Dp initially grew as Q increased, but then shrunk when a hydraulic jump with low streambed pressured formed downstream of the structure. The restoration structures created counter-acting forces of increased downwelling head due to backwater effects, and increased upwelling due to low streambed pressure and standing waves downstream of the structure.

  16. Heterogeneous hyporheic zone dechlorination of a TCE groundwater plume discharging to an urban river reach.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Juliana G; Rivett, Michael O; Roche, Rachel S; Durrant Neé Cleverly, Megan; Walker, Caroline; Tellam, John H

    2015-02-01

    The typically elevated natural attenuation capacity of riverbed-hyporheic zones is expected to decrease chlorinated hydrocarbon (CHC) groundwater plume discharges to river receptors through dechlorination reactions. The aim of this study was to assess physico-chemical processes controlling field-scale variation in riverbed-hyporheic zone dechlorination of a TCE groundwater plume discharge to an urban river reach. The 50-m long pool-riffle-glide reach of the River Tame in Birmingham (UK) studied is a heterogeneous high energy river environment. The shallow riverbed was instrumented with a detailed network of multilevel samplers. Freeze coring revealed a geologically heterogeneous and poorly sorted riverbed. A chlorine number reduction approach provided a quantitative indicator of CHC dechlorination. Three sub-reaches of contrasting behaviour were identified. Greatest dechlorination occurred in the riffle sub-reach that was characterised by hyporheic zone flows, moderate sulphate concentrations and pH, anaerobic conditions, low iron, but elevated manganese concentrations with evidence of sulphate reduction. Transient hyporheic zone flows allowing input to varying riverbed depths of organic matter are anticipated to be a key control. The glide sub-reach displayed negligible dechlorination attributed to the predominant groundwater baseflow discharge condition, absence of hyporheic zone, transition to more oxic conditions and elevated sulphate concentrations expected to locally inhibit dechlorination. The tail-of-pool-riffle sub-reach exhibited patchy dechlorination that was attributed to sub-reach complexities including significant flow bypass of a low permeability, high organic matter, silty unit of high dechlorination potential. A process-based conceptual model of reach-scale dechlorination variability was developed. Key findings of practitioner relevance were: riverbed-hyporheic zone CHC dechlorination may provide only a partial, somewhat patchy barrier to CHC

  17. Scales and Patterns of Nitrate Transport and Transformation in the Hyporheic Zone of a Lowland River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naden, E.; Krause, S.; Tecklenburg, C.; Munz, M.

    2009-04-01

    The Hyporheic Zone (HZ) represents the spatially and temporally variable part of the streambed that is affected by the mixture of groundwater and surface water and often characterised by strong redox gradients and high turnover rates of redox reactive substances. The HZ has often been understood as a complex bioreactor with a high potential to affect groundwater-surface water exchange as well control the chemical signature of waters along the hyporheic passage. Currently, 73% of groundwater and 28% of UK rivers sampled exhibit either high nitrate levels or rising trends (Defra, 2008) Because of the high metabolic rates that have often be observed, the HZ is by many expected to potentially ameliorate groundwater nitrate fluxes and thus to reduce nitrate pollution and benefit freshwater ecosystems. The objective of this pilot study was to set up a monitoring program on a typical lowland river within glacio-fluvial deposits and well connected to the shallow groundwater aquifer. This study aims to derive a conceptual model of hyporheic exchange and nutrient metabolism in an agriculturally used lowland system including the development of upscaling strategies that allow for the assessment of hyporheic uptake or contribution on a subcatchment scale. The research area covers a 250 metre stream reach of the River Tern (Shropshire, UK), a lowland groundwater dependent surface water body at risk of failing to achieve ‘good water' status under the WFD, primarily due to diffuse agricultural pollution. In two horizontal arrays 42 multi piezometers have been installed in the river bed offering sampling from between three and eight sampling points ranging from 5 cm to 200 cm depth. These allow the sampling of streambed porewater from more than 150 locations. Additionally, ten shallow groundwater boreholes (up to 3m depth) have been installed within the riparian floodplain. From June to September 2008 head measurements were taken at the streambed piezometers, riparian groundwater

  18. Thermal dynamic in hyporheic zone response to river temperatures formed by reservoir operations in Xinanjiang River, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Zhao, J.; Chen, L.; Tao, X.; Zhao, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding heat fluxes through hyporheic zones (HZ) becomes increasingly important as anthropogenic influences and changing climate alter river thermal regimes. The HZ directly interacts with river thermal regimes by storing and releasing heat over a range of timescales. Alteration of HZ can lead to shifts in aquatic species composition and changes in biogeochemical processes. In this study we examine a reach of the Xinanjiang, China downstream of the Xinanjiang Dam. The Xinanjiang Dam introduces a low temperature water (LTW) region to the downstream of a length of 23 km and an area of 9.9 km2, which greatly changes the downstream thermal regime. However, how and to what extent the LTW in stream affect the HZ temperature distribution and, ulteriorly, the full range of the river ecosystem are still not completely understood. We quantify hyporheic exchange and heat transport induced by LTW by field experiments and numerical simulations for coupled groundwater flow and heat transport. Both surface and subsurface water temperature are measured in a study region for model validation. The hydraulic head and water temperature along the water-aquifer interface are considered as the input boundaries for groundwater models. The upwelling water with short streamline paths shows the same temperature pattern as surface water but the temperature of water that comes out from the deep subsurface zones rises much higher and shows a relatively lower variation. However, with the continuing exchange of surface LTW and groundwater, the low temperature spreads over the entire domain. Detailed field characterization and groundwater modeling indicate residence times of hyporheic flux can vary from hours to months. A significant implication is that the LTW released from upstream reservoir contributes to the downstream temperature field and potential degradation of habitats in hyporheic zones.

  19. Comparison of tracer methods to quantify hydrodynamic exchange within the hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, I.; Piepenbrink, M.; Trauth, N.; Stadler, S.; Kludt, C.; Schulz, M.; Schüth, C.; Ternes, T. A.

    2011-03-01

    SummaryHydrodynamic exchange between surface-water and groundwater was studied at a river located within the Rhine Valley in Germany. Piezometric pressure heads and environmental tracers such as temperature, stable isotopes, chloride, X-ray contrast media, and artificial sweetener were investigated within the hyporheic zone and river water plume. Vertical profiles of environmental tracers were collected using multi-level wells within the neutral up-gradient zone, beneath the river bed, and within the horizontal proximal and distal down-gradient zone. Infiltration velocities were calculated from pressure heads, temperature fluctuations and gradients. The amount of river water within groundwater was estimated from vertical profiles of chloride, stable isotopes, and persistent pharmaceuticals. Profiles of stable isotopes and chloride reveal the existence of down-welling within the shallow hyporheic zone that is generated by river bed irregularities. Due to down-welling an above-average migration of river water into the hyporheic zone establishes even under upward hydraulic pressure gradients. The investigated environmental tracers could not distinctively display short-time-infiltration velocities representative for flood waves, while average infiltration velocities calculated over several months are uniform displayed. Based on vertical temperature profiles the down-gradient migration of the river water plume could be observed even after long periods of effluent conditions and over a distance of 200 m from the river bank. X-ray contrast media and artificial sweeteners were observed in high concentrations within the proximal zone, but were not detected at a distance of 200 m from the river bank. Using temperature as environmental tracer within the hyporheic zone may result in overestimating the migration of pollutants within the river water plume as the process of natural attenuation will be neglected. Furthermore, temperature was not able to display the effect of down

  20. Tracking tracer breakthrough in the hyporheic zone using time‐lapse DC resistivity, Crabby Creek, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nyquist, Jonathan E.; Toran, Laura; Fang, Allison C.; Ryan, Robert J.; Rosenberry, Donald O.

    2010-01-01

    Characterization of the hyporheic zone is of critical importance for understanding stream ecology, contaminant transport, and groundwater‐surface water interaction. A salt water tracer test was used to probe the hyporheic zone of a recently re‐engineered portion of Crabby Creek, a stream located near Philadelphia, PA. The tracer solution was tracked through a 13.5 meter segment of the stream using both a network of 25 wells sampled every 5–15 minutes and time‐lapse electrical resistivity tomographs collected every 11 minutes for six hours, with additional tomographs collected every 100 minutes for an additional 16 hours. The comparison of tracer monitoring methods is of keen interest because tracer tests are one of the few techniques available for characterizing this dynamic zone, and logistically it is far easier to collect resistivity tomographs than to install and monitor a dense network of wells. Our results show that resistivity monitoring captured the essential shape of the breakthrough curve and may indicate portions of the stream where the tracer lingered in the hyporheic zone. Time‐lapse resistivity measurements, however, represent time averages over the period required to collect a tomographic data set, and spatial averages over a volume larger than captured by a well sample. Smoothing by the resistivity data inversion algorithm further blurs the resulting tomograph; consequently resistivity monitoring underestimates the degree of fine‐scale heterogeneity in the hyporheic zone.

  1. Differences in Hyporheic-Zone Microbial Community Structure along a Heavy-Metal Contamination Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Feris, Kevin; Ramsey, Philip; Frazar, Chris; Moore, Johnnie N.; Gannon, James E.; Holben, William E.

    2003-01-01

    The hyporheic zone of a river is nonphotic, has steep chemical and redox gradients, and has a heterotrophic food web based on the consumption of organic carbon entrained from downwelling surface water or from upwelling groundwater. The microbial communities in the hyporheic zone are an important component of these heterotrophic food webs and perform essential functions in lotic ecosystems. Using a suite of methods (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, 16S rRNA phylogeny, phospholipid fatty acid analysis, direct microscopic enumeration, and quantitative PCR), we compared the microbial communities inhabiting the hyporheic zone of six different river sites that encompass a wide range of sediment metal loads resulting from large base-metal mining activity in the region. There was no correlation between sediment metal content and the total hyporheic microbial biomass present within each site. However, microbial community structure showed a significant linear relationship with the sediment metal loads. The abundances of four phylogenetic groups (groups I, II, III, and IV) most closely related to α-, β-, and γ-proteobacteria and the cyanobacteria, respectively, were determined. The sediment metal content gradient was positively correlated with group III abundance and negatively correlated with group II abundance. No correlation was apparent with regard to group I or IV abundance. This is the first documentation of a relationship between fluvially deposited heavy-metal contamination and hyporheic microbial community structure. The information presented here may be useful in predicting long-term effects of heavy-metal contamination in streams and provides a basis for further studies of metal effects on hyporheic microbial communities. PMID:12957946

  2. Hydrologic connectivity increases denitrification in the hyporheic zone and restored floodplains of an agricultural stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roley, Sarah S.; Tank, Jennifer L.; Williams, Maureen A.

    2012-09-01

    Stream ecotones, specifically the lateral floodplain and subsurface hyporheic zone, can be important sites for nitrogen (N) removal via denitrification, but their role in streams with constructed floodplains has not been examined. We studied denitrification in the hyporheic zone and floodplains of an agriculturally influenced headwater stream in Indiana, USA, that had floodplains added as part of a "two-stage ditch" restoration project. To examine the potential for N removal in the hyporheic zone, we seasonally measured denitrification rates and nitrate concentrations by depth into the stream sediments. We found that nitrate concentration and denitrification rates declined with depth into the hyporheic zone, but denitrification was still measureable to a depth of at least 20 cm. We also measured denitrification rates on the restored floodplains over the course of a flood (pre, during, and post-inundation), and also compared denitrification rates between vegetated and non-vegetated areas of the floodplain. We found that floodplain denitrification rates increased over the course of a floodplain inundation event, and that the presence of surface water increased denitrification rates when vegetation was present. Stream ecotones in midwestern, agriculturally influenced streams have substantial potential for N removal via denitrification, particularly when they are hydrologically connected with high-nitrate surface water.

  3. Diurnal temperature effect on nitrate removal and production efficiency in bedform-induced hyporheic zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.; Cardenas, M. B.

    2014-12-01

    Rivers and aquifers are connected through the hyporheic zone (HZ). Pore water in the subsurface sediments is continuously exchanged with the overlying surface water. The exchange of water, mass and energy occurring along the surface-subsurface interface or within the HZ exerts a strong influence on the quality of both surface and subsurface waters, and fluvial ecology. Moreover, the HZ is rich in biologically active sediment, creating a favorable condition for microbially-facilitated reactions to occur, including organic carbon oxidation (aerobic respiration), nitrification, and denitrification. Inorganic N, especially NO3-, is of concern as a drinking water pollutant and as a cause for eutrophication that threatens ecosystems. The biogeochemical reactions in the HZ could produce or consume NO3- and thus the HZ could serve a nitrate source or sink role in the fluvial system. In addition, hyporheic exchange across the sediment-water interface (SWI) leads to penetration of diel temperature cycles from the river, leading to dynamic HZ temperature pattern. This in turn affects biogeochemical reactions in the HZ. The main objective of this study is to integrate all the processes that occur along the SWI to understand how diurnal temperature variations affect the biogeochemical function of the HZ. We conducted numerical simulations of coupled turbulent open-channel fluid flow, porous fluid flow, porous heat transport and reactive solute transport to study feedbacks and coupling between these processes. We assumed sinusoidally varying diurnal temperature variations. We studied the effects of different mean temperatures and different amplitudes of the diurnal temperature variations on nitrate removal or production efficiency in the HZ. The simulation results show that the average temperature effect on the HZ nitrate source-sink functionality and its associated efficiency has strong dependence on the [NO3-]/[NH4+ ] ratio in the river. However, the effects of the

  4. Direct observations of aluminosilicate weathering in the hyporheic zone of an Antarctic Dry Valley stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurice, Patricia A.; McKnight, Diane M.; Leff, Laura; Fulghum, Julia E.; Gooseff, Michael

    2002-04-01

    This study focused on chemical weathering and bacterial ecology in the hyporheic zone of Green Creek, a McMurdo Dry Valley (Antarctica) stream. An in situ microcosm approach was used to observe dissolution features on the basal-plane surface of muscovite mica. Four mica chips were buried in December 1999 and dug up 39 d later. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) of the basal-plane surfaces revealed small, anhedral ˜10-Å-deep etch pits covering ˜4% of the surfaces, from which an approximate basal-plane dissolution rate of 8.3 × 10 -18 mol muscovite cm -2 s -1 was calculated (on the basis of the geometric surface area) for the study period. This is an integrated initial dissolution rate on a fresh surface exposed for a relatively brief period over the austral summer and should not be compared directly to other long-term field rates. The observation of weathering features on mica agrees with previous stream- and watershed-scale studies in the Dry Valleys, which have demonstrated that weathering occurs where liquid water is present, despite the cold temperatures. AFM imaging of mica surfaces revealed biofilms including numerous small (<1 μm long), rounded, oblong bacteria. The AFM observations agreed well with X-ray photoelectron microscopy results showing increased organic C and N. Bacteriologic analysis of the hyporheic zone sediments also revealed <1-μm-long bacteria. α-Proteobacteria were observed, consistent with the oligotrophic conditions of the hyporheic zone. Nitrate-reducing bacteria were found, in agreement with a previous tracer test at Green Creek that suggested nitrate reduction occurs in the hyporheic zone. The results of this study thus provide direct evidence of dynamic geochemical and microbial processes in the hyporheic zone of a Dry Valley stream despite the extreme conditions; such processes were inferred previously from stream-scale hydrogeochemical studies.

  5. The hyporheic zone and its functions: revision and research status in Neotropical regions.

    PubMed

    Mugnai, R; Messana, G; Di Lorenzo, T

    2015-08-01

    The hyporheic zone (HZ), as the connecting ecotone between surface- and groundwater, is functionally part of both fluvial and groundwater ecosystems. Its hydrological, chemical, biological and metabolic features are specific of this zone, not belonging truly neither to surface- nor to groundwater. Exchanges of water, nutrients, and organic matter occur in response to variations in discharge and bed topography and porosity. Dynamic gradients exist at all scales and vary temporally. Across all scales, the functional significance of the HZ relates to its activity and connection with the surface stream. The HZ is a relatively rich environment and almost all invertebrate groups have colonized this habitat. This fauna, so-called hyporheos, is composed of species typical from interstitial environment, and also of benthic epigean and phreatic species. The hyporheic microbiocenose consists in bacteria, archaea, protozoa and fungi. The HZ provides several ecosystem services, playing a pivotal role in mediating exchange processes, including both matter and energy, between surface and subterranean ecosystems, functioning as regulator of water flow, benthic invertebrates refuge and place of storage, source and transformation of organic matter. The hyporheic zone is one of the most threatened aquatic environments, being strongly influenced by human activities, and the least protected by legislation worldwide. Its maintenance and conservation is compelling in order to preserve the ecological interconnectivity among the three spatial dimensions of the aquatic environment. Although several researchers addressed the importance of the hyporheic zone early, and most contemporary stream ecosystem models explicitly include it, very little is known about the HZ of Neotropical regions. From a biological standpoint, hyporheos fauna in Neotropical regions are still largely underestimated. This review focuses on a brief presentation of the hyporheic zone and its functions and significance as

  6. Morphology control on hyporheic zone hydrodynamics: implication on redox and thermal regimes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzadri, A.; Tonina, D.; Bellin, A.

    2013-12-01

    Stream ecotones, specifically riparian and hyporheic zones, received a great deal of attention for their key role in nitrogen removal and in important ecological functions such as habitat and food web maintenance. An important characteristic of these zones is the continuous and dynamic exchange of water and mass with the stream. The interaction between stream flow and stream bed morphology generates spatial and temporal variations of the near-bed energy heads (pumping processes) which originates exchange fluxes between the stream and the underlying hyporheic zone. The ecological status of these zones depends on temporal and spatial patterns of such fluxes. In the present work we discuss the capabilities of a Lagrangian approach to investigate the transport of a passive quantity (temperature) and the transformation of nitrogen within the hyporheic zone of gravel-bed rivers. In particular, the flow field within the hyporheic zone of a gravel-bed river is first obtained analytically with suitable boundary conditions mimicking the pumping effect originating from the interaction between the stream and the bed-forms. Successively transport is modelled with a semi-analytical Lagrangian approach founded on the travel time concept. The hyporheic residence time distribution provides a simple kinematic explanation of the emergence of tailing in the Breakthrough Curves (BTC) observed in field experiments. According to our model, the first three normalized central moments of the residence time distribution can be written as function of the alternate bar dimensionless depth, Y*BM, which is given by the ratio between the mean flow depth and the equilibrium amplitude of the alternate bar. Both are measurable quantities. Another important statistical moment derived from the residence time distribution is the median residence time (τ50): 50% of the downwelled particles of a nonreactive tracer are still within the hyporheic zone after this time has passed since the injection

  7. Factors Controlling Dissolved Oxygen Concentration in the Hyporheic Zone Induced by Fish Egg Nests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, A.; Cardenas, M. B.; Kaufman, M.; Zheng, L.; Kessler, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    There is currently limited research on the effects of bed depressions, such as those associated with fish nests, on hyporheic flow and biogeochemistry. A series of flume experiments are in progress, with the aim of understanding the effects of bed depressions on the hyporheic flow of oxygenated water. This study focuses on fish nests, also called redds, which represent a typical depression or scour feature. Previous research has shown that redd topography induces hyporheic circulation, but experiments regarding the oxygen concentration in and around the redds have not been conducted. We are determining the ways in which redds affect dissolved oxygen distribution and how this is controlled by hyporheic flow. The oxygen concentration across the cross-sectional plane of a fish nest is measured using a planar optode and microsensors. Hydraulic measurements include pressure measurements along the sediment-water interface and dye visualization. The redd design is based on a salmonid redd, which consists of a scour feature and a tailspin. The salmonid eggs are found in the tailspin. We hypothesize that the oxygen concentration will be greatest in close proximity to the gravel base of the redd and concentration will decrease with increasing depth and distance from the redd. Higher oxygen concentrations in the tailspin supports the placement of fish eggs within that area as opposed to a less oxygenated area of the streambed. Thus, fish nests are likely bio-engineered to optimize hyporheic flow and biogeochemistry to improve egg viability.

  8. Using Stratasampler{sup {alpha}} Multi-Level Wells to Examine the Hyporheic Zone within a Riparian Wetland

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, D.L.; Dixon, K.L.; Nichols, R.L.; Schwartzman, A.; Roseberry, R.

    1998-02-01

    The initial objectives of this research are to establish a baseline and monitor the influences of local scale hydrology and biogeochemical behavior within the hyporheic zone at an unimpacted, uncontaminated site.

  9. Multi-offset GPR methods for hyporheic zone investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brosten, T.R.; Bradford, J.H.; McNamara, J.P.; Gooseff, M.N.; Zarnetske, J.P.; Bowden, W.B.; Johnston, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    Porosity of stream sediments has a direct effect on hyporheic exchange patterns and rates. Improved estimates of porosity heterogeneity will yield enhanced simulation of hyporheic exchange processes. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) velocity measurements are strongly controlled by water content thus accurate measures of GPR velocity in saturated sediments provides estimates of porosity beneath stream channels using petrophysical relationships. Imaging the substream system using surface based reflection measurements is particularly challenging due to large velocity gradients that occur at the transition from open water to saturated sediments. The continuous multi-offset method improves the quality of subsurface images through stacking and provides measurements of vertical and lateral velocity distributions. We applied the continuous multi-offset method to stream sites on the North Slope, Alaska and the Sawtooth Mountains near Boise, Idaho, USA. From the continuous multi-offset data, we measure velocity using reflection tomography then estimate water content and porosity using the Topp equation. These values provide detailed measurements for improved stream channel hydraulic and thermal modelling. ?? 2009 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  10. Microbial Production in the Hyporheic Zone of a Coastal Floodplain River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinton, S. M.; Edwards, R. T.

    2001-12-01

    Microbes living on saturated sediments influence stream ecosystem processes by altering the amount and chemical composition of materials delivered from the watershed to the river. Although many factors control rates of microbial processes, available dissolved organic matter (DOM) is often limiting. This limitation is of key interest in the hyporheic (subsurface) zone where microorganisms are dependent upon allochthonous sources of DOM for respiration and production. In floodplain rivers, long hyporheic flowpaths (hundreds of meters) occur beneath productive riparian terraces. At this scale, advecting DOM is rapidly utilized at the head of the flowpath leaving a large proportion of the hyporheic microbial community potentially DOM limited. An alternative source of labile DOM however, is the infiltration of DOM from overlying riparian soils. I investigated how variation in DOM and microbial activity was related to differences among the successional stages of overlying vegetation and positions along flowpaths in the hyporheic zone of a floodplain terrace on the Queets River, WA. Samples for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and microbial production were collected seasonally from 30 wells during 2000-2001. Dissolved organic carbon ranged from 0.5-2.0 mg/L over the year and was higher in wells overlain by mixed old-growth conifer than young alder. There was insufficient DOC in advecting surface water to support hyporheic respiration in the terrace, suggesting that riparian soils were a potential DOM source for microbial metabolism. Microbial growth experiments demonstrated that hyporheic microorganisms were capable of metabolizing riparian soil leachates. Microbial production was higher at the head of the flowpaths than the end of the flowpaths; however it did not decrease in a fashion predicted from other studies. Although microbial production was higher in wells overlain by older trees, production was not statistically related to the overlying patch structure. The

  11. Geomicrobial profile through the hyporheic zone of a historic mining flood plain

    SciTech Connect

    Wielinga, B.; Benner, S.; Brick, C.; Moore, J.; Gannon, J.

    1994-12-31

    A unique sampling method has been developed to assist the simultaneous sampling of the geochemical and microbiological stratigraphy from surface sediment into the underlying ground water at a highly contaminated historic mining site located near Butte, Montana. These waters often contain high levels of Fe and Mn in addition to elevated amounts of As, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn. The aqueous geochemical profile defined three zones: surface water with high pH (7.8) and low metal concentrations (Fe(II) = 0.2ppm); ground water zone with low pH (4.5) and high metal concentrations (Fe(II) = 350ppm); and hyporheic zone, intermediate in composition between surface and ground water. The behavior of metals within this sequence is primarily controlled by geochemical conditions of the aqueous phase and is strongly influenced by oxic inflow from surface waters. General heterotrophic bacterial numbers were high in the surface sediments ({approximately}10{sup 7}cfu/cm{sup 2}) but dropped significantly ({approximately}10{sup 4}cfu/cm{sup 2}) under the surface sediment layer. Manganese oxidizing bacteria represented a large subset of the total culturable heterotrophs throughout the hyporheic zone but not in the surface sediment. A sharp transition existed at the hyporheic zone/ground water interface. Throughout a steep 10 cm gradient the pH and the culturable bacteria each dropped two orders of magnitude. Geochemically this zone contained a dense band of precipitated metals species forming as a result of mixing between hyporheic water and ground water. The results presented suggest a strong correlation between geochemical events and the indigenous microflora.

  12. The Role of Hyporheic Zones in Cycling of Carbon and Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, D.; Steefel, C. I.; Arora, B.; Bisht, G.; Williams, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    Hyporheic zones impact the biogeochemical cycling of carbon and nitrogen, both organic and inorganic. To investigate and develop a predictive understanding of the coupled carbon and nitrogen cycling in the subsurface, we integrated a genome inspired complex reaction network with a high-resolution, three-dimensional, reactive flow and transport code - PFLOTRAN. Three-dimensional reactive flow and transport simulations were performed, making use of the high performance computing platform provided by PFLOTRAN, to describe the biogeochemical zonation developed because of the organic carbon rich sediments and a gradient of dissolved oxygen and pH within the hyporheic zone. We conducted this study in the lower East River, a high elevation catchment in southwestern Colorado. The lower East River site displays a rolling-to-mountainous topography with multiple river meanders that extend over a distance of 11 km. We carried out simulations within two stream meanders to examine (1) the impact of hyporheic exchanges on the biogeochemical zonation of variables and (2) how carbon and nitrogen fluxes at the meander scale influence coupled carbon and nitrogen cycling at the river scale. Three-dimensional model domain - 330 m (X) by 400 m (Y) by 48 m (Z) - was uniformly discretized with 10 m horizontal (X and Y) and 0.25 m vertical (Z) resolutions using structured grids in PFLOTRAN. Simulation results show that the intra-meander hyporheic flow paths and biogeochemical reactions result in the lateral redox zonation, which considerably impact the carbon and nitrogen fluxes into the stream system. The meander-driven hyporheic flow paths enhance the denitrification because of relatively longer residence times in the organic carbon-rich sediments.

  13. Metals and Colloids in the Hyporheic Zone of an Acid Mine Drainage-Contaminated Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norvell, A. S.; Ryan, J. N.; McKnight, D. M.; Ren, J.

    2009-12-01

    A key component of human and ecological risk assessments of acid mine drainage is predicting the fate and transport of metals in receiving streams. In order to learn more about the processes that control metal removal in the stream, we studied the role of colloids and the exchange of stream water with the hyporheic zone in Lefthand Creek, a stream contaminated by acid mine drainage in northwestern Boulder County, Colorado. We installed a set of mini-piezometers in the streambed and sampled the hyporheic pore waters along a 90 m reach of the creek for metals, colloids, and other geochemical parameters in the water and sediments. We conducted tracer dilution tests to determine the extent and time scale of hyporheic exchange. The results of these investigations showed that hyporheic exchange is a significant process in the attenuation of metals. The conservative tracer (bromide) concentration reached plateaus of up to 80 % of the surface concentration at depths of 40 cm and up to only 5% at depths of 100 cm. Hydraulic residence times in the upper 40 cm range from 20 minutes at 5 cm depths to under 3 hours at 40 cm depths. Colloidal transport of some metals is significant; large fractions of lead and copper were associated with colloids composed primarily of iron and aluminum, while zinc was not significantly associated with colloids. Sequential extractions of the sediments showed that trace metals were incorporated in iron and manganese oxide coatings found on the streambed sediments.

  14. Characterizing biogeochemical processes in the hyporheic zone using flume experiments and reactive transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quick, A. M.; Reeder, W. J.; Farrell, T. B.; Feris, K. P.; Tonina, D.; Benner, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    The hyporheic zones of streams are hotspots of biogeochemical cycling, where reactants from surface water and groundwater are continually brought into contact with microbial populations on the surfaces of stream sediments and reaction products are removed by hyporheic flow and degassing. Using large flume experiments we have documented the complex redox dynamics associated with dune-scale hyporheic flow. Observations, coupled with reactive transport modeling, provide insight into how flow dictates spatio-temporal distribution of redox reactions and the associated consumption and production of reactants and products. Dune hyporheic flow was experimentally produced by maintaining control over flow rates, slopes, sediment grain size, bedform geomorphology, and organic carbon content. An extensive in-situ monitoring array combined with sampling events over time elucidated redox-sensitive processes including constraints on the spatial distribution and magnitude of aerobic respiration, organic carbon consumption, sulfide deposition, and denitrification. Reactive transport modeling reveals further insight into the influence of system geometry and reaction rate. As an example application of the model, the relationship between residence times and reaction rates may be used to generate Damköhler numbers that are related to biogeochemical processes, such as the potential of streambed morphology and nitrate loading to influence production of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide via incomplete denitrification.

  15. Hydrogeomorphology of the hyporheic zone: stream solute and fine particle interactions with a dynamic streambed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, J.W.; Drummond, J.D.; Martin, R.L.; McPhillips, L.E.; Packman, A.I.; Jerolmack, D.J.; Stonedahl, S.H.; Aubeneau, A.F.; Sawyer, A.H.; Larsen, L.G.; Tobias, C.R.

    2012-01-01

    Hyporheic flow in streams has typically been studied separately from geomorphic processes. We investigated interactions between bed mobility and dynamic hyporheic storage of solutes and fine particles in a sand-bed stream before, during, and after a flood. A conservatively transported solute tracer (bromide) and a fine particles tracer (5 μm latex particles), a surrogate for fine particulate organic matter, were co-injected during base flow. The tracers were differentially stored, with fine particles penetrating more shallowly in hyporheic flow and retained more efficiently due to the high rate of particle filtration in bed sediment compared to solute. Tracer injections lasted 3.5 h after which we released a small flood from an upstream dam one hour later. Due to shallower storage in the bed, fine particles were rapidly entrained during the rising limb of the flood hydrograph. Rather than being flushed by the flood, we observed that solutes were stored longer due to expansion of hyporheic flow paths beneath the temporarily enlarged bedforms. Three important timescales determined the fate of solutes and fine particles: (1) flood duration, (2) relaxation time of flood-enlarged bedforms back to base flow dimensions, and (3) resulting adjustments and lag times of hyporheic flow. Recurrent transitions between these timescales explain why we observed a peak accumulation of natural particulate organic matter between 2 and 4 cm deep in the bed, i.e., below the scour layer of mobile bedforms but above the maximum depth of particle filtration in hyporheic flow paths. Thus, physical interactions between bed mobility and hyporheic transport influence how organic matter is stored in the bed and how long it is retained, which affects decomposition rate and metabolism of this southeastern Coastal Plain stream. In summary we found that dynamic interactions between hyporheic flow, bed mobility, and flow variation had strong but differential influences on base flow retention and

  16. Modeling and inverting reactive stream tracers undergoing two-site sorption and decay in the hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zijie; Lemke, Dennis; Osenbrück, Karsten; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2013-06-01

    Performing stream-tracer experiments is an accepted technique to assess transport characteristics of streams undergoing hyporheic exchange. Recently, combining conservative and reactive tracers, in which the latter presumably undergoes degradation exclusively within the hyporheic zone, has been suggested to study in-stream transport, hyporheic exchange, and the metabolic activity of the hyporheic zone. The combined quantitative analysis to adequately describe such tests, however, has been missing. In this paper, we present mathematical methods to jointly analyze breakthrough curves of a conservative tracer (fluorescein), a linearly degrading tracer (resazurin), and its daughter compound (resorufin), which are synchronously introduced into the stream as pulses. In-stream transport is described by the one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation, amended with a convolution term to account for transient storage within the hyporheic zone over a distribution of travel times, transformation of the reactive tracer in the hyporheic zone, and two-site sorption of the parent and daughter compounds therein. We use a shape-free approach of describing the hyporheic travel-time distribution, overcoming the difficulty of identifying the best functional parameterization for transient storage. We discuss how this model can be fitted to the breakthrough curves of all three compounds and demonstrate the method by an application to a tracer test in the third-order stream Goldersbach in Southern Germany. The entire river water passes once through the hyporheic zone over a travel distance of about 200 m with mean hyporheic residence times ranging between 16 and 23 min. We also observed a secondary peak in the transfer functions at about 1 h indicating a second hyporheic flow path. We could jointly fit the breakthrough curves of all compounds in three monitoring stations and evaluated the parameter uncertainty of the individual and joint fits by a method based on conditional

  17. Nutrient Cycling in the Bank Hyporheic Zone of the Regulated Lower Colorado River, Austin, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briody, A.; Cardenas, M.

    2013-12-01

    Periodic releases from an upstream dam cause rapid stage fluctuations in the Colorado River near Austin, Texas. These daily pulses modulate fluid exchange and residence times in the hyporheic region, where biogeochemical reactions have been found to be more pronounced. We have installed two transects of wells perpendicular to the river in order to further examine the reactions occurring in this zone of surface-water and groundwater exchange. One well transect records physical water level fluctuations and allows us to map hydraulic head gradients and fluid movement. The second transect allows for water sample collection at three discrete depths. Samples were collected on a regular (approximately hourly) basis from 12 wells for at least 24-hours and were analyzed for nutrients, carbon, major ions, and stable isotopes. The results will provide a detailed picture of biogeochemical processes in hyporheic zones driven by upstream dam operations.

  18. Geoelectrical Response of a Hyporheic Zone within a Fractured Sedimentary Bedrock Riverbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steelman, C. M.; Kennedy, C. S.; Capes, D. C.; Parker, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    Fractured sedimentary bedrock aquifers represent an important source of water for many communities around the world. Although the effective porosities of these aquifers are extremely low relative to their unconsolidated counterparts, the existence of dense networks of interconnected fractures, dissolution-enhanced conduits or karst features can result in productive, yet heterogeneous and anisotropic, flow systems. Fluid-filled fractures remain connected to the porous matrix through advective-diffusive processes. This dual porosity concept is routinely applied to groundwater resource and contaminant transport studies; however, they have only recently been examined in shallow hyporheic environments, where groundwater and surface water influence one another through water and solute exchange across a streambed. Needless to say, there remains a gap in our conceptual understanding of hyporheic zones along rivers where water flowing through high-permeability fracture networks variably interacts with porewater residing in the low-permeability matrix. It is hypothesized that bedrock rivers will possess some measure of a hyporheic zone, albeit one that is governed by a vertical/horizontal fracture network but remains connected to the porous matrix. Hydrogeophysical methods provide a non-invasive means of assessing the scale and variability of critical zone dynamics. Here, we focus on the capacity of surface electrical resistivity for the detection and monitoring of a seasonally variable hyporheic zone at a field station located along the Eramosa River near Guelph, Ontario, Canada. Unlike conventional hydrogeological methods which potentially bias conduction in the fractures, surface resistivity is sensitive to the bulk electrical conductivity of the formation, making it more suited for detection of matrix conditions. Electrical resistivity data was collected along two 50 m profiles along a pool-riffle sequence on a daily to weekly interval from July 2014 to July 2015 and

  19. Response of invertebrates from the hyporheic zone of chalk rivers to eutrophication and land use.

    PubMed

    Pacioglu, Octavian; Moldovan, Oana Teodora

    2016-03-01

    Whereas the response of lotic benthic macroinvertebrates to different environmental stressors is a widespread practice nowadays in assessing the water and habitat quality, the use of hyporheic zone invertebrates is still in its infancy. In this study, classification and regression trees analysis were employed in order to assess the ecological requirements and the potential as bioindicators for the hyporheic zone invertebrates inhabiting four lowland chalk rivers (south England) with contrasting eutrophication levels (based on surface nitrate concentrations) and magnitude of land use (based on percentage of fine sediments load and median interstitial space). Samples of fauna, water and sediment were sampled twice, during low (summer) and high (winter) groundwater level, at depths of 20 and 35 cm. Certain groups of invertebrates (Glossosomatidae and Psychomyiidae caddisflies, and riffle beetles) proved to be good indicators of rural catchments, moderately eutrophic and with high fine sediment load. A diverse community dominated by microcrustaceans (copepods and ostracods) were found as good indicators of highly eutrophic urban streams, with moderate-high fine sediment load. However, the use of other taxonomic groups (e.g. chironomids, oligochaetes, nematodes, water mites and the amphipod Gammarus pulex), very widespread in the hyporheic zone of all sampled rivers, is of limited use because of their high tolerance to the analysed stressors. We recommend the use of certain taxonomic groups (comprising both meiofauna and macroinvertebrates) dwelling in the chalk hyporheic zone as indicators of eutrophication and colmation and, along with routine benthic sampling protocols, for a more comprehensive water and habitat quality assessment of chalk rivers. PMID:26531711

  20. Hydrologic dynamics and geochemical responses within a floodplain aquifer and hyporheic zone during Hurricane Sandy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, A. H.; Kaplan, L. A.; Lazareva, O.; Michael, H. A.

    2014-06-01

    Storms dominate solute export budgets from catchments and drive hydrogeochemical changes in the near-stream environment. We captured near-stream hydrogeochemical dynamics during an intense storm (Hurricane Sandy, October 2012), by instrumenting a riparian-hyporheic zone transect of White Clay Creek in the Christina River Basin Critical Zone Observatory with pressure transducers, redox probes, and pore water samplers. In the floodplain aquifer, preferential vertical flow paths such as macropores facilitated rapid infiltration early in the storm. Water table rose quickly and promoted continuous groundwater discharge to the stream. Floodplain-hillslope topography controlled poststorm aquifer drainage rates, as the broad, western floodplain aquifer drained more slowly than the narrow, eastern floodplain aquifer adjacent to a steep hillslope. These changes in groundwater flow drove heterogeneous geochemical responses in the floodplain aquifer and hyporheic zone. Vertical infiltration in the floodplain and hyporheic exchange in the streambed increased DOC and oxygen delivery to microbially active sediments, which may have enhanced respiration. Resulting geochemical perturbations persisted from days to weeks after the storm. Our observations suggest that groundwater-borne solute delivery to streams during storms depends on unique interactions of vertical infiltration along preferential pathways, perturbations to groundwater geochemistry, and topographically controlled drainage rates.

  1. Time Lapse Electrical Resistivity Tomography and Distributed Temperature Measurements in the Hyporheic Zone of an Alpine River.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassiani, Giorgio; Boaga, Jacopo; Busato, Laura; Perri, Maria Teresa; Putti, Mario; Pasetto, Damiano; Majone, Bruno; Bellin, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    The hyporheic zone is a very complex transition zone, where interrelated hydrological and biogeochemical processes take place, mainly controlled by the exchanges of water between the stream and the surrounding riparian zone and underlying aquifer. Monitoring of the hyporheic zone faces similar problems of groundwater monitoring, often exacerbated by the strong physical and biogeochemical gradients that characterize this transition area. Geophysical time-lapse techniques can provide a dynamic monitoring of the hyporheic and riparian zones. We installed in the hyporheic zone of the Vermigliana creek, Trentino, Italy, a monitoring system composed of (a) an Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) apparatus for time-lapse monitoring of electrical resistivity changes, (b) an optical fiber for DTS monitoring of temperature. The installation below the river bed was done thanks to the recent horizontal directional drilling technology capable to be remote-guided during perforation. We installed 48 electrodes below the stream, plus 24 electrodes on the top of the riparian zone, thus closing nearly entirely the region to be monitored. Parallel to the ERT cable we also installed Raman technology fiber optic cable for the distributed monitoring of the subsoil temperature. We present here the results of the time-lapse measurement surveys of the first year, together with the flow/transport modeling conducted to link quantitatively the data collected to the hydraulic parameters of the system. The hyporheic zone evidences an active underflow dynamics that, to be correctly described, needs accurate distributed variably saturated flow and transport modeling.

