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Sample records for hypotension clinical presentation

  1. Clinical case-based approach to understanding intradialytic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, M J

    2001-10-01

    The approach to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients who develop intradialytic hypotension (IDH) encompasses an understanding of the pathophysiology, appropriate dialysis prescription modification, application of newer pharmacologic therapies, and development of strategies for prevention. Patients should have a "minimal data set" as part of their predialysis assessment. This information is critical to prescription modifications that may help decrease the risk for IDH. Individuals at "high risk" for IDH should be kept to a "safe zone" for dialysis ultrafiltration (hypotension and the increased relative risk for death in ESRD patients. Clinical training sessions on IDH risk recognition and appropriate treatment should be implemented within the dialysis unit. Because repeated bouts of IDH can be disruptive to the smooth efficiency of unit operations, attention to prevention as well as acute intervention of IDH is important. Preventive strategies can be developed in each unit to decrease the number of future IDH events. Considering the importance of hypotension in overall patient survival, attention to identifying the percentage of patients in each unit who experience IDH and/or who present with low blood pressure (systolic <110 mm Hg) should be tracked as a quality assurance initiative. PMID:11602459

  2. A rare presentation of an ancient disease: scurvy presenting as orthostatic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Zipursky, Jonathan Samuel; Alhashemi, Ahmad; Juurlink, David

    2014-01-01

    A 49-year-old man presented to hospital with severe orthostatic hypotension, gingival dysplasia and a purpuric rash involving his extremities. The orthostatic hypotension failed to respond to fluids and, on the basis of physical examination and dietary history, the patient was given a preliminary diagnosis of scurvy (ascorbic acid deficiency). Serum ascorbic acid levels were undetectable and the orthostasis was resolved within 24 h of ascorbic acid replacement. The pathogenesis of orthostatic hypotension in the setting of scurvy appears to involve impaired catecholamine synthesis and attenuated vasomotor response to α-adrenergic stimulation. We believe that this case describes a rare presentation of scurvy and highlights a previously under-reported connection between scurvy and vasomotor instability. PMID:24859547

  3. A rare presentation of an ancient disease: scurvy presenting as orthostatic hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Zipursky, Jonathan Samuel; Alhashemi, Ahmad; Juurlink, David

    2014-01-01

    A 49-year-old man presented to hospital with severe orthostatic hypotension, gingival dysplasia and a purpuric rash involving his extremities. The orthostatic hypotension failed to respond to fluids and, on the basis of physical examination and dietary history, the patient was given a preliminary diagnosis of scurvy (ascorbic acid deficiency). Serum ascorbic acid levels were undetectable and the orthostasis was resolved within 24 h of ascorbic acid replacement. The pathogenesis of orthostatic hypotension in the setting of scurvy appears to involve impaired catecholamine synthesis and attenuated vasomotor response to α-adrenergic stimulation. We believe that this case describes a rare presentation of scurvy and highlights a previously under-reported connection between scurvy and vasomotor instability. PMID:24859547

  4. Recent advances in orthostatic hypotension presenting orthostatic dizziness or vertigo.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Ah; Yi, Hyon-Ah; Lee, Hyung

    2015-11-01

    Orthostatic hypotension (OH), a proxy for sympathetic adrenergic failure, is the most incapacitating sign of autonomic failure. Orthostatic dizziness (OD) is known to be the most common symptom of OH. However, recent studies have demonstrated that 30-39 % of patients with OH experienced rotatory vertigo during upright posture (i.e., orthostatic vertigo, OV), which challenges the dogma that OH induces dizziness and not vertigo. A recent population-based study on spontaneously occurring OD across a wide age range showed that the one-year and lifetime prevalence of OD was 10.9 and 12.5 %, respectively. Approximately 83 % of patients with OD had at least one abnormal autonomic function test result. So far, 11 subtypes of OD have been proposed according to the pattern of autonomic dysfunction, and generalized autonomic failure of sympathetic adrenergic and parasympathetic cardiovagal functions was the most common type. Four different patterns of OH, such as classic, delayed, early, and transient type have been found in patients with OD. The head-up tilt test and Valsalva maneuver should be performed for a comprehensive evaluation of sympathetic adrenergic failure in patients with OD/OV. This review summarizes current advances in OH presenting OD/OV, with a particular focus on the autonomic dysfunction associated with OD. PMID:26292788

  5. Clinical effects of elastic bandage on neurogenic orthostatic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Y; Hakusui, S; Hirayama, M; Ieda, T; Koike, Y; Matsuoka, Y; Takahashi, A

    2000-07-01

    Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (OH) often causes troublesome symptoms such as dizziness, syncope and falling, interfering active daily life or various therapies in rehabilitation. Nonpharmacologic measures for treating patients with OH include wearing elastic leotard, head-up tilting at night, etc. Elastic garment or antigravity suits is certainly effective, but it may be uncomfortable and not practical. Although elastic bandage (EB) bound on the lower limbs has been thought to be useful, there is few clinical report about its beneficial evidence. We investigated short-term clinical effects of commercially available EB on OH, and estimated the mechanism of its effectiveness by measuring some blood pressure-related humoral variables in neurodegenerative patients with OH. PMID:12697524

  6. A retrospective study to correlate breech presentation and enhanced risk of postspinal hypotension during cesarean delivery

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anshul; Pandey, Shivali; Kumar, Roopesh; Sethi, Chavi; Sharma, Sanjya

    2015-01-01

    Background Subarachnoid blockade for cesarean section still poses a threat of profound hypotension and can result in unstable maternal and fetal hemodynamics. The correlation of fetal breech and vertex presentation with the occurrence of hypotension under spinal anesthesia is reviewed in this retrospective, double-blind study. Patients and methods The study was conducted on pregnant females scheduled for a lower segment cesarean section between January 2014 and December 2014. After applying inclusion criteria, 568 patients were recruited in the study out of which 363 had vertex and 184 patients had breech presentation. They were divided into two groups, Group I and Group II. The monitoring and therapeutic data (blood pressure, heart rate, arterial oxygen saturation, and dose of vasopressor/atropine) recovered from automated data analysis were analyzed retrospectively for prevalence of hypotension, bradycardia, and hypotension with bradycardia and nausea ± vomiting. Results Among Group I, prevalence of hypotension, bradycardia, and hypotension together with bradycardia was 152 (41.83%) patients, eight (2.20%) patients, and seven (1.92%) patients, respectively. In Group II, the prevalence of hypotension, bradycardia, and hypotension with bradycardia was 93 (50.5%) patients, five (2.71%) patients, and six (3.2%) patients, respectively. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant for hypotension. For Group I, 152 patients (41.87%) experienced one, 23 patients (6.33%) experienced two, and three patients (0.82%) experienced three episodes of hypotension. In Group II, 93 (50.5%), 19 (7.89%), and two (1.08%) patients experienced such episodes. The difference was significant with respect of one and two episodes. The prevalence of intraoperative nausea was 11.01% (40 patients) in Group I, whereas 11.41% (21 patients) in Group II. Intraoperative vomiting occurred in 19 patients (5.23%) of Group I and 14 patients (7.60%) of Group II. The height of the block was comparable in both the groups for T6, and the difference was significant in respect to T4 level. Conclusion Incidence of hypotension is more in pregnant females with breech fetal presentation. PMID:26719724

  7. [Clinical experimental studies in patients with asympathicotonic hypotension].

    PubMed

    Anlauf, M; Werner, U; Merguet, P; Nitzs, T; Graben, N; Bock, K D

    1975-04-25

    Three patients with postural hypotension (two of the idiopathic type, one possibly due to familial dysautonomia) were found to have not only the pathognomonic postural hypotension, without rise in heart rate, cardiac output and peripheral vascular resistance, but also a similarly abnormal regulatory mechanism on ergometric stress when recumbent. There was a delayed-response to the bloodpressure fall on Valsalva a manoeuvre, and the blood volume was reduced. A combined effect of these factors explains that these patients have a more marked impairment of physical capcity than might be expected merely from the orthostatic hypotension. The actions of noradrenaline, adrenaline, phenylephrine, isoproterenol, angiotensin and tyramine on blood pressure and heart rate were different from normal. Plasma-renin activity was reduced in all three patients and could not be raised. Urinary excretion of adrenaline and noradrenaline was markedly diminished. Reactions to noradrenaline and tyramine, as well as the excretion pattern of the catecholamine metabolites suggest a disorder of active adrenaline liberation. Furthermore, different disorders of catecholamine metabolism underlie idiopathic orthostatic hypotension and familial autonomia. Therapeutic trials with fludrocortisone, beta-receptor blockers and levodopa brought improvement, but long-term results are not yet available. PMID:1122861

  8. [Orthostatic hypotension].

    PubMed

    Schmitz, U; Ko, Y; Seewald, S; Glänzer, K; Düsing, R; Vetter, H

    1995-03-01

    We report about a 67-year-old woman presenting with progressive orthostatic vertigo, urinary incontinence and clinical signs of Parkinson's disease. The Schellong test revealed deficient sympathetic orthostatic pressure response without an increase of plasma norepinephrine; therefore, a Shy-Drager syndrome was diagnosed. Because of inefficiency of the general measures (compressive pantyhose), the sympathomimetic agonists, and the centrally active alpha-2-antagonists, norepinephrine was administered via a miniature dosing pump. By this therapeutic regimen a marked improvement of orthostatic hypotension was achieved. PMID:7892555

  9. Intraoperative hypotension - a neglected causative factor in hospital-acquired acute kidney injury; a Mayo Clinic Health System experience revisited

    PubMed Central

    Onuigbo, Macaulay Amechi Chukwukadibia; Agbasi, Nneoma

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a relatively common complication of cardiothoracic surgery and has both short- and long-term survival implications, even when AKI does not progress to severe renal failure. Given that currently, there are no active effective treatments for AKI, other than renal replacement therapy when indicated, the focus of clinicians ought to be on prevention and risk factor management. In the AKI-surgery literature, there exists this general consensus that intraoperative hypotension (IH) following hypotensive anesthesia (HA) or controlled hypotension (CH) in the operating room has no significant short-term and long-term impacts on renal function. In this review, we examine the basis for this consensus, exposing some of the flaws of the clinical study data upon which this prevailing consensus is based. We then describe our experiences in the last decade at the Mayo Clinic Health System, Eau Claire, in Northwestern Wisconsin, USA, with two selected case presentations to highlight the contribution of IH as a potent yet preventable cause of post-operative AKI. We further highlight the causative although neglected role of IH in precipitating postoperative AKI in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. We show additional risk factors associated with this syndrome and further make a strong case for the elimination of IH as an achievable mechanism to reduce overall, the incidence of hospital acquired AKI. We finally posit that as the old saying goes, prevention is indeed better than cure. PMID:26468476

  10. Intraoperative hypotension - a neglected causative factor in hospital-acquired acute kidney injury; a Mayo Clinic Health System experience revisited.

    PubMed

    Onuigbo, Macaulay Amechi Chukwukadibia; Agbasi, Nneoma

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a relatively common complication of cardiothoracic surgery and has both short- and long-term survival implications, even when AKI does not progress to severe renal failure. Given that currently, there are no active effective treatments for AKI, other than renal replacement therapy when indicated, the focus of clinicians ought to be on prevention and risk factor management. In the AKI-surgery literature, there exists this general consensus that intraoperative hypotension (IH) following hypotensive anesthesia (HA) or controlled hypotension (CH) in the operating room has no significant short-term and long-term impacts on renal function. In this review, we examine the basis for this consensus, exposing some of the flaws of the clinical study data upon which this prevailing consensus is based. We then describe our experiences in the last decade at the Mayo Clinic Health System, Eau Claire, in Northwestern Wisconsin, USA, with two selected case presentations to highlight the contribution of IH as a potent yet preventable cause of post-operative AKI. We further highlight the causative although neglected role of IH in precipitating postoperative AKI in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. We show additional risk factors associated with this syndrome and further make a strong case for the elimination of IH as an achievable mechanism to reduce overall, the incidence of hospital acquired AKI. We finally posit that as the old saying goes, prevention is indeed better than cure. PMID:26468476

  11. Orthostatic hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ninet, J.

    1981-01-01

    Basic orientation of the article, by the leader of a group of medical researchers associated with hospitals in Lyon, France, is toward definition and classification. A table divides OH (orthostatic hypotension) according to physiopathological classification into sympathicotonic and asympathicotonic types and then each of these into primary and secondary with subdivisions. The figure sketches organization and functioning of the baroreflex arc. Applications to clinical study of circulatory reflexes, listing measurement tests and the biological study of hormonal regulation listing the appropriate kinds of studies. Data are not given.

  12. Listeriosis: clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Doganay, Mehmet

    2003-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an uncommon cause of illness in the general population. However, this bacterium is an important cause of severe infections in neonates, pregnant women, the elderly, transplant recipients and other patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity. Various clinical syndromes due to L. monocytogenes have been described such as sepsis, central nervous system infections, endocarditis, gastroenteritis and localized infections. A review of the clinical presentation of listeriosis is given in this paper. PMID:12648833

  13. Orthostatic hypotension in a cohort of hypertensive patients referring to a hypertension clinic.

    PubMed

    Di Stefano, C; Milazzo, V; Totaro, S; Sobrero, G; Ravera, A; Milan, A; Maule, S; Veglio, F

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of orthostatic hypotension (OH) in hypertensive patients ranges from 3 to 26%. Drugs are a common cause of non-neurogenic OH. In the present study, we retrospectively evaluated the medical records of 9242 patients with essential hypertension referred to our Hypertension Unit. We analysed data on supine and standing blood pressure values, age, sex, severity of hypertension and therapeutic associations of drugs, commonly used in the treatment of hypertension. OH was present in 957 patients (10.4%). Drug combinations including α-blockers, centrally acting drugs, non-dihydropyridine calcium-channel blockers and diuretics were associated with OH. These pharmacological associations must be administered with caution, especially in hypertensive patients at high risk of OH (elderly or with severe and uncontrolled hypertension). Angiotensin-receptor blocker (ARB) seems to be not related with OH and may have a potential protective effect on the development of OH. PMID:25631221

  14. A case of anti-NMDAR encephalitis presented hypotensive shock during plasma exchange.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, Akihiko; Monden, Yukifumi; Osaka, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Yamagata, Takanori

    2016-04-01

    We are reporting on a case of pediatric anti-NMDAR encephalitis with autonomic instability. The patient showed little response to first-line treatment of steroid and IVIG. We initiated plasma exchange, also a first-line treatment. This worsened his autonomic instability, resulting in hypotensive shock. He responded well to rituximab and cyclophosphamide, second-line therapies. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis is often accompanied by autonomic instability. Our and other reported cases, raise the question of plasma exchange as a first-line therapy for pediatric NMDAR encephalitis, which is frequently accompanied by autonomic instability. Plasma exchange should be performed cautiously in such patients. PMID:26524986

  15. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension: diagnosis to management.

    PubMed

    Limaye, Kaustubh; Samant, Rohan; Lee, Ricky W

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension typically occurs from spontaneous CSF leak. CSF volume depletion rather than decrease in CSF pressure is thought to be the main causative feature for intracranial hypotension. More and more cases of intracranial hypotension are getting diagnosed with the advances in the imaging. The advances in the imaging have also led to the better understanding of the dynamic changes that occur with intracranial hypotension. The old theories of CSF overproduction or CSF underproduction have not been substantially associated with intracranial hypotension. It has also led to the fore different atypical clinical features and presentations. Although, it has been known for a long time, the diagnosis is still challenging and dilemma persists over one diagnostic modality over other and the subsequent management. Spontaneous CSF leaks occur at the spinal level and the skull base and other locations are rare. The anatomy of spontaneous intracranial hypotension is a very complex process with significant overlap in connective tissue disorders, previous dural weakness or meningeal diverticula. To localize the location of the CSF leak-CT myelography is the modality of choice. CSF cysternography may provide additional confirmation in uncertain cases and also MRI spine imaging may be of significant help in some cases. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension continues to be a diagnostic dilemma and our effort was to consolidate available information on the clinical features, diagnostics, and management for a practicing neurologist for a "15-20 min quick update of the topic". PMID:26661291

  16. Effect of ondansetron on prevention of post-induction hypotension in elderly patients undergoing general anesthesia: A randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Golparvar, Mohammad; Saghaei, Mahmoud; Saadati, Mohammad Ali; Farsaei, Shadi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Elderly patients are susceptible to post-induction hypotension. Volume loading and vasopressors for prevention of hypotension in elderly patients may increase perioperative cardiovascular risks. Ondansetron by blocking Bezold–Jarisch reflex (BJR) through inhibition of serotonin receptors has been effective in the prevention of post-spinal hypotension, and bradycardia. Bradycardia frequently accompanies post-induction hypotension in elderly patients, which signifies a possible preventing role for ondansetron. No previous study has evaluated the prophylactic effects of ondansetron for the prevention of post-induction hypotension. Materials and Methods: In this randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial, ondansetron 4 mg was given intravenously to 65 elderly patients, 20 min before induction of general anesthesia, and the rate of post-induction hypotension defined as 25% or more reduction in mean arterial blood pressure, compared with a placebo groups. Results: A total of 114 patients completed the study (58 in ondansetron and 56 in the placebo group). Proportions of post-induction hypotension were 9 (16%) and 25 (45%) in ondansetron and placebo groups, respectively, (P = 0.001). Forty-five patients (40%) developed bradycardia. Rates of bradycardia were not significantly different between two groups. Conclusions: The results of this study show the effectiveness of intravenous ondansetron for prevention of post-induction hypotension in elderly patients. The mechanism of this effect largely is unknown. Role of ondansetron for prevention of post-induction hypotension may not fully understandable by its interaction with BJR, as has been shown in post-spinal hypotension. PMID:26543450

  17. Orthostatic hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimm, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    Following a brief physiopathological review, orthostatic hypotension is classified into three groups: organic, functional and medication-dependent. The importance of etiological diagnosis, the use of objective tests and appropriate therapy, especially concerning the organic forms, is stressed.

  18. Melanoma: Clinical Presentations.

    PubMed

    Kibbi, Nour; Kluger, Harriet; Choi, Jennifer Nam

    2016-01-01

    The malignant cell in melanoma is the melanocyte. Because melanocytes are located in the basal layer of the epidermis, melanoma is most commonly seen on the skin. However, melanoma can also arise on mucosal surfaces such as the oral cavity, the upper gastrointestinal mucosa, the genital mucosa, as well as the uveal tract of the eye and leptomeninges. Melanomas tend to be pigmented but can also present as pink or red lesions. They can mimic benign or other malignant skin lesions. This chapter presents the spectrum of typical and less typical presentations of melanoma, as well as patterns of spread. It is divided into (1) cutaneous lesions; (2) patterns of regional spread, (3) non-cutaneous lesions; and (4) distant metastases. PMID:26601860

  19. [Diclofurime, a new major hypotensive agent. Clinical study in 24 patients (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Letac, B; Chevallier, B; Cribier, A; Barthes, P

    1980-03-01

    Diclofurine is a new ketone-oxime derivative with potent peripheral vasodilating properties. Its hypotensive effects were studied in 24 patients suffering from severe hypertension resistant to combinations of most hypotensive drugs. In 22 patients who received diclofurime alone the blood pressure decreased from mean values of 194 +/- 1/118 +/- 3 to 166 +/- 4/97 +/- 3 mmHg after the weeks of treatment and remined at simular levels on further examinations. Most remarkably, the fall in BP was accompanied by a decrease of 15 beats/minute in supine heart rate. The mean daily dosage of diclofurime was 518 mg, the drug being taken in three divided doses. In 7 cases where diclofurime was combined with acebutolol either from the start or (in 5 cases) after an initial period of monotherapy, the efficacy of the treatment was enhanced by the beta-blocking agent. Out of 24 patients studied only one failed to respond. The new drug was generally well tolerated. Diclofurime appears to be one of the most active and best tolerated drugs for long-term oral treatment of arterial hypertension. PMID:7375348

  20. Hypotension in Tetanus

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, J. L.; Spalding, J. M. K.; Harris, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    Three patients with severe tetanus had episodes of profound arterial hypotension lasting from minutes to hours. The blood pressure was recorded continuously for 13, 19, and six days respectively by an intra-arterial catheter, and other measurements included heart rate, central venous pressure, cardiac output, and blood gases. The hypotension was distinguished from that of “shock”, for there was no clinical evidence of peripheral vasoconstriction and no tachycardia. It could not be attributed to disturbances of salt and water balance. During episodes of hypotension the blood pressure fell as low as 32/16 mm Hg, the heart rate fell from a mild tachycardia to normal values or a mild bradycardia, and the central venous pressure did not rise. The onset and the end of such episodes was often abrupt and the hypotension was often produced in response to a stimulus. In one patient extreme hypotension followed the aspiration of secretions from the trachea. These changes may represent another effect of tetanus on autonomic nervous activity, including impairment of baroreceptor reflexes. PMID:4726136

  1. What Causes Hypotension?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Hypotension? Conditions or factors that disrupt the body's ability to control blood pressure cause hypotension. The different types of hypotension have different ...

  2. Meningitis, clinical presentation of tetanus.

    PubMed

    Moniuszko, Anna; Zajkowska, Agata; Tumiel, Ewa; Rutkowski, Krzysztof; Czupryna, Piotr; Pancewicz, Sławomir; Rutkowski, Ryszard; Zdrodowska, Agnieszka; Zajkowska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Background. Tetanus is an acute disease caused by a neurotoxin produced by Clostridium tetani. Tetanus immunization has been available since the late 1930s but sporadic cases still occur, usually in incompletely vaccinated or unvaccinated individuals. Case Report. An elderly previously vaccinated female contracted tetanus following foot injury. Clinically she presented with meningitis causing diagnostic and therapeutic delays. Why Should Physician Be Aware of This? Even in developed countries the differential diagnosis of meningitis, especially in the elderly, should include tetanus. Treatment in intensive care unit is required. General population might benefit from vaccine boosters and education on this potentially fatal disease. PMID:25789186

  3. Multiple System Atrophy with Orthostatic Hypotension (Shy-Drager Syndrome)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Multiple System Atrophy with Orthostatic Hypotension Information Page Synonym(s): Shy- ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Multiple System Atrophy with Orthostatic Hypotension? Multiple system atrophy with ...

  4. Severe resistant maternal hypotension following tocolysis with nifedipine.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Freda; Mathur, Manisha

    2014-01-01

    An 18-year-old woman, gravida 3, para 2, presented at 24 weeks of gestation with preterm premature rupture of membranes. She was started on nifedipine for tocolysis and to facilitate administration of steroids. Two and a half hours later, the patient developed tachycardia and hypotension. Sepsis from chorioamnionitis, acute cardiac event and pulmonary embolism were considered as differential diagnoses. Laboratory and radiological investigations, however, ruled out these possible causes of haemodynamic instability. Her clinical condition deteriorated and hypotension remained intractable despite aggressive fluid resuscitation. An emergency caesarean section at 24 weeks of gestation was carried out in the interest of saving the mother's life. The haemodynamic status of the patient recovered rapidly postcaesarean section. This case report highlights the rare but potentially serious adverse effects of hypotension in administration of nifedipine; and thus reminds us of the importance of judicious prescription and careful titration of nifedipine as a tocolytic. PMID:25515131

  5. The clinical effectiveness of permissive hypotension in blunt abdominal trauma with hemorrhagic shock but without head or spine injuries or burns: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Alsawadi, Abdulrahman

    2012-01-01

    Background Trauma is a major cause of death and disability. The current trend in trauma management is the rapid administration of fluid as per the Advanced Trauma Life Support guidelines, although there is no evidence to support this and even some to suggest it might be harmful. Some guidelines, protocols, and recommendations have been established for the use of permissive hypotension although there is reluctance concerning its application in blunt injuries. Objectives The aim of this review is to determine whether there is evidence of the use of permissive hypotension in the management of hemorrhagic shock in blunt trauma patients. This review also aims to search for any reason for the reluctance to apply permissive hypotension in blunt injuries. Methods This systematic review has followed the steps recommended in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. It is also being reported in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Statement and checklist. Database searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases and the Cochrane Library were made for eligible studies as well as journal searches. Inclusion criteria included systematic reviews that have similar primary questions to this review and randomized controlled trials where patients with blunt torso injuries and hemorrhagic shock were not excluded. Rapid or early fluid administration was compared with controlled or delayed fluid resuscitation and a significant outcome was obtained. Results No systematic reviews attempting to answer similar questions were found. Two randomized controlled trials with mixed types of injuries in the included patients found no significant difference between the groups used in each study. Data concerning the question of this review was sought after these papers were appraised. Conclusion The limited available data are not conclusive. However, the supportive theoretical concept and laboratory evidence do not show any reason for treating blunt injuries differently from other traumatic injuries. Moreover, permissive hypotension is being used for some nontraumatic causes of hemorrhagic shock and in theater. Therefore, this should encourage interested researchers to continue clinical work in this important field.

  6. A thin line between Meniere's disease and spontaneous intracranial hypotension syndrome.

    PubMed

    Botica, Iva; Vrca, Anđelko; Špero, Martina; Šubarić, Marin; Carić, Tomislav; Vrca Botica, Marija; Kovačić, Jelena; Makaruha, Kristijan; Roglić, Aleksandra

    2016-02-01

    Aim To point out the similarity of Meniere disease and spontaneous intracranial hypotension and difference of their treatment. Methods A case of a 54-year-old male patient with previously diagnosed Meniere's disease and newly diagnosed spontaneous intracranial hypotension syndrome is presented. Additional neuroradiological examination, Brain contrast-enhanced MRI and MR myelography were used for diagnosis. Results Due to deterioration of vertigo, hearing loss and tinnitus in the right ear the patient was referred to the additional neuroradiological examination which confirmed the diagnosis of spontaneous intracranial hypotension syndrome. Brain contrast-enhanced MRI showed increased pachymeningeal contrast enhancement, and MR myelography identified the location of CSF leak. The patient was successfully treated conservatively. Conclusion According to our knowledge this is the fifth case report of Meniere's disease and spontaneous intracranial hypotension coexistence. Both diseases have similar clinical presentation and initial treatment. We suggest procedures of additional examination when the treatment fails and initial diagnosis becomes questionable. PMID:26827704

  7. Postexercise Hypotension: Central Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao-Yin; Bonham, Ann C.

    2010-01-01

    A single bout of exercise can lead to a postexercise decrease in blood pressure in hypertensive individuals, called postexercise hypotension. Compelling evidence suggests that the central baroreflex pathway plays a crucial role in the development of postexercise hypotension. This review focuses on the exercise-induced changes in brainstem nuclei involved in blood pressure regulation. PMID:20577060

  8. [Spontaneous nerve root cerebrospinal fluid leaks and intracranial hypotension: case report].

    PubMed

    Falavigna, Asdrubal; Ferraz, Fernando Antonio Patriani; Boscato, Giovana; Shimokawa, Marcos

    2003-03-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is a rare syndrome, characterized by pressure in the cerebrospinal fluid ranging between 50 and 70 mmH2O and postural headache. Its diagnosis is made through the clinical presentation, measurement of the cerebrospinal fluid pressure and neurorimage features. The clinical recognition of this pathology has been increasing and the differential diagnosis must be made with inflammatory meningeal processes and tumor. We report a case of spontaneous nerve root cerebrospinal fluid leaks in a 34 year-old man and intracranial hypotension. A literature review was performed evaluating the clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of this unusual pathology. PMID:12715038

  9. Amiodarone-Induced Life-Threatening Refractory Hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Deepak; Jayawardana, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 70 Final Diagnosis: Cardiogenic shock Symptoms: Chest discomfort and intermittent palpitations Medication: Amiodarone Clinical Procedure: Intubation Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Amiodarone is frequently used in emergency departments for treatment of arrhythmias. Incidence of several amiodarone-related adverse events is unknown. The literature is sparse for potentially life-threatening adverse effects of amiodarone. Case Report: We present a case of a male patient who presented with chest discomfort and rapid atrial fibrillation. He was known to have paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, which did not respond to initial beta-blocker treatment. The second-line drug amiodarone was given to the patient for rate control. He developed severe hypotension related to amiodarone and required inotropic support along with rapid-sequence intubation. Conclusions: Intravenous amiodarone can cause severe and refractory hypotension. PMID:26366832

  10. [Orthostatic hypotension in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Gila, Teresa; Rízea, Cristian

    2013-03-16

    Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is defined as a decrease in systolic blood pressure of 20 mmHg, or a decrease in diastolic blood pressure of 10 mmHg within three minutes of standing. It results from an inadequate response to postural changes in blood pressure. Common symptoms include dizziness, light-headedness, blurred vision, weakness, fatigue, nausea, palpitations, sweating, head and neck ache, slow cognitive performance and transient loss of conscientiousness. OH is a common problem among elderly patients and its aetiology is diverse, including autonomic nervous system dysfunction, cardiac problems, medication side effects, ageing changes or transitory deregulation of blood volume. The instrumental diagnosis can be easily accomplished by the tilt-table test, with continuous monitoring of blood pressure and cardiac parameters. It is a non-invasive technique and needs minimal collaboration from the patient. In our experience, when reviewing 327 patients, aged over 40 years and examined because of clinical suspicion of OH, the prevalence thereof was 51% whereas if focused in subjects older than 70, OH was proven in 90% of the cases. The older the patients, the more frequently they presented general deterioration, neurological or cardiac problems as well as pharmacological side effects. Ruling out neurological or cardiac malfunction can drastically improve the prognosis with possible reversibility of symptoms. Some nonpharmacological and pharmacological approaches to improve management of OH and life quality are described for guidance. PMID:23483469

  11. The different clinical presentations of vasovagal syncope.

    PubMed

    Alboni, Paolo

    2015-05-01

    For some decades, after the introduction of the head-up tilt test into clinical practice, the clinical presentation of vasovagal syncope (VVS) has been classified as typical (or classical) and atypical (or non-classical). Some clinical features and recent data suggest that even unexplained falls and syncope during sleeping hours may be possible clinical presentations of VVS. In recent studies, tilt testing and carotid sinus massage by means of the 'method of symptoms' were performed in one group of patients with unexplained falls and in another group with unexplained syncope (presence of prodromal symptoms). Overall, tilt testing and carotid sinus massage displayed a high positivity rate in the group of patients with unexplained falls (about 60%), which was similar to that of the unexplained syncope group. These new data seem to indicate that some unexplained falls could be cases of atypical VVS/carotid sinus syncope with retrograde amnesia. Some clinical features suggest that syncope during sleeping hours is a form of VVS with a different clinical presentation: high prevalence of autonomic prodromes, of diurnal episodes of typical VVS and specific phobias, and of positive tilt testing with severe cardioinhibition. PMID:25792719

  12. Diagnosis and clinical presentation of hemoglobin Kirksey.

    PubMed

    Hitaka, Daisuke; Arai, Junichi

    2016-03-01

    More than 1000 hemoglobin (Hb) variants have been identified. Hb Kirksey, a rare Hb variant involving mutation at codon 94 of ?2-globin, is associated with low oxygen affinity. To our knowledge, there is no case report on Hb Kirksey in the literature, and, accordingly, the clinical features of patients with Hb Kirksey are currently unknown. We report here the case of a neonate who presented with asymptomatic low oxygen saturation on pulse oximetry (SpO2 ) just after birth, together with clinical analysis of the sister and cousin. Based on the presentations, Hb Kirksey does not seem to be associated with clinical abnormalities. Discrepancy between SpO2 and partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2 ) detected on arterial blood gas analysis provided a clue to the diagnosis. Hb variants should be suspected and arterial blood gases should be measured in pediatric cases of unexplained low SpO2 . PMID:26678362

  13. Clinical Linguistics: Its Past, Present and Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Historiography is a growing area of research within the discipline of linguistics, but so far the subfield of clinical linguistics has received virtually no systematic attention. This article attempts to rectify this by tracing the development of the discipline from its pre-scientific days up to the present time. As part of this, I include the…

  14. Iatrogenic cerebrospinal fluid leak and intracranial hypotension after gynecological surgery.

    PubMed

    Tu, Albert; Creedon, Kerry; Sahjpaul, Ramesh

    2014-09-01

    Perineural cysts are common lesions of the sacral spine. They have rarely been reported in a presacral location, leading to their misdiagnosis as a gynecological lesion. The authors report the second such case, in a patient undergoing fenestration of what was presumed to be a benign pelvic cyst, and the resultant high-flow CSF leak that occurred. They describe the clinical presentation and manifestations of intracranial hypotension, as well as the pertinent investigations. They also review the literature for the best management options for this condition. Although they are uncommon, large perineural cysts should be included in the differential diagnosis when examining patients with a pelvic lesion. Appropriate imaging investigations should be performed to rule out a perineural cyst. The CSF leak that occurs from iatrogenic cyst fenestration may not respond to traditional first-line treatments for intracranial hypotension and may require early surgical intervention. The authors would recommend neurosurgical involvement prior to definitive treatment. PMID:24905389

  15. [Clinical presentation and diagnosis of epileptic auras].

    PubMed

    Barletova, E I; Kremenchugskaia, M R; Mukhin, K Iu; Glukhova, L Iu; Mironov, M B

    2012-01-01

    To define clinical presentations of visual auras and to reveal their clinical, encephalographic and neuroimaging correlates, we examined 23 patients, aged from 5 to 25 years (mean 14±6 years), with focal forms of epilepsy. Patients had visual auras regardless of the etiology of epilepsy which developed immediately before epileptic seizures or were isolated. Patients had simple or complex visual hallucinations, the former occurring more frequently, visual illusions and ictal amaurosis. Positive visual phenomena were noted more frequently than negative ones. In most of the patients, visual hallucinations were associated with the pathological activity in cortical occipital regions of the brain and, in some cases, in temporal and parietal regions. The different pathologies (developmental defects, post-ischemic, atrophic and other disturbances) identified by MRI were found in a half of patients. PMID:23120768

  16. A Rare Clinical Presentation of Darier's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ferizi, Mybera; Begolli-Gerqari, Antigona; Luzar, Bostjan; Kurshumliu, Fisnik; Ferizi, Mergita

    2013-01-01

    Darier's disease, also known as keratosis follicularis or dyskeratosis follicularis, is a rare disorder of keratinization. It is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis with high penetrance and variable expressivity. Its manifestation appears as hyperkeratotic papules, primarily affecting seborrheic areas on the head, neck, and thorax and less frequently on the oral mucosa. When oral manifestations are present, the palatal and alveolar mucosae are primarily affected. They are usually asymptomatic and are discovered in routine dental examination. Histologically, the lesions are presented as suprabasal clefts in the epithelium with acantholytic and dyskeratotic cells represented by "corps ronds and grains". This paper reports a case of a 53-year-old woman that was admitted to our clinic with more than 10-year history of keratotic papules, presented on the hands and feet, nose, ears, genitalia, and whitish lesions on palatal mucosae. PMID:23573430

  17. A Rare Clinical Presentation of Darier's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferizi, Mybera; Begolli-Gerqari, Antigona; Luzar, Bostjan; Kurshumliu, Fisnik; Ferizi, Mergita

    2013-01-01

    Darier's disease, also known as keratosis follicularis or dyskeratosis follicularis, is a rare disorder of keratinization. It is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis with high penetrance and variable expressivity. Its manifestation appears as hyperkeratotic papules, primarily affecting seborrheic areas on the head, neck, and thorax and less frequently on the oral mucosa. When oral manifestations are present, the palatal and alveolar mucosae are primarily affected. They are usually asymptomatic and are discovered in routine dental examination. Histologically, the lesions are presented as suprabasal clefts in the epithelium with acantholytic and dyskeratotic cells represented by “corps ronds and grains”. This paper reports a case of a 53-year-old woman that was admitted to our clinic with more than 10-year history of keratotic papules, presented on the hands and feet, nose, ears, genitalia, and whitish lesions on palatal mucosae. PMID:23573430

  18. Orbital dermoids: clinical presentation and management.

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, R P; Rootman, J; Lapointe, J S

    1984-01-01

    The authors have reviewed 15 cases of orbital dermoids representing 6% of orbital tumours seen at the University of British Columbia Orbital Clinic. They tended to occur as either asymptomatic superficial lesions in children or as complicated deep lesions in adolescents and adults. The superficial lesions were as frequent medially as laterally and could be dealt with by a direct uncomplicated surgical approach. The deep lesions in contrast, were frequently extensive and difficult to remove, requiring careful preoperative planning. Sites of origin, presentation, differential diagnosis, and management are discussed. Images PMID:6466593

  19. Diagnosis and clinical presentation of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Abhishek, A; Doherty, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), the commonest arthropathy, targets the knees, hips, finger interphalangeal joints, thumb bases, first metatarsophalangeal joints, and spinal facet joints, and displays marked heterogeneity of clinical presentation. Signs of OA include coarse crepitus, bony enlargement, reduced range of movement, and joint-line tenderness. Muscle wasting and joint deformity occur with severe OA. Painful periarticular disorders often coexist with OA. Inflammation is absent or only modest, although mild-moderate effusions are common at the knee. The diagnosis of OA may be made without recourse to radiographic or laboratory investigations in the at-risk age group with typical symptoms and signs. PMID:23312410

  20. Medical Therapy and Physical Maneuvers in the Treatment of the Vasovagal Syncope and Orthostatic Hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Satish R; Coffin, Samuel T

    2012-01-01

    Patients with vasovagal syncope and neurogenic orthostatic hypotension can both present with pre-syncope and syncope resulting from systemic hypotension. While not directly responsible for increased mortality, both of these conditions can have a tremendous deleterious impact on the daily lives of patients. This negative impact can take the form of both physical symptoms and injury, but also a psychological impact from living in fear of the next syncopal episode. Despite these similarities, these are different disorders with fixed damage to the autonomic nerves in neurogenic orthostatic hypotension, as opposed to a transient reflex hypotension in neurally mediated vasovagal syncope. The treatment approaches for both disorders are parallel. The first step is to educate the patient about the pathophysiology and prognosis of their disorder. Next, offending medications should be withdrawn when possible. Non-pharmacological therapies and maneuvers can be used, both in an effort to prevent the symptoms and to prevent syncope at the onset of presyncope. This is all that is required in many patients with vasovagal syncope. If needed, pharmacological options are also available for both vasovagal syncope and neurogenic orthostatic hypotension, many of which are focused on blood volume expansion, increasing cardiac venous return, or pressor agents to increase vascular tone. There is a paucity of high quality clinical trial data to support the use of these pharmacological agents. We aim to review the literature on these different therapy choices and to give recommendations on tailored approaches to the treatment of these conditions. PMID:23472781

  1. Neuromyelitis Optica: Atypical Clinical and Neuroradiological Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, Silvia; Anselmi, Monica; Catalucci, Alessia; Di Cesare, Ernesto; Gallucci, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The extreme variability of clinical and MRI findings in the suspicion of Devic's disease always requires the detection of specific antibodies (AQP4). MRI scans were performed with a high-field MRI scanner (1.5T General Electric Signa Horizon): the MRI protocol of the brain employed axial DP, T2, T1, FLAIR and DWI weighted images (wi) and coronal T2-wi. After intravenous administration of contrast medium axial and sagittal T1-weighted images of the brain were repeated. The spine protocol employed after contrast medium included sagittal T2-wi, T2-wi with fat suppression and T1-wi. In May 2004, a 64-year-old healthy Caucasian woman began to suffer loss of motor and thermal sensitivity in the left lower limb. MRI showed non-specific areas of abnormal signal intensity on the deep left frontal and right frontoparietal white matter with no pathological enhancement after contrast medium and a small intramedullary area of altered signal at metameric level C2-C4 with a diagnosis of post-viral transverse myelitis. The patient had two similar episodes years later so the neurologist decided to search for circulating IgG AQP4 with the definitive diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica. In this case, compared to a clinical presentation of atypical deficit neurological involvement, the neuroradiological results of a progressive diffuse involvement of the white matter were atypical. PMID:25924171

  2. Clinical presentations of parvovirus B19 infection.

    PubMed

    Servey, Jessica T; Reamy, Brian V; Hodge, Joshua

    2007-02-01

    Although most persons with parvovirus B19 infection are asymptomatic or have mild, nonspecific, cold-like symptoms, several clinical conditions have been linked to the virus. Parvovirus B19 usually infects children and causes the classic "slapped-cheek" rash of erythema infectiosum (fifth disease). The virus is highly infectious and spreads mainly through respiratory droplets. By the time the rash appears, the virus is no longer infectious. The virus also may cause acute or persistent arthropathy and papular, purpuric eruptions on the hands and feet ("gloves and socks" syndrome) in adults. Parvovirus B19 infection can trigger an acute cessation of red blood cell production, causing transient aplastic crisis, chronic red cell aplasia, hydrops fetalis, or congenital anemia. This is even more likely in patients with illnesses that have already shortened the lifespan of erythrocytes (e.g., iron deficiency anemia, human immunodeficiency virus, sickle cell disease, thalassemia, spherocytosis). A clinical diagnosis can be made without laboratory confirmation if erythema infectiosum is present. If laboratory confirmation is needed, serum immunoglobulin M testing is recommended for immunocompetent patients; viral DNA testing is recommended for patients in aplastic crisis and for those who are immunocompromised. Treatment is usually supportive, although some patients may require transfusions or intravenous immune globulin therapy. Most patients recover completely. PMID:17304869

  3. Treatment of orthostatic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, Olaf; Kribben, Andreas; Baumgart, Dietrich; Philipp, Thomas; Erbel, Raimund; Cohen, Michael V

    2002-12-01

    Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is a fall in blood pressure after assuming an upright position. Whereas asymptomatic patients usually need no treatment, the majority of symptomatic patients can be cured by avoidance of trigger mechanisms and the use of physical countermaneuvers and non-pharmacological interventions. Several pharmacological therapies are available and generally fludrocortisone and midodrine are the drugs of first choice. Recently, highly individualized therapy with ambulatory norepinephrine therapy was able to mobilize otherwise immobile patients. PMID:12482740

  4. Hypotension Associated with Advanced Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Geetanjali; Hamad, Hussein; Mohajer, Roozbeh; Catchatourian, Rosalind; Kovarik, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Hypotension is an extremely rare manifestation of Hodgkin lymphoma. We report the case of a patient who presented with new onset hypotension and was diagnosed with urosepsis and septic shock requiring pressor support for maintaining his blood pressure. computed tomography (CT) scan of abdomen showed liver lesions, which were new on comparison with a CT abdomen done 3 weeks back. Biopsy of the liver lesions and subsequently a bone marrow biopsy showed large atypical Reed-Sternberg cells, positive for CD15 and CD 30 and negative for CD45, CD3 and CD20 on immuno-histochemical staining, hence establishing the diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma. The mechanism involved in Hodgkin lymphoma causing hypotension remains anecdotal, but since it is mostly seen in patients with advanced Hodgkin lymphoma, it is hypothetically related to a complex interaction between cytokines and mediators of vasodilatation. Here we review relevant literature pertaining to presentation and pathogenesis of this elusive and rare association. PMID:25317321

  5. A Reversible Cause of Skin Hyperpigmentation and Postural Hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Mehreen; Madduri, Sujay; Okolie, Pamela; Nunlee-Bland, Gail; Williams, James

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency results in neuropsychiatric, hematologic, gynecologic, cardiovascular, and cutaneous manifestations. It is seen most commonly in the elderly, malabsorption diseases??(>60% of all cases), vegans, and vegetarians. Manifestations of pernicious anemia may be similar to Addison disease and may lead to a misdiagnosis. Herein, we report two cases of vitamin B12 deficiency in which clinical features shared many similarities with Addison disease. Both patients presented with progressive darkening of hands and postural hypotension that reversed with replenishment of vitamin B12. Vitamin B12 deficiency should be considered in patients presenting with skin lesions especially with other coexisting autoimmune diseases. PMID:23840983

  6. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension Associated with Kinetic Tremor and Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is a clinically variable syndrome caused by low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure due to a non-traumatic CSF leak. Phenomenology Shown This case describes a 68-year-old gentleman who presents with chronic and slightly progressive kinetic tremor of bilateral hands associated with gait ataxia and gait start hesitation. Educational Value This case underscores the importance of having a high index of suspicion for the diagnosis of SIH when encountering a patient presenting with late-onset progressive kinetic tremor and gait ataxia syndrome.

