Sample records for hypotension clinical presentation

  1. Hypotension

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Anemia Arrhythmia Cardiogenic Shock Heart Attack Heart Valve Disease Send a link ... stomach). In extreme cases, hypotension can lead to shock . Outlook In a healthy person, low blood pressure ...

  2. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension presenting as a reversible dorsal midbrain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fedi, Marco; Cantello, Roberto; Shuey, Neil H; Mitchell, L Anne; Comi, Cristoforo; Monaco, Francesco; Versino, Maurizio

    2008-12-01

    A 47-year-old woman with postural headache, episodic stupor, and vertical gaze palsy had brain imaging findings consistent with spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH), including severe descent of the mesodiencephalic structures and diffuse pachymeningeal enhancement. The source of the cerebrospinal fluid leakage was a ruptured dorsal perineural cyst. Clinical symptoms improved after a targeted epidural blood patch was performed. Dorsal midbrain syndrome has not been reported previously as a manifestation of SIH. Perhaps distortion of structures in this brain region can occur in SIH as it does in obstructive hydrocephalus. PMID:19145127

  3. A 90-year-old patient presenting with postoperative hypotension and a new murmur: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Hospitalists are frequently consulted on postoperative patients with hypotension. Postoperative hypotension is common and can be due to variety of causes. Systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve leading to left ventricular outflow tract obstruction is a rare cause of postoperative hypotension and can occur without prior structural heart disease. A high index of suspicion can lead to early recognition of this unique condition. Case presentation A 90-year-old Caucasian woman with no known structural heart abnormality was admitted to the intensive care unit with hypotension after a left hip arthroplasty revision. A transthoracic echocardiogram revealed systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve and dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction as the likely cause of her hypotension. Our patient was treated with fluid resuscitation and phenylephrine with improvement in blood pressure. A repeat echocardiogram on postoperative day 5 showed resolution of the left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. Intraoperative vasodilatation and volume loss that caused underfilling of the left ventricle likely led to dynamic outflow tract obstruction in our patient. Conclusions Hospitalists should be aware of systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve as a rare peri-operative complication in patients with or without underlying cardiac pathology as it is treated differently than other causes of peri-operative hypotension. Clinical suspicion, early recognition, and prompt treatment can improve clinical outcomes in these patients. PMID:25384414

  4. [Orthostatic hypotension].

    PubMed

    Schmitz, U; Ko, Y; Seewald, S; Glänzer, K; Düsing, R; Vetter, H

    1995-03-01

    We report about a 67-year-old woman presenting with progressive orthostatic vertigo, urinary incontinence and clinical signs of Parkinson's disease. The Schellong test revealed deficient sympathetic orthostatic pressure response without an increase of plasma norepinephrine; therefore, a Shy-Drager syndrome was diagnosed. Because of inefficiency of the general measures (compressive pantyhose), the sympathomimetic agonists, and the centrally active alpha-2-antagonists, norepinephrine was administered via a miniature dosing pump. By this therapeutic regimen a marked improvement of orthostatic hypotension was achieved. PMID:7892555

  5. Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension: pathophysiology, evaluation, and management.

    PubMed

    Metzler, Manuela; Duerr, Susanne; Granata, Roberta; Krismer, Florian; Robertson, David; Wenning, Gregor K

    2013-09-01

    Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension is a distinctive and treatable sign of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction. It is caused by failure of noradrenergic neurotransmission that is associated with a range of primary or secondary autonomic disorders, including pure autonomic failure, Parkinson's disease with autonomic failure, multiple system atrophy as well as diabetic and nondiabetic autonomic neuropathies. Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension is commonly accompanied by autonomic dysregulation involving other organ systems such as the bowel and the bladder. In the present review, we provide an overview of the clinical presentation, pathophysiology, epidemiology, evaluation and management of neurogenic orthostatic hypotension focusing on neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:23180176

  6. Orthostatic hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ninet, J.

    1981-01-01

    Basic orientation of the article, by the leader of a group of medical researchers associated with hospitals in Lyon, France, is toward definition and classification. A table divides OH (orthostatic hypotension) according to physiopathological classification into sympathicotonic and asympathicotonic types and then each of these into primary and secondary with subdivisions. The figure sketches organization and functioning of the baroreflex arc. Applications to clinical study of circulatory reflexes, listing measurement tests and the biological study of hormonal regulation listing the appropriate kinds of studies. Data are not given.

  7. Lacaziosis - unusual clinical presentation*

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa, Pétra Pereira; Schettini, Antonio Pedro Mendes; Rodrigues, Carlos Alberto Chirano; Westphal, Danielle Cristine

    2015-01-01

    Lacaziosis or Jorge Lobo's disease is a fungal, granulomatous, chronic infectious disease caused by Lacazia loboi, which usually affects the skin and subcutaneous tissue. It is characterized by slow evolution and a variety of cutaneous manifestations with the most common clinical expression being nodular keloid lesions that predominate in exposed areas. We report the case of a patient who had an unusual clinical presentation, with a single-plated lesion on the back. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of Lacaziosis.

  8. Types of Hypotension

    MedlinePLUS

    ... loss, certain severe infections, severe burns and allergic reactions, and poisoning. Shock can be fatal if it's not treated right away. Rate This Content: Next >> November 1, 2010 Hypotension Clinical ...

  9. Living with Hypotension

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Anemia Arrhythmia Cardiogenic Shock Heart Attack Heart Valve Disease Send a link ... about your blood pressure. Severe hypotension linked to shock is an emergency. Shock can lead to death ...

  10. Relationship between the number of outpatient visits for hypotension in the springtime in Japan, extracted from clinical electronic records, and global solar radiation levels.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, T; Hoshino, A; Matsubara, N; Matsuoka, T; Kikuchi, Y; Shimbo, T; Shimizu, T

    2011-01-01

    Hypotension is commonly reported in springtime when health changes, such as autonomic imbalance, are common and its symptoms may cause difficulties in daily activities. In this study, medical data from 101 outpatient clinic attendees (mean age 43.9 years; 16 males) making their first visit for hypotension symptoms, were compared with meteorological data from the clinic's location. The main symptom of hypotension was giddiness on standing. The most common coexisting conditions were gastrointestinal; e.g. gastro-oesophageal reflux disorder and irritable bowel syndrome. The 7-day moving average of total global solar radiation correlated significantly with the 7-day moving average of the number of patients with hypotension. Discriminant analysis revealed an increase in hypotension consultations in the total global solar radiation moving average range 11-19 MJ/m(2), consistent with the local spring season. Guidance--such as wearing compression stockings during springtime--may help to reduce the occurrence of clinical hypotension in susceptible patients. PMID:21986119

  11. Orthostatic hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimm, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    Following a brief physiopathological review, orthostatic hypotension is classified into three groups: organic, functional and medication-dependent. The importance of etiological diagnosis, the use of objective tests and appropriate therapy, especially concerning the organic forms, is stressed.

  12. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed Central

    Renowden, S A; Gregory, R; Hyman, N; Hilton-Jones, D

    1995-01-01

    The clinical features and radiological appearances of spontaneous intracranial hypotension are described in three patients and the medical literature is reviewed. Awareness of this condition and its differentiation from more sinister meningitic processes is important to avoid unnecessary invasive investigations and to allow prompt diagnosis and effective treatment. Images PMID:8530936

  13. Rosacea: clinical presentation and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Diamantis, Stephanie; Waldorf, Heidi A

    2006-01-01

    Acne rosacea is one of the most common diagnoses seen in the clinical dermatologic practice. The classic presentation of rosacea, acneiform papules, and pustules on a background of telangiectasia, is often easily identified by primary care physicians, patients, or their similarly afflicted friends or family members. However, rosacea actually represents a spectrum of disease from chronic skin hypersensitivity and flushing to rhinophyma. Although the pathogenesis of rosacea remains unknown, it is important to understand its various presentations and possible etiologies prior to developing individualized treatment protocols. PMID:16468286

  14. Multiple System Atrophy with Orthostatic Hypotension (Shy-Drager Syndrome)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Multiple System Atrophy with Orthostatic Hypotension Information Page Synonym(s): Shy- ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Multiple System Atrophy with Orthostatic Hypotension? Multiple system atrophy with ...

  15. Comparison of Prophylactic Infusion of Phenylephrine with Ephedrine for Prevention of Hypotension in Elective Cesarean Section under Spinal Anesthesi: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Moslemi, Farnaz; Rasooli, Sousan

    2015-01-01

    Background Spinal anesthesia is an accepted technique in elective cesarean sections. However, hypotension, resulted from sympathectomy is a common problem, especially in pregnant women. Prevention of this complication by sympathomimetic agents is of potential clinical significance. The aim of this study is to compare the effect of prophylactic infusion of Phenylephrine versus Ephedrine in the prevention of hypotension during spinal anesthesia in elective cesarean section. Methods Eighty-three patients were enrolled in this study and randomly divided into three groups. Group Ph received phenylephrine infusion, group E received ephedrine infusion while group P were delivered placebo. Vital signs (blood pressure, heart rate, and arterial oxygen saturation) were recorded throughout the surgery. Maternal and neonatal perioperative complications were also controlled and recorded. Results There was an insignificant difference in demographic data between the groups. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were higher in the phenylephrine group than control, but not higher than the ephedrine group. Maternal dysrhythmias were more common in ephedrine and phenylephrine groups than the control group. Vomiting was more common in ephedrine group (P<0.05). In addition, the fifth-minute Apgar score of neonates was higher in phenylephrine and ephedrine groups than the control group (P<0.05). Neonates of phenylephrine group had less acidosis than the other groups. Conclusion Prophylactic infusion of phenylephrine can effectively decrease spinal anesthesia related hypotension without any significant complication for mother or her fetus. Trial Registration Number: IRCT2012120911700N1 PMID:25649721

  16. Meningitis, Clinical Presentation of Tetanus

    PubMed Central

    Moniuszko, Anna; Zajkowska, Agata; Tumiel, Ewa; Rutkowski, Krzysztof; Pancewicz, S?awomir; Rutkowski, Ryszard; Zdrodowska, Agnieszka; Zajkowska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Background. Tetanus is an acute disease caused by a neurotoxin produced by Clostridium tetani. Tetanus immunization has been available since the late 1930s but sporadic cases still occur, usually in incompletely vaccinated or unvaccinated individuals. Case Report. An elderly previously vaccinated female contracted tetanus following foot injury. Clinically she presented with meningitis causing diagnostic and therapeutic delays. Why Should Physician Be Aware of This? Even in developed countries the differential diagnosis of meningitis, especially in the elderly, should include tetanus. Treatment in intensive care unit is required. General population might benefit from vaccine boosters and education on this potentially fatal disease.

  17. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension without intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Peeraully, Tasneem; Rosenberg, Michael L

    2011-09-01

    A 52-year-old man with a family history of multiple aneurysms presented with the gradual onset of generalized headaches and bilateral sixth nerve palsies. Following intravenous contrast, MRI revealed diffuse pachymeningeal enhancement consistent with spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH). Lack of any postural component to the headaches and repeatedly normal opening pressures on lumbar puncture delayed the diagnosis. A cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak was not found, but an epidural blood patch led to resolution of symptoms. Although the atypical features of nonorthostatic headache and normal CSF opening pressure have been documented in SIH, and failure to find the site of the leak is not unusual, this case illustrates a confluence of all these findings. An underlying disorder of connective tissue has been linked to SIH, and we propose that decreased meningeal compliance could account for a symptomatic low-volume state of CSF without a low opening pressure. PMID:21119535

  18. Clinical presentation of hepatitis E.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Rakesh

    2011-10-01

    Hepatitis E is a form of acute hepatitis, which is caused by infection with hepatitis E virus. The infection is transmitted primarily through fecal-oral route and the disease is highly endemic in several developing countries with opportunities for contamination of drinking water. In these areas with high endemicity, it occurs as outbreaks and as sporadic cases of acute hepatitis. The illness often resembles that associated with other hepatotropic viruses and is usually self-limiting; in some cases, the disease progresses to acute liver failure. The infection is particularly severe in pregnant women. Patients with chronic liver disease and superimposed HEV infection can present with severe liver injury, the so-called acute-on-chronic liver failure. In recent years, occasional sporadic cases with locally acquired hepatitis E have been reported from several developed countries in Europe, United States, and Asia. In these areas, in addition to acute hepatitis similar to that seen in highly endemic areas, chronic hepatitis E has been reported among immunosuppressed persons, in particular solid organ transplant recipients. HEV-infected mothers can transmit the infection to foetus, leading to premature birth, increased fetal loss and hypoglycaemia, hypothermia, and anicteric or icteric acute hepatitis in the newborns. Occasional cases with atypical non-hepatic manifestations, such as acute pancreatitis, hematological abnormalities, autoimmune phenomena, and neurological syndromes have been reported from both hyperendemic and non-endemic regions. The pathogenesis of these manifestations remains unclear. PMID:21458513

  19. Clinical Treatment of Orthostatic Hypotension after Spinal Cord Injury with Standing Training Coupled with a Remote Monitoring System

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Dantong; Huang, Huai; Yuan, Hui; Zhang, Xu; Li, Min

    2014-01-01

    Background The treatment for orthostatic hypotension (OH) after spinal cord injury (SCI) is an important part of rehabilitation in late-stage SCI. Electric uprise bed training is a relatively commonly used method in treating OH, and how to carry out uprise bed training safely and effectively is an urgent problem. In the early stage of SCI, we used a remote monitoring system to monitor the whole process of uprise bed training, and we explored a safe and efficient method of electric uprise bed training. Material/Methods The experimental group consisted of 36 patients diagnosed with orthostatic hypotension (OH) after SCI and who received training with an electric uprise bed coupled with remote monitoring system, and the control group of 18 subjects who used a traditional training method. Results There were no differences in baseline data between the 2 groups. There were no severe symptoms during training in the experimental group, but 3 patients had severe symptoms in the control group. Among the 32 enrolled subjects reaching upright training status within 30 days (17 subjects in the experimental group and 15 subjects in the control group), time interval of training from horizontal position to erect position in the experimental group was 18.00±3.12 days and 21.40±4.95 days in the control group. Time interval in the experimental group was significantly less than in the control group. However, among all 36 subjects, by combining results of follow-up, there was no significant difference of time interval of training from horizontal position to erect position between the experimental group and the control group. In the experimental group 90.52% of patients finished training compared to 78.19% in the control group (P<0.01). After training, values of OCs and OCd of the experimental group were lower than in the control group. There was no significant difference between groups in number of re-diagnosed OH. Conclusions Implementation of training with electric uprise bed coupled with remote monitoring system is generally safe for patients with OH after SCI. For patients who could reach standing training status within 30 days, implementation can improve efficiency of training by shortening time interval of training from horizontal position to erect position. It can increase orthostatic blood pressure change during position change. PMID:25529992

  20. How Is Hypotension Treated?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the type of hypotension you have and the severity of your signs and symptoms. The goal of treatment is to bring blood pressure back to normal ... you should seek medical care. Orthostatic Hypotension Many treatments ... or no alcohol. Standing up slowly. Not crossing your legs while ...

  1. [Hypotension from endocrine origin].

    PubMed

    Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Douillard, Claire; Balavoine, Anne-Sophie

    2012-11-01

    Hypotension is defined by a low blood pressure either permanently or only in upright posture (orthostatic hypotension). In contrast to hypertension, there is no threshold defining hypotension. The occurrence of symptoms for systolic and diastolic measurements respectively below 90 and 60 mm Hg establishes the diagnosis. Every acute hypotensive event should suggest shock, adrenal failure or an iatrogenic cause. Chronic hypotension from endocrine origin may be linked to adrenal failure from adrenal or central origin, isolated hypoaldosteronism, pseudohypoaldosteronism, pheochromocytoma, neuro-endocrine tumors (carcinoïd syndrome) or diabetic dysautonomia. Hypotension related to hypoaldosteronism associates low blood sodium and above all high blood potassium levels. They are generally classified according to their primary (hyperreninism) or secondary (hyporeninism) adrenal origin. Isolated primary hypoaldosteronisms are rare in adults (intensive care unit, selective injury of the glomerulosa area) and in children (aldosterone synthase deficiency). Isolated secondary hypoaldosteronism is related to mellitus diabetes complicated with dysautonomia, kidney failure, age, iatrogenic factors, and HIV infections. In both cases, they can be associated to glucocorticoid insufficiency from primary adrenal origin (adrenal failure of various origins with hyperreninism, among which congenital 21 hydroxylase deficiency with salt loss) or from central origin (hypopituitarism with hypo-reninism). Pseudohypoaldosteronisms are linked to congenital (type 1 pseudohypoaldosteronism) or acquired states of resistance to aldosterone. Acquired salt losses from enteric (total colectomy with ileostomy) or renal (interstitial nephropathy, Bartter and Gitelman syndromes…) origin might be responsible for hypotension and are associated with hyperreninism-hyperaldosteronism. Hypotension is a rare manifestation of pheochromocytomas, especially during surgical removal when the patient has not been prepared with calcium inhibitors. Every flush with hypotension should suggest a carcinoid crisis, which is very sensitive to subcutaneous somatostatin analog. An accurate etiological diagnosis should allow treat efficiently endocrine hypotension without inducing hypertension in supine posture. PMID:22975403

  2. Unilateral pulmonary hypoplasia: a rare clinical presentation

    PubMed Central

    Pathania, Monika; Lali, Bhagat Singh; Rathaur, Vyas Kumar

    2013-01-01

    The clinical presentation of an adolescent man with left lung hypoplasia is described in detail including the history and clinical examination findings. On further investigation, the chest x-ray and CT scan of the chest reveal interesting findings. Generally, such conditions are brought to notice in the early years of life but the presentation of this condition at the age of 18?years make it even more interesting and unique. This is a discussion of the management of such a patient and the different types of lung hypoplasia which can be encountered in clinical practice. PMID:23519505

  3. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension: report of four cases and review of the literature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. A. Christoforidis; B. A. Mehta; J. L. Landi; E. J. Czarnecki; R. A. Piaskowski

    1998-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is an unusual syndrome of postural headache and low cerebrospinal fluid pressure without\\u000a an established cause. We present four cases, analyze those previously reported in the literature, examine the MRI, CT, angiographic\\u000a and cisternographic finding and discuss the clinical picture, proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms and potential treatment.

  4. Iatrogenic cerebrospinal fluid leak and intracranial hypotension after gynecological surgery.

    PubMed

    Tu, Albert; Creedon, Kerry; Sahjpaul, Ramesh

    2014-09-01

    Perineural cysts are common lesions of the sacral spine. They have rarely been reported in a presacral location, leading to their misdiagnosis as a gynecological lesion. The authors report the second such case, in a patient undergoing fenestration of what was presumed to be a benign pelvic cyst, and the resultant high-flow CSF leak that occurred. They describe the clinical presentation and manifestations of intracranial hypotension, as well as the pertinent investigations. They also review the literature for the best management options for this condition. Although they are uncommon, large perineural cysts should be included in the differential diagnosis when examining patients with a pelvic lesion. Appropriate imaging investigations should be performed to rule out a perineural cyst. The CSF leak that occurs from iatrogenic cyst fenestration may not respond to traditional first-line treatments for intracranial hypotension and may require early surgical intervention. The authors would recommend neurosurgical involvement prior to definitive treatment. PMID:24905389

  5. Clinical presentation of chronic traumatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Baugh, Christine M.; Seichepine, Daniel R.; Montenigro, Philip H.; Riley, David O.; Fritts, Nathan G.; Stamm, Julie M.; Robbins, Clifford A.; McHale, Lisa; Simkin, Irene; Stein, Thor D.; Alvarez, Victor E.; Goldstein, Lee E.; Budson, Andrew E.; Kowall, Neil W.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Cantu, Robert C.; McKee, Ann C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study was to examine the clinical presentation of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in neuropathologically confirmed cases. Methods: Thirty-six adult male subjects were selected from all cases of neuropathologically confirmed CTE at the Boston University Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy brain bank. Subjects were all athletes, had no comorbid neurodegenerative or motor neuron disease, and had next-of-kin informants to provide retrospective reports of the subjects' histories and clinical presentations. These interviews were conducted blind to the subjects' neuropathologic findings. Results: A triad of cognitive, behavioral, and mood impairments was common overall, with cognitive deficits reported for almost all subjects. Three subjects were asymptomatic at the time of death. Consistent with earlier case reports of boxers, 2 relatively distinct clinical presentations emerged, with one group whose initial features developed at a younger age and involved behavioral and/or mood disturbance (n = 22), and another group whose initial presentation developed at an older age and involved cognitive impairment (n = 11). Conclusions: This suggests there are 2 major clinical presentations of CTE, one a behavior/mood variant and the other a cognitive variant. PMID:23966253

  6. Medical Therapy and Physical Maneuvers in the Treatment of the Vasovagal Syncope and Orthostatic Hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Satish R; Coffin, Samuel T

    2012-01-01

    Patients with vasovagal syncope and neurogenic orthostatic hypotension can both present with pre-syncope and syncope resulting from systemic hypotension. While not directly responsible for increased mortality, both of these conditions can have a tremendous deleterious impact on the daily lives of patients. This negative impact can take the form of both physical symptoms and injury, but also a psychological impact from living in fear of the next syncopal episode. Despite these similarities, these are different disorders with fixed damage to the autonomic nerves in neurogenic orthostatic hypotension, as opposed to a transient reflex hypotension in “neurally mediated” vasovagal syncope. The treatment approaches for both disorders are parallel. The first step is to educate the patient about the pathophysiology and prognosis of their disorder. Next, offending medications should be withdrawn when possible. Non-pharmacological therapies and maneuvers can be used, both in an effort to prevent the symptoms and to prevent syncope at the onset of presyncope. This is all that is required in many patients with vasovagal syncope. If needed, pharmacological options are also available for both vasovagal syncope and neurogenic orthostatic hypotension, many of which are focused on blood volume expansion, increasing cardiac venous return, or pressor agents to increase vascular tone. There is a paucity of high quality clinical trial data to support the use of these pharmacological agents. We aim to review the literature on these different therapy choices and to give recommendations on tailored approaches to the treatment of these conditions. PMID:23472781

  7. Clinical presentations of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Skomro, R P; Kryger, M H

    1999-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common but still underrecognized disorder. It affects 2% to 4% of middle-aged adults, a significant proportion of whom are female. The spectrum of clinical presentations of OSAS and their severity is variable, ranging from neurocognitive complaints to cardiorespiratory failure. OSAS has a significant impact on quality of life, cardiovascular morbidity, and mortality. Its major sequelae include daytime somnolence and its consequences (motor vehicle accidents, poor work performance, disrupted social interactions), systemic and pulmonary hypertension, and ischemic heart disease. Treatment of OSAS results in improvement in symptoms, quality of life, and blood pressure control, and may improve mortality. An expansion of our understanding of this condition has resulted in increased awareness of its consequences, but the recognition of OSAS in clinical practice is still delayed. Identification of these patients in clinical practice requires attention to risk factors (history of snoring and witnessed apneas, obesity, increased neck circumference, hypertension, family history) and careful examination of the upper airway. Clinical impression alone, however, has poor (50% to 60%) sensitivity and specificity (63% to 70%) and the diagnosis is usually obtained on polysomnography. Physicians and other health care professionals need to be aware of the progress made in this area and recognize the necessity for prompt evaluation and treatment of these patients. PMID:10406327

  8. Electrical stimulation-evoked contractions blunt orthostatic hypotension in sub-acute spinal cord-injured individuals: two clinical case studies.

    PubMed

    Hamzaid, N A; Tean, L T; Davis, G M; Suhaimi, A; Hasnan, N

    2014-11-01

    Study design:Prospective study of two cases.Objectives:To describe the effects of electrical stimulation (ES) therapy in the 4-week management of two sub-acute spinal cord-injured (SCI) individuals (C7 American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) B and T9 AIS (B)).Setting:University Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.Methods:A diagnostic tilt-table test was conducted to confirm the presence of orthostatic hypotension (OH) based on the current clinical definitions. Following initial assessment, subjects underwent 4 weeks of ES therapy 4 times weekly for 1?h per day. Post-tests tilt table challenge, both with and without ES on their rectus abdominis, quadriceps, hamstrings and gastrocnemius muscles, was conducted at the end of the study (week 5). Subjects' blood pressures (BP) and heart rates (HR) were recorded every minute during pre-test and post-tests. Orthostatic symptoms, as well as the maximum tolerance time that the subjects could withstand head up tilt at 60°, were recorded.Results:Subject A improved his orthostatic symptoms, but did not recover from clinically defined OH based on the 20-min duration requirement. With concurrent ES therapy, 60° head up tilt BP was 89/62?mm?Hg compared with baseline BP of 115/71?mm?Hg. Subject B fully recovered from OH demonstrated by BP of 105/71?mm?Hg during the 60° head up tilt compared with baseline BP of 124/77?mm?Hg. Both patients demonstrated longer tolerance time during head up tilt with concomitant ES (subject A: pre-test 4?min, post-test without ES 6?min, post-test with ES 12?min; subject B: pre-test 4?min, post-test without ES 28?min, post-test with ES 60?min).Conclusions:Weekly ES therapy had positive effect on OH management in sub-acute SCI individuals.Spinal Cord advance online publication, 4 November 2014; doi:10.1038/sc.2014.187. PMID:25366533

  9. Hypotension Associated with Advanced Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Geetanjali; Hamad, Hussein; Mohajer, Roozbeh; Catchatourian, Rosalind; Kovarik, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Hypotension is an extremely rare manifestation of Hodgkin lymphoma. We report the case of a patient who presented with new onset hypotension and was diagnosed with urosepsis and septic shock requiring pressor support for maintaining his blood pressure. computed tomography (CT) scan of abdomen showed liver lesions, which were new on comparison with a CT abdomen done 3 weeks back. Biopsy of the liver lesions and subsequently a bone marrow biopsy showed large atypical Reed-Sternberg cells, positive for CD15 and CD 30 and negative for CD45, CD3 and CD20 on immuno-histochemical staining, hence establishing the diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma. The mechanism involved in Hodgkin lymphoma causing hypotension remains anecdotal, but since it is mostly seen in patients with advanced Hodgkin lymphoma, it is hypothetically related to a complex interaction between cytokines and mediators of vasodilatation. Here we review relevant literature pertaining to presentation and pathogenesis of this elusive and rare association. PMID:25317321

  10. Clinical Proteomics: Present and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Verrills, Nicole M

    2006-01-01

    Advances in proteomics technology offer great promise in the understanding and treatment of the molecular basis of disease. The past decade of proteomics research, the study of dynamic protein expression, post-translational modifications, cellular and sub-cellular protein distribution, and protein-protein interactions, has culminated in the identification of many disease-related biomarkers and potential new drug targets. While proteomics remains the tool of choice for discovery research, new innovations in proteomic technology now offer the potential for proteomic profiling to become standard practice in the clinical laboratory. Indeed, protein profiles can serve as powerful diagnostic markers, and can predict treatment outcome in many diseases, in particular cancer. A number of technical obstacles remain before routine proteomic analysis can be achieved in the clinic; however the standardisation of methodologies and dissemination of proteomic data into publicly available databases is starting to overcome these hurdles. At present the most promising application for proteomics is in the screening of specific subsets of protein biomarkers for certain diseases, rather than large scale full protein profiling. Armed with these technologies the impending era of individualised patient-tailored therapy is imminent. This review summarises the advances in proteomics that has propelled us to this exciting age of clinical proteomics, and highlights the future work that is required for this to become a reality. PMID:17077880

  11. Clinical diaphanography--its present perspective.

    PubMed

    Girolamo, R F; Gaythorpe, J V

    1984-01-01

    The application of nonionizing radiations and magnetism in clinical medical diagnosis has been rapidly increasing. The incorporation of these techniques into the armamentarium of the diagnostic roentgenologist warrants a change in nonmenclature to diagnostic imageologists. This review of the clinical applications of diaphanography covers the period of simple light source examination of the 1930s to the present sophisticated imaging with infrared film or videcon T.V. computerized format. Light physics of the infrared spectrum is well known, however experimental data of the mechanism of transillumination or normal and abnormal breasts are being investigated. A short discussion of breast anatomy and pathology including benign and malignant is basic to the clinical evaluation technique. A realistic appraisal of the application, the limitations of the technique and the current ongoing investigative studies in the European and American literatures are reviewed. Other noninvasive breast diagnostic techniques of thermography, ultrasound, and NMR are included as well as mammography in the diagnosis of breast disease and cancer. PMID:6397269

  12. Delusional infestations: clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Heller, Misha M; Wong, Jillian W; Lee, Eric S; Ladizinski, Barry; Grau, Manuel; Howard, Josephine L; Berger, Timothy G; Koo, John Y M; Murase, Jenny E

    2013-07-01

    Patients with delusional infestations (DI), previously named delusions of parasitosis, have a fixed, false belief that they are infested with living or non-living pathogens. Patients have abnormal cutaneous symptoms such as itching, biting, or crawling sensations. They often demonstrate self-destructive behavior in an effort to rid the pathogens from under their skin, leading to excoriations, ulcerations, and serious secondary infections. This review article aims to provide an overview of DI including its clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment. Strategies on how to establish a strong therapeutic alliance with DI patients are discussed. In addition, antipsychotic medications used in the treatment of DI are described. PMID:23789596

  13. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bahram Mokri

    2001-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is typically manifested by orthostatic headaches that may be associated with one\\u000a or more of several other symptoms, including pain or stiffness of the neck, nausea, emesis, horizontal diplopia, dizziness,\\u000a change in hearing, visual blurring or visual field cuts, photophobia, interscapular pain, and occasionally face numbness or\\u000a weakness or radicular upper-limb symptoms. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressures,

  14. N sup G -methyl-L-arginine inhibits tumor necrosis factor-induced hypotension: Implications for the involvement of nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbourn, R.G.; Adams, J. (Univ. of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston (USA)); Gross, S.S.; Griffith, O.W.; Levi, R. (Cornell Univ. Medical College, New York, NY (USA)); Jubran, A.; Lodato, R.F. (Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, Houston (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Clinical assessment of the activity of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) against human cancer has been limited by a dose-dependent cardiovascular toxicity, most frequently hypotension. TNF is also thought to mediate the vascular collapse resulting from bacterial endotoxin. The present studies address the mechanism by which TNF causes hypotension and provide evidence for elevated production of nitric oxide, a potent vasodilator initially characterized as endothelium-derived relaxing factor. Nitric oxide is synthesized by several cell types, including endothelial cells and macrophages, from the guanidino nitrogen of L-arginine; the enzymatic pathway is competitively inhibited by N{sup G}-methyl-L-arginine. The authors found that hypotension induced in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs by TNF was completely reversed within 2 min following administration of N{sup G}-methyl-L-arginine. In contrast, N{sup G}-methyl-L-arginine failed to reverse the hypotensive response to an equivalent depressor dose of nitroglycerin, a compound that acts by forming nitric oxide by a monenzymatic, arginine-independent mechanism. The effect of N{sup G}-methyl-L-arginine on TNF-induced hypotension was antagonized, and the hypotension restored, by administration of excess L-arginine findings suggest that excessive nitric oxide production mediates the hypotensive effect of TNF.

  15. The Management of Orthostatic Hypotension in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Ferro, Álvaro; Benito-León, Julián; Gómez-Esteban, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is a common and disabling symptom affecting Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients. We present the effect of the different therapies commonly used to manage PD on this clinical manifestation. For this purpose, we describe the relationship between OH and the current treatments employed in PD, such as L-DOPA, dopaminergic agonists, and continuous dopaminergic stimulation therapies. Additionally, we review the therapeutic measures that could be used to ameliorate OH. There are different approaches to deal with this manifestation, including pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments, although none of them is specifically aimed for treating OH in PD. PMID:23772219

  16. Intracranial hypotension in the setting of concurrent perineural cyst rupture and subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Walavan; Ravindra, Vijay M; Cutler, Aaron; Couldwell, William T

    2014-06-01

    Although most patients with intracranial hypotension typically present with headaches, the rest of the clinical spectrum is characteristically non-specific and often quite variable. In a patient with concurrent pathologies that can produce a similar clinical picture, a high index of suspicion must be maintained to achieve the correct diagnosis. The authors report a patient with intracranial hypotension in the setting of concurrent perineural cyst rupture and subarachnoid hemorrhage. A 63-year-old woman with a family history of ruptured intracranial aneurysms presented after a sudden thunderclap headache and was found to have diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage. Imaging revealed anterior communicating and superior hypophyseal artery aneurysms. Following the uneventful clipping of both aneurysms, the patient experienced a delayed return to her neurological baseline. After it was noted that the patient had an improved neurological examination when she was placed supine, further investigation confirmed intracranial hypotension from perineural cyst rupture. The patient improved and returned to her neurological baseline after undergoing a high-volume blood patch and remained neurologically intact at postoperative follow-up. Although intracranial hypotension is known to be commonly associated with cerebrospinal fluid leak, its causal and temporal relationship with subarachnoid hemorrhage has yet to be elucidated. PMID:24314847

  17. [Indolent lymphomas: classification, clinical presentation and treatment

    PubMed

    Zenhäusern, Reinhard

    2013-03-27

    The malignant lymphomas comprise a heterogeneous group of neoplastic diseases of the lymphatic system. In the WHO classification 70 different entities are subdivided. Each type of lymphoma is defined as a disease with specific clinical characteristics, as well as morphological, immunophenotypic and genetic characteristics. The indolent lymphomas include follicular lymphoma, marginal zone lymphoma, Lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma, small cell lymphocytic lymhoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia, prolymphocytic leukemia and hairy cell leukemia. Indolent lymphomas are characterized by slow growth and a chronic course of the disease. Antibody-based therapies, have significantly improved the prognosis, nevertheless there is no curative treatment. Watch and wait is still an reasonable option in asymptomatic patients. The goal of therapy has been to maintain the best quality of life. and to avoid late toxicities. The following review presents the current treatment options. PMID:23531907

  18. The clinical presentation of chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Lenihan, Michael W; Jordan, Barry D

    2015-05-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder attributed to repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. The diagnosis in a living individual can be challenging and can be made definitively only at autopsy. The symptoms are often nonspecific and overlap with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Higher exposure to repetitive head trauma increases the risk of CTE. Genetic risk factors such as presence of an apolipoprotein E ?4 allele may be important. Individuals have varying degrees of cognitive, behavioral, and motor decline. Limitations in the manner in which data have been obtained over the years have led to different clinical descriptions of CTE. At present, there are no biomarkers to assist in the diagnosis. Standard neuroimaging may show nonspecific atrophic changes; however, newer imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) show promise. Neuropsychological testing may be helpful in determining the pattern of cognitive or behavioral decline. PMID:25772999

  19. [Postprandial hypotension in patients with compression of the celiac trunk].

    PubMed

    Ignashov, A M; Tiurina, T V; Vrabi?, A A; Maslevtsov, D V

    2010-01-01

    One of the causes of the development of postprandial hypotension is thought to be impaired vegetative nervous regulation of arterial pressure. Patients with the syndrome of the celiac trunk compression also have signs of dysautonomy. The investigation performed has shown that syndrome of the celiac trunk compression is often combined with postprandial hypotension. Patients with such combination much more often have complains associated with asthenia and dysfunction of the autonomous nervous system. After operative treatment of patients with the celiac trunk compression (decompression of the celiac trunk) the frequency of symptoms of postprandial hypotension and clinical manifestations of asthenia and dysautonomy become less often in such patients. PMID:21137264

  20. Causes of chronic orthostatic hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, D.; Robertson, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of various causes of orthostatic hypotension. DESIGN: Survey. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: One hundred patients with moderate to severe orthostatic hypotension. RESULTS: Twenty-seven percent of the patients had primary autonomic failure, 35% had secondary autonomic failure, and 38% had hypotension without evidence of generalized autonomic degeneration. CONCLUSIONS: In a tertiary referral center, only a minority of patients with severe orthostatic hypotension will have Shy-Drager syndrome or Bradbury-Eggleston syndrome as their primary disease. Occasional patients who initially appear to have Bradbury-Eggleston syndrome ultimately prove to have Shy-Drager syndrome or paraneoplastic autonomic failure. Antidepressant drugs, even in low doses, remain a major overlooked cause of orthostatic hypotension.

  1. Vasopressin and Prevention of Hypotension During Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Beladi Mousavi, Seyed Seifollah; Tamadon, Mohamad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Context: The occurrence of intradialytic hypotension (IDH) during hemodialysis (HD) continues to be a main problem in patients with ESRD (end-stage kidney disease). It also negatively affects health-related quality of life. We aimed to determine vasopressin effect in decreasing IDH. Evidence Acquisition: We reviewed clinical and experimental literature in a variety of sources, including PubMed, Current Content, Scopus, Embase, and Iranmedex regarding the possible effect of vasopressin administration in prevention of hypotension during HD to clarify its mechanism, efficacy, and safety. Results: Although arginine vasopressin is widely recognized for its anti-diuretic properties, it is also a well-recognized vasoconstrictor. It has been shown that the vasopressin release (as it would normally be expected) does not increase in the majority of HD patients with recurrent dialysis hypotension. In addition, it has also been reported that vasopressin secretion (due to the osmotic stimulation) is the most important mechanism in blood pressure control in ESRD patients receiving hypertonic solution for IDH. Therefore, it is suggested that vasopressin administration may improve hemodynamic stability among ESRD patients during HD. There are few clinical trials about this issue, suggesting that administration of exogenous vasopressin may be significantly associated with a decreased incidence of IDH as well as cardiovascular stability in ESRD patients in need of volume removal during HD. Conclusions: Vasopressin insufficiency may have an important role in the pathogenesis of hemodynamic instability during HD and administration of exogenous vasopressin is significantly associated with a lower incidence of IDH.

  2. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension: improving recognition and treatment strategies in the local setting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gregory K Y; Abrigo, Jill M; Cheung, Tom C Y; Siu, Deyond Y W; Chan, Danny T M

    2014-12-01

    We report a case of spontaneous intracranial hypotension with classic symptoms of orthostatic headache and acute presentation of subdural haematoma on computed tomographic scan. Conventional approach with conservative treatment was initially adopted. The patient's condition, however, deteriorated after 2 weeks, requiring surgical evacuation of the intracranial haemorrhage. We reviewed the clinical features of this disease and the correlated magnetic resonance imaging findings with the pathophysiological mechanisms, and described treatment strategies in the local setting. Subtle findings on initial computed tomographic scan are also reported which might improve pathology recognition. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is not uncommonly encountered in Hong Kong, and physicians must adopt a high level of clinical suspicion to facilitate early diagnosis and appropriate management. In addition, novel therapeutic approaches may be required in those with recurrent symptoms or who are refractory to current treatment strategies. PMID:25488033

  3. Uterine sarcomas: clinical presentation and MRI features.

    PubMed

    Santos, Pedro; Cunha, Teresa Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Uterine sarcomas are a rare heterogeneous group of tumors of mesenchymal origin, accounting for approximately 8% of uterine malignancies. They comprise leiomyosarcoma, endometrial stromal sarcoma, undifferentiated endometrial sarcoma, and adenosarcoma. Compared with the more common endometrial carcinomas, uterine sarcomas behave more aggressively and are associated with a poorer prognosis. Due to their distinct clinical and biological behavior, the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics introduced a new staging system for uterine sarcomas in 2009, categorizing uterine carcinosarcoma as a variant of endometrial carcinoma, rather than a pure sarcoma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has a developing role in the assessment of these malignancies. Features such as tumor localization, irregular or nodular margins, necrosis, rapid growth, intense contrast enhancement, and restriction at diffusion-weighted imaging can suggest the diagnosis and help differentiate from more common leiomyomas and endometrial carcinoma. MRI is therefore extremely useful in preoperative detection and staging and, consequently, in determination of appropriate management. This pictorial review aims to discuss the clinical features of uterine sarcomas, as well as their most common appearances and distinct characteristics in MRI. PMID:25347940

  4. Diverticulitis in women: an unappreciated clinical presentation.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, J D; Gray, L A; Polk, H C

    1977-01-01

    A final diagnosis of diverticulosis or diverticulitis was made in 1,031 women over a 10 year period. The 69 patients who underwent abdominal operation for what proved to be diverticulitis are discussed in detail. Thirty-eight per cent of these women were believed to have gynecologic disease because of the presence of a pelvic mass. Diverticulitis is an important differential diagnosis of a pelvic mass with or without clinical and laboratory indications of infection and with or without history of diverticulosis or diverticulitis. The increasing awareness of ovarian carcinoma and its ominous prognosis make this differential diagnosis especially important. Diverticular disease should always be considered among such patients and preparations made to allow optimal treatment at that operation, whatever the ultimate cause of the mass. PMID:843136

  5. Insights into the clinical management of the syndrome of supine hypertension – orthostatic hypotension (SH-OH): The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Our previously proposed morphological classification of orthostatic hypotension (MOH) is an approach to the definition of three typical orthostatic hemodynamic patterns using non-invasive beat-to-beat monitoring. In particular, the MOH pattern of large drop/non-recovery (MOH-3) resembles the syndrome of supine hypertension–orthostatic hypotension (SH-OH), which is a treatment challenge for clinicians. The aim of this study was to characterise MOH-3 in the first wave of The Irish Longitudinal Study of Ageing (TILDA), with particular attention to concurrent symptoms of orthostatic intolerance (OI), prescribed medications and association with history of faints and blackouts. Methods The study included all TILDA wave 1 participants who had a Finometer® active stand. Automatic data signal checks were carried out to ensure that active stand data were of sufficient quality. Characterisation variables included demographics, cardiovascular and neurological medications (WHO-ATC), and self-reported information on comorbidities and disability. Multivariable statistics consisted of logistic regression models. Results Of the 4,467 cases, 1,456 (33%) were assigned to MOH-1 (small drop, overshoot), 2,230 (50%) to MOH-2 (medium drop, slower but full recovery), and 781 (18%) to MOH-3 (large drop, non-recovery). In the logistic regression model to predict MOH-3, statistically significant factors included being on antidepressants (OR = 1.99, 95% CI: 1.50 – 2.64, P < 0.001) and beta blockers (OR = 1.60, 95% CI: 1.26 – 2.04, P < 0.001). MOH-3 was an independent predictor of OI after full adjustment (OR = 1.47, 95% CI: 1.25 – 1.73, P < 0.001), together with being on hypnotics or sedatives (OR = 1.83, 95% CI: 1.31 – 2.54, P < 0.001). In addition, OI was an independent predictor of history of falls/blackouts after full adjustment (OR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.09 – 1.48, P = 0.003). Conclusions Antidepressants and beta blockers were independently associated with MOH-3, and should be used judiciously in older patients with SH-OH. Hypnotics and sedatives may add to the OI effect of MOH-3. Several trials have demonstrated the benefits of treating older hypertensive patients with cardiovascular medications that were not associated with adverse outcomes in our study. Therefore, the evidence of benefit does not necessarily have to conflict with the evidence of potential harm. PMID:23855394

  6. Moya Moya disease : an unusual clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Somarajan, A; Ashalatha, R; Syam, K

    2005-01-01

    Moya Moya disease is a rare cause of stroke in adults, and is a rarity secondary to hepatitis C virus infection (HCV) and cryoglobulinemia (CG). We report such a rare association in a young patient who presented with intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:15857014

  7. Orthostatic hypotension and the Holmes-Adie syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, R. H.; McLellan, D. L.; Love, D. R.

    1971-01-01

    Two patients who presented with symptoms due to orthostatic hypotension were found on examination to have the Holmes-Adie syndrome. Physiological investigation suggested that they both had an afferent block from baroreceptors in contrast to the efferent autonomic block found in most other cases of idiopathic orthostatic hypotension, including the cases of multisystem disease, now often called the Shy-Drager syndrome. Images PMID:5122384

  8. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension Secondary to Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Tae

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is often idiopathic. We report on a patient presenting with symptomatic intracranial hypotension and pain radiating to the right leg caused by a transdural lumbar disc herniation. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain revealed classic signs of intracranial hypotension, and an additional spinal MR confirmed a lumbar transdural herniated disc as the cause. The patient was treated with a partial hemilaminectomy and discectomy. We were able to find the source of cerebrospinal fluid leak, and packed it with epidural glue and gelfoam. Postoperatively, the patient's headache and log radiating pain resolved and there was no neurological deficit. Thus, in this case, lumbar disc herniation may have been a cause of spontaneous intracranial hypotension. PMID:20157378

  9. Lobomycosis: epidemiology, clinical presentation, and management options

    PubMed Central

    Francesconi, Valeska Albuquerque; Klein, Ana Paula; Santos, Ana Paula Botelho Gualda; Ramasawmy, Rajendranath; Francesconi, Fábio

    2014-01-01

    Lobomycosis is a subcutaneous mycosis of chronic evolution caused by the Lacazia loboi fungus. Its distribution is almost exclusive in the Americas, and it has a particularly high prevalence in the Amazon basin. Cases of lobomycosis have been reported only in dolphins and humans. Its prevalence is higher among men who are active in the forest, such as rubber tappers, bushmen, miners, and Indian men. It is recognized that the traumatic implantation of the fungus on the skin is the route by which humans acquire this infection. The lesions affect mainly exposed areas such as the auricles and upper and lower limbs and are typically presented as keloid-like lesions. Currently, surgical removal is the therapeutic procedure of choice in initial cases. Despite the existing data and studies to date, the active immune mechanisms in this infection and its involvement in the control or development of lacaziosis have not been fully clarified. In recent years, little progress has been made in the appraisal of the epidemiologic aspects of the disease. So far, we have neither a population-based study nor any evaluation directed to the forest workers. PMID:25328400

  10. Cerebral Sinus Venous Thrombosis in Two Patients with Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stéphane Berroir; David Grabli; Françoise Héran; Pierre Bakouche; Marie-Germaine Bousser

    2004-01-01

    We report 2 patients who had clinical and neuroimaging signs of spontaneous intracranial hypotension and who developed cerebral sinus venous thrombosis. This sequence of events – known after dural puncture but not in spontaneous intracranial hypotension – was suggested by the change in the pattern of headache, from a postural to a permanent and increasing one. The diagnostic and therapeutic

  11. Central hypotensive effects of the alpha2a-adrenergic receptor subtype.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, L B; Hein, L; Smith, M S; Piascik, M T; Limbird, L E

    1996-08-01

    alpha2-Adrenergic receptors (alpha2ARs) present in the brainstem decrease blood pressure and are targets for clinically effective antihypertensive drugs. The existence of three alpha2AR subtypes, the lack of subtype-specific ligands, and the cross-reactivity of alpha2AR agonists with imidazoline receptors has precluded an understanding of the role of individual alpha2AR subtypes in the hypotensive response. Gene targeting was used to introduce a point mutation into the alpha2aAR subtype in the mouse genome. The hypotensive response to alpha2AR agonists was lost in the mutant mice, demonstrating that the alpha2aAR subtype plays a principal role in this response. PMID:8670421

  12. Adrenal histoplasmosis: clinical presentation and imaging features in nine cases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Kumar; S. Singh; S. Govil

    2003-01-01

    Background: We describe a retrospective analysis of the clinical presentation and imaging features in nine patients with adrenal histoplasmosis in nonimmunocompromised patients from a nonendemic region. Methods: Clinically, a tuberculosis-like presentation in four patients and a tumor-like presentation in five patients were seen. All patients were seronegative for the human immunodeficiency virus. Ultrasound (US) in all patients, computed tomography (CT)

  13. Pathogenesis and clinical presentation of acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ponikowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Ewa A

    2015-04-01

    Acute heart failure constitutes a heterogeneous clinical syndrome, whose pathophysiology is complex and not completely understood. Given the diversity of clinical presentations, several different pathophysiological mechanisms along with factors triggering circulatory decompensation are involved. This article discusses the available evidence on the pathophysiological phenomena attributed or/and associated with episodes of acute heart failure and describes different clinical profiles, which, from a clinical perspective, constitute a key element for therapeutic decision-making. PMID:25743769

  14. Overdose of drugs for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: clinical presentation, mechanisms of toxicity, and management.

    PubMed

    Spiller, Henry A; Hays, Hannah L; Aleguas, Alfred

    2013-07-01

    The prevalence of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the USA is estimated at approximately 4-9% in children and 4% in adults. It is estimated that prescriptions for ADHD medications are written for more than 2.7 million children per year. In 2010, US poison centers reported 17,000 human exposures to ADHD medications, with 80% occurring in children <19 years old and 20% in adults. The drugs used for the treatment of ADHD are diverse but can be roughly separated into two groups: the stimulants such as amphetamine, methylphenidate, and modafinil; and the non-stimulants such as atomoxetine, guanfacine, and clonidine. This review focuses on mechanisms of toxicity after overdose with ADHD medications, clinical effects from overdose, and management. Amphetamine, dextroamphetamine, and methylphenidate act as substrates for the cellular monoamine transporter, especially the dopamine transporter (DAT) and less so the norepinephrine (NET) and serotonin transporter. The mechanism of toxicity is primarily related to excessive extracellular dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin. The primary clinical syndrome involves prominent neurological and cardiovascular effects, but secondary complications can involve renal, muscle, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal (GI) effects. In overdose, the patient may present with mydriasis, tremor, agitation, hyperreflexia, combative behavior, confusion, hallucinations, delirium, anxiety, paranoia, movement disorders, and seizures. The management of amphetamine, dextroamphetamine, and methylphenidate overdose is largely supportive, with a focus on interruption of the sympathomimetic syndrome with judicious use of benzodiazepines. In cases where agitation, delirium, and movement disorders are unresponsive to benzodiazepines, second-line therapies include antipsychotics such as ziprasidone or haloperidol, central alpha-adrenoreceptor agonists such as dexmedetomidine, or propofol. Modafinil is not US FDA approved for treatment of ADHD; however, it has been shown to improve ADHD signs and symptoms and has been used as an off-label pharmaceutical for this diagnosis in both adults and children. The mechanism of action of modafinil is complex and not fully understood. It is known to cause an increase in extracellular concentrations of dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin in the neocortex. Overdose with modafinil is generally of moderate severity, with reported ingestions of doses up to 8 g. The most common neurological effects include increased anxiety, agitation, headache, dizziness, insomnia, tremors, and dystonia. The management of modafinil overdose is largely supportive, with a focus on sedation, and control of dyskinesias and blood pressure. Atomoxetine is a selective presynaptic norepinephrine transporter inhibitor. The clinical presentation after overdose with atomoxetine has generally been mild. The primary effects have been drowsiness, agitation, hyperactivity, GI upset, tremor, hyperreflexia, tachycardia hypertension, and seizure. The management of atomoxetine overdose is largely supportive, with a focus on sedation, and control of dyskinesias and seizures. Clonidine is a synthetic imidazole derivative with both central and peripheral alpha-adrenergic agonist actions. The primary clinical syndrome involves prominent neurological and cardiovascular effects, with the most commonly reported features of depressed sensorium, bradycardia, and hypotension. While clonidine is an anti-hypertensive medication, a paradoxical hypertension may occur early with overdose. The clinical syndrome after overdose of guanfacine may be mixed depending on central or peripheral alpha-adrenoreceptor effects. Initial clinical effects may be drowsiness, lethargy, dry mouth, and diaphoresis. Cardiovascular effects may depend on time post-ingestion and may present as hypotension or hypertension. The management of guanfacine overdose is largely supportive, with a focus on support of blood pressure. Overdose with ADHD medications can produce major morbidity, with many cases requiring intensive care medicine an

  15. VERATRUM VIRIDE—Hypotensive and Cardiac Effects of Intravenous Use

    PubMed Central

    Elek, Stephen R.; McNair, J. Douglas; Griffith, George C.

    1953-01-01

    The hypotensive action of veratrum viride given intravenously was studied in 24 patients, 22 of them hypertensive and 2 normotensive. Vasodepression of considerable but variable degree was obtained in all patients. Maximum hypotension occurred 8 to 15 minutes after injection and relative hypotension usually lasted at least two hours. In four patients subnormal hypotension occurred but there were no clinical manifestations of shock. The blood pressure rose promptly when pressor drugs were administered. A dose of 0.3 to 0.5 mg. brought about a satisfactory decrease in blood pressure. The degree of decrease was affected by the speed of administration and in a few patients by idiosyncratic sensitivity to the drug. Veratrum has an extravagal action on the pulse rate, and in that and other respects resembles digitalis. Veratrum should be given with caution to digitalized patients. Atropine reduced but did not abolish the hypotensive effect of veratrum, and was more effective when given before veratrum. This indicates that the parasympathomimetic action of veratrum is important in the mechanism of blood pressure reduction. PMID:13094542

  16. Veratrum viride; hypotensive and cardiac effects of intravenous use.

    PubMed

    ELEK, S R; McNAIR, J D; GRIFFITH, G C

    1953-10-01

    The hypotensive action of veratrum viride given intravenously was studied in 24 patients, 22 of them hypertensive and 2 normotensive. Vasodepression of considerable but variable degree was obtained in all patients. Maximum hypotension occurred 8 to 15 minutes after injection and relative hypotension usually lasted at least two hours. In four patients subnormal hypotension occurred but there were no clinical manifestations of shock. The blood pressure rose promptly when pressor drugs were administered.A dose of 0.3 to 0.5 mg. brought about a satisfactory decrease in blood pressure. The degree of decrease was affected by the speed of administration and in a few patients by idiosyncratic sensitivity to the drug. Veratrum has an extravagal action on the pulse rate, and in that and other respects resembles digitalis. Veratrum should be given with caution to digitalized patients. Atropine reduced but did not abolish the hypotensive effect of veratrum, and was more effective when given before veratrum. This indicates that the parasympathomimetic action of veratrum is important in the mechanism of blood pressure reduction. PMID:13094542

  17. Hypotensive Alkaloids of Veratrum album

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William L. Glen; Gordon S. Myers; Richard Barber; Paul Morozovitch; Gordon A. Grant

    1952-01-01

    INVESTIGATIONS on alkaloids of Veratrum viride necessitated the preparation of a pure specimen of protoveratrine and prompted an examination of the alkaloids which could be isolated from commercial samples of Veratrum album. As a result of these studies, we now report the isolation of two new hypotensive ester alkaloids which have been named `germitetrine' and `veratetrine'.

  18. Vein of Galen malformations: epidemiology, clinical presentations, management.

    PubMed

    Recinos, Pablo F; Rahmathulla, Gazanfar; Pearl, Monica; Recinos, Violette Renard; Jallo, George I; Gailloud, Philippe; Ahn, Edward S

    2012-01-01

    The vein of Galen aneurysmal malformation is a congenital vascular malformation that comprises 30% of the pediatric vascular and 1% of all pediatric congenital anomalies. Treatment is dependent on the timing of presentation and clinical manifestations. With the development of endovascular techniques, treatment paradigms have changed and clinical outcomes have significantly improved. In this article, the developmental embryology, clinical features and pathophysiology, diagnostic workup, and management strategies are reviewed. PMID:22107867

  19. Clinical Presentation and Outcome of Brown Recluse Spider Bite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seth W Wright; Keith D Wrenn; Lindsay Murray; Donna Seger

    1997-01-01

    Study objective: To examine the clinical presentation and outcome of patients treated in the ED or toxicology clinic for suspected brown recluse spider bites. Methods: We assembled a retrospective case series of patients at a southeastern US university hospital. Our study group comprised 111 patients with suspected brown recluse spider bites treated during a 30-month period. Our main outcome measures

  20. Childhood polycythemias\\/erythrocytoses: classification, diagnosis, clinical presentation, and treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Cario

    2005-01-01

    Polycythemias or erythrocytoses in childhood and adolescence are very rare. Systematic data on the clinical presentation and laboratory evaluations as well as on treatment regimens are sparse. The diagnostic program in absolute erythrocytosis includes extensive clinical, hematological, biochemical, and molecular biological examinations which should be applied following a stepwise algorithm. Absolute erythrocytoses are usually subdivided into primary and secondary forms.

  1. Bedside Echocardiography for Undifferentiated Hypotension: Diagnosis of a Right Heart Thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, James F.; Zhong, Xun; Brown, Cara; Das, Devjani; Royall, Brock; Kapoor, Monica

    2015-01-01

    A free-floating right heart thrombus is often a harbinger of a massive pulmonary embolism and must be diagnosed and treated rapidly in order to avoid significant adverse sequelae. We present the case of an 84-year-old female who presented with two days of dyspnea and was hypotensive on arrival. Bedside ultrasound was performed by the emergency physician and showed a large, mobile right heart thrombus leading to immediate administration of a thrombolytic. In this case, bedside ultrasound was utilized to help further delineate clinical care in a progressively worsening patient, leading to a potentially lifesaving treatment. PMID:25671037

  2. Clinical Presentation of Acute Abdomen: Study of 600 Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Staniland; Janet Ditchburn; F. T. de Dombal

    1972-01-01

    This paper presents the clinical features of 600 patients suffering from abdominal pain of acute onset and admitted to either the General Infirmary or St. James's Hospital, Leeds. The survey was initially retrospective, but later put on a prospective basis. Roughly two-thirds of these 600 patients presented a “typical” picture of the disease with which they presented, while the remaining

  3. Orthostatic hypotension in patients, bed rest subjects, and astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathers, C. M.; Charles, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension after even short space flights has affected a significant number of astronauts. Given the need for astronauts to function at a high level of efficiency during and after their return from space, the application of pharmacologic and other treatments is strongly indicated. This report addresses the clinical problem of orthostatic hypotension and its treatments to ascertain whether pharmacologic or physiologic treatment may be useful in the prevention of orthostatic hypotension associated with space flight. Treatment of orthostatic hypotension in patients now includes increasing intravascular volume with high sodium intake and mineralocorticoids, or increasing vascular resistance through the use of drugs to stimulate alpha or block beta vascular receptors. Earlier treatment used oral sympathomimetic ephedrine hydrochloride alone or with "head-up" bed rest. Then long-acting adrenocortical steroid desoxycorticosterone preparations with high-salt diets were used to expand volume. Fludrocortisone was shown to prevent the orthostatic drop in blood pressure. The combination of the sympathomimetic amine hydroxyamphetamine and a monoamine oxidase inhibitor tranylcypromine has been used, as has indomethacin alone. Davies et al. used mineralocorticoids at low doses concomitantly with alpha-agonists to increase vasoconstrictor action. Schirger et al used tranylcypromine and methylphenidate with or without a Jobst elastic leotard garment or the alpha-adrenergic agonist midodrine (which stimulates both arterial and venous systems without direct central nervous system or cardiac effects). Vernikos et al established that the combination of fludrocortisone, dextroamphetamine, and atropine exhibited a beneficial effect on orthostatic hypotension induced by 7-day 6 degrees head-down bed rest (a model used to simulate the weightlessness of space flight). Thus, there are numerous drugs that, in combination with mechanical techniques, including lower body negative pressure to elevate transmural pressure, could be studied to treat orthostatic hypotension after space flight.

  4. Efficacy of atomoxetine versus midodrine for the treatment of orthostatic hypotension in autonomic failure.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Claudia E; Okamoto, Luis E; Arnold, Amy C; Gamboa, Alfredo; Diedrich, André; Choi, Leena; Raj, Satish R; Robertson, David; Biaggioni, Italo; Shibao, Cyndya A

    2014-12-01

    The clinical presentation of autonomic failure is orthostatic hypotension. Severely affected patients require pharmacological treatment to prevent presyncopal symptoms or frank syncope. We previously reported in a proof of concept study that pediatric doses of the norepinephrine transporter blockade, atomoxetine, increases blood pressure in autonomic failure patients with residual sympathetic activity compared with placebo. Given that the sympathetic nervous system is maximally activated in the upright position, we hypothesized that atomoxetine would be superior to midodrine, a direct vasoconstrictor, in improving upright blood pressure and orthostatic hypotension-related symptoms. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effect of acute atomoxetine versus midodrine on upright systolic blood pressure and orthostatic symptom scores in 65 patients with severe autonomic failure. There were no differences in seated systolic blood pressure (means difference=0.3 mm Hg; 95% confidence [CI], -7.3 to 7.9; P=0.94). In contrast, atomoxetine produced a greater pressor response in upright systolic blood pressure (means difference=7.5 mm Hg; 95% CI, 0.6 to 15; P=0.03) compared with midodrine. Furthermore, atomoxetine (means difference=0.4; 95% CI, 0.1 to 0.8; P=0.02), but not midodrine (means difference=0.5; 95% CI, -0.1 to 1.0; P=0.08), improved orthostatic hypotension-related symptoms as compared with placebo. The results of our study suggest that atomoxetine could be a superior therapeutic option than midodrine for the treatment of orthostatic hypotension in autonomic failure. PMID:25185131

  5. Multicentric reticulohistiocytosis presenting with clinical features of dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Hsiung, Sherry H; Chan, Edward F; Elenitsas, Rosalie; Kolasinski, Sharon L; Schumacher, H Ralph; Werth, Victoria P

    2003-02-01

    Multicentric reticulohistiocytosis (MRH) is a rare disorder with proliferating histiocytes that develop into multinucleated giant cells with "ground-glass" cytoplasm. The disease presents with a rapidly destructive, sometimes permanently debilitating, polyarthritis and a papulonodular eruption, generally of the face and hands. We present 3 cases of MRH in which the initial clinical diagnosis was thought to be dermatomyositis (DM). The cutaneous findings in these cases included an erythematous, predominantly photodistributed macular and papular eruption clinically consistent with DM. However, skin biopsy specimens revealed the diagnosis of MRH. This previously unreported clinical similarity between MRH and DM is significant because the treatment options and future complications vary greatly between the 2 diseases. Thus, it is important to consider the possibility of multicentric reticulohistiocytosis when evaluating a patient with the clinical diagnosis of dermatomyositis. PMID:12582374

  6. Intracranial hypotension following scoliosis surgery: dural penetration of a thoracic pedicle screw

    PubMed Central

    Ulu, Mustafa Onur; Hanimoglu, Hakan; Kaynar, Mehmet Yasar; Hanci, Murat

    2008-01-01

    The authors report on a 14 years old female with intracranial hypotension who had a history of spinal instrumentation surgery for scoliosis 3 months prior to her admission. She had been diagnosed with migraine in a neurology clinic and was under medical therapy when presented. During the investigation process, a right thoracic pedicle screw, which was penetrating and transversing the dura mater at the T3–T4 level was identified. The diagnosis and management of such a case is discussed. Knowledge of this entity is of extreme importance to spine surgeons, in order to prevent delayed diagnosis and possible complications. PMID:18437432

  7. Multicentric reticulohistiocytosis presenting with clinical features of dermatomyositis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sherry H. Hsiung; Edward F. Chan; Rosalie Elenitsas; Sharon L. Kolasinski; H. Ralph Schumacher; Victoria P. Werth

    2003-01-01

    Multicentric reticulohistiocytosis (MRH) is a rare disorder with proliferating histiocytes that develop into multinucleated giant cells with “ground-glass” cytoplasm. The disease presents with a rapidly destructive, sometimes permanently debilitating, polyarthritis and a papulonodular eruption, generally of the face and hands. We present 3 cases of MRH in which the initial clinical diagnosis was thought to be dermatomyositis (DM). The cutaneous

  8. Oral manifestations of Cowden's disease. Presentation of a clinical case

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rafael Segura Saint-Gerons; Alejandro Ceballos Salobreña; Mariano Toro Rojas; José Manuel Gándara Rey; Emilio Luque

    Cowden's disease, or multiple hamartoma syndrome, is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis, characterized by the presence of multiple cutaneous hamartomas, oral fibromas and benign acral keratosis. It affects multiple organs (breast, thyroids, stomach, colon), with the strong possibility of malignant neoplasia developing in these organs. We present a case of this rare syndrome, highlighting the presentation of some clinical characteristics that,

  9. Predicting Acute Hypotensive Episode by Bhattacharyya Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awandekar, Vaibhav; Cheeran, A. N.

    2013-03-01

    Acute hypotensive episode (AHE) is a serious clinical event, which can lead to irreversible organ damage and sometimes death. When detected in time, an appropriate intervention can significantly lower the risks for the patient. An algorithm is developed for automated statistical prediction of AHE in patients, using mean arterial pressure (MAP). The dataset used for this work is from MIMIC II of PhysioNet/Computers in Cardiology. The algorithm consists of probability distributions of MAP and information divergence methods for calculating the statistical distance between two probability distributions. The Bhattacharyya Distance is found out to be most accurate method for calculating such statistical distance. Beat classification of AHE patients with respect to Non-AHE patient is carried out by using training set of MIMIC II database. The comparison is also carried out for feasibility of Bhattacharyya distance with another divergence method like KL ivergence

  10. What type of different clinical manifestations can cardiac sarcoidosis present?

    PubMed

    Sentürk, Ay?egül; Mara?, Yüksel; Argüder, Emine; Karalezli, Ay?egül; Hasano?lu, H Canan; O?üt, Tuba; Ba?tu?, Serdal; Karabekir, Ercan

    2014-11-28

    Cardiac sarcoidosis is an infiltrative, granulomatous inflammatory disease of the myocardium. Generally, it can be difficult to diagnose cardiac sarcoidosis clinically because of the non-specific nature of its clinical manifestations. This property can be based on the presence of any clinical evidence of sarcoidosis in the other organs. We present two cases of cardiac sarcoidosis so as to demonstrate its different clinical manifestations. The first patient displayed no cardiac symptoms; the electrocardiogram showed an incidental right bundle branch block. Her cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) revealed late-phase opaque material enhancement involving the inferior and inferoseptal segment of the left ventricle. The second patient was severely symptomatic in terms of cardiac involvement, and a transthoracic echocardiogram revealed global hypokinesia and septal brightness; his ejection fraction decreased to 45 %. These cases highlighted the challenges encountered in the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac sarcoidosis. CMRI should be considered in all patients who have suspected findings for cardiac involvement. PMID:25429793

  11. Rhinosporidiosis presenting as an oropharyngeal mass: A clinical predicament?

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Rachna; Baig, Shadab Ali; Debata, Tribikram

    2015-01-01

    Rhinosporidiosis, is a chronic granulomatous disease presenting as a polypoidal mass in the nasal cavity and nasopharynx caused by Rhinosporidium seeberi and is endemic in India and Sri Lanka. Diagnosis is mainly by clinical observations and is confirmed by histopathology. We report a case of atypical rhinosporidiosis that presented as an oropharyngeal mass and mimicked chronic tonsillitis. Hence possibility of this atypical rhinosporidiosis should be included in the clinical differential diagnosis of any posterior oral or oropharyngeal mass, particularly when managing patients from rural endemic areas.

  12. Refractory intraoperative hypotension with elevated serum tryptase

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Kelly J.; Divekar, Rohit D.; Butterfield, Joseph H.; Schwartz, Lawrence B.; Weingarten, Toby N.