  2. Investigation of the Hyporheic Zone at the 300 Area,Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Brad G.; Kohn, Nancy P.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; McFarland, Doug; Arntzen, Evan V.; Mackley, Rob D.; Patton, Gregory W.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Bunn, Amoret L.

    2007-10-01

    The Remediation Task of the Science and Technology (S&T) Project is intended to provide research to meet several objectives concerning the discharge of groundwater contamination into the river at the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. This report serves to meet the research objectives by developing baseline data for future evaluation of remedial technologies, evaluating the effects changing river stage on near-shore groundwater chemistry, improving estimates of contaminant flux to the river, providing estimates on the extent of contaminant discharge areas along the shoreline, and providing data to support computer models used to evaluate remedial alternatives. This report summarizes the activities conducted to date and provides an overview of data collected through July 2006. Recent geologic investigations (funded through other U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs) have provided a more complete geologic interpretation of the 300 Area and a characterization of the vertical extent of uranium contamination. Extrapolation of this geologic interpretation into the hyporheic zone is possible, but there is little data to provide corroboration. Penetration testing was conducted along the shoreline to develop evidence to support the extrapolation of the mapping of the geologic facies. In general, this penetration testing provided evidence supporting the extrapolation of the most recent geologic interpretation, but it also provided some higher resolution detail on the shape of the layer than constrains contaminant movement. Information on this confining layer will provide a more detailed estimate of the area of river bed that has the potential to be impacted by uranium discharge to the river from groundwater transport. Water sampling in the hyporheic zone has provided results that illustrate the degree of mixing that occurs in the hyporheic zone. Uranium concentrations measured at individual sampling locations can vary by several orders of magnitude depending on the river and

  3. Reactive uptake of trace metals in the hyporheic zone of a mining- contaminated stream, Pinal Creek, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, C.C.; Harvey, J.W.

    2000-01-01

    Significant uptake of dissolved metals occurred by interaction of groundwater and surface water with hyporheic-zone sediments during transport in Pinal Creek, AZ. The extent of trace metal uptake was calculated by mass balance measurements made directly within the hyporheic zone. A conservative solute tracer injected into the stream was used to quantify hydrologic exchange with the stream and groundwater. Fractional reactive uptake of dissolved metals entering the hyporheic zone was determined at 29 sites and averaged 52 ?? 25, 27 ?? 19, and 36 ?? 24% for Co, Ni, and Zn, compared with Mn uptake of 22 ?? 19%. First-order rate constants (??(h)) of metal uptake in the hyporheic zone were determined at seven sites using the exchange rate of water derived from tracer arrival in the streambed. Reaction-time constants (1/??(h)) averaged 0.41, 0.84, and 0.38 h for Co, Ni, and Zn, respectively, and 1.3 h for Mn. In laboratory experiments with streambed sediments, metal uptake increased with preexisting Mn oxide concentration, supporting our interpretation that Mn oxides in the hyporheic zone enhance trace metal uptake. Reach-scale mass-balance calculations that include groundwater metal inputs indicated that decreases in metal loads ranged from 12 to 68% over the 7-km perennial reach depending on the metal. The decreases in metal loads are attributed to uptake of trace metals by Mn oxides in the hyporheic zone that is enhanced because of ongoing Mn oxide formation. Analysis of dissolved- metal streambed profiles and conservative solute tracers provide a valuable tool for quantifying metal uptake or release in the hyporheic zone of contaminated streams.

  4. Groundwater-surface water interactions in the hyporheic zone under climate change scenarios.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shangbo; Yuan, Xingzhong; Peng, Shuchan; Yue, Junsheng; Wang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Hong; Williams, D Dudley

    2014-12-01

    Slight changes in climate, such as the rise of temperature or alterations of precipitation and evaporation, will dramatically influence nearly all freshwater and climate-related hydrological behavior on a global scale. The hyporheic zone (HZ), where groundwater (GW) and surface waters (SW) interact, is characterized by permeable sediments, low flow velocities, and gradients of physical, chemical, and biological characteristics along the exchange flows. Hyporheic metabolism, that is biogeochemical reactions within the HZ as well as various processes that exchange substances and energy with adjoining systems, is correlated with hyporheic organisms, habitats, and the organic matter (OM) supplied from GW and SW, which will inevitably be influenced by climate-related variations. The characteristics of the HZ in acting as a transition zone and in filtering and purifying exchanged water will be lost, resulting in a weakening of the self-purification capacity of natural water bodies. Thus, as human disturbances intensify in the future, GW and SW pollution will become a greater challenge for mankind than ever before. Biogeochemical processes in the HZ may favor the release of carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O), and methane (CH4) under climate change scenarios. Future water resource management should consider the integrity of aquatic systems as a whole, including the HZ, rather than independently focusing on SW and GW. PMID:25081003

  5. Quantifying hyporheic zones formed by large woody debris: Synthesis of numerical, laboratory flume, and field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, A. H.; Cardenas, M. B.; Buttles, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    The flow of river water around wood debris creates pressure gradients along the riverbed that drive a large zone of river-groundwater mixing, or hyporheic exchange. River water downwells into the riverbed upstream of a channel-spanning log and upwells downstream. Using laboratory flume experiments and coupled CFD-groundwater flow simulations, we develop a predictive relationship for the pressure wave created by a channel-spanning log and resulting hyporheic flow. Amplitude of the pressure wave (and thus hyporheic exchange) increases with channel Froude number and blockage ratio (log diameter:channel flow depth). This relationship can be used to predict losses or gains in river-groundwater connectivity due to removal or addition of instream wood debris. We tested this relationship in a second-order stream in Valles Caldera National Preserve (NM). Log additions created alternating zones of upwelling and downwelling in a reach that was previously losing throughout. Though losing conditions limited the magnitude of exchange, the fundamental shift in exchange patterns from losing to nested flows could influence habitat complexity and transport of nutrients and energy.

  6. Denitrification in sediments from the hyporheic zone adjacent to a small forested stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duff, J.H.; Triska, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    Denitrifying potentials increased with increasing distance from the stream channel. Dissolved oxygen was 100% of the concentration expected in equilibrium with the atmosphere in water obtained from monitoring wells immediately adjacent to the stream but was as low as 7% of the expected value in water 11.4 m inland. Both nitrate and dissolved organic carbon decreased over summer in wells at the base of the alder-forested slope. A 48-h injection of nitrate-amended stream water into hyporheic water 8.4 m inland stimulated nitrous oxide production in the presence of acetylene. Nitrous oxide was generated as nitrate and acetylene were co-transported to a well 13 m down-gradient. Acetylene-block experiments coupled with the chemistry data suggest that denitrification can modify the chemistry of water during passage through the hyporheic zone. -from Authors

  7. Predicting mean residence time and exchange velocity in the hyporheic zone of restored streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morén, Ida; Wörman, Anders; Riml, Joakim

    2016-04-01

    The hyporheic zones of streams and rivers have been identified as hotspots for biogeochemical reactions in the aquatic environment, making the retention time and exchange velocity of the hyporheic zone essential parameters in the modelling of these processes. However, exact site-specific values of those parameters are often missing in stream restoration projects because there are no well-defined scaling relationships linking them to measurable reach characteristics. In this study we derive semi-analytical solutions for the retention time and exchange velocity in the hyporheic zone. In particular the effect on hyporheic exchange is expressed by the use of physically based models and by superimposing different geomorphologic features of different scales. It is suggested that all exchange phenomena can be modelled as head anomalies expressed with a harmonic distribution along the stream with specific wavelength and head amplitude. The maximum head of an exchange phenomena is either dominated by hydrodynamic or hydrostatic water pressure, depending on the size of the feature causing the exchange. The theory leads to constitutive relationships for exchange velocity and residence time expressed as functions of the distribution of wavelengths, distribution of head amplitude and hydraulic conductivity. In order to validate and evaluate certain empirical coefficients, a number of Rhodamine WT tracer tests were performed in a partly restored agricultural stream in the south of Sweden called the Tullstorps brook. To evaluate the tracer test in sections where remediation actions have been undertaken we used the method of temporal moments. In conjunction with the tracer tests a characterisation of the stream was carried out where hydraulic conductivity of the streambed and stream morphology was measured. The study verifies that the residence time in the hyporheic zone decreases with the maximum hydraulic head of the largest (dominating) geomorphic feature of the reach, and

  8. Stream discharge events increase the reaction efficiency of the hyporheic zone of an in-stream gravel bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleckenstein, J. H.; Trauth, N.; Schmidt, C.

    2015-12-01

    Streambed structures such as dunes, pool-riffles or bars enhance the exchange of stream water and solutes with the subsurface, the hyporheic zone. Prior studies have evaluated the factors which control hyporheic exchange and biogeochemical processes for steady state hydrological conditions using numerical models. However, the impact of natural discharge variability on water and solute exchange, creating hydraulically specific conditions for the reactions in the shallow streambed, has not been studied so far. In our study, we set up a transient flow and reactive transport model to elucidate the impact of single stream discharge events on water exchange, solute transport and reactions within the hyporheic zone of an in-stream gravel bar. The discharge events were varied by their duration and the maximum stream discharge. Temporally variable hydraulic heads were assigned as hydraulic head boundary conditions at the top of the reactive groundwater model MIN3P. A steady ambient groundwater flow field was introduced by lateral upstream and downstream hydraulic head boundaries, generating in combination with the stream water level, losing, neutral, or gaining stream conditions. Stream water borne dissolved oxygen, dissolved organic carbon and nitrate can infiltrate into the modelling domain across the top boundary and can react with each other by aerobic respiration and denitrification. Our results show that water and solute exchange through the hyporheic zone (only stream water that infiltrates into the subsurface and exfiltrates back to the stream) is highly dependent on the interplay between event characteristics and the ambient groundwater level. In scenarios where the stream discharge shifts the hydraulic system to strong and long-lasting losing conditions, hyporheic flow paths are longer and the extent of the hyporheic zone are deeper than under base flow conditions and small events where gaining conditions prevail. Consequently, stream discharge events may

  9. Stream discharge events increase the reactive efficiency of the hyporheic zone of an in-stream gravel bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauth, Nico; Schmidt, Christian; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2016-04-01

    Streambed structures such as dunes, pool-riffles or bars enhance the exchange of stream water and solutes with the subsurface, the hyporheic zone. Prior studies have evaluated the factors which control hyporheic exchange and biogeochemical processes for steady state hydrological conditions using numerical models. However, the impact of natural discharge variability on water and solute exchange, creating hydraulically specific conditions for the reactions in the shallow streambed, has received less attention to date. In our study, we set up a transient flow and reactive transport model to elucidate the impact of single stream discharge events on water exchange, solute transport and reactions within the hyporheic zone of an in-stream gravel bar. The discharge events were varied by their duration and the maximum stream discharge. Temporally varying hydraulic heads were assigned as hydraulic head boundary conditions at the top of the reactive groundwater model MIN3P. A steady ambient groundwater flow field was introduced by lateral upstream and downstream hydraulic head boundaries, resulting in losing, neutral, or gaining conditions in the stream with respect to exchange with groundwater. Stream water borne dissolved oxygen, dissolved organic carbon and nitrate can infiltrate across the top of the modelling domain, where aerobic respiration and denitrification are simulated. Our results show that water and solute exchange through the hyporheic zone (only stream water that infiltrates into the subsurface and exfiltrates back to the stream) is highly dependent on the interplay between event characteristics and the ambient groundwater level. In scenarios where the stream discharge shifts the hydraulic system to strong and long-lasting losing conditions, hyporheic flow paths are longer and the extent of the hyporheic zone deeper than under base flow conditions and small hydrologic events where gaining conditions prevail. Consequently, stream discharge events may

  10. Aquatic Hyphomycete Species Are Screened by the Hyporheic Zone of Woodland Streams

    PubMed Central

    Chauvet, Eric; Mermillod-Blondin, Florian; Assemat, Fiona; Elger, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic hyphomycetes strongly contribute to organic matter dynamics in streams, but their abilities to colonize leaf litter buried in streambed sediments remain unexplored. Here, we conducted field and laboratory experiments (slow-filtration columns and stream-simulating microcosms) to test the following hypotheses: (i) that the hyporheic habitat acting as a physical sieve for spores filters out unsuccessful strategists from a potential species pool, (ii) that decreased pore size in sediments reduces species dispersal efficiency in the interstitial water, and (iii) that the physicochemical conditions prevailing in the hyporheic habitat will influence fungal community structure. Our field study showed that spore abundance and species diversity were consistently reduced in the interstitial water compared with surface water within three differing streams. Significant differences occurred among aquatic hyphomycetes, with dispersal efficiency of filiform-spore species being much higher than those with compact or branched/tetraradiate spores. This pattern was remarkably consistent with those found in laboratory experiments that tested the influence of sediment pore size on spore dispersal in microcosms. Furthermore, leaves inoculated in a stream and incubated in slow-filtration columns exhibited a fungal assemblage dominated by only two species, while five species were codominant on leaves from the stream-simulating microcosms. Results of this study highlight that the hyporheic zone exerts two types of selection pressure on the aquatic hyphomycete community, a physiological stress and a physical screening of the benthic spore pool, both leading to drastic changes in the structure of fungal community. PMID:24441154

  11. Exploring controls on saline tracer movement within the hyporheic zone using finite-element modeling and electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, P. B.; Singha, K.; Gooseff, M. N.

    2012-12-01

    The extent of the hyporheic zone is governed by complex physical processes and material properties that are difficult to characterize with well data or in-stream data alone. Here, we explore use of three dimensional electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) to provide spatially distributed information of stream solute transport and image the dominant pathways of solute movement into the hyporheic zone in a synthetic study. A fully coupled three-dimensional finite-element model of the surface and subsurface system is developed in COMSOL to explore the extent of the hyporheic zone given variations in a series of properties: (1) stream discharge, (2) changes in the hydraulic gradient between aquifer and stream and (3) the width of the stream. We also explore ERI's ability to image the hyporheic extent under these controls given differences in injected tracer concentration. ERI is found to be well correlated with solute transport data, and both data accurately predict the mean arrival time of stream water within the hyporheic zone and the solute extent into the subsurface.

  12. Engineered Hyporheic Zones as Novel Water Quality Best Management Practice: Flow and Contaminant Attenuation in Constructed Stream Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, S.; McCray, J. E.; Higgins, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    The hyporheic zone is a hotspot for biogeochemical processing that can attenuate a variety of nonpoint source contaminants in streamwater. However, hyporheic zones in urban and agricultural streams are often degraded and poorly connected with surface water. In order to increase hyporheic exchange and improve water quality, we introduced engineered streambeds as a stormwater and restoration best management practice. Modifications to streambed hydraulic conductivity and reactivity are termed Biohydrochemical Enhancement structures for Streamwater Treatment (BEST). BEST are subsurface modules that utilize low- and high-permeability sediments to drive efficient hyporheic exchange, and reactive geomedia to increase reaction rates within the hyporheic zone. This work presents the first physical performance data of BEST modules at the pilot scale. BEST modules were installed in a constructed stream facility at the Colorado School of Mines in Golden, CO. This facility features two 15m artificial streams, which included an all sand control condition alongside the BEST test condition. Streams were continuously operated at a discharge of 1 L/s using recycled water. Time-lapse electrical resistivity surveys demonstrated that BEST modules provided substantially greater hyporheic exchange than the control condition. Water quality samples at the hyporheic and reach scales also revealed greater attenuation of nitrogen, coliforms, and select metals and trace organics by BEST modules relative to the control condition. These experimental results were also compared to previous numerical model simulations to evaluate model accuracy. Together, these results show that BEST may be an effective best management practice for improving streamwater quality in urban and agricultural settings.

  13. The negligible effect of bed form migration on denitrification in hyporheic zones of permeable sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Adam J.; Cardenas, M. Bayani; Cook, Perran L. M.

    2015-03-01

    Bed form celerity, the migration rate of ripples along a sediment bed, has previously been shown to have dramatic effects on oxygen distribution and transport within the hyporheic zone of permeable sediments. This has the potential to influence denitrification rates—in particular by increasing the coupling of nitrification and denitrification. To further understand this, we numerically modeled nitrogen cycling under migrating ripples. While the simulated oxygen profiles match with expected behavior, almost no effect on denitrification or coupled nitrification-denitrification was observed with increasing celerity. Instead, denitrification rates were dominantly controlled by the flow velocity of water overlying the sediment.

  14. Factors affecting hyporheic and surface transient storage in a western U.S. river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Zachary C.; Warwick, John J.; Schumer, Rina

    2014-03-01

    Hyporheic storage accounts for a significant fraction of solute residence time in small streams and has been shown to have a large effect on the transport of solutes. It is not clear whether this characteristic is preserved in larger streams and rivers, as increased discharge and decreased slope may reduce overall exchange between the channel and subsurface, and the size of surface storage zones may increase. Conservative tracer tests conducted in the Truckee River, a stream with mean annual discharge >0.5 m3 s-1, were simulated with both one (1-SZ) and two-storage zone (2-SZ) transport models to quantify the relative role of surface transient storage (STS) and hyporheic transient storage (HTS) on the physical transport of solutes in a large stream. Tracer injections were conducted at two different discharge levels in two reaches with distinct geomorphic characteristics. STS was the dominant storage mechanism for all reaches and discharge levels and surface storage accounted for a larger fraction of median transport time (FMED200) than hyporheic storage in all but one case. Increased discharge significantly reduced the influence of the HTS (primarily) and STS zones on median transport time at the study site. Comparisons with studies of discharge and geomorphic effects on TS characteristics in other streams indicated differing physical controls on STS and HTS zones. Therefore, measurements such as slope, sinuosity, width, depth, and gross gains and losses of discharge need to be considered along with discharge. This work adds to the growing sentiment that up-scaling and prediction of stream storage characteristics based on discharge and channel properties is far from straightforward. Since biogeochemical processing occurs differently in the HTS and STS, two-zone storage models provide necessary representations of transport in river systems for studies focused on aspects of water quality. Extra parameters are required for model optimization but simple cross

  15. Rn as a geochemical tool for estimating residence times in the hyporheic zone and its application to biogeochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfedder, Benjamin; Dörner, Sebastian; Ebertshäuser, Marlene Esther; Glaser, Barbara; Klug, Maria; Pittroff, Marco; Pieruschka, Ines; Waldemer, Carolin

    2014-05-01

    The hyporheic zone is at the interface between groundwater and surface water systems. It is also often a geochemical and redox boundary between typically reduced groundwater and oxic surface water. It experiences dynamic physical and chemical conditions as both groundwater fluxes and surface water levels vary in time and space. This can be particularly important for processes such as biogeochemical processing of nutrients and carbon. There has recently been an increasing focus on coupling residence times of surface water in the hyporheic zone with biogeochemical reactions. While geochemical profiles can be readily measured using established geochemical sampling techniques (e.g. peepers), quantifying surface water residence times and flow paths within the hyporheic zone is more elusive. The nobel gas radon offers a method for quantification of surface water residence times in the hyporheic zone. Radon activities are typically low in surface waters due to degassing to the atmosphere and decay. However once the surface water flows into the hyporheic zone radon accumulates along the flow path due to emanation from the sediments. Using simple analytical equations the water residence time can be calculated based on the difference between measured 222Rn activities and 222Rn activities at secular equilibrium, with a maximum limit of about 20 days (depending on measurement precision). Rn is particularly suited to residence time measurements in the hyporheic zone since it does not require addition of tracers to the stream nor does it require complex simulations and assumptions (such as 1D vertical flow) as for temperature measurements. As part of the biogeochemistry course at the University of Bayreuth, we have investigated the coupling of redox processes and water residence times in the hyporheic zone using 222Rn as a tracer for residence time. Of particular interest were nitrate and sulfate reduction and methane and CO2 production. Measurements were made in a sandy section

  16. Comparison of environmental tracer to characterize wastewater mass fluxes into the hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Irina; Barth, Johannes A. C.; Prommer, Henning; Schulz, Manoj; Ternes, Thomas A.; Schüth, Christoph; van Geldern, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Groundwater and surface water are in many cases closely linked components of the water cycle with respect to both quantity and quality. Bank filtrates may eventually be impacted by the infiltration of wastewater-derived pollutants from surface waters. To study the fate of wastewater-derived substances (e.g. X-ray contrast media) in groundwater, different environmental tracers (temperature, stable isotopes, and the artificial sweetener acesulfame) were evaluated in a model-based analysis of a field experiment within the hyporheic and riparian zone of a highly polluted stream in Germany [1,2]. The suitability of acesulfame to trace wastewater-related surface water fluxes from streams into the hyporheic and riparian zone was compared with the transport of water stable isotopes (δ18O and δ2H), temperature, and hydraulic heads via analytical and numerical approaches. A calibrated conservative transport model based on a joint inversion of temperature, acesulfame, and piezometric pressure heads was employed in a model validation using additional data sets of acesulfame and water stable isotopes collected over 5 months in a stream and groundwater. Surface water ratios calculated with a mixing equation from water stable isotopes and simulated acesulfame mass fluxes were investigated for their ability to estimate the contribution of wastewater-related surface water inflow within groundwater. The results of this study point to limitations for the application of acesulfame to trace surface water-groundwater interactions properly. Acesulfame completely missed to indicate wastewater-related surface water volumes that remain in the hyporheic zone even under stream-gaining conditions. In contrast, under stream-losing conditions, acesulfame based predictions lead to an overestimation of the surface water volume of up to 25% in the riparian zone [2]. A model sensitivity analysis revealed temperature as the best indicator in terms of mass flux prediction beneath the stream bed

  17. Mixing interfaces, fluxes, residence times and redox conditions of the hyporheic zones induced by dune-like bedforms and ambient groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzadri, Alessandra; Tonina, Daniele; Bellin, Alberto; Valli, Alberto

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies highlighted the importance of the interface between streams and their surrounding sediment, known as the hyporheic zone, where stream waters flow through the alluvium. These pore water fluxes stem from the interaction among streambed morphology, stream hydraulics and surrounding groundwater flow. We analytically model the hyporheic hydraulics induced by a spatially uniform ambient groundwater flow made of a horizontal, underflow, and a vertical, basal, component, which mimics gaining and losing stream conditions. The proposed analytical solution allows to investigate the control of simple hydromorphological quantities on the extent, residence time and redox conditions of the hyporheic zone, and the thickness of the mixing interface between hyporheic and groundwater cells. Our analysis shows that the location of the mixing zone shallows or deepens in the sediment as a function of bedform geometry, surface hydraulic and groundwater flow. The point of stagnation, where hyporheic flow velocities vanish and where the separation surface passes through, is shallower than or coincides with the deepest point of the hyporheic zone only due to underflow. An increase of the ambient flow causes a reduction of the hyporheic zone volume similarly in both losing and gaining conditions. The hyporheic residence time is lognormally distributed under neutral, losing and gaining conditions, with the residence time moments depending on the same set of parameters describing dune morphology and stream flow.

  18. Time Lapse Electrical Resistivity Tomography, Distributed Temperature Measurements and Modeling in the Hyporheic Zone of an Alpine River.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boaga, J.; Busato, L.; Perri, M. T.; Strapazzon, G.; Pasetto, D.; Putti, M.; Cano Paoli, K.; Majone, B.; Bellin, A.; Cassiani, G.

    2014-12-01

    The hyporheic zone is a very complex transition zone, where interrelated hydrological and biogeochemical processes take place, mainly controlled by the exchanges of water between the stream and the surrounding riparian zone and underlying aquifer. Modeling may offer an opportunity to deepen our understanding on how these important ecosystems work. However this is only possible if hydrological and biogeochemical models are coupled to measurements that can constrain the model predictions and lead to robust estimates of the system key parameters and processes. Monitoring of the hyporheic zone faces similar problems of groundwater monitoring, often exacerbated by the strong physical biogeochemical gradients that characterize this transition area. Geophysical time-lapse techniques can provide a dynamic monitoring of the hyporheic and riparian zones.We installed in the hyporheic zone of the Vermigliana creek, Trentino, Italy, a monitoring system composed of (a) an Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) apparatus for time-lapse monitoring of electrical resistivity changes, (b) an optical fiber for DTS monitoring of temperature. The installation below the river bed was done thanks to the recent horizontal directional drilling technology capable to be remote-guided during perforation. We installed 48 electrodes below the stream,plus 24 electrodes on the top of the riparian zone, thus closing nearly entirely the region to be monitored. Parallel to the ERT cable we also installed raman technology fiber optic cable for the distributed monitoring of the subsoil temperature. We present here the results of the time-lapse measurement surveys of the first year, together with the flow/transport modeling conducted to link quantitatively the data collected to the hydraulic parameters of the system. The hyporheic zone evidences an active underflow dynamics that, to be correctly described, needs accurate distributed variably saturated flow and transport modeling.

  19. Influence of streambed hydraulic conductivity on solute exchange with the hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Robert J.; Boufadel, Michel C.

    2006-11-01

    A conservative solute tracer experiment was conducted in Indian Creek, a small urban stream in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to investigate the role of subsurface properties on the exchange between streamwater and the hyporheic zone (subsurface surrounding the stream). Sodium Bromide (NaBr) was used as a conservative tracer, and it was monitored in the surface water at two stations and in the upper bed sediments (shallow hyporheic zone extending from 7.5 to 10 cm below the streambed). The hydraulic conductivity ( K) of the upper bed sediments and the lower bed sediments (10 12.5 cm below the streambed) was measured in situ. High tracer concentrations were observed in the upper layer at locations where the hydraulic conductivity of the upper layer was larger than that of the lower layer. Low concentrations in the upper layer were observed in the converse case. A statistically significant relationship between the mass retained in the upper layer and the difference of K values between layers was observed.

  20. Argon concentration time-series as a tool to study gas dynamics in the hyporheic zone.

    PubMed

    Mächler, Lars; Brennwald, Matthias S; Kipfer, Rolf

    2013-07-01

    The oxygen dynamics in the hyporheic zone of a peri-alpine river (Thur, Switzerland), were studied through recording and analyzing the concentration time-series of dissolved argon, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and temperature during low flow conditions, for a period of one week. The argon concentration time-series was used to investigate the physical gas dynamics in the hyporheic zone. Differences in the transport behavior of heat and gas were determined by comparing the diel temperature evolution of groundwater to the measured concentration of dissolved argon. These differences were most likely caused by vertical heat transport which influenced the local groundwater temperature. The argon concentration time-series were also used to estimate travel times by cross correlating argon concentrations in the groundwater with argon concentrations in the river. The information gained from quantifying the physical gas transport was used to estimate the oxygen turnover in groundwater after water recharge. The resulting oxygen turnover showed strong diel variations, which correlated with the water temperature during groundwater recharge. Hence, the variation in the consumption rate was most likely caused by the temperature dependence of microbial activity. PMID:23611693

  1. Association of Arsenic and Phosphorus with Iron Nanoparticles in the hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Carroll, Denis; Hartland, Adam; Larsen, Joshua; Andersen, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The role of colloids and nanoparticles in hyporheic zone reactive transport is currently poorly understood, and may play an important role in contaminant mobility. The microbial oxidation of organic matter coupled to reductive iron oxide dissolution is widely recognized as the dominant mechanism driving elevated arsenic (As) concentrations in aquifers. This paper considers the potential of nanoparticles to increase the mobility of As in aquifers, thereby accounting for discrepancies between predicted and observed As transport reported elsewhere. Arsenic, phosphorus, and iron size distributions and natural organic matter association were examined along a flow path from surface water via the hyporheic zone to shallow groundwater. Our analysis demonstrates that the colloidal Fe concentration (>1 kDa) correlates with both colloidal P and colloidal As concentrations. Importantly, increases in the concentration of colloidal P (>1 kDa) were positively correlated with increases in the concentration of nominally dissolved As (<1 kDa), but no correlation was observed between colloidal As and nominally dissolved P. This suggests that P actively competes for adsorption sites on Fe nanoparticles, displacing adsorbed As, thus mirroring their interaction with Fe oxides in the aquifer matrix. Dynamic redox fronts at the interface between streams and aquifers may therefore provide globally widespread conditions for the generation of Fe nanoparticles, a mobile phase for As adsorption currently not a part of reactive transport models.

  2. 3D Electrical resistivity tomography monitoring of an artificial tracer injected within the hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houzé, Clémence; Pessel, Marc; Durand, Veronique

    2016-04-01

    Due to the high complexity level of hyporheic flow paths, hydrological and biogeochemical processes which occur in this mixing place are not fully understood yet. Some previous studies made in flumes show that hyporheic flow is strongly connected to the streambed morphology and sediment heterogeneity . There is still a lack of practical field experiment considering a natural environment and representation of natural streambed heterogeneities will be always limited in laboratories. The purpose of this project is to propose an innovative method using 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) monitoring of an artificial tracer injection directly within the streambed sediments in order to visualize the water pathways within the hyporheic zone. Field experiment on a small stream was conducted using a plastic tube as an injection piezometer and home-made electrodes strips arranged in a rectangular form made of 180 electrodes (15 strips of 12 electrodes each). The injection of tracer (NaCl) lasted approximatively 90 minutes, and 24h monitoring with increasing step times was performed. The physical properties of the water are controlled by CTD probes installed upstream and downstream within the river. Inverse time-lapse tomographs show development and persistence of a conductive water plume around the injection point. Due to the low hydraulic conductivity of streambed sediments (clay and overlying loess), the tracer movement is barely visible, as it dilutes gradually in the pore water. Impact of boundary conditions on inversion results can lead to significant differences on images, especially in the shallow part of the profiles. Preferential paths of transport are not highlighted here, but this experiment allows to follow spatially and temporarily the evolution of the tracer in a complex natural environment .

  3. The hyporheic zone as a source of dissolved organic carbon and carbon gases to a temperate forested stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schindler, J.E.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine chemical changes in porewaters that occur over small scales (cm) as groundwater flows through the hyporheic zone and discharges to a stream in a temperate forest of northern Wisconsin. Hyporheic-zone porewaters were sampled at discrete depths of 2, 10, 15, 61, and 183 cm at three study sites in the study basin. Chemical profiles of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), CO2, CH4, and pH show dramatic changes between 61 cm sediment depth and the water-sediment interface. Unless discrete samples at small depth intervals are taken, these chemical profiles are not accounted for. Similar trends were observed at the three study locations, despite each site having very different hydraulic-flow regimes. Increases in DOC concentration by an order of magnitude from 61 to 15 cm depth with a corresponding decrease in pH and rapid decreases in the molecular weight of the DOC suggest that aliphatic compounds (likely organic acids) are being generated in the hyporheic zone. Estimated efflux rates of DOC, CO2, and CH4 to the stream are 6.2, 0.79, 0.13 moles m2 d-1, respectively, with the vast majority of these materials produced in the hyporheic zone. Very little of these materials are accounted for by sampling stream water, suggesting rapid uptake and/or volatilization.

  4. Hydrology controls dissolved organic matter export and composition in an Alpine stream and its hyporheic zone

    PubMed Central

    Fasching, Christina; Ulseth, Amber J.; Schelker, Jakob; Steniczka, Gertraud

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Streams and rivers transport dissolved organic matter (DOM) from the terrestrial environment to downstream ecosystems. In light of climate and global change it is crucial to understand the temporal dynamics of DOM concentration and composition, and its export fluxes from headwaters to larger downstream ecosystems. We monitored DOM concentration and composition based on a diurnal sampling design for 3 years in an Alpine headwater stream. We found hydrologic variability to control DOM composition and the coupling of DOM dynamics in the streamwater and the hyporheic zone. High‐flow events increased DOM inputs from terrestrial sources (as indicated by the contributions of humic‐ and fulvic‐like fluorescence), while summer baseflow enhanced the autochthonous imprint of DOM. Diurnal and seasonal patterns of DOM composition were likely induced by biological processes linked to temperature and photosynthetic active radiation (PAR). Floods frequently interrupted diurnal and seasonal patterns of DOM, which led to a decoupling of streamwater and hyporheic water DOM composition and delivery of aromatic and humic‐like DOM to the streamwater. Accordingly, DOM export fluxes were largely of terrigenous origin as indicated by optical properties. Our study highlights the relevance of hydrologic and seasonal dynamics for the origin, composition and fluxes of DOM in an Alpine headwater stream. PMID:27478248

  5. Transport of Solutes in Hyporheic Zones with Temperature-Dependent Reversible Sorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, M.; Cardenas, M. B.; Zheng, L.

    2014-12-01

    One of the most important processes impacting the mobility of heavy metals in rivers and their hyporheic zones is reversible sorption to sediment. Reversible sorption has been shown to be a temperature dependent process, however the impact of this variability on heavy metal fate and transport, as well as environmental metal concentrations, has not received much attention. In this study we used zinc as an example heavy metal. Previous studies of the impact of temperature on the sorption of zinc on a goethite substrate show a change in partitioning coefficient and thus retardation factor of 10 to over 60 percent with a temperature change from 10 to 25*C, depending on concentration of dissolved zinc in the water. This relationship was extrapolated to estimate the change in reversible sorption of zinc on silicate sand. This change was then utilized within a finite-element model coupling hyporheic fluid flow in porous media with heat transfer and solute transport with reversible sorption to explore the ways in which variations in surface water temperature over varying timescales can drive changes in both zinc sorption and dissolved zinc fluxes at the bedform scale. These linked processes are of fundamental importance when considering the number of different ways in which surface water temperatures can be varied through both human and non-human activities.

  6. Flume experiments elucidate relationships between microbial genetics, nitrogen species and hydraulics in controlling nitrous oxide production in the hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quick, A. M.; Farrell, T. B.; Reeder, W. J.; Feris, K. P.; Tonina, D.; Benner, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    The hyporheic zone is a potentially important producer of nitrous oxide, a powerful greenhouse gas. The location and magnitude of nitrous oxide generation within the hyporheic zone involves complex interactions between multiple nitrogen species, redox conditions, microbial communities, and hydraulics. To better understand nitrous oxide generation and emissions from streams, we conducted large-scale flume experiments in which we monitored pore waters along hyporheic flow paths within stream dune structures. Measured dissolved oxygen, ammonia, nitrate, nitrite, and dissolved nitrous oxide showed distinct spatial relationships reflecting redox changes along flow paths. Denitrifying genes (nosZ, nirS, and nirK), determined using qPCR, were spatially associated with abundances of nitrogen species. Using residence times along a flow path, clear trends in oxygen conditions, genes encoding for microbial catalysis, and nitrogen species were observed. Hotspots of targeted genes correlated with hotspots for conversion of nitrogen species, including nitrous oxide production and conversion to dinitrogen. Trends were apparent regardless of dune size, allowing for the possibility to apply observed relationships to multiple streambed morphologies. Relating streambed morphology and loading of nitrogen species allows for prediction of nitrous oxide production in the hyporheic zone.

  7. Storage and Transformation of Artificial and Natural Salmon-Derived Nutrients in the Hyporheic Zone of a Southeast Alaska Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, M. C.; Edwards, R. T.; Hall, R. O.; Norberg, E. C.

    2005-05-01

    Adding nutrients in organic pellets (analogs) or salmon carcasses (SDN) is one strategy resource managers use to enhance productivity in streams where natural salmon nutrient subsidies have been reduced. We compared hyporheic storage and transformation of nutrients from carcasses to those from analogs added to surface water of two tributaries of a salmon stream in Southeast Alaska. Hyporheic sediments responded differently to the two sources with some responses detectable the following summer. Average hyporheic and phreatic SRP concentrations in the analog treatment were 2.5 and 3.5 times greater, respectively, than controls one month after the August additions. Subsurface SRP was again higher the following spring and summer in the analog treatment. Surface water SRP was higher in the analog treatment in late summer a year after the addition. Respiration in phreatic zones in analog and control reaches remained under 1.1 mg DO L sediment-1 h-1. However, respiration rates were elevated in phreatic zones in the carcass treatment reach (3.0 mg DO L sediment-1 h-1) the summer after the addition, suggesting delayed use of stored carcass carbon. These results support the hypothesis that hyporheic zones provide long-term storage and remobilization of SDN thereby enhancing stream productivity in subsequent years.

  8. Modeling the influence of varying hydraulic conditions on aerobic respiration and denitrification in the hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauth, N.; Schmidt, C.; Fleckenstein, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    Exchange of water and solutes across the stream-sediment interface is an important control for biogeochemical transformations in the hyporheic zone (HZ) with measurable impacts on nutrient cycling and solute attenuation in fluvial systems. Here we investigate the interplay between turbulent stream flow and HZ flow under various hydraulic conditions applied to two cases: a) three-dimensional generic pool-riffle sequences with different morphological properties, and b) a real mid-stream gravel-bar. Stream flow is simulated by the open source computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software OpenFOAM which provides the hydraulic head distribution at the streambed. It is sequentially coupled to the top of the groundwater model code MIN3P, simulating flow, solute transport, aerobic respiration (AR) and denitrification (DN) in the HZ. Flow in the HZ is directly influenced by the hydraulic head distribution at the streambed surface and the ambient groundwater flow. Three reactive transport scenarios are considered: 1) stream water as the primary source of dissolved oxygen (DO), nitrate (NO3) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), 2) upwelling groundwater as an additionally source of NO3, and 3) upwelling groundwater as an additional source of DO in various concentrations. Results show an increase in hyporheic exchange flow for increasing stream discharge with a concurrent decrease in residence time. The fraction of circulating stream water through the HZ is in the range of 1x10-5 to 1x10-6 per unit stream length, decreasing with increasing discharge. Ambient groundwater flow in both the up- and downwelling direction diminishes significantly the hyporheic exchange flow and extent. Biogeochemical processes in the HZ are strongly controlled by ambient groundwater flow, even more so than by changes in stream discharge. AR and DN efficiencies of the HZ are significantly reduced by up- and downwelling groundwater and are positively correlated with median residence times. AR occurs in

  9. Residence time control on hot moments of net nitrate production and uptake in the hyporheic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Briggs, Martin A.; Lautz, Laura K.; Hare, Danielle K.

    2014-01-01

    moments of net production and uptake, enhancing NO3- production as residence times approach the anaerobic threshold, and changing zones of net NO3- production to uptake as residence times increase past the net sink threshold. The anaerobic and net sink thresholds for beaver-influenced streambed morphology occur at much shorter residence times (1.3 h and 2.3 h, respectively) compared to other documented hyporheic systems, and the net sink threshold compares favorably to the lower boundary of the anaerobic threshold determined for this system with the new oxygen Damkohler number. The consistency of the residence time threshold values of NO3- cycling in this study, despite environmental variability and disparate morphology, indicates that NO3- hot moment dynamics are primarily driven by changes in physical hydrology and associated residence times.

  10. Temperature dependent redox zonation and attenuation of wastewater-derived organic micropollutants in the hyporheic zone.