  7. A reversible cause of skin hyperpigmentation and postural hypotension.

    PubMed

    Cherqaoui, Rabia; Husain, Mehreen; Madduri, Sujay; Okolie, Pamela; Nunlee-Bland, Gail; Williams, James

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency results in neuropsychiatric, hematologic, gynecologic, cardiovascular, and cutaneous manifestations. It is seen most commonly in the elderly, malabsorption diseases  (>60% of all cases), vegans, and vegetarians. Manifestations of pernicious anemia may be similar to Addison disease and may lead to a misdiagnosis. Herein, we report two cases of vitamin B12 deficiency in which clinical features shared many similarities with Addison disease. Both patients presented with progressive darkening of hands and postural hypotension that reversed with replenishment of vitamin B12. Vitamin B12 deficiency should be considered in patients presenting with skin lesions especially with other coexisting autoimmune diseases. PMID:23840983

  8. Clinical review of grayanotoxin/mad honey poisoning past and present.

    PubMed

    Gunduz, Abdulkadir; Turedi, Suleyman; Russell, Robert M; Ayaz, Faik Ahmet

    2008-06-01

    Grayanotoxin is a naturally occurring sodium channel toxin which enters the human food supply by honey made from the pollen and nectar of the plant family Ericaceae in which rhododendron is a genus. Grayanotoxin/mad honey poisoning is a little known, but well studied, cholinergic toxidrome resulting in incapacitating and, sometimes, life-threatening bradycardia, hypotension, and altered mental status. Complete heart blocks occur in a significant fraction of patients. Asystole has been reported. Treatment with saline infusion and atropine alone is almost always successful. A pooled analysis of the dysrhythmias occurring in 69 patients from 11 different studies and reports is presented. The pathophysiology, signs, symptoms, clinical course, and treatment of grayanotoxin/mad honey poisoning are discussed. In the nineteenth century grayanotoxin/mad honey poisoning was reported in Europe and North America. Currently, documented poisoning from locally produced honey in Europe or North America would be reportable. Possible reasons for this epidemiologic change are discussed. PMID:18568799

  9. DIPNECH: Association Between Histopathology and Clinical Presentation.

    PubMed

    Trisolini, Rocco; Valentini, Ilaria; Tinelli, Carmine; Ferrari, Marco; Guiducci, Gian Marco; Parri, Sergio Nicola Forti; Dalpiaz, Giorgia; Cancellieri, Alessandra

    2016-04-01

    Diffuse idiopathic pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (DIPNECH) is a rare disorder which can be an incidental finding in imaging tests performed during the investigation of another condition, or is the final diagnosis in patients evaluated for chronic obstructive complaints. To explore the possible association between specific histopathology features and the mode of clinical presentation, we retrieved the clinical, functional, radiological, and pathological data of all 13 patients diagnosed with DIPNECH at our Institution over a 14-year period (2000-2014). As compared to patients with incidental disease (6/13, 46 %), patients with symptomatic disease were younger [mean (SD): 57.7 vs. 68.7 years, p = 0.046], were more likely to have mosaic attenuation (100 vs. 0 %, p = 0.001) and small multiple nodules (100 vs. 17 %, p = 0.005) at CT, and showed a significantly higher number of foci of linear neuroendocrine proliferation [median (IQR): 28 (13-37) vs. 6 (5-13), p = 0.018] and of tumorlets [median (IQR): 10 (8-20) vs. 1 (1-1), p = 0.002] at histology. Incidental disease was found in association with pulmonary adenocarcinoma in five out of six patients (83.3 %). The results of our study provide preliminary evidence that symptomatic patients with DIPNECH represent a specific subset characterized by younger age and a higher burden of foci of neuroendocrine proliferation. PMID:26880164

  10. Recurrent erysipelas - risk factors and clinical presentation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Erysipelas is a common infection that often recurs, but the impact of specific risk factors for reoccurrence remains elusive. In the present study we aimed at clarifying predisposing conditions for reoccurrence. Methods Medical records were reviewed from all patients ≥18 years of age diagnosed with erysipelas at the Department of Infectious Diseases at Skåne University Hospital, Sweden, from January 2007 to February 2011. 502 patients were included, of which 357 were single episode erysipelas and 145 had recurrent erysipelas. These two groups were compared regarding underlying conditions and clinical presentation. Results Erysipelas in the lower limbs had the greatest propensity of recurrence. The associations between underlying conditions and recurrence were largely depending on the site of erysipelas. Overall, the most prominent risk factor for recurrence was lymphedema and other conditions causing a chronic impairment of the defence against microbes. Conditions temporarily disrupting the skin barrier (e.g. a local wound or toe web intertrigo), although likely being risk factors for erysipelas per se, did not seem to predispose to repeated episodes. Individuals with recurrent erysipelas tended to seek medical attention earlier, and were less likely to be hospitalized or receive intravenous antibiotics, but there was no evidence of any difference in inflammatory reaction when taking confounding factors into account. Conclusions In this large cross-sectional study of over 500 patients with erysipelas, lymphedema was the most prominent risk factors for recurrence although the distribution of predisposing conditions varies depending on the site of erysipelas. PMID:24884840

  11. A man with small vessel vasculitis presenting with brachial diplegia, multiple cranial mononeuropathies and severe orthostatic hypotension in diabetes mellitus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We report a rare case of fulminant vasculitic mononeuropathy resulting in brachial diplegia, with suspected brainstem and autonomic nervous system involvement in a patient with diabetes mellitus. Case presentation A 58-year-old Hispanic Caucasian man with diabetes mellitus presented with a 1-year history of progressive bilateral upper extremity weakness, orthostatic intolerance and progressive memory decline. Diagnostic evaluation including laboratory tests for progressive encephalopathies, systemic inflammatory and non-inflammatory neuropathies, cerebrospinal fluid analyses, electrodiagnostic studies, and nerve biopsy were performed. Clinical examination revealed moderate cognitive deficits on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment scale, bilateral facial weakness and weakness of bilateral shoulder girdle and intrinsic hand muscles. Cerebrospinal fluid analyses revealed elevated protein and an elevated immunoglobulin G synthesis rate, suggesting an immune-mediated process. Further laboratory work up was non-diagnostic. Electrodiagnostic studies demonstrated chronic asymmetric axonal mononeuropathies with ongoing denervation. A superficial radial nerve biopsy showed a chronic vasculitic neuropathy. Glucocorticosteroid treatment, symptomatic pharmacologic and supportive non-pharmacologic therapies resulted in improved clinical outcomes despite challenges with glycemic control. Conclusions This case report emphasizes the importance of a thorough evaluation of atypical or uncommon neuromuscular presentations in diabetic patients without etiological presumptions. This is necessary in order to promptly establish a diagnosis, initiate appropriate therapies and prevent irreversible nerve injury. PMID:24083508

  12. Droxidopa in neurogenic orthostatic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Horacio; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Palma, Jose-Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (nOH) is a fall in blood pressure (BP) on standing due to reduced norepinephrine release from sympathetic nerve terminals. nOH is a feature of several neurological disorders that affect the autonomic nervous system, most notably Parkinson disease (PD), multiple system atrophy (MSA), pure autonomic failure (PAF), and other autonomic neuropathies. Droxidopa, an orally active synthetic amino acid that is converted to norepinephrine by the enzyme aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (dopa-decarboxylase), was recently approved by the FDA for the short-term treatment of nOH. It is presumed to raise BP by acting at the neurovascular junction to increase vascular tone. This article summarizes the pharmacological properties of droxidopa, its mechanism of action, and the efficacy and safety results of clinical trials. PMID:26092297

  13. Droxidopa in neurogenic orthostatic hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Horacio; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Palma, Jose-Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (nOH) is a fall in blood pressure on standing due to reduced norepinephrine release from sympathetic nerve terminals. nOH is a feature of several neurological disorders that affect the autonomic nervous system, most notably Parkinson disease (PD), multiple system atrophy, pure autonomic failure and other autonomic neuropathies. Droxidopa, an orally active synthetic amino acid that is converted to norepinephrine by the enzyme aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (dopa-decarboxylase), was recently approved by the FDA for the short-term treatment of nOH. It is presumed to raise blood pressure by acting at the neurovascular junction to increase vascular tone. This review summarizes the pharmacological properties of droxidopa, its mechanism of action, and the efficacy and safety results of clinical trials. PMID:26092297

  14. [Neonatal Dengue. Presentation of clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Romero-Santacruz, Edith; Lira-Canul, Janeth Jaqueline; Pacheco-Tugores, Fredy; Palma-Chan, Adolfo Gonzalo

    2015-05-01

    Dengue is an infectious disease caused by a flavivirus, with four serotypes, transmitted by the mosquito Aedes aegypti. In Mexico it is a public health problem, especially in the region of central and southeast of the country. The disease can be asymptomatic or present serious forms and even death. It is confirmed by detection of the NS1 Antigen; IgM antibodies, polymerase chain reaction and virus isolation. The vertical transmission to de newborn has been little studied. 7 cases in neonates from November to December 2011 are reported. All patients were male, obtained by caesarean section between 34 and 40 weeks of gestation, whose mothers were enrolled with fever and symptoms associated with dengue disease and serology positive for dengue. Six with positive AgNS1 and one positive IgM; one mother died. All the newborns had positive serology for dengue, 4 with positive AgNS1 and 3 positive IgM. The clinical features of the newborn ranged from asymptomatic to one serious dengue fever, shock and hemorrhage. The symptomatic 6 attended with thrombocytopenia, changes in temperature and unspecific disturbance. The severity of mothers conditioned disrepair product at birth, but not with subsequent gravity of the new born. Vertical trasmission of dengue should be suspected in risk areas, to maintain vigilance and to give early treatment. Also is neccesary promote the realization of specific diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines to the neonatal period. PMID:26233977

  15. The Management of Orthostatic Hypotension in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Ferro, Álvaro; Benito-León, Julián; Gómez-Esteban, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is a common and disabling symptom affecting Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients. We present the effect of the different therapies commonly used to manage PD on this clinical manifestation. For this purpose, we describe the relationship between OH and the current treatments employed in PD, such as L-DOPA, dopaminergic agonists, and continuous dopaminergic stimulation therapies. Additionally, we review the therapeutic measures that could be used to ameliorate OH. There are different approaches to deal with this manifestation, including pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments, although none of them is specifically aimed for treating OH in PD. PMID:23772219

  16. Further hypotensive metabolites from Verbesina caracasana.

    PubMed

    Delle Monache, G; Volpe, A R; Delle Monache, F; Vitali, A; Botta, B; Espinal, R; De Bonnevaux, S C; De Luca, C; Botta, M; Corelli, F; Carmignani, M

    1999-11-15

    After the isolation of caracasanamide and caracasandiamide, further hypotensive components of Verbesina caracasana were shown to be N3-prenylagmatine, N1-3',4'-dimethoxycinnamoylagmatine, agmatine and galegin (prenylguanidine). The structures were assigned on the basis of the spectral data of both metabolites and products from their alkaline hydrolyses. A pharmacological analysis of these products is also presented. PMID:10576697

  17. Causes of chronic orthostatic hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, D.; Robertson, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of various causes of orthostatic hypotension. DESIGN: Survey. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: One hundred patients with moderate to severe orthostatic hypotension. RESULTS: Twenty-seven percent of the patients had primary autonomic failure, 35% had secondary autonomic failure, and 38% had hypotension without evidence of generalized autonomic degeneration. CONCLUSIONS: In a tertiary referral center, only a minority of patients with severe orthostatic hypotension will have Shy-Drager syndrome or Bradbury-Eggleston syndrome as their primary disease. Occasional patients who initially appear to have Bradbury-Eggleston syndrome ultimately prove to have Shy-Drager syndrome or paraneoplastic autonomic failure. Antidepressant drugs, even in low doses, remain a major overlooked cause of orthostatic hypotension.

  18. Extragingival Pyogenic Granuloma: an Unusual Clinical Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Suresh K.

    2015-01-01

    Pyogenic granuloma is thought to represent an exuberant tissue reaction to local irritation. It occurs in second decade of life in young females. Clinically, oral pyogenic granuloma is a smooth or lobulated exophytic growth, pedunculated or sessile, which usually bleeds on provocation. Oral pyogenic granuloma preferentially affects the gingiva. On rare occasion, it can be found extragingivally on lips, tongue, buccal mucosa, and palate which may mimic more serious pathological conditions such as malignancies. This article reports an unusual case of extra gingival pyogenic granuloma occurring on the right buccal mucosa in a female patient and discusses the features that distinguish this lesion from other similar oral mucosal lesions. PMID:26535410

  19. Clinical Presentation and Management of Hallux Rigidus.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Kamran S; Parekh, Selene G

    2015-09-01

    Hallux rigidus is the most commonly occurring arthritic condition of the foot and is marked by pain, limited motion in the sagittal plane of the first metatarsophalangeal joint and varying degrees of functional impairment. In conjunction with clinical findings, radiographic grading helps guide therapeutic choices. Nonsurgical management with anti-inflammatory medications, corticosteroid injections, or shoewear and activity modifications can be successful in appropriately selected patients. Patients with more severe disease or refractory to conservative management may benefit from surgical intervention. Operative options range from joint-preserving procedures (eg, cheilectomy with or without associated osteotomies) to joint-altering procedures (eg, arthroplasty or arthrodesis). PMID:26320554

  20. Clinical oncology in Malaysia: 1914 to present

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    A narration of the development of staff, infrastructure and buildings in the various parts of the country is given in this paper. The role of universities and other institutions of learning, public health, palliative care, nuclear medicine and cancer registries is described together with the networking that has been developed between the government, non-governmental organisations and private hospitals. The training of skilled manpower and the commencement of the Master of Clinical Oncology in the University of Malaya is highlighted. Efforts taken to improve the various aspects of cancer control which includes prevention of cancer, early detection, treatment and palliative care are covered. It is vital to ensure that cancer care services must be accessible and affordable throughout the entire health system, from the primary care level up to the centres for tertiary care, throughout the whole country. PMID:21614216

  1. [Clinical presentation of cutaneous adnexal tumors].

    PubMed

    Zelger, B; Kazakov, D V; Zelger, B G

    2014-09-01

    Cutaneous adnexal lesions can sometimes be clinically diagnosed even by an experienced clinician or a differential diagnosis can at least be narrowed down. However, clinical findings alone cannot replace histological investigations and diagnosis or make them superfluous. This expertise is based on an algorithm which first differentiates inflammatory pseudo-tumors, such as ruptured infundibular cysts (atheroma) from authentic neoplastic adnexal lesions. In a second step criteria of regularity and/or chaos, such as asymmetry, irregular border, color variation and/or destruction with exulceration help to evaluate the dignity. In a third step criteria of differentiation allow the characterization of lesions varying in size from macules to papules, plaques, nodules and tumors to the subgroups of adnexal differentiation. Infundibular differentiation is characterized by comedones and is skin-colored, yellow or white and hard. Follicular differentiation notifies hair and is skin-colored, pearl-like to occasionally brown-black and variably hard. Sebaceous differentiation signifies lobulation and is yellow to skin-colored or red and soft. Apocrine lesions are reddish and fleshy. Eccrine differentiation shows either papillary reddish-brown (differential diagnosis viral warts) or skin-colored hard lesions. Multiple, monomorphous lesions are characteristic of syndromes, such as Spiegler-Brooke-Fend, Birt-Hogg-Dubé, Muir-Torre, and Gorlin-Goltz.One peculiarity of adnexal lesions is their potential to form cysts. Cysts with horny or hairy material are skin-colored to yellow, with glandular fluid fluctuation, a bluish character, and with illumination a Tyndall phenomenon becomes obvious, while ruptured cysts reveal an erythematous-reddish, ill-defined foreign body reaction. Brown to bluish-gray and black color is seen by the presence of melanocytes with melanin in lesions with mostly follicular differentiation. Strong vascularization and bleeding are reddish, soft, spongy and compressible and in due course variably dark due to the presence of hemosiderin. PMID:25154603

  2. Eosinophilic oesophagitis: clinical presentation and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bystrom, Jonas; O'Shea, Nuala R

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) is an inflammatory disorder of the oesophagus which has become increasingly recognised over recent years, although it remains underdiagnosed in many centres. It is characterised histologically by a significant eosinophilic infiltration of the oesophageal mucosa (>15 eosinophils per high powered field), and clinically with features of oesophageal dysfunction such a dysphagia, food impaction, and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) resistant dyspepsia. Fibrosis and oesophageal remodelling may occur and lead to oesophageal strictures. An allergic predisposition is common in the EoE population, which appears to be primarily food antigen driven in children and aeroallergen driven in adults. Evidence suggests that the pathogenesis of EoE is due to a dysregulated immunological response to an environmental allergen, resulting in a T helper type 2 (Th2) inflammatory disease and remodelling of the oesophagus in genetically susceptible individuals. Allergen elimination and anti-inflammatory therapy with corticosteroids are currently the mainstay of treatment; however, an increasing number of studies are now focused on targeting different stages in the disease pathogenesis. A greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms resulting in EoE will allow us to improve the therapeutic options available. PMID:24647582

  3. Atomoxetine for Orthostatic Hypotension in an Elderly Patient Over 10 Weeks: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hale, Genevieve M; Brenner, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Several nonpharmacologic strategies for orthostatic hypotension exist including avoiding large carbohydrate-rich meals; limiting alcohol consumption; maintaining adequate hydration; adding salt to foods; and using compression stockings, tilt-table exercises, or abdominal binders. If these fail, however, only limited evidence-based pharmacologic treatment options are available including the use of fludrocortisone, midodrine, pyridostigmine, and droxidopa as well as pseudoephedrine, ocetreotide, and atomoxetine. This report discusses a case of atomoxetine use for 10weeks in an elderly patient with primary orthostatic hypotension. An 84-year-old man with long-standing primary orthostatic hypotension presented to our ambulatory cardiology pharmacotherapy clinic after several unsuccessful pharmacologic therapies including fludrocortisone, midodrine, and pyridostigmine. Nonpharmacologic strategies were also implemented. Atomoxetine was initiated, and the patient showed gradual improvements in symptoms and blood pressure control over the course of 10weeks. Our data suggest that low-dose atomoxetine is an effective and safe agent for symptom improvement and blood pressure control in elderly patients with primary orthostatic hypotension. PMID:26406777

  4. Functional (psychogenic) movement disorders - Clinical presentations.

    PubMed

    Hallett, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Functional or psychogenic movement disorders are common and disabling, and sometime difficult to diagnose. The history and physical exam can give positive features that will support the diagnosis, which should not be based solely on exclusion. Some clues in the history are sudden onset, intermittent time course, variability of manifestation over time, childhood trauma, history of other somatic symptom and secondary gain. Anxiety and depression are common, but not necessarily more than the general population. On examination, distraction and suggestibility may be present. There are specific signs that should be looked for with different types of movements. For example, with tremor, change in frequency over time and entrainment are common features. With myoclonus, the movements might be complex in type with long latencies to stimulus induced jerks. Gait disorders show good balance despite claims to the contrary. Functional dystonia still remains a challenging diagnosis in many circumstances, although fixed dystonia is one sign more likely to be functional. PMID:26365778

  5. Gastroesophageal reflux: clinical presentations, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed Central

    Waterfall, W E; Craven, M A; Allen, C J

    1986-01-01

    Symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux occurs daily in an estimated 7% of adults and weekly or monthly in 29%. Untreated it can lead to esophageal erosions, ulceration and stricture formation. The pathogenesis is often multifactorial: defects in the function of the lower esophageal sphincter, esophageal clearance mechanisms and gastric emptying combine to produce frequent lengthy periods during which the lower esophagus is bathed in regurgitated acid. In most patients reflux disease is easily recognized as recurrent heartburn, regurgitation or dysphagia, or a combination. When acute chest pain or respiratory illness is the primary presenting complaint the patient needs particularly careful investigation to determine whether the symptoms are due to a primary cardiac or respiratory condition, are secondary to gastroesophageal reflux alone or represent a combination of disorders. Endoscopy with biopsy and long-term pH monitoring are the most reliable ways of determining whether reflux disease is present. Additional investigations, such as exercise testing, cardiac catheterization or inhalation challenge, may be needed in patients with cardiac or respiratory symptoms. Treatment should follow a stepped-care approach and in most patients should begin with changes in lifestyle, including dietary manipulation, reducing alcohol and cigarette consumption, and raising the head of the bed, together with appropriate use of antacids or alginate-antacid combinations. H2-receptor antagonists and agents to improve both gastric emptying and the tone of the lower esophageal sphincter may be added in sequence. Most patients will respond well to this regimen. Surgery should be considered only for those with intractable symptoms or with complications (e.g., stricture formation, bleeding, development of dysplastic epithelium in those with Barrett's esophagus, or secondary pulmonary disease that does not respond to medical management). It is successful in 85% of well-selected patients and has few complications. PMID:2876769

  6. Lobomycosis: epidemiology, clinical presentation, and management options

    PubMed Central

    Francesconi, Valeska Albuquerque; Klein, Ana Paula; Santos, Ana Paula Botelho Gualda; Ramasawmy, Rajendranath; Francesconi, Fábio

    2014-01-01

    Lobomycosis is a subcutaneous mycosis of chronic evolution caused by the Lacazia loboi fungus. Its distribution is almost exclusive in the Americas, and it has a particularly high prevalence in the Amazon basin. Cases of lobomycosis have been reported only in dolphins and humans. Its prevalence is higher among men who are active in the forest, such as rubber tappers, bushmen, miners, and Indian men. It is recognized that the traumatic implantation of the fungus on the skin is the route by which humans acquire this infection. The lesions affect mainly exposed areas such as the auricles and upper and lower limbs and are typically presented as keloid-like lesions. Currently, surgical removal is the therapeutic procedure of choice in initial cases. Despite the existing data and studies to date, the active immune mechanisms in this infection and its involvement in the control or development of lacaziosis have not been fully clarified. In recent years, little progress has been made in the appraisal of the epidemiologic aspects of the disease. So far, we have neither a population-based study nor any evaluation directed to the forest workers. PMID:25328400

  7. Hypotensive syndromes are not associated with cognitive impairment in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Schoon, Yvonne; Lagro, Joep; Verhoeven, Yolanda; Rikkert, Marcel Olde; Claassen, Jurgen

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the association of the hypotensive syndromes orthostatic hypotension (OH), postprandial hypotension (PPH), and carotid sinus hypersensitivity (CSH) with cognitive impairment (mild cognitive impairment/dementia). Continuous measurements of blood pressure (Finapres) were performed during active standing, meal test, and carotid sinus massage, among 184 elderly patients presenting with falls. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia were diagnosed following a multidisciplinary assessment. The study design was a retrospective cohort study. The OH, PPH, and CSH were observed in 104 (58%), 108 (64%), and 78 (51%) patients, respectively. A total of 79 (43%) patients were cognitively impaired (MCI impairment n = 44; dementia n = 35). The prevalence of cognitive impairment varied little across the hypotensive syndromes (32%-43%) and was similar in patients with and without hypotensive syndromes (P = .59). In this geriatric population with a high prevalence of both hypotensive syndromes and cognitive impairment, patients with one or more hypotensive syndromes were not likely to have cognitive impairment. PMID:23242123

  8. Orthostatic hypotension and the Holmes-Adie syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, R. H.; McLellan, D. L.; Love, D. R.

    1971-01-01

    Two patients who presented with symptoms due to orthostatic hypotension were found on examination to have the Holmes-Adie syndrome. Physiological investigation suggested that they both had an afferent block from baroreceptors in contrast to the efferent autonomic block found in most other cases of idiopathic orthostatic hypotension, including the cases of multisystem disease, now often called the Shy-Drager syndrome. Images PMID:5122384

  9. Acute Hypotension After 50% Dextrose Injections.

    PubMed

    Saites, Victoria; Laudanski, Krzysztof

    2016-05-15

    The hemodynamic effects of small-volume boluses of hyperosmotic solutions are often deemed negligible in the clinical setting. However, animal studies have reported decreases in systemic arterial blood pressure and bradycardia with the administration of hyperosmotic solutions. This is a report of a 60-year-old woman, intubated and sedated, who developed acute decreases in systemic arterial blood pressure with the administration of ≤50 mL of 50% dextrose. Animal studies suggest that hyperosmolar-induced hypotension may be avoided by administering the hyperosmotic solution slowly. This allows for admixture and therefore a decreased osmotic load at the proposed osmoreceptor involved in the neural reflex. PMID:26934608

  10. Overdose of drugs for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: clinical presentation, mechanisms of toxicity, and management.

    PubMed

    Spiller, Henry A; Hays, Hannah L; Aleguas, Alfred

    2013-07-01

    The prevalence of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the USA is estimated at approximately 4-9% in children and 4% in adults. It is estimated that prescriptions for ADHD medications are written for more than 2.7 million children per year. In 2010, US poison centers reported 17,000 human exposures to ADHD medications, with 80% occurring in children <19 years old and 20% in adults. The drugs used for the treatment of ADHD are diverse but can be roughly separated into two groups: the stimulants such as amphetamine, methylphenidate, and modafinil; and the non-stimulants such as atomoxetine, guanfacine, and clonidine. This review focuses on mechanisms of toxicity after overdose with ADHD medications, clinical effects from overdose, and management. Amphetamine, dextroamphetamine, and methylphenidate act as substrates for the cellular monoamine transporter, especially the dopamine transporter (DAT) and less so the norepinephrine (NET) and serotonin transporter. The mechanism of toxicity is primarily related to excessive extracellular dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin. The primary clinical syndrome involves prominent neurological and cardiovascular effects, but secondary complications can involve renal, muscle, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal (GI) effects. In overdose, the patient may present with mydriasis, tremor, agitation, hyperreflexia, combative behavior, confusion, hallucinations, delirium, anxiety, paranoia, movement disorders, and seizures. The management of amphetamine, dextroamphetamine, and methylphenidate overdose is largely supportive, with a focus on interruption of the sympathomimetic syndrome with judicious use of benzodiazepines. In cases where agitation, delirium, and movement disorders are unresponsive to benzodiazepines, second-line therapies include antipsychotics such as ziprasidone or haloperidol, central alpha-adrenoreceptor agonists such as dexmedetomidine, or propofol. Modafinil is not US FDA approved for treatment of ADHD; however, it has been shown to improve ADHD signs and symptoms and has been used as an off-label pharmaceutical for this diagnosis in both adults and children. The mechanism of action of modafinil is complex and not fully understood. It is known to cause an increase in extracellular concentrations of dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin in the neocortex. Overdose with modafinil is generally of moderate severity, with reported ingestions of doses up to 8 g. The most common neurological effects include increased anxiety, agitation, headache, dizziness, insomnia, tremors, and dystonia. The management of modafinil overdose is largely supportive, with a focus on sedation, and control of dyskinesias and blood pressure. Atomoxetine is a selective presynaptic norepinephrine transporter inhibitor. The clinical presentation after overdose with atomoxetine has generally been mild. The primary effects have been drowsiness, agitation, hyperactivity, GI upset, tremor, hyperreflexia, tachycardia hypertension, and seizure. The management of atomoxetine overdose is largely supportive, with a focus on sedation, and control of dyskinesias and seizures. Clonidine is a synthetic imidazole derivative with both central and peripheral alpha-adrenergic agonist actions. The primary clinical syndrome involves prominent neurological and cardiovascular effects, with the most commonly reported features of depressed sensorium, bradycardia, and hypotension. While clonidine is an anti-hypertensive medication, a paradoxical hypertension may occur early with overdose. The clinical syndrome after overdose of guanfacine may be mixed depending on central or peripheral alpha-adrenoreceptor effects. Initial clinical effects may be drowsiness, lethargy, dry mouth, and diaphoresis. Cardiovascular effects may depend on time post-ingestion and may present as hypotension or hypertension. The management of guanfacine overdose is largely supportive, with a focus on support of blood pressure. Overdose with ADHD medications can produce major morbidity, with many cases requiring intensive care medicine and prolonged hospital stays. However, fatalities are rare with appropriate care. PMID:23757186

  11. Induced hypotension during anesthesia with special reference to orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, C.

    1995-01-01

    Since Gardner first used arteriotomy during anesthesia to improve visibility in the surgical field, various techniques and pharmacological agents have been tried for the same purpose. With reports documenting the spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome through blood transfusions, prevention of homologous blood transfusions during surgery has also become a major concern. Induced hypotension has been used to reduce blood loss and thereby address both issues. In orthognathic surgery, induced hypotension during anesthesia has been used for similar reasons. It is recommended that hypotensive anesthesia be adjusted in relation to the patient's preoperative blood pressure rather than to a specific target pressure and be limited to that level necessary to reduce bleeding in the surgical field and in duration to that part of the surgical procedure deemed to benefit by it. A mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) 30% below a patient's usual MAP, with a minimum MAP of 50 mm Hg in ASA Class I patients and a MAP not less than 80 mm Hg in the elderly, is suggested to be clinically acceptable. Various pharmacological agents have been used for induced hypotension during orthognathic surgery. In addition, there are many drugs that have been used in other types of surgery that could be used in orthognathic surgery to induce hypotension. Recent reports using control groups do not show significant differences in morbidity and mortality attributable to induced hypotension during anesthesia. Appropriate patient evaluation and selection, proper positioning and monitoring, and adequate fluid therapy are stressed as important considerations in patients undergoing induced hypotension during orthognathic surgery. PMID:8934953

  12. Plants and hypotensive, antiatheromatous and coronarodilatating action.

    PubMed

    Petkov, V

    1979-01-01

    However great the success in the therapy of hypertension, atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease has been gained today by recent efficient drugs, the definite healing of patients is not yet attained. The late discovery of reserpine, such an efficient drug of plant origin against hypertension, convinced so far reluctant scientists to consider the chemical compounds of the plant world. With respect to this traditional medical knowledge, it seems necessary to define more accurately the specificity of these healings-sometimes recommended unspecifically for a whole branch of medicine. This experimental verification should not use inconsiderately the present-day classification of diseases; there should be an awareness that conventional experimental methods in pharmacology are often unsuitable for revealing the real biological activity of one or another medicinal plant. The interest in the millennial empirical field of health care is acknowledged by the World Health Organization which promotes research and development of traditional medicine, along with investigations into its psychosocial and ethnographic aspects. These studies cover a number of plants growing in Bulgaria that have a healing effect in hypertension, atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease according to the data of traditional medicine. Using screening methods, extracts and chemically pure substances were investigated; extraction was done with solvents such as water, ether, chloroform, dichloretan, ethanol, methanol, and acetone. Most of the experiments were carried out on anesthetized cats, rabbits and dogs. The substances tested were applied mainly intravenously, and in some experiments orally. Chronic experiments were also carried out on wakeful dogs with induced hypertension, on animals fed on an atherogenic diet, and on animals with induced arrhythmia and coronary spasm. Data are presented of clinical examination of some plants or of active substances isolated from them. Major results of these studies are presented for the following plants: Garlic, Geranium; Hellebore; Mistletoe; Olive; Valerian; Hawthorn; Pseucedanum arenarium; Periwinkle; Fumitory. For another 50 plants growing in Bulgaria and in other countries the author presents his and other investigators' experimental and clinical data about hypotensive, antiatheromatous and coronarodilatating action. PMID:574353

  13. [Causes and clinical presentation of physical pain in childhood].

    PubMed

    Zakanj, Zora

    2007-01-01

    Pain is the most common symptom of pathological process in childhood, presenting with different clinical symptoms. Pain can produce physical and psychical distress in the child, and its management is rarely practiced in pediatric population. The aim of this review is to present patophysiological mechanism of acute and chronic pain in childhood, its clinical signs, the causes of pain, and also differential diagnosis regarding organ systems: headache, chest pain, abdominal pain, and neck pain. PMID:17489515

  14. Clinical presentation, diagnosis, and prognosis of chronic laminitis.

    PubMed

    Herthel, D; Hood, D M

    1999-08-01

    This article focuses on the initial assessment of the horse affected with chronic laminitis. Variations in the clinical presentation and primary considerations in making a differential diagnosis are included. The elements of a clinical history essential to sound, therapeutic management, and prognosis are summarized. The physical and radiographic assessment of the digital lesions and diagnostic approaches to the common systemic aspects of the disease are presented and discussed. PMID:10472118

  15. Refractory hypotension in a patient with Wernicke's encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi; Hou, Xiaojun; Ding, Suju; Guan, Yangtai; Zhen, Huimin; Tu, Laihui; Qiu, Yiqing

    2012-01-01

    A 57-year-old male patient with gastric carcinoma underwent radical distal gastrectomy type II + Braun anastomosis, and received total parenteral nutrition for 10 days after surgery, followed by small amounts of semi-liquid nutrition for 3 days and liquid nutrition for 2 days. The patient developed refractory hypotension for more than 1 week in the early course of disease, and on Day 15 after surgery presented with characteristic signs of Wernicke's encephalopathy, including diplopia and mental confusion. The hypotension did not improve despite appropriate fluid replacement soon after admission. Treatment with moderate dose of thiamine for 3 months partly relieved ophthalmoplegia and confusion, but not Korsakoff syndrome. This extraordinary presentation with refractory hypotension and the unusual course of the disease encouraged us to present this case. PMID:21969096

  16. Regional grey matter atrophy in clinically isolated syndromes at presentation

    PubMed Central

    Henry, R G; Shieh, M; Okuda, D T; Evangelista, A; Gorno-Tempini, M L; Pelletier, D

    2016-01-01

    Background The presence and degree of neuronal degeneration already existing in patients at their initial presentation with a clinically isolated syndrome suggestive of multiple sclerosis (CIS) is unclear, and whole brain or whole normalised grey matter analyses have not demonstrated significant atrophy in CIS cohorts at clinical presentation. Voxel-based analyses allow detection of regional atrophy throughout the brain and, therefore, may be sensitive to regional atrophy in CIS patients, and these changes may correspond with clinical disability. Methods: This study used a modified voxel-based morphometry (VBM) method to correct for lesion effects to analyse regional atrophy and perform voxel-wise correlations between volume and clinical metrics in 41 untreated CIS patients at presentation compared with 49 healthy controls. Results The results confirmed that there was no significant difference in whole normalised grey matter volume between CIS and controls, whereas VBM showed significant areas of bilateral thalamic, hypothalamic, putamen and caudate atrophy. Voxel-wise correlations with clinical measures showed that cerebellar volumes correlated with clinical cerebellar function, nine-hole peg test scores and the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (MSFC) score, and that the MSFC score was also correlated with putamen volume. Lastly, T1 lesion volumes were found to correlate with thalamic and hippocampal atrophy, suggesting a link between white matter lesions and grey matter degeneration at the earliest stages of multiple sclerosis. Conclusions Atrophy is present in CIS patients at presentations, particularly in the thalamus, and other deep grey matter structures. Furthermore, the correlations with clinical metrics suggest the importance of this atrophy to clinical status and the correlation with T1 lesion load suggests a possible role of Wallerian degeneration. PMID:18469033

  17. Orthostatic hypotension in patients, bed rest subjects, and astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathers, C. M.; Charles, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension after even short space flights has affected a significant number of astronauts. Given the need for astronauts to function at a high level of efficiency during and after their return from space, the application of pharmacologic and other treatments is strongly indicated. This report addresses the clinical problem of orthostatic hypotension and its treatments to ascertain whether pharmacologic or physiologic treatment may be useful in the prevention of orthostatic hypotension associated with space flight. Treatment of orthostatic hypotension in patients now includes increasing intravascular volume with high sodium intake and mineralocorticoids, or increasing vascular resistance through the use of drugs to stimulate alpha or block beta vascular receptors. Earlier treatment used oral sympathomimetic ephedrine hydrochloride alone or with "head-up" bed rest. Then long-acting adrenocortical steroid desoxycorticosterone preparations with high-salt diets were used to expand volume. Fludrocortisone was shown to prevent the orthostatic drop in blood pressure. The combination of the sympathomimetic amine hydroxyamphetamine and a monoamine oxidase inhibitor tranylcypromine has been used, as has indomethacin alone. Davies et al. used mineralocorticoids at low doses concomitantly with alpha-agonists to increase vasoconstrictor action. Schirger et al used tranylcypromine and methylphenidate with or without a Jobst elastic leotard garment or the alpha-adrenergic agonist midodrine (which stimulates both arterial and venous systems without direct central nervous system or cardiac effects). Vernikos et al established that the combination of fludrocortisone, dextroamphetamine, and atropine exhibited a beneficial effect on orthostatic hypotension induced by 7-day 6 degrees head-down bed rest (a model used to simulate the weightlessness of space flight). Thus, there are numerous drugs that, in combination with mechanical techniques, including lower body negative pressure to elevate transmural pressure, could be studied to treat orthostatic hypotension after space flight.

  18. Intracranial hypotension secondary to spinal pathology: Diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Sartip, Kamyar; McKenna, Gregory; Spina, Michael; Grahovac, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Spinal pathology resulting in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak and intracranial hypotension is an infrequently reported and a potentially severe cause of headaches. We present a case of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak caused by a thoracic disk herniation successfully treated with two targeted epidural blood patches. Although patients typically present with orthostatic headaches, the imaging findings of intracranial hypotension should prompt investigation of the spine for site and cause of the CSF leakage. Treatment includes autologous blood patch and surgery in refractory cases. PMID:26914140

  19. Efficacy of atomoxetine versus midodrine for the treatment of orthostatic hypotension in autonomic failure.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Claudia E; Okamoto, Luis E; Arnold, Amy C; Gamboa, Alfredo; Diedrich, André; Choi, Leena; Raj, Satish R; Robertson, David; Biaggioni, Italo; Shibao, Cyndya A

    2014-12-01

    The clinical presentation of autonomic failure is orthostatic hypotension. Severely affected patients require pharmacological treatment to prevent presyncopal symptoms or frank syncope. We previously reported in a proof of concept study that pediatric doses of the norepinephrine transporter blockade, atomoxetine, increases blood pressure in autonomic failure patients with residual sympathetic activity compared with placebo. Given that the sympathetic nervous system is maximally activated in the upright position, we hypothesized that atomoxetine would be superior to midodrine, a direct vasoconstrictor, in improving upright blood pressure and orthostatic hypotension-related symptoms. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effect of acute atomoxetine versus midodrine on upright systolic blood pressure and orthostatic symptom scores in 65 patients with severe autonomic failure. There were no differences in seated systolic blood pressure (means difference=0.3 mm Hg; 95% confidence [CI], -7.3 to 7.9; P=0.94). In contrast, atomoxetine produced a greater pressor response in upright systolic blood pressure (means difference=7.5 mm Hg; 95% CI, 0.6 to 15; P=0.03) compared with midodrine. Furthermore, atomoxetine (means difference=0.4; 95% CI, 0.1 to 0.8; P=0.02), but not midodrine (means difference=0.5; 95% CI, -0.1 to 1.0; P=0.08), improved orthostatic hypotension-related symptoms as compared with placebo. The results of our study suggest that atomoxetine could be a superior therapeutic option than midodrine for the treatment of orthostatic hypotension in autonomic failure. PMID:25185131

  20. EFFICACY OF ATOMOXETINE VERSUS MIDODRINE FOR THE TREATMENT OF ORTHOSTATIC HYPOTENSION IN AUTONOMIC FAILURE

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Claudia E.; Okamoto, Luis E.; Arnold, Amy C.; Gamboa, Alfredo; Diedrich, André; Choi, Leena; Raj, Satish R.; Robertson, David; Biaggioni, Italo; Shibao, Cyndya A.

    2014-01-01

    The clinical presentation of autonomic failure is orthostatic hypotension. Severely affected patients require pharmacologic treatment to prevent pre-syncopal symptoms or frank syncope. We previously reported in a proof of concept study that pediatric doses of the norepinephrine transporter blockade, atomoxetine, increases blood pressure in autonomic failure patients with residual sympathetic activity compared with placebo. Given that the sympathetic nervous system is maximally activated in the upright position, we hypothesized that atomoxetine would be superior to midodrine, a direct vasoconstrictor, in improving upright blood pressure and orthostatic hypotension-related symptoms. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effect of acute atomoxetine versus midodrine on upright systolic blood pressure and orthostatic symptom scores in 65 patients with severe autonomic failure. There were no differences in seated systolic blood pressure (95% CI= −7.3 to 7.9, P=0.94) or seated diastolic blood pressure (95% CI= −3.4 to 4.2, P=0.83) between atomoxetine and midodrine. In contrast, atomoxetine produced a greater pressor response in upright systolic blood pressure (95% CI= 0.6 to 15, P=0.03) and upright diastolic blood pressure (95% CI=-0.05 to 8.3, P=0.05), compared with midodrine. Furthermore, atomoxetine (95% CI=0.1 to 0.8, P=0.02), but not midodrine (95% CI=-0.1 to 1.0, P=0.08), improved orthostatic hypotension-related symptoms as compared with placebo. The results of our study suggest that atomoxetine could be a superior therapeutic option than midodrine for the treatment of orthostatic hypotension in autonomic failure. PMID:25185131

  1. Paraneoplastic orthostatic hypotension associated with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, S; Chary, M; Petersen, B; Mascarenhas, J O

    2015-08-01

    Paraneoplastic neuropathies associated with leukemia are rare, and early diagnosis and treatment are crucial due to the potential for irreversible neurological deficits and delay in treatment of the leukemia. This is the first report to describe severe paraneoplastic orthostatic hypotension which resolved after treatment of the acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The patient is a 76 year-old woman who presented with progressive dizziness, anorexia, and fatigue. She had severe orthostatic hypotension (supine systolic blood pressure 186 mmHg and standing 79 mmHg). She was found to have AML, for which azacitidine was initiated, and orthostatic hypotension resolved after initiation of treatment. This case demonstrates a unique example of paraneoplastic sequelae remitting with treatment of the underlying hematologic neoplasm. Physicians should be aware of this unusual occurrence of autonomic neuropathy with AML as delay in treatment of the hematologic malignancy can lead to irreversible neurologic deficit and increased morbidity and mortality. PMID:26241551

  2. Vagolytic atropine attenuates cerebral vasodilation response during acute orthostatic hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Woo-Jong; Lee, Kichang; Kim, Young-Kug; Song, Kyo-Joon; Jeong, Sung-Moon

    2015-01-01

    Background Atropine is an anticholinergic drug which is commonly used in clinical practice. The effect of parasympathetic block with atropine on dynamic cerebrovascular regulation remains unclear. This study was aimed to identify effects of vagolytic atropine on cerebrovascular response during acute orthostatic hypotension in humans. Methods Continuous middle cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV, transcranial Doppler) and arterial blood pressure (ABP, Finometer) were measured during a sit-to-stand procedure in 10 healthy subjects with placebo and vagolytic (10 µg/kg) doses of atropine. Cerebral vascular tone was assessed by cerebrovascular resistance (CVR = ABP / CBFV). Dynamic cerebral autoregulation was also assessed by transfer function analysis of ABP and CBFV. Results During the standing session, ABP fell to a similar extent in both groups by an average of 23 to 25 mmHg (26% to 29%). CBFV also fell in all subjects but significantly more in vagolytic atropine (-15.0 ± 7.0 cm/s) compared with placebo (-12.0 ± 5.8 cm/s, P < 0.05). CVR was decreased significantly in the placebo group during posture change (1.56 ± 0.44 vs. 1.38 ± 0.38, P < 0.05), in contrast, lesser decreased in the atropine group (1.60 ± 0.50 vs. 1.53 ± 0.42, P = 0.193). Transfer function coherence in the very-low-frequency range was significantly increased in the atropine group during the standing session (0.55 ± 0.14), compared with the sitting session (0.45 ± 0.14, P = 0.006). Conclusions These data present that vagolytic atropine attenuates cerebral vasodilation response to acute orthostatic hypotension, suggesting the use of atropine may need care in patients with cerebrovascular disease with vagal impairment. PMID:26634084

  3. Bradycardia and severe hypotension caused by wild honey poisoning.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Laxman; Maskey, Arun; Regmi, Shyam

    2009-01-01

    Wild honey is taken as an alternative medicine for the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases as well as for coronary artery disease. However, wild honey made from the nectar of some species of rhododendron may be poisonous. The cause of the poisoning is the toxin grayanotoxin. Grayanotoxin is a naturally occurring sodium channel toxin that causes life-threatening bradycardia, hypotension, and altered mental status. Complete heart blocks may occur in some patients. We present an interesting case of bradycardia and hypotension due to wild honey ingestion. The symptoms, mechanism, and management of wild honey poisoning are discussed. PMID:19767287

  4. Possible fatal acetaminophen intoxication with atypical clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    De-Giorgio, Fabio; Lodise, Maria; Chiarotti, Marcello; d'Aloja, Ernesto; Carbone, Arnaldo; Valerio, Luca

    2013-09-01

    Acetaminophen or paracetamol, a commonly used over-the-counter analgesic, is known to elicit severe adverse reactions when taken in overdose, chronically at therapeutic dosage or, sporadically, following single assumptions of a therapeutic dose. Damage patterns including liver damage and, rarely, acute tubular necrosis or a fixed drug exanthema. We present a case of fatal acetaminophen toxicity with postmortem blood concentration 78 μg/mL and unusual clinical features, including a visually striking and massive epidermolysis and rhabdomyolysis, disseminated intravascular coagulation and myocardial ischemia. This case is compared with the most similar previous reports in terms of organ damage, clinical presentation, and cause of death. We conclude that a number of severe patterns of adverse effects to acetaminophen are emerging that were previously greatly underestimated, thus questioning the adequacy of the clinical spectrum traditionally associated with acetaminophen intoxication and leading to the need to review this spectrum and the associated diagnostic criteria. PMID:23822653

  5. Exotic mammal renal disease: causes and clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Peter G

    2006-01-01

    Renal disease is not uncommon in exotic mammals, with degenerative,infectious (bacterial, viral, parasitic), metabolic, nutritional,neoplastic, anatomic, and toxic causes all represented. This article discusses the clinical presentation for the various renal diseases affecting exotic mammals. Anatomic pathology at the gross and microscopic level is reviewed, as is disease pathophysiology unique to the species under discussion. PMID:16407079

  6. Changes in CO2 responsiveness and in autoregulation of the cerebral circulation during and after halothane-induced hypotension.

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Y; McDowall, D G; Ali, M M; Lane, J R

    1976-01-01

    CO2 responsiveness of the cerebral circulation has been measured in baboons before, during, and after halothane-induced hypotension. At a systolic blood pressure (BP) of 60 mmHg, C02 responsiveness was abolished, but was maintained at higher levels of BP. After hypotension, CO2 responsiveness returned to control values. Autoregulation to BP increases induced by intravenous noradrenaline was impaired when cerebral perfusion pressure during the hypotensive period had been below 30-40 mmHg. It is concluded that at levels of halothane-induced hypotension commonly employed clinically, CO2 responsiveness of the cerebral circulation may be absent. The return of CO2 responsiveness in the post-hypotensive phase argues in favour of controlled hyperventilation after neurosurgery which has involved induced hypotension. PMID:932738

  7. Clinical presentation of acute abdomen: study of 600 patients.

    PubMed

    Staniland, J R; Ditchburn, J; De Dombal, F T

    1972-08-12

    This paper presents the clinical features of 600 patients suffering from abdominal pain of acute onset and admitted to either the General Infirmary or St. James's Hospital, Leeds. The survey was initially retrospective, but later put on a prospective basis. Roughly two-thirds of these 600 patients presented a "typical" picture of the disease with which they presented, while the remaining third presented one or more atypical features. Since other prospective studies have indicated that the diagnostic accuracy of a group of clinicians in respect of the acute abdomen is roughly 65% it is tentatively suggested (a) that clinical diagnosis contains a large element of "pattern-matching," and (b) that such a policy can be expected to be ineffective in roughly one-third of all cases of acute abdominal pain. PMID:4506871

  8. Age-related macular degeneration: linking clinical presentation to pathology.

    PubMed

    Nivison-Smith, Lisa; Milston, Rebecca; Madigan, Michele; Kalloniatis, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide in the elderly population. Optometrists, as primary eye health care providers, require the skills and knowledge to accurately diagnose and manage AMD patients. There is an overwhelming body of research related to the clinical presentation, etiology, epidemiology, and pathology of this disease. Additionally, the evolution of new imaging modalities creates new opportunities to clinically detect and analyze previously uncharacterized and earlier changes in the retina. The challenge for optometrists is to combine all this information into an applicable knowledge base for use in everyday clinical assessment of AMD so that timely and accurate referrals can be made to retinal specialists. This review attempts to address this issue by linking the clinical presentation of AMD with the underlying disease biology. We emphasize the contribution of recent noninvasive imaging technologies to the clinical assessment of early and more advanced AMD including optical coherence tomography, fundus autofluorescence, and infrared reflectance. PMID:24879089

  9. Early onset marfan syndrome: Atypical clinical presentation of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Ozyurt, A; Baykan, A; Argun, M; Pamukcu, O; Halis, H; Korkut, S; Yuksel, Z; Gunes, T; Narin, N

    2015-01-01

    Early onset Marfan Syndrome (eoMFS) is a rare, severe form of Marfan Syndrome (MFS). The disease has a poor prognosis and most patients present with resistance to heart failure treatment during the newborn period. This report presents two cases of eoMFS with similar clinical features diagnosed in the newborn period and who died at an early age due to the complications related to the involvement of the cardiovascular system. PMID:26929908

  10. Cultural variation in the clinical presentation of sleep paralysis.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Joop T V M

    2005-03-01

    Sleep paralysis is one of the lesser-known and more benign forms of parasomnias. The primary or idiopathic form, also called isolated sleep paralysis, is illustrated by showing how patients from different cultures weave the phenomenology of sleep paralysis into their clinical narratives. Clinical case examples are presented of patients from Guinea Bissau, the Netherlands, Morocco, and Surinam with different types of psychopathology, but all accompanied by sleep paralysis. Depending on the meaning given to and etiological interpretations of the sleep paralysis, which is largely culturally determined, patients react to the event in specific ways. PMID:15881269

  11. Fludrocortisone in the treatment of hypotensive disorders in the elderly.

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, R. M.; McIntosh, S. J.; Lawson, J.; Kenny, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate tolerance of fludrocortisone in older patients with hypotensive disorders. DESIGN: Prospective case series. SETTING: Syncope clinic. PATIENTS: 64 Consecutive patients over 65 years (mean age 80 years) with one or more hypotensive disorders (orthostatic hypotension, vasodepressor carotid sinus syncope, and/or vasodepressor neurocardiogenic syncope. INTERVENTIONS: Fludrocortisone in daily doses of 100 micrograms [corrected] (72%), 50 micrograms [corrected] (27%), and 200 micrograms [corrected] (one patient). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Adverse events, treatment withdrawal. RESULTS: During follow up 13 patients died of unrelated causes. Of the remainder 33% discontinued fludrocortisone at a mean of five months. Reasons for discontinuing treatment were hypertension, five; cardiac failure, four; depression, three; oedema, three; and unspecified, two. In those who continued treatment supine systolic and diastolic blood pressure did not differ significantly from baseline (follow up two to 21 months). Hypokalaemia developed in 24% at a mean of eight months; in no case was treatment withdrawn because of hypokalaemia. CONCLUSION: Fludrocortisone, even in low doses, is poorly tolerated in the long term in older patients with hypotensive disorders. PMID:9014799

  12. Recurrent spontaneous intracranial hypotension in early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Emer; Monaghan, Thomas S; Alexander, Michael; Hennessy, Michal J

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is an uncommon condition characterised by postural headache secondary to low cerebrospinal fluid pressure. Here we present a case of recurrence of SIH in early pregnancy in a 26-year-old woman. She first presented at the age of 21 years at 15 weeks' gestation with a history of headache, nausea, vomiting, neck stiffness and photophobia. Findings from a MRI brain scan led to a diagnosis of SIH. She was treated with autologous epidural blood patching and remained asymptomatic until her second pregnancy 5 years later, when she re-presented at 16 weeks' gestation with similar symptoms. She was again diagnosed with SIH and required a repeat treatment of autologous epidural blood patching. She subsequently remained symptom free and delivered a healthy boy at term. PMID:22791729

  13. Hypotensive peptides from milk proteins.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, Richard J; Murray, Brian A; Walsh, Daniel J

    2004-04-01

    Hypertension is the major controllable risk factor associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) events such as myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, and end-stage diabetes. A 5 mm Hg decrease in blood pressure has been equated with approximately 16% decrease in CVD. In the U.S. alone current annual antihypertensive drug costs are approximately dollars 15 billion. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is a target for blood pressure control. Cleavage of angiotensinogen by renin produces angiotensin I which is subsequently hydrolyzed by angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) to angiotensin II (a potent vasoconstrictor). Various side effects are associated with the use of ACE inhibitory drugs in the control of blood pressure including hypotension, increased potassium levels, reduced renal function, cough, angioedema, skin rashes, and fetal abnormalities. Milk proteins, both caseins and whey proteins, are a rich source of ACE inhibitory peptides. Several studies in spontaneously hypertensive rats show that these casokinins and lactokinins can significantly reduce blood pressure. Furthermore, a limited number of human studies have associated milk protein-derived peptides with statistically significant hypotensive effects (i.e., lower systolic and diastolic pressures). The advent of effective milk protein based functional food ingredients/nutraceuticals for the prevention/control of blood pressure therefore has the potential to significantly reduce global healthcare cost. PMID:15051858

  14. [Bronchiolitis. Part 1--anatomic features, classification, clinical presentation and imaging].