    2015-01-01

    Severe intraoperative hypotension has been reported in patients on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 antagonists. We describe a patient on lisinopril who developed refractory intraoperative hypotension associated with increased serum tryptase level suggesting mast cell activation (allergic reaction). However, allergology workup ruled out an allergic etiology as well as mastocytosis, and hypotension recalcitrant to treatment was attributed to uninterrupted lisinopril therapy. Elevated serum tryptase was attributed to our patient's chronic renal insufficiency. PMID:25653920

  13. Damage control resuscitation: permissive hypotension and massive transfusion protocols.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Naomi T; Burd, Randall S; Teach, Stephen J

    2014-09-01

    Evidence for changes in adult trauma management often precedes evidence for changes in pediatric trauma management. Many adult trauma centers have adopted damage-control resuscitation management strategies, which target the metabolic syndrome of acidosis, coagulopathy, and hypothermia often found in severe uncontrolled hemorrhage. Two key components of damage-control resuscitation are permissive hypotension, which is a fluid management strategy that targets a subnormal blood pressure, and hemostatic resuscitation, which is a transfusion strategy that targets coagulopathy with early blood product administration. Acceptance of damage-control resuscitation strategies is reflected in recent changes in the American College of Surgeons' Advanced Trauma Life Support curriculum; the most recent edition has decreased its initial fluid recommendation to 1 L from 2 L, and it now recommends early administration of blood products without specifying any specific ratio. These recommendations are not advocating permissive hypotension or hemostatic resuscitation directly but represent an initial step toward limiting fluid resuscitation and using blood products to treat coagulopathy earlier. Evidence for permissive hypotension exists in animal studies and few adult clinical trials. There is no evidence to support permissive hypotension strategies in pediatrics. Evidence for hemostatic resuscitation in adult trauma management is more comprehensive, and there are limited data to support its use in pediatric trauma patients with severe hemorrhage. Additional studies on the management of children with severe uncontrolled hemorrhage are needed. PMID:25186511

  14. Demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with diabetes presenting to an urban public hospital ophthalmology clinic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard S. Baker; Neil L. Watkins; M. Roy Wilson; Mohsen Bazargan; Charles W. Flowers

    1998-01-01

    ObjectiveThis study aims to describe the clinical and sociodemographic characteristics of patients with diabetes who are newly presenting to an inner city public hospital eye clinic. This study also aims to determine the prevalence and severity of ocular morbidity in this population at time of presentation and to assess the adequacy of the ophthalmic surveillance to which this population was

  15. Giant colonic diverticulum: Clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment: Systematic review of 166 cases

    PubMed Central

    Nigri, Giuseppe; Petrucciani, Niccolò; Giannini, Giulia; Aurello, Paolo; Magistri, Paolo; Gasparrini, Marcello; Ramacciato, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of giant colonic diverticulum (GCD, by means of a complete and updated literature review). GCD is a rare manifestation of diverticular disease of the colon. Less than 200 studies on GCD were published in the literature, predominantly case reports or small patient series. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was performed using the Embase and PubMed databases to identify all the GCD studies. The following MESH search headings were used: “giant colonic diverticulum”; “giant sigmoid diverticulum”. The “related articles” function was used to broaden the search, and all of the abstracts, studies, and citations were reviewed by two authors. The following outcomes were of interest: the disease and patient characteristics, study design, indications for surgery, type of operation, and post-operative outcomes. Additionally, a subgroup analysis of cases treated in the last 5 years was performed to show the current trends in the treatment of GCD. A GCD case in an elderly patient treated in our department by a sigmoidectomy with primary anastomosis and a diverting ileostomy is presented as a typical example of the disease. RESULTS: In total, 166 GCD cases in 138 studies were identified in the literature. The most common clinical presentation was abdominal pain, which occurred in 69% of the cases. Among the physical signs, an abdominal mass was detected in 48% of the cases, whereas 20% of the patients presented with fever and 14% with abdominal tenderness. Diagnosis is based predominantly on abdominal computed tomography. The most frequent treatment was colic resection with en-bloc resection of the diverticulum, performed in 57.2% of cases, whereas Hartmann’s procedure was followed in 11.4% of the cases and a diverticulectomy in 10.2%. An analysis of sixteen cases reported in the last 5 years showed that the majority of patients were treated with sigmoidectomy and en-bloc resection of the diverticulum; the postoperative mortality was null, morbidity was very low (1 patient was hospitalized in the intensive care unit for postoperative hypotension), and the patients were discharged 4-14 d after surgery. CONCLUSION: Giant colonic diverticulum is a rare manifestation of diverticular diseases. Surgical treatment, consisting predominantly of colonic resection with en bloc resection of the diverticulum, is the preferred option for GCD and guarantees excellent results. PMID:25574112

  16. Possible fatal acetaminophen intoxication with atypical clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    De-Giorgio, Fabio; Lodise, Maria; Chiarotti, Marcello; d'Aloja, Ernesto; Carbone, Arnaldo; Valerio, Luca

    2013-09-01

    Acetaminophen or paracetamol, a commonly used over-the-counter analgesic, is known to elicit severe adverse reactions when taken in overdose, chronically at therapeutic dosage or, sporadically, following single assumptions of a therapeutic dose. Damage patterns including liver damage and, rarely, acute tubular necrosis or a fixed drug exanthema. We present a case of fatal acetaminophen toxicity with postmortem blood concentration 78 ?g/mL and unusual clinical features, including a visually striking and massive epidermolysis and rhabdomyolysis, disseminated intravascular coagulation and myocardial ischemia. This case is compared with the most similar previous reports in terms of organ damage, clinical presentation, and cause of death. We conclude that a number of severe patterns of adverse effects to acetaminophen are emerging that were previously greatly underestimated, thus questioning the adequacy of the clinical spectrum traditionally associated with acetaminophen intoxication and leading to the need to review this spectrum and the associated diagnostic criteria. PMID:23822653

  17. Correlation of Angiographic Morphology and Clinical Presentation in Unstable Angina

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George Dangas; Roxana Mehran; Sylvan Wallenstein; Nikolaos A Courcoutsakis; Venu Kakarala; Jacqueline Hollywood; John A Ambrose

    1997-01-01

    Objectives. This study sought to correlate angiographically detected complex lesions and intracoronary thrombus with the severity of clinical presentation in unstable angina (UA).Background. Unstable angina is usually related to acute thrombosis superimposed on a disrupted plaque. Complex and thrombotic lesions are more prevalent in UA and have been associated with a worse prognosis. The highest levels of the Braunwald classification

  18. Age-related macular degeneration: linking clinical presentation to pathology.

    PubMed

    Nivison-Smith, Lisa; Milston, Rebecca; Madigan, Michele; Kalloniatis, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide in the elderly population. Optometrists, as primary eye health care providers, require the skills and knowledge to accurately diagnose and manage AMD patients. There is an overwhelming body of research related to the clinical presentation, etiology, epidemiology, and pathology of this disease. Additionally, the evolution of new imaging modalities creates new opportunities to clinically detect and analyze previously uncharacterized and earlier changes in the retina. The challenge for optometrists is to combine all this information into an applicable knowledge base for use in everyday clinical assessment of AMD so that timely and accurate referrals can be made to retinal specialists. This review attempts to address this issue by linking the clinical presentation of AMD with the underlying disease biology. We emphasize the contribution of recent noninvasive imaging technologies to the clinical assessment of early and more advanced AMD including optical coherence tomography, fundus autofluorescence, and infrared reflectance. PMID:24879089

  19. Neonatal hypotension: dopamine or dobutamine?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Samir; Donn, Steven M

    2014-02-01

    Controversy surrounds the assessment of perfusion and the methods currently utilised to define hypotension, especially blood pressure. There is growing agreement to assess heart function when selecting inotropic therapy and use bedside tools such as echocardiography for assessing at-risk infants. Both dopamine and dobutamine have comparative efficacy, and in certain disease states with immature myocardium there could be potential advantages in using dobutamine. The concomitant use of hydrocortisone has been shown to be beneficial when escalating doses of first-line inotropes are used. Other inotropes require further study through randomised trials for their safety and efficacy to be established. PMID:24100169

  20. Membranous nephropathy in children: clinical presentation and therapeutic approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shina Menon; Rudolph P. Valentini

    2010-01-01

    The approach to the pediatric patient with membranous nephropathy (MN) can be challenging to the practitioner. The clinical\\u000a presentation of the child with this histologic entity usually involves some degree of proteinuria ranging from persistent,\\u000a subnephrotic-ranged proteinuria to overt nephrotic syndrome. Patients often have accompanying microscopic hematuria and may\\u000a have azotemia or mild hypertension. Children presenting with nephrotic syndrome are

  1. Clinical Presentation and Magnetic Resonance Findings in Sellar Tuberculomas

    PubMed Central

    Bonifacio-Delgadillo, Dulce; Aburto-Murrieta, Yolanda; Salinas-Lara, Citlaltepetl; Sotelo, Julio; Montes-Mojarro, Ivonne; Garcia-Marquez, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Background and Importance. Sellar tuberculomas are extremely rare lesions with nonspecific clinical manifestations. The tuberculous infection of the pituitary gland and sellar region is characterized by the presence of an acute or chronic inflammatory reaction and may occur in the absence of systemic tuberculosis. The diagnosis is difficult prior to the surgery. An adequate diagnostic and antituberculous drugs usually result in a good outcome. Clinical Presentation. We report four cases of sellar tuberculoma, 3/1 female/male, age range: 50–57 years. All patients had visual disturbances and low levels of cortisol. Conclusion. The clinical diagnosis of sellar tuberculoma is a challenge and should be suspected when a sellar lesion shows abnormal enhancement pattern and stalk involvement, and absence of signal suppression in FLAIR. PMID:25114688

  2. Clinical presentation and magnetic resonance findings in sellar tuberculomas.

    PubMed

    Bonifacio-Delgadillo, Dulce; Aburto-Murrieta, Yolanda; Salinas-Lara, Citlaltepetl; Sotelo, Julio; Montes-Mojarro, Ivonne; Garcia-Marquez, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Background and Importance. Sellar tuberculomas are extremely rare lesions with nonspecific clinical manifestations. The tuberculous infection of the pituitary gland and sellar region is characterized by the presence of an acute or chronic inflammatory reaction and may occur in the absence of systemic tuberculosis. The diagnosis is difficult prior to the surgery. An adequate diagnostic and antituberculous drugs usually result in a good outcome. Clinical Presentation. We report four cases of sellar tuberculoma, 3/1 female/male, age range: 50-57 years. All patients had visual disturbances and low levels of cortisol. Conclusion. The clinical diagnosis of sellar tuberculoma is a challenge and should be suspected when a sellar lesion shows abnormal enhancement pattern and stalk involvement, and absence of signal suppression in FLAIR. PMID:25114688

  3. Orthostatic hypotension: definition, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Kanjwal, Khalil; George, Anil; Figueredo, Vincent M; Grubb, Blair P

    2015-02-01

    Orthostatic hypotension commonly affects elderly patients and those suffering from diabetes mellitus and Parkinson's disease. It is a cause of significant morbidity in the affected patients. The goal of this review is to outline the pathophysiology, evaluation, and management of the patients suffering from orthostatic hypotension. PMID:24933201

  4. Orthostatic hypotension: epidemiology, pathophysiology and management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, G.; Robertson, D.

    1995-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension is characterized by low upright blood pressure levels and symptoms of cerebral hypoperfusion. Whereas orthostatic hypotension is heterogeneous, correct pathophysiologic diagnosis is important because of therapeutic and prognostic considerations. Although therapy is not usually curative, it can be extraordinarily beneficial if it is individually tailored. Management of the Shy-Drager syndrome (multiple-system atrophy) remains a formidable challenge.

  5. Swallow Syncope: Clinical Presentation, Diagnostic Criteria, and Therapeutic Options

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Shashank; Girotra, Mohit; Glasser, Stephen; Dutta, Sudhir K.

    2014-01-01

    We recently encountered three patients with episodes of syncope associated with food ingestion. A 31-year-old woman had an episode of syncope in the hospital while drinking soda. Transient asystole was noted on the telemonitor, confirming the diagnosis of swallow syncope. The other two patients were 78- and 80 year old gentlemen, respectively, who presented with recurrent and transient episodes of dizziness during deglutition. Extensive work-up of syncope was negative in both cases and a diagnosis of swallow syncope was made by clinical criteria. These cases illustrate the challenging problem of swallow syncope. The diagnosis can be suspected on the basis of clinical presentation and confirmed with the demonstration of transient brady-arrhythmia during deglutition. Medical management includes avoiding trigger foods, use of anticholinergics, and/or placement of a permanent cardiac pacemaker. PMID:25038205

  6. Suprasellar cysts: clinical presentation, surgical indications, and optimal surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To describe the clinical presentation of suprasellar cysts (SSCs) and surgical indications, and compare the treatment methods of endoscopic ventriculocystostomy (VC) and ventriculocystocisternotomy (VCC). Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of 73 consecutive patients with SSC who were treated between June 2002 and September 2009. Twenty-two patients were treated with VC and 51 with VCC. Outcome was assessed by clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging. Results The patients were divided into five groups based on age at presentation: age less than 1 year (n = 6), 1-5 years (n = 36), 6-10 years (n = 15), 11-20 years (n = 11), and 21-53 years (n = 5). The main clinical presentations were macrocrania (100%), motor deficits (50%), and gaze disturbance (33.3%) in the age less than 1 year group; macrocrania (75%), motor deficits (63.9%), and gaze disturbance (27.8%) in the 1-5 years group; macrocrania (46.7%), symptoms of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) (40.0%), endocrine dysfunction (40%), and seizures (33.3%) in the 6-10 years group; symptoms of raised ICP (54.5%), endocrine dysfunction (54.5%), and reduced visual field or acuity (36.4%) in the 11-20 years group; and symptoms of raised ICP (80.0%) and reduced visual field or acuity (40.0%) in the 21-53 years group. The overall success rate of endoscopic fenestration was 90.4%. A Kaplan-Meier curve for long-term efficacy of the two treatment modalities showed better results for VCC than for VC (p = 0.008). Conclusions Different age groups with SSCs have different main clinical presentations. VCC appears to be more efficacious than VC. PMID:21586175

  7. Clinical zinc deficiency as early presentation of Wilson disease.

    PubMed

    Van Biervliet, Stephanie; Küry, Sébastien; De Bruyne, Ruth; Vanakker, Olivier M; Schmitt, Sébastien; Vande Velde, Saskia; Blouin, Eric; Bézieau, Stéphane

    2015-04-01

    Wilson disease is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of the copper metabolism caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the ATP-ase Cu(2+) transporting polypeptide (ATP7B) gene. The copper accumulation in different organs leads to the suspicion of Wilson disease. We describe a child with clinical zinc deficiency as presenting symptom of Wilson disease, which was confirmed by 2 mutations within the ATP7B gene and an increased copper excretion. PMID:25825851

  8. Diverse Clinical and Histology Presentation in C1q Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Malleshappa, Pavan; Vankalakunti, Mahesha

    2013-01-01

    Patients presenting with nephrotic syndrome with or without nephritic illness rarely come across with the diagnosis of ‘C1q nephropathy’. This entity is purely diagnosed with the help of immunofluorescence like IgA nephropathy. Clinical presentation is heterogenous, ranging from nephrotic range proteinuria to sub-nephrotic state; and with or without hematuria / renal insufficiency. Similarly, the concept of ‘C1q nephroapthy’ has periodically evolved since its original description by Jenette and Hipp in 1985. Here the pathophysiology, histologic findings / diagnostic and therapeutic options in patients with C1q nephropathy are discussed. PMID:24282787

  9. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia endogenous endophthalmitis: clinical presentation, antibiotic susceptibility, and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Chhablani, Jay; Sudhalkar, Aditya; Jindal, Animesh; Das, Taraprasad; Motukupally, Swapna R; Sharma, Savitri; Pathengay, Avinash; Flynn, Harry W

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe clinical presentation, antibiotic susceptibility, and outcomes in patients with Stenotrophomonas maltophilia endogenous endophthalmitis. Design Retrospective case series. Participants Four eyes of four patients with S. maltophilia endogenous endophthalmitis. Methods Retrospective chart review of culture-positive S. maltophilia endogenous endophthalmitis treated at L V Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India, between January 2007 and December 2012, was done. Collected information included demographic, clinical, and microbiology data. Results These four patients with S. maltophilia endogenous endophthalmitis cases accounted for 0.47% (4/836) of total bacterial endophthalmitis cases treated in this period. All patients were from a rural setting and younger than 40 years. Two of the four patients had a history of immune compromise or hospitalization. The visual acuity at presentation was less than 20/320 in all patients. Common presenting features were severe anterior and posterior segment inflammation and hypopyon. All patients underwent vitrectomy with injection of intravitreal antibiotics and dexamethasone. Direct microscopy of the vitreous sample was positive in all cases. All isolates were sensitive to fluoroquinolones and chloramphenicol; sensitivity to aminoglycosides and third-generation cephalosporins was highly variable. The final visual acuity was 20/80 or more in three patients. The time to presentation did not seem to influence the visual or anatomical outcome. Conclusion S. maltophilia is a rare cause of endogenous endophthalmitis and usually occurs in young and apparently healthy individuals. Clinical presentation is moderate to severe, and recovery is variable. Fourth-generation fluoroquinolones and chloramphenicol were the most sensitive antibiotics against S. maltophilia in this series of patients. PMID:25170244

  10. Indeterminate cell histiocytosis that presented clinically as benign cephalic histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Haimovic, Adele; Chernoff, Karen; Hale, Christopher S; Meehan, Shane A; Schaffer, Julie V

    2014-12-01

    Indeterminate cell histiocytosis (ICH) is a rare, heterogeneous disorder that is characterized by immunophenotypic features of both Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) and non-LCH. We describe a 12-month-old boy with a four-month history of asymptomatic, small, pink-tan papules on his face. Histopathologic evaluation showed a superficial, dermal infiltrate of histiocytes that was positive for S100, CD1a, CD68, and Factor XIIIa. To our knowledge, this represents the first report of the clinical presentation of benign cephalic histiocytosis with immunohistochemical findings of ICH. We review the classification of histiocytic disorders and the clinical and immunohistochemical features of both ICH and benign cephalic histiocytosis. PMID:25526330

  11. Postural Hypotension Associated with Nonelastic Pantyhose during Lymphedema Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pereira de Godoy, Jose Maria; Guerreiro Godoy, Maria de Fatima

    2014-01-01

    The case of a 72-year-old female patient with elephantiasis is reported. The patient was submitted to two surgeries to remove the edema. After surgery, the leg again evolved to elephantiasis and eventually she was referred to the Clinica Godoy for clinical treatment. Intensive treatment was carried out (6 to 8 hours per day) and the patient lost more than 70% of the limb volume within one week. After this loss, the volume was maintained using grosgrain compression pantyhose for 24 hours per day. During the return appointment, the patient suffered from systemic hypotension (a drop of more than 30?mmHg within three minutes) while she was standing after removing the stocking. A further investigation showed that the symptoms only appeared when the stocking was worn for 24 hours. Thus, the patient was advised to use the stocking only during the day thereby avoiding the symptoms of hypotension. PMID:25105033

  12. Postural Hypotension Associated with Nonelastic Pantyhose during Lymphedema Treatment.

    PubMed

    Pereira de Godoy, Jose Maria; Zucchi Libanore, Daniel; Guerreiro Godoy, Maria de Fatima

    2014-01-01

    The case of a 72-year-old female patient with elephantiasis is reported. The patient was submitted to two surgeries to remove the edema. After surgery, the leg again evolved to elephantiasis and eventually she was referred to the Clinica Godoy for clinical treatment. Intensive treatment was carried out (6 to 8 hours per day) and the patient lost more than 70% of the limb volume within one week. After this loss, the volume was maintained using grosgrain compression pantyhose for 24 hours per day. During the return appointment, the patient suffered from systemic hypotension (a drop of more than 30?mmHg within three minutes) while she was standing after removing the stocking. A further investigation showed that the symptoms only appeared when the stocking was worn for 24 hours. Thus, the patient was advised to use the stocking only during the day thereby avoiding the symptoms of hypotension. PMID:25105033

  13. Diuretic, hypotensive and hypoglycaemic effect of Phyllanthus amarus.

    PubMed

    Srividya, N; Periwal, S

    1995-11-01

    Diuretic, hypotensive and hypoglycaemic effects of Phyllanthus amarus (syn. Phyllanthus niruri) on human subjects were assessed. Nine mild hypertensives (four of them also suffering from diabetes mellitus) were treated with a preparation of the whole plant of P. amarus for 10 days. Suitable parameters were studied in the blood and urine samples of the subjects, along with physiological profile and dietary pattern before and after the treatment period. Significant increase in 24 hr urine volume, urine and serum Na levels was observed. A significant reduction in systolic blood pressure in non-diabetic hypertensives and female subjects was noted. Blood glucose was also significantly reduced in the treated group. Clinical observations revealed no harmful side effects. These observations indicate that P. amarus is a potential diuretic, hypotensive and hypoglycaemic drug for humans. PMID:8786163

  14. Systemic lupus erythematosus presenting as acute adrenal insufficiency: a rare clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Ra; Khan, I; Mir, T; Khan, I; Wani, M

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a complex autoimmune disease with multisystem involvement with varied presentation. Autoimmune adrenal disease, on the other hand, can be associated with other autoimmune diseases. Adrenal insufficiency as a presenting feature of Systemic lupus erythematosus is a rare occurrence. We hereby report a case of a 20 year-old female who presented to us in an acute hypoadrenal state and was found to have Systemic lupus erythematosus with renal involvement. Patient was successfully managed with steroids and improved clinically. PMID:24669348

  15. Review of Clinical Presentation and Diagnosis of Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksz, C.J.; Harmatz, P.; Beck, M.; Jones, S.; Wood, T.; Lachman, R.; Gravance, C.G.

    2013-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA) was described in 1929 by Luis Morquio from Uruguay and James Brailsford from England, and was later found as an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease. MPS IVA is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme, N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS). Reduced GALNS activity results in impaired catabolism of two glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), chondroitin-6-sulfate (C6S) and keratan sulfate (KS). Clinical presentations of MPS IVA reflect a spectrum of progression from a severe ”classical” phenotype to a mild “attenuated” phenotype. More than 180 different mutations have been identified in the GALNS gene, which likely explains the phenotypic heterogeneity of the disorder. Accumulation of C6S and KS manifests predominantly as short stature and skeletal dysplasia (dysostosis multiplex), including atlantoaxial instability and cervical cord compression. However, abnormalities in the visual, auditory, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems can also affect individuals with MPS IVA. Diagnosis is typically based on clinical examination, skeletal radiographs, urinary GAG, and enzymatic activity of GALNS in blood cells or fibroblasts. Deficiency of GALNS activity is a common assessment for the laboratory diagnosis of MPS IVA; however, with recently increased availability, gene sequencing for MPS IVA is often used to confirm enzyme results. As multiple clinical presentations are observed, diagnosis of MPS IVA may require multi-system considerations. This review provides a history of defining MPS IVA and how the understanding of the disease manifestations has changed over time. A summary of the accumulated knowledge is presented, including information from the International Morquio Registry. The classical phenotype is contrasted with attenuated cases, which are now being recognized and diagnosed more frequently. Laboratory based diagnoses of MPS IVA are also discussed. PMID:23665161

  16. Subacute Thyroiditis: Clinical Presentation and Long Term Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Alfadda, Assim A.; Sallam, Reem M.; Elawad, Ghadi E.; AlDhukair, Hisham; Alyahya, Mossaed M.

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have been reported from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (SA) to describe the clinical presentation and long term outcomes of subacute thyroiditis (SAT). Our aim was to review the demographic, anthropometric, clinical presentation, laboratory results, treatment, and disease outcome in Riyadh region and to compare those with results from different regions of the Kingdom and different parts of the world. We reviewed the medical files of patients who underwent thyroid uptake scan during an 8-year period in King Khalid University Hospital. Only 25 patients had confirmed diagnosis of thyroiditis. Age and gender distribution were similar to other studies. Most patients presented with palpitation, goiter, and weight change. Elevated thyroid hormones, suppressed thyroid-stimulating hormone, and elevated ESR were reported. Among those, 7 cases of SAT were recorded. ?-Blockers were prescribed to 57% and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to 29% of SAT. Long follow-up demonstrated that 85.7% of SAT cases recovered, while 14.3% developed permanent hypothyroidism. In conclusion, SAT is uncommon in the central region of SA. Compared to the western region, corticosteroid is not commonly prescribed, and permanent hypothyroidism is not uncommon. A nation-wide epidemiological study to explain these interprovincial differences is warranted. PMID:24803929

  17. Progranulin gene mutation with an unusual clinical and neuropathologic presentation.

    PubMed

    Wider, Christian; Uitti, Ryan J; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Fang, John Y; Josephs, Keith A; Baker, Matthew C; Rademakers, Rosa; Hutton, Michael L; Dickson, Dennis W

    2008-06-15

    Progranulin gene (PGRN) mutations cause frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-U). Patients usually present with a frontotemporal dementia syndrome and have prominent atrophy and neuronal loss in frontal and temporal cortices and the striatum, with neuronal intranuclear and cytoplasmic inclusions. Clinical, neuropathological, and genetic studies are reported on an individual with PGRN mutation and her family members. We describe a patient with a PGRN c.26C>A mutation who presented with progressive stuttering dysarthria, oculomotor abnormalities, choreic buccolingual movements, and mild parkinsonism. Two other family members were affected, one with a behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia syndrome, the other with a diagnosis of probable Alzheimer's disease. At autopsy there was no neuronal loss in the cortex or medial temporal lobe structures, but there was striatal gliosis. Immunohistochemistry for ubiquitin and TDP-43 revealed neuronal cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions as well as neurites. This study further expands the clinical and pathological spectrum of PGRN mutations, and suggests the diagnosis could be missed in some individuals with atypical presentations. PMID:18442119

  18. Clinical Presentation of Prostate Cancer in Black South Africans

    PubMed Central

    Tindall, Elizabeth A; Monare, L Richard; Petersen, Desiree C; van Zyl, Smit; Hardie, Rae-Anne; Segone, Alpheus M; Venter, Philip A; Bornman, MS Riana; Hayes, Vanessa M

    2014-01-01

    Background Compared with White Americans, Black American men are at a significant increased risk of presenting with prostate cancer (PCa) and associated mortality, suggesting a link to African-ancestry. However, PCa status within Africa is largely unknown. We address the clinical presentation of PCa within Black South African men. Methods Over 1,000 participants with or without PCa have enrolled in the Southern African Prostate Cancer Study (SAPCS). Using genome-wide profiling we establish a unique within Africa population substructure. Adjusting for age, clinical variables were assessed, compared against Black Americans and between rural and urban localities while addressing potential socio-demographic confounders. Results We report a significant difference in the distribution of prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels skewed towards higher PSA levels in the PCa cases (83.0% present with a PSA???20?µg/L; median PSA?=?98.8?µg/L) relative to men with no detectable PCa (18.5% present with a PSA???20?µg/L; median PSA?=?9.1?µg/L). Compared with Black Americans, Black South Africans presented with significantly more aggressive disease defined by Gleason score >7 (17% and 36%, respectively) and PSA???20?µg/L (17.2% and 83.2%, respectively). We report exasperated disease aggression defined by Gleason score >7 (P?=?0.0042) and poorly differentiated tumor grade (P?present with higher PSA levels and histopathological tumor grade compared with Black Americans, which is further escalated in men from rural localities. Our data suggests that lack of PSA testing may be contributing to an aggressive PCa disease phenotype within South African men. PMID:24723425

  19. Stroke and Pregnancy: Clinical Presentation, Evaluation, Treatment and Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Grear, Karrie E; Bushnell, Cheryl D

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is a neurological emergency that carries a risk of morbidity and mortality. Recent studies have shown that the incidence of stroke, while rare, is increasing in pregnant females. In this review, stroke and other vasculopathies in the pregnant and post-partum female are examined. A discussion of the symptoms and clinical presentation of stroke is provided, as well as the current guideline for treatment of stroke in pregnancy. Finally, the data illustrating the recent increases in stroke incidence is outlined. PMID:23632643

  20. Hypotension-induced blindness in haemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Shveta; Ansons, Alec; Vishwanath, Mandagere

    2014-01-01

    Hypotension is a commonly encountered complication in haemodialysis patients and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Bilateral visual loss in dialysis induced hypotension remains poorly recognized as a complication by both renal physicians and ophthalmologists. We report 2 cases of patients on renal dialysis who suffered severe longstanding hypotension with bilateral non-arteritic anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy. Both patients experienced bilateral loss of vision over a short time period. We feel that physicians must be aware of patients complaining of painless visual loss in this high risk group, as control of blood pressure may be the most important factor in prevention of this visually devastating condition.

  1. The Clinical Presentation of Celiac Disease: Experiences from Northeastern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ganji, Azita; Esmaielzadeh, Abbas; Aafzal Aghayee, Mehdi; Goshayeshi, Ladan; Ghaffarzadegan, Kamran

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to explore demographic characteristics and clinical presentations of celiac disease (CD) in Northeastern Iran. METHODS This was a cross-sectional retrospective study of 193 adults with CD who presented to Mashhad University Gastroenterology Clinic between 2008 and 2013. Patient data that included mode of presentation and the presence of any concomitant illnesses were collected. Intestinal biopsy and serum anti-tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG) were used for diagnosis. Mucosal lesions were classified according to modified Marsh classification. RESULTS Overall, 132 females and 61 males, with a mean age at diagnosis of 32.6 ± 13.2 years were included. The patient’s chief complaints in order of decreasing frequency were dyspepsia (24.6%), diarrhea (20%), anemia (12.8%), and flatulence (7.2%). Bone disease was seen (osteopenia, osteoporosis) in 30% of patients. A positive family history of CD was found in 17.9% of cases. There were 64% who had serum anti-tTG >200 units/ml and 78% had a Marsh classification grade 3 on duodenal biopsy. The histology grade (Marsh) did not show any correlation with anti-tTG serum levels, age, body mass index (BMI) or hemoglobin levels. CONCLUSION In Northeastern Iran, CD was seen more commonly in females and with non-diarrheal presentations. Abdominal discomfort, anemia and bone disease were most common primary presentations in this area. Histology grade showed no significant correlation with level of anti-tTG, BMI or hemoglobin levels. We suggest screening for CD in unexplained abdominal discomfort, bone disease and anemia. PMID:24872868

  2. Clinical presentation of ectopic pregnancy in Transkei, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Amoko, D H; Buga, G A

    1995-12-01

    Due to advances in diagnostic techniques, it has become possible to identify and manage ectopic pregnancies before they cause clinical symptoms in many developed countries. However, the situation appears not to be the same in developing countries. We carried out a cross-sectional study at Umtata General Hospital, which serves an underprivileged black South African population in order to document the incidence, risk factors, clinical presentation and complications of ectopic pregnancy. We found the incidence of ectopic pregnancy was 11 per 1000 reported pregnancies, and the mortality rate was 2.0%. Of 148 consecutive cases of ectopic pregnancy, 62.2% were in shock and two thirds were severely anaemic on arrival. About 71% of the cases had tubal rupture and 25% were chronic leaking ectopics. Only four intact unruptured ectopics were found in spite of the availability of modern diagnostic techniques such as ultrasonography and sensitive pregnancy tests. About 86% of the cases had evidence of previous pelvic infection, thus making pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) the most important risk factor for ectopic pregnancy. We conclude that most ectopic pregnancies in Transkei are associated with previous pelvic infection, and still present as acute emergencies. Preventive measures should aim at controlling sexually transmitted diseases and PID. PMID:8689974

  3. [Sarcoidosis: etiology, pathogenesis, epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentation].

    PubMed

    Éksarenko, O V; Kharlap, S I; Safonova, T N

    2012-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic idiopathic multisystem granulomatous inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. Prevalence of this condition is approximately 3-5: 100 000 with the highest incidence at the age of 25-40 years old and no gender predomination. Early morbidity, disability and severe prognosis worsen patient's condition and make them socially limited. In some cases ocular involvement and vision loss aggravate general condition of the patients. Ocular involvement in sarcoidosis occurs in 10-75% patients. At the same time some data confirm the fact that in 7% of patients ocular damage is the presenting sign making them come to an ophthalmologist whereas orbital involvement may present in systemic disease only. Unclear etiology and clinical similarity with other conditions cause difficulties in early diagnosis and monitoring of patients with sarcoidosis. PMID:23120925

  4. Familial Dementia With Lewy Bodies With an Atypical Clinical Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Lauren T.; Tsuang, Debby W.; Cherrier, Monique M.; Eugenio, Charisma J.; Du, Jennifer Q.; Steinbart, Ellen J.; Limprasert, Pornprot; La Spada, Albert R.; Seltzer, Benjamin; Bird, Thomas D.; Leverenz, James B.

    2006-01-01

    The authors report a case of a 64-year-old male with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) pathology at autopsy who did not manifest the core symptoms of DLB until very late in his clinical course. His initial presentation of early executive and language dysfunction suggested a cortical dementia similar to frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Core symptoms of DLB including dementia, hallucination, and parkinsonian symptoms were not apparent until late in the course of his illness. Autopsy revealed both brainstem and cortical Lewy bodies and AD pathology. Family history revealed 7 relatives with a history of dementia including 4 with possible or probable DLB. This case is unique because of the FTLD-like presentation, positive family history of dementia, and autopsy confirmation of DLB. PMID:12641375

  5. Abdominal angiostrongyliasis: report of two cases with different clinical presentations.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Rubens; Dequi, Roberta Martins; Peruzzo, Lucas; Mesquita, Paulo Moacir; Garcia, Errol; Fornari, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    Abdominal angiostrongyliasis is a sporadic infectious disease caused by the nematode Angiostrongylus costaricensis. It usually presents as acute abdomen, secondary to mesenteric ischemia, and pronounced eosinophilia. In some cases its course is insidious and transient, and the diagnosis is suspicious. The disease is confirmed by the detection of A. costaricensis elements in surgical specimen. The treatment is supportive, with avoidance of antihelminthic administration due to a possible erratic migration followed by worsening of the disease. We report two cases, both with intense eosinophilia and serum IgG-ELISA positive to A. costaricensis. The first case presented ileal perforation and was surgically treated. The second one showed hepatic nodules at ultrasound and was only symptomatically treated, evolving to an apparent protracted resolution. These two cases exemplify different clinical forms of the disease, one of them with liver involvement. PMID:19082375

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis—Atlanto-Axial Subluxation and Its Clinical Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, H. S.

    1966-01-01

    The clinical picture, radiological findings and treatment of 22 patients with atlantoaxial subluxation and rheumatoid arthritis are described. This lesion, untreated, may result in damage to the spinal cord, paresis or sudden death. Occipital headache, present in 13 of 22 patients, was often aggravated by working with the head in forward flexion. Paresthesias were present in six patients. The spine of the axis was often prominent. In three patients there was objective evidence of cord compression with sensory and/or pyramidal signs. In eight the lesion was asymptomatic and discovered by routine lateral radiography in flexion, the position of maximum subluxation. Conservative treatment involved the continuous use of a cervical collar to limit neck flexion. This usually relieved subjective symptoms including headaches. Successful surgical fixation was performed in two individuals. Surgical indications included acute or chronic cord compression or severe symptoms unrelieved by a collar. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:5907320

  7. Rhinitis in children: Common clinical presentations and differential diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Rotiroti, G; Roberts, G; Scadding, G K

    2015-03-01

    Rhinitis is a common presentation in childhood. Acute virally induced rhinitis is generally self-limiting and usually does not require medical attention. Whilst allergic rhinitis is the focus of the paediatric allergist, the presentation of other diseases or comorbidities that can complicate or mimic allergic rhinitis needs to be considered. Effects on the child's quality of life also need to be addressed. Rhinitis can be associated with asthma and other significant comorbidities: importantly, non-allergic rhinitis can sometimes be a consequence of systemic immune impairment. The diagnosis of rhinitis is based on clinical findings with directed investigations. Nasal nitric oxide measurement is an emerging diagnostic tool and helpful particularly in relation to evaluating the differential diagnosis in more difficult rhinitis. Successfully identifying the cause of rhinitis in childhood and associated comorbidities can ensure that the patient is successfully treated as described in the recently published EAACI Pediatric Rhinitis Position Paper. PMID:25616224

  8. Droxidopa for neurogenic orthostatic hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Roy; Biaggioni, Italo; Low, Phillip; Pedder, Simon; Hewitt, L. Arthur; Mauney, Joe; Feirtag, Michael; Mathias, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether droxidopa, an oral norepinephrine precursor, improves symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (nOH). Methods: Patients with symptomatic nOH due to Parkinson disease, multiple system atrophy, pure autonomic failure, or nondiabetic autonomic neuropathy underwent open-label droxidopa dose optimization (100–600 mg 3 times daily), followed, in responders, by 7-day washout and then a 7-day double-blind trial of droxidopa vs placebo. Outcome measures included patient self-ratings on the Orthostatic Hypotension Questionnaire (OHQ), a validated, nOH-specific tool that assesses symptom severity and symptom impact on daily activities. Results: From randomization to endpoint (n = 162), improvement in mean OHQ composite score favored droxidopa over placebo by 0.90 units (p = 0.003). Improvement in OHQ symptom subscore favored droxidopa by 0.73 units (p = 0.010), with maximum change in “dizziness/lightheadedness.” Improvement in symptom-impact subscore favored droxidopa by 1.06 units (p = 0.003), with maximum change for “standing a long time.” Mean standing systolic blood pressure (BP) increased by 11.2 vs 3.9 mm Hg (p < 0.001), and mean supine systolic BP by 7.6 vs 0.8 mm Hg (p < 0.001). At endpoint, supine systolic BP >180 mm Hg was observed in 4.9% of droxidopa and 2.5% of placebo recipients. Adverse events reported in ?3% of double-blind droxidopa recipients were headache (7.4%) and dizziness (3.7%). No patients discontinued double-blind treatment because of adverse events. Conclusions: In patients with symptomatic nOH, droxidopa improved symptoms and symptom impact on daily activities, with an associated increase in standing systolic BP, and was generally well tolerated. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that in patients with symptomatic nOH who respond to open-label droxidopa, droxidopa improves subjective and objective manifestation of nOH at 7 days. PMID:24944260

  9. Fibrosing mediastinitis: clinical presentation, therapeutic outcomes, and adaptive immune response.

    PubMed

    Peikert, Tobias; Colby, Thomas V; Midthun, David E; Pairolero, Peter C; Edell, Eric S; Schroeder, Darrell R; Specks, Ulrich

    2011-11-01

    Fibrosing mediastinitis (FM) is a rare disorder characterized by the invasive proliferation of fibrous tissue within the mediastinum. FM frequently results in the compression of vital mediastinal structures and has been associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Its pathogenesis remains unknown. However, in North America most cases are thought to represent an immune-mediated hypersensitivity response to Histoplasma capsulatum infection. To characterize the clinical disease spectrum, natural disease progression, responses to therapy, and overall survival, we retrospectively analyzed all 80 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of FM evaluated at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, from 1998 to 2007. Furthermore, we characterized the adaptive immune response in 15 representative patients by immunohistochemistry. The majority of patients presented with nonspecific respiratory symptoms due to the compression of mediastinal broncho-vascular structures. Chest radiographic imaging most frequently revealed localized, invasive, and frequently calcified right-sided mediastinal masses. Most patients had radiographic or serologic evidence of previous histoplasmosis. In contrast to earlier reports summarizing previously reported FM cases, the clinical course of our patients appeared to be more benign and less progressive. The overall survival was similar to that of age-matched controls. There were only 5 deaths, 2 of which were attributed to FM. These differences may reflect publication bias associated with the preferential reporting of more severely affected FM patients in the medical literature, as well as the more inclusive case definition used in our consecutive case series. Surgical and nonsurgical interventions effectively relieved symptoms caused by the compression of mediastinal vascular structures in these carefully selected patients. In contrast, antifungal and antiinflammatory agents appeared ineffective. Histologic examination and immunostaining revealed mixed inflammatory infiltrates consistent with a fibroinflammatory tissue response in these histoplasmosis-associated FM cases. The immune cell infiltrates included large numbers of CD20-positive B lymphocytes. As B lymphocytes may contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease, therapeutic B-cell depletion should be investigated as a therapeutic strategy for FM. PMID:22033450

  10. Graded Compression Stockings Prevent Post-spaceflight Orthostatic Hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platts, S. H.; Brown, A. K.; Locke, J.; Stenger, M. B.

    2008-01-01

    Post-spaceflight orthostatic intolerance is characterized by hypotension and presyncope in 20-30% of returning astronauts. Previous data from our laboratory suggests that this is largely a result of decreased venous return. Currently, NASA astronauts wear an anti-gravity suit (AGS) which consists of inflatable air bladders over the calves, thighs and abdomen, which are typically pressurized from 0.5 to 1.5 PSI (27 to 78 mmHg). ISS crew members sometimes wear Russian Kentavr suits which consist of laced compression shorts and gaiters, providing 30 mmHg nominally. While these garments are effective during reentry, there are a number of drawbacks that make them impractical for postflight use. We studied the ability of commercially available, custom fit, graded compression stockings (Jobst, 55 mmHg at ankle to 6 mmHg at top of thigh, 25 mmHg mean compression) to prevent postflight orthostatic intolerance, hypothesizing that these garments would prevent orthostatic intolerance following short duration space flight. Crew members from a single Space Shuttle flight were tilted to 80 degrees for 10 min while wearing the stockings (n=5 males) upon arrival at the clinic (2 hrs after landing). Hemodynamic data were compared to data from all crewmembers tilted (without countermeasures) since return to flight (n=9). Two-way, repeated measures ANOVA, using the entire tilt time curve (0-10 min) show that systolic blood pressure (SBP, group effect p=0.008), stroke volume (SV, group effect p=0.003), and cardiac output (CO, group effect p=0.004) were higher in crewmembers who wore the Jobst stockings. A one-way ANOVA comparing the last minute standing also showed that SV (p=0.001) and CO (p less than 0.001) were higher and SBP tended to be higher (p=0.06) in Jobst subjects compared to controls. Control subjects had a higher rate of presyncope than Jobst subjects (3/9 vs 0/5) during the tilt on landing day. Orthostatic hypotension continues to present following spaceflight, despite fluid loading and other countermeasures. This preliminary study shows that commercially available compression stockings may ameliorate this problem. These stockings are readily available, inexpensive, and can be worn for days following landing. We have observed similar protection against orthostatic intolerance in ground-based studies of hypovolemic test subjects. Further refinements to the design and compression of the stockings are in progress.

  11. Late-Onset Nephropathic Cystinosis: Clinical Presentation, Outcome, and Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Servais, Aude; Morinière, Vincent; Grünfeld, Jean-Pierre; Noël, Laure-Hélène; Goujon, Jean-Michel; Chadefaux-Vekemans, Bernadette; Antignac, Corinne

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by the intralysosomal accumulation of cystine, as a result of a defect in cystine transport across the lysosomal membrane. Three clinical forms have been described on the basis of severity of symptoms and age of onset: infantile cystinosis, characterized by renal proximal tubulopathy and progression to end-stage renal disease before 12 yr of age; juvenile form, with a markedly slower rate of progression; and adult form, with only ocular abnormalities. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Fourteen patients in nine unrelated families with noninfantile cystinosis were studied. Information about clinical outcome, biochemical data, renal histopathologic data, and genotyping was collected. Results: Eight patients had Fanconi syndrome. Proteinuria was present in all patients. Serum creatinine at last follow-up, without specific treatment, ranged between 69 and 450 ?mol/L, at an age of 12 to 56 yr. Four patients reached end-stage renal disease by 12 to 28 yr. Renal biopsies, available in four cases, disclosed focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in three and crystals in three. Genetic screening showed that patients were compound heterozygous for mutations in the CTNS gene in four families and homozygous in two families. Patients had at least one “mild” mutation. A single heterozygous mutation was identified in one family and none in two families (only 72% mutations found). Conclusion: Renal involvement is heterogeneous in patients with noninfantile cystinosis even within families, and renal disease should be assessed even in families of patients with seemingly isolated ocular forms. PMID:18178779

  12. Current pharmacologic treatment for orthostatic hypotension

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roy Freeman

    2008-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension is treated effectively with the combined use of non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions.\\u000a Patients should be counseled as to the nature of the underlying disorder and reversible causes of orthostatic hypotension\\u000a should be removed. Should symptoms persist, pharmacological treatment is implemented. First line pharmacotherapeutic interventions\\u000a include volume repletion in combination with alpha-adrenoreceptor agonists. If unsuccessful there are several supplementary

  13. Clinical presentation and protocol for management of hepatic sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Modaresi Esfeh, Jamak; Culver, Daniel; Plesec, Thomas; John, Binu

    2015-03-01

    The liver is one of the most commonly involved extrapulmonary sites in sarcoidosis. Hepatic sarcoidosis has a broad range of presentations from scattered, asymptomatic noncaseating granulomas with normal liver enzymes, which are very common in patients with known pulmonary sarcoidosis, to portal hypertension and cirrhosis, which are relatively uncommon. Diagnosis is based on a combination of clinical, laboratory and histological manifestations. The authors' protocol for management of patients with suspected sarcoidosis of the liver without focal lesions includes a transjugular liver biopsy with portal pressure measurements to confirm the diagnosis, rule out coexisting liver diseases and to identify select patients with fibrosis or portal hypertension for consideration of immunosuppression. Steroids and azathioprine are the preferred agents and methotrexate is not recommended. PMID:25473783

  14. Pharmacology of centrally acting hypotensive drugs.

    PubMed

    van Zwieten, P A

    1980-01-01

    1. A survey is given of the various aspects of centrally acting hypotensive drugs. The majority of centrally acting hypotensive agents act by way of central alpha-adrenoceptors, probably located in the pontomedullary region of the brain. These central receptors are stimulated by clonidine, guanfacine and various related compounds, and also by alpha-methylnoradrenaline, generated in vivo upon biotransformation of alpha-methyldopa within the brain. The stimulation of the alpha-adrenoceptors induces a decrease in peripheral sympathetic tone and thus a fall in arterial blood pressure and bradycardia. 2. The possibility that presynaptic alpha-adrenoceptors in the brain are involved in the central hypotensive action of clonidine, guanfacine and related compounds is discussed. Also, the possible involvement of central histaminergic and cholinergic receptors in central hypotensive effects is reviewed. 3. Various experimental compounds with a central hypotensive effect different from that of clonidine and related drugs are mentioned. 4. Finally, it is pointed out that the hypotensive effects of various beta-sympatholytic drugs and of prazosin are probably not of central origin. PMID:6104975

  15. Clinical presentation and etiology of osteomalacia/rickets in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hazzazi, Mohammad A; Alzeer, Ibrahim; Tamimi, Waleed; Al Atawi, Mohsen; Al Alwan, Ibrahim

    2013-09-01

    This study was conducted to determine the causes and clinical presentations of osteomalacia/rickets in adolescents seen at the King Abdulaziz Medical City (KAMC), Riyadh. Because osteomalacia and rickets constitute the same entity, the term osteomalacia will be used for future discussion. A retrospective file review was performed on all adolescents (10-16 years) with osteomalacia, defined as alkaline phosphatase levels ?500 IU/L, seen at the KAMC, Riyadh, from 2000 to 2006. We recorded the signs and symptoms, dietary history and amount of sun exposure at presentation. A total of 135 patients were found to fit the inclusion criteria for the study. Of them, 57 had nutritional causes, with a mean age of 13.2 years, and included 32 females. At diagnosis, 22 patients were found to have bone pain, 10 had bone deformities, eight had pathological fractures and 17 were asymptomatic. Secondary causes for osteomalacia were found in 59 cases who had liver and renal disease and in 19 other patients who were on medications such as anticonvulsants and steroids, which are known to cause osteomalacia. Our study indicates that osteomalacia is a significant health burden that deserves special attention. Bone pain is the most common presenting symptom at diagnosis. Because of the high risk of osteomalacia associated with the use of anticonvulsants and steroids, it is advised that all patients on these drugs should be routinely screened for secondary osteomalacia. PMID:24029258

  16. Sciatica presenting as post-amputation neuroma: presentation and clinical findings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ali Mofidi; Amit Kotecha; Robin Banerjee; Chandra M. Rao; J. M. Trivedi

    2010-01-01

    Study design  Case report, level-5 evidence.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Objective  To highlight the clinical challenges associated with lumbar disc disease in an amputee.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Summary of background  Radicular compression in a patient with lower limb amputation may present as phantom limb pain. Furthermore, nerve root tension\\u000a signs as a diagnostic sign of nerve root compression may be meaningless on the amputated side due to the absence of

  17. Demographic and Clinical Characteristics of New Patients Presenting to a Community Teaching Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Lishchyna, Natalia; Mior, Silvano

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We compare patient populations attending chiropractors in the field to those in teaching clinics to allow educational institutions to determine if students are exposed to a similar case mix. The purpose of our study was to describe and compare descriptively the clinical case mix of a recently opened community-based teaching clinic to previously published practice data. Methods: A retrospective descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using new patient records completed at a clinic. Data were extracted using a specifically designed abstraction form. Results: We manually abstracted 649 files. A total of 580 new patient files was included in the analysis, among which 57.7% included female patients with a mean age of 43 years (SD 18), and 42.1% presented with a chief complaint of more than one year in duration. The vast majority of patients complained of spinal pain (81.4%), most commonly low back pain. Almost 92% of the diagnoses were classified as simple (sprain/strain). The average number of visits per patient was 7.4 (SD 11.3); 54.7% received spinal manipulation on their first visit. The majority of patients were referred by the treating intern (64.8%) and about 24% of patients were local residents. Conclusions: Our study contributed to the few studies detailing patients attending chiropractic academic teaching clinics. It provided benchmark demographic and clinical data that may be used for operational planning. Our study suggested that the case mix of this teaching clinic provides interns with appropriate learning opportunities to achieve entry to practice competencies. PMID:23362363

  18. Cerebral venous thrombosis in post-lumbar puncture intracranial hypotension: case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Kate, Mahesh P.

    2014-01-01

    The spectrum of presentation of intracranial hypotension is clinically perplexing. We report a case of 31-year-old post-partum woman who underwent an uneventful caesarean section under spinal anesthesia. From the second day of surgery she developed postural headache, the headache lost its postural character after few days. She then developed seizures and ataxic hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging showed features of severe intracranial hypotension in the brain and the spinal cord, and magnetic resonance venography showed cortical vein and partial superior sagittal sinus thrombosis. Prothrombotic (etiological) work-up showed Protein C and S deficiency. She responded to anticoagulation therapy and recovered completely. On review of literature two distinct groups could be identified obstetric and non-obstetric. The non-obstetric group included patients who underwent diagnostic lumbar puncture, intrathecal injection of medications and epidural anesthesia for non-obstetric surgeries. Poor outcome and mortality was noted in non-obstetric group, while obstetric group had an excellent recovery. PMID:24627803

  19. Presentation and Outcomes with Clinically Apparent Interferon Beta Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Robert J.; Hayashi, Paul; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Kleiner, David E.; Kochhar, Sweta; Gu, Jiezhun; Ghabril, Marwan

    2013-01-01

    AIMS The aim of this study was to describe the presenting features and outcomes of consecutive patients with liver injury attributed to interferon beta. Methods The presenting features of 8 subjects with clinically apparent liver injury attributed to interferon beta enrolled in the U.S. Drug-Induced Liver Injury Network (DILIN) prospective registry between 2004 and 2010 were reviewed and compared to 11 published reports of symptomatic hepatotoxicity. Results All 8 of the DILIN patients were women, 75% were Caucasian and the mean age was 49 years. Most subjects presented with an acute hepatocellular injury pattern and mean serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels were 725 ± 593 U/L. The median duration of interferon beta use before injury onset was 462 days, and 4 patients had been treated for more than a year. No patient had detectable antinuclear or smooth muscle antibodies. One patient died of acute liver failure and the remaining patients usually recovered within 2 to 3 months. Causality assessment scored 3 cases as definite, 3 highly likely, 1 probable and 1 possible. Eleven additional published cases were all women, mean age was 40 years, mean ALT at onset 840 U/L, and 7 (63%) had autoantibodies. Liver histology in 3 cases from DILIN and 9 from the literature commented upon centri-lobular (zone 3) necrosis and infiltrates with lymphocytes and plasma cells. Conclusions Interferon beta hepatotoxicity occurs mostly in women and has a variable, but often prolonged time to onset. Most patients have self-limited acute hepatocellular liver injury but several have required liver transplantation or died of acute liver failure. Liver histology available in 3 cases demonstrated zone 3 necrosis and autoimmune features suggestive of an immunologic basis to this adverse drug reaction. PMID:23377559

  20. Randomized Withdrawal Study of Patients With Symptomatic Neurogenic Orthostatic Hypotension Responsive to Droxidopa

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Roy; Mathias, Christopher J.; Low, Phillip; Hewitt, L. Arthur; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract— We evaluated whether droxidopa, a prodrug converted to norepinephrine, is beneficial in the treatment of symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension, which results from failure to generate an appropriate norepinephrine response to postural challenge. Patients with symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension and Parkinson disease, multiple system atrophy, pure autonomic failure, or nondiabetic autonomic neuropathy underwent open-label droxidopa titration (100–600 mg, 3× daily). Responders then received an additional 7-day open-label treatment at their individualized dose. Patients were subsequently randomized to continue with droxidopa or withdraw to placebo for 14 days. We then assessed patient-reported scores on the Orthostatic Hypotension Questionnaire and blood pressure measurements. Mean worsening of Orthostatic Hypotension Questionnaire dizziness/lightheadedness score from randomization to end of study (the primary outcome; N=101) was 1.9±3.2 with placebo and 1.3±2.8 units with droxidopa (P=0.509). Four of the other 5 Orthostatic Hypotension Questionnaire symptom scores and all 4 symptom-impact scores favored droxidopa, with statistical significance for the patient’s self-reported ability to perform activities requiring standing a short time (P=0.033) and standing a long time (P=0.028). Furthermore, a post hoc analysis of a predefined composite score of all symptoms (Orthostatic Hypotension Questionnaire composite) demonstrated a significant benefit for droxidopa (P=0.013). There was no significant difference between groups for standing systolic blood pressure (P=0.680). Droxidopa was well tolerated. In summary, this randomized withdrawal droxidopa study failed to meet its primary efficacy end point. Additional clinical trials are needed to confirm that droxidopa is beneficial in symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension, as suggested by the positive secondary outcomes of this trial. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00633880. PMID:25350981

  1. Clinical Presentation, Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Ralf J.

    2013-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is a chronic mucocutaneous autoimmune skin blistering disease. The pathogenic relevance of autoantibodies targeting type VII collagen (COL7) has been well-documented. Therefore, EBA is a prototypical autoimmune disease with a well-characterized pathogenic relevance of autoantibody binding to the target antigen. EBA is a rare disease with an incidence of 0.2 new cases per million and per year. The current treatment of EBA relies on general immunosuppressive therapy, which does not lead to remission in all cases. Therefore, there is a high, so far unmet medical need for the development of novel therapeutic options. During the last 10 years, several novel in vitro and in vivo models of EBA have been established. These models demonstrated a critical role of the genetic background, T cells, and cytokines for mediating the loss of tolerance towards COL7. Neutrophils, complement activation, Fc gamma receptor engagement, cytokines, several molecules involved in cell signaling, release of reactive oxygen species, and matrix metalloproteinases are crucial for autoantibody-induced tissue injury in EBA. Based on this growing understanding of the diseases' pathogenesis, several potential novel therapeutic targets have emerged. In this review, the clinical presentation, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and current treatment options for EBA are discussed in detail. PMID:23956869

  2. Current Concepts in Orthostatic Hypotension Management

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Amy C.; Shibao, Cyndya

    2013-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension is a condition commonly affecting the elderly and is often accompanied by disabling presyncopal symptoms, syncope and impaired quality of life. The pathophysiology of orthostatic hypotension is linked to abnormal blood pressure regulatory mechanisms and autonomic insufficiency. As part of its diagnostic evaluation, a comprehensive history and medical examination focused on detecting symptoms and physical findings of autonomic neuropathy should be performed. In individuals with substantial falls in blood pressure upon standing, autonomic function tests are recommended to detect impairment of autonomic reflexes. Treatment should always follow a stepwise approach with initial use of nonpharmacologic interventions including avoidance of hypotensive medications, high-salt diet and physical counter maneuvers. If these measures are not sufficient, medications such as fludrocortisone and midodrine can be added. The goals of treatment are to improve symptoms and to make the patient as ambulatory as possible instead of targeting arbitrary blood pressure values. PMID:23832761

  3. Dialysis dose and intra-dialytic hypotension – results from the HEMO Study

    PubMed Central

    Mc Causland, Finnian R.; Brunelli, Steven M.; Waikar, Sushrut S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Intra-dialytic hypotension is common and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in chronic hemodialysis patients. Higher dialysis ‘dose’ may generate transient intra-dialytic osmotic gradients, predisposing to intracellular fluid shifts and resulting in hypotension. Study Design We performed a post-hoc analysis of the HEMO Study, a multi-center trial that randomized chronic hemodialysis patients to high vs. standard Kt/V and higher vs. lower membrane flux. In order to achieve dose targets, per protocol, adjustments were made in membrane efficiency, blood flow, or dialysate flow before changing session length. Detailed hemodynamic and urea kinetic modeling data were abstracted from 1825 individuals. The primary outcome was the occurrence of hypotensive events necessitating clinical intervention (saline infusion, lowering of ultrafiltration rate or reduced blood flow). Results Intra-dialytic hypotensive events occurred more frequently in the higher Kt/V group (18.3 vs. 16.8%; p<0.001). Participants randomized to higher target Kt/V had a greater adjusted risk of intra-dialytic hypotension than those randomized to standard Kt/V (OR 1.12; 95%CI 1.01–1.25). Higher KoA and rate of urea removal was associated with greater adjusted odds of intra-dialytic hypotension (OR 1.05; 95%CI 1.04–1.06 per mg/dL/hr). Conclusions Higher dialysis dose, over relatively constrained treatment times, may associate with an increased risk of intra-dialytic hypotension. These findings raise the possibility that rapidity of intra-dialytic reductions in plasma osmolality may have an important role in mediating hemodynamic instability. PMID:24192428

  4. Genetics and molecular biology of hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, D.

    1994-01-01

    Major strides in the molecular biology of essential hypertension are currently underway. This has tended to obscure the fact that a number of inherited disorders associated with low blood pressure exist and that these diseases may have milder and underrecognized phenotypes that contribute importantly to blood pressure variation in the general population. This review highlights some of the gene products that, if abnormal, could cause hypotension in some individuals. Diseases due to abnormalities in the catecholamine enzymes are discussed in detail. It is likely that genetic abnormalities with hypotensive phenotypes will be as interesting and diverse as those that give rise to hypertensive disorders.

  5. Clinical presentation and management of diabetes mellitus in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Azemi, Nasser; Diejomaoh, Michael F; Angelaki, Elisavet; Mohammed, Asiya T

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical presentation, management, and the outcome of diabetes mellitus in pregnancy. Methods One hundred seventy-one patients with diabetes mellitus admitted between September 1, 2006, and June 30, 2008, to the labor room at Maternity Hospital in Kuwait for induction of labor made up the study population; while an equivalent number of patients without medical complications who also were admitted for induction of labor made up the control group. The patients were assessed at admission, and their medical data were extracted. The study and control patients were monitored through labor/puerperium, and the outcome was documented. Results Gestational diabetes mellitus was diagnosed in 71.9% of the study patients, a past history of diabetes mellitus was recorded in 81.34% of the study patients, and 49.2% of the patients were admitted at 8–12 weeks of gestation for diabetic control. The mean weight gained in pregnancy was significantly higher for control patients (11.52±5.643 versus [vs] 9.90±5.757 kg/m2; P<0.009), and the body mass index of study patients was higher (32.00±6.160 vs 28.20±5.885 kg/m2; P<0.0001). Of the study population, 64.3% of the patients were managed with diet and increased physical activity and 35.7% with insulin, diet, and increased physical activity. The incidences of maternal morbidity in both study and control groups were comparable, and the incidence of preeclampsia was low, at 2.3%. The gestational age at delivery was higher in the control group (39.02±1.834 weeks vs 38.62±1.773 weeks; P<0.0001), and the percentage of cesarean deliveries was higher in the study population (44.4% vs 33.3%; P=0.046). The Apgar scores of the both groups were comparable and in the normal range, and the incidences of fetal anomaly (1.17%), shoulder dystocia (1.8%), and Erb’s palsy (1.8%) were low. Conclusion Gestational diabetes mellitus was diagnosed in 71.9% of the diabetic patients studied, and dietary control and increased physical activity were the main modalities of management. There was an increased rate of cesarean section in the study population, the incidences of maternal and perinatal morbidity were low, and the perinatal outcomes were satisfactory. PMID:24376363

  6. Orthostatic Hypotension (Low Blood Pressure) and Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Order Free Materials Today Orthostatic Hypotension (Low Blood Pressure) Callers to the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation (PDF) National ... known as orthostatic hypotension (OH), or low blood pressure. If you have experienced it, you may already ...

  7. Malaria real-time PCR: correlation with clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Dormond, L; Jaton, K; de Vallière, S; Genton, B; Greub, G

    2015-05-01

    Among 112 patients infected only by Plasmodium falciparum, WHO criteria of severity were compared with parasite load assessed by microscopy and quantitative PCR. Clinical severity was significantly correlated with higher parasite load as determined by microscopy (p < 0.001) and by PCR (p < 0.001). Hence, quantitative PCR might be useful to predict outcome. PMID:25905022

  8. Malaria real-time PCR: correlation with clinical presentation

    PubMed Central

    Dormond, L.; Jaton, K.; de Vallière, S.; Genton, B.; Greub, G.

    2015-01-01

    Among 112 patients infected only by Plasmodium falciparum, WHO criteria of severity were compared with parasite load assessed by microscopy and quantitative PCR. Clinical severity was significantly correlated with higher parasite load as determined by microscopy (p < 0.001) and by PCR (p < 0.001). Hence, quantitative PCR might be useful to predict outcome.

  9. Current clinical presentation of prostatic abscesses; two case reports

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P Ribes; P. L Blanc; E Legrand; J. M Marc

    2001-01-01

    Clinical cases – We report two cases of prostatic abscesses. The first was a diabetic patient with a prostatic adenoma both risk factors. In this case, the bacteria was Staphylococcus aureus, susceptible to ofloxacin and roxythromycin per os. The abscess was drained by a transrectal puncture. The second case was a patient hospitalized in the ICU after abdominal surgery. Multiple

  10. Necrotizing Fasciitis: Clinical Presentation, Microbiology, and Determinants of Mortality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CHIN-HO WONG; HAW-CHONG CHANG; SHANKER PASUPATHY; LAY-WAI KHIN; JEE-LIM TAN; CHENG-OOI LOW

    Results: The paucity of cutaneous findings early in the course of the disease makes the diagnosis difficult, and only thirteen of the eighty-nine patients had a diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis at the time of admission. Preadmission treatment with antibiotics modified the initial clinical picture and often masked the severity of the underlying infec- tion. Polymicrobial synergistic infection was the most

  11. [Clinical presentations and a classification of oligophrenia psychoses in children.

    PubMed

    Makarov, I V

    2014-01-01

    The article discusses the clinical variants of psychosis in children with mental retardation. A particular group of psychotic disorders - oligophrenia psychosis, is described. A total of 28 children (19 boys) who were hospitalized in a psychiatric hospital or treated as outpatients from 1992 to 2012 were examined. The average age of the patients was 12±1.3 years. The duration of follow-up (analysis of medical records or direct clinical observation) was up to 18 years. Almost all children had mild mental retardation (only one patient had moderate mental retardation). Diagnosis corresponded to ICD-10 codes F06.07, F06.27, F06.29, F06.817 or F06.819. Mental retardation corresponded to the second code section F70 (F71 in one case). Clinical and psychopathological methods, follow-up study, statistical analysis of the data were used. Four clinical variants of oligophrenia psychoses in children were identified: 1) psychosis with amentive confusion, 2) schizophreniform psychosis, 3) verbal hallucinosis, 4) psychosis with a predominance of psychomotor agitation. PMID:24637824

  12. The Use of a Structured Case Presentation Examination to Evaluate Clinical Competencies of Psychology Doctoral Students

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick V. Petti

    2008-01-01

    Although the evaluation of clinical competence is an essential responsibility for all programs in clinical and counseling psychology, this task presents many conceptual and operational difficulties. The Clinical Proficiency Progress Review (CPPR) was developed to define and evaluate clinical competencies for third-year practicum students. Normative data for 911 students and 52 examiners over 10 years are presented. Outcomes yielded consistent

  13. Nocturnal Systemic Hypotension Increases the Risk of Glaucoma Progression

    PubMed Central

    Charlson, Mary E.; de Moraes, Carlos Gustavo; Link, Alissa; Wells, Martin T.; Harmon, Gregory; Peterson, Janey C.; Ritch, Robert; Liebmann, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this prospective, longitudinal study of patients with normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) was to determine whether patients with nocturnal hypotension are at greater risk for visual field (VF) loss over 12 months than those without nocturnal hypotension. Design Prospective, longitudinal study. Participants Consecutive patients with NTG with at least 5 prior VF tests were screened for eligibility. Methods The baseline evaluation assessed demographic and clinical characteristics, covering systemic comorbid conditions, including systemic hypertension. All oral and ophthalmologic medications were recorded. A complete ophthalmological examination was performed at baseline and follow-up. Patients had their blood pressure (BP) monitored every 30 minutes for 48 hours with an ambulatory recording device at baseline and 6 and 12 months. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was based on the global rates of VF progression by linear regression of the mean VF threshold sensitivity over time (decibels/year). Results Eighty-five patients with NTG (166 eyes; mean age, 65 years; 67% were women) were included. Of the 85 patients, 29% had progressed in the 5 VFs collected before study enrollment. The nocturnal mean arterial pressure (MAP) was compared with the daytime MAP. Multivariate analysis showed that the total time that sleep MAP was 10 mmHg below the daytime MAP was a significant predictor of subsequent VF progression (P<0.02). Conclusions Cumulative nocturnal hypotension predicted VF loss in this cohort. Our data suggest that the duration and magnitude of decrease in nocturnal blood pressure below the daytime MAP, especially pressures that are 10 mmHg lower than daytime MAP, predict progression of NTG. Low nocturnal blood pressure, whether occurring spontaneously or as a result of medications, may lead to worsening of VF defects. PMID:24869467

  14. Hypotension and environmental noise: a replication study.

    PubMed

    Lercher, Peter; Widmann, Ulrich; Thudium, Jürg

    2014-09-01

    Up to now, traffic noise effect studies focused on hypertension as health outcome. Hypotension has not been considered as a potential health outcome although in experiments some people also responded to noise with decreases of blood pressure. Currently, the characteristics of these persons are not known and whether this down regulation of blood pressure is an experimental artifact, selection, or can also be observed in population studies is unanswered. In a cross-sectional replication study, we randomly sampled participants (age 20-75, N = 807) from circular areas (radius = 500 m) around 31 noise measurement sites from four noise exposure strata (35-44, 45-54, 55-64, >64 Leq, dBA). Repeated blood pressure measurements were available for a smaller sample (N = 570). Standardized information on socio-demographics, housing, life style and health was obtained by door to door visits including anthropometric measurements. Noise and air pollution exposure was assigned by GIS based on both calculation and measurements. Reported hypotension or hypotension medication past year was the main outcome studied. Exposure-effect relationships were modeled with multiple non-linear logistic regression techniques using separate noise estimations for total, highway and rail exposure. Reported hypotension was significantly associated with rail and total noise exposure and strongly modified by weather sensitivity. Reported hypotension medication showed associations of similar size with rail and total noise exposure without effect modification by weather sensitivity. The size of the associations in the smaller sample with BMI as additional covariate was similar. Other important cofactors (sex, age, BMI, health) and moderators (weather sensitivity, adjacent main roads and associated annoyance) need to be considered as indispensible part of the observed relationship. This study confirms a potential new noise effect pathway and discusses potential patho-physiological routes of actions. PMID:25162707

  15. Hypotension and Environmental Noise: A Replication Study

    PubMed Central

    Lercher, Peter; Widmann, Ulrich; Thudium, Jürg

    2014-01-01

    Up to now, traffic noise effect studies focused on hypertension as health outcome. Hypotension has not been considered as a potential health outcome although in experiments some people also responded to noise with decreases of blood pressure. Currently, the characteristics of these persons are not known and whether this down regulation of blood pressure is an experimental artifact, selection, or can also be observed in population studies is unanswered. In a cross-sectional replication study, we randomly sampled participants (age 20–75, N = 807) from circular areas (radius = 500 m) around 31 noise measurement sites from four noise exposure strata (35–44, 45–54, 55–64, >64 Leq, dBA). Repeated blood pressure measurements were available for a smaller sample (N = 570). Standardized information on socio-demographics, housing, life style and health was obtained by door to door visits including anthropometric measurements. Noise and air pollution exposure was assigned by GIS based on both calculation and measurements. Reported hypotension or hypotension medication past year was the main outcome studied. Exposure-effect relationships were modeled with multiple non-linear logistic regression techniques using separate noise estimations for total, highway and rail exposure. Reported hypotension was significantly associated with rail and total noise exposure and strongly modified by weather sensitivity. Reported hypotension medication showed associations of similar size with rail and total noise exposure without effect modification by weather sensitivity. The size of the associations in the smaller sample with BMI as additional covariate was similar. Other important cofactors (sex, age, BMI, health) and moderators (weather sensitivity, adjacent main roads and associated annoyance) need to be considered as indispensible part of the observed relationship. This study confirms a potential new noise effect pathway and discusses potential patho-physiological routes of actions. PMID:25162707

  16. Chronic pelvic ischemia: etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation and management.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, H; Gupta, E; Sood, A

    2014-06-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) and bladder pain syndrome (BPS) although common, are vaguely defined and difficult to diagnose and manage etiologies of storage-type lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). The lack of optimal management options is a direct consequence of deficient understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying these conditions. These conditions are especially prevalent in females, and cumulative contemporary epidemiological, clinical and laboratory evidence implicates ischemia as one of the key players in the pathophysiologic foundation of both these disorders. Taken together they make up "the" diagnostic as well as therapeutic black-hole in urologic practice. Much akin to chronic ischemic heart disease, chronic ischemia-reperfusion has been shown to cause degenerative changes at cellular and subcellular level in the bladder mucosa, smooth muscle fibers, and vesical neural and microvascular structures leading to a hypersensitive, hyperactive bladder initially, which with time invariably progresses into a failed, fibrotic and pressurized bladder. Diagnosis and management of these diseases are currently symptom focused and remains a source of much frustration. Consideration of role of ischemia connotates hope and could lead to a paradigm shift in the management of these patients with a completely new therapeutic armamentarium attacking the pathology itself. The aim of the current review is to provide a clinical thought perspective on the etiology/pathophysiology of chronic pelvic ischemia and its role as a precursor to the aforementioned conditions, and shed some light upon the potential management strategies to consider. PMID:24988204

  17. [Iron deficiency in elderly people: clinical presentation and management].

    PubMed

    Chassagne, Philippe; Bahri, Oarda; Roca, Frédéric

    2014-06-01

    Iron deficiency (absolute or functional) is commonly observed (frequently without associated anemia) in up to one third of old people. Iron deficiency is the most cause of anemia in adults. Many non hematological consequences of iron deficiency are described like: cardiac failure, mood or cognitive disorders, chronic fatigue or restless leg syndrome. Iron deficiency can be orally or with intravenous iron replacement treates if necessary. Long term compliance of patients orally treated for iron deficiency is poor mainly because of fair tolerability of drugs. New regimen of intravenous iron replacement are now available when orally iron administration can not be achieved. In functional iron deficiency iron intravenous replacement seems especially relevant. However further controlled studies are necessary to assess their clinical benefits. PMID:25031217

  18. Bacillary angiomatosis with atypical clinical presentation in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Bernabeu-Wittel, J; Luque, R; Corbi, R; Mantrana-Bermejo, M; Navarrete, M; Vallejo, A; Bernabeu-Wittel, M

    2010-01-01

    Bacillary angiomatosis is a recently described infectious disease that usually affects immunosupressed hosts with a previous history of contact with cats. We report a rare case of bacillary angiomatosis in an immunocompetent 59-year-old woman with no history of previous exposure to cats, and atypical clinical features (fever and subcutaneous nodules with ulceration on the left ankle). Histopathology of the lesion showed extensive ulceration and reactive tumor-like vascular proliferation of the blood vessels with swollen endothelial cells and an inflammatory infiltrate including neutrophils and lymphocytes in the dermis and subcutis. Staining with the Warthin-Starry method demonstrated the presence of clustered bacilli located in the extracellular matrix adjacent to the proliferating endothelial cells. Diagnosis was confirmed with the detection of Bartonella spp. DNA in the affected skin and in bone marrow using polymerase chain reaction. PMID:21079313

  19. [Sclerosing mesenteritis. Report of two cases with different clinical presentation].

    PubMed

    Martínez Odriozola, P; García Jiménez, N; Cabeza García, S; Oceja Barrutieta, E

    2003-05-01

    Sclerosing mesenteritis is a rare disease of the mesenterium of unknown cause and chronic evolution. Two presentations have been reported: mesenteric panniculitis and retractile mesenteritis; inflammation of mesenteric fat predominates in one of them, while fibrotic thickening and shortening of the mesenterium is characteristic of the other. We report two cases of sclerosing mesenteritis which presented in very different ways. One patient suffered an episode of intestinal obstruction, and the second one was admitted for evaluation of fever of unknown origin (FUO). While intestinal obstruction is a relatively common complication of sclerosing mesenteritis, its presentation as a FUO is exceptional. PMID:12831301

  20. Clinical Focus Presentations: Can You Talk the Talk?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    PhD Cynthia J Miller (University of Louisville Physiology & Biophysics)

    2011-01-01

    When students are asked to do a class presentation about a disease affecting the human body, they often end up simply relaying facts and basic knowledge. This activity has very little relevancy to the actual tasks they would be completing in the medical field. This learning activity was designed to allow students to practice two different modes of real world communication: 1. Professional communication among colleagues 2. Bedside communication with patients. Students work in pairs to develop oral presentations that address these two very different set of skills. This resource includes guidelines for the activity, a rubric to assess student performance, and a suggested list of topics for the presentations.

  1. Pathophysiological basis of orthostatic hypotension in autonomic failure

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Adrianus A J; Halliwill, John R; Low, Phillip A; Wieling, Wouter

    1999-01-01

    In patients with autonomic failure orthostatic hypotension results from an impaired capacity to increase vascular resistance during standing. This fundamental defect leads to increased downward pooling of venous blood and a consequent reduction in stroke volume and cardiac output that exaggerates the orthostatic fall in blood pressure. The location of excessive venous blood pooling has not been established so far, but present data suggest that the abdominal compartment and perhaps leg skin vasculature are the most likely candidates. To improve the orthostatic tolerance in patients with autonomic failure, protective measures that reduce excessive orthostatic blood pooling have been developed and evaluated. These measures include physical counter-manoeuvres and abdominal compression. PMID:10432334

  2. Pathophysiological basis of orthostatic hypotension in autonomic failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smit, A. A.; Halliwill, J. R.; Low, P. A.; Wieling, W.

    1999-01-01

    In patients with autonomic failure orthostatic hypotension results from an impaired capacity to increase vascular resistance during standing. This fundamental defect leads to increased downward pooling of venous blood and a consequent reduction in stroke volume and cardiac output that exaggerates the orthostatic fall in blood pressure. The location of excessive venous blood pooling has not been established so far, but present data suggest that the abdominal compartment and perhaps leg skin vasculature are the most likely candidates. To improve the orthostatic tolerance in patients with autonomic failure, protective measures that reduce excessive orthostatic blood pooling have been developed and evaluated. These measures include physical counter-manoeuvres and abdominal compression.