    PubMed

    Burke, Victoria; Greskowiak, Janek; Asmuß, Tina; Bremermann, Rebecca; Taute, Thomas; Massmann, Gudrun

    2014-06-01

    The hyporheic zone - a spatially fluctuating ecotone connecting surface water and groundwater - is considered to be highly reactive with regard to the attenuation of organic micropollutants. In the course of the presented study an undisturbed sediment core was taken from the infiltration zone of a bank filtration site in Berlin and operated under controlled laboratory conditions with wastewater-influenced surface water at two different temperatures, simulating winter and summer conditions. The aim was to evaluate the fate of site-relevant micropollutants, namely metoprolol, iopromide, diclofenac, carbamazepine, acesulfame, tolyltriazole, benzotriazole, phenazone and two phenazone type metabolites, within the first meter of infiltration dependent on the prevailing temperature. A change in temperature resulted in a development of significantly distinct redox conditions. Both temperature dependencies and related redox dependencies were identified for all micropollutants except for benzotriazole and carbamazepine, which behaved persistent under all conditions. For the remaining compounds degradation rate constants generally decreased from warm and oxic/penoxic/suboxic over cold and oxic/penoxic to warm and manganese reducing (transition zone). Individual degradation rate constants ranged from 0 (e.g. diclofenac, acesulfame and tolyltriazole in the transition zone) to 1.4×10(-4)s(-1) for metoprolol under warm conditions within the oxic to suboxic zone. PMID:24642095

  11. Stoichiometry of Carbon, Nitrogen, and Phosphorus Regeneration Interactions in the Hyporheic Zones of Arctic Streams Draining Areas of Continuous Permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, W. B.; Greenwald, M. J.; Gooseff, M. N.; McNamara, J. P.; Bradford, J.; Zarnetske, J. P.; Brosten, T.

    2007-12-01

    We used conservative tracer (Rhodamine WT) additions to examine flow paths in two arctic tundra streams with contrasting physical characteristics (high and low gradient, cobble and peat substrate). We installed mini- piezometers in the same streams to examine nutrient patterns longitudinally and with depth. The combination of the flow and nutrient data allowed us to estimate nutrient regeneration rates. In a separate study, we used whole- stream metabolism methods to estimate whole-system photosynthesis and respiration. Comparison to chamber-based metabolism methods showed that most of the whole-system respiration could be attributed to heterotrophic activity in the hyporheic zone. We found that regeneration of C in the hyporheic zone (respiration) was in reasonable stoichiometric agreement with the regeneration of N and P. Increasing temperature and discharge had relatively modest impacts on ecosystem respiration and photosynthesis. We concluded that a substantial portion of the N and P required to support ecosystem photosynthesis in these permafrost-dominated streams can be obtained from hyporheic regeneration. Second, a substantial portion of the excess C (supersaturated CO2) in these streams may be due to hyporheic respiration rather than terrestrial runoff of CO2-laden groundwater. Third, the expected changes in future climate in the arctic foothills may have only a limited effect on the instantaneous rates of C, N, and P processing. The larger effect is likely to be on annual processing rates, due to the longer flowing water season.

  12. Temperature effect on tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) biodegradation kinetics in hyporheic zone soils

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Mark H; Sims, Ronald C; McLean, Joan E; Doucette, William J

    2007-01-01

    Background Remediation of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) in subsurface waters should be taken into consideration at reformulated gasoline contaminated sites since it is a biodegradation intermediate of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE), and tert-butyl formate (TBF). The effect of temperature on TBA biodegradation has not been not been published in the literature. Methods Biodegradation of [U 14C] TBA was determined using hyporheic zone soil microcosms. Results First order mineralization rate constants of TBA at 5°C, 15°C and 25°C were 7.84 ± 0.14 × 10-3, 9.07 ± 0.09 × 10-3, and 15.3 ± 0.3 × 10-3 days-1, respectively (or 2.86 ± 0.05, 3.31 ± 0.03, 5.60 ± 0.14 years-1, respectively). Temperature had a statistically significant effect on the mineralization rates and was modelled using the Arrhenius equation with frequency factor (A) and activation energy (Ea) of 154 day-1 and 23,006 mol/J, respectively. Conclusion Results of this study are the first to determine mineralization rates of TBA for different temperatures. The kinetic rates determined in this study can be used in groundwater fate and transport modelling of TBA at the Ronan, MT site and provide an estimate for TBA removal at other similar shallow aquifer sites and hyporheic zones as a function of seasonal change in temperature. PMID:17877835

  13. Stream-aquifer interactions and hyporheic exchange in gaining and losing sinuous streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, M. Bayani

    2009-06-01

    The irregular planform morphology of rivers leads to formation of hyporheic zones along its banks. This study investigates how hyporheic exchange in stream banks, whose planform is idealized as sinusoidal, is affected by net gains from and net losses of water to the adjacent aquifer. These effects are studied via numerical modeling of groundwater flow adjacent to sinuous channels across a broad range of sinuosity and gain/loss magnitude. Hyporheic zone areas and fluxes both decrease exponentially with increasing magnitude of net gain or loss relative to the case where the stream has no net flux of water (neutral). Residence time through the hyporheic zone also decreases with gain/loss magnitude. The hyporheic zones become constrained near the apex of bends, indicating that these areas could be hot spots for mixing and biogeochemical processing. Hyporheic zones in channels with smaller sinuosity are more prone to hyporheic flux and area reduction while very sinuous channels are able to maintain a hyporheic zone even under largely losing or gaining conditions. Equations fitted to the suite of simulation results allow for prediction of hyporheic flux, area, and residence time on the basis of aquifer hydraulic conductivity, channel sinuosity, and the ratio of along-valley and across-valley mean head gradients.

  14. Trace Element Mobility in Water and Sediments in a Hyporheic Zone Adjacent to an Abandoned Uranium Mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldan, C.; Blake, J.; Cerrato, J.; Ali, A.; Cabaniss, S.

    2015-12-01

    The legacy of abandoned uranium mines lead to community concerns about environmental and health effects. This study focuses on a cross section of the Rio Paguate, adjacent to the Jackpile Mine on the Laguna Reservation, west-central New Mexico. Often, the geochemical interactions that occur in the hyporheic zone adjacent to these abandoned mines play an important role in trace element mobility. In order to understand the mobility of uranium (U), arsenic (As), and vanadium (V) in the Rio Paguate; surface water, hyporheic zone water, and core sediment samples were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). All water samples were filtered through 0.45μm and 0.22μm filters and analyzed. The results show that there is no major difference in concentrations of U (378-496μg/L), As (0.872-6.78μg/L), and V (2.94-5.01μg/L) between the filter sizes or with depth (8cm and 15cm) in the hyporheic zone. The unfiltered hyporheic zone water samples were analyzed after acid digestion to assess the particulate fraction. These results show a decrease in U concentration (153-202μg/L) and an increase in As (33.2-219μg/L) and V (169-1130μg/L) concentrations compared to the filtered waters. Surface water concentrations of U(171-184μg/L) are lower than the filtered hyporheic zone waters while As(1.32-8.68μg/L) and V(1.75-2.38μg/L) are significantly lower than the hyporheic zone waters and particulates combined. Concentrations of As in the sediment core samples are higher in the first 15cm below the water-sediment interface (14.3-3.82μg/L) and decrease (0.382μg/L) with depth. Uranium concentrations are consistent (0.047-0.050μg/L) at all depths. The over all data suggest that U is mobile in the dissolved phase and both As and V are mobile in the particular phase as they travel through the system.

  15. Inverse Modeling of Tracer Tests in Streams Undergoing Hyporheic Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zijie; Arie Cirpka, Olaf

    2010-05-01

    Hyporheic exchange has been identified as a key process in solute transport, biogeochemical cycling, and ecosystem functioning of streams. Physical solute transport through the hyporheic zone may be characterized by the total flux of water exchange and the distribution of hyporheic travel times. The classical method of obtaining travel-time distributions is an artificial-tracer experiment, in which an easy to detect compound is injected into the river, and the breakthrough curve (BTC) is measured at an observation point further downstream in the river. This BTC is affected by in-stream transport and hyporheic exchange as expressed in the transient storage model for linear solute transport in rivers undergoing hyporheic exchange: (∫ ) δc+ v-δc- D δ2c-= q tp(?)c(t- ?)exp(- λ?)d? - c(t) + q (c - c(t)) δt δx δx2 he 0 in in (1) in which v and D are the velocity and dispersion coefficient, respectively, qhe is the hyporheic exchange flux, ? is the travel-time coordinate in the hyporheic zone, p(?) is the probability density function of ?, λ is a first-order rate coefficient quantifying potential decay within the hyporheic zone, qin expresses lateral inflow, and cin is the corresponding concentration within that inflow. The target quantities are the exchange flux qhe and the nonnegative travel time distribution p(?) in the hyporheic zone. Common transient storage models use parametric distribution functions, such as the exponential, power-law, or log-normal distributions. By predefining the functional form of p(?), however, important features such as multimodality may remain unnoticed. We present a nonparametric approach of obtaining p(?) jointly with the other transport parameters by fitting BTCs of conservative and reactive solutes. For regularization p(?) is assumed autocorrelated, and nonnegativity is enforced by the method of Lagrange multipliers. The method extends a nonparametric deconvolution approach for the determination of transfer functions. It

  16. The Dynamic Hyporheic Zone: Variability of Groundwater-Surface Water Exchange at Multiple Temporal Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binley, A. M.; Dudley-Southern, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The pathways of exchange of surface water and groundwater can have a significant influence on the delivery of nutrient-rich groundwater to streams. Many studies have revealed how the spatial variability of physical properties (sediment permeability, bedform structures, etc.) at the interface of groundwater and surface water can impact on flow pathways and residence times of hyporheic exchange flow. Here we explore the temporal variability of flow pathways at this interface. We focus on observations made on a study reach of the River Leith, UK but also provide evidence of dynamic exchanges at a number of other study sites. Under baseflow conditions, the study reach of the River Leith shows a predominance of upwelling of groundwater to the river, and in some sections of the reach a significant groundwater discharge zone in evident. However, from observations of piezometric heads made over a two year study period, repeated reversal of flow direction was observed during storm events. By deploying novel miniature electrode sensors in the river bed we were able to monitor the migration of surface water during these events. Penetration of river water to depths of 30cm was observed during monitored events, which support the reported reversal of hydraulic gradients. We, therefore, observed event-driven hyporheic exchange flow. The duration and frequency of such events may have significant impact on the biogeochemistry of shallow river bed sediments within this reach. Furthermore, temporal variability of exchange is not limited to such events: changes in regional groundwater flow pathways over longer time scales may have a significant impact on the location of localised upwelling; at much shorter timescales we see evidence of diurnal fluctuations in hydraulic heads due to evapotranspiration processes. We report on similar observations at companion study sites and discuss implications on the management of water quality in these groundwater fed systems.

  17. Time-lapse ERT and DTS for seasonal and short-term monitoring of an alpine river hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boaga, Jacopo; Laura, Busato; Mariateresa, Perri; Giorgio, Cassiani

    2016-04-01

    The hyporheic zone (HZ) is the area located beneath and adjacent to rivers and streams, where the interactions between surface water and groundwater take place. This complex physical domain allows the transport of several substances from a stream to the unconfined aquifer below, and vice versa, thus playing a fundamental role in the river ecosystem. The importance of the hyporheic zone makes its characterization a goal shared by several disciplines, which range from applied geophysics to biogeochemistry, from hydraulics to ecology. The frontier field of HZ characterization stays in applied non-invasive methodologies as Electrical Resistivity Tomography - ERT - and Distributed Temperature Sensing - DTS. ERT is commonly applied in cross-well configuration or with a superficial electrodes deployment while DTS is used in hydro-geophysics in the last decade, revealing a wide applicability to the typical issues of this field of study. DTS for hydro-geophysics studies is based on Raman scattering and employs heat as tracer and uses a fiber-optic cable to acquire temperature values. We applied both techniques for an alpine river case studies located in Val di Sole, TN, Italy. The collected measurements allow high-resolution characterization of the hyporheic zone, overcoming the critical problem of invasive measurements under riverbeds. In this work, we present the preliminary results regarding the characterization of the hyporheic zone of the alpine river obtained combining ERT and DTS time-lapse measurements. The data collection benefits from an innovative instrumentation deployment, which consists of both an ERT multicore cable and a DTS fiber-optic located in two separated boreholes drilled 5m under the watercourse and perpendicular to it. In particular we present the first year monitoring results and a short time-lapse monitoring experiment conducted during summer 2015. The site and the results here described are part of the EU FP7 CLIMB (Climate Induced Changes on the

  18. Morphodynamic controls on redox conditions and on nitrogen dynamics within the hyporheic zone: Application to gravel bed rivers with alternate-bar morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzadri, A.; Tonina, D.; Bellin, A.

    2012-09-01

    Hyporheic flows, which stem from the interaction between stream flow and bedform, transport solute-laden surface waters into the streambed sediments, where reactive solutes undergo biogeochemical transformations. Despite the importance of hyporheic exchange on riverine ecosystem and biogeochemical cycles, research is limited on the effects of hyporheic fluxes on the fate of reactive solutes within the hyporheic zone. Consequently, we investigate the controls of hyporheic flowpaths, which we link to stream morphology and streamflow, on prevailing hyporheic redox conditions and on biogeochemical transformations occurring within streambeds. We focus on the dissolved inorganic reactive forms of nitrogen, ammonium and nitrate, because nitrogen is one of the most common reactive solutes and an essential nutrient found in stream waters. Our objectives are to explore the influence of stream morphology, hyporheic water temperature and relative abundance of ammonium and nitrate, on transformation of ammonium, removal of nitrates and production of nitrous oxide, a potent greenhouse gas. We address our objectives with analytical solutions of the Multispecies Reactive Advection-Dispersion Equation coupled with linearized Monod's kinetics and analytical solutions of the hyporheic flow for alternate-bar morphology. We introduce a new Damköhler number,Da, defined as the ratio between the median hyporheic residence time and the time scale of oxygen consumption, which we prove to be a good indicator of where aerobic or anaerobic conditions prevail. In addition, Dais a key index to quantify hyporheic nitrification and denitrification efficiencies and defines a new theoretical framework for scaling results at both the morphological-unit and stream-reach scales.

  19. A tale of two interfaces: Dynamic nitrate removal in the hyporheic zone of a tidal fresh river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, A. H.; Knights, D. H.; Barnes, R. T.; Wallace, C.; Bray, S. N.; Musial, C.

    2015-12-01

    At the interface of rivers and oceans, tidal freshwater zones (TFZs) stretch for tens to hundreds of kilometers but are rarely monitored for nitrogen export due to their complex hydrodynamics. Field observations from the TFZ of White Clay Creek (Delaware, USA) show that river discharge and nitrate export rates decrease during rising tide, while hyporheic storage increases. During falling tide, river discharge and nitrate export rates increase, while stored hyporheic water is released to the river. We estimate that 11% of river water exchanges through the hyporheic zone of this TFZ due to tidal pumping alone. We developed a one-dimensional, coupled fluid flow and solute transport model to quantify the influence of tidal pumping on nitrate removal in the riverbed. Tidal pumping promotes a deep, oscillating zone of aerobic respiration that limits denitrification near the sediment-water interface. As tide rises, groundwater residence times in shallow riverbed sediments increase, which causes a doubling of denitrification rates relative to falling tide. Given a uniform substrate along TFZs, removal rates of groundwater-borne nitrate should decrease as tidal amplitude increases downstream. Denitrification hot spots should occur in less permeable, organic-rich sediment under low tidal ranges. Because TFZs connect lowland nitrogen sources to the ocean, it is imperative that we expand monitoring efforts and elucidate their role in nitrogen export to the coast.

  20. Riparian Zones and the Role of Hyporheic Exchange in the Carbon Budget of a Small, Forested, Headwater Stream, Western Oregon, USA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wondzell, S. M.; Corson-Rikert, H.; Dosch, N.; Haggerty, R.

    2014-12-01

    Recent estimates have identified streams as important conduits in the global carbon budget. Stream waters are typically super-saturated with CO2. This CO2 is assumed to come from carbon fixed in the upland terrestrial environment and then transported to the stream via soil water or groundwater. Evasion of CO2 occurs at the stream surface, which usually comprises less than 2% of the watershed area, yet this flux might account for as much as 30% of the net ecosystem exchange in a watershed. This view does not consider the role of hyporheic exchange, despite the fact that hyporheic exchange fluxes can be very large in headwater streams, which drain the majority of the landscape. Using continuously recording probes, we show that pCO2 averages 890 ppmv in stream water and 7,680 ppmv in hyporheic water in a 96-ha watershed. Independent estimates show that stream water turn-over lengths through the hyporheic zone are less than 100 m at baseflow, which suggests that stream water is continuously recharged with CO2 every time it is cycled through the hyporheic zone. We monitored DIC and DOC in a co-located well network and show that DOC decreases, and DIC increases, with travel time through the hyporheic zone. However, respiration of stream-source DOC can only account for approximately 10% of the increase in DIC. Previous hydrologic studies suggest that lateral inputs of soil water or groundwater are limited within this study reach, so the large increases in DIC must come from particulate organic matter buried in the hyporheic zone and from the overlying soil. These measurements suggest that riparian zones supply, via hyporheic exchange, a disproportionately large fraction of carbon to headwater streams and may therefore play an outsized role in the global carbon cycle.

  1. Experimental analysis and modelling of the oxygen balance in the hyporheic zone of the Kharaa River (Mongolia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, M.; Borchardt, D.

    2012-04-01

    The hyporheic zone has important functions for the aquatic ecosystem like beeing a habitat for a variety of organisms and a reactor for a multitude of transformation processes. But these functions are dependent on the availability of oxygen. Under oxygen depletion for example, the habitat for macroinvertebrates and fish gets lost, and denitrification or the dissolution of phosphorous occurs. Then again, the input, retention time and depletion of oxygen is for most of the part dependent on the morphology and the sediment properties. Therefor, the aim of the study is the process analysis of the oxygen balance within the compartments surface water column and hyporheic zone along a river gradient and under consideration of sediment input. The study area of the Kharaa River (Mongolia) is suitable for that reason as it is close to natural conditions and an identifiable point source of suspended sediment enables a causal analysis of the clogging problem. For the numerical analysis a two-compartment model on the riffle scale was conceptualized. According to that an intensive monitoring program was conducted in spring and late summer of 2010 and 2011 including methods for the characterization of the hydraulics, the exchange as well as biogeochemical properties. The model concept was implemented in AQUASIM and calibrated with the data. The data show a decreased interaction of surface and interstitial water along the river gradient, in particular the diversity of oxygenation and therefor potential transformation processes within the hyporheic zone decreased. And the functional loss for habitat and production could be proved to be impaired by suspended or infiltrated sediments. The results of the numerical analysis demonstrates, at which state the clogging process can become critical for the hyporheic functioning. This study provides important information in order to identify critical conditions for the aquatic ecology as well as for the self regulation of the river under

  2. Mixing effects on nitrogen and oxygen concentrations and the relationship to mean residence time in a hyporheic zone of a riffle-pool sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naranjo, Ramon C.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Davis, Clinton J.

    2015-09-01

    Flow paths and residence times in the hyporheic zone are known to influence biogeochemical processes such as nitrification and denitrification. The exchange across the sediment-water interface may involve mixing of surface water and groundwater through complex hyporheic flow paths that contribute to highly variable biogeochemically active zones. Despite the recognition of these patterns in the literature, conceptualization and analysis of flow paths and nitrogen transformations beneath riffle-pool sequences often neglect to consider bed form driven exchange along the entire reach. In this study, the spatial and temporal distribution of dissolved oxygen (DO), nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+) were monitored in the hyporheic zone beneath a riffle-pool sequence on a losing section of the Truckee River, NV. Spatially varying hyporheic exchange and the occurrence of multi-scale hyporheic mixing cells are shown to influence concentrations of DO and NO3- and the mean residence time (MRT) of riffle and pool areas. Distinct patterns observed in piezometers are shown to be influenced by the first large flow event following a steady 8 month period of low flow conditions. Increases in surface water discharge resulted in reversed hydraulic gradients and production of nitrate through nitrification at small vertical spatial scales (0.10-0.25 m) beneath the sediment-water interface. In areas with high downward flow rates and low MRT, denitrification may be limited. The use of a longitudinal two-dimensional flow model helped identify important mechanisms such as multi-scale hyporheic mixing cells and spatially varying MRT, an important driver for nitrogen transformation in the riverbed. Our observations of DO and NO3- concentrations and model simulations highlight the role of multi-scale hyporheic mixing cells on MRT and nitrogen transformations in the hyporheic zone of riffle-pool sequences.

  3. Mixing effects on nitrogen and oxygen concentrations and the relationship to mean residence time in a hyporheic zone of a riffle-pool sequence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naranjo, Ramon C.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Clinton Davis

    2015-01-01

    Flow paths and residence times in the hyporheic zone are known to influence biogeochemical processes such as nitrification and denitrification. The exchange across the sediment-water interface may involve mixing of surface water and groundwater through complex hyporheic flow paths that contribute to highly variable biogeochemically active zones. Despite the recognition of these patterns in the literature, conceptualization and analysis of flow paths and nitrogen transformations beneath riffle-pool sequences often neglect to consider bed form driven exchange along the entire reach. In this study, the spatial and temporal distribution of dissolved oxygen (DO), nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+) were monitored in the hyporheic zone beneath a riffle-pool sequence on a losing section of the Truckee River, NV. Spatially-varying hyporheic exchange and the occurrence of multi-scale hyporheic mixing cells are shown to influence concentrations of DO and NO3- and the mean residence time (MRT) of riffle and pool areas. Distinct patterns observed in piezometers are shown to be influenced by the first large flow event following a steady 8 month period of low flow conditions. Increases in surface water discharge resulted in reversed hydraulic gradients and production of nitrate through nitrification at small vertical spatial scales (0.10 to 0.25 m) beneath the sediment-water interface. In areas with high downward flow rates and low MRT, denitrification may be limited. The use of a longitudinal two-dimensional flow model helped identify important mechanisms such as multi-scale hyporheic mixing cells and spatially varying MRT, an important driver for nitrogen transformation in the riverbed. Our observations of DO and NO3- concentrations and model simulations highlight the role of multi-scale hyporheic mixing cells on MRT and nitrogen transformations in the hyporheic zone of riffle-pool sequences. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Mixing controls on nitrogen and oxygen concentrations and the relationship to mean residence time in a hyporheic zone of a riffle-pool sequence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naranjo, R. C.; Niswonger, R. G.; Davis, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Flow paths and residence times in the hyporheic zone are known to control biogeochemical processes such as nitrification and denitrification. The exchange across the sediment-water interface involves mixing of surface water and groundwater through complex hyporheic flow paths that contribute highly variable biogeochemical active zones. The objectives of this study were to determine the fate of nitrate (NO3) and dissolved oxygen (DO) during temporally varying flow conditions and compare concentrations to residence times simulated along a longitudinal cross-section accounting for mixing behavior of vertical and horizontal flow paths. In this study, the spatial and temporal distribution of nutrients was monitored in the hyporheic zone beneath a riffle-pool sequence on the Truckee River, NV using in-stream piezometers and riparian monitoring wells. Time-varying river discharge, spatially-varying hyporheic flow, and the distribution and mixing of flow paths appear to control the nitrification and denitrification process, and result in biogeochemical hot spots and hot moments. Results indicate that dissolved organic nitrogen concentrations in the hyporheic zone are generally greater than surface water concentrations, especially in down-welling zones. Concentrations of NO3 and DO were greater beneath the riffle areas as compared to pool areas, as a result of mineralization and nitrification of down-welling surface water. Replenishment of DO appears to support nitrification over long flow paths (101 of meters) and residence times (days). Denitrification along longer horizontal flow paths is limited by the influx of DO into the riverbed and the reductions in mean residence times. It is important to consider the occurrence of rapid inflows of surface water into the hyporheic zones resulting from variability in stage and riverbed topography, that replenishes DO and controls reaction rates and solute residence times. Flow-tube conceptual models for simulating residence times

  5. Dissolved Oxygen Concentration Profiles in the Hyporheic Zone Through the Use of a High-Density Fiber Optic Measurement Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeder, William Jeffrey; Quick, Annika; Farrell, Tiffany B.; Benner, Shawn G.; Feris, Kevin P.; Tonina, Daniele

    2015-04-01

    The majority of chemical reactions in riverine systems occur within the hyporheic zone (HZ). Hyporheic exchange, flow into and out of the hyporheic zone, represents a primary control over those reactions because the flow rate will determine the residence time and amount of chemical constituents in the HZ. Hyporheic flow can be conceptualized as discreet streamlines that collectively represent a broad distribution of residence times. Within this context, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration becomes a primary indicator of the redox and biochemical state of the HZ including, for example, the fate of carbon, contaminant behavior, nutrient cycling, stream DO levels and nitrous oxide (N2O) production. River systems have been identified as a significant source of N2O emissions, contributing an estimated 10% of anthropogenically generated N2O. The primary biochemical transformations that lead to N2O production are nitrification (NH4+ to NO3-) and denitrification (NO3- to N2) reactions that are mediated by microbes living in the HZ. Current theory describes a process in which DO enters the stoss side of the HZ and is consumed by respiration and nitrification in the upstream, oxic portion of the streamlines leading to a progressive partitioning of the HZ from oxic to anoxic. This conceptualization, however, has not been well validated in a physical sense, due to inherent difficulties associated with measuring chemical concentrations in the HZ. To test current theory, we measured HZ DO concentrations, in a large-scale flume experiment, almost continuously for five months using a multiplexed optical network and a precision robotic surface probe system. We were able to measure DO at higher spatial and temporal resolution than has been previously demonstrated. These measurements, coupled with detailed numerical modeling of HZ flowlines, allowed us to map HZ DO concentrations spatially and over time. Our findings validate the models that describe the consumption of DO through

  6. Chemoautotrophic production and respiration in the hyporheic zone of a sonoran desert stream

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.B. Jr.; Holmes, R.M.; Fisher, S.G.; Grimm, N.B.

    1994-12-31

    Chemoautotrophic production and respiration (aerobic and anaerobic) were examined along flowpaths in three subsystems in Sycamore Creek, Arizona. Chemoautotrophic production was highest where surface waters enter parafluvial sediments (64 to 76 mgC{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}d{sup {minus}1}) and lowest in anoxic bank sediments (14 to 16 mgC{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}d{sup {minus}1}). Aerobic respiration was considerable greater than chemoautotrophy in oxygenated hyporheic and parafluvial zones (2,400 to 4,900 mgC{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}d{sup {minus}1}). In anoxic bank sediments, respiration was also much greater than chemoautotrophy, but was entirely anaerobic (i.e., methane production; 3,500 mgC{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}d{sup {minus}1}). Weighting subsystems by areal extent, the largest proportion of aerobic respiration and chemoautotrophic production occurred in parafluvial sediments (64 to 76%), whereas anoxic bank sediments were most important for anaerobic respiration (94% of total anaerobic respiration). Overall, chemoautotrophic production was only 1.0 to 1.3% of respiration and methane production was only 5% of total sediment respiration.

  7. Freeze shoe sampler for the collection of hyporheic zone sediments and porewater.

    PubMed

    Bianchin, M; Smith, L; Beckie, R

    2015-01-01

    The Starr and Ingleton (1992) drive point piston sampler (DPPS) design was modified by fitting it with a Murphy and Herkelrath (1996) type sample-freezing drive shoe (SFDS), which uses liquid carbon dioxide as a cryogen. Liquid carbon dioxide was used to freeze sediments in the lower 0.1 m of the core and the drive-point piston sealed the core at the top preserving the reductive-oxidation (redox) sensitive sediments from the atmosphere and maintaining natural stratigraphy. The use of nitrogen gas to provide positive pressure on the gas system blocked the ingress of water which froze on contact with the cryogen thus blocking the gas lines with ice. With this adaptation to the gas system cores could be collected at greater depths beneath the static water level. This tool was used to collect intact saturated sediment cores from the hyporheic zone of the tidally influenced Fraser River in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada where steep geochemical and microbial gradients develop within the interface between discharging anaerobic groundwater and recharging aerobic river water. In total, 25 cores driven through a 1.5 m sampling interval were collected from the river bed with a mean core recovery of 75%. The ability to deploy this method from a fishing vessel makes the tool more cost effective than traditional marine-based drilling operations which often use barges, tug boats, and drilling rigs. PMID:24825508

  8. Unraveling the Drivers of Spatial and Temporal Variability in Biogeochemical Cycling at Aquifer-River Interfaces - The LEVERHULME Hyporheic Zone Research Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    While there has been substantial improvement of understanding hyporheic exchange flow and residence time controls on biogeochemical turnover rates, there is little knowledge of the actual drivers of the spatial and temporal variability of interlinked biogeochemical cycles. Previous research has mainly focused on bedform controlled hyporheic exchange and the transformation of surface solutes along a hyporheic flow path but failed to explain observations of spatially and temporally variable nutrient turnover in streambeds with higher structural heterogeneity and autochthonous carbon and nitrogen sources. The "Leverhulme Hyporheic Zone Research Network" has developed an interdisciplinary strategy for investigating the physical controls on hyporheic exchange fluxes and residence time distributions, heat and reactive solute transport along biogeographical and catchment gradients. This strategy combines smart tracer applications with distributed sensor networks in multi-scale nested monitoring schemes and numerical model studies to investigate the interactions between physico-chemical process dynamics and hyporheic microbial, invertebrate and macrophyte ecology. Investigations integrating the process knowledge from mesocosms to artificial channels and stream reaches highlight the impact of small-scale streambed structure on spatial patterns of hyporheic exchange flow, residence time distribution and the development of biogeochemical hotspots. Manipulation studies inhibiting flow through dominant hyporheic exchange flow paths allowed to quantify the functional significance, sensitivity and resilience of biogeochemical, microbial and ecological functioning of identified hyporheic hotspots to environmental change. Further discharge and stage manipulations proved to not only control in-channel macrophyte growth but also temperature patterns and residence time distributions as well as microbial metabolic activity and biogeochemical processing rates, highlighting the potential

  9. Unraveling the Drivers of Spatial and Temporal Variability in Biogeochemical Cycling at Aquifer-River Interfaces - The LEVERHULME Hyporheic Zone Research Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, S.; Ward, A. S.; Zarnetske, J. P.; Martí Roca, E.; Larned, S.; Milner, A.; Datry, T.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Schmidt, C.; Blaen, P.; Kurz, M. J.; Klaar, M. J.; Drummond, J. D.; Knapp, J.; Folegot, S.; Hannah, D. M.; Romeijn, P.; Blume, T.; Lewandowski, J.; Maruedo, A.; Ledger, M.; Lee-Cullin, J. A.; O'Callaghan, M.; Keller, T.; Vieweg, M.

    2014-12-01

    While there has been substantial improvement of understanding hyporheic exchange flow and residence time controls on biogeochemical turnover rates, there is little knowledge of the actual drivers of the spatial and temporal variability of interlinked biogeochemical cycles. Previous research has mainly focused on bedform controlled hyporheic exchange and the transformation of surface solutes along a hyporheic flow path but failed to explain observations of spatially and temporally variable nutrient turnover in streambeds with higher structural heterogeneity and autochthonous carbon and nitrogen sources. The "Leverhulme Hyporheic Zone Research Network" has developed an interdisciplinary strategy for investigating the physical controls on hyporheic exchange fluxes and residence time distributions, heat and reactive solute transport along biogeographical and catchment gradients. This strategy combines smart tracer applications with distributed sensor networks in multi-scale nested monitoring schemes and numerical model studies to investigate the interactions between physico-chemical process dynamics and hyporheic microbial, invertebrate and macrophyte ecology. Investigations integrating the process knowledge from mesocosms to artificial channels and stream reaches highlight the impact of small-scale streambed structure on spatial patterns of hyporheic exchange flow, residence time distribution and the development of biogeochemical hotspots. Manipulation studies inhibiting flow through dominant hyporheic exchange flow paths allowed to quantify the functional significance, sensitivity and resilience of biogeochemical, microbial and ecological functioning of identified hyporheic hotspots to environmental change. Further discharge and stage manipulations proved to not only control in-channel macrophyte growth but also temperature patterns and residence time distributions as well as microbial metabolic activity and biogeochemical processing rates, highlighting the potential

  10. Seasonal variation of water level, water and soil temperature, chemistry, and stable isotopes in hyporheic zone of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, W. H.; Lee, J. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of study was to evaluate interaction between groundwater and stream water in hyporheic zone using water level, water temperature, soil temperature, chemistry, and stable isotopes. We installed seven piezometers (IYHW1 to 7) in the streambed that across stream in every 10 m and in depth of 0.85 to 1.54 m, a device that measure stage level nearby IYHW1, and devices that measure soil temperature in every 10 cm down to 50 cm nearby each piezometer was installed. We monitored water level and water temperature every hour from automatic transducers at the piezometers and the stage level, and soil temperatures were monitored every two hours. We took samples from the hyporheic water, stream water, and nearby groundwater to analysis chemical and isotopic compositions. The water level difference between stream water and hyporheic waters indicated that groundwater was downwelling in wet season and upwelling in dry season. The groundwater temperature remained steady in different seasons, but the stream water represented a frequent fluctuation with large amplitude. The hyporheic waters and soil temperature represented intermediate variation characteristics. The chemical compositions were not able to indicate in interaction of groundwater and stream water because no distinctive difference in seasonal variation in waters. The quantity of isotopic compositions of oxygen and hydrogen determined from using mixing ratio indicated that downwelling in wet season and upwelling in dry season. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2011-0007232).

  11. Heterogeneity of groundwater - surface water interactions in the hyporheic zone of a salmon spawning stream in Scotland: hydrological and ecological implications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malcolm, I. A.; Soulsby, C.; Youngson, A.

    2001-12-01

    Spatial and temporal variability of groundwater - surface water interactions in the hyporheic zone of a salmonid spawning stream were investigated. Four locations in a 150m reach of the stream were studied using hydrochemical and hydrometric techniques. Heterogeneity was identified at a number of scales. At the reach scale heterogeneity appeared to be largely controlled by hydrological connectivity between hillslope, riparian area, and stream channel. At two locations hydraulic gradients and hydrochemical changes indicated that the hyporheic zone was dominated by reduced groundwater upwelling, characterised by low dissolved oxygen concentrations (ca. 2 mgl-1), high alkalinity and high conductivity. At other locations, connectivity was less evident and, at most times, the hyporheic zone was dominated by downwelling of well-oxygenated stream water. At finer spatial scales (<1m), the characteristics of hyporheic water varied with depth, and also with upstream or downstream location. This likely reflects both the diminishing influence of surface water with depth into the hyporheic zone, and the heterogeneity of streambed deposits. Stable conditions observed during periods of low flow changed rapidly over the course of hydrological events, the nature of the hydrochemical response varying among locations depending on the dynamics of local groundwater flow paths. It is suggested that greater emphasis on spatial and temporal heterogeneity in groundwater - surface water interactions is necessary for a consideration of hydrochemical effects on the hyporheos. This is clearly demonstrated by the survival and development of salmonid eggs in hyporheic gravels. Mortality rates in hyporheic gravels ranged from 0-100 % and showed a clear negative relationship with mean DO concentrations (r2 = 0.85, P < 0.01). Where mortality was less than 100 % low DO appeared to continue effecting embryo development rates. Fish habitat improvement schemes are often based solely on creating

  12. Dynamic Change of Water Quality in Hyporheic Zone at Water Curtain Cultivation Area, Cheongju, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, S. H.; Kim, Y.

    2015-12-01

    There has been recently growing numbers of facilities for water curtain cultivation of strawberry and lettuce in Korea. These areas are nearly all located in the fluvial deposits near streams which can replenish water resources into exhausted groundwater aquifers during peak season. The purpose of this study is on groundwater chemistry and the change in physical and chemical properties due to stream-groundwater exchange or mixing in the representative agricultural area among the Jurassic granitic terrain of Korea. In the study area, groundwater level continuously decreased from November through March due to intensive use of groundwater, which forced stream water into aquifer. After March, groundwater level was gradually recovered to the original state. To evaluate the extent and its variations of stream water mixing into aquifer, field parameters including T, pH, EC and DO values, concentrations of major ions and oxygen and hydrogen stable isotopic ratios were used. Field measurements and water sample collections were performed several times from 2012 to 2015 mainly during peak time of groundwater use. To compare the temporal variations and areal differences, 21 wells from four cross sections perpendicular to stream line were used. While water temperature, EC values and concentrations of Ca, Mg, Si, HCO3 showed roughly gradual increase from stream line to 150 m distance, pH and DO values showed reverse phenomenon. This can be used to evaluate the extent and limit of stream water introduction into aquifer. However, individual wells showed yearly variations in those parameters and this dynamic and unstable feature indicates that mixing intensity of stream water over groundwater in this hyporheic zone varied year by year according to amounts of groundwater use and decrease of groundwater level.

  13. Combining direct residence time measurements and biogeochemistry to calculate in-situ reaction rates in the hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittroff, Marco; Gilfedder, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    The hyporheic zone is an active interface between groundwater, riparian and surface water systems. Exchange and reaction of water, nutrients, and organic matter occur due to variations in surface and groundwater flow regimes, bed topography and active biogeochemistry fuelled by bioavailable carbon. There has been an increasing focus on coupling the residence time of surface water in the hyporheic zone with biogeochemical reactions. However, there are very few tracers that can be used to measure residence times in-situ, especially in complex groundwater-surface water settings. In this work we have used the natural radioisotope Radon (222Rn) as an in-situ tracer for river water residence time in a riffle-pool sequence (Rote Main River), and combined this information with biogeochemical parameters (DOC and C quality, O3, NO3, CO2). We can clearly observe a dependence of reaction progress on the water residence times, with oxygen and nitrate reduction following inverse logarithmic trends as a function of time. By comparing with initial concentrations (the river end member) with riverbed levels we have estimated first-order in-situ reduction rates for nitrate and oxygen. Nitrate reduction rates are at the higher end of published values, which is likely due to the continual supply of bioavailable carbon from the river system. This work helps to better understand the function and efficiency of the hyporheic zone as a natural filter for redox sensitive species such as nitrate at the groundwater - steam interface. It also provides a useful method for estimating residence times in complex, higher order river systems.

  14. Development of a Passive Sensor for Measuring Water and Solute Mass Flux in the Hyporheic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annable, Michael D.; Layton, Leif; Hatfield, Kirk; Newman, Mark C.; Cho, Jaehyun; Klammler, Harald

    2014-05-01

    Measuring water, pollutant and nutrient exchange at the groundwater-surface water interface is challenging due to the dynamic nature of the hyporheic zone. Quantifying the exchange is critical to understanding mass balance across this interface. Technologies currently exist to identify groundwater discharge zones and infer estimates of contaminant mass flux based on total contaminant concentration in bulk sediment, though it is generally accepted that freely dissolved concentration in pore water is a better measure of potential exposure. Laboratory and preliminary field testing has been completed to demonstrate a new tool with potential to provide more accurate characterization of water, pollutant and nutrient flux at the groundwater-surface water interface through direct in-situ measurement. The sediment bed passive flux meter (SBPFM) was designed for passively and directly providing in-situ measurements of volumetric water flux and solute mass flux vertically through the upper surface sediment layer and into the overlying water column. The SBPFM consists of an internal permeable sorbent which is impregnated with one or more water soluble tracers (typically alcohols) and is contained in a dedicated drive-point with upper and lower screened openings for fluid intake and exhaust. This configuration generates water flow through the device proportional to the vertical gradient between the sediment bed and the water column. Once the SBPFM has been deployed, the tracers are displaced from the sorbent at rates proportional to the average vertical specific discharge. The mass loss of tracers during deployment can be used to calculate the cumulative water flux. Similarly, the cumulative mass of sorbed pollutants or nutrients provide a direct measurement of the vertical mass flux during deployment. The SBPFM prototype has been tested in controlled laboratory sediment interface models. The results show good agreement between the SBPFM calculated and the applied water and

  15. Numerical model of hyporheic exchange and reactive transport dynamics from the perspective of residence time on upwelling and downwelling zones at River Bure, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokdemir, C.; Heppell, K.; Tonina, D.; Harvey, G.; Bellin, A.