    PubMed

    Kroegel, C; Haidl, P; Kohlhäufl, M; Voshaar, T

    2012-01-01

    The term "bronchiolitis" refers to a broad spectrum of common conditions related to the small airways associated with a miscellaneous aetiology, histology, clinical features and course. Due to their variability, bronchiolar disorders are generally difficult to diagnose. History (smoking, collagen vascular disease, inhalational injury, medication usage, and organ transplant) may point towards a bronchiolar process. In addition, signs of systemic and pulmonary infection and evidence of air trapping may provide diagnostic hints. Although clinical presentation, physical examination, pulmonary function tests (obstructive ventilatory defect), and plain chest radiographs may demonstrate abnormalities suggesting small airways involvement, they are often non-specific and rarely diagnostic. In contrast, the high-resolution CT (HR-CT) scanning of the chest provides three distinct HR-CT patterns that assist in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of bronchiolar conditions: (i) a tree-in-bud pattern, (ii) ill-defined centrilobular ground-glass nodules, and (iii) a mosaic attenuation pattern (best visible on expiratory images). The present paper summarises the current knowledge, the classification, imaging, and the clinical presentation of bronchiolar disorders. PMID:22250053

  15. Orthostatic hypotension: epidemiology, pathophysiology and management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, G.; Robertson, D.

    1995-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension is characterized by low upright blood pressure levels and symptoms of cerebral hypoperfusion. Whereas orthostatic hypotension is heterogeneous, correct pathophysiologic diagnosis is important because of therapeutic and prognostic considerations. Although therapy is not usually curative, it can be extraordinarily beneficial if it is individually tailored. Management of the Shy-Drager syndrome (multiple-system atrophy) remains a formidable challenge.

  16. [Urticaria pigmentosa: two different clinical presentations in pediatric patients].

    PubMed

    Spada, Julieta; Lequio, Mariana; Pyke, María de los Ángeles; Hernández, Marisa; Chouela, Edgardo

    2011-08-01

    Urticaria pigmentosa (UP) is the most frequent clinical feature of cutaneous mastocytosis. It usually begins in a bimodal way: a peak of incidence from birth to the age of 3 and the other one between 2(nd) and 6(th) decades of life. Darier's sign is constant over the affected skin without affecting the surrounding skin. When UP starts early, it has a good prognosis disappearing into adolescence, while late onset is often associated with persistent or systemic involvement. This article reports two cases of UP, one with the classic description of the disease and the other with an unusual clinical presentation, prompting the pediatrician to incorporate both forms as different manifestations of the same entity. PMID:21829861

  17. Clinical Presentations of Coenzyme Q10 Deficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Quinzii, Catarina M.; Emmanuele, Valentina; Hirano, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous syndrome which has been associated with 5 major clinical phenotypes: (1) encephalomyopathy, (2) severe infantile multisystemic disease, (3) nephropathy, (4) cerebellar ataxia, and (5) isolated myopathy. Of these phenotypes, cerebellar ataxia and syndromic or isolated nephrotic syndrome are the most common. CoQ10 deficiency predominantly presents in childhood. To date, causative mutations have been identified in a small proportion of patients, making it difficult to identify a phenotype-genotype correlation. Identification of CoQ10 deficiency is important because the disease, in particular muscle symptoms and nephropathy, frequently responds to CoQ10 supplementation. PMID:25126046

  18. A Rare Clinical Presentation of Intraoral Darier's Disease.

    PubMed

    Manoja, K G D; Siriwardena, B S M S; Jayasooriya, P R; Siriwardane, D J L; Tilakaratne, W M

    2011-01-01

    Darier's disease, also known as keratosis follicularis or dyskeratosis follicularis, is a rare disorder of keratinization. It is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis with high penetrance and variable expressivity. Its manifestation appears as hyperkeratotic papules primarily affecting seborrheic areas on the head, neck, thorax, and less frequently the oral mucosa. When oral manifestations are present, the palatal and alveolar mucosae are primarily affected. They usually asymptomatic and are discovered in routine dental examination. Histologically, the lesions present as suprabasal clefts in the epithelium with acantholytic and dyskeratotic cells represented by "corps ronds and grains." This paper reports a case of an adult male patient who presented with painful whitish lesions on buccal mucosa with crusty lips as the only clinical sign of Darier's disease. As this patient did not have skin lesions or family history, an intraoral biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of Darier's disease by a multidisciplinary team. PMID:22937379

  19. Review of Clinical Presentation and Diagnosis of Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksz, C.J.; Harmatz, P.; Beck, M.; Jones, S.; Wood, T.; Lachman, R.; Gravance, C.G.

    2013-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA) was described in 1929 by Luis Morquio from Uruguay and James Brailsford from England, and was later found as an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease. MPS IVA is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme, N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS). Reduced GALNS activity results in impaired catabolism of two glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), chondroitin-6-sulfate (C6S) and keratan sulfate (KS). Clinical presentations of MPS IVA reflect a spectrum of progression from a severe ”classical” phenotype to a mild “attenuated” phenotype. More than 180 different mutations have been identified in the GALNS gene, which likely explains the phenotypic heterogeneity of the disorder. Accumulation of C6S and KS manifests predominantly as short stature and skeletal dysplasia (dysostosis multiplex), including atlantoaxial instability and cervical cord compression. However, abnormalities in the visual, auditory, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems can also affect individuals with MPS IVA. Diagnosis is typically based on clinical examination, skeletal radiographs, urinary GAG, and enzymatic activity of GALNS in blood cells or fibroblasts. Deficiency of GALNS activity is a common assessment for the laboratory diagnosis of MPS IVA; however, with recently increased availability, gene sequencing for MPS IVA is often used to confirm enzyme results. As multiple clinical presentations are observed, diagnosis of MPS IVA may require multi-system considerations. This review provides a history of defining MPS IVA and how the understanding of the disease manifestations has changed over time. A summary of the accumulated knowledge is presented, including information from the International Morquio Registry. The classical phenotype is contrasted with attenuated cases, which are now being recognized and diagnosed more frequently. Laboratory based diagnoses of MPS IVA are also discussed. PMID:23665161

  20. Review of clinical presentation and diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidosis IVA.

    PubMed

    Hendriksz, C J; Harmatz, P; Beck, M; Jones, S; Wood, T; Lachman, R; Gravance, C G; Orii, T; Tomatsu, S

    2013-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA) was described in 1929 by Luis Morquio from Uruguay and James Brailsford from England, and was later found as an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease. MPS IVA is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme, N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS). Reduced GALNS activity results in impaired catabolism of two glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), chondroitin-6-sulfate (C6S) and keratan sulfate (KS). Clinical presentations of MPS IVA reflect a spectrum of progression from a severe "classical" phenotype to a mild "attenuated" phenotype. More than 180 different mutations have been identified in the GALNS gene, which likely explains the phenotypic heterogeneity of the disorder. Accumulation of C6S and KS manifests predominantly as short stature and skeletal dysplasia (dysostosis multiplex), including atlantoaxial instability and cervical cord compression. However, abnormalities in the visual, auditory, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems can also affect individuals with MPS IVA. Diagnosis is typically based on clinical examination, skeletal radiographs, urinary GAG, and enzymatic activity of GALNS in blood cells or fibroblasts. Deficiency of GALNS activity is a common assessment for the laboratory diagnosis of MPS IVA; however, with recently increased availability, gene sequencing for MPS IVA is often used to confirm enzyme results. As multiple clinical presentations are observed, diagnosis of MPS IVA may require multi-system considerations. This review provides a history of defining MPS IVA and how the understanding of the disease manifestations has changed over time. A summary of the accumulated knowledge is presented, including information from the International Morquio Registry. The classical phenotype is contrasted with attenuated cases, which are now being recognized and diagnosed more frequently. Laboratory based diagnoses of MPS IVA are also discussed. PMID:23665161

  1. Clinical Presentation of Prostate Cancer in Black South Africans

    PubMed Central

    Tindall, Elizabeth A; Monare, L Richard; Petersen, Desiree C; van Zyl, Smit; Hardie, Rae-Anne; Segone, Alpheus M; Venter, Philip A; Bornman, MS Riana; Hayes, Vanessa M

    2014-01-01

    Background Compared with White Americans, Black American men are at a significant increased risk of presenting with prostate cancer (PCa) and associated mortality, suggesting a link to African-ancestry. However, PCa status within Africa is largely unknown. We address the clinical presentation of PCa within Black South African men. Methods Over 1,000 participants with or without PCa have enrolled in the Southern African Prostate Cancer Study (SAPCS). Using genome-wide profiling we establish a unique within Africa population substructure. Adjusting for age, clinical variables were assessed, compared against Black Americans and between rural and urban localities while addressing potential socio-demographic confounders. Results We report a significant difference in the distribution of prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels skewed towards higher PSA levels in the PCa cases (83.0% present with a PSA ≥ 20 µg/L; median PSA = 98.8 µg/L) relative to men with no detectable PCa (18.5% present with a PSA ≥ 20 µg/L; median PSA = 9.1 µg/L). Compared with Black Americans, Black South Africans presented with significantly more aggressive disease defined by Gleason score >7 (17% and 36%, respectively) and PSA ≥ 20 µg/L (17.2% and 83.2%, respectively). We report exasperated disease aggression defined by Gleason score >7 (P = 0.0042) and poorly differentiated tumor grade (P < 0.0001) within rural versus urban localities. Conclusion Black South African men present with higher PSA levels and histopathological tumor grade compared with Black Americans, which is further escalated in men from rural localities. Our data suggests that lack of PSA testing may be contributing to an aggressive PCa disease phenotype within South African men. PMID:24723425

  2. Subacute Thyroiditis: Clinical Presentation and Long Term Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Alfadda, Assim A.; Sallam, Reem M.; Elawad, Ghadi E.; AlDhukair, Hisham; Alyahya, Mossaed M.

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have been reported from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (SA) to describe the clinical presentation and long term outcomes of subacute thyroiditis (SAT). Our aim was to review the demographic, anthropometric, clinical presentation, laboratory results, treatment, and disease outcome in Riyadh region and to compare those with results from different regions of the Kingdom and different parts of the world. We reviewed the medical files of patients who underwent thyroid uptake scan during an 8-year period in King Khalid University Hospital. Only 25 patients had confirmed diagnosis of thyroiditis. Age and gender distribution were similar to other studies. Most patients presented with palpitation, goiter, and weight change. Elevated thyroid hormones, suppressed thyroid-stimulating hormone, and elevated ESR were reported. Among those, 7 cases of SAT were recorded. β-Blockers were prescribed to 57% and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to 29% of SAT. Long follow-up demonstrated that 85.7% of SAT cases recovered, while 14.3% developed permanent hypothyroidism. In conclusion, SAT is uncommon in the central region of SA. Compared to the western region, corticosteroid is not commonly prescribed, and permanent hypothyroidism is not uncommon. A nation-wide epidemiological study to explain these interprovincial differences is warranted. PMID:24803929

  3. B-Raf Inhibition in the Clinic: Present and Future.

    PubMed

    Fiskus, Warren; Mitsiades, Nicholas

    2016-01-14

    Somatic activating mutations in the B-Raf kinase (BRAF mutations) are present in hairy-cell leukemia, cutaneous melanoma, thyroid carcinomas and, less commonly, in ovarian, colon, lung, and other malignancies. These mutations-in particular the most common substitution, V600E-are oncogenic drivers and important therapeutic targets. The development of small-molecule Raf inhibitors allowed rapid translation of basic advances to the clinic. In BRAF-mutant melanomas, orally bioavailable B-Raf inhibitors, such as vemurafenib, achieve dramatic responses initially, but this is followed by rapid emergence of resistance driven by numerous mechanisms and requiring second-generation treatment approaches. In tumors with wild-type B-Raf, vemurafenib paradoxically activates downstream signaling and cell proliferation and is thus contraindicated, highlighting again the importance of genotype-based clinical decision making. These advances were greatly facilitated by the study of biopsied tumor tissue, especially at the time of drug resistance. Combinatorial approaches targeting the Raf pathway hold promise for even more substantial clinical benefits in the future. PMID:26768236

  4. [Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: clinical presentation and eliciting factors].

    PubMed

    Dors, N; Rodrigues Pereira, R; van Zwieten, R; Fijnvandraat, K; Peters, M

    2008-05-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, a hereditary X-linked disorder, is the most common enzymatic disorder of red blood cells in humans, affecting more than 200 million people worldwide. The prevalence is increasing in the Netherlands due to immigration of people from the Middle East and Africa. We present three different clinical manifestations of G6PD deficiency: neonatal jaundice, haemolysis provoked by infection and haemolysis caused by fava beans. The pathophysiology and treatment are discussed. Furthermore a recent update of chemicals which should be avoided in G6PD deficiency is provided. PMID:18547022

  5. Vulvar and Vaginal Atrophy: Physiology, Clinical Presentation, and Treatment Considerations.

    PubMed

    Lev-Sagie, Ahinoam

    2015-09-01

    Vulvovaginal atrophy is a common condition associated with decreased estrogenization of the vaginal tissue. Symptoms include vaginal dryness, irritation, itching, soreness, burning, dyspareunia, discharge, urinary frequency, and urgency. It can occur at any time in a woman's life cycle, although more commonly in the postmenopausal phase, during which the prevalence is approximately 50%. Despite the high prevalence and the substantial effect on quality of life, vulvovaginal atrophy often remains underreported and undertreated. This article aims to review the physiology, clinical presentation, assessment, and current recommendations for treatment, including aspects of effectiveness and safety of local vaginal estrogen therapies. PMID:26125962

  6. Localized, single-organ vasculitis: clinical presentation and management.

    PubMed

    Atisha-Fregoso, Yemil; Hinojosa-Azaola, Andrea; Alcocer-Varela, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The term vasculitis usually evokes a systemic disease with catastrophic outcomes; however, vasculitides may also present in a localized form, with a better prognosis when compared with their systemic counterpart. In order to avoid confusion and facilitate classification, the term single-organ vasculitis (SOV) has been proposed. Remarkably, current criteria for the classification of the vasculitis do not include the SOV term, due in part to the lack of appropriate definitions, since most data come from case series; moreover, the scarce information available is also extremely heterogeneous. This review focuses on the epidemiology, clinical course, prognosis, and suggested treatment of the SOV, with emphasis in the most recent information available. PMID:22918493

  7. Acute, transient hemorrhagic hypotension does not aggravate structural damage or neurologic motor deficits but delays the long-term cognitive recovery following mild to moderate traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Christian; Stover, John F.; Thompson, Hilaire J.; Hoover, Rachel C.; Morales, Diego M.; Schouten, Joost W.; McMillan, Asenia; Soltesz, Kristie; Motta, Melissa; Spangler, Zachery; Neugebauer, Edmund; McIntosh, Tracy K.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Posttraumatic hypotension is believed to increase morbidity and mortality in traumatically brain-injured patients. Using a clinically relevant model of combined traumatic brain injury with superimposed hemorrhagic hypotension in rats, the present study evaluated whether a reduction in mean arterial blood pressure aggravates regional brain edema formation, regional cell death, and neurologic motor/cognitive deficits associated with traumatic brain injury. Design Experimental prospective, randomized study in rodents. Setting Experimental laboratory at a university hospital. Subjects One hundred nineteen male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 350-385 g. Interventions Experimental traumatic brain injury of mild to moderate severity was induced using the lateral fluid percussion brain injury model in anesthetized rats (n = 89). Following traumatic brain injury, in surviving animals one group of animals was subjected to pressure-controlled hemorrhagic hypotension, maintaining the mean arterial blood pressure at 50-60 mm Hg for 30 mins (n = 47). The animals were subsequently either resuscitated with lactated Ringer’s solution (three times shed blood volume, n = 18) or left uncompensated (n = 29). Other groups of animals included those with isolated traumatic brain injury (n = 34), those with isolated hemorrhagic hypotension (n = 8), and sham-injured control animals receiving anesthesia and surgery alone (n = 22). Measurements and Main Results The withdrawal of 6-7 mL of arterial blood significantly reduced mean arterial blood pressure by 50% without decreasing arterial oxygen saturation or Pao2. Brain injury induced significant cerebral edema (p < .001) in vulnerable brain regions and cortical tissue loss (p < .01) compared with sham-injured animals. Neither regional brain edema formation at 24 hrs postinjury nor the extent of cortical tissue loss assessed at 7 days postinjury was significantly aggravated by superimposed hemorrhagic hypotension. Brain injury-induced neurologic deficits persisted up to 20 wks after injury and were also not aggravated by the hemorrhagic hypotension. Cognitive dysfunction persisted for up to 16 wks postinjury. The superimposition of hemorrhagic hypotension significantly delayed the time course of cognitive recovery. Conclusions A single, acute hypotensive event lasting 30 mins did not aggravate the short- and long-term structural and motor deficits but delayed the speed of recovery of cognitive function associated with experimental traumatic brain injury. PMID:16424733

  8. The clinical presentation of celiac disease: experiences from northeastern iran.

    PubMed

    Ganji, Azita; Esmaielzadeh, Abbas; Aafzal Aghayee, Mehdi; Goshayeshi, Ladan; Ghaffarzadegan, Kamran

    2014-04-01

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to explore demographic characteristics and clinical presentations of celiac disease (CD) in Northeastern Iran. METHODS This was a cross-sectional retrospective study of 193 adults with CD who presented to Mashhad University Gastroenterology Clinic between 2008 and 2013. Patient data that included mode of presentation and the presence of any concomitant illnesses were collected. Intestinal biopsy and serum anti-tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG) were used for diagnosis. Mucosal lesions were classified according to modified Marsh classification. RESULTS Overall, 132 females and 61 males, with a mean age at diagnosis of 32.6 ± 13.2 years were included. The patient's chief complaints in order of decreasing frequency were dyspepsia (24.6%), diarrhea (20%), anemia (12.8%), and flatulence (7.2%). Bone disease was seen (osteopenia, osteoporosis) in 30% of patients. A positive family history of CD was found in 17.9% of cases. There were 64% who had serum anti-tTG >200 units/ml and 78% had a Marsh classification grade 3 on duodenal biopsy. The histology grade (Marsh) did not show any correlation with anti-tTG serum levels, age, body mass index (BMI) or hemoglobin levels. CONCLUSION In Northeastern Iran, CD was seen more commonly in females and with non-diarrheal presentations. Abdominal discomfort, anemia and bone disease were most common primary presentations in this area. Histology grade showed no significant correlation with level of anti-tTG, BMI or hemoglobin levels. We suggest screening for CD in unexplained abdominal discomfort, bone disease and anemia. PMID:24872868

  9. Familial Dementia With Lewy Bodies With an Atypical Clinical Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Lauren T.; Tsuang, Debby W.; Cherrier, Monique M.; Eugenio, Charisma J.; Du, Jennifer Q.; Steinbart, Ellen J.; Limprasert, Pornprot; La Spada, Albert R.; Seltzer, Benjamin; Bird, Thomas D.; Leverenz, James B.

    2006-01-01

    The authors report a case of a 64-year-old male with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) pathology at autopsy who did not manifest the core symptoms of DLB until very late in his clinical course. His initial presentation of early executive and language dysfunction suggested a cortical dementia similar to frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Core symptoms of DLB including dementia, hallucination, and parkinsonian symptoms were not apparent until late in the course of his illness. Autopsy revealed both brainstem and cortical Lewy bodies and AD pathology. Family history revealed 7 relatives with a history of dementia including 4 with possible or probable DLB. This case is unique because of the FTLD-like presentation, positive family history of dementia, and autopsy confirmation of DLB. PMID:12641375

  10. Autistic spectrum disorders: clinical presentation in preschool children.

    PubMed

    Allen, D A

    1988-01-01

    It is well recognized that children with "autistic features" constitute a very heterogeneous population. There is a growing consensus that the core symptoms seen in autism include deficits in: (1) social/affective/behavioral functions, (2) developmental language disorders with concomitant deficits in interpersonal communication, and (3) play/preferred activities/preoccupations which have a repetitive or stereotypic quality. The definition of the boundaries of "autism" as opposed to other related pervasive developmental disorders is widely debated among clinicians and research investigators alike. In the present paper, it is argued that autism is a cover term for a spectrum disorder with similarities and differences in the clinical presentation of preschool children. A model for subtyping the autistic spectrum disorders is suggested. PMID:3198903

  11. A potent hypotensive factor in chicken left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Reilly, T; Gregg, C M; Wideman, R F; Jarrett-Zaczek, D

    1987-12-01

    Chicken artria and ventricles both have membrane-bound granules which resemble those containing atriopeptin (ANP) in mammals. However, nothing is known about the contents of the avian granules. A previous study in chickens showed that although extracts of whole chicken heart or synthetic rat ANP both caused profound hypotension, ANP caused both natriuresis and diuresis, while chicken heart extract did not. The present study sought to locate the region(s) of chicken heart containing the hypotensive activity, and to observe the effect on sodium and water excretion and blood pressure in rats. Acid extracts of either atrium, either ventricle, ventricular septum, skeletal muscle, and liver were identically prepared from chickens and rats. Extracts were adjusted to the same protein concentration and injected (0.15 ml/kg) into anesthetized Single Comb White Leghorn roosters. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and the time for recovery were measured. The most potent extract from chicken hearts was from the left ventricle (-38 +/- 1 mm Hg, 149 +/- 9 sec to recover). All other extracts (including right ventricle) produced only small (10-20 mm Hg), short-lived (20-30 sec) decreases in MAP. In contrast, only rat atrial extracts evoked long-lasting hypotension (greater than 40 mm Hg, recovery time greater than 200 sec). A 30-min infusion of the most potent chicken extract (left ventricle, CLV) into rats produced a small but significant natriuresis and diuresis compared to the vehicle time control (P less than 0.05) and the hypotensive response to bolus injection was about one-third that seen in the chicken. The location of potent spasmolytic activity primarily in chicken left ventricle, the different avian renal responses to chicken heart extract and synthetic rat ANP (5), and the weak diuretic, natriuretic, and hypotensive effects of CLV extract in rats all suggest that the chicken heart substance may be different from mammalian ANP. PMID:2962198

  12. A potent hypotensive factor in chicken left ventricle.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Reilly T; Gregg CM; Wideman RF Jr; Jarrett-Zaczek D

    1987-12-01

    Chicken artria and ventricles both have membrane-bound granules which resemble those containing atriopeptin (ANP) in mammals. However, nothing is known about the contents of the avian granules. A previous study in chickens showed that although extracts of whole chicken heart or synthetic rat ANP both caused profound hypotension, ANP caused both natriuresis and diuresis, while chicken heart extract did not. The present study sought to locate the region(s) of chicken heart containing the hypotensive activity, and to observe the effect on sodium and water excretion and blood pressure in rats. Acid extracts of either atrium, either ventricle, ventricular septum, skeletal muscle, and liver were identically prepared from chickens and rats. Extracts were adjusted to the same protein concentration and injected (0.15 ml/kg) into anesthetized Single Comb White Leghorn roosters. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and the time for recovery were measured. The most potent extract from chicken hearts was from the left ventricle (-38 +/- 1 mm Hg, 149 +/- 9 sec to recover). All other extracts (including right ventricle) produced only small (10-20 mm Hg), short-lived (20-30 sec) decreases in MAP. In contrast, only rat atrial extracts evoked long-lasting hypotension (greater than 40 mm Hg, recovery time greater than 200 sec). A 30-min infusion of the most potent chicken extract (left ventricle, CLV) into rats produced a small but significant natriuresis and diuresis compared to the vehicle time control (P less than 0.05) and the hypotensive response to bolus injection was about one-third that seen in the chicken. The location of potent spasmolytic activity primarily in chicken left ventricle, the different avian renal responses to chicken heart extract and synthetic rat ANP (5), and the weak diuretic, natriuretic, and hypotensive effects of CLV extract in rats all suggest that the chicken heart substance may be different from mammalian ANP.

  13. Postural Hypotension Associated with Nonelastic Pantyhose during Lymphedema Treatment.

    PubMed

    Pereira de Godoy, Jose Maria; Zucchi Libanore, Daniel; Guerreiro Godoy, Maria de Fatima

    2014-01-01

    The case of a 72-year-old female patient with elephantiasis is reported. The patient was submitted to two surgeries to remove the edema. After surgery, the leg again evolved to elephantiasis and eventually she was referred to the Clinica Godoy for clinical treatment. Intensive treatment was carried out (6 to 8 hours per day) and the patient lost more than 70% of the limb volume within one week. After this loss, the volume was maintained using grosgrain compression pantyhose for 24 hours per day. During the return appointment, the patient suffered from systemic hypotension (a drop of more than 30 mmHg within three minutes) while she was standing after removing the stocking. A further investigation showed that the symptoms only appeared when the stocking was worn for 24 hours. Thus, the patient was advised to use the stocking only during the day thereby avoiding the symptoms of hypotension. PMID:25105033

  14. Postural Hypotension Associated with Nonelastic Pantyhose during Lymphedema Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pereira de Godoy, Jose Maria; Guerreiro Godoy, Maria de Fatima

    2014-01-01

    The case of a 72-year-old female patient with elephantiasis is reported. The patient was submitted to two surgeries to remove the edema. After surgery, the leg again evolved to elephantiasis and eventually she was referred to the Clinica Godoy for clinical treatment. Intensive treatment was carried out (6 to 8 hours per day) and the patient lost more than 70% of the limb volume within one week. After this loss, the volume was maintained using grosgrain compression pantyhose for 24 hours per day. During the return appointment, the patient suffered from systemic hypotension (a drop of more than 30 mmHg within three minutes) while she was standing after removing the stocking. A further investigation showed that the symptoms only appeared when the stocking was worn for 24 hours. Thus, the patient was advised to use the stocking only during the day thereby avoiding the symptoms of hypotension. PMID:25105033

  15. Clinical spectrum of rhabdomyolysis presented to pediatric emergency department

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rhabdomyolysis is a potentially life-threatening syndrome that can develop from a variety of causes. The aim of the work is to analyze the clinical spectrum and to evaluate the prevalence of various etiologies in children, who present to the emergency department (ED) with rhabdomyolysis. Methods During a 6-year study period, we retrospectively analyzed the medical charts of patients, aged 18 years or younger, with a definite diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis and serum creatinine phosphokinase (CK) levels greater than 1000IU/L. We analyzed the clinical spectrum and evaluated the potential risk factors of acute renal failure (ARF). Results Thirty-seven patients (mean age = 10.2 ± 5.5 years), including 26 males and 11 females, were enrolled in the study. Two of the most common presented symptoms in these 37 patients were muscle pain and muscle weakness (83.8% and 73%, respectively). Dark urine was reported in only 5.4% of the patients. The leading cause of rhabdomyolysis in the 0- to 9-year age group was presumed infection, and the leading cause in the 10- to 18-year age group was trauma and exercise. The incidence of ARF associated with rhabdomyolysis was 8.1 % and no child needed for renal replacement therapy (RRT). We did not identify any reliable predictors of ARF or need for RRT. Conclusions The classic triad of symptoms of rhabdomyolysis includes myalgia, weakness and dark urine are not always presented in children. The cause of rhabdomyolysis in younger age is different from that of teenager group. However, the prognosis of rhabdomyolysis was good with appropriate management. PMID:24004920

  16. Update on transcobalamin deficiency: clinical presentation, treatment and outcome.

    PubMed

    Trakadis, Y J; Alfares, A; Bodamer, O A; Buyukavci, M; Christodoulou, J; Connor, P; Glamuzina, E; Gonzalez-Fernandez, F; Bibi, H; Echenne, B; Manoli, I; Mitchell, J; Nordwall, M; Prasad, C; Scaglia, F; Schiff, M; Schrewe, B; Touati, G; Tchan, M C; Varet, B; Venditti, C P; Zafeiriou, D; Rupar, C A; Rosenblatt, D S; Watkins, D; Braverman, N

    2014-05-01

    Transcobalamin (TC) transports cobalamin from blood into cells. TC deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder usually presenting in early infancy with failure to thrive, weakness, diarrhoea, pallor, anemia, and pancytopenia or agammaglobulinemia. It can sometimes resemble neonatal leukemia or severe combined immunodeficiency disease. Diagnosis of TC deficiency is suspected based on megaloblastic anemia, elevation of total plasma homocysteine, and blood or urine methylmalonic acid. It is confirmed by studying the synthesis of TC in cultured fibroblasts, or by molecular analysis of the TCN2 gene. TC deficiency is treatable with supplemental cobalamin, but the optimal type, route and frequency of cobalamin administration and long term patient outcomes are unknown. Here we present a series of 30 patients with TC deficiency, including an update on multiple previously published patients, in order to evaluate the different treatment strategies and provide information about long term outcome. Based on the data presented, current practice appears to favour treatment of individuals with TC deficiency by intramuscular injections of hydroxy- or cyanocobalamin. In most cases presented, at least weekly injections (1 mg IM) were necessary to ensure optimal treatment. Most centres adjusted the treatment regimen based on monitoring CBC, total plasma homocysteine, plasma and urine methylmalonic acid, as well as, clinical status. Finally, continuing IM treatment into adulthood appears to be beneficial. PMID:24305960

  17. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo Part I: Background and clinical presentation

    PubMed Central

    van der Velde, Gabrielle M

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To review recent theories regarding the aetiology and pathophysiology of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), including its epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and differential diagnosis. Data sources: Relevant studies were identified by searching MEDLINE from 1966 - March, 1997. Study selection: A total of 35 studies were selected on the basis of their relevance to Part I of this review. Data extraction: The findings and results of relevant studies and their subsequent theories and conclusions are discussed and compiled into a general overview of BPPV. Results of data synthesis: BPPV is considered the most common cause of vertigo of peripheral origin. A potential causal association has been observed with numerous apparent aetiological factors, all of which may lead to peripheral vestibular trauma. Findings of densities within the posterior semi-circular canal have given rise to the most recent theories regarding the pathophysiology for BPPV, canalithiasis and cupulolithiasis. Conclusions: BPPV is a multiaetiological peripheral vestibular disease whose underlying cause remains an enigma. The existing evidence supports two recent pathophysiological theories, cupulolithiasis and canalithiasis. Two conditions of special concern to the chiropractor, vertebrobasilar insufficiency and cervicogenic vertigo, closely ressemble BPPV, and can be differentiated by certain identifying features. BPPV may be diagnosed clinically, after ruling out conditions in which vertigo is a central feature. A review of the treatment for BPPV, focusing on recent physical treatments will be discussed in Part II of this paper.

  18. Presentation of clinically suspected persistent chlamydial infection: a case series.

    PubMed

    Pitt, R A; Alexander, S; Horner, P J; Ison, C A

    2013-06-01

    In vivo antimicrobial resistance has yet to be documented in Chlamydia trachomatis; however, there have been anecdotal reports of persistent infection. The purpose of this case series was to describe a group of patients who have persistent chlamydia infection despite adequate treatment and where re-infection was considered unlikely. Patients were selected using a clinical questionnaire. For inclusion patients had to have tested positive for C. trachomatis, at least twice, using a nucleic acid amplification test despite having been fully compliant with at least two rounds of recommended therapy and be deemed to be at low risk of re-infection. Patients were grouped into categories based on sexual behaviour. Twenty-eight patients are included in this case series; 46% declared no sexual contact since initial diagnosis (category 1), a further 36% declaring contact that was considered low risk of re-infection (categories 2-4); 61% showed signs and symptoms at initial presentation increasing to 75% at re-attendance. Thirty-nine percent of patients received azithromycin only while 48% received doxycycline also. This case series identifies patients with persistent chlamydia despite receiving treatment. There is a need for a case definition of clinical treatment failure, development of susceptibility testing methods and guidance on appropriate treatment for patients with persistent infection. PMID:23970750

  19. Pathophysiology and clinical presentations of salt-losing tubulopathies.

    PubMed

    Seyberth, Hannsjörg W

    2016-03-01

    At least three renal tubular segments are involved in the pathophysiology of salt-losing tubulopathies (SLTs). Whether the pathogenesis starts either in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle (TAL) or in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT), it is the function of the downstream-localized aldosterone sensitive distal tubule (ASDT) to contribute to the adaptation process. In isolated TAL defects (loop disorders) ASDT adaptation is supported by upregulation of DCT, whereas in DCT disorders the ASDT is complemented by upregulation of TAL function. This upregulation has a major impact on the clinical presentation of SLT patients. Taking into account both the symptoms and signs of primary tubular defect and of the secondary reactions of adaptation, a clinical diagnosis can be made that eventually leads to an appropriate therapy. In addition to salt wasting, as occurs in all SLTs, characteristic features of loop disorders are hypo- or isosthenuric polyuria and hypercalciuria, whereas characteristics of DCT disorders are hypokalemia and (symptomatic) hypomagnesemia. In both SLT categories, replacement of urinary losses is the primary goal of treatment. In loop disorders COX inhibitors are also recommended to mitigate polyuria, and in DCT disorders magnesium supplementation is essential for effective treatment. Of note, the combination of a salt- and potassium-rich diet together with an adequate fluid intake is always the basis of long-term treatment in all SLTs. PMID:26178649

  20. Substance Use Disorders in Men Presenting to a Psychosexual Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, Ravi Philip

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Substance use disorders (SUDs) are commonly associated with a variety of psychiatric disorders. Community-based studies have found a significant association between SUDs and sexual dysfunction in men, with a possible causal relation in the case of nicotine. Methods. The case records of 105 men presenting to a clinic for patients with psychosexual disorders were reviewed. Men with and without comorbid SUDs were compared in terms of demographic, clinical, and familial variables. Results. 25 of the 105 men (23.8%) had a lifetime diagnosis of SUD, and 19 (18.1%) had a current SUD. The commonest substances involved were nicotine (n = 21, 20%) and alcohol (n = 9, 9.5%). Men with comorbid SUDs were more likely to report a family history of substance dependence, particularly alcoholism. Single men with SUDs were more likely to have a comorbid mood disorder. Conclusion. SUDs, particularly nicotine and alcohol use disorders, are common comorbidities in patients with psychosexual disorders. Identifying and treating these disorders in this population are important aspects of management. PMID:25938122

  1. Clinical trials in nasopharyngeal carcinoma-past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Xu, Cheng; Chen, Yu-Pei; Ma, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) has an age-adjusted incidence for both sexes with greater frequency in some endemic regions, especially the southern China. Genetic, ethnic, environmental factors and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection might take part in the cause of the disease. Based on the understanding and research progresses, we have had a further step among the diagnosis and prognosis of the disease. Meanwhile, a numerous clinical trials aiming to pick out the most suitable therapeutic choice are carried on from past till now. The purpose of this review is to summarize therapeutic approaches from past RCTs, introduce hot topics at present, and explore the development trend in the future. Applying appropriate combining procedures of radiotherapy and chemotherapy with developments in gene therapy and immunotherapy, the outcomes in the future might be widely improved. PMID:27121880

  2. Clinical presentation and protocol for management of hepatic sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Modaresi Esfeh, Jamak; Culver, Daniel; Plesec, Thomas; John, Binu

    2015-03-01

    The liver is one of the most commonly involved extrapulmonary sites in sarcoidosis. Hepatic sarcoidosis has a broad range of presentations from scattered, asymptomatic noncaseating granulomas with normal liver enzymes, which are very common in patients with known pulmonary sarcoidosis, to portal hypertension and cirrhosis, which are relatively uncommon. Diagnosis is based on a combination of clinical, laboratory and histological manifestations. The authors' protocol for management of patients with suspected sarcoidosis of the liver without focal lesions includes a transjugular liver biopsy with portal pressure measurements to confirm the diagnosis, rule out coexisting liver diseases and to identify select patients with fibrosis or portal hypertension for consideration of immunosuppression. Steroids and azathioprine are the preferred agents and methotrexate is not recommended. PMID:25473783

  3. Intraorbital foreign body: clinical presentation, radiological appearance and management.

    PubMed

    Al-Mujaini, Abdullah; Al-Senawi, Rana; Ganesh, Anuradha; Al-Zuhaibi, Sana; Al-Dhuhli, Humoud

    2008-03-01

    Intraorbital foreign bodies usually occur after a high velocity injury such as gunshot or industrial accidents; more rarely they occur following trivial trauma. A retained foreign body can give rise to serious complications, the most devastating of which is loss of the eye. This retrospective, interventional case report reviews the clinical features, radiological appearance and surgical management of two patients who presented at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman with intraorbital foreign bodies. Details of ocular history, preoperative ocular examination findings including visual acuity, surgical procedure and subsequent management were noted. The two patients, aged 10 years and 9 years old respectively, sustained orbital trauma with sharp objects. Both patients were found to have intraorbital foreign bodies that were documented clearly by computed tomography (CT) scans of the orbit. The first patient presented straight after injury, had no ocular involvement, underwent immediate surgical exploration and ended up with full recovery. The second patient presented to us after a delay of 4 days, and was found to have endophthalmitis. This patient ultimately lost all visual function in the affected eye. A CT scan is the modality of choice for orbital foreign body detection and localization. Early surgical exploration and foreign body extraction greatly influence the visual prognosis and final outcome. PMID:21654960

  4. Multifacctorial origin and clinical presentations of epilepsy in west Bengal.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Jayanta; Sadhu, Manika; Mandal, Salil Kr; Roy, Trishit

    2010-09-01

    Epilepsy is a brain dysfunction characterised by unpredictable occurrence of seizures. There are various causes and presentations of epilepsy but in many cases no definite cause is found. In the present work an effort has been made to search different causes and presentations of epilepsy in West Bengal. In this respect 66 subjects of different age groups suffering from epilepsy were chosen during a period of 1 1/2 years (June 2003 to November 2004). They were closely followed with thorough history taking, clinical examination and relevant investigations. Partial seizures comparised 57.6% cases whereas generalised seizure accounted for rest 42.4% cases. Idiopathic epilepsy was found to be highest in number (59.0%) followed by infective (15.2%) and and post-traumatic (7.6%). Positive family history was obtained in 35.9% cases, history of birth asphyxia in 25.6% cases and history of febrile convulsion in 20.5% cases of idiopathic epilepsy. In a certain percentage of idiopathic cases various psychosocial factors were found to be associated with epilepsy. PMID:21510532

  5. Sympathoinhibition and hypotension in carotid sinus hypersensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. L.; Ellenbogen, K. A.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    Carotid sinus reflex hypersensitivity is a known cause of syncope in humans. The condition is characterized by cardioinhibition and vasodepression, each to varying degrees. The extent and importance of sympathoinhibition has not been determined in patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity. This study reports on the extent of sympathoinhibition measured directly directly during carotid massage with and without atrioventricular sequential pacing, in a patient with symptomatic carotid sinus reflex hypersensitivity. Carotid massage elicited asystole, hypotension and complete inhibition of muscle sympathetic nerve activity. Carotid massage during atrioventricular pacing produced similar sympathoinhibition, but with minimal hypotension. Therefore, sympathoinhibition did not contribute importantly to the hypotension during carotid massage in the supine position in this patient. Further investigations are required to elucidate the relation of sympathoinhibition to hypotension in patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity in the upright position.

  6. Clinical Presentation of Hypertensive Crises in Emergency Medical Services

    PubMed Central

    Salkic, Sabina; Batic-Mujanovic, Olivera; Ljuca, Farid; Brkic, Selmira

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study is to evaluate the incidence and clinical presentation of hypertensive crises in the Emergency medical services of the Community Health Centre “Dr. Mustafa Šehović” Tuzla in relation to age, sex, duration and severity of hypertension, as well as the prevalence of accompanying symptoms and clinical manifestations. Methods: The study was conducted between November 2009 and April 2010 and included 180 subjects of both sexes, aged 30-80 with a diagnosis of arterial hypertension. All subjects were divided into two groups: a control group, which consisted of subjects without hypertensive crisis (95 subjects) and an experimental group that consisted of subjects with hypertensive crisis (85 subjects). Results: The study results indicate that female subjects were significantly over- represented compared to men (60% vs. 40 %, p=0.007). The average age of the male subjects was 55.83±11.06 years, while the female subjects’ average age was 59.41±11.97 years. The incidence of hypertensive crisis was 47.22%, with hypertensive urgency significantly more represented than emergency (16.47% vs. 83.53%, p<0.0001). The majority of subjects in the experimental group (28.23%) belonged to the age group of 60-69 years of age: 26.76% urgency and 35.71% emergency. The most common accompanying symptoms in hypertensive subjects were headache (75%), chest pain (48.33%), vertigo (44.44%), shortness of breath (38.88%) and nausea (33.89%). The most common symptoms in subjects with hypertensive crisis were headache (74.11%), chest pain and shortness of breath (62.35%), vertigo (49.41%), and nausea and vomiting (41.17%). Conclusions: Chest pain, shortness of breath, nausea and vomiting were significantly over-represented in subjects with hypertensive crisis (p<0.005). Clinical manifestations of hypertensive emergencies in almost all subjects included acute coronary syndrome, and only one subject had acute pulmonary edema. PMID:24757394

  7. Orthostatic Hypotension: Mechanisms, Causes, Management

    PubMed Central

    Tomalia, Victoria A.

    2015-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension (OH) occurs when mechanisms for the regulation of orthostatic BP control fails. Such regulation depends on the baroreflexes, normal blood volume, and defenses against excessive venous pooling. OH is common in the elderly and is associated with an increase in mortality rate. There are many causes of OH. Aging coupled with diseases such as diabetes and Parkinson's disease results in a prevalence of 10-30% in the elderly. These conditions cause baroreflex failure with resulting combination of OH, supine hypertension, and loss of diurnal variation of BP. The treatment of OH is imperfect since it is impossible to normalize standing BP without generating excessive supine hypertension. The practical goal is to improve standing BP so as to minimize symptoms and to improve standing time in order to be able to undertake orthostatic activities of daily living, without excessive supine hypertension. It is possible to achieve these goals with a combination of fludrocortisone, a pressor agent (midodrine or droxidopa), supplemented with procedures to improve orthostatic defenses during periods of increased orthostatic stress. Such procedures include water bolus treatment and physical countermaneuvers. We provide a pragmatic guide on patient education and the patient-orientated approach to the moment to moment management of OH. PMID:26174784

  8. Graded Compression Stockings Prevent Post-spaceflight Orthostatic Hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platts, S. H.; Brown, A. K.; Locke, J.; Stenger, M. B.

    2008-01-01

    Post-spaceflight orthostatic intolerance is characterized by hypotension and presyncope in 20-30% of returning astronauts. Previous data from our laboratory suggests that this is largely a result of decreased venous return. Currently, NASA astronauts wear an anti-gravity suit (AGS) which consists of inflatable air bladders over the calves, thighs and abdomen, which are typically pressurized from 0.5 to 1.5 PSI (27 to 78 mmHg). ISS crew members sometimes wear Russian Kentavr suits which consist of laced compression shorts and gaiters, providing 30 mmHg nominally. While these garments are effective during reentry, there are a number of drawbacks that make them impractical for postflight use. We studied the ability of commercially available, custom fit, graded compression stockings (Jobst, 55 mmHg at ankle to 6 mmHg at top of thigh, 25 mmHg mean compression) to prevent postflight orthostatic intolerance, hypothesizing that these garments would prevent orthostatic intolerance following short duration space flight. Crew members from a single Space Shuttle flight were tilted to 80 degrees for 10 min while wearing the stockings (n=5 males) upon arrival at the clinic (2 hrs after landing). Hemodynamic data were compared to data from all crewmembers tilted (without countermeasures) since return to flight (n=9). Two-way, repeated measures ANOVA, using the entire tilt time curve (0-10 min) show that systolic blood pressure (SBP, group effect p=0.008), stroke volume (SV, group effect p=0.003), and cardiac output (CO, group effect p=0.004) were higher in crewmembers who wore the Jobst stockings. A one-way ANOVA comparing the last minute standing also showed that SV (p=0.001) and CO (p less than 0.001) were higher and SBP tended to be higher (p=0.06) in Jobst subjects compared to controls. Control subjects had a higher rate of presyncope than Jobst subjects (3/9 vs 0/5) during the tilt on landing day. Orthostatic hypotension continues to present following spaceflight, despite fluid loading and other countermeasures. This preliminary study shows that commercially available compression stockings may ameliorate this problem. These stockings are readily available, inexpensive, and can be worn for days following landing. We have observed similar protection against orthostatic intolerance in ground-based studies of hypovolemic test subjects. Further refinements to the design and compression of the stockings are in progress.