  3. Vulvar cancer: epidemiology, clinical presentation, and management options

    PubMed Central

    Alkatout, Ibrahim; Schubert, Melanie; Garbrecht, Nele; Weigel, Marion Tina; Jonat, Walter; Mundhenke, Christoph; Günther, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiology Vulvar cancer can be classified into two groups according to predisposing factors: the first type correlates with a HPV infection and occurs mostly in younger patients. The second group is not HPV associated and occurs often in elderly women without neoplastic epithelial disorders. Histology Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common malignant tumor of the vulva (95%). Clinical features Pruritus is the most common and long-lasting reported symptom of vulvar cancer, followed by vulvar bleeding, discharge, dysuria, and pain. Therapy The gold standard for even a small invasive carcinoma of the vulva was historically radical vulvectomy with removal of the tumor with a wide margin followed by an en bloc resection of the inguinal and often the pelvic lymph nodes. Currently, a more individualized and less radical treatment is suggested: a radical wide local excision is possible in the case of localized lesions (T1). A sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy may be performed to reduce wound complications and lymphedema. Prognosis The survival of patients with vulvar cancer is good when convenient therapy is arranged quickly after initial diagnosis. Inguinal and/or femoral node involvement is the most significant prognostic factor for survival. PMID:25848321

  4. Clinical presentation and manual therapy for lower quadrant musculoskeletal conditions.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Carol A; Clark, Jeffrey D; Duncombe, Alison M; O'Hearn, Michael A

    2011-11-01

    Chronic lower quadrant injuries constitute a significant percentage of the musculoskeletal cases seen by clinicians. While impairments may vary, pain is often the factor that compels the patient to seek medical attention. Traumatic injury from sport is one cause of progressive chronic joint pain, particularly in the lower quarter. Recent studies have demonstrated the presence of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms in different lower quadrant pain syndromes, such as lumbar spine related leg pain, osteoarthritis of the knee, and following acute injuries such as lateral ankle sprain and anterior cruciate ligament rupture. Proper management of lower quarter conditions should include assessment of balance and gait as increasing pain and chronicity may lead to altered gait patterns and falls. In addition, quantitative sensory testing may provide insight into pain mechanisms which affect management and prognosis of musculoskeletal conditions. Studies have demonstrated analgesic effects and modulation of spinal excitability with use of manual therapy techniques, with clinical outcomes of improved gait and functional ability. This paper will discuss the evidence which supports the use of manual therapy for lower quarter musculoskeletal dysfunction. PMID:23115474

  5. Clinical presentation and diagnosis of toxoplasmic encephalitis in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Naoya; Maeda, Takuya; Mikita, Kei; Kato, Yasuyuki; Yanagisawa, Naoki; Suganuma, Akihiko; Imamura, Akifumi; Nakamura-Uchiyama, Fukumi; Miyahira, Yasushi; Kawana, Akihiko; Ohnishi, Kenji; Ajisawa, Atsushi

    2014-10-01

    Distinguishing life-threatening toxoplasmic encephalitis (TE) from brain lymphoma in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) may be difficult. Empiric anti-toxoplasmosis treatment is often initiated because of the reluctance in performing brain biopsies, which may delay the diagnosis and treatment of brain lymphoma in Japan. In this study, we retrospectively examined the clinical characteristics of 13 AIDS patients with TE in Japan, including magnetic resonance imaging and thallium 201 (201TI) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) findings, cerebral spinal fluid analysis, serology, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results. All patients improved on anti-toxoplasmosis treatment. Of the 11 patients who underwent serological testing, 6 (55%) had a positive serological result. Of the 7 patients who underwent PCR testing, 3 (42.9%) had a positive PCR result. Nine of 11 patients with TE (81.8%) had multiple lesions. Analysis of the sites of TE lesions did not reveal a difference in site predilection between TE and brain lymphoma. Uptake was negative in all 9 patients who underwent 201Tl SPECT. The study findings suggest that toxoplasma serostatus and PCR may be used to discriminate TE from brain lymphoma. No focal accumulation of 201TI is strongly suggestive of TE in patients with AIDS in Japan. PMID:24929035

  6. Present status of clinical deployment of glucokinase activators

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Akinobu; Terauchi, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Glucokinase is one of four members of the hexokinase family of enzymes. Its expression is limited to the major organs (such as the pancreas, liver, brain and the gastrointestinal tract) that are thought to have an integrated role in glucose sensing. In the liver, phosphorylation of glucose by glucokinase promotes glycogen synthesis, whereas in the ?-cells, it results in insulin release. Studies of glucokinase-linked genetically-modified mice and mutations in humans have illustrated the important roles played by glucokinase in whole-body glucose homeostasis, and suggest that the use of pharmacological agents that augment glucokinase activity could represent a viable treatment strategy in patients with type 2 diabetes. Since 2003, many glucokinase activators (GKAs) have been developed, and their ability to lower the blood glucose has been shown in several animal models of type 2 diabetes. Also, we and others have shown in mouse models that GKAs also have the effect of stimulating the proliferation of ?-cells. However, the results of recent phase II trials have shown that GKAs lose their efficacy within several months of use, and that their use is associated with a high incidence of hypoglycemia; furthermore, patients treated with GKAs frequently developed dyslipidemia. A better understanding of the role of glucokinase in metabolic effects is required to resolve several issues identified in clinical trials. PMID:25802718

  7. Amphetamine, past and present – a pharmacological and clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sharon L; Gosden, Jane; Nutt, David J

    2013-01-01

    Amphetamine was discovered over 100 years ago. Since then, it has transformed from a drug that was freely available without prescription as a panacea for a broad range of disorders into a highly restricted Controlled Drug with therapeutic applications restricted to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy. This review describes the relationship between chemical structure and pharmacology of amphetamine and its congeners. Amphetamine’s diverse pharmacological actions translate not only into therapeutic efficacy, but also into the production of adverse events and liability for recreational abuse. Accordingly, the balance of benefit/risk is the key challenge for its clinical use. The review charts advances in pharmaceutical development from the introduction of once-daily formulations of amphetamine through to lisdexamfetamine, which is the first d-amphetamine prodrug approved for the management of ADHD in children, adolescents and adults. The unusual metabolic route for lisdexamfetamine to deliver d-amphetamine makes an important contribution to its pharmacology. How lisdexamfetamine’s distinctive pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile translates into sustained efficacy as a treatment for ADHD and its reduced potential for recreational abuse is also discussed. PMID:23539642

  8. Chronic pelvic ischemia: etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation and management.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, H; Gupta, E; Sood, A

    2014-06-18

    Overactive Bladder (OAB) and Bladder Pain Syndrome (BPS) although common, are vaguely defined and difficult to diagnose and manage etiologies of storage--type lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). The lack of optimal management options is a direct consequence of deficient understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying these conditions. These conditions are especially prevalent in females, and cumulative contemporary epidemiological, clinical and laboratory evidence implicates ischemia as one of the key players in the pathophysiologic foundation of both these disorders. Taken together they make up 'the' diagnostic as well as therapeutic black--hole in urologic practice. Much akin to chronic ischemic heart disease, chronic ischemia--reperfusion has been shown to cause degenerative changes at cellular and sub--cellular level in the bladder mucosa, smooth muscle fibers, and vesical neural and microvascular structures leading to a hypersensitive, hyperactive bladder initially, which with time invariably progresses into a failed, fibrotic and pressurized bladder. Diagnosis and management of these diseases are currently symptom focused and remains a source of much frustration. Consideration of role of ischemia connotates hope and could lead to a paradigm shift in the management of these patients with a completely new therapeutic armamentarium attacking the pathology itself. PMID:24939050

  9. Present status of clinical deployment of glucokinase activators.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Akinobu; Terauchi, Yasuo

    2015-03-01

    Glucokinase is one of four members of the hexokinase family of enzymes. Its expression is limited to the major organs (such as the pancreas, liver, brain and the gastrointestinal tract) that are thought to have an integrated role in glucose sensing. In the liver, phosphorylation of glucose by glucokinase promotes glycogen synthesis, whereas in the ?-cells, it results in insulin release. Studies of glucokinase-linked genetically-modified mice and mutations in humans have illustrated the important roles played by glucokinase in whole-body glucose homeostasis, and suggest that the use of pharmacological agents that augment glucokinase activity could represent a viable treatment strategy in patients with type 2 diabetes. Since 2003, many glucokinase activators (GKAs) have been developed, and their ability to lower the blood glucose has been shown in several animal models of type 2 diabetes. Also, we and others have shown in mouse models that GKAs also have the effect of stimulating the proliferation of ?-cells. However, the results of recent phase II trials have shown that GKAs lose their efficacy within several months of use, and that their use is associated with a high incidence of hypoglycemia; furthermore, patients treated with GKAs frequently developed dyslipidemia. A better understanding of the role of glucokinase in metabolic effects is required to resolve several issues identified in clinical trials. PMID:25802718

  10. Clinical presentation and manual therapy for lower quadrant musculoskeletal conditions

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, Carol A; Clark, Jeffrey D; Duncombe, Alison M; O’Hearn, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    Chronic lower quadrant injuries constitute a significant percentage of the musculoskeletal cases seen by clinicians. While impairments may vary, pain is often the factor that compels the patient to seek medical attention. Traumatic injury from sport is one cause of progressive chronic joint pain, particularly in the lower quarter. Recent studies have demonstrated the presence of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms in different lower quadrant pain syndromes, such as lumbar spine related leg pain, osteoarthritis of the knee, and following acute injuries such as lateral ankle sprain and anterior cruciate ligament rupture. Proper management of lower quarter conditions should include assessment of balance and gait as increasing pain and chronicity may lead to altered gait patterns and falls. In addition, quantitative sensory testing may provide insight into pain mechanisms which affect management and prognosis of musculoskeletal conditions. Studies have demonstrated analgesic effects and modulation of spinal excitability with use of manual therapy techniques, with clinical outcomes of improved gait and functional ability. This paper will discuss the evidence which supports the use of manual therapy for lower quarter musculoskeletal dysfunction. PMID:23115474

  11. Clinical presentation and operative repair of hernia of Morgagni

    PubMed Central

    Loong, T; Kocher, H

    2005-01-01

    A 77 year old woman who presented with an incarcerated hernia of Morgagni was successfully treated without complications. A Medline search (1996 to date) along with cross referencing was done to quantify the number of acute presentations in adults compared to children. Different investigating modalities—for example, lateral chest and abdominal radiography, contrast studies or, in difficult cases, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging—can be used to diagnose hernia of Morgagni. The favoured method of repair—laparotomy or laparoscopy—is also discussed. A total of 47 case reports on children and 93 case reports on adults were found. Fourteen percent of children (seven out of 47) presented acutely compared with 12% of adults (12 out of 93). Repair at laparotomy was the method of choice but if uncertain, laparoscopy would be a useful diagnostic tool before attempted repair. Laparoscopic repair was favoured in adults especially in non-acute cases. PMID:15640427

  12. Appendiceal Crohn’s disease clinically presenting as acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hulin; Kim, Hyunsung; Rehman, Abdul; Jang, Se Min; Paik, Seung Sam

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the incidence of appendiceal Crohn’s disease (CD) and to summarize the characteristic histologic features of appendiceal CD. METHODS: We reviewed the pathology files of 2179 appendectomy specimens from January 2007 to May 2013. The computer-assisted retrieval search facility was utilized to collect specimens. We selected those cases that were diagnosed as CD or chronic granulomatous inflammation and defined the final diagnosis according to the histologic findings of CD, including transmural lymphocytic inflammation, non-caseating epithelioid granulomas, thickening of the appendiceal wall secondary to hypertrophy of muscularis mucosa, mucosal ulceration with crypt abscesses, mucosal fissures, and fistula formation. RESULTS: We found 12 cases (7 male and 5 female patients, with an average age of 29.8 years) of appendiceal CD. The incidence of appendiceal CD was 0.55%. The chief complaints were right lower quadrant pain, abdominal pain, lower abdominal pain, and diarrhea. The duration of symptom varied from 2 d to 5 mo. The histologic review revealed appendiceal wall thickening in 11 cases (92%), transmural inflammation in all cases (100%), lymphoid aggregates in all cases (100%), epithelioid granulomas in all cases (100%), mucosal ulceration in 11 cases (92%), crypt abscesses in 5 cases (42%), perforation in 2 cases (17%), muscular hypertrophy in 1 case (8%), neural hyperplasia in 5 cases (42%), and perpendicular serosal fibrosis in 8 cases (67%). CONCLUSION: A typical and protracted clinical course, unusual gross features of the appendix and the characteristic histologic features are a clue in the diagnosis of appendiceal CD. PMID:25516865

  13. [Myotonic dystrophies: clinical presentation, pathogenesis, diagnostics and therapy].

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Rudnik-Schöneborn, S

    2015-01-01

    The autosomal-dominant myotonic dystrophies dystrophia myotonica type-1 (DM1, Curschmann-Steinert disease) and dystrophia myotonica type-2 (DM2, proximal myotonic myopathy (PROMM)), are, contrary to the non-dystrophic myotonias, progressive multisystem disorders. DM1 and DM2 are the most frequent of the muscular dystrophies. In both diseases the skeletal muscle is the most severely affected organ (weakness, wasting, myotonia, myalgia). Additionally, they manifest in the eye, heart, brain, endocrine glands, gastrointestinal tract, skin, skeleton, and peripheral nerves. Phenotypes of DM1 may be classified as congenital, juvenile, classical, or late onset. DM2 is a disorder of the middle or older age and usually has a milder course compared to DM1. DM1 is due to a CTG-repeat expansion >?50 repeats in the non-coding 3' UTR of the DMPK-gene. DM2 is caused by a CCTG-repeat expansion to 75?-?11?000 repeats in intron-1 of the CNBP/ZNF9 gene. Mutant pre-mRNAs of both genes aggregate within the nucleus (nuclear foci), which sequester RNA-binding proteins and result in an abnormal protein expression via alternative splicing in downstream effector genes (toxic RNA diseases). Other mechanisms seem to play an additional pathogenetic role. Clinical severity of DM1 increases from generation to generation (anticipation). The higher the repeat expansion the more severe the DM1 phenotype. In DM2 severity of symptoms and age at onset do not correlate with the expansion size. Contrary to DM2, there is a congenital form and anticipation in DM1. PMID:25602187

  14. Spinal intramedullary cavernoma: clinical presentation and surgical outcome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Harel Deutsch; George I. Jallo; Alina Faktorovich; Fred Epstein

    2000-01-01

    Object. Improved neuroimaging techniques have led to an increase in the reported cases of intramedullary caver- nomas. The purpose of this study was to define the spectrum of presenting signs and symptoms in patients with spinal intramedullary cavernomas and to analyze the role of surgery as a treatment for these lesions. Methods. The authors reviewed the charts of 16 patients

  15. The Clinical Spectrum of Schwannomas Presenting With Visual Dysfunction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kimberly Peele Cockerham; Glenn C Cockerham; Richard Stutzman; Ahmed A Hidayat; Mark H Depper; Roger E Turbin; John S Kennerdell

    1999-01-01

    Schwannomas (neurilemomas) are benign tumors that arise from Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system. The most commonly involved nerves that cause neuro-ophthalmic manifestations are cranial nerves V and VIII. In this series of three women, schwannomas presented as intraconal masses that mimicked a cavernous hemangioma, a superior orbital mass transgressing the superior orbital fissure, and an expansive frontal lobe

  16. Digital Device in Postextraction Implantology: A Clinical Case Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Borgonovo, A. E.; Rigaldo, F.; Battaglia, D.; Giannì, A. B.

    2014-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this work is to describe a case of immediate implant placement after extraction of the upper right first premolar, with the use of CAD/CAM technology, which allows an early digital impression of the implant site with an intraoral scanner (MHT 3D Progress, Verona, Italy). Case Report. A 46-year-old female was referred with a disorder caused by continuous debonding of the prosthetic crown on the upper right first premolar. Clinically, there were no signs, and the evaluation of the periapical radiograph showed a fracture of the root, with a mesial well-defined lesion of the hard tissue of the upper right first premolar, as the radiolucent area affected the root surface of the tooth. It was decided, in accordance with the patient, that the tooth would be extracted and the implant (Primer, Edierre implant system, Genoa, Italy) with diameter of 4.2?mm and length of 13?mm would be inserted. After the insertion of the implant, it was screwed to the scan abutment, and a scan was taken using an intraoral scanner (MHT 3D Progress, Verona, Italy). The scanned images were processed with CAD/CAM software (Exocad DentalCAD, Darmstadt, Germany) and the temporary crown was digitally drawn (Dental Knowledge, Milan, Italy) and then sent to the milling machine for production with a composite monoblock. After 4 months, when the implant was osteointegrated, it was not necessary to take another dental impression, and the definitive crown could be screwed in. Conclusion. The CAD/CAM technology is especially helpful in postextraction implant for aesthetic rehabilitation, as it is possible to immediately fix a provisional crown with an anatomic shape that allows an optimal healing process of the tissues. Moreover, the removal of healing abutments, and the use of impression copings, impression materials, and dental stone became unnecessary, enabling the reduction of the chair time, component cost, and patient's discomfort. However, it is still necessary for scientific research to continue to carry out studies on this procedure, in order to improve the accuracy, the reliability, and the reproducibility of the results. PMID:25610665

  17. Cowden Syndrome Presenting as Breast Cancer: Imaging and Clinical Features

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Mirinae; Ahn, Hye Shin; Moon, Hyeong-Gon

    2014-01-01

    Cowden syndrome is an uncommon, autosomal dominant disease which is characterized by multiple hamartomas of the skin, mucous membrane, brain, breast, thyroid, and gastrointestinal tract. The diagnosis of Cowden syndrome implicates an increased risk of developing breast cancer. We report a case of a 22-year-old woman with Cowden syndrome that presented as breast cancer with concomitant bilateral exuberant benign masses in both breasts. PMID:25246819

  18. Henoch–Schönlein purpura: a clinical case with dramatic presentation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    João Bento; Adriana Magalhães; Conceição Souto Moura; Venceslau Hespanhol

    2010-01-01

    A case study involving a 55-year-old Caucasian male with end-stage glomerulosclerosis is presented here. Kidney biopsies showed no deposits on imunofluorescent microscopy. Relapsing massive haemoptysis and suspected bronchovascular malformation required lung lobectomy which revealed malformative and tortuous small blood vessels, with no vasculitis. Blood antinuclear antibodies, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and antiglomerular basement membrane antibodies were undetectable. Seric immunoglobulins and complement

  19. Extreme clinical presentations of venous stasis: coronary sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Kachalia, Amit; Sideras, Panagiotis; Javaid, Mian; Muralidharan, Sethu; Stevens-Cohen, Pilar

    2013-11-01

    Sixty six year old male with history of heart failure was admitted for dysphagia, weight loss. CT scan chest revealed diffuse oesophageal wall thickening. Upper endoscopy, oesophagogram confirmed diagnosis of achalasia. TTE revealed severely reduced biventricular systolic function with LVEF 10%; PASP 75-80 mmHg. Parasternal long views showed dilated coronary sinus with a visible, mobile 2.0 cm thrombus. Pro-thrombotic workup was negative. Coronary sinus thrombosis has been identified as a rare complication to invasive cardiac procedures causing damage to coronary sinus endothelium and in hypercoagulable states.Typically acute thrombosis presents with chest pain, dynamic ECG changes, but chronic development does not present with ischaemic signs due to formation of efficient collateral circulation. We present a case report of stable primary coronary sinus thrombus incidentally diagnosed, secondary to chronic venous stasis in coronary circulation. Currently, there are no guidelines to assist physicians in long term management of such patients and thus warrants further investigations. PMID:24974504

  20. Henoch–Schönlein purpura: a clinical case with dramatic presentation

    PubMed Central

    Bento, João; Magalhães, Adriana; Moura, Conceição Souto; Hespanhol, Venceslau

    2010-01-01

    A case study involving a 55-year-old Caucasian male with end-stage glomerulosclerosis is presented here. Kidney biopsies showed no deposits on imunofluorescent microscopy. Relapsing massive haemoptysis and suspected bronchovascular malformation required lung lobectomy which revealed malformative and tortuous small blood vessels, with no vasculitis. Blood antinuclear antibodies, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and antiglomerular basement membrane antibodies were undetectable. Seric immunoglobulins and complement levels were normal. Three months later, arthralgia and joint oedema first appeared. Skin biopsy revealed vasculitis immune-reactive to immunoglobulin A. Systemic corticotherapy was then started. Two weeks later, the patient presented with abdominal pain melena and rectal bleeding (haematoquesia). Endoscopic study showed diffuse gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Angiographic study revealed diffuse lesions compatible with vasculitis and haemorrhage from multiple spots. Cyclophosphamide and then intravenous immunoglobulin were associated to treatment without response. Increasing blood loss occurred, with massive gastrointestinal haemorrhage and haemorrhagic ascitis. Death occurred due to uncontrolled diffuse bleeding. Necropsy findings showed generalised small vessels vasculitis compatible with Henoch–Schönlein purpura. PMID:22778211

  1. Attending rounds: A patient with intradialytic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Robert F

    2014-04-01

    Intradialytic hypotension is the most common adverse event that occurs during the hemodialysis procedure. Despite advances in machine technology, it remains a difficult management issue. The pathophysiology of intradialytic hypotension and measures to reduce its frequency are discussed. An accurate assessment of dry weight is crucial in all patients on dialysis and especially those patients prone to intradialytic hypotension. The presence of edema and hypertension has recently been shown to be a poor predictor of volume overload. Noninvasive methods to assess volume status, such as whole body and segmental bioimpedance, hold promise to more accurately assess fluid status. Reducing salt intake is key to limiting interdialytic weight gain. A common problem is that patients are often told to restrict fluid but not salt intake. Lowering the dialysate temperature, prohibiting food ingestion during hemodialysis, and midodrine administration are beneficial. Sodium modeling in the absence of ultrafiltration modeling should be abandoned. There is not enough data on the efficacy of l-carnitine to warrant its routine use. PMID:24385517

  2. Multiple Autoimmune Syndromes Associated with Psoriasis: A Rare Clinical Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Masood, Sadia; Sajid, Sara; Jafferani, Asif; Tabassum, Saadia; Ansar, Sobia

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are known to have association with each other but it is very rare to see multiple autoimmune diseases in one patient. The combination of at least three autoimmune diseases in the same patient is referred to as multiple autoimmune syndrome. The case we are reporting features multiple autoimmune syndrome with five different conditions. The patient had type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, systemic lupus erythematosus, vitiligo, and psoriasis. Psoriasis has rarely been reported previously under the spectrum of autoimmune syndrome. Although the relationship of autoimmune conditions with each other has been explored in the past, this case adds yet another dimension to the unique evolution of autoimmune pathologies. The patient presented with a combination of five autoimmune diseases, which makes it consistent type three multiple autoimmune syndromes with the addition of psoriasis. The current case is unique in this aspect that the combination of these five autoimmune disorders has never been reported in the past. PMID:24715941

  3. The broad clinical phenotype of Type 1 diabetes at presentation.

    PubMed

    Merger, S R; Leslie, R D; Boehm, B O

    2013-02-01

    Immune-mediated (auto-immune) Type 1 diabetes mellitus is not a homogenous entity, but nonetheless has distinctive characteristics. In children, it may present with classical insulin deficiency and ketoacidosis at disease onset, whereas autoimmune diabetes in adults may not always be insulin dependent. Indeed, as the adult-onset form of autoimmune diabetes may resemble Type 2 diabetes, it is imperative to test for diabetes-associated autoantibodies to establish the correct diagnosis. The therapeutic response can be predicted by measuring the levels of autoantibodies to various islet cell autoantigens, such as islet cell antibodies (ICA), glutamate decarboxylase 65 (GAD65), insulin, tyrosine phosphatase (IA-2) and IA-2?, and zinc transporter 8 (ZnT8) and evaluating ?-cell function. A high risk of progression to insulin dependency is associated with particular genetic constellations, such as human leukocyte antigen risk alleles, young age at onset, the presence of multiple autoantibodies, including high titres of anti-GAD antibodies; such patients should be offered early insulin replacement therapy, as they respond poorly to diet and oral hypoglycaemic drug therapy. Hence, considering the broad spectrum of phenotypes seen in adult-onset diabetes, treatment targets can only be reached by identification of immune-mediated cases, as their management differs from those with classical Type 2 diabetes. PMID:23075321

  4. Losartan-induced hypotension leads to tau hyperphosphorylation and memory deficit.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinghua; Wang, Zhihong; Xia, Yiyuan; Yu, Guang; Zeng, Kuan; Luo, Hongbin; Hu, Jichang; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Zhou, Xin-Wen; Wang, Xiao-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have reported a correlation between dementia and low blood pressure. How hypotension is associated with the increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains unclear. Here we show that one month treatment of losartan, an angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist, causes chronic and sustained hypotension, along with oxidative stress in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Furthermore, we show that losartan treatment increases the level of inactivated protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and the hyperphosphorylation of tau at Ser 199 and Ser 396. Rats treated with losartan present memory deficits and decreases in spine-density. These findings suggest that losartan-induced hypotension may increase the risk of AD-like pathological alteration and behavioral impairment through oxidative stress which leads to tau hyperphosphorylation and loss of dendritic spines. PMID:24448782

  5. Unexpected refractory intra-operative hypotension during non-cardiac surgery: Diagnosis and management guided by trans-oesophageal echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Sundara; Ueda, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of severe refractory hypotension in a patient undergoing de-bulking liver resection for massive polycystic liver disease. Emergent trans-oesophageal echocardiography (TOE) revealed dynamic left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction with systolic anterior motion (SAM) of the anterior mitral leaflet (AML). Notably, he had a structurally normal heart on pre-operative trans-thoracic echocardiography (TTE). Diagnosis of SAM by TOE, possible mechanisms and specific management of refractory hypotension in this context are discussed. PMID:24700900

  6. Nontraumatic Hypotension and Shock in the Emergency Department and the Prehospital setting, Prevalence, Etiology, and Mortality: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Holler, Jon Gitz; Bech, Camilla Nørgaard; Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard; Mikkelsen, Søren; Pedersen, Court; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute patients presenting with hypotension in the prehospital or emergency department (ED) setting are in need of focused management and knowledge of the epidemiology characteristics might help the clinician. The aim of this review was to address prevalence, etiology and mortality of nontraumatic hypotension (SBP ? 90 mmHg) with or without the presence of shock in the prehospital and ED setting. Methods We performed a systematic literature search up to August 2013, using Medline, Embase, Cinahl, Dare and The Cochrane Library. The analysis and eligibility criteria were documented according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA-guidelines) and The Cochrane Collaboration. No restrictions on language, publication date, or status were imposed. We used the Newcastle-Ottawa quality assessment scale (NOS-scale) and the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE-statement) to assess the quality. Results Six observational studies were considered eligible for analysis based on the evaluation of 11,880 identified papers. Prehospital prevalence of hypotension was 19.5/1000 emergency medicine service (EMS) contacts, and the prevalence of hypotensive shock was 9.5-19/1000 EMS contacts with an inhospital mortality of shock between 33 to 52%. ED prevalence of hypotension was 4-13/1000 contacts with a mortality of 12%. Information on mortality, prevalence and etiology of shock in the ED was limited. A meta-analysis was not feasible due to substantial heterogeneity between studies. Conclusion There is inadequate evidence to establish concise estimates of the characteristics of nontraumatic hypotension and shock in the ED or in the prehospital setting. The available studies suggest that 2% of EMS contacts present with nontraumatic hypotension while 1-2% present with shock. The inhospital mortality of prehospital shock is 33-52%. Prevalence of hypotension in the ED is 1% with an inhospital mortality of 12%. Prevalence, etiology and mortality of shock in the ED are not well described. PMID:25789927

  7. Comparison of clinical findings between intensity-windowed versus CLAHE presentation of chest CT images

    E-print Network

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    Comparison of clinical findings between intensity-windowed versus CLAHE presentation of chest CT significantly different overall, there are specific clinical findings where the radiologists were less applied to clinical material and to compare the diagnostic information perceived by the radiologists from

  8. Orthostatic Hypotension in Patients with Parkinson's Disease and Atypical Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Lökk, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is one of the commonly occurring nonmotor symptoms in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) and atypical parkinsonism (AP). We aimed to review current evidences on epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of OH in patients with IPD and AP. Major electronic medical databases were assessed including PubMed/MEDLINE and Embase up to February 2013. English-written original or review articles with keywords such as “Parkinson's disease,” “atypical parkinsonism,” and “orthostatic hypotension” were searched for relevant evidences. We addressed different issues such as OH definition, epidemiologic characteristics, pathophysiology, testing and diagnosis, risk factors for symptomatic OH, OH as an early sign of IPD, prognosis, and treatment options of OH in parkinsonian syndromes. Symptomatic OH is present in up to 30% of IPD, 80% of multiple system atrophy (MSA), and 27% of other AP patients. OH may herald the onset of PD before cardinal motor symptoms and our review emphasises the importance of its timely diagnosis (even as one preclinical marker) and multifactorial treatment, starting with patient education and lifestyle approach. Advancing age, male sex, disease severity, and duration and subtype of motor symptoms are predisposing factors. OH increases the risk of falls, which affects the quality of life in PD patients. PMID:24634790

  9. Noninvasive diagnosis and management of spontaneous intracranial hypotension in patients with marfan syndrome: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Bassani, Luigi; Graffeo, Christopher S.; Behrooz, Navid; Tyagi, Vineet; Wilson, Taylor; Penaranda, Saul; Zagzag, David; Rifkin, Daniel B; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Fatterpekar, Girish; Placantonakis, Dimitris

    2014-01-01

    Background: Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is an uncommon clinical entity. Heritable connective tissue disorders (HCTD), such as Marfan syndrome, are frequently implicated as an underlying cause, due to dural structural weaknesses that predispose patients to spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. Due to the high prevalence of multi-system disease in HCTD, diagnosis and treatment are often complicated. Case Description: We present a 58-year-old female with Marfan syndrome on anticoagulation for a mechanical aortic valve replacement who came to medical attention with severe, acute-onset headache following a straining episode. Noninvasive magnetic resonance (MR) myelography confirmed thoracic CSF extravasations and multiple lumbar diverticula. The patient was treated conservatively and her symptoms resolved. Conclusion: We discuss the common presentation, diagnostic tools, and treatment options for spontaneous CSF leaks in patients with Marfan syndrome or related HCTD with an emphasis on noninvasive modalities and a review of the major radiographic criteria used to diagnose dural abnormalities, such as dural ectasia. PMID:24575323

  10. Ischemic Posterior Circulation Stroke: A Review of Anatomy, Clinical Presentations, Diagnosis, and Current Management

    PubMed Central

    Nouh, Amre; Remke, Jessica; Ruland, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Posterior circulation strokes represent approximately 20% of all ischemic strokes (1, 2). In contrast to the anterior circulation, several differences in presenting symptoms, clinical evaluation, diagnostic testing, and management strategy exist presenting a challenge to the treating physician. This review will discuss the anatomical, etiological, and clinical classification of PC strokes, identify diagnostic pitfalls, and overview current therapeutic regimens. PMID:24778625

  11. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension due to intradural thoracic osteophyte with superimposed disc herniation: report of two cases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zehra Isik Hasiloglu; Bashar Abuzayed; Ahmet Esat Imal; Emin Cagil; Sait Albayram

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is a clinical syndrome in which absolute or relative hypovolemia of the cerebrospinal\\u000a fluid (CSF) results in various neurological symptoms. The etiology of spontaneous CSF leaks often remains unknown. However,\\u000a it is believed that the most common cause is the fragility of spinal meninges at the level of radicular nerve root sleeve.\\u000a These tears can be

  12. Risk Factors for Subdural Haematoma in Patients with Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin; Hu, Bei-Bei; Xu, Qing-Lin; Zhou, Zhi-Jie; Lou, Min

    2015-01-01

    Subdural haematoma (SDH) is a potentially life-threatening complication in patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH). In serious cases, SIH patients who present with SDHs develop neurological deficits, a decreased level of consciousness, or cerebral herniation, and may even require an urgent neurosurgical drainage. Despite numerous publications on SDHs, few report its potential risk factors in patients with SIH. In this study, we retrospectively investigated 93 consecutive SIH patients and divided them into an SDH group (n = 25) and a non-SDH (NSDH) group (n = 68). The clinical and radiographic characteristics of these 93 patients were analyzed, and then univariate analysis and further multiple logistic regression analysis were performed to identify the potential risk factors for the development of SDHs. The univariate analysis showed that advanced age, male gender, longer clinical course, dural enhancement, and the venous distension sign were associated with the development of SDHs. However, multivariate analysis only included the latter three factors. Our study reveals important radiological manifestations for predicting the development of SDHs in patients with SIH. PMID:25853681

  13. [Volume therapy in hypotensive trauma patients].

    PubMed

    Pargger, H; Studer, W; Rüttimann, U

    2000-10-21

    In trauma patients it is mandatory to establish the exact reason for their hypotension. If hypovolaemia is most probably responsible for the hypotension, fluid resuscitation should be initiated. The therapy of choice is infusion of sugarless, isotonic crystalloids with a physiologic serum electrolyte composition. In patients with brain injuries a decrease in serum osmolality is not advisable and hypertonic fluids may therefore be considered. Human albumin preparations are no longer indicated, but synthetic colloids may be an adjunct to a pure crystalloid regime. Hydroxyethyl starch preparations with a molecular weight in the mean range are reasonable choices considering the individual advantages and disadvantages of the various colloids. Larger blood losses must be treated with blood components such as packed red cells, fresh frozen plasma and thrombocyte concentrates as indicated. There are no widely accepted values for laboratory or monitoring parameters in starting or stopping a given fluid therapy; these values are unquestionably influenced, among other things, by the patient history and the pattern of the injuries. Initial resuscitation (when to start, who should administer the fluid and how much) also remains a focus of heated controversy. PMID:11092053

  14. Cerebral venous thrombosis in two patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Carreira, M C; Vergé, D Cánovas; Branera, J; Zauner, M; Herrero, J Estela; Tió, E; Perpinyà, G Ribera

    2014-01-01

    Although few patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension develop cerebral venous thrombosis, the association between these two entities seems too common to be simply a coincidental finding. We describe two cases of spontaneous intracranial hypotension associated with cerebral venous thrombosis. In one case, extensive cerebral venous thrombosis involved the superior sagittal sinus and multiple cortical cerebral veins. In the other case, only a right frontoparietal cortical vein was involved. Several mechanisms could contribute to the development of cerebral venous thrombosis in spontaneous intracranial hypotension. When spontaneous intracranial hypotension and cerebral venous thrombosis occur together, it raises difficult practical questions about the treatment of these two conditions. In most reported cases, spontaneous intracranial hypotension was treated conservatively and cerebral venous thrombosis was treated with anticoagulation. However, we advocate aggressive treatment of the underlying cerebrospinal fluid leak. PMID:25525533

  15. Clinical Implications of Pneumococcal Serotypes: Invasive Disease Potential, Clinical Presentations, and Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Nahm, Moon H.; Moseley, M. Allen

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae can asymptomatically colonize the nasopharynx and cause a diverse range of illnesses. This clinical spectrum from colonization to invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) appears to depend on the pneumococcal capsular serotype rather than the genetic background. According to a literature review, serotypes 1, 4, 5, 7F, 8, 12F, 14, 18C, and 19A are more likely to cause IPD. Although serotypes 1 and 19A are the predominant causes of invasive pneumococcal pneumonia, serotype 14 remains one of the most common etiologic agents of non-bacteremic pneumonia in adults, even after 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) introduction. Serotypes 1, 3, and 19A pneumococci are likely to cause empyema and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Serotype 1 pneumococcal meningitis is prevalent in the African meningitis belt, with a high fatality rate. In contrast to the capsule type, genotype is more closely associated with antibiotic resistance. CC320/271 strains expressing serotype 19A are multidrug-resistant (MDR) and prevalent worldwide in the era of PCV7. Several clones of MDR serotype 6C pneumococci emerged, and a MDR 6D clone (ST282) has been identified in Korea. Since the pneumococcal epidemiology of capsule types varies geographically and temporally, a nationwide serosurveillance system is vital to establishing appropriate vaccination strategies for each country. PMID:23341706

  16. Spontaneous CSF Collection in the Cervical Spine may Cause Neurological Deficit and Intra-cranial Hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Rasheed; Wilby, Martin; Fletcher, Nicholas A

    2013-01-01

    Objective: a case is described of a spontaneously occurring cerebrospinal fluid collection in the ventral cervical spine which caused radiculopathy and spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Case: a sixty eight year old Caucasian man presented with a 2 year history of proximal upper limb weakness with a his-tory of trivial cervical trauma many years previously. Methods: the patient was investigated with blood tests for causes of peripheral neuropathy, nerve conduction and electro-myography studies, lumbar puncture and MRI of the brain and spine with contrast. Results: a cerebrospinal fluid collection was identified in the ventral cervical spinal cord causing mass effect associated with cord atrophy and there were signs of spontaneous intracranial hypotension on the MRI brain including subdural cere-brospinal fluid collections, meningeal enhancement and slumped posterior fossa. Conclusions: this is the first description of a spontaneous spinal fluid collection causing direct compression and cord sig-nal change, manifest as a motor deficit, with intracranial signs of spontaneous hypotension. Spinal imaging is recom-mended in cases of spontaneous intracranial hypotension and cerebrospinal fluid collections in the spine may rarely be a cause of radiculopathy in such cases. PMID:23407592

  17. NCI Spanish-Language Presentations on Clinical Trials | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    These three PowerPoint presentations, which are in Spanish, provide a basic overview of clinical trials. They can be used by community leaders, advocates and health care providers when discussing clinical trials with Spanish-speaking audiences who are not familiar with the topic.

  18. Deliberate Hypotensive Anesthesia With the Rapidly Acting, Vascular-Selective, L-Type Calcium Channel Antagonist—Clevidipine: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Kevin; Probst, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Deliberate hypotension is an important technique for use in select anesthetics for procedures such as orthognathic surgery, specifically LeFort I maxillary osteotomy. We present a case report of an anesthetic involving deliberate hypotension for a 17-year-old female patient who presented for a LeFort I osteotomy, bilateral sagittal split of the mandible, and a genioplasty in order to correct a skeletal class III malocclusion. After reaching a steady-state general anesthetic, deliberate hypotension was induced solely with a bolus and subsequent continuous infusion of the ultrashort acting calcium channel blocker, clevidipine. The preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative course and anesthetic management are discussed. PMID:24697821

  19. Mechanisms of orthostatic hypotension and tachycardia in patients with pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Streeten, D H; Anderson, G H

    1996-08-01

    We have explored the pathophysiological mechanisms of orthostatic hypotension and orthostatic tachycardia, found to be present in 83% and 61% respectively of 18 patients with subsequently proven pheochromocytoma. Orthostatic increases in plasma norepinephrine (NE) concentrations were significantly greater in the patients than in normal control subjects. Intravenous infusions of NE at 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 micrograms/min induced similar increases in plasma NE levels but smaller increments in systolic and diastolic BP in the pheochromocytoma patients than in normal control subjects. This was reflected by a significantly greater increment in plasma NE concentration required to raise systolic BP by 15 mm Hg and diastolic BP by 7 mm Hg in the pheochromocytoma patients than in the normal subjects (P < .05 and P < .01, respectively). Measurements of venous contractile responses to locally infused NE by the dorsal hand vein (LVDT) technique revealed significantly reduced slopes of the regressions of log NE infusion rate on change in venous diameter in the pheochromocytoma patients compared with normal subjects. The results indicate reduced responsiveness of the vasculature to NE in patients with pheochromocytoma, probably due to down-regulation of alpha-adrenergic receptors resulting from persistent elevation of the physiological agonist NE. This was shown by other authors to be present in circulating platelets. The pathophysiological importance of the subnormal venous responses to the orthostatic hypotension and tachycardia in the patients were supported by the finding that the orthostatic changes were corrected by lower body compression to 45 mm Hg with a MAST pressure suit. PMID:8862222

  20. Adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: Assessment guidelines based on clinical presentation to a specialty clinic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Roy-Byrne; Leonard Scheele; John Brinkley; Nicholas Ward; Connie Wiatrak; Joan Russo; Brenda Townes; Christopher Varley

    1997-01-01

    Of 143 adults presenting for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) evaluation, 46 (32%) clearly met diagnostic criteria, 46 (32%) clearly did not meet diagnostic criteria, and another 51 (36%) with current ADHD-like features did not meet criteria due to either a lack of childhood history and\\/or complicating severe psychiatric or substance abuse comorbidity. The three groups were similar in demographics, psychiatric

  1. Profiling the clinical presentation of diagnostic characteristics of a sample of symptomatic TMD patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients might present a number of concurrent clinical diagnoses that may be clustered according to their similarity. Profiling patients’ clinical presentations can be useful for better understanding the behavior of TMD and for providing appropriate treatment planning. The aim of this study was to simultaneously classify symptomatic patients diagnosed with a variety of subtypes of TMD into homogenous groups based on their clinical presentation and occurrence of comorbidities. Methods Clinical records of 357 consecutive TMD patients seeking treatment in a private specialized clinic were included in the study sample. Patients presenting multiple subtypes of TMD diagnosed simultaneously were categorized according to the AAOP criteria. Descriptive statistics and two-step cluster analysis were used to characterize the clinical presentation of these patients based on the primary and secondary clinical diagnoses. Results The most common diagnoses were localized masticatory muscle pain (n?=?125) and disc displacement without reduction (n?=?104). Comorbidity was identified in 288 patients. The automatic selection of an optimal number of clusters included 100% of cases, generating an initial 6-cluster solution and a final 4-cluster solution. The interpretation of within-group ranking of the importance of variables in the clustering solutions resulted in the following characterization of clusters: chronic facial pain (n?=?36), acute muscle pain (n?=?125), acute articular pain (n?=?75) and chronic articular impairment (n?=?121). Conclusion Subgroups of acute and chronic TMD patients seeking treatment can be identified using clustering methods to provide a better understanding of the clinical presentation of TMD when multiple diagnosis are present. Classifying patients into identifiable symptomatic profiles would help clinicians to estimate how common a disorder is within a population of TMD patients and understand the probability of certain pattern of clinical complaints. PMID:22857609

  2. Shenfu Injection for Intradialytic Hypotension: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xusheng; Qin, Xindong; Huang, Jing; He, Zhiren; Lin, Junjie; Hu, Qinqing; Cai, Youqing; Liu, Zhuangzhu; Wang, Lixin

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of Shenfu injection (SFI) for intradialytic hypotension (IDH). Methods. A systematic review of data sources published as of April 2014 was conducted. These included the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (2014 issue 4), Pubmed, Embase, CBM, CNKI, VIP, and Wangfang Data. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving SFI for treatment and prevention of IDH were identified. Two researchers independently selected articles, extracted data, assessed quality, and cross checked the results. Revman 5.2 was used to analyze the results. Results. Eight RCTs were included. The meta-analysis indicated that compared with conventional therapies alone, SFI could elevate systolic blood pressure (SBP), increase the clinical effective rate, decrease the incidence of hypotension, increase serum albumin (ALB) levels, and reduce C-reactive protein (CRP) levels without serious adverse effects. GRADE Quality of Evidence. the quality of SBP, the effective rate, ALB, and CRP were low, and hypotension incidence and DBP were very low. Conclusions. SFI is more effective than conventional therapies for prevention and treatment of IDH. However, a clinical recommendation is not warranted due to the small number of studies included and low methodology quality. Multi-center and high-quality RCTs with large sample sizes are needed to provide stronger evidence. PMID:25587340

  3. [The historical background and present development of evidence-based healthcare and clinical nursing].

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jung-Mei

    2014-12-01

    Evidence-based healthcare (EBHC) emphasizes the integration of the best research evidence with patient values, specialist suggestions, and clinical circumstances during the process of clinical decision-making. EBHC is a recognized core competency in modern healthcare. Nursing is a professional discipline of empirical science that thrives in an environment marked by advances in knowledge and technology in medicine as well as in nursing. Clinical nurses must elevate their skills and professional qualifications, provide efficient and quality health services, and promote their proficiency in EBHC. The Institute of Medicine in the United States indicates that evidence-based research results often fail to disseminate efficiently to clinical decision makers. This problem highlights the importance of better promoting the evidence-based healthcare fundamentals and competencies to frontline clinical nurses. This article describes the historical background and present development of evidence-based healthcare from the perspective of modern clinical nursing in light of the importance of evidence-based healthcare in clinical nursing; describes the factors associated with evidence-based healthcare promotion; and suggests strategies and policies that may improve the promotion and application of EBHC in clinical settings. The authors hope that this paper provides a reference for efforts to improve clinical nursing in the realms of EBHC training, promotion, and application. PMID:25464952

  4. Clinical presentations and imaging findings of neuroblastoma beyond abdominal mass and a review of imaging algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Chu, C M; Rasalkar, D D; Hu, Y J; Cheng, F W T; Li, C K; Chu, W C W

    2011-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is one of the most common malignant neoplasms in childhood. The most common clinical presentation of this tumour is abdominal mass. However, affected children may have various clinical presentations as a result of disseminated metastatic disease or associated paraneoplastic syndromes at the time of diagnosis. In this article we have outlined the imaging findings in seven patients with “extra-abdominal” presentation of neuroblastoma and the pitfalls in making the correct diagnosis. The purpose of this pictorial review is to alert the general radiologist to the possible presentations of this common childhood malignancy to derive early detection and diagnosis. PMID:21172969

  5. Misleading presentations of malignant breast diseases--role of clinical cytology.

    PubMed

    Kai?, Gordana; Stoos-Vei?, Tajana; Ostovi?, Karmen Trutin; Vojnovi?, Jovanka; Vidovi?, Ljerka; Lambasa, Smiljka; Harim, Visnja; Ajdukovi?, Radmila; Stanec, Sanda; Budi, Sre?ko

    2010-03-01

    We described two examples with misleading presentations to draw attention to the role of clinical cytology as apart of multidisciplinary approach to breast lesions. In the first case--Paget's disease of the nipple, there was no obvious clinical and radiological evidence of breast cancer, while the second case--primary non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the breast imitated advanced breast carcinoma. The question is whether accurate and fast diagnoses can be made without cytological examinations. It must be kept in mind that first-hand clinical information and contact with the patient is necessary in rendering accurate cytological diagnoses. PMID:20432750

  6. Bed Rest and Orthostatic-Hypotensive Intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Suzanne M.

    2000-01-01

    Orthostatic tolerance may be defined as the ability of humans to maintain cerebral perfusion and consciousness upon movement from a supine or sitting position to the upright posture; for example, subjects can stand suddenly or be tilted to the head-up body position. Similar but not identical physiological responses can be induced by positive G(sub Z) (head to foot) acceleration or exposure to lower body negative pressure (LBNP). The objective is to suddenly shift blood to the lower body to determine how effectively cardiovascular and neural-hormonal compensatory responses react to maintain blood pressure. In the most precise method for measuring tolerance, individuals would be stressed until they faint (syncope). However, the potential consequences and discomforts of such a test usually prohibit such a procedure so that few investigators actually induce syncope. In a more common approach, subjects are exposed to a given level of stress, for example, head-up tilt for 15 min, and any increases in heart rate or decreases in blood pressure are interpreted as indicators of progress toward syncope. Presumably, the greater the perturbation of heart rate and blood pressure, the closer to "tolerance," i.e., point of unconsciousness. Another more appropriate approach is to induce a progressively increasing hypotensive stress until pre-determined physiological responses or pre-syncopal symptoms appear. The physiological criteria may include a sudden drop in systolic blood pressure (greater than 25 mm/min), a sudden drop in heart rate (greater than 15 beats/min), or a systolic blood pressure less than 70 mmHg. The most common pre-syncopal symptoms include lightheadedness, stomach awareness or distress, feelings of warmth, tingly skin, and light to profuse sweating. Usually a combination of physiological responses and symptoms occurs such that, on different days, the tolerance time to the same orthostatic protocol is reproducible for a given individual. The assumption is that by taking subjects to near fainting, one can determine their tolerance. This latter pre-syncopal approach is better for estimating orthostatic or hypotensive tolerance than the former measurement of heart rate and blood pressure responses to a given stress. There is considerable variability in individual responses to orthostasis. For example, some subjects are "heart-rate responders" and have a pronounced cardiovascular response similar to that when performing moderately hard aerobic exercise, whereas others may experience pre-syncopal symptoms with very little increase in heart rate. Some individuals have a slow, gradual fall in blood pressure to orthostasis, and others have little change in blood pressure until a sudden precipitous fall in pressure occurs just prior to fainting. With both tilt and LBNP tests there is a low correlation between heart-rate or blood-pressure responses to a sub-tolerance stress as a measure of pre-syncopal limited orthostatic-hypotensive tolerance.

  7. Canavan disease - unusual imaging features in a child with mild clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ho V; Ishak, Gisele E

    2015-03-01

    Canavan disease is a rare hereditary leukodystrophy that manifests in early childhood. Associated with rapidly progressive clinical deterioration, it usually results in death by the third year of life. The predominant MRI appearance is diffuse and symmetrical white matter disease. We discuss an atypical, late presentation of Canavan disease with a benign clinical course and uncharacteristic imaging features. This case introduces a previously unreported pattern of diffuse cortical abnormality without significant white matter involvement. PMID:25107638

  8. Endothelin 1 levels in relation to clinical presentation and outcome of Henoch Schonlein purpura

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S Fessatou; P Nicolaidou; D Gourgiotis; H Georgouli; K Douros; M Moustaki; A Fretzayas

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Henoch Schonlein purpura (HSP) is a common vasculitis of small vessels whereas endothelin-1 (ET-1) is usually reported elevated in vasculities and systematic inflammation. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether ET-1 levels are correlated with the clinical presentation and the outcome of HSP. METHODS: The study sample consisted of thirty consecutive patients with HSP. An equal

  9. Intradialytic Hypotension and Cardiac Remodeling: A Vicious Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jenq-Wen; Yen, Chung-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Hemodynamic instability during hemodialysis is a common but often underestimated issue in the nephrologist practice. Intradialytic hypotension, namely, a decrease of systolic or mean blood pressure to a certain level, prohibits the safe and smooth achievement of ultrafiltration and solute removal goal in chronic dialysis patients. Studies have elucidated the potential mechanisms involved in the development of Intradialytic hypotension, including excessive ultrafiltration and loss of compensatory mechanisms for blood pressure maintenance. Cardiac remodeling could also be one important piece of the puzzle. In this review, we intend to discuss the role of cardiac remodeling, including left ventricular hypertrophy, in the development of Intradialytic hypotension. In addition, we will also provide evidence that a bidirectional relationship might exist between Intradialytic hypotension and left ventricular hypertrophy in chronic dialysis patients. A more complete understanding of the complex interactions in between could assist the readers in formulating potential solutions for the reduction of both phenomena. PMID:25654122

  10. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Hypotension?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... away after sitting down. Severe Hypotension Linked to Shock In shock , not enough blood and oxygen flow to the ... sleepiness, and confusion. In the earliest stages of shock, it may be hard to detect any signs ...

  11. Randomised trial of dopamine compared with hydrocortisone for the treatment of hypotensive very low birthweight infants

    PubMed Central

    Bourchier, D.; Weston, P.

    1997-01-01

    AIM—To compare the efficacy of hydrocortisone with dopamine for the treatment of hypotensive, very low birthweight (VLBW) infants.?METHODS—Forty infants were randomly allocated to receive either hydrocortisone (n=21) or dopamine (n=19).?RESULTS—All 19 infants randomised to dopamine responded; 17 of 21 (81%) did so in the hydrocortisone group. Three of the four non-responders in the hydrocortisone group had clinically significant left to right ductal shunting. The incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity, intraventricular haemorrhage, necrotising enterocolitis, symptomatic patent ductus arteriosus, hyperglycaemia, sepsis (bacterial or fungal) or survival did not differ between groups. The adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) stimulated plasma cortisol activity, either before or after treatment, did not differ between the two groups of infants. Although a significant difference in efficacy between dopamine and hydrocortisone was not noted (P = 0.108), there were four treatment failures in the hydrocortisone group, compared with none in the dopamine group.?CONCLUSION—Both hydrocortisone and dopamine are effective treatments for hypotension in very low birthweight infants.?? Keywords: hydrocortisone; dopamine; hypotension; very low birthweight; plasma cortisol PMID:9175947

  12. Radial neck fracture presenting to a Chiropractic clinic: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe a patient that presented with a Mason type II radial neck fracture approximately three weeks following a traumatic injury. Clinical features A 59-year old female presented to a chiropractic practice with complaints of left lateral elbow pain distal to the lateral epicondyle of the humerus and pain provocation with pronation, supination and weight bearing. The complaint originated three weeks prior following a fall on her left elbow while hiking. Intervention and outcome Plain film radiographs of the left elbow and forearm revealed a transverse fracture of the radial neck with 2mm displacement--classified as a Mason Type II fracture. The patient was referred for medical follow-up with an orthopedist. Conclusion This report discusses triage of an elbow fracture presenting to a chiropractic clinic. This case study demonstrates the thorough clinical examination, imaging and decision making that assisted in appropriate patient diagnosis and management. PMID:24685056

  13. Pregnancy-related pelvic girdle pain (PPP), I: Terminology, clinical presentation, and prevalence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. H. Wu; O. G. Meijer; K. Uegaki; J. M. A. Mens; J. H. van Dieën; P. I. J. M. Wuisman; H. C. Östgaard

    2004-01-01

    Pregnancy-related lumbopelvic pain has puzzled medicine for a long time. The present systematic review focuses on terminology, clinical presentation, and prevalence. Numerous terms are used, as if they indicated one and the same entity. We propose “pregnancy-related pelvic girdle pain (PPP)”, and “pregnancy-related low back pain (PLBP)”, present evidence that the two add up to “lumbopelvic pain”, and show that

  14. Initial Systolic Time Interval (ISTI) as a Predictor of Intradialytic Hypotension (IDH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biesheuvel, J. D.; Vervloet, M. G.; Verdaasdonk, R. M.; Meijer, J. H.

    2013-04-01

    In haemodialysis treatment the clearance and volume control by the kidneys of a patient are partially replaced by intermittent haemodialysis. Because this artificial process is performed on a limited time scale, unphysiological imbalances in the fluid compartments of the body occur, that can lead to intradialytic hypotensions (IDH). An IDH endangers the efficacy of the haemodialysis session and is associated with dismal clinical endpoints, including mortality. A diagnostic method that predicts the occurrence of these drops in blood pressure could facilitate timely measures for the prevention of IDH. The present study investigates whether the Initial Systolic Time Interval (ISTI) can provide such a diagnostic method. The ISTI is defined as the time difference between the R-peak in the electrocardiogram (ECG) and the C-wave in the impedance cardiogram (ICG) and is considered to be a non-invasive assessment of the time delay between the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. This time delay has previously been found to depend on autonomic nervous function as well as preload of the heart. Therefore, it can be expected that ISTI may predict an imminent IDH caused by a low circulating blood volume. This ongoing observational clinical study investigates the relationship between changes in ISTI and subsequent drops in blood pressure during haemodialysis. A registration of a complicated dialysis showed a significant correlation between a drop in blood pressure, a decrease in relative blood volume and a substantial increase in ISTI. An uncomplicated dialysis, in which also a considerable amount of fluid was removed, showed no correlations. Both, blood pressure and ISTI remained stable. In conclusion, the preliminary results of the present study show a substantial response of ISTI to haemodynamic instability, indicating an application in optimization and individualisation of the dialysis process.

  15. Different Clinical Presentation of Appendicolithiasis. The Report of Three Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Bulent; Eris, Cengiz

    2011-01-01

    An appendicolith is composed of firm feces and some mineral deposits. After increased use of abdominal computed tomography, appendicoliths are more frequently detected. Most of the patients with appendicolith are asymptomatic. However, an appendicolith may be associated with complicated appendicitis with serious outcomes. We reported three patients who exhibited different clinical symptoms due to appendicolithiasis. While one of the patients was confused with urolithiasis, the other two patients presented with phlegmenous and perforated appendicitis. We submit that appendicoliths may present different clinical findings and can mimic several pathologies including urinary disorders. PMID:21487530

  16. Hypotensive effects of intravenously administered uridine and cytidine in conscious rats: Involvement of adenosine receptors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Sertac Yilmaz; Cenk Coskun; Oner Suzer; Murat Yalcin; Duygu Mutlu; Vahide Savci

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the cardiovascular effects of intravenously injected uridine or cytidine, and the role of adenosine receptors in mediating these effects, in conscious normotensive rats. Intravenous (i.v.) administration of uridine (124, 250, 500 mg\\/kg) dose-dependently decreased arterial pressure and heart rate. Cytidine (124, 250, 500 mg\\/kg; i.v.) produced slight dose-related hypotension without changing heart rate. Plasma uridine and

  17. Sporotrichosis in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: Sporothrix brasiliensis Is Associated with Atypical Clinical Presentations

    PubMed Central

    Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; de Oliveira, Manoel Marques Evangelista; Freitas, Dayvison Francis Saraiva; do Valle, Antônio Carlos Francesconi; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria; Gutierrez-Galhardo, Maria Clara

    2014-01-01

    Background There have been several recent changes in the taxonomy of Sporothrix schenckii as well as new observations regarding the clinical aspects of sporotrichosis. In this study, we determined the identification of the Sporothrix species associated with both classic and unusual clinical aspects of sporotrichosis observed in the endemic area of sporotrichosis in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Methodology/Principal Findings To verify whether S. brasiliensis is associated with clinical manifestations of sporotrichosis, a cross-sectional study was performed in which Sporothrix isolates from 50 patients with different clinical manifestations were analyzed and their isolates were studied by phenotypic and genotypic methods. Data from these patients revealed a distinct clinical picture and therapeutic response in infections caused by Sporothrix brasiliensis (n?=?45) compared to patients with S. schenckii sensu stricto (n?=?5). S. brasiliensis was associated with disseminated cutaneous infection without underlying disease, hypersensitivity reactions, and mucosal infection, whereas patients with S. schenckii presented with less severe and more often localized disease, similar to the majority of previously described sporotrichosis cases. Interestingly, S. brasiliensis-infected patients overall required shorter durations of itraconazole (median 16 weeks) compared to the individuals with S. schenckii (median 24 weeks). Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that Sporothrix species are linked to different clinical manifestations of sporotrichosis and that S. brasiliensis is effectively treated with oral itraconazole. PMID:25233227

  18. Clinical hyperthermia of prostate cancer using magnetic nanoparticles: Presentation of a new interstitial technique

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Johannsen; U. Gneveckow; L. Eckelt; A. Feussner; N. WaldÖFner; R. Scholz; S. Deger; P. Wust; S. A. Loening; A. Jordan

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate whether the technique of magnetic fluid hyperthermia can be used for minimally invasive treatment of prostate cancer. This paper presents the first clinical appli- cation of interstitial hyperthermia using magnetic nanoparticles in locally recurrent prostate cancer. Treatment planning was carried out using computerized tomography (CT) of the prostate. Based on the

  19. Mayo Clinic urologists present findings at American Urological Association annual meeting

    Cancer.gov

    Mayo Clinic researchers presented findings on prostate cancer risk, screening, treatment and other urological research at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association May 19–23 in Atlanta. In one study, of adjuvant hormonal therapy following radical prostatectomy, researchers found no adverse impact in overall survival of patients even when other health factors, specifically cardiovascular disease, were taken into account.

  20. Central diabetes insipidus in five cats: clinical presentation, diagnosis and oral desmopressin therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Itamar Aroch; Michal Mazaki-Tovi; Oved Shemesh; Havi Sarfaty; Gilad Segev

    2005-01-01

    Five cases of central diabetes insipidus (CDI) in domestic shorthair cats are described. All cats were under 3 years of age at the onset of clinical signs, and outdoor or outdoor\\/indoor cats, in which a prior trauma was either present or possible. The history included polydipsia and polyuria, and physical examination abnormalities included urinary bladder distention and dehydration. All cats

  1. Glomerular filtration rate estimated by cystatin C among different clinical presentations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A D Rule; E J Bergstralh; J M Slezak; J Bergert; T S Larson

    2006-01-01

    Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimates from serum creatinine has not been generalizable across all populations. Cystatin C has been proposed as an alternative marker for estimating GFR. The objective of this study was to compare cystatin C with serum creatinine for estimating GFR among different clinical presentations. Cystatin C and serum creatinine levels were obtained from adult patients (n=460) during

  2. Extracorporeal Ultrasound-Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound: Implications from the Present Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tinghe; Fu, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Extracorporeal ultrasound-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been clinically used for 15 years, and over 36000 cases have been reported. However, there yet lacked a consensus in the clinical values, suggesting the necessity of checking clinical findings. Clinical trials were searched and data reevaluated. HIFU was hardly performed alone; almost all present anticancer means have been applied during an HIFU treatment, and a specific regimen varied between trials; there were heterogeneity and disagreement between trials. The complexity made it difficult to distinguish the effect of HIFU. Based upon evaluable data, the efficacy of HIFU was similar to that of radio frequency, chemoembolization, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or hormone therapy; a combined therapy did not improve the efficacy. The survival rate of HIFU plus radiotherapy was lower than that of radical surgery in liver cancers. Adverse events had no downtrend in the past years. HIFU was not a standardized procedure where the intensity and insonation mode were modified constantly throughout a treatment, limiting an evaluation from the perspective of ultrasonics. These implied that HIFU should be applied as an alternative at most occasions. The present clinical trials had defects making against the understating of HIFU. PMID:24982965

  3. Cranio-maxillofacial non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma: Clinical and histological presentation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sebastian Scherfler; Kolja Freier; Robin Seeberger; Claire Bacon; Jürgen Hoffmann; Oliver C. Thiele

    Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma represents about 5% of all malignant lesions of the head and neck. In this study we retrospectively evaluated clinical presentation, histological subtype and long-term prognosis of 42 patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma involving the craniofacial area. The mean age at diagnosis was 64years. More than half of the patients presented with disseminated disease at multiple sites (55%, n=23). In

  4. Hotline update of clinical trials and registries presented at the German Cardiac Society Meeting 2009

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. S. Maier; S. H. Schirmer; K. Walenta; C. Jacobshagen; M. Böhm

    2009-01-01

    This review article gives an overview on a number of novel clinical trials and registries in the field of cardiovascular medicine.\\u000a Key presentations made at the 75th annual meeting of the German Cardiac Society, held in Mannheim, Germany, in April 2009\\u000a are reported. The data were presented by leading experts in the field with relevant positions in the trials and

  5. Contribution of Transjugular Liver Biopsy in Patients with the Clinical Presentation of Acute Liver Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Miraglia, Roberto, E-mail: rmiraglia@ismett.edu; Luca, Angelo; Gruttadauria, Salvatore; Minervini, Marta Ida; Vizzini, Giovanni; Arcadipane, Antonio; Gridelli, Bruno [Istituto Mediterraneo per i Trapianti e Terapie ad Alta Specializzazione (IsMeTT) (Italy)

    2006-12-15

    Purpose. Acute liver failure (ALF) treated with conservative therapy has a poor prognosis, although individual survival varies greatly. In these patients, the eligibility for liver transplantation must be quickly decided. The aim of this study was to assess the role of transjugular liver biopsy (TJLB) in the management of patients with the clinical presentation of ALF. Methods. Seventeen patients with the clinical presentation of ALF were referred to our institution during a 52 month period. A TJLB was performed using the Cook Quick-Core needle biopsy. Clinical data, procedural complications, and histologic findings were evaluated. Results. Causes of ALF were virus hepatitis B infection in 7 patients, drug toxicity in 4, mushroom in 1, Wilson's disease in 1, and unknown origin in 4. TJLB was technically successful in all patients without procedure-related complications. Tissue specimens were satisfactory for diagnosis in all cases. In 14 of 17 patients the initial clinical diagnosis was confirmed by TJLB; in 3 patients the initial diagnosis was altered by the presence of unknown cirrhosis. Seven patients with necrosis <60% were successfully treated with medical therapy; 6 patients with submassive or massive necrosis ({>=}85%) were treated with liver transplantation. Four patients died, 3 had cirrhosis, and 1 had submassive necrosis. There was a strict statistical correlation (r = 0.972, p < 0.0001) between the amount of necrosis at the frozen section examination and the necrosis found at routine histologic examination. The average time for TJLB and frozen section examination was 80 min. Conclusion. In patients with the clinical presentation of ALF, submassive or massive liver necrosis and cirrhosis are predictors of poor prognosis. TLJB using an automated device and frozen section examination can be a quick and effective tool in clinical decision-making, especially in deciding patient selection and the best timing for liver transplantation.

  6. Systemic Arthritis in Children: A Review of Clinical Presentation and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gurion, R.; Lehman, T. J. A.; Moorthy, L. N.

    2012-01-01

    Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) constitutes a small part of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), yet has a disproportionally higher rate of mortality. Despite being grouped under JIA, it is considered to be a multifactorial autoinflammatory disease. The objective of this paper is to review the epidemiology, pathogenesis, genetics, clinical manifestations, complications, therapy, prognosis, and outcome of sJIA. The presentation and clinical manifestations of sJIA have not changed much in the past several decades, but the collective understanding of the pathogenesis and the development of new targeted therapies (particularly the biologic agents) have transformed and improved the disease outcome for children with sJIA. PMID:22235382

  7. Hypotension, as consequence of the interaction between tacrolimus and mirtazapine, in a patient with renal transplant.

    PubMed

    Fraile, Pilar; Garcia-Cosmes, Pedro; Garcia, Tamara; Corbacho, Luis; Alvarez, Marcos; Tabernero, Jose Matias

    2009-06-01

    The prevalence of psychiatric disorders in dialyzed patients is estimated around 5-20% of the cases. This explains the high use of antidepressant drugs in these patients. We present the case of a 68-year-old woman with a history of renal failure, with chronic hemodialysis and a depressive syndrome in treatment with Mirtazapine. In November 2008, the patient received a renal graft. An immunosuppressant treatment was started with Basiliximab, Tacrolimus, Mycophenolate Mofetil, and corticosteroids. The patient did not present renal immediate renal function. Four days after the transplant, the treatment with Mirtazapine was re-applied, with an asymptomatic hypotension after 2 hours, and without surgical complications. Tacrolimus blood levels were higher than 15 ng/ml. In our opinion, hypotension was a consequence of the interaction Mirtazapine-Tacrolimus in a patient without immediate renal function. This situation has not been described in the literature before, and hypotension could have had negative consequences in the evolution of the graft. PMID:19332869

  8. Risk factors and clinical presentation of craniocervical arterial dissection: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Craniocervical arterial dissection is a major cause of ischaemic stroke in young adults. The pathogenesis is not fully understood but is thought to be related to a combination of an intrinsic weakness in the arterial wall and an external trigger. Intrinsic susceptibility is thought to be a generalised arteriopathy, vascular anomaly or genetic predisposition. Proposed extrinsic factors include recent viral infection and minor mechanical trauma to the neck, including neck manipulation, which has raised concerns amongst manual practitioners in particular as to the appropriate screening of patients and avoidance of more vigorous therapeutic techniques. The presenting features of dissection may mimic a musculoskeletal presentation, creating a diagnostic dilemma for primary care practitioners. Early recognition is critical so that appropriate management can be commenced. The aims of this study are to prospectively investigate young patients ?55?years admitted to hospital with radiologically diagnosed craniocervical arterial dissection compared to matched controls with stroke but not dissection, to identify risk factors and early presenting clinical features, so these may be more readily identified by primary care practitioners. Methods Patients ? 55?years presenting to hospital with craniocervical arterial dissection and controls will have their medical records reviewed and be interviewed and questioned about possible risk factors, preceding events to admission such as recent neck trauma, and presenting clinical features including any preceding transient ischaemic features. Clinical assessment will include a connective tissue screening examination to identify subclinical connective tissue disorders. Radiology and blood screening will be reviewed for typical features and inflammatory markers. Functional outcome will be reviewed to determine the burden of the stroke. Discussion This study will provide descriptive and comparative data on intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for craniocervical arterial dissection and outline the typical clinical presentation, including the nature of early presenting features which might assist practitioners to identify those patients for whom vigorous manual therapy of the neck is inappropriate and alert them to those for whom immediate urgent medical care should be sought. PMID:22937796

  9. Clinical presentation of PCOS following development of an insulinoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Murray, R D; Davison, R M; Russell, R C; Conway, G S

    2000-01-01

    A 24 year old woman presented with a prolonged clinical history of fasting and exertional hypoglycaemia, and was subsequently diagnosed with an insulinoma. Concurrent symptoms of oligomenorrhoea and hyperandrogenism of similar duration were noted. Biochemically, hyperinsulinaemia was observed in association with a raised serum luteinizing hormone (LH), raised testosterone and androstendione concentrations. Surgical removal of the insulinoma resulted in resolution of the clinical and biochemical features of the polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) but minimal change was observed in the ovarian ultrasound appearances. This case demonstrates the role of insulin in mediating the hypersecretion of both LH and androgens in women with polycystic ovaries. We suggest that hyperinsulinaemia converted occult 'polycystic ovaries' to become clinically manifest as 'polycystic ovary syndrome'. This paradigm has clear implications for women with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus who presumably have systemic hyperinsulinaemia. PMID:10611194

  10. Severe Rift Valley Fever May Present with a Characteristic Clinical Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kahlon, Summerpal S.; Peters, Clarence J.; LeDuc, James; Muchiri, Eric M.; Muiruri, Samuel; Njenga, M. Kariuki; Breiman, Robert F.; Clinton White, A.; King, Charles H.