    2013-12-01

    The hyporheic zone is often defined as where mixing of surface water and groundwater occurs in shallow sediments beneath and adjacent to rivers. This mixing is credited with creating unique biogeochemical conditions that can attenuate contaminants from either upstream surface water or groundwater under gaining and losing conditions. Hyporheic exchange often results from differences in the channel near-bed total pressures as they vary in response to interactions between the surface flow and bed topography and the nearby water table. Reactions of contaminants in groundwater also dependent on mixing from surface water. Therefore, representation of the profile of upwelling and downwelling exchange between surface water and groundwater have important consequences for contaminant transport. Here we are studying nitrogen fate within a restored reach of the River Bure, Norfolk, United Kingdom. We combine field measurements of surface flow properties, nearby groundwater table and nitrogen compound concentration with numerical simulation of the hyporheic flow path. We numerically model mixing between hyporheic flow paths induced by sediment, bedform, meanders on riverbed, and flow paths of adjacent upwelling of deeper groundwater. Preliminary results indicate that with the coarse topographical data and with limited surface water hydraulic data it is possible to define the spatial extent of hyporheic exchange and potential mixing zones for contaminants as a function of residence time. The proposed work has the potential to depict high residence time zones and biogeochemical reactivity in homogeneous and heterogeneous sediments. Furthermore, our results aim to clarify hyporheic zone definitions from the perspective of residence time and of upwelling and downwelling contaminants in order to understand real case biogeochemical dynamics.

  16. Coupled transport and reaction kinetics control the nitrate source-sink function of hyporheic zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarnetske, Jay P.; Haggerty, Roy; Wondzell, Steven M.; Bokil, Vrushali A.; GonzáLez-Pinzón, Ricardo

    2012-11-01

    The fate of biologically available nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) in stream ecosystems is controlled by the coupling of physical transport and biogeochemical reaction kinetics. However, determining the relative role of physical and biogeochemical controls at different temporal and spatial scales is difficult. The hyporheic zone (HZ), where groundwater-stream water mix, can be an important location controlling N and C transformations because it creates strong gradients in both the physical and biogeochemical conditions that control redox biogeochemistry. We evaluated the coupling of physical transport and biogeochemical redox reactions by linking an advection, dispersion, and residence time model with a multiple Monod kinetics model simulating the concentrations of oxygen (O2), ammonium (NH4), nitrate (NO3), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). We used global Monte Carlo sensitivity analyses with a nondimensional form of the model to examine coupled nitrification-denitrification dynamics across many scales of transport and reaction conditions. Results demonstrated that the residence time of water in the HZ and the uptake rate of O2 from either respiration and/or nitrification determined whether the HZ was a source or a sink of NO3 to the stream. We further show that whether the HZ is a net NO3 source or net NO3 sink is determined by the ratio of the characteristic transport time to the characteristic reaction time of O2 (i.e., the Damköhler number, DaO2), where HZs with DaO2 < 1 will be net nitrification environments and HZs with DaO2 ≪ 1 will be net denitrification environments. Our coupling of the hydrologic and biogeochemical limitations of N transformations across different temporal and spatial scales within the HZ allows us to explain the widely contrasting results of previous investigations of HZ N dynamics which variously identify the HZ as either a net source or sink of NO3. Our model results suggest that only estimates of residence times and O2uptake rates

  17. Functional and Structural Responses of Hyporheic Biofilms to Varying Sources of Dissolved Organic Matter

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Karoline; Bengtsson, Mia M.; Besemer, Katharina; Sieczko, Anna; Burns, Nancy R.; Herberg, Erik R.

    2014-01-01

    Headwater streams are tightly connected with the terrestrial milieu from which they receive deliveries of organic matter, often through the hyporheic zone, the transition between groundwater and streamwater. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) from terrestrial sources (that is, allochthonous) enters the hyporheic zone, where it may mix with DOM from in situ production (that is, autochthonous) and where most of the microbial activity takes place. Allochthonous DOM is typically considered resistant to microbial metabolism compared to autochthonous DOM. The composition and functioning of microbial biofilm communities in the hyporheic zone may therefore be controlled by the relative availability of allochthonous and autochthonous DOM, which can have implications for organic matter processing in stream ecosystems. Experimenting with hyporheic biofilms exposed to model allochthonous and autochthonous DOM and using 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA (targeting the “active” community composition) and of the 16S rRNA gene (targeting the “bulk” community composition), we found that allochthonous DOM may drive shifts in community composition whereas autochthonous DOM seems to affect community composition only transiently. Our results suggest that priority effects based on resource-driven stochasticity shape the community composition in the hyporheic zone. Furthermore, measurements of extracellular enzymatic activities suggest that the additions of allochthonous and autochthonous DOM had no clear effect on the function of the hyporheic biofilms, indicative of functional redundancy. Our findings unravel possible microbial mechanisms that underlie the buffering capacity of the hyporheic zone and that may confer stability to stream ecosystems. PMID:25063654

  18. Functional and structural responses of hyporheic biofilms to varying sources of dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Karoline; Bengtsson, Mia M; Besemer, Katharina; Sieczko, Anna; Burns, Nancy R; Herberg, Erik R; Battin, Tom J

    2014-10-01

    Headwater streams are tightly connected with the terrestrial milieu from which they receive deliveries of organic matter, often through the hyporheic zone, the transition between groundwater and streamwater. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) from terrestrial sources (that is, allochthonous) enters the hyporheic zone, where it may mix with DOM from in situ production (that is, autochthonous) and where most of the microbial activity takes place. Allochthonous DOM is typically considered resistant to microbial metabolism compared to autochthonous DOM. The composition and functioning of microbial biofilm communities in the hyporheic zone may therefore be controlled by the relative availability of allochthonous and autochthonous DOM, which can have implications for organic matter processing in stream ecosystems. Experimenting with hyporheic biofilms exposed to model allochthonous and autochthonous DOM and using 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA (targeting the "active" community composition) and of the 16S rRNA gene (targeting the "bulk" community composition), we found that allochthonous DOM may drive shifts in community composition whereas autochthonous DOM seems to affect community composition only transiently. Our results suggest that priority effects based on resource-driven stochasticity shape the community composition in the hyporheic zone. Furthermore, measurements of extracellular enzymatic activities suggest that the additions of allochthonous and autochthonous DOM had no clear effect on the function of the hyporheic biofilms, indicative of functional redundancy. Our findings unravel possible microbial mechanisms that underlie the buffering capacity of the hyporheic zone and that may confer stability to stream ecosystems. PMID:25063654

  19. Linking hyporheic flow and nitrogen cycling near the Willamette River - A large river in Oregon, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkle, S.R.; Duff, J.H.; Triska, F.J.; Laenen, A.; Gates, E.B.; Bencala, K.E.; Wentz, D.A.; Silva, S.R.

    2001-01-01

    strong vertical redox gradient was observed, with nitrate-limited denitrification potential in deeper sediment and both nitrification and denitrification potential in shallower sediment. Since nitrogen cycling is strongly affected by redox conditions, nitrogen cycling in the hyporheic zone of this large-river system likely is affected by dynamics of ground water/surface water interactions that control fluxes of nitrogen and other redox species to hyporheic zone sediment.

  20. Effects of Fluctuating River flow on Groundwater/Surface Water Mixing in the Hyporheic Zone of a Regulated, Large Cobble Bed River

    SciTech Connect

    Arntzen, Evan V.; Geist, David R.; Dresel, P. Evan

    2006-10-31

    Physicochemical relationships in the boundary zone between groundwater and surface water (i.e., the hyporheic zone) are controlled by surface water hydrology and the hydrogeologic properties of the riverbed. We studied how sediment permeability and river discharge altered the vertical hydraulic gradient (VHG) and water quality of the hyporheic zone within the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. The Columbia River at Hanford is a large, cobble-bed river where water level fluctuates up to 2 m daily because of hydropower generation. Concomitant with recording river stage, continuous readings were made of water temperature, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, and water level of the hyporheic zone. The water level data were used to calculate VHG between the river and hyporheic zone. Sediment permeability was estimated using slug tests conducted in piezometers installed into the river bed. The response of water quality measurements and VHG to surface water fluctuations varied widely among study sites, ranging from no apparent response to co-variance with river discharge. At some sites, a hysteretic relationship between river discharge and VHG was indicated by a time lag in the response of VHG to changes in river stage. The magnitude, rate of change, and hysteresis of the VHG response varied the most at the least permeable location (hydraulic conductivity (K) = 2.9 x 10-4 cms-1), and the least at the most permeable location (K=8.0 x 10-3 cms-1). Our study provides empirical evidence that sediment properties and river discharge both control the water quality of the hyporheic zone. Regulated rivers, like the Columbia River at Hanford, that undergo large, frequent discharge fluctuations represent an ideal environment to study hydrogeologic processes over relatively short time scales (i.e., days to weeks) that would require much longer periods of time to evaluate (i.e., months to years) in un-regulated systems.

  1. Understanding groundwater, surface water, and hyporheic zone biogeochemical processes in a Chalk catchment using fluorescence properties of dissolved and colloidal organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapworth, D. J.; Gooddy, D. C.; Allen, D.; Old, G. H.

    2009-09-01

    Understanding groundwater-surface water (GW-SW) interaction in Chalk catchments is complicated by the degree of geological heterogeneity. At this study site, in southern United Kingdom, alluvial deposits in the riparian zone can be considered as a patchwork of varying grades and types with an equally varied lateral connectivity. Some display good connection with the river system and others good connection with the groundwater system and, by definition, poorer connectivity with the surface water. By coupling tangential flow fractionation (TFF) with fluorescence analysis we were able to characterize the organic matter in the river and hyporheic zone. There is a significant proportion of particulate and colloidal fluorescent organic matter (FOM) within the river system and at depth within the gravels beneath the river channel. At depth in the hyporheic zone, the surface water inputs are dampened by mixing with deeper groundwater FOM. The shallow (0-0.5 m below river bed) hyporheic zone is highly dynamic as a result of changing surface water inputs from upstream processes. Labile C in the form of protein-like FOM appears to be attenuated preferentially compared to fulvic-like fluorescence in the hyporheic zone compared to the adjacent gravel and sand deposits. These preliminary findings have important implications for understanding nutrient and trace element mobility and attenuation within the groundwater, surface water, and hyporheic zone of permeable Chalk catchments. Fluorescence analysis of dissolved organic matter has been shown to be a useful environmental tracer that can be used in conjunction with other methods to understand GW-SW processes within a permeable Chalk catchment.

  2. Temperature effects on nitrogen cycling and nitrate removal-production efficiency in bed form-induced hyporheic zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lizhi; Cardenas, M. Bayani; Wang, Lichun

    2016-04-01

    Hyporheic flow in aquatic sediment controls solute and heat transport thereby mediating the fate of nutrients and contaminants, dissolved oxygen, and temperature in the hyporheic zone (HZ). We conducted a series of numerical simulations of hyporheic processes within a dune with different uniform temperatures, coupling turbulent open channel fluid flow, porous fluid flow, and reactive solute transport to study the temperature dependence of nitrogen source/sink functionality and its efficiency. Two cases were considered: a polluted stream and a pristine stream. Sensitivity analysis was performed to investigate the influence of stream water [NO3-]/[NH4+]. The simulations showed that in both cases warmer temperatures resulted in shallower denitrification zones and oxic-anoxic zone boundaries, but the trend of net denitrification rate and nitrate removal or production efficiency of the HZ for these two cases differed. For both cases, at high [NO3-]/[NH4+], the HZ functioned as a NO3- sink with the nitrate removal efficiency increasing with temperature. But at low [NO3-]/[NH4+] for the polluted stream, the HZ is a NO3- sink at low temperature but then switches to a NO3- source at warmer temperatures. For the pristine stream case, the HZ was always a NO3- source, with the NO3- production efficiency increasing monotonically with temperature. In addition, although the interfacial fluid flux expectedly increased with increasing temperature due to decreasing fluid viscosity, the total nitrate flux into the HZ did not follow this trend. This is because when HZ nitrification is high, uniformly elevated [NO3-] lowers dispersive fluxes into the HZ. We found that there are numerous confounding and interacting factors that combined to lead to the final temperature dependence of N transformation reaction rates. Although the temperature effect on the rate constant can be considered as the dominant factor, simply using the Arrhenius equation to predict the reaction rate would lead to

  3. Processes of zinc attenuation by biogenic manganese oxides forming in the hyporheic zone of Pinal Creek, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, Christopher C.; Bargar, John R.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and speciation of Zn sorbed to biogenic Mn oxides forming in the hyporheic zone of Pinal Creek, AZ, was investigated using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and microfocused synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (μSXRF) mapping, and chemical extraction. μSXRF and chemical extractions show that contaminant Zn co-varied with Mn in streambed sediment grain coatings. Bulk and microfocused EXAFS spectra of Zn in the biogenic Mn oxide coating are indicative of Zn forming triple-corner-sharing inner-sphere complexes over octahedral vacancies in the Mn oxide sheet structure. Zn desorbed in response to the decrease in pH in batch experiments and resulted in near-equal dissolved Zn at each pH over a 10-fold range in the solid/solution ratio. The geometry of sorbed Zn was unchanged after 50% desorption at pH 5, indicating that desorption is not controlled by dissolution of secondary Zn phases. In summary, these findings support the idea that Zn attenuation in Pinal Creek is largely controlled by sorption to microbial Mn oxides forming in the streambed during hyporheic exchange. Sorption to biogenic Mn oxides is likely an important process of Zn attenuation in circum-neutral pH reaches of many acid-mine drainage contaminated streams when dissolved Mn is present.

  4. Processes of zinc attenuation by biogenic manganese oxides forming in the hyporheic zone of Pinal Creek, Arizona

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Christopher C.; Bargar, John R.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and speciation of Zn sorbed to biogenic Mn oxides forming in the hyporheic zone of Pinal Creek, AZ, was investigated using micro-focused Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) and X-ray fluorescence (μSXRF) mapping , bulk EXAFS, and chemical extraction. μSXRF and chemical extractions show that contaminant Zn co-varied with Mn in streambed sediment grain coatings. Bulk and micro-focused EXAFS spectra of Zn in the biogenic Mn oxides coating are indicative of Zn forming triple corner sharing inner-sphere complexes over octahedral vacancies in the Mn oxide sheet structure. Zn desorbed in response to decreasing in pH in batch experiments and resulted in near-equal dissolved Zn at each pH over a 10-fold range in solid to solution ratio. The geometry of sorbed Zn was unchanged after 50% desorption at pH 5, indicating desorption is not controlled by dissolution of secondary Zn phases. In sum, these findings support the idea that Zn attenuation in Pinal Creek is largely controlled by sorption to microbial Mn oxides forming in the streambed during hyporheic exchange. Sorption to biogenic Mn oxides is likely an important process in Zn attenuation in circum-neutral pH reaches of many acid-mine drainage contaminated streams when dissolved Mn is present. PMID:24460038

  5. Hyporheic Restoration in Streams and Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, E. T.; Gooseff, M. N.

    2008-12-01

    The hyporheic zone is the area of mixing of surface and groundwater beneath and adjacent to streams and rivers. The unique physical, chemical, and biological properties of the hyporheic zone, often different from both surface water and groundwater, create unique habitat for organisms. Exchange of water between surface water and the hyporheic zone additionally creates hyporheic functions such as nutrient processing, toxic mineralization, and thermal buffering, which benefit surface water ecosystems and humans downstream. Human activities have reduced hyporheic exchange through impacts like channel simplification and introduction of fines which clog the bed. Efforts to improve ecological conditions in impaired streams and rivers have increased dramatically in recent decades. Nevertheless, the value of hyporheic restoration as a component of stream and river restoration is only beginning to be acknowledged. Further, guidance for accomplishing hyporheic restoration is scarce. Nevertheless, due to considerable recent interest in the hyporheic zone and its functions, data that could inform hyporheic restoration efforts are already fairly common. Here we lay out possible goals for hyporheic restoration and summarize design data that already exist in the scientific literature. We also lay out the hyporheic restoration process, and set that within the largest context of stream and river restoration and watershed planning. Finally, we present our future vision for future research, creating design guidance, and government leadership.

  6. Use of an Instrumented Mini-Well Matrix to Document Hydraulic and Transport Fluctuations in the Hyporheic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinlein, E. S.; Ostendorf, D. W.

    2010-12-01

    A matrix of mini-wells was installed and instrumented to monitor the hyporheic zone linking a river and its floodplain deposit in Eastern Massachusetts. The Neponset River is of small to moderate size with seasonal approximate depths ranging from 1-3 m, widths of 5-15 m, and flows varying from 0.3-28 m3/s in the study area adjacent to a major interstate highway. Transport in the hyporheic zone is governed by the floodplain deposit and the river which combine to induce diurnal timescale dispersive mixing. A low steady groundwater gradient drives transport toward the river at a rate of approximately 10 meters per year. The floodplain deposit is made up of silty sand to a depth of 21 m underlain by 9 m of low permeability medium silt. The mini-well installation is in the medium silt river bank. Because of the presence of conductive ions in the floodplain deposit, it is possible to use the mini-well matrix to document a front where groundwater and river water meet both through changes in hydraulic head and groundwater conductivity. Specific conductivity values are in the range of 500 uS/cm in the river and 1500 uS/cm in the adjacent 4.5 m deep well 15 m away. Four clusters of existing monitoring wells currently measure head and conductivity outside the hyporheic zone in 4.5 m deep wells along a line from 15-300 m away from the river. A monitoring station at the river measures river level and conductivity. The mini-well matrix captures the final 15 m between the last well cluster and the river. Data from the existing well cluster adjacent to the hyporheic zone shows response to high river levels on the order of 12-24 hrs, with a predicted excursion amplitude of 1 m in response to a hydrograph amplitude of 2 m from a storm of Feb, 2010. The mini-well matrix will measure the horizontal excursions as well as vertical gradients of head and conductivity. Due to complications associated with river bank topography and the sensitivity of the area, the mini-wells were installed

  7. Vertical distribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in the hyporheic zone of a eutrophic river in North China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhixin; Wang, Ziyuan; Huang, Caihong; Pei, Yuansheng

    2014-04-01

    Nitrification plays a significant role in the global nitrogen cycle, and this concept has been challenged with the discovery of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in the environment. In this paper, the vertical variations of the diversity and abundance of AOA in the hyporheic zone of the Fuyang River in North China were investigated by molecular techniques, including clone libraries, phylogenetic analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction. The archaeal amoA gene was detected in all sediments along the profile, and all AOA fell within marine group 1.1a and soil group1.1b of the Thaumarchaeota phylum, with the latter being the dominant type. The diversity of AOA decreased with the sediment depth, and there was a shift in AOA community between top-sediments (0-5 cm) and sub-sediments (5-70 cm). The abundance of the archaeal amoA gene (1.48 × 10⁷ to 5.50 × 10⁷ copies g⁻¹ dry sediment) was higher than that of the bacterial amoA gene (4.01 × 10⁴ to 1.75 × 10⁵ copies g⁻¹ dry sediment) in sub-sediments, resulting in a log₁₀ ratio of AOA to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) from 2.27 to 2.69, whereas AOB outnumbered AOA in top-sediments with a low log10 ratio of (-0.24). The variations in the AOA community were primarily attributed to the combined effect of the nutrients (ammonium-N, nitrate-N and total organic carbon) and oxygen in sediments. Ammonium-N was the major factor influencing the relative abundance of AOA and AOB, although other factors, such as total organic carbon, were involved. This study helps elucidate the roles of AOA and AOB in the nitrogen cycling of hyporheic zone. PMID:24242890

  8. The dark side of the hyporheic zone: Depth profiles of nitrogen and its processing in stream sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stelzer, R.S.; Bartsch, L.A.; Richardson, W.B.; Strauss, E.A.

    2011-01-01

    1.Although it is well known that sediments can be hot spots for nitrogen transformation in streams, many previous studies have confined measurements of denitrification and nitrate retention to shallow sediments (<5cm deep). We determined the extent of nitrate processing in deeper sediments of a sand plains stream (Emmons Creek) by measuring denitrification in core sections to a depth of 25cm and by assessing vertical nitrate profiles, with peepers and piezometers, to a depth of 70cm. 2.Denitrification rates of sediment slurries based on acetylene block were higher in shallower core sections. However, core sections deeper than 5cm accounted for 68% of the mean depth-integrated denitrification rate. 3.Vertical hydraulic gradient and vertical profiles of pore water chloride concentration suggested that deep ground water upwelled through shallow sediments before discharging to the stream channel. The results of a two-source mixing model based on chloride concentrations suggested that the hyporheic zone was very shallow (<5cm) in Emmons Creek. 4.Vertical profiles showed that nitrate concentration in shallow ground water was about 10-60% of the nitrate concentration of deep ground water. The mean nitrate concentrations of deep and shallow ground water were 2.17 and 0.73mgNO3-NL-1, respectively. 5.Deep ground water tended to be oxic (6.9mgO2L-1) but approached anoxia (0.8mgO2L-1) after passing through shallow, organic carbon-rich sediments, which suggests that the decline in the nitrate concentrations of upwelling ground water was because of denitrification. 6.Collectively, our results suggest that there is substantial nitrate removal occurring in deep sediments, below the hyporheic zone, in Emmons Creek. Our findings suggest that not accounting for nitrate removal in deep sediments could lead to underestimates of nitrogen processing in streams and catchments. ?? 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Groundwater flow, nutrient, and stable isotope dynamics in the parafluvial-hyporheic zone of the regulated Lower Colorado River (Texas, USA) over the course of a small flood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briody, Alyse C.; Cardenas, M. Bayani; Shuai, Pin; Knappett, Peter S. K.; Bennett, Philip C.

    2016-01-01

    Periodic releases from an upstream dam cause rapid stage fluctuations in the Lower Colorado River near Austin, Texas, USA. These daily pulses modulate fluid exchange and residence times in the hyporheic zone where biogeochemical reactions are typically pronounced. The effects of a small flood pulse under low-flow conditions on surface-water/groundwater exchange and biogeochemical processes were studied by monitoring and sampling from two dense transects of wells perpendicular to the river. The first transect recorded water levels and the second transect was used for water sample collection at three depths. Samples were collected from 12 wells every 2 h over a 24-h period which had a 16-cm flood pulse. Analyses included nutrients, carbon, major ions, and stable isotopes of water. The relatively small flood pulse did not cause significant mixing in the parafluvial zone. Under these conditions, the river and groundwater were decoupled, showed potentially minimal mixing at the interface, and did not exhibit any discernible denitrification of river-borne nitrate. The chemical patterns observed in the parafluvial zone can be explained by evaporation of groundwater with little mixing with river water. Thus, large pulses may be necessary in order for substantial hyporheic mixing and exchange to occur. The large regulated river under a low-flow and small flood pulse regime functioned mainly as a gaining river with little hydrologic connectivity beyond a narrow hyporheic zone.

  10. Groundwater flow, nutrient, and stable isotope dynamics in the parafluvial-hyporheic zone of the regulated Lower Colorado River (Texas, USA) over the course of a small flood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briody, Alyse C.; Cardenas, M. Bayani; Shuai, Pin; Knappett, Peter S. K.; Bennett, Philip C.

    2016-06-01

    Periodic releases from an upstream dam cause rapid stage fluctuations in the Lower Colorado River near Austin, Texas, USA. These daily pulses modulate fluid exchange and residence times in the hyporheic zone where biogeochemical reactions are typically pronounced. The effects of a small flood pulse under low-flow conditions on surface-water/groundwater exchange and biogeochemical processes were studied by monitoring and sampling from two dense transects of wells perpendicular to the river. The first transect recorded water levels and the second transect was used for water sample collection at three depths. Samples were collected from 12 wells every 2 h over a 24-h period which had a 16-cm flood pulse. Analyses included nutrients, carbon, major ions, and stable isotopes of water. The relatively small flood pulse did not cause significant mixing in the parafluvial zone. Under these conditions, the river and groundwater were decoupled, showed potentially minimal mixing at the interface, and did not exhibit any discernible denitrification of river-borne nitrate. The chemical patterns observed in the parafluvial zone can be explained by evaporation of groundwater with little mixing with river water. Thus, large pulses may be necessary in order for substantial hyporheic mixing and exchange to occur. The large regulated river under a low-flow and small flood pulse regime functioned mainly as a gaining river with little hydrologic connectivity beyond a narrow hyporheic zone.

  11. Determining long and short hyporheic flow paths in Antarctic streams by comparing evaporative enrichment of D and 18O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooseff, M. N.; McKnight, D. M.

    2001-12-01

    In glacial meltwater streams of the Dry Valleys, Antarctica, streambeds are composed of porous alluvium, allowing the development of extensive, well-defined hyporheic zones. Stream water and subsurface water from the adjoining saturated alluvium were sampled for major ions and stable isotopes (D and 18O) in order to discritize the hyporheic zone based on variations in residence times. Subsurface water was more enriched in heavier isotopes and had higher solute content than water in the stream. Downstream surface water D and 18O enrichment rates were greater than could be accounted for by direct surface water evaporation, based on data from an evaporation pan experiment. Subsurface samples collected from wells farther from the edge of the open channel, at the upland edge of the hyporheic zone were the most enriched in D and 18O. These results suggest greater fractionation in lateral hyporheic water due to longer residence times at the edges of the hyporheic zone, and that hyporheic mixing may account for the stream water enrichment rates. Inverse modeling results using OTIS confirm the influence of exchange on stream water. These findings show that the hyporheic zones have areas of rapid stream water exchange, where "fast" biogeochemical reactions may influence water chemistry, and areas of very slow exchange in which any magnitude of chemical reaction rate may affect water chemistry.

  12. A 3D analysis algorithm to improve interpretation of heat pulse sensor results for the determination of small-scale flow directions and velocities in the hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angermann, Lisa; Lewandowski, Jörg; Fleckenstein, Jan H.; Nützmann, Gunnar

    2012-12-01

    The hyporheic zone is strongly influenced by the adjacent surface water and groundwater systems. It is subject to hydraulic head and pressure fluctuations at different space and time scales, causing dynamic and heterogeneous flow patterns. These patterns are crucial for many biogeochemical processes in the shallow sediment and need to be considered in investigations of this hydraulically dynamic and biogeochemical active interface. For this purpose a device employing heat as an artificial tracer and a data analysis routine were developed. The method aims at measuring hyporheic flow direction and velocity in three dimensions at a scale of a few centimeters. A short heat pulse is injected into the sediment by a point source and its propagation is detected by up to 24 temperature sensors arranged cylindrically around the heater. The resulting breakthrough curves are analyzed using an analytical solution of the heat transport equation. The device was tested in two laboratory flow-through tanks with defined flow velocities and directions. Using different flow situations and sensor arrays the sensitivity of the method was evaluated. After operational reliability was demonstrated in the laboratory, its applicability in the field was tested in the hyporheic zone of a low gradient stream with sandy streambed in NE-Germany. Median and maximum flow velocity in the hyporheic zone at the site were determined as 0.9 × 10-4 and 2.1 × 10-4 m s-1 respectively. Horizontal flow components were found to be spatially very heterogeneous, while vertical flow component appear to be predominantly driven by the streambed morphology.

  13. A field investigation of arsenic transport by colloidal iron oxides in the hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Carroll, D. M.; Hartland, A.; Larsen, J.; Andersen, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    Conceptual models concerning the fate of arsenic, and many other heavy metals, in aqueous environments including groundwater do not traditionally include colloids as potential facilitators of transport. However, there is significant evidence that heavy metals and oxyanions, including arsenic, preferentially partition into oxide phases. Iron oxides are commonly present as colloids (e.g. Ferrihydrite) and have the potential to mobilise and transport arsenic further than typically assumed. Interactions between Fe-oxides and natural organic matter (NOM) may be particularly significant in hyporheic sediments, given the comparatively high concentrations of dissolved organic carbon present and the presence of pronounced and dynamic redox fronts. Colloidal Fe-oxide stability may be enhanced by NOM surface coatings, potentially limiting colloid sedimentation and making encapsulated colloids more mobile. Furthermore, NOM is a significant agent driving As release, through the consumption of dissolved oxygen by microorganisms (leading to reductive dissolution of Fe-oxides in sediments. In this study the size-distribution and speciation of colloidal phases were studied beneath an ephemeral stream. We determined the proportions of Fe and As in colloidal fractions and determined the proportions held in complexes with NOM. Redox conditions went from aerobic, immediately beneath the stream, to anoxic and finally aerobic away from the stream and into the aquifer. This presentation will discuss dominant arsenic transport pathways including the possible importance of iron and natural organic colloids on arsenic transport.

  14. On the spatial variability of the hyporheic zone: in-situ investigation of porosity and grain size using diving bells and 3D photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frings, R. M.; Vollmer, S.

    2012-04-01

    In order to improve the ecological status of rivers, lakes and other water bodies, recent legislation, such as the European Water Framework Directive, requires for each water body an assessment of its suitability as habitat for organisms. Such an assessment, though, is not easy. This is especially true for the lowest part of the water body: the substrate or hyporheic zone. Even if it is known which kind of hyporheic zone is preferred by an organism, it remains difficult to determine where it can be found, because it is often impossible to observe the hyporheic zone from the banks or shores. It has become common to classify an entire water body as suitable or unsuitable as habitat, using only limited field observations of the hyporheic zone. This is a doubtful practice, which disregards the huge spatial variability of this zone. The objective of this study was to quantify the spatial variability in hyporheic-zone characteristics in the river Rhine. We focused on two basic characteristics: grain size and porosity, the latter being a primary control on the transport of nutrients, heat, oxygen and organic matter. A diving bell (caisson) was used to obtain access to the river bed, which enabled undisturbed sampling of the hyporheic zone. Between 1968 and 2009 6436 sediment samples were taken and sieved to determine their grain size distribution. Furthermore, in 2009 and 2011 about 100 porosity measurements were carried out, using a novel technique based on a combination of field measurements using three-dimensional photogrammetry and laboratory measurements using the water displacement method. The measurements revealed a strong cross-sectional variability in porosity and grain size. Each river cross-section contains spots with high porosity (order 0.40) and spots with low porosity (order 0.10). The large cross-sectional variability made it impossible to recognize systematic streamwise porosity trends from the data. Therefore we investigated if porosity was correlated to

  15. Modeling Hyporheic Flux Along a Second-Order Semi-arid Stream: Red Canyon Creek, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lautz, L. K.; Siegel, D. I.

    2004-12-01

    Models of near-stream hyporheic exchange flows are difficult to prepare because geomorphic stream features and adjacent subsurface characteristics both affect groundwater-surface water interaction. Inverse models of the results of in-stream tracer tests characterize net short time-scale hyporheic exchange along reaches, but not the actual physical processes driving the exchange. In contrast, numerical groundwater flow models simulate near-stream and hyporheic flow driven by hydraulic gradients from a physical process perspective. In this paper, we present a three-dimensional MODFLOW model of hyporheic exchange along a lower riparian reach of Red Canyon Creek, Wyoming. We calibrated the model results to hydraulic head measurements from > 30 monitoring wells, piezometers, in-stream mini-piezometers, and to changes in stream discharge measured by in-stream tracer tests. We also simulated hyporheic flow paths with MODPATH (a particle-tracking package), from which we obtained residence times of water parcels in the hyporheic zone. Hydraulic gradients around in-stream flow obstructions, such as beaver dams, and through meander bends, cause most near-stream hyporheic exchange (residence time <30 days). Hyporheic residence times <10 days occur only along flow paths around beaver dams. We also simulated stream solutes moving into the subsurface with MT3D, a solute transport package, and operationally defined the hyporheic zone as places where solute concentrations were equal to or greater than 10% of the stream water concentration after a 10-day model simulation. The results of this modeling agreed with MODPATH; solutes move both horizontally and vertically from streams into the subsurface behind debris dams, which create hydraulic steps in the subsurface and surface flow systems.

  16. Hydraulic controls of in-stream gravel bar hyporheic exchange and reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauth, Nico; Schmidt, Christian; Vieweg, Michael; Oswald, Sascha E.; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2015-04-01

    Hyporheic exchange transports solutes into the subsurface where they can undergo biogeochemical transformations, affecting fluvial water quality and ecology. A three-dimensional numerical model of a natural in-stream gravel bar (20 m × 6 m) is presented. Multiple steady state streamflow is simulated with a computational fluid dynamics code that is sequentially coupled to a reactive transport groundwater model via the hydraulic head distribution at the streambed. Ambient groundwater flow is considered by scenarios of neutral, gaining, and losing conditions. The transformation of oxygen, nitrate, and dissolved organic carbon by aerobic respiration and denitrification in the hyporheic zone are modeled, as is the denitrification of groundwater-borne nitrate when mixed with stream-sourced carbon. In contrast to fully submerged structures, hyporheic exchange flux decreases with increasing stream discharge, due to decreasing hydraulic head gradients across the partially submerged structure. Hyporheic residence time distributions are skewed in the log-space with medians of up to 8 h and shift to symmetric distributions with increasing level of submergence. Solute turnover is mainly controlled by residence times and the extent of the hyporheic exchange flow, which defines the potential reaction area. Although streamflow is the primary driver of hyporheic exchange, its impact on hyporheic exchange flux, residence times, and solute turnover is small, as these quantities exponentially decrease under losing and gaining conditions. Hence, highest reaction potential exists under neutral conditions, when the capacity for denitrification in the partially submerged structure can be orders of magnitude higher than in fully submerged structures.

  17. Fate of organic micropollutants in the hyporheic zone of a eutrophic lowland stream: results of a preliminary field study.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Jörg; Putschew, Anke; Schwesig, David; Neumann, Christiane; Radke, Michael

    2011-04-15

    Many rivers and streams worldwide are impacted by pharmaceuticals originating from sewage. The hyporheic zone underlying streams is often regarded as reactive bioreactor with the potential for eliminating such sewage-born micropollutants. The present study aims at checking the elimination potential and analyzing the coupling of hydrodynamics, biogeochemistry and micropollutant processing. To this end, two sites at the lowland stream Erpe, which receives a high sewage burden, were equipped and sampled with nested piezometers. From temperature depth profiles we determined that at one of the sites infiltration of surface water into the aquifer occurs while exfiltration dominates at the other site. Biogeochemical data reveal intense mineralization processes and strictly anoxic conditions in the streambed sediments at both sites. Concentrations of the pharmaceuticals indomethacin, diclofenac, ibuprofen, bezafibrate, ketoprofen, naproxen and clofibric acid were high in the surface water and also in the subsurface at the infiltrating site. The evaluation of the depth profiles indicates some attenuation but due to varying surface water composition the evaluation of subsurface processes is quite complex. Borate and non-geogenic gadolinium were measured as conservative wastewater indicators. To eliminate the influence of fluctuating sewage proportions in the surface water, micropollutant concentrations are related to these indicators. The indicators can cope with different dilutions of the sewage but not with temporally varying sewage composition. PMID:21349571

  18. A Comparison of In-Channel Dead Zone and Hyporheic Zone Transient Storage Parameter Estimates Between a 1st and 5th Order Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, M.; Gooseff, M.; Morkeski, K.; Wollheim, W.; Hopkinson, C.; Peterson, B.; Vorosmarty, C.

    2007-12-01

    A major enhancement to our understanding of how watersheds function would be the ability to discriminate between in-channel dead zone ( DZ) and hyporheic zone ( HZ) transient storage, and an evaluation of how these properties scale across stream orders. The nature of DZ storage is to display faster exchange rates with the main channel and less overall sediment contact time than HZ storage. These differences have great significance to many in-stream processes such as nutrient cycling. The combination of high slope, coarse bed material and fluvial structure endemic to many 1st order streams can provide greater forcing of hyporheic flow paths than occurs within the lower gradient 5th order streams. Conversely many 5th order reaches exhibit large side pool and back eddy DZ areas not common along 1st order streams. This study builds on existing methods to delineate the DZ and HZ from the integrated signal of a conservative solute's breakthrough curve ( BTC). Data for this comparison were collected over the summer of 2007 within the Ipswich River watershed, a basin which drains into Plum Island Sound on the north shore of Massachusetts, USA. The conservative solute NaCl was injected into both a 1st order medium gradient stream and a 5th order low gradient stream. The BTCs collected in thalwegs from the NaCl injections were simulated using a version of the solute transport model OTIS containing two zones of transient storage. Hydrometric measurements of stream velocity were used to estimate average main channel cross sectional area ( A) and DZ cross sectional area ( ASDZ) for each reach to constrain parameter estimates and avoid model equifinality between the storage zones. Initial values for the exchange rate between main channel flow and DZ storage ( αDZ) were estimated from DZ BTCs. Our results indicate that although the overall storage zone is much larger in proportion to the main channel for the 1st order reach than for the 5th order reach, the percentage of median

  19. Towards the `hyporheic meter': prediction of hyporheic exchange from bedforms to bars and bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, M. B.

    2009-04-01

    The hyporheic zone is now recognized as an integral component of the river-aquifer-floodplain continuum. It hosts myriad ecosystem services and biogeochemical processes. These phenomena are typically mediated by fluid flow processes; by definition, the hyporheic zone is a fluid flow path beginning and ending at the stream-sediment interface. A holistic understanding of the hyporheic zone therefore begins with a solid hydrodynamic basis. This talk presents recent lessons learned about hyporheic zone hydrology primarily from a suite of both standard and state-of-the-art numerical simulations. Coupled simulations of turbulent open channel flow and porewater flow lead to a set of equations useful for predicting hyporheic zone flux, depth, and residence time at the bedform scale under neutral, losing and gaining river conditions. Traditional groundwater flow simulations of hyporheic flow across meander bends and bars lead to a similar set of predictive equations for flux, depth and residence time in rivers of increasing sinuosity and under neutral, gaining and losing conditions. The approach presented here could be used as a template to generate predictive equations for other hyporheic-flow inducing features, such as pool-riffle or step-pool sequences and other in-stream structures. Eventually, this would result in a matrix of predictive equations, and convolution/superposition of the appropriate equations representing a collection of hyporheic forcing mechanisms present in a given river would lead to a robust ‘hyporheic meter'.

  20. Comparison of Whole-stream and Hyporheic-zone Estimates of Denitrification Determined Simultaneously During an Isotope Tracer Injection in a Nitrate-Rich Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J. W.; Bohlke, J. K.; Voytek, M. A.

    2005-05-01

    15N labeled nitrate is increasingly being used as a reactive tracer in stream tracer tests to estimate whole-stream denitrification averaged at a spatial scale large enough to allow comparisons across disparate stream ecosystems. No matter how valuable, these whole-stream estimates are not very informative about controlling processes and will have limited transfer value unless processes controlling denitrification are investigated simultaneously at finer scales. Insights about the processes that influence the whole-stream rates could be especially informative if simultaneous rate measurements are made representing variable hydrologic and biogeochemical conditions near reactive surfaces in the stream and in the streambed. Our approach was to investigate factors that control denitrification by simultaneously measuring denitrification in-situ in a variety of streambed environments by sampling evolution of the (15NO3-) tracer during transport through shallow hyporheic flow paths. Here we report results from two tracer studies conducted in Sugar Creek, western Indiana, in a basin dominated by corn and soybean agriculture. The two tracer experiments were conducted in September 2001 and September 2003, when streamflows (40 and 20 L s-1) and stream NO3- concentrations (70 and 175 μmoles L-1) in the two reaches were near their annual minimum values. The experiments involved co-injection of conservative (Br), reactive (15NO3-), and dissolved gas (SF6) tracers into streamflow allowing quantification of advection, dispersion, gas evasion, hydrologic retention in "storage" zones, and also allowing in-situ estimation of denitrification within selected hyporheic flow paths. The experiments resulted in estimates of both whole-stream and hyporheic-zone rates of denitrification and related nitrogen reactions. The streambed of Sugar Creek is covered in most areas with a relatively thin layer (ranging from <1 to 3 cm) of fine granular and organic sediment and periphyton, overlying a

  1. Use of rhodamine WT to quantify stream transport and hyporheic exchange: Is there a price to pay for the easy way out? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runkel, R. L.