  9. Hyoscine-N-Butyl-Bromide-Induced Hypotension and Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wen-Hsiu

    2013-01-01

    Hyoscine N-butyl bromide, also known as scopolamine, is a type of antimuscarinic agent. This drug is associated with numerous common side effects, including abdominal fullness, constipation, urinary retention, blurred vision, skin flushing, tachycardia, decreased sweating, and salivation. The most unfavorable side effect is hemodynamic instability. In the present case, hypotension and acute myocardial infarction developed after intravenous hyoscine injection as a premedication therapy for colonoscopy. It was difficult to differentiate the cause-effect relationship between myocardial infarction and hypotension. Because both conditions were present under drug effects, we considered 2 possible diagnoses. One was coronary spasm with cardiogenic shock, and the other was myocardial ischemic sequela due to shock status. The latter diagnosis was confirmed after a series of examinations. PMID:24829823

  10. Hyoscine-N-butyl-bromide-induced hypotension and myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guan-Liang; Hsu, Wen-Hsiu

    2013-01-01

    Hyoscine N-butyl bromide, also known as scopolamine, is a type of antimuscarinic agent. This drug is associated with numerous common side effects, including abdominal fullness, constipation, urinary retention, blurred vision, skin flushing, tachycardia, decreased sweating, and salivation. The most unfavorable side effect is hemodynamic instability. In the present case, hypotension and acute myocardial infarction developed after intravenous hyoscine injection as a premedication therapy for colonoscopy. It was difficult to differentiate the cause-effect relationship between myocardial infarction and hypotension. Because both conditions were present under drug effects, we considered 2 possible diagnoses. One was coronary spasm with cardiogenic shock, and the other was myocardial ischemic sequela due to shock status. The latter diagnosis was confirmed after a series of examinations. PMID:24829823

  11. Modeling of the acute effects of primary hypertension and hypotension on the hemodynamics of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Sarrami-Foroushani, Ali; Villa-Uriol, Maria-Cruz; Nasr Esfahany, Mohsen; Coley, Stuart C; Di Marco, Luigi Yuri; Frangi, Alejandro F; Marzo, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Hemodynamics is a risk factor in intracranial aneurysms (IA). Hypertension and pharmacologically induced hypotension are common in IA patients. This study investigates how hypertension and hypotension may influence aneurysmal hemodynamics. Images of 23 IAs at typical locations were used to build patient-specific Computational Fluid Dynamics models. The effects of hypotension and hypertension were simulated through boundary conditions by modulating the normotensive flow and pressure waveforms, in turn produced by a 1D systemic vascular model. Aneurysm location and flow pattern types were used to categorize the influence of hypotension and hypertension on relevant flow variables (velocity, pressure and wall shear stress). Results indicate that, compared to other locations, vertebrobasilar aneurysms (VBA) are more sensitive to flow changes. In VBAs, space-averaged velocity at peak systole increased by 30% in hypertension (16-21% in other locations). Flow in VBAs in hypotension decreased by 20% (10-13% in other locations). Momentum-driven hemodynamic types were also more affected by hypotension and hypertension, than shear-driven types. This study shows how patient-specific modeling can be effectively used to identify location-specific flow patterns in a clinically-relevant study, thus reinforcing the role played by modeling technologies in furthering our understanding of cardiovascular disease, and their potential in future healthcare. PMID:25118666

  12. High thoracic epidural anesthesia in cardiac surgery: risk factors for arterial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Casalino, Stefano; Mangia, Fabio; Stelian, Edmond; Novelli, Eugenio; Diena, Marco; Tesler, Ugo F

    2006-01-01

    There is an interest in the use of high thoracic epidural anesthesia in cardiac surgery, because experimental and clinical studies have suggested that central neuroaxial blockade attenuates the response to surgical stress and improves myocardial metabolism and perioperative analgesia-thus enabling earlier extubation and a smoother postoperative course. Matters of major concern in the adoption of high thoracic epidural anesthesia in cardiac surgery are neurologic injury secondary to neuroaxial hematoma and hypotension secondary to sympatholysis. The risk associated with possible neuraxial hematoma caused by high thoracic epidural anesthesia has been thoroughly investigated and largely discounted, but scant attention has been devoted to the onset of hypotensive episodes in the same setting. We analyzed the hypotensive episodes that occurred in a series of 144 patients who underwent on-pump cardiac surgery procedures. Among the patient variables that we tested in a multivariate logistic-regression model, only female sex was found to be significantly correlated with hypotension. In order to decrease the incidence and severity of hypotensive episodes resulting from anesthetic blockade, anesthesiologists need to monitor, with special care, women patients who are under high thoracic epidural anesthesia. Further studies are needed in order to determine why women undergoing open heart surgery under high thoracic epidural anesthesia are at a relatively greater risk of hypotension. PMID:16878616

  13. Clinical presentation of inappropriate sinus tachycardia and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Peyrol, Michael; Lévy, Samuel

    2016-06-01

    Inappropriate sinus tachycardia (IST) is a syndrome characterized by a sinus tachycardia not related to a medical condition, to a physiological response, or to medication or drugs and associated with symptoms, often invalidating and altering the quality of life of affected patients. It occurs predominantly in adolescents and young adults, and in the female sex. The diagnosis requires a complete work-up in order to exclude other causes of sinus tachycardia and one or several additional tests: 24-h ECG ambulatory recordings, echocardiogram, exercise testing, and autonomous nervous system assessment. It should be differentiated from the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, with which it shares a number of symptoms, and other supraventricular tachycardias originating in the high right atrium. An electrophysiological study should be considered in selected cases in order to differentiate IST from other supraventricular tachycardias. The mechanism is still unclear, and possible etiologies may include intrinsic abnormality of the sinus node, autonomic dysfunction, hypersensitivity of the sinus node to catecholamines, blunted vagal system, or a combination of the above. The authors emphasize the wide spectrum of clinical presentations and the need to better define the IST and the criteria required to ascertain its diagnosis. PMID:26329720

  14. Present situation of the clinical utilization of radioactive tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masi, R.

    1983-10-01

    The utilization of radioactive tracers in Italy with a clinical scope is examined. Geographic distribution of clinical centers, legislation, disposal of radioactive wastes, personnel, equipment available, operation mode and prospectives are discussed. Deficiencies in equipment, personnel and choice of diagnosis methods are shown.

  15. Down syndrome and moyamoya: clinical presentation and surgical management.

    PubMed

    See, Alfred P; Ropper, Alexander E; Underberg, Daniel L; Robertson, Richard L; Scott, R Michael; Smith, Edward R

    2015-07-01

    OBJECT Moyamoya can cause cerebral ischemia and stroke in Down syndrome (DS) patients. In this study, the authors defined a surgically treated population of patients with DS and moyamoya and compared their clinical presentation, response to surgical treatment, and long-term prognosis with those of the general population of patients with moyamoya but without DS. METHODS This study was a retrospective review of a consecutive operative series of moyamoya patients with DS treated at Boston Children's Hospital from 1985 through 2012. RESULTS Thirty-two patients, average age 9.7 years (range 1.8-29.3 years), underwent surgery for moyamoya in association with DS. The majority presented with ischemic symptoms (87% stroke, 42% transient ischemic attacks). Twenty-four patients (75%) had congenital heart disease. Nineteen patients (59%) had bilateral moyamoya on presentation, and 13 presented with unilateral disease, of which 2 progressed to surgery on the opposite side at a later date. Patients were followed for a median of 7.5 years (1-20.2 years) after surgery, with no patients lost to follow-up. Follow-up arteriography demonstrated Matsushima Grade A collaterals in 29 of 39 (74%) hemispheres, Grade B in 5 (13%), and Grade C in 5 (13%). Complications included postoperative strokes in 2 patients, which occurred within 48 hours of surgery in both; one of these patients had arm weakness and the other confusion (both had recovered completely at follow-up). Seizures occurred in 5 patients perioperatively, including one who had a new seizure disorder related to hypocalcemia. CONCLUSIONS Moyamoya disease is a cause of stroke in patients with DS. Both the incidence of preoperative stroke (87% vs 67%) and the average age at diagnosis for children under age 21 (8.4 vs 6.5 years) were greater in patients with DS and moyamoya than in the general moyamoya surgical population, suggesting a possible delay in reaching a correct diagnosis of the cause of cerebral ischemia in the DS patient population. Pial synangiosis provided long-term protection from stroke in all patients treated. PMID:25837890

  16. [Open-angle glaucoma clinical presentation and management].

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Y

    2001-12-01

    Both primary open-angle and normal-tension glaucoma belong to an identical spectrum of diseases. Clinical presentations of primary open-angle or high-tension glaucoma (POAG) and normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) were studied in an attempt to determine prognostic, clinical factors and define the appropriate management. Clinical data obtained from 826 primary open-angle and normal-tension glaucoma patients were analyzed. In addition, the results of laboratory studies, including the immunological assay of heat shock protein (hsp) and gene analyses which were undertaken to identify risk factors at the molecular level, are discussed. 1. The identified prognostic factors were disk hemorrhage, peripapillary chorioretinal atrophy (PPA), maximum intraocular pressure (IOP), the recovery rate of skin temperature after exposure to cold, family history of glaucoma, systemic systolic channel blood pressure, and oral administration of Ca(2+)-channel antagonists. 2. Disk hemorrhage was observed in 30.5% of NTG patients and 15.4% of POAG patients. Cumulative probability of hemorrhagic events was 16.9% in POAG and 38.4% in NTG patients at the end of a 14.8-year follow-up. 3. The hazard ratio of disk hemorrhage decreased with the increase of IOP(26%/5 mmHg) and was 1.46 times higher in females than in males. Disk hemorrhage was closely associated with PPA: PPA becomes greater in association with the progression of glaucomatous optic neuropathy in both POAG and NTG. No such correlation was noted in primary angle-closure glaucoma. 4. Color Doppler imaging analyses and the hourly determination of ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) indicated a difference in retrobulbar hemodynamics between OPP-mean deviation concordant and OPP-mean deviation discordant patients: a circulatory disturbance causally unrelated to OPP seems to be involved in the OPP-mean deviation discordant patients. 5. The oral administration of Ca(2+)-channel antagonists was shown to favorably influence retrobulbar hemodynamics in NTG patients. 6. Serum antigen titer to hsps(hsp 27, alpha B crystallin, human & bacterial hsp 60) was higher in both POAG and NTG patients than in normal subjects. None of the hsp-antigens was correlated to any morphometric parameters of the optic disk or any global indices of the visual field. 7. Myocilin mutation was noted in only 0.5% of POAG patients and 2.37% of NTG patients. The very low rate of occurrence precludes the value of mutation of the gene as a prognostic factor in open-angle glaucoma(OAG). 8. IOP reduction achieved by mitomycin-C trabeculectomy is effective in maintaining visual function in OAG eyes. 9. Brovincamine fumarate is effective in inhibiting the progression of glaucomatous field loss in NTG. PMID:11802456

  17. The clinical role of nurse lecturers: Past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Barrett, David

    2007-07-01

    The clinical role of nurse lecturers has been the subject of much debate since the transfer of nurse education into Higher Education Institutions within the United Kingdom. This article provides a critical evaluation of the clinical role of nurse lecturers in terms of policy drivers and strategies for implementing national guidelines. Policies from the initiation of Project 2000, through to recent consultation documents on the support of students in practice, are evaluated. Formal aspects of the nurse lecturer remit, such as link tutor and personal supervisor roles, are discussed in terms of their impact on clinical practice. There is also a brief review of the development of the lecturer practitioner role as a bridge between education and practice. The fundamental arguments in support of nurse lecturers maintaining a clinical role in practice are analysed. This analysis includes consideration of the concept of 'clinical credibility' in terms of the impact on teaching and the closure of the theory-practice gap. The article concludes with suggestions for strategies to resolve the ongoing debate surrounding the clinical role of nurse lecturers. These recommendations include a review of staff:student ratios in nurse education, re-evaluation of the need for a clinical role, and the use of innovative recruitment and development strategies by higher education institutions. PMID:16914233

  18. Clinical presentation and management of severe Ebola virus disease.

    PubMed

    West, T Eoin; von Saint André-von Arnim, Amélie

    2014-11-01

    Clinicians caring for patients infected with Ebola virus must be familiar not only with screening and infection control measures but also with management of severe disease. By integrating experience from several Ebola epidemics with best practices for managing critical illness, this report focuses on the clinical presentation and management of severely ill infants, children, and adults with Ebola virus disease. Fever, fatigue, vomiting, diarrhea, and anorexia are the most common symptoms of the 2014 West African outbreak. Profound fluid losses from the gastrointestinal tract result in volume depletion, metabolic abnormalities (including hyponatremia, hypokalemia, and hypocalcemia), shock, and organ failure. Overt hemorrhage occurs infrequently. The case fatality rate in West Africa is at least 70%, and individuals with respiratory, neurological, or hemorrhagic symptoms have a higher risk of death. There is no proven antiviral agent to treat Ebola virus disease, although several experimental treatments may be considered. Even in the absence of antiviral therapies, intensive supportive care has the potential to markedly blunt the high case fatality rate reported to date. Optimal treatment requires conscientious correction of fluid and electrolyte losses. Additional management considerations include searching for coinfection or superinfection; treatment of shock (with intravenous fluids and vasoactive agents), acute kidney injury (with renal replacement therapy), and respiratory failure (with invasive mechanical ventilation); provision of nutrition support, pain and anxiety control, and psychosocial support; and the use of strategies to reduce complications of critical illness. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation may be appropriate in certain circumstances, but extracorporeal life support is not advised. Among other ethical issues, patients' medical needs must be carefully weighed against healthcare worker safety and infection control concerns. However, meticulous attention to the use of personal protective equipment and strict adherence to infection control protocols should permit the safe provision of intensive treatment to severely ill patients with Ebola virus disease. PMID:25369317

  19. Severe unexplained relative hypotension and bradycardia in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Kharod, Shivam; Norman, Candice; Ryan, Matthew; Hoelle, Robyn M

    2014-01-01

    A precipitous episode of hypotension with concomitant bradycardia is a true medical emergency especially in patients with chronic hypertension and often requires hospitalization for detailed interrogation of the underlying causes. We describe herein a case of a patient with chronic labile hypertension who presented to the ED with a sharp drop in blood pressure and heart rate which was not simply explained by an antihypertensive overdose but more so by an aggregate of the patient's multiple chronic medical conditions. This report highlights the complexities of treating simultaneous hypotension and bradycardia and the importance of discerning the underpinnings of the causes including past medical issues, patient medications, and the timeline of key events leading to the issue at hand. PMID:24826356

  20. Orthostatic hypotension associated with baroreceptor dysfunction: treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Briasoulis, Alexandros; Silver, Adam; Yano, Yuichiro; Bakris, George L

    2014-02-01

    Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is a relatively common heterogeneous and multifactorial disorder often caused by autonomic dysfunction. This condition has a deleterious impact on quality of life and contributes to higher mortality rates. Supine hypertension is very common in patients with autonomic failure, limits the use of pressor agents, and can result in end-organ damage. Current recommendations on the optimal management of these patients are based on expert opinion and poor-quality small cross-sectional studies including patients with primary autonomic failure and severe orthostatic hypotension. The authors present their treatment approach in 12 patients with disabling orthostatic hypotension and supine hypertension not related to primary autonomic failure, presenting to a referral center over a 4-year period. The first step is to educate the patient about the pathophysiology and course of their disorder. Nonpharmacologic therapies and maneuvers are usually effective in relieving symptoms and preventing syncope. If needed, pharmacologic options such as fludrocortisones and midodrine are also available in patients with severe symptoms. Supine hypertension represents a challenge in the treatment of this condition. Therefore, elevation of the bed of the head and dosing of short-acting antihypertensive agents at bedtime is often indicated. PMID:24588814

  1. Orthostatic hypotension associated with paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, R N; Johnson, R H

    1975-01-01

    Two patients (aged 46 and 49 years) are presented who gave a history of several years' duration of unsteadiness, dizziness, and syncopal attacks on standing. Both had orthostatic hypotension which was associated with the development of a unifocal paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia. There was no evidence of organic heart disease. In one of the patients the symptoms usually developed when standing after working in a crouched position. He responded to treatment with beta-adrenergic blockade. The other patient developed her symptoms on standing, after exercise or other stress. The paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia, which occurred in the upright position only, was accompanied by a marked rise in plasma adrenaline. In this patient one contributory factor was a low blood volume and she responded to plasma volume expansion. We wish to draw attention to the common neurological symptoms with which paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia may present. We suggest that paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia may result from ventricular sensitivity to circulating adrenaline and not due to aberrant innervation of the heart as has been suggested previously. PMID:1159442

  2. University Clinic of Toxicology--historical note and present work.

    PubMed

    Bozinovska, C

    2013-01-01

    The University Clinic of Toxicology (UCT) in Skopje was founded as the Clinic for Toxicology and Emergency Internal Medicine on January 15th 1976. Today UCT has a modern building with office space of 1,300 m2 on 4 floors, 40 hospital beds and 72 employees including 18 doctors. UCT works in accordance with the public healthcare services in the Republic of Macedonia through the use of specialist/consultative and hospital healthcare for people over the age of 14 years. The Clinic also provides services in the field of emergency internal medicine, acute poisoning with medications, pesticides, corrosives, poisonous gases and mushrooms, heavy metals and other chemicals. The Clinic takes an active part in the detoxification programme for users of opiates and psychotropic substances, protocols for enteral and parenteral nutrition and guides for home treatment. Yearly there are more than 14,000 ambulance admissions, over 1,400 hospitalized patients, over 4,000 urgent EHO checks, more than 1,000 urgent upper endoscopies and over 700 other toxicological analyses and other interventions. The educational services and activities are realized through the chair for internal medicine. The Clinic offers undergraduate and graduate level education for medical students and dentists, for medical nurses, radiology technicians, speech therapists and physiotherapists. Over 300 papers and reports have been published to date by the medical staff at the UCT in the form of abstracts and integrated projects in the Republic of Macedonia and aboard. 8 doctorates have been successfully completed by employees from the Clinic as well as 4 master's theses and 1 in-depth project. UCT employees are the authors of some textbooks and monographs. UCT have undertaken some scientific projects. Employees from the Clinic of Toxicology are members taking an active part in many domestic and international associations. PMID:23928801

  3. Tentorial meningioma presenting as hemifacial spasm: An unusual clinical scenario.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Raghavendra; Chaudhuri, Anupkumar; Chattopadhyay, Aniruddha; Ghosh, Samarendranath

    2016-01-01

    Hemifacial spasm (HFS), which is a rare clinical entity, occurs most commonly due to vascular structures at facial nerve root entry zone. Tumor as a cause of HFS is rarely described in the literature. Here, we describe an unusual case of HFS which is caused by contralateral tentorial meningioma. The pathology, etiology, and surgical treatment have been discussed. PMID:27057238

  4. [Clinical presentations, etiologies and prognosis of epilepsy in children].

    PubMed

    Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Panagiotakaki, Eleni; Bouveyron, Séverine

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy in children is a neurological pathology with very diverse clinical forms and aetiologies. An electroencephalogram is essential for guiding the diagnosis, completed when indicated with imaging examinations. The treatment aims to control the seizures and takes into account the quality of the child's life. Regular follow-up must be provided by a paediatric neurologist specialised in epilepsy. PMID:26100478

  5. Tentorial meningioma presenting as hemifacial spasm: An unusual clinical scenario

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Raghavendra; Chaudhuri, Anupkumar; Chattopadhyay, Aniruddha; Ghosh, Samarendranath

    2016-01-01

    Hemifacial spasm (HFS), which is a rare clinical entity, occurs most commonly due to vascular structures at facial nerve root entry zone. Tumor as a cause of HFS is rarely described in the literature. Here, we describe an unusual case of HFS which is caused by contralateral tentorial meningioma. The pathology, etiology, and surgical treatment have been discussed. PMID:27057238

  6. Hypotensive potential of sildenafil and tamsulosin during orthostasis.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Tuomo; Kbi, Tiit; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Khnen, Mika

    2006-01-01

    We describe pronounced hypotension in a patient during orthostatic testing while receiving treatment with sildenafil and tamsulosin, but not with placebo. The patient was 71 years of age and had no history of orthostatic reactions. He had been diagnosed with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and glaucoma simplex (open-angle glaucoma). The only regular medication used was a combination of latanoprost and timolol one drop daily into each eye. The patient was among 16 men with BPH enrolled in a study of the haemodynamic effects of tamsulosin and sildenafil. The present patient was excluded from data analysis because of atypical reactions: he experienced a decrease in peripheral vascular resistance upon orthostasis during treatment with sildenafil and tamsulosin. This led to marked hypotension and cancellation of the tilt tests with both sildenafil alone (Riva-Rocci [RR] 75/50 mm Hg) and a combination of sildenafil and tamsulosin (RR 60/45 mm Hg); however, tamsulosin alone also lowered blood pressure to some extent (RR 100/80 mm Hg). In conclusion, even though sildenafil and tamsulosin are considered haemodynamically safe, they may induce considerable vasodilation and, subsequently, harmful hypotension in susceptible patients. PMID:17163302

  7. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension: Targeted or blind blood patch.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kyle A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this review is to determine the efficacy and optimal strategy for epidural blood patch placement in the treatment of spontaneous intracranial hypotension. We present a 37-year-old man who developed a 4week duration postural headache without sustaining significant trauma. The diagnosis of spontaneous intracranial hypotension with associated subdural hygromas was confirmed with lumbar puncture and radiologic imaging. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is generally due to cerebrospinal fluid leak from the thecal sac or nerve root sleeves, although the cause of leakage is unknown. In our patient, the site of leakage was identified at cervical C1-C2 level in the spine on myelography. Conservative management with repeated epidural blood patches was successful in symptom relief and complete resolution of cerebrospinal fluid leak and subdural hygromas. We reviewed the literature for efficacy of blood patches delivered directly to the site of leakage (targeted) or to the lumbar or thoracic spine away from the site of leakage or where the site cannot be determined (blind). No clear evidence exists on comparative efficacy due to paucity of randomized trials. However, epidural blood patches in general result in positive outcomes with overall efficacy near 90%. Some trials have suggested greater efficacy for targeted rather than blind epidural blood patches, but randomized studies and long-term prognosis remain to be evaluated. PMID:26461907

  8. Hypotensive constituents from the pods of Moringa oleifera.

    PubMed

    Faizi, S; Siddiqui, B S; Saleem, R; Aftab, K; Shaheen, F; Gilani, A H

    1998-04-01

    Hypotensive activity of the ethanolic and aqueous extracts of Moringa oleifera whole pods and their parts, namely, coat, pulp, and seed was investigated. The activity of the ethanolic extract of both the pods and the seeds was equivalent at the dose of 30 mg/kg. The ethyl acetate phase of the ethanolic extract of pods was found to be the most potent fraction at the same dose. Its bioassay-directed fractionation led to the isolation of thiocarbamate and isothiocyanate glycosides which were also the hypotensive principles of the pods as observed in case of Moringa leaves. Two new compounds, O-[2'-hydroxy-3'-(2"-heptenyloxy)]-propyl undecanoate (1) and O-ethyl-4-[(alpha-L-rhamnosyloxy)-benzyl] carbamate (2) along with the known substances methyl p-hydroxybenzoate (3) and beta-sitosterol have also been isolated in the present studies. The latter two compounds and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde showed promising hypotensive activity. Structures of all these compounds have been deduced by spectroscopy and chemical reactions. PMID:9581519

  9. Current Concepts in Orthostatic Hypotension Management

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Amy C.; Shibao, Cyndya

    2013-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension is a condition commonly affecting the elderly and is often accompanied by disabling presyncopal symptoms, syncope and impaired quality of life. The pathophysiology of orthostatic hypotension is linked to abnormal blood pressure regulatory mechanisms and autonomic insufficiency. As part of its diagnostic evaluation, a comprehensive history and medical examination focused on detecting symptoms and physical findings of autonomic neuropathy should be performed. In individuals with substantial falls in blood pressure upon standing, autonomic function tests are recommended to detect impairment of autonomic reflexes. Treatment should always follow a stepwise approach with initial use of nonpharmacologic interventions including avoidance of hypotensive medications, high-salt diet and physical counter maneuvers. If these measures are not sufficient, medications such as fludrocortisone and midodrine can be added. The goals of treatment are to improve symptoms and to make the patient as ambulatory as possible instead of targeting arbitrary blood pressure values. PMID:23832761

  10. Applications of PET CT in clinical practice: Present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Durval Campos

    2007-02-01

    Radionuclide imaging and specially positron emission tomography (PET) has already demonstrated its benefits in three major medical subjects, i.e. neurology, cardiology and particularly clinical oncology. More recently the combination of PET and X-ray computed tomography (CT) as PET-CT led to a significant increment of the already large number of clinical applications of this imaging modality. This "anatomy-metabolic fusion" also known as Metabolic Imaging has its future assured if we can: (1) improve resolution reducing partial volume effect, (2) achieve very fast whole body imaging, (3) obtain accurate quantification of specific functions with higher contrast resolution and, if possible, (4) reduce exposure rates due to the unavoidable use of ionizing radiation.

  11. Cellular characterization of MPZ mutations presenting with diverse clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Chung; Lin, Kon-Ping; Chang, Ming-Hong; Liao, Yi-Chu; Tsai, Ching-Piao; Liao, Kwong-Kum; Soong, Bing-Wen

    2010-10-01

    Mutations in MPZ, which encodes myelin protein zero (P(0)), may lead to different subtypes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). The aim of this study was to characterize the cellular manifestations of various MPZ mutations associated with CMT1, Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS) and CMT2, and to correlate their cellular and clinical phenotypes. Nine P(0) mutants associated with CMT1 (P(0)S63F, R98H, R277S, and S233fs), DSS (P(0) I30T and R98C), and CMT2 (P(0)S44F, D75V, and T124M), were investigated. Wild-type and mutant P(0) fused with fluorescent proteins were expressed in vitro to monitor their intracellular localization. An adhesiveness assay was used to evaluate the adhesiveness of the transfected cells. Protein localization and cell adhesiveness of each mutant protein were compared and correlated with their clinical phenotypes. Three different intracellular localization patterns of the mutant P(0) were observed. Wild-type P(0), P(0)I30T, S44F, S63F, D75V, T124M, and R227S were mostly localized on the cell membrane, P(0)R98H, and R98C were found in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or Golgi apparatus, and P(0)S233fs formed aggregates within the ER. Cells expressing mutant P(0), as compared with those expressing wild-type P(0), demonstrated variable degrees of reduction in the cell adhesiveness. The molecular patho-mechanisms of MPZ mutations are likely very complex and the clinical phenotype must be influenced by many genetic or environmental factors. This complexity may contribute to the highly variable clinical manifestations resulting from different MPZ mutations. PMID:20461396

  12. Genetics and molecular biology of hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, D.

    1994-01-01

    Major strides in the molecular biology of essential hypertension are currently underway. This has tended to obscure the fact that a number of inherited disorders associated with low blood pressure exist and that these diseases may have milder and underrecognized phenotypes that contribute importantly to blood pressure variation in the general population. This review highlights some of the gene products that, if abnormal, could cause hypotension in some individuals. Diseases due to abnormalities in the catecholamine enzymes are discussed in detail. It is likely that genetic abnormalities with hypotensive phenotypes will be as interesting and diverse as those that give rise to hypertensive disorders.

  13. [The treatment of orthostatic hypotension with metoclopramide].

    PubMed

    Laederach, K; Weidmann, P

    1991-02-23

    The dopamine receptor antagonist metoclopramide (paspertin, primpéran, gastrosil, meclopran, gastro-timelets), used as monotherapy or in combination with an inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase enzyme, affords good results in orthostatic hypotension due to insufficiency of the sympathetic nervous system. The mechanism of action in these cases is unclear but is assumed to be elevation of vascular tone in the splanchnic vessels. A case is discussed which documents the effectiveness of metoclopramide therapy in orthostatic hypotension, even in absence of signs of autonomic dysfunction. PMID:2011722

  14. Neurofibromatosis clinical presentations: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, Robert G; Waddell, Brad M; Willson, Robert D

    1987-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis (NFT) is an autosomal dominant disorder. Several distinctive clinical features may be discovered in the presence of the disease, including ècafé au laité spots, cutaneous neurofibromas, axillary freckling, Lisch nodules, and a positive familial history. Chiropractic management of this condition should include early recognition, appropriate supportive referral and symptomatic treatment of accompanying biomechanical dysfunctions. Early diagnosis will not only permit appropriate assessment, but will allow for vital genetic counselling. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7

  15. Pre-septal cellulitis--varied clinical presentations.

    PubMed

    Rao, V A; Hans, R; Mehra, A K

    1996-12-01

    Preseptal cellulitis has a typically benign course when treated with antibiotics, the clinical course depending on age of the patient, aetiology and the causative organism. In this study, 14 cases of preseptal cellulitis are documented with the age ranging from 2 to 55 years. The organisms isolated were Staphylococcus aureus (7 cases), Streptococcus pyogenes (2 cases) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (1 case). In the remaining four patients no organism could be identified. All except four patients were cured within 6 weeks. Complications seen included lagophthalmos, lid abscess, cicatricial ectropion and lid necrosis in one patient each. The prognosis for preseptal cellulitis is good with appropriate antibiotics and surgical therapy. PMID:9251267

  16. Clinical presentation, allergens, and management of wheat allergy.

    PubMed

    Quirce, Santiago; Boyano-Martínez, Teresa; Díaz-Perales, Araceli

    2016-05-01

    IgE-mediated allergy to wheat proteins can be caused by exposure through ingestion, inhalation, or skin/mucosal contact, and can affect various populations and age groups. Respiratory allergy to wheat proteins is commonly observed in adult patients occupationally exposed to flour, whereas wheat food allergy is more common in children. Wheat allergy is of growing importance for patients with recurrent anaphylaxis, especially when exercise related. The diagnosis of wheat allergy relies on a consistent clinical history, skin prick testing with well-characterized extracts and specific IgE tests. The accuracy of wheat allergy diagnosis may be improved by measuring IgE responses to several wheat components. However, a high degree of heterogeneity has been found in the recognition pattern of allergens among patient groups with different clinical profiles, as well as within each group. Thus, oral provocation with wheat or the implicated cereal is the reference test for the definitive diagnosis of ingested wheat/cereal allergy. PMID:26800201

  17. Autism in Phenylketonuria Patients: From Clinical Presentation to Molecular Defects.

    PubMed

    Khemir, Sameh; Halayem, Soumeyya; Azzouz, Hatem; Siala, Hajer; Ferchichi, Maherzia; Guedria, Asma; Bedoui, Amel; Abdelhak, Sonia; Messaoud, Taieb; Tebib, Neji; Belhaj, Ahlem; Kaabachi, Naziha

    2016-06-01

    Autism has been reported in untreated patients with phenylketonuria. The authors aimed to explore autism in 15 Tunisian and 4 Algerian phenylketonuria patients, and report their clinical, biochemical and molecular peculiarities. The Childhood Autism Rating Scale and the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised were used for the diagnosis of autism. Five exons of phenylalanine hydroxylase gene (7, 6, 10, 11, and 5) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and directly sequenced. Among these patients, 15 were suffering from autism at the time of evaluation. Six mutations were identified: p.E280K, p.G352Vfs, IVS10nt11, p.I224T, p.R261Q, and p.R252W. There was no correlation between autism and mutations affecting the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene, but the age of diet onset was the determining factor in autistic symptoms' evolution. PMID:26759449

  18. MUSCLE INJURY – PHYSIOPATHOLOGY, DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT AND CLINICAL PRESENTATION

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Tiago Lazzaretti; Pedrinelli, André; Hernandez, Arnaldo José

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue has the largest mass in the human body, accounting for 45% of the total weight. Muscle injuries can be caused by bruising, stretching or laceration. The current classification divides such injuries into mild, moderate and severe. The signs and symptoms of grade I lesions are edema and discomfort; grade II, loss of function, gaps and possible ecchymosis; and grade III, complete rupture, severe pain and extensive hematoma. The diagnosis can be confirmed by: ultrasound, which is dynamic and cheap, but examiner dependent; and tomography or magnetic resonance, which gives better anatomical definition, but is static. Initial phase of the treatment can be summarized as the “PRICE” protocol. NSAIDs, ultrasound therapy, strengthening and stretching after the initial phase and range of motion without pain are used in clinical treatment. On the other hand, surgery has precise indications: hematoma drainage and muscle-tendon reinsertion and reinforcement. PMID:27047816

  19. Beta-haemolytic streptococcal endocarditis: clinical presentation, management and outcomes.

    PubMed

    El Rafei, Abdelghani; DeSimone, Daniel C; DeSimone, Christopher V; Lahr, Brian D; Steckelberg, James M; Sohail, Muhammad R; Wilson, Walter R; Baddour, Larry M

    2016-05-01

    Background Beta-haemolytic streptococcal (BHS) endocarditis is rare, but well-recognised for its high morbidity and mortality. This study sought to further characterise clinical features, management and outcomes of BHS endocarditis. Methods Retrospective review of all adultpatients (≥ 18 years old) with BHS endocarditis treated at the Mayo Clinic from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2014. Results Forty-nine cases of BHS endocarditis were identified with a mean (± SD) age of 64 (±14.9) years and 65% were males. The infection was community acquired in 92% of the cases, with a median (IQR) time to diagnosis from symptom onset of 6 days (5-10). Associated conditions included the presence of a prosthetic valve (41%), malignancy (33%) and diabetes mellitus (DM) (31%). Median (IQR) vegetation size was 12 mm (9-17 mm). In a univariate analysis patients with DM had larger vegetations, median (IQR) = 17 mm (10.5-26 mm) compared to non-diabetic patients, median (IQR) = 11 mm (8-15 mm) (p = 0.01). Septic brain emboli occurred in 43% of cases. Eighteen patients (37%) underwent early (within 30 days) surgery. All-cause 1 month and 6 month mortality rates were 25% and 31%, respectively. Conclusion BHS endocarditis has an acute onset and is complicated by relatively large vegetations with a high rate of systemic embolisation. DM was the second most common associated medical condition and patients with DM had larger vegetations. Despite medical and surgical advances, mortality due to BHS endocarditis remains high, particularly within 30 days of diagnosis. PMID:26950685

  20. Pelvic paraganglioma: a rare and unusual clinical presentation of paraganglioma.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Suresh; Banerjee, Indraneel; Tomar, Vinay; Yadav, Sher Singh

    2016-01-01

    Paraganglioma of the urinary bladder is a rare tumour of the urinary bladder causing palpitation, headache, paroxysmal hypertension, tachycardia, blurring of vision and haematuria. Patients may present with these exaggerated symptoms during or just after micturition. We present a case of a 15-year-old girl who presented to us with accelerated hypertension, headache, palpitation and blurring of vision. On the basis of a positive family history, laboratory investigations and imaging studies, she was diagnosed to have an extra-adrenal paraganglioma. Complete enucleation of the tumour with preservation of the bladder was done. This case is reported because of the rarity of the disease in urology. PMID:26740269

  1. Autonomic failure with postprandial hypotension: case report.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, C J; Palmer, K T; Taylor, B B

    1981-07-01

    A case of severe symptomatic postprandial hypotension associated with idiopathic autonomic neuropathy and endogenous hyperinsulinaemia is described. The possible mechanisms of the blood pressure changes are discussed. Attempts at treatment included dietary change; the use of vasodilators with salt and fludrocortisone; elastic stockings, antigravity suit; diazoxide and bromocriptine. PMID:6943464

  2. Amphetamine, past and present – a pharmacological and clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sharon L; Gosden, Jane; Nutt, David J

    2013-01-01

    Amphetamine was discovered over 100 years ago. Since then, it has transformed from a drug that was freely available without prescription as a panacea for a broad range of disorders into a highly restricted Controlled Drug with therapeutic applications restricted to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy. This review describes the relationship between chemical structure and pharmacology of amphetamine and its congeners. Amphetamine’s diverse pharmacological actions translate not only into therapeutic efficacy, but also into the production of adverse events and liability for recreational abuse. Accordingly, the balance of benefit/risk is the key challenge for its clinical use. The review charts advances in pharmaceutical development from the introduction of once-daily formulations of amphetamine through to lisdexamfetamine, which is the first d-amphetamine prodrug approved for the management of ADHD in children, adolescents and adults. The unusual metabolic route for lisdexamfetamine to deliver d-amphetamine makes an important contribution to its pharmacology. How lisdexamfetamine’s distinctive pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile translates into sustained efficacy as a treatment for ADHD and its reduced potential for recreational abuse is also discussed. PMID:23539642

  3. Amphetamine, past and present--a pharmacological and clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Heal, David J; Smith, Sharon L; Gosden, Jane; Nutt, David J

    2013-06-01

    Amphetamine was discovered over 100 years ago. Since then, it has transformed from a drug that was freely available without prescription as a panacea for a broad range of disorders into a highly restricted Controlled Drug with therapeutic applications restricted to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy. This review describes the relationship between chemical structure and pharmacology of amphetamine and its congeners. Amphetamine's diverse pharmacological actions translate not only into therapeutic efficacy, but also into the production of adverse events and liability for recreational abuse. Accordingly, the balance of benefit/risk is the key challenge for its clinical use. The review charts advances in pharmaceutical development from the introduction of once-daily formulations of amphetamine through to lisdexamfetamine, which is the first d-amphetamine prodrug approved for the management of ADHD in children, adolescents and adults. The unusual metabolic route for lisdexamfetamine to deliver d-amphetamine makes an important contribution to its pharmacology. How lisdexamfetamine's distinctive pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile translates into sustained efficacy as a treatment for ADHD and its reduced potential for recreational abuse is also discussed. PMID:23539642

  4. Clinical presentation and manual therapy for lower quadrant musculoskeletal conditions

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, Carol A; Clark, Jeffrey D; Duncombe, Alison M; O’Hearn, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    Chronic lower quadrant injuries constitute a significant percentage of the musculoskeletal cases seen by clinicians. While impairments may vary, pain is often the factor that compels the patient to seek medical attention. Traumatic injury from sport is one cause of progressive chronic joint pain, particularly in the lower quarter. Recent studies have demonstrated the presence of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms in different lower quadrant pain syndromes, such as lumbar spine related leg pain, osteoarthritis of the knee, and following acute injuries such as lateral ankle sprain and anterior cruciate ligament rupture. Proper management of lower quarter conditions should include assessment of balance and gait as increasing pain and chronicity may lead to altered gait patterns and falls. In addition, quantitative sensory testing may provide insight into pain mechanisms which affect management and prognosis of musculoskeletal conditions. Studies have demonstrated analgesic effects and modulation of spinal excitability with use of manual therapy techniques, with clinical outcomes of improved gait and functional ability. This paper will discuss the evidence which supports the use of manual therapy for lower quarter musculoskeletal dysfunction. PMID:23115474

  5. Present status of clinical deployment of glucokinase activators

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Akinobu; Terauchi, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Glucokinase is one of four members of the hexokinase family of enzymes. Its expression is limited to the major organs (such as the pancreas, liver, brain and the gastrointestinal tract) that are thought to have an integrated role in glucose sensing. In the liver, phosphorylation of glucose by glucokinase promotes glycogen synthesis, whereas in the β-cells, it results in insulin release. Studies of glucokinase-linked genetically-modified mice and mutations in humans have illustrated the important roles played by glucokinase in whole-body glucose homeostasis, and suggest that the use of pharmacological agents that augment glucokinase activity could represent a viable treatment strategy in patients with type 2 diabetes. Since 2003, many glucokinase activators (GKAs) have been developed, and their ability to lower the blood glucose has been shown in several animal models of type 2 diabetes. Also, we and others have shown in mouse models that GKAs also have the effect of stimulating the proliferation of β-cells. However, the results of recent phase II trials have shown that GKAs lose their efficacy within several months of use, and that their use is associated with a high incidence of hypoglycemia; furthermore, patients treated with GKAs frequently developed dyslipidemia. A better understanding of the role of glucokinase in metabolic effects is required to resolve several issues identified in clinical trials. PMID:25802718

  6. Clinical presentation and diagnostic approach in cases of genitourinary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Rakesh; Ansari, M. S.; Mandhani, Anil; Gulia, Anil

    2008-01-01

    Objective: We herein describe the various modes of presentation in genitourinary tuberculosis (GUTB) and a simple diagnostic approach to it. Materials and Methods: We made a literature search through Medline database and various other peer-reviewed online journals to study the various modes of presentation in GUTB. We reviewed over 100 articles published in the last 10 years (1998 -- 2007), which were tracked through the key words like GUTB and extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Results: GUTB has varied presentation and the most common way of presentation is in the form of irritative voiding symptoms, which are found in more than 50% of the patients. The usual frequency of organ involvement is: kidney, bladder, fallopian tube, and scrotum. The usual tests used to diagnose GUTB are the demonstration of mycobacterium in urine or body fluid and radiographic examination. Intravenous urography (IVU) has been considered to be one of the most useful tests for the anatomical as well as the functional details of kidneys and ureters. In cases of renal failure, MRI can be used. Newer examinations such as radiometric liquid culture systems (i.e., BACTEC®, Becton Dickinson, USA) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) give rapid results and are highly sensitive in the identification of mycobacterium. Conclusion: GUTB can involve any part of the genitourinary system and presentation may vary from vague urinary symptoms to chronic kidney disease. Newer tests like radiometric liquid culture systems and polymerase chain reaction give rapid results and carry high diagnostic value. PMID:19468477

  7. Pertussis in young infants: clinical presentation, course and prevention.

    PubMed

    O'Riordan, A; Cleary, J; Cunney, R; Nicholson, A J

    2014-01-01

    Pertussis is a highly contagious disease caused by the Gram negative aerobic coccobacillus, Bordetella pertussis. It may present with severe symptoms and complications in infants and can pose a diagnostic challenge. This is a vaccine preventable illness covered by the Irish Childhood Immunisation Schedule. In 2011, a retrospective review was conducted of the records of infants, under six months, with a confirmed diagnosis of pertussis, presenting to Temple Street Children's University Hospital (TSCUH). A summery of notifications of pertussis nationally, from 2001 to 2012, was also examined as part of the study. This found that the rate of reported cases of pertussis has been increasing in Ireland. This national increase corresponds with a rising number of cases identified at TSCUH. Patients commonly presented severely ill with cyanosis and apnoea, on a background of prolonged cough. We found that pertussis was diagnosed rapidly in most cases however in all cases there was a delay to commencement of appropriate macrolide therapy. PMID:25226721

  8. Clinical presentation and operative repair of hernia of Morgagni.

    PubMed

    Loong, T P F; Kocher, H M

    2005-01-01

    A 77 year old woman who presented with an incarcerated hernia of Morgagni was successfully treated without complications. A Medline search (1996 to date) along with cross referencing was done to quantify the number of acute presentations in adults compared to children. Different investigating modalities--for example, lateral chest and abdominal radiography, contrast studies or, in difficult cases, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging--can be used to diagnose hernia of Morgagni. The favoured method of repair--laparotomy or laparoscopy--is also discussed. A total of 47 case reports on children and 93 case reports on adults were found. Fourteen percent of children (seven out of 47) presented acutely compared with 12% of adults (12 out of 93). Repair at laparotomy was the method of choice but if uncertain, laparoscopy would be a useful diagnostic tool before attempted repair. Laparoscopic repair was favoured in adults especially in non-acute cases. PMID:15640427

  9. False-positive focused abdominal sonography in trauma in a hypotensive child: case report.

    PubMed

    Imamedjian, Isabelle; Baird, Robert; Dubrovsky, Alexander Sasha

    2015-06-01

    We report a case of a false-positive focused abdominal sonography in trauma (FAST) examination in a persistently hypotensive pediatric trauma patient, performed 12 hours after the trauma, suspected to be caused by massive fluid resuscitation leading to ascites. While a positive FAST in a hypotensive trauma patient usually indicates hemoperitoneum, this case illustrates that the timing of the FAST examination relative to the injury, as well as clinical evolution including the volume of fluid resuscitation, need to be considered when interpreting the results of serial and/or late FAST examinations. PMID:26035503

  10. Hypotension and Environmental Noise: A Replication Study

    PubMed Central

    Lercher, Peter; Widmann, Ulrich; Thudium, Jürg

    2014-01-01

    Up to now, traffic noise effect studies focused on hypertension as health outcome. Hypotension has not been considered as a potential health outcome although in experiments some people also responded to noise with decreases of blood pressure. Currently, the characteristics of these persons are not known and whether this down regulation of blood pressure is an experimental artifact, selection, or can also be observed in population studies is unanswered. In a cross-sectional replication study, we randomly sampled participants (age 20–75, N = 807) from circular areas (radius = 500 m) around 31 noise measurement sites from four noise exposure strata (35–44, 45–54, 55–64, >64 Leq, dBA). Repeated blood pressure measurements were available for a smaller sample (N = 570). Standardized information on socio-demographics, housing, life style and health was obtained by door to door visits including anthropometric measurements. Noise and air pollution exposure was assigned by GIS based on both calculation and measurements. Reported hypotension or hypotension medication past year was the main outcome studied. Exposure-effect relationships were modeled with multiple non-linear logistic regression techniques using separate noise estimations for total, highway and rail exposure. Reported hypotension was significantly associated with rail and total noise exposure and strongly modified by weather sensitivity. Reported hypotension medication showed associations of similar size with rail and total noise exposure without effect modification by weather sensitivity. The size of the associations in the smaller sample with BMI as additional covariate was similar. Other important cofactors (sex, age, BMI, health) and moderators (weather sensitivity, adjacent main roads and associated annoyance) need to be considered as indispensible part of the observed relationship. This study confirms a potential new noise effect pathway and discusses potential patho-physiological routes of actions. PMID:25162707

  11. Unusual Clinical Presentations of Cervical or Lumbar Dorsal Ramus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shin Jae; Ko, Myeong Jin; Lee, Young Seok; Kim, Young Baeg; Chung, Chan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Patients with cervical (CDRS) or lumbar dorsal ramus syndrome (LDRS) are characterized by neck or low back pain with referred pain to upper or lower extremities. However, we experienced some CDRS or LDRS patients with unusual motor or bladder symptoms. We analyzed and reviewed literatures on the unusual symptoms identified in patients with CDRS or LDRS. Methods This study included patients with unusual symptoms and no disorders of spine and central nervous system, a total of 206 CDRS/LDRS patients over the past 3 years. We diagnosed by using double diagnostic blocks for medial branches of dorsal rami of cervical or lumbar spine with 1% lidocaine or 0.5% bupivacaine for each block with an interval of more than 1 week between the blocks. Greater than 80% reduction of the symptoms, including unusual symptoms, was considered as a positive response. The patients with a positive response were treated with radiofrequencyneurotomy. Results The number of patients diagnosed with CDRS and LDRS was 86 and 120, respectively. Nine patients (10.5%) in the CDRS group had unusual symptoms, including 4 patients with motor weakness of the arm, 3 patients with tremors, and rotatory torticollis in 2 patients. Ten patients (8.3%) in the LDRS group showed unusual symptoms, including 7 patients with motor weakness of leg, 2 patients with leg tremor, and urinary incontinence in 1 patient. All the unusual symptoms combined with CDRS or LDRS were resolved after treatment. Conclusion It seems that the clinical presentationssuch as motor weakness, tremor, urinary incontinence without any other etiologic origin need to be checked for unusual symptoms of CDRS or LDRS. PMID:25110484

  12. Primary biliary cirrhosis: Pathophysiology, clinical presentation and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Treta; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2015-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is an autoimmune, slowly progressive, cholestatic, liver disease characterized by a triad of chronic cholestasis, circulating anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMA), and characteristic liver biopsy findings of nonsuppurative destructive cholangitis and interlobular bile duct destruction. About 10% of PBC patients, however, lack AMA. A variant, called PBC-autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) overlap, is characterized by the above findings of PBC together with findings of elevated serum alanine aminotransferase, elevated serum immunoglobulin G, and circulating anti-smooth muscle antibodies, with liver biopsy demonstrating periportal or periseptal, lymphocytic, piecemeal necrosis. PBC is hypothesized to be related to environmental exposure in genetically vulnerable individuals. It typically occurs in middle-aged females. Prominent clinical features include fatigue, pruritis, jaundice, xanthomas, osteoporosis, and dyslipidemia. The Mayo Risk score is the most widely used and best prognostic system. Ursodeoxycholic acid is the primary therapy. It works partly by reducing the concentration and injury from relatively toxic bile acids. PBC-AIH overlap syndrome is treated with ursodeoxycholic acid and corticosteroids, especially budesonide. Obeticholic acid and fibrate are promising new, but incompletely tested, therapies. Liver transplantation is the definitive therapy for advanced disease, with about 70% 10-year survival after transplantation. Management of pruritis includes local skin care, dermatologist referral, avoiding potential pruritogens, cholestyramine, and possibly opioid antagonists, sertraline, or rifaximin. Management of osteoporosis includes life-style modifications, administration of calcium and vitamin D, and alendronate. Statins are relatively safe to treat the osteopenia associated with PBC. Associated Sjogren’s syndrome is treated by artificial tears, cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsion to stimulate tear production; and saliva substitutes, cholinergic agents, and scrupulous oral and dental care. Complications of cirrhosis from advanced PBC include esophageal varices, ascites, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, hepatorenal syndrome, and hepatoma formation. PMID:25954476