    2010-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus is an emerging pathogen that is transmitted in many regions of sub-Saharan Africa, parts of Egypt, and the Arabian peninsula. Outbreaks of RVF, like other diseases caused by hemorrhagic fever viruses, typically present in locations with very limited health resources, where initial diagnosis must be based only on history and physical examination. Although general signs and symptoms of human RVF have been documented, a specific clinical syndrome has not been described. In 2007, a Kenyan outbreak of RVF provided opportunity to assess acutely ill RVF patients and better delineate its presentation and clinical course. Our data reveal an identifiable clinical syndrome suggestive of severe RVF, characterized by fever, large-joint arthralgia, and gastrointestinal complaints and later followed by jaundice, right upper-quadrant pain, and delirium, often coinciding with hemorrhagic manifestations. Further characterization of a distinct RVF clinical syndrome will aid earlier detection of RVF outbreaks and should allow more rapid implementation of control. PMID:20207858

  11. Clinical presentations and biochemical profile in adult celiac disease patients in Hyderabad: Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Masood, Naila; Ali Shaikh, Imran

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To see the various clinical presentations and biochemical profile in adult celiac disease patients of Hyderabad Sindh. Methods: A total 60 suspected cases of adult celiac disease, both males and females were screened out from Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences hospital and private clinics at Sadar Hyderabad Sind by non probability purposive sampling during a period from July 2011 to December 2012.Age ranged between 18 to 55 Years. A detailed history and clinical examination was done. Patients already on gluten free diet, age <12years, tuberculosis or cancer of intestine/colon and patients of diabetes and thyroid disorder were excluded, while patients having positive ant tTG (value >15 iu/ml detected by ELISA) were included. The biochemical profile including serum albumin, calcium ,ferritin, SGPT, Alkaline phosphatase and Haemoglobin were estimated in central Diagnostic laboratory LUMHS by taking 10 cc centrifuged blood sample. The data was plotted on SPSS 16, mean and percentages were calculated. Results: All patients were divided in to three groups according to age. The most common group was 18-30 years; (mean, 23.5±5.6) comprised 56.6%. The commonest clinical presentation was diarrhoea in 50%, menstrual irregularity in 21%, walking problems 21%, undue fatigue in 15% and edema in 15%. P values calculated in quantitative variable of males and females. The p value was significant in between serum calcium (p 0.004), haemoglobin (p 0,004), serum ferritin (<0.005) and alkaline phosphatise (<0.005). Conclusion: This study showed that Adult celiac disease was present with entirely different clinical and biochemical profile in patients in this region. PMID:24772128

  12. Centrally injected histamine increases posterior hypothalamic acetylcholine release in hemorrhage-hypotensive rats.

    PubMed

    Altinbas, Burcin; Yilmaz, Mustafa S; Savci, Vahide; Jochem, Jerzy; Yalcin, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Histamine, acting centrally as a neurotransmitter, evokes a reversal of hemorrhagic hypotension in rats due to the activation of the sympathetic and the renin-angiotensin systems as well as the release of arginine vasopressin and proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides. We demonstrated previously that central nicotinic cholinergic receptors are involved in the pressor effect of histamine. The aim of the present study was to examine influences of centrally administrated histamine on acetylcholine (ACh) release at the posterior hypothalamus-a region characterized by location of histaminergic and cholinergic neurons involved in the regulation of the sympathetic activity in the cardiovascular system-in hemorrhage-hypotensive anesthetized rats. Hemodynamic and microdialysis studies were carried out in Sprague-Dawley rats. Hemorrhagic hypotension was induced by withdrawal of a volume of 1.5 ml blood/100 g body weight over a period of 10 min. Acute hemorrhage led to a severe and long-lasting decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and an increase in extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and choline (Ch) levels by 56% and 59%, respectively. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered histamine (50, 100, and 200 nmol) dose- and time-dependently increased MAP and HR and caused an additional rise in extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and Ch levels at the most by 102%, as compared to the control saline-treated group. Histamine H1 receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine (50 nmol; i.c.v.) completely blocked histamine-evoked hemodynamic and extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and Ch changes, whereas H2 and H3/H4 receptor blockers ranitidine (50 nmol; i.c.v.) and thioperamide (50 nmol; i.c.v.) had no effect. In conclusion, centrally administered histamine, acting via H1 receptors, increases ACh release at the posterior hypothalamus and causes a pressor and tachycardic response in hemorrhage-hypotensive anesthetized rats. PMID:25468497

  13. Design, in vitro stability, and ocular hypotensive activity of t-butalone chemical delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Reddy, I K; Vaithiyalingam, S R; Khan, M A; Bodor, N S

    2001-08-01

    The objective of this work was to synthesize two bioreversible diacyl derivatives of t-butalone (chemical delivery systems), determine their chemical and in vitro stability, and investigate their potential use as topical antiglaucoma agents. The stability of these compounds was determined in isotonic phosphate buffers (pH range 5-8) and in selected biological media, including human whole blood, rabbit and rat blood, and the anterior segment tissues of rabbit. The ocular hypotensive activity of these compounds in unrestrained, normotensive albino rabbits was determined with a pneumatonometer. The two compounds were stable at lower pH. The stability decreased as the pH increased, suggesting their lability to base-catalyzed hydrolysis. These compounds exhibited significant differences in the hydrolytic rates in the whole blood among species examined (rat > rabbit > human). The observed rates of disappearance in different ocular tissues were indicative of relative enzyme activity in these media (iris-ciliary body > cornea > aqueous humor). The two compounds exhibited a significant ocular hypotensive activity (P < 0.01) at 2% dose level. The peak activity was found between 2 and 4 h, and the activity was maintained for 4.5 to 7 h. The dipivalyl derivative of t-butalone exhibited more pronounced decrease in intraocular pressure than that of diisovaleryl derivative. The present study suggests the possible use of diacyl derivatives of t-butalone as ocular hypotensive agents. PMID:11536206

  14. Concentric visual field defect related to spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Pilo-de-la-Fuente, Belen; Gonzalez Martin-Moro, Julio; Navacerrada, Francisco; Plaza-Nieto, Francisco Jose; Jimenez-Jimenez, Felix Javier

    2013-10-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is a rare syndrome characterized by postural headache associated with a low cerebrospinal fluid pressure in the absence of dural puncture or penetrating trauma. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically shows diffuse pachymeningeal gadolinium enhancement, subdural fluid collections, prominence of cerebral venous sinuses and brain descent. Visual signs and symptoms have been described infrequently in patients with SIH. These include third or sixth nerve palsy, superior nasal quadrantanopia and temporal hemianopia. We report a 34 year-old woman who presented with a two-year history of orthostatic headache, dizziness and transient visual obscurations. Campimetry showed a bilateral concentric visual field defect. She also described that intermittently a transparent fluid leaked out of her nose. She had no past history of trauma, sinus surgery or intracranial surgery. Cranial MRI was normal. Neuro-ophthalmological examination ruled out any other causes of concentric visual field defects. Lumbar puncture showed a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) opening pressure of 9 cm H2O. Radioisotope cisternography suggested a dural leak at cribiform plate. The cribiform plate region was repaired endoscopically with improvement of all symptoms. One year later she remains asymptomatic and the visual field defects have improved. PMID:23277208

  15. Case of acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau following psoriasis with atypical clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Shigeruko; Okazaki, Yukiko; Watanabe, Shinya; Maruyama, Yoko

    2014-11-01

    We present a 63-year-old Japanese woman who had clinically unique symmetrical skin rashes on her lower face, inframammary area, back and extremities, with some pustules on the cheeks. Skin biopsy specimens showed typical findings of psoriasis, and Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score was 5.9. After the skin lesions were treated successfully with vitamin D3 ointment, pustules developed on the tips of the fingers and toes, with paronychial and subungual involvement. The pathology of the nail matrix was consistent with pustular psoriasis, and the patient was diagnosed with acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau (ACH) following psoriasis with an unusual clinical presentation. ACH was well controlled with a low dose of cyclosporin. Our patient is a rare case chronologically affected by two diseases in the same category. We confirmed that ACH is a variant of pustular psoriasis, and believe that the patient could provide another clue to determining the entity of ACH. PMID:25346303

  16. Chronic GM1 gangliosidosis presenting as dystonia: clinical and biochemical studies in a new case.

    PubMed

    Nardocci, N; Bertagnolio, B; Rumi, V; Combi, M; Bardelli, P; Angelini, L

    1993-06-01

    Clinical and biochemical findings in a patient affected by chronic GM1 gangliosidosis, presenting as progressive dystonia and mental deterioration, are reported. The patient, a 13-year-old male, showed, at the age of 3 years, an impairment of gait with frequent falls, dysarthria and stuttering. At the age of 6, writing dystonia appeared and subsequently mental deterioration and dystonic postures of arms and legs became evident. The clinical features presented by this patient are similar to those shown by the cases of adult/chronic GM1 gangliosidosis previously reported, except for the early onset. This observation emphasizes the occurrence of dystonia as prominent symptom in chronic GM1 gangliosidosis, underlining that this disease must be considered in the diagnostic approach to the progressive dystonias of the early infancy. PMID:8355822

  17. Glucose transporter 1 deficiency syndrome and hemiplegic migraines as a dominant presenting clinical feature.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Shekeeb S; Coman, David; Calvert, Sophie

    2014-12-01

    Glucose transporter 1 deficiency syndrome (OMIM 606777) is a treatable epileptic encephalopathy caused by mutations in the SLC2A1 gene (OMIM 138140) causing impaired glucose transport into the brain. The classical phenotype is associated with seizures, developmental delay, ataxia and spasticity; however, milder phenotypes are emerging. We describe an 8-year-old boy with glucose transporter 1 deficiency syndrome whose clinical presentation was dominated by hemiplegic migraines that resolved with institution of a modified Atkins diet. PMID:25440161

  18. Primary Laryngeal Neuroendocrine Carcinoma – A Rare Entity with Deviant Clinical Presentation

    PubMed Central

    K, Anoosha; K, Amita; Shankar S, Vijay; Geeta K, Avadhani

    2014-01-01

    Primary laryngeal neuroendocrine carcinomas are rare neoplasms. WHO classifies them under five categories of which, the moderately differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma is synonymous with atypical or malignant carcinoid tumour. We report a rare case of primary laryngeal neuroendocrine carcinoma with an unusual and misleading clinical presentation. The initial cytological diagnosis of secondary neuroendocrine carcinoma in the cervical lymph node led to the suspicion of primary neuroendocrine carcinoma in the larynx. PMID:25386445

  19. A case of ethylmalonic encephalopathy with atypical clinical and biochemical presentation.

    PubMed

    Di Rocco, Maja; Caruso, Ubaldo; Briem, Egill; Rossi, Andrea; Allegri, Anna E M; Buzzi, Davide; Tiranti, Valeria

    2006-12-01

    A child is reported presenting with a clinical picture suggestive of genetic connective tissue disorders (vascular fragility, articular hyperlaxity, delayed motor development, and normal cognitive development), an absence of pathological ethylmalonic acid excretion during inter-critical phases and a homozygous R163W mutation in the ETHE1 gene. This case suggests that ethylmalonic aciduria is not a constant biochemical marker of ethylmalonic encephalopathy and that its normal excretion outside of metabolic decompensation episodes does not exclude this metabolic disease. PMID:16828325

  20. A case of ethylmalonic encephalopathy with atypical clinical and biochemical presentation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maja Di Rocco; Ubaldo Caruso; Egill Briem; Andrea Rossi; Anna E. M. Allegri; Davide Buzzi; Valeria Tiranti

    2006-01-01

    A child is reported presenting with a clinical picture suggestive of genetic connective tissue disorders (vascular fragility, articular hyperlaxity, delayed motor development, and normal cognitive development), an absence of pathological ethylmalonic acid excretion during inter-critical phases and a homozygous R163W mutation in the ETHE1 gene. This case suggests that ethylmalonic aciduria is not a constant biochemical marker of ethylmalonic encephalopathy

  1. An unusual presentation of Kabuki syndrome: clinical overlap with CHARGE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Verhagen, Judith M A; Oostdijk, Wilma; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Cecilia E J; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E; van Bever, Yolande

    2014-09-01

    Kabuki syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by intellectual disability and multiple congenital anomalies, including short stature, peculiar facial appearance, skeletal anomalies, a variety of visceral malformations and abnormal dermatoglyphic patterns. We describe a case of Kabuki syndrome presenting with atypical features, consisting of bilateral microphthalmia, coloboma, anal atresia and panhypopituitarism, showing considerable phenotypic overlap with CHARGE syndrome. This report demonstrates that clinical follow-up and molecular genetic testing can be useful for establishing the correct diagnosis. PMID:24862881

  2. Peritoneal Perforation of Liver Hydatid Cysts: Clinical Presentation, Predisposing Factors, and Surgical Outcome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alper Akcan; Hizir Akyildiz; Tarik Artis; Ahmet Ozturk; Mehmet Ali Deneme; Engin Ok; Erdogan Sozuer

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical presentation of, predisposing factors in, and early and long-term outcome\\u000a of patients treated surgically for intraperitoneal ruptured liver hydatid cysts. Medical records of 27 patients with traumatic\\u000a rupture of hydatid cysts were evaluated retrospectively, as were records of 347 patients with nonperforated hydatid cysts.\\u000a The ratio of perforation cases to

  3. Levels of soluble adhesion molecules in various clinical presentations of coronary atherosclerosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ümit Güray; A. Riza Erbay; Yesim Güray; M. Birhan Yilmaz; Asiye Ayca Boyac?; Hatice Sasmaz; Sule Korkmaz; Emine Kütük

    2004-01-01

    Adhesion molecules play an important role in the development and course of coronary atherosclerosis. In this study, soluble forms of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), E-selectin and P-selectin were evaluated in patients with various clinical presentations of coronary atherosclerosis and compared them to those with angiographically documented normal coronary arteries. Venous plasma samples were collected from

  4. Clinical presentation and physiotherapy treatment of 4 patients with low back pain and isthmic spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Silvano; Vanti, Carla; O'Reilly, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Objective Spondylolisthesis is a pathological condition characterized by the slipping of a vertebral body, compared with the underlying one, following structural and/or degenerative changes of the spine. The purpose of this case series is to describe clinical presentations and the conservative physiotherapy management of 4 patients with low back pain and lumbar isthmic spondylolisthesis. Clinical Features Four patients aged 25, 43, 36, and 50 years presented with low back pain of various duration. Radiographs confirmed the presence of lumbar isthmic spondylolisthesis. Outcome measures included numerical rating scale, disability outcome measure (Oswestry Disability Index), spinal instability tests (Prone Instability Test, Passive Lumbar Extension test), and muscle function tests (Aberrant Movement Patterns, Active Straight Leg Raising, Prone and Supine Bridge Tests). Intervention and Outcomes Treatment consisted of postural reeducation, stretching, and strengthening exercises. Over the course of individualized treatment, ranging from 8 to 10 treatment visits, outcomes improved for all 4 patients. Conclusion This report describes varying clinical presentations and treatment of 4 patients with isthmic spondylolisthesis, suggesting that different pain generators could be managed by different conservative approaches. PMID:23204952

  5. Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria syndrome with stroke-like imaging presentation: clinical, biochemical and molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Al-Hassnan, Zuhair N; Rashed, Mohamed S; Al-Dirbashi, Osama Y; Patay, Zoltan; Rahbeeni, Zuhair; Abu-Amero, Khaled K

    2008-01-15

    Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in ORNT1 gene that encodes a mitochondrial ornithine transporter. It has variable clinical presentations with episodic hyperammonemia, liver dysfunction, and chronic neurological manifestations. In this work, we report the findings of HHH syndrome in 3 Saudi siblings. The 4-year-old proband presented with recurrent Reye-like episodes, hypotonia, and multiple stroke-like lesions on brain MRI. Biochemical and molecular analysis confirmed that she had HHH syndrome. She significantly improved on protein restriction and sodium benzoate. Her two older siblings have milder phenotypes with protein intolerance and learning problems. In comparison to their sister, their homocitrulline and orotic acid were only mildly elevated even before treatment. The three patients were homozygous for a novel mutation in ORNT1 with a Gly220Arg change. In view of the CNS lesions, which initially were felt to be suggestive of MELAS, we sequenced the entire mtDNA genome and no potential pathogenic mutations were detected. Analysis of ORNT2 did not provide explanation of the clinical and biochemical variability. This work presents a yet unreported CNS involvement pattern, notably multiple supratentorial stroke-like lesions in association with HHH syndrome. Moreover, it illustrates considerable clinical/biochemical correlation, and describes a novel mutation. We suggest including HHH syndrome in the differential diagnosis of patients found to have stroke-like lesions on brain MRI. PMID:17825324

  6. Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis presenting to a chiropractic clinic: a description of 2 cases

    PubMed Central

    Stainsby, Brynne E.; Muir, Bradley J.; Miners, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case series is to describe the presentation of 2 patients who presented to a chiropractic teaching clinic with Paget-Schroetter syndrome (PSS) and to discuss the potential role for conservative therapy in the management of symptoms. Clinical Features Two patients presented with a vascular and muscular findings suggesting activity-related upper extremity deep vein thrombosis. One patient presented with recent onset of symptoms (pain in the neck with a “pinched nerve sensation” in the left upper trapezius); and the other presented with chronic, low-grade neck pain of 1 year's duration. Intervention and Outcome The initial treatment approach for the patient with acute symptoms included soft tissue therapy. During the second appointment, he was immediately referred for medical evaluation and management because of worsening symptoms. He was diagnosed with thrombus in the left brachial vein, started immediately on a thrombolytic agent, and referred to a thrombosis clinic. Treatment for the second patient with chronic symptoms included soft tissue therapy, spinal manipulative therapy, and active care. Two months after 3 treatments, she reported improved symptoms. She remains under supportive care and has reported continued relief of her symptoms. Conclusion Although a rare condition, PSS has the potential to result in significant morbidity and potentially fatal complications; thus, it is critical that practitioners recognize the signs and symptoms to facilitate appropriate and timely referrals. Clinicians should be aware of the presentation and proposed pathogenesis of PSS, and consider this diagnosis in patients with unilateral upper limb and/or neck pain. PMID:23843762

  7. Midodrine as a Countermeasure for Post-Spaceflight Orthostatic Hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael B.; Stein, Sydney P.; Meck, Janice V.; Platts, Steven H.

    2008-01-01

    One possible mechanism for post-spaceflight orthostatic hypotension, which affects approximately 30% of astronauts after short duration shuttle missions, is inadequate norepinephrine release during upright posture. We performed a two phased study to determine the effectiveness of an alpha1-adrenergic agonist, midodrine, as a countermeasure to post-spaceflight orthostatic hypotension. The first phase of the study examined the landing day orthostatic responses of six veteran astronauts after oral midodrine (10 mg) administered on the ground within approximately two hours of wheel stop. One female crewmember exhibited orthostatic hypotension in a previous flight but not after midodrine. Five male crewmembers, who did not exhibit orthostatic hypotension during previous flights, also did not show signs of orthostatic hypotension after midodrine. Additionally, phase one showed that midodrine did not cause hypertension in these crewmembers. In the second phase of this study, midodrine is ingested inflight (near time of ignition, TIG) and orthostatic responses are determined immediately upon landing via an 80 degree head-up tilt test performed on the crew transport vehicle (CTV). Four of ten crewmembers have completed phase two of this study. Two crewmembers completed the landing day tilt tests, while two tests were ended early due to presyncopal symptoms. All subjects had decreased landing day stroke volumes and increased heart rates compared to preflight. Midodrine appears to have increased total peripheral resistance in one crewmember who was able to complete the landing day tilt test. The effectiveness of midodrine as a countermeasure to immediate post-spaceflight orthostatic hypotension has yet to be determined; interpretation is made more difficult due to low subject number and the lack of control subjects on the CTV.

  8. The Morel-Lavallée lesion: pathophysiology, clinical presentation, imaging features, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Bonilla-Yoon, Iris; Masih, Sulabha; Patel, Dakshesh B; White, Eric A; Levine, Benjamin D; Chow, Kira; Gottsegen, Christopher J; Matcuk, George R

    2014-02-01

    Morel-Lavallée lesions are posttraumatic hemolymphatic collections related to shearing injury and disruption of interfascial planes between subcutaneous soft tissue and muscle. We review the pathophysiology of Morel-Lavallée lesions, clinical presentation, and potential sites of involvement. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice for characterization. We present the MRI classification and highlight the key imaging features that distinguish the different types, focusing on the three most common: seroma, subacute hematoma, and chronic organizing hematoma. Potential mimics of Morel-Lavallée lesions, such as soft tissue sarcoma and hemorrhagic prepatellar bursitis, are compared and contrasted. Treatment options and a management algorithm are also briefly discussed. PMID:23949106

  9. [Solid-pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas. Presentation of 3 clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Venturelli, Francisco M; Carrasco, Cristian L; Del Pozo, Maeva L; Cárcamo, Carlos I; Felmer, Orlando E; Ibaceta, Marcela Cárcamo; Leonelli, Aliro Venturelli

    2011-01-01

    The solid-pseudopapillary tumors of the pancreas (TSPP) are a uncommon neoplasm (1- 2% of exocrine tumors). Are more frequent in young women and presents a low malignant potential (15% develop metastases). Its preoperative diagnosis is very difficult, because these tumors haven`t radiological features that makes distinguish from the other pancreatic cysts tumors. Usually are a histopathological finding. Surgical therapy provides good survival, even in the presence of metastases. We present 3 cases with clinical, imaging, treatment and histopathology to provide more information about this rare disease. PMID:21544159

  10. Hypotensive action of an aqueous extract of Pimenta dioica (Myrtaceae) in rats.

    PubMed

    Suárez, A; Ulate, G; Ciccio, J F

    2000-03-01

    The intra-venous (i.v.) hypotensive action of the final aqueous fraction of Pimenta dioica was studied in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR). The rats were anaesthetized (sodium pentobarbital 50 mg/kg), the trachea, right carotid artery and jugular vein were cannulated for adequate ventilation, direct blood pressure measurement and intra-venous administration of extracts, solutions and drugs. The arterial line was connected to a pressure transducer (Viggo-Spectramed model P23 XL) and a polygraph (Grass model 7H) and monitored continuously during the first five minutes after plant extract administration and then at 5 and 15 minute intervals for one hour. Responses were taken as the maximum pressure changes observed during this period. Increasing doses of the final aqueous fraction were given i.v. to groups of six SHR each. It produced a dose dependent decrease in blood pressure and the ED50 was 45 mg/kg. To discard that the hypotensive effect of the extracts was due to its ionic composition, a solution containing KCl, NaCl, CaCl2 and MgCl2 equivalent to the ion contents present in a dose of 50 mg/kg of total aqueous extract was injected to Sprague-Dawley rats (SDN) using the same method as described above. It did not produce significant changes in blood pressure. Pharmacological antagonistic studies were done injecting either autonomic ganglion, alpha adrenoceptor, beta adrenoceptor and cholinergic receptor blockers prior to extract administration in SHR rats. Atropine, propranolol and phentolamine did not affect the hypotensive effect of the final aqueous fraction. With hexamethonium (autonomic ganglion blocker) the hypotensive response was diminished in a significant way (p < 0.05). The hypotensive action of the final aqueous extract was not mediated through cholinergic, alpha or beta adrenergic receptors. The extract may posses vasorelaxing activity which could not be evident after autonomic ganglion blockade due to extreme vasodilation present prior to extract administration. Future studies should address the question of a possible direct vasodilating effect of the extracts. PMID:11021313

  11. Recent advances in the treatment of orthostatic hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, D.; Davis, T. L.

    1995-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension is a fall in blood pressure on standing that causes symptoms of dizziness, visual changes, and discomfort in the head and neck. The goal of treatment is the improvement of the patient's functional capacity, rather than a target blood pressure. For treatment to be successful, it must be individualized. Non-pharmalogic interventions include carefully managed exercise, scheduled activities, and monitoring of the environmental temperature. Agents such as fludrocortisone, midodrine, and epoetin alfa offer successful pharmacologic interventions. Although these measures ease the symptoms of orthostatic hypotension, current approaches neither reverse nor stabilize the disease process in autonomic disorders.

  12. False fracture of the penis: Different pathology but similar clinical presentation and management

    PubMed Central

    Kurkar, Adel; Elderwy, Ahmad A.; Orabi, Elderwy

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Penile fracture is the most common presentation of acute penis. Rupture of the superficial dorsal penile vein (s) may mimic penile fractures with similar clinical presentation but with intact corporeal bodies. Our aim of the study is to highlight superficial dorsal penile vein (s) injury as true emergency with better prognosis. Subjects and Methods: Sixty-eight patients with suspected penile fractures presented to our hospital between June 2007 and January 2013. Out of these, 11 patients showed intact tunica albuginea on exploration with injured dorsal penile vein (s) identified. Records of such 11 cases were reviewed regarding age, etiology, symptoms, physical signs, findings of surgical exploration and post-operative erectile function. Results: All 11 patients were injured during sexual intercourse and presented with penile swelling and ecchymosis and gradual detumescence. Mild penile pain was encountered in 5 cases and the “snap” sound was noted in 2 cases. Examination revealed no localized tenderness, or tunical defect. All the patients regained penile potency without deformity after surgical ligation of the severed vessels. One patient developed penile hypoesthesia. Conclusion: Although the classic “snap” sound and immediate detumescence are usually lacking in the symptomology of dorsal penile vein rupture, its clinical presentation can be indistinguishable from true penile fracture. Surgical exploration is still required to avoid missing tunical tear with possible future complications. The long-term outcome and prognosis are excellent. PMID:24669117

  13. Idiopathic Retroperitoneal Fibrosis: A Retrospective Review of Clinical Presentation, Treatment, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kermani, Tanaz A.; Crowson, Cynthia S.; Achenbach, Sara J.; Luthra, Harvinder S.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical manifestations, laboratory results, imaging findings, and treatments in patients with idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis (IRF) seen at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In this retrospective study, we used International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes to identify all patients evaluated for IRF between January 1, 1996, and December 31, 2006, at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. Medical records were reviewed, and clinical information was abstracted. Idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis was diagnosed on the basis of compatible imaging findings. Patients were followed up until their last visit at Mayo Clinic, death, or December 31, 2008, whichever came first. RESULTS: Of the 185 patients identified as having IRF, 113 (61%) were men and 72 (39%) were women. Mean ± SD age at diagnosis was 57.6±11.8 years. Biopsy specimens were obtained in 142 cases (77%). The most common presenting symptoms were back pain (38%) and abdominal pain (40%). Baseline erythrocyte sedimentation rate and/or C-reactive protein levels were elevated in 88 (58%) of the 151 patients tested. The median creatinine level at diagnosis was 1.3 mg/dL (interquartile range, 1.1-2.1 mg/dL). Fifteen patients (8%) were treated with ureteral procedures only, 58 patients (31%) with medications only, and 105 patients (57%) with a combination of medical and surgical therapies. Seven patients (4%) were not treated. Corticosteroids were initiated in 116 patients (63%), and tamoxifen was used in 120 patients (65%). Follow-up was available for 151 patients (82%). Creatinine levels were normal at last visit in 102 (68%) of the 151 patients with follow-up. No patient developed end-stage renal disease. Relapses occurred in 18 (12%) of the 151 patients. Eleven patients died. CONCLUSION: In this cohort, outcomes such as end-stage renal disease or death from renal failure were not observed. Relapses may occur, and patients with IRF warrant long-term follow-up. PMID:21454732

  14. Presentations

    Cancer.gov

    Presentations Name Position Presentation (ppt) Sudhir Srivastava, PhD, MPH Chief, Cancer Biomarkers Research Group Metabolomics: An Untapped Frontier (ppt, 161kb) John Milner, PhD Chief, Nutritional Sciences research Group Can Metabolomics

  15. Comorbidity and high viral load linked to clinical presentation of respiratory human bocavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Ghietto, Lucía María; Majul, Diego; Ferreyra Soaje, Patricia; Baumeister, Elsa; Avaro, Martín; Insfrán, Constanza; Mosca, Liliana; Cámara, Alicia; Moreno, Laura Beatriz; Adamo, Maria Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a new parvovirus associated with acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI). In order to evaluate HBoV significance as an agent of acute respiratory disease, we screened 1,135 respiratory samples from children and adults with and without symptoms during two complete calendar years. HBoV1 prevalence in patients with ARTI was 6.33 % in 2011 and 11.64 % in 2012, including neonatal and adult patients. HBoV1 was also detected in 3.77 % of asymptomatic individuals. The co-detection rate was 78.1 %. Among children, 87 % were clinically diagnosed with lower respiratory infection (no significant differences between patients with and without coinfection), and 31 % exhibited comorbidities. Pediatric patients with comorbidities were significantly older than patients without comorbidities. Patients with ARTI had either high or low viral load, while controls had only low viral load, but there were no clinical differences between patients with high or low viral load. In conclusion, we present evidence of the pathogenic potential of HBoV1 in young children with ARTI. Since patients with HBoV1-single infection are not significantly different from those with coinfection with respect to clinical features, the virus can be as pathogenic by itself as other respiratory agents are. Furthermore, an association between high HBoV1 load and disease could not be demonstrated in this study, but all asymptomatic individuals had low viral loads. Also, children with comorbidities are susceptible to HBoV1 infection at older ages than previously healthy children. Thus, the clinical presentation of infection may occur depending on both viral load and the particular interaction between the HBoV1 and the host. PMID:25269520

  16. Association between DNA Methylation of the BDNF Promoter Region and Clinical Presentation in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Ishii, Jumpei; Shinagawa, Shunichiro; Nakayama, Ritsuko; Shibata, Nobuto; Kuerban, Bolati; Ohnuma, Tohru; Kondo, Kazuhiro; Arai, Heii; Yamada, Hisashi; Nakayama, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims In the present study, we examined whether DNA methylation of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promoter is associated with the manifestation and clinical presentation of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods Of 20 patients with AD and 20 age-matched normal controls (NCs), the DNA methylation of the BDNF promoter (measured using peripheral blood samples) was completely analyzed in 12 patients with AD and 6 NCs. The resulting methylation levels were compared statistically. Next, we investigated the correlation between the DNA methylation levels and the clinical presentation of AD. Results The total methylation ratio (in %) of the 20 CpG sites was significantly higher in the AD patients (5.08 ± 5.52%) than in the NCs (2.09 ± 0.81%; p < 0.05). Of the 20 CpG sites, the methylation level at the CpG4 site was significantly higher in the AD subjects than in the NCs (p < 0.05). Moreover, the methylation level was significantly and negatively correlated with some neuropsychological test subscores (registration, recall, and prehension behavior scores; p < 0.05). Conclusion These results suggest that the DNA methylation of the BDNF promoter may significantly influence the manifestation of AD and might be associated with its neurocognitive presentation.

  17. Aggressive Pseudomyxoma Peritonei: A Case Report with an Unusual Clinical Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Kavouras, Nikolaos; Menis, Michalis; Lavant, Laurant

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) is an uncommon surgical entity. We report a case of aggressive disease with an unusual clinical presentation and we analyze current data on diagnosis and management of PMP. Case Presentation. A 71-year-old male patient presented with intermittent diarrhea and loss of appetite during the last two months, without any other classic symptoms of PMP. The clinical examination was misleading due to patient's obesity. The radiological evaluation revealed ascites of the abdomen and possible mucocele of the appendix, whereas the laboratory exams showed high values of specific tumour markers. The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy for definite diagnosis. Biopsies and immunohistochemical examination confirmed the diagnosis of an aggressive and extended peritoneal mucinous carcinomatosis (PMCA). The patient was programmed for adjuvant systematic chemotherapy, which was not completed due to progression of the disease. Conclusions. Progressed PMP can present with unspecific symptoms that mislead diagnosis. Cytoreductive surgery in combination with systematic chemotherapy could be appropriate for aggressive PMCA, even with an unfavourable prognosis. PMID:24324903

  18. Tuberculous Otitis with Proteus mirabilis Co-Infection: An Unsuspected Presentation Encountered in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Sardar, Moumita; Jadhav, Savita Vivek; Vyawahare, Chanda; Misra, Rabindranath

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis, a contagious bacterial disease which is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, primarily involves the lungs.Though Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is the commonest clinical presentation, there is a need for alertness towards uncommon presentations which involve other organs. Tuberculous otitis media (TOM) is one such rare presentation seen in paediatric practice. It is characterized by painless otorrhoea which fails to respond to the routine antibacterial treatment. TOM usually occurs secondary to PTB. Here is a case of tuberculous otitis media with Proteus mirabilis co-infection, with no evidence of PTB. In the sample of ear discharge obtained from the patient, acid fast bacilli were demonstrated on direct microscopy after Ziehl-Neelsen staining. Culture done on Lowenstein-Jensen medium demonstrated slow-growing Mycobacterium. Bacteriological culture and identification helped in isolating Proteus mirabilis. PCR, followed by Line- Probe Assay for early identification and susceptibility testing to primary drugs, was done. Further, patient tested negative for the Mantoux test. Patient was enrolled in National Tuberculosis programme- RNTCP. This case emphasizes on one of the less common presentations of a common disease. A high clinical suspicion and laboratory confirmation are required for appropriate patient management. PMID:24995225

  19. Temazepam, but not zolpidem, causes orthostatic hypotension in astronauts after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Shang-Jin; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Meck, Janice V.

    2003-01-01

    Insomnia is a common symptom, not only in the adult population but also in many astronauts. Hypnotics, such as temazepam (a benzodiazepine) and zolpidem (an imidazopyridine), are often taken to relieve insomnia. Temazepam has been shown clinically to have hemodynamic side effects, particularly in the elderly; however, the mechanism is not clear. Zolpidem does not cause hemodynamic side effects. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of different hypnotics during spaceflight might contribute significantly to the high incidence of postflight orthostatic hypotension, and to compare the findings in astronauts with clinical research. Astronauts were separated into three groups: control (n = 40), temazepam (15 or 30 mg; n = 9), and zolpidem (5 or 10 mg; n = 8). In this study, temazepam and zolpidem were only taken the night before landing. The systolic and diastolic blood pressures and heart rates of the astronauts were measured during stand tests before spaceflight and on landing day. On landing day, systolic pressure decreased significantly and heart rate increased significantly in the temazepam group, but not in the control group or in the zolpidem group. Temazepam may aggravate orthostatic hypotension after spaceflight when astronauts are hemodynamically compromised. Temazepam should not be the initial choice as a sleeping aid for astronauts. These results in astronauts may help to explain the hemodynamic side effects in the elderly who are also compromised. Zolpidem may be a better choice as a sleeping aid in these populations.

  20. Clinical presentation of Paget's disease: evaluation of a contemporary cohort and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tan, Adrian; Ralston, Stuart H

    2014-11-01

    Paget's disease of bone (PDB) has become less common over recent decades but it is unclear if this has impacted on clinical presentation. Here we evaluated the presenting features of PDB in a contemporary cohort of UK patients and conducted a systematic review of studies in which the presenting features had been reported. The case series comprised 88 patients referred to a specialist clinic between 2005 and 2013. Bone pain was the most common presenting feature occurring in 73.8% of patients. Others included bone deformity (18.1%), deafness (7.9%) and pathological fracture (5.7%). The disease was asymptomatic in 22% of cases. Antiresorptive treatment was given for pain in 34 cases and 61.7% of patients responded. Patients with a shorter disease duration were more likely to respond (p = 0.047). In the systematic review, bone pain was the most common presenting feature (52.2% of cases) followed by deformity (21.5%), deafness (8.9%) and fracture (8.5%). Time trend analysis in subjects of European descent showed that fracture was less common in studies performed during the past 25 years as compared with older studies (5.5 vs. 10.8% p < 0.001) whereas pain was more common (54.3 vs. 48.3%, p = 0.003). While changes in the mode of presentation of PDB have occurred over recent years, many patients present with complications such as fracture and deformity. Further research is required to determine if early detection and therapeutic intervention might be of value in preventing the morbidity associated with this common disease. PMID:25160936

  1. Changes in clinical & biochemical presentations of primary hyperparathyroidism in India over a period of 20 years

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Viral N.; Bhadada, Sanjay Kumar; Bhansali, Anil; Behera, Arnanshu; Mittal, B.R.

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: With the advent of serum chemistry autoanalyzer and routine estimation of serum calcium as a part of annual physical examination, there has been a dramatic change in the presentation of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) from symptomatic to asymptomatic disease in the United States. However, such trend has not been documented from India. We carried out this retrospective study to analyse the changes in clinical presentations of PHPT patients over a period of two decades in a tertiary care centre in north India. Methods: This retrospective study included patients with PHPT treated at a single centre of north India between March1990 and October 2010. Two decades were divided into four different time periods, i.e. 1990 to 1994, 1995 to 1999, 2000 to 2004 and 2005 to 2010. Clinical presentations, biochemical parameters and surgical outcomes were compared between different time periods using appropriate statistical methods. Results: Data of 202 patients with PHPT with male: female ratio of 3:7 were analyzed. There was a rise in the number of cases of PHPT diagnosed in the last decade compared to the previous decade (28 cases vs 174 cases, P<0.001). Change in the mean age, male: female ratio, lag time for the diagnosis of PHPT and clinical presentations of PHPT (predominance of bone and stone symptoms) did not differ across different time periods. Non-significant decrease in serum calcium levels at the time of diagnosis of PHPT and a significant, decline in the serum alkaline phosphatase levels (P<0.01) were found in the last decade, however, iPTH levels were higher in the last decade (P<0.05). There was no change in the site and size of parathyroid adenoma in the two decades, however, postoperative symptomatic hypocalcemia was less frequent in the last decade. Interpretation & conclusions: The findings of this retrospective analysis show that the PHPT still remains symptomatic disease with increasing awareness over the last two decades in our center. There was not much change in the clinical presentation, in the past two decades. PMID:25027078

  2. Involvement of the histaminergic system in cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine-induced reversal of critical haemorrhagic hypotension in rats.

    PubMed

    Jochem, J; Savci, V; Filiz, N; Rybus-Kalinowska, B; Fogel, W A; Yalcin, M

    2010-02-01

    Cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) is an endogenously synthesized mononucleotide which exerts a variety of physiological effects by altering central cholinergic transmission. Administered intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) or intravenously, it reverses haemorrhagic hypotension in rats, apparently by the activation of central cholinergic receptors. The study was undertaken to investigate the involvement of the central histaminergic system in CDP-choline-mediated reversal of haemorrhagic hypotension. Experiments were carried out in male ketamine/xylazine-anaesthetised Wistar rats subjected to haemorrhagic hypotension of 20-26 mmHg. CDP-choline (2 micromol; i.c.v.) administered at 5 min of critical hypotension produced a long-lasting pressor effect with increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and renal, hindquarters and mesenteric blood flows, resulting in a 100% survival at 2 h. The action was accompanied by approximately a 26% increase in extracellular histamine concentration at the posterior hypothalamus, as measured by microdialysis. Cardiovascular effects mediated by CDP-choline were almost completely blocked by pretreatment with H(1) receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine (50 nmol; i.c.v.), but not with H(2) receptor blocker ranitidine (25 nmol; icv) or H(3)/H(4) receptor antagonist thioperamide (50 nmol; i.c.v.). In conclusion, the present results show that he central histaminergic system, through the activation of H(1) histaminergic receptors, is involved in CDP-choline-induced resuscitating effect in haemorrhage-shocked rats. PMID:20228413

  3. Varicella Zoster Virus Meningitis in a Young Immunocompetent Adult without Rash: A Misleading Clinical Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Pasedag, Thomas; Weissenborn, Karin; Wurster, Ulrich; Ganzenmueller, Tina

    2014-01-01

    Meningitis caused by varicella zoster virus (VZV) is rare in healthy population. Predominantly immunocompromised patients are affected by reactivation of this virus with primary clinical features of rash and neurological symptoms. Here we report a young otherwise healthy man diagnosed with a VZV meningitis without rash. He complained of acute headache, nausea, and vomiting. The clinical examination did not show any neurological deficits or rash. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed a high leukocyte cell count of 1720?cells/µL and an elevated total protein of 1460?mg/L misleadingly indicating a bacterial infection. Further CSF analyses, including polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and detection of intrathecal synthesis of antibodies, showed a VZV infection. Clinical and CSF follow-up examinations proved the successful antiviral treatment. In conclusion, even young immunocompetent patients without rash might present with VZV meningitis. CSF examination is a key procedure in the diagnosis of CNS infections but in rare cases the standard values cell count and total protein might misleadingly indicate a bacterial infection. Thus, virological analyses should be considered even when a bacterial infection is suspected. PMID:25614843

  4. Clostridium difficile infection among kidney transplant recipients: frequency, clinical presentation, and outcome.

    PubMed

    Lionaki, Sophia; Panagiotellis, Konstantinos; Moris, Demetrios; Daikos, George; Psyhogiou, Mina; Vernadakis, Spiridon; Zavos, Georgios; Boletis, John N

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of Clostridium Difficile Infection (CDI) among kidney transplant recipients and describe the clinical picture in correlation with the presence of certain risk factors. We included kidney transplant recipients with a functioning graft, who were admitted during the period 1/2012-12/2013, and patients with ESRD who were admitted to undergo Kidney Transplantation (KTx) from a deceased or a living donor in the same period. Patients were screened following clinical indication of gastrointestinal infection. CDI diagnosis was based on a positive stool sample for CD toxins and stool culture. Within the period 2012-2013, we recorded 24 cases of CDI in 19 patients, accounting for a frequency of 5.4% of CDI in our population. In addition to diarrhea, 63.15% of the patients presented with fever, 31.25% with anorexia, while abdominal pain was a rare symptom (0.53%). None of the patients had ileus, bowel obstruction or megacolon. Fourteen patients (73.7%) had a history of recent exposure (15 days) to antimicrobial agents prior to the evolution of CDI symptoms. A relapse of the CDI infection was identified in five cases. CDI infection is a significant factor of morbidity in patients with KTx and should be considered in the clinical setting of diarrhea, even in cases with no exposure to antibiotic agents. PMID:25556694

  5. Red flags in patients presenting with headache: clinical indications for neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    M, Sobri; Lamont, A C; Alias, N A; Win, M N

    2003-08-01

    Headache is a very common patient complaint but secondary causes for headache are unusual. Neuroimaging is both expensive and has a low yield in this group. Most patients with intracranial pathology have clinical features that would raise a "red flag". Appropriate selection of patients with headache for neuroimaging to look for secondary causes is very important. Red flags act as screening tools to help in identifying those patients presenting with headache who would benefit from prompt neuroimaging, and may increase the yield. The aim of this study is to evaluate clinical features in patients with headache using neuroimaging as a screening tool for intracranial pathology. 20 red flags were defined. A retrospective study of 111 patients was performed and the outcomes were divided into positive and negative. Abnormal neuroimaging was present in 39 patients. Results were analysed using the Logistic Regression model. Sensitivity and specificity of red flags were analysed to establish the cut-off point to predict abnormal neuroimaging and a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve plotted to show the sensitivity of the diagnostic test. Three red flag features proved to be statistically significant with the p-value of less than 0.05 on both univariate and multivariate analysis. These were: paralysis; papilloedema; and "drowsiness, confusion, memory impairment and loss of consciousness". In addition, if three or more red flags from the list were present, this showed strong indication of abnormal neuroimaging, from cut-off point of ROC curve (area under the curve =0.76). PMID:12893694

  6. Poland’s Syndrome: Different Clinical Presentations and Surgical Reconstructions in 18 Cases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Renato da Silva Freitas; André Ricardo Dall’Oglio Tolazzi; Vanessa Dello Mônaco Martins; Breno Albuquerque Knop; Ruth Maria Graf; Gilvani Azor de Oliveira e Cruz

    2007-01-01

    Background  The literature reports many variations of Poland’s syndrome. This article describes 18 cases of Poland’s syndrome in different\\u000a stages of treatment, with variable clinical presentations and reconstructive techniques.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  This study evaluated 15 females and 3 males, ages 2 to 43 years, for breast deformity, nipple–areolar complex position, pectoralis\\u000a muscle malformation, thoracic deformities, and the presence of brachysyndactyly. Surgical treatment was

  7. Cerebral Circulation in Sleep: Vasodilatory Response to Cerebral Hypotension

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel A. Grant; Carlo Franzini; Jennene Wild; Adrian M. Walker

    1998-01-01

    Little is known of the factors that regulate CBF in sleep. We therefore studied 10 lambs to assess the vasodilatory processes that underlie cerebral autoregulation during sleep. Lambs, instrumented to measure CBF (flow probe on the superior sagittal sinus), sleep state, and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), were rapidly made hypotensive by inflating a cuff around the brachiocephalic artery to reduce

  8. Hypotension, myocardial infarction, and coagulopathy following gila monster bite.

    PubMed

    Preston, C A

    1989-01-01

    We report a 23-year-old man who developed life threatening hypotension, myocardial infarction, coagulopathy, and renal failure following the bite of a Gila monster (Heloderma suspectum). These are previously unreported complications in humans. The patient recovered after fluid resuscitation and treatment with pressor agents. PMID:2703689

  9. Central Methysergide Prevents Renal Sympathoinhibition and Bradycardia during Hypotensive Hemorrhage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veelken, Roland; Johnson, Kim; Scrogin, Karie E.

    1998-01-01

    Central methysergide prevents renal sympathoinhibition and bradycardia during hypotensive hemorrhage. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) were measured in conscious rats during either hemorrhage or cardiopulmonary receptor stimulation with phenylbiguanide (PBG) after intracerebroventricular injection of the 5-HT1/5-HT2-receptor antagonist, methysergide (40 microg). Progressive hemorrhage caused an initial rise (109 +/- 33%) followed by a fall in RSNA (-60 +/- 7%) and a fall in HR (-126 +/- 7 beats/min). Methysergide delayed the hypotension and prevented both the sympathoinhibitory and bradycardic responses to hemorrhage. Systemic 5-HT3-receptor blockade did not influence responses to hemorrhage. The PBG infusion caused transient depressor(-25 +/- 6 mmHg), bradycardic (-176 +/- 40 beats/min), and renal sympathostimulatory (182 +/-47% baseline) responses that were not affected by central methysergide (-20 +/- 6 mmHg, -162 +/- 18 beats/min, 227 +/- 46% baseline). These data indicate that a central serotonergic receptor-mediated component contributes to the sympathoinhibitory and bradycardic responses to hypotensive hemorrhage in conscious rats. Furthermore, the same central 5-HT-receptor populations involved in reflex responses to hypotensive hemorrhage probably do not mediate the sympathoinhibitory response to cardiopulmonary chemosensitive 5-HT3 receptors.

  10. Presentations from the SNM NCI Workshop: Use of PET CT in the Clinic and Clinical Trials: Quantitation for Change Analysis

    Cancer.gov

    The session was aimed at physicians and physicists with an interest in the use of PET CT and other imaging modalities in clinical trials and clinical medicine. A basic understanding of PET imaging principles is useful as a background for viewing this material.

  11. HYPOTENSIVE EFFECTS OF RESISTANCE EXERCISES WITH BLOOD FLOW RESTRICTION.

    PubMed

    Neto, Gabriel R; Sousa, Maria S C; Costa, Pablo B; Salles, Belmiro F; Novaes, Giovanni S; Novaes, Jefferson S

    2014-10-17

    The effects of low-intensity resistance exercise combined with blood flow restriction (BFR) on blood pressure are an important factor to be considered due to the acute responses imposed by training. The aim of this study was to compare the hypotensive effect of resistance exercise (RE) performed with and without BFR in normotensive young subjects. After one repetition maximum (1RM) tests, 24 men (21.79 ± 3.21 years; 1.72 ± 0.06 m; 69.49 ± 9.80 kg) performed the following four experimental protocols in a randomized order: a) high intensity RE at 80% of 1RM (HI); b) low intensity RE at 20% of 1RM (LI); c) low intensity RE at 20% of 1RM combined with partial blood flow restriction (LI+BFR); and d) control (CON). Analysis of systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) was conducted over a 60-minute period. The three RE protocols, resulted in hypotensive SBP (HI = -3.8%, LI = -3.3%, LI+BFR = -5.5%) responses during the 60 minutes (p< 0.05). The LI+BFR protocol promoted hypotensive (-11.5%) responses in DBP during the 60 minutes (p< 0.05), and both the HI and LI+BFR protocols resulted in mean blood pressure (MBP) hypotension between 30 (-7.0%, -7.7%) and 60 minutes (-3.6%, -8.8%), respectively. In conclusion, post-exercise hypotension may occur after all three exercise protocols with greater reductions in SBP after HI and LI+BFR, in DBP after LI+BFR, and in MBP after HI and LI+BFR protocols. PMID:25330083

  12. Comparison of clinical findings between intensity-windowed versus CLAHE presentations of chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemminger, Bradley M.; Johnston, Richard E.; Muller, Keith E.; Taylor, D.; Mauro, J. Matthew; Schiebler, M.; Pisano, Etta D.

    1992-05-01

    We are investigating how radiologists's readings of standard intensity windowed (IW) chest computed tomography (CT) films compare with readings of the same images processed with contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE). Previously reported studies where CLAHE has been tested have involved detection of computer generated targets in medical images. Our study is designed to evaluate CLAHE when applied to clinical material and to compare the diagnostic information perceived by the radiologists from CLAHE processed images to that from the conventional IW images. Our initial experiment with two radiologists did not yield conclusive results, due in part, to inadequate observer training prior to the experiment. The initial experimental protocol was redesigned to include more in-depth training. Three new radiologist observers were recruited for the follow-up study. Results from the initial study are reviewed and the follow-up study is presented. In the new study we find that while CLAHE and IW are not statistically significantly different overall, there are specific clinical findings where the radiologists were less comfortable reading CLAHE presentations. Advantages and disadvantages of using CLAHE as a replacement or as an adjunct to IW are discussed.

  13. Clinical presentation of a patient with localized acquired cutis laxa of abdomen: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gveri?, Tugomir; Bari?, Marko; Bulat, Vedrana; Situm, Mirna; Pusi?, Jana; Huljev, Dubravko; Zdilar, Boris; Gveri?-Ahmetasevi?, Snjezana; Tomas, Davor

    2010-01-01

    Background. Cutis laxa (CL) is a rare disorder of elastic tissue characterized by loose, sagging skin with reduced elasticity, and resilience without resulting scarring. CL may be inherited as a dominant, recessive, or X-linked recessive disease, or acquired. The heritable forms of CL predominantly begin at birth, but it may be delayed until puberty or age of 30 years with extracutaneous manifestations including pulmonary emphysema, umbilical and inguinal hernias, and gastrointestinal and vesicourinary tract diverticuli. An acquired form of the disease occurs in adults with no evidence of internal organ involvement. Objective. The aim of this case report was to present our patient suffering from CL, and to evaluate clinical presentation, diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties in this rare condition. Case Report. A 30-year-old female patient was admitted to our Hospital due to localized loose and sagging skin of abdomen, induced by prior cesarean section 6 years ago. CL has been diagnosed based on the clinical picture and pathohistological appearance. Conclusion. Reconstructive surgery provides a dramatic cosmetic improvement with significant psychosocial benefit. Repeated surgical procedures may be required to correct the lax skin, which worsens with age. PMID:20585600

  14. Clinical Presentation of a Patient with Localized Acquired Cutis Laxa of Abdomen: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gveri?, Tugomir; Bari?, Marko; Bulat, Vedrana; Šitum, Mirna; Puši?, Jana; Huljev, Dubravko; Zdilar, Boris; Gveri?-Ahmetaševi?, Snježana; Tomas, Davor

    2010-01-01

    Background. Cutis laxa (CL) is a rare disorder of elastic tissue characterized by loose, sagging skin with reduced elasticity, and resilience without resulting scarring. CL may be inherited as a dominant, recessive, or X-linked recessive disease, or acquired. The heritable forms of CL predominantly begin at birth, but it may be delayed until puberty or age of 30 years with extracutaneous manifestations including pulmonary emphysema, umbilical and inguinal hernias, and gastrointestinal and vesicourinary tract diverticuli. An acquired form of the disease occurs in adults with no evidence of internal organ involvement. Objective. The aim of this case report was to present our patient suffering from CL, and to evaluate clinical presentation, diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties in this rare condition. Case Report. A 30-year-old female patient was admitted to our Hospital due to localized loose and sagging skin of abdomen, induced by prior cesarean section 6 years ago. CL has been diagnosed based on the clinical picture and pathohistological appearance. Conclusion. Reconstructive surgery provides a dramatic cosmetic improvement with significant psychosocial benefit. Repeated surgical procedures may be required to correct the lax skin, which worsens with age. PMID:20585600

  15. Severe dental caries as the first presenting clinical feature in primary Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Elham; Fallahi, Sasan; Alaeddini, Mojgan; Hasani Tabatabaei, Masoomeh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Sjögren’s syndrome is an autoimmune syndrome involving the exocrine glands specially the salivary and lacrimal glands leading to xerostomia and xerophtalmia. This paper presents a case with primary Sjögren’s syndrome that severe dental caries were the first clinical manifestation. Case Presentation: A 42-year-old man was referred to the School of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences due to unexplained severe dental decays. After systematic evaluation and consultation with the rheumatologist and the ophthalmologist, the diagnosis of primary Sjögren’s syndrome was suggested and confirmed by serologic and histopathologic study. Conclusion: Primary Sjögren’s syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with early severe dental caries. PMID:24009970

  16. Renal failure: unusual clinical presentation of an isolated intrarenal hydatid cyst.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Mehwash; Biyabani, Syed Raziuddin; Pervez, Shahid

    2013-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis or hydatid disease is a zoonotic parasitic infection caused by larval stage of cestode Echinococcus spp. Humans are an accidental intermediate host and present with the involvement of different organs, the liver being the most common while kidney is the rarest site. Here, authors are reporting a case of a 55-year-old woman who presented with renal failure and was found to have a right-sided intrarenal hydatid cyst, diagnosed and treated with nephroscopy without sacrificing the kidney. She had an uneventful postoperative course and her renal function improved dramatically. She is now on oral albendazole therapy and doing well on follow-up. To the best of our knowledge, renal failure has never been reported in the literature as clinical manifestation of intrarenal hydatid cyst in adult population. PMID:24243503

  17. Pathological gambling, co-occurring disorders, clinical presentation, and treatment outcomes at a university-based counseling clinic.

    PubMed

    Soberay, Adam; Faragher, J Michael; Barbash, Melissa; Brookover, Amanda; Grimsley, Paul

    2014-03-01

    It is the intent of this study to examine the relationship between the number of co-occurring disorders in a sample of pathological gamblers and variables associated with clinical presentation and treatment outcomes. Participants were given screening tools for four common psychological disorders: the hands depression screen, the Mood Disorder Questionnaire, the Carroll-Davidson generalized anxiety disorder screen, and the Sprint-4 PTSD Screen. The number of co-occurring disorders, as indicated by the results of these screening instruments, was compared to severity of gambling problems at outset of treatment, as measured by the NORC diagnostic screen for gambling problems-self administered. The number of co-occurring disorders was also compared to psychosocial functioning at the outset of treatment, as well as level of improvement in psychosocial functioning through treatment. Psychosocial functioning was measured using the Outcome Questionnaire 45 (OQ-45). The number of co-occurring disorders was compared to participant satisfaction with the therapeutic relationship as measured by the working alliance inventory-short form. Results suggest that co-occurring disorders are commonplace among treatment seeking pathological gamblers. Over 86 % of the sample screened positively for at least one of the four targeted psychological disorders. Furthermore, the number of co-occurring disorders was found to be positively related to severity of gambling problems at outset of treatment and negatively related to level of psychosocial functioning at outset of treatment. However, the number of co-occurring disorders was not found to be significantly related to level of improvement in psychosocial functioning through treatment. Overall, those that attended at least six sessions reported significantly improved psychosocial functioning by the end of their sixth session. Finally, the number of co-occurring disorders was not found to be significantly related to participants' reported level of satisfaction with the therapeutic relationship. PMID:23297170

  18. Clinical Management of Patients Presenting with Non-Adjustable Gastric Band (NAGB) Complications

    PubMed Central

    Balogh, Julius; Vizhul, Andrey; Dunkin, Brian J.; Tariq, Nabil; Sherman, Vadim

    2014-01-01

    Background: A number of bariatric surgical procedures have been developed to manage morbid obesity and related co-morbidities. The non-adjustable gastric band (NAGB) was one such procedure that created restriction to food intake by gastric segmentation. Benefits of the procedure included a low risk of perioperative complications and substantial early weight loss. Unfortunately, the long term results of NAGB include a high incidence of complications and failure to maintain weight loss. The purpose of this study was to examine the presentation, workup, and treatment of patients presenting with complications following NAGB placement. Methods: A retrospective review of the diagnosis and management of 11 patients who presented with complications related to NAGB placement. Results: All patients presented with some degree of proximal gastric outlet obstruction. The majority of patients (8/11) presented with vomiting as the main complaint. Other complaints included intolerance to solids, liquids, and reflux. Only 2/11 patients presented with weight loss since undergoing NAGB placement, while the remainder had weight regain to their pre-NAGB level and above. Depending on clinical presentation, desire for additional weight loss and co-morbid conditions, patients underwent a variety of treatments. This included NAGB removal (endoscopic, laparo-endoscopic, and laparoscopic) as well as conversion to another bariatric procedure (sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass). Conclusion: Patients with NAGB complications present with symptoms related to a proximal gastric outlet obstruction, related to constriction imposed by the band. This may result in severe food and liquid intolerance and subsequent weight loss, but more likely results in maladaptive eating and subsequent weight gain. Optimal therapy involves removal of the NAGB. Laparoscopic conversion to another bariatric procedure, optimally a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, is warranted to treat morbid obesity and associated co-morbidities. PMID:24910561

  19. Influence of HTLV-1 on the clinical, microbiologic and immunologic presentation of tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background HTLV-1 is associated with increased susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and severity of tuberculosis. Although previous studies have shown that HTLV-1 infected individuals have a low frequency of positive tuberculin skin test (TST) and decreasing in lymphoproliferative responses compared to HTLV-1 uninfected persons, these studies were not performed in individuals with history of tuberculosis or evidence of M. tuberculosis infection. Therefore the reasons why HTLV-1 infection increases susceptibility to infection and severity of tuberculosis are not understood.The aim of this study was to evaluate how HTLV-1 may influence the clinical, bacteriologic and immunologic presentation of tuberculosis. Methods The study prospectively enrolled and followed 13 new cases of tuberculosis associated with HTLV-1 (cases) and 25 patients with tuberculosis without HTLV-1 infection (controls). Clinical findings, bacterial load in the sputum, x-rays, immunological response and death were compared in the two groups. Results There were no differences in the demographic, clinical and TST response between the two study groups. IFN-? and TNF-? production was higher in unstimulated cultures of mononuclear cells of case than in control patients (p?

  20. Foot Small Muscle Atrophy is present before the detection of Clinical Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Greenman, Robert L; Khaodhiar, Lalita; Lima, Christina; Dinh, Thanh; Giurini, John M; Veves, Aristidis

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize structural changes and the metabolic profile in the foot muscles and correlate them with diabetic neuropathy measurements using a phosphorus-31 (31P) rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) MRI method. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Twelve control subjects, nine non-neuropathic and 12 neuropathic diabetic patients were studied using 31P RARE and proton (1H) MRI at 3 Tesla. The ratio of the total cross-sectional area of the foot to that of the muscle tissue was calculated from trans-axial 1H and 31P images. The average 31P concentration across the metatarsal head region was measured from the 31P images. RESULTS The muscle/total-area ratio was different among all three groups: 0.55 ± 0.04 (means ± SD); 0.44 ± 0.05; and 0.06 ± 0.06 for controls, non-neuropathic and neuropathic subjects respectively, (p <0.0001). The average 31P concentration was also different among all groups: 27.7 ± 3.8 mM; 21.7 ± 4.8; and 7.9 ± 8.8 for controls, non-neuropathic and neuropathic subjects respectively, (p <0.0001). The muscle/total-area ratios strongly correlated with clinical measurements: Neuropathy Disability Score (NDS) (r = ?0.83, p <0.0001), Vibration Perception Threshold (VPT) (r= ?0.79, p <0.0001) and Semmes-Weinstein Monofilaments (SWM) (r = ?0.87, p <0.0001). CONCLUSIONS Small muscle atrophy is present in diabetes before clinical peripheral neuropathy can be detected using standard techniques available in clinical practice. The 31P RARE MRI method evaluates the severity of muscle atrophy, even in the early stages when neuropathy is absent. This technique may prove a useful diagnostic tool that can identify early stage diabetic foot problems. PMID:15920063

  1. Variable Clinical Presentation of an MUC1 Mutation Causing Medullary Cystic Kidney Disease Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Kmoch, Stanislav; Antignac, Corinne; Robins, Vicki; Kidd, Kendrah; Kelsoe, John R.; Hladik, Gerald; Klemmer, Philip; Knohl, Stephen J.; Scheinman, Steven J.; Vo, Nam; Santi, Ann; Harris, Alese; Canaday, Omar; Weller, Nelson; Hulick, Peter J.; Vogel, Kristen; Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederick F.; Tuazon, Jennifer; Deltas, Constantinos; Somers, Douglas; Megarbane, Andre; Kimmel, Paul L.; Sperati, C. John; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Ben-Shachar, Shay; Waugh, David A.; McGinn, Stella; Hoda?ová, Kate?ina; Vylet'al, Petr; Živná, Martina; Hart, Thomas C.; Hart, P. Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives The genetic cause of medullary cystic kidney disease type 1 was recently identified as a cytosine insertion in the variable number of tandem repeat region of MUC1 encoding mucoprotein-1 (MUC1), a protein that is present in skin, breast, and lung tissue, the gastrointestinal tract, and the distal tubules of the kidney. The purpose of this investigation was to analyze the clinical characteristics of families and individuals with this mutation. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Families with autosomal dominant interstitial kidney disease were referred for genetic analysis over a 14-year period. Families without UMOD or REN mutations prospectively underwent genotyping for the presence of the MUC1 mutation. Clinical characteristics were retrospectively evaluated in individuals with the MUC1 mutation and historically affected individuals (persons who were both related to genetically affected individuals in such a way that ensured that they could be genetically affected and had a history of CKD stage IV or kidney failure resulting in death, dialysis, or transplantation). Results Twenty-four families were identified with the MUC1 mutation. Of 186 family members undergoing MUC1 mutational analysis, the mutation was identified in 95 individuals, 91 individuals did not have the mutation, and111 individuals were identified as historically affected. Individuals with the MUC1 mutation suffered from chronic kidney failure with a widely variable age of onset of end stage kidney disease ranging from 16 to >80 years. Urinalyses revealed minimal protein and no blood. Ultrasounds of 35 individuals showed no medullary cysts. There were no clinical manifestations of the MUC1 mutation detected in the breasts, skin, respiratory system, or gastrointestinal tract. Conclusion MUC1 mutation results in progressive chronic kidney failure with a bland urinary sediment. The age of onset of end stage kidney disease is highly variable, suggesting that gene–gene or gene–environment interactions contribute to phenotypic variability. PMID:24509297

  2. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and obesity: Biochemical, metabolic and clinical presentations

    PubMed Central

    Mili?, Sandra; Luli?, Davorka; Štimac, Davor

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in the world. Presentation of the disease ranges from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NAFLD is a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome that includes central abdominal obesity along with other components. Up to 80% of patients with NAFLD are obese, defined as a body mass index (BMI) > 30 kg/m2. However, the distribution of fat tissue plays a greater role in insulin resistance than the BMI. The large amount of visceral adipose tissue (VAT) in morbidly obese (BMI > 40 kg/m2) individuals contributes to a high prevalence of NAFLD. Free fatty acids derived from VAT tissue, as well as from dietary sources and de novo lipogenesis, are released to the portal venous system. Excess free fatty acids and chronic low-grade inflammation from VAT are considered to be two of the most important factors contributing to liver injury progression in NAFLD. In addition, secretion of adipokines from VAT as well as lipid accumulation in the liver further promotes inflammation through nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathways, which are also activated by free fatty acids, and contribute to insulin resistance. Most NAFLD patients are asymptomatic on clinical presentation, even though some may present with fatigue, dyspepsia, dull pain in the liver and hepatosplenomegaly. Treatment for NAFLD and NASH involves weight reduction through lifestyle modifications, anti-obesity medication and bariatric surgery. This article reviews the available information on the biochemical and metabolic phenotypes associated with obesity and fatty liver disease. The relative contribution of visceral and liver fat to insulin resistance is discussed, and recommendations for clinical evaluation of affected individuals is provided. PMID:25071327

  3. Clinical presentation of intracranial epidermoids: a surgical series of 20 initial and four recurred cases

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Koichi; Ujiie, Hiroshi; Higa, Takashi; Hayashi, Masataka; Kubo, Osami; Okada, Yoshikazu; Hori, Tomokatsu

    2010-01-01

    Epidermoids are generally recognized as benign tumors; however, total resection is often difficult. The recurrence from the residual capsule, dissemination of the tumor, and aseptic meningitis are common problems. The aim of the present study was to analyze and report on the clinical characteristics of intracranial epidermoids, particularly complications and cases with a poor clinical outcome. 24 patients with intracranial epidermoids who were treated surgically at Tokyo Women's Medical University Hospital between 1997 and 2007 were examined. The location and size of the tumor, pre-and postoperative symptoms, adherence of the tumor to cranial nerves, and proliferative capacity were determined. The most frequent site of the tumor was the cerebello-pontine (C-P) angle (16/24); eight of these patients presented with hearing loss and six presented with trigeminal neuralgia. In many cases, hearing loss and diplopia persisted after surgery. All epidermoids located in the C-P angle were attached to and/or compressed the trigeminal nerves, therefore, the origin is suggested to be the dura mafer of petrous bone around the trigeminal nerve. Of all 24 patients, the tumor recurred in four (after 3, 5, 10 and 20 years). One patient had a poor prognosis, with dissemination and brain stem infarction. Epidermoids can recur from residual capsule adhering to the brain stem or cranial nerves up to 10-20 years after the initial surgery. Long-term follow-up imaging studies are required when complete resection of the tumor capsule is not possible. In rare cases, spontaneous cyst rupture, dissemination, and brain stem infarction result in a poor prognosis. PMID:22028741

  4. Phenobarbitone-induced haematological abnormalities in idiopathic epileptic dogs: prevalence, risk factors, clinical presentation and outcome.

    PubMed

    Bersan, E; Volk, H A; Ros, C; De Risio, L

    2014-09-13

    The aim of this retrospective study was to assess prevalence, risk factors, clinical presentation and outcome of phenobarbitone induced haematological abnormalities (PBIHA) in dogs. The medical records of two veterinary referral institutions were searched for dogs diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy and treated with PB as monotherapy or polytherapy between March 2003 and September 2010. Sixteen dogs had PBIHA; the median age at diagnosis was 69.5?months. Phenobarbitone was administered at a median dose of 3?mg/kg twice a day for a median period of 100.5?days and the median serum phenobarbitone level was 19??g/ml. Two dogs had neutropenia, three had anaemia and thrombocytopenia, two had anaemia and neutropenia; the remaining nine had pancytopenia. All dogs were referred for non-specific clinical signs. Phenobarbitone was discontinued after diagnosis, and the median time to resolution of PBIHA was 17?days. The prevalence and risk factors for PBIHA were evaluated from a questionnaire survey of referring practices to obtain more detailed follow-up on cases diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy. The prevalence rate of PBIHA was 4.2%, and the condition occurred in dogs treated with standard therapeutic doses often within the first three months after starting treatment. Serial haematological evaluations should be therefore considered from the beginning of phenobarbitone therapy to allow early diagnosis and treatment of PBIHA. PMID:24836432

  5. Seasonal trend and clinical presentation of Bacillus cereus bloodstream infection: association with summer and indwelling catheter.

    PubMed

    Kato, K; Matsumura, Y; Yamamoto, M; Nagao, M; Ito, Y; Takakura, S; Ichiyama, S

    2014-08-01

    Bacillus cereus, an opportunistic pathogen, can cause fatal infection. However, B. cereus bloodstream infections (BSIs) have not been well characterised. From 2008 to 2013, B. cereus isolates from all of the specimens and patients with B. cereus BSIs were identified. Environmental samples were collected to detect B. cereus contamination. We also characterised the clinical presentation of B. cereus BSI through analyses of risk factors for BSI and mortality. A total of 217 clinical B. cereus isolates was detected. Fifty-one patients with nosocomial infections were diagnosed as B. cereus BSI, and 37 had contaminated blood cultures. The number of B. cereus isolates and BSI patients was significantly greater from June to September than from January to April (4.9 vs. 1.5 per month and 1.2 vs. 0.2, respectively). All BSIs were nosocomial and related to central or peripheral vascular catheter. Urinary catheter [odds ratio (OR) 6.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.40-20.0] was the independent risk factor associated with BSI patients when compared to patients regarded as contaminated. In-hospital mortality among BSI patients was 20% and was associated with urinary catheter (OR 34.7, 95 % CI 1.89-63.6) and higher Charlson index (OR 1.99, 95 % CI 1.26-3.12). The number of B. cereus isolates and BSI increased during summer. Inpatients with indwelling vascular or urinary catheters should be carefully monitored for potential B. cereus BSIs. PMID:24584718

  6. Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension in Parkinson’s disease: evaluation, management, and emerging role of droxidopa

    PubMed Central

    Isaacson, Stuart H; Skettini, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (nOH) is due to failure of the autonomic nervous system to regulate blood pressure in response to postural changes due to an inadequate release of norepinephrine, leading to orthostatic hypotension and supine hypertension. nOH is common in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Prevalence varies throughout the course of PD, ranging from 40% to 60%, and resulting in symptomatic nOH in approximately half. Symptomatic nOH, including lightheadedness, can limit daily activities and lead to falls. Symptomatic nOH can also limit therapeutic options for treating PD motor symptoms. Clinical evaluation should routinely include symptom assessment and blood pressure measurement of supine, sitting, and 3-minute standing; 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring can also be helpful. Non-pharmacological management of symptomatic nOH involves education, physical maneuvers, and adequate hydration. Current pharmacological treatment of symptomatic nOH includes salt supplement, fludrocortisone, midodrine, pyridostigmine, and other empiric medications. Despite these options, treatment of symptomatic nOH remains suboptimal, often limited by severe increases in supine blood pressure. Droxidopa, an oral prodrug converted by decarboxylation to norepinephrine, is a promising therapeutic option for symptomatic nOH in PD, improving symptoms of nOH, daily activities, falls, and standing systolic blood pressure in several recent trials. These trials demonstrated short-term efficacy and tolerability, with comparable increases in standing and supine blood pressures. Longer-term studies are ongoing to confirm durability of treatment effect. PMID:24729712

  7. Intracranial hypotension in a girl with Marfan syndrome: case report and review of the literature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Cheuret; T. Edouard; M. Mejdoubi; P. Acar; C. Pienkowski; C. Cances; S. Lebon; M. Tauber; Y. Chaix

    2008-01-01

    Introduction  A 14-year-old girl, followed in our department for Marfan syndrome, presented with postural headache for a month. Neurological\\u000a examination was normal. The diagnosis of intracranial hypotension syndrome was suspected.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Discussion  Bilateral subdural hematomas were found on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and spinal MRI showed large lumbosacral\\u000a arachnoid diverticula; no cerebrospinal fluid leaks could be found. Despite bed rest and hydration

  8. Anaphylaxis to Iodinated Contrast Media: Clinical Characteristics Related with Development of Anaphylactic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Hye; Lee, Suh-Young; Lee, Seung-Eun; Yang, Min-Suk; Jung, Jae-Woo; Park, Chang Min; Lee, Whal; Cho, Sang-Heon; Kang, Hye-Ryun

    2014-01-01

    Objective Anaphylaxis is the most severe form of radiocontrast media (RCM) induced hypersensitivity and can be life-threatening if profound hypotension is combined. With increased use of iodine based RCM, related hypersensitivity is rapidly growing. However, the clinical characteristics and risk factors of RCM induced anaphylaxis accompanied by hypotension (anaphylactic shock) are not clearly defined. This study was performed to investigate the risk factors of RCM induced anaphylactic shock and the clinical value of RCM skin testing to identify causative agents in affected patients. Methods We analyzed the data of RCM induced anaphylaxis monitored by an inhospital pharmacovigilance center at a tertiary teaching hospital from January 2005 to December 2012 and compared the clinical features and skin test results according to the accompanying hypotension. Results Among total of 104 cases of RCM induced anaphylaxis, 34.6% of patients, developed anaphylaxis on their first exposure to RCM. Anaphylactic patients presenting with shock were older (57.4 vs. 50.1 years, p?=?0.026) and had a history of more frequently exposure to RCM (5.1±7.8 vs. 1.9±3.3, p?=?0.004) compared to those without hypotension. Among RCMs, hypotension was more frequent in anaphylaxis related to iopromide compared to other agents (85.0% vs. 61.4%, p?=?0.011). Skin tests were performed in 51 patients after development of RCM induced anaphylaxis. Overall skin test positivity to RCM was 64.7% and 81.8% in patients with anaphylactic shock. Conclusion RCM induced anaphylactic shock is related to multiple exposures to RCM and most patients showed skin test positivity to RCM. PMID:24932635

  9. The ESPEN clinical practice Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition: present status and perspectives for future research.