    2010-12-01

    hyporheic zone, as the physical properties of the hyporheic zone (size and rate of exchange) affect the biogeochemistry. Investigations employing rhodamine WT as the primary tracer should therefore include checks on mass conservation, so that mass loss due to sorption reactions can be taken into account when quantifying hyporheic exchange. Alternatively, investigators may opt to employ ionic tracers (e.g. bromide) in streams with large hyporheic zones and/or high organic matter contents.

  2. Thermal variability within the hyporheic zone of an Alpine stream gravel bar is influenced by solar radiation and other climatic factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boodoo, Kyle; Schelker, Jakob; Battin, Tom

    2016-04-01

    Gravel bars with largely unsubmerged surface areas exposed to the atmosphere are recipient to high levels of incoming radiation during the day, particularly during summer months. Transfer of heat from the atmosphere downward into the hyporheic zone (HZ) below a gravel bar (GB) can thus possibly lead to the alteration of the vertical temperature profile within its HZ, with implications for physical and biogeochemical processes therein. Here we present results from the analysis of seasonal, high frequency spatio-temporal data including, vertical hyporheic temperature, physical parameters and climatic data for a GB located within an Alpine cold water stream (Oberer Seebach, Austria). Vertical temperature profiles throughout the GB were analyzed together with corresponding climatic data for different seasons to elucidate the spatio-temporal variability of HZ temperature gradients in relation to air temperature, incoming global radiation and stream discharge.Initial analyses indicate a clear seasonal difference between Summer and Autumn temperature profiles throughout the GB, with a strongly developed, exponentially decreasing temperature-depth gradient throughout the GB during summer months. In contrast, this observed gradient substantially weakened or collapsed during autumn months. Furthermore, the highest absolute temperatures and steepest depth gradients within the HZ occurred during summer days, coinciding with the falling hydrograph,where hyporheic temperatures exceeded that of both surface water and groundwater. These findings point to the effect of solar radiation and/or air temperature as a contributor to GB temperatures, possibly influencing diurnal and seasonal GB temperature profiles.Overall, our results suggest that not only the mixing of groundwater and streamwater, but also heat transfer associated with solar radiation and/or air temperature may act as an important driver of HZ temperature, particularly during summer months. This may have implications

  3. The Effect of Beaver Dams on Geochemistry of the Hyporheic Zone at Varied Depth and Location over a Range of Discharges During Flood Recession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hare, D. K.; Briggs, M.; Lautz, L. K.

    2010-12-01

    As beaver populations increase in the Western United States, beaver dams are becoming more numerous in many incised low-order streams. These dams raise the water table locally, enhancing riparian zone connection and creating pools that increase stream water residence time. Additionally, the stepped drop in stream head over dams enhances hyporheic exchange and creates spatially and temporally transient seepage flux patterns, which may be sensitive to stream discharge. As discharge falls during flood recession, the two main drivers of hyporheic exchange, head and velocity, should also change. Patterns of high seepage flux into the hyporheic zone, indicated by high dissolved oxygen and concentrations of redox sensitive species (i.e. NO3-, Fe, SO42-), may then be transient during periods of large changes in stream discharge. Cherry Creek, a 2nd order stream outside of Lander Wyoming, has a ~2 km reach populated with beaver dams. A small beaver dam (~35 cm in height) and large dam (~75 cm in height) were instrumented with nested piezometers equipped with sampling ports screened at 5-10, 15-20, 30-35, and 50-55 cm intervals. Four sampling stations were installed above the small dam and five above the large dam in locations chosen to best encompass the local geomorphic complexity. Samples were drawn four times at each location over the summer when stream discharge was 383L/s, 331L/s ,268L/s and 259 L/s to determine the effect of changing stream discharge on flux patterns and geochemical conditions in the hyporheic zone. To analyze these flux patterns, pH and DO were measured on-site at the time of sampling and cation (Mg2+, Ca2+, Na+, NH4+) and anion (SO42+, Cl-, NO3-) concentrations were measured in the laboratory using ion chromatography. These data were collected in conjunction with heat flux measurements using distributed temperature sensing (DTS) to determine hyporheic flux patterns. Decreases in dissolved oxygen concentrations in many locations were observed as the

  4. Floodplain Hyporheic Response under Dam Release Hydrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, T.; Ward, A. S.; O'Connor, B. L.; Endreny, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    Hydropower operations cause altered hydrograph patterns downstream of dams, which regulates the direction and magnitude of floodplain and riverbed hyporheic flux. Periodic adjustments in river stage changes temporal and spatial patterns in hydraulic pressure, initiates propagation of lateral and vertical hyporheic flux, and affects the riparian ecological system by changing the hyporheic penetration distance, hyporheic flux rate, and thermal conditions in river banks. While this issue has been largely neglected by watershed scientists and managers, there is the potential to use hyporheic metrics in setting dam release rules and restoring downstream river reaches. In order to evaluate the hyporheic feedbacks of various dam release patterns, this study applied a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to simulate the interaction of open water hydrographs on porous media lateral hyporheic exchange for the Green River, Utah, downstream of Flaming Gorge Dam. The CFD initially represented the river as a straight channel with a thick porous media extending from the channel banks and bottom. The dam release hydrographs changed the patterns of hyporheic flux at the river banks, the penetration distance of the hyporheic flux, the subsurface thermal patterns, and the residence time of water in the subsurface. The results suggest the undulating river stage downstream of dam releases can initiate patterns of hyporheic exchange similar to those induced by restoration of river bed morphology.

  5. The role of water exchange between a stream channel and its hyporheic zone in nitrogen cycling at the terrestrial-aquatic interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Triska, F.J.; Duff, J.H.; Avanzino, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    The subsurface riparian zone was examined as an ecotone with two interfaces. Inland is a terrestrial boundary, where transport of water and dissolved solutes is toward the channel and controlled by watershed hydrology. Streamside is an aquatic boundary, where exchange of surface water and dissolved solutes is bi-directional and flux is strongly influenced by channel hydraulics. Streamside, bi-directional exchange of water was qualitatively defined using biologically conservative tracers in a third order stream. In several experiments, penetration of surface water extended 18 m inland. Travel time of water from the channel to bankside sediments was highly variable. Subsurface chemical gradients were indirectly related to the travel time. Sites with long travel times tended to be low in nitrate and DO (dissolved oxygen) but high in ammonium and DOC (dissolved organic carbon). Sites with short travel times tended to be high in nitrate and DO but low in ammonium and DOC. Ammonium concentration of interstitial water also was influenced by sorption-desorption processes that involved clay minerals in hyporheic sediments. Denitrification potential in subsurface sediments increased with distance from the channel, and was limited by nitrate at inland sites and by DO in the channel sediments. Conversely, nitrification potential decreased with distance from the channel, and was limited by DO at inland sites and by ammonium at channel locations. Advection of water and dissolved oxygen away from the channel resulted in an oxidized subsurface habitat equivalent to that previously defined as the hyporheic zone. The hyporheic zone is viewed as stream habitat because of its high proportion of surface water and the occurrence of channel organisms. Beyond the channel's hydrologic exchange zone, interstitial water is often chemically reduced. Interstitial water that has not previously entered the channel, groundwater, is viewed as a terrestrial component of the riparian ecotone. Thus

  6. A mini drivepoint sampler for measuring pore water solute concentrations in the hyporheic zone of sand-bottom streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duff, J.H.; Murphy, F.; Fuller, C.C.; Triska, F.J.

    1998-01-01

    A new method for collecting pore-water samples in sand and gravel streambeds is presented. We developed a mini drivepoint solution sampling (MINIPOINT) technique to collect pore-water samples at 2.5-cm vertical resolution. The sampler consisted of six small-diameter stainless steel drivepoints arranged in a 10-cm-diameter circular array. In a simple procedure, the sampler was installed in the streambed to preset drivepoint depths of 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0, 12.5, and 15.0 cm. Sampler performance was evaluated in the Shingobee River, Minnesota, and Pinal Creek, Arizona, by measuring the vertical gradient of chloride concentration in pore water beneath the streambed that was established by the uninterrupted injection to the stream for 3 d. Pore-water samples were withdrawn from all drivepoints simultaneously. In the first evaluation, the vertical chloride gradient was unchanged at withdrawal rates between 0.3 and 4.0 ml min-1 but was disturbed at higher rates. In the second evaluation, up to 70 ml of pore water was withdrawn from each drivepoint at a withdrawal rate of 2.5 ml min-1 without disturbing the vertical chloride gradient. Background concentrations of other solutes were also determined with MINIPOINT sampling. Steep vertical gradients were present for biologically reactive solutes such as DO, NH4/+, NO3/-, and dissolved organic C in the top 20 cm of the streambed. These detailed solute profiles in the hyporheic zone could not have been determined without a method for close interval vertical sampling that does not disturb natural hydrologic mixing between stream water and groundwater.

  7. Estimation of hydrological and thermal parameters in the hyporheic zone using a novel Bayesian inverse modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucchi, Karina; Flipo, Nicolas; Rivière, Agnès; Rubin, Yoram

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal properties of the stream-aquifer interface are key information for modeling water and heat transfers in hydrological basins. Our study introduces an algorithm to estimate hydrological and thermal parameters of the hyporheic zone (HZ), as well as their associated uncertainties. Properties of the HZ are inferred from a combination of head differential time series and vertically-distributed temperature time series measured continually in a HZ vertical profile. Head differential and two temperature time series are used as boundary conditions for the vertical profile; the other temperature time series are used as conditioning measurements. Following the Bayesian framework, model parameters are treated as random variables and we seek to characterize their probability density function (PDF) conditional on the temperature time series. Our algorithm follows the Method of Anchored Distributions (MAD) implemented in the MAD# software. In order to cut down the number of simulations needed, we develop a hybrid discrete-continuous inversion approach. We first identify the most sensitive parameters in a sensitivity analysis, these parameters are characterized with continuous PDFs. Less sensitive parameters are represented with a discrete PDFs using a finite number of discrete outcomes. We use a non-parametric likelihood function and time series dimension reduction techniques in order to calculate posterior PDFs of HZ parameters. We demonstrate the approach on a synthetic study using an analytical solution and then apply it to field measurements gathered in the Avenelles basin, France. We present one application of this approach, the uncertainty-quantified time series of localized stream-aquifer exchanges.

  8. The role of the benthic-hyporheic zone in controlling nitrous oxide emissions along two stream networks draining watersheds with contrasting land use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzadri, Alessandra; Dee, Martha M.; Tonina, Daniele; Tank, Jennifer L.; Bellin, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas responsible of stratospheric ozone destruction. Denitrification in stream ecosystems occurs within the benthic layer at the sediment-water interface and within subsurface environments such as the hyporheic zone and results in N2O production that could be eventually emitted to the atmosphere. Here, we quantify the role of benthic and hyporheic zones as sources of N2O gas and explore the dependence of emissions from stream morphology, flow hydraulics, land use and climate using a recently-developed fully analytical framework. Variations in N2O emissions within and among catchments of contrasting land use can be explained with a new denitrification Damköhler number (DaD) that accounts for denitrification processes within both benthic and hyporheic zones. For initial model development, we found a strong relationship between DaD and stream N2O emissions using field data collected from multiple headwater streams (i.e., LINXII project) from different biomes draining contrasting land use. We then tested its generality by comparing N2O emissions predicted with DaD to those measured using a synoptic sampling campaign in two stream networks draining contrasting land use: Manistee R (Michigan, USA) and Tippecanoe R (Indiana, USA). Our dimensionless analysis shows that the effect of land use disappears after making the emissions dimensionless with respect to the nitrogen load. Reliable predictions of N2O emissions at the stream network scale can be obtained from a limited amount of information, consisting in relatively easy to obtain biogeochemical and hydromorphological quantities.

  9. Carbon availability and the distribution of denitrifying organisms influence N2O production in the hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, T. B.; Quick, A. M.; Reeder, W. J.; Tonina, D.; Benner, S. G.; Feris, K. P.

    2013-12-01

    It has been estimated that 10% of greenhouse gas N2O emissions take place within river networks, with the majority of these processes occurring in the hyporheic zone (HZ). These emissions are the result of microbially-mediated nitrogen transformations (i.e. nitrification and denitrification) and yet the role of microbial distribution and function in this complex system is not well understood. We hypothesized that the concentration and availability of organic carbon influences the production of redox gradients, DIN (via mineralization, nitrification, and loss of DIN via denitrification), and ultimately N2O production in the HZ by controlling the distribution and activity of denitrifying microbial communities. Further, we hypothesized that by linking the distribution of denitrifying microbial communities and their associated functional genes (i.e. the relative abundance of N2O vs. N2 producing genetic elements) to flow dynamics and biogeochemical processes, we can begin to better understand what controls N2O production in hyporheic networks. To address these hypotheses we performed a series of column experiments designed to determine the influence of carbon concentration on redox gradient development and N2O flux along a one-dimensional flow path. Intact sediment cores were amended with 0.01%, 0.05%, 0.15%, and 0.5% dry mass riparian vegetation (>90% Populus sp.) to serve as an endogenous particulate organic matter (POM) source. During quasi-steady state conditions dissolved oxygen (DO), NH4+, NO3-, and N2O levels were measured. As predicted, a positive relationship between the level of POM amendment and development of a gradient of oxic and anoxic conditions was observed. There was negligible N2O production within columns inoculated with 0.01% and 0.05% DOC likely because these POC treatments were too low to create anoxic conditions necessary to stimulate denitrification. Maximum N2O flux was observed with the 0.15% POC treatment. Both oxic and anoxic conditions

  10. Deriving time-variant aerobic respiration in the hyporheic zone by combining continuous EC and O2 measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieweg, M.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Schmidt, C.

    2013-12-01

    Hyporheic zones (HZ) are typically characterized by steep gradients of dissolved oxygen and nutrients which form a highly reactive biogeochemical zone. Under the complex conditions of natural environments, the existing flow field is difficult to characterize, and temporal changes of the hydrological conditions induce variable flow paths and travel times. We propose a method for using the natural electrical conductivity signal (EC) of the infiltrated stream water as a tracer to reveal transient travel times in the HZ. By combining measured oxygen concentrations with the travel times of infiltrated stream water, this method can also estimate aerobic respiration rates. Our method utilizes optode-based oxygen loggers, and EC, pressure, and temperature loggers for measuring diurnal fluctuations of these vital stream indicators. Streambed adapted probe rods were designed to minimize riverbed and HZ disruption, to facilitate high temporal and spatial precision, and to minimize the impact on streamflow. Time lags between the surface water EC time series and the EC measured in the sediment at 45 cm depth were analyzed by assuming a one dimensional flow path. We used a windowed cross correlation approach with a moving average smoothing filter to obtain a time-resolved advective travel time. The moving average smoothing filter was applied to the input signal to help maximize the correlation coefficient and to indicate potential dispersion. We used the resulting shifts and smooths to model the sediment EC signal. Diverging amplitudes are interpreted as mass loss and determined by adjusting the filter weight for obtaining a recovery rate. The obtained variations in physical transport conditions (advection, dispersion, recovery rate) are then assigned to the oxygen data. Differences between observed and modeled oxygen concentrations in the sediment were attributed to aerobic respiration. Modeled rates of aerobic respiration varied from 2-19 mg/l/d in August/September 2012 (mean

  11. Mixing between hyporheic flow cells and upwelling groundwater: laboratory simulations and implications for mixing-dependent reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, E. T.; Nida, A.

    2014-12-01

    The hyporheic zone is the region where surface water and groundwater interact beneath and adjacent to stream and river systems. The hyporheic zone has been shown to affect water quality constituents such as heat, pollutants, and nutrients in this interfacial region. Recent modeling studies have shown that some compounds upwelling from groundwater toward surface water only react when water originating in surface water and groundwater mix at the edge of the hyporheic zone. These "mixing-dependent" reactions may be important for addressing upwelling pollution, yet depend on the extent of the mixing zone. Recent modeling studies have also shown this mixing zone to be thin, but this has not been confirmed in lab or field studies. Our current study took the first step toward such confirmation by simulating mixing between hyporheic flow cells and upwelling groundwater in a 1.7 m x 1m flow-through laboratory sediment mesocosm. We used tracer dyes and digital photographs taken through the glass wall of the mesocosm to quantify mixing zone thickness. We varied key hydraulic controls such as the surface water head drop that drives the hyporheic flow cells. Steady-state results confirm the thin mixing zones predicted by the earlier modeling. Mixing zone length increases with increasing surface water head drop, but mixing zone thickness appears to remain relatively constant. Furthermore, if the head drop in surface water changes rapidly, the mixing zone moves through riverbed sediments but does not appear to change appreciably in thickness. As a result, we conclude that mixing zones are probably thin under a range of field conditions. This has implications for one common definition of the hyporheic zone as an area of substantial mixing of surface water and groundwater. Thin mixing zones also may limit mixing-dependent reactions of upwelling contaminants, which bears further study.

  12. Storm-associated hydrodynamics drive transient solute and redox chemistry within the floodplain aquifer and hyporheic zone of a piedmont stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, A. H.; Kaplan, L. A.; Lazareva, O.; Michael, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    Riparian and hyporheic zones are dynamic settings where fluctuations in pore water flow influence redox-sensitive biogeochemical processes and solute transport. We instrumented a riparian-hyporheic zone transect with pressure transducers, redox probes, and pore water samplers to measure hydrology, redox potential, and water chemistry before, during and after Hurricane Sandy in October 2012. The transect spanned opposing, topographically distinct floodplains, consisting of a broad, flat western side and narrow, steep eastern side. The water table on both sides of the stream rose rapidly with rising stage and promoted continuous groundwater discharge to the stream throughout the storm hydrograph. Soil moisture and oxygen isotope data suggest that preferential recharge through macropores drove the rapid water table response. Macropore flow was also implicated in the delivery of oxygenated, carbon-rich water from the land surface into the floodplain aquifer, driving a shift in redox conditions at depth. Groundwater chemistry changed dramatically: DOC concentrations increased while nitrate and metal concentrations decreased. Greater shifts in groundwater chemistry occurred on the steep eastern side and required more time to reestablish after the storm. The eastern floodplain aquifer also drained more rapidly. Topographic variations across the floodplain transect influenced fluid flow paths and residence times that ultimately controlled the spatial and temporal dynamics of groundwater biogeochemistry. Use of paired sensors such as redox and pressure sensors can improve our understanding of hydrobiogeochemical dynamics during storms.

  13. Patterns of hydrological exchange and nutrient transformation in the hyporheic zone of a gravel-bottom stream: examining terrestrial- aquatic linkages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Triska, F.J.; Duff, J.H.; Avanzino, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    The terrestrial-aquatic interface beneath a riparian corridor was investigated as a region of hydrological and biological control of nutrient flux. Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in the hyporheic zone ranged from <1.0 to 9.5 mg l-1 due to permeability variations in bankside sediments. DO concentration was related to the proportion of stream water in the lateral hyporheic zone, indicating that the channel water was the DO source. The magnitude and timing of lateral water exchange was linked to previously published studies of nitrification and denitrification. Both nitrification potential and channel exchange decreased with distance from the channel and were absent at sites lacking effective exchange, due to low DO. Field amendment of ammonium to an aerobic flow path indicated nitrification potential under natural hydrological conditions. Denitrification potential was inversely related to channel exchange and was insignificant in channel sediments. Field amendment of acetylene plus nitrate to a flow path with low DO and minimal channel exchange indicated denitrification of amended nitrate. -from Authors

  14. Multiscale hyporheic exchange through strongly heterogeneous sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryshlak, Timothy T.; Sawyer, Audrey H.; Stonedahl, Susa H.; Soltanian, Mohamad Reza

    2015-11-01

    Heterogeneity in hydraulic conductivity (K) and channel morphology both control surface water-groundwater exchange (hyporheic exchange), which influences stream ecosystem processes and biogeochemical cycles. Here we show that heterogeneity in K is the dominant control on exchange rates, residence times, and patterns in hyporheic zones with abrupt lithologic contrasts. We simulated hyporheic exchange in a representative low-gradient stream with 300 different bimodal K fields composed of sand and silt. Simulations span five sets of sand-silt ratios and two sets of low and high K contrasts (1 and 3 orders of magnitude). Heterogeneity increases interfacial flux by an order of magnitude relative to homogeneous cases, drastically changes the shape of residence time distributions, and decreases median residence times. The positioning of highly permeable sand bodies controls patterns of interfacial flux and flow paths. These results are remarkably different from previous studies of smooth, continuous K fields that indicate only moderate effects on hyporheic exchange. Our results also show that hyporheic residence times are least predictable when sand body connectivity is low. As sand body connectivity increases, the expected residence time distribution (ensemble average for a given sand-silt ratio) remains approximately constant, but the uncertainty around the expectation decreases. Including strong heterogeneity in hyporheic models is imperative for understanding hyporheic fluxes and solute transport. In streams with strongly heterogeneous sediments, characterizing lithologic structure is more critical for predicting hyporheic exchange metrics than characterizing channel morphology.

  15. Hydrological Mechanism for Arsenic Deposits in Meghna River Hyporheic Zone Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappett, Peter; Datta, Saugata; Dimova, Natasha; Myers, Kimberly; Hossain, Abrar; Berube, Michelle; Shuai, Pin; Rhodes, Kimberly; Jewell, Katrina; Lipsi, Mehtaz; Hossain, Saddam; Hosain, Alamgir; Peterson, Jacqeline; Ahmed, Kazi

    2016-04-01

    develop within one season. A 3-D numerical groundwater flow model indicates that river water preferentially moves into the seepage face under the influence of tidal fluctuations. This process, coupled with gaining conditions may be responsible for the formation of the high As zone. Sea level rise and increased groundwater pumping will convert many rivers throughout the world into losing rivers altering this process whereby heavy metals are deposited in river sediments along seepage faces. This may remove an important heavy metal sink and shut off the discharge of other important elements to the oceans.

  16. USE OF ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY PROBE WITH MODFLOW FOR SCREENING LEVEL DETERMINATION OF PARAFLUVIAL HYPORHEIC FLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hyporheic zone can provide significant nutrient attenuation in watersheds. Conceptual models describe the behavior of nutrients and biota for the hyporheic ecotone, but site characterization is needed to quantify these effects at the restoration reach scale (hundreds of meter...

  17. Using heat as a tracer to estimate spatially distributed mean residence times in the hyporheic zone of a riffle-pool sequence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naranjo, Ramon C.

    2013-01-01

    Biochemical reactions that occur in the hyporheic zone are highly dependent on the time solutes that are in contact with sediments of the riverbed. In this investigation, we developed a 2-D longitudinal flow and solute-transport model to estimate the spatial distribution of mean residence time in the hyporheic zone. The flow model was calibrated using observations of temperature and pressure, and the mean residence times were simulated using the age-mass approach for steady-state flow conditions. The approach used in this investigation includes the mixing of different ages and flow paths of water through advection and dispersion. Uncertainty of flow and transport parameters was evaluated using standard Monte Carlo and the generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation method. Results of parameter estimation support the presence of a low-permeable zone in the riffle area that induced horizontal flow at a shallow depth within the riffle area. This establishes shallow and localized flow paths and limits deep vertical exchange. For the optimal model, mean residence times were found to be relatively long (9–40.0 days). The uncertainty of hydraulic conductivity resulted in a mean interquartile range (IQR) of 13 days across all piezometers and was reduced by 24% with the inclusion of temperature and pressure observations. To a lesser extent, uncertainty in streambed porosity and dispersivity resulted in a mean IQR of 2.2 and 4.7 days, respectively. Alternative conceptual models demonstrate the importance of accounting for the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity in simulating mean residence times in a riffle-pool sequence.

  18. Relating hyporheic fluxes, residence times, and redox-sensitive biogeochemical processes upstream of beaver dams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Briggs, Martin A.; Lautz, Laura; Hare, Danielle K.

    2013-01-01

    ¨hler number seemed to overestimate the actual transition as indicated by multiple secondary electron acceptors, illustrating the gradient nature of anaerobic transition. Temporal flux variability in low-flux morphologies generated a much greater range in hyporheic redox conditions compared to high-flux zones, and chemical responses to changing flux rates were consistent with those predicted from the empirical relationship between redox condition and residence time. The Raz tracer revealed that hyporheic flow paths have strong net aerobic respiration, particularly at higher residence time, but this reactive exchange did not affect the net stream signal at the reach scale.

  19. A Survey of Escherichia coli and Salmonella in the Hyporheic Zone of a Subtropical Stream: Their Bacteriological, Physicochemical and Environmental Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Mugnai, Riccardo; Sattamini, Ana; Albuquerque dos Santos, José Augusto; Regua-Mangia, Adriana Hamond

    2015-01-01

    The Hyporheic Zone is among the most important interstitial freshwater habitats, but the relationship between biotic and abiotic factors in this zone remains under-explored. Enterobacteria were expected to be present, but no specific studies had ever confirmed this prediction. The aim of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the total coliforms, Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. in hyporheic water and to determine the relationship of the physical, chemical and environmental factors at different depths in a rainforest stream. To this end, thirty-six water samples were collected at three depths in sites located in the first, second and third orders in diverse substrates. The total coliforms, Escherichia coli and Salmonella sp. were evaluated in terms of their CFU/ml. In the interstitial samples, coliforms were detected in 100% of the samples. The total coliform counts had higher values at intermediate depths, while E. coli and Salmonella spp. instead had higher values at intermediate and large depths, often reaching or exceeding the values of the surface samples. Our results revealed that Salmonella spp. and the coliforms have different microhabitat preferences. Salmonella spp. and coliform species prefer deposition areas, such as lateral sides of pools, curves and bars, but they have a tendency to distribute into different depths, likely due to temperature differences. Salmonella spp. prefer compact substrata, with fewer fluids passing through and with upwelling areas with lower oxygen inflow. The coliform species showed the opposite preference. Our results suggest that bacterial variation is related to environmental factors and physical-chemical parameters within the HZ and may play a key role in the microbial diversity and distribution in these ecosystems. PMID:26067288

  20. Impact of a wastewater treatment plant on microbial community composition and function in a hyporheic zone of a eutrophic river.

    PubMed

    Atashgahi, Siavash; Aydin, Rozelin; Dimitrov, Mauricio R; Sipkema, Detmer; Hamonts, Kelly; Lahti, Leo; Maphosa, Farai; Kruse, Thomas; Saccenti, Edoardo; Springael, Dirk; Dejonghe, Winnie; Smidt, Hauke

    2015-01-01

    The impact of the installation of a technologically advanced wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) on the benthic microbial community of a vinyl chloride (VC) impacted eutrophic river was examined two years before, and three and four years after installation of the WWTP. Reduced dissolved organic carbon and increased dissolved oxygen concentrations in surface water and reduced total organic carbon and total nitrogen content in the sediment were recorded in the post-WWTP samples. Pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments in sediment cores showed reduced relative abundance of heterotrophs and fermenters such as Chloroflexi and Firmicutes in more oxic and nutrient poor post-WWTP sediments. Similarly, quantitative PCR analysis showed 1-3 orders of magnitude reduction in phylogenetic and functional genes of sulphate reducers, denitrifiers, ammonium oxidizers, methanogens and VC-respiring Dehalococcoides mccartyi. In contrast, members of Proteobacteria adapted to nutrient-poor conditions were enriched in post-WWTP samples. This transition in the trophic state of the hyporheic sediments reduced but did not abolish the VC respiration potential in the post-WWTP sediments as an important hyporheic sediment function. Our results highlight effective nutrient load reduction and parallel microbial ecological state restoration of a human-stressed urban river as a result of installation of a WWTP. PMID:26607034

  1. Impact of a wastewater treatment plant on microbial community composition and function in a hyporheic zone of a eutrophic river

    PubMed Central

    Atashgahi, Siavash; Aydin, Rozelin; Dimitrov, Mauricio R.; Sipkema, Detmer; Hamonts, Kelly; Lahti, Leo; Maphosa, Farai; Kruse, Thomas; Saccenti, Edoardo; Springael, Dirk; Dejonghe, Winnie; Smidt, Hauke

    2015-01-01

    The impact of the installation of a technologically advanced wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) on the benthic microbial community of a vinyl chloride (VC) impacted eutrophic river was examined two years before, and three and four years after installation of the WWTP. Reduced dissolved organic carbon and increased dissolved oxygen concentrations in surface water and reduced total organic carbon and total nitrogen content in the sediment were recorded in the post-WWTP samples. Pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments in sediment cores showed reduced relative abundance of heterotrophs and fermenters such as Chloroflexi and Firmicutes in more oxic and nutrient poor post-WWTP sediments. Similarly, quantitative PCR analysis showed 1–3 orders of magnitude reduction in phylogenetic and functional genes of sulphate reducers, denitrifiers, ammonium oxidizers, methanogens and VC-respiring Dehalococcoides mccartyi. In contrast, members of Proteobacteria adapted to nutrient-poor conditions were enriched in post-WWTP samples. This transition in the trophic state of the hyporheic sediments reduced but did not abolish the VC respiration potential in the post-WWTP sediments as an important hyporheic sediment function. Our results highlight effective nutrient load reduction and parallel microbial ecological state restoration of a human-stressed urban river as a result of installation of a WWTP. PMID:26607034

  2. Impact of a wastewater treatment plant on microbial community composition and function in a hyporheic zone of a eutrophic river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atashgahi, Siavash; Aydin, Rozelin; Dimitrov, Mauricio R.; Sipkema, Detmer; Hamonts, Kelly; Lahti, Leo; Maphosa, Farai; Kruse, Thomas; Saccenti, Edoardo; Springael, Dirk; Dejonghe, Winnie; Smidt, Hauke

    2015-11-01

    The impact of the installation of a technologically advanced wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) on the benthic microbial community of a vinyl chloride (VC) impacted eutrophic river was examined two years before, and three and four years after installation of the WWTP. Reduced dissolved organic carbon and increased dissolved oxygen concentrations in surface water and reduced total organic carbon and total nitrogen content in the sediment were recorded in the post-WWTP samples. Pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments in sediment cores showed reduced relative abundance of heterotrophs and fermenters such as Chloroflexi and Firmicutes in more oxic and nutrient poor post-WWTP sediments. Similarly, quantitative PCR analysis showed 1-3 orders of magnitude reduction in phylogenetic and functional genes of sulphate reducers, denitrifiers, ammonium oxidizers, methanogens and VC-respiring Dehalococcoides mccartyi. In contrast, members of Proteobacteria adapted to nutrient-poor conditions were enriched in post-WWTP samples. This transition in the trophic state of the hyporheic sediments reduced but did not abolish the VC respiration potential in the post-WWTP sediments as an important hyporheic sediment function. Our results highlight effective nutrient load reduction and parallel microbial ecological state restoration of a human-stressed urban river as a result of installation of a WWTP.

  3. Impact of watershed topography on hyporheic exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, Alice; Ridolfi, Luca; Boano, Fulvio

    2016-08-01

    Among the interactions between surface water bodies and aquifers, hyporheic exchange has been recognized as a key process for nutrient cycling and contaminant transport. Even though hyporheic exchange is strongly controlled by groundwater discharge, our understanding of the impact of the regional groundwater flow on hyporheic fluxes is still limited because of the complexity arising from the multi-scale nature of these interactions. In this work, we investigate the role of watershed topography on river-aquifer interactions by way of a semi-analytical model, in which the landscape topography is used to approximate the groundwater head distribution. The analysis of a case study shows how the complex topographic structure is the direct cause of a substantial spatial variability of the aquifer-river exchange. Groundwater upwelling along the river corridor is estimated and its influence on the hyporheic zone is discussed. In particular, the fragmentation of the hyporeic corridor induced by groundwater discharge at the basin scale is highlighted.

  4. USE OF ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY PROBE FOR DETERMINATION OF HYPORHEIC FLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hyporheic zone can play a significant role in nutrient behavior in watersheds. Conceptual models describe the behavior of nutrients and biota for the hyporheic ecotone, but site characterization is needed to quantiiy effects at the restoration reach scale (hundreds of meters)...

  5. Fe(II)- and Sulfide-Facilitated Reduction of 99Tc(VII)O4- in Microbially Reduced Hyporheic Zone Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Heald, Steve M.; McKinley, James P.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Resch, Charles T.; Moore, Dean A.

    2014-07-01

    Redox-reactive, biogeochemical phases generated by reductive microbial activity in hyporheic zone sediments from a dynamic groundwater-river interaction zone were evaluated for their ability to reduce soluble pertechnetate [99Tc(VII)O4-] to less soluble Tc(IV). The sediments were bioreduced by indigenous microorganisms that were stimulated by organic substrate addition in synthetic groundwater with or without sulfate. In most treatments, 20 µmol L-1 initial aqueous Tc(VII) was reduced to near or below detection (3.82×10-9 mol L-1) over periods of days to months in suspensions of variable solids concentrations. Native sediments containing significant lithogenic Fe(II) in various phases were, in contrast, unreactive with Tc(VII). The reduction rates in the bioreduced sediments increased with increases in sediment mass, in proportion to weak acid-extractable Fe(II) and sediment-associated sulfide (AVS). The rate of Tc(VII) reduction was first order with respect to both aqueous Tc(VII) concentration and sediment mass, but correlations between specific reductant concentrations and reaction rate were not found. X-ray microprobe measurements revealed a strong correlation between Tc hot spots and Fe-containing mineral particles in the sediment. However, only a portion of Fe-containing particles were Tc-hosts. The Tc-hot spots displayed a chemical signature (by EDXRF) similar to pyroxene. The application of autoradiography and electron microprobe allowed further isolation of Tc-containing particles that were invariably found to be ca 100 µm aggregates of primary mineral material embedded within a fine-grained phyllosilicate matrix. EXAFS spectroscopy revealed that the Tc(IV) within these were a combination of a Tc(IV)O2-like phase and Tc(IV)-Fe surface clusters, with a significant fraction of a TcSx-like phase in sediments incubated with SO42-. AVS was implicated as a more selective reductant at low solids concentration even though its concentration was below that

  6. Assessment of hyporheic zone, flood-plain, soil-gas, soil, and surface-water contamination at the Old Incinerator Area, Fort Gordon, Georgia, 2009-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guimaraes, Wladmir B.; Falls, W. Fred; Caldwell, Andral W.; Ratliff, W. Hagan; Wellborn, John B.; Landmeyer, James E.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of the Army Environmental and Natural Resources Management Office of the U.S. Army Signal Center and Fort Gordon, Georgia, assessed the hyporheic zone, flood plain, soil gas, soil, and surface-water for contaminants at the Old Incinerator Area at Fort Gordon, from October 2009 to September 2010. The assessment included the detection of organic contaminants in the hyporheic zone, flood plain, soil gas, and surface water. In addition, the organic contaminant assessment included the analysis of explosives and chemical agents in selected areas. Inorganic contaminants were assessed in soil and surface-water samples. The assessment was conducted to provide environmental contamination data to the U.S. Army at Fort Gordon pursuant to requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B Hazardous Waste Permit process. Total petroleum hydrocarbons were detected above the method detection level in all 13 samplers deployed in the hyporheic zone and flood plain of an unnamed tributary to Spirit Creek. The combined concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and total xylene were detected at 3 of the 13 samplers. Other organic compounds detected in one sampler included octane and trichloroethylene. In the passive soil-gas survey, 28 of the 60 samplers detected total petroleum hydrocarbons above the method detection level. Additionally, 11 of the 60 samplers detected the combined masses of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and total xylene above the method detection level. Other compounds detected above the method detection level in the passive soil-gas survey included octane, trimethylbenzene, perchlorethylene, and chloroform. Subsequent to the passive soil-gas survey, six areas determined to have relatively high contaminant mass were selected, and soil-gas samplers were deployed, collected, and analyzed for explosives and chemical agents. No explosives or chemical agents were detected above

  7. Effect of Hyporheic Exchange Induced by Riverbed Dunes on Mixing of Contaminants Daylighting from Aquifers to Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, E. T.; Young, K. I.; Widdowson, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Interaction of surface water and groundwater in hyporheic sediments of river systems is known to create unique biogeochemical conditions that can attenuate contaminants flowing downstream. In such cases, oxygen, carbon, and the contaminants themselves often advect together from sources in surface water. However, the ability of the hyporheic zone to attenuate contaminants in upwelling groundwater plumes as they exit to rivers is less known. Such reactions may be more dependent on mixing of carbon and oxygen sources from surface water with contaminants from deeper groundwater. A few studies have shown that attenuation in shallow sediments can be much greater than in upgradient aquifers, yet have not determined what site characteristics most control such "hyporheic natural attenuation." Here we focus on mixing between hyporheic flow paths induced beneath riverbed dunes and flowpaths of adjacent upwelling of deeper groundwater. We simulated such mixing using numerical simulations of groundwater flow, particle tracking, and conservative tracer transport using MODFLOW, MODPATH, and MT3DMS, respectively. We conducted a sensitivity analysis that varied parameters which affect the degree of mixing. We found that mixing occurs only within a thin zone at the interface of hyporheic flow paths and upwelling groundwater flowpaths. We also found that variation of control parameters affects mixing zone size in two distinct ways. On the one hand, variation of sediment hydraulic conductivity (K), upwelling groundwater flowrate (bottom Q), and anisotropy all affect mixing zone size primarily by affecting the length of the mixing zone: mixing zone size increases as K increases, bottom Q decreases, or anisotropy decreases. On the other hand, sediment heterogeneity affects mixing zone size primarily by affecting the thickness of the mixing zone: mixing zone size increases as standard deviation of the K field increases and as the ratio of horizontal to vertical correlation scales of the

  8. Hyporheic flow and transport processes: mechanisms, models, and biogeochemical implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boano, Fulvio; Harvey, Judson W.; Marion, Andrea; Packman, Aaron I.; Revelli, Roberto; Ridolfi, Luca; Anders, Wörman

    2014-01-01

    Fifty years of hyporheic zone research have shown the important role played by the hyporheic zone as an interface between groundwater and surface waters. However, it is only in the last two decades that what began as an empirical science has become a mechanistic science devoted to modeling studies of the complex fluid dynamical and biogeochemical mechanisms occurring in the hyporheic zone. These efforts have led to the picture of surface-subsurface water interactions as regulators of the form and function of fluvial ecosystems. Rather than being isolated systems, surface water bodies continuously interact with the subsurface. Exploration of hyporheic zone processes has led to a new appreciation of their wide reaching consequences for water quality and stream ecology. Modern research aims toward a unified approach, in which processes occurring in the hyporheic zone are key elements for the appreciation, management, and restoration of the whole river environment. In this unifying context, this review summarizes results from modeling studies and field observations about flow and transport processes in the hyporheic zone and describes the theories proposed in hydrology and fluid dynamics developed to quantitatively model and predict the hyporheic transport of water, heat, and dissolved and suspended compounds from sediment grain scale up to the watershed scale. The implications of these processes for stream biogeochemistry and ecology are also discussed."

  9. Hyporheic flow and transport processes: Mechanisms, models, and biogeochemical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boano, F.; Harvey, J. W.; Marion, A.; Packman, A. I.; Revelli, R.; Ridolfi, L.; Wörman, A.