  13. Primary biliary cirrhosis: Pathophysiology, clinical presentation and therapy.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Treta; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2015-05-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is an autoimmune, slowly progressive, cholestatic, liver disease characterized by a triad of chronic cholestasis, circulating anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMA), and characteristic liver biopsy findings of nonsuppurative destructive cholangitis and interlobular bile duct destruction. About 10% of PBC patients, however, lack AMA. A variant, called PBC-autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) overlap, is characterized by the above findings of PBC together with findings of elevated serum alanine aminotransferase, elevated serum immunoglobulin G, and circulating anti-smooth muscle antibodies, with liver biopsy demonstrating periportal or periseptal, lymphocytic, piecemeal necrosis. PBC is hypothesized to be related to environmental exposure in genetically vulnerable individuals. It typically occurs in middle-aged females. Prominent clinical features include fatigue, pruritis, jaundice, xanthomas, osteoporosis, and dyslipidemia. The Mayo Risk score is the most widely used and best prognostic system. Ursodeoxycholic acid is the primary therapy. It works partly by reducing the concentration and injury from relatively toxic bile acids. PBC-AIH overlap syndrome is treated with ursodeoxycholic acid and corticosteroids, especially budesonide. Obeticholic acid and fibrate are promising new, but incompletely tested, therapies. Liver transplantation is the definitive therapy for advanced disease, with about 70% 10-year survival after transplantation. Management of pruritis includes local skin care, dermatologist referral, avoiding potential pruritogens, cholestyramine, and possibly opioid antagonists, sertraline, or rifaximin. Management of osteoporosis includes life-style modifications, administration of calcium and vitamin D, and alendronate. Statins are relatively safe to treat the osteopenia associated with PBC. Associated Sjogren's syndrome is treated by artificial tears, cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsion to stimulate tear production; and saliva substitutes, cholinergic agents, and scrupulous oral and dental care. Complications of cirrhosis from advanced PBC include esophageal varices, ascites, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, hepatorenal syndrome, and hepatoma formation. PMID:25954476

  14. Appendiceal Crohn’s disease clinically presenting as acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hulin; Kim, Hyunsung; Rehman, Abdul; Jang, Se Min; Paik, Seung Sam

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the incidence of appendiceal Crohn’s disease (CD) and to summarize the characteristic histologic features of appendiceal CD. METHODS: We reviewed the pathology files of 2179 appendectomy specimens from January 2007 to May 2013. The computer-assisted retrieval search facility was utilized to collect specimens. We selected those cases that were diagnosed as CD or chronic granulomatous inflammation and defined the final diagnosis according to the histologic findings of CD, including transmural lymphocytic inflammation, non-caseating epithelioid granulomas, thickening of the appendiceal wall secondary to hypertrophy of muscularis mucosa, mucosal ulceration with crypt abscesses, mucosal fissures, and fistula formation. RESULTS: We found 12 cases (7 male and 5 female patients, with an average age of 29.8 years) of appendiceal CD. The incidence of appendiceal CD was 0.55%. The chief complaints were right lower quadrant pain, abdominal pain, lower abdominal pain, and diarrhea. The duration of symptom varied from 2 d to 5 mo. The histologic review revealed appendiceal wall thickening in 11 cases (92%), transmural inflammation in all cases (100%), lymphoid aggregates in all cases (100%), epithelioid granulomas in all cases (100%), mucosal ulceration in 11 cases (92%), crypt abscesses in 5 cases (42%), perforation in 2 cases (17%), muscular hypertrophy in 1 case (8%), neural hyperplasia in 5 cases (42%), and perpendicular serosal fibrosis in 8 cases (67%). CONCLUSION: A typical and protracted clinical course, unusual gross features of the appendix and the characteristic histologic features are a clue in the diagnosis of appendiceal CD. PMID:25516865

  15. Cerebellopontine angle epidermoid cysts: clinical presentations and surgical outcome.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Nouri, Mohsen; Nagahisa, Shinya; Yoshida, Koichiro; Adachi, Kazuhide; Inamasu, Joji; Hirose, Yuichi; Fujisawa, Hironori

    2016-04-01

    Epidermoid cysts constitute less than 1 % of intracranial tumors with the majority of them involving cerebellopontine angle (CPA). Although several mechanisms for cranial nerve dysfunction due to these tumors have been proposed, no direct evaluation for hyper- or hypoactive dysfunction has been done. In this case series, pathophysiology of cranial nerve dysfunction in CPA epidermoid cysts was evaluated with special attention to a new mechanism of capsule strangulation caused by stratified tumor capsule. Twenty-two cases with epidermoid cysts of CPA micro-neurosurgically treated in our departments since 2005 were reviewed. Clinical status of the patients before the surgery and post-operative functional outcome were recorded. Available data from the English literature were summarized for comparison. Mass reduction of cyst contents in most cases was usually associated with prompt and marked improvement of the symptoms suggesting neuroapraxia caused by compression of the tumor content and/or mild ischemia. Among them, two cases showed strangulation of the affected nerves by the tumor capsule whose preoperative dysfunction did not improve after surgery in spite of meticulous microsurgical removal of the lesion. Involved facial and abducent nerves in these two cases showed distortion of nerve axis and nerve atrophy distal to the strangulation site. We report the first direct evidence of etiology of cranial nerve dysfunction caused by cerebellopontine angle epidermoid tumors. Young age and rapidly progressive neurological deficit might be the characteristics for strangulation of the affected nerves by the cyst capsule. Even though the number of cases might be limited, immediate decompression and release of the strangulating band might be urged in such patients to prevent irreversible deficits. PMID:26566990

  16. Sarcoidosis Presenting Addison's Disease.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kentaro; Kagami, Shin-Ichiro; Kawashima, Hirotoshi; Kashiwakuma, Daisuke; Suzuki, Yoshio; Iwamoto, Itsuo

    2016-01-01

    We herein describe a second Japanese case of sarcoidosis presenting Addison's disease. A 52-year-old man was diagnosed with sarcoidosis based on clinical and laboratory findings, including bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy and elevated levels of serum angiotensin-converting enzyme and lysozyme, as well as the presence of noncaseating epithelioid granulomas. The patient also exhibited general fatigue, pigmentation, weight loss, hypotension and hyponatremia, suggestive of chronic adrenocortical insufficiency. An endocrine examination confirmed primary adrenocortical insufficiency. This case suggests the direct involvement of sarcoid granuloma in the adrenal glands. PMID:27150885

  17. Cowden Syndrome Presenting as Breast Cancer: Imaging and Clinical Features

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Mirinae; Ahn, Hye Shin; Moon, Hyeong-Gon

    2014-01-01

    Cowden syndrome is an uncommon, autosomal dominant disease which is characterized by multiple hamartomas of the skin, mucous membrane, brain, breast, thyroid, and gastrointestinal tract. The diagnosis of Cowden syndrome implicates an increased risk of developing breast cancer. We report a case of a 22-year-old woman with Cowden syndrome that presented as breast cancer with concomitant bilateral exuberant benign masses in both breasts. PMID:25246819

  18. Digital device in postextraction implantology: a clinical case presentation.

    PubMed

    Borgonovo, A E; Rigaldo, F; Battaglia, D; Re, D; Giannì, A B

    2014-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this work is to describe a case of immediate implant placement after extraction of the upper right first premolar, with the use of CAD/CAM technology, which allows an early digital impression of the implant site with an intraoral scanner (MHT 3D Progress, Verona, Italy). Case Report. A 46-year-old female was referred with a disorder caused by continuous debonding of the prosthetic crown on the upper right first premolar. Clinically, there were no signs, and the evaluation of the periapical radiograph showed a fracture of the root, with a mesial well-defined lesion of the hard tissue of the upper right first premolar, as the radiolucent area affected the root surface of the tooth. It was decided, in accordance with the patient, that the tooth would be extracted and the implant (Primer, Edierre implant system, Genoa, Italy) with diameter of 4.2 mm and length of 13 mm would be inserted. After the insertion of the implant, it was screwed to the scan abutment, and a scan was taken using an intraoral scanner (MHT 3D Progress, Verona, Italy). The scanned images were processed with CAD/CAM software (Exocad DentalCAD, Darmstadt, Germany) and the temporary crown was digitally drawn (Dental Knowledge, Milan, Italy) and then sent to the milling machine for production with a composite monoblock. After 4 months, when the implant was osteointegrated, it was not necessary to take another dental impression, and the definitive crown could be screwed in. Conclusion. The CAD/CAM technology is especially helpful in postextraction implant for aesthetic rehabilitation, as it is possible to immediately fix a provisional crown with an anatomic shape that allows an optimal healing process of the tissues. Moreover, the removal of healing abutments, and the use of impression copings, impression materials, and dental stone became unnecessary, enabling the reduction of the chair time, component cost, and patient's discomfort. However, it is still necessary for scientific research to continue to carry out studies on this procedure, in order to improve the accuracy, the reliability, and the reproducibility of the results. PMID:25610665

  19. Systemic mastocytosis presenting as osteoporosis: a clinical and histomorphometric study.

    PubMed

    Chines, A; Pacifici, R; Avioli, L V; Teitelbaum, S L; Korenblat, P E

    1991-01-01

    Ten patients with systemic mastocytosis (SM) were evaluated for their metabolic bone disease (4 men and 6 women; mean +/- SD, 59 +/- 13 yr). All patients presented with generalized osteopenia and/or atraumatic vertebral compression fractures. Three patients had long-standing urticaria pigmentosa; in these, the diagnosis of cutaneous mastocytosis had been established by skin biopsy. One of the 3 and 2 of the other 7 individuals had symptoms suggestive of SM. Although six patients had previously undergone decalcified bone marrow trephine core biopsy (DBMB), findings were consistent with SM in only 2 of them. X-Ray survey revealed generalized osteopenia in all 10 patients and vertebral compression fractures in 9. No patient had sclerotic bone lesions. Histological findings of undecalcified transiliac crest biopsy (UTBB) specimens from 9 patients (5 patients underwent both DBMB and UTBB, 4 underwent only UTBB, and 1 had only DBMB) disclosed bone marrow that contained nodules characteristic of mast cell granulomas and numerous scattered oval- and spindle-shaped mast cells. The trabecular bone contained abundant newly synthesized bone matrix and a significant increase in osteoblastic, osteoclastic, and resorptive surfaces. Dynamic histomorphometric parameters revealed a significantly increased mineral apposition rate. Our study suggests that SM may be a more frequent cause of osteoporosis than previously recognized. Generalized osteopenia with compression fractures may be the only presentation of SM. Undecalcified bone biopsy is useful in the diagnosis of SM. Accelerated bone remodeling is a characteristic histomorphometric feature of SM with diffuse osteopenia. PMID:1986013

  20. Overview and clinical presentation of generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Rickels, K; Rynn, M

    2001-03-01

    1. To distinguish GAD from panic disorder is not difficult if a patient has frequent, spontaneous panic attacks and agoraphobic symptoms, but many patients with GAD have occasional anxiety attacks or panic attacks. Such patients should be considered as having GAD. An even closer overlap probably exists between GAD and social phobia. Patients with clear-cut phobic avoidant behavior may be distinguished easily from patients with GAD, but patients with social anxiety without clear-cut phobic avoidant behavior may overlap with patients with GAD and possibly should be diagnosed as having GAD and not social phobia. The cardinal symptoms of GAD commonly overlap with those of social phobia, particularly if the social phobia is more general and not focused on a phobic situation. For example, free-floating anxiety may cause the hands to perspire and may cause a person to be shy in dealing with people in public, and thus many patients with subthreshold social phobic symptoms have, in the authors' opinion, GAD and not generalized social phobia. The distinction between GAD and obsessive-compulsive disorder, acute stress disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder should not be difficult by definition. At times, however, it may be difficult to distinguish between adjustment disorder with anxious mood from GAD or anxiety not otherwise specified, particularly if the adjustment disorder occurs in a patient with a high level of neuroticism or trait anxiety or type C personality disorder. Table 2 presents features distinguishing GAD from other psychiatric disorders. 2. Lifetime comorbid diagnoses of other anxiety or depression disorders, not active for 1 year or more and not necessitating treatment during that time period, should not effect a diagnosis of current GAD. On the other hand, if concomitant depressive symptoms are present and if these are subthreshold, a diagnosis of GAD should be made, and if these are full threshold, a diagnosis of MDD should be made. 3. If GAD is primary and if no such current comorbid diagnosis, such as other anxiety disorders or MDD, is present, except for minor depression and dysthymia, or if only subthreshold symptoms of other anxiety disorders are present, GAD should be considered primary and treated as GAD; however, patients with concurrent threshold anxiety or mood disorders should be diagnosed according to the definitions of these disorders in the DSM-IV and ICD-10 and treated as such. 4. Somatization disorders are now classified separately from anxiety disorders. Some of these, particularly undifferentiated somatization disorder, may overlap with GAD and be diagnostically difficult to distinguish. The authors believe that, as long as psychic symptoms of anxiety are present and predominant, patients should be given a primary diagnosis of GAD. 5. Two major shifts in the DSM diagnostic criteria for GAD have markedly redefined the definition of this disorder. One shift involves the duration criterion from 1 to 6 months, and the other, the increased emphasis on worry and secondary psychic [table: see text] symptoms accompanied by the elimination of most somatic symptoms. This decision has had the consequence of orphaning a large population of patients suffering from GAD that is more transient and somatic in its focus and who typically present not to psychiatrists but to primary care physicians. Therefore, clinicians should consider using the ICD-10 qualification of illness duration of "several months" to replace the more rigid DSM-IV criterion of 6 months and to move away from the DSM-IV focus on excessive worry as the cardinal symptom of anxiety and demote it to only another important anxiety symptom, similar to free-floating anxiety. One also might consider supplementing this ICD-10 criterion with an increased symptom severity criterion as, for example, a Hamilton Anxiety Scale of 18. Finally, the adjective excessive, not used in the definition of other primary diagnostic criteria, such as depressed mood for MDD, should be omitted (Table 3). 6. One may want to consider the distinction of trait (chronic) from state (acute) anxiety, but whether the presence of some personality characteristics, particularly anxious personality or Cluster C personality and increased neuroticism, as an indicator of trait [table: see text] anxiety is a prerequisite for anxiety disorders; occurs independently of anxiety disorders; or is a vulnerability factor that, in some patients, leads to anxiety symptoms and, in others, does not, is unknown. 7. Symptoms that some clinicians consider cardinal for a diagnosis of GAD, such as extreme worry, obsessive rumination, and somatization, also are present in other disorders, such as MDD. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED) PMID:11225502

  1. A review of the clinical presentation of dientamoebiasis.

    PubMed

    Stark, Damien; Barratt, Joel; Roberts, Tamalee; Marriott, Deborah; Harkness, John; Ellis, John

    2010-04-01

    Among 750 symptomatic and asymptomatic patients, Dientamoeba fragilis was detected at a prevalence of 5.2% and more common than Giardia intestinalis. Most infected patients presented with diarrhea and abdominal pain with symptoms greater than 2 weeks duration being common. Bacterial and viral causes of infection were excluded by routine microbiological techniques. Treatment of D. fragilis infection with either iodoquinol, paromomycin, or combination therapy resulted in the eradication of the parasite and complete resolution of symptoms. Treatment failure/relapses were associated only with the use of metronidazole. Nineteen patients were examined for pin worm, no Enterobius vermicularis, a proposed vector of transmission, were detected. Intermittent shedding of D. fragilis was found to be highly variable. These studies confirm the pathogenic nature of D. fragilis and we recommend laboratories routinely test for the organism. PMID:20348509

  2. Cerebrovascular disease as the initial clinical presentation of haematological disorders.

    PubMed

    Arboix, A; Besses, C

    1997-01-01

    We describe 14 patients (mean age 57 years) in whom stroke or TIA was the presenting manifestation of a haematologic disorder. Twelve patients had an ischaemic stroke and 2 a haemorrhagic stroke. This group represented 1.27% (14/1,099) of the total number of patients with first-ever stroke diagnosed from 1986 to 1992 at our institution, accounted for 1.32% (12/906) of all brain infarcts and 1.03% (2/193) of all haemorrhagic strokes, and was the most common aetiology (25%) of ischaemic stroke of unusual cause. Haematological disorders included essential thrombocythaemia (6), polycythaemia vera (1), smoker's polycythaemia (1), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (1), IgA lambda myeloma (1), acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (1), Waldenström's macroglobulinaemia (1), chronic granulocytic leukaemia (1) and IgG lambda myeloma (1). Stroke subtypes included definitive cerebral infarct (10), TIA (2), parenchymal haemorrhage (1) and spontaneous subdural haematoma (1). Vascular territories in ischaemic stroke were the carotid in 7 patients, the vertebrobasilar in 1 and undetermined in 4. Mean follow-up was 40 months (range, 1-96 months). The mortality rate was 18.7%. PMID:9208259

  3. Hypotensive peptides from snake venoms: structure, function and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaolong; Li, Bing; Zhu, Shanshan; Rong, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Snake venoms have evolved over millions of years, and some toxins have evolved to specifically target various sites in the cardiovascular system of prey animals, producing prey hypotension. So far, a number of specific hypotensive peptides have been identified from different snake venoms. These snake hypotensive peptides are divided into five classes: bradykinin potentiating peptides, natriuretic peptides, sarafotoxins, Phospholipases A2 and L-type Ca(2+) channel blockers. They differ widely in their structure, mechanism and points of action. Each class has many different isoforms with similar structures but different hypotensive activities. In the last decade, research efforts on snake hypotensive peptides have produced great advance in their understanding and applications in designing antihypertensive agents. In addition, several new classes of hypotensive peptides have been found from snake venoms. This review attempts to provide an overview of the current understanding of the structure, function and mechanism of snake hypotensive peptides. PMID:25686732

  4. Pathophysiological basis of orthostatic hypotension in autonomic failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smit, A. A.; Halliwill, J. R.; Low, P. A.; Wieling, W.

    1999-01-01

    In patients with autonomic failure orthostatic hypotension results from an impaired capacity to increase vascular resistance during standing. This fundamental defect leads to increased downward pooling of venous blood and a consequent reduction in stroke volume and cardiac output that exaggerates the orthostatic fall in blood pressure. The location of excessive venous blood pooling has not been established so far, but present data suggest that the abdominal compartment and perhaps leg skin vasculature are the most likely candidates. To improve the orthostatic tolerance in patients with autonomic failure, protective measures that reduce excessive orthostatic blood pooling have been developed and evaluated. These measures include physical counter-manoeuvres and abdominal compression.

  5. Pathophysiological basis of orthostatic hypotension in autonomic failure

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Adrianus A J; Halliwill, John R; Low, Phillip A; Wieling, Wouter

    1999-01-01

    In patients with autonomic failure orthostatic hypotension results from an impaired capacity to increase vascular resistance during standing. This fundamental defect leads to increased downward pooling of venous blood and a consequent reduction in stroke volume and cardiac output that exaggerates the orthostatic fall in blood pressure. The location of excessive venous blood pooling has not been established so far, but present data suggest that the abdominal compartment and perhaps leg skin vasculature are the most likely candidates. To improve the orthostatic tolerance in patients with autonomic failure, protective measures that reduce excessive orthostatic blood pooling have been developed and evaluated. These measures include physical counter-manoeuvres and abdominal compression. PMID:10432334

  6. Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome as a cause for infant hypotension.

    PubMed

    Coates, Ryan W; Weaver, Kevin R; Lloyd, Rezarta; Ceccacci, Nicole; Greenberg, Marna Rayl

    2011-11-01

    Infants with food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) may present to the emergency department (ED) with vomiting and hypotension. A previously healthy, 5-month-old male presented with vomiting and hypotension 2 to 3 hours after eating squash. The patient was resuscitated with intravenous fluids, antibiotics, and admitted for presumed sepsis. No source of infection was ever found and the patient was discharged. The patient returned 8 days later with the same symptoms after eating sweet potatoes; the diagnosis of FPIES was made during this admission. Two additional ED visits occurred requiring hydration after new food exposure. FPIES should be considered in infants presenting with gastrointestinal complaints and hypotension. A dietary history, including if a new food has been introduced in the last few hours, may help facilitate earlier recognition of the syndrome. PMID:22224148

  7. Occult Breast Cancer Presenting as Metastatic Adenocarcinoma of Unknown Primary: Clinical Presentation, Immunohistochemistry, and Molecular Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jue; Talmon, Geoffrey; Hankins, Jordan H.; Enke, Charles

    2012-01-01

    We report a rare presentation of a 66-year-old female with diffuse metastatic adenocarcinoma of unknown primary involving liver, lymphatic system and bone metastases. The neoplastic cells were positive for CK7 and OC125, while negative for CK20, thyroid transcription factor 1, CDX2, BRST-2, chromogranin, synaptophysin, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu). Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed no amplification of the HER2/neu gene. Molecular profiling reported a breast cancer origin with a very high confidence score of 98%. The absence of immunohistochemistry staining for ER, PR, and HER2/neu further classified her cancer as triple-negative breast cancer. Additional studies revealed high expression levels of topoisomerase (Topo) I, androgen receptor, and ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase large subunit; the results were negative for thymidylate synthase, Topo II-a and O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase. The patient was initially treated with a combination regimen of cisplatin and etoposide, and she experienced a rapid resolution of cancer-related symptoms. Unfortunately, her therapy was complicated by a cerebrovascular accident (CVA), which was thought to be related to cisplatin and high serum mucin. After recovery from the CVA, the patient was successfully treated with second-line chemotherapy based on her tumor expression profile. We highlight the role of molecular profiling in the diagnosis and management of this patient and the implication of personalized chemotherapy in this challenging disease. PMID:22379471

  8. Postural hypotension in a patient with cervical myelopathy due to craniovertebral anomaly.

    PubMed

    Misra, U K; Kalita, J; Kapoor, R

    1997-10-01

    We report a patient with craniovertebral anomaly leading to cervical cord compression who presented with disabling postural hypotension. A 60-year-old electrician presented with progressive weakness of the upper and lower limbs, which had started 7 years previously. He had difficulty in holding urine for the previous year and had blacked out on standing for the past 3 months. He had upper limb wasting and lower limb spasticity, with impaired joint position sense. Autonomic dysfunctions included postural hypotension, absence of sinus arrhythmia, impaired Valsalva ratio, and lack of increase in blood pressure on cold immersion and isometric contraction. Cervical spine radiograph and magnetic resonance imaging revealed atlantoaxial dislocation, Klippel-Feil syndrome and osteophytes, resulting in cord compression at C2-C4. Partial and selective damage to the descending autonomic fibres may be responsible for postural hypotension in this patient. PMID:9370068

  9. 2-vessel occlusion/hypotension: a rat model of global brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Thomas H; Wider, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac arrest followed by resuscitation often results in dramatic brain damage caused by ischemia and subsequent reperfusion of the brain. Global brain ischemia produces damage to specific brain regions shown to be highly sensitive to ischemia (1). Hippocampal neurons have higher sensitivity to ischemic insults compared to other cell populations, and specifically, the CA1 region of the hippocampus is particularly vulnerable to ischemia/reperfusion (2). The design of therapeutic interventions, or study of mechanisms involved in cerebral damage, requires a model that produces damage similar to the clinical condition and in a reproducible manner. Bilateral carotid vessel occlusion with hypotension (2VOH) is a model that produces reversible forebrain ischemia, emulating the cerebral events that can occur during cardiac arrest and resuscitation. We describe a model modified from Smith et al. (1984) (2), as first presented in its current form in Sanderson, et al. (2008) (3), which produces reproducible injury to selectively vulnerable brain regions (3-6). The reliability of this model is dictated by precise control of systemic blood pressure during applied hypotension, the duration of ischemia, close temperature control, a specific anesthesia regimen, and diligent post-operative care. An 8-minute ischemic insult produces cell death of CA1 hippocampal neurons that progresses over the course of 6 to 24 hr of reperfusion, while less vulnerable brain regions are spared. This progressive cell death is easily quantified after 7-14 days of reperfusion, as a near complete loss of CA1 neurons is evident at this time. In addition to this brain injury model, we present a method for CA1 damage quantification using a simple, yet thorough, methodology. Importantly, quantification can be accomplished using a simple camera-mounted microscope, and a free ImageJ (NIH) software plugin, obviating the need for cost-prohibitive stereology software programs and a motorized microscopic stage for damage assessment. PMID:23851591

  10. Characterization of the hypotensive effects of glucagon-like peptide-2 in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Takashi; Kaneko, Maki; Sasaki-Hamada, Sachie; Oka, Jun-Ichiro

    2013-08-29

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a proglucagon-derived peptide released from enteroendocrine cells and neurons. We recently reported that GLP-2 induced hypotension. In the present study, we characterized the mechanisms of GLP-2-induced hypotension. GLP-2 was administered peripherally or centrally to male Wistar rats anesthetized with urethane and α-chloralose. The rats were vagotomized or systemically pretreated with atropine, prazosin, or propranolol before the GLP-2 administration. The central and peripheral administration of GLP-2 reduced mean arterial blood pressure (MAP). The maximum change of MAP (maximum ΔMAP) was reduced by vagotomy or prazosin, but not propranolol. The effects of the central but not peripheral administration of GLP-2 were reduced by atropine. These results suggest that GLP-2 modulates vagal afferent inputs and inhibits the sympathetic nervous system in the brain to induce hypotension. PMID:23867714

  11. Analyzing Clinical Presentation, Service Utilization, and Clinical Outcome of Female Sexual Minority College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Heather C.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers examining clinically-relevant trends for sexual minority women have found evidence of psychological distress and greater utilization of mental health services compared to heterosexually-identified women. However, the results of many research studies with this population have methodological limitations surrounding recruitment of…

  12. Optimizing the respiratory pump: harnessing inspiratory resistance to treat systemic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Convertino, Victor A; Ryan, Kathy L; Rickards, Caroline A; Glorsky, Steven L; Idris, Ahamed H; Yannopoulos, Demetris; Metzger, Anja; Lurie, Keith G

    2011-06-01

    We review the physiology and affects of inspiration through a low level of added resistance for the treatment of hypotension. Recent animal and clinical studies demonstrated that one of the body's natural response mechanisms to hypotension is to harness the respiratory pump to increase circulation. That finding is consistent with observations, in the 1960s, about the effect of lowering intrathoracic pressure on key physiological and hemodynamic variables. We describe studies that focused on the fundamental relationship between the generation of negative intrathoracic pressure during inspiration through a low level of resistance created by an impedance threshold device and the physiologic sequelae of a respiratory pump. A decrease in intrathoracic pressure during inspiration through a fixed resistance resulting in a pressure difference of 7 cm H(2)O has multiple physiological benefits, including: enhanced venous return and cardiac stroke volume, lower intracranial pressure, resetting of the cardiac baroreflex, elevated cerebral blood flow oscillations, increased tissue blood flow/pressure gradient, and maintenance of the integrity of the baroreflex-mediated coherence between arterial pressure and sympathetic nerve activity. While breathing has traditionally been thought primarily to provide gas exchange, studies of the mechanisms involved in animals and humans provide the physiological underpinnings for "the other side of breathing": to increase circulation to the heart and brain, especially in the setting of physiological stress. The existing results support the use of the intrathoracic pump to treat clinical conditions associated with hypotension, including orthostatic hypotension, hypotension during and after hemodialysis, hemorrhagic shock, heat stroke, septic shock, and cardiac arrest. Harnessing these fundamental mechanisms that control cardiopulmonary physiology provides new opportunities for respiratory therapists and others who have traditionally focused on ventilation to also help treat serious and often life-threatening circulatory disorders. PMID:21333089

  13. Alanine increases blood pressure during hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Maher, T. J.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of L-alanine administration on blood pressure (BP) during haemorrhagic shock was investigated using anesthetized rats whose left carotid arteries were cannulated for BP measurement, blood removal, and drug administration. It was found that L-alanine, in doses of 10, 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, increased the systolic BP of hypotensive rats by 38 to 80 percent (while 100 mg/kg pyruvate increased BP by only 9.4 mmhg, not significantly different from saline). The results suggest that L-alanine might influence cardiovascular function.

  14. Orthostatic hypotension. Causes, evaluation, and management.

    PubMed Central

    Hollister, A S

    1992-01-01

    Chronic orthostatic hypotension is caused by a variety of disorders. Frequently patients withdraw from social interactions, are prone to adverse drug reactions and inappropriate diagnoses, and are bed-bound by the time of diagnosis. Applying basic principles of cardiovascular physiology and pharmacology usually permits these patients to lead active lives and to live longer. Much of the management is based on common sense and knowledge of the basic pathophysiology of the disorder and depends on thorough patient education and close monitoring of blood pressure in many of the activities of daily living. PMID:1475949

  15. Ischemic Posterior Circulation Stroke: A Review of Anatomy, Clinical Presentations, Diagnosis, and Current Management

    PubMed Central

    Nouh, Amre; Remke, Jessica; Ruland, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Posterior circulation strokes represent approximately 20% of all ischemic strokes (1, 2). In contrast to the anterior circulation, several differences in presenting symptoms, clinical evaluation, diagnostic testing, and management strategy exist presenting a challenge to the treating physician. This review will discuss the anatomical, etiological, and clinical classification of PC strokes, identify diagnostic pitfalls, and overview current therapeutic regimens. PMID:24778625

  16. Opportunities for Web-based Drug Repositioning: Searching for Potential Antihypertensive Agents with Hypotension Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kejian; Wan, Mei; Wang, Rui-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Drug repositioning refers to the process of developing new indications for existing drugs. As a phenotypic indicator of drug response in humans, clinical side effects may provide straightforward signals and unique opportunities for drug repositioning. Objective We aimed to identify drugs frequently associated with hypotension adverse reactions (ie, the opposite condition of hypertension), which could be potential candidates as antihypertensive agents. Methods We systematically searched the electronic records of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) through the openFDA platform to assess the association between hypotension incidence and antihypertensive therapeutic effect regarding a list of 683 drugs. Results Statistical analysis of FAERS data demonstrated that those drugs frequently co-occurring with hypotension events were more likely to have antihypertensive activity. Ranked by the statistical significance of frequent hypotension reporting, the well-known antihypertensive drugs were effectively distinguished from others (with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve > 0.80 and a normalized discounted cumulative gain of 0.77). In addition, we found a series of antihypertensive agents (particularly drugs originally developed for treating nervous system diseases) among the drugs with top significant reporting, suggesting the good potential of Web-based and data-driven drug repositioning. Conclusions We found several candidate agents among the hypotension-related drugs on our list that may be redirected for lowering blood pressure. More important, we showed that a pharmacovigilance system could alternatively be used to identify antihypertensive agents and sustainably create opportunities for drug repositioning. PMID:27036325

  17. Association of Mortality Risk with Various Definitions of Intradialytic Hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Hui; Lynch, Katherine E.; Curhan, Gary C.; Brunelli, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Intradialytic hypotension is a serious and frequent complication of hemodialysis; however, there is no evidence-based consensus definition of intradialytic hypotension. As a result, coherent evaluation of the effects of intradialytic hypotension is difficult. We analyzed data from 1409 patients in the HEMO Study and 10,392 patients from a single large dialysis organization to investigate the associations of commonly used intradialytic hypotension definitions and mortality. Intradialytic hypotension definitions were selected a priori on the basis of literature review. For each definition, patients were characterized as having intradialytic hypotension if they met the corresponding definition in at least 30% of baseline exposure period treatments or characterized as control otherwise. Overall and within subgroups of patients with predialysis systolic BP<120 or 120–159 mmHg, an absolute nadir systolic BP<90 mmHg was most potently associated with mortality. Within the subgroup of patients with predialysis BP≥160 mmHg, nadir BP<100 mmHg was most potently associated with mortality. Intradialytic hypotension definitions that considered symptoms, interventions, and decreases in BP during dialysis were not associated with outcome, and when added to nadir BP, symptom and intervention criteria did not accentuate associations with mortality. Our results suggest that nadir-based definitions best capture the association between intradialytic hypotension and mortality. PMID:25270068

  18. Cranial dural arteriovenous shunts. Part 4. Clinical presentation of the shunts with leptomeningeal venous drainage.

    PubMed

    Baltsavias, Gerasimos; Spiessberger, Alex; Hothorn, Torsten; Valavanis, Anton

    2015-04-01

    Cranial dural arteriovenous fistulae have been classified into high- and low-risk lesions mainly based on the pattern of venous drainage. Those with leptomeningeal venous drainage carry a higher risk of an aggressive clinical presentation. Recently, it has been proposed that the clinical presentation should be considered as an additional independent factor determining the clinical course of these lesions. However, dural shunts with leptomeningeal venous drainage include a very wide spectrum of inhomogeneous lesions. In the current study, we correlated the clinical presentation of 107 consecutive patients harboring cranial dural arteriovenous shunts with leptomeningeal venous drainage, with their distinct anatomic and angiographic features categorized into eight groups based on the "DES" (Directness and Exclusivity of leptomeningeal venous drainage and features of venous Strain) concept. We found that among these groups, there are significant angioarchitectural differences, which are reflected by considerable differences in clinical presentation. Leptomeningeal venous drainage of dural sinus shunts that is neither direct nor exclusive and without venous strain manifested only benign symptoms (aggressive presentation 0%). On the other end of the spectrum, the bridging vein shunts with direct and exclusive leptomeningeal venous drainage and venous strain are expected to present aggressive symptoms almost always and most likely with bleeding (aggressive presentation 91.5%). Important aspects of the above correlations are discussed. Therefore, the consideration of leptomeningeal venous drainage alone, for prediction of the clinical presentation of these shunts appears insufficient. Angiographic analysis based on the above concept, offers the possibility to distinguish the higher- from the lower-risk types of leptomeningeal venous drainage. In this context, consideration of the clinical presentation as an additional independent factor for the prediction of their clinical course seems superfluous and possibly misleading. Topography is connected to the clinical presentation of the dural shunts inasmuch as the former determines the venous anatomy and the angioarchitectural features of the lesions. PMID:25421555

  19. Cognitive functioning in orthostatic hypotension due to pure autonomic failure.

    PubMed

    Heims, Hannah C; Critchley, Hugo D; Martin, Naomi H; Jäger, H Rolf; Mathias, Christopher J; Cipolotti, Lisa

    2006-04-01

    Psychophysiological science proposes close interactions between cognitive processes and autonomic responses, yet the consequences of autonomic failure on cognitive functioning have not been documented. This pilot study investigates, for the first time, the cognitive profile of 14 patients with Pure Autonomic Failure (PAF). Each patient was administered a comprehensive battery of neuropsychological tests and neuroimaging investigation. A number of patients (n = 6) presented with cognitive impairment. The two most frequent types of impairment were: deficits of speed and attention, and executive functioning. Impairments of free recall memory, intellectual functioning, nominal and calculation functions were also documented, albeit in a much lower frequency. These cognitive changes were not always associated with white matter abnormalities. We speculate that the cognitive impairments associated with PAF represent consequences of systemic hypotension with cerebral underperfusion. However, a failure in integrated bodily arousal responses during cognitive behaviours may also contribute to some of the observed deficits. PMID:16683070

  20. Effects of propranolol in a case of orthostatic hypotension.

    PubMed Central

    Brevetti, G; Chiariello, M; Lavecchia, G; Rengo, F

    1979-01-01

    In a hypertensive patient with orthostatic hypotension, the changes in several haemodynamic indices with respect to posture were evaluated. In the upright position, systemic blood pressure was reduced as compared with the supine position, and peripheral vasodilation was present, as shown by an increase in Jantsch's index of the impedance plethysmographic tracings. Systolic time intervals remained unchanged with changes in posture. Propranolol 10 mg intravenously brought the response to normal. In fact, after beta-blockade in the standing position the blood pressure remained unchanged and normal peripheral vasoconstriction was observed. Similar results were seen during atrial pacing at a constant heart rate of 130 beats/minute. In this patient, propranolol appears to normalise the response to the posture change, by restoring normal vasoconstriction in the upright position. PMID:426969

  1. Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension – management update and role of droxidopa

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, Joy; Sharma, Vijay K

    2015-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is defined as a significant decrease in blood pressure (BP) during the first 3 minutes of standing or a head up on a tilt table. Symptoms of OH are highly variable, ranging from mild light-headedness to recurrent syncope. OH occurs due to dysfunction of one or more components of various complex mechanisms that interplay closely to maintain BP in a normal range during various physiological and associated disease states. Various biochemical and electrophysiological studies are often undertaken to assess the severity and etiology of OH. In addition to the lifestyle modifications, various medications that stimulate the adrenergic receptors or increase central blood volume are used in patients with OH. Droxidopa is a newer agent that increases the levels of norepinephrine in postganglionic sympathetic neurons. Management strategies for OH are presented, including the mechanism of action of droxidopa and various studies performed to assess its efficacy. PMID:26089676

  2. Evaluation and treatment of orthostatic hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Shibao, Cyndya; Lipsitz, Lewis A.; Biaggioni, Italo

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides recommendations on the treatment of orthostatic hypotension (OH) as reviewed by the American Society of Hypertension. It focuses on recent reports on the evaluation and management of OH and provides practical advice for clinicians on how to screen, diagnose, and treat patients using behavioral, nonpharmacologic, and pharmacologic strategies. The authors also provide a stepwise approach on how to apply new findings to successfully control OH and reduce the risk of syncope and falls in these patients. Treatment of OH is also discussed in special situations such as in hypertensive and hospitalized patients. It should be noted, however, that research in this area is mostly limited to studies in small numbers of patients. Unfortunately, the trials of the type needed to develop evidence-based guidelines are not available for this condition. PMID:23721882

  3. Profiling the clinical presentation of diagnostic characteristics of a sample of symptomatic TMD patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients might present a number of concurrent clinical diagnoses that may be clustered according to their similarity. Profiling patients’ clinical presentations can be useful for better understanding the behavior of TMD and for providing appropriate treatment planning. The aim of this study was to simultaneously classify symptomatic patients diagnosed with a variety of subtypes of TMD into homogenous groups based on their clinical presentation and occurrence of comorbidities. Methods Clinical records of 357 consecutive TMD patients seeking treatment in a private specialized clinic were included in the study sample. Patients presenting multiple subtypes of TMD diagnosed simultaneously were categorized according to the AAOP criteria. Descriptive statistics and two-step cluster analysis were used to characterize the clinical presentation of these patients based on the primary and secondary clinical diagnoses. Results The most common diagnoses were localized masticatory muscle pain (n = 125) and disc displacement without reduction (n = 104). Comorbidity was identified in 288 patients. The automatic selection of an optimal number of clusters included 100% of cases, generating an initial 6-cluster solution and a final 4-cluster solution. The interpretation of within-group ranking of the importance of variables in the clustering solutions resulted in the following characterization of clusters: chronic facial pain (n = 36), acute muscle pain (n = 125), acute articular pain (n = 75) and chronic articular impairment (n = 121). Conclusion Subgroups of acute and chronic TMD patients seeking treatment can be identified using clustering methods to provide a better understanding of the clinical presentation of TMD when multiple diagnosis are present. Classifying patients into identifiable symptomatic profiles would help clinicians to estimate how common a disorder is within a population of TMD patients and understand the probability of certain pattern of clinical complaints. PMID:22857609

  4. Investigating common clinical presentations in first opinion small animal consultations using direct observation

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, N. J.; Dean, R. S.; Cobb, M.; Brennan, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding more about the clinical presentations encountered in veterinary practice is vital in directing research towards areas relevant to practitioners. The aim of this study was to describe all problems discussed during a convenience sample of consultations using a direct observation method. A data collection tool was used to gather data by direct observation during small animal consultations at eight sentinel practices. Data were recorded for all presenting and non-presenting specific health problems discussed. A total of 1901 patients were presented with 3206 specific health problems discussed. Clinical presentation varied widely between species and between presenting and non-presenting problems. Skin lump, vomiting and inappetence were the most common clinical signs reported by the owner while overweight/obese, dental tartar and skin lump were the most common clinical examination findings. Skin was the most frequently affected body system overall followed by non-specific problems then the gastrointestinal system. Consultations are complex, with a diverse range of different clinical presentations seen. Considering the presenting problem only may give an inaccurate view of the veterinary caseload, as some common problems are rarely the reason for presentation. Understanding the common diagnoses made is the next step and will help to further focus questions for future research. PMID:25564472

  5. Investigating common clinical presentations in first opinion small animal consultations using direct observation.

    PubMed

    Robinson, N J; Dean, R S; Cobb, M; Brennan, M L

    2015-05-01

    Understanding more about the clinical presentations encountered in veterinary practice is vital in directing research towards areas relevant to practitioners. The aim of this study was to describe all problems discussed during a convenience sample of consultations using a direct observation method. A data collection tool was used to gather data by direct observation during small animal consultations at eight sentinel practices. Data were recorded for all presenting and non-presenting specific health problems discussed. A total of 1901 patients were presented with 3206 specific health problems discussed. Clinical presentation varied widely between species and between presenting and non-presenting problems. Skin lump, vomiting and inappetence were the most common clinical signs reported by the owner while overweight/obese, dental tartar and skin lump were the most common clinical examination findings. Skin was the most frequently affected body system overall followed by non-specific problems then the gastrointestinal system. Consultations are complex, with a diverse range of different clinical presentations seen. Considering the presenting problem only may give an inaccurate view of the veterinary caseload, as some common problems are rarely the reason for presentation. Understanding the common diagnoses made is the next step and will help to further focus questions for future research. PMID:25564472

  6. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Secondary to CSF Leak and Intracranial Hypotension: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Hammad, Tariq; DeDent, Alison; Algahtani, Rami; Alastal, Yaseen; Elmer, Lawrence; Medhkour, Azedine; Safi, Fadi; Assaly, Ragheb

    2015-01-01

    Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) is a clinical neuroradiological condition characterized by insidious onset of neurological symptoms associated with radiological findings indicating posterior leukoencephalopathy. PRES secondary to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak leading to intracranial hypotension is not well recognized etiology of this condition. Herein, we report a case of PRES that occurred in the setting of CSF leak due to inadvertent dural puncture. Patient underwent suturing of the dural defect. Subsequently, his symptoms resolved and a repeated brain MRI showed resolution of brain lesions. The pathophysiology and mechanistic model for developing PRES in the setting of intracranial hypotension were discussed. We further highlighted the importance of tight blood pressure control in patients with CSF leak and suspected intracranial hypotension because they are more vulnerable to develop PRES with normal or slightly elevated bleed pressure values. PMID:26106495

  7. White lesions in the oral cavity: clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kyle Burke; Jordan, Richard

    2015-12-01

    White lesions in the oral cavity are common and have multiple etiologies, some of which are also associated with dermatological disease. While most intraoral white lesions are benign, some are premalignant and/or malignant at the time of clinical presentation, making it extremely important to accurately identify and appropriately manage these lesions. Due to their similar clinical appearances, it may be difficult sometimes to differentiate benign white lesions from their premalignant/malignant counterparts. This review will discuss many of the most common intraoral white lesions including their clinical presentation, how to make an accurate diagnosis, and effective treatment and management strategies. PMID:26650693

  8. A Comparison of the Predictive Power of Anthropometric Indices for Hypertension and Hypotension Risk

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bum Ju; Kim, Jong Yeol

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims It is commonly accepted that body fat distribution is associated with hypertension, but the strongest anthropometric indicator of the risk of hypertension is still controversial. Furthermore, no studies on the association of hypotension with anthropometric indices have been reported. The objectives of the present study were to determine the best predictors of hypertension and hypotension among various anthropometric indices and to assess the use of combined indices as a method of improving the predictive power in adult Korean women and men. Methods For 12789 subjects 21–85 years of age, we assessed 41 anthropometric indices using statistical analyses and data mining techniques to determine their ability to discriminate between hypertension and normotension as well as between hypotension and normotension. We evaluated the predictive power of combined indices using two machine learning algorithms and two variable subset selection techniques. Results The best indicator for predicting hypertension was rib circumference in both women (p = <0.0001; OR = 1.813; AUC = 0.669) and men (p = <0.0001; OR = 1.601; AUC = 0.627); for hypotension, the strongest predictor was chest circumference in women (p = <0.0001; OR = 0.541; AUC = 0.657) and neck circumference in men (p = <0.0001; OR = 0.522; AUC = 0.672). In experiments using combined indices, the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) for the prediction of hypertension risk in women and men were 0.721 and 0.652, respectively, according to the logistic regression with wrapper-based variable selection; for hypotension, the corresponding values were 0.675 in women and 0.737 in men, according to the naïve Bayes with wrapper-based variable selection. Conclusions The best indicators of the risk of hypertension and the risk of hypotension may differ. The use of combined indices seems to slightly improve the predictive power for both hypertension and hypotension. PMID:24465449

  9. Hypotensive shock syndrome associated with acute Babesia canis infection in a dog.

    PubMed

    Freeman, M J; Kirby, B M; Panciera, D L; Henik, R A; Rosin, E; Sullivan, L J

    1994-01-01

    A Doberman Pinscher contracted babesiosis after receiving a fresh blood transfusion from a Greyhound blood donor. Hypotensive shock syndrome was suspected on the basis of arterial hypotension, weakness, and pyrexia in the absence of detectable hemolysis and within hours of detection of low numbers of circulating Babesia canis organisms. Treatment with imidocarb dipropionate appears to have been effective in eliminating circulating B canis organisms and clinical disease. The blood donor, recently acquired from a race track, was healthy and lacked any abnormalities on initial laboratory evaluation; however, its serum antibody titer for B canis was > 1:5,000; B canis organisms were later identified on blood smears after the dog had been splenectomized and treated with corticosteroids at an immunosuppressive dosage. This case draws attention to a potential problem in current screening practices for infectious diseases of retired racing Greyhounds intended for use as blood donors. PMID:8125828

  10. Effect of prenalterol on orthostatic hypotension in the Shy-Drager syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Goovaerts, J; Verfaillie, C; Fagard, R; Knockaert, D

    1984-01-01

    Treatment of idiopathic orthostatic hypotension is often unsatisfactory. A patient with the Shy-Drager syndrome, in which the most important symptom is orthostatic hypotension, was treated with prenalterol, initially 30 mg six times daily. The dosage was reduced to 30 mg four times daily because of the development of complex ventricular premature beats. Orthostatic symptoms were reduced and standing blood pressure increased. Fludrocortisone 0.5 mg a day was added to treatment with further improvement. This clinical effect was maintained throughout 12 months of follow up, during which the treatment was continued unchanged. Prenalterol was effective in reducing orthostatic symptoms in this patient. Further studies in patients with a similar haemodynamic pattern are indicated. PMID:6142747

  11. Acute controlled hypotension and EEG in patients with hypertension and cerebrovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Harmsen, P.; Kjærulff, J.; Skinhøj, E.

    1971-01-01

    Forty-seven patients with hypertension and/or cerebrovascular disease were examined by an acute controlled hypotension test. This was performed by intravenous administration of the ganglionic blocking agent pentholonium and head-up tilting on a pivoted table with observation of the clinical neurological state and simultaneous EEG recording. Blood pressure was reduced by approximately 55% and brought to the point where signs of general cerebral ischaemia developed. By tilting back to horizontal the blood pressure returned to near the normal level. No change in focal neurological symptoms or changes in the EEG were observed, and it is concluded that the majority of hypertensive patients with or without previous stroke do tolerate normalization of their blood pressure. Controlled hypotension with tilting seems a simple and valuable test for excluding those few subjects who might not tolerate a blood pressure reduction. Whether EEG monitoring during the test increases the value of the test has not been answered. PMID:4398343

  12. [The historical background and present development of evidence-based healthcare and clinical nursing].