    PubMed

    Bozzetti, Federico; Forbes, Alastair

    2009-08-01

    The ESPEN Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition (PN) reflect current scientific knowledge in the field of clinical nutrition in adults. They summarize the indications for PN and its anticipated outcomes in respect of the underlying disease, nutritional status and quality of life. They are companion documents to the ESPEN Guidelines on Enteral Nutrition and follow the same general format. They address the influence of the underlying disease on the patient's nutritional status, and that of malnutrition on the outcome of the disease. Contraindications to and complications of PN are considered, together with comparative analyses of the roles of the parenteral and enteral routes in different illness states. The quality and strength of the supporting literature has been graded according to the criteria of the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) and the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research. Hence, meta-analysis of randomised clinical trials (level of evidence Ia) or at least one randomised clinical trial (level of evidence Ib) translate to a Grade A recommendation. Levels of evidence IIa, IIb and III are attributed respectively to: at least one well-designed controlled trial without randomisation; at least one other type of well-designed, quasi-experimental study; or well-designed non-experimental descriptive studies such as comparative studies, correlation studies, case-control studies; each of these sustains a Grade B recommendation. Grade C recommendations reflect expert opinion and/or the clinical experience of respected authorities (level of evidence IV). Each of the 11 sets of PN Guidelines was devised by an international working group, the total faculty comprising no fewer than 87 experts from 16 European/Mediterranean countries, each group's contributions being co-ordinated by a designated chairman. Once each guideline had been approved by all the members of the relevant working group, this version was reviewed by at least two independent external reviewers (one selected from ESPEN's Education and Clinical Practice Committee, and at least one from outside the ESPEN committee structure). Following this review each guideline was hosted in draft form on the public pages of the ESPEN website for at least one month to permit the receipt of comments or suggestions from any interested party. At this point the Guidelines were reviewed and revised again by the original working group chairman and submitted to the Clinical Nutrition editorial process. At least 3 further reviewers were selected by the Journal's editorial office for each guideline, in line with the normal selection process. Final revisions were performed by the Chairmen of the working groups, and by ourselves as commissioning editors of the whole project. More than 300 evidence-based recommendations are now presented. Fewer than one sixth of the recommendations are Grade A, and disappointingly, but unsurprisingly, more than 50% are Grade C. The need for more and better controlled trials in the field remains apparent. PMID:19523723

  10. Impact of HIV on clinical presentation and outcomes of tuberculosis treatment at primary care level.

    PubMed

    Henegar, C; Behets, F; Vanden Driessche, K; Tabala, M; Van Rie, A

    2013-11-01

    Little is known on how human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection impacts pediatric tuberculosis (TB) in primary care. We compared TB type, HIV care and case fatality rates between 5685 adults and 830 children with TB treated at primary care clinics in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. Children represented a substantial burden (13%) of TB, and presented predominantly with difficult to diagnose smear-negative TB and extra-pulmonary TB. The HIV co-infection rate was lower in children than in adults, and fewer children than adults received antiretroviral therapy during anti-tuberculosis treatment. Case fatality was four times higher in HIV-infected than non-infected children. Child-friendly point-of-care TB diagnostics and decentralized pediatric TB-HIV care should receive greater attention. PMID:24125443

  11. Aligning new interventions with developing country health systems: Target product profiles, presentation, and clinical trial design

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Alan; Nunes, Julia K.; Garnett, Andrew; Biellik, Robin; Leboulleux, Didier; Birkett, Ashley J.; Loucq, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Many new interventions are being created to address health problems of the developing world. However, many developing countries have fragile health systems and find it difficult to accommodate change. Consequently, it is essential that new interventions are well aligned with health systems and their users. Establishing target product profiles (TPPs) is a critical, early step towards tailoring interventions to suit both of these constituencies. Specific analyses can help identify and establish relevant TPP criteria such as optimal formulation, presentation and packaging. Clinical trials for a new intervention should be designed to address both TPP-specific questions and anticipated use of the intervention in target countries. Examples are provided from research on malaria vaccines that are also applicable to other new public health interventions. PMID:22783872

  12. The clinical characteristics of patients with glaucoma presenting to Botswana healthcare facilities: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Daniel J; Razai, Mohammad S; Falama, Rosemary; Mongwa, Matlhogonolo; Mutapanduwa, Mishell; Baemisi, Chao; Josiah, Engelinah; Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Lehasa, Alice; Brealey, Evelyn; White, Andrew J; Jankowski, Deborah; Kerr-Muir, Malcolm G; Martin, Keith R; Ngondi, Jeremiah M

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to establish the clinical characteristics of patients with glaucoma attending eye care facilities in Botswana, and management of glaucoma among patients who received care in these facilities. The study also aimed to calculate the number of new diagnoses of glaucoma within the glaucoma service. Design A prospective, hospital-based, observational study. Setting A multicentre study was undertaken in government-run eye departments in Botswana from June to August 2012. Participants All patients with a diagnosis of glaucoma attending clinics at seven study sites were invited to participate. Outcome measures Examination findings, diagnosis and management were extracted from individual patient-held medical charts. Sociodemographic characteristics, patient knowledge and understanding of glaucoma were assessed through face-to-face interviews. In addition, details of outpatient attendances for 2011 were collected from 21 government-run hospitals. Results The majority of the 366 patients interviewed had a diagnosis of primary glaucoma (86.6%). The diagnoses were mainly made by ophthalmologists (48.6%) and ophthalmic nurses (44.0%). Many patients (38.5%) had been symptomatic for over 6?months before visiting an eye clinic. The mean presenting intraocular pressure was 28.2?mm?Hg (SD 11.9?mm?Hg). Most follow-up patients (79.2%) had not received surgery, however, many (89.5%) would accept surgery. Only 11.5% of participants had heard of glaucoma prior to diagnosis. Many participants (35.9%) did not understand glaucoma after being diagnosed. The majority (94.9%) of living first-degree relatives had never been examined. The number of newly diagnosed glaucoma cases for 2011 in the south of the country was 14.1/100?000; 95% CI (12.0 to 16.5), in the north it was 16.2/100?000; 95% CI (13.8 to 19.0). Conclusions Glaucoma is a significant burden that presents challenges to ophthalmic services in Botswana. Many patients have limited understanding of the condition and poor access to services. There is a need to develop a treatment infrastructure to include safe surgery and a reliable supply of effective medication. PMID:25472657

  13. Pulmonary embolism, part I: Epidemiology, risk factors and risk stratification, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and nonthrombotic pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    B?lohlávek, Jan; Dytrych, Vladimír; Linhart, Aleš

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is an important clinical entity with considerable mortality despite advances in diagnosis and treatment. In the present article, the authors offer a comprehensive review focused mainly on epidemiology, risk factors, risk stratification, pathophysiological considerations and clinical presentation. Diagnosis based on assessment of clinical likelihood, electrocardiography, chest x-ray, D-dimer levels, markers of myocardial injury and overload, and blood gases is discussed in detail. Special attention is devoted to the clinical use of computed tomography, pulmonary angiography and echocardiography in the setting of pulmonary embolism. PMID:23940438

  14. Difficult diagnoses in an austere environment: a clinical vignette ?the presentation, diagnosis, and management of ichthyosis.

    PubMed

    Pickard-Gabriel, C J; Rudinsky, Sherri

    2013-01-01

    Lamellar ichthyosis (LI) is a rare inherited skin disorder of cornification, with an incidence of approximately 1 in 200,000 births. It is one of three types of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI), a collective term for the spectrum of nonsyndromic ichthyoses caused by a number of well-described genetic mutations. We describe the case of LI diagnosed in a 10-day-old child of a Somali refugee at a free clinic in downtown Djibouti. Initial concern was for staphylococcal infection versus congenital disease. With the use of digital photographs, consultation with experts accessed through the Army Teledermatology Consultation Service supported a diagnosis of ARCI. Providing care to patients in austere environments can present numerous medical challenges. A provider cannot be expected to be able to diagnose and treat every disease and disorder alone, especially if there is a language barrier. Telemedicine can help close the gap in knowledge, particularly when presented with a challenging case. With a novel presentation, simply taking a photograph and e-mailing a consultant can quickly augment one?s medical acumen, ensuring appropriate diagnosis and treatment. PMID:23526325

  15. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension: trendelenberg just may be the answer.

    PubMed

    Koch, Krista K; Moran, Thomas J

    2015-03-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension may share some characteristics with the more common causes of headaches such as migraines or tension headaches, but its diagnosis and treatment is much more laborious and invasive. Here, the case of a 31-year-old man with multiple weeks of positional headaches is described. This symptom persisted following multiple blood patches, and progressed to worsening mental status, encephalopathy, and eventually obtundation with Glascow Coma Score less than 8. Surgery was required; however, small improvement was seen on imaging or in the patient's status. When the patient's position was changed to 20 degrees of Trendelenberg, immediate improvement was seen, leading to a full recovery. Although epidural blood patch is considered the treatment mainstay for spontaneous intracranial hypotension, this case shows another factor to consider in the treatment of this difficult condition. PMID:25735032

  16. A Review of Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Its Presentation in Different Clinical Settings

    PubMed Central

    Mufaddel, Amir; Osman, Ossama T.; Almugaddam, Fadwa

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a relatively common psychiatric disorder characterized by preoccupations with perceived defects in physical appearance. This review aimed to explore epidemiology, clinical features, comorbidities, and treatment options for BDD in different clinical settings. Data Source and Study Selection: A search of the literature from 1970 to 2011 was performed using the MEDLINE search engine. English-language articles, with no restriction regarding the type of articles, were identified using the search terms body dysmorphic disorder, body dysmorphic disorder clinical settings, body dysmorphic disorder treatment, and body dysmorphic disorder & psychodermatology. Results: BDD occurs in 0.7% to 2.4% of community samples and 13% of psychiatric inpatients. Etiology is multifactorial, with recent findings indicating deficits in visual information processing. There is considerable overlap between BDD and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in symptom etiology and response to treatment, which has led to suggestions that BDD can be classified with anxiety disorders and OCD. A recent finding indicated genetic overlap between BDD and OCD. Over 60% of patients with BDD had a lifetime anxiety disorder, and 38% had social phobia, which tends to predate the onset of BDD. Studies reported a high level of comorbidity with depression and social phobia occurring in > 70% of patients with BDD. Individuals with BDD present frequently to dermatologists (about 9%–14% of dermatologic patients have BDD). BDD co-occurs with pathological skin picking in 26%–45% of cases. BDD currently has 2 variants: delusional and nondelusional, and both variants respond similarly to serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs), which may have effect on obsessive thoughts and rituals. Cognitive-behavioral therapy has the best established treatment results. Conclusions: A considerable overlap exists between BDD and other psychiatric disorders such as OCD, anxiety, and delusional disorder, and this comorbidity should be considered in evaluation, management, and long-term follow-up of the disorder. Individuals with BDD usually consult dermatologists and cosmetic surgeons rather than psychiatrists. Collaboration between different specialties (such as primary care, dermatology, cosmetic surgery, and psychiatry) is required for better treatment outcome. PMID:24392251

  17. Clinical presentation and imaging characteristics of occult lung cancer associated ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Mai, Hui; Xia, Jun; Wu, Yongjun; Ke, Junlong; Li, Junliang; Pan, Jiangang; Chen, Wubiao; Shao, Yiming; Yang, Zhi; Luo, Saihua; Sun, Yonghua; Zhao, Bin; Li, Longxuan

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the clinical and imaging characteristics of initial and recurrent strokes in patients with occult lung cancer associated ischemic stroke (OLCA-stroke). A retrospective review of all ischemic stroke patients with occult lung cancer in the absence of conventional stroke etiologies between 2005 and 2013 was conducted. We compared the initial and recurrent lesion patterns on diffusion-weighted MRI in patients with OLCA-stroke, with respect to vascular territory involved, number and size of lesions, clinical presentation, cancer subtypes, recurrences and fatalities, and outcome of survivors. Thirteen patients with confirmed OLCA-stroke were identified. All had elevated D-dimer levels, six had central lung cancer and seven had peripheral lung cancer. Eight (62%) had adenocarcinoma, and nine (69%) had metastasis. Ten (77%) patients had multiple lesions in multiple vascular territories. Twelve (92%) patients suffered recurrent strokes. Multiple small and large disseminated lesions in multiple vascular territories were more frequent in recurrent strokes in comparison with initial strokes. The middle cerebral artery was most frequently involved in recurrent strokes, followed by the posterior circulation territory and anterior cerebral artery, which were of similar frequency as initial strokes. Overall, 58% of patients had their first recurrent stroke within the first month, and 69% had a poor outcome, especially for those with multiple recurrent strokes and metastases. Occult cancer should be considered in the setting of multiple and recurrent embolic strokes within the short term in the absence of conventional stroke etiologies. The severity of malignancy and cancer treatments and stroke influenced the recurrences and outcome. PMID:25443087

  18. Dental Erosion and Its Growing Importance in Clinical Practice: From Past to Present

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Ann-Katrin; Omar, Ridwaan; Carlsson, Gunnar E.; Johansson, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Since the mid-1990s, the focus of studies on tooth wear has steadily shifted from the general condition towards the more specific area of dental erosion; equally, a shift has occurred from studies in adults to those in children and adolescents. During this time, understanding of the condition has increased greatly. This paper attempts to provide a critical overview of the development of this body of knowledge, from earlier perceptions to the present. It is accepted that dental erosion has a multifactorial background, in which individual and lifestyle factors have great significance. Notwithstanding methodological differences across studies, data from many countries confirm that dental erosion is common in children and young people, and that, when present, it progresses rapidly. That the condition, and its ramifications, warrants serious consideration in clinical dentistry, is clear. It is important for the oral healthcare team to be able to recognize its early signs and symptoms and to understand its pathogenesis. Preventive strategies are essential ingredients in the management of patients with dental erosion. When necessary, treatment aimed at correcting or improving its effects might best be of a minimally invasive nature. Still, there remains a need for further research to forge better understanding of the subject. PMID:22505907

  19. Proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndromes: advances in pathogeneses, clinical presentations, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Amelia; Jacks, Jennifer; Kessler, Marcus; Emanuel, Peter D; Gao, Ling

    2015-02-01

    The disease spectrum currently known as the proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndromes (PRAAS) was first described in 1939 in patients who presented with recurrent fevers beginning in infancy or early childhood, which were accompanied by nodular erythema, a pernio-like rash, and joint contractures. Since then, several syndromes, such as chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE) syndrome, Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome (NNS), joint contractures, muscle atrophy, microcytic anemia and panniculitis-induced lipodystrophy (JMP) syndrome, and Japanese autoinflammatory syndrome with lipodystrophy (JASL), have been used to categorize patients with diseases within the same spectrum. Recently, independent studies have identified mutations in the human proteasome subunit ? type 8 (PSMB8) gene, which result in a sustained inflammatory response in all syndromes. Further functional studies not only suggest a causative role of PSMB8 mutations but also imply that they represent one disease spectrum, referred to as PRAAS. In this paper, we review the clinical presentations and laboratory findings of PRAAS, as well as the most recent advances in pathogeneses, diagnosis, and treatment options for patients with diseases in this spectrum. PMID:25521013

  20. Clinical and Histological Presentation of Helicobacter pylori and Gluten Related Gastroenteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nejad, Mohammad Rostami; Rostami, Kamran; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Mashayekhi, Reza; Molaei, Mahsa; Dabiri, Hossein; Al Dulaimi, David; Mirsattari, Dariush; Zojaji, Homayoun; Norouzinia, Mohsen; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2011-01-01

    Background Celiac disease has been reported to be associated with gastric abnormalities. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between the prevalence of celiac disease and Helicobacter pylori infection in an Iranian population of 250 patients. Methods Biopsies were taken from the gastric antrum and duodenum. Morphology and histology were evaluated using the updated Sydney system and modified Marsh criteria, respectively. To simplify the interpretation of gastric lesions we classified gastritis in macroscopic and microscopic stages. Serology for anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody was performed to determine the presence of celiac disease. Results Among 250 patients, 232 (93%) had histological evidence of Helicobacter pylori infection. Histological abnormalities (Marsh I to IIIc) were present in 24 (10%). Of 24 patients, 20 (83%) with histological abnormalities were infected with Helicobacter pylori. Of 250 patients, 25 (10%) had a positive anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody. Of 25 anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody positive patients, 9 (3.6%) had microscopic and macroscopic enteritis (Marsh I to IIIc). Conclusions Clinical presentation of celiac disease was not distinguishable from cases infected with Helicobacter pylori. Histology, even in patients with positive serology, was non-specific and unhelpful. We found a high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and chronic gastritis, but neither was associated with celiac disease, in agreement with studies in Western populations. PMID:21361718

  1. H1 receptor-mediated vasodilatation contributes to postexercise hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, Jennifer M; Wilkins, Brad W; Halliwill, John R

    2005-01-01

    In normally active individuals, postexercise hypotension after a single bout of aerobic exercise is due to an unexplained peripheral vasodilatation. Histamine has been shown to be released during exercise and could contribute to postexercise vasodilatation via H1 receptors in the peripheral vasculature. The purpose of this study was to determine the potential contribution of an H1 receptor-mediated vasodilatation to postexercise hypotension. We studied 14 healthy normotensive men and women (ages 21.9 ± 2.1 years) before and through to 90 min after a 60 min bout of cycling at 60% on randomized control and H1 receptor antagonist days (540 mg oral fexofenadine hydrochloride; Allegra). Arterial blood pressure (automated auscultation) and femoral blood flow (Doppler ultrasound) were measured in the supine position. Femoral vascular conductance was calculated as flow/pressure. Fexofenadine had no effect on pre-exercise femoral vascular conductance or mean arterial pressure (P > 0.5). At 30 min postexercise on the control day, femoral vascular conductance was increased (?+33.7 ± 7.8%; P < 0.05 versus pre-exercise) while mean arterial pressure was reduced (??6.5 ± 1.6 mmHg; P < 0.05 versus pre-exercise). In contrast, at 30 min postexercise on the fexofenadine day, femoral vascular conductance was not elevated (?+10.7 ± 9.8%; P = 0.7 versus pre-exercise) and mean arterial pressure was not reduced (??1.7 ± 1.2 mmHg; P = 0.2 versus pre-exercise). Thus, ingestion of an H1 receptor antagonist markedly reduces vasodilatation after exercise and blunts postexercise hypotension. These data suggest H1 receptor-mediated vasodilatation contributes to postexercise hypotension. PMID:15618271

  2. Are portable folding chairs useful to combat orthostatic hypotension?

    PubMed

    Smit, A A; Hardjowijono, M A; Wieling, W

    1997-12-01

    The effect of sitting on a derby chair (height, 48 cm), fishing chair (38 cm), and footstool (20 cm) on the improvement of postural hypotension was studied serially in 8 patients with autonomic failure. The increment in blood pressure during sitting was higher by using a lower portable chair. This was related to an increasing cardiac output at lower sitting heights. The fishing chair was, according to our patients' experience, most useful. PMID:9403491

  3. Advance prediction of hypotension at cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, S M; Norris, M C

    1996-01-01

    Cardiovascular responses to supine inferior vena cava compression might predict hypotension risk during elective cesarean delivery using spinal anesthesia. In this pilot study we investigated 27 women before operation by taking blood pressure and heart rate measurements for 5 min in the left lateral position, 5 min supine, and then performed one further reading in the left lateral position and one sitting. Anesthesia with hyperbaric bupivacaine was rigorously standardised. A pre-operative 'supine stress test', combining an increase in maternal heart rate of greater than 10 beats/min or leg flexion movements while supine, was analysed. A positive supine stress test (SST) was 4.1 times more frequent in those with severe systolic hypotension below 70% of baseline (12 out of 16 women) than in those without (2 out of 11 women), with a sensitivity of 75% (95% C.I. 48% to 93%) and specificity of 82% (95% C.I. 48% to 98%). A positive test was associated with twice as much vasopressor use as a negative test (30.7 +/-/14.5 mg versus 13.5 +/-/ 9.9 mg; P = 0.0014). Unlike the SST, cardiovascular responses to the change from recumbent to sitting (tilt test) were not useful as a predictor of hypotension. PMID:15321375

  4. Postprandial hypotension - novel insights into pathophysiology and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Gentilcore, Diana; Jones, Karen L; O'Donovan, Deirdre G; Horowitz, Michael

    2006-04-01

    Postprandial hypotension is a frequent disorder, occurring in approximately 40% of nursing-home residents, and represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Current approaches to management are suboptimal. While it has been generally assumed that ingestion of carbohydrate has the greatest effect, the fall in blood pressure (BP) does not appear to be mediated by the consequent elevations in blood glucose and insulin. Moreover, there is evidence that fat may decrease BP to a comparable extent to carbohydrate, although onset of the response may be slower, and that the response is affected by the type of carbohydrate. It has recently been established that the rate of nutrient delivery from the stomach into the small intestine is an important determinant of the hypotensive response to carbohydrate, so that the magnitude of the fall in BP and rise in heart rate is greater when gastric emptying is relatively more rapid. In both healthy elderly subjects and patients with type 2 diabetes, the fall in BP is attenuated when gastric emptying and small intestinal carbohydrate absorption are slowed by dietary (e.g. guar) or pharmacological (e.g. acarbose) means. Conversely, gastric distension attenuates the postprandial fall in BP. Strategies for the treatment of postprandial hypotension should, therefore, potentially be directed at (i) meal composition, particularly carbohydrate type and content, (ii) slowing gastric emptying and/or small intestinal carbohydrate absorption and/or (iii) increasing postprandial gastric distension. PMID:16611158

  5. Hemofiltration and Hemodiafiltration Reduce Intradialytic Hypotension in ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Altieri, Paolo; Andrulli, Simeone; Bolasco, Piergiorgio; Sau, Giovanna; Pedrini, Luciano A.; Basile, Carlo; David, Salvatore; Feriani, Mariano; Montagna, Giovanni; Di Iorio, Biagio Raffaele; Memoli, Bruno; Cravero, Raffaella; Battaglia, Giovanni; Zoccali, Carmine

    2010-01-01

    Symptomatic intradialytic hypotension is a common complication of hemodialysis (HD). The application of convective therapies to the outpatient setting may improve outcomes, including intradialytic hypotension. In this multicenter, open-label, randomized controlled study, we randomly assigned 146 long-term dialysis patients to HD (n = 70), online predilution hemofiltration (HF; n = 36), or online predilution hemodiafiltration (HDF; n = 40). The primary end point was the frequency of intradialytic symptomatic hypotension (ISH). Compared with the run-in period, the frequency of sessions with ISH during the evaluation period increased for HD (7.1 to 7.9%) and decreased for both HF (9.8 to 8.0%) and HDF (10.6 to 5.2%) (P < 0.001). Mean predialysis systolic BP increased by 4.2 mmHg among those who were assigned to HDF compared with decreases of 0.6 and 1.8 mmHg among those who were assigned to HD and HF, respectively (P = 0.038). Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated significant risk reductions in ISH for both HF (odds ratio 0.69; 95% confidence interval 0.51 to 0.92) and HDF (odds ratio 0.46, 95% confidence interval 0.33 to 0.63). There was a trend toward higher dropout for those who were assigned to HF (P = 0.107). In conclusion, compared with conventional HD, convective therapies (HDF and HF) reduce ISH in long-term dialysis patients. PMID:20813866

  6. Implications of a Vasodilatory Human Monoclonal Autoantibody in Postural Hypotension*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongliang; Zuccolo, Jonathan; Kem, David C.; Zillner, Caitlin; Lee, Jiyeon; Smith, Kenneth; James, Judith A.; Cunningham, Madeleine W.; Yu, Xichun

    2013-01-01

    Functional autoantibodies to the autonomic receptors are increasingly recognized in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. To date, no human activating monoclonal autoantibodies to these receptors have been available. In this study, we describe for the first time a ?2-adrenergic receptor (?2AR)-activating monoclonal autoantibody (C5F2) produced from the lymphocytes of a patient with idiopathic postural hypotension. C5F2, an IgG3 isotype, recognizes an epitope in the N terminus of the second extracellular loop (ECL2) of ?2AR. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed high binding affinity for the ?2AR ECL2 peptide. Immunoblotting and immunofluorescence demonstrated specific binding to ?2AR in H9c2 cardiomyocytes, CHO cells expressing human ?2AR, and rat aorta. C5F2 stimulated cyclic AMP production in ?2AR-transfected CHO cells and induced potent dilation of isolated rat cremaster arterioles, both of which were specifically blocked by the ?2AR-selective antagonist ICI-118551 and by the ?2AR ECL2 peptide. This monoclonal antibody demonstrated sufficient activity to produce postural hypotension in its host. Its availability provides a unique opportunity to identify previously unrecognized causes and new pharmacological management of postural hypotension and other cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24043632

  7. What Are the Correlates of Infertility-Related Clinical Anxiety? A Literature Review and the Presentation of a Conceptual Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katherine Peoquin; Marie-France Lafontaine

    2010-01-01

    Infertility is a major stressor for many couples. Although several reviews addressing psychological distress and depression within infertile couples exist, less emphasis has been placed on infertility-related anxiety. Yet it is important to know whether clinical anxiety is a prevalent problem among infertile couples and what are the characteristics of those suffering from clinical anxiety. The present article summarizes the

  8. Late presentation of hyperandrogenism in pregnancy: clinical features and differential diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Das, Gautam; Eligar, Vinay S; Govindan, Jyothish; Rees, D Aled

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Hyperandrogenic states in pregnancy are rare but arise most commonly due to new-onset ovarian pathology in pregnancy. We describe the case of a young woman who presented in the latter half of her pregnancy with features of hyperandrogenism. We review the biochemical and imaging findings and discuss the differential diagnosis. Case presentation A 26-year-old woman presented in the later part of her pregnancy with widespread hirsutism. Biochemical testing confirmed hyperandrogenism (testosterone, 13.7?nmol/l and second-trimester pregnancy range, 0.9–4.9?nmol/l), although she had no history of menstrual disturbance, hirsutism or acne prior to conception. Radiological evaluation (ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging) revealed multiple cystic lesions in both ovaries, leading to a presumptive diagnosis of hyperreactio luteinalis (HL). The implications of maternal hyperandrogenism on foetal virilisation were considered and the patient was counselled appropriately. She delivered a healthy baby boy uneventfully. Androgen levels, hirsutism and acne normalised within a few weeks of delivery. Conclusion HL can occur at any stage of pregnancy and is an important differential diagnosis in pregnant patients with features of androgen excess. Most cases regress spontaneously after delivery and major interventions are usually not needed. Learning points Hyperandrogenism in pregnancy is rare.Clinical features are similar to the non-pregnant state in the mother but virilisation in the foetus can have profound consequences.HL and pregnancy luteoma are the most common ovarian pathologies leading to hyperandrogenism in pregnancy.Spontaneous regression occurs in the post-partum period in the vast majority of cases and surgery is only required for local complications. PMID:24616776

  9. Embryological, clinical and ultrastructural study of human oocytes presenting indented zona pellucida.

    PubMed

    Sousa, M; Teixeira da Silva, J; Silva, J; Cunha, M; Viana, P; Oliveira, E; Sá, R; Soares, C; Oliveira, C; Barros, A

    2015-02-01

    Human oocyte dysmorphisms attain a large proportion of retrieved oocytes from assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment cycles. Extracytoplasmic defects involve abnormal morphology of the zona pellucida (ZP), perivitelline space and first polar body. The aim of the present study was to describe a novel dysmorphism affecting the ZP, indented ZP. We also evaluated the clinical, embryological and ultrastructural features of these cases. We evaluated all ART treatment cycles during 7 consecutive years and found 13 treatment cycles (six patients) with all oocytes presenting an indented ZP. In addition, these oocytes presented total or partial absence of the perivitelline space, absence of resistance to ZP and oolemma penetration during microinjection, and low ooplasm viscosity during aspiration. This novel described dysmorphism was recurrent and attained all oocytes in three cases that had more than one treatment cycle. When compared with controls, data showed significant low oocyte maturity (42% versus 81.6%) and high cycle cancellation (30.8% versus 8.5%) rates, normal degeneration (3.4% versus 6.3%) and fertilization rates (69% versus 69.5%), and low pregnancy (15.4% versus 33.3%) and live-birth delivery (7.7% versus 27.7%) rates per cycle. Ultrastructure analysis revealed a zona pellucida structure with large empty electrolucent regions, an outer ZP layer with an indented surface with protuberances and a thick inner ZP that obliterated the perivitelline space. There was evidence of exocytosis of ZP material by the oocyte. In conclusion, oocytes with this novel described dysmorphism (indented ZP) are associated with low maturity, pregnancy and live-birth delivery rates. PMID:23992046

  10. Clinical Presentation of Novel Influenza A (H1N1) in Hospitalized Children

    PubMed Central

    Soleimani, Gholamreza; Akbarpour, Marzieh

    2011-01-01

    Objective Human pandemic influenza H1N1 virus as the cause of febrile respiratory infection ranging from self-limited to severe illness has spread globally during 2009. Signs and symptoms of upper and lower respiratory tract involvement, fever, sore throat, rhinitis, myalgia, malaise, headache, chills and fatigue are common. In this article we report the clinical presentation of Influenza A (H1N1) in our hospitalized children. Methods Between September and October 2009, all children requiring hospitalization for suspected H1N1 infection were transferred to Pediatric Infectious Diseases ward. For all patients the throat swab was taken for PCR testing to confirm or exclude the diagnosis of H1N1 Influenza A. Case patients consisted of H1N1-positive patients. Age, sex, symptoms, signs, laboratory data, CXR changes, details of therapy, duration of admission and patient outcome were documented. Findings Twenty patients were H1N1 positive. Mean age of the patients was 65.50±9.8 months. Fever and coughs were with 55% the most commonly reported symptoms. Other presentations included vomiting (55%), abdominal pain (25%), cyanosis and dyspnea (5%), body ache (40%), rhinorrhea (80%), sore throat (35%), head stiffness (5%) and loss of conciousness (5%). The median temperature of the patients was 38.5°C. Chest X-Ray changes were noted in 13 out of 20 patients (65%). Mean leukocyte and platelet was 6475 and 169000 respectively. Seventeen (85%) patients were treated with Oseltamivir, 3 patients received adjuvant antibiotics. The mean duration of admission was 3 days. Three patients required intensive care support and all of them expired due to superinfection. Conclusion Our data confirm that the presentation of influenza in children is variable and 2009 H1N1 influenza may cause leucopenia and thrombocytopenia. PMID:23056790

  11. Clinical and hematological presentation of children and adolescents with polycythemia vera

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Holger Cario; Mary Frances McMullin; Heike L. Pahl

    2009-01-01

    Polycythemia vera (PV) in children and adolescents is very rare. Data on clinical and laboratory evaluations as well as on\\u000a treatment modalities are sparse. Here, we report the long-term clinical course of a PV patient first diagnosed more than 40 years\\u000a ago at age 12. In addition, after a systematic review of the scientific medical literature, clinical and hematological data\\u000a of

  12. Hypotensive mechanism of the extracts and artemetin isolated from Achillea millefolium L. (Asteraceae) in rats.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Priscila; Gasparotto, Arquimedes; Crestani, Sandra; Stefanello, Maria Élida Alves; Marques, Maria Consuelo Andrade; da Silva-Santos, José Eduardo; Kassuya, Cândida Aparecida Leite

    2011-07-15

    Traditional uses of Achillea millefolium L. (Asteraceae) include the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, we used anesthetized rats to assess the hypotensive effect of a hydroethanolic extract (HEAM), and its dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate (EA), butanolic (BT), and dichloromethane-2 (DCM-2) fractions, besides the flavonoid artemetin, isolated from A. millefolium. The oral administration of HEAM (100-300 mg/kg), DCM (20mg/kg), DCM-2 (10-30 mg/kg), but not EA (10 mg/kg) and BT (50 mg/kg) fractions significantly reduced the mean arterial pressure (MAP) of normotensive rats. The phytochemical analysis by NMR (1)H of DCM and DCM-2 fractions revealed high amounts of artemetin, that was isolated and administered by either oral (1.5 mg/kg) or intravenous (0.15-1.5 mg/kg) routes in rats. This flavonoid was able to dose-dependently reduce the MAP, up to 11.47 ± 1.5 mmHg (1.5 mg/kg, i.v.). To investigate if artemetin-induced hypotension was related to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition, we evaluated the influence of this flavonoid on the vascular effects of both angiotensin I and bradykinin. Intravenous injection of artemetin (0.75 mg/kg) significantly reduced the hypertensive response to angiotensin I while increased the average length of bradykinin-induced hypotension. Artemetin (1.5 mg/kg, p.o.) was also able to reduce plasma (about 37%) and vascular (up to 63%) ACE activity in vitro, compared to control group. On the other hand, artemetin did not change angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Our study is the first showing the hypotensive effects induced by the extract and fractions obtained from A. millefollium. In addition, our results disclosed that this effect may be, at least in part, associated with high levels of artemetin and its ability to decrease angiotensin II generation in vivo, by ACE inhibition. PMID:21420289

  13. Literature Review and Clinical Presentation of Cervical Spondylitis Due to Salmonella Enteritidis in Immunocompetent

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhi-Yun; Guo, Fang

    2014-01-01

    A 48-year-old woman was presented to our clinic with some fever and neck pains for about one month. Based on the symptoms and results of image, an empirical diagnosis of tuberculous cervical spondylitis was made. The pain was not significantly decreased after anti-tuberculosis therapy. And, 3 weeks later, she was re-admitted to our hospital for the unbearable pain. An exploration of the C4/5 by the anterior medial approach was recommended to evaluate the germ and debridement. Bacteriological tests showed that the pathogen was Salmonella Enteritidis. The pain was relieved significantly after operation and sensitive antibiotic treatments. Infections with Salmonella Typhi or Salmonella Paratyphi have been well-documented, while there are few reports of cervical spondylitis caused by Salmonella Enteritidis. We reported a case of a healthy woman with whom pyogenic cervical spondylitis of Salmonella Enteritidis was corroborated and treated and reviewed according to previous reports about spondylitis caused by Salmonella Enteritidis in the literature. PMID:24761205

  14. Clinical Presentation and Microarray Analysis of Peruvian Children with Atypical Development and/or Aberrant Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Merlin G.; Usrey, Kelly; Roberts, Jennifer L.; Schroeder, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    We report our experience with high resolution microarray analysis in infants and young children with developmental disability and/or aberrant behavior enrolled at the Centro Ann Sullivan del Peru in Lima, Peru, a low income country. Buccal cells were collected with cotton swabs from 233 participants for later DNA isolation and identification of copy number variation (deletions/duplications) and regions of homozygosity (ROH) for estimating consanguinity status in 15 infants and young children (12 males, 3 females; mean age ± SD = 28.1?m ± ?7.9?m; age range 14?m–41?m) randomly selected for microarray analysis. An adequate DNA yield was found in about one-half of the enrolled participants. Ten participants showed deletions or duplications containing candidate genes reported to impact behavior or cognitive development. Five children had ROHs which could have harbored recessive gene alleles contributing to their clinical presentation. The coefficient of inbreeding was calculated and three participants showed first-second cousin relationships, indicating consanguinity. Our preliminary study showed that DNA isolated from buccal cells using cotton swabs was suboptimal, but yet in a subset of participants the yield was adequate for high resolution microarray analysis and several genes were found that impact development and behavior and ROHs identified to determine consanguinity status. PMID:25400949

  15. Comparison of MRI criteria at first presentation to predict conversion to clinically definite multiple sclerosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frederik Barkhof; Massimo Filippi; L. H. Miller; Philip Scheltens; Adriana Campi; Chris H. Polman; Giancarlo Comi; H. J. Adhr; Nick Losseff; Jacob Valk

    1997-01-01

    Summary We compared MRI criteria used to predict conversion of suspected multiple sclerosis to clinically definte multiple sclerosis. Seventy-four patients with clinically isolated neurological symptoms suggestive of multiple sclerosis were studied with MRI. Logistic regression analysis was used to remove redundant information, and a diagnostic model was built after each MRI parameter was dichotomized according to maximum accuracy using receiver

  16. Bloodstream Infection among Children Presenting to a General Hospital Outpatient Clinic in Urban Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Rahul; Shrestha, Umesh; Gautam, Samir C.; Thorson, Stephen; Shrestha, Kabindra; Yadav, Bharat K.; Kelly, Dominic F.; Adhikari, Neelam; Pollard, Andrew J.; Murdoch, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Background There are limited data on the etiology and characteristics of bloodstream infections in children presenting in hospital outpatient settings in South Asia. Previous studies in Nepal have highlighted the importance of murine typhus as a cause of febrile illness in adults and enteric fever as a leading bacterial cause of fever among children admitted to hospital. Methods We prospectively studied a total of 1084 febrile children aged between 2 months and 14 years presenting to a general hospital outpatient department in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, over two study periods (summer and winter). Blood from all patients was tested by conventional culture and by real-time PCR for Rickettsia typhi. Results Putative etiological agents for fever were identified in 164 (15%) patients. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) was identified in 107 (10%), S. enterica serovar Paratyphi A (S. Paratyphi) in 30 (3%), Streptococcus pneumoniae in 6 (0.6%), S. enterica serovar Typhimurium in 2 (0.2%), Haemophilus influenzae type b in 1 (0.1%), and Escherichia coli in 1 (0.1%) patient. S. Typhi was the most common organism isolated from blood during both summer and winter. Twenty-two (2%) patients were PCR positive for R. typhi. No significant demographic, clinical and laboratory features distinguished culture positive enteric fever and murine typhus. Conclusions Salmonella infections are the leading cause of bloodstream infection among pediatric outpatients with fever in Kathmandu Valley. Extension of immunization programs against invasive bacterial disease to include the agents of enteric fever and pneumococcus could improve the health of children in Nepal. PMID:23115652

  17. Bleb-related Endophthalmitis: Clinical Presentation, Isolates, Treatment and Visual Outcome of Culture-proven Cases

    PubMed Central

    Ba'arah, Basel T.; Smiddy, William E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate clinical features, causative organisms and their antibiotic sensitivity, management, and visual acuity outcomes of eyes with bleb-related endophthalmitis (BRE). Design: Retrospective, noncomparative, consecutive eye series. Methods: Clinical and microbiological records of patients with culture positive bleb-related endophthalmitis treated at a single institution between April 1995 and February 2002 were revised retrospectively. Main Outcome Measures: Final visual acuity, loss of eye and complications. Results: There were 34 cases with presenting visual acuities ranging from 20/200 to light perception. Decrease of visual acuity was the most frequent sign (94%) followed by pain (79%) and hypopyon (53%). Associated features included pseudophakia (79%), vitreous wick (29%), and wound leak (12%). The most frequent organisms isolated from vitreous specimens, were streptococcus species (55%) and gram positive coagulase negative staphylococci (20%). Polymicrobial growth was noted in 27% of cases. The cultured organisms were sensitive to antibiotics used in 94% of cases. Treatment modality used was vitreous tap with antibiotic injection without (65%) or with vitrectomy (35%). The most common intravitreal antibiotics combination was vancomycin with ceftazidime, Intravitreal dexamethsone was administered in 56% of cases. Final visual outcome of 20/400 or better was noticed in 50% of cases without and 33% with vitrectomy, but this was not statistically significant (p=0.45). The difference in final visual acuity of cases infected by gram-positive coagulase-negative staphylococci and streptococcus species were not statistically significant (p= 0.18). Overall, final visual outcome of 20/400 or better was noticed in 47% of cases, while no light perception was recorded in 8 (24%) cases. Of no light perception cases 7 underwent evisceration or enucleation. Overall, 32% of the cases experienced other complications like retinal detachment with dislocated intraocular lens, phthisis bulbi, and epiretinal membrane formation. Conclusion: BRE is associated with substantial visual morbidity. Prompt treatment of BRE with intravitreal vancomycin and broad spectrum antibiotics recommended while culture results are pending. Neither tap-injection with vitrectomy nor tap-injection without vitrectomy proved superior in the management of this condition. PMID:20142955

  18. Demographic, epidemiologic and clinical profile of snake bite cases, presented to Emergency Medicine department, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

    PubMed Central

    Jarwani, Bhavesh; Jadav, Pradeep; Madaiya, Malhar

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Snake bite is a common medical emergency faced mainly by the rural populations in tropical and subtropical countries with heavy rainfall and humid climate. Although India is a single largest contributor of snake bite cases, reporting is very poor. There is hardly any publication of the same from Gujarat state that is developing at a good pace. Hence, we aimed to study the snake bite cases with particular attention to demography, epidemiology, and clinical profile. Settings and Design: The present descriptive, observational study was carried out at the Emergency Medicine Department of a tertiary care center in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. This department is one if the firsts to get recognized by the Medical Council of India. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional single-center study. Cases were entered into the prescribed form, and detailed information regarding demographic, epidemiologic, and clinical parameters was entered. Statistical Method: Data were analyzed using Epi2000. Means and frequencies for each variable were calculated. Results: Majority (67.4%) of the snake bite victims were in the age group between 15 and 45 years. Majority were male victims (74.2%). 71% victims of snake bite lived in rural areas. Farmers and laborers were the main victims. 61.2% incidents took place at night time or early morning (before 6 a.m.). 64% patients had bite mark on the lower limb. 40% victims had seen the snake. Eight patients had snake bite, but were asymptomatic. 52% had neuroparalytic manifestation, 34% were asymptomatic, and 9.6% had hemorrhagic manifestation. 14% cases received treatment within 1 h of the bite and 64.84% within 1-6 h after the bite. First aid given was in the form of application of tourniquet (16.2%), local application of lime, chillies, herbal medicine, etc., (1%). 2.20% cases were sensitive to anti-snake venom. Only three patients died. Conclusion: In this region (Gujarat), neuroparalytic manifestation of snake bite is more prevalent. Cobra and krait are the commonest types of poisonous snakes. The time of seeking treatment has reduced because of awareness about snake bite treatment and better transport and ambulance facility. Mortality is very less in well-equipped hospitals due to early initiation of treatment with anti-snake venom. PMID:23960378

  19. Hypotension, Syncope, and Fever in Systemic Mastocytosis without Skin Infiltration and Rapid Response to Corticosteroid and Cyclosporin: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ozdemir, Didem; Dagdelen, Selcuk; Erbas, Tomris; Agbaht, Kemal; Serefhanoglu, Songul; Aksu, Salih; Ersoy-Evans, Sibel

    2010-01-01

    Mast cell disorders are defined by an abnormal accumulation of tissue mast cells in one or more organ systems. In systemic mastocytosis, at least one extracutaneous organ is involved by definition. Although, systemic mastocytosis usually represents with skin lesion called urticaria pigmentosa, in a small proportion, there is extracutaneous involvement without skin infiltration. Other manifestations are flushing, tachycardia, dyspepsia, diarrhea, hypotension, syncope, and rarely fever. Various medications have been used but there is not a definite cure for systemic mastocytosis. The principles of treatment include control of symptoms with measures aimed to decrease mast cell activation. We describe a case of systemic mastocytosis presenting with hypotension, syncope attacks, fever, and local flushing. In bone marrow biopsy, increased mast cell infiltration was demonstrated. She had no skin infiltration. A good clinicopathological response was obtained acutely with combination therapy of glucocorticoid and cyclosporine. PMID:21209730

  20. Clinical presentations of substance abuse in bipolar heroin addicts at time of treatment entry

    E-print Network

    2012-01-01

    self-medication hypothesis’ have focused on substance abuseabuse (heroin included) at study entry We excluded patients: Receiving opioid agonist medicationsabuse in the clinical course of bipolar patients [16,31]. Studies on the self-medication

  1. Familial Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis May Present during Adulthood: Clinical and Genetic Features of a Small Series

    PubMed Central

    Piccin, Andrea; Gherlinzoni, Filippo; Sasso, Ferdinando Carlo; Rabusin, Marco; Attard, Luciano; Bosi, Alberto; Pende, Daniela; Moretta, Lorenzo; Aricò, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Familial Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) is a rare immune deficiency with defective cytotoxic function. The age at onset is usually young and the natural course is rapidly fatal if untreated. A later onset of the disease has been sporadically reported even in adolescents and adults. We report the results of our retrospective data collection of all cases diagnosed with FHL at an age of 18 years or older and enrolled in the Italian Registry of HLH. All cases were diagnosed with FHL based on evidence of genetic defect in one FHL-related gene. A total of 11 patients were diagnosed with FHL. They were 9 males and 2 females, from 10 unrelated families; their age ranged between 18 and 43 years (median, 23 years). Family history was unremarkable in eight families at the time of the diagnosis. Their genetic diagnoses are: FHL2 (n?=?6), FHL3 (n?=?2), FHL5 (n?=?1), XLP1 (n?=?2). Clinical, molecular and functional data are described. These data confirm that FHL may present beyond the pediatric age and up to the fifth decade. FHL2 due to perforin defect is the most frequently reported subtype. Adult specialists should consider FHL in the differential diagnosis of patients with cytopenia and liver or central nervous system disorders, especially when a lymphoproliferative disease is suspected but eventually not confirmed. FHL may turn to be fatal within a short time course even in adults. This risk, together with the continuous improvement in the transplant technique, especially in the area of transplant from matched unrelated donor, resulting in reduced treatment related mortality, might suggest a wider use of SCT in this population. Current diagnostic approach allows prompt identification of patients by flow-cytometry screening, then confirmed by the genetic study, and treatment with chemo-immunotherapy followed by stem cell transplantation. PMID:22970278

  2. Erlotinib-induced Hepatotoxicity—Clinical Presentation and Successful Management: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Anil K

    2011-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a common occurrence in clinical practice in the present era because of frequent use of drugs and increase in patients who have increased susceptibility to DILI (because of underlying non-alcoholic steatohepatitis [NASH], chronic hepatitis C, chronic hepatitis B and alcoholic liver disease). DILI is the most common reason for withdrawal of an approved drug from the market. The overall mortality rate among patients hospitalized for DILI is approximately 10%. Erlotinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is indicated for treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer and pancreatic cancer. The most common adverse effects associated with erlotinib use are rash and diarrhea. Liver function test (LFT) abnormalities are commonly associated with erlotinib use. Grade 2 (ALT elevations > 2.5–5× upper limit of normal [ULN]) LFT abnormalities are observed in around 4% of patients while Grade 3 (ALT < 5–20× ULN) are not reported. We report a case of acute hepatitis due to administration of erlotinib in 81-year-old gentleman diagnosed as having non-small cell lung cancer with metastasis to mediastinal lymph nodes and started on erlotinib 150 mg/day. This type of deep jaundice is very rare, and timely diagnosis and withdrawal of the drug saved the life of the patient. It is recommended that liver functions be closely monitored in those with hepatic impairment, who are also on other cytochrome P450 3A4 inhibitors such as ketoconazole, clarithromycin, voriconazole, etc. In conclusion, we report a case of DILI secondary to erlotinib with significant hyperbilirubinemia (> 5× ULN; grade 4) in absence of concomitant P450 inhibitor intake and liver metastases. As erlotinib is now commonly incorporated into treatment of advanced lung and pancreatic cancer, it is important that clinicians are aware of this potential complication in practice especially in elderly patients.

  3. Suppression of Peripheral Sympathetic Activity Underlies Protease-Activated Receptor 2-Mediated Hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hwan; Ahn, Duck-Sun; Joeng, Ji-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2 is expressed in endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells. It plays a crucial role in regulating blood pressure via the modulation of peripheral vascular tone. Although some reports have suggested involvement of a neurogenic mechanism in PAR-2-induced hypotension, the accurate mechanism remains to be elucidated. To examine this possibility, we investigated the effect of PAR-2 activation on smooth muscle contraction evoked by electrical field stimulation (EFS) in the superior mesenteric artery. In the present study, PAR-2 agonists suppressed neurogenic contractions evoked by EFS in endothelium-denuded superior mesenteric arterial strips but did not affect contraction elicited by the external application of noradrenaline (NA). However, thrombin, a potent PAR-1 agonist, had no effect on EFS-evoked contraction. Additionally, ?-conotoxin GVIA (CgTx), a selective N-type Ca2+ channel (ICa-N) blocker, significantly inhibited EFS-evoked contraction, and this blockade almost completely occluded the suppression of EFS-evoked contraction by PAR-2 agonists. Finally, PAR-2 agonists suppressed the EFS-evoked overflow of NA in endothelium-denuded rat superior mesenteric arterial strips and this suppression was nearly completely occluded by ?-CgTx. These results suggest that activation of PAR-2 may suppress peripheral sympathetic outflow by modulating activity of ICa-N which are located in peripheral sympathetic nerve terminals, which results in PAR-2-induced hypotension. PMID:25598663

  4. High vibration perception threshold and autonomic dysfunction in hemodialysis patients with intradialysis hypotension

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Po-Tsang Lee; Hua-Chang Fang; Chien-Liang Chen; Hsiao-Min Chung; Yee-Hsuan Chiou; Kang-Ju Chou

    2003-01-01

    High vibration perception threshold and autonomic dysfunction in hemodialysis patients with intradialysis hypotension.BackgroundIntradialysis hypotension is a common problem among hemodialysis patients. Some studies have shown that autonomic neuropathy could be a major cause of intradialysis hypotension, whereas others have not. Furthermore, whether there are parallel changes in the autonomic nervous system and somatic nerves remains unclear.MethodsWe investigated the autonomic and

  5. Spinal anaesthesia for Caesarean section. The influence of hypotension on neonatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Corke, B C; Datta, S; Ostheimer, G W; Weiss, J B; Alper, M H

    1982-06-01

    The effect upon the neonate of a short period of maternal hypotension sustained during the initiation of spinal analgesia for Caesarean section was studied. Babies born to mothers with hypotension were significantly more acidotic than controls although acid-base levels were still within normal limits. Neurobehavioural studies were found to be normal in both groups at 4 and 24 hours. It was concluded that a short period (less than 2 minutes) of hypotension was not harmful to the neonate. PMID:7091625

  6. Frequency, Clinical Presentation and Evolution of Renal Oncocytomas: Multicentric Experience from a European Database

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leo Romis; Luca Cindolo; Jean Jacques Patard; Giovanni Messina; Vincenzo Altieri; Laurent Salomon; Claude Clement Abbou; Dominique Chopin; Bernard Lobel; Alexandre de La Taille

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To understand the clinical behavior of renal oncocytoma in a retrospective analysis of a European multicentric nephrectomies database.Methods: The records of 891 patients who underwent surgical resection of renal neoplasm were reviewed. Relevant clinical and pathological data for each patient were retrieved in a database.Results: Thirty-two (3.6%) cases of renal oncocytoma were identified. Twenty patients (62.5%) were asymptomatic. No

  7. Meeting report: present state of molecular genetics in clinical laboratories. Report on the VII European Symposium on Clinical Laboratory and In Vitro Diagnostic Industry in Barcelona.

    PubMed

    Padró-Miquel, Ariadna; Candás-Estébanez, Beatriz

    2015-02-01

    The VII European Symposium of the Clinical Laboratory and In Vitro Diagnostic Industry, co-organized between the Catalan Association for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (ACCLC) and the Catalan Society of Biology, was held on May 28th-29th, 2013 in Barcelona (Catalonia, Spain) under the IFCC auspices and the IUPAC sponsorship. The subject of the present Symposium was "Molecular Genetics in the Clinical Laboratory" and began with an opening conference that was a stroll through the history of molecular genetics in the context of the clinical laboratory. The scientific program was structured in several 2-h length roundtables that dealt with the following topics: recent advances in molecular genetics for clinical microbiology, latest evidences and real applicability of pharmacogenetics in the clinical practice, quality assurance of a molecular genetics laboratory, and latest trends in prenatal genetic diagnosis. The aim of the Symposium was the discussion of the transformation that molecular genetics has generated on clinical laboratories in terms of organization, specialization, interpretation of results and fast technical and knowledge evolution. High-qualified professionals from several countries together with in-country experts formed the roundtables. Attendants participated actively in the debates, increasing the overall interest. PMID:25296673

  8. Patient characteristics upon initial presentation to chiropractic teaching clinics: A descriptive study conducted at one university

    PubMed Central

    Kaeser, Martha A.; Hawk, Cheryl; Anderson, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare demographics and chief complaints of the new patient population at our institution's fee-for-service clinics to the patient population of practicing chiropractors in the United States. We also compared the prevalence of obesity and hypertension to reference standards for the adult population. Methods Patient data were obtained from the electronic health records. All records identified as new patients during October 2013 were included. Variables of interest were clinic site, patient demographics, blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), chief complaint, and ICD-9 codes. Descriptive statistics were computed and compared to reference standards from previous reports. Results During October 2013, there were 224 new patients that entered the clinics. The average patient was a 31- to 50-year-old white male. Our clinic patients differed from those seen by US chiropractors in the distribution of all demographic variables. For adult patients, 31.4% were overweight, 29% were obese, and 8% stage 1 or 2 hypertension. Conclusion New patients in the fee-for-service teaching clinics appear to be dissimilar to those of US practicing chiropractors in several important demographics, characteristics, and types of complaints. The new patients had lower levels of overweight, obesity, and hypertension compared to US reference standards. PMID:25162982

  9. Role of the median preoptic nucleus in the chronic hypotensive effect of losartan in sodium-replete normal rats.

    PubMed

    Ployngam, Trasida; Katz, Stephen S; Collister, John P

    2010-01-01

    1. We have shown previously that the chronic hypotensive effect of the angiotensin II AT1 receptor antagonist losartan is mediated, in part, by the subfornical organ (SFO). However, the neural pathway(s) mediating this central effect of losartan downstream from the SFO has not been completely elucidated. 2. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) is a crucial part of the neural pathway necessary for the chronic hypotensive effect of losartan. To test this hypothesis, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either Sham or electrolytic lesion of the MnPO (MnPOx). Rats were instrumented with radiotelemetric transducers and aortic flow probes for the continuous measurement of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate and cardiac output (CO), respectively. Total peripheral resistance (TPR) was calculated as MAP/CO. After 3 days of baseline measurements, rats were infused intraperitoneally with losartan (10 mg/kg per day) via an osmotic minipump at a rate of 5 microL/min. 3. The data revealed that, by Day 9 of losartan treatment, MAP had decreased 34 +/- 2 mmHg in MnPOx rats (n = 9), whereas the MAP of Sham-lesioned rats (n = 8) had only decreased 24 +/- 3 mmHg. These findings were accompanied by a greater decrease in TPR in MnPOx compared with Sham rats (-0.464 vs-0.237 mmHg/mL per min, respectively), whereas CO remained unchanged throughout the study protocol. 4. These results do not support the hypothesis that an intact MnPO is necessary to mediate the full chronic hypotensive effect of losartan in normal rats. Instead, they appear to suggest that the MnPO may play an important role in buffering the profound hypotension induced by losartan. PMID:19793103

  10. Profile of patients presenting at a low vision clinic in a developing country

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Low vision is an important public health problem; however, very few low vision clinics are available to address the needs of low vision patients in most developing countries. The purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics of patients attending the low vision clinic of a Nigerian tertiary hospital. Methods This was a prospective cross sectional study of all new patients seen at the low vision clinic over a 36?month period. Patients were administered with a structured questionnaire, and were examined and tested with low vision devices by the attending low vision specialist. Information on the demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients was recorded. Results A total of 193 new patients seen during the period were studied. The mean age was 41.4?years, and their ages ranged between 6 and 90?years with a male to female ratio of 1.9:1. Majority (58%) were aged below 50?years, 23.3% were children (?15?years), while 21.8% were elderly patients (?65?years). The commonest cause of low vision was retinitis pigmentosa (16.6%); 14.5% had age related macular degeneration (ARMD); 9.8% had albinism; while only 1% had diabetic retinopathy. ARMD (45.2%) was the commonest cause in the elderly patients, while albinism (24.4%) and optic atrophy (24.4%) were the commonest in children. Conclusion The demographic and clinical characteristics of low vision patients seen in this clinic are similar to that of patients in other developing countries, but different from those in developed countries. Elderly patients and females may be under-utilising low vision services. There is a need for further research into the determinants of low vision service utilisation in developing countries. This would further aid the planning and delivery of services to low vision patients in these countries. PMID:22846399

  11. [Case of spontaneous intracranial hypotension associated with depressed consciousness].

    PubMed

    Kato, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Itsuo; Hidaka, Shozo; Okada, Yasunori; Kubo, Takashi; Okamura, Kenta

    2007-04-01

    We experienced a case of spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) complicated with depressed consciousness after its treatment. A 56-year-old woman developed postural headache, and her MRI revealed bilateral chronic subdural hematoma (CSH). After treatment with epidural autolongous blood patch, her headache resolved completely. However, two days after, the patient developed depressed conciousness, and MRI showed brain sagging and downward brain displacement. After management with conservative treatment, including second epidural blood patch and hematoma drainage, the patient became alert and other symptoms resolved gradually. We demonstrated that caution should be taken for the management of SIH, especially in the case associated with CSH. PMID:17441454

  12. Early experiences of vasodilators and hypotensive anesthesia in children.

    PubMed

    Brown, T C K

    2012-07-01

    The physiological application of OHMS LAW explains the basis of hypotensive anesthesia. V?=?IR translates into: Pressure?=?Flow?×?Resistance or Blood pressure?=?Cardiac Output?×?Peripheral Resistance. If peripheral resistance is reduced by a vasodilator such as sodium nitroprusside (a short acting, vascular smooth muscle relaxant) or phenoxybenzamine (a long acting ? adrenoreceptor antagonist), blood pressure will fall and vasoconstriction and bleeding will be reduced. A less desirable alternative to lowering blood pressure could be to reduce cardiac output by suppressing myocardial contractility using a ß(1) adrenoceptor antagonist or an inhalational agent such as isoflurane. PMID:22243693

  13. Past trauma and present functioning of patients attending a women's psychiatric clinic.

    PubMed

    Borins, E F; Forsythe, P J

    1985-04-01

    A women's psychiatric clinic, incorporated within a university teaching general hospital and staffed entirely by women, was opened in March of 1980. The authors studied a sample of 100 women who came to the clinic and characterized them by demographic variables, psychiatric diagnoses, health problems, chronic illness, death in the family, and traumatic incidents. Death in the family before she was 18 was found to predict a woman's subsequent request for or completion of sterilization. Physical or sexual abuse was significantly related to abortion, and abortion and trauma were significantly correlated. PMID:3976919

  14. Chronic graft-versus-host disease: clinical presentation of multiple lesions of lichenoid and atrophic pattern*

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Luiza; Vieira, Érica Cristina; Minicucci, Eliana Maria; Salvio, Ana Gabriela; de Souza, Mair Pedro; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar; Marques, Silvio Alencar

    2013-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease is observed mainly in recipients of hematopoietic cell transplantation and is expressed by cutaneous or systemic signals and symptoms. Graft-versus-host disease is clinically classified as acute or chronic. Chronic Graft-versus-host disease occurs in up to 70% of hematopoietic cell transplanted patients and its clinical manifestations have important impact on morbidity and quality of life. The authors report an expressive cutaneous, oral and adnexal involvement in a patient with chronic Graft-versus-host disease with multiple lesions of lichenoid and atrophic pattern. PMID:24173188

  15. Cognitive Behavioral Treatment of Panic Disorder and Agoraphobia in a Multiethnic Urban Outpatient Clinic: Initial Presentation and Treatment Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Steven; Braunstein, Jeffrey W.; Halpern, Beth

    2006-01-01

    Few studies examine the effectiveness of panic control treatment across diverse ethnic groups. In this paper we present data on 40 patients (African American, n = 24; Caucasian, n = 16) with panic disorder and comorbid agoraphobia who presented at an anxiety disorder clinic in an inner-city area. On initial assessment both groups were similar on…

  16. Clinical Presentation of Inhalational Anthrax Following Bioterrorism Exposure Report of 2 Surviving Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thom A. Mayer; Susan Bersoff-Matcha; Cecele Murphy; James Earls; Scott Harper; Denis Pauze; Michael Nguyen; Jonathan Rosenthal; Donald Cerva; Glenn Druckenbrod; Dan Hanfling; Naaz Fatteh; Anthony Napoli; Ashna Nayyar; Elise L. Berman

    The use of anthrax as a weapon of biological terrorism has moved from theory to reality in recent weeks. Following processing of a letter containing anthrax spores that had been mailed to a US senator, 5 cases of inhalational anthrax have occurred among postal workers employed at a major postal facility in Wash- ington, DC. This report details the clinical

  17. Annual Research Review: Attachment Disorders in Early Childhood--Clinical Presentation, Causes, Correlates, and Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeanah, Charles H.; Gleason, Mary Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Background: Though noted in the clinical literature for more than 50 years, attachment disorders have been studied systematically only recently. In part because of the ubiquity of attachments in humans, determining when aberrant behavior is best explained as an attachment disorder as opposed to insecure attachment has led to some confusion. In…

  18. Clinical Profile of Childhood Onset Depression Presenting to Child Adolescent and Family Services in Northampton

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majumder, Pallab; Hammad, Hala

    2006-01-01

    Background: The clinical profile of depressive disorder in children and young people in Child Adolescent and Family Services (CAFS), Northampton was studied. Methods: Twenty-five patients who had attended the CAFS over a period of 2 years were analysed retrospectively. Results: The age range of subjects was 8 to 19 years. Majority of patients were…

  19. Present outlook in bronchiectasis: clinical and social study and review of factors influencing prognosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D A Ellis; P E Thornley; A J Wightman; M Walker; J Chalmers; J W Crofton

    1981-01-01

    One hundred and sixteen patients with proven bronchiectasis diagnosed at least five years previously were studied to determine the clinical outcome, change in pulmonary function, and degree of social disability. Twenty-two patients had died and the mean duration of follow-up in the survivors was 14 years. The patients who died were characterised by a poorer initial ventilatory capacity than the

  20. Post-allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation membranous nephropathy: clinical presentation, outcome and pathogenic aspects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Benjamin Terrier; Yahsou Delmas; Aurelie Hummel; Claire Presne; Francois Glowacki; Bertrand Knebelmann; Christian Combe; Philippe Lesavre; Natacha Maillard; Natahlie Patey-Mariaud de Serre; Sylvie Nusbaum; Isabelle Radford; Agnes Buzyn; Fadi Fakhouri

    2007-01-01

    Background. Post-allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) membranous nephropathy (MN), a rare complication of HSCT, remains an ill- defined entity. We describe the clinical and biological characteristics and outcome of five patients with post- HSCT MN, review the previously reported cases and discuss the pathogenic aspects of this nephropathy. Methods. Cases were identified by using a question- naire sent to

  1. The past, present and future of stem cell clinical trials for ALS.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Gretchen M; Gowing, Genevieve; Svendsen, Soshana; Svendsen, Clive N

    2014-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by progressive degeneration of motor neurons in the cortex, brainstem and spinal cord. This leads to paralysis, respiratory insufficiency and death within an average of 3 to 5 years from disease onset. While the genetics of ALS are becoming more understood in familial cases, the mechanisms underlying disease pathology remain unclear and there are no effective treatment options. Without understanding what causes ALS it is difficult to design treatments. However, in recent years stem cell transplantation has emerged as a potential new therapy for ALS patients. While motor neuron replacement remains a focus of some studies trying to treat ALS with stem cells, there is more rationale for using stem cells as support cells for dying motor neurons as they are already connected to the muscle. This could be through reducing inflammation, releasing growth factors, and other potential less understood mechanisms. Prior to moving into patients, stringent pre-clinical studies are required that have at least some rationale and efficacy in animal models and good safety profiles. However, given our poor understanding of what causes ALS and whether stem cells may ameliorate symptoms, there should be a push to determine cell safety in pre-clinical models and then a quick translation to the clinic where patient trials will show if there is any efficacy. Here, we provide a critical review of current clinical trials using either mesenchymal or neural stem cells to treat ALS patients. Pre-clinical data leading to these trials, as well as those in development are also evaluated in terms of mechanisms of action, validity of conclusions and rationale for advancing stem cell treatment strategies for this devastating disorder. PMID:24613827

  2. Genomic imbalances in patients with a clinical presentation in the spectrum of Cornelia de Lange syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a rare autosomal-dominant disorder characterised by facial dysmorphism, growth and psychomotor developmental delay and skeletal defects. To date, causative mutations in the NIPBL (cohesin regulator) and SMC1A (cohesin structural subunit) genes account for > 50% and 6% of cases, respectively. Methods We recruited 50 patients with a CdLS clinical diagnosis or with features that overlap with CdLS, who were negative for mutations at NIPBL and SMC1A at molecular screening. Chromosomal rearrangements accounting for the clinical diagnosis were screened for using array Comparative Genomic Hybridisation (aCGH). Results Four patients were shown to carry imbalances considered to be candidates for having pathogenic roles in their clinical phenotypes: patient 1 had a 4.2 Mb de novo deletion at chromosome 20q11.2-q12; patient 2 had a 4.8 Mb deletion at chromosome 1p36.23-36.22; patient 3 carried an unbalanced translocation, t(7;17), with a 14 Mb duplication of chromosome 17q24.2-25.3 and a 769 Kb deletion at chromosome 7p22.3; patient 4 had an 880 Kb duplication of chromosome 19p13.3, for which his mother, who had a mild phenotype, was also shown to be a mosaic. Conclusions Notwithstanding the variability in size and gene content of the rearrangements comprising the four different imbalances, they all map to regions containing genes encoding factors involved in cell cycle progression or genome stability. These functional similarities, also exhibited by the known CdLS genes, may explain the phenotypic overlap between the patients included in this study and CdLS. Our findings point to the complexity of the clinical diagnosis of CdLS and confirm the existence of phenocopies, caused by imbalances affecting multiple genomic regions, comprising 8% of patients included in this study, who did not have mutations at NIPBL and SMC1A. Our results suggests that analysis by aCGH should be recommended for CdLS spectrum cases with an unexplained clinical phenotype and included in the flow chart for diagnosis of cases with a clinical evaluation in the CdLS spectrum. PMID:23551878

  3. A review of central retinal artery occlusion: clinical presentation and management

    PubMed Central

    Varma, D D; Cugati, S; Lee, A W; Chen, C S

    2013-01-01

    Central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) is an ophthalmic emergency and the ocular analogue of cerebral stroke. Best evidence reflects that over three-quarters of patients suffer profound acute visual loss with a visual acuity of 20/400 or worse. This results in a reduced functional capacity and quality of life. There is also an increased risk of subsequent cerebral stroke and ischaemic heart disease. There are no current guideline-endorsed therapies, although the use of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been investigated in two randomized controlled trials. This review will describe the pathophysiology, epidemiology, and clinical features of CRAO, and discuss current and future treatments, including the use of tPA in further clinical trials. PMID:23470793

  4. Cancer immunotherapy in clinical practice—the past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Gaurav; Sun, Weijing

    2014-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the field of cancer immunotherapy in recent years. This has been made possible in large part by the identification of new immune-based cellular targets and the development of novel approaches aimed at stimulating the immune system. The role played by the immunosuppressive microenvironment in the development of tumors has been established. The success of checkpoint-inhibiting antibodies and cancer vaccines has marked the beginning of a new era in cancer treatment. This review highlights the clinically relevant principles of cancer immunology and various immunotherapeutic approaches that have either already entered mainstream oncologic practice or are currently in the process of being evaluated in clinical trials. Furthermore, the current barriers to the development of effective immunotherapies and the potential strategies of overcoming them are also discussed. PMID:25189717

  5. Clinical presentation of genetically defined patients with hypokalemic salt-losing tubulopathies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melanie Peters; Nikola Jeck; Stephan Reinalter; Andreas Leonhardt; Burkhard Tönshoff; G. ünter Klaus; Martin Konrad; Hannsjörg W Seyberth

    2002-01-01

    PurposeHypokalemic salt-losing tubulopathies (Bartter-like syndromes) comprise a set of clinically and genetically distinct inherited renal disorders. Mutations in four renal membrane proteins involved in electrolyte reabsorption have been identified in these disorders: the furosemide-sensitive sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter NKCC2, the potassium channel ROMK, the chloride channel ClC-Kb, and the thiazide-sensitive sodium-chloride cotransporter NCCT. The aim of this study was to characterize the

  6. Clinical presentation and management of mTOR inhibitor-associated stomatitis.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Marcio Augusto; Martins E Martins, Fabiana; Wang, Qian; Sonis, Stephen; Demetri, George; George, Suzanne; Butrynski, James; Treister, Nathaniel S

    2011-10-01

    Anti-cancer agents that inhibit the mTOR pathway are associated with a number of unique toxicities, with one of the most significant and potentially dose-limiting being stomatitis. The objective of this study was to report the clinical features and management outcomes of a series of cancer patients who developed painful mTOR inhibitor-associated stomatitis (mIAS). Seventeen cancer patients developed mIAS while being treated with everolimus- or ridaforolimus-containing protocols at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and were referred to the oral medicine clinic for evaluation and management. Clinical characteristics, toxicity management, and outcomes were summarized. In addition, the frequency and rationale for dose reductions and therapy discontinuation were assessed. The median duration of mTOR inhibitor therapy was 80 days (range 9-187 days). The median time to development of mouth ulcers was 10 days (range 4-25 days). Five patients required protocol-directed dose reductions due to grades 2 and 3 stomatitis and one patient discontinued cancer treatment due to mouth ulcers. Clinical improvement and pain relief was reported in 86.6% of patients following topical, intralesional, or systemic corticosteroid therapy, with side effects limited to secondary candidiasis (n=2). Mouth ulcers are a common and potentially dose limiting toxicity associated with the use of mTOR inhibitors in cancer treatment. This case series demonstrates that local and systemic corticosteroid therapy is an effective approach to managing patients with symptomatic mIAS. Prospective studies are necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment and prevention strategies with the ultimate goal of improving overall cancer treatment outcomes. PMID:21890398

  7. Combined methylmalonic acidemia and homocystinuria, cblC type. I. Clinical presentations, diagnosis and management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nuria Carrillo-Carrasco; Randy J. Chandler; Charles P. Venditti

    Combined methylmalonic acidemia and homocystinuria, cblC type, is an inborn error of intracellular cobalamin metabolism with\\u000a a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations that is stated to be the most common inherited disorder of cobalamin metabolism.\\u000a This metabolic disease is caused by mutations in the MMACHC gene and results in impaired intracellular synthesis of adenosylcobalamin and methylcobalamin, cofactors for the methylmalonyl-CoA

  8. Chronic idiopathic polyneuropathy presenting in middle or old age: a clinical and electrophysiological study of 75 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Notermans, N C; Wokke, J H; Franssen, H; van der Graaf, Y; Vermeulen, M; van den Berg, L H; Bär, P R; Jennekens, F G

    1993-01-01

    The clinical and electrophysiological features were prospectively studied of 75 patients (46 men and 29 women) with chronic polyneuropathy presenting in middle or old age in whom a diagnosis could not be made even after extensive evaluation and a follow up of six months. The mean age at the onset of symptoms was 56.5 years. The clinical features of chronic idiopathic polyneuropathy are heterogeneous. On clinical grounds 44 patients had a sensorimotor, 29 patients a sensory, and two patients a motor polyneuropathy. The overall clinical course in chronic idiopathic polyneuropathy was slowly progressive. None of the patients became severely disabled. Electrophysiological and nerve biopsy studies were compatible with an axonal polyneuropathy. Antibodies against myelin associated glycoprotein, gangliosides, and sulphatides were assessed in 70 patients and found to be negative. PMID:7691991

  9. The association between orthostatic hypotension and recurrent falls in nursing home residents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wee L Ooi; Monir Hossain; Lewis A Lipsitz

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Orthostatic hypotension is common among the elderly, but its relation to falls is not certain. We determined whether orthostatic hypotension, including its timing and frequency, was associated with falls in elderly nursing home residents.SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We conducted a prospective study of 844 elderly (60 years of age and older), long-stay residents at 40 facilities that were part of

  10. Shy-Drager Syndrome and Severe Unexplained Intraoperative Hypotension Responsive to Vasopressin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ricardo Vallejo; Gerard DeSouza; Jong Lee

    2002-01-01

    he cause of intraoperative hypotension is often multifactorial, including, for example, myocar- dial depression, hypovolemia, anesthetic over- dose, infection, autoimmune reactions, and endocrine disorders. We describe a case in which a patient pre- sented with severe intraoperative hypertension. The patient received labetalol and, subsequently, hydral- azine. Profound hypotension followed hydralazine administration which was unresponsive to IV fluid, ephedrine, and phenylephrine

  11. Effects of exercise conditioning on semen characteristics from hyper? and hypotensive lines of turkeys

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. M. Krista; E. E. M. Pierson; G. R. McDaniel; E. C. Mora; J. A. McGuire; S. L. Bolden; L. E. Miller

    1985-01-01

    1. Twenty?one male Broad Breasted White turkeys which had been selected for high or low blood pressure were put on an exercise regimen to determine its effect on semen quality. Eleven were from the hypertensive line and 10 from the hypotensive line.2. Eleven (6 hypertensive and 5 hypotensive) turkeys were placed on an exercise regime of walking (herding) about 1

  12. Group B streptococcal disease: its diagnosis with the use of antigen detection, Gram's stain, and the presence of apnea, hypotension.