    2014-12-01

    Fifty years of hyporheic zone research have shown the important role played by the hyporheic zone as an interface between groundwater and surface waters. However, it is only in the last two decades that what began as an empirical science has become a mechanistic science devoted to modeling studies of the complex fluid dynamical and biogeochemical mechanisms occurring in the hyporheic zone. These efforts have led to the picture of surface-subsurface water interactions as regulators of the form and function of fluvial ecosystems. Rather than being isolated systems, surface water bodies continuously interact with the subsurface. Exploration of hyporheic zone processes has led to a new appreciation of their wide reaching consequences for water quality and stream ecology. Modern research aims toward a unified approach, in which processes occurring in the hyporheic zone are key elements for the appreciation, management, and restoration of the whole river environment. In this unifying context, this review summarizes results from modeling studies and field observations about flow and transport processes in the hyporheic zone and describes the theories proposed in hydrology and fluid dynamics developed to quantitatively model and predict the hyporheic transport of water, heat, and dissolved and suspended compounds from sediment grain scale up to the watershed scale. The implications of these processes for stream biogeochemistry and ecology are also discussed.

  10. Short-term groundwater fluxes in the hyporheic zone as a consequence of changing river stages; numerical simulation by HYDRUS 2D/3D.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyseure, Guido; Chou, Po-Yi

    2010-05-01

    All hydrological handbooks contain methods for direct runoff and base-flow separation. The semi-log separation method is the most classical one. One can, however, question the physical base for such method. In addition, the water fluxes in the riverbed are important for ecology and water quality. In our study an 2-D cross-section including the river and the surrounding aquifer was set-up in HYDRUS 2D/3D. Initial conditions were a steady-state subsurface flow feeding the river with a recharge from the soil surface. A surface runoff event was simulated by a rise and recession of the water level in the river. Differences between summer and winter situation were explored by given representative temperatures to the different components of the river-aquifer system. The simulations show that the fluxes are very different along the riverbed. Even during steady state baseflow we see that the fluxes through the bottom were 2 to 3 times smaller as compared to the side banks. During the hydrographs the proportion can become up to 5 times. Another interesting result is that within the time frame of the hydrograph and its immediate recession relatively little water, which pentetrated in the aquifer, returns to the river. Most of the water replenishes the aquifer and there is only a very small rise of baseflow. In our simulation we returned to the original level as before the hydrograph, so in reality even less or no rise in baseflow may occur immediately after a hydrograph. Of course, in a longer time-frame the recharge of the aquifer will give a rise to the actual subsurface drainage. The change in seasonal temperatures within the river-aquifer system has a substantial effect. For identical river stage hydrograph changes the hyporheic exchange fluxes are more intense in summer than in winter. If we define the hyporheic zone as the extedn to which the water fluxes from the river can penetrate, then we see that this zone is wider on the sides as compared to the bottom of the

  11. Hyporheic Flow and Heat Transport Within a Bed-to-Bank Transect of a Large Regulated River: Colorado River, Austin, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerecht, K.; Cardenas, B.; Guswa, A. J.; Sawyer, A. H.; Swanson, T.; Nowinski, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    The stage and discharge of the Lower Colorado River (LCR) near Austin, Texas is regulated by a series of dams for hydropower generation, flood management, water supply, and recreation. Daily releases from a dam, 23 km upstream of the study site, cause the stage at the site to fluctuate by more than 1.5 m with a mean depth of 1.3 m. These fluctuations cause the LCR at the study site to transition from a regionally gaining river to a river that both gains and loses over each daily cycle. To assess the effects of the flow management on river-groundwater exchange, we collected temperature and head measurements across a hyporheic-to-riparian transect that were highly resolved in both space and time over two campaigns of three days each. These observations show that river-groundwater exchange flux is consistently larger close to the bank and decreases with distance from the bank. Correspondingly, both the depth of the hyporheic zone and the exchange time are greatest near the bank. Adjacent to the bank streambed head response is hysteretic, with hysteresis dissipating with increased distance from the bank, indicating that transient bank storage affects the direction and magnitude of vertical exchange close to the bank. Hyporheic zone temperature is perturbed up to one meter below the bed. When the river stage is high, which coincides with when the river is coldest, downward advection of heat from a previous cycles’ warm-water pulse warms the hyporheic zone. When the river is at its lowest stage but warmest temperature, upwelling groundwater cools the hyporheic zone. These hydraulic and thermal alterations may change the biogeochemical and ecologic dynamics of the river and its hyporheic and riparian zones, including the hyporheic zone’s capacity to act as a biological filter and habitat.

  12. Seasonal hyporheic temperature dynamics over riffle bedforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannah, D. M.; Malcolm, I. A.; Bradley, C.

    2009-04-01

    There is growing interest in riverbed temperature due to the ecological and biogeochemical significance of the hyporheic zone, and its potential to moderate river temperature. Riffles exhibit complex thermal behaviour, hypothesised to be caused by local alteration of groundwater-surface water (GW-SW) interactions; but hitherto most research has been in upland/ gravel-bed/ hard rock catchments. Accordingly, this article aims: (1) to characterise spatio- temporal variability in hyporheic temperature over two riffles (R1 and R2) in a lowland river basin (Tern, Shropshire, UK) underlain by sandstone; and (2) to explain thermal dynamics by inferring hyporheic processes and the influence of GW-SW interactions. Hyporheic [riffle head, crest and tail at 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 m], water column, spring water and air temperature were collected at 15 min resolution over 22 months and used to explore seasonal variations. Borehole water levels and temperature provide insight into groundwater variability over a hydrological year. Hyporheic temperature is cooler (warmer) than water column in summer (winter), with convergence in spring and autumn. Riffle heads and R2 crest yield small thermal gradients; and R1 tail larger vertical difference. R1 crest temperature is similar and attenuated (cf. water column) at all depths. R2 tail temperature differs markedly from surface water. Thus, hyporheic temperature varies temporally across and between riffles, reflecting: (1) hydroclimatological controls on river and groundwater temperature, and (2) hydrological, local morphological and sedimentary controls on surface water and groundwater flux. This research demonstrates the utility of depth-related riverbed temperature time-series in understanding hyporheic zone processes and groundwater-surface water interactions.

  13. Hydroecological Connections: Hyporheic Zone Weathering of Silicate Minerals Controls Diatom Biodiversity in Microbial Mats in Glacial Meltwater Streams of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, D. M.; Dyson, I.; Esposito, R. M.; Gooseff, M. N.; Lyons, W. B.; Welch, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica is comprised of alpine and terminal glaciers, large expanses of patterned ground, and ice-covered lakes in the valley floors, which are linked by glacial meltwater streams that flow during the austral summer. As part of the McMurdo Dry Valleys Long-Term Ecological research project, we have observed stream ecosystem response to a sustained 18 year cool period with low flows, which has been recently interrupted by three "flood events" during sunny, warm summers. Many of these streams contain thriving microbial mats comprised of cyanobacteria and endemic diatoms, the most diverse group of eukaryotic organisms in the valleys. Of the 45 diatom taxa, some common taxa are heavily silicified, Hantzschia amphioxys f. muelleri, while others are only lightly silicified. By comparing diatom communities in streams which flow every summer with those in streams that only flow during flood events, we found that hydrologic flow regime acts as a strong environmental filter on diatom community composition. Following the first flood event in 2001/02, mat biomass was two-fold lower due to scouring and recovered over several years, with lesser declines following the subsequent floods. In the longer streams, the diatom community composition remained stable through the flood events, whereas in two of the shorter streams, Green and Bowles Creeks, the diatom community shifted after the first flood event to a greater abundance of lightly silicified taxa. Water quality monitoring and reactive transport modeling have shown that rapid weathering of silicate minerals in the hyporheic zone accounts for the downstream increases in Si concentration which are observed in the longer streams. One mechanism driving this greater abundance of lightly silicified diatoms in shorter streams could be the greater dilution of the Si supply from hyporheic weathering in shorter streams under high flows. Given that the stream diatom community is well preserved in the 40

  14. High Variance within Salmonid Spawning Gravels at Restoration Sites Creates More Suitable Habitat within the Hyporheic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janes, M. K.; Heffernan, J. E.; Rosenberry, J. W.; Horner, T.

    2012-12-01

    The Lower American River has historically provided natural spawning habitat for approximately one third of Northern California's salmon population. However, since the construction of Folsom and Nimbus Dams, downstream reaches have become sediment starved and periodic high outflow from the dam has caused channel armoring and incision, thereby degrading the natural spawning habitat. Restoration work on spawning sites in the Lower American River has consisted primarily of importing gravel to create riffles during periods of moderate flow. This is an effort to mitigate armoring of the riverbed and to rehabilitate salmonid spawning habitat by providing suitable grain size for all stages of spawning (redd construction, incubation, and emergence). Since restoration activities began, all rehabilitated sites have not been equally used for spawning. This study attempts to examine and compare the physical properties of each site in order to ascertain which characteristics create more suitable rehabilitated habitat. To do this, we compared restored areas to pre-restoration conditions through the assessment of three main aspects of the restored spawning habitat; grain size and its natural mobility, water flow in the surface and subsurface, and intragravel water quality. We found that some augmentation sites are more heterogeneous than others, and this correlates with higher spawning use. Most spawning was at fin height, and salmonids tend to use sites with higher depth variance (surface features) and higher variance in flow directions and velocities. With time, salmonids alter the spawning sites, creating small ridges and valleys perpendicular to flow. This creates more variable subsurface flow and generates hyporheic flow through the new gravel. This may have an effect on spawning as the more seasoned additions have a higher frequency of spawning than the newer augmentations. In order to efficiently rehabilitate a site and expedite the "seasoning process", creating variance

  15. Study of heterogeneous vertical hyporheic flux via streambed temperature at different depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Shu, L.; Lu, C.; Li, J.; Chen, S.; Li, S.; Wang, G.

    2015-05-01

    The hyporheic flux can be characterized using the heat-tracing method. Based on the analytical solution of the one-dimensional steady-state heat transport equation under vertical groundwater discharge conditions, hyporheic flux was obtained via a curve fitting method. The temperature data used was obtained from monitoring three different sections of the DaWen River, Shandong Province. The distribution of the depth of the hyporheic zone was analysed by a curve relating groundwater temperature and the depth of the hyporheic zone. The study results showed that the vertical hyporheic flux was significantly heterogeneous along the three sections. The hyporheic flux ranged from 99.61 to 356.25 L/m2 per day. In the summer, the low temperature area on streambed profile was in accordance with the high value areas of hyporheic flux. There were several strong discharge zones within the same section and these flux values were normally distributed. The depth of the hyporheic zone was inversely proportional to the hyporheic flux and the hyporheic zone depth, also, presented great spatial heterogeneity.

  16. Hydrological and geochemical consequences of river regulation - hyporheic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siergieiev, Dmytro; Lundberg, Angela; Widerlund, Anders

    2014-05-01

    River-aquifer interfaces, essential for ecosystem functioning in terms of nutrient exchange and biological habitat, appear greatly threatened worldwide. Although river regulation is a vast pressure on river-aquifer interaction, influencing entire watersheds, knowledge about hyporheic exchange in regulated rivers is rather limited. In this study, we combine two decades of research on hydrological and geochemical impacts of hydropower regulation on river water and hyporheic zone in two large boreal rivers, unregulated Kalix River and regulated Lule River. Altered river discharge, with reduced spring peaks, daily summer fluctuations and elevated winter base flow severely modified Lule River water geochemistry and thus the transport of solutes to the Bothnian Bay (Baltic Sea). Further, these river modifications changed the river-aquifer exchange on both daily and seasonal scale, which resulted in deteriorated hyporheic conditions with reduced riverbed hydraulic conductivity (formation of a clogging layer) reflected in a declined hyporheic flux. Altered hydrological regime of the hyporheic zone created quasi-stagnant conditions beneath the river-aquifer interface and promoted the formation of geochemically suboxic environment. Taken that hyporheic water is a mixture of river water and groundwater, mixing models for the regulated site demonstrate a considerable addition of Fe, Mn, Al, NH4 and removal of dissolved oxygen and nitrate, which suggests the hyporheic zone in the Lule River to be a source of solutes. This contradicts the observations from the hyporheic zone in the unregulated river, with opposite behaviour functioning as a barrier. These results suggest that the hyporheic zone function is dependent on the river discharge and the state of the river-aquifer connectivity. Improved knowledge about the latter on a watershed scale will substantially increase our understanding about the status and potential pressures of riverine ecosystems and assist management and

  17. Resolving hyporheic and groundwater components of streambed water flux

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bhaskar, Aditi S.; Harvey, Judson W.; Henry, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Hyporheic and groundwater fluxes typically occur together in permeable sediments beneath flowing stream water. However, streambed water fluxes quantified using the thermal method are usually interpreted as representing either groundwater or hyporheic fluxes. Our purpose was to improve understanding of co-occurring groundwater and hyporheic fluxes using streambed temperature measurements and analysis of one-dimensional heat transport in shallow streambeds. First, we examined how changes in hyporheic and groundwater fluxes affect their relative magnitudes by reevaluating previously published simulations. These indicated that flux magnitudes are largely independent until a threshold is crossed, past which hyporheic fluxes are diminished by much larger (1000-fold) groundwater fluxes. We tested accurate quantification of co-occurring fluxes using one-dimensional approaches that are appropriate for analyzing streambed temperature data collected at field sites. The thermal analytical method, which uses an analytical solution to the one-dimensional heat transport equation, was used to analyze results from a numerical heat transport model, in which hyporheic flow was represented as increased thermal dispersion at shallow depths. We found that co-occurring groundwater and hyporheic fluxes can be quantified in streambeds, although not always accurately. For example, using a temperature time series collected in a sandy streambed, we found that hyporheic and groundwater flow could both be detected when thermal dispersion due to hyporheic flow was significant compared to thermal conduction. We provide guidance for when thermal data can be used to quantify both hyporheic and groundwater fluxes, and we show that neglecting thermal dispersion may affect accuracy and interpretation of estimated streambed water fluxes.

  18. Hyporheic flow pattern based on the coupling of regional and stream scales: Case of Krycklan Catchment area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojarrad, Morteza; Wörman, Anders; Riml, Joakim

    2016-04-01

    Water resources intense development within the past century has had an enormous impact on hydrological systems especially on rivers and groundwater resources. A river basin is a flow system involving the interaction between surface water and groundwater. This interaction occurs in terrestrial and coastal zone and even in arid and semi-arid areas, where surface water overlie on a permeable sediment. A key zone for the interaction between surface water and groundwater is the hyporheic zone, which forms by stream water that in- and exfiltrating in the permeable sediments surrounding the river corridor. Groundwater and hyporheic flows arise due to different range of topographical scales and their relative importance is investigated in this study. Krycklan is a well-monitored research catchment in which the data collection for more than 90 years has comprised hydrology, biochemistry, and aquatic ecology. The catchment is located in a boreal area of northern Sweden. The head-water streams begin in mountainous area and fall to the Baltic Sea near the city of Umea. In this paper, COMSOL Multi-physics simulation software has been used to model the subsurface flow of the whole Krycklan catchment in order to reach a comprehensive understanding of large-scale groundwater circulation and its impact of the stream hyporheic flows. The model statement is based on the 3D Laplace equation, which has been applied independently on two ranges of topographical scales to obtain a superimposed solution. Steady state simulation has been done based on the simplified assumption of constant boundary conditions of the groundwater surface and otherwise non-flow boundaries. The hydraulic head of the groundwater surface was taken as the topography, which apply as an approximation in wet climate with shallow soil layers. The results demonstrated how the ratio of the topographical amplitudes on different scales affect the size (depth) and fragmentation of the hyporheic zone. "Fragmentation" was

  19. Nested patterns in hyporheic meta-communities: the role of body morphology and penetrability of sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omesová, Marie; Horsák, Michal; Helešic, Jan

    2008-10-01

    Nestedness has been regarded as a common pattern of species distribution especially in terrestrial systems and vertebrate faunas. However, a significantly lower degree of nestedness has been reported for aquatic invertebrates. We analyzed the vertical distribution patterns of taxa in the upper 70 cm of the hyporheic zone. This biotope is abundantly inhabited by epigean fauna, which is morphologically pre-adapted to life within the limited space of sediment interstices. We tested the hypotheses that in the vertical profile of the hyporheic zone sediment acts as a physical barrier (filter), allowing only the morphologically pre-adapted and adapted (i.e., smaller, narrower, more flexible) taxa to penetrate to deeper layers. We demonstrated that this mechanism can promote a strongly nested and colonization-driven pattern at higher taxa levels. The sediment filter (1) constricted the body width: 0.50 mm appeared to be the upper limit for successful sediment colonization at the study site, and (2) favored elongated taxa against small sized taxa. We tested also the assumption that distribution of fine sediment affects the accessibility of hyporheic zone for fauna (“filter density”) and thereby influences nestedness. However, we found that nestedness could be sufficiently explained by the depth itself. Our study offers a possible explanation of depth patterns in hyporeic meta-communities as a result of morphological characteristics promoting nestedness at higher taxa level.

  20. Response of crayfish to hyporheic water availability and excess sedimentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyer, Joseph J.; Worthington, Thomas A.; Brewer, Shannon K.

    2015-01-01

    Crayfish in many headwater streams regularly cope with seasonal drought. However, it is unclear how landscape changes affect the long-term persistence of crayfish populations. We designed two laboratory experiments to investigate the acute effects of common landscape stressors on crayfish: water withdrawal and sedimentation. The first experiment tested the interaction among water withdrawals (four 24-h water reductions of 0, 15, 30, or 45 cm) and two substrate treatments (pebble and cobble) on the burrowing depth of crayfish. The second experiment evaluated the effects of excess fine sediment (three treatments of 0, 45, and 90% sediment) and substrate type (cobble and pebble) on crayfish burrowing depth. Crayfish were able to burrow deeper into the simulated hyporheic zone in cobble substrate when compared to pebble. Crayfish subjected to greater water withdrawals in the pebble treatment were not able to reach the simulated hyporheic zone. Excess fine sediment reduced the depth that crayfish burrowed, regardless of substrate type. Results from this study suggest excess fine sediment may reduce crayfish persistence, particularly when seeking refuge during prolonged dry conditions.

  1. Statistical Modeling to Predict N2O Production Within the Hyporheic Zone by Coupling Denitrifying Microbial Community Abundance to Geochemical and Hydrological Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, T. B.; Quick, A. M.; Reeder, W. J.; Benner, S. G.; Tonina, D.; Feris, K. P.

    2015-12-01

    The hyporheic zone (HZ) of streams may be a significant source of nitrous oxide (N2O). However, the biogeochemical processes controlling N2O emissions remain poorly constrained due to difficulties in obtaining high-resolution chemical, physical, and biological data from streams. Our research elucidates specific controls on N2O production within the HZ by coupling the distribution of denitrifying microbial communities to flow dynamics (i.e. hydraulics and streambed morphology) and biogeochemical processes. We conducted a large-scale flume experiment that allowed us to constrain streambed morphology, flow rate, organic carbon loading, grain size distribution, and exogenous nitrate loading while enabling regular monitoring of dissolved oxygen, pH, alkalinity, nitrogen species, and elemental concentrations in the HZ. We also employed real-time PCR (qPCR) to quantify the distribution of denitrifying functional genes (nirS and nosZ, nitrite reductase and nitrous oxide reductase genes, respectively) in HZ sediment cores as a measure of denitrifying microorganism abundance. A steady increase in N2O was observed after 8 hours of residence time with a peak in concentration (9.5 μg-N/L) recorded at hour 18. Abundance of nosZ increased an order of magnitude between hours 8 and 18 (2.6x106 to 2.1x107 gene copy #/g dry sediment). nirS abundance remained within the same order of magnitude between hours 8 and 18 (1.7x107 to 3.8x107). Linear and nonlinear mixed-effects models were used to investigate N2O production in the HZ as a function of total nitrogen, nirS, nosZ, residence time, and dissolved oxygen. N2O production was localized at redox-controlled hotspots within the subsurface and concentrations were strongly correlated with the availability of nitrogen when an interaction with nosZ abundance was considered. On-going analysis will provide predictions of N2O production and support for conditions under which the HZ could be a significant contributor of N2O emissions. These

  2. Characterizing multiple timescales of stream and storage zone interaction that affect solute fate and transport in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choi, J.; Harvey, J.W.; Conklin, M.H.

    2000-01-01

    The fate of contaminants in streams and rivers is affected by exchange and biogeochemical transformation in slowly moving or stagnant flow zones that interact with rapid flow in the main channel. In a typical stream, there are multiple types of slowly moving flow zones in which exchange and transformation occur, such as stagnant or recirculating surface water as well as subsurface hyporheic zones. However, most investigators use transport models with just a single storage zone in their modeling studies, which assumes that the effects of multiple storage zones can be lumped together. Our study addressed the following question: Can a single-storage zone model reliably characterize the effects of physical retention and biogeochemical reactions in multiple storage zones? We extended an existing stream transport model with a single storage zone to include a second storage zone. With the extended model we generated 500 data sets representing transport of nonreactive and reactive solutes in stream systems that have two different types of storage zones with variable hydrologic conditions. The one storage zone model was tested by optimizing the lumped storage parameters to achieve a best fit for each of the generated data sets. Multiple storage processes were categorized as possessing I, additive; II, competitive; or III, dominant storage zone characteristics. The classification was based on the goodness of fit of generated data sets, the degree of similarity in mean retention time of the two storage zones, and the relative distributions of exchange flux and storage capacity between the two storage zones. For most cases (> 90%) the one storage zone model described either the effect of the sum of multiple storage processes (category I) or the dominant storage process (category III). Failure of the one storage zone model occurred mainly for category II, that is, when one of the storage zones had a much longer mean retention time (t(s) ratio > 5.0) and when the dominance of

  3. Deriving variable travel times and aerobic respiration in the hyporheic zone using electrical conductivity as natural tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieweg, Michael; Fleckenstein, Jan H.; Schmidt, Christian

    2014-05-01

    level is affecting the travel-time, albeit these effects differ depending on the morphology and strength of the streamflow events. The derived travel times allowed for estimating a transient respiration rate between 3 and 12 mg/l/day. Temperature was found to control over 70% of the variation of the respiration rate. The oxygen concentration in the streambed is more influenced by the variability of the respiration rate than of the travel time.

  4. Hyporheic and Total Transient Storage in Small Sand-Bed Streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Key processes in stream ecosystems are linked to hydraulic retention, which is the departure of stream flow from ideal “plug flow,” and reflects fluid movement through surface and hyporheic storage zones. Most existing information about hyporheic exchange is based on flume studies or field measureme...

  5. TRANSIENT STORAGE AND HYPORHEIC FLOW ALONG THE UPPER WILLAMETTE RIVER, OREGON: FIELD MEASUREMENTS AND MODEL ESTIMATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Transient storage measures the exchange of main channel flow with subsurface hyporheic flow and surface water dead zones. Hyporheic flow, in which river water enters the channel bed and banks to emerge downstream, promotes biochemical processes that are iimportant for water qual...

  6. Cumulative Significance of Hyporheic Exchange and Biogeochemical Processing in River Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J. W.; Gomez-Velez, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Biogeochemical reactions in rivers that decrease excessive loads of nutrients, metals, organic compounds, etc. are enhanced by hydrologic interactions with microbially and geochemically active sediments of the hyporheic zone. The significance of reactions in individual hyporheic flow paths has been shown to be controlled by the contact time between river water and sediment and the intrinsic reaction rate in the sediment. However, little is known about how the cumulative effects of hyporheic processing in large river basins. We used the river network model NEXSS (Gomez-Velez and Harvey, submitted) to simulate hyporheic exchange through synthetic river networks based on the best available models of network topology, hydraulic geometry and scaling of geomorphic features, grain size, hydraulic conductivity, and intrinsic reaction rates of nutrients and metals in river sediment. The dimensionless reaction significance factor, RSF (Harvey et al., 2013) was used to quantify the cumulative removal fraction of a reactive solute by hyporheic processing. SF scales reaction progress in a single pass through the hyporheic zone with the proportion of stream discharge passing through the hyporheic zone for a specified distance. Reaction progress is optimal where the intrinsic reaction timescale in sediment matches the residence time of hyporheic flow and is less efficient in longer residence time hyporheic flow as a result of the decreasing proportion of river flow that is processed by longer residence time hyporheic flow paths. In contrast, higher fluxes through short residence time hyporheic flow paths may be inefficient because of the repeated surface-subsurface exchanges required to complete the reaction. Using NEXSS we found that reaction efficiency may be high in both small streams and large rivers, although for different reasons. In small streams reaction progress generally is dominated by faster pathways of vertical exchange beneath submerged bedforms. Slower exchange

  7. Concurrent conservative and reactive tracer tests in a stream undergoing hyporheic exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, Dennis; Liao, Zijie; WöHling, Thomas; Osenbrück, Karsten; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2013-05-01

    Knowledge about the strength and travel times of hyporheic exchange is vital to predict reactive transport and biogeochemical cycling in streams. In this study, we outline how to perform and analyze stream tracer tests using pulse injections of fluorescein as conservative and resazurin as reactive tracer, which is selectively transformed to resorufin when exposed to metabolically active zones, presumably located in the hyporheic zone. We present steps of preliminary data analysis and apply a conceptually simple mathematical model of the tracer tests to separate effects of in-stream transport from hyporheic exchange processes. To overcome the dependence of common parameter estimation schemes on the initial guess, we derive posterior parameter probability density functions using an adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo scheme. By this, we can identify maximum-likelihood parameter values of in-stream transport, strength of hyporheic exchange, distribution of hyporheic travel times as well as sorption and reactivity coefficients of the hyporheic zone. We demonstrate the approach by a tracer experiment at River Goldersbach in southern Germany (60 L/s discharge). In-stream breakthrough curves were recorded with online fluorometers and jointly fitted to simulations of a one-dimensional reactive transport model assuming an exponential hyporheic travel-time distribution. The findings show that the additional analysis of resazurin not only improved the physical basis of the modeling, but was crucial to differentiate between surface transport and hyporheic transient storage of stream solutes. Parameter uncertainties were usually small and could not explain parameter variability between adjacent monitoring stations. The latter as well as a systematic underestimation of the tailing are due to structural errors of the model, particularly the exponential hyporheic travel-time distribution. Mean hyporheic travel times were in the range of 12 min, suggesting that small streambed

  8. Hyporheic interactions under a hydropeaking scenario: a multi-scale approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas-Mulet, R.; Alfredsen, K.

    2012-04-01

    Sudden flow changes caused by hydropeaking are likely to become more frequent with increasing demand for renewable energy. These sudden fluctuations affect both the surface and subsurface flow regime and change the hydrological interaction patterns occurring in the hyporheic zone. The hyporheos plays an important role in freshwater ecology, especially for early stages of salmon embryo development. Hydrological hyporheic interactions and associated larger scale hydrological processes have hardly been investigated in a hydropeaking scenario. The works presented aim (i) to investigate detailed hydrological processes occurring in the hyporheic zone at the micro-scale during hydropeaking; (ii) to upscale the findings at the meso-scale by repeating the same detailed experiments in differentiated morphologies; and (iii) to use the outputs for establishing more environmentally sound hydropower operations at the catchment scale. An experimental set-up was started in December 2011 in the river Lundesokna (central Norway). A total of 14 pipes were buried at several depths (from 20 to 70 cm) across and along a 5 x 20 m side bar subject to regular drying out and dewatering due to hydropeaking operations. Water pressure sensors were placed in the pipes to monitor the hyporheic water level and flow with 1-2 minutes time resolution. In addition, temperature, conductivity and dissolved oxygen are collected at the same site for an expected period of 3 months, coinciding with early stages of salmonid egg development in this catchment. Results to date show sudden and high groundwater dominated inflow as a consequence of the quick surface water drop during dewatering episodes. But slow reaction spots where surface water remains for longer periods in form of water pockets has been observed. Such processes have the potential to influence the survival of salmon eggs at both smaller and larger scales.

  9. Quantification of hyporheic exchange using conservative and reactive tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, D.; Liao, Z.; Cirpka, O. A.; Osenbrück, K.

    2012-04-01

    The transition zone between groundwater and surface water is commonly referred to as the hyporheic zone. In the so-called hyporheic exchange river water penetrates into the subsurface, remains there for a certain time, and then returns into the active water channel at a location further downstream. Hence, solutes enter the sediment where they can potentially be retained or degraded so that the hyporheic exchange is of particular importance for the prediction of reactive solute transport in rivers. In the past, tracer experiments where a conservative tracer is added into the river and measured further downstream were used to characterize hyporheic exchange. The problem is that the hyporheic exchange has similar effects on the measured tracer breakthrough curves than mixing processes in the river itself (e.g. dispersion). In order to separate these processes, we carried out tracer tests where the compound resazurin was used as a reactive tracer in addition to a conservative tracer (uranine). Resazurin degrades selectively and irreversibly in the hyporheic zone and thus provides additional information specifically on the hyporheic exchange. We performed a total of five tracer tests at two different tributaries of the river Neckar (Goldersbach and Steinlach) and at the river Selke in Germany. We used three-channel fluorometers that are able to measure resazurin, resorufin and uranine simultaneously and directly in the field. The high temporal resolution of the measurements and the avoidance of possible errors related to sample storage and contamination led to high quality data sets that were used as input for the subsequent modeling. The breakthrough curves of uranine and resazurin were analyzed simultaneously using a shape-free method for the determination of hyporheic travel time distributions (deconvolution). In comparison to the analysis of uranine alone, we were able to improve the determination of the strength of hyporheic exchange and hyporheic travel time

  10. Assessment of Hyporheic Zone, Flood-Plain, Soil-Gas, Soil, and Surface-Water Contamination at the McCoys Creek Chemical Training Area, Fort Gordon, Georgia, 2009-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guimaraes, Wladmir B.; Falls, W. Fred; Caldwell, Andral W.; Ratliff, W. Hagan; Wellborn, John B.; Landmeyer, James E.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of the Army Environmental and Natural Resources Management Office of the U.S. Army Signal Center and Fort Gordon, Georgia, assessed the hyporheic zone, flood plain, soil gas, soil, and surface water for contaminants at the McCoys Creek Chemical Training Area (MCTA) at Fort Gordon, from October 2009 to September 2010. The assessment included the detection of organic contaminants in the hyporheic zone, flood plain, soil gas, and surface water. In addition, the organic contaminant assessment included the analysis of organic compounds classified as explosives and chemical agents in selected areas. Inorganic contaminants were assessed in soil and surface-water samples. The assessment was conducted to provide environmental contamination data to the U.S. Army at Fort Gordon pursuant to requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B Hazardous Waste Permit process. Ten passive samplers were deployed in the hyporheic zone and flood plain, and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and octane were detected above the method detection level in every sampler. Other organic compounds detected above the method detection level in the hyporheic zone and flood-plain samplers were trichloroethylene, and cis- and trans- 1, 2-dichloroethylene. One trip blank detected TPH below the method detection level but above the nondetection level. The concentrations of TPH in the samplers were many times greater than the concentrations detected in the blank; therefore, all other TPH concentrations detected are considered to represent environmental conditions. Seventy-one soil-gas samplers were deployed in a grid pattern across the MCTA. Three trip blanks and three method blanks were used and not deployed, and TPH was detected above the method detection level in two trip blanks and one method blank. Detection of TPH was observed at all 71 samplers, but because TPH was detected in the trip and method blanks, TPH was

  11. Breakthrough curve moments scaling in hyporheic exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellin, A.; Tonina, D.; Marzadri, A.

    2015-02-01

    The interaction between stream flow and bed forms creates an uneven distribution of near-bed energy heads, which is the driving force of hyporheic exchange. Owing to the large disparity of advection characteristic times in the stream and within the hyporheic zone, solute mass exchange is often modeled by considering the latter as an immobile region. In a recent contribution Gónzalez-Pinzón et al. (2013) showed that existing models employing this hypothesis are structurally inconsistent with the scaling revealed by the analysis of 384 breakthrough curves collected in 44 streams across five continents. Motivated by this result, we analyze the scaling characteristics of a model that we recently developed by combining the analytical solution of the advective flow within the hyporheic zone with a Lagrangian solute transport model. Results show that similarly to the experimental data our model predicts breakthrough curves with a constant skewness, irrespective of the stream size, and that the scaling of the first three moments observed by Gónzalez-Pinzón et al. (2013) is also respected. Moreover, we propose regression curves that relate the first three moments of the residence time distribution with the alternate bar dimensionless depth (YBM*), a quantity that is easily measurable in the field. The connection between BTC moments and YBM* opens new possibilities for modeling transport processes at the catchment scale.

  12. Effects of resource chemistry on the composition and function of stream hyporheic biofilms.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, E.K.; Besemer, K.; Kohl, L.; Preiler, C.; Reidel, K.; Schneider, T.; Wanek, W.; Battin, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    Fluvial ecosystems process large quantities of dissolved organic matter as it moves from the headwater streams to the sea. In particular, hyporheic sediments are centers of high biogeochemical reactivity due to their elevated residence time and high microbial biomass and activity. However, the interaction between organic matter and microbial dynamics in the hyporheic zone remains poorly understood. We evaluated how variance in resource chemistry affected the microbial community and its associated activity in experimentally grown hyporheic biofilms. To do this we fed beech leaf leachates that differed in chemical composition to a series of bioreactors filled with sediment from a sub-alpine stream. Differences in resource chemistry resulted in differences in diversity and phylogenetic origin of microbial proteins, enzyme activity, and microbial biomass stoichiometry. Specifically, increased lignin, phenolics, and manganese in a single leachate resulted in increased phenoloxidase and peroxidase activity, elevated microbial biomass carbon:nitrogen ratio, and a greater proportion of proteins of Betaproteobacteria origin. We used this model system to attempt to link microbial form (community composition and metaproteome) with function (enzyme activity) in order to better understand the mechanisms that link resource heterogeneity to ecosystem function in stream ecosystems.

  13. Effects of Resource Chemistry on the Composition and Function of Stream Hyporheic Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Hall, E. K.; Besemer, K.; Kohl, L.; Preiler, C.; Riedel, K.; Schneider, T.; Wanek, W.; Battin, T. J.

    2012-01-01

    Fluvial ecosystems process large quantities of dissolved organic matter as it moves from the headwater streams to the sea. In particular, hyporheic sediments are centers of high biogeochemical reactivity due to their elevated residence time and high microbial biomass and activity. However, the interaction between organic matter and microbial dynamics in the hyporheic zone remains poorly understood. We evaluated how variance in resource chemistry affected the microbial community and its associated activity in experimentally grown hyporheic biofilms. To do this we fed beech leaf leachates that differed in chemical composition to a series of bioreactors filled with sediment from a sub-alpine stream. Differences in resource chemistry resulted in differences in diversity and phylogenetic origin of microbial proteins, enzyme activity, and microbial biomass stoichiometry. Specifically, increased lignin, phenolics, and manganese in a single leachate resulted in increased phenoloxidase and peroxidase activity, elevated microbial biomass carbon:nitrogen ratio, and a greater proportion of proteins of Betaproteobacteria origin. We used this model system to attempt to link microbial form (community composition and metaproteome) with function (enzyme activity) in order to better understand the mechanisms that link resource heterogeneity to ecosystem function in stream ecosystems. PMID:22347877

  14. Linking Multi-Scale Observations to Determine Hyporheic Nitrate Removal in a Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarnetske, J. P.; Haggerty, R.; Wondzell, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    Surplus nitrate (NO3-) in streams is a persistent problem for many aquatic ecosystems and denitrification represents the primary removal process for NO3- in streams. Hyporheic zones can have high denitrification potentials, but the role of the hyporheic denitrification on reach and network scale NO3- removal is unknown because it is difficult to estimate using current methods. Here, we develop a new approach that links existing independent and complementary multi-scale measurements of denitrification and total NO3- uptake. This approach is then used to quantify the role of hyporheic NO3- removal in a 303m reach of a third-order agricultural stream in western Oregon, USA. The reach scale NO3- dynamics were characterized with steady-state 15N-NO3- tracer addition experiments and solute transport modeling, while the hyporheic conditions were measured via in situ biogeochemical and groundwater modeling. Our linking of multi-scale approaches revealed that the hyporheic NO3- removal (rate coefficient λHZ = 0.007 h-1) accounted for 17% of the observed total reach NO3- uptake, and 32% of the reach denitrification estimated from the 15N experiments. The primary limitations of hyporheic denitrification at the reach scale were labile dissolved organic carbon availability (low hyporheic SUVA254) and the restricted size of the hyporheic zone due to anthropogenic channelization (sediment thickness ≤ 1.5 m). Linking multi-scale methods enabled us to make one of the first ever reach-scale estimates of hyporheic influence on stream NO3- and denitrification dynamics. Further, this study also demonstrates that the traditional reach scale tracer experimental designs and subsequent transport modeling cannot be used alone to directly investigate the role of the hyporheic zone on reach scale water and solute dynamics.

  15. Hyporheic invertebrate assemblages at reach scale in a Neotropical stream in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mugnai, R; Messana, G; Di Lorenzo, T

    2015-11-01

    In the Neotropical Region, information concerning hyporheic communities is virtually non-existent. We carried out a sampling survey in the hyporheic zone of the Tijuca River, in the Tijuca National Park, located in the urban area of the city of Rio de Janeiro. Biological samples from the hyporheic zone were collected in three different stream reaches, in June 2012. The main objectives were: 1) to describe the structure of invertebrate assemblages in the hyporheic zone of a neotropical stream; 2) to apply a reach-scale approach in order to investigate spatial patterns of the hyporheic assemblages in relation to hydrology, depth and microhabitat typology. A total of 1460 individuals were collected and identified in 31 taxa belonging to Nematoda, Annelida, Crustacea, Hydrachnidia and Insecta. The class Insecta dominated the upper layer of the hyporheic zone. Copepods were the most abundant taxon among crustaceans and occurred mostly in the upwelling areas of the reaches. The results of this study represent one of the few contributions so far about hyporheic invertebrate assemblages of the Neotropical Region. PMID:26675897

  16. Hydrology and Hyporheic Nitrogen Biogeochemistry in a Geomorphically Degraded Urban Stream

    EPA Science Inventory

    Few studies have investigated the relationship between hydrology and nitrogen biogeochemistry in hyporheic zones of degraded urban streams despite significant national efforts to restore such streams in attempts to improve the nutrient uptake functions in these ecosystems. We ex...

  17. Hyporheic Exchange in Gravel-Bed Rivers with Pool-Riffle Morphology: A 3D Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonina, D.; Buffington, J. M.

    2004-12-01

    The hyporheic zone is a saturated band of sediment that surrounds river flow and forms a linkage between the river and the aquifer. It is a rich ecotone where benthic, hyporheic, and groundwater species temporarily or permanently reside. Head gradients along the streambed draw river water into the hyporheic zone and expel pore water into the stream. This process, known as hyporheic exchange, is important for delivering nutrients, oxygen and other solutes to the sediment, and for washing away waste products to support this ecotone. It is an essential component of the carbon and nitrogen cycles, and it controls in-stream contaminant transport. Although hyporheic exchange has been studied in sand-bed rivers with two-dimensional dune morphology, few studies have been conducted for gravel-bed rivers with three-dimensional pool-riffle geometry. The hyporheic zone of gravel-bed rivers is particularly important for salmonids, many of which are currently at risk world wide. Salmon and trout lay their eggs within the hyporheic zone for incubation. After hatching, the alevins live in the gravel before emerging into the stream. The upwelling and downwelling hyporheic fluxes are intense in these streams due to the highly permeable sediment and strong head variations forced by shallow flow over high-amplitude bed forms. Moreover, gravel-bed rivers show a wide range of flow regimes that change seasonally and have strong effects on hyporheic exchange. To study this exchange, we used four sets of pool-riffle geometries in twelve recirculating flume experiments. We kept a constant bed-form wavelength, but changed the bed-form amplitude and imposed three discharges, covering a wide range of hydraulic and geometric characteristics. Hyporheic exchange was predicted from a three-dimensional model based on bedform-induced pumping transport, where the boundary head profile is the pressure head distribution at the sediment interface, measured with an array of mini-piezometers buried within

  18. Lateral Hyporheic Exchange Along a Beaver-Dammed Stream Draining a Montane Peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, E. L.; Westbrook, C. J.; Janzen, K. F.