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jung-Mei

    2014-12-01

    Evidence-based healthcare (EBHC) emphasizes the integration of the best research evidence with patient values, specialist suggestions, and clinical circumstances during the process of clinical decision-making. EBHC is a recognized core competency in modern healthcare. Nursing is a professional discipline of empirical science that thrives in an environment marked by advances in knowledge and technology in medicine as well as in nursing. Clinical nurses must elevate their skills and professional qualifications, provide efficient and quality health services, and promote their proficiency in EBHC. The Institute of Medicine in the United States indicates that evidence-based research results often fail to disseminate efficiently to clinical decision makers. This problem highlights the importance of better promoting the evidence-based healthcare fundamentals and competencies to frontline clinical nurses. This article describes the historical background and present development of evidence-based healthcare from the perspective of modern clinical nursing in light of the importance of evidence-based healthcare in clinical nursing; describes the factors associated with evidence-based healthcare promotion; and suggests strategies and policies that may improve the promotion and application of EBHC in clinical settings. The authors hope that this paper provides a reference for efforts to improve clinical nursing in the realms of EBHC training, promotion, and application. PMID:25464952

  13. Hypotension, bradycardia and syncope caused by honey poisoning.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ozcan; Eser, Metin; Sahiner, Atilla; Altintop, Levent; Yesildag, Osman

    2006-03-01

    Honey intoxication, a kind of food poisoning, can be seen in the Black Sea region of Turkey and in various other parts of the world as well. In this study, 66 patients were hospitalized with a variety of symptoms including nausea, vomiting, salivation, dizziness, weakness, hypotension, bradycardia and syncope several hours after the ingestion of small amounts of honey. All patients had hypotension, and majority had bradycardia. These features resolved completely in 24 h with i.v. fluids and atropine, and none died. In conclusion, honey poisoning should be taken into consideration in the differential diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction and in the patients with vomiting, hypotension and bradycardia. PMID:16457936

  14. Recurrent serous macular detachment after topical ocular hypotensive medication.

    PubMed

    Besada, Eulogio; Shechtman, Diana; Frauens, Barry J

    2008-11-01

    We document the recurrence of a CSMD in a patient subsequent to the instillation of topical ocular hypotensive medications and its resolution on discontinuation of therapy. An independent cause or causes contributing to the development of CSMD other than the use of topical ocular hypotensive medications cannot be ruled out in this case, neither can it be considered dissociated from the use of these drugs. We recommend that patients with VTS, those with a history of CSMD or having developed recurrent episodes of CSMD requiring management with topical ocular hypotensive medications, be cautiously monitored for the possible occurrence or exacerbation of CSMD. PMID:18537988

  15. Bed Rest and Orthostatic-Hypotensive Intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Suzanne M.

    2000-01-01

    Orthostatic tolerance may be defined as the ability of humans to maintain cerebral perfusion and consciousness upon movement from a supine or sitting position to the upright posture; for example, subjects can stand suddenly or be tilted to the head-up body position. Similar but not identical physiological responses can be induced by positive G(sub Z) (head to foot) acceleration or exposure to lower body negative pressure (LBNP). The objective is to suddenly shift blood to the lower body to determine how effectively cardiovascular and neural-hormonal compensatory responses react to maintain blood pressure. In the most precise method for measuring tolerance, individuals would be stressed until they faint (syncope). However, the potential consequences and discomforts of such a test usually prohibit such a procedure so that few investigators actually induce syncope. In a more common approach, subjects are exposed to a given level of stress, for example, head-up tilt for 15 min, and any increases in heart rate or decreases in blood pressure are interpreted as indicators of progress toward syncope. Presumably, the greater the perturbation of heart rate and blood pressure, the closer to "tolerance," i.e., point of unconsciousness. Another more appropriate approach is to induce a progressively increasing hypotensive stress until pre-determined physiological responses or pre-syncopal symptoms appear. The physiological criteria may include a sudden drop in systolic blood pressure (greater than 25 mm/min), a sudden drop in heart rate (greater than 15 beats/min), or a systolic blood pressure less than 70 mmHg. The most common pre-syncopal symptoms include lightheadedness, stomach awareness or distress, feelings of warmth, tingly skin, and light to profuse sweating. Usually a combination of physiological responses and symptoms occurs such that, on different days, the tolerance time to the same orthostatic protocol is reproducible for a given individual. The assumption is that by taking subjects to near fainting, one can determine their tolerance. This latter pre-syncopal approach is better for estimating orthostatic or hypotensive tolerance than the former measurement of heart rate and blood pressure responses to a given stress. There is considerable variability in individual responses to orthostasis. For example, some subjects are "heart-rate responders" and have a pronounced cardiovascular response similar to that when performing moderately hard aerobic exercise, whereas others may experience pre-syncopal symptoms with very little increase in heart rate. Some individuals have a slow, gradual fall in blood pressure to orthostasis, and others have little change in blood pressure until a sudden precipitous fall in pressure occurs just prior to fainting. With both tilt and LBNP tests there is a low correlation between heart-rate or blood-pressure responses to a sub-tolerance stress as a measure of pre-syncopal limited orthostatic-hypotensive tolerance.

  16. Clinical pictures of unknown origin in neurology: past, present and future usefulness of artificial intelligence.

    PubMed

    Conti, Andrea A; Conti, Antonio; Masoni, Marco; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2005-01-01

    Although, in the course of the last 50 years, the achievements in the medical field have been astonishing, at the beginning of the third millennium a number of clinical pictures are still left without a precise nosographic origin. In the past, the delay in scientific communication was the main explanation presented for the lack of understanding of clinical pictures of unknown nosographic origin. The history of medicine provides excellent examples of this dispersion of human capital, even if the history of clinical neurology presents "exceptions" (the pictures that we now call de la Tourette's syndrome and Parkinson's disease) that indicate that major clinical syndromes could be clearly detected and relatively rapidly diffused even in the 19th century. Contrary to the past, the delay in scientific communication no longer seems an obstacle to the sharing of medical knowledge. Nevertheless, the problem of the in-depth comprehension of clinical pictures of unknown nosographic origin still remains dominant, mainly because of the limited spread of ample and flexible online accessible databases of unknown nosographic origin clinical syndromes. The need for interactive electronic archives and other artificial intelligence resources in order to promote progress in clinical knowledge is discussed in this paper. PMID:16052845

  17. The unicornuate uterus and its variants: clinical presentation, imaging findings, and associated complications.

    PubMed

    Khati, Nadia J; Frazier, Aletta A; Brindle, Kathleen A

    2012-02-01

    This article will describe the different variants of the unicornuate uterus, their clinical presentation and imaging findings, as well their associated complications. We will also review the associated renal anomalies. Patients' symptoms and their imaging findings will vary depending on the unicornuate subtype. Radiologic evaluation includes a combination of hysterosalpingography, sonography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Complications include obstetric ones related to the small uterine size and endometriosis and ectopic pregnancies when a cavitary rudimentary uterine horn is present. Radiologists should be familiar with all variants of the unicornuate uterus as well as their clinical presentation and associated imaging findings. PMID:22298877

  18. Diagnoses and Presenting Symptoms in an Infant Psychiatry Clinic: Comparison of Two Diagnostic Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankel, Karen A.; Boyum, Lisa A.; Harmon, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To present data from a general infant psychiatry clinic, including range and frequency of presenting symptoms, relationship between symptoms and diagnoses, and comparison of two diagnostic systems, DSM-IV and Diagnostic Classification of Mental Health and Developmental Disorders of Infancy and Early Childhood (DC: 0-3). Method: A…

  19. Lichen sclerosus: a potpourri of misdiagnosed cases based on atypical clinical presentations

    PubMed Central

    Ventolini, Gary; Patel, Ravi; Vasquez, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objective Lichen sclerosus (LS) is a chronic progressive inflammatory autoimmune-induced disease that primarily affects the epidermis and dermis of the external genital-anal region. Intense and recalcitrant pruritus is the hallmark of LS. Physical exam reveals thinning, hyperkeratosis, and parchment-like appearance. However, the classic symptom and signs of LS may not always be present and patients may be asymptomatic for pruritus. Hence, we describe 15 misdiagnosed cases with atypical clinical presentations. We believe that the absence of pruritus contributed to their initial misdiagnosis. The purpose of this paper is to increase awareness of atypical presentations of LS. Methods Data base review of de-identified clinical case pictures was performed. All patients had histopathology-confirmed diagnoses of LS. The data base file contains 800 cases of vulvovaginal disorders. The Institutional Review Board (IRB) considered that searching a de-identified data base of pictures did not require IRB approval. Results We identified 15 different atypical clinical cases. Patient ages were 18–75 years old. These patients were asymptomatic for pruritus and were misdiagnosed before they presented to the vulvovaginal specialized clinic. Conclusion Fifteen patients asymptomatic for pruritus with histopathology-confirmed diagnosis of LS were identified. They illustrate atypical clinical presentations that LS may have. PMID:26056492

  20. Venous infarction mimicking a neoplasm in spontaneous intracranial hypotension: an unusual cause of Parinaud's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Timothy James Pengilley; Chandrashekar, Hoskote; Rees, Jeremy; Burke, Ailbhe; Merve, Ashirwad; Thust, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of longstanding, undiagnosed spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) with an acute presentation of Parinaud's syndrome, in whom serial imaging demonstrated development of a midbrain mass. The patient was ultimately diagnosed with tumefactive venous infarction secondary to SIH. However, this patient underwent a brainstem biopsy, which in retrospect may have been avoidable. This case demonstrates the imaging features of tumefactive venous infarction in SIH and highlights the risk of misinterpretation as a neoplasm with potentially catastrophic consequences. PMID:26987945

  1. Venous infarction mimicking a neoplasm in spontaneous intracranial hypotension: an unusual cause of Parinaud's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bray, Timothy James Pengilley; Chandrashekar, Hoskote; Rees, Jeremy; Burke, Ailbhe; Merve, Ashirwad; Thust, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of longstanding, undiagnosed spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) with an acute presentation of Parinaud's syndrome, in whom serial imaging demonstrated development of a midbrain mass. The patient was ultimately diagnosed with tumefactive venous infarction secondary to SIH. However, this patient underwent a brainstem biopsy, which in retrospect may have been avoidable. This case demonstrates the imaging features of tumefactive venous infarction in SIH and highlights the risk of misinterpretation as a neoplasm with potentially catastrophic consequences. PMID:26987945

  2. Chronic Subdural Hematoma Associated with Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension: Therapeutic Strategies and Outcomes of 55 Cases

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Koichi; MIMA, Tatsuo; AKIBA, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) has increasingly been recognized, and it is well known that SIH is sometimes complicated by chronic subdural hematoma (SDH). In this study, 55 cases of SIH with SDH were retrospectively analyzed, focusing on therapeutic strategies and outcomes. Of 169 SIH cases (75 males, 84 females), 55 (36 males, 19 females) were complicated by SDH. SIH was diagnosed based on clinical symptoms, neuroimaging, and/or low cerebrospinal fluid pressure. Presence of orthostatic headache and diffuse meningeal enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging were regarded as the most important criteria. Among 55 SIH with SDH cases, 13 improved with conservative treatment, 25 initially received an epidural blood patch (EBP), and 17 initially underwent irrigation of the hematomas. Of the 25 initially treated with EBP, 7 (28.0%) needed SDH surgery and 18 (72.0%) recovered fully without surgery. Of 17 SDH cases initially treated with surgery, 6 (35.7%) required no EBP therapy and the other 11 (64.3%) needed EBP and/or additional SDH operations. In the latter group, 2 cases had transient severe complications during and after the procedures. One of these 2 cases developed a hoarse voice complication. Despite this single, non-severe complication, all enrolled in this study achieved good outcomes. The present study suggests that patients initially receiving SDH surgery may need additional treatments and may occasionally have complications. If conservative treatment is insufficient, EBP should be performed prior to hematoma irrigation. PMID:26489406

  3. Androgen-producing adrenocortical carcinoma: report of 3 cases with different clinical presentations.

    PubMed

    Jaruratanasirikul, Somchit; Patarapinyokul, Sakda; Mitranun, Winyou

    2012-06-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma is extremely rare in children. The majority of cases presented with a combination of clinical features of Cushing syndrome and hyperandrogenism. The authors report three cases of isolated androgen-producing adrenocortical carcinoma with different clinical presentations. The two cases had clinical manifestations of hyperandrogenism: one boy with isosexual pseudoprecocity and one girl with heterosexual pseudoprecocity, both of whom underwent complete tumor removal and were well after surgery. The third patient presented with a huge abdominal mass and weight loss. Local and distant metastases (both lungs) were detected at the time of diagnosis. The patient expired after 36 days of hospitalization. The pathological section in all three patients demonstrated highly pleomorphism, increased mitoses, and scattered areas of necrosis. All cases had high levels of 1 7-hydroxyprogesterone, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulphate, and testosterone. PMID:22774627

  4. Effects of secondary amyloidosis on arteriovenous hemodialysis fistula outcomes and intradialytic hypotension: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Solak, Yalcin; Caymaz, Memduh; Tonbul, Halil Zeki; Ozbek, Orhan; Turkmen, Kultigin; Gormus, Niyazi

    2012-07-01

    Amyloid fibrils can affect vascular structure through deposition and by causing nitric oxide depletion and increase of asymmetric dimethyl arginine. Patients with amyloidosis are prone to development of hypotension. Hypotension may also affect the maturation of arteriovenous fistula (AVF) and may set the stage for formation of thrombosis and fistula failure. Thus, we aimed to evaluate effects of secondary amyloidosis on AVF outcomes and intradialytic hypotension. This is a case-control study which included 20 hemodialysis patients with amyloidosis and 20 hemodialysis patients without amyloidosis as control group. All patients underwent Doppler ultrasound of AVF. A thorough fistula history and baseline laboratory values along with episodes of intradialytic hypotension and blood pressure measurements were recorded. There was no difference between the groups regarding age, gender, body mass index, presence of comorbidities, hypertension, and drug use. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were similar (119 ± 28/75 ± 17 and 120 ± 14/75 ± 10 mmHg for patients with and without amyloidosis, respectively). Intradialytic hypotension episodes were also similar. Patients with amyloidosis had significantly lower serum albumin and higher C-reactive protein values compared to control hemodialysis patients. AVF sites and total number of created fistulas were similar in both groups. Flow rates of current functional AVFs were not different between the groups (1084 ± 875 and 845 ± 466 mL/minute for patients with and without amyloidosis, respectively, p:0.67). Patency duration of first AVF was not different between the groups. Clinical fistula outcomes and rate of intradialytic hypotension episodes were not significantly different between patients with and without secondary systemic amyloidosis. PMID:22360544

  5. The effects of hypotensive anaesthesia on otoacoustic emissions: a prospective, randomized, double-blind study with objective outcome measures.

    PubMed

    Aladag, Ibrahim; Kaya, Ziya; Gurbuzler, Levent; Eyibilen, Ahmet; Songu, Murat; Ates, Duzgun; Erkorkmaz, Unal

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare pre- and post-operative otoacoustic emission examinations of patients who experienced surgery under hypotensive anaesthesia using distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) and transient evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE). Forty-one patients, admitted to our tertiary centre for nasal valve surgery, were prospectively and randomly assigned into two groups. Hypotensive group included 20 patients, while control group included 21 patients. All investigators and patients were blinded to anaesthesia assignment throughout the course of the study. DPOAEs and TEOAEs were performed before surgery and repeated after 15 days in both groups. In control group, DPOAE-DP1 levels per frequency increased significantly in the post-operative period when compared with the pre-operative values in all patients. However, DPOAE-DP1 levels decreased significantly in hypotensive group. Similarly, DPOAE-SNR levels per frequency decreased significantly in hypotensive group. In conclusion, we have observed that under the influence of hypotensive general anaesthesia, the amplitudes of OAEs are affected. PMID:25563238

  6. Kynurenine causes vasodilation and hypotension induced by activation of KCNQ-encoded voltage-dependent K(+) channels.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Kensuke; Feng, Guo-Gang; Li, Jiazheng; Akahori, Takahiko; Yasuda, Yoshitaka; Nakamura, Emi; Hatakeyama, Noboru; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    Kynurenine is a potential contributor to hypotension in animal and human sepsis. The present study was designed to examine whether the voltage-dependent K(+) channels encoded by the KCNQ gene family (Kv7 channels) mediate vasodilator effects of kynurenine and whether modulation of these channels ameliorates hypotension caused by this compound. Rat aortas and mesenteric arteries or human omental arteries without endothelium were used. Some rings were incubated with the selective Kv7 channel inhibitor linopirdine (10 μM). l-Kynurenine (10 μM-1 mM) induced concentration-dependent relaxation in rat aortas and mesenteric arteries as well as human omental arteries, whereas linopirdine abolished the relaxation. l-Kynurenine (1 mM) produced hyperpolarization of vascular smooth muscle, which was reversed by linopirdine (10 μM). Wistar rats received l-kynurenine (1 mM) iv and subsequent linopirdine (10 μM) iv under 3% sevoflurane inhalation. l-Kynurenine iv caused hypotension, whereas linopirdine iv partially reversed it. In conclusion, kynurenine dilates arteries from rats as well as humans via Kv7 channels in the vascular smooth muscle. In rats, this tryptophan metabolite causes hypotension, which is partly counteracted by Kv7 channel inhibition. These results suggest that modulation of Kv7 channels may be a novel strategy to treat hypotension induced by the kynurenine. PMID:26318674

  7. Neural mechanism of electroacupuncture's hypotensive effects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Longhurst, John C.

    2010-01-01

    EA at P 56 and S 3637 using low current and low frequency may be able to reduce elevated blood pressure in a subset of patients (~70%) with mild to moderate hypertension. The effect is slow in onset but is long-lasting. Experimental studies have shown that EA inhibition of cardiovascular sympathetic neurons that have been activated through visceral reflex stimulation is through activation of neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, vlPAG in the midbrain and NRP in the medulla, which, in turn, inhibit the activity of premotor sympathetic neurons in the rVLM. The arcuate also provides direct projections to the rVLM that contain endorphins. Glutamate, acetylcholine, opioids, GABA, nociceptin, serotonin and endocannabinoids all appear to participate in the EA hypotensive response although their importance varies between nuclei. Thus, a number of mechanisms underlying the long-lasting effect of EA on cardiovascular function have been identified but clearly further investigation is warranted. PMID:20444652

  8. Randomised trial of dopamine compared with hydrocortisone for the treatment of hypotensive very low birthweight infants

    PubMed Central

    Bourchier, D.; Weston, P.

    1997-01-01

    AIMTo compare the efficacy of hydrocortisone with dopamine for the treatment of hypotensive, very low birthweight (VLBW) infants.?METHODSForty infants were randomly allocated to receive either hydrocortisone (n=21) or dopamine (n=19).?RESULTSAll 19infants randomised to dopamine responded; 17of 21(81%) did so in the hydrocortisone group. Three of the four non-responders in the hydrocortisone group had clinically significant left to right ductal shunting. The incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity, intraventricular haemorrhage, necrotising enterocolitis, symptomatic patent ductus arteriosus, hyperglycaemia, sepsis (bacterial or fungal) or survival did not differ between groups. The adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) stimulated plasma cortisol activity, either before or after treatment, did not differ between the two groups of infants. Although a significant difference in efficacy between dopamine and hydrocortisone was not noted (P=0.108), there were four treatment failures in the hydrocortisone group, compared with none in the dopamine group.?CONCLUSIONBoth hydrocortisone and dopamine are effective treatments for hypotension in very low birthweight infants.?? Keywords: hydrocortisone; dopamine; hypotension; very low birthweight; plasma cortisol PMID:9175947

  9. Cultural Intersection of Asian Indian Ethnicity and Presenting Problem: Adapting Multicultural Competence for Clinical Accessibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bean, Roy A.; Titus, Gayatri

    2009-01-01

    A more accessible approach to using multicultural counseling competence is presented to bridge the researcher-practitioner gap and increase the likelihood of quality clinical services. The focus of the approach is on counselor awareness, knowledge, and skills as they relate to the most important contextualizing factors: ethnic culture and the

  10. Abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion as clinical presentation of acute intermittent porphyria.

    PubMed

    Valle Feijóo, M L; Bermúdez Sanjurjo, J R; González Vázquez, L; Rey Martínez, M; de la Fuente Aguado, J

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a rare condition characterized by abdominal pain and a wide range of nonspecific symptoms. We report the case of a woman with abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) as clinical presentation of AIP. The diagnosis was achieved through the etiologic study of the SIADH. PMID:25796467

  11. Cultural Intersection of Asian Indian Ethnicity and Presenting Problem: Adapting Multicultural Competence for Clinical Accessibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bean, Roy A.; Titus, Gayatri

    2009-01-01

    A more accessible approach to using multicultural counseling competence is presented to bridge the researcher-practitioner gap and increase the likelihood of quality clinical services. The focus of the approach is on counselor awareness, knowledge, and skills as they relate to the most important contextualizing factors: ethnic culture and the…

  12. 21 CFR 50.54 - Clinical investigations not otherwise approvable that present an opportunity to understand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Clinical investigations not otherwise approvable that present an opportunity to understand, prevent, or alleviate a serious problem affecting the health or welfare of children. 50.54 Section 50.54 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL...

  13. [A clinical presentation of a very rare infection: parenchymal Fasciola hepatica].

    PubMed

    Sapmaz, Ferdane; Kalkan, Ismail Hakkı; Guliter, Sefa; Nazlıoğlu, Adem

    2013-01-01

    Fascioliasis is primarily an infection of livestock such as cattle and sheep, caused by the flat, brown liver fluke Fasciola hepatica. Humans are accidental hosts. The diagnosis of infection depends on suspicion. Radiologic findings are specific. Usually, Computed Tomography (CT) and other imaging studies show hypodense migratory lesions of the liver. The development of a chronic liver abscess appears to be extremely rare. Here we present our case with hepatic abscess due to F. hepatica, which is a rare clinical presentation. PMID:24412878

  14. Contribution of Transjugular Liver Biopsy in Patients with the Clinical Presentation of Acute Liver Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Miraglia, Roberto Luca, Angelo; Gruttadauria, Salvatore; Minervini, Marta Ida; Vizzini, Giovanni; Arcadipane, Antonio; Gridelli, Bruno

    2006-12-15

    Purpose. Acute liver failure (ALF) treated with conservative therapy has a poor prognosis, although individual survival varies greatly. In these patients, the eligibility for liver transplantation must be quickly decided. The aim of this study was to assess the role of transjugular liver biopsy (TJLB) in the management of patients with the clinical presentation of ALF. Methods. Seventeen patients with the clinical presentation of ALF were referred to our institution during a 52 month period. A TJLB was performed using the Cook Quick-Core needle biopsy. Clinical data, procedural complications, and histologic findings were evaluated. Results. Causes of ALF were virus hepatitis B infection in 7 patients, drug toxicity in 4, mushroom in 1, Wilson's disease in 1, and unknown origin in 4. TJLB was technically successful in all patients without procedure-related complications. Tissue specimens were satisfactory for diagnosis in all cases. In 14 of 17 patients the initial clinical diagnosis was confirmed by TJLB; in 3 patients the initial diagnosis was altered by the presence of unknown cirrhosis. Seven patients with necrosis <60% were successfully treated with medical therapy; 6 patients with submassive or massive necrosis ({>=}85%) were treated with liver transplantation. Four patients died, 3 had cirrhosis, and 1 had submassive necrosis. There was a strict statistical correlation (r = 0.972, p < 0.0001) between the amount of necrosis at the frozen section examination and the necrosis found at routine histologic examination. The average time for TJLB and frozen section examination was 80 min. Conclusion. In patients with the clinical presentation of ALF, submassive or massive liver necrosis and cirrhosis are predictors of poor prognosis. TLJB using an automated device and frozen section examination can be a quick and effective tool in clinical decision-making, especially in deciding patient selection and the best timing for liver transplantation.

  15. Orthostatic hypotension in acute cerebellar infarction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Ah; Lee, Hyung

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the frequency and pattern of orthostatic hypotension (OH) associated with acute isolated cerebellar infarction, and to identify the cerebellar structure(s) potentially responsible for OH, 29 patients (mean age 60.0) with acute isolated cerebellar infarction performed a standard battery of autonomic function tests including the head up tilt test using Finapres for recording of the beat-to-beat BP response during the acute period. Cerebellar infarction related OH was defined as fall in BP (>20 mmHg systolic BP) on tilting in patients without any disease(s) that could potentially cause autonomic dysfunction, or in patients who had a potential cause of autonomic dysfunction, but showed the absence of OH during a follow-up test. The severity and distribution of autonomic dysfunction were measured by the composite autonomic severity score (CASS). Nine patients (31 %) had OH (range 24-53 mmHg) on tilting during the acute period. Most patients (7/9) had a remarkable decrement in systolic BP immediately upon tilting, but OH rapidly normalized. Mean of maximal decrease in systolic BP during head up tilt test was 37.0 mmHg. The OH group showed mild autonomic dysfunctions (CASS, 3.7) with adrenergic sympathetic dysfunction appearing as the most common abnormality. Lesion subtraction analyses revealed that damage to the medial part of the superior semilunar lobule (Crus I) and tonsil was more frequent in OH group compared to non-OH group. Cerebellar infarction may cause a brief episode of OH. The medial part of the superior semilunar lobule and tonsil may participate in regulating the early BP response during orthostasis. PMID:26530504

  16. Initial Systolic Time Interval (ISTI) as a Predictor of Intradialytic Hypotension (IDH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biesheuvel, J. D.; Vervloet, M. G.; Verdaasdonk, R. M.; Meijer, J. H.

    2013-04-01

    In haemodialysis treatment the clearance and volume control by the kidneys of a patient are partially replaced by intermittent haemodialysis. Because this artificial process is performed on a limited time scale, unphysiological imbalances in the fluid compartments of the body occur, that can lead to intradialytic hypotensions (IDH). An IDH endangers the efficacy of the haemodialysis session and is associated with dismal clinical endpoints, including mortality. A diagnostic method that predicts the occurrence of these drops in blood pressure could facilitate timely measures for the prevention of IDH. The present study investigates whether the Initial Systolic Time Interval (ISTI) can provide such a diagnostic method. The ISTI is defined as the time difference between the R-peak in the electrocardiogram (ECG) and the C-wave in the impedance cardiogram (ICG) and is considered to be a non-invasive assessment of the time delay between the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. This time delay has previously been found to depend on autonomic nervous function as well as preload of the heart. Therefore, it can be expected that ISTI may predict an imminent IDH caused by a low circulating blood volume. This ongoing observational clinical study investigates the relationship between changes in ISTI and subsequent drops in blood pressure during haemodialysis. A registration of a complicated dialysis showed a significant correlation between a drop in blood pressure, a decrease in relative blood volume and a substantial increase in ISTI. An uncomplicated dialysis, in which also a considerable amount of fluid was removed, showed no correlations. Both, blood pressure and ISTI remained stable. In conclusion, the preliminary results of the present study show a substantial response of ISTI to haemodynamic instability, indicating an application in optimization and individualisation of the dialysis process.

  17. Clinical Presentation Resembling Mucosal Disease Associated with 'HoBi'-like Pestivirus in a Field Outbreak.

    PubMed

    Weber, M N; Mósena, A C S; Simões, S V D; Almeida, L L; Pessoa, C R M; Budaszewski, R F; Silva, T R; Ridpath, J F; Riet-Correa, F; Driemeier, D; Canal, C W

    2016-02-01

    The genus Pestivirus of the family Flaviviridae consists of four recognized species: Bovine viral diarrhoea virus 1 (BVDV-1), Bovine viral diarrhoea virus 2 (BVDV-2), Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) and Border disease virus (BDV). Recently, atypical pestiviruses ('HoBi'-like pestiviruses) were identified in batches of contaminated foetal calf serum and in naturally infected cattle with and without clinical symptoms. Here, we describe the first report of a mucosal disease-like clinical presentation (MD) associated with a 'HoBi'-like pestivirus occurring in a cattle herd. The outbreak was investigated using immunohistochemistry, antibody detection, viral isolation and RT-PCR. The sequence and phylogenetic analysis of 5'NCR, N(pro) and E2 regions of the RT-PCR positive samples showed that four different 'HoBi'-like strains were circulating in the herd. The main clinical signs and lesions were observed in the respiratory and digestive systems, but skin lesions and corneal opacity were also observed. MD characteristic lesions and a pestivirus with cytopathic biotype were detected in one calf. The present study is the first report of a MD like presentation associated with natural infection with 'HoBi'-like pestivirus. This report describes the clinical signs and provides a pathologic framework of an outbreak associated with at least two different 'HoBi'-like strains. Based on these observations, it appears that these atypical pestiviruses are most likely underdiagnosed in Brazilian cattle. PMID:24735072

  18. Variables influencing presenting symptoms of patients with eating disorders at psychiatric outpatient clinics.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Mei-Chih Meg; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chang, Chin-Hao; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Chen, Hsi-Chung

    2016-04-30

    Eating disorders (EDs) have been underdiagnosed in many clinical settings. This study investigates the influence of clinical characteristics on presenting symptoms of patients with EDs. Psychiatric outpatients, aged 18-45, were enrolled sequentially and received a two-phase survey for EDs in August 2010-January 2013. Their primary reasons for seeking psychiatric help were obtained at their first encounter with outpatient psychiatrists. Patients' clinical and demographic characteristics were compared according to presenting symptoms with or without eating/weight problems. Of 2140 patients, 348 (16.3%) were diagnosed with an ED (22.6% of women and 6.3% of men). The three most common reasons for seeking psychiatric help were eating/weight problems (46.0%), emotional problems (41.3%), and sleep disturbances (19.3%). The multivariate analyses suggest that when patients with EDs presented symptoms that were less related to eating/weight problems, they were significantly more likely to be those having diagnoses other than anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa and less severe degree of binge-eating. Further, patients with EDs who demonstrated more impulsive behaviors and poorer functioning were less likely to report their eating problems when visiting psychiatric clinics. Thus, ED should be assessed routinely in patients with complex psychopathology to facilitate comprehensive treatment. PMID:27086254

  19. Primary spontaneous pneumothorax presenting to a chiropractic clinic as undifferentiated thoracic spine pain: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To present a case of primary spontaneous pneumothorax presenting to a chiropractic clinic as undifferentiated thoracic spine pain. Clinical Features: A tall thin 25-year-old male anxiously presented to a chiropractic clinic with six days of sudden unexplained left thorax pain. His breathing was laboured and his dry cough aggravating. After assessment a high clinical suspicion of primary spontaneous pneumothorax prevailed. Intervention and Outcome: The patient was referred to hospital for further investigation and primary spontaneous pneumothorax was confirmed on chest radiograph. He underwent immediate tube thoracostomy to drain the air from his pleural space and to re-inflate his lung. After three days the tube was removed. By two weeks the lung had returned to full size. No recurrences have occurred to date. Conclusions: Primary spontaneous pneumothorax is a medical emergency in the presence of shortness of breath. The focus of treatment is to drain air from the pleural linings and to prevent recurrences. In less severe cases, patients may believe they have thoracic spine pain and seek manual therapy care. This case highlights the important role chiropractors have as primary contact health care providers. PMID:27069268

  20. ABCDE in Clinical Encounters: Presentations of Self in Doctor-Patient Communication

    PubMed Central

    Ventres, William

    2015-01-01

    Professional discussions about communication in medical settings often ignore the various personal identities that doctors and patients bring to their clinical encounters. From my 26 years as a family physician, and informed by literature from other professional disciplines, I propose an alternate understanding: to think of doctors and patients as a collection of individual identities, each formed by a discrete presentation of self. I describe how at least 5 important presentations of self arise in clinical encounters, including those relating to meaning, community, agency, anxiety, and organism. I frame these presentations of self with the mnemonic ABCDE, briefly review key dimensions of each, and suggest how physicians can reflect on these dimensions in order to find equilibrium in their interactions with patients. Lastly, I submit that finding this balance can reduce relational challenges with patients and enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of doctor-patient communication. PMID:25964409

  1. Endobronchial Enigma: A Clinically Rare Presentation of Nocardia beijingensis in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Rahman, Nader; Izhakain, Shimon; Wasser, Walter G.; Fruchter, Oren; Kramer, Mordechai R.

    2015-01-01

    Nocardiosis is an opportunistic infection caused by the Gram-positive weakly acid-fast, filamentous aerobic Actinomycetes. The lungs are the primary site of infection mainly affecting immunocompromised patients. In rare circumstances even immunocompetent hosts may also develop infection. Diagnosis of pulmonary nocardiosis is usually delayed due to nonspecific clinical and radiological presentations which mimic fungal, tuberculous, or neoplastic processes. The present report describes a rare bronchoscopic presentation of an endobronchial nocardial mass in a 55-year-old immunocompetent woman without underlying lung disease. The patient exhibited signs and symptoms of unresolving community-acquired pneumonia with a computed tomography (CT) scan that showed a space-occupying lesion and enlarged paratracheal lymph node. This patient represents the unusual presentation of pulmonary Nocardia beijingensis as an endobronchial mass. Pathology obtained during bronchoscopy demonstrated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmation of nocardiosis. Symptoms and clinical findings improved with antibiotic treatment. This patient emphasizes the challenge in making the diagnosis of pulmonary nocardiosis, especially in a low risk host. A literature review presents the difficulties and pitfalls in the clinical assessment of such an individual. PMID:26819795

  2. Lactic acidosis and diastolic hypotension after intermittent albuterol nebulization in a pediatric patient

    PubMed Central

    Saadia, Tehila A.; George, Mathew; Lee, Haesoon

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of 13-year-old female with intermittent asthma who developed lactic acidosis and diastolic hypotension after receiving intermittent albuterol nebulizer treatment. She presented to the emergency department (ED) with sudden onset of shortness of breath and chest pain. She received two albuterol nebulizer treatments at home without symptomatic relief. She was treated in the ED with intermittent albuterol nebulization for a total of 22.5 mg over the next 5 hours. A decrease in diastolic blood pressure from 60 mmHg to 40 mmHg was noted after the treatment. Blood lactate level was 5.9 mmol/L. She recovered from it and was discharged to home but she had recurrence of shortness of breath and presented to the ED two days later. She was treated with albuterol nebulization for a total of 17.5 mg over the next two and half hours and developed diastolic hypotension again, as low as 30 mm Hg. After discontinuation of albuterol nebulization, her BP normalized. Cardiopulmonary and metabolic side effects of continuous albuterol therapy have been reported in the recent medical literature. Our patient, however, developed these adverse effects on intermittent albuterol nebulizer treatment. It is important for the pediatrician to recognize the adverse effects of β2-agonist therapy to avoid carrying out extensive workup for hypotension and hyperlactatemia prolonging hospital stay. PMID:26744665

  3. Papulonodular secondary syphilis: a rare clinic presentation confirmed by serologic and histologic exams.

    PubMed

    Veasey, John Verrinder; Lellis, Rute Facchini; Boin, Maria Fernanda Feitosa de Camargo; Porto, Pedro Loureiro; Chen, Jessica Chia Sin

    2016-04-01

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by Treponema pallidum and divided into three stages according to the duration of the disease: primary, secondary and tertiary. Secondary syphilis has diverse clinical presentations, such as papular-nodular lesions. This presentation is rare, with 15 cases reported in the literature over the past 20 years. We report a case of secondary syphilis with papular-nodular lesions in a healthy 63-year-old patient, who has presented treponema in immunohistochemical examination of the skin lesions. PMID:27192520

  4. Papulonodular secondary syphilis: a rare clinic presentation confirmed by serologic and histologic exams*

    PubMed Central

    Veasey, John Verrinder; Lellis, Rute Facchini; Boin, Maria Fernanda Feitosa de Camargo; Porto, Pedro Loureiro; Chen, Jessica Chia Sin

    2016-01-01

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by Treponema pallidum and divided into three stages according to the duration of the disease: primary, secondary and tertiary. Secondary syphilis has diverse clinical presentations, such as papular-nodular lesions. This presentation is rare, with 15 cases reported in the literature over the past 20 years. We report a case of secondary syphilis with papular-nodular lesions in a healthy 63-year-old patient, who has presented treponema in immunohistochemical examination of the skin lesions. PMID:27192520

  5. Clinical presentation of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in adults is less typical than in children

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zuojuan; Wang, Juandong; Ji, Buqiang; von Bahr Greenwood, Tatiana; Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Yongjing; Kong, Dexiao; Li, Ai; Jiang, Yang; Guo, Yanan; Liu, Xiaoli; Wang, Yingxue; Dou, Aixia; Li, Nailin; Henter, Jan-Inge; Sun, Guizhen; Zheng, Chengyun

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in adults is largely underdiagnosed. To improve the rate and accuracy of diagnosis in adults, the clinical and laboratory characteristics of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis were analyzed in and compared between adults and children in a Chinese cohort. METHOD: Data from 50 hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis patients, including 34 adults and 16 children who fulfilled the 2004 hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis diagnostic criteria, were collected and analyzed. RESULTS: 1. Etiological factors: The proportion of Epstein-Barr virus infection was lower in adults compared with children, whereas fungal infection and natural killer/T cell lymphoma were more frequent in adults (P<0.05). 2. Clinical manifestations and laboratory findings: Over 90% of adults and pediatric patients presented with fever, thrombocytopenia and high serum ferritin levels. However, in adults, the proportions of hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and jaundice were much lower (P<0.01) than in children, and serous cavity effusion was more frequent in adult patients (P<0.05). More children had hemoglobin <90 g/L, total bilirubin >19 mmol/L and lactate dehydrogenase >500 U/L compared with adults (P<0.05). 3. The time interval from the onset of symptoms to clinical diagnosis was significantly shorter in pediatric patients than in adults (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Certain clinical features were different between the two groups. The less characteristic clinical presentation of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in adults may make the disease more difficult to diagnose. Our findings suggest that hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis should be considered when an adult patient presents with the above-mentioned symptoms. PMID:27166770

  6. Cervical intervertebral foraminal disc extrusion in dogs: clinical presentation, MRI characteristics and outcome after medical management.

    PubMed

    Bersan, E; McConnell, F; Trevail, R; Behr, S; De Decker, S; Volk, H A; Smith, P M; Gonçalves, R

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical signs, MRI characteristics, interobserver agreement and outcome after medical treatment in dogs affected by cervical intervertebral foraminal disc extrusion (CIFDE). The medical records of three referral institutions were searched for dogs diagnosed with CIFDE between 2010 and 2012. Thirteen dogs were identified with CIFDE; affected dogs often had a normal neurological examination, with cervical hyperaesthesia and lameness as the most common clinical signs. On MRI, sagittal images showed no evidence of compression of the spinal cord; CIFDE could be identified only on transverse sections in all cases. An excellent interobserver agreement was found in the localisation of the affected intervertebral disc space, and a substantial agreement was found on the detection of CIFDE versus foraminal stenosis caused by overgrowing articular processes. All but two dogs recovered completely, and they were considered free of clinical signs without analgesia within a median of 7.5 weeks (range: 2-20) after medical management was started. The remaining two dogs were surgically treated followed by complete recovery. In view of our findings, the importance of a thorough MRI investigation in dogs presenting with cervical hyperaesthesia as the sole clinical sign should be highlighted. PMID:25745084

  7. Clinical presentations of X-linked retinoschisis in Taiwanese patients confirmed with genetic sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Laura; Chen, Ho-Min; Tsai, Shawn; Chang, Tsong-Chi; Tsai, Tzu-Hsun; Yang, Chung-May; Chao, An-Ning; Chen, Kuan-Jen; Kao, Ling-Yuh; Yeung, Ling; Yeh, Lung-Kun; Hwang, Yih-Shiou; Wu, Wei-Chi; Lai, Chi-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the clinical characteristics of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) and identify genetic mutations in Taiwanese patients with XLRS. Methods This study included 23 affected males from 16 families with XLRS. Fundus photography, spectral domain optical coherent tomography (SD-OCT), fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and full-field electroretinograms (ERGs) were performed. The coding regions of the RS1 gene that encodes retinoschisin were sequenced. Results The median age at diagnosis was 18 years (range 4–58 years). The best-corrected visual acuity ranged from no light perception to 20/25. The typical spoke-wheel pattern in the macula was present in 61% of the patients (14/23) while peripheral retinoschisis was present in 43% of the patients (10/23). Four eyes presented with vitreous hemorrhage, and two eyes presented with leukocoria that mimics Coats’ disease. Macular schisis was identified with SD-OCT in 82% of the eyes (31/38) while foveal atrophy was present in 18% of the eyes (7/38). Concentric area of high intensity was the most common FAF abnormality observed. Seven out of 12 patients (58%) showed electronegative ERG findings. Sequencing of the RS1 gene identified nine mutations, six of which were novel. The mutations are all located in exons 4–6, including six missense mutations, two nonsense mutations, and one deletion-caused frameshift mutation. Conclusions XLRS is a clinically heterogeneous disease with profound phenotypic inter- and intrafamiliar variability. Genetic sequencing is valuable as it allows a definite diagnosis of XLRS to be made without the classical clinical features and ERG findings. This study showed the variety of clinical features of XLRS and reported novel mutations. PMID:25999676

  8. Cutaneous and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis resembling borderline-tuberculoid leprosy: a new clinical presentation?

    PubMed

    Dassoni, Federica; Abebe, Zerihun; Naafs, Bernard; Morrone, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Both cutaneous and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis are endemic in Northern Ethiopia. The different clinical presentations depend on the responsible organism and the host's immune response. Localized cutaneous leishmaniasis is the type most frequently seen. Diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis is relatively rare and usually associated with mucous membrane involvement. Diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis presents with multiple lesions, can be difficult to diagnose and responds less favourably to treatment. We report here 2 patients with unusual presentations of diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis presenting with large hypopigmented skin lesions mimicking borderline-tuberculoid leprosy. To our knowledge this presentation has not been described before and may present difficulties in making a definite diagnosis in regions where both leprosy and cutaneous leishmaniasis are endemic. Lepromatous leprosy and diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis are regularly confused, particularly when no skin smears for acid-fast bacillus or Leishman-Donovan bodies are performed. PMID:22434112

  9. Intracranial hypotension masquerading as nonconvulsive status epilepticus: report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Hedna, Vishnumurthy Shushrutha; Kumar, Abhay; Miller, Bayard; Bidari, Sharathchandra; Salardini, Arash; Waters, Michael F; Hella, Maria; Valenstein, Edward; Eisenschenk, Stephan

    2014-03-01

    Intracranial hypotension (IH) has been a known entity in neurocritical care since 1938. Even though many cases are spontaneous, the incidence of intracranial hypotension in the neurocritical care setting is increasing by virtue of the increased number of neurosurgical interventions. Whether spontaneous or secondary in etiology, diagnosis of IH usually requires the presence of orthostatic symptoms, including headaches and nausea with low opening CSF pressure. However, typical clinical features in the appropriate clinical context and imaging, even with normal CSF pressure, can indicate IH. In the neurocritical care setting, challenges for accurate semiology include altered sensorium and reduced levels of responsiveness for which many etiologies may exist, including metabolic dysfunction, traumatic brain injury, IH, or nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE). The authors describe 3 patients whose clinical picture and electroencephalography (EEG) findings initially suggested NCSE but who did not respond to treatment with antiepileptic drugs alone. Neuroimaging suggested IH, and subsequent treatment of IH successfully improved the patient's clinical status. To the authors' knowledge this paper is the first in the literature that reports a correlation of IH with electrographic findings similar to NCSE as cause and effect. The authors' hypothesis is that thalamocortical dysfunction causes EEG findings that appear to be similar to those in NCSE but that these conditions do not coexist. The EEG activity is not epileptogenic, and IH results in blocking network pathways producing thalamocortical dysfunction. The authors discuss the hypothesis and pathophysiology of these epileptiform changes in relation to IH. PMID:23971956

  10. Risk factors for intraoperative hypotension during thyroid surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kalezic, Nevena; Stojanovic, Marina; Ladjevic, Nebojsa; Markovic, Dejan; Paunovic, Ivan; Palibrk, Ivan; Milicic, Biljana; Sabljak, Vera; Antonijevic, Vesna; Ivanovic, Branislava; Ugrinovic, Djordje; Zivaljevic, Vladan

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypotension is a common adverse effect of IV anaesthetics, especially during the induction of anaesthesia. The aim of our study was to determine the incidence and risk factors for intraoperative hypotension (IOH) in thyroid surgery, as well as to determine whether and to what extent IOH affects the occurrence of postoperative hypotension. Material/Methods The study included 1252 euthyroid patients, ASA 2 and ASA 3 status (American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification), who had thyroid surgery between 2007 and 2011. IOH was defined as a decrease in systolic blood pressure of >20% of baseline values. We studied the influence of demographic characteristics (sex, age, body mass index-BMI), comorbidity, type and duration of surgery, and anaesthesia on the occurrence of IOH. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were used to determine predictors of occurrence of IOH. Results IOH was registered in 6.5% of patients. The most common operation was thyroidectomy. Patients with IOH were younger, had lower BMI, and significantly less often had hypertension as a coexisting disease. The multivariate regression model identified BMI and the absence of hypertension as a coexisting disease, and as independent predictors of occurrence of IOH. Significantly more patients with IOH had postoperative hypotension (9.9% vs. 2.4%, p=0.000). Conclusions IOH is common, even during operations of short duration and with minimal bleeding. It is necessary to pay special attention to these patients, given that many of these patients remained hypotensive during the postoperative period. PMID:23548975

  11. CADASIL presenting with a movement disorder: a clinical study of a Chilean kindred.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Marcelo; Dichgans, Martin; Slachevsky, Andrea; Urbina, Francisco; Mena, Ismael; Venegas, Pablo; Galvez, Marcelo

    2006-07-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a hereditary vascular disease that usually begins with migraine, followed by repeated strokes and progressive dementia. We describe an unusual clinical presentation of this condition in members of a Chilean family with an established NOTCH3 mutation. We report early clinical, neuropsychological, transcranial ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cerebral blood flow, and skin biopsy findings on these patients. Of the patients, 2 presented with facial dystonia, 1 of whom had abnormal single photon emission computed tomography and transcranial ultrasound studies after normal brain MRI scans. Our report emphasizes that CADASIL must be considered in the study of patients with secondary dystonia. PMID:16538621

  12. Endometrial Cholesterol Granuloma Associated with Prolapsed Uterus- A Rare Case Report with Unusual Clinical Presentation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol granuloma is a chronic inflammatory reaction to cholesterol deposition. It may develop in variety of sites including middle ear, mastoid process, para nasal sinuses, mediastinum, breast, testis and kidney. But endometrial cholesterol granuloma is a rarely reported case and is usually presented clinically as pyometra. This article reports a case of cholesterol granuloma in the endometrium associated with prolapsed uterus. In this case the patient clinically presented with urinary retention and overflow incontinence of urine. The reason of acute urinary retention in this case was pelvic fibrosis and adhesion secondary to this chronic inflammatory reaction. This was supported by the presence of pus like yellowish material over the uterine surface and pelvic adhesion, noted during surgery. Endometrial biopsy revealed cholesterol granuloma that confirmed the source of chronic inflammatory reaction and pelvic fibrosis. PMID:27134881

  13. [Gastrointestinal causes of weight loss: clinical presentation, diagnostic workup and therapy].

    PubMed

    Fromhold-Treu, Sophie; Lamprecht, Georg

    2016-02-01

    This review describes the gasterointestinal entities, their pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic workup and therapy that typically involve weight loss as the major presenting symptom. The differentiation of malassimilation into maldigestion and malabsorption is clinically mostly not helpful. Instead primary malasssimilation can be distinguished from secondary due to another disease. Celiac disease, lambliasis, small bowel CD, CVIDS and Whipple's disease result in loss of absorptive surface. Chronic intestinal pseudobstruction leads to weight loss through dysmotility and postprandial pain. Microscopic colitis involves some weight loss and needs to be considered because of its high prevalence. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency and the various protein loosing enteropathies may be primary or secondary syndromes. Dumping, bile acid malabsorption and short bowel syndrome occur after typical operative procedures. Chronic radiation enteritis, chronic intestinal ischemia and intestinal diabetic polyneuropathy are due to chronic intestinal injury. PMID:26886038

  14. Clinical presentation, imaging findings, and prognosis of spinal dural arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jookyung; Lim, Young-Min; Suh, Dae Chul; Rhim, Seung Chul; Kim, Sang Joon; Kim, Kwang-Kuk

    2016-04-01

    Spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) is a relatively common acquired vascular malformation of the spinal cord. Assessment of a SDAVF is often difficult because of non-specific findings on non-invasive imaging modalities. Diagnosis of a SDAVF is often delayed, and some patients receive unnecessary treatment and treatment delays, often resulting in a poor outcome. The aim of this study was to characterize the clinical presentation, typical imaging findings, and long-term outcome of SDAVF. Forty patients (13 women, 27 men; mean age 58.18±standard deviation 14.75years) who were treated at our hospital from June 1992 to March 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. We investigated the baseline characteristics, clinical presentation, imaging findings, treatment modalities, and outcome of the patients. The most common clinical presentation was a sensory symptom (80%), followed by motor weakness (70%), and sphincter dysfunction (62.5%). Roughly one-third (32.5%) of patients had a stepwise progression of fluctuating weakness and sensory symptoms, but the most common presentation was chronic progressive myelopathic symptoms (47.5%). Thirty-four patients (85%) had T2 signal change on the spinal cord MRI, indicative of cord edema. Thirty-eight patients had typical perimedullary vessel flow voids on T2-weighted MRI. Twenty-eight patients were treated with endovascular embolization, five patients underwent surgery, and four patients underwent both. Clinical outcome was determined by severity of initial deficit (p=0.008), extent of cord edema (p=0.010), treatment failure (p=0.004), and a residual fistula (p=0.017). SDAVF causes a treatable myelopathy, so early diagnosis and intervention is essential. PMID:26765752

  15. Aetiology and clinical presentations of auditory processing disorders—a review

    PubMed Central

    Bamiou, D; Musiek, F; Luxon, L

    2001-01-01

    Auditory processing disorders may have detrimental consequences on a child's life, if undiagnosed and untreated. We review causes of auditory processing disorders in order to raise clinical awareness. Auditory processing disorders may present against a background of neurological disease or developmental disorders, as well as in isolation. Clinicians need to be aware of potential causes and implications of auditory processing disorders.