    PubMed

    Ingram, D L; Pendergrass, E L; Bromberger, P I; Thullen, J D; Yoder, C D; Collier, A M

    1980-08-01

    Antigen detection was found to be a rapid and useful technique in diagnosing group B streptococcal (GBS) infections. Of the two techniques described, latex agglutination was more sensitive than countercurrent immunoelectrophoresis. Concentrated urine was the best body fluid to test with 100% containing antigen. Though no false-positive reactions were noted, this is a potential problem. Gram-positive cocci in the gastric aspirate were associated with severe systemic infections with these organisms in almost half of the neonates with clinical signs of infection or respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). There was only a 4% infection rate in clinically similar neonates without Gram-positive cocci in the gastric aspirates. Apnea and/or hypotension was seen commonly in both early onset GBS pneumonia and RDS, making this finding alone of little clinical use. PMID:6996474

  13. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension from calcified thoracic disc protrusions causing CSF leak successfully treated with targeted epidural blood patch.

    PubMed

    Allmendinger, Andrew M; Lee, Thomas C

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks are increasingly recognized in patients presenting with orthostatic headache and ultimately diagnosed with intracranial hypotension. While the precise cause of these spontaneous leaks is unknown, it is thought to result from underlying weakness in the spinal meninges and may be associated with meningeal diverticula or Tarlov cysts. Rarely, calcified intervertebral discs or bony osteophytes can result in CSF leakage, which has been described in the surgery literature but not well recognized in the radiology literature. The authors present three cases of patients presenting with CSF leaks from calcified thoracic disc protrusions that were successfully treated with epidural blood patches. PMID:23395554

  14. Prevalence and clinical presentation of Cryptococcal meningitis among HIV seropositive patients.

    PubMed

    Baradkar, Vasant; Mathur, M; De, A; Kumar, S; Rathi, M

    2009-01-01

    A total of 573 HIV seropositive and clinically suspected cases of Cryptococcal meningitis were included in the study, from January 2006 to January 2007. CSF samples were processed by negative staining with 10% Nigrosin, cultured on Sabouraud's dextrose agar, biochemical tests, such as urease test and brownish growth in Niger seed agar. The prevalence of Cryptococcal meningitis was found to be 2.79%. The most common signs and symptoms were: fever (100%), headache (100%), altered sensorium (100%), and neck stiffness (90%). All the patients responded to intravenous Amphotericin B treatment. PMID:21938109

  15. Clinical presentations of severe cutaneous drug reactions in HIV-infected Africans.

    PubMed

    Lehloenya, Rannakoe J; Kgokolo, Mahlatse

    2014-04-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa is the epicenter of the HIV pandemic and HIV-infected people are more susceptible to inflammatory dermatoses, infections, and drug eruptions. Many of the drugs used for HIV-associated opportunistic infections are associated with a higher incidence of drug-related toxicities and drug interactions. This article discusses the epidemiology, pharmacogenetics, and clinical features of idiosyncratic drug reactions in HIV-infected Africans. Special considerations in this population, including immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, multiple drug hypersensitivity syndrome, drug reactions in pregnancy, drug rechallenge in lichenoid drug eruptions, and anxiety/depression after cutaneous adverse drug reactions, are also briefly discussed. PMID:24680008

  16. Antinuclear antibody determination: the present state of diagnostic and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Smeenk, R; Westgeest, T; Swaak, T

    1985-01-01

    Determination of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) will gain in diagnostic significance if a specific type of ANA can be related to a defined clinical disorder. The past decade has brought us quite a lot of papers dedicated to this subject. Yet, with exception of the DNA/anti-DNA system, observed correlations have remained scarce or contradictory. Also, still little is known about the pathogenic role of ANA. Perhaps more recent approaches using biochemical technologies will provide us with highly purified nuclear antigens necessary to study possible correlations at a more sophisticated level. PMID:3890156

  17. An Unusual Clinical Presentation of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in a Sudanese Refugee

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carlos Franco-Paredes

    2010-01-01

    Some anxiety disorders may present with signs and symptoms that may linger many years after the stress-inducer events and\\u000a threat has passed. A case of posttraumatic stress disorder is presented in this report of a Sudanese refugee presenting with\\u000a chronic abdominal and lower back pain. PTSD in refugees may present with typical or atypical manifestations such as chronic\\u000a pain syndromes.

  18. Exome sequencing and directed clinical phenotyping diagnose cholesterol ester storage disease presenting as autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Stitziel, Nathan O.; Fouchier, Sigrid W.; Sjouke, Barbara; Peloso, Gina M.; Moscoso, Alessa M.; Auer, Paul L.; Goel, Anuj; Gigante, Bruna; Barnes, Timothy A.; Melander, Olle; Orho-Melander, Marju; Duga, Stefano; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Nikpay, Majid; Martinelli, Nicola; Girelli, Domenico; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Kooperberg, Charles; Lange, Leslie A.; Ardissino, Diego; McPherson, Ruth; Farrall, Martin; Watkins, Hugh; Reilly, Muredach P.; Rader, Daniel J.; de Faire, Ulf; Schunkert, Heribert; Erdmann, Jeanette; Samani, Nilesh J.; Charnas, Lawrence; Altshuler, David; Gabriel, Stacey; Kastelein, John J.P.; Defesche, Joep C.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Hovingh, G. Kees

    2014-01-01

    Objective Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia (ARH) is a rare inherited disorder characterized by extremely high total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels that has been previously linked to mutations in LDLRAP1. We identified a family with ARH not explained by mutations in LDLRAP1 or other genes known to cause monogenic hypercholesterolemia. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular etiology of ARH in this family. Approach and Results We used exome sequencing to assess all protein coding regions of the genome in three family members and identified a homozygous exon 8 splice junction mutation (c.894G>A, also known as E8SJM) in LIPA that segregated with the diagnosis of hypercholesterolemia. Since homozygosity for mutations in LIPA is known to cause cholesterol ester storage disease (CESD), we performed directed follow-up phenotyping by non-invasively measuring hepatic cholesterol content. We observed abnormal hepatic accumulation of cholesterol in the homozygote individuals, supporting the diagnosis of CESD. Given previous suggestions of cardiovascular disease risk in heterozygous LIPA mutation carriers, we genotyped E8SJM in >27,000 individuals and found no association with plasma lipid levels or risk of myocardial infarction, confirming a true recessive mode of inheritance. Conclusions By integrating observations from Mendelian and population genetics along with directed clinical phenotyping, we diagnosed clinically unapparent CESD in the affected individuals from this kindred and addressed an outstanding question regarding risk of cardiovascular disease in LIPA E8SJM heterozygous carriers. PMID:24072694

  19. Clinical and electrophysiological features in a French family presenting with seipinopathy.

    PubMed

    Ollivier, Yolaine; Magot, Armelle; Latour, Philippe; Perrier, Julie; Mercier, Sandra; Maisonobe, Thierry; Péréon, Yann

    2015-02-01

    Seipinopathies are a group of inherited diseases affecting upper and lower motor neurons due to mutations in the Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy 2 gene (BSCL2). We report a French family carrying the N88S mutation in the BSCL2 gene. A 12-yr-old girl complained of bilateral asymmetrical pes cavus with right hand motor deficit and amyotrophy, asymmetrical leg amyotrophy and pyramidal signs. Electrophysiological examination showed axonal asymmetrical motor neuropathy with distal predominance. Her father complained of right hand rest tremor with bilateral hand weakness. Physical examination revealed left leg, hand and forearm amyotrophy, akinesia and right arm rigidity, brisk reflexes in the lower limbs and bilateral Babinski sign. Nerve conduction studies showed distal asymmetrical axonal neuropathy with slight sensitive impairment with moderate decrease of nerve conduction velocity in some nerves. DNA sequencing revealed the presence of the known N88S mutation in the BSCL2 gene (dideoxy-nucleotide method on a 3730 DNA Analyzer, Life Technologies). BSCL2 gene mutations are associated with a wide spectrum of clinical and electrophysiological phenotypes and should be suspected in cases of distal hereditary motor neuropathy with pyramidal signs or early hand involvement. There may also be associated mild demyelination which may vary in severity within the same family. Clinical diagnosis was more difficult in this particular case due to the association with Parkinson symptoms. PMID:25454168

  20. Brain MRI findings in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis types I and II and mild clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Matheus, M Gisele; Castillo, Mauricio; Smith, J Keith; Armao, Diane; Towle, Diane; Muenzer, Joseph

    2004-08-01

    Our objective was to determine the brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities in a selected group of patients with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) types I and II who had only mild clinical manifestations. We retrospectively assessed MRI brain studies in 18 patients with MPS (type I: 6 and type II: 12). We evaluated abnormal signal intensity in the white matter, widening of the cortical sulci, size of the supratentorial ventricles, dilatation of the perivascular spaces (PVS) and enlargement of the subarachnoid spaces. We observed a broad spectrum of findings, and despite severely abnormal MRI studies, no patients had mental retardation. We also observed that dilated PVS, previously believed to be caused by macroscopic deposition of the mucopolysaccharides, had an appearance similar to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in all MRI sequences performed, even in FLAIR and trace diffusion weighted images. Based on our results, we believe that with the exception of white matter abnormalities and brain atrophy, all other findings may be related to abnormal resorption of CSF, and there is no relationship between the imaging and clinical manifestations of the disease. PMID:15205860

  1. Between clinical medicine and the laboratory: medical research funding in France from 1945 to the present.

    PubMed

    Esterle, Laurence; Picard, Jean-François

    2011-10-01

    By focusing on funding methods, this paper considers the way in which medical research eventually led to the science-based medicine that is prevalent in France today. This process seems to have taken place in three stages during the second half of the twentieth century. In the 1940s and 1950s, two major events occurred. The first was the creation of a national health insurance fund in France, which opened up new reasons for, and ways of, funding medical research. The second was the development of antibiotics, which triggered a revival of clinical medicine. In the 1960s and 1970s, a proactive government science policy allowed the life sciences and medical research to come together in the wake of a burgeoning new science: molecular biology. Thus, in 1964, the creation of the National Health and Medical Research Institute (Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale or INSERM), destined to "molecularize" medical research, was seen as the fulfillment of the government's ambitious research policy. Today, with medicine irreversibly embedded in scientific and technical rationality, health has become a major issue in modern societies. This paper therefore touches on some of the key features of biomedical research, including the revival of funding systems for clinical research and the development of a system of research grants that was made possible by patient organizations and the creation of new funding agencies. PMID:21037320

  2. Idiopathic bile acid malabsorption--a review of clinical presentation, diagnosis, and response to treatment.

    PubMed

    Williams, A J; Merrick, M V; Eastwood, M A

    1991-09-01

    Between 1982 and 1989, the seven day retention of 75SeHCAT was measured in 181 patients with chronic diarrhoea that remained unexplained after full investigation. Altogether 121 of the 181 had a seven day 75SeHCAT retention greater than or equal to 15% and thus had no evidence of abnormal bile acid turnover. Twenty one had a seven day 75SeHCAT retention greater than or equal to 10% but less than 15%. Their clinical features were typical of the irritable bowel syndrome, and none of eight treated with cholestyramine showed symptomatic improvement. Sixteen patients had a seven day retention greater than or equal to 5% and less than 10%, six of whom had improved symptoms after treatment with bile acid chelating agents. The remaining 23 patients had a 75SeHCAT retention of less than 5% at seven days and responded to bile acid chelators. This group had a characteristic illness with intermittent watery diarrhoea, but no constitutional upset. It was not possible to distinguish the patients with bile acid malabsorption exclusively on the basis of the clinical symptoms and investigations, other than 75SeHCAT retention. We conclude that the measurement of 75SeHCAT retention is useful, appropriate, and necessary in patients with unexplained chronic diarrhoea. PMID:1916479

  3. Idiopathic bile acid malabsorption--a review of clinical presentation, diagnosis, and response to treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, A J; Merrick, M V; Eastwood, M A

    1991-01-01

    Between 1982 and 1989, the seven day retention of 75SeHCAT was measured in 181 patients with chronic diarrhoea that remained unexplained after full investigation. Altogether 121 of the 181 had a seven day 75SeHCAT retention greater than or equal to 15% and thus had no evidence of abnormal bile acid turnover. Twenty one had a seven day 75SeHCAT retention greater than or equal to 10% but less than 15%. Their clinical features were typical of the irritable bowel syndrome, and none of eight treated with cholestyramine showed symptomatic improvement. Sixteen patients had a seven day retention greater than or equal to 5% and less than 10%, six of whom had improved symptoms after treatment with bile acid chelating agents. The remaining 23 patients had a 75SeHCAT retention of less than 5% at seven days and responded to bile acid chelators. This group had a characteristic illness with intermittent watery diarrhoea, but no constitutional upset. It was not possible to distinguish the patients with bile acid malabsorption exclusively on the basis of the clinical symptoms and investigations, other than 75SeHCAT retention. We conclude that the measurement of 75SeHCAT retention is useful, appropriate, and necessary in patients with unexplained chronic diarrhoea. PMID:1916479

  4. Cantharidin Poisoning due to Blister Beetle Ingestion in Children: Two case reports and a review of clinical presentations.

    PubMed

    Al-Binali, Ali M; Shabana, Medhat; Al-Fifi, Suliman; Dawood, Sami; Shehri, Amer A; Al-Barki, Ahmed

    2010-08-01

    Cantharidin is an intoxicant found in beetles in the Meloidae (Coleoptera) family. Ingestion may result in haematemesis, impaired level of consciousness, electrolyte disturbance, haematurea and renal impairment. Here, we report two paediatric cases of meloid beetle ingestion resulting in cantharidin poisoning and the clinical presentation of the ensuing intoxication. PMID:21509239

  5. Vascular leiomyoma of the oral cavity. Clinical, histopathological and immunohistochemical characteristics. Presentation of five cases and review of the literature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luis Alberto Gaitan Cepeda; Daniel Quezada River; Fernando Tenorio Rocha; Elba Rosa; Leyva Huerta; Edgar Ramiro; Mendez Sánchez

    Leiomyoma, a benign neoplasia arising from smooth muscle is an uncommon neoplasia of the oral cavity. The most common histological subtype in the oral cavity is the vascular one. To supplement information on vascular leiomyoma of the oral cavity (VLOC), we present cases of VLOC describing their clinical, histological, and immunohistochemical characteristics. Case reports. Five cases of VLOC (3 females;

  6. Clinical Predictors of Acute Kidney Injury Following Snake Bite Envenomation

    PubMed Central

    Dharod, Mrudul V; Patil, Tushar B; Deshpande, Archana S; Gulhane, Ragini V; Patil, Mangesh B; Bansod, Yogendra V

    2013-01-01

    Background: Snake bite envenomation is a major public health concern in developing countries. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is as important cause of mortality in patients with vasculotoxic snake bite. Aims: This study was to evaluate the clinical profile of snake bite patients and to determine the predictors of developing AKI following snake bite. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and eighty-one patients with snake envenomation were included. Eighty-seven patients developed AKI (Group A) and 194 (Group B) did not. History, examination findings and investigations results were recorded and compared between the two groups. Results: In group A, 61 (70.11%) patients were male and in group B, 117 (60.30%) patients were male. Out of 281 patients, 232 had cellulitis, 113 had bleeding tendencies, 87 had oliguria, 76 had neuroparalysis, and 23 had hypotension at presentation. After multivariate analysis, bite to hospital time (P = 0.016), hypotension (P = 0.000), albuminuria (P = 0.000), bleeding time (P = 0.000), prothrombin time (P = 0.000), hemoglobin (P = 0.000) and total bilirubin (P = 0.010) were significant independent predictors of AKI. Conclusions: AKI developed in 30.96% of patients with snake bite, leading to mortality in 39.08% patients. Factors associated with AKI are bite to hospital time, hypotension, albuminuria, prolonged bleeding time, prolonged prothrombin time, low hemoglobin and a high total bilirubin. PMID:24350071

  7. Hotline sessions and clinical trial updates presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress in Stockholm 2010.

    PubMed

    Lenski, Matthias; Mahfoud, Felix; Werner, Christian; Bauer, Axel; Böhm, Michael

    2010-11-01

    This article gives an overview on several novel clinical trials in the field of cardiovascular (CV) medicine which were presented during the hotline sessions and clinical trial updates at the European Society of Cardiology Congress, held in Stockholm, Sweden, from 28th August to 1st September 2010. The data have been presented by leading experts in the accordant field with relevant positions in the trials. Unpublished reports should be considered as preliminary data as the analysis may change in the final publications. The summaries presented in the manuscript were generated from the oral presentations and should provide the readers with the most comprehensive information on diagnostic and therapeutic development in CV medicine similar as previously reported Schirmer SH et al. PMID:20890707

  8. Clinical applications for magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU): present and future.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Samantha; Rieke, Viola; Kohi, Maureen; Westphalen, Antonio C

    2013-08-01

    It has been well known for decades that high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) generates heat in tissues resulting in coagulative necrosis. Implementation, however, has been slow, due to difficulties with finding an appropriate imaging modality that could not only guide treatment, but also provide real-time thermal feedback. These problems have been overcome with the newest magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound systems (MRgHIFU). With its superior spatial resolution enabling accurate image guidance coupled with its ability to provide real-time thermography during treatments, MRI is moving further into the realm of therapeutics for oncologic patient care. This article will discuss the implementation of an MR-guided HIFU system, current clinical indications and touch on future directions. PMID:23870333

  9. Pulmonary Embolism in Ischemic Stroke: Clinical Presentation, Risk Factors, and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Pongmoragot, Jitphapa; Rabinstein, Alejandro A.; Nilanont, Yongchai; Swartz, Richard H.; Zhou, Limei; Saposnik, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    Background Limited information is available on the frequency of pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients with an acute ischemic stroke (AIS). We evaluated clinical characteristics, predisposing factors, and outcomes in AIS patients with PE. Methods and Results We included all AIS patients admitted to participating institutions in the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network. Clinically PE was documented by a physician and confirmed by computed tomography pulmonary angiography within 30 days of the stroke case index. The primary outcome was death or disability at discharge. Secondary outcomes included disposition, length of hospital stay, mortality at 3 months and 1 year. Among 11 287 patients with AIS, PE was found in 89 (0.78%) patients. History of cancer, deep vein thrombosis (DVT)/PE, and DVT during the hospitalization were associated with PE. PE was associated with higher risk of death at 30 days (25.8% versus 13.6%; P<0.001), at 1 year (47.2% versus 24.6%; P<0.001), and disability at discharge (85.4% versus 63.6%; P<0.001). Mean length of stay was longer in stroke patients with PE (36 versus 16 days; P=0.001). After adjusting for age, sex, and stroke severity, PE remained associated with lower survival at 30 days and 1 year, and death or disability at discharge (OR 3.02; 95% CI 1.56 to 5.83). Conclusions In this large cohort study, PE occurred in nearly 1% of AIS patients. PE was more common in patients with severe stroke, history of cancer, previous DVT/PE or acute DVT and associated with lower short? and long?term survival, greater disability, and longer length of stay. PMID:24275627

  10. Reward-Related Decision Making in Older Adults: Relationship to Clinical Presentation of Depression

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, Amanda R.; Alexopoulos, George S.; Yuen, Genevieve S.; Morimoto, Sarah Shizuko; Gunning, Faith M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Impairment in reward processes has been found in individuals with depression and in the aging population. The purpose of this study was twofold: 1. To use an affective neuroscience probe to identify abnormalities in reward-related decision making in late-life depression. 2. To examine the relationship of reward-related decision making abnormalities in depressed, older adults to the clinical expression of apathy in depression. We hypothesized that relative to elderly, healthy subjects, depressed, elderly patients would exhibit impaired decision making and that apathetic, depressed patients would show greater impairment in decision making than non-apathetic, depressed patients. Methods We used the Iowa Gambling Task to examine reward-related decision making in 60 non-demented, elderly patients with non-psychotic major depression and 36 elderly, psychiatrically healthy participants. Apathy was quantified using the Apathy Evaluation Scale. Of those with major depression, 18 individuals reported clinically significant apathy whereas 42 participants did not have apathy. Results Older adults with depression and healthy comparison participants did not differ in their performance on the IGT. However, apathetic, depressed older adults adopted an advantageous strategy and selected cards from the conservative decks compared to non-apathetic, depressed older adults. Non-apathetic, depressed patients showed a failure to adopt a conservative strategy and persisted in making risky decisions throughout the task. Conclusions This study indicates that apathy in older, depressed adults is associated with a conservative response style on a behavioral probe of the systems involved in reward-related decision making. This conservative response style may be the result of reduced sensitivity to rewards in apathetic individuals. PMID:25306937

  11. The Many Faces of Celiac Disease: Clinical Presentation of Celiac Disease in the Adult Population

    Microsoft Academic Search

    PETER H. R. GREEN

    2005-01-01

    The major modes of presentation of patients with celiac disease are the classic diarrhea-predominant form and silent celiac disease. Those with silent celiac disease lack diarrhea, although they may present with manifestations of celiac disease that include an irritable bowel syndrome, anemia, osteoporosis, neurologic diseases, or malignancy. A significant proportion of patients are diagnosed through screening at-risk groups including relatives

  12. Alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency due to Pi null: clinical presentation and evidence for molecular heterogeneity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F J Bamforth; N A Kalsheker

    1988-01-01

    The proteinase inhibitor null (Pi-) allele is a rare cause of alpha 1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency. In three families, all the subjects with AAT deficiency due to PiZ- presented in early childhood with recurrent chest infections and wheezing presumably related to passive smoking. In Pi- the AAT gene is present and there is no evidence for a gene deletion. In

  13. Diagnosis, Clinical Presentation, and In-Hospital Mortality of Severe Malaria in HIV-Coinfected Children and Adults in Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksen, Ilse C. E.; Ferro, Josefo; Montoya, Pablo; Chhaganlal, Kajal D.; Seni, Amir; Gomes, Ermelinda; Silamut, Kamolrat; Lee, Sue J.; Lucas, Marcelino; Chotivanich, Kesinee; Fanello, Caterina I.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; White, Nicholas J.; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Dondorp, Arjen M.

    2012-01-01

    Background.?Severe falciparum malaria with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection is common in settings with a high prevalence of both diseases, but there is little information on whether HIV affects the clinical presentation and outcome of severe malaria. Methods.?HIV status was assessed prospectively in hospitalized parasitemic adults and children with severe malaria in Beira, Mozambique, as part of a clinical trial comparing parenteral artesunate versus quinine (ISRCTN50258054). Clinical signs, comorbidity, complications, and disease outcome were compared according to HIV status. Results.?HIV-1 seroprevalence was 11% (74/655) in children under 15 years and 72% (49/68) in adults with severe malaria. Children with HIV coinfection presented with more severe acidosis, anemia, and respiratory distress, and higher peripheral blood parasitemia and plasma Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein-2 (PfHRP2). During hospitalization, deterioration in coma score, convulsions, respiratory distress, and pneumonia were more common in HIV-coinfected children, and mortality was 26% (19/74) versus 9% (53/581) in uninfected children (P < .001). In an age- and antimalarial treatment–adjusted logistic regression model, significant, independent predictors for death were renal impairment, acidosis, parasitemia, and plasma PfHRP2 concentration. Conclusions.?Severe malaria in HIV-coinfected patients presents with higher parasite burden, more complications, and comorbidity, and carries a higher case fatality rate. Early identification of HIV coinfection is important for the clinical management of severe malaria. PMID:22752514

  14. Stromal prostatic sarcoma: a rare tumor with rare clinical and imaging presentation.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Jiménez, Anamaría; Otero-Garcia, Milagros; Mateos-Martin, Alejandro

    2013-07-01

    Adult prostatic stromal sarcoma is a rare malignant tumor. The main presenting symptom is urinary retention secondary to bladder outlet obstruction. Prostatic Specific Antigen level can be normal. Imaging features show a prostate mass with or without pelvic organ invasion depending on the aggressiveness of the tumor. We present a patient with prostatic stromal sarcoma who debuted with urinary obstruction, leukocytosis and neutrophilia, prostate enlargement, and hypodense prostate areas on CT images, simulating prostatitis with abscess formation. PMID:24421945

  15. Stromal prostatic sarcoma: a rare tumor with rare clinical and imaging presentation

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Jiménez, Anamaría; Otero-Garcia, Milagros; Mateos-Martin, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Adult prostatic stromal sarcoma is a rare malignant tumor. The main presenting symptom is urinary retention secondary to bladder outlet obstruction. Prostatic Specific Antigen level can be normal. Imaging features show a prostate mass with or without pelvic organ invasion depending on the aggressiveness of the tumor. We present a patient with prostatic stromal sarcoma who debuted with urinary obstruction, leukocytosis and neutrophilia, prostate enlargement, and hypodense prostate areas on CT images, simulating prostatitis with abscess formation. PMID:24421945

  16. Clinical and Genetic Characteristics of Mexican Patients with Juvenile Presentation of Niemann-Pick Type C Disease

    PubMed Central

    Piña-Aguilar, Raul E.; Vera-Loaiza, Aurea; Chacón-Camacho, Oscar F.; Zenteno, Juan Carlos; Nuñez-Orozco, Lilia; Santillán-Hernández, Yuritzi

    2014-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C disease (NPC) is a rare lysosomal disease with a protean presentation, ranging from a fatal neonatal course with visceromegaly to an adult presentation with only neurological or psychiatric symptomatology. In this report we describe the genetic and clinical characteristics of 3 Mexican patients from different families with juvenile presentation of NPC. Clinical examination, imaging of central nervous and gastrointestinal system, and EEG were performed. Genetic studies include sequencing and deletion/duplication analysis of NPC1 and NPC2 genes. All patients presented with cognitive impairment, ataxia, and supranuclear vertical gaze palsy; one case had gelastic cataplexy. Also they developed epilepsy and cortical atrophy and two patients had thinning of corpus callosum. The 3 patients were compound heterozygotes for NPC1 sequence variants, including 5 missense and 1 nonsense mutations: p.P1007A and p.F1087L in Case 1; p.Q921P and p.G992R in Case 2; and p.R348? and p.V1165M in case 3. Mexican patients with juvenile NPC presented with a variable clinical phenotype and compound heterozygosity. This suggests a relative high frequency of mutation carriers as it is reported for European population. Consequently, clinicians should consider NPC as a diagnosis possibility in any adolescent or young adult patient with juvenile dementia and/or ataxia, even in absence of gelastic cataplexy and supranuclear vertical gaze palsy. PMID:25349751

  17. Nitric oxide does not contribute to the hypotension of heatstroke.

    PubMed

    Ryan, K L; Tehrany, M R; Jauchem, J R

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether nitric oxide (NO) contributes to the hypotensive state induced by prolonged environmental heat (EH) stress. Ketamine-anesthetized rats were instrumented for the measurement of arterial blood pressure, electrocardiogram, and temperature at four sites. Rats were exposed to EH (ambient temperature, 40 +/- 1 degrees C) until mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) decreased to 75 mmHg, which was arbitrarily defined as the induction of heatstroke. In addition to cardiovascular and temperature measurements, the time required to reach this MAP end point and the subsequent survival time were measured. In three separate experimental series, the competitive NO synthesis inhibitor N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) was administered (0, 10, or 100 mg/kg) either before, during (30 min after initiation of EH), or immediately after EH. L-NAME administered at any of these times transiently increased MAP. L-NAME infusion either before or during EH did not alter the EH time required to decrease MAP to 75 mmHg, but L-NAME pretreatment did decrease the colonic temperature at which this MAP end point was reached. L-NAME infusion before or after EH did not affect subsequent survival time, but L-NAME administered during EH significantly decreased survival time. The administration of L-NAME at any time point, therefore, did not prove beneficial in either preventing or reversing heatstroke. Taken together, these data suggest that NO does not mediate the hypotension associated with heatstroke. PMID:11181607

  18. Clinical application of Electrical Impedance Tomography in the Present Health Scenario of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborti, K. L., Dr; Selvamurthy, W., Dr

    2010-04-01

    Early detection of Breast Cancer is currently emerging as a big clinical entity requiring a non invasive, radiation less, harmless, cost effective diagnostic technique. Survival is improved if detected early. Breast Cancer is the second most common cancer in India. Health corporate system of India is urgently requiring a cost effective, noninvasive novel technique like "Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT)" for screening large poor rural population of India for early diagnosis of Breast Cancer. EIT is the technique to visualize spatial distribution of Electro-impedance (or conductivity) inside the object, such as human body. A medical device which allows imaging of the distribution of conductivity in 3D in regions below the skin surface has been developed and tested. Its purpose is to enable early detection and preliminary diagnosis of breast tumors. The system uses a planar array consisting of 256 electrodes and enables obtaining images of the three-dimensional conductivity distribution in regions below the skin's surface up to several centimeters deep. The developed measuring system and image reconstruction algorithm can be used for breast tissue imaging and diagnostic, in particular for malignant tumor detection. Initially ten patients as control and ten patients with breast lesions have been studied with this new technique. It was found that electrical impedance mammograms from different groups has clear visual distinctions and statistically significant difference in breast glands conductivity. The results are quiet encouraging. EIT may emerge as the first line noninvasive imaging method of choice for screening large population for early detection of breast cancer.

  19. Clinical and research measurement techniques of the pulmonary circulation: the present and the future.

    PubMed

    Naeije, Robert; D'Alto, Michele; Forfia, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    There has been a lot of progress in measurement techniques of the pulmonary circulation in recent years, and this has required updating of basic physiological knowledge. Pulmonary artery pressures (PAP) are normally low and dependent on left atrial pressure (LAP) and cardiac output (CO). Therefore, defining the functional state of the pulmonary circulation for the detection of pulmonary vascular disease or evaluation of disease progression requires measurements of PAP, LAP and CO. Invasive measurements have lately improved by a better definition of zero leveling and of the effects of intrathoracic pressure changes, and understanding of the inherent limitations of fluid-filled thermodilution catheters. The effects of LAP and pulmonary flow on PAP in health and disease are now integrated in the hemodynamic diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension. Development of alternative noninvasive approaches is critically dependent on their potential to quantify pulmonary vascular pressures and CO. Doppler echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging are coming close. Both approaches are performant for flow measurements, but pressures remain indirectly assessed from flow velocities and/or structural changes. Doppler echocardiography or magnetic resonance imaging has been shown to be accurate, allowing for valid population studies, but with insufficient precision for single number-derived clinical decision making. PMID:25534670

  20. Collagenous colitis: a retrospective study of clinical presentation and treatment in 163 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bohr, J; Tysk, C; Eriksson, S; Abrahamsson, H; Järnerot, G

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data on collagenous colitis have been based on a limited number of patients. AIMS: To obtain more information on this disease from a register set up at Orebro Medical Center Hospital. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty five Swedish hospitals have contributed to this patient register, which comprises 163 histopathologically verified cases. Clinical data were retrospectively analysed. RESULTS: Collagenous colitis followed a chronic intermittent course in most cases (85%) with a sudden onset in 42%. Symptoms were chronic watery diarrhoea, often nocturnal (27%), abdominal pain (41%), and weight loss (42%). Sixty six patients (40%) had one or more associated diseases. Routine laboratory data were mostly normal. The median age at diagnosis was 55 (range 16-86) years, but 25% of the patients were younger than 45 years. Seven patients died of unrelated diseases. The response rate for sulphasalazine was 59%, and 50% and 40% for mesalazine and olsalazine. Prednisolone was most effective with a response rate of 82%, but the required dose was often high and the effect was not sustained after withdrawal. Antibiotics were efficient in 63%. Cholestyramine and loperamide had response rates of 59% and 71% respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Collagenous colitis follows a chronic continuous course. Symptoms can be socially disabling, but the disease does not seem to have a malignant potential. A plan for the treatment of a newly diagnosed patient with collagenous colitis is proposed. PMID:9038667

  1. Persistence and Prognostic Implications of Orthostatic Hypotension in Older Individuals with Mild-to-Moderate Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Soennesyn, Hogne; Dalen, Ingvild; Aarsland, Dag

    2014-01-01

    Aim To study the course and prognostic implications of orthostatic hypotension (OH) in older individuals with mild-to-moderate dementia. Methods Referrals to outpatient clinics specialising in old age psychiatry and geriatric medicine in the counties of Rogaland and Hordaland in western Norway with a first-time diagnosis of mild dementia were consecutively asked for inclusion. A total of 211 participants underwent a comprehensive baseline assessment with annual follow-ups. Patients with OH at both baseline and the 1-year follow-up were classified as having persistent OH. Outcome measures were the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Clinical Dementia Rating sum of boxes (CDR-SB), and time to death. Results From baseline to the 4-year follow-up, 30-45% of the participants had OH at each follow-up. In multivariable analysis, persistent OH was not significantly associated with either the longitudinal course of MMSE or CDR-SB scores or survival. Conclusions OH was moderately prevalent over 4 years in older individuals with mild dementia, and persistent OH did not predict either cognitive or functional decline or survival.

  2. Hypotensive and sympathoinhibitory responses to selective central AT2 receptor stimulation in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Brouwers, Sofie; Smolders, Ilse; Wainford, Richard D; Dupont, Alain G

    2015-07-01

    The type 2 angiotensin receptor (AT2R) has been suggested to counterbalance the type 1 angiotensin receptor (AT1R) in the central regulation of blood pressure and sympathetic tone. In the present study we investigated the blood pressure responses to stimulation of central AT2Rs by the selective agonist Compound 21 in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY rats). We also assessed the impact on noradrenaline [norepinephrine (NE)] plasma levels, autonomic function, spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity, and the possible involvement of the nitric oxide (NO) pathway and the AT1Rs. Chronic intracerebroventricular Compound 21 infusion lowered blood pressure and NE plasma levels in both rat strains. The night-time hypotensive effect was greater in SHRs compared with WKY rats. Compound 21 improved spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity more in SHRs than in WKY rats. These effects were abolished by co-administration of the AT2R antagonist PD123319 or the NO synthase inhibitor N?-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME). Central AT1R blockade did not enhance the hypotensive response to Compound 21. Chronic selective stimulation of central AT2Rs lowers blood pressure through sympathoinhibition, and improves spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity more in SHRs than in WKY rats. These responses appear to require a functioning central NO pathway, but are not modified by central AT1R blockade. Collectively, the data demonstrate specific beneficial effects of stimulation of central AT2Rs in hypertension associated with increased sympathetic tone, and suggest that central AT2Rs may represent a potential new therapeutic target for the treatment of neurogenic hypertension. PMID:25655919

  3. [Treatment of spontaneous intracranial hypotension with continuous epidural saline infusion: a case report].

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, S; Yamamoto, Y; Sunami, N; Suga, M; Mizumatsu, S; Inoue, T

    1999-08-01

    We describe that a 27-year-old woman with a severe postural headache for a month due to spontaneous intracranial hypotension was successfully treated with a continuous epidural saline infusion (CESI). She presented with sudden postural headache and back pain. On admission, CT scans of the head and thoracic spine were normal. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) was suspected from her symptoms that her headache was worsen by the erect position and relieved by the supine position. She was treated with intravenous infusion (1000 ml/day), but her headache did not resolve. Three weeks later, MR images showed descent of the brain stem and cerebellar tonsil, effacement of the sulci and cisterns, subdural fluid collections and diffuse meningeal enhancement. A lumbar puncture was performed and yielded an opening CSF pressure of 75 mmH2O in the horizontal position. Radionucleotide cisternography showed early accumulation of nucleotide in the bladder, slow ascent along the spinal axis, less than expected activity over the cerebral convexities and early disappearance of radioactivity. As for the treatment, an epidural catheter was placed at the L 1-2 level and CESI of 15 ml/hour was started. Immediately the postural headache resolved and the next day she could walk. CESI was continued for 5 days. MR images after CESI showed normalization of the sulci and cisterns including spinal subarachnoid space, reelevation of the brain stem and cerebellar tonsil and improvement of meningeal enhancement. She remained headache free during 7 months of follow-up period. We propose this method as a safe and effective treatment for SIH. PMID:10478356

  4. The clinical presentation and imaging manifestation of psychosis and dementia in general paresis: a retrospective study of 116 cases.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dong; Zhou, Daoyou; Zhao, Zhongyan; Liu, Zhonglin; Xiao, Songhua; Xing, Yigang; Suo, William Z; Liu, Jun

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, occurrence of "general paresis (GP)" has increased significantly because of the increasing incidence of syphilis in China. Early diagnosis plays a very important role for effective treatment. Incidence is becoming extensive enough to warrant an updated investigation of the clinical characteristics of GP. The authors retrospectively reviewed 116 cases of GP in Guangzhou, China, and analyzed its incidence and clinical appearance, as well as the characteristics of EEG, neuroradiology, serum, and cerebrospinal fluid examinations. Of the 116 GP patients, clinical symptoms presented frequently on admission were a variety of psychiatric-behavioral symptoms and varying degrees of dementia. Positive sucking reflex was the most common sign, as well as hyperreflexia and Argyll-Robertson pupil. EEG data mainly showed slightly abnormal EEG activity, with increased ? waves. Focal atrophy in one or multiple cerebral regions was evident on neuroimage. The prevalence of GP extends to various social strata or classes, with clinical presentation varying considerably among patients. For patients with progressive cognitive and behavioral deterioration, accompanied with psychotic and/or affective behavioral disorders or cerebral atrophy of unknown cause, general paresis should be considered. PMID:21948891

  5. Infantile Pompe disease on ERT: update on clinical presentation, musculoskeletal management, and exercise considerations.

    PubMed

    Case, Laura E; Beckemeyer, Alexandra A; Kishnani, Priya S

    2012-02-15

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with alglucosidase alpha, approved by the FDA in 2006, has expanded possibilities for individuals with Pompe disease (glycogen storage disease type II, GSDII, or acid maltase deficiency). Children with infantile Pompe disease are surviving beyond infancy, some achieving independent walking and functional levels never before possible. Individuals with late-onset Pompe disease are experiencing motor and respiratory improvement and/or stabilization with slower progression of impairments. A new phenotype is emerging for those with infantile Pompe disease treated with ERT. This new phenotype appears to be distinct from the late-onset phenotype rather than a shift from infantile to late-onset phenotype that might be expected from a simple diminution of symptoms with ERT. Questions arise regarding the etiology of the distinct distribution of weakness in this new phenotype, with increasing questions regarding exercise and musculoskeletal management. Answers require an increased understanding of the muscle pathology in Pompe disease, how that muscle pathology may be impacted by ERT, and the potential impact of, and need for, other clinical interventions. This article reviews the current state of knowledge regarding the pathology of muscle involvement in Pompe disease and the potential change in muscle pathology with ERT; the newly emerging musculoskeletal and gross motor phenotype of infantile Pompe disease treated with ERT; updated recommendations regarding musculoskeletal management in Pompe disease, particularly in children now surviving longer with residual weakness impacting development and integrity of the musculoskeletal system; and the potential impact and role of exercise in infantile Pompe survivors treated with ERT. PMID:22252989

  6. Helicobacter pylori HopE and HopV porins present scarce expression among clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    Lienlaf, Maritza; Morales, Juan Pablo; Díaz, María Inés; Díaz, Rodrigo; Bruce, Elsa; Siegel, Freddy; León, Gloria; Harris, Paul R; Venegas, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate how widely Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) HopE and HopV porins are expressed among Chilean isolates and how seroprevalent they are among infected patients in Chile. METHODS: H. pylori hopE and hopV genes derived from strain CHCTX-1 were cloned by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli AD494 (DE3). Gel-purified porins were used to prepare polyclonal antibodies. The presence of both genes was tested by PCR in a collection of H. pylori clinical isolates and their expression was detected in lysates by immunoblotting. Immune responses against HopE, HopV and other H. pylori antigens in sera from infected and non-infected patients were tested by Western blotting using these sera as first antibody on recombinant H. pylori antigens. RESULTS: PCR and Western blotting assays revealed that 60 and 82 out of 130 Chilean isolates carried hopE and hopV genes, respectively, but only 16 and 9, respectively, expressed these porins. IgG serum immunoreactivity evaluation of 69 H. pylori-infected patients revealed that HopE and HopV were infrequently recognized (8.7% and 10.1% respectively) compared to H. pylori VacA (68.1%) and CagA (59.5%) antigens. Similar values were detected for IgA serum immunoreactivity against HopE (11.6%) and HopV (10.5%) although lower values for VacA (42%) and CagA (17.4%) were obtained when compared to the IgG response. CONCLUSION: A scarce expression of HopE and HopV among Chilean isolates was found, in agreement with the infrequent seroconversion against these antigens when tested in infected Chilean patients. PMID:20082477

  7. Hypotensive Response Magnitude and Duration in Hypertensives: Continuous and Interval Exercise

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Raphael Santos Teodoro; Pires, Cássio Mascarenhas Robert; Junqueira, Gustavo Cardoso; Freitas, Dayana; Marchi-Alves, Leila Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background Although exercise training is known to promote post-exercise hypotension, there is currently no consistent argument about the effects of manipulating its various components (intensity, duration, rest periods, types of exercise, training methods) on the magnitude and duration of hypotensive response. Objective To compare the effect of continuous and interval exercises on hypotensive response magnitude and duration in hypertensive patients by using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). Methods The sample consisted of 20 elderly hypertensives. Each participant underwent three ABPM sessions: one control ABPM, without exercise; one ABPM after continuous exercise; and one ABPM after interval exercise. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and double product (DP) were monitored to check post-exercise hypotension and for comparison between each ABPM. Results ABPM after continuous exercise and after interval exercise showed post-exercise hypotension and a significant reduction (p < 0.05) in SBP, DBP, MAP and DP for 20 hours as compared with control ABPM. Comparing ABPM after continuous and ABPM after interval exercise, a significant reduction (p < 0.05) in SBP, DBP, MAP and DP was observed in the latter. Conclusion Continuous and interval exercise trainings promote post-exercise hypotension with reduction in SBP, DBP, MAP and DP in the 20 hours following exercise. Interval exercise training causes greater post-exercise hypotension and lower cardiovascular overload as compared with continuous exercise. PMID:25517389

  8. Early Motor Unit Disease Masquerading as Psychogenic Breathy Dysphonia: A Clinical Case Presentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Arnold E.

    1971-01-01

    Presented is a study of a 20-year-old girl with mild, breathy dysphonia, previously diagnosed as psychogenic. In actuality, her voice change was a sign of early myasthenia gravis. It is pointed out that voice changes can be a first and only sign of early neurologic disease. (Author/KW)

  9. Past, Present, and Future Trends in Teaching Clinical Skills through Web-Based Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coe Regan, Jo Ann R.; Youn, Eric J.

    2008-01-01

    Distance education in social work has grown significantly due to the use of interactive television and computer networks. Given the recent developments in delivering distance education utilizing Web-based technology, this article presents a literature review focused on identifying generational trends in the development of Web-based learning…

  10. Orbital Fibroblast Heterogeneity May Determine the Clinical Presentation of Thyroid Associated Ophthalmopathy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    TERRY J. SMITH; LAURA KOUMAS; ANNEMARIE GAGNON; ANDREA BELL; GREGORY D. SEMPOWSKI; RICHARD P. PHIPPS; ALEXANDER SORISKY

    Thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy, a process in which the orbital tissues become inflamed and are remodeled, occurs with a variable presentation. In some patients, eye muscle enlargement predominates. In others, the connective\\/adipose tissue enlargement appears the more significant problem. Or- bital fibroblasts exhibit heterogeneous phenotypes in culture. Here we report that fibroblasts derived from the connective\\/ adipose tissue depot are distinct from

  11. A Current Review of Ebola Virus: Pathogenesis, Clinical Presentation, and Diagnostic Assessment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adrian M. Casillas; Adeline M. Nyamathi; Anthony Sosa; Cam L. Wilder; Heather Sands

    2003-01-01

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) is an acute viral syndrome that presents with fever and an ensuing bleeding diathesis that is marked by high mortality in human and nonhuman primates. Fatality rates are between 50% and 100%. Due to its lethal nature, this filovirus is classified as a biological class 4 pathogen. The natural reservoir of the virus is unknown. As

  12. Gender Differences in the Clinical Presentation of PTSD and Its Concomitants in Survivors of Interpersonal Assault

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tara E. Galovski; Juliette Mott; Yinong Young-Xu; Patricia A. Resick

    2011-01-01

    This study compares a sample of PTSD-positive, female survivors of interpersonal assault (n = 162) to a sample of similarly traumatized male counterparts (n = 45) on a number of variables, including PTSD-symptom severity, depressive symptoms, anger, guilt, and health-related concerns. Results indicate that male and female interpersonal assault survivors presented similarly with respect to PTSD and depressive symptomatology and

  13. Intuitive presentation of clinical forensic data using anonymous and person-specific 3D reference manikins.

    PubMed

    Urschler, Martin; Höller, Johannes; Bornik, Alexander; Paul, Tobias; Giretzlehner, Michael; Bischof, Horst; Yen, Kathrin; Scheurer, Eva

    2014-08-01

    The increasing use of CT/MR devices in forensic analysis motivates the need to present forensic findings from different sources in an intuitive reference visualization, with the aim of combining 3D volumetric images along with digital photographs of external findings into a 3D computer graphics model. This model allows a comprehensive presentation of forensic findings in court and enables comparative evaluation studies correlating data sources. The goal of this work was to investigate different methods to generate anonymous and patient-specific 3D models which may be used as reference visualizations. The issue of registering 3D volumetric as well as 2D photographic data to such 3D models is addressed to provide an intuitive context for injury documentation from arbitrary modalities. We present an image processing and visualization work-flow, discuss the major parts of this work-flow, compare the different investigated reference models, and show a number of cases studies that underline the suitability of the proposed work-flow for presenting forensically relevant information in 3D visualizations. PMID:24952238

  14. Dissecting Aneurysms of Posterior Cerebral Artery: Clinical Presentation, Angiographic Findings, Treatment, and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Taqi, Muhammad A.; Lazzaro, Marc A.; Pandya, Dhruvil J.; Badruddin, Aamir; Zaidat, Osama O.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The dissecting posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysms are very rare. These aneurysms pose significant treatment challenge and need careful evaluation to formulate an optimal treatment plan in case of ruptured or un-ruptured presentations. Methods: Retrospective review of a prospectively collected data. Results: Seven patients with dissecting aneurysms of the PCA were identified. Six out of seven presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and one with ischemic stroke. Three out of seven were treated with endovascular coil embolization without sacrifice of the parent artery and the rest had parent artery occlusion (PAO) with coil embolization. None of the patients developed new neurological deficits post-procedure. Aneurysm re-occurred in two patients that were treated without PAO. Conclusion: Endovascular treatment of the dissecting PCA aneurysm is safe and feasible. It can be performed with or without PAO. Recurrence is more common without PAO and close follow-up is warranted. PMID:21734905

  15. Present status of clinical studies of Fluosol-DA (20%) in Japan.

    PubMed

    Mitsuno, T; Ohyanagi, H

    1985-01-01

    Fluosol-DA (20%) is a fine-particle stable emulsion with low toxicity and rapid elimination from the body. Based on comprehensive animal experiments and phase one human studies, Fluosol-DA (20%) has been given clinically to 401 patients in Japan. In 270 of these patients, it was given to treat severe hemorrhage, and in 131, it was given to improve impaired cerebral circulation or for other nonhemorrhagic indications. In these studies, Fluosol-DA (20%) was effective as a blood gas carrier as well as a plasma expander. After infusion of 20 ml of Fluosol-DA (20%) per kilogram of body weight, while maintaining the FIO2 at or near 0.5 or 0.6, PFCs transport an amount of oxygen equivalent to approximately 6.3 +/- 1.4% of the oxygen transported by the hemoglobin phase and approximately 100% of the oxygen transported by plasma. The arteriovenous oxygen difference in the PFC phase was approximately 25 to 30% of that in the hemoglobin phase. Of the oxygen consumed by the tissues, approximately 17% was provided by the PFC phase after treatment with Fluosol-DA (20%). Hemodynamic parameters of patients with hemorrhage were either maintained or recovered to normal levels after Fluosol-DA (20%) infusion. No acute or chronic untoward reactions were observed either early or late after infusion of Fluosol-DA (20%), except for a transient decrease in neutrophils and platelets after the initial administration of a test dose of 1 ml, and these parameters recovered spontaneously in 30 minutes. No abnormal findings that could be attributed to Fluosol-DA (20%) were found in the heart, lungs, liver, spleen, kidneys, bone marrow, endocrine system, or other organs. Organ retention of PFC particles was evaluated in 6 autopsy cases in Japan. Although PFCs were detected in many organs several months after a single Fluosol-DA (20%) injection of 20 ml per kilogram of body weight, PFCs were not found in body tissues of those who were autopsied more than 7 months after its infusion. RES function was slightly depressed for a few days in patients receiving 20 ml of Fluosol-DA (20%) per kilogram of body weight. It was also depressed for several days in rats given 40 ml per kilogram of body weight. Compared with that of control patients, recovery to preoperative levels was slightly delayed in patients receiving Fluosol-DA (20%). Despite this, administration of up to 20 ml of Fluosol-DA (20%) per kilogram of body weight should be safe with respect to the RES function.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:3980104

  16. NEUROCYSTICERCOSIS IN CHILDREN PRESENTING WITH AFEBRILE SEIZURE: CLINICAL PROFILE, IMAGING AND SERODIAGNOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Priyadarshi Soumyaranjan; Seepana, Jyotsna; Padela, Sudarsini; Sahu, Abani Kanta; Subbarayudu, Swarna; Barua, Ankur

    2014-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is one of the major causes of childhood seizures in developing countries including India and Latin America. In this study neurological pediatric cases presenting with afebrile seizures were screened for anti-Cysticercus antibodies (IgG) in their sera in order to estimate the possible burden of cysticercal etiology. The study included a total of 61 pediatric afebrile seizure subjects (aged one to 15 years old); there was a male predominance. All the sera were tested using a pre-evaluated commercially procured IgG-ELISA kit (UB-Magiwell Cysticercosis Kit ™). Anti-Cysticercus antibody in serum was positive in 23 of 61 (37.7%) cases. The majority of cases with a positive ELISA test presented with generalized seizure (52.17%), followed by complex partial seizure (26.08%), and simple partial seizure (21.73%). Headaches were the major complaint (73.91%). Other presentations were vomiting (47.82%), pallor (34.78%), altered sensorium (26.08%), and muscle weakness (13.04%). There was one hemiparesis case diagnosed to be NCC. In this study one child without any significant findings on imaging was also found to be positive by serology. There was a statistically significant association found between the cases with multiple lesions on the brain and the ELISA-positivity (p = 0.017). Overall positivity of the ELISA showed a potential cysticercal etiology. Hence, neurocysticercosis should be suspected in every child presenting with afebrile seizure especially with a radio-imaging supportive diagnosis in tropical developing countries or areas endemic for taeniasis/cysticercosis. PMID:24879004

  17. Four-repeat tauopathy clinically presenting as posterior cortical atrophy: atypical corticobasal degeneration?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kurt A. JellingerAnja; Anja Grazer; Katja Petrovic; Stefan Ropele; Günter Alpi; Peter Kapeller; Thomas Ströbel; Reinhold Schmidt

    2011-01-01

    A man aged 55 with negative family history presented with progressive decline in spatial orientation and visual functions\\u000a for 2 years. He showed impaired optic fixation, optic ataxia, agraphia, acalculia, ideomotor apraxia, disturbed right–left\\u000a differentiation but preserved color matching, memory and motor perception, gradually progressing to dementia, without extrapyramidal\\u000a signs. Brain MRI and PET showed severe bilateral atrophy and hypometabolism in

  18. Neurocysticercosis in children presenting with afebrile seizure: clinical profile, imaging and serodiagnosis.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Priyadarshi Soumyaranjan; Seepana, Jyotsna; Padela, Sudarsini; Sahu, Abani Kanta; Subbarayudu, Swarna; Barua, Ankur

    2014-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is one of the major causes of childhood seizures in developing countries including India and Latin America. In this study neurological pediatric cases presenting with afebrile seizures were screened for anti-Cysticercus antibodies (IgG) in their sera in order to estimate the possible burden of cysticercal etiology. The study included a total of 61 pediatric afebrile seizure subjects (aged one to 15 years old); there was a male predominance. All the sera were tested using a pre-evaluated commercially procured IgG-ELISA kit (UB-Magiwell Cysticercosis Kit ™). Anti-Cysticercus antibody in serum was positive in 23 of 61 (37.7%) cases. The majority of cases with a positive ELISA test presented with generalized seizure (52.17%), followed by complex partial seizure (26.08%), and simple partial seizure (21.73%). Headaches were the major complaint (73.91%). Other presentations were vomiting (47.82%), pallor (34.78%), altered sensorium (26.08%), and muscle weakness (13.04%). There was one hemiparesis case diagnosed to be NCC. In this study one child without any significant findings on imaging was also found to be positive by serology. There was a statistically significant association found between the cases with multiple lesions on the brain and the ELISA-positivity (p = 0.017). Overall positivity of the ELISA showed a potential cysticercal etiology. Hence, neurocysticercosis should be suspected in every child presenting with afebrile seizure especially with a radio-imaging supportive diagnosis in tropical developing countries or areas endemic for taeniasis/cysticercosis. PMID:24879004

  19. Analysis of clinical and demographic characteristics of patients presenting with renal colic in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Serinken, Mustafa; Karcioglu, Ozgur; Turkcuer, Ibrahim; Ozkan, Halis Ilke; Keysan, Mustafa Kemal; Bukiran, Aytaç

    2008-01-01

    Background Renal colic (RC), is one of the most severe pain patterns which is most commonly diagnosed and managed in the emergency department (ED). This study is designed to evaluate the characteristics of adult patients presenting with pain and diagnosed with RC in the ED, length of stay in the ED and hospital and factors affecting these variables. Methods All consecutive adult patients who presented with side pain, flank pain, abdominal or groin pain and consequently diagnosed with urolithiasis or RC were analyzed retrospectively. Sociodemographic data, times of admission into and discharge from the ED, adjunctive complaints, results of laboratory investigations, findings on examination, treatment and drugs administered were noted. Results A total of 235 patients with a diagnostic code of urolithiasis were enrolled. Physicians were more likely to order radiological and laboratory investigations for female patients and those without hematuria in urinalysis. The peak incidence of patients diagnosed with RC (p = 0.001) was noted in August, while the winter had the lowest frequency of relevant admissions. The peak frequency was between 06:00 and 08:00. Women stayed longer in the ED (p = 0.001). Absence of hematuria in urinalysis was associated with increased length of stay (p = 0.007). Conclusion Although RC is a common ED presentation for which the emergency physician has no guidelines in terms of diagnosis and management, there is no exact pattern to guide ordering investigations. Patients with atypical presentations stay longer in the ED and are likely to undergo additional tests in management. PMID:18793451

  20. Unusual clinical presentation of thoracic tuberculosis: the need for a better knowledge of illness.

    PubMed

    Manca, Sandra; Fois, Alessandro Giuseppe; Santoru, Luigi; Trisolini, Rocco; Polo, Maria Francesca; Ostera, Salvatore; Patelli, Marco; Pirina, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Background Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), a highly contagious infectious disease, is a significant public health problem all over the world and remains an important cause of preventable death in the adult population. Endobronchial TB is an unusual form of thoracic TB that may be complicated by tracheobronchial stenosis, and bronchoesophageal fistula formation is a very rare complication. Tubercular lymphadenitis can also lead to fistula formation through a process of caseum necrosis and opening of a fistula between the bronchus and oesophagus. Case Report We report an uncommon case of thoracic TB in an immunocompetent 73-year-old Caucasian man who presented several problems: bronchoesophageal fistula, endobronchial TB, and mediastinal lymphadenopathy in the absence of contemporary parenchymal consolidation. Furthermore, he presented a normal chest radiograph and mostly unclear and non-specific symptoms at onset. Conclusions We emphasize the need for a better knowledge of this illness and awareness that it may have an unusual presentation. In these cases, diagnosis and proper treatment can be delayed, with severe complications for the patient. Pulmonary TB remains a real diagnostic challenge: a normal chest radiograph and nonspecific symptoms do not allow us to exclude this persistent infectious disease. PMID:25907152

  1. Essentiality of Early Diagnosis of Molar Incisor Hypomineralization in Children and Review of its Clinical Presentation, Etiology and Management

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Abhay Kumar; Saha, Sonali; Singh, Jaspal

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a common developmental condition resulting in enamel defects in first permanent molars and permanent incisors. It presents at eruption of these teeth. One to four molars, and often also the incisors, could be affected. Since first recognized, the condition has been puzzling and interpreted as a distinct phenomenon unlike other enamel disturbances. Early diagnosis is essential since, rapid breakdown of tooth structure may occur, giving rise to acute symptoms and complicated treatment. The purpose of this article is to review MIH and illustrate its diagnosis and clinical management in young children. How to cite this article: Garg N, Jain AK, Saha S, Singh J. Essentiality of Early Diagnosis of Molar Incisor Hypomineralization in Children and Review of its Clinical Presentation, Etiology and Management. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(3):190-196. PMID:25206166

  2. A case of fixed drug eruption secondary to quinine in tonic water presenting to a sexual health clinic.

    PubMed

    Lonsdale-Eccles, Elizabeth; Wallett, Arabella; Ward, Alison M

    2014-08-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a cutaneous drug reaction which occurs repeatedly at a given mucocutaneous site after exposure to the causative agent. Lesions typically occur on extremities, oral mucosa and genital skin. Quinine is a common food additive and is recognised as a rare cause of FDE. We report a case of FDE with oral and genital lesions presenting to a sexual health clinic due to quinine contained in tonic water. PMID:24583965

  3. Gender-related differences in the clinical presentation of malignant and benign pheochromocytoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edwin W. Lai; Shiromi M. Perera; Bas Havekes; Henri J. L. M. Timmers; Frederieke M. Brouwers; Beverly McElroy; Karen T. Adams; Shoichiro Ohta; Robert A. Wesley; Graeme Eisenhofer; Karel Pacak

    2008-01-01

    Signs and symptoms associated with pheochromocytomas are predominantly caused by catecholamine excess, but tend to be highly\\u000a variable and non-specific. In this study, we evaluated 23 male and 35 female pheochromocytoma patients for symptoms and signs\\u000a of pheochromocytoma with special regard to gender-related differences in presentation. Total symptom score comparison between\\u000a genders showed significant differences (12.0 vs. 7.8, P-value 0.0001).

  4. Gender differences in the clinical presentation of PTSD and its concomitants in survivors of interpersonal assault.

    PubMed

    Galovski, Tara E; Mott, Juliette; Young-Xu, Yinong; Resick, Patricia A

    2011-03-01

    This study compares a sample of PTSD-positive, female survivors of interpersonal assault (n = 162) to a sample of similarly traumatized male counterparts (n = 45) on a number of variables, including PTSD-symptom severity, depressive symptoms, anger, guilt, and health-related concerns. Results indicate that male and female interpersonal assault survivors presented similarly with respect to PTSD and depressive symptomatology and reported comparable levels of guilt and that women reported significantly more health-related complaints than men did. With respect to the experience of anger, men report significant elevations on the state anger subscale of the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory compared to women. PMID:20498379

  5. Sclerosing Mesenteritis: Diverse clinical presentations and dissimilar treatment options. A case series and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Sclerosing mesenteritis (SM) is a rare pathological condition affecting the mesentery. It is a benign, non-specific inflammation of the adipose tissue of the mesentery of the small intestine and colon. It is characterized by a variable amount of chronic fibrosis. Its etiology is unknown, the pathogenesis is obscure, while the pathological characteristics of the disease are unspecific. The initial clinical presentation varies from typically asymptomatic to that of an acute abdomen. The diagnosis is suggested by computed tomography but is usually confirmed by surgical biopsies. Treatment is largely empirical; it is decided upon on the basis of the clinical condition of the patient, and usually a few specific drugs are used. Surgical resection is sometimes attempted for definitive therapy, although the surgical approach is often limited. We will present five cases of SM as well as a review of the available literature in order to state and compare a variety of clinical presentations, diverse possible etiologies and dissimilar treatment options. PMID:21635777

  6. Sclerosing Mesenteritis: Diverse clinical presentations and dissimilar treatment options. A case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vlachos, Konstantinos; Archontovasilis, Fotis; Falidas, Evangelos; Mathioulakis, Stavros; Konstandoudakis, Stefanos; Villias, Constantinos

    2011-01-01

    Sclerosing mesenteritis (SM) is a rare pathological condition affecting the mesentery. It is a benign, non-specific inflammation of the adipose tissue of the mesentery of the small intestine and colon. It is characterized by a variable amount of chronic fibrosis. Its etiology is unknown, the pathogenesis is obscure, while the pathological characteristics of the disease are unspecific. The initial clinical presentation varies from typically asymptomatic to that of an acute abdomen. The diagnosis is suggested by computed tomography but is usually confirmed by surgical biopsies. Treatment is largely empirical; it is decided upon on the basis of the clinical condition of the patient, and usually a few specific drugs are used. Surgical resection is sometimes attempted for definitive therapy, although the surgical approach is often limited. We will present five cases of SM as well as a review of the available literature in order to state and compare a variety of clinical presentations, diverse possible etiologies and dissimilar treatment options. PMID:21635777

  7. Metabolomic Analysis of Clinical Plasma from Cerebral Infarction Patients Presenting with Blood Stasis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Jung; Jung, Jeeyoun; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Myeong Soo; Kim, Myung-Sunny

    2015-01-01

    Blood stasis (BS) is characterized as a disorder of blood circulation. In traditional Korean medicine (TKM), it is viewed as a cause factor of diseases such as multiple sclerosis and stroke. This study investigated differences in the plasma metabolites profiles of subjects displaying BS or non-BS patterns. Thirty-one patients with cerebral infarction diagnosed with BS and an equal number of sex- and age-matched non-BS patients were enrolled. Metabolic profiling was performed using UPLC-MS. The ratio of subjects with a rough pulse and purple coloration of the tongue was higher in patients presenting with BS pattern. Through metabolomics analysis, 82 metabolites that differed significantly between the BS and non-BS pattern were identified, and the two groups were significantly separated using an orthogonal partial least square-discriminant analysis model (P < 0.001). Of these 82 metabolites, acetyl carnitine, leucine, kynurenine, phosphocholine, hexanoyl carnitine, and decanoyl carnitine were present in significantly higher levels in patients with a BS pattern than those with a non-BS pattern. Our results also demonstrated that seven plasma metabolites, including acyl-carnitines and kynurenine, were associated with a BS pattern, suggesting that variant plasma metabolic profiles may serve as a biomarker for diagnosis of BS in patients with cerebral infarction. PMID:25834622

  8. Microbial communities present in the lower respiratory tract of clinically healthy birds in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Shabbir, Muhammad Zubair; Malys, Tyler; Ivanov, Yury V; Park, Jihye; Shabbir, Muhammad Abu Bakr; Rabbani, Masood; Yaqub, Tahir; Harvill, Eric Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Commercial poultry is an important agricultural industry worldwide. Although dense living conditions and large flocks increase meat and egg production, they also increase the risk of disease outbreaks and zoonoses. Current pathogen identification methods mostly rely on culture-dependent techniques and, therefore, are limited to a very small number of bacteria present in the environment. Next Generation Sequencing allows for culture-independent characterization of lower respiratory microbiome of birds including the identification of novel commensals and potentially emerging pathogens. In this study, we collected tracheo-bronchoalveolar lavage of 14 birds raised at 3 different farms in the Punjab province of Pakistan. To characterize the lower respiratory microbiome of these birds, we sequenced hyper-variable regions of the 16S ribosomal subunit gene. Although dominated by bacteria belonging to a small number of taxonomic classifications, the lower respiratory microbiome from each farm was far more diverse and novel than previously known. The differences in microbiome among farms suggest that inter-farm differences affect the microbiome of birds more than breed, geographic location, or management system. The presence of potential and known pathogens in genetically similar specialty breeds of chickens kept at unnaturally high densities and under variable conditions presents an extraordinary opportunity for the selection of highly pathogenic bacteria. In some instances, opportunistic respiratory pathogens were observed in apparently healthy birds. Understanding and monitoring the respiratory microbiome of such populations may allow the early detection of future disease threats. PMID:25667427

  9. Clinical Presentation, Convalescence, and Relapse of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in Dogs Experimentally Infected via Tick Bite

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Michael L.; Killmaster, Lindsay F.; Zemtsova, Galina E.; Ritter, Jana M.; Langham, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a tick-borne disease caused by R. rickettsii in North and South America. Domestic dogs are susceptible to infection and canine RMSF can be fatal without appropriate treatment. Although clinical signs of R. rickettsii infection in dogs have been described, published reports usually include descriptions of either advanced clinical cases or experimental infections caused by needle-inoculation of cultured pathogen rather than by tick bite. The natural progression of a tick-borne R. rickettsii infection has not been studied in sufficient detail. Here, we provide a detailed description of clinical, hematological, molecular, and serological dynamics of RMSF in domestic dogs from the day of experimental exposure to infected ticks through recovery. Presented data indicate that neither the height/duration of fever nor detection of rickettsial DNA in dogs' blood by PCR are good indicators for clinical prognosis. Only the apex and subsequent subsidence of neutrophilia seem to mark the beginning of recovery and allow predicting a favorable outcome in Rickettsia-infected dogs, even despite the continuing persistence of mucosal petechiae and skin rash. On the other hand the appropriate (doxycycline) antibiotic therapy of sufficient duration is crucial in prevention of RMSF relapses in dogs. PMID:25542001

  10. Acute paranoid psychosis as sole clinical presentation of hepatic artery thrombosis after living donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hepatic artery thrombosis is a devastating complication after orthotopic liver transplantation often requiring revascularization or re-transplantation. It is associated with considerably increased morbidity and mortality. Acute cognitive dysfunction such as delirium or acute psychosis may occur after major surgery and may be associated with the advent of surgical complications. Case presentation Here we describe a case of hepatic artery thrombosis after living-donor liver transplantation which was not preceded by signs of liver failure but rather by an episode of acute psychosis. After re-transplantation the patient recovered without sequelae. Conclusion This case highlights the need to remain cautious when psychiatric disorders occur in patients after liver transplantation. The diagnostic procedures should not be restricted to medical or neurological causes of psychosis alone but should also focus vascular complications related to orthotopic liver transplantation. PMID:20175918

  11. Delayed diagnosis of angiosarcoma of the spleen: clinically presenting as recurrent haemoperitoneum following embolisation.

    PubMed

    Kornmann, Verena; van Rijn, Philip; Mulder, Dries; Reijnders, Koen

    2015-01-01

    Angiosarcoma is a highly aggressive and extremely rare neoplasm of the spleen, with a limited number of reported cases worldwide. We report a case of a 69-year-old man who presented with progressive symptoms of fatigue, abdominal and back pain, anaemia and haemoperitoneum 1?year following embolisation of the spleen for splenic rupture. Additional imaging and colonoscopy with biopsy revealed intra-abdominal fluid and a colonic adenocarcinoma. Diagnostic laparoscopy demonstrated a haemoperitoneum and colon carcinoma, after which splenectomy via laparotomy was performed. Pathology report revealed an angiosarcoma of the spleen with peritoneal tumour deposits. Rupturing of a spleen may be due to an underlying disease. Therefore, the differential diagnosis of splenic rupture should include the possibility of a splenic tumour. The definitive diagnosis and treatment of a splenic angiosarcoma may require splenectomy, although prognosis is poor. PMID:25858933

  12. Late-presenting diaphragmatic hernia associated with intrathoracic kidney: tachypnoea as unique clinical sign

    PubMed Central

    Sesia, Sergio B; Haecker, Frank-Martin

    2012-01-01

    Intrathoracic renal ectopia associated with a congenital diaphragmatic hernia represents a very rare congenital malformation. The incidence of intrathoracic renal ectopia with congenital diaphragmatic hernia is reported to be less than 0.25%. The authors report on a 5-month-old female infant with late-presenting congenital diaphragmatic hernia associated with a left-sided intrathoracic ectopic kidney and adrenal gland. While prenatal ultrasound showed no pathology, the postnatal ultrasound assumed a left-sided renal agenesia. After recurrent episodes of tachypnoea, a chest x-ray confirmed the diagnosis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia which was repaired without complications. Intraoperatively, intrathoracic ectopic kidney was diagnosed. The authors discuss embryogenesis, the diagnostic algorithm and therapy as well as follow-up of this rare malformation. PMID:22604763

  13. Extensive Middle Cranial Fossa Arachnoid Cysts and Different Clinical Presentation in Two Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yüce, Özge; Dö?er, Esra; Çelik, Nurullah; Emeksiz, Hamdi Cihan; Bulduk, Erkut Baha; Çamurdan, Mahmut Orhun; Bideci, Aysun; Cinaz, Peyami

    2014-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts (ACs), particularly suprasellar cysts, cause a wide spectrum of endocrine disorders. Herein, we report two patients diagnosed with an extensive AC in the middle cranial fossa while being investigated for etiologies of precocious puberty and short stature. One of them required surgery due to his pubertal disorders associated with compression effects of cyst. After surgery, his puberty progression was regressed within one year. On the other hand, surgery was not planned for the second patient considering of his cranial imaging findings and the extremely low incidence of growth hormone (GH) deficiency caused by middle fossa AC (MFAC). We started treatment with recombinant human GH and no complication was found during treatment follow-up. Endocrine disorders associated with MFACs are extremely rare. By presenting with these two cases, we aimed to remain our fellow physcians that ACs can be possibly cause of endocrine disorders. Clinicians should be careful evaluating endocrine disorders because real cause may not be cyst itself but masked by it. PMID:25241612

  14. Mutations in the gene encoding DMT1: clinical presentation and treatment.

    PubMed

    Iolascon, Achille; De Falco, Luigia

    2009-10-01

    Divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) is the protein that allows elemental iron entry into the duodenal cell. It is expressed ubiquitously and it also allows the iron exit from the endosomes. This protein plays a central role in iron metabolism and it is strictly regulated. Several animal models elucidate its role in physiology. Recently three patients affected with DMT1 deficiency have been described. This recessively inherited condition appears at birth with severe microcytic anemia. Serum markers could be particularly useful to establish a correct diagnosis: high serum iron, normal total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), increased saturation of transferrin (Tf), slightly elevated ferritin, and increased soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR). Increased free erythrocyte protoporphyrins (FEPs) could address the diagnosis to iron-deficient anemia. All patients appeared to respond to erythropoietin (Epo) administration. Because mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) did not change during Epo treatment, it was concluded that Epo did not improve iron utilization of the erythroblasts but likely reduced the degree or intensity of apoptosis, affecting erythropoiesis. Moreover liver iron overload was present and documented in all of the affected patients. In this review we analyze the role of DMT1 in iron metabolism and the major causes of reduction and their consequences in animal models as well in humans, and we attempt to define the correct treatment for human mutants. PMID:19786204

  15. PAPILLON–LEFEVRE SYNDROME: A COMBINED APPROACH FROM THE DERMATOLOGIST AND DENTIST – A CLINICAL PRESENTATION

    PubMed Central

    Muppa, Radhika; Prameela, B; Duddu, Mahesh; Dandempally, Arthi

    2011-01-01

    Papillon–Lefevre syndrome (PLS) is a rare disease characterized by skin lesions, which includes palmar-plantar hyperkeratosis and hyperhidrosis with severe periodontal destruction involving both the primary and the permanent dentitions. It is transmitted as an autosomal-recessive condition, and consanguinity of parents is evident in about one-third of the cases. This paper describes a 13-year-old male patient who presented to the department of pedodontics, with rapidly progressing periodontitis. A general physical examination revealed scaling on the hands and feet, which had been medically diagnosed as PLS. The incidence of this rare entity is increasing in the recent times, which is associated with irreparable periodontal destruction at an early age, with not so prominent skin lesions in some cases. In such instances, the dentist has a more important role in diagnosing, treatment planning and preservation of the periodontal tissues and, at the same time, referring for the treatment of the skin lesions. This paper emphasizes the combined effort of the two specialities in order to maintain skin as well as dental conditions in health by early intervention and a synergistic treatment approach. PMID:22345785

  16. Prenatal diagnosis of partial trisomy 12q: clinical presentations and outcome.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hsiu-Huei; Wang, Tzu-Hao; Hsueh, Ding-Wei; Chang, Shuenn-Dyh; Soong, Yung-Kuei

    2005-06-01

    We present a pregnant woman with a fetus prenatally diagnosed as 46, XY,der(4) t(4;12) (q35.1; q21.2). This defect resulted from the unbalanced segregation of a paternal balanced translocation, t(4;12) (q35.1; q21.2). Prenatal ultrasound revealed borderline ventriculomegaly, a thick nuchal fold, pericardial effusion, arthrogryposis, a single umbilical artery, and micropenis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome painting probe and microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis further confirmed chromosomal gain of terminal 12q. The woman had her pregnancy terminated at 20 weeks of gestational age. When compared with previously reported cases, the proband had characteristics common to the phenotypes of partial trisomy 12q, including an abnormal facial appearance and multiple anomalies. Additionally, this case had previously unreported phenotypes, such as arthrogryposis, a single umbilical artery, and a micropenis. Regarding the outcome of partial trisomy 12q, the fetuses carrying trisomies distal to 12q24 have a good chance of extended postnatal survival. In contrast, the cases with trisomies involving a larger amount of 12q likely die prenatally or within a few days after birth. PMID:15966037

  17. The clinical presentation and histopathologic-immunohistochemical classification of histiocytic sarcomas in the Flat Coated Retriever.