    2008-12-01

    Hyporheic zones are dynamic areas important in increasing stream water transit time through basins and enhancing redox-sensitive biogeochemical reactions that influence downstream water quality and ecosystem health. Hyporheic flowpath length and complexity may be increased by beaver dams, which are common throughout lower-order streams in North America. We investigated lateral hyporheic exchange along a beaver dammed, second-order stream draining a ~1.3 km2 Canadian Rocky Mountain peatland. Observations of hydraulic heads and chloride concentrations in a network of 224 piezometers and 80 water table wells were used to document spatial and temporal patterns of hyporheic flow and zone extent. Heads were measured throughout the summer of 2006-2008 and water samples were taken weekly in summer 2008. Hyporheic fluxes were computed using Darcy's Law. Samples were analyzed for chloride concentrations, which were used as a conservative tracer in a two-component mixing model to separate subsurface water into its stream and groundwater components. The hyporheic zone was delineated where subsurface water contained >10% stream water. In contrast to findings in other geographic areas, lateral hyporheic fluxes and zone size did not vary with stream discharge. Instead, we show that beaver dams are a key driver of stream water into the banks, which resulted in greater extension of the hyporheic zone into the bank than along an undammed reach. Summer mean hyporheic flux was <0.005 L/s along the undammed reach and ranged from 0.002 to 0.015 L/s along the beaver dammed reach, and stream water flowed under the banks in a looping fashion around the dam. Chloride concentrations indicate that the size of the hyporheic zone lateral to the stream at the beaver dam was at least 30% greater than at the undammed reach. Chloride concentrations were >10% in nearly all piezometers and water table wells, suggesting that our reach may be nested within a larger hyporheic flow system generated by

  19. Modeling dune-induced hyporheic exchange and nutrient reactions in stream sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardini, L.; Boano, F.; Cardenas, M. B.; Revelli, R.; Ridolfi, L.

    2012-04-01

    The exchange of water across the streambed plays an important role in the ecology of fluvial environments, since it assures the connections of surface and subsurface waters, which have very different peculiarities. Water-borne chemicals are also involved in the process: they enter the sediments with the water and they are transformed into oxidized or reduced substances by biogeochemical reactions, mediated by the hyporheic microbiota. In particular, organic substances can be used as electron donors in a series of redox reactions, with different electron acceptors, e.g., oxygen and nitrate. Nitrification and other secondary reactions also occur as soon as water enters the streambed. These pore-scale transformations concur to affect subsurface solute concentrations and, consequently, the chemistry of upwelling water and the quality of the stream environment. The exchange with the hyporheic zone occurs in response to variations in bed topography, with a very wide range of spatial and temporal scales. For instance, small-scale exchanges are mainly induced by river bed forms, like ripples and dunes, while large-scale exchanges depend on larger geomorphological features. In this work we focus on small-scale exchange induced by the presence of dunes on the streambed, investigating the interplay of hydrological and biogeochemical processes and their effects on solute spatial distribution in the sediments. We numerically simulate the turbulent water flow and the pressure distribution on the streambed and then we evaluate the coupled flow field and biogeochemical reactions in the hyporheic zone in steady-state conditions. Four representative reactive compounds are taken into account: dissolved organic carbon (DOC), oxygen (O2), nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+). Sensitivity analyses are also performed to analyze the influence of hydrological and chemical properties of the system on solute reaction rates. The results demonstrate that the stream water quality can strongly

  20. Physicochemical Characteristics of the Hyporheic Zone Affect Redd Site Selection of Chum and Fall Chinook Salmon, Columbia River.

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, David R.

    2001-10-01

    Chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) may historically have been the most abundant species of Columbia River salmon, contributing as much as 50% of the total biomass of all salmon in the Pacific Ocean prior to the 1940's (Neave 1961). By the 1950's, however, run sizes to the Columbia River dropped dramatically and in 1999 the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listed Columbia River chum salmon as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA; NMFS 1999). Habitat degradation, water diversions, harvest, and artificial propagation are the major human-induced factors that have contributed to the species decline (NMFS 1998). Columbia River chum salmon spawn exclusively in the lower river below Bonneville Dam, including an area near Ives Island. The Ives Island chum salmon are part of the Columbia River evolutionary significant unit (ESU) for this species, and are included in the ESA listing. In addition to chum salmon, fall chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) also spawn at Ives Island. Spawning surveys conducted at Ives Island over the last several years show that chum and fall chinook salmon spawned in clusters in different locations (US Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, unpublished data). The presence of redd clusters suggested that fish were selecting specific habitat features within the study area (Geist and Dauble 1998). Understanding the specific features of these spawning areas is needed to quantify the amount of habitat available to each species so that minimum flows can be set to protect fish and maintain high quality habitat.

  1. Transient Storage versus Hyporheic Exchange in Low-gradient Headwater Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jefferson, A.; Clinton, S. M.; Osypian, M.

    2013-12-01

    In-channel storage and hyporheic exchange are components of transient storage that exist as a function of geomorphology and which can have contrasting effects on nutrient retention, temperature, and biological communities. In order to evaluate and predict the effects of geomorphic changes on the biogeochemical and ecological functioning of transient storage zones, in-channel storage needs to be quantified separately from hyporheic exchange. In four headwater streams, we used salt injections modeled in OTIS-P to quantify total transient storage fluxes and piezometer measurements to quantify hyporheic fluxes. In the mixed bedrock-alluvial streams, restoration increased both in-channel and hyporheic exchange fluxes, but in-channel transient storage was dominant. In the fully alluvial streams, total transient storage fluxes were ~100 times greater in the stream which had undergone restoration than in one where no restoration had occurred. Conversely, hyporheic fluxes were ~400 times smaller in the restored alluvial stream. Thus, in the restored stream, hyporheic flux was <1% of total transient storage flux, while in the unrestored stream, hyporheic flux accounted for up to 75% of total transient storage fluxes. This difference in the contribution of the hyporheic zone to total transient storage appears to be a function of both channel morphology and bed sediments, primarily the creation of pools and reduction in sediment size that occurred as a result of restoration. These dramatic variations in the magnitude and relative proportions of in-channel and hyporheic fluxes that occur across low-gradient, headwater streams may be an important control on reach-scale biogeochemical and ecosystem functioning.

  2. The influence of stream thermal regimes and preferential flow paths on hyporheic exchange in a glacial meltwater stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozzetto, Karen D.; Bencala, Kenneth E.; Gooseff, Michael N.; McKnight, Diane M.

    2013-09-01

    Given projected increases in stream temperatures attributable to global change, improved understanding of relationships between stream temperatures and hyporheic exchange would be useful. We conducted two conservative tracer injection experiments in a glacial meltwater stream, to evaluate the effects of hyporheic thermal gradients on exchange processes, including preferential flow paths (PFPs). The experiments were conducted on the same day, the first (a stream injection) during a cool, morning period and the second (dual stream and hyporheic injections) during a warm, afternoon period. In the morning, the hyporheic zone was thermally uniform at 4°C, whereas by the afternoon the upper 10 cm had warmed to 6-12°C and exhibited greater temperature heterogeneity. Solute transport modeling showed that hyporheic cross-sectional areas (As) at two downstream sites were two and seven times lower during the warm experiment. Exchange metrics indicated that the hyporheic zone had less influence on downstream solute transport during the warm, afternoon experiment. Calculated hyporheic depths were less than 5 cm, contrasting with tracer detection at 10 and 25 cm depths. The hyporheic tracer arrival at one downstream site was rapid, comparable to the in-stream tracer arrival, providing evidence for PFPs. We thus propose a conceptual view of the hyporheic zone in this reach as being dominated by discrete PFPs weaving through hydraulically isolated areas. One explanation for the simultaneous increase in temperature heterogeneity and As decrease in a warmer hyporheic zone may be a flow path preferentiality feedback mechanism resulting from a combination of temperature-related viscosity decreases and streambed heterogeneity.

  3. Monitoring hyporheic exchanges during a dam controlled experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houzé, Clémence; Varnède, Lucie; Durand, Véronique; Pessel, Marc

    2016-04-01

    Precise understanding of the hyporheic exchanges response to stream flow fluctuations remains a great challenge for many environmental and hydrological problems. Multiplication of natural stream restoration programs and anthropic structures removal highlight that a better understanding of the hydrodynamic and ecological functioning of hyporheic exchanges is critical . The objective of this field experiment was to monitor the dynamic exchanges within the hyporheic zone due to an artificial stream head variation. Various types of measurements were performed, using natural tracers and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). The dam downstream the studied river reach was successively lowered during two days, and raised during three days, implying river heads variations of about 15cm. The studied area was equipped with CTD probes (measuring the head and the conductivity) within the river, 2 multi-depths water sampling tubes inserted up to one meter depth within the riverbed deposits and 3 ERT profiles with various electrode spacing (20 cm, 25 cm, 50 cm). During the 5 days experiment, water sampling and ERT profiles were done regularly. Estimations of the sediments hydraulic conductivity were obtained by several slug tests in plastic tubes at different depths within the streambed. First results showed that stream fluctuation leads to a rapid hyporheic response according to chloride variations between stream and riverbed sediments. Similar results between geochemical and geophysical tools were found. A decrease in stream head leads to reduce the depth of the mixing zone, as the river gaining conditions intensify. On the contrary, we observed that an increased river head tends to deepen the hyporheic exchange zone.

  4. Shape-free inference of hyporheic traveltime distributions from synthetic conservative and “smart” tracer tests in streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zijie; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2011-07-01

    The hyporheic zone has been identified as important for river ecology, natural biogeochemical turnover, filtration of particles, degradation of dissolved pollutants—and thus for the self-cleaning capacity of streams, and for groundwater quality. Good estimation of the traveltime distribution in the hyporheic zone is required to achieve a better understanding of transport in the river system. The transient-storage model has been accepted as an appropriate tool for reach-scale transport in rivers undergoing hyporheic exchange, but the choice of the best parametric function for the hyporheic traveltime distribution has remained unclear. We present an approach to obtaining hyporheic traveltime distributions from synchronous conservative and "smart" tracer experiments that does not rely on a particular functional form of the hyporheic traveltime distribution, but treats the latter as a continuous function. Nonnegativity of the hyporheic traveltime distribution is enforced by the application of Lagrange multipliers. A smoothness parameter, needed for regularization, and uncertainty bounds are obtained by the expectation-maximization method relying on conditional realizations. The shape-free inference provides the opportunity for capturing unconventional shapes, e.g., multiple peaks, in the estimation. We test the approach by applying it to a virtual test case with a bimodal hyporheic traveltime distribution, which is recaptured in the inversion of noisy data.

  5. Contrasting effects of hydrological stability and flow extremes on benthic and hyporheic invertebrate communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbington, Rachel; Wood, Paul J.; Reid, Ian

    2010-05-01

    In lotic ecosystems, the most common disturbance events occur at the extremes of the hydrological continuum, i.e. spates and streambed drying. During spates, high flow velocities can mobilise sediments and displace invertebrates, and during streambed drying, loss of free water can cause mass mortality of many aquatic taxa. In both cases, invertebrates inhabiting the surface sediments are subject to a greater frequency and magnitude of disturbance than those in the hyporheic zone, and this habitat may therefore act as a refugium. Between extreme events, stable hydrological conditions allow competitive species to thrive, which can cause biotic interactions to increase. We compared the effects of flow extremes and hydrological stability on benthic and hyporheic invertebrate communities. Hydrological conditions included spates, flow recession, and localised streambed drying. During flow recession, competitive benthic taxa, particularly Gammarus pulex (Amphipoda) increased in abundance in surface sediments, causing community diversity to decline. A concurrent increase in the hyporheic abundance of G. pulex indicated that the hyporheic zone may act as a refugium from increasing biotic pressures in the benthic sediments. In contrast, spate events caused severe reductions in both benthic and hyporheic invertebrate abundance, and declines in G. pulex abundance were particularly pronounced; spate events were therefore important in increasing both benthic and hyporheic community diversity.

  6. Dimensionless Numbers For Morphological, Thermal And Biogeochemical Controls Of Hyporheic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellin, Alberto; Marzadri, Alessandra; Tonina, Daniele

    2013-04-01

    Transport of solutes and heat within the hyporheic zone are interface processes that gained growing attention in the last decade, when several modelling strategies have been proposed, mainly at the local or reach scale. We propose to upscale local hyporheic biogeochemical processes to reach and network scales by means of a Lagrangian modelling framework, which allows to consider the impact of the flow structure on the processes modelled. This analysis shows that geochemical processes can be parametrized through two new Damköhler numbers, DaO, and DaT. DaO = ?up,50-?lim is defined as the ratio between the median hyporheic residence time, ?up,50 and the time of consuming dissolved oxygen to a prescribed threshold concentration, ?lim, below which reductive reactions are activated. It quantifies the biogeochemical status of the hyporheic zone and could be a metric for upscaling local hyporheic biogeochemical processes to reach and river-network scale processes. In addition, ?up,50 is the time scale of hyporheic advection; while ?lim is the representative time scale of biogeochemical reactions and indicates the distance along the streamline, measured as the time needed to travel that distance, that a particle of water travels before the dissolved oxygen concentration declines to [DO]lim, the value at which denitrification is activated. We show that DaO is representative of the redox status and indicates whether the hyporheic zone is a source or a sink of nitrate. Values of DaO larger than 1 indicate prevailing anaerobic conditions, whereas values smaller than 1 prevailing aerobic conditions. Similarly, DaT quantifies the importance of the temperature daily oscillations of the stream water on the hyporheic environment. It is defined as the ratio between ?up,50, and the time limit at which the ratio between the amplitude of the temperature oscillation within the hyporheic zone (evaluated along the streamline) and in the stream water is smaller than e-1. We show that

  7. Three-dimensional versus two-dimensional bed form-induced hyporheic exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaobing; Cardenas, M. Bayani; Chen, Li

    2015-04-01

    The hyporheic zone is often a critical component of river systems. Hyporheic exchange is generally forced by variation in riverbed topography such as due to bed forms. Most previous research on bed form-driven hyporheic flow has focused on two-dimensional (2-D) dunes and ripples, while little has been done on their three-dimensional (3-D) counterparts. Here we compared hyporheic exchange and associated metrics for a previously studied pair of corresponding 2-D and 3-D bed forms. To accomplish this, a series of multiphysics computational fluid dynamics models were conducted both in 2-D and 3-D with similar open channel Reynolds numbers (Re). Results show that the pressure gradient along the sediment-water interface is highly sensitive to the spatial structure of bed forms, which consequently determines hyporheic flow dynamics. Hyporheic flux is a function of Re for both 2-D and 3-D dunes via a power law; however, the equivalent 3-D dunes have a higher flux since the 3-D form induces more drag. The hyporheic zone depths and volumes are only slightly different with the 3-D case having a larger volume. The mean fluid residence times for both cases are related to Re by an inverse power law relationship, with the 3-D dune having smaller residence times at moderate to high Re. The effects of increasing flux on residence time in 3-D dunes are partly modulated by a slightly increasing hyporheic volume. Our results suggest that a 2-D idealization is a reasonable approximation for the more complex 3-D situation if local details are unimportant but that development of predictive models for mean fluxes and residence times, which are critical for biogeochemical processes, based on 2-D models may be insufficient.

  8. Impact of debris dams on hyporheic interaction along a semi-arid stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lautz, Laura K.; Siegel, Donald I.; Bauer, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    Hyporheic exchange increases the potential for solute retention in streams by slowing downstream transport and increasing solute contact with the substrate. Hyporheic exchange may be a major mechanism to remove nutrients in semi-arid watersheds, where livestock have damaged stream riparian zones and contributed nutrients to stream channels. Debris dams, such as beaver dams and anthropogenic log dams, may increase hyporheic interactions by slowing stream water velocity, increasing flow complexity and diverting water to the subsurface.Here, we report the results of chloride tracer injection experiments done to evaluate hyporheic interaction along a 320 m reach of Red Canyon Creek, a second order stream in the semi-arid Wind River Range of Wyoming. The study site is part of a rangeland watershed managed by The Nature Conservancy of Wyoming, and used as a hydrologic field site by the University of Missouri Branson Geologic Field Station. The creek reach we investigated has debris dams and tight meanders that hypothetically should enhance hyporheic interaction. Breakthrough curves of chloride measured during the field experiment were modelled with OTIS-P, a one-dimensional, surface-water, solute-transport model from which we extracted the storage exchange rate and cross-sectional area of the storage zone As for hyporheic exchange. Along gaining reaches of the stream reach, short-term hyporheic interactions associated with debris dams were comparable to those associated with severe meanders. In contrast, along the non-gaining reach, stream water was diverted to the subsurface by debris dams and captured by large-scale near-stream flow paths. Overall, hyporheic exchange rates along Red Canyon Creek during snowmelt recession equal or exceed exchange rates observed during baseflow at other streams.

  9. Passive hyporheic flux meter - measuring nitrate flux to the reactive sites in the river bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, Julia Vanessa; Borchardt, Dietrich; Rode, Michael; Annable, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Most European lowland rivers are afflicted by high nitrate loads, modified morphology and discharge regulations, resulting in restricted capacity to retain nitrate. In those nutrient saturated rivers, sediment bound denitrification is the only process by which nitrate is removed from the system. Despite the importance of the hyporheic zone in nutrient reduction we are lacking detailed information on the transport to and retention at those reactive sites. Passive flux meters have successfully been used to measure contaminant transport to aquifers (eg Cho and Annable 2007). Here we present how a modification of those samplers can be used to quantify nitrate flux to and intermediate storage patterns in the interstices of an agriculturally impacted river. Installed in the river bed sediments, water flux and nutrient quantities passing through the device are recorded. While the amount of water flux serves as an index for connectivity of the hyporheic zone (exchange surface-subsurface water) the nitrate flux through the device can be seen as the portion of nitrate subjected to denitrification. The generated data on solute behavior in hyporheic zones are the missing puzzle to in-stream nitrate dynamics. Complementing flume and tracer experiments our approach depicts how discharge, morphology and sediment characteristics control the denitrification rate via the connectivity of the hyporheic zone. Passive hyporheic flux meter are a novel method to directly asses the quantity of removed nitrate by an in situ experiment.

  10. Impact of streambed heterogeneity on hyporheic exchange fluxes under losing and gaining stream flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Aryeh; Laube, Gerrit; Schmidt, Christian; Fleckenstein, Jan H.; Arnon, Shai

    2015-04-01

    Biogeochemical processes in streams are affected by water exchange between the surface and subsurface environments (e.g. hyporheic exchange). It has previously been shown that hyporheic exchange is strongly affected by the local morphology of the streambed and the flow conditions, including overlying water velocity and losing or gaining fluxes. The objectives of this work were to evaluate how the streambed heterogeneity is affecting hyporheic exchange. In addition, we tested how losing or gaining flow conditions are affecting the hyporheic exchange fluxes and the spatial distribution of the flow paths within the streambed. Experiments measuring the combined effect of streambed heterogeneity and losing and gaining flow conditions on hyporheic exchange were conducted in a laboratory flume system (640 cm long and 30 cm wide). The flow in the flume is fully controlled including gaining or losing fluxes, and it was packed with heterogeneous sediments. An estimate of the solute exchange between the stream and the sediment was obtained from the analysis of a salt tracer (NaCl) injection into the overlying water, which then was monitored by an electrical conductivity meter. In addition, dye injections into the overlying water were used to visualize the effect of sediment heterogeneity on the flow paths in the streambed. Experimental results showed that increasing losing and gaining fluxes resulted in a similar decline in the hyporheic exchange flux as previously observed for a homogenous streambed. However the location in which the hyporheic exchange takes place is different and is strongly influenced by the sediment heterogeneity. The spatial distribution of hyporheic exchange within the streambed will be discussed in light of the distribution of the local, horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivities.

  11. Experiments in Advective and Turbulent Hyporheic Pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mccluskey, A. H.; Grant, S.; Stewardson, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Hyporheic exchange (HE) is the mixing of stream and subsurface waters beneath the sediment-water interface (SWI). At the patch and reach scales, HE is dominated by periodic upwelling and downwelling zones, induced by pressure variation and processes within the turbulent boundary layer (TBL). This can be caused by (1) the geometry of the stream, imposing a stationary wave at the SWI or (2) by a travelling wave associated with the propagation of turbulent pressure waves generated from the TBL. Case (1) has generally been the favoured model of hyporheic exchange and has been referred to as hyporheic 'pumping' by Elliott and Brooks, and subsequently others. Case (2) can be termed turbulent pumping, and has been proposed as a mechanism to model the combined effects of turbulent dispersion alongside steady-state advection. While this has been represented numerically and analytically, conjecture remains about the physical representation of these combined processes. We present initial results from experiments undertaken to classify the spatial and temporal characteristics of pressure variation at and beneath the SWI, with a periodic sinusoidal geometry of wavelength 0.28m and height 0.02m. As an initial characterisation, the advective flow profile has been examined using time-lapse photography of dyes released across the span of a periodic downwelling zone. These tracer tests confirmed delineation of isolated upwelling and downwelling cells as noted by previous authors in modelling studies. However, their distribution deviates from the typical pumping pattern with increased discharge and stream gradient. Empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis of high frequency (250Hz) pressure measurements, sampled at an array along the centroid of the flume underneath one wavelength gave further insight into the spatial distribution of turbulent signatures arising from roughness-generated turbulence. A turbulent frequency of 6-10Hz dominates, however the penetration depth appears to

  12. A Comparison of Hyporheic Transport at a Cross-Vane Structure and Natural Riffle.

    PubMed

    Smidt, Samuel J; Cullin, Joseph A; Ward, Adam S; Robinson, Jesse; Zimmer, Margaret A; Lautz, Laura K; Endreny, Theodore A

    2015-01-01

    While restoring hyporheic flowpaths has been cited as a benefit to stream restoration structures, little documentation exists confirming that constructed restoration structures induce comparable hyporheic exchange to natural stream features. This study compares a stream restoration structure (cross-vane) to a natural feature (riffle) concurrently in the same stream reach using time-lapsed electrical resistivity (ER) tomography. Using this hydrogeophysical approach, we were able to quantify hyporheic extent and transport beneath the cross-vane structure and the riffle. We interpret from the geophysical data that the cross-vane and the natural riffle induced spatially and temporally unique hyporheic extent and transport, and the cross-vane created both spatially larger and temporally longer hyporheic flowpaths than the natural riffle. Tracer from the 4.67-h injection was detected along flowpaths for 4.6 h at the cross-vane and 4.2 h at the riffle. The spatial extent of the hyporheic zone at the cross-vane was 12% larger than that at the riffle. We compare ER results of this study to vertical fluxes calculated from temperature profiles and conclude significant differences in the interpretation of hyporheic transport from these different field techniques. Results of this study demonstrate a high degree of heterogeneity in transport metrics at both the cross-vane and the riffle and differences between the hyporheic flowpath networks at the two different features. Our results suggest that restoration structures may be capable of creating sufficient exchange flux and timescales of transport to achieve the same ecological functions as natural features, but engineering of the physical and biogeochemical environment may be necessary to realize these benefits. PMID:25408169

  13. Crack arrest toughness of a heat-affected zone containing local brittle zones

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, L.; Pussegoda, L.N.; Graville, B.A.; Tyson, W.R.

    1996-11-01

    The awareness of the presence of local brittle zones (LBZs) in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of welds has led to the requirements for minimum initiation toughness for the HAZ for critical applications. A fracture control philosophy that is proposed to be an attractive alternative for heat-affected zones containing LBZs is the prevention of crack propagation rather than of crack initiation. Such an approach would be viable if it could be demonstrated that cracks initiated in the LBZs will be arrested without causing catastrophic failure, notwithstanding the low initiation (CTOD) toughness resulting from the presence of LBZs. Unstable propagation of a crack initiating from an LBZ requires the rupture of tougher microstructural regions surrounding the LBZ in HAZ, and therefore the CTOD value reflecting the presence of LBZ is unlikely to provide a true indication of the potential for fast fracture along the heat-affected zone. Base metal specifications usually ensure that small unstable cracks propagating from the weld zone into the base metal would be arrested. To investigate the likelihood of fast fracture within the HAZ, a test program has been carried out that involved performing compact plane strain and plane stress crack arrest tests on a heat-affected zone that contained LBZs, and thus exhibited unacceptable low CTOD toughness for resistance to brittle fracture initiation. The results indicated that the crack arrest toughness was little influenced by the presence of local brittle zones. Instead, the superior toughness of the larger proportion of finer-grain HAZ surrounding the LBZ present along the crack path has a greater influence on the crack arrest toughness.

  14. Root-Zone Glyphosate Exposure Adversely Affects Two Ditch Species

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Lyndsay E.; Koontz, Melissa B.; Pezeshki, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Glyphosate, one of the most applied herbicides globally, has been extensively studied for its effects on non-target organisms. In the field, following precipitation, glyphosate runs off into agricultural ditches where it infiltrates into the soil and thus may encounter the roots of vegetation. These edge-of-field ditches share many characteristics with wetlands, including the ability to reduce loads of anthropogenic chemicals through uptake, transformation, and retention. Different species within the ditches may have a differential sensitivity to exposure of the root zone to glyphosate, contributing to patterns of abundance of ruderal species. The present laboratory experiment investigated whether two species commonly found in agricultural ditches in southcentral United States were affected by root zone glyphosate in a dose-dependent manner, with the objective of identifying a sublethal concentration threshold. The root zone of individuals of Polygonum hydropiperoides and Panicum hemitomon were exposed to four concentrations of glyphosate. Leaf chlorophyll content was measured, and the ratio of aboveground biomass to belowground biomass and survival were quantified. The findings from this study showed that root zone glyphosate exposure negatively affected both species including dose-dependent reductions in chlorophyll content. P. hydropiperdoides showed the greatest negative response, with decreased belowground biomass allocation and total mortality at the highest concentrations tested. PMID:24833234

  15. Mechanical Properties of Heat Affected Zone of High Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefcikova, K.; Brtnik, T.; Dolejs, J.; Keltamaki, K.; Topilla, R.

    2015-11-01

    High Strength Steels became more popular as a construction material during last decade because of their increased availability and affordability. On the other hand, even though general use of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) is expanding, the wide utilization is limited because of insufficient information about their behaviour in structures. The most widely used technique for joining steels is fusion welding. The welding process has an influence not only on the welded connection but on the area near this connection, the so-called heat affected zone, as well. For that reason it is very important to be able to determine the properties in the heat affected zone (HAZ). This area of investigation is being continuously developed in dependence on significant progress in material production, especially regarding new types of steels available. There are currently several types of AHSS on the world market. Two most widely used processes for AHSS production are Thermo-Mechanically Controlled Processing (TMCP) and Quenching in connection with Tempering. In the presented study, TMCP and QC steels grade S960 were investigated. The study is focused on the changes of strength, ductility, hardness and impact strength in heat affected zone based on the used amount of heat input.

  16. Dynamics of hyporheic flow and heat transport across a bed-to-bank continuum in a large regulated river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerecht, Katelyn E.; Cardenas, M. Bayani; Guswa, Andrew J.; Sawyer, Audrey H.; Nowinski, John D.; Swanson, Travis E.

    2011-03-01

    The lower Colorado River (LCR) near Austin, Texas is heavily regulated for hydropower generation. Daily water releases from a dam located 23 km upstream of our study site in the LCR caused the stage to fluctuate by more than 1.5 m about a mean depth of 1.3 m. As a result, the river switches from gaining to losing over a dam storage-release cycle, driving exchange between river water and groundwater. We assessed the hydrologic impacts of this by simultaneous temperature and head monitoring across a bed-to-bank transect. River-groundwater exchange flux is largest close to the bank and decreases away from the bank. Correspondingly, both the depth of the hyporheic zone and the exchange time are largest close to the bank. Adjacent to the bank, the streambed head response is hysteretic, with the hysteresis disappearing with distance from the bank, indicating that transient bank storage affects the magnitude and direction of vertical exchange close to the bank. Pronounced changes in streambed temperature are observed down to a meter. When the river stage is high, which coincides with when the river is coldest, downward advection of heat from a previous cycles' warm-water pulse warms the streambed. When the river is at its lowest stage but warmest temperature, upwelling groundwater cools the streambed. Future research should consider and focus on a more thorough understanding of the impacts of dam regulation on the hydrologic, thermal, biogeochemical, and ecologic dynamics of rivers and their hyporheic and riparian zones.

  17. Application of heat pulse injections for investigating shallow hyporheic flow in a lowland river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angermann, Lisa; Krause, Stefan; Lewandowski, Joerg

    2012-10-01

    Hyporheic zone processes can have significant impact on groundwater and surface water resources. Detailed knowledge of exchange flow patterns is crucial for understanding the ecohydrological and biogeochemical functioning of river corridors. In particular, small-scale hyporheic exchange flow is still poorly understood, partially because of the lack of adequate in situ monitoring technology. This paper investigates the spatial heterogeneity of hyporheic exchange flow in a lowland river at multiple scales. It demonstrates the conjunctive use of active heat pulse tracing at shallow depths (15 cm) and vertical hydraulic gradients (VHG) at 120-150 cm streambed depth for improving the understanding of hyporheic exchange flow processes. Generally positive VHG indicated a regional dominance of groundwater up-welling. High and temporally variable VHG were used to identify confined conditions caused by low conductivity layers in the subsurface (low connectivity), while locations with lower and temporally less variable VHG indicated free groundwater up-welling (high connectivity) in highly conductive sediments. A heat pulse sensor (HPS) was applied for identifying shallow hyporheic flow at three locations representative for high versus low streambed connectivity. Shallow hyporheic flow patterns were found to be spatially heterogeneous. Subsurface flow could only partially be explained by streambed topography. Surface water infiltration and horizontal flow coincided with inhibited groundwater up-welling, whereas locations with high streambed connectivity were characterized by increased up-welling. The combined information of spatiotemporal VHG variability and flow vector frequency distribution by HPS has the potential to improve the understanding of impacts of streambed topography and subsurface stratification on hyporheic flow patterns.

  18. Modeling hyporheic exchange and in-stream transport with time-varying transit time distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, A.; Harman, C. J.; Ward, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    Transit time distributions (TTD) are used to understand in-stream transport and exchange with the hyporheic zone by quantifying the probability of water (and of dissolved material) taking time T to traverse the stream reach control volume. However, many studies using this method assume a TTD that is time-invariant, despite the time-variability of the streamflow. Others assume that storage is 'randomly sampled' or 'well-mixed' with a fixed volume or fixed exchange rate. Here we present a formulation for a time-variable TTD that relaxes both the time-invariant and 'randomly sampled' assumptions and only requires a few parameters. The framework is applied to transient storage, representing some combination of in-stream and hyporheic storage, along a stream reach. This approach does not assume that hyporheic and dead-zone storage is fixed or temporally-invariant, and allows for these stores to be sampled in more physically representative ways determined by the system itself. Instead of using probability distributions of age, probability distributions of storage (ranked by age) called Ω functions are used to describe how the off-stream storage is sampled in the outflow. Here the Ω function approach is used to describe hyporheic exchange during diurnal fluctuations in streamflow in a gaining reach of the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest. The breakthrough curves of salt slugs injected four hours apart over a 28-hour period show a systematic variation in transit time distribution. This new approach allows us to relate these salt slug TTDs to a corresponding time-variation in the Ω function, which can then be related to changes in in-stream storage and hyporheic zone mobilization under varying flow conditions. Thus, we can gain insights into how channel storage and hyporheic exchange are changing through time without having to specify difficult to measure or unmeasurable quantities of our system, such as total storage.

  19. Potential for 3-D hyporheic exchange flow along a succession of pool-riffle sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käser, Daniel; Binley, Andrew; Krause, Stefan; Heathwaite, Louise

    2010-05-01

    Pool-riffle sequences are key geomorphological features that can influence the ecology of streams by inducing a flow exchange between surface water and groundwater - a process called hyporheic exchange flow (HEF). The objective of this research was to test the suitability of a simple 3-D groundwater model for characterizing HEF induced by pool-riffle sequences that had been the focus of experimental study. Three reaches of 20 m were modelled separately. While the bed topography was surveyed and represented at a high resolution, the permeability distribution referred to a simple conceptual model consisting of two superposed layers. One hypothesis was that, despite its simplicity, the calibrated model would produce an acceptable fit between observed and simulated heads because its permeability structure resembled the natural system. The potential complexity of hyporheic flow patterns is well-known, yet this study highlights the usefulness of a simple conceptual model coupled to mechanistic flow equations for describing HEF in 3-D. The error structure of the calibrated model provides insight into various site-specific features. The root mean square error between computed and observed hydraulic heads (relative to the head drop over the structure) is comparable to other studies with more elaborate permeability structures. After calibration, a sensitivity analysis was conducted in order to determine the influence of permeability contrast between the layers, depth of the permeability interface, and basal flux on three HEF characteristics: residence time, lateral and vertical extent, and total flux. Results indicate that permeability characteristics can affect HEF in different ways. For example, the vertical extent is deepest in homogeneous conditions, whereas the lateral extent is not significantly affected by permeability contrast, or by the depth of the interface between the two layers. Thus bank piezometers may be insufficient to calibrate groundwater models of HEF

  20. Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Hyporheic Respiration Under Variable Discharge Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, M. J.; Schmidt, C.; Knapp, J.; Romeijn, P.; Blaen, P.; Klaar, M. J.; Keller, T.; Krause, S.; Ward, A. S.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Larned, S.; Zarnetske, J. P.; Martí Roca, E.; Datry, T.

    2014-12-01

    The hyporheic zone is the site of intensive biogeochemical cycling in streams. However, the controls on spatio-temporal variability in hyporheic processing, and the impact of this hyporheic processing on reach-scale processing, are largely unknown. We aimed to evaluate spatial variability in hyporheic respiration along an upland river over the course of a flood event using the reactive tracer resazurin (Raz). Raz, a weakly fluorescent dye, irreversibly transforms to resorufin (Rru) under mildly reducing conditions, providing a proxy for aerobic respiration in the hyporheic zone. Eight conductivity loggers and in-situ fluorometers, measuring in-stream concentrations of Raz, Rru, fluorescein, and turbidity, were evenly spaced along a 1km reach of the Selke River, a gravelly, third-order river in north-central Germany. Sub-reaches between fluorometers differed in the number of streambed structures (ex. pool-riffle sequences and gravel bars) hypothesized to impact hyporheic exchange, residence time distributions, and the development of biogeochemical hotspots. Discharge over the 5 days of the experiment in the Selke River ranged from baseflow conditions of 0.3 m3/s to peak flows of 2.6 m3/s. Seven in-stream slug injections of Raz, NaCl and the conservative tracer fluorescein were conducted at discharge conditions of 0.3, 0.8, 2.5, 2.1, 1.3, 1.0, and 0.9 m3/s. Aerobic respiration rates and residence time distributions in the reach and sub-reaches are evaluated relative to the changing discharge conditions. Preliminary results indicate that although reach-scale tracer travel times decrease with increasing discharge, the reach-scale transformation of Raz to Rru is lowest at intermediate discharge and highest at during baseflow and peak flow conditions. This suggests that the highest transformation rates occur during high discharge.

  1. Flume experiments elucidate relationships between stream morphology, hyporheic residence time, and nitrous oxide production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quick, Annika; Farrell, Tiffany B.; Reeder, William Jeffrey; Feris, Kevin P.; Tonina, Daniele; Benner, Shawn G.

    2015-04-01

    The hyporheic zone is a potentially important producer of nitrous oxide, a powerful greenhouse gas. The location and magnitude of nitrous oxide generation within the hyporheic zone involves complex interactions between multiple nitrogen species, redox conditions, microbial communities, and hydraulics. To better understand nitrous oxide generation and emissions from streams, we conducted large-scale flume experiments in which we monitored pore waters along hyporheic flow paths within stream dune structures. Measurements of dissolved oxygen, ammonia, nitrate, nitrite, and dissolved nitrous oxide showed distinct spatial relationships reflecting redox changes along flow paths. Using residence times along a flow path, clear trends in oxygen conditions and nitrogen species were observed. Three dune sizes were modeled, resulting in a range of residence times, carbon reactivity levels and respiration rates. We found that the magnitude and location of nitrous oxide production in the hyporheic zone is related to nitrate loading, dune morphology, and residence time. Specifically, increasing exogenous nitrate levels in surface water to approximately 3 mg/L resulted in an increase in dissolved N2O concentrations greater than 500% (up to 10 µg/L N-N2O) in distinct zones of specific residence times. We also found, however, that dissolved N2O concentrations decreased to background levels further along the flow path due to either reduction of nitrous oxide to dinitrogen gas or degassing. The decrease in measurable N2O along a flow path strongly suggests an important relationship between dune morphology, residence time, and nitrous oxide emissions from within stream sediments. Relating streambed morphology and loading of nitrogen species allows for prediction of nitrous oxide production in the hyporheic zone of natural systems.

  2. Characteristics of GTA fusion zones and heat affected zones in superalloy 713C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachowicz, M. B.; Dudziński, W.

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, metallographic examinations, characterising microstructural changes in the 713C superalloy subjected to remelting by GTA method, are presented. In the fusion zone, precipitation of M23C6 or M6C carbides based on chromium and molybdenum was observed. Eutectic mixtures of ( γ- gg')-M x C y type with highly developed morphology were also perceived. It was found that, in the matrix areas with non-homogeneous chemical composition, the eutectic reaction γ-γ' can occur at the temperature close to that of the precipitation of the M x C y carbides. The presence of silicon in the carbide phases can be conducive to lowering their solidification point by creating low-melting compound NbSi. Both in the fusion zone (FZ) and in the heat-affected zone (HAZ), the secondary precipitates of the Ni3(AlTi)- γ' phase, varying in size from 50 to 100 nm, were found. The lattice mismatch factor of the γ and γ' particles was +0.48 % to +0.71 %, which is characteristic of the coherent precipitates of the Ni3Al phase enriched with titanium. No dislocations or stacking faults were observed in the microstructure of the FZ. In the HAZ, some primary undissolved γ' precipitates, with a part of aluminium probably replaced with niobium were observed, which raised their melting point.

  3. Where and why hyporheic exchange is important: Inferences from a parsimonious, physically-based river network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Velez, J. D.; Harvey, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Hyporheic exchange has been hypothesized to have basin-scale consequences; however, predictions throughout river networks are limited by available geomorphic and hydrogeologic data as well as models that can analyze and aggregate hyporheic exchange flows across large spatial scales. We developed a parsimonious but physically-based model of hyporheic flow for application in large river basins: Networks with EXchange and Subsurface Storage (NEXSS). At the core of NEXSS is a characterization of the channel geometry, geomorphic features, and related hydraulic drivers based on scaling equations from the literature and readily accessible information such as river discharge, bankfull width, median grain size, sinuosity, channel slope, and regional groundwater gradients. Multi-scale hyporheic flow is computed based on combining simple but powerful analytical and numerical expressions that have been previously published. We applied NEXSS across a broad range of geomorphic diversity in river reaches and synthetic river networks. NEXSS demonstrates that vertical exchange beneath submerged bedforms dominates hyporheic fluxes and turnover rates along the river corridor. Moreover, the hyporheic zone's potential for biogeochemical transformations is comparable across stream orders, but the abundance of lower-order channels results in a considerably higher cumulative effect for low-order streams. Thus, vertical exchange beneath submerged bedforms has more potential for biogeochemical transformations than lateral exchange beneath banks, although lateral exchange through meanders may be important in large rivers. These results have implications for predicting outcomes of river and basin management practices.