 PMID:11668093

  16. [Visual presentation of psychiatric clinical decision-making by "graphic assessment sheet for diagnoses and treatments"].

    PubMed

    Ota, Toshio; Yoshida, Sumiko; Tsunashima, Sousuke; Totsuka, Takao; Watanabe, Takafumi; Toyoshima, Ryoichi

    2011-01-01

    Psychiatrists often have to treat patients even when the clinical information is insufficient to make a definite diagnosis. This is the case especially when we are treating first-visit outpatients or inpatients who have just been admitted. One of the causes of information insufficiency is a delay in obtaining clinical information on the patient, and another is a lack of characteristic manifestations of the disease because of an immature developmental stage. Even in such situations, however, clinicians have to make reasonable judgements using the information that is available at that time. The framework for making judgements on such occasions, or "the framework of decision-making under imperfect-information conditions", is becoming more and more important in psychiatric clinical practice in Japan for the following reasons. First, team members in charge of a patient became very heterogeneous in terms of their career and motivation after the start of the new post-graduate clinical training system in Japan several years ago, resulting in a higher risk of miscommunication. Secondly, the need for precise explanation to patients and their families has become crucial in recent years as the result of various social changes. Ota T, one of the authors, once put forward the framework of decision-making under imperfect-information conditions on the basis of Bayesian statistics. In the present paper, in consideration of the above background, we devised a sheet for visualizing the above framework so that relevant staff could share the clinical decision-making process. Specifically, we visually arranged on a sheet of paper the components and variables of the framework, so that the staff could communicate with each other explicitly and precisely about the estimated probability of each possible disease, merits and demerits of each treatment option, etc. We employed the sheet on treating patients in our acute psychiatric ward, 2 of whom are presented in the paper. Discussions were made on the usefulness, limitations, and remaining problems. PMID:21882540

  17. Clinical Characteristics and Outcome of Patients with Neuroblastoma Presenting Genomic Amplification of Loci Other than MYCN

    PubMed Central

    Guimier, Anne; Ferrand, Sandrine; Pierron, Gaëlle; Couturier, Jérôme; Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle; Combaret, Valérie; Mosseri, Véronique; Thebaud, Estelle; Gambart, Marion; Plantaz, Dominique; Marabelle, Aurélien; Coze, Carole; Rialland, Xavier; Fasola, Sylvie; Lapouble, Eve; Fréneaux, Paul; Peuchmaur, Michel; Michon, Jean; Delattre, Olivier; Schleiermacher, Gudrun

    2014-01-01

    Background Somatically acquired genomic alterations with MYCN amplification (MNA) are key features of neuroblastoma (NB), the most common extra-cranial malignant tumour of childhood. Little is known about the frequency, clinical characteristics and outcome of NBs harbouring genomic amplification(s) distinct from MYCN. Methods Genomic profiles of 1100 NBs from French centres studied by array-CGH were re-examined specifically to identify regional amplifications. Patients were included if amplifications distinct from the MYCN locus were seen. A subset of NBs treated at Institut Curie and harbouring MNA as determined by array-CGH without other amplification was also studied. Clinical and histology data were retrospectively collected. Results In total, 56 patients were included and categorised into 3 groups. Group 1 (n = 8) presented regional amplification(s) without MNA. Locus 12q13-14 was a recurrent amplified region (4/8 cases). This group was heterogeneous in terms of INSS stages, primary localisations and histology, with atypical clinical features. Group 2 (n = 26) had MNA as well as other regional amplifications. These patients shared clinical features of those of a group of NBs MYCN amplified (Group 3, n = 22). Overall survival for group 1 was better than that of groups 2 and 3 (5 year OS: 87.5%±11% vs 34.9%±7%, log-rank p<0.05). Conclusion NBs harbouring regional amplification(s) without MNA are rare and seem to show atypical features in clinical presentation and genomic profile. Further high resolution genetic explorations are justified in this heterogeneous group, especially when considering these alterations as predictive markers for targeted therapy. PMID:25013904

  18. Centrally injected histamine increases posterior hypothalamic acetylcholine release in hemorrhage-hypotensive rats.

    PubMed

    Altinbas, Burcin; Yilmaz, Mustafa S; Savci, Vahide; Jochem, Jerzy; Yalcin, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Histamine, acting centrally as a neurotransmitter, evokes a reversal of hemorrhagic hypotension in rats due to the activation of the sympathetic and the renin-angiotensin systems as well as the release of arginine vasopressin and proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides. We demonstrated previously that central nicotinic cholinergic receptors are involved in the pressor effect of histamine. The aim of the present study was to examine influences of centrally administrated histamine on acetylcholine (ACh) release at the posterior hypothalamus-a region characterized by location of histaminergic and cholinergic neurons involved in the regulation of the sympathetic activity in the cardiovascular system-in hemorrhage-hypotensive anesthetized rats. Hemodynamic and microdialysis studies were carried out in Sprague-Dawley rats. Hemorrhagic hypotension was induced by withdrawal of a volume of 1.5 ml blood/100 g body weight over a period of 10 min. Acute hemorrhage led to a severe and long-lasting decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and an increase in extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and choline (Ch) levels by 56% and 59%, respectively. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered histamine (50, 100, and 200 nmol) dose- and time-dependently increased MAP and HR and caused an additional rise in extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and Ch levels at the most by 102%, as compared to the control saline-treated group. Histamine H1 receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine (50 nmol; i.c.v.) completely blocked histamine-evoked hemodynamic and extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and Ch changes, whereas H2 and H3/H4 receptor blockers ranitidine (50 nmol; i.c.v.) and thioperamide (50 nmol; i.c.v.) had no effect. In conclusion, centrally administered histamine, acting via H1 receptors, increases ACh release at the posterior hypothalamus and causes a pressor and tachycardic response in hemorrhage-hypotensive anesthetized rats. PMID:25468497

  19. [Pathomechanism and clinical presentation of neurobehavioral disturbances in a patient with MELAS syndrome].

    PubMed

    Pachalska, M; DiMauro, S; MacQueen, B D; Tłokiński, W; Jeleńska-Szyguła, I

    2001-01-01

    The authors present the results of a longitudinal study of the neurobehavioral disturbances seen in K.S., a 22-year-old female patient with a mitochondrial cytopathy (MELAS) caused by the novel mutation C8293T. K.S. became ill in 1994 at the age of 16. She was referred for diagnosis to several different clinics. Four years after onset, the clinical diagnosis was established in the Department of Medical Rehabilitation at the Cracow Rehabilitation Center; the diagnosis was not confirmed until six years after onset, following the discovery of the mutation in the patient's mtDNA at Columbia University. Since 1996 the patient has presented with progressive dementia and periodic stroke-like episodes that produced fluctuating neurological symptoms. The essential pathomechanism of the neurobehavioral disturbances consists in the fragmentation of complex cerebral processes into their constituent elements; individual functions are frequently correctly executed on a lower level of cerebral organization, but the patient is unable to combine them into a sensible whole. The authors discuss the theoretical and clinical significance of the results presented here. PMID:11783410

  20. Clinical presentation and physiotherapy treatment of 4 patients with low back pain and isthmic spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Silvano; Vanti, Carla; O'Reilly, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Objective Spondylolisthesis is a pathological condition characterized by the slipping of a vertebral body, compared with the underlying one, following structural and/or degenerative changes of the spine. The purpose of this case series is to describe clinical presentations and the conservative physiotherapy management of 4 patients with low back pain and lumbar isthmic spondylolisthesis. Clinical Features Four patients aged 25, 43, 36, and 50 years presented with low back pain of various duration. Radiographs confirmed the presence of lumbar isthmic spondylolisthesis. Outcome measures included numerical rating scale, disability outcome measure (Oswestry Disability Index), spinal instability tests (Prone Instability Test, Passive Lumbar Extension test), and muscle function tests (Aberrant Movement Patterns, Active Straight Leg Raising, Prone and Supine Bridge Tests). Intervention and Outcomes Treatment consisted of postural reeducation, stretching, and strengthening exercises. Over the course of individualized treatment, ranging from 8 to 10 treatment visits, outcomes improved for all 4 patients. Conclusion This report describes varying clinical presentations and treatment of 4 patients with isthmic spondylolisthesis, suggesting that different pain generators could be managed by different conservative approaches. PMID:23204952

  1. Medial prefrontal cortex acetylcholine injection-induced hypotension: the role of hindlimb vasodilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crippa, G. E.; Lewis, S. J.; Johnson, A. K.; Correa, F. M.

    2000-01-01

    The injection of acetylcholine (ACh) into the cingulate region of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) causes a marked fall in arterial blood pressure which is not accompanied by changes in heart rate. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the hemodynamic basis for this stimulus-induced hypotension in Sprague-Dawley rats. The study was designed to determine whether a change in the vascular resistance of hindlimb, renal or mesenteric vascular beds contributes to the fall in arterial pressure in response to ACh injection into the cingulate cortex. Miniature pulsed-Doppler flow probes were used to measure changes in regional blood flow and vascular resistance. The results indicated that the hypotensive response was largely due to a consistent and marked vasodilation in the hindlimb vascular bed. On this basis, an additional experiment was then undertaken to determine the mechanisms that contribute to hindlimb vasodilation. The effect of interrupting the autonomic innervation of one leg on the hindlimb vasodilator response was tested. Unilateral transection of the lumbar sympathetic chain attenuated the cingulate ACh-induced vasodilation in the ipsilateral, but not in the contralateral hindlimb. These results suggest that the hypotensive response to cingulate cortex-ACh injection is caused by skeletal muscle vasodilation mediated by a sympathetic chain-related vasodilator system.

  2. Cannabis use and violence in three remote Aboriginal Australian communities: Analysis of clinic presentations.

    PubMed

    Kylie Lee, K S; Sukavatvibul, Krisakorn; Conigrave, Katherine M

    2015-12-01

    Anecdotal reports have linked cannabis use to violence in some remote Australian Aboriginal communities. We examine the relationship between cannabis use and presentations to local clinics for violence-related trauma at a population level. As part of a larger study, estimates of cannabis and alcohol use status were obtained for 264 randomly selected individuals aged 14-42. These estimates were collected from Aboriginal health workers and respected community informants using a previously validated approach. Clinic records for the sample were audited for physical trauma presentations between January 2004 and June 2006. One in 3 individuals (n = 88/264) presented to the clinic with physical trauma. Of these, the majority (65.9%, n = 58/88) had at least one presentation that was violence-related. Nearly 2 in every 3 of the total presentations for trauma following violence (n = 40/63) involved the use of a weapon. Hunting tools were most often used, followed by wooden or rock implements. Individuals who reported any current cannabis use were nearly 4 times more likely than nonusers to present at least once for violent trauma after adjusting for current alcohol use, age, and sex (OR = 3.8, 95% CI [1.5, 9.8]). Aboriginal individuals in these remote communities experience high rates of physical trauma and violence, often involving weapons. A comprehensive study is needed to explore the association between cannabis and violence. At the same time, an investment in local programmes is needed to address cannabis use and underlying risk factors for substance use and for violence. PMID:26045571

  3. Papillon–Lefèvre syndrome: clinical presentation and management options

    PubMed Central

    Sreeramulu, Basapogu; Shyam, Naragani DVN; Ajay, Pilla; Suman, Pathipaka

    2015-01-01

    Papillon–Lefèvre syndrome (PLS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by diffuse palmoplantar keratoderma and precocious aggressive periodontitis, leading to premature loss of deciduous and permanent dentition at a very young age. Various etiopathogenic factors are associated with the syndrome, like immunologic alterations, genetic mutations, and the role of bacteria. Dentists play a significant role in the diagnosis and management of PLS as there are characteristic manifestations like periodontal destruction at an early age and an early eruption of permanent teeth. Here, we are presenting an elaborate review of PLS, its etiopathogenesis, clinical presentation, and management options. PMID:26203280

  4. Leishmania isoenzyme polymorphisms in Ecuador: Relationships with geographic distribution and clinical presentation

    PubMed Central

    Calvopina, Manuel; Armijos, Rodrigo X; Marco, Jorge D; Uezato, Hiroshi; Kato, Hirotomo; Gomez, Eduardo A; Korenaga, Masataka; Barroso, Paola A; Mimori, Tatsuyuki; Cooper, Philip J; Nonaka, Shigeo; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa

    2006-01-01

    Background Determinants of the clinical presentation of the leishmaniases are poorly understood but Leishmania species and strain differences are important. To examine the relationship between clinical presentation, species and isoenzyme polymorphisms, 56 Leishmania isolates from distinct presentations of American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL) from Ecuador were analyzed. Methods Isolates were characterized by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis for polymorphisms of 11 isoenzymes. Patients were infected in four different ecologic regions: highland and lowland jungle of the Pacific coast, Amazonian lowlands and Andean highlands. Results Six Leishmania species constituting 21 zymodemes were identified: L. (Viannia) panamensis (21 isolates, 7 zymodemes), L. (V.) guyanensis (7 isolates, 4 zymodemes), L. (V.) braziliensis (5 isolates, 3 zymodemes), L. (Leishmania) mexicana (11 isolates, 4 zymodemes), L. (L.) amazonensis (10 isolates, 2 zymodemes) and L. (L.) major (2 isolates, 1 zymodeme). L. panamensis was the species most frequently identified in the Pacific region and was associated with several clinical variants of cutaneous disease (CL); eight cases of leishmaniasis recidiva cutis (LRC) found in the Pacific highlands were associated with 3 zymodemes of this species. Mucocutaneous leishmaniasis found only in the Amazonian focus was associated with 3 zymodemes of L. braziliensis. The papular variant of CL, Uta, found in the Andean highlands was related predominantly with a single zymodeme of L. mexicana. Conclusion Our data show a high degree of phenotypic variation within species, and some evidence for associations between specific variants of ATL (i.e. Uta and LRC) and specific Leishmania zymodemes. This study further defines the geographic distribution of Leishmania species and clinical variants of ATL in Ecuador. PMID:16968553

  5. Clinical presentation and imaging results of patients with symptomatic gluteus medius tears

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Dror; Shohat, Noam; Botser, Itamar; Agar, Gabriel; Domb, Benjamin G.

    2015-01-01

    Greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) is a common complaint. Recently, it has become well recognized that tendinopathy and tears of the gluteus medius (GM) are a cause of recalcitrant GTPS. Nevertheless, the clinical syndrome associated with GM tears is not fully characterized. We characterize the clinical history, findings on physical examination, imaging and intraoperative findings associated with symptomatic GM tears. Forty-five patients (47 hips) who underwent GM repair for the diagnosis of tear were evaluated. Pain was estimated on the visual analog scale (VAS) and hip-specific scores were administered to assess functional status. The imaging modalities were reviewed and intra operative findings were recorded. The average patient age was 54 years (17–76), 93% were females. Symptom onset was commonly insidious (75%) and the average time to diagnosis was 28 months (2–240). The most common pain location was the lateral hip (75%). The average pre-surgery VAS and modified Harris Hip Score were 6.65 (0–10) and 55.5 (12–90), respectively. All patients had pathological findings on magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) ranging from tendinosis to complete tears of the GM tendon. There was a discrepancy between MRA interpretation by a radiologist and findings during surgery. Hip abductor tears are an under-recognized cause of hip pain and hip symptomatology. In this study, we further characterize the clinical presentation of this entity. The data we present here may facilitate early diagnosis, early orthopedic care and avoid unnecessary prolonged patient sufferings. PMID:27011854

  6. Midodrine as a Countermeasure for Post-Spaceflight Orthostatic Hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael B.; Stein, Sydney P.; Meck, Janice V.; Platts, Steven H.

    2008-01-01

    One possible mechanism for post-spaceflight orthostatic hypotension, which affects approximately 30% of astronauts after short duration shuttle missions, is inadequate norepinephrine release during upright posture. We performed a two phased study to determine the effectiveness of an alpha1-adrenergic agonist, midodrine, as a countermeasure to post-spaceflight orthostatic hypotension. The first phase of the study examined the landing day orthostatic responses of six veteran astronauts after oral midodrine (10 mg) administered on the ground within approximately two hours of wheel stop. One female crewmember exhibited orthostatic hypotension in a previous flight but not after midodrine. Five male crewmembers, who did not exhibit orthostatic hypotension during previous flights, also did not show signs of orthostatic hypotension after midodrine. Additionally, phase one showed that midodrine did not cause hypertension in these crewmembers. In the second phase of this study, midodrine is ingested inflight (near time of ignition, TIG) and orthostatic responses are determined immediately upon landing via an 80 degree head-up tilt test performed on the crew transport vehicle (CTV). Four of ten crewmembers have completed phase two of this study. Two crewmembers completed the landing day tilt tests, while two tests were ended early due to presyncopal symptoms. All subjects had decreased landing day stroke volumes and increased heart rates compared to preflight. Midodrine appears to have increased total peripheral resistance in one crewmember who was able to complete the landing day tilt test. The effectiveness of midodrine as a countermeasure to immediate post-spaceflight orthostatic hypotension has yet to be determined; interpretation is made more difficult due to low subject number and the lack of control subjects on the CTV.

  7. Clinical presentation and antiviral therapy for poxvirus infection in pudu (Pudu puda).

    PubMed

    Junge, R E; Duncan, M C; Miller, R E; Gregg, D; Kombert, M

    2000-09-01

    A severe poxvirus infection occurred in three pudu (Pudu puda), resulting in two fatalities. Cutaneous ulcers with mucopurulent exudate were present around the eyes and nose, at the lip margins, coronary bands, and teats. Mucosal ulcers were present in the oral cavity, esophagus, and forestomachs. In the two fatalities, a secondary disseminated fungal infection also occurred. Affected animals were leukopenic, hypocalcemic, and hyperphosphatemic and had elevated serum alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, and aspartate aminotransferase levels. Electron microscopic examination of affected skin confirmed the presence of a poxvirus. Neutralizing antibody titers to this virus were present in the two pudu tested. One case was treated with cidofovir, 5 mg/kg i.v. q7d for four treatments. Complete recovery occurred in the treated animal. This is the second report of poxvirus infection in pudu and the first report describing clinical presentation, presence of secondary disseminated fungal infection, and successful treatment. PMID:11237153

  8. Are vector-borne pathogen co-infections complicating the clinical presentation in dogs?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Infection by two or more canine vector-borne disease (CVBD)-causing pathogens is common in subtropical and tropical regions where vectors are plentiful. Co-infections may potentiate disease pathogenesis, thereby altering clinical manifestations typically associated with singular infections. These factors complicate diagnosis, treatment and can adversely influence prognosis if the practitioner fails to suspect, document, and treat each concurrent infection. The spectrum of pathogens co-infecting dogs may change over time in a given practice location due to the rapid expansion of arthropods and their associated vectored agents, and international transit among pets and wild animals. This applies, for example, to Dirofilaria immitis and Leishmania infantum, the distributions of which have expanded from northern to southern Italy, and vice versa, respectively. Indeed, mixed infections by D. immitis and L. infantum have only been reported once in Italy, probably due to the fact that competent vectors for these infections do not usually occur in the same geographical areas. Thus, information that would help practitioners to identify clinical presentations in dogs co-infected by D. immitis and L. infantum and other CVBD-causing pathogens is scant. Findings This manuscript describes the clinical history and physical examination of findings for 7 CVBD co-infected dogs that were examined because of a spectrum of clinical signs. Five dogs were co-infected with L. infantum and Ehrlichia canis, one dog with L. infantum, E. canis and D. immitis and the remaining dog with L. infantum and D. immitis. Conclusions The clinical signs and haematological abnormalities associated with the diagnostic evaluation and treatment of these dogs is discussed. Also, the usefulness of bone marrow specimens for the molecular diagnosis of CVBDs and for the enhanced monitoring of treatment response is emphasized. PMID:23587324

  9. Mucocutaneous warts in Middle Anatolia, Turkey: clinical presentations and therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Gönül, Müzeyyen; Iyidal, Ayşegül Yalçınkaya; Çakmak, Seray; Kılıç, Arzu; Gul, Ulker; Doner, Pinar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Viral warts are common skin condition caused by the human papilloma virus. Aim To determine the clinical features of warts and therapeutic approaches to warts and compare them with the literature. Material and methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted on 362 consecutive patients presenting to a dermatology clinic in Ankara, Middle Anatolia, Turkey. Age, gender, anatomic localization, clinical types, number of warts, and medical therapy histories were recorded. Results In our study 139 (38.4%) children and 223 (61.6%) adults had warts. Warts were seen in 191 men, and 171 women. The mean age was 24.7 ±13.5. In all groups the incidence and the number of warts were higher in men. Clinical types of warts were vulgar, anogenital, plantar, verruca plana, filiform, and mosaic. Thirty-six (9.9%) of 362 cases had more than one type. The locations of warts were as follows extremities (n = 233, 64.4%), anogenital (n = 86, 23.7%) and head and neck (n = 73, 20.2%). The incidence of anogenital warts was statistically higher in men than women (p < 0.05). Topical medical treatment was the first choice (n = 60, 57.1%). Conclusions In our study, the incidence and the number of warts were higher in men, which is different than in previous reports. The anogenital wart (AW) was ranked second in all types of warts. According to this finding, we can say that the frequency of AW has been increased in Turkey. To our knowledge recently there have been no studies investigating the clinical features of viral warts in all ages in the literature. PMID:26161058

  10. Colloid cysts of the third ventricle exhibit various clinical presentation: a review of three cases.

    PubMed

    Ravnik, Janez; Bunc, Gorazd; Grcar, Anja; Zunic, Miodrag; Velnar, Tomaz

    2014-01-01

    Colloid cysts are benign intracranial tumours usually occurring in the front part of the third ventricle. Clinical presentation may be non-specific and heterogeneous. The problems are frequently associated with development of hydrocephalus, these cysts may cause. We describe three cases of patients with diverse clinical symptoms, who underwent surgery for colloid cysts of the third ventricle. In the first patient, the colloid cyst caused a sudden deterioration of consciousness due to an acute hydrocephalus. The cyst in the second and third patient was discovered accidentally, during the course of epileptic seizures treatment and due to chronic headache with quanti- and qualitative deterioration of consciousness in the setting of chronic hydrocefalus, respectively. Surgery improved health in all three patients. PMID:25172970

  11. Gender Differences in the Pathophysiology, Clinical Presentation, and Outcomes of Ischemic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Dunlay, Shannon M.; Roger, Véronique L.

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction (MI), heart failure (HF) remains a frequent acute and long-term outcome of ischemic heart disease (IHD). In response to acute coronary ischemia, women are relatively protected from apoptosis, and experience less adverse cardiac remodeling than men, frequently resulting in preservation of left ventricular size and ejection fraction. Despite these advantages, women are at increased risk for HF-complicating acute MI when compared with men. However, women with HF retain a survival advantage over men with HF, including a decreased risk of sudden death. Sex-specific treatment of HF has been hindered by historical under-representation of women in clinical trials, though recent work has suggested that women may have a differential response to some therapies such as cardiac resynchronization. This review highlights the sex differences in the pathophysiology, clinical presentation and outcomes of ischemic heart failure and discusses key areas worthy of further investigation. PMID:22864856

  12. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy systematic review: Pathophysiologic process, clinical presentation and diagnostic approach to Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ono, Ryohei; Falcão, L Menezes

    2016-04-15

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is characterized by transient left ventricular apical ballooning with the absence of coronary occlusion, which typically occurs in older women after emotional or physical stress. The pathophysiology of TTC is not well established, though several possible causes such as catecholamine cardiotoxicity, metabolic disturbance, coronary microvascular impairment and multivessel epicardial coronary artery spasm have been proposed. A number of diagnostic criteria have been suggested in the world and not unified as single, but the most common accepted one is Mayo Clinic proposed criteria. Since the clinical presentation of TTC is usually similar to acute coronary syndrome, differential diagnosis is essential to exclude other diseases and also for its treatment. Imaging modality including echocardiogram, angio CT and cardiac MRI, and lab tests for catecholamine, troponin T, creatine kinase MB and B-type natriuretic peptide can be useful to differentiate TTC from other diseases. Prognosis is generally favorable and in-hospital mortality is from 0% to within 10%. PMID:26896623

  13. Burkitt's lymphoma: a child's case presenting in the maxilla. Clinical and radiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela-Salas, Borja; Dean-Ferrer, Alicia; Alamillos-Granados, Francisco-Jesús

    2010-05-01

    Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is a neoplasm which, despite its very aggressive behaviour is potentially curable. It typically affects the paediatric population. BL belongs to the non-Hodgkin lymphomas group, and is the first human tumour undoubtedly related to a viral origin (Epstein-Barr virus). Two main clinical subtypes are recognized: endemic or African type, and sporadic type; HIV associated BL constitutes a third type. Although common in endemic BL, maxillary involvement is rare in sporadic cases. This, together with the clinical lack of specificity associated to this location, makes diagnosis difficult. New chemotherapeutic protocols achieve a high survival rate. Most important prognostic factors are location and tumour stage. We report a paediatric case of BL presenting in the maxilla, with a review and a description of the characteristics of the disease. PMID:20038882

  14. Phenotypes as Clues to Deciphering the Clinical Presentations, Pathogenesis and Treatment of the Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Frederick W.

    2014-01-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies or myositis syndromes, the most common forms of which are polymyositis, dermatomyositis and inclusion body myositis, are systemic autoimmune diseases defined by chronic muscle weakness and inflammation of unknown etiology resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. We describe a dermatomyositis patient who represents a newly recognized phenotype defined by anti-p155 autoantibodies. She presented with photosensitive skin rashes and had a chronic illness course with widespread skin disease and generalized lipodystrophy. Research suggests that categorizing the heterogeneous myositis syndromes into mutually exclusive and stable phenotypes by using clinical and immune response features is useful for predicting clinical signs and symptoms, associated genetic and environmental risk factors, responses to therapy and prognosis. Knowledge of myositis phenotypes should enhance clinicians’ ability to recognize and manage these rare disorders. PMID:21224460

  15. AMERICAN CUTANEOUS LEISHMANIASIS WITH UNUSUAL CLINICAL PRESENTATION AND RESPONSE TO TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    FERNANDES, Andrea Claudia Bekner Silva; PEDROSO, Raíssa Bocchi; VENAZZI, Eneide Aparecida Sabaini; ZANZARINI, Paulo Donizeti; ARISTIDES, Sandra Mara Alessi; LONARDONI, Maria Valdrinez Campana; SILVEIRA, Thaís Gomes Verzignassi

    2016-01-01

    The clinical manifestations and prognosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) can be influenced by the immune response of the patient and the species of the parasite. A case of atypical clinical presentation of CL, with development of non-characteristic lesions, poor response to therapy, and a long time to resolution is reported. Confirmatory laboratory tests included parasite detection, indirect immunofluorescence, Montenegro skin test, polymerase chain reaction, and parasite identification by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. The parasite was identified as Leishmaniabraziliensis. The lesion was unresponsive to three complete courses of N-methylglucamine antimoniate intramuscular, and to treatment with pentamidine. The patient did not tolerate amphotericin B. The lesion finally receded after treatment with intravenous N-methylglucamine antimoniate. It is essential to ensure the accuracy of diagnosis and the appropriate treatment, which can include the use a second choice drug or a different route of administration. PMID:27007563

  16. [Acute hypotensive episodes prediction based on non-linear chaotic analysis].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dazhi; Li, Liyu; Peng, Chenfeng

    2015-02-01

    In intensive care units (ICU) , the occurrence of acute hypotensive episodes (AHE) is the key problem for the clinical research and it is meaningful for clinical care if we can use appropriate computational technologies to predict the AHE. In this study, based on the records of patients in ICU from the MIMIC II clinical data, the chaos signal analysis method was applied to the time series of mean artery pressure, and then the patient's Lyapunov exponent curve was drawn ultimately. The research showed that a curve mutation appeared before AHE symptoms took place. This is powerful and clear basis for AHE determination. It is also expected that this study may offer a reference to research of AHE theory and clinical application. PMID:25997294

  17. Recent advances in the treatment of orthostatic hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, D.; Davis, T. L.

    1995-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension is a fall in blood pressure on standing that causes symptoms of dizziness, visual changes, and discomfort in the head and neck. The goal of treatment is the improvement of the patient's functional capacity, rather than a target blood pressure. For treatment to be successful, it must be individualized. Non-pharmalogic interventions include carefully managed exercise, scheduled activities, and monitoring of the environmental temperature. Agents such as fludrocortisone, midodrine, and epoetin alfa offer successful pharmacologic interventions. Although these measures ease the symptoms of orthostatic hypotension, current approaches neither reverse nor stabilize the disease process in autonomic disorders.

  18. Clinical Presentation and Predictors of Target Vessel Revascularization after Drug-Eluting Stent Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Muradi, Hazem Al; Mehra, Aditya; Okolo, Joseph; Vlachos, Helen; Selzer, Faith; Marroquin, Oscar C.; Skelding, Kimberly; Holper, Elizabeth M.; Williams, David O.; Abbott, J. Dawn

    2012-01-01

    Background Drug eluting stent (DES) failure including restenosis and stent thrombosis, or disease progression may result in target vessel revascularization (TVR) but the relative contribution of these mechanisms in the DES era is not well described. We sought to examine the predictors and presentations of patients with clinically driven TVR after DES. Methods Patients with all lesions treated with a DES in the Dynamic Registry from 2004 to 2006 were analyzed. Included were 2691 patients with 3401 lesions. Patients with and without incident clinically driven TVR at 2 years were compared according to baseline clinical, procedural, and angiographic characteristics and independent predictors of TVR and target lesion revascularization (TLR) were determined by multivariate analysis. Results By 2-years, TVR occurred in 7.2% of patients and TLR in 3.8%, with 71.6% and 82.5% of repeat revascularization events occurring in the first year, respectively. The indication for first TVR was myocardial infarction in 18.6 % (n=34), unstable angina in 42.6 % (n=78), stable coronary disease in 25.7% (n=47) and other/unknown 13.1% (n=24). Disease progression was responsible for 47% of TVR. Among patients with TLR, restenosis was the mechanism in 86.6% and stent thrombosis in 13.4%. Independent predictors of TVR included younger age, diabetes, attempted graft lesion, lesion length >30mm and prior lesion intervention. Independent predictors of TVR and TLR were similar. Conclusion The incidence of clinically driven TVR is low in patients treated with DES and nearly half is attributable to disease progression, which along with the low rate of in-stent restenosis explains why the mode of presentation is often an acute coronary syndrome. PMID:23164476

  19. Diabetes Is Associated with Worse Clinical Presentation in Tuberculosis Patients from Brazil: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hickson, Lucas S.; Daltro, Carla; Castro, Simone; Kornfeld, Hardy; Netto, Eduardo M.; Andrade, Bruno B.

    2016-01-01

    Background The rising prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) worldwide, especially in developing countries, and the persistence of tuberculosis (TB) as a major public health issue in these same regions, emphasize the importance of investigating this association. Here, we compared the clinical profile and disease outcomes of TB patients with or without coincident DM in a TB reference center in Brazil. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of a TB patient cohort (treatment naïve) of 408 individuals recruited at a TB primary care center in Brazil between 2004 and 2010. Data on diagnosis of TB and DM were used to define the groups. The study groups were compared with regard to TB disease presentation at diagnosis as well as to clinical outcomes such as cure and mortality rates upon anti-tuberculosis therapy (ATT) initiation. A composite score utilizing clinical, radiological and microbiological parameters was used to compare TB severity between the groups. Results DM patients were older than non-diabetic TB patients. In addition, diabetic individuals more frequently presented with cough, night sweats, hemoptysis and malaise than those without DM. The overall pattern of lung lesions assessed by chest radiographic examination was similar between the groups. Compared to non-diabetic patients, those with TB-diabetes exhibited positive acid-fast bacilli in sputum samples more frequently at diagnosis and at 30 days after ATT initiation. Notably, higher values of the TB severity score were significantly associated with TB-diabetes comorbidity after adjustment for confounding factors. Moreover, during ATT, diabetic patients required more frequent transfers to TB reference hospitals for complex clinical management. Nevertheless, overall mortality and cure rates were indistinguishable between the study groups. Conclusions These findings reinforce the idea that diabetes negatively impacts pulmonary TB severity. Our study argues for the systematic screening for DM in TB reference centers in endemic areas. PMID:26752596

  20. Comorbidity and high viral load linked to clinical presentation of respiratory human bocavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Ghietto, Lucía María; Majul, Diego; Ferreyra Soaje, Patricia; Baumeister, Elsa; Avaro, Martín; Insfrán, Constanza; Mosca, Liliana; Cámara, Alicia; Moreno, Laura Beatriz; Adamo, Maria Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a new parvovirus associated with acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI). In order to evaluate HBoV significance as an agent of acute respiratory disease, we screened 1,135 respiratory samples from children and adults with and without symptoms during two complete calendar years. HBoV1 prevalence in patients with ARTI was 6.33 % in 2011 and 11.64 % in 2012, including neonatal and adult patients. HBoV1 was also detected in 3.77 % of asymptomatic individuals. The co-detection rate was 78.1 %. Among children, 87 % were clinically diagnosed with lower respiratory infection (no significant differences between patients with and without coinfection), and 31 % exhibited comorbidities. Pediatric patients with comorbidities were significantly older than patients without comorbidities. Patients with ARTI had either high or low viral load, while controls had only low viral load, but there were no clinical differences between patients with high or low viral load. In conclusion, we present evidence of the pathogenic potential of HBoV1 in young children with ARTI. Since patients with HBoV1-single infection are not significantly different from those with coinfection with respect to clinical features, the virus can be as pathogenic by itself as other respiratory agents are. Furthermore, an association between high HBoV1 load and disease could not be demonstrated in this study, but all asymptomatic individuals had low viral loads. Also, children with comorbidities are susceptible to HBoV1 infection at older ages than previously healthy children. Thus, the clinical presentation of infection may occur depending on both viral load and the particular interaction between the HBoV1 and the host. PMID:25269520

  1. Clinical Presentation and Course of Persistent Delusional Disorder: Data From a Tertiary Care Center in India

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Karishma R.; Arasappa, Rashmi; Prasad, Krishna M.; Zutshi, Amit; Chand, Prabhat K.; Muralidharan, Kesavan; Murthy, Pratima

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Despite its long history as a psychiatric diagnosis, little is known about the sociodemographic and clinical profile of persistent delusional disorder (PDD) or its subtypes, treatment response, and outcomes, particularly in India. We examined the clinical characteristics and course of PDD in patients presenting to a tertiary neuropsychiatry center in India. Method: A retrospective chart review of patients diagnosed with PDD (ICD-10) between January 2000 and May 2014 was conducted. Sociodemographic and clinical data including age at onset, total duration of the illness, clinical symptoms and treatment, hospitalizations, occupational functioning, and follow-up were extracted from the files. The study was approved by the institute ethics committee. Results: The sample (N = 455) consisted of 236 men and 219 women. The mean age at onset was 32.36 ± 10.47 years. The most common delusion was infidelity (n = 203, 44.6%) followed by persecution (n = 149, 32.7%). Hallucinations were present in 78 (17.1%), depressive symptoms in 187 (41.1%), and comorbid substance dependence in 61 (13.4%) subjects; 141 subjects (31.0%) had a family history of mental illness. Follow-up data were available for 308 subjects, of whom 285 (92.5%) reported good compliance with medication. Of the subjects, 163 (52.9%) showed a good response to treatment. The diagnosis of PDD remained unchanged in 274 of 308 subjects (88.9%). Conclusion: In our center, PDD appears to be uncommon and has a near-equal gender representation. Infidelity was the most common delusion, which is in contrast to the reported literature. The diagnosis of PDD appears to be stable with good response to atypical antipsychotics if compliance can be ensured.

  2. Cancer, Warts, or Asymptomatic Infections: Clinical Presentation Matches Codon Usage Preferences in Human Papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Félez-Sánchez, Marta; Trösemeier, Jan-Hendrik; Bedhomme, Stéphanie; González-Bravo, Maria Isabel; Kamp, Christel; Bravo, Ignacio G

    2015-08-01

    Viruses rely completely on the hosts' machinery for translation of viral transcripts. However, for most viruses infecting humans, codon usage preferences (CUPrefs) do not match those of the host. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a showcase to tackle this paradox: they present a large genotypic diversity and a broad range of phenotypic presentations, from asymptomatic infections to productive lesions and cancer. By applying phylogenetic inference and dimensionality reduction methods, we demonstrate first that genes in HPVs are poorly adapted to the average human CUPrefs, the only exception being capsid genes in viruses causing productive lesions. Phylogenetic relationships between HPVs explained only a small proportion of CUPrefs variation. Instead, the most important explanatory factor for viral CUPrefs was infection phenotype, as orthologous genes in viruses with similar clinical presentation displayed similar CUPrefs. Moreover, viral genes with similar spatiotemporal expression patterns also showed similar CUPrefs. Our results suggest that CUPrefs in HPVs reflect either variations in the mutation bias or differential selection pressures depending on the clinical presentation and expression timing. We propose that poor viral CUPrefs may be central to a trade-off between strong viral gene expression and the potential for eliciting protective immune response. PMID:26139833

  3. Cancer, Warts, or Asymptomatic Infections: Clinical Presentation Matches Codon Usage Preferences in Human Papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Félez-Sánchez, Marta; Trösemeier, Jan-Hendrik; Bedhomme, Stéphanie; González-Bravo, Maria Isabel; Kamp, Christel; Bravo, Ignacio G.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses rely completely on the hosts’ machinery for translation of viral transcripts. However, for most viruses infecting humans, codon usage preferences (CUPrefs) do not match those of the host. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a showcase to tackle this paradox: they present a large genotypic diversity and a broad range of phenotypic presentations, from asymptomatic infections to productive lesions and cancer. By applying phylogenetic inference and dimensionality reduction methods, we demonstrate first that genes in HPVs are poorly adapted to the average human CUPrefs, the only exception being capsid genes in viruses causing productive lesions. Phylogenetic relationships between HPVs explained only a small proportion of CUPrefs variation. Instead, the most important explanatory factor for viral CUPrefs was infection phenotype, as orthologous genes in viruses with similar clinical presentation displayed similar CUPrefs. Moreover, viral genes with similar spatiotemporal expression patterns also showed similar CUPrefs. Our results suggest that CUPrefs in HPVs reflect either variations in the mutation bias or differential selection pressures depending on the clinical presentation and expression timing. We propose that poor viral CUPrefs may be central to a trade-off between strong viral gene expression and the potential for eliciting protective immune response. PMID:26139833

  4. Tuberculous Otitis with Proteus mirabilis Co-Infection: An Unsuspected Presentation Encountered in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Sardar, Moumita; Jadhav, Savita Vivek; Vyawahare, Chanda; Misra, Rabindranath

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis, a contagious bacterial disease which is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, primarily involves the lungs.Though Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is the commonest clinical presentation, there is a need for alertness towards uncommon presentations which involve other organs. Tuberculous otitis media (TOM) is one such rare presentation seen in paediatric practice. It is characterized by painless otorrhoea which fails to respond to the routine antibacterial treatment. TOM usually occurs secondary to PTB. Here is a case of tuberculous otitis media with Proteus mirabilis co-infection, with no evidence of PTB. In the sample of ear discharge obtained from the patient, acid fast bacilli were demonstrated on direct microscopy after Ziehl-Neelsen staining. Culture done on Lowenstein-Jensen medium demonstrated slow-growing Mycobacterium. Bacteriological culture and identification helped in isolating Proteus mirabilis. PCR, followed by Line- Probe Assay for early identification and susceptibility testing to primary drugs, was done. Further, patient tested negative for the Mantoux test. Patient was enrolled in National Tuberculosis programme- RNTCP. This case emphasizes on one of the less common presentations of a common disease. A high clinical suspicion and laboratory confirmation are required for appropriate patient management. PMID:24995225

  5. Amyloid-beta imaging in older adults presenting to a memory clinic with subjective cognitive decline

    PubMed Central

    Snitz, Beth E.; Lopez, Oscar L.; McDade, Eric; Becker, James T.; Cohen, Ann D.; Price, Julie C.; Mathis, Chester A.; Klunk, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Subjective cognitive decline (SCD) in otherwise normal aging may be identified via symptom inventories in a research setting (‘questionnaire-discovered complaints’) or via patients seeking evaluation / services in a clinical setting (‘presenting complainers’). Most studies of SCD and amyloid-beta (Aβ) imaging to date have used the former approach, with inconsistent results. Objective To test whether ‘presenting SCD’ participants in an academic memory clinic setting show increased brain Aβ deposition on imaging. Methods Fourteen patients (mean age 68.1, SD 4.0 years) diagnosed with subjective cognitive complaints with normal neuropsychological testing were recruited into a Pittsburgh compound B (PiB)-PET study. Detailed self-report inventories and additional cognitive tests were administered. Results were compared to a reference cohort of cognitively normal (CN) volunteers from an independent neuroimaging study (mean age 73.6, SD 5.8 years) Results 57% (8/14) of SCD participants were PiB-positive by a sensitive, regionally-based definition, compared to 31% (26/84) of the CN cohort. SCD participants had significantly higher PiB retention (SUVR) than CN in three of six regions of interest: frontal cortex (p=.02), lateral temporal cortex (p=.02) and parietal cortex (p=.04). Findings were suggestive that deficits on verbal associative binding may be specific to Aβ-positive vs. Aβ-negative SCD. Conclusion Older participants with SCD presenting to a memory clinic have higher brain Aβ deposition compared to normal aging study volunteers unselected on complaints. Further study of presenting SCD are warranted to determine the prognostic significance of Aβ deposition in this context. PMID:26402082

  6. Clinical presentation and microbiological diagnosis in paediatric respiratory tract infection: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Hannah V; Blair, Peter S; Lovering, Andrew M; Muir, Peter; Hay, Alastair D

    2015-01-01

    Background Antibiotic prescribing decisions for respiratory tract infection (RTI) in primary care could be improved if clinicians could target bacterial infections. However, there are currently no evidence-based diagnostic rules to identify microbial aetiology in children presenting with acute RTIs. Aim To analyse evidence of associations between clinical symptoms or signs and detection of microbes from the upper respiratory tract (URT) of children with acute cough. Design and setting Systematic review and meta-analysis. Method A literature search identified articles reporting relationships between individual symptoms and/or signs, and microbes detected from URT samples. Associations between pathogens and symptoms or signs were summarised, and meta-analysis conducted where possible. Results There were 9984 articles identified, of which 28 met inclusion criteria. Studies identified 30 symptoms and 41 signs for 23 microbes, yielding 1704 potential associations, of which only 226 (13%) have presently been investigated. Of these, relevant statistical analyses were presented for 175 associations, of which 25% were significant. Meta-analysis demonstrated significant relationships between respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) detection and chest retractions (pooled odds ratio [OR] 1.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.6 to 2.3), wheeze (pooled OR 1.7, 95% CI = 1.5 to 2.0), and crepitations/crackles (pooled OR 1.7, 95% CI = 1.3 to 2.2). Conclusions There was an absence of evidence for URT pathogens other than RSV. The meta-analysis identified clinical signs associated with RSV detection, suggesting clinical presentation may offer some, albeit poor, diagnostic value. Further research is urgently needed to establish the value of symptoms and signs in determining microbiological aetiology and improve targeting of antibiotics in primary care. PMID:25624310

  7. Clinical challenges in drug induced pancreatitis: Presentation of two cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Yanar, Fatih; Agcaoglu, Orhan; Sarici, Inanc S.; Ozcinar, Beyza; Gok, Ali F.K.; Gunay, Kayıhan; Ertekin, Cemalettin

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION A wide variety of drugs have been reported to cause pancreatitis. Although the incidence of drug induced acute pancreatitis is low, the disease is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality, which makes timely identification of the causative agent important. PRESENTATION OF CASE Herein, we report two patients with clinical, biochemical, and radiological evidence of acute pancreatitis. There were no etiologic factors except their prescribed drugs. DISCUSSION The majority of patients with acute pancreatitis recover uneventfully, but there remains an uncontrollable risk of mortality. It is prudent to withdraw a medication with a known association with acute pancreatitis. Necessity of multi-drug regimens especially in oncological patients however, presents a challenge. CONCLUSION Corticosteroid pulse therapy was easily detectable as the causative agent in our first case, but combined anti-neoplastic drug therapy and additional multi-drug regimen presented great difficulties in identifying single causative agent in our second patient. PMID:23810919

  8. Association between tuberculin skin test result and clinical presentation of tuberculosis disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The tuberculin skin test (TST) is used to test for latent tuberculosis (TB) infection and support the diagnosis of active TB. However, little is known about the relationship between the TST result and the clinical presentation of TB disease. Methods We analyzed US TB surveillance data, 1993–2010, and used multinomial logistic regression to calculate the association between TST result (0–4 mm [negative], 5–9 mm, 10–14 mm, and ≥ 15 mm) and clinical presentation of disease (miliary, combined pulmonary and extrapulmonary, extrapulmonary only, non-cavitary pulmonary, and cavitary pulmonary). For persons with pulmonary disease, multivariate logistic regression was used to calculate the odds of having acid-fast bacilli (AFB) positive sputum. Results There were 64,238 persons with culture-confirmed TB included in the analysis, which was stratified by HIV status and birthplace (US- vs. foreign-born). Persons with a TST ≥ 15 mm were less likely to have miliary or combined pulmonary and extrapulmonary disease, but more likely to have cavitary pulmonary disease than non-cavitary pulmonary disease. Persons with non-cavitary pulmonary disease with a negative TST were significantly more likely to have AFB positive sputum. Conclusions Clinical presentation of TB disease differed according to TST result and persons with a negative TST were more likely to have disseminated disease (i.e., miliary or combined pulmonary and extrapulmonary). Further study of the TST result may improve our understanding of the host-pathogen relationship in TB disease. PMID:24093965

  9. Unusual Clinical Presentation of Thoracic Tuberculosis: The Need for a Better Knowledge of Illness

    PubMed Central

    Manca, Sandra; Fois, Alessandro Giuseppe; Santoru, Luigi; Trisolini, Rocco; Polo, Maria Francesca; Ostera, Salvatore; Patelli, Marco; Pirina, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 73 Final Diagnosis: Bronchoesophageal fistula in endobronchial tuberculosis and mediastinal lymphadenopathy Symptoms: Nonproductive cough • weight loss Medication: Isoniazid • rifampin • pyrazinamide • ethambutol Clinical Procedure: Laser treatment Specialty: Pulmonology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), a highly contagious infectious disease, is a significant public health problem all over the world and remains an important cause of preventable death in the adult population. Endobronchial TB is an unusual form of thoracic TB that may be complicated by tracheobronchial stenosis, and bronchoesophageal fistula formation is a very rare complication. Tubercular lymphadenitis can also lead to fistula formation through a process of caseum necrosis and opening of a fistula between the bronchus and oesophagus. Case Report: We report an uncommon case of thoracic TB in an immunocompetent 73-year-old Caucasian man who presented several problems: bronchoesophageal fistula, endobronchial TB, and mediastinal lymphadenopathy in the absence of contemporary parenchymal consolidation. Furthermore, he presented a normal chest radiograph and mostly unclear and non-specific symptoms at onset. Conclusions: We emphasize the need for a better knowledge of this illness and awareness that it may have an unusual presentation. In these cases, diagnosis and proper treatment can be delayed, with severe complications for the patient. Pulmonary TB remains a real diagnostic challenge: a normal chest radiograph and nonspecific symptoms do not allow us to exclude this persistent infectious disease. PMID:25907152

  10. A novel ATP1A3 mutation with unique clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Rosewich, Hendrik; Baethmann, Martina; Ohlenbusch, Andreas; Gärtner, Jutta; Brockmann, Knut

    2014-06-15

    Mutations in the ATP1A3 gene are associated with rapid-onset dystonia-parkinsonism (RDP) and alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC) as well as RDP/AHC intermediate presentations. Phenotypic diversity is being recognized. In order to identify ATP1A3-related phenotypes not meeting the classical criteria for RDP or AHC we lowered the threshold for mutation analysis in clinical presentations resembling AHC or RDP. A novel heterozygous ATP1A3 missense mutation c.2600G>A (p.Gly867Asp, G867D) was detected in a 15-year-old girl. Her clinical phenotype is partially consistent with an intermediate presentation between alternating hemiplegia of childhood and rapid-onset dystonia-parkinsonism and comprises additional yet unreported features. With onset at 4½ years of age recurrent paroxysmal flaccid hemiplegia alternating in laterality was triggered by watching television or playing computer games. Occlusion of both eyes reliably stopped the plegic attacks with the patient remaining awake. Our observation further widens the phenotypic spectrum associated with ATP1A3 mutations. PMID:24713507

  11. Epidemiology and clinical presentation of stroke in Upper Egypt (desert area)

    PubMed Central

    El Tallawy, Hamdy N; Farghaly, Wafaa M; Badry, Reda; Hamdy, Nermin A; Shehata, Ghaydaa A; Rageh, Tarek A; Metwally, Nabil A; Hassan, Enas M; Elsayed, Sayed S; Yehia, Mohamed A; Soliman, Wael T

    2015-01-01

    Background Stroke is a common cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Four out of five strokes occur in the low- and middle-income countries. This study aims to find lifetime prevalence of stroke in Upper Egypt and to identify clinical presentations and possible risk factors of stroke in this population. Methods This is a door-to-door (every door) study conducted on all inhabitants in Al Kharga district (representative of western desert) and Al Quseir city (representative of eastern desert). The study was conducted in two stages, and every stage consisted of three phases (screening, diagnostic, and investigatory). Results The total lifetime prevalence of stroke was 8.5/1,000 in the population aged 20 years and more. It increased with advancing age and was higher among males than females among all age groups except in the childbearing period (20 years to <40 years of age). Lifetime prevalence of ischemic stroke (7.2/1,000) was higher than hemorrhagic stroke (1.1/1,000). Hemiparesis and hemiplegia were the commonest presentation of stroke. Headache, vomiting, and vertigo were found to be significantly more common accompaniments of hemorrhagic stroke. The most common risk factor was hypertension, followed by hyperlipidemia and diabetes mellitus. Conclusion The total lifetime prevalence of stroke in the population aged 20 years and more in Upper Egypt (desert area) lies within the range that is recorded in developing countries. Clinical presentation and risk factors are similar to those recorded from developing and developed countries. PMID:26346729

  12. Clostridium difficile infection among kidney transplant recipients: frequency, clinical presentation, and outcome.

    PubMed

    Lionaki, Sophia; Panagiotellis, Konstantinos; Moris, Demetrios; Daikos, George; Psyhogiou, Mina; Vernadakis, Spiridon; Zavos, Georgios; Boletis, John N

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of Clostridium Difficile Infection (CDI) among kidney transplant recipients and describe the clinical picture in correlation with the presence of certain risk factors. We included kidney transplant recipients with a functioning graft, who were admitted during the period 1/2012-12/2013, and patients with ESRD who were admitted to undergo Kidney Transplantation (KTx) from a deceased or a living donor in the same period. Patients were screened following clinical indication of gastrointestinal infection. CDI diagnosis was based on a positive stool sample for CD toxins and stool culture. Within the period 2012-2013, we recorded 24 cases of CDI in 19 patients, accounting for a frequency of 5.4% of CDI in our population. In addition to diarrhea, 63.15% of the patients presented with fever, 31.25% with anorexia, while abdominal pain was a rare symptom (0.53%). None of the patients had ileus, bowel obstruction or megacolon. Fourteen patients (73.7%) had a history of recent exposure (15 days) to antimicrobial agents prior to the evolution of CDI symptoms. A relapse of the CDI infection was identified in five cases. CDI infection is a significant factor of morbidity in patients with KTx and should be considered in the clinical setting of diarrhea, even in cases with no exposure to antibiotic agents. PMID:25556694

  13. Varicella Zoster Virus Meningitis in a Young Immunocompetent Adult without Rash: A Misleading Clinical Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Pasedag, Thomas; Weissenborn, Karin; Wurster, Ulrich; Ganzenmueller, Tina

    2014-01-01

    Meningitis caused by varicella zoster virus (VZV) is rare in healthy population. Predominantly immunocompromised patients are affected by reactivation of this virus with primary clinical features of rash and neurological symptoms. Here we report a young otherwise healthy man diagnosed with a VZV meningitis without rash. He complained of acute headache, nausea, and vomiting. The clinical examination did not show any neurological deficits or rash. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed a high leukocyte cell count of 1720 cells/µL and an elevated total protein of 1460 mg/L misleadingly indicating a bacterial infection. Further CSF analyses, including polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and detection of intrathecal synthesis of antibodies, showed a VZV infection. Clinical and CSF follow-up examinations proved the successful antiviral treatment. In conclusion, even young immunocompetent patients without rash might present with VZV meningitis. CSF examination is a key procedure in the diagnosis of CNS infections but in rare cases the standard values cell count and total protein might misleadingly indicate a bacterial infection. Thus, virological analyses should be considered even when a bacterial infection is suspected. PMID:25614843

  14. Terrestrial Snakebites in the South East of the Arabian Peninsula: Patient Characteristics, Clinical Presentations, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Alkaabi, Juma M.; Al Neyadi, Mariam; Al Darei, Fakhra; Al Mazrooei, Mariam; Al Yazedi, Jawaher; Abdulle, Abdishakur M.