    PubMed

    Constantino-Casas, F; Mayhew, D; Hoather, T M; Dobson, J M

    2011-05-01

    The Flat Coated Retriever is a breed at risk of development of histiocytic sarcoma (HS), but in contrast to the disseminated form of disease recognized in the Bernese Mountain Dog, most reports of HS in Flat Coated Retrievers describe a localized lesion affecting the musculature or fascia of limbs. The purpose of this study was to review data and material received though an ongoing Flat Coated Retriever tumor survey to better define the presentation of HS in the breed and to determine the utility of subclassification of tumors arising at different sites by histology and immunohistologic phenotyping. Data on 180 dogs bearing HS-like tumors were available for review, which showed that although the majority (101 lesions, 57%) were primary limb lesions, 47 dogs (26%) had visceral, mainly splenic lesions with no peripheral primary tumor. A detailed histologic and immunohistologic review of 20 limb tumors and 20 splenic tumors showed that 2 distinct phenotypic subtypes could be identified: a histiocytic subtype, most prevalent in the splenic tumors, and a histiocytic-spindle-pleomorphic subtype, mainly seen in the limb tumors. Despite their variable morphology, all tumors expressed major histocompatibility complex class II and the leukocyte antigen CD18, but only those tumors in the spleen consistently expressed CD11d. The majority of tumors also contained a mild to moderate infiltrate of T lymphocytes. PMID:20930108

  18. A Spectrum of Clinical Presentations in Seven Japanese Patients with Vitamin D Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Takuo; Kotani, Tomoo; Miyoshi, Yoko; Santo, Yoko; Hirai, Haruhiko; Namba, Noriyuki; Shima, Masaaki; Shimizu, Kazuo; Nakajima, Shigeo; Ozono, Keiichi

    2006-01-01

    Recently, the reemergence of vitamin D deficiency in developed countries has been pointed out. Vitamin D deficiency is diagnosed based on the serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) level. However, its normal range is still controversial, making the diagnosis of vitamin D deficiency difficult. Here, we present seven Japanese patients diagnosed with vitamin D deficiency. Three patients complained of leg bowing, and the other four of tetany. The patients with leg bowing were toddlers. Radiographic surveys demonstrated evidence of rickets. Laboratory findings showed decreased levels of serum inorganic phosphorus and increased levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and intact-parathyroid hormone (iPTH). The serum levels of 25OHD were relatively low, ranging from 13 to 15.2 ng/ml. Of the patients with tetany, three were young infants. Laboratory findings showed decreased levels of serum calcium and increased levels of ALP and iPTH. The serum levels of 25OHD were markedly decreased (below 8 ng/ml). Thus, these results indicate that relatively low levels of 25OHD can cause rickets, a symptom of vitamin D deficiency, and that clinicians should therefore carefully evaluate the levels of 25OHD. PMID:24790316

  19. Acromegaly presenting as hirsuitism: Uncommon sinister aetiology of a common clinical sign

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rajesh; Dutta, Deep; Shivaprasad, KS; Maisnam, Indira; Ghosh, Sujoy; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2012-01-01

    Hirsuitism though not uncommon (24%), is not considered to be a prominent feature of acromegaly because of its lack of specificity and occurrence. Hirsuitism is very common in women of reproductive age (5-7%) and has been classically associated with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Twenty-eight year lady with 3 year duration of hirsuitism (Modified Ferriman Gallwey score-24/36), features of insulin resistance (acanthosis), subtle features of acromegaloidism (woody nose and bulbous lips) was diagnosed to have acromegaly in view of elevated IGF-1 (1344 ng/ml; normal: 116-358 ng/ml), basal (45.1 ng/ml) and post glucose growth hormone (39.94 ng/ml) and MRI brain showing pituitary macroadenoma. Very high serum androstenedione (>10 ng/ml; normal 0.5-3.5 ng/ml), elevated testosterone (0.91 ng/ml, normal <0.8) and normal dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) (284 mcg/dl, normal 35-430 mcg/dl) along with polycystic ovaries on ultrasonography lead to diagnosis of associated PCOS. She was also diagnosed to have diabetes. This case presentation intends to highlight that hirsuitism may rarely be the only prominent feature of acromegaly. A lookout for subtle features of acromegaly in all patients with hirsuitism and going for biochemical evaluation (even at the risk of investigating many patients of insulin resistance and acromegloidism) may help us pick up more patients of acromegaly at an earlier stage thus help in reducing disease morbidity. PMID:23565405

  20. Hydrodynamic ultrasonic maxillary sinus lift: Review of a new technique and presentation of a clinical case

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Ruiz, Manuel M.; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Pérez-Dorao, Beatriz; Wainwright, Marcel; Abalos-Labruzzi, Camilo; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Placing implants in the posterior maxillary area has the drawback of working with scarce, poor quality bone in a significant percentage of cases. Numerous advanced surgical techniques have been developed to overcome the difficulties associated with these limitations. Subsequent to reports on the elevation of the maxillary sinus through the lateral approach, there were reports on the use of the crestal approach, which is less aggressive but requires a minimal amount of bone. Furthermore, it is more sensitive to operator technique, as the integrity of the sinus membrane is checked indirectly. The aim of this paper is to review the technical literature on minimally invasive sinus lift and compare the advantages of different techniques with Intralift™, a new technique. Study Design: The present study is a review of techniques used to perform minimally invasive sinus lift published in Cochrane, Embase and Medline over the past ten years and the description of the crestal sinus lift technique based on minimally invasive piezosurgery, with the example of a case report. Results: Only eight articles were found on minimally invasive techniques for sinus lift. The main advantage of this new technique, Intralift, is that it does not require a minimum amount of crestal bone (indeed, the smaller the width of the crestal bone, the better this technique is performed). The possibility of damage to the sinus membrane is minimised by using ultrasound based hydrodynamic pressure to lift it, while applying a very non-aggressive crestal approach. Conclusions: We believe that this technique is an advance in the search for less traumatic and aggressive techniques, which is the hallmark of current surgery. Key words: Sinus lift, surgical technique, minimally invasive surgery, ultrasound surgery. PMID:22143696

  1. Gastrointestinal bleeding from Dieulafoy’s lesion: Clinical presentation, endoscopic findings, and endoscopic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nojkov, Borko; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2015-01-01

    Although relatively uncommon, Dieulafoy’s lesion is an important cause of acute gastrointestinal bleeding due to the frequent difficulty in its diagnosis; its tendency to cause severe, life-threatening, recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding; and its amenability to life-saving endoscopic therapy. Unlike normal vessels of the gastrointestinal tract which become progressively smaller in caliber peripherally, Dieulafoy’s lesions maintain a large caliber despite their peripheral, submucosal, location within gastrointestinal wall. Dieulafoy’s lesions typically present with severe, active, gastrointestinal bleeding, without prior symptoms; often cause hemodynamic instability and often require transfusion of multiple units of packed erythrocytes. About 75% of lesions are located in the stomach, with a marked proclivity of lesions within 6 cm of the gastroesophageal junction along the gastric lesser curve, but lesions can also occur in the duodenum and esophagus. Lesions in the jejunoileum or colorectum have been increasingly reported. Endoscopy is the first diagnostic test, but has only a 70% diagnostic yield because the lesions are frequently small and inconspicuous. Lesions typically appear at endoscopy as pigmented protuberances from exposed vessel stumps, with minimal surrounding erosion and no ulceration (visible vessel sans ulcer). Endoscopic therapy, including clips, sclerotherapy, argon plasma coagulation, thermocoagulation, or electrocoagulation, is the recommended initial therapy, with primary hemostasis achieved in nearly 90% of cases. Dual endoscopic therapy of epinephrine injection followed by ablative or mechanical therapy appears to be effective. Although banding is reportedly highly successful, it entails a small risk of gastrointestinal perforation from banding deep mural tissue. Therapeutic alternatives after failed endoscopic therapy include repeat endoscopic therapy, angiography, or surgical wedge resection. The mortality has declined from about 30% during the 1970’s to 9%-13% currently with the advent of aggressive endoscopic therapy.

  2. [Familial Marfan's syndrome. A critical review and presentation of a clinical case].

    PubMed

    Iannello, S; Spina, M; Prestipino, M; Strano, A M; Bellassai, M; Politi, G; Belfiore, F

    1996-05-01

    Aim of this paper is to describe and discuss, on the basis of an exhaustive review of literature, the case of a 14-year-old girl with familiar Marfan's syndrome. This disease is a generalized inherited disorder with involvement of connective tissue and symptoms affecting ocular, skeletal and cardio-vascular systems, usually diagnosed in young age and associated with a poor prognosis because of late severe aortic complications (dissection, dilation or aneurysms, regurgitation, etc.). The young patient sought to our medical attention because of severe leanness, delayed menarca and irregular menstruations; physical examination disclosed the typical "morphotype of Marfan" with long limbs, slenderness of hands and feet, severe kyphoscoliosis, narrow chest with "pectus excavatum", marked hyperextensible joints, and high arched palate with malocclusion. Echocardiography demonstrated a mild mitral valve prolapse. The 43-year-old patient's mother presented an undiagnosed Marfan's syndrome, despite typical morphotype, muscle-skeletal alterations and moderate dilation of ascending aorta. The maternal grand-mother deceased prematurely for cardiopathy of unknown origin. It is stressed that the disease should not be underestimated, because the early diagnosis is important for the patient's prognosis, allowing the early preventive surgical intervention for correcting aortic or valvular alterations. The echocardiography represents a sensitive and noninvasive mean, useful to manage the patients with proven or suspected aortic dilation. The subjects with Marfan's syndrome who exhibit rapid progression of aortic dilation, or an aortic diameter in excess of 50 mm, should be considered for an elective surgical intervention (at low mortality and suitable to increase remarkably the lifetime expectation). Women with syndrome of Marfan should be advised on the high cardio-vascular risk during pregnancy. PMID:8700348

  3. Gastrointestinal bleeding from Dieulafoy's lesion: Clinical presentation, endoscopic findings, and endoscopic therapy.

    PubMed

    Nojkov, Borko; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2015-04-16

    Although relatively uncommon, Dieulafoy's lesion is an important cause of acute gastrointestinal bleeding due to the frequent difficulty in its diagnosis; its tendency to cause severe, life-threatening, recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding; and its amenability to life-saving endoscopic therapy. Unlike normal vessels of the gastrointestinal tract which become progressively smaller in caliber peripherally, Dieulafoy's lesions maintain a large caliber despite their peripheral, submucosal, location within gastrointestinal wall. Dieulafoy's lesions typically present with severe, active, gastrointestinal bleeding, without prior symptoms; often cause hemodynamic instability and often require transfusion of multiple units of packed erythrocytes. About 75% of lesions are located in the stomach, with a marked proclivity of lesions within 6 cm of the gastroesophageal junction along the gastric lesser curve, but lesions can also occur in the duodenum and esophagus. Lesions in the jejunoileum or colorectum have been increasingly reported. Endoscopy is the first diagnostic test, but has only a 70% diagnostic yield because the lesions are frequently small and inconspicuous. Lesions typically appear at endoscopy as pigmented protuberances from exposed vessel stumps, with minimal surrounding erosion and no ulceration (visible vessel sans ulcer). Endoscopic therapy, including clips, sclerotherapy, argon plasma coagulation, thermocoagulation, or electrocoagulation, is the recommended initial therapy, with primary hemostasis achieved in nearly 90% of cases. Dual endoscopic therapy of epinephrine injection followed by ablative or mechanical therapy appears to be effective. Although banding is reportedly highly successful, it entails a small risk of gastrointestinal perforation from banding deep mural tissue. Therapeutic alternatives after failed endoscopic therapy include repeat endoscopic therapy, angiography, or surgical wedge resection. The mortality has declined from about 30% during the 1970's to 9%-13% currently with the advent of aggressive endoscopic therapy. PMID:25901208

  4. Progressive outer retinal necrosis syndrome: a comprehensive review of its clinical presentation, relationship to immune system status, and management.

    PubMed

    Austin

    2000-12-01

    Progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) syndrome is a form of the Varicella zoster virus (VZV) chorioretinitis found almost exclusively in people with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). This destructive infection has an extremely rapid course that may lead to no light perception in affected eyes within days or weeks. Attempts at its treatment have had limited success. Rhegmatogenous retinal detachments often occur after the development of atrophic retinal holes, and silicone oil temponade has been found to be the most successful reattachment procedure. Unfortunately, cataract formation is common after such surgery. PORN needs to be differentiated from acute retinal necrosis (ARN) syndrome, a necrotizing retinitis that can also be caused by VZV. PORN and ARN are found at opposite ends of the spectrum of necrotizing herpetic retinopathies (NHR), where its clinical presentation depends upon immune system status. After a brief case presentation, the distinguishing clinical characteristics of PORN, its differentiation from ARN, attempts at its treatment, the role of the immune system status on its clinical appearance and treatment, and management of complications such as retinal detachment and subsequent cataracts are discussed. PMID:11137426

  5. Autoimmune Cytopenia in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma (CLL): Changes in Clinical Presentation and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Zent, Clive S.; Ding, Wei; Reinalda, Megan S.; Schwager, Susan M.; Hoyer, James D.; Bowen, Deborah A.; Jelinek, Diane F.; Tschumper, Renee C.; Call, Timothy G.; Shanafelt, Tait D.; Kay, Neil E.; Slager, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    Improved medical care could have altered the clinical presentation and survival of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL) complicated by autoimmune cytopenia (AID cytopenia). We reviewed the clinical characteristics, treatment, and outcome of AID cytopenia that was diagnosed in 75 (4.3%) of 1750 CLL patients seen at a single institution over 10 years. Compared to historical reported data, our study shows a lower rate of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (2.3%), and similar rates of immune thrombocytopenia (2.0%) and pure red blood cell aplasia (0.5%). AID cytopenia occurred at all stages of CLL, responded well to treatment, did not alter overall survival, and contributed to death in only 6 (12%) patients. We propose that more sensitive and accurate diagnostic methods for CLL have decreased the perceived prevalence of AID cytopenia and that improvements in management could have increased the survival of these patients. PMID:19811329

  6. A rare case of swyer-james macleod syndrome and a new clinical presentation, acquired lobar emphysema.

    PubMed

    Yekeler, Erdal

    2012-05-01

    Swyer-James Macleod syndrome is a radiologic entity characterized by hyperlucency of one or more lobes or of the entire lung, decreased number and diameter of ipsilateral peripheral pulmonary vessels, and difficult visibility of the arterial network and unobstructed bronchial system. A 21-year-old male was admitted to our clinic on the observation of left hemithoracic hyperinflation on chest radiography. Preoperative evaluation revealed an increase of ventilation to the left lower lobe and the deletion of peripheral vascular structures. Scintigraphy revealed a perfusion defect in the left lower lobe. In this patient with congenital left upper lobe hypoplasia and Swyer-James Macleod syndrome in the lower half of the lower lobe, I present the coexistence of these two rare clinical entities and "acquired lobar emphysema." PMID:22541234

  7. [Investigation of orthostatic hypotension by the provoked hypercapnia test (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Holzapfel, L; Robert, D; Blanc, P L; Bertoye, A

    1980-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension results from an alteration in the baroreflex at any level with subsequent disturbance in blood pressure homeostasis in response to variations. The second part of this reflex arc, from the bulbar vasopressor centre to the peripheral effector sites, can be explored directly by studying the hemodynamic response to an increase in arterial CO2 levels. Normally the response is an increase in blood pressure, but under abnormal conditions there is a reduction. Orthostatic hypotension with a normal hemodynamic response to increased CO2 levels indicates that the first part of the reflex arc is involved, an abnormal response is due to the second part being affected. The CO2 test was conducted in 8 subjects with orthostatic hypotension (bulbar lesions, medullary lesions, idiopathic orthostatic hypotension, polyradiculoneuritis, primary amylosis). Comparing the typical anatomoclinical characteristics of each of the lesions explored with the results of the hemodynamic response to CO2 test suggests that the interpretation proposed is a valid one. PMID:6784632

  8. Hypotension as a risk factor for acute kidney injury in ICU patients

    E-print Network

    Lehman, Li-Wei H.

    In the context of critical illness, hypotension may be associated with acute kidney injury (AKI). Using the MIMIC II database, we studied the risk of AKI in ICU patients as a function of both the severity and duration of ...

  9. Hypotensive Anesthesia versus Normotensive Anesthesia during Major Maxillofacial Surgery: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Yoav, Leiser; Abu el-Naaj, Imad

    2015-01-01

    Steady blood pressure within normal limits during surgery is one of the markers of the ideal and skillful anesthesia. Yet, reduced blood pressure is advantageous in some settings because it can contribute to a reduction in overall blood loss and improve the surgical field conditions. Controlled hypotension during anesthesia or hypotensive anesthesia is often used in major maxillofacial operations. Since hypotensive anesthesia carries the risk of hypoperfusion to important organs and tissues, mainly the brain, heart, and kidneys, it cannot be applied safely in all patients. In this paper we review the medical literature regarding hypotensive anesthesia during major maxillofacial surgery, the means to achieve it, and the risks and benefits of this technique, in comparison to normotensive anesthesia.

  10. Predicting acute hypotensive episodes: The 10th annual PhysioNet/Computers in Cardiology Challenge

    E-print Network

    Moody, George B.

    This year's PhysioNet/Computers in Cardiology Challenge aimed to stimulate development of methods for identifying intensive care unit (ICU) patients at imminent risk of acute hypotensive episodes (AHEs), motivated by the ...

  11. A hypotensive episode predictor for intensive care based on heart rate and blood pressure time series

    E-print Network

    Lee, J.

    In the intensive care unit (ICU), prompt therapeutic intervention to hypotensive episodes (HEs) is a critical task. Advance alerts that can prospectively identify patients at risk of developing an HE in the next few hours ...

  12. Differences in Clinical Presentation and Findings between Idiopathic Dilated and Ischaemic Cardiomyopathy in an Unselected Population of Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mantziari, Lilian; Ziakas, Antonis; Ventoulis, Ioannis; Kamperidis, Vasileios; Lilis, Leonidas; Katsiki, Niki; Karavasiliadou, Savvato; Kiraklidis, Konstantinos; Pliakos, Christodoulos; Gemitzis, Konstantinos; Karvounis, Haralambos; Styliadis, Ioannis H

    2012-01-01

    We explored the differences in epidemiologic, clinical, laboratory and echocardiographic characteristics between idiopathic dilated (IDCM) and ischaemic cardiomyopathy (ICM). Consecutive patients with stable chronic heart failure evaluated at a tertiary cardiac centre were enrolled. Clinical examination, blood tests and echocardiographic study were performed. A total of 76 patients (43 IDCM, 33 ICM) were studied. IDCM patients were younger (p<0.001) and female gender was more prevalent (p=0.022). NYHA class and left ventricular ejection fraction were similar. IDCM patients had lower rates of dyslipidaemia (p<0.001) but smoked more than ICM patients (p=0.023) and had higher rates of family history of sudden cardiac death (p=0.048). Blood pressure was similar but resting heart rate was higher in IDCM patients (p=0.022). IDCM patients presented less frequently with peripheral oedema or ascites (p=0.046 and 0.020, respectively) and showed better right ventricular function on echocardiogram. QRS duration was similar between groups but only in IDCM patients there was a positive correlation between QRS duration and age (r=0.619, p<0.001). Cardiac output was similar but functional capacity assessed by the Duke Activity Status Index was better in IDCM (p=0.036). Despite these differences, IDCM and ICM patients received similar treatments. Patients with IDCM were younger, presented lower rates of right ventricular dysfunction and clinical right ventricular failure and had better functional capacity. Additional differences in clinical and laboratory findings exist pointing to a different patient population with diverse prognosis and potential need for individualized management. PMID:23002403

  13. Systemic bacteraemia in children presenting with clinical pneumonia and the impact of non-typhoid salmonella (NTS)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The diagnosis and antimicrobial treatment of pneumonia in African children in the absence of diagnostic means such as x-ray facilities or microbiological laboratories relies primarily on clinical symptoms presented by the patients. In order to assess the spectrum of bacterial pathogens, blood cultures were performed in children fulfilling the clinical criteria of pneumonia. Methods In total, 1032 blood cultures were taken from children between 2 months and 5 years of age who were admitted to a rural hospital in Ghana between September 2007 and July 2009. Pneumonia was diagnosed clinically and according to WHO criteria classified as "non-severe pneumonia" and "severe pneumonia" ("severe pneumonia" includes the WHO categories "severe pneumonia" and "very severe pneumonia"). Results The proportion of bacteriaemia with non-typhoid salmonella (NTS) was similar in children with pneumonia (16/173, 9.2%) compared to children hospitalized for other reasons (112/859, 13%). NTS were the predominant organisms isolated from children with clinical pneumonia and significantly more frequent than Streptococcus pneumoniae (8/173, 4.6%). Nine percent (9/101) of children presenting with severe pneumonia and 10% (7/72) of children with non-severe pneumonia were infected with NTS. Nineteen out of 123 NTS isolates (15%) were susceptible to aminopenicillins (amoxycillin/ampicillin), 23/127 (18%) to chlorampenicol, and 23/98 (23%) to co-trimoxazole. All NTS isolates were sensitive to ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin. Conclusion In Sub-saharan Africa, sepsis with NTS should be considered in children with symptoms of pneumonia and aminopenicillins might often not be the adequate drugs for treatment. PMID:21050455

  14. Clinical Presentation and Outcome in Hospitalized Patients of 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) viral infection in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Akhwand Shakeel; Puttaswamy, Chandrashekar; Mudasser, Sayed; Abdelaziz, Omaima

    2011-01-01

    Objectives In 2009, cases of human infection with a novel influenza A (H1N1) virus were detected and soon reached a pandemic level. Presenting clinical features of this disease in Oman were observed and an attempt was made to identify features predicting the high risk of mortality. Methods The clinical and laboratory features at the time of presentation in adult patients admitted with flu-like illness or pneumonia were studied who were later diagnosed as H1N1 infection by PCR of nasopharyngeal and/or throat swabs. Results H1N1 infection mostly affected younger individuals who presented with fever and cough. One-third of the patients had rhinorrhea and a few had vomiting and diarrhea. Chest crepitations were common. Most of the patients had normal or low cell counts. The chest X-ray was normal in 23 (41.8%) cases, while in other cases pneumonia was detected characteristically starting from base and extending up. Almost half of the patients were either in frank or impending respiratory failure. Nine (16.4%) patients died. Conclusion It is difficult to identify H1N1 influenza cases from other patients with a flu-like illness, but it can be strongly suspected when a patient presents with basal pneumonia, particularly if bilateral, with lymphocytopenia, and is hypoxemic, in the presence of other H1N1 infected cases in the community. These features are also indicative of severe illness with high mortality risk. PMID:22125727

  15. Hypotensive effects and performance responses between different resistance training intensities and exercise orders in apparently health women.

    PubMed

    Bentes, Claudio M; Costa, Pablo B; Neto, Gabriel R; Costa E Silva, Gabriel V; de Salles, Belmiro F; Miranda, Humberto L; Novaes, Jefferson S

    2015-05-01

    To compare the hypotensive effect and performance responses between different resistance training intensities and different exercise orders in apparently healthy women, thirteen apparently healthy women performed four resistance training sessions in randomized order. One group performed the resistance training exercises with 60% of 1RM (SeqA60%): leg press (LG), chest press (CP), leg extension (LE), lat pull down (PD), leg curl (LC) and biceps curl (BC). Another group performed the resistance training exercises with 80% of 1RM (SeqA80%) with the same exercise order. Two other groups performed the resistance training exercises with 60% (SeqB60%) and 80% of 1RM (SeqB80%), however, in another sequence of exercises: CP, PD, BC or LG, LE, LC. The blood pressure was measured before, and at every 15 min until 60 min postexercise. The different intensities and different exercise orders resulted in a significant hypotensive effect in systolic and diastolic blood pressures that remained until 15 min. In addition, significant reductions in systolic blood pressure were observed at 30 min for SeqA in both intensities and for SeqB with intensities of 80% of 1RM. However, there was no significant difference between intensities and different prescription orders (P>0·05). Although the current study showed significant decreases in systolic and diastolic blood pressures after different resistance training sessions, the manipulation of intensity and exercise sequence, such as those used in the present study, was not able to generate significant changes in the duration and magnitude of hypotensive effect. PMID:24690383

  16. Diuretic, hypotensive, and hypocholesterolemic effects of Eclipta alba in mild hypertensive subjects: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rangineni, Vasavi; Sharada, D; Saxena, Saileshnath

    2007-03-01

    The combined effect of dried Eclipta alba leaf powder (3 g/day) in encapsulated form on blood pressure, diuresis, and lipid profile of 60 mildly hypertensive male subjects in the age group of 40-55 years was studied. The subjects were divided into two groups, i.e., a control (placebo) and the Eclipta group, and were given six capsules (500 mg each) per day in three equal doses for a period of 60 days. Clinical parameters, viz., blood pressure, urine volume, electrolytes (Na and K) in serum and urine, lipid profile, and plasma lipid peroxides, were analyzed before and after the feeding trials. The findings revealed that the Eclipta-supplemented group showed a marked reduction in mean arterial pressure by 15%, total cholesterol (17%), low-density lipoprotein fraction (24%), triglycerides (14%), very-low-density lipoprotein fraction (14%), and plasma lipid peroxides (18%). Results also revealed a remarkable increase in urine volume (34%), urine sodium (24%), serum vitamin C (17%), and serum tocopherols (23%) of the Eclipta group. In conclusion, it would appear that E. alba is diuretic, hypotensive, and hypocholesterolemic and helps in the alleviating oxidative stress-induced complications in hypertensives. PMID:17472478

  17. Caffeine Attenuates Early Post-Exercise Hypotension in Middle-Aged Subjects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Catherine F. Notarius; Beverley L. Morris; John S. Floras

    2006-01-01

    Background: Sustained hypotension after an acute dynamic exercise bout is due primarily to peripheral vasodilation. We tested the hypothesis that adenosine-mediated vasodilation contributes to hypotension after exercise, by determining the effect of blocking its actions with caffeine.Methods: Fourteen healthy middle-aged subjects (mean age = 51 ± 3 years), cycled to peak effort on 2 study days, after a randomized double-blind

  18. Solving the problem of spinal-induced hypotension in obstetric anesthesia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alison Macarthur

    2002-01-01

    HIS issue’s quantitative systematic review of ephedrine’s effect in reducing maternal hypotension during spinal anesthesia for Cesarean delivery is of interest to obstetric anesthesiologists. 1 Unfortunately the review does not hand us the “Holy Grail” of obstetric anesthesia – an infallible technique to prevent spinal anesthesiainduced hypotension. We can however, reflect upon the scientific study of this topic and re-evaluate

  19. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and orthostatic hypotension in old people: the Pro.V.A. study.

    PubMed

    Veronese, Nicola; Bolzetta, Francesco; De Rui, Marina; Zambon, Sabina; Corti, Maria-Chiara; Musacchio, Estella; Baggio, Giovannella; Crepaldi, Gaetano; Perissinotto, Egle; Manzato, Enzo; Sergi, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    Interest in the association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) and blood pressure has increased because recent research showed a close relationship between them, but there is still little information on the possible association between 25OHD and orthostatic hypotension. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship of 25OHD levels with any presence of orthostatic hypotension in a large group of older people. This study was part of the Progetto Veneto Anziani (Pro.V.A.), an Italian population-based cohort study involving people aged >65 years. In this cross-sectional work, we considered 2640 (1081 men and 1559 women) with a mean age of 73.8±6.8 years. Orthostatic hypotension was defined as a drop of ?20 mm Hg in systolic or ?10 mm Hg in diastolic blood pressure <3 minutes of orthostatism. Orthostatic hypotension was identified in 32.2% of the sample. The prevalence of orthostatic hypotension was higher in individuals with 25OHD levels <50 nmol/L, but this trend was not significant (P=0.13). Individuals who had orthostatic hypotension had significantly lower 25OHD levels than those who did not (75.0±51.4 versus 82.6±54.0 nmol/L; P<0.0001). On logistic regression analysis, the greater likelihood of individuals with lower 25OHD levels having orthostatic hypotension was no longer statistically significant after adjusting for potential confounders (odds ratio, 1.08; 95% confidence interval, 0.77-1.51; P=0.67 for people with 25OHD levels ?25 nmol/L; odds ratio, 1.01; 95% confidence interval, 0.78-1.32; P=0.92 for those with 25OHD levels between 25 and 50 nmol/L). In conclusion, vitamin D is not significantly associated with any orthostatic hypotension in older people. PMID:24914191

  20. Glibenclamide-sensitive hypotension produced by helodermin assessed in the rat.

    PubMed

    Horikawa, N; Kataha, K; Watanabe, N; Ishii, K; Yanaihara, N; Tanaka, Y; Shigenobu, K; Nakayama, K

    1998-12-01

    The effects of helodermin, a basic 35-amino acid peptide isolated from the venom of a lizard salivary gland, on arterial blood pressure and heart rate were examined in the rat, focusing on the possibility that activation of ATP sensitive K+ (K(ATP)) channels is involved in the responses. The results were also compared with those of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). Helodermin produced hypotension in a dose-dependent manner with approximately similar potency and duration to VIP. Hypotension induced by both peptides was significantly attenuated by glibenclamide, which abolished a levcromakalim-produced decrease in arterial blood pressure. Oxyhemoglobin did not affect helodermin-induced hypotension, whereas it shortened the duration of acetylcholine (ACh)-produced hypotension. These findings suggest that helodermin-produced hypotension is partly attributable to the activation of glibenclamide-sensitive K+ channels (K(ATP) channels), which presumably exist on arterial smooth muscle cells. EDRF (endothelium-derived relaxing factor)/nitric oxide does not seem to play an important role in the peptide-produced hypotension. PMID:9881641

  1. Exercise training hypotension - Implications for plasma volume, renin, and vasopressin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Sciaraffa, D.; Shvartz, E.; Keil, L. C.; Brock, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    The relation of changes in plasma volume, plasma renin activity and arginine vasopressin to changes in resting blood pressure during exercise training is investigated. Resting supine, sitting, and standing systolic and fifth-phase diastolic blood pressures were measured in ten men before and after an eight-day training period on a cycle ergometer in either a hot (39.8 C) or cool (23.8 C) environment, and compared with plasma volume, renin and vasopressin levels, heart rates, maximal oxygen uptakes, rectal temperatures and sweat rates. Following acclimatization, resting supine and sitting diastolic pressures are observed to decrease by 6 and 9 mm Hg, respectively, while no significant changes are found in the diastolic pressures of the control group or the systolic pressures of either group. Resting plasma volume is found to increase by 12.2% in the controls and by 17.6% after acclimatization following the exercise training. Results suggest that the resting hypotension produced is not attributable to changes in resting plasma volume, renin or vasopressin, although heat acclimatization, which leads to large decreases in plasma volume and increases in vasopressin and renin activity, may be useful in the treatment of hypertension.

  2. Intrinsic multipotential mesenchymal stromal cell activity in gelatinous Heberden’s nodes in osteoarthritis at clinical presentation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Gelatinous Heberden’s nodes (HNs), also termed synovial cysts, are a common form of generalized osteoarthritis (OA). We sought to determine whether HN cases at clinical presentation contained multipotential stromal cells (MSCs) and to explore whether such cells were more closely related to bone marrow (BM) or synovial fluid (SF) MSCs by transcriptional analysis. Methods At clinical presentation, gelatinous material was extracted/extruded from the distal phalangeal joint of OA patients with HNs. From this, plastic adherent cells were culture-expanded for phenotypic and functional characterization and comparison with BM- and SF-MSCs. Mesenchymal related gene expression was studied by using a custom-designed TaqMan Low Density Array to determine transcriptional similarities between different MSC groups and skin fibroblasts. Results In all cases, HN material produced MSC-like colonies. Adherent cultures displayed an MSC phenotype (CD29+, CD44+, CD73+, CD81+, and CD90+ and CD14- CD19-, CD31-, CD34-, CD45-, and HLADR-) and exhibited osteogenic, chondrogenic lineage differentiation but weak adipogenesis. Gene cluster analysis showed that HN-MSCs were more closely related to SF- than normal or OA BM-MSCs with significantly higher expression of synovium-related gene markers such as bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4), bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 1A (BMPR1A), protein/leucine-rich end leucine-rich repeat protein (PRELP), secreted frizzled-related protein 4 (SFRP4), and tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced protein 6 (TNFAIP6) (P <0.05). Conclusions Gelatinous HNs derived from hand OA at clinical presentation contain a population of MSCs that share transcriptional similarities with SF-derived MSCs. Their aberrant entrapment within the synovial cysts may impact on their normal role in joint homeostasis. PMID:24894724

  3. Aortic Dissection: Clinical Presentation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ragavendra R. Baliga; Jai Raman; Kim Eagle

    More ink than blood has been split on the subject of aortic dissections, beginning with the first well-documented case of\\u000a aortic dissection—George II of England, who died while straining on the commode. Morgagni first described aortic dissection\\u000a more than 200 years ago. The advent and adoption of modern cardiac surgical procedures have dramatically altered the outcome\\u000a what was once a

  4. Incidentally discovered goblet cell carcinoid clinically presenting as acute intestinal obstruction: a case report with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Afroz, Nishat; Shamim, Nida; Sofi, Lateef Ahmed; Rizvi, Syed Amjad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Goblet cell carcinoid (GCC) is a rare variant of carcinoid tumor that exclusively involves the appendix. It usually occurs in 5th-6th decade with the most common clinical presentation being acute appendicitis. The natural history of this tumor is intermediate between carcinoids and adenocarcinomas. We here report a case of GCC diagnosed incidentally in a patient presenting with acute intestinal obstruction. Ultrasonographic examination supported the clinical diagnosis of acute intestinal obstruction, following which the patient underwent laparotomy and resection of ileum along with appendix was done. On gross pathological examination, a nodular growth was present on the tip and body of appendix that was yellow in color with a semi-solid to mucoid consistency on cut section. On microscopy, lakes of mucin with few acinar structures floating in them were seen. The submucosa as well as serosa were infiltrated by clusters of goblet cells and well-formed acini, with little atypia. Glands and nests were positive for periodic acid Schiff and immunohistochemistry showed focal chromogranin positivity in glandular structures, thereby confirming the diagnosis of GCC. Although the prognosis of GCC is better than adenocarcinomas, it is one of the carcinoids having a poorer outcome when compared with other variants of carcinoid tumor. Therefore, it is important to rule out other differential diagnoses of goblet cell carcinoid, the most important being mucinous adenocarcinomas. PMID:24739849

  5. An Unusual Clinical Presentation of Kimura's Disease Occurring on the Buttock of a Five-year-old Boy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won Jun; Hur, Jae; Ko, Joo Yeon; Yeo, Kwang Yeoll; Kim, Joung Soo

    2010-01-01

    Kimura's disease is a rare inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology primarily seen in young Asian males. It is characterized by painless subcutaneous masses, blood and tissue eosinophilia, and markedly elevated serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels. Clinically, the subcutaneous nodules occur predominantly in the head and neck. However, we report the case of a five-year-old boy presenting with an asymptomatic solitary brown pigmented nodule on the left buttock diagnosed with Kimura's disease. Here we describe the diagnosis and treatment of this unusual case. PMID:20548883

  6. Left ventricular diastolic function in workers occupationally exposed to mercury vapour without clinical presentation of cardiac involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Por?ba, Rafa?, E-mail: sogood@poczta.onet.pl; Skoczy?ska, Anna; Ga?, Pawe?; Turczyn, Barbara; Wojakowska, Anna

    2012-09-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate left ventricular diastolic function in workers occupationally exposed to mercury vapour without clinical presentation of cardiac involvement. The studies included 115 workers (92 men and 23 women) occupationally exposed to mercury vapour without clinical presentation of cardiac involvement (mean age: 47.83 ± 8.29). Blood samples were taken to determine blood lipid profile, urine was collected to estimate mercury concentration (Hg-U) and echocardiographic examination was performed to evaluate diastolic function of the left ventricle. In the entire group of workers occupationally exposed to mercury vapour without clinical presentation of cardiac involvement, Spearman correlations analysis demonstrated the following significant linear relationships: between body mass index (BMI) and ratio of maximal early diastolic mitral flow velocity/early diastolic mitral annular velocity (E/E') (r = 0.32, p < 0.05), between serum HDL concentration and E/E' (r = ? 0.22, p < 0.05), between Hg-U and E/E' (r = 0.35, p < 0.05), between Hg-U and isovolumetric relaxation time (IVRT') (r = 0.41, p < 0.05), between Hg-U and ratio of maximal early diastolic mitral flow velocity/maximal late diastolic mitral flow velocity (E/A) (r = ? 0.31, p < 0.05) and between serum HDL concentration and E/A (r = 0.43, p < 0,05). In logistic regression analysis it as shown that independent factors of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction risk in the study group included a higher urine mercury concentration, a higher value of BMI and a lower serum HDL concentration (OR{sub Hg}-{sub U} = 1.071, OR{sub BMI} = 1.200, OR{sub HDL} = 0.896, p < 0.05). Summing up, occupational exposure to mercury vapour may be linked to impaired left ventricular diastolic function in workers without clinical presentation of cardiac involvement. -- Highlights: ? Study aimed at evaluation of LVDD in workers occupationally exposed to Hg. ? There was significant linear relationships between Hg-U and E/E'. ? Independent risk factor of LVDD in study group included higher Hg-U. ? Independent risk factor of LVDD in study group included higher BMI and lower HDL. ? Occupational exposure to Hg may be linked to LVDD.

  7. Squamous Carcinoma of the Lung Presenting as Migraine-Type Headache: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Waran, Eswaran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Orthostatic hypotension has long been recognised as a paraneoplastic effect of lung cancer. Lung cancer presenting with orthostatic hypotension and migraine-type headaches has not been previously described in the literature. Case Report A 62-year-old Caucasian male presented with headaches, typical of his migraine, after a 30-year migraine-free period. An examination revealed a significant postural drop in BP with reflex tachycardia and no other features of dysautonomia. Investigations showed a metastatic squamous cell lung cancer. Pharmacological treatment of orthostatic hypotension resolved the migraine-type headaches. Discussion Orthostatic hypotension is associated with lung cancer. Prompt pharmacological treatment in patients not responding to non-pharmacological therapy can provide relief from disabling symptoms of orthostatic hypotension. In this patient, this included symptoms consistent with migraine-type headaches.

  8. Occult cystobiliary communication presenting as postoperative biliary leakage after hydatid liver surgery: Are there significant preoperative clinical predictors?

    PubMed Central

    Demircan, Orhan; Baymus, Mustafa; Seydaoglu, Gülsah; Akinoglu, Alper; Sakman, Gürhan

    2006-01-01

    Background Occult cystobiliary communication (CBC) presents with biliary leakage, if the cystobiliary opening cannot be detected and repaired at operation. We investigated the clinical signs associated with the risk of occult CBC in the preoperative period by studying patients who developed biliary leakage after hydatid liver surgery. Methods We analyzed the records of 191 patients treated for hydatid liver cyst. Postoperative biliary leakage developed in 41 patients (21.5%). Independent predictive factors were established by logistic regression analysis using clinical parameters, whose cutoff values were determined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results Postoperative biliary leakage presented as external biliary fistula in 31 (75.6%) of 41 patients, as biliary peritonitis in 6 (14.6%) and as cyst cavity biliary abscess in 4 (9.8%). Independent clinical predictors of occult CBC, represented by biliary leakage, were alkaline phosphatase > 250 U/L, total bilirubin > 17.1 ?mol/L, direct bilirubin > 6.8 ?mol/L, ?-glutamyl transferase > 34.5 U/L, eosinophils > 0.09 and cyst diameter > 8.5 cm. Multilocular or degenerate cysts increased the risk of biliary leakage (p = 0.012). Postoperative complication rates were 53.7% in the patients with biliary leakage, and 10.0% (p < 0.001) in those without. The mean postoperative hospital stay was longer in patients with biliary leakage (14.3 [and standard deviation {SD} 1.9] d) than in those without (7.3 [SD 2.3] d) (p < 0.001). Nineteen (61.3%) of 31 biliary fistulae closed spontaneously within 10 days. The remaining 12 (38.7%) fistulae closed within 7 days after endoscopic sphincterotomy. Conclusion Factors that predict occult CBC due to hydatid liver cyst were identified. These factors should allow the likelihood of CBC to be determined and, thus, indicate the need for additional procedures during operation to prevent the complications of biliary leakage. PMID:16749978

  9. Deconstructing Negative Symptoms of Schizophrenia: Avolition-Apathy and Diminished Expression Clusters Predict Clinical Presentation and Functional Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Gregory P.; Horan, William P.; Kirkpatrick, Brian; Fischer, Bernard A.; Keller, William R.; Miski, Pinar; Buchanan, Robert W.; Green, Michael F.; Carpenter, William T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies indicate that negative symptoms reflect a separable domain of pathology from other symptoms of schizophrenia. However, it is currently unclear whether negative symptoms themselves are multi-faceted, and whether sub-groups of patients who display unique negative symptom profiles can be identified. Methods A data-driven approach was used to examine the heterogeneity of negative symptom presentations in two samples: Study 1 included 199 individuals with schizophrenia assessed with a standard measure of negative symptoms and Study 2 included 169 individuals meeting criteria for deficit schizophrenia (i.e., primary and enduring negative symptoms) assessed with a specialized measure of deficit symptoms. Cluster analysis was used to determine whether different groups of patients with distinct negative symptoms profiles could be identified. Results Across both studies, we found evidence for two distinctive negative symptom sub-groups: one group with predominantly Avolition-Apathy (AA) symptoms and another with a predominantly Diminished Expression (DE) profile. Follow-up discriminant function analyses confirmed the validity of these groups. AA and DE negative symptom sub-groups significantly differed on clinically relevant external validators, including measures of functional outcome, premorbid adjustment, clinical course, disorganized symptoms, social cognition, sex, and ethnicity. Conclusions These results suggest that distinct subgroups of patients with elevated AA or DE can be identified within the broader diagnosis of schizophrenia and that these subgroups show clinically meaningful differences in presentation. Additionally, AA tends to be associated with poorer outcomes than DE, suggesting that it may be a more severe aspect of psychopathology. PMID:23453820

  10. Suggested guidelines for using systemic antimicrobials in bacterial skin infections: part 1—diagnosis based on clinical presentation, cytology and culture

    PubMed Central

    Beco, L.; Guaguère, E.; Méndez, C. Lorente; Noli, C.; Nuttall, T.; Vroom, M.

    2013-01-01

    Systemic antimicrobials are critically important in veterinary healthcare, and resistance is a major concern. Antimicrobial stewardship will be important in maintaining clinical efficacy by reducing the development and spread of antimicrobial resistance. Bacterial skin infections are one of the most common reasons for using systemic antimicrobials in dogs and cats. Appropriate management of these infections is, therefore, crucial in any policy for responsible antimicrobial use. The goals of therapy are to confirm that an infection is present, identify the causative bacteria, select the most appropriate antimicrobial, ensure that the infection is treated correctly, and to identify and manage any underlying conditions. This is the first of two articles that will provide evidence-led guidelines to help practitioners address these issues. This article covers diagnosis, including descriptions of the different clinical presentations of surface, superficial and deep bacterial skin infections, how to perform and interpret cytology, and how to best use bacterial culture and sensitivity testing. Part 2 will discuss therapy, including choice of drug and treatment regimens. PMID:23292951

  11. Angiotensin-(1-7) antagonist [D-Ala7-Ang-(1-7);A-779] attenuates post-suspension hypotension in Sprague-Dawley rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayorh, M. A.; Wang, M.; Socci, R. R.; Eatman, D.; Emmett, N.; Thierry-Palmer, M.

    1999-01-01

    Cardiovascular deconditioning manifested by reduction in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and cardioaccleration are usually observed in astronauts during standing postflight. The head-down tilt (HDT) rat model with "unloaded" hindlimbs has been extensively studied because some of the observed responses mimic observations made during exposure to microgravity. Angiotensin-(1-7) is a biologically active component of the renin-angiotensin system that acts to oppose the pressor and proliferative actions of Angiotensin II. It produces a hypotensive response by either stimulating production of vasodilator prostaglandins (i.e., prostacyclin), increasing nitric oxide or both. In the present study, we have evaluated the role of a specific inhibitor of Ang-(1-7), D-Ala7-Ang-(1-7)[A-779], as a countermeasure against post-suspension hypotension.

  12. Self-tuning adaptive control of induced hypotension in humans: a comparison of isoflurane and sodium nitroprusside.

    PubMed

    Prys-Roberts, C; Millard, R K

    1990-07-01

    Induced hypotension is commonly used during surgery to decrease arterial pressure. Sodium nitroprusside and isoflurane are well-known hypotensive agents. The use of self-tuning adaptive control of induced hypotension was assessed with the use of sodium nitroprusside and isoflurane as hypotensive agents. Nineteen surgical patients were studied during closed-loop control of hypotension induced with sodium nitroprusside. This group of patients was compared with 10 similar patients in whom infusions of sodium nitroprusside were controlled manually by an anesthesiologist. Although the results of the two studies varied, no conclusion could be drawn regarding the superiority of either manual or closed-loop control. When manual versus automatic control of isoflurane-induced hypotension was assessed in a similar fashion, the two methods of induction were found to be comparable. PMID:2380754

  13. The Incidence Risk, Clustering, and Clinical Presentation of La Crosse Virus Infections in the Eastern United States, 2003–2007

    PubMed Central

    Haddow, Andrew D.; Odoi, Agricola

    2009-01-01

    Background Although La Crosse virus (LACV) is one of the most common causes of pediatric arboviral infections in the United States, little has been done to assess its geographic distribution, identify areas of higher risk of disease, and to provide a national picture of its clinical presentation. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the geographic distribution of LACV infections reported in the United States, to identify hot-spots of infection, and to present its clinical picture. Methods and Findings Descriptive and cluster analyses were performed on probable and confirmed cases of LACV infections reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from 2003–2007. A total of 282 patients had reported confirmed LACV infections during the study period. Of these cases the majority (81 percent) presented during the summer, occurred in children 15 years and younger (83.3 percent), and were found in male children (64.9 percent). Clinically, the infections presented as meningioencephalitis (56.3 percent), encephalitis (20.7 percent), meningitis (17.2 percent), or uncomplicated fever (5 percent). Deaths occurred in 1.9 percent of confirmed cases, and in 8.6 percent of patients suffering from encephalitis. The majority of these deaths were in patients 15 years and younger. The county-level incidence risk among counties (n?=?136) reporting both probable and confirmed cases for children 15 years and younger (n?=?355) ranged from 0.2 to 228.7 per 100,000 persons. The southern United States experienced a significantly higher (p<0.05) incidence risk during the months of June, July, August, and October then the northern United States. There was significant (p<0.05) clustering of high risk in several geographic regions with three deaths attributed to complications from LAC encephalitis occurring in two of these hot-spots of infections. Conclusions Both the incidence risk and case fatality rates were found to be higher than previously reported. We detected clustering in four geographic regions, a shift from the prior geographic distributions, and developed maps identifying high-risk areas. These findings are useful for raising awareness among health care providers regarding areas at a high risk of infections and for guiding targeted multifaceted interventions by public health officials. PMID:19582158

  14. Autoregulation of cerebral blood flow in orthostatic hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, V.; Novak, P.; Spies, J. M.; Low, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We sought to evaluate cerebral autoregulation in patients with orthostatic hypotension (OH). METHODS: We studied 21 patients (aged 52 to 78 years) with neurogenic OH during 80 degrees head-up tilt. Blood flow velocities (BFV) from the middle cerebral artery were continuously monitored with transcranial Doppler sonography, as were heart rate, blood pressure (BP), cardiac output, stroke volume, CO2, total peripheral resistance, and cerebrovascular resistance. RESULTS: All OH patients had lower BP (P<.0001), BFV_diastolic (P<.05), CVR (P<.007), and TPR (P<.02) during head-up tilt than control subjects. In control subjects, no correlations between BFV and BP were found during head-up tilt, suggesting normal autoregulation. OH patients could be separated into those with normal or expanded autoregulation (OH_NA; n=16) and those with autoregulatory failure (OH_AF; n=5). The OH_NA group showed either no correlation between BFV and BP (n=8) or had a positive BFV/BP correlation (R2>.75) but with a flat slope. An expansion of the "autoregulated" range was seen in some patients. The OH_AF group was characterized by a profound fall in BFV in response to a small reduction in BP (mean deltaBP <40 mm Hg; R2>.75). CONCLUSIONS: The most common patterns of cerebral response to OH are autoregulatory failure with a flat flow-pressure relationship or intact autoregulation with an expanded autoregulated range. The least common pattern is autoregulatory failure with a steep flow-pressure relationship. Patients with patterns 1 and 2 have an enhanced capacity to cope with OH, while those with pattern 3 have reduced capacity.

  15. 'Non-hypotensive' hypovolaemia reduces ascending aortic dimensions in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, J A; Halliwill, J R; Brown, T E; Hayano, J; Eckberg, D L

    1995-01-01

    1. The notion that small, 'non-hypotensive' reductions of effective blood volume alter neither arterial pressure nor arterial baroreceptor activity is pervasive in the experimental literature. We tested two hypotheses: (a) that minute arterial pressure and cardiac autonomic outflow changes during hypovolaemia induced by lower body suction in humans are masked by alterations in breathing, and (b) that evidence for arterial baroreflex engagement might be obtained from measurements of thoracic aorta dimensions. 2. In two studies, responses to graded lower body suction at 0 (control), 5, 10, 15, 20 and 40 mmHg were examined in twelve and ten healthy young men, respectively. In the first, arterial pressure (photoplethysmograph), R-R interval, and respiratory sinus arrhythmia amplitude (complex demodulation) were measured during uncontrolled and controlled breathing (constant breathing frequency and tidal volume). In the second, cross-sectional areas of the ascending thoracic aorta were calculated from nuclear magnetic resonance images. 3. Lower body suction with controlled breathing resulted in an increased arterial pulse pressure at mild levels (5-20 mmHg; ANOVA, P < 0.05) and a decreased arterial pulse pressure at moderate levels (40 mmHg; ANOVA, P < 0.05). Both R-R intervals and respiratory sinus arrhythmia were negatively related to lower body suction level, whether group averages (general linear regression, r > 0.92) or individual subjects (orthogonal polynomials, 12 of 12 subjects) were assessed. 4. Aortic pulse area decreased progressively and significantly during mild lower body suction, with 47% of the total decline occurring by 5 mmHg. 5. These results suggest that small reductions of effective blood volume reduce aortic baroreceptive areas and trigger haemodynamic adjustments which are so efficient that alterations in arterial pressure escape detection by conventional means. Images Figure 1 PMID:7776239

  16. Present at the creation: the clinical pastoral movement and the origins of the dialogue between religion and psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Hart, Curtis W; Div, M

    2010-12-01

    The contemporary dialogue between religion and psychiatry has its roots in what is called the clinical pastoral movement. The early leaders of the clinical pastoral movement (Anton Boisen, Elwood Worcester, Helen Flanders Dunbar, and Richard Cabot) were individuals of talent, even genius, whose lives and work intersected one another in the early decades of the twentieth century. Their legacy endures in the persons they inspired and continue to inspire and in the professional organizations and academic programs that profit from their pioneering work. To understand them and the era of their greatest productivity is to understand some of what psychiatry and religion have to say to each other. Appreciating their legacy requires attention to the context of historical movements and forces current in America at the end of the nineteenth and the beginning of the twentieth century that shaped religious, psychiatric, and cultural discourse. This essay attempts to provide an introduction to this rich and fascinating material. This material was first presented as a Grand Rounds lecture at The New York Presbyterian Hospital, Payne Whitney Westchester in the Department of Psychiatry, Weill Cornell Medical College. PMID:20300962

  17. Video-based feedback of oral clinical presentations reduces the anxiety of ICU medical students: a multicentre, prospective, randomized study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Oral presentations of clinical cases by medical students during medical rounds in hospital wards are a source of anxiety and little is known about how this anxiety can be alleviated. The objective of this study was to investigate whether video-based feedback of public oral presentations can reduce anxiety in 4th year medical students. Methods Multicentre randomized study conducted in six intensive care units (ICU) and emergency departments (ED) in France over a 9-month period in 2012. One hundred and forty two 4th year medical students were randomized to two groups: intervention and control. Students in the intervention group were recorded while making an oral presentation of a patient during morning ward rounds, followed by video-based feedback. Students in the control group conducted presented classical oral presentations without being filmed and with no formal feedback. Anxiety levels during a public oral presentation were assessed using the Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S). The primary outcome was the difference in STAI-S scores between groups at the beginning and at the end of a 3-month ICU or ED internship. Results Seventy four students were randomized to the ‘video-based feedback’ group and 68 were randomized to the control group. In both groups, STAI-S scores were significantly lower after 3 months of internship. However, the reduction in STAI-S scores was significantly greater in the “video-based feedback” group than in controls (-9.2?±?9.3 vs. –4.6?±?8.2, p?=?0.024. Compared to the control group, significantly fewer students with high-level anxiety were observed in the “video-based feedback” group after 3 months of internship (68 vs. 28%, p <0.001). Conclusions Compared to “usual practice”, video-assisted oral feedback reduced anxiety and significantly decreased the proportion of students experiencing severe anxiety. PMID:24885005

  18. A rare presentation of the double inferior vena cava with an anomalous retrocaval right ureter: embryogenesis and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pratibha; Khullar, Meenakshi; Sharma, Ravikant; Singh, Richhpal

    2013-03-01

    On dissection of the abdomen of an adult male cadaver, in addition to the normal inferior vena cava on the right side, an unusual venous channel which connected the left renal vein with the left common iliac vein was found; (probably the left inferior vena cava). The left testicular and the left suprarenal veins were opening into the left renal vein as usual. Other than this, a retrocaval ureter was found on the right side. The works of previous authors have highlighted the incidence of a venacaval duplication and its surgical implications, but here, we are presenting a unique case of a double inferior vena cava with an anomalous retrocaval ureter. A conglomeration of such vascular malformations is of immense surgical importance, and it is indicative of a grossly defective angiogenesis. Keeping in mind the clinical relevance of the variations which were observed, an attempt was made to explain them in the light of the embryogenic development. PMID:23634409

  19. A Rare Presentation of the Double Inferior Vena Cava with an Anomalous Retrocaval Right Ureter: Embryogenesis and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pratibha; Khullar, Meenakshi; Sharma, Ravikant; Singh, Richhpal

    2013-01-01

    On dissection of the abdomen of an adult male cadaver, in addition to the normal inferior vena cava on the right side, an unusual venous channel which connected the left renal vein with the left common iliac vein was found; (probably the left inferior vena cava). The left testicular and the left suprarenal veins were opening into the left renal vein as usual. Other than this, a retrocaval ureter was found on the right side. The works of previous authors have highlighted the incidence of a venacaval duplication and its surgical implications, but here, we are presenting a unique case of a double inferior vena cava with an anomalous retrocaval ureter. A conglomeration of such vascular malformations is of immense surgical importance, and it is indicative of a grossly defective angiogenesis. Keeping in mind the clinical relevance of the variations which were observed, an attempt was made to explain them in the light of the embryogenic development. PMID:23634409

  20. Clinical characteristics at presentation of type 1 diabetes mellitus in children younger than 15 years in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Stipancic, Gordana; Sepec, Marija Pozgaj; Sabolic, Lavinija La Grasta; Radica, Ana; Skrabic, Veselin; Severinski, Srecko; Tiljak, Mirjana Kujundzic

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the clinical and biochemical characteristics of type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) at presentation in children younger than 15 years in Croatia during a 9-year period, with special attention to diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) incidence. The registered data set comprised blood glucose, pH, serum bicarbonate levels, and clinical symptoms at disease manifestation. During the study period, 692 children were diagnosed with type 1 DM. Polydipsia (96.7%), polyuria (96.05%), and weight loss (82.7%) were the most frequent symptoms anticipating disease detection. Enuresis was recorded in 11.55%. A total of 36.41% patients had DKA (pH < 7.3) at disease onset. During the 9-year period, the percentage of children presenting with DKA at time of diagnosis decreased from 41.67% to 33.33% (z = 1.68, p = 0.046). A positive family history of DM, the only factor with an impact on the DKA incidence rate in our population, lowers the probability of the development of ketoacidosis. This study confirms the importance of the detection of the classic symptoms of polyuria, polydipsia, and weight loss in patients with new-onset type 1 DM. The percentage of patients with DKA at diabetes onset decreased during the observed period but is still high and includes one-third of all patients. This is why in every acutely ill child, especially at a younger age, one should evaluate the possibility of type 1 DM to avoid the development of ketoacidosis. PMID:22145453

  1. The variable presentations of glycogen storage disease type IV: a review of clinical, enzymatic and molecular studies.

    PubMed

    Moses, Shimon W; Parvari, Ruti

    2002-03-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD-IV), also known as Andersen disease or amylopectinosis (MIM 23250), is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of glycogen branching enzyme (GBE) leading to the accumulation of amylopectin-like structures in affected tissues. The disease is extremely heterogeneous in terms of tissue involvement, age of onset and clinical manifestations. The human GBE cDNA is approximately 3-kb in length and encodes a 702-amino acid protein. The GBE amino acid sequence shows a high degree of conservation throughout species. The human GBE gene is located on chromosome 3p14 and consists of 16 exons spanning at least 118 kb of chromosomal DNA. Clinically the classic Andersen disease is a rapidly progressive disorder leading to terminal liver failure unless liver transplantation is performed. Several mutations have been reported in the GBE gene in patients with classic phenotype. Mutations in the GBE gene have also been identified in patients with the milder non-progressive hepatic form of the disease. Several other variants of GSD-IV have been reported: a variant with multi-system involvement including skeletal and cardiac muscle, nerve and liver; a juvenile polysaccharidosis with multi-system involvement but normal GBE activity; and the fatal neonatal neuromuscular form associated with a splice site mutation in the GBE gene. Other presentations include cardiomyopathy, arthrogryposis and even hydrops fetalis. Polyglucosan body disease, characterized by widespread upper and lower motor neuron lesions, can present with or without GBE deficiency indicating that different biochemical defects could result in an identical phenotype. It is evident that this disease exists in multiple forms with enzymatic and molecular heterogeneity unparalleled in the other types of glycogen storage diseases. PMID:11949934

  2. Relation between HLA typing and clinical presentations in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus patients in Al-Qassim region, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Wadi, Walid; Elhefny, Noor eldeen A.M.; Mahgoub, Essam H.; Almogren, Adel; Hamam, Khaled D.; Al–hamed, Hamad A.; Gasim, Gasim I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a disease with diverse clinical presentations due to interaction between genetic and environmental factors. SLE is associated worldwide with polymorphisms at various loci, including the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), although inconsistencies exist among these studies. Aims This study was carried out to investigate, the association of HLA-DRB1, DRB3, DRB4, DRB5, and DQB1 alleles in SLE patients and clinical presentations at Qassim, Saudi Arabia. Methods Fifty one patients with SLE—84.3% of whom had kidney involvement were studied in a case control study for HLA-DRB1, DRB3, DRB4, DRB5, and DQB1. Results It was found that DRB3 is a protective gene among Saudi’s against SLE, HLA DRB3, HLA DRB1*11 frequency was increased in patients with serositis with a p value of (0.004), (0.047) respectively, increased frequency of HLA DQB1*3 among SLE patients with skin manifestations with a p value of (0.041), the frequency of HLA DRB1*15 alleles was increased among SLE patients with nephritis with a p value of (0.029), the frequency of HLA DRB1*11 among those with hematological manifestations with a p value of (0.03) and the frequency DRB1*10 was found to be increased among SLE patients with neurological manifestations with a p value of (0.002) Conclusion In contradistinction to what have been found among other populations DRB3 is a protective gene among Saudi’s against SLE. No evidence for a role of the HLA-DRB1, DRB4, DRB5, DQB1 alleles. There was an increased HLA DRB3 frequency with serositis, DQB1*3 skin manifestations, HLA DRB1*15 with nephritis, DRB1*10 with hematological manifestations and DRB1*11 with neurological manifestations. PMID:25246883

  3. Integrating Arden-Syntax-based clinical decision support with extended presentation formats into a commercial patient data management system.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Stefan; Castellanos, Ixchel; Toddenroth, Dennis; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Bürkle, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce clinical decision support (CDS) that exceeds conventional alerting at tertiary care intensive care units. We investigated physicians' functional CDS requirements in periodic interviews, and analyzed technical interfaces of the existing commercial patient data management system (PDMS). Building on these assessments, we adapted a platform that processes Arden Syntax medical logic modules (MLMs). Clinicians demanded data-driven, user-driven and time-driven execution of MLMs, as well as multiple presentation formats such as tables and graphics. The used PDMS represented a black box insofar as it did not provide standardized interfaces for event notification and external access to patient data; enabling CDS thus required periodically exporting datasets for making them accessible to the invoked Arden engine. A client-server-architecture with a simple browser-based viewer allows users to activate MLM execution and to access CDS results, while an MLM library generates hypertext for diverse presentation targets. The workaround that involves a periodic data replication entails a trade-off between the necessary computational resources and a delay of generated alert messages. Web technologies proved serviceable for reconciling Arden-based CDS functions with alternative presentation formats, including tables, text formatting, graphical outputs, as well as list-based overviews of data from several patients that the native PDMS did not support. PMID:23354988

  4. Mechanisms underlying the hypotensive and vasodilator effects of Ru(terpy)(bdq)NO](3+), a nitric oxide donor, differ between normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Potje, Simone R; Munhoz, Felipe C; Perassa, Ligia A; Graton, Murilo E; Pereira, Ariana A F; Nakamune, Ana Claúdia M S; da Silva, Roberto S; Bendhack, Lusiane M; Sumida, Doris H; Antoniali, Cristina

    2014-10-15

    The endothelium impairs the vasodilator effect of Ru(terpy)(bdq)NO](3+) (TERPY) in Wistar rat aortas. We hypothesized that endothelial dysfunction could modulate TERPY?s effect in spontaneously hypertensive rats. The present study investigated the role of the endothelium in the hypotensive and vasodilator effects of TERPY in spontaneously hypertensive rats. We observed a higher hypotensive effect of TERPY in spontaneously hypertensive than in Wistar rats. l-N(G)-Nitroarginine methyl ester, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, increased TERPY?s hypotensive effect in Wistar but not in spontaneously hypertensive rats. TERPY induced a concentration-dependent vasodilator effect in aortas of both rat models. Endothelium removal or l-NAME increased TERPY?s potency in Wistar rat aortas; this effect was decreased in spontaneously hypertensive rats. TERPY increased nitric oxide level in spontaneously hypertensive rat endothelial cells; this increase was abolished in the presence of l-NAME. In contrast, this effect was increased in Wistar rats. TERPY, with or without l-NAME, decreased levels of reactive oxygen species in spontaneously hypertensive rat endothelial cells. However, it increased these levels in Wistar rats. TERPY reduced aortic endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression in Wistar rats, but did not alter its expression in spontaneously hypertensive rats. In conclusion, different mechanisms underlie the hypotensive and vasodilator effects of TERPY in these two rat models. TERPY reduced endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression and increased reactive oxygen species production in Wistar rat aortas, but did not alter these in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Furthermore, the nitric oxide released by TERPY reacts with reactive oxygen species, decreasing their bioavailability in spontaneously hypertensive rats. PMID:25179868

  5. Hybrid Formulations of Liposomes and Bioadhesive Polymers Improve the Hypotensive Effect of the Melatonin Analogue 5-MCA-NAT in Rabbit Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Santiago; Allemandi, Daniel; Herrero-Vanrell, Rocío; Molina-Martínez, Irene T.

    2014-01-01

    For the treatment of chronic ocular diseases such as glaucoma, continuous instillations of eye drops are needed. However, frequent administrations of hypotensive topical formulations can produce adverse ocular surface effects due to the active substance or other components of the formulation, such as preservatives or other excipients. Thus the development of unpreserved formulations that are well tolerated after frequent instillations is an important challenge to improve ophthalmic chronic topical therapies. Furthermore, several components can improve the properties of the formulation in terms of efficacy. In order to achieve the mentioned objectives, we have developed formulations of liposomes (150–200 nm) containing components similar to those in the tear film and loaded with the hypotensive melatonin analog 5-methoxycarbonylamino-N-acetyltryptamine (5-MCA-NAT, 100 µM). These formulations were combined with mucoadhesive (sodium hyaluronate or carboxymethylcellulose) or amphiphilic block thermosensitive (poloxamer) polymers to prolong the hypotensive efficacy of the drug. In rabbit eyes, the decrease of intraocular pressure with 5-MCA-NAT-loaded liposomes that were dispersed with 0.2% sodium hyaluronate, 39.1±2.2%, was remarkably higher compared to other liposomes formulated without or with other bioadhesive polymers, and the effect lasted more than 8 hours. According to the results obtained in the present work, these technological strategies could provide an improved modality for delivering therapeutic agents in patients with glaucoma. PMID:25329636

  6. Hybrid formulations of liposomes and bioadhesive polymers improve the hypotensive effect of the melatonin analogue 5-MCA-NAT in rabbit eyes.

    PubMed

    Quinteros, Daniela; Vicario-de-la-Torre, Marta; Andrés-Guerrero, Vanessa; Palma, Santiago; Allemandi, Daniel; Herrero-Vanrell, Rocío; Molina-Martínez, Irene T

    2014-01-01

    For the treatment of chronic ocular diseases such as glaucoma, continuous instillations of eye drops are needed. However, frequent administrations of hypotensive topical formulations can produce adverse ocular surface effects due to the active substance or other components of the formulation, such as preservatives or other excipients. Thus the development of unpreserved formulations that are well tolerated after frequent instillations is an important challenge to improve ophthalmic chronic topical therapies. Furthermore, several components can improve the properties of the formulation in terms of efficacy. In order to achieve the mentioned objectives, we have developed formulations of liposomes (150-200 nm) containing components similar to those in the tear film and loaded with the hypotensive melatonin analog 5-methoxycarbonylamino-N-acetyltryptamine (5-MCA-NAT, 100 µM). These formulations were combined with mucoadhesive (sodium hyaluronate or carboxymethylcellulose) or amphiphilic block thermosensitive (poloxamer) polymers to prolong the hypotensive efficacy of the drug. In rabbit eyes, the decrease of intraocular pressure with 5-MCA-NAT-loaded liposomes that were dispersed with 0.2% sodium hyaluronate, 39.1±2.2%, was remarkably higher compared to other liposomes formulated without or with other bioadhesive polymers, and the effect lasted more than 8 hours. According to the results obtained in the present work, these technological strategies could provide an improved modality for delivering therapeutic agents in patients with glaucoma. PMID:25329636

  7. Novel hydrogel application in minimally invasive surgical approaches to spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Chai, Casey M; Banu, Matei A; Cobb, William; Mehta, Neel; Heier, Linda; Boockvar, John A

    2014-10-01

    The authors report 2 cases of orthostatic headaches associated with spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) secondary to CSF leaks that were successfully treated with an alternative dural repair technique in which a tubular retractor system and a hydrogel dural sealant were used. The 2 patients, a 63-year-old man and a 45-year-old woman, presented with orthostatic headache associated with SIH secondary to suspected lumbar and lower cervical CSF leaks, respectively, as indicated by bony defects or epidural fluid collection. Epidural blood patch repair failed in both cases, but both were successfully treated with the minimally invasive application of a hydrogel dural sealant as a novel adjunct to traditional dural repair techniques. Both patients tolerated the procedure well. Moreover, SIH symptoms and MRI signs were completely resolved at 1-month follow-up in both patients. The minimally invasive dural repair procedure with hydrogel dural sealant described here offers a viable alternative in patients in whom epidural blood patches have failed, with obscure recalcitrant CSF leaks at the cervical as well as lumbar spinal level. The authors demonstrate that the adjuvant use of sealant is a safe and efficient repair method regardless of dural defect location. PMID:25084466

  8. Post-suspension hypotension is attenuated in Sprague-Dawley rats by prostacyclin synthase inhibition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayorh, M. A.; Eatman, D.; Walton, M.; Socci, R. R.; Emmett, N.