  4. Dynamic hyporheic exchange at intermediate timescales: testing the relative importance of evapotranspiration and flood pulses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, Laurel G.; Harvey, Judson W.; Maglio, Morgan M.

    2014-01-01

    Hyporheic fluxes influence ecological processes across a continuum of timescales. However, few studies have been able to characterize hyporheic fluxes and residence time distributions (RTDs) over timescales of days to years, during which evapotranspiration (ET) and seasonal flood pulses create unsteady forcing. Here we present a data-driven, particle-tracking piston model that characterizes hyporheic fluxes and RTDs based on measured vertical head differences. We used the model to test the relative influence of ET and seasonal flood pulses in the Everglades (FL, USA), in a manner applicable to other low-energy floodplains or broad, shallow streams. We found that over the multiyear timescale, flood pulses that drive relatively deep (∼1 m) flow paths had the dominant influence on hyporheic fluxes and residence times but that ET effects were discernible at shorter timescales (weeks to months) as a break in RTDs. Cumulative RTDs on either side of the break were generally well represented by lognormal functions, except for when ET was strong and none of the standard distributions applied to the shorter timescale. At the monthly timescale, ET increased hyporheic fluxes by 1–2 orders of magnitude; it also decreased 6 year mean residence times by 53–87%. Long, slow flow paths driven by flood pulses increased 6 year hyporheic fluxes by another 1–2 orders of magnitude, to a level comparable to that induced over the short term by shear flow in streams. Results suggest that models of intermediate-timescale processes should include at least two-storage zones with different RTDs, and that supporting field data collection occur over 3–4 years.

  5. Hyporheic Temperature Dynamics: Predicting Hyporheic Temperatures Based on Travel Time Assuming Instantaneous Water-Sediment Conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraseski, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    Recently developed conceptual frameworks and new observations have improved our understanding of hyporheic temperature dynamics and their effects on channel temperatures. However, hyporheic temperature models that are both simple and useful remain elusive. As water moves through hyporheic pathways, it exchanges heat with hyporheic sediment through conduction, and this process dampens the diurnal temperature wave of the water entering from the channel. This study examined the mechanisms underlying this behavior, and utilized those findings to create two simple models that predict temperatures of water reentering the channel after traveling through hyporheic pathways for different lengths of time. First, we developed a laboratory experiment to represent this process and determine conduction rates for various sediment size classes (sand, fine gravel, coarse gravel, and a proportional mix of the three) by observing the time series of temperature changes between sediment and water of different initial temperatures. Results indicated that conductions rates were near-instantaneous, with heat transfer being completed on the scale of seconds to a few minutes of the initial interaction. Heat conduction rates between the sediment and water were therefore much faster than hyporheic flux rates, rendering reasonable an assumption of instantaneous conduction. Then, we developed two simple models to predict time series of hyporheic water based on the initial diurnal temperature wave and hyporheic travel distance. The first model estimates a damping coefficient based on the total water-sediment heat exchange through each diurnal cycle. The second model solves the heat transfer equation assuming instantaneous conduction using a simple finite difference algorithm. Both models demonstrated nearly complete damping of the sine wave over the distance traveled in four days. If hyporheic exchange is substantial and travel times are long, then hyporheic damping may have large effects on

  6. Examining Hyporheic Dynamics Under Fluctuating Stream Stage Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley-Southern, M. J.; Binley, A. M.; Pates, J.; Wynn, P.

    2013-12-01

    Gaining river systems that are connected to groundwaters with increasing nitrate levels are at risk from increased nitrate loading. The consequences of greater nitrate transfer to surface waters are uncertain, but attenuation of nitrate waters at the groundwater -surface water interface may help to reduce the ecological impact on receiving surface waters. The majority of studies of groundwater-surface water interactions have focussed on low flow conditions. Some studies have revealed evidence of biogeochemical reactions occurring at a greater depth in the subsurface than could be supported by mixing between surface water and groundwater under low flow conditions. We believe that, under particular geomorphological settings, short-lived changes in groundwater flow pathways may lead to transformations of the extent of hyporheic flow, and thus potentially impact on biogeochemical cycling at this interface. Here we focus on the influence of changes in stream stage, during storm events, on the extent of the hyporheic zone. It is hypothesised that when there is a large sudden change in surface water level, ambient groundwater gradients can undergo a transient reversal, leading to temporary downwelling of surface water which alters the physical and biogeochemical conditions in the subsurface. Physically, downwelling surface water increases the residence time of water within the subsurface by impeding the movement of upwelling groundwater. Biogeochemically, downwelling surface water supplies, for example, dissolved organic carbon to the subsurface, potentially supporting favourable redox conditions for nutrient transformations. To evaluate this concept, the dynamics of groundwater-surface water interactions are being examined at an instrumented gaining reach of the River Leith, Cumbria, UK. Experimental evidence is being gathered by continuously logged hydraulic head data, electrical geophysics and temperature profiles. These data are supported by repeat spot sampling

  7. Bead temperature effects on FCAW heat-affected zone hardness

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefer, J.H.

    1995-11-01

    Hardness limits for welding procedure qualification are often imposed to lessen the chances of delayed hydrogen cracking during production fabrication. Temper bead techniques have been used by fabricators during these qualifications to improve their chances of success. This practice involves using the heat of additional weld beads to soften the heat-affected zone (HAZ) hardness in the base metal next to the weld where the hardness is the greatest. The technique works under controlled conditions, but the consistency for field use was questionable. This report describes an investigate of the effect of welding parameters, base metal chemical composition, and weld bead placement on HAZ softening. An empirical formula developed from base plate chemical composition, weld cooling time, and temper bead placement can be used to estimate the amount of HAZ tempering. Combined with an appropriate hardness prediction formula, it can help find the welding procedure needed to achieve a desired maximum HAZ hardness, or predict the HAZ hardness of existing welds. Based on the results of the study, bead temperature is not recommended for HAZ hardness control on large scale fabrications.

  8. Spatial patterns of hyporheic exchange and biogeochemical cycling around cross-vane restoration structures: Implications for stream restoration design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Ryan P.; Lautz, Laura K.; Daniluk, Timothy L.

    2013-04-01

    Natural channel design restoration projects in streams often include the construction of cross-vanes, which are stone, dam-like structures that span the active channel. Vertical hyporheic exchange flux (HEF) and redox-sensitive solutes were measured in the streambed around four cross-vanes with different morphologies. Observed patterns of HEF and redox conditions are not dominated by a single, downstream-directed hyporheic flow cell beneath cross-vanes. Instead, spatial patterns of moderate (<0.4 m d-1) upwelling and downwelling are distributed in smaller cells around pool and riffle bed forms upstream and downstream of structures. Patterns of biogeochemical cycling are controlled by dissolved oxygen concentrations and resulting redox conditions, and are also oriented around secondary bed forms. Strong downwelling into the hyporheic zone (0.5-3.5 m d-1) was observed immediately upstream of structures, but was limited to an area 1-2 m from the cross-vane; these hyporheic flow paths likely rejoin the stream at the base of cross-vanes after residence times too short to alter nitrate concentrations or accumulate reaction products. Total hyporheic exchange volumes are ˜0.4% of stream discharge in restored reaches of 45-55 m. Results show that shallow hyporheic flow and associated biogeochemical cycling near cross-vanes is primarily controlled by secondary bed forms created or augmented by the cross-vane, rather than by the cross-vane itself. This study suggests that cross-vane restoration structures benefit the stream ecosystem by creating heterogeneous patches of varying HEF and redox conditions in the hyporheic zone, rather than by processing large amounts of nutrients to alter in-stream water chemistry.

  9. WATER QUALITY CHANGES IN HYPORHEIC FLOW AT THE AQUATIC-TERRESTRIAL INTERFACE OF A LARGER RIVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exchange between river water and groundwater in hyporheic flow at the aquatic-terrestrial interface can importantly affect water quality and aquatic habitat in the main channel of large rivers and at off-channel sites that include flowing and stagnant side channels. With tracer ...

  10. Using Measurements of Heat and Pressure to Characterize Hyporheic Exchange through a Riffle-Pool Sequence in the Truckee River, NV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naranjo, R. C.; Niswonger, R. G.; Stone, M.; Davis, C.; McKay, W. A.

    2010-12-01

    Flow in and out of the hyporheic zone is largely influenced by streambed topography, hydraulic conductivity, and stream discharge. The timing and magnitude of stream discharge, and the character and distribution of streambed material can significantly affect the chemical, physical, and biological gradients within the hyporheic zone, and ultimately, the structure and function of aquatic ecosystems. In this study, the spatial and temporal distribution of nutrients was observed along a riffle-pool sequence on the Truckee River, NV. The study area was selected due to the presence of significant algal blooms, which are attributed to increased nutrient loading to the stream in this area. Piezometers were installed into the streambed and the surrounding riparian floodplain to monitor nitrate and dissolved oxygen concentrations, temperature, and pressure at multiple depths beneath the streambed. Measurements of temperature and pressure were used to calibrate a 2-dimensional water- and heat-flow model. The model domain consists of a longitudinal profile that traverses a riffle-pool sequence. The purpose of the model was to determine the relationship between vertical and horizontal seepage velocity, and the nitrate and dissolved oxygen concentrations in the stream sediments. The flow model was calibrated using a uniform random sampling approach to explore the feasible parameter space and to estimate the uncertainty in the velocity estimates. A uniform distribution was selected from ranges in hydraulic and thermal parameters reported in the literature based on sediment texture. Using this approach, streambed heterogeneity, parameter identifiability and parameter sensitivity were determined. Results indicate a trade off exists between matching observed temperatures and observed pressures beneath the streambed. However, the estimated parameters were more unique when both temperature and pressure were used as observations, relative to using solely temperature or pressure

  11. Hyporheic flow, solute transport, and heat flux in the stream bed around cross-vane restoration structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Ryan; Lautz, Laura; Daniluk, Timothy

    2010-05-01

    Natural channel design restoration projects in streams often include cross-vanes, which are low, stone, dam-like structures that span the active channel. The change in water elevation over a cross-vane decreases the static pressure head across the structure from upstream to downstream. It is hypothesized that, as a result, a cross-vane increases the local hyporheic exchange of water through the stream bed. Stream beds are the permeable interface between surface water in streams and groundwater in fluvial aquifers. The hyporheic zone includes the area of the bed where water from the active channel mixes with pore water in shallow sediments and returns to the channel. Channel forms, such as steps, pools, and riffles, intensify the flux of water through the hyporheic zone. Flow paths that redirect stream water through the hyporheic zone increase the residence time of dissolved oxygen, organic material, and nutrients in the stream bed, where enhanced geochemical and biological processes alter the water chemistry and create distinct gradients of redox-sensitive solutes. Hyporheic exchange therefore influences surface water quality, and impacts the health of aquatic species and ecosystems. Few studies have investigated the impact of static restoration structures on hyporheic exchange fluxes or water chemistry. Here we present the results of an investigation of hyporheic flow, solute transport, and heat flux at the locations of two cross-vanes and one natural riffle in a second-order stream in central New York State, USA. Pore water temperatures and water samples from the stream bed were collected in a meter-scale grid at 20-cm depth surrounding the structures and riffle. Temperature was also recorded every 10 minutes for over 2 weeks at several different depths at a subset of points at each site. The time-series temperature data and meter-scale grid temperature measurements were used to calculate vertical water flux rates using an analytical heat transport model. Water

  12. Analyses of Bed Topography and Hyporheic Exchange Using a High-Resolution Bathymetric Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKean, J. A.; Tonina, D.; Marzadri, A.; Tiedemann, M.

    2011-12-01

    The hyporheic zone is a critical stream bed ecotone used by microorganisms, macroinvertebrates and spawning fish. Hyporheic exchange often results from differences in the channel near-bed total pressures as they vary in response to interactions between the surface flow and bed topography. The elevation head and the static and dynamic pressure heads are all sensitive to the spacing and amplitude of bed forms. We used a high resolution bathymetric lidar to describe the morphology of 30 km of a mountain river, and then defined the frequency and amplitude of bed forms in the channel with 1D wavelet transforms. We also mapped spatial variations in other important channel attributes, such as width and slope, using the River Bathymetry Toolkit (RBT), a freeware Arc-based GIS toolkit that automatically extracts hydrologic geometry and habitat information from high resolution DEMs of streams (http://www.fs.fed.us/rm/boise/AWAE/projects/river_bathymetry_toolkit.shtml). The wavelet transforms and geometry patterns were exploited to stratify the 30 km domain into hypothesized areas of consistent hyporheic exchange. The accuracy of our form-based hyporheic stratification is being tested with fluid dynamic models of surface and groundwater flow. The biological significance of the strata is also being evaluated by comparison with field samples of macroinvertebrate populations.

  13. Scaling Hyporheic Flow and Biogeochemical Reactions across a Wide Range of Flow and Sediment Conditions in Aquatic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J. W.; O'Connor, B. L.

    2008-12-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are strongly influenced by advective transport from surface water into shallow sediments of the hyporheic zone. The delivery of energy and nutrient-rich materials to microbially and geochemically reactive sediment stimulates high rates of biogeochemical reactions that influence the overall metabolism of the ecosystem as well as influencing the chemistry of downstream receiving waters. Predicting hyporheic flow is difficult because of the potential involvement of many physical processes, including diffusion, shear, bedform-scale advective pumping, bed mobility and bioturbation, turbulence penetration, and head potential- driven groundwater exchange. We used published data from carefully controlled laboratory flume experiments to develop a scaling relationship that predicts hyporheic exchange based on physical descriptors (e.g. shear stress velocity, roughness height, and sediment permeability) that summarize fluid- flow and sediment characteristics. We tested the scaling relationship's predictions by comparing them with more time and labor intensive measurements of solute and reactive tracer transport made in situ in hyporheic zones. In situ measurements were acquired using the USGS MINIPOINT sampler, which allows detailed subsurface measurements without significant disturbance of sediment or the ambient surface or subsurface water fluxes. Fieldwork was undertaken in several streams that varied widely in surface water flow velocities, grain type, median grain size, sediment porosity, sediment organic content, sediment hydraulic conductivity, and groundwater specific discharge. The comparison generally supported the predictive capability of the scaling relationship in complex field settings. The value of the scaling relationship is also indicated for improving rate measurements of biogeochemical reactions in hyporheic zones (e.g. oxygen uptake, denitrification, and manganese oxidation), as well as for estimating the cumulative influence of

  14. Effects of Hyporheic Exchange Flows on Egg Pocket Water Temperature in Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Geist, David R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Abernethy, Cary S.

    2004-09-24

    The development of the Snake River hydroelectric system has affected fall chinook salmon smolts by shifting their migration timing to a period when downstream reservoir conditions are unfavorable for survival. Subsequent to the Snake River chinook salmon fall-run Evolutionary Significant Unit being listed as Threatened under the Endangered Species Act, recovery planning has included changes in hydrosystem operations to improve water temperature and flow conditions during the juvenile chinook salmon summer migration period. In light of the limited water supplies from the Dworshak reservoir for summer flow augmentation, and the associated uncertainties regarding benefits to migrating fall chinook salmon smolts, additional approaches for improved smolt survival need to be evaluated. This report describes research conducted by PNNL that evaluated relationships among river discharge, hyporheic zone characteristics, and egg pocket water temperature in Snake River fall chinook salmon spawning areas. The potential for improved survival would be gained by increasing the rate at which early life history events proceed (i.e., incubation and emergence), thereby allowing smolts to migrate through downstream reservoirs during early- to mid-summer when river conditions are more favorable for survival. PNNL implemented this research project throughout 160 km of the Hells Canyon Reach (HCR) of the Snake River. The hydrologic regime during the 2002?2003 sampling period exhibited one of the lowest, most stable daily discharge patterns of any of the previous 12 water years. The vertical hydraulic gradients (VHG) between the river and the riverbed suggested the potential for predominantly small magnitude vertical exchange. The VHG also showed little relationship to changes in river discharge at most sites. Despite the relatively small vertical hydraulic gradients at most sites, the results from the numerical modeling of riverbed pore water velocity and hyporheic zone temperatures

  15. Characterisation of transient storage biogeochemistry through groundwater models: the importance of considering microform hyporheic exchange in models at coarser scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käser, D.; Binley, A.; Heathwaite, L.

    2010-12-01

    Transient storage of stream water in the sediment, or hyporheic exchange flow (HEF), is a primary control on the ecological structure and functions of the hyporheic zone. Increasingly, river rehabilitation programmes require quantitative methods for evaluating its influence on the lotic system, particularly on its pollutant attenuation capacity. Previous studies have already shown the potential of groundwater numerical models to characterize HEF at the channel-unit or the reach scale, for example to compare different rehabilitation scenarios. Modellers and end-users, however, must consider these results with care. The predominant underlying concept implies that HEF is driven by geomorphological features such as pool-riffle or pool-step sequences, and meanders. Yet any degree of streambed roughness is also likely to induced small scale HEF through current-obstacle interaction. Both scales of exchange potentially play a crucial role in terms of biogeochemical transformations. Simulated conceptualisations show that ignoring current-obstacle interactions in groundwater models can lead to strong underestimations of short residence time flow paths or to a misrepresentation of biogeochemical 'hotspots'. For example, ‘Head to tail’ flow paths through riffles are sometimes thought to explain variations in stream water chemistry; however, because riffles are shallow zones of high stream water velocity, they have a potential for pumping exchange that would typically be characterized by a small depth, short residence times, and large fluxes. Little is known on the relative efficiency of these two scales of HEF systems. A sensitivity analysis shows how the interaction of pumping exchange and HEF caused by channel-unit structures may create various small-scale and complex patterns of downwelling and upwelling areas that may control in return the biogeochemical patchiness in the shallow subsurface. There is still much to learn about the interaction of HEF systems of different

  16. Analysis of three-dimensional versus two-dimensional bedform-induced hyporheic exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Cardenas, M. B.; Chen, L.

    2014-12-01

    The hyporheic zone is a critical ecotone for maintaining the health of river systems due to the exchange of water and nutrients between streams and groundwater. Within riverbeds, hyporheic exchange is generally forced by variation in riverbed topography such as due to bedforms. In the past, a vast majority of research on bedform-driven hyporheic flow has focused on two-dimensional (2D) scenarios, while little has been done on more realistic three-dimensional (3D) situations. We investigated hyporheic exchanged using a sinuous-crested 3D dune which is superimposed with successive crest lines of 2D dunes, and compared it to a 2D dune with similar wavelength and height. These 2D and 3D dunes are depicted in detail in McLean (1997) and Maddux (2003), respectively. A series of modeling studies are conducted both in 2D and 3D with similar open channel Reynolds numbers (Re). Turbulent flow in the water column is simulated by solving the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the k-ω turbulence closure model, and a Darcy flow model is applied for the underlying porous media. These two sets of equations are coupled via the pressure distribution on the sediment-water interface (SWI). Results show that the pressure gradient along the SWI is highly controlled by the spatial structure of bedforms, which consequently determines flow dynamics in the porous media. Hyporheic flux is a function of Re for both 2D and 3D via a power-law trend; however, the hyporheic flux in the 3D dunes is generally higher and much more sensitive to Re. The depth and volume of the interfacial exchange zone of the 3D-bedform driven flow are only slightly different from the 2D situation, showing that the dimensionality of bedform has less impact on the exchanged zone. The mean fluid residence times for both 3D/2D dunes are related to Re by an inverse-power law relationship, they are different at low Re and become similar at higher Re. A 2D idealization seems a reasonable approximation for the

  17. The significance of droughts for hyporheic dwellers: evidence from freshwater crayfish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouba, Antonín; Tíkal, Jan; Císař, Petr; Veselý, Lukáš; Fořt, Martin; Příborský, Josef; Patoka, Jiří; Buřič, Miloš

    2016-05-01

    Freshwater biodiversity is globally threatened by various factors while severe weather events like long-term droughts may be substantially devastating. In order to remain in contact with the water or stay in a sufficiently humid environment at drying localities, the ability to withstand desiccation by dwelling in the hyporheic zone, particularly through vertical burrowing is crucial. We assessed the ability of three European native and five non-native crayfish as models to survive and construct vertical burrows in a humid sandy-clayey substrate under a simulated one-week drought. Three native species (Astacus astacus, A. leptodactylus, and Austropotamobius torrentium) suffered extensive mortalities. Survival of non-native species was substantially higher while all specimens of Cherax destructor and Procambarus clarkii survived. The native species and Pacifastacus leniusculus exhibited no ability to construct vertical burrows. Procambarus fallax f. virginalis and P. clarkii constructed bigger and deeper burrows than C. destructor and Orconectes limosus. In the context of predicted weather fluctuations, the ability to withstand desiccation through constructing vertical burrows into the hyporheic zone under drought conditions might play a significant role in the success of particular crayfish species, as well as a wide range of further hyporheic-dwelling aquatic organisms in general.

  18. The significance of droughts for hyporheic dwellers: evidence from freshwater crayfish.

    PubMed

    Kouba, Antonín; Tíkal, Jan; Císař, Petr; Veselý, Lukáš; Fořt, Martin; Příborský, Josef; Patoka, Jiří; Buřič, Miloš

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater biodiversity is globally threatened by various factors while severe weather events like long-term droughts may be substantially devastating. In order to remain in contact with the water or stay in a sufficiently humid environment at drying localities, the ability to withstand desiccation by dwelling in the hyporheic zone, particularly through vertical burrowing is crucial. We assessed the ability of three European native and five non-native crayfish as models to survive and construct vertical burrows in a humid sandy-clayey substrate under a simulated one-week drought. Three native species (Astacus astacus, A. leptodactylus, and Austropotamobius torrentium) suffered extensive mortalities. Survival of non-native species was substantially higher while all specimens of Cherax destructor and Procambarus clarkii survived. The native species and Pacifastacus leniusculus exhibited no ability to construct vertical burrows. Procambarus fallax f. virginalis and P. clarkii constructed bigger and deeper burrows than C. destructor and Orconectes limosus. In the context of predicted weather fluctuations, the ability to withstand desiccation through constructing vertical burrows into the hyporheic zone under drought conditions might play a significant role in the success of particular crayfish species, as well as a wide range of further hyporheic-dwelling aquatic organisms in general. PMID:27225308

  19. The significance of droughts for hyporheic dwellers: evidence from freshwater crayfish

    PubMed Central

    Kouba, Antonín; Tíkal, Jan; Císař, Petr; Veselý, Lukáš; Fořt, Martin; Příborský, Josef; Patoka, Jiří; Buřič, Miloš

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater biodiversity is globally threatened by various factors while severe weather events like long-term droughts may be substantially devastating. In order to remain in contact with the water or stay in a sufficiently humid environment at drying localities, the ability to withstand desiccation by dwelling in the hyporheic zone, particularly through vertical burrowing is crucial. We assessed the ability of three European native and five non-native crayfish as models to survive and construct vertical burrows in a humid sandy-clayey substrate under a simulated one-week drought. Three native species (Astacus astacus, A. leptodactylus, and Austropotamobius torrentium) suffered extensive mortalities. Survival of non-native species was substantially higher while all specimens of Cherax destructor and Procambarus clarkii survived. The native species and Pacifastacus leniusculus exhibited no ability to construct vertical burrows. Procambarus fallax f. virginalis and P. clarkii constructed bigger and deeper burrows than C. destructor and Orconectes limosus. In the context of predicted weather fluctuations, the ability to withstand desiccation through constructing vertical burrows into the hyporheic zone under drought conditions might play a significant role in the success of particular crayfish species, as well as a wide range of further hyporheic-dwelling aquatic organisms in general. PMID:27225308

  20. Product-to-parent reversion processes: Stream-hyporheic spiraling increases ecosystem exposure and environmental persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, A. S.; Cwiertny, D. M.; Kolodziej, E. P.

    2014-12-01

    The product-to-parent reversion of metabolites of trenbolone acetate (TBA), a steroidal growth promoter used widely in beef cattle production, was recently observed to occur in environmental waters. The rapid forward reaction is by direct photolysis (i.e., photohydration), with the much slower reversion reaction occurring via dehydration in the dark. The objective of this study is to quantify the potential effect of this newly discovered reversible process on TBA metabolite concentrations and total bioactivity exposure in fluvial systems. Here, we demonstrate increased persistence of TBA metabolites in the stream and hyporheic zone due to the reversion process, increasing chronic and acute exposure to these endocrine-active compounds along a stream. The perpetually dark hyporheic zone is a key location for reversion in the system, ultimately providing a source of the parent compound to the stream and increasing mean in-stream concentration of 17α-trenbolone (17α-TBOH) by 40% of the input concentration under representative fluvial conditions. As such, regulatory frameworks for compounds undergoing product-to-parent reversion will require new approaches for assessing total exposure to bioactive compounds. Further, we demonstrate generalized cases for prediction of exposure for species with product-to-parent reversion in stream-hyporheic systems.

  1. Hyporheic discharge of river water into fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) spawning areas in the Hanford Reach, Columbia River

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, David R. )

    1999-12-01

    Fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) spawned predominantly in areas of the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River where hyporheic water discharged into the river channel. This upwelling water had a dissolved solids content (i.e., specific conductance) indicative of river water and was presumed to have entered highly permeable riverbed substrate at locations upstream of the spawning areas. Hyporheic discharge zones composed of undiluted ground water or areas with little or no upwelling were not used by spawning salmon. Rates of upwelling into spawning areas averaged 1,200 L?m-2?day-1 (95% C.I.= 784 to 1,665 L?m-2?day-1) as compared to approximately 500 L?m-2?day-1 (95% C.I.= 303 to 1,159 L?m-2?day-1) in non-spawning areas. Dissolved oxygen content of the hyporheic discharge near salmon spawning areas was about 9 mg?L-1 (+ 0.4 mg?L-1) whereas in non-spawning areas dissolved oxygen values were 7 mg?L-1 (+ 0.9 mg?L-1) or lower. In both cases dissolved oxygen of the river water was higher (11.3+ 0.3 mg?L-1). Physical and chemical gradients between the hyporheic zone and the river may provide cues for adult salmon to locate suitable spawning areas. This information will help fisheries managers to describe the suitability of salmon spawning habitat in large rivers.

  2. Hydrogeochemical niches associated with hyporheic exchange beneath an acid mine drainage-contaminated stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Lance N.; Fitzgerald, Michael; Singha, Kamini; Gooseff, Michael N.; Macalady, Jennifer L.; Burgos, William

    2013-09-01

    Biological low-pH Fe(II)-oxidation creates terraced iron formations (TIFs) that remove Fe(III) from solution. TIFs can be used for remediation of acid mine drainage (AMD), however, as sediment depth increases, Fe(III)-reduction in anoxic subsurface areas may compromise treatment effectiveness. In this study we used near-surface electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) and in situ pore-water samplers to spatially resolve bulk conductivity changes within a TIF formed in a stream emanating from a large abandoned deep clay mine in Cambria County, Pennsylvania, USA. Because of the high fluid electrical conductivity of the emergent AMD (1860 μS), fresh water (42 μS) was added as a dilution tracer to visualize the spatial and temporal extent of hyporheic exchange and to characterize subsurface flow paths. Distinct hydrogeochemical niches were identified in the shallow subsurface beneath the stream by overlaying relative groundwater velocities (derived from ERI) with pore-water chemistry profiles. Niches were classified based on relatively “fast” versus “slow” rates of hyporheic exchange and oxic versus anoxic conditions. Pore-water concentrations and speciation of iron, pH, and redox potential differed between subsurface flow regimes. The greatest extent of hyporheic exchange was beneath the center of the stream, where a shallower (<10 cm) Fe(II)-oxidizing zone was observed. Meanwhile, less hyporheic exchange was observed near the channel banks, concurrent with a more pronounced, deeper (>70 cm) Fe(II)-oxidizing zone. At these locations, relatively slower groundwater exchange may promote biotic Fe(II)-oxidation and improve the long-term stability of Fe sequestered in TIFs.

  3. Streambed sediment controls on hyporheic greenhouse gas production - a microcosm experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romejn, Paul; Comer, Sophie; Gooddy, Daren; Ullah, Sami; Hannah, David; Krause, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Hyporheic zones, as the interfaces between groundwater and surface water, can contribute significantly to whole stream carbon respiration. The drivers and controls of rates and magnitude of hyporheic greenhouse gas (GHG) production remain poorly understood. Recent research has hypothesised that nitrous oxide emissions resulting from incomplete denitrification in nutrient rich agricultural streams may contribute substantially to GHG emissions. This paper reports on a controlled microcosm incubation experiment that has been set up to quantify the sensitivity of hyporheic zone GHG production to temperature and nutrient concentrations. Experiments were conducted with sediment from two contrasting UK lowland rivers (sandstone and chalk). Adopting a gradient approach, sediments with different organic matter and carbon content were analysed from both rivers. Our analytical approach integrated several novel methods, such as push-pull application of the Resazurin/Resorufin smart tracer system for estimation of sediment microbial metabolic activity, high-resolution gas sampling and analysis of methane, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry, coupled with and high precision in-situ dissolved oxygen measurements. Our results indicate strong temperature controls of GHG production rates, overlapping with the observed impacts of different sediment types. Experimental findings indicate that increased hyporheic temperatures during increasing baseflow and drought conditions may enhance substantially sediment respiration and thus, GHG emissions from the streambed interface. The presented results integrated with field experiments of respiration and GHG emission rates under different treatments. This research advances understanding of scale dependent drivers and controls of whole stream carbon and nitrogen budgets and the role of streambed interfaces in GHG emissions.

  4. Streambed sediment controls on hyporheic greenhouse gas production - a microcosm experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeijn, P.; Comer, S.; Krause, S.; Hannah, D. M.; Gooddy, D.

    2015-12-01

    Hyporheic zones, as the interfaces between groundwater and surface water, can contribute significantly to whole stream carbon respiration. The drivers and controls of rates and magnitude of hyporheic greenhouse gas (GHG) production remain poorly understood. Recent research has hypothesised that nitrous oxide emissions resulting from incomplete denitrification in nutrient rich agricultural streams may contribute substantially to GHG emissions. This paper reports on a controlled microcosm incubation experiment that has been set up to quantify the sensitivity of hyporheic zone GHG production to temperature and nutrient concentrations. Experiments were conducted with sediment from two contrasting UK lowland rivers (sandstone and chalk). Adopting a gradient approach, sediments with different organic matter and carbon content were analysed from both rivers. Our analytical approach integrated several novel methods, such as push-pull application of the Resazurin/Resorufin smart tracer system for estimation of sediment microbial metabolic activity, high-resolution gas sampling and analysis of methane, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry, coupled with and high precision in-situ dissolved oxygen measurements. Our results indicate strong temperature controls of GHG production rates, overlapping with the observed impacts of different sediment types. Experimental findings indicate that increased hyporheic temperatures during increasing baseflow and drought conditions may enhance substantially sediment respiration and thus, GHG emissions from the streambed interface. The presented results integrated with field experiments of respiration and GHG emission rates under different treatments. This research advances understanding of scale dependent drivers and controls of whole stream carbon and nitrogen budgets and the role of streambed interfaces in GHG emissions.

  5. Examining Hyporheic Dynamics Under Fluctuating Stream Stage Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley-Southern, Marina; Binley, Andrew; Pates, Jackie; Wynn, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Gaining river systems that are connected to groundwaters with increasing nitrate levels are at risk from increased nitrate loading. The consequences of greater nitrate transfer to surface waters are uncertain, but attenuation of nitrate waters at the groundwater -surface water interface may help to reduce the ecological impact on receiving surface waters. The majority of studies of groundwater-surface water interactions have focussed on low flow conditions. Some studies have revealed evidence of biogeochemical reactions occurring at a greater depth in the subsurface than could be supported by mixing between surface water and groundwater under low flow conditions. We believe that, under particular geomorphological settings, short-lived changes in groundwater flow pathways may lead to transformations of the extent of hyporheic flow, and thus potentially impact on biogeochemical cycling at this interface. Here we focus on the influence of changes in stream stage, during storm events, on the extent of the hyporheic zone. It is hypothesised that when there is a large sudden change in surface water level, ambient groundwater gradients can undergo a transient reversal, leading to temporary downwelling of surface water which alters the physical and biogeochemical conditions in the subsurface. Physically, downwelling surface water increases the residence time of water within the subsurface by impeding the movement of upwelling groundwater. Biogeochemically, downwelling surface water supplies, for example, dissolved organic carbon to the subsurface, potentially supporting favourable redox conditions for nutrient transformations. To evaluate this concept, the dynamics of groundwater-surface water interactions are being examined at an instrumented gaining reach of the River Leith, Cumbria, UK. Experimental evidence is being gathered by continuously logged hydraulic head data, electrical geophysics and temperature profiles. These data are supported by repeat spot sampling

  6. Experimental investigations into processes controlling stream and hyporheic temperatures, Fryxell Basin, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozzetto, Karen; McKnight, Diane; Nylen, Thomas; Fountain, Andrew

    2006-02-01

    Glacial meltwater streams in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica exhibit daily cycles in temperature with maxima frequently reaching 10-15 °C, often 10 °C above air temperatures. Hydrologic and biogeochemical processes occurring in these streams and their hyporheic zones strongly influence the flux of water, solutes, and sediment to the ice-covered lakes on the valley bottoms. The purpose of this study was to identify the dominant processes controlling water temperature in these polar desert streams and to investigate in particular the role of hyporheic exchange. In order to do this, we analyzed stream temperature patterns on basin-wide, longitudinal, and reach scales. In the basin-wide study, we examined stream temperature monitoring data for seven streams in the Lake Fryxell Basin. For the longitudinal study, we measured temperatures at seven sites along a 5-km length of Von Guerard Stream. Maximum temperatures in the Fryxell Basin streams ranged from 8 to 15 °C. Daily temperature changes in the streams averaged 6-9 °C. Stream temperature patterns showed strong diel cycles peaking at roughly the same time throughout the lake basin as well as along the longitudinal gradient of Von Guerard Stream. Further, temperature patterns closely matched the associated net shortwave radiation patterns. Von Guerard Stream experienced its greatest amount of warming, 3-6 °C, in a playa region and cooled below snowfields. Temperatures in several streams around Lake Fryxell converged on similar values for a given day as did temperatures in downstream reaches of Von Guerard Stream not influenced by snowfields suggesting that at a certain point instream warming and cooling processes balance one another. The reach-scale investigation involved conducting two dual-injection conservative tracer experiments at mid-day in a 143-m reach of Von Guerard Stream instrumented with temperature and specific conductance probes. In one experiment, snow was added to the stream to suppress the

  7. Biogeomorphology: Effects of Salmon Redds on River Hydraulics and Hyporheic Flow in Gravel-Bed Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonina, D.; Buffington, J. M.

    2005-12-01

    Salmonids, many of which are currently at risk world wide, bury their eggs in streambed gravels for incubation within the near-surface hyporheic zone. During construction of their nests (redds), a female salmon digs a pit in which the eggs are laid, and then covers them with the spoils of a second upstream pit. Redd construction modifies channel topography, creating a pit and a downstream hump (tailspill), the dimensions of which can be comparable to macro-scale bedforms. Additionally, spawning activity winnows fine grains from the streambed, resulting in relatively coarser and more porous sediment, with higher hydraulic conductivity than the undisturbed bed material. Here, we examine the effects of a salmon nest on local river hydraulics and hyporheic flow in a gravel pool-riffle channel. A computational fluid dynamics model is used to simulate channel hydraulics and shallow hyporheic flow through a single pool-riffle sequence with, and without, a redd placed at the pool tail (a typical spawning location because of downwelling hyporheic flow induced by near-bed pressure variations caused by pool and riffle topography). For the numerical model, we use scaled values of channel and redd dimensions surveyed in gravel-bed rivers of central Idaho. Results confirm that pool tails, where redds are commonly constructed, are areas of high pressure and downwelling. Moreover, hyporheic flow generated by pool-riffle topography creates marginally suitable subsurface habitat for salmonid eggs even without the effects of redds; there is sufficient downwelling with adequate hyporheic velocity and oxygen content for egg survival at depths where egg pockets would be located. However, the presence of salmon nests significantly changes local river hydraulics and local patterns of upwelling and downwelling, enhancing the flow velocity and dissolved oxygen concentration through the egg pocket, thereby potentially enhancing offspring survival. These findings demonstrate that salmonids

  8. Using multiple natural and injected tracers to evaluate spatial and temporal patterns of hyporheic flux and biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, M. A.; Lautz, L. K.; Gordon, R. P.; McKenzie, J. M.; Gonzalez Pinzon, R. A.; Hare, D. K.

    2011-12-01

    had weak, shallow flux (less than 0.4 md-1) that increased significantly as streamflow receded. The biogeochemical profiles at locations where flux had trends showed a transition to shallow oxic conditions when downward flux increased and residence times decreased; conversely, where flux decreased there was a transition to more anoxic conditions. Pools had persistently weak, shallow vertical flux and anoxic conditions, even when located very close to the dam step. The resazurin tracer revealed that hyporheic zones at glides were hotspots of aerobic microbial reactivity. These results show that comprehensive studies, making use of multiple natural and new injected tracers, can provide a more complete understanding of how patterns of physical hyporheic flux and biogeochemical processes are coupled in space and time.

  9. Opportunities and Limitation of Hyporheic Restoration in a 4th Order Semi-Arid Floodplain: a Case Study of Meacham Creek, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Daniel, S. J.; Amerson, B. E.; Lambert, M. B.

    2014-12-01

    Persistent societal interest in improving water quality and recovering imperiled, native, aquatic species has expanded the scope of stream restoration to include the hyporheic zone as a focus. Despite the lack of detailed studies, hyporheic restoration is often invoked as a means to achieve multiple objectives including moderation of water temperature, delay of seasonal flows and increasing the localized volume of floodplain water. We present interim results from an ongoing case study that monitors the changes as a result of stream restoration of the hyporheic zone of a 4th order, alluvial floodplain in northeast Oregon, USA, Meacham Creek. Active and passive restoration of 2.5 km of Meacham Creek has altered the creek from a single-threaded, incised and bedrock-dominated channel to a perched, alluvial channel that seasonally exchanges overbank flows with the surrounding floodplain. Our results suggest that the stream restoration effort on Meacham Creek has increased the volume of annual hyporheic storage and created a more diverse distribution of flowpath lengths within the restoration site. Furthermore, our monitoring indicates that hyporheic process response to stream restoration, analogous to other geomorphic processes, conforms to a systematic hierarchy where nested flow paths range in length and residence time from meters and hours at the habitat scale to tens of meters and months at the floodplain scale. We assert that scale-explicit and measurement-focused restoration planning has a greater likelihood of meeting the stated objectives and result in improved water quality and encourage recovery of many native aquatic species.

  10. WATER QUALITY EFFECTS OF HYPORHEIC PROCESSING IN A LARGE RIVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water quality changes along hyporheic flow paths may have
    important effects on river water quality and aquatic habitat. Previous
    studies on the Willamette River, Oregon, showed that river water follows
    hyporheic flow paths through highly porous deposits created by river...