    2002-01-01

    Cardiovascular deconditioning, sometimes manifested in astronauts during standing postflight, may be related to the impairment of autonomic function and/or excessive production of endothelium-dependent relaxing factors. In the present study, we examined the cardiovascular responses to 7-day 30 degrees tail-suspension and a subsequent 6-h post-suspension period in conscious male Sprague-Dawley rats to determine the role of prostacyclin in the observed post-suspension reduction in mean arterial pressure (MAP). The specific prostacyclin synthase inhibitor U-51605 (0.3 mg/kg), or saline, was administered intravenously prior to release from suspension and at 2 and 4 h post-suspension. During 7 days of suspension, MAP did not change, however, there was a post-suspension reduction in MAP which was associated with significant increases in plasma prostacyclin and nitric oxide. U-51605 attenuated the observed post-suspension hypotension and reduced plasma prostacyclin levels, but not nitric oxide levels. The baroreflex sensitivity for heart rate was modified by U-51605: increased MAP threshold and effective MAP range. Thus, the post-suspension reduction in mean arterial pressure may be due to overproduction of prostacyclin and/or other endothelium-dependent relaxing factors and alteration in baroreflex activity.

  9. Daily Mean Temperature and Clinical Kidney Stone Presentation in Five U.S. Metropolitan Areas: A Time-Series Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pulido, Jose E.; Gasparrini, Antonio; Saigal, Christopher S.; Horton, Benjamin P.; Landis, J. Richard; Madison, Rodger; Keren, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Background: High ambient temperatures are a risk factor for nephrolithiasis, but the precise relationship between temperature and kidney stone presentation is unknown. Objectives: Our objective was to estimate associations between mean daily temperature and kidney stone presentation according to lag time and temperatures. Methods: Using a time-series design and distributed lag nonlinear models, we estimated the relative risk (RR) of kidney stone presentation associated with mean daily temperatures, including cumulative RR for a 20-day period, and RR for individual daily lags through 20 days. Our analysis used data from the MarketScan Commercial Claims database for 60,433 patients who sought medical evaluation or treatment of kidney stones from 2005–2011 in the U.S. cities of Atlanta, Georgia; Chicago, Illinois; Dallas, Texas; Los Angeles, California; and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Results: Associations between mean daily temperature and kidney stone presentation were not monotonic, and there was variation in the exposure–response curve shapes and the strength of associations at different temperatures. However, in most cases RRs increased for temperatures above the reference value of 10°C. The cumulative RR for a daily mean temperature of 30°C versus 10°C was 1.38 in Atlanta (95% CI: 1.07, 1.79), 1.37 in Chicago (95% CI: 1.07, 1.76), 1.36 in Dallas (95% CI: 1.10, 1.69), 1.11 in Los Angeles (95% CI: 0.73, 1.68), and 1.47 in Philadelphia (95% CI: 1.00, 2.17). Kidney stone presentations also were positively associated with temperatures < 2°C in Atlanta, and < 10°C in Chicago and Philadelphia. In four cities, the strongest association between kidney stone presentation and a daily mean temperature of 30°C versus 10°C was estimated for lags of ? 3 days. Conclusions: In general, kidney stone presentations increased with higher daily mean temperatures, with the strongest associations estimated for lags of only a few days. These findings further support an adverse effect of high temperatures on nephrolithiasis. Citation: Tasian GE, Pulido JE, Gasparrini A, Saigal CS, Horton BP, Landis JR, Madison R, Keren R, for the Urologic Diseases in America Project. 2014. Daily mean temperature and clinical kidney stone presentation in five U.S. metropolitan areas: a time-series analysis. Environ Health Perspect 122:1081–1087;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307703 PMID:25009122

  10. Endometriosis presenting with hemorrhagic ascites, severe anemia, and shock.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Trent L; Tomich, Eric B; Heiner, Jason D

    2013-01-01

    Hemorrhagic ascites due to endometriosis is an exceedingly uncommon diagnosis rarely reported in the medical literature. We present a case of a 27-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department for flank and neck pain and was found to be hypotensive with massive hemorrhagic ascites and severe anemia. After emergency department resuscitation and hospitalization, her condition was found to be due to complications of endometriosis. A paracentesis of more than 4000 mL of bloody ascitic fluid revealed no evidence of cancer, and she was discharged on hospital day 3 with hormone therapy and no recurrence of symptoms upon outpatient follow-up. This case illustrates the clinical management, diagnostic approach, and underlying etiology of an infrequent but life-threatening complication of endometriosis. PMID:22809773

  11. Severe clinical presentation of visceral leishmaniasis in naturally infected dogs with disruption of the splenic white pulp.

    PubMed

    Lima, Isadora S; Silva, Joselli S; Almeida, Valter A; Junior, Floriano G Leal; Souza, Patrício An; Larangeira, Daniela F; Moura-Neto, José P; Fraga, Deborah B M; de Freitas, Luiz A R; dos-Santos, Washington L C

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we investigated the association between the disruption of splenic lymphoid tissue and the severity of visceral leishmaniasis in dogs. Clinical and laboratory data from 206 dogs were reviewed. Spleen sections collected during the euthanasia of these animals were analyzed, and the splenic lymphoid tissue samples were classified as well organized (spleen type 1), slightly disorganized (spleen type 2), or moderately to extensively disorganized (spleen type 3). Of 199 dogs with evidence of Leishmania infection, 54 (27%) had spleen type 1, 99 (50%) had spleen type 2, and 46 (23%) had spleen type 3. The number of clinical signs associated with visceral leishmaniasis was significantly higher in the animals with evidence of Leishmania infection and spleen type 2 or 3 than in the animals with spleen type 1. Alopecia, anemia, dehydration, dermatitis, lymphadenopathy, and onychogryphosis were all more frequent among animals with evidence of Leishmania infection and spleen type 3 than among the dogs with evidence of Leishmania infection and spleen type 1. The association between the severity of canine visceral leishmaniasis and the disorganization of the splenic lymphoid tissue was even more evident in the group of animals with positive spleen culture. Conjunctivitis and ulceration were also more common in the animals with spleen type 3 than in the animals with spleen type 1. The serum levels (median, interquartile range) of albumin (1.8, 1.4-2.3 g/dL) and creatinine (0.7, 0.4-0.8 mg/dL) were significantly lower and the serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase were significantly higher (57, 39-95 U) in animals with spleen type 3 than in animals with spleen type 1 (2.8, 2.4-3.4 g/dL; 0.9, 0.7-1.2 mg/dL and 23, 20-32 U, respectively). Our data confirm the hypothesis that disruption of the splenic lymphoid tissue is associated with a more severe clinical presentation of canine visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:24498367

  12. Application and Evaluation of Interactive 3D PDF for Presenting and Sharing Planning Results for Liver Surgery in Clinical Routine

    PubMed Central

    Newe, Axel; Becker, Linda; Schenk, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background & Objectives The Portable Document Format (PDF) is the de-facto standard for the exchange of electronic documents. It is platform-independent, suitable for the exchange of medical data, and allows for the embedding of three-dimensional (3D) surface mesh models. In this article, we present the first clinical routine application of interactive 3D surface mesh models which have been integrated into PDF files for the presentation and the exchange of Computer Assisted Surgery Planning (CASP) results in liver surgery. We aimed to prove the feasibility of applying 3D PDF in medical reporting and investigated the user experience with this new technology. Methods We developed an interactive 3D PDF report document format and implemented a software tool to create these reports automatically. After more than 1000 liver CASP cases that have been reported in clinical routine using our 3D PDF report, an international user survey was carried out online to evaluate the user experience. Results Our solution enables the user to interactively explore the anatomical configuration and to have different analyses and various resection proposals displayed within a 3D PDF document covering only a single page that acts more like a software application than like a typical PDF file (“PDF App”). The new 3D PDF report offers many advantages over the previous solutions. According to the results of the online survey, the users have assessed the pragmatic quality (functionality, usability, perspicuity, efficiency) as well as the hedonic quality (attractiveness, novelty) very positively. Conclusion The usage of 3D PDF for reporting and sharing CASP results is feasible and well accepted by the target audience. Using interactive PDF with embedded 3D models is an enabler for presenting and exchanging complex medical information in an easy and platform-independent way. Medical staff as well as patients can benefit from the possibilities provided by 3D PDF. Our results open the door for a wider use of this new technology, since the basic idea can and should be applied for many medical disciplines and use cases. PMID:25551375

  13. Extraintestinal Salmonellosis in a General Hospital (1991 to 1996): Relationships between Salmonella Genomic Groups and Clinical Presentations

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Mercedes; de Diego, Isabel; Mendoza, M. Carmen

    1998-01-01

    Episodes of extraintestinal salmonellosis treated at a general hospital (1,522 beds) over a 6-year period (1991 to 1996) were characterized by the analysis of phenotypic and genotypic traits of Salmonella organisms and clinical data from medical reports. Extraintestinal salmonellosis accounted for 8% of all salmonellosis episodes. Fifty-two medical reports, dealing with 6 cases of typhoid fever, 32 cases of bacteremia, and 14 focal infections, were reviewed. All cases of typhoid fever except 1, 7 cases of bacteremia, and 5 focal infections were not related to any underlying disease or predisposing factors, while 25 cases of bacteremia and 9 focal infections were associated with some of these risk factors. All typhoid isolates and 65.4% of the nontyphoid isolates were susceptible to antimicrobials. Fifty-one nontyphoid strains were analyzed and assigned to 21 genomic groups, which were defined by serotype, combined ribotype, and combined randomly amplified polymorphic DNA type (each genomic group could include organisms differing in some phenotypic traits). The relationships between genomic groups and clinical presentations were traced. Organisms causing 22 episodes (17 episodes of bacteremia, 2 of pneumonia, 1 of peritonitis, 1 of pyelonephritis, and 1 of cystitis) belonged to a prevalent Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis genomic group, which included organisms assigned to four phage types, five biotypes, and four resistance patterns, causing infections in patients with and without risk factors. Seven other genomic groups, 4 Enteritidis groups (associated with both bacteremia and focal infections), 2 Typhimurium groups (one associated with bacteremia and the other with focal infections) and 1 Brandenburg group (associated with bacteremia) included two or more strains, and the remaining 13 genomic groups consisted of only one strain each. PMID:9774581

  14. The clinical presentation and early outcomes of necrotizing fasciitis in a Ugandan Tertiary Hospital- a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Necrotizing fasciitis is an infectious process characterized by rapidly progressing necrosis of superficial fascia and subcutaneous tissue with subsequent necrosis of overlying skin. Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare but fatal infection. The worldwide incidence is at 0.4 per 100,000. Mortality is up to 80% with no intervention, and 30-50% with intervention. Delay in intervention is associated with poor outcome. The risk factors for necrotizing fasciitis are diabetes mellitus, HIV, malignancy, illicit drug use, malnutrition among others. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical presentation and early outcomes of necrotizing fasciitis amongst Ugandan patients. Methods A prospective descriptive case series study conducted at Mulago National Referral and Teaching hospital from 5th January to 30th April 2011. Patients with necrotizing fasciitis were consecutively recruited after clinical evaluation, laboratory and microbiological tests were performed. Aggressive debridement was done and broad-spectrum antibiotics administered. Patients were followed up on surgical wards. Ethical approval was obtained. Results Thirty five patients were recruited over a 4 months period. More males were affected with, M: F 3:1. The 20-40 years age group was most affected. Attainment of healthy granulation tissue took 19 days on average. Mortality rate was 14% (5/35). Limbs were the most affected body parts 20/35 (57%), the scrotum and perineum (23%). Among infants the scalp was the most affected. Co-morbidities included HIV 8/35 (17%), and DM (5%) among others. The commonest organisms were gram negative. Split skin grafting was necessary in 74% (26/35) of patients. Conclusion There were a high number of patients with necrotizing fasciitis; it was associated with low mortality but high morbidity (long hospital stay). There was a high preponderance to males and limbs were the more affected body parts. PMID:25069415

  15. Retained Fetal Membranes in C57BL/6NCrl Mice: Description of Clinical Case Presentations and Related Epidemiologic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jenelle K; Vemulapalli, Tracy H; Van Alstine, William G; Roberts, Christopher S; Garner, Joseph P; Hickman, Debra L

    2011-01-01

    During a triinstitutional study to test whether individually ventilated caging systems impaired welfare and reproduction relative to static housing systems, varying numbers (2 to 7) of discoid-shaped, fleshy structures were found in utero of 17 postpartum female mice on study. Further investigation revealed these structures to be retained fetal membranes (RFM). A point prevalence of 24.3% was calculated based on a total population of 70 postpartum female mice on study. This finding was preceded by 3 typical clinical presentations, which are described here. We designed a case-control matched cross-sectional epidemiologic study to identify associated risk factors and antemortem indicators of RFM. Housing on the bottom shelves and attachment to the rack systems were factors associated with a diagnosis of the condition. In addition, neutrophilia, monocytosis, lymphopenia, and decreasing hematocrit values were associated with the diagnosis of RFM. These results confirmed that a CBC can be a useful antemortem screening test for the identification of affected mice. We conclude that RFM are likely an incidental finding although they may present concurrent with other pregnancy complications. PMID:22330577

  16. Group C streptococcal endocarditis presenting as clinical meningitis: Report of a case and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Allen R; Briedis, Dalius J

    1992-01-01

    Lancefield group C streptococci are known to be pathogenic in a number of animal species, but cause human disease much less commonly than do streptococci of scrogroups A or B. Reported cases of bacteremic infection, pneumonia or meningitis in humans have been very severe with a grave prognosis. The authors describe a patient who presented with classic clinical and laboratory evidence of bacterial meningitis which proved to be a complication of endocarditis caused by a group C streptococcus. This is the first reported case in which meningitis was the presenting manifestation of group C streptococcal endocarditis and is only the second case in which group C streptococcal meningitis and endocarditis have been associated in the same patient. A total of 13 cases of group C streptococcal meningitis have now been reported in the medical literature. Five of these patients died, and four others recovered only to be left with neurological sequelae. The current case confirms the seriousness of group C streptococcal infections in humans. Such infections are associated with a poor prognosis despite apparently adequate antimicrobial therapy. PMID:22416199

  17. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Regulates Organ Blood Flow and Apoptosis during Controlled Hypotension in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lele; Shao, Xiaomei; Zhou, Chuanlong; Guo, Xiaoqing; Jin, Ling; Lian, Linli; Yu, Xiaojing; Dong, Zhenhua; Mo, Yadi; Fang, Jianqiao

    2014-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is commonly used in clinical practice for alleviating pains and physiological disorders. It has been reported that TENS could counteract the ischemic injury happened in some vital organs. To determine the protective effect of TENS on internal organs during CH in dogs, target hypotension was maintained for 60 min at 50% of the baseline mean arterial pressure (MAP). The perfusion to the brain, liver, stomach, and kidney was recorded and apoptosis within these organs was observed. Results showed that when arriving at the target MAP, and during the maintaining stage for 10 min, perfusion to the stomach and liver in the CH+TENS group was much higher than in the CH group (P<0.05). Perfusion to the cerebral cortex greatly declined in both the controlled pressure groups when compared with the general anesthesia (GA) group (P<0.05). After withdrawing CH, the hepatic blood flow in both the CH and CH+TENS groups, and the gastric and cerebral cortical blood flow in the CH+TENS group, were rapidly increased. By the end of MAP restoration, gastric blood flow in the CH group was still low. At 72 h after applying CH, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells in stomach and kidney tissue from the CH group were significantly increased compared with those in the GA group (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in TUNEL-positive cells in the liver and hippocampus among the three groups. Our results demonstrated that CH with a 50% MAP level could cause lower perfusion to the liver, stomach, cerebral cortex, and kidney, with apoptosis subsequently occurring in the stomach and kidney. TENS combined GA is able to improve the blood flow to the liver, stomach, and reduce the apoptosis in the stomach and kidney. PMID:24732970

  18. Efficacy of compression of different capacitance beds in the amelioration of orthostatic hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denq, J. C.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.; Giuliani, M.; Felten, J.; Convertino, V. A.; Low, P. A.

    1997-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is the most disabling and serious manifestation of adrenergic failure, occurring in the autonomic neuropathies, pure autonomic failure (PAF) and multiple system atrophy (MSA). No specific treatment is currently available for most etiologies of OH. A reduction in venous capacity, secondary to some physical counter maneuvers (e.g., squatting or leg crossing), or the use of compressive garments, can ameliorate OH. However, there is little information on the differential efficacy, or the mechanisms of improvement, engendered by compression of specific capacitance beds. We therefore evaluated the efficacy of compression of specific compartments (calves, thighs, low abdomen, calves and thighs, and all compartments combined), using a modified antigravity suit, on the end-points of orthostatic blood pressure, and symptoms of orthostatic intolerance. Fourteen patients (PAF, n = 9; MSA, n = 3; diabetic autonomic neuropathy, n = 2; five males and nine females) with clinical OH were studied. The mean age was 62 years (range 31-78). The mean +/- SEM orthostatic systolic blood pressure when all compartments were compressed was 115.9 +/- 7.4 mmHg, significantly improved (p < 0.001) over the head-up tilt value without compression of 89.6 +/- 7.0 mmHg. The abdomen was the only single compartment whose compression significantly reduced OH (p < 0.005). There was a significant increase of peripheral resistance index (PRI) with compression of abdomen (p < 0.001) or all compartments (p < 0.001); end-diastolic index and cardiac index did not change. We conclude that denervation increases vascular capacity, and that venous compression improves OH by reducing this capacity and increasing PRI. Compression of all compartments is the most efficacious, followed by abdominal compression, whereas leg compression alone was less effective, presumably reflecting the large capacity of the abdomen relative to the legs.

  19. Modulation of oxidative stress and microinflammatory status by colloids in refractory dialytic hypotension

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Intradialytic hypotension may adversely affect the outcome of chronic hemodialysis. Therapeutic albumin has powerful anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. We have recently shown that systematic colloid infusion during hemodialysis sessions improves hemodynamic parameters in most dialysis hypotension-prone patients unresponsive to usual of preventive measures. We postulated that frequent hypotensive episodes may lead to a noxious inflammatory response mediated by oxidative stress induced by ischemia-reperfusion. The aim of this study was therefore to analyze the effect of 20% albumin and 4% gelatin infusions on oxidative stress and microinflammatory status in hypotension-prone patients unresponsive to usual preventive measures. Methods Prospective cross-over study (lasting 20 weeks) of routine infusion of 200 ml of 20% albumin versus 200 ml of 4% gelatin in 10 patients with refractory intradialytic hypotension. We analyzed the effect of 20% albumin and 4% gelatin on microinflammatory status, oxidative stress, serum nitrite and nitrate levels by analysis of variance. Results A significant decrease in serum ceruloplasmin and serum C3 was observed during the albumin period (p < 0.05, repeated measure ANOVA). A significant decrease in serum hydrogen peroxide was seen during albumin and gelatin administration (p < 0.01, repeated measure ANOVA) and a very large decrease in serum lipid peroxides was observed during the albumin period only (p < 0.01, Friedman test). Serum lactoferrin, serum proinflammatory cytokines and serum nitrite and nitrate levels remained stable during the different periods of this pilot trial. Conclusions We conclude that the improvement in microinflammatory status observed during colloid infusion in hypotension-prone dialysis patients may be related to a decrease in ischemia-reperfusion of noble organs, together with a specific reduction in oxidative stress by albumin. Trial registration ISRCTN 20957055 PMID:22013952

  20. Effect of Transient Maternal Hypotension on Apoptotic Cell Death in Foetal Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Özyürek, Hamit; Bayrak, Sibel; Pehlivano?lu, Bilge; Atilla, Pergin; Balkanc?, Zeynep Dicle; Çakar, Nur; Anlar, Banu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Intrauterine perfusion insufficiency induced by transient maternal hypotension has been reported to be associated with foetal brain malformations. However, the effects of maternal hypotension on apoptotic processes in the foetal brain have not been investigated experimentally during the intrauterine period. Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of transient maternal hypotension on apoptotic cell death in the intrauterine foetal brain. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Three-month-old female Wistar albino rats were allocated into four groups (n=5 each). The impact of hypoxic/ischemic injury induced by transient maternal hypotension on the 15th day of pregnancy (late gestation) in rats was investigated at 48 (H17 group) or 96 hours (H19 group) after the insult. Control groups underwent the same procedure except for induction of hypotension (C17 and H17 groups). Brain sections of one randomly selected foetus from each pregnant rat were histopathologically evaluated for hypoxic/ischemic injury in the metencephalon, diencephalon, and telencephalon by terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling and active cysteine-dependent aspartate-directed protease-3 (caspase-3) positivity for cell death. Results: The number of terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (+) cells in all the areas examined was comparable in both hypotension and control groups. The H17 group had active caspase-3 (+) cells in the metencephalon and telencephalon, sparing diencephalon, whereas the C19 and H19 groups had active caspase-3 (+) cells in all three regions. The number of active caspase-3 (+) cells in the telencephalon in the H19 group was higher compared with the metencephalon and diencephalon and compared with H17 group (p<0.05). Conclusion: Our results suggest that prenatal hypoxic/ischemic injury triggers apoptotic mechanisms. Therefore, blockade of apoptotic pathways, considering the time pattern of the insult, may constitute a potential neuroprotective approach for the detrimental effects of prenatal hypoperfusion. PMID:25207175

  1. Clinical Presentation and Follow-Up of 30 Patients with Congenital Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus ANGENITA F. VAN LIEBURG,* NINE V. A. M. KNOERS, † and

    Microsoft Academic Search

    LEO A. H. MONNENS

    1999-01-01

    Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is charac- terized by insensitivity of the distal nephron to arginine vaso- pressin. Clinical knowledge of this disease is based largely on case reports. For this study, data were collected on clinical presentation and during long-term follow-up of 30 male pa- tients with congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. The ma- jority of patients (87%) were diagnosed within

  2. Nutritional Needs of the Child with a Handicap or Chronic Illness. Manual II: Clinical Nutrition. Presentations from a National Interdisciplinary Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekvall, Shirley M.; Wheby, Elizabeth A.

    The following papers were presented at a symposium on clinical nutrition for the child who is chronically ill or handicapped: (1) "Food Allergy"; (2) "Anemia and the Chronically Ill or Handicapped Child"; (3) "Nutrition and Neurotransmitters--Clinical Implications"; (4) "The Importance of Lipid Type in the Diet after Burn Injury"; (5) "Advances of…

  3. Isothermal dialysis to control intradialytic hypotension and patient comfort: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianjun; Bellury, Lanell; Baird, Marianne; Van Brackle, Lewis N; Aduddell, Kathie

    2014-01-01

    Isothermal hemodialysis to improve intradialytic tolerance in hypotension-prone patients has been effective in outpatient settings. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine thermal control in an acute care setting and describe comfort issues associated with thermal control Although complaints of cold or shivering occurred more frequently with the isothermal hemodialysis group, cold discomfort was managed by nursing interventions and was not a cause of significant discomfort. No statistically significant difference was observed in blood pressure or patient's comfort level between standard and isothermal dialysis. However, isothermal hemodialysis may be an appropriate hemodialysis option for control of intradialytic hypotension in the acute care setting. Further research is recommended. PMID:25065061

  4. Patients' choice of portable folding chairs to reduce symptoms of orthostatic hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smit, A. A.; Wieling, W.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.; van Emmerik-Levelt, H. M.; Low, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    Patients with neurogenic orthostatic hypotension may use portable folding chairs to prevent or reduce symptoms of low blood pressure. However, a concomitant movement disorder may limit the use of these chairs in daily living. In this prospective study, 13 patients with orthostatic hypotension, balance disturbance associated with motor disability, or both examined three commercially available portable folding chairs. A questionnaire was used to document the characteristics in chair design that were relevant for satisfactory use to these patients. Armrests, seat width, and an adjustable sitting height were found to be important features of a portable folding chair. One chair was selected by 11 of 13 patients to fit most needs.

  5. Patients' choice of portable folding chairs to reduce symptoms of orthostatic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Smit, A A; Wieling, W; Opfer-Gehrking, T L; van Emmerik-Levelt, H M; Low, P A

    1999-12-01

    Patients with neurogenic orthostatic hypotension may use portable folding chairs to prevent or reduce symptoms of low blood pressure. However, a concomitant movement disorder may limit the use of these chairs in daily living. In this prospective study, 13 patients with orthostatic hypotension, balance disturbance associated with motor disability, or both examined three commercially available portable folding chairs. A questionnaire was used to document the characteristics in chair design that were relevant for satisfactory use to these patients. Armrests, seat width, and an adjustable sitting height were found to be important features of a portable folding chair. One chair was selected by 11 of 13 patients to fit most needs. PMID:10638808

  6. Hypotension in Fetal and Newborn Lambs; Different Patterns of Reflex Heart Rate Control Revealed by Autonomic Blockade

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adrian M. Walker; J. P. Cannata; B. C. Ritchie; J. E. Maloney

    1983-01-01

    Reflex heart rate (HR) responses to hypotension were studied in chronically instrumented fetal and newborn lambs. Studies spanned 106–141 days of gestation and 1–22 days after birth. Brief hypotensive stimuli (10 s) were produced by inflation of a cuff implanted around the inferior vena cava; HR and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were recorded from a carotid arterial catheter. Autonomic nervous

  7. The Duration of Hypotension Determines the Evolution of Bacteremia-Induced Acute Kidney Injury in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Janssen van Doorn, Karin; Verbrugghe, Walter; Wouters, Kristien; Jansens, Hilde; Jorens, Philippe G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Exploration of the impact of severe hypotension on the evolution of acute kidney injury in septic patients. Methods and Results We reviewed the hemodynamic parameters of 137 adults with septic shock and proven blood stream infection in the ICU. Severe hypotension was defined as a mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) ?65 mmHg. The influence of the duration of severe hypotension on the evolution of acute kidney injury was evaluated according to the RIFLE classification, with day 0 defined as the day of a positive blood stream infection. After bloodstream infection, the probability for a patient to be in Failure was significantly higher than before blood stream infection (OR?=?1.94, p?=?0.0276). Patients have a significantly higher risk of evolving to Failure if the duration of severe hypotension is longer (OR?=?1.02 for each 10 minutes increase in duration of a MAP <65 mmHg, p?=?0.0472). A cut-off of at least 51 minutes of severe hypotension (<65 mmHg) or at least 5.5 periods of severe hypotension within 1 day identified patients with increased risk to evolve to Failure. Conclusions There is a significant influence of both the duration and the number of periods of severe hypotension on the evolution to Failure. Blood stream infection has a significantly negative effect on the relationship between severe hypotension and Failure. PMID:25504214

  8. Risks, precipitants and clinical presentation of gastroesophageal reflux disease at the Kilimanjaro christian medical centre in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Mwandri, Michael Bartholomew; Mwita, Julius Chacha; Mgwaya, Magafu; Kilonzo, Kajiru Gad; Urasa, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Risk factors and precipitants of gastroesophageal disease (GERD) differ widely in communities. We conducted an observational study to describe these risks, precipitants and clinical presentation of GERD patients at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre (KCMC) in Tanzania. Methods We consecutively recruited 92 GERD patients referred for endoscopy at KCMC from March to November 2008. Using structured questionnaire risk factors, precipitants and symptoms of GERD were enquired. Their upper gastrointestinal endoscopic findings were as well documented. Results The mean (± SD) age of the study population was 47.32 (±17) years. Reported symptoms included water brash (37%), dyspepsia (6%), chronic cough (11%) and hemoptysis (5%). More than half (56%) of the patients surveyed identified food precipitants for their GERD symptoms. Triggers of GERD symptoms were boiled beans 19%, spicy food 11%, sour/fermented meals 10%, roasted tomato 9%, silver cyprinid fish (dagaa)5%,beans with cooked green banana (matoke) 2% and fermented milk 1%. Most of the studied patients had normal body mass index (52%), and 25% admitted to be consuming alcohol though they didn't associate it with their GERD symptoms. The most common endoscopy finding was ‘loose lower esophageal sphincter (85%). Conclusion Most GERD patients referred for endoscopy at KCMC were found to have water brash and ‘loose lower esophageal sphincters’ as described by endoscopists to denote mechanical abnormality of the lower esophageal sphincter. GERD symptoms were precipitated by common locally available food and spices.

  9. Acute promyelocytic leukemia associated with the PLZF-RARA fusion gene: two additional cases with clinical and laboratorial peculiar presentations.

    PubMed

    Rohr, Sandra S; Pelloso, Luís Arthur Flores; Borgo, Aline; De Nadai, Livia Chiosini; Yamamoto, Mihoko; Rego, Eduardo M; de Lourdes L F Chauffaille, Maria

    2012-12-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is characterized by the presence of the t(15;17) and PML-RARa rearrangement, with good response to treatment with retinoids. However, few cases of variant APL involving alternative chromosomal aberrations have been reported, including t(11;17)(q23;q21) (Wells et al. in Nat Genet 17:109-113, 1; Arnould et al. in Hum Mol Genet 8:1741-1749, 2) t(5;17)(q35;q12-21), t(11;17)(q13;q21) (Grimwade et al in Blood 96:1297-1308, 3) and der(17) (Rego et al. in Blood (ASH Annual Meeting Abstracts)114:Abstract 6, 4), whereby RARa is fused to the PLZF, NPM, NuMA, and STAT5b genes, respectively, have been described. These cases are characterized by distinct morphology, clinical presentation, and in respect to PLZF, a lack of differentiation response to retinoids leading to the need of different approaches concerning diagnostic methods and therapeutics. This paper describes two cases of APL associated with the PLZF-RARA fusion gene enrolled in the IC-APL trial that is a non-randomized, multicenter study conducted in Brazil, Mexico, Chile and Uruguay with the aim to improve the treatment outcome of APL patients in developing countries. These cases, although rare, offer a challenge to its early recognition and proper conduction. PMID:22205181

  10. Pharmacy Education Reaction to Presentations on Bridging the Gap Between the Basic Sciences and Clinical Practice: Teaching, Research, and Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doluisio, James T.

    1980-01-01

    Issues in the conflict between clinical practice and basic research in pharmacy are reviewed: professional associations' role, curriculum needs and traditions, internal strains and diversity in the profession, computer use, scholarly work of faculty, using the medical profession as a model, and misperceptions of what clinical and basic sciences…

  11. Burkitt Lymphoma with Initial Clinical Presentation due to Infiltration of the Central Nervous System and Eye Orbits

    PubMed Central

    Camilo, Gustavo Bittencourt; Machado, Dequitier Carvalho; de Oliveira, Celso Estevão; Lacerda, Letícia da Silva; de Oliveira, Romulo Varella; de França Silva, Monique; Lopes, Agnaldo José

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 17 Final Diagnosis: Burkitt lymphoma Symptoms: Anisocoria, ipsilateral ptosis, opthalmoparesis, paresis Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Oncology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Burkitt lymphoma rarely affects the central nervous system and ocular region. Under these conditions, computed tomography and (particularly) magnetic resonance imaging of the skull increase the diagnostic accuracy, as they objectively show the topography of lesions and the effect of neoplasia on structures. Case Report: We report here the case of a 17-year-old male whose initial clinical manifestations were related to neurological impairment and to the ocular musculature and ocular innervation. The diagnosis of Burkitt lymphoma with leukemization and infiltration of the central nervous system was confirmed. Conclusions: In this case, it is important to recognize that the neuroimaging findings were fundamentally important in indicating the initial form of the disease and in directing the appropriate clinical management. PMID:25243420

  12. Clinical presentation, treatment and outcome of paraphenylene-diamine induced acute kidney injury following hair dye poisoning: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Shigidi, Mazin; Mohammed, Osama; Ibrahim, Mohammed; Taha, Elshafie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In Africa and Asia hair dye is applied together with henna to decorate the hands and feet. Paraphenylene-diamine (PPD), a highly toxic constituent of hair dye can lead to acute kidney injury (AKI). Methods A cohort study was conducted during the period from April 2012 to March 2013 in Khartoum Teaching Hospital, Sudan. It targeted adults presenting acutely with an evident history and clinical features of hair dye poisoning, together with AKI as per the RIFLE criteria. Analysis of data was done using SPSS. Results 30 adults were included, their mean age was 25.6 ± 4.2 years, 93.3% were females. Exposure to PPD was suicidal in 86.7%. The mean duration to onset of renal symptoms was 34.8 ± 7.6 hours, maximum median serum creatinine was 8.6 ± 2.3 mg/dl, 86.7% had loss of kidney function as per the RIFLE classification and required dialysis. Initial renal recovery was seen after a mean duration of 9.8 ± 2.2 days. One patient died, 3.3%; all others, 96.7%, recovered normal kidney function. The amount of ingested PPD correlated significantly to the severity of symptoms, number of dialysis sessions required and time for renal recovery with P values < 0.05. Conclusion Hair dye poisoning was associated with prolonged hospital stay, requirement of dialysis and increased morbidity. The severity of symptoms directly correlates to the dose of PPD ingested, with the kidney damage being reversible in almost all survivors.

  13. Effects of high-volume, rapid-fluid therapy on cardiovascular function and hematological values during isoflurane-induced hypotension in healthy dogs

    PubMed Central

    Valverde, Alexander; Gianotti, Giacomo; Rioja-Garcia, Eva; Hathway, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of the administration of a high volume of isotonic crystalloid at a rapid rate on cardiovascular function in normovolemic, isoflurane-anesthetized dogs during induced hypotension. Using a prospective study, 6 adult dogs were induced to general anesthesia and cardiovascular and hematological values were measured while the dogs were maintained at 3 hemodynamic states: first during light anesthesia with 1.3% end-tidal isoflurane (ETI); then during a hypotensive state induced by deep anesthesia with 3% ETI for 45 min while administered 1 mL/kg body weight (BW) per minute of isotonic fluids; and then decreased to 1.6% ETI while receiving 1 mL/kg BW per minute of fluids for 15 min. End-tidal isoflurane (ETI) at 3.0 ± 0.2% decreased arterial blood pressure (ABP), cardiac index (CI), and stroke volume index (SVI), and increased stroke volume variation (SVV) and central venous pressure (CVP). Fluid administration during 3% ETI decreased only SVV and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI), while CVP increased progressively. Decreasing ETI to 1.6 ± 0.1% returned ABP and SVI to baseline (ETI 1.3 ± 0.1%), while CI and heart rate increased and SVV decreased. There was significant progressive clinical hemodilution of hemoglobin (Hb), packed cell volume (PCV), total protein (TP), colloid osmotic pressure (COP), arterial oxygen content (CaO2), and central-venous oxygen content (CcvO2). High-volume, rapid-rate administration of an isotonic crystalloid was ineffective in counteracting isoflurane-induced hypotension in normovolemic dogs at a deep plane of anesthesia. Cardiovascular function improved only when anesthetic depth was reduced. Excessive hemodilution and its adverse consequences should be considered when a high volume of crystalloid is administered at a rapid rate. PMID:23024452

  14. Effects of hemorrhagic hypotension on tyrosine concentrations in rat spinal cord and plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Maher, T. J.; Roberts, C. H.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    Tyrosine is the precursor for catecholamine neurotransmitters. When catecholamine-containing neurons are physiologically active (as sympathoadrenal cells are in hypotension), tyrosine administration increases catecholamine synthesis and release. Since hypotension can alter plasma amino acid composition, the effects of an acute hypotensive insult on tyrosine concentrations in plasma and spinal cord were examined. Rats were cannulated and bled until the systolic blood pressure was 50 mmHg, or were kept normotensive for 1 h. Tyrosine and other large neutral amino acids (LNAA) known to compete with tyrosine for brain uptake were assayed in plasma and spinal cord. The rate at which intra-arterial (H-3)tyrosine disappeared from the plasma was also estimated in hemorrhaged and control rats. In plasma of hemorrhaged animals, both the tyrosine concentration and the tyrosine/LNAA ratio was elevated; moreover, the disappearance of (H-3)tyrosine was slowed. Tyrosine concentrations also increased in spinal cords of hemorrhaged-hypotensive rats when compared to normotensive controls. Changes in plasma amino acid patterns may thus influence spinal cord concentrations of amino acid precursors for neurotransmitters during the stress of hemorrhagic shock.

  15. Administration of a nitric oxide donor does not affect hypotension induced by 35-GHz microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Ryan, K L; Lovelace, J D; Frei, M R; Jauchem, J R

    1997-09-01

    Sustained whole body exposure to 35-GHz radiofrequency radiation produces localized hyperthermia and hypotension, leading to circulatory failure and death. We previously demonstrated that pressor responses to nitric oxide (NO) synthesis inhibition are reduced following 35-GHz microwave (MMW) heating, implying that NO levels might also be reduced. This study therefore sought to determine whether administration of S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), a NO donor, influences MMW-induced hypotension in ketamine-anesthetized rats. First, rats were exposed to MMW until mean arterial pressure (MAP) fell to 75 mmHg. MMW exposure was then discontinued and either SNAP (300 micrograms/kg/h) or saline was infused. SNAP infusion affected neither the hypotension nor the survival time following MMW exposure. In a second protocol, SNAP (300 micrograms/kg/h) or saline was infused prior to and throughout MMW exposure, which was continued until death. SNAP infusion did not alter either the onset or the magnitude of terminal hypotension. Therefore, we conclude that exogenous NO does not affect cardiovascular responses to 35-GHz MMW heating. PMID:9413828

  16. In vivo arginine production and intravascular nitric oxide synthesis in hypotensive sepsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arginine is important in the response to infections and is a precursor for the synthesis of the vasodilator nitric oxide (NO). Low plasma arginine is correlated with a worse prognosis in patients with sepsis, and increased NO has been implicated in the hypotension of sepsis. Data on in vivo arginine...

  17. Dynamic regulation of heart rate during acute hypotension: new insight into baroreflex function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, R.; Behbehani, K.; Crandall, C. G.; Zuckerman, J. H.; Levine, B. D.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    To examine the dynamic properties of baroreflex function, we measured beat-to-beat changes in arterial blood pressure (ABP) and heart rate (HR) during acute hypotension induced by thigh cuff deflation in 10 healthy subjects under supine resting conditions and during progressive lower body negative pressure (LBNP). The quantitative, temporal relationship between ABP and HR was fitted by a second-order autoregressive (AR) model. The frequency response was evaluated by transfer function analysis. Results: HR changes during acute hypotension appear to be controlled by an ABP error signal between baseline and induced hypotension. The quantitative relationship between changes in ABP and HR is characterized by a second-order AR model with a pure time delay of 0.75 s containing low-pass filter properties. During LBNP, the change in HR/change in ABP during induced hypotension significantly decreased, as did the numerator coefficients of the AR model and transfer function gain. Conclusions: 1) Beat-to-beat HR responses to dynamic changes in ABP may be controlled by an error signal rather than directional changes in pressure, suggesting a "set point" mechanism in short-term ABP control. 2) The quantitative relationship between dynamic changes in ABP and HR can be described by a second-order AR model with a pure time delay. 3) The ability of the baroreflex to evoke a HR response to transient changes in pressure was reduced during LBNP, which was due primarily to a reduction of the static gain of the baroreflex.

  18. Cardiovascular Effects of Low-Dose Dexamethasone in Very Low Birth Weight Neonates with Refractory Hypotension

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shahab Noori; Bijan Siassi; Manuel Durand; Ruben Acherman; Smeeta Sardesai; Rangasamy Ramanathan

    2006-01-01

    Background: Administration of hydrocortisone and relatively high doses of dexamethasone increase blood pressure in volume- and pressor-resistant hypotensive preterm infants. However, little is known about the temporal relationship of dexamethasone administration and the improvement in blood pressure and the weaning of pressors\\/inotropes. Furthermore, there are no sufficient data available on whether a smaller dose of dexamethasone would also be effective

  19. 8OH-DPAT-Induced ocular hypotension: sites and mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Chu, T C; Ogidigben, M J; Potter, D E

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the ocular actions of 8-OH-DPAT(DPAT), a 5-HT(1A)receptor agonist. The intraocular pressure responses to topically applied DPAT were dose related (25, 125, 250 microgram) and bilateral in normal rabbits but of relatively short duration. Ocular hypotension induced by topical, unilateral DPAT (125 microgram) in normal eyes did not occur in sympathetically denervated eyes. DPAT-induced ocular hypotension was inhibited by pretreatment with spiroxatrine, a 5-HT(1A)and alpha(2C)receptor antagonist, but not spiperone, a 5-HT(2A)receptor antagonist. In contrast, the hypotensive effect produced by unilaterally applied DPAT in the contralateral eye was abolished following pretreatment with rauwolscine, an alpha(2)-receptor antagonist, but the DPAT-induced ocular hypotension was not antagonized in the treated (ipsilateral) eye. Following central administration of DPAT (3 microgram) into the lateral ventricle, intraocular pressure was lowered bilaterally at 10 min and the effect lasted for 2 hr. In in vitro experiments, DPAT (0.1, 1, 10 micrometer) failed to alter norepinephrine release in rabbit iris-ciliary bodies. However, DPAT depressed basal cAMP levels in rabbit iris-ciliary bodies and also caused a dose-related (1, 10, 100 micrometer) inhibition of isoproterenol (1 micrometer)-stimulated cAMP accumulation by 26%, 58% and 82%, respectively. These findings indicate that: (1) based upon bilateral activity by the topical route, DPAT-induced ocular hypotension could result, in part, through activation of 5-HT(1A)receptors in the eye and 5-HT(1A)receptors and/or alpha(2C)adrenoreceptors in the central nervous system, (2) the activity of DPAT on 5-HT(1A)and/or alpha(2C)receptors was confirmed by antagonism of the ocular hypotensive response by spiroxatrine, (3) although there is no apparent prejunctional effect of DPAT on sympathetic nerves of iris-ciliary bodies, the accumulation of basal and isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP levels were depressed by DPAT, and (4) as a result of inhibition by rauwolscine, the ocular hypotensive effect of DPAT in the contralateral eye could involve an action on alpha(2)adrenoreceptors in the central nervous system. PMID:10433858

  20. Clinical update on nursing home medicine: 2013.

    PubMed

    Messinger-Rapport, Barbara J; Gammack, Julie K; Thomas, David R; Morley, John E

    2013-12-01

    This is the seventh article in the series of Clinical Updates on Nursing Home Care. The topics covered are antiresorptive drugs, hip fracture, hypertension, orthostatic hypotension, depression, undernutrition, anorexia, cachexia, sarcopenia, exercise, pain, and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. PMID:24286710

  1. Associations of endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness with intradialytic hypotension and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    DUBIN, Ruth; OWENS, Christopher; GASPER, Warren; GANZ, Peter; JOHANSEN, Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    Intradialytic hypotension and hypertension are both independently associated with mortality among persons with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis. Endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness are two possible mechanisms underlying these phenomena, but their association with hemodynamic instability during dialysis has not been evaluated. Thirty patients were recruited from chronic dialysis units at San Francisco General Hospital and San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Endothelial dysfunction was assessed with flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery after upper arm occlusion. Arterial stiffness was assessed using carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity measured by tonometry. Intradialytic hypotension and hypertension were defined as the average decrease in systolic blood pressure (SBP) over 1 week, as well as the frequency over 1 month of hypotension or hypertension. Every 5% decrease in flow-mediated dilation was associated with a 7.5mmHg decrease in SBP after adjustment for phosphorus, body mass index, atherosclerosis, and ultrafiltration (P=0.02). Every 5 m/s increase in pulse wave velocity was associated with an 8mmHg increase in SBP after adjustment for predialysis SBP and ultrafiltration (P=0.03). Over 1 month, every 5% lower flow-mediated dilation was associated with a 10% higher frequency of hypotension (P=0.09), and every 5 m/s increase in pulse wave velocity was associated with an 15% higher frequency of hypertension (P=0.02). In a cross-sectional analysis of 30 dialysis patients, endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness were independently associated with intradialytic hypotension and intradialytic hypertension, respectively. Elucidating these potential mechanisms of hemodynamic instability during dialysis may facilitate development of treatment strategies specific to this pathophysiology. PMID:21658174

  2. Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study with midodrine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovic, J.; Gilden, J. L.; Hiner, B. C.; Kaufmann, H.; Brown, D. C.; Coghlan, C. H.; Rubin, M.; Fouad-Tarazi, F. M.

    1993-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the efficacy and safety of midodrine for treatment of patients with orthostatic hypotension due to autonomic failure. PATIENTS: Ninety-seven patients with orthostatic hypotension were randomized in a 4-week, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study with a 1-week placebo run-in period. Patients ranged in age from 22 to 86 years (mean: 61 years). METHODS: After a 1-week run-in phase, either placebo or midodrine at a dose of 2.5 mg, 5 mg, or 10 mg was administered three times a day for 4 weeks. Both the placebo group and the 2.5-mg midodrine group received constant doses throughout the double-blind phase. The patients receiving 5 mg or 10 mg of midodrine were given doses that were increased at weekly intervals by 2.5-mg increments until the designated dose was reached. Efficacy evaluations were based on an improvement at 1-hour postdose in standing systolic blood pressure and in symptoms of orthostatic hypotension (syncope, dizziness/lightheadedness, weakness/fatigue, and low energy level). RESULTS: Midodrine (10 mg) increased standing systolic blood pressure by 22 mm Hg (28%, p < 0.001 versus placebo). Midodrine improved (p < 0.05) the following symptoms of orthostatic hypotension compared to placebo: dizziness/lightheadedness, weakness/fatigue, syncope, low energy level, impaired ability to stand, and feelings of depression. The overall side effects were mainly mild to moderate. One or more side effects were reported by 22% of the placebo group compared with 27% of the midodrine-treated group. Scalp pruritus/tingling, which was reported by 10 of 74 (13.5%) of the midodrine-treated patients, was most frequent. Other reported side effects included supine hypertension (8%) and feelings of urinary urgency (4%). CONCLUSION: We conclude that midodrine is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for moderate-to-severe orthostatic hypotension associated with autonomic failure.

  3. Effect of perturbations and a meal on superior mesenteric artery flow in patients with orthostatic hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujimura, J.; Camilleri, M.; Low, P. A.; Novak, V.; Novak, P.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.

    1997-01-01

    Our aims were to evaluate to role of superior mesenteric blood flow in the pathophysiology of orthostatic hypotension in patients with generalized autonomic failure. METHODS: Twelve patients with symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension and 12 healthy controls underwent superior mesenteric artery flow measurements using Doppler ultrasonography during head-up tilt and tilt plus meal ingestion. Autonomic failure was assessed using standard tests of the function of the sympathetic adrenergic, cardiovagal and postganglionic sympathetic sudomotor function. RESULTS: Superior mesenteric flow volume and time-averaged velocity were similar in patients and controls at supine rest; however, responses to cold pressor test and upright tilt were attenuated (p < 0.05) in patients compared to controls. Head-up tilt after the meal evoked a profound fall of blood pressure and mesenteric blood flow in the patients; the reduction of mesenteric blood flow correlated (r = 0.89) with the fall of blood pressure in these patients, providing another manifestation of failed baroreflexes. We make the novel finding that the severity of postprandial orthostatic hypotension regressed negatively with the postprandial increase in mesenteric flow in patients with orthostatic hypotension. CONCLUSION: Mesenteric flow is under baroreflex control, which when defective, results in, or worsens orthostatic hypotension. Its large size and baroreflexivity renders it quantitatively important in the maintenance of postural normotension. The effects of orthostatic stress can be significantly attenuated by reducing the splanchnic-mesenteric volume increase in response to food. Evaluation of mesenteric flow in response to eating and head-up tilt provide important information on intra-abdominal sympathetic adrenergic function, and the ability of the patient to cope with orthostatic stress.

  4. Usefulness of Intracoronary Epinephrine in Severe Hypotension during Percutaneous Coronary Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin Hee; Lee, Sang Hyun; Chon, Min Ku; Lee, Sang-Gwon; Kim, Jeong Su; Kim, Jun; Park, Yong-Hyun; Kim, June Hong

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives Life-threatening hypotension during percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) is devastating for the patient and is associated with fatal adverse outcomes. The aim of our study was to assess the usefulness of intracoronary epinephrine in severe hypotension unresponsive to other measures during PCI. Subjects and Methods We analyzed the Pusan National University Yangsan hospital cardiac catheterization laboratory database to identify patients who underwent PCI from December 2008 to July 2012. The outcomes were changes of blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) before and after intracoronary epinephrine and in-hospital mortality. Results A total of 30 patients who were initially stable and received intracoronary epinephrine for severe hypotension during PCI were included. Following administration of intracoronary epinephrine (dose 181±24.8 microgram), systolic and diastolic BP (from 53.8±13.0 mm Hg up to 112.8±21.2 mm Hg, from 35±7.6 mm Hg up to 70.6±12.7 mm Hg, respectively) and HR (from 39.4±5.1 beats/min up to 96.8±29.3 beats/min) were increased. Additionally, 21 patients (70%) showed hemodynamically acceptable responses to intracoronary epinephrine without the intraaortic balloon pump and temporary pacemaker during the PCI. In-hospital mortality was 17% (n=5). Conclusion Although our study was small, intracoronary epinephrine was found to be well tolerated and resulted in prompt and successful recovery from severe hypotension in most patients when other measures were ineffective. Intracoronary epinephrine could be a safe and useful measure in patients developing severe hypotension during PCI. PMID:24363749

  5. Preventing haemodynamic instability in patients at risk for intra-dialytic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Leunissen, K M; Kooman, J P; van Kuijk, W; van der Sande, F; Luik, A J; van Hooff, J P

    1996-01-01

    Although as yet no major breakthroughs have occurred to improve long-term survival of haemodialysis patients with impaired cardiovascular function, it is possible to reduce morbidity by intra-dialytic hypotension in these patients by the use of relatively simple manoeuvres. In our experience, this can be achieved using the following approach (Table 1). First, the decline in plasma volume can be reduced by adequate estimation of the optimal dry weight by objective methods, such as echography of the inferior caval vein or bioimpedance measurements. Furthermore, the ultrafiltration rate during haemodialysis should be moderate and should be limited to a maximum value, which has to be defined empirically for each individual patient. Especially in patients with excess inter-dialytic weight gain, isolated ultrafiltration should be used when the required amount of fluid cannot be removed during haemodialysis. The use of low-sodium dialysate should be avoided. Probably it is best to use a physiological sodium concentration of the dialysate because a greater sodium concentration may result in increased thirst and intra-dialytic weight gain. Sodium profiling should be based on further studies concerning plasma volume changes during haemodialysis in different patient groups. Because of the deleterious impact of acetate on vascular reactivity, it should never be used in patients prone to hypotensive periods. Vascular reactivity can also be impaired by the use of vasoactive medication prior to haemodialysis treatment. Therefore, in patients prone to hypotensive periods, vasoactive medication should be withheld the morning before haemodialysis, if possible. Also, one should be very cautious with the use of low-calcium dialysate in patients with frequent hypotensive periods, and ideally it should be avoided. If the use of these manoeuvres fails to control intra-dialytic hypotension, one should consider the use of cold dialysate. Switching to haemofiltration or to continuous treatment modes such as CAPD are other options. Future studies should address haemodynamics during other treatment modes, such as haemodiafiltration or acetate-free biofiltration. PMID:8803987

  6. Orthostatic hypotension as a risk factor for incident heart failure: the atherosclerosis risk in communities study.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christine D; Loehr, Laura; Franceschini, Nora; Rosamond, Wayne D; Chang, Patricia P; Shahar, Eyal; Couper, David J; Rose, Kathryn M

    2012-05-01

    Heart failure causes significant morbidity and mortality. Distinguishing risk factors for incident heart failure can help identify at-risk individuals. Orthostatic hypotension may be a risk factor for incident heart failure; however, this association has not been fully explored, especially in nonwhite populations. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study included 12363 adults free of prevalent heart failure with baseline orthostatic measurements. Orthostatic hypotension was defined as a decrease of systolic blood pressure ?20 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure ?10 mmHg with position change from supine to standing. Incident heart failure was identified from hospitalization or death certificate disease codes. Over 17.5 years of follow-up, orthostatic hypotension was associated with incident heart failure with multivariable adjustment (hazard ratio: 1.54 [95% CI: 1.30-1.82]). This association was similar across race and sex groups. A stronger association was identified in younger individuals ?55 years old (hazard ratio: 1.90 [95% CI: 1.41-2.55]) than in older individuals >55 years old (hazard ratio: 1.37 [95% CI: 1.12-1.69]; interaction P=0.034). The association between orthostatic hypotension and incident heart failure persisted with exclusion of those with diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, and those on antihypertensives or psychiatric or Parkinson disease medications. However, exclusion of those with hypertension somewhat attenuated the association (hazard ratio: 1.34 [95% CI: 1.00-1.80]). We identified orthostatic hypotension as a predictor of incident heart failure among middle-aged individuals, particularly those 45 to 55 years of age. This association may be partially mediated through hypertension. Orthostatic measures may enhance risk stratification for future heart failure development. PMID:22431580

  7. Ocular hypotensive action of topical flunarizine in the rabbit: role of sigma 1 recognition sites.

    PubMed

    Campana, Gabriele; Bucolo, Claudio; Murari, Giovanna; Spampinato, Santi

    2002-12-01

    In a previous study we ascertained the presence of sigma1 and sigma2 recognition sites in the rabbit iris-ciliary body, an ocular structure involved in aqueous humor production and drainage. We characterized the sigma1 sites using the preferential ligand (+)-pentazocine, which caused a significant reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP). In the present study, flunarizine, a calcium channel blocker with a complex pharmacological profile, bound to sigma1 sites expressed in the iris-ciliary body with moderate affinity (K(i) = 68 nM). Unilateral topical flunarizine (0.01-0.1%) caused a dose-related reduction of IOP in ocular normotensive rabbits and in the alpha-chymotrypsin model of ocular hypertension, without altering the IOP of the contralateral eye. This activity was blocked by the sigma1 site antagonist NE-100 [N,N-dipropyl-2-[4-methoxy-3-(2-phenylethoxy)phenyl]ethylamine HCl] which, by itself, had no effect on IOP. Detection of flunarizine in rabbit iris-ciliary body homogenates, after topical instillation, showed that it adequately penetrates the rabbit eye. To investigate mechanisms that may contribute to ocular hypotension induced by sigma1 agonists, we carried out in vitro studies on the isolated rabbit iris-ciliary body. Flunarizine (IC50 = 5. 96 nM) and (+)-pentazocine (IC50 = 3. 81 nM) inhibited [3H]norepinephrine release. Moreover, flunarizine (IC50 = 6.34 nM) and (+)-pentazocine (IC50 = 27.26 nM) also antagonized isoproterenol-induced cAMP accumulation. The action of flunarizine and (+)-pentazocine was sensitive to NE-100 antagonism; however, this latter compound partially prevented their effect on [3H]norepinephrine and cAMP accumulation. These findings indicate that flunarizine and (+)-pentazocine interact with ocular sigma1 sites and may prove effective in the control of ocular hypertension. PMID:12438531

  8. Extraskeletal Myxoid Chondrosarcoma Presenting as an Intradural Spinal Mass: Report of a Rare Clinical Presentation With an Emphasis on Differential Diagnostic Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Priya; Colen, Rivka R.; Bruner, Janet M.; Meis, Jeanne M.

    2014-01-01

    Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma is a rare soft tissue neoplasm that occurs predominantly in the soft tissues of the lower extremities. Herein we present a case of a 29 year old male who presented with bilateral femoral numbness believed to be the result of prior injury to his back. A magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass in the T4-T5 epidural space compressing the spinal cord. Laminectomy was performed and the lesion removed piecemeal. The pathology specimen consisted of multiple fragments of dura involved by a myxoid neoplasm with a nodular growth pattern. The tumor cells were arranged in anastomosing cords and strands. Individual tumor cells were small, of uniform size and shape, with small hyperchromatic nuclei and scant eosinophilic cytoplasm. Immunohistochemical stains were performed which showed the tumor cells were diffusely positive for vimentin and focally positive for EMA, S-100 protein and cytokeratin, whereas they were negative for CD34 and CD99. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies showed a clonal population of cells with re-arrangement of the EWSR1 locus, confirming the histologic impression of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma. This is the first report of a case of an extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma arising from the dura, confirmed to have rearrangement of the EWSR1 gene by FISH. There have only been two other cases of dural based extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma reported prior to our case. We also briefly review the published literature and discuss differential diagnostic considerations for this rare tumor. PMID:25568751

  9. Clinical presentation, auscultation recordings, ultrasonographic findings and treatment response of 12 adult cattle with chronic suppurative pneumonia: case study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Auscultation is considered the critical component of the veterinary clinical examination for the diagnosis of bovine respiratory disease but the accuracy with which adventitious sounds reflect underlying lung pathology remains largely unproven. Modern portable ultrasound machines provide the veterinary practitioner with an inexpensive, non-invasive tool with which to examine the pleural surfaces and superficial lung parenchyma. Simultaneous recording of sounds overlying normal lung and defined pathology allows critical assessment of auscultated sounds in the same animal removing confounding factors such as respiratory rate and thickness of the chest wall (body condition). Twelve cows, referred to the University of Edinburgh Veterinary School, were diagnosed with chronic suppurative pneumonia and enrolled into this prospective study to record and monitor lung sounds, ultrasonographic findings, and response to a standardised antibiotic treatment regimen. Most cows (8/12) had a normal rectal temperature on presentation but all cows had received antibiotic therapy at some time in the previous two weeks and six animals were receiving antibiotic treatment upon admission. All cattle were tachypnoeic (>40 breaths per minute) with frequent and productive coughing, halitosis, and a purulent nasal discharge most noticeable when the head was lowered. Ultrasonographic examination of the chest readily identified pathological changes consistent with severe lung pathology subsequently confirmed as chronic suppurative pneumonia in four cows at necropsy; eight cows recovered well after antibiotic treatment and were discharged two to six weeks after admission. It proved difficult to differentiate increased audibility of normal lung sounds due to tachypnoea from wheezes; coarse crackles were not commonly heard. In general, sounds were reduced in volume over consolidated lung relative to normal lung tissue situated dorsally. Rumen contraction sounds were commonly transmitted over areas of lung pathology. Trueperella (formerly Arcanobacterium) pyogenes was isolated from three of four lung tissue samples at necrospy. Treatment with procaine penicillin for 42 consecutive days resulted in marked improvement with return to normal appetite and improvement in body condition in 8 of 12 cows (67%) where lesions did not extend more than 10-15 cm above the level of the olecranon on both sides of the chest. PMID:23547784

  10. Clinical presentation, auscultation recordings, ultrasonographic findings and treatment response of 12 adult cattle with chronic suppurative pneumonia: case study.

    PubMed

    Scott, Philip R

    2013-01-01

    Auscultation is considered the critical component of the veterinary clinical examination for the diagnosis of bovine respiratory disease but the accuracy with which adventitious sounds reflect underlying lung pathology remains largely unproven. Modern portable ultrasound machines provide the veterinary practitioner with an inexpensive, non-invasive tool with which to examine the pleural surfaces and superficial lung parenchyma. Simultaneous recording of sounds overlying normal lung and defined pathology allows critical assessment of auscultated sounds in the same animal removing confounding factors such as respiratory rate and thickness of the chest wall (body condition). Twelve cows, referred to the University of Edinburgh Veterinary School, were diagnosed with chronic suppurative pneumonia and enrolled into this prospective study to record and monitor lung sounds, ultrasonographic findings, and response to a standardised antibiotic treatment regimen.Most cows (8/12) had a normal rectal temperature on presentation but all cows had received antibiotic therapy at some time in the previous two weeks and six animals were receiving antibiotic treatment upon admission. All cattle were tachypnoeic (>40 breaths per minute) with frequent and productive coughing, halitosis, and a purulent nasal discharge most noticeable when the head was lowered. Ultrasonographic examination of the chest readily identified pathological changes consistent with severe lung pathology subsequently confirmed as chronic suppurative pneumonia in four cows at necropsy; eight cows recovered well after antibiotic treatment and were discharged two to six weeks after admission. It proved difficult to differentiate increased audibility of normal lung sounds due to tachypnoea from wheezes; coarse crackles were not commonly heard. In general, sounds were reduced in volume over consolidated lung relative to normal lung tissue situated dorsally. Rumen contraction sounds were commonly transmitted over areas of lung pathology.Trueperella (formerly Arcanobacterium) pyogenes was isolated from three of four lung tissue samples at necrospy. Treatment with procaine penicillin for 42 consecutive days resulted in marked improvement with return to normal appetite and improvement in body condition in 8 of 12 cows (67%) where lesions did not extend more than 10-15 cm above the level of the olecranon on both sides of the chest. PMID:23547784

  11. Traditional eye medicine use by newly presenting ophthalmic patients to a teaching hospital in south-eastern Nigeria: socio-demographic and clinical correlates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Boniface Ikenna Eze; Chimdi Memnofu Chuka-Okosa; Judith Nkechi Uche

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study set out to determine the incidence, socio-demographic, and clinical correlates of Traditional Eye Medicine (TEM) use in a population of newly presenting ophthalmic outpatients attending a tertiary eye care centre in south-eastern Nigeria. METHODS: In a comparative cross-sectional survey at the eye clinic of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH), Enugu, between August 2004 - July

  12. The Clinical Application of Deep Touch Pressure with a Man with Autism Presenting with Severe Anxiety and Challenging Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blairs, Sharon; Slater, Susan; Hare, Dougal Julian

    2007-01-01

    Although there have been claims of significant therapeutic benefits arising from the use of deep touch pressure techniques with children with autistic spectrum disorders, to date there have been few empirical investigations of its use with adults with autistic spectrum disorders and anxiety in clinical practice. This paper reports on the…

  13. High prevalence of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) as presentation of cystathionine beta-synthase deficiency in childhood: molecular and clinical findings of Turkish probands.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Mehmet; Hismi, Burcu; Ozgul, Riza Koksal; Karaca, Sefayet; Yilmaz, Didem Yucel; Coskun, Turgay; Sivri, Hatice Serap; Tokatli, Aysegul; Dursun, Ali

    2014-01-25

    Classical homocystinuria is the most commonly inherited disorder of sulfur metabolism, caused by the genetic alterations in human cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) gene. In this study, we present comprehensive clinical findings and the genetic basis of homocystinuria in a cohort of Turkish patients. Excluding some CBS mutations, detailed genotype-phenotype correlation for different CBS mutations has not been established in literature. We aimed to make clinical subgroups according to main clinical symptoms and discussed these data together with mutational analysis results from our patients. Totally, 16 different mutations were identified; twelve of which had already been reported, and four are novel (p.N93Y, p.L251P, p.D281V and c.829-2A>T). The probands were classified into three major groups according to the clinical symptoms caused by these mutations. A psychomotor delay was the most common diagnostic symptom (n=12, 46.2% neurological presentation), followed by thromboembolic events (n=6, 23.1% vascular presentation) and lens ectopia, myopia or marfanoid features (n=5, 19.2% connective tissue presentation). Pyridoxine responsiveness was 7.7%; however, with partial responsive probands, the ratio was 53.9%. In addition, five thrombophilic nucleotide changes including MTHFR c.677 C>T and c.1298 A>C, Factor V c.1691 G>A, Factor II c.20210 G>A, and SERPINE1 4G/5G were investigated to assess their contributions to the clinical spectrum. We suggest that the effect of these polymorphisms on clinical phenotype of CBS is not very clear since the distribution of thrombophilic polymorphisms does not differ among specific groups. This study provides molecular findings of 26 Turkish probands with homocystinuria and discusses the clinical presentations and putative effects of the CBS mutations. PMID:24211323

  14. Non-MALT marginal zone B-cell lymphomas: a description of clinical presentation and outcome in 124 patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francoise Berger; Pascale Felman; Catherine Thieblemont; Thierry Pradier; Lucille Baseggio; Paul-Andre Bryon; Gilles Salles; Evelyne Callet-Bauchu; Bertrand Coiffier

    2000-01-01

    Marginal zone B-cell lymphoma (MZL) is a recently individualized lymphoma that encompasses mucosa-associated lym- phoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, splenic lymphoma with or without villous lympho- cytes, and nodal lymphoma with or with- out monocytoid B-cells. If the clinical description and outcome of MALT lym- phoma is well known, this is not the case for the other subtypes. We reviewed 124

  15. Clinical presentation, microbiological features and correlates of disease severity of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) infection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Di Giambenedetto; L. Zileri Dal Verme; M. Sali; S. Farina; V. Di Cristo; S. Manzara; A. De Luca; G. Pignataro; M. Prosperi; A. Di Franco; N. Gentiloni Silveri; G. Delogu; R. Cauda; M. Fabbiani; G. Fadda

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe epidemiological, clinical and microbiological characteristics of confirmed novel\\u000a influenza A (H1N1) infection, investigating factors associated with disease severity. We retrospectively selected patients\\u000a seeking care for respiratory symptoms in two periods (May–August and September–November 2009) with different epidemiological\\u000a characteristics. Only patients with confirmed pandemic influenza A (H1N1) were enrolled in this study. A

  16. Posterior fossa dural arteriovenous fistula presenting clinically as a carotid-cavernous fistula treated by a direct access cavernous sinus approach.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ai Peng; Taneja, Manish; Hui, Francis

    2013-01-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs) represent approximately 10-15% of all cerebral vascular malformations. Although dAVFs can occur anywhere in the brain, they occur most frequently in the cavernous and transverse-sigmoid sinuses. Posterior fossa dAVFs presenting clinically as carotid-cavernous fistulae (CCF) are rarely encountered in clinical practice. We discuss and illustrate an unusual case of a left posterior fossa dAVF that presented clinically with chemosis and early visual impairment, similar to that of CCF. This was subsequently treated by a direct access cavernous sinus approach. We describe the technique used to access the cavernous sinus directly in cases where conventional transvenous and transarterial routes have been exhausted. PMID:24334466

  17. Posterior fossa dural arteriovenous fistula presenting clinically as a carotid-cavernous fistula treated by a direct access cavernous sinus approach.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ai Peng; Taneja, Manish; Hui, Francis

    2014-12-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs) represent approximately 10-15% of all cerebral vascular malformations. Although dAVFs can occur anywhere in the brain, they occur most frequently in the cavernous and transverse-sigmoid sinuses. Posterior fossa dAVFs presenting clinically as carotid-cavernous fistulae (CCF) are rarely encountered in clinical practice. We discuss and illustrate an unusual case of a left posterior fossa dAVF that presented clinically with chemosis and early visual impairment, similar to that of CCF. This was subsequently treated by a direct access cavernous sinus approach. We describe the technique used to access the cavernous sinus directly in cases where conventional transvenous and transarterial routes have been exhausted. PMID:24353329

  18. Fos-activation of FoxP2 and Lmx1b neurons in the parabrachial nucleus evoked by hypotension and hypertension in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Miller, R L; Knuepfer, M M; Wang, M H; Denny, G O; Gray, P A; Loewy, A D

    2012-08-30

    The parabrachial nucleus (PB) is a brainstem cell group that receives a strong input from the nucleus tractus solitarius regarding the physiological status of the internal organs and sends efferent projections throughout the forebrain. Since the neuroanatomical organization of the PB remains unclear, our first step was to use specific antibodies against two neural lineage transcription factors: Forkhead box protein2 (FoxP2) and LIM homeodomain transcription factor 1 beta (Lmx1b) to define the PB in adult rats. This allowed us to construct a cytoarchitectonic PB map based on the distribution of neurons that constitutively express these two transcription factors. Second, the in situ hybridization method combined with immunohistochemistry demonstrated that mRNA for glutamate vesicular transporter Vglut2 (Slc17a6) was present in most of the Lmx1b+ and FoxP2+ parabrachial neurons, indicating these neurons use glutamate as a transmitter. Third, conscious rats were maintained in a hypotensive or hypertensive state for 2h, and then, their brainstems were prepared by the standard c-Fos method which is a measure of neuronal activity. Both hypotension and hypertension resulted in c-Fos activation of Lmx1b+ neurons in the external lateral-outer subdivision of the PB (PBel-outer). Hypotension, but not hypertension, caused c-Fos activity in the FoxP2+ neurons of the central lateral PB (PBcl) subnucleus. The Kölliker-Fuse nucleus as well as the lateral crescent PB and rostral-most part of the PBcl contain neurons that co-express FoxP2+ and Lmx1b+, but none of these were activated after blood pressure changes. Salt-sensitive FoxP2 neurons in the pre-locus coeruleus and PBel-inner were not c-Fos activated following blood pressure changes. In summary, the present study shows that the PBel-outer and PBcl subnuclei originate from two different neural progenitors, contain glutamatergic neurons, and are affected by blood pressure changes, with the PBel-outer reacting to both hypo- and hypertension, and the PBcl signaling only hypotensive changes. PMID:22641087

  19. Fos-activation of FoxP2 and Lmx1b neurons in the parabrachial nucleus evoked by hypotension and hypertension in conscious rats

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Rebecca L.; Knuepfer, Mark M.; Wang, Michelle H.; Denny, George O.; Gray, Paul A.; Loewy, Arthur D.

    2012-01-01

    The parabrachial nucleus (PB) is a brainstem cell group that receives a strong input from the nucleus tractus solitarius regarding the physiological status of the internal organs and sends efferent projections throughout the forebrain. Since the neuroanatomical organization of the PB remains unclear, our first step was to use specific antibodies against two neural lineage transcription factors: Forkhead box protein2 (FoxP2) and LIM homeodomain transcription factor 1 beta (Lmx1b) to define the PB in adult rats. This allowed us to construct a cytoarchitectonic PB map based on the distribution of neurons that constitutively express these two transcription factors. Second, the in situ hybridization method combined with immunohistochemistry demonstrated that mRNA for glutamate vesicular transporter Vglut2 (Slc17a6) was present in most of the Lmx1b+ and FoxP2+ parabrachial neurons, indicating these neurons use glutamate as a transmitter. Third, conscious rats were maintained in a hypotensive or hypertensive state for two hours, and then, their brainstems were prepared by the standard c-Fos method which is a measure of neuronal activity. Both hypotension and hypertension resulted in c-Fos activation of Lmx1b+ neurons in the external lateral-outer subdivision of the PB (PBel-outer). Hypotension, but not hypertension, caused c-Fos activity in the FoxP2+ neurons of the central lateral PB (PBcl) subnucleus. The Kölliker-Fuse nucleus as well as the lateral crescent PB and rostralmost part of the PBcl contain neurons that co-express FoxP2+ and Lmx1b+, but none of these were activated after blood pressure changes. Salt-sensitive FoxP2 neurons in the pre-locus coeruleus and PBel-inner were not c-Fos activated following blood pressure changes. In summary, the present study shows that the PBel-outer and PBcl subnuclei originate from two different neural progenitors, contain glutamatergic neurons, and are affected by blood pressure changes, with the PBel-outer reacting to both hypo- and hypertension, and the PBcl signaling only hypotensive changes. PMID:22641087

  20. Prolonged Refractory Hypotension following Combined Amlodipine and Losartan Ingestion Responsive to Metaraminol

    PubMed Central

    Plumb, James O. M.; Stewart, Craig; Eddleston, Michael; de Beer, Thearina

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Overdose with the calcium channel blocker amlodipine can cause profound hypotension that may be exacerbated by the concurrent ingestion of an angiotensin II receptor antagonist. Best management of such overdoses is uncertain although the use of hyperinsulinaemia-euglycaemia (HIE) has been recommended. Case report. We report a case of mixed amlodipine and losartan overdose in a 50-year-old lady. Severe hypotension was resistant to conventional vasopressors and high-dose insulin/euglycaemia, but did respond to a metaraminol infusion. Conclusion. A trial of metaraminol early in severe cases of calcium channel blocker and angiotensin II receptor antagonist toxicity may be of benefit, especially when conventional ionotropic treatment measures are failing. PMID:21629799