    2011-01-01

    Background To describe the characteristics, clinical presentations, management and complications of snakebites in the border region between Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Buraimi, Sultanate of Oman. Methodology/Principal Findings We carried out a retrospective review of medical records to study snakebite cases over four-year duration at three tertiary hospitals. Overall, 64 snakebite cases were studied with median hospitalization of 2 (interquartile range [IQR] 1–4) days. The majority of cases were male (87.5%), and most (61%) of the incidents occurred during summer months. The bite sites were predominantly (95%) to the feet and hands. Main clinical features included pain, local swelling, and coagulopathy, blistering and skin peeling. Overall, there were no deaths, but few major complications occurred; extensive skin peeling (n = 5, 8%), multi-organ failure (n = 1, 1.5%), and compartment syndrome (n = 1, 1.5%). Polyvalent anti snake venom (ASV), analgesia, tetanus toxoid, intravenous fluids, and antibiotics such as ampicillin, cloxacillin, and cephalosporins were commonly instituted as part of treatment protocols in the three hospitals. Conclusion The overwhelming majority of bites occurred during summer months, and envenomations were more common in, relatively, young male farmers, but with no serious clinical complications. Prevention and treatment strategies should include increasing public awareness, developing management guidelines, and manufacturing specific ASV for a wide spectrum of the local venomous snakes. PMID:21931788

  15. A changing picture of shigellosis in southern Vietnam: shifting species dominance, antimicrobial susceptibility and clinical presentation

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Shigellosis remains considerable public health problem in some developing countries. The nature of Shigellae suggests that they are highly adaptable when placed under selective pressure in a human population. This is demonstrated by variation and fluctuations in serotypes and antimicrobial resistance profile of organisms circulating in differing setting in endemic locations. Antimicrobial resistance in the genus Shigella is a constant threat, with reports of organisms in Asia being resistant to multiple antimicrobials and new generation therapies. Methods Here we compare microbiological, clinical and epidemiological data from patients with shigellosis over three different periods in southern Vietnam spanning14 years. Results Our data demonstrates a shift in dominant infecting species (S. flexneri to S. sonnei) and resistance profile of the organisms circulating in southern Vietnam. We find that there was no significant variation in the syndromes associated with either S. sonnei or S. flexneri, yet the clinical features of the disease are more severe in later observations. Conclusions Our findings show a change in clinical presentation of shigellosis in this setting, as the disease may be now more pronounced, this is concurrent with a change in antimicrobial resistance profile. These data highlight the socio-economic development of southern Vietnam and should guide future vaccine development and deployment strategies. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN55945881 PMID:20003464

  16. Syringoma of vulva: an unusual presentation. Clinical, morphological and immunohistochemical aspects.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Troconis, José; Viloria de Alvarado, María Elena

    2015-03-01

    The case of a 34-year-old woman, who consulted because she observed the appearance of numerous yellow-white asymptomatic papules on the vulva, is presented. Clinical diagnosis of syringoma of vulva was established. The pathological and immunohistochemical studies confirmed the diagnosis. Vulvar syringoma usually occurs as a multiple flesh-colored or brownish papules on both sides of labia majora of women in their third decade. Its diagnosis should be considered when the patient complaints of vulvar pruritus and/or sweating. PMID:25920186

  17. Present status of PACS at Kyoto University Hospital: image workstation for clinical education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minato, Kotaro; Komori, Masaru; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Okajima, Kaoru; Kimura, Ishu; Takahashi, Takashi; Konishi, Junji; Abe, Mituyuki; Gotoh, Yoshihiro; Sato, Kazuhiro

    1990-08-01

    The PAC system: KIDS (Kyoto University Hospital Image Database and Communication System) has been expanded to include several major digital imaging modalities such as X-ray CT, MRI, DSA and CR. The fiber optic high-speed local area network and the workstation with quick image handling are newly designed. The system (new KIDS) is intended to achieve a film-less environment in the department of radiology and to evaluate the feasibility of a hospital-wide PAC system. The present status of the system at the end of 1989 including a image workstation installed in a lecture hall for clinical education is described.

  18. Management of Low-Flow Vascular Malformations: Clinical Presentation, Classification, Patient Selection, Imaging and Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    McCafferty, Ian

    2015-10-15

    This review article aims to give an overview of the current state of imaging, patient selection, agents and techniques used in the management of low-flow vascular malformations. The review includes the current classifications for low-flow vascular malformations including the 2014 updates. Clinical presentation and assessment is covered with a detailed section on the common sclerosant agents used to treat low-flow vascular malformations, including dosing and common complications. Imaging is described with a guide to a simple stratification of the use of imaging for diagnosis and interventional techniques.

  19. Pharmacological Evidence of α2-Adrenergic Receptors in the Hypotensive Effect of Platonia insignis Mart.

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Marcelo Bezerra; da Silva-Filho, José Couras; Sabino, Carla Kelly Barroso; Arcanjo, Daniel Dias Rufino; Sousa, Cleyton Marcos Melo; Costa, Isabella Cristhina Gonçalves; Chaves, Mariana Helena; Oliveira, Rita de Cássia Meneses

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Platonia insignis Mart. (Clusiaceae) is a medicinal plant from the Brazilian Amazon region. The present study evaluated the biological potential of the ethanol extract (Pi-EtOH) and ethyl acetate fraction (Pi-EtOAc) of the P. insignis fruit shells on the cardiovascular system of rats. Pi-EtOH or Pi-EtOAc (12.5, 25, and 50 mg/kg) was administered intravenously in normotensive rats (260–300 g), and the mean arterial pressure and the heart rate were monitored. The Pi-EtOH induced hypotension (−11.56±0.89, −7.43±0.85, and −17.56±1.97 mmHg) followed by bradycardia in two highest doses (−8.89±3.62 and −15.79±1.83 beats/min) and Pi-EtOAc, at the same doses, induced hypotension (−11.2±1.03, −14.48±1.13, −29.89±2.67 mmHg) more intensively, followed by tachycardia at the dose 12.5 and 25 mg/kg (15.64±2.06, 19.31±1.92 beats/min) and bradycardia at a dose of 50 mg/kg (−9.98±7.33 beats/min). The hypotensive response from Pi-EtOAc was not attenuated when used in the pretreatment with L-NAME, verapamil, propranolol, and hexamethonium. However, when using yohimbine, the hypotensive effect was inhibited (−4.42±1.28 (P<.05), −3.29±0.99 (P<.05), 2.06±1.18 mmHg (P<.05); Student's t-test). Hence, the Pi-EtOAc seems to act similarly to the α2-adrenergic agonist in this hypotensive effect. PMID:25055183

  20. Clinical presentations and outcomes of necrotizing fasciitis in males and females over a 13-year period

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Nissar; El-Menyar, Ayman; Mudali, Insolvisagan Natesa; Tabeb, AbdelHakem; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Background Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a rapidly progressive infection of fascia and subcutaneous tissue resulting in serious outcomes. We aimed to evaluate the clinical presentations, hospital course and outcomes of NF based on patient gender. Patients and methods All patients admitted with NF were enrolled in the study over a 13-year period in the main tertiary hospital in Qatar. Clinical presentations, co-morbidities, severity and outcomes were analyzed and compared in male and female patients. Results A total of 331 NF patients were identified with a mean age of 51 ± 15 years and male to female ratio of 3:1. However, Arab Qatari females were more frequently affected by NF in comparison to their male counterparts and south Asian females (p < 0.001), respectively. Female patients were older and had significantly higher incidence of abdominal and groin NF (p < 0.004). There were 13 cases with recurrent NF; 85% of them were males. Male NF patients had significantly higher rate of organ failure (p = 0.02), but there was no significant difference in the hospital length of stay as well as mortality in both genders. Overall, there were 85 (25.7%) deaths (23 females and 62 males). Conclusion Necrotizing fasciitis remains a life threatening entity. Although, NF is more common in males, Qatari females are more likely to develop NF than males. NF of abdominal wall and groin is significantly higher in females. Development of organ failure is more common in males with NF. NF remains a challenging clinical problem in Qatar with a mortality rate ranging from 25 to 27% for both genders. PMID:26568823

  1. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Pediatric Athletes Presenting to Sports Medicine Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Stracciolini, Andrea; Stein, Cynthia J.; Zurakowski, David; Meehan, William P.; Myer, Gregory D.; Micheli, Lyle J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Limited data exist regarding the effect of the growth process on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk in male versus female children. Hypothesis: The proportion of ACL injuries/sports injuries presenting to clinic will vary by age, sex, and body mass index (BMI). Study Design: Cross-sectional epidemiologic study. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Methods: The study group consisted of a randomly selected 5% probability sample of all children 5 to 17 years of age presenting to a sports medicine clinic from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2009; 2133 charts were reviewed. Data collected included demographics, height and weight, injury mechanism, diagnosis, treatment, previous injury, and organized sports. Results: A total of 206 ACL tears were analyzed (104 girls, 102 boys). Girls were slightly older than boys (15.1 ± 1.7 vs 14.3 ± 2.1 years; P < 0.01). Male-female comparison of ACL injury/total injury by age revealed that girls had a steeper increase by age than boys. Among 5- to 12-year-olds, boys had a higher ACL injury/total injury ratio than girls (all P < 0.01). Children 13 to 17 years of age showed no significant difference for sex in ACL injury/total injury ratio. As age advanced, the proportion of ACL injuries/total injuries increased for both girls (P < 0.01) and boys (P = 0.04). BMI was independently associated with an ACL injury (P < 0.01). Conclusion: The proportion of ACL injuries/total injuries was similar for boys and girls aged 13 to 17 years. Girls showed a significantly steeper increase in ACL injury proportion versus boys through puberty. Clinical Relevance: This study will increase clinician awareness of ACL injury occurrence in young male and female athletes 5 to 12 years of age. Injury prevention efforts should target young girls before the onset of puberty and before injury occurs. PMID:25984258

  2. Purpura of the Face and Neck: An Atypical Clinical Presentation Revealing a Hepatosplenic T Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kuonen, Franois; Bucher, Maya; de Leval, Laurence; Vernez, Maxime; Gilliet, Michel; Conrad, Curdin; Feldmeyer, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatosplenic T cell lymphoma (HSTL) is a rare but very aggressive peripheral T cell lymphoma whose initial silent clinical presentation unfortunately delays the diagnosis and worsens the prognosis of patient survival. Efforts should be aimed at early recognition and treatment. Methods We describe a case of a 62-year-old woman who presented at our clinic with a non-palpable purpuric eruption of the face. Investigations revealed thrombocytopenia with hepatosplenomegaly, which showed rapid progression together with accentuation of the purpura. Two months later, a bone marrow biopsy revealed the diagnosis of a HSTL. Results The patient received six cycles of CHOP chemotherapy (vincristine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, methylprednisolone) followed by a well-tolerated autologous bone marrow graft. Normalization of the platelet count resulted in regression of the purpuric rash. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report of a facial thrombocytopenic purpura as the inaugural symptom of HSTL. It emphasizes the privileged position of the dermatologist for early recognition of potentially lethal HSTL. PMID:24707248

  3. Prevention of supine hypotensive syndrome in pregnant women treated with transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deborah Rubin; Wang, Eileen

    2014-08-15

    In our studies of transcranial magnetic stimulation in pregnant women with major depressive disorder, two subjects had an episode of supine hypotensive syndrome and one subject had an episode of dizziness without hypotension. Prevention of the supine hypotensive syndrome in pregnant women receiving transcranial magnetic stimulation is described. PMID:24768354

  4. [Niemann-Pick type C disease: clinical presentations in pediatric patients].

    PubMed

    Héron, B; Ogier, H

    2010-06-01

    Niemann-Pick type C disease (NPC) is a rare, neurovisceral, autosomic recessive, lysosomal lipid storage disorder associated with impaired intracellular lipid trafficking leading to accumulation of cholesterol and glycosphingolipids in the brain, the liver, the spleen and also the lung. NPC has a very heterogenous clinical presentation from perinatal period to adulthood. The perinatal presentation is visceral. In the early-infantile, late-infantile and juvenile period, a wide range of aspecific and progressive neurologic symptoms varies according to the age at onset, but four signs have a great diagnostic value : prolonged neonatal cholestasis, splenomegaly, cataplexy and vertical supranuclear gaze palsy. The diagnosis confirmation requires a fibroblast culture and molecular genetic testing of NPC1 and NPC2 genes. The recent approval of a specific treatment, reducing neurological disease progression, makes essential an early diagnosis of NPC. PMID:20620895

  5. Pyogenic hepatic abscess presenting years after a choledochojejunostomy: a rare clinical occurrence.

    PubMed

    Yu, Megan; Mangaonkar, Abhishek; Lovelace, Candace; Ibe, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A 69-year-old Caucasian man presented with fever, chills/rigors and night sweats since 6 days. Blood cultures (4/4) initially reported Gram negative lactose-fermenting rods. Physical examination was fairly benign which included a normal abdominal examination. Laboratory tests were significant for an elevated white cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C reactive protein . Empirically, he was treated with piperacillin tazobactam. A chart review showed that he had undergone a choledochojejunostomy for a pancreatic head tumour 7 years before. We found a few reported cases of hepatic abscesses after choledochojejunostomy presenting years after the procedure. An abdominal CT scan confirmed our suspicion. Percutaneous drainage was performed and his antibiotics were switched to ciprofloxacin and metronidazole, based on the sensitivity report. The patient's clinical condition steadily improved. PMID:24913077

  6. Arrhythmic syncope in neurogenic orthostatic hypotension: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Di Stefano, Cristina; Milazzo, Valeria; Sobrero, Gabriele; Ravera, Agnese; Maule, Simona; Veglio, Franco

    2014-08-01

    Patients with autonomic failure experience orthostatic hypotension (OH) often leading to syncope. Arrhythmias may cause severe syncope, characterized by an increased risk of mortality. We report two cases of patients with primary autonomic neuropathy suffering from both severe OH and arrhythmic syncope. PMID:24879449

  7. Midodrine as a Countermeasure for Post-spaceflight Orthostatic Hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platts, Steven H.; Ziegler, Michael G.; Waters, Wendy W.; Meck, Janice V.

    2007-01-01

    Up to 30 % of astronauts exhibit post-spaceflight orthostatic hypotension due to inadequate norepinephrine release during upright posture following short duration spaceflight. We hypothesize that the (alpha)1-adrenergic agonist midodrine will be an effective countermeasure. This study is being conducted in 2 phases. The first phase is complete and consisted testing six short duration crew members. All of these subjects participated in preflight and postflight tilt testing on a control flight as well as on the test flights, where midodrine was administered after landing, 1 hour before testing. Hemodynamic variables were compared between the 2 flights. Midodrine improved stroke volume, cardiac output, systolic pressure and heart rate, without increasing vascular resistance. None of these subjects experienced orthostatic hypotension on landing day. Phase II is similar to phase I, except that midodrine is ingested in flight (near TIG) and the tilt test is performed immediately after landing on the CTV. One crewmember has completed phase II testing. This crewmember had no evidence of orthostatic hypotension or presyncope, four additional crewmembers have volunteered for this study. To date, midodrine has been shown to be a safe and effective countermeasure to post-spaceflight orthostatic hypotension.

  8. Effects of infusion of different fluids during controlled hypotension on gastric intramucosal pH and postoperative gastroenterological function☆

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guanglei; Liu, Su; Liu, Gongjian

    2011-01-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of infusion of different fluids combined with controlled hypotension on gastric intramucosal pH (pHi) and postoperative gastrointestinal function in patients undergoing hepatocarcinoma surgery. Forty-five patients (ASA II) scheduled for surgical resection of hepatocarcinoma undergoing controlled hypotension were randomly assigned to three groups and received infusion of 20 mL/kg Ringer's solution (R group), 6% HAES(H group) or 6% Voluven group (W group). Intragastric PgCO2, pHi, hematocrit and hemoglobin were measured. The significant decrease of pHi and increase of PgCO2 were produced at 1 and 2 h after controlled hypotension in the R group (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). The time of bowel movement after operation was shorter in the W group than the R group. Meanwhile, we also did not find obvious difference in blood gas indexes among the three groups. The infusion of HAES and Voluven during controlled hypotension could improve gastrointestinal perfusion and accelerate the recovery of postoperative gastrointestinal function. PMID:23554689

  9. The contribution of genetic and environmental factors to quantitative variability of erythrocyte membrane proteins in primary hypotension.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, V P; Polonikov, A V; Solodilova, M A

    2005-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that, compared with healthy individuals, patients with primary arterial hypotension (PAH) have significant quantitative changes in erythrocyte membrane proteins. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the contribution made by genetic and environmental factors to quantitative variation of erythrocyte membrane proteins in PAH. We studied 109 hypotensive patients, 124 normotensive subjects, 222 of their first-degree relatives and 24 twin pairs by sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The decomposition of total phenotypic variance of erythrocyte membrane proteins to genetic and environmental components was performed on the basis of correlations among first-degree relatives by the least squares method. The genetic dominance and shared environmental factors were found to influence the variability of cytoskeletal membrane proteins whose contents were changed in PAH. Furthermore, variations in alpha-spectrin, actin and anion exchanger in hypotensives were substantially influenced by major gene and maternal effects. Ankyrin 2.1 and actin content was under the control of common underlying genes. Variations in membrane-associated glutathione-S-transferase and tropomyosin were predominantly affected by polygenes. These findings suggest that the putative major genes with pleiotropic effects appear to be involved in the control of quantitative disorders of erythrocyte membrane proteins in primary hypotension. PMID:15638825

  10. The influence of intraoperative hypotension and perioperative blood transfusion on disease-free survival in patients with complete resection of colorectal liver metastases.

    PubMed Central

    Younes, R N; Rogatko, A; Brennan, M F

    1991-01-01

    An increased interest in surgical treatment of liver metastases from colorectal origin has evolved recently. However not all patients benefit from this approach, with early recurrence and death still being encountered. To evaluate clinical as well as perioperative factors that might significantly affect the outcome of patients with completely resected colorectal liver metastases, we examined 116 patients who underwent resection between September 1987 and August 1989. Median follow-up time was 13.2 months (0.6 to 31.4 months). The overall survival rate was 91% at 1 year and 75% at 2 years. Median survival was not reached. Median disease-free survival time was 11.5 months, with 49.4% and 21.2% of the patients being free of disease at 1 and 2 years, respectively. By univariate analysis, site of primary colorectal cancer, preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level, size of metastases, number of metastases, length of operation time, percentage mean arterial pressure, number of hypotensive episodes, duration of hypotensive episodes, and whole blood transfusion significantly affected recurrence rate following resection. However only site of primary tumor, CEA, number of metastases, and number of hypotensive episodes remained significant in the multivariate analysis. The most significant single factor that affected recurrence rate was the number of hypotensive episodes during the operative procedure. It is concluded that hypotensive episodes, even when well controlled, should be avoided during operation to maximize the chances of cure and prolong disease-free survival of patients with colorectal liver metastases. PMID:1867517

  11. Temazepam, but not zolpidem, causes orthostatic hypotension in astronauts after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Shang-Jin; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Meck, Janice V.

    2003-01-01

    Insomnia is a common symptom, not only in the adult population but also in many astronauts. Hypnotics, such as temazepam (a benzodiazepine) and zolpidem (an imidazopyridine), are often taken to relieve insomnia. Temazepam has been shown clinically to have hemodynamic side effects, particularly in the elderly; however, the mechanism is not clear. Zolpidem does not cause hemodynamic side effects. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of different hypnotics during spaceflight might contribute significantly to the high incidence of postflight orthostatic hypotension, and to compare the findings in astronauts with clinical research. Astronauts were separated into three groups: control (n = 40), temazepam (15 or 30 mg; n = 9), and zolpidem (5 or 10 mg; n = 8). In this study, temazepam and zolpidem were only taken the night before landing. The systolic and diastolic blood pressures and heart rates of the astronauts were measured during stand tests before spaceflight and on landing day. On landing day, systolic pressure decreased significantly and heart rate increased significantly in the temazepam group, but not in the control group or in the zolpidem group. Temazepam may aggravate orthostatic hypotension after spaceflight when astronauts are hemodynamically compromised. Temazepam should not be the initial choice as a sleeping aid for astronauts. These results in astronauts may help to explain the hemodynamic side effects in the elderly who are also compromised. Zolpidem may be a better choice as a sleeping aid in these populations.

  12. Clinical Management of Patients Presenting with Non-Adjustable Gastric Band (NAGB) Complications

    PubMed Central

    Balogh, Julius; Vizhul, Andrey; Dunkin, Brian J.; Tariq, Nabil; Sherman, Vadim

    2014-01-01

    Background: A number of bariatric surgical procedures have been developed to manage morbid obesity and related co-morbidities. The non-adjustable gastric band (NAGB) was one such procedure that created restriction to food intake by gastric segmentation. Benefits of the procedure included a low risk of perioperative complications and substantial early weight loss. Unfortunately, the long term results of NAGB include a high incidence of complications and failure to maintain weight loss. The purpose of this study was to examine the presentation, workup, and treatment of patients presenting with complications following NAGB placement. Methods: A retrospective review of the diagnosis and management of 11 patients who presented with complications related to NAGB placement. Results: All patients presented with some degree of proximal gastric outlet obstruction. The majority of patients (8/11) presented with vomiting as the main complaint. Other complaints included intolerance to solids, liquids, and reflux. Only 2/11 patients presented with weight loss since undergoing NAGB placement, while the remainder had weight regain to their pre-NAGB level and above. Depending on clinical presentation, desire for additional weight loss and co-morbid conditions, patients underwent a variety of treatments. This included NAGB removal (endoscopic, laparo-endoscopic, and laparoscopic) as well as conversion to another bariatric procedure (sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass). Conclusion: Patients with NAGB complications present with symptoms related to a proximal gastric outlet obstruction, related to constriction imposed by the band. This may result in severe food and liquid intolerance and subsequent weight loss, but more likely results in maladaptive eating and subsequent weight gain. Optimal therapy involves removal of the NAGB. Laparoscopic conversion to another bariatric procedure, optimally a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, is warranted to treat morbid obesity and associated co-morbidities. PMID:24910561

  13. Hypotensive effects of resistance exercises with blood flow restriction.

    PubMed

    Neto, Gabriel R; Sousa, Maria S C; Costa, Pablo B; Salles, Belmiro F; Novaes, Giovanni S; Novaes, Jefferson S

    2015-04-01

    The effects of low-intensity resistance exercise (RE) combined with blood flow restriction (BFR) on blood pressure (BP) are an important factor to be considered because of the acute responses imposed by training. The aim of this study was to compare the hypotensive effect of RE performed with and without BFR in normotensive young subjects. After 1 repetition maximum (1RM) tests, 24 men (21.79 ± 3.21 years; 1.72 ± 0.06 m; 69.49 ± 9.80 kg) performed the following 4 experimental protocols in a randomized order: (a) high-intensity RE at 80% of 1RM (HI), (b) low-intensity RE at 20% of 1RM (LI), (c) low-intensity RE at 20% of 1RM combined with partial BFR (LI + BFR), and (d) control. Analysis of systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) was conducted over a 60-minute period. The 3 RE protocols resulted in hypotensive SBP (HI = -3.8%, LI = -3.3%, LI + BFR = -5.5%) responses during the 60 minutes (p ≤ 0.05). The LI + BFR protocol promoted hypotensive (-11.5%) responses in DBP during the 60 minutes (p ≤ 0.05), and both the HI and LI + BFR protocols resulted in mean blood pressure (MBP) hypotension between 30 (-7.0%, -7.7%) and 60 minutes (-3.6%, -8.8%), respectively. In conclusion, postexercise hypotension may occur after all 3 exercise protocols with greater reductions in SBP after HI and LI + BFR, in DBP after LI + BFR, and in MBP after HI and LI + BFR protocols. PMID:25330083

  14. Treatment of orthostatic hypotension with midodrine and octreotide.

    PubMed

    Hoeldtke, R D; Horvath, G G; Bryner, K D; Hobbs, G R

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare two treatments for orthostatic hypotension, midodrine (an alpha adrenergic agonist), and octreotide (an SRIH analogue) to each other and to combination therapy. Sixteen patients participated. Our hypothesis was that the 2 drugs together would be more effective than either drug alone. The effect of the drugs on the hemodynamic response to food ingestion was evaluated while patients were sitting. Midodrine (5 mg orally, 30 min before breakfast) increased mean blood pressure slightly (5-10 mm Hg, over 30 min) before the patients started eating, but it only partially reversed the hypotensive effect of food ingestion. The nadir in postprandial blood pressure after midodrine was 69 +/- 4 mm Hg, not different from placebo (63 +/- 5). Nevertheless, midodrine accentuated the response to sc octreotide (0.5 microgram/kg). Fifteen minutes after octreotide administration to midodrine-pretreated patients, the average mean blood pressure was 115 +/- 9 mm Hg, higher (P = .0095) than after octreotide given alone (102 +/- 7). Drug effects on orthostatic hypotension were assessed by measuring standing time (minutes before symptoms of hypotension or definite hypotension). In the absence of treatment, standing time was 3.5 +/- 7 min; 1 h after 10 mg midodrine, 8.4 +/- 2.7 min (P = .11); after 1.0 microgram/kg octreotide, 13.2 +/- 3.9 min (P = .0034 vs. no treatment); and after both drugs, 21.2 +/- 5.5 min (P = .0002 vs. no treatment, P = .036 vs. octreotide only). The combination of midodrine and octreotide is more potent than either drug alone. PMID:9467537

  15. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and obesity: Biochemical, metabolic and clinical presentations

    PubMed Central

    Milić, Sandra; Lulić, Davorka; Štimac, Davor

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in the world. Presentation of the disease ranges from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NAFLD is a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome that includes central abdominal obesity along with other components. Up to 80% of patients with NAFLD are obese, defined as a body mass index (BMI) > 30 kg/m2. However, the distribution of fat tissue plays a greater role in insulin resistance than the BMI. The large amount of visceral adipose tissue (VAT) in morbidly obese (BMI > 40 kg/m2) individuals contributes to a high prevalence of NAFLD. Free fatty acids derived from VAT tissue, as well as from dietary sources and de novo lipogenesis, are released to the portal venous system. Excess free fatty acids and chronic low-grade inflammation from VAT are considered to be two of the most important factors contributing to liver injury progression in NAFLD. In addition, secretion of adipokines from VAT as well as lipid accumulation in the liver further promotes inflammation through nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathways, which are also activated by free fatty acids, and contribute to insulin resistance. Most NAFLD patients are asymptomatic on clinical presentation, even though some may present with fatigue, dyspepsia, dull pain in the liver and hepatosplenomegaly. Treatment for NAFLD and NASH involves weight reduction through lifestyle modifications, anti-obesity medication and bariatric surgery. This article reviews the available information on the biochemical and metabolic phenotypes associated with obesity and fatty liver disease. The relative contribution of visceral and liver fat to insulin resistance is discussed, and recommendations for clinical evaluation of affected individuals is provided. PMID:25071327

  16. An Endotoxin Tolerance Signature Predicts Sepsis and Organ Dysfunction at Initial Clinical Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Pena, Olga M.; Hancock, David G.; Lyle, Ngan H.; Linder, Adam; Russell, James A.; Xia, Jianguo; Fjell, Christopher D.; Boyd, John H.; Hancock, Robert E.W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sepsis involves aberrant immune responses to infection, but the exact nature of this immune dysfunction remains poorly defined. Bacterial endotoxins like lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are potent inducers of inflammation, which has been associated with the pathophysiology of sepsis, but repeated exposure can also induce a suppressive effect known as endotoxin tolerance or cellular reprogramming. It has been proposed that endotoxin tolerance might be associated with the immunosuppressive state that was primarily observed during late-stage sepsis. However, this relationship remains poorly characterised. Here we clarify the underlying mechanisms and timing of immune dysfunction in sepsis. Methods We defined a gene expression signature characteristic of endotoxin tolerance. Gene-set test approaches were used to correlate this signature with early sepsis, both newly and retrospectively analysing microarrays from 593 patients in 11 cohorts. Then we recruited a unique cohort of possible sepsis patients at first clinical presentation in an independent blinded controlled observational study to determine whether this signature was associated with the development of confirmed sepsis and organ dysfunction. Findings All sepsis patients presented an expression profile strongly associated with the endotoxin tolerance signature (p<0.01; AUC 96.1%). Importantly, this signature further differentiated between suspected sepsis patients who did, or did not, go on to develop confirmed sepsis, and predicted the development of organ dysfunction. Interpretation Our data support an updated model of sepsis pathogenesis in which endotoxin tolerance-mediated immune dysfunction (cellular reprogramming) is present throughout the clinical course of disease and related to disease severity. Thus endotoxin tolerance might offer new insights guiding the development of new therapies and diagnostics for early sepsis. PMID:25685830

  17. Annual Research Review: Attachment disorders in early childhood – clinical presentation, causes, correlates and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zeanah, Charles H.; Gleason, Mary Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Background Though noted in the clinical literature for more than 50 years, attachment disorders have been studied systematically only recently. In part because of the ubiquity of attachments in humans, determining when aberrant behavior is best explained as an attachment disorder as opposed to insecure attachment has led to some confusion. In this selective review, we consider the literature on reactive attachment disorder and disinhibited social engagement disorder and describe an emerging consensus about a number of issues, while also noting some areas of controversy and others where we lack clear answers. We include a brief history of the classification of the disorders, as well as measurement issues. We describe their clinical presentation, causes and vulnerability factors, and clinical correlates, including the relation of disorders to secure and insecure attachment classifications. We also review what little is known and what more we need to learn about interventions. Methods We conducted a literature search using PubMed, PsycINFO, and Cochrane Library databases, using search terms “reactive attachment disorder,” “attachment disorder,” “indiscriminate behavior,” “indiscriminate friendliness,” “indiscriminate socially disinhibited reactive attachment disorder,” “disinhibited social engagement disorder,” and “disinhibited social behavior.” We also contacted investigators who have published on these topics. Findings A growing literature has assessed behaviors in children who have experienced various types of adverse caregiving environments reflecting signs of putative attachment disorders, though fewer studies have investigated categorically defined attachment disorders. The evidence for two separate disorders is considerable, with reactive attachment disorder indicating children who lack attachments despite the developmental capacity to form them, and disinhibited social engagement disorder indicating children who lack developmentally appropriate reticence with unfamiliar adults and who violate socially sanctioned boundaries. Conclusions Though many questions remain to be answered, especially regarding appropriate interventions, we know considerably more about attachment disorders than we did only a decade ago. PMID:25359236

  18. Clinical perception: a study of intimate partner violence versus methamphetamine use as presenting problems.

    PubMed

    Fussell, Holly; Haaken, Janice; Lewy, Colleen S; McFarland, Bentson H

    2009-01-01

    This study draws on theory by Solomon Asch (1946, 1952) to examine how presenting with intimate partner violence versus methamphetamine use shapes characteristics of substance abuse assessment interviews. When responding to an initial open-ended question from a substance abuse counselor, the methamphetamine user and intimate partner violence survivor may elicit very different reactions from the counselor. We predicted that these differing presenting problems would initiate different trajectories for overall impression formation. To test this hypothesis, 18 substance abuse practitioners interviewed one standardized patient (an actor portraying a substance abuse client) who alternated her presenting problem between a) violence in a domestic setting and b) methamphetamine use. The remainder of her story was identical for counselors in either presenting problem group. Results included differences between the two groups in median length of the interviews and failure of both groups to explore domestic violence as a cooccurring problem. Clinical practices related to substance abuse counseling and intimate partner violence are discussed in light of these findings. PMID:20070136

  19. Clinical presentation of infective endocarditis caused by different groups of non-beta haemolytic streptococci.

    PubMed

    Nilson, B; Olaison, L; Rasmussen, M

    2016-02-01

    Streptococci are common causes of infective endocarditis (IE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has provided a practical tool for their species determination. We aimed to investigate if particular groups of non-beta heamolytic streptococci were associated with IE or to specific presentations thereof. The Swedish Registry of Infective Endocarditis was used to identify cases of IE caused by streptococci and a local database to identify cases of streptococcal bacteremia. The bacteria were grouped using MALDI-TOF MS and the clinical characteristics of IE caused by different groups were compared. We identified a group of 201 streptococcal IE isolates: 18 isolates belonged to the anginosus, 19 to the bovis, 140 to the mitis, 17 to the mutans, and seven to the salivarius groups. The mitis and mutans groups were significantly more common and the anginosus group less common among IE cases as compared to all cause bacteremia. Patients infected with the bovis group isolates were older, had more cardiac devices, and had more commonly prosthetic valve IE compared to IE caused by streptococci of the other groups. Twenty-one percent of patients needed surgery, and in-hospital mortality was 8% with no significant differences between the groups. Grouping of non-beta haemolytic streptococci using MALDI-TOF MS can provide a basis for decision-making in streptococcal bacteremia. IE caused by bovis group isolates have clinical characteristics distinguishing them from IE caused by other groups of Streptococcus. PMID:26610338

  20. Childhood disintegrative disorder with seasonal total mutism: A rare clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Elham; Hosseinpoor, Sara; Mirhosseini, Seyyed Mohammad Mahdy; Bidaki, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Childhood disintegrative disorder (CDD) is a rare autistic-like clinical condition with unknown etiology, in that previously acquired age-appropriate language, social and adaptive abilities deteriorate significantly in 2-10-year-old healthy children, although physical and neurological evaluations display no observable abnormality. Our case is a 22-year-old female born of a consanguineous marriage, with the appearance of CDD symptoms in her fifth year of age following normal mental and physical development during her initial four years of life. Without any precipitating factor, she gradually lost her language abilities, social relational skills, affectionate behavior, adaptive capacities, peer play and meaningful interest in her surrounding, friends and family members over a period of 4 years, reaching a plateau in her ninth year of age. The unique special clinical symptom in this case is a seasonal total mutism, which after the beginning of her CDD symptoms is revealing every year covering the spring. As no additional physical or psychological change accompanies her total seasonal speech loss, it cannot be attributed to any mental condition known as having a seasonal pattern. Because in the literature CDD is presented mostly as case reports with lacking of advanced research data, describing any new case is recommended to improve the knowledge about this rare condition, especially if it displays some new unusual signs, not reported till now. PMID:27069898

  1. Childhood disintegrative disorder with seasonal total mutism: A rare clinical presentation

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Elham; Hosseinpoor, Sara; Mirhosseini, Seyyed Mohammad Mahdy; Bidaki, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Childhood disintegrative disorder (CDD) is a rare autistic-like clinical condition with unknown etiology, in that previously acquired age-appropriate language, social and adaptive abilities deteriorate significantly in 2-10-year-old healthy children, although physical and neurological evaluations display no observable abnormality. Our case is a 22-year-old female born of a consanguineous marriage, with the appearance of CDD symptoms in her fifth year of age following normal mental and physical development during her initial four years of life. Without any precipitating factor, she gradually lost her language abilities, social relational skills, affectionate behavior, adaptive capacities, peer play and meaningful interest in her surrounding, friends and family members over a period of 4 years, reaching a plateau in her ninth year of age. The unique special clinical symptom in this case is a seasonal total mutism, which after the beginning of her CDD symptoms is revealing every year covering the spring. As no additional physical or psychological change accompanies her total seasonal speech loss, it cannot be attributed to any mental condition known as having a seasonal pattern. Because in the literature CDD is presented mostly as case reports with lacking of advanced research data, describing any new case is recommended to improve the knowledge about this rare condition, especially if it displays some new unusual signs, not reported till now. PMID:27069898

  2. Erythrocytosis due to PHD2 Mutations: A Review of Clinical Presentation, Diagnosis, and Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Rachel; Syed, Nausheen; Shah, Prabodh

    2016-01-01

    The association of mutations in the PHD2 protein of the hypoxia-sensing pathway and erythrocytosis has only been established in the last decade. Here we report the case of a novel PHD2 gene mutation in a patient with erythrocytosis and summarize all reported cases to date. Case Report. A 55-year-old man presented with dyspnea and a previous diagnosis of idiopathic erythrocytosis. PHD gene sequencing revealed a mutation on exon 2. The mutation was recognized as p.(Trp334⁎) (c. 1001G>A) resulting in a truncation of a highly conserved amino acid residue in catalytic domain. A diagnosis of erythrocytosis secondary to mutant PHD2 gene was made. Conclusions. Our findings indicate that with PHD2 mutations there is moderate erythrocytosis and erythropoietin (Epo) levels are generally low to normal. Two patients with PHD2 substitution mutations were found to have paraganglioma and one of these patients had a concurrent pheochromocytoma. In addition, one mutation was associated with sagittal sinus thrombosis. Given the severity of some of the clinical features of these mutations, we conclude that clinical guidelines should include the PHD2 mutation in the idiopathic erythrocytosis workup. PMID:27034858

  3. Oral Lichen Planus: An Update on Etiology, Pathogenesis, Clinical Presentation, Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sonia; Jawanda, Manveen Kaur

    2015-01-01

    The mouth is a mirror of health or disease, a sentinel or early warning system. The oral cavity might well be thought as a window to the body because oral manifestations accompany many systemic diseases. In many instances, oral involvement precedes the appearance of other symptoms or lesions at other locations. Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic mucocutaneous disorder of stratified squamous epithelium of uncertain etiology that affects oral and genital mucous membranes, skin, nails, and scalp. LP is estimated to affect 0.5% to 2.0% of the general population. This disease has most often been reported in middle-aged patients with 30-60 years of age and is more common in females than in males. The disease seems to be mediated by an antigen-specific mechanism, activating cytotoxic T cells, and non-specific mechanisms like mast cell degranulation and matrix metalloproteinase activation. A proper understanding of the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis of the disease becomes important for providing the right treatment. This article discusses the prevalence, etiology, clinical features, oral manifestations, diagnosis, complications and treatment of oral LP. PMID:26120146

  4. Erythrocytosis due to PHD2 Mutations: A Review of Clinical Presentation, Diagnosis, and Genetics.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Rachel; Syed, Nausheen; Shah, Prabodh

    2016-01-01

    The association of mutations in the PHD2 protein of the hypoxia-sensing pathway and erythrocytosis has only been established in the last decade. Here we report the case of a novel PHD2 gene mutation in a patient with erythrocytosis and summarize all reported cases to date. Case Report. A 55-year-old man presented with dyspnea and a previous diagnosis of idiopathic erythrocytosis. PHD gene sequencing revealed a mutation on exon 2. The mutation was recognized as p.(Trp334(⁎)) (c. 1001G>A) resulting in a truncation of a highly conserved amino acid residue in catalytic domain. A diagnosis of erythrocytosis secondary to mutant PHD2 gene was made. Conclusions. Our findings indicate that with PHD2 mutations there is moderate erythrocytosis and erythropoietin (Epo) levels are generally low to normal. Two patients with PHD2 substitution mutations were found to have paraganglioma and one of these patients had a concurrent pheochromocytoma. In addition, one mutation was associated with sagittal sinus thrombosis. Given the severity of some of the clinical features of these mutations, we conclude that clinical guidelines should include the PHD2 mutation in the idiopathic erythrocytosis workup. PMID:27034858

  5. Novel Mutation of the GNE Gene Presenting Atypical Mild Clinical Feature: A Korean Case Report.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Ah; Park, Sung-Hye; Yi, Youbin; Kim, Keewon

    2015-06-01

    Glucosamine (UDP-N-acetyl)-2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine kinase (GNE) myopathy is caused by mutations in GNE, a key enzyme in sialic acid biosynthesis. Here, we reported a case of GNE that presented with atypical mild clinical feature and slow progression. A 48-year-old female had a complaint of left foot drop since the age of 46 years. Electromyography (EMG) and muscle biopsy from left tibialis anterior muscle were compatible with myopathy. Genetic analysis led to the identification of c.1714G>C/c.527A>T compound heterozygous mutation, which is the second most frequent mutation in Japan as far as we know. Previous research has revealed that c.1714G>C/c.527A>T compound heterozygous mutation is a mild mutation as the onset of the disease is much later than the usual age of onset of GNE myopathy and the clinical course is slowly progressive. This was the first case report in Korea of the clinicopathological characteristics of GNE myopathy with GNE (c.1714G>C/c.527A>T compound heterozygous) mutation. PMID:26161358

  6. Clinical Presentation of Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal infections in Research and Community Settings

    PubMed Central

    Seidlitz, Jakob; Kovacevic, Miro; Latimer, M. Elizabeth; Hommer, Rebecca; Lougee, Lorraine; Grant, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: The first cases of pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS) were described>15 years ago. Since that time, the literature has been divided between studies that successfully demonstrate an etiologic relationship between Group A streptococcal (GAS) infections and childhood-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and those that fail to find an association. One possible explanation for the conflicting reports is that the diagnostic criteria proposed for PANDAS are not specific enough to describe a unique and homogeneous cohort of patients. To evaluate the validity of the PANDAS criteria, we compared clinical characteristics of PANDAS patients identified in two community practices with a sample of children meeting full research criteria for PANDAS. Methods: A systematic review of clinical records was used to identify the presence or absence of selected symptoms in children evaluated for PANDAS by physicians in Hinsdale, Illinois (n=52) and Bethesda, Maryland (n=40). Results were compared against data from participants in National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) research investigations of PANDAS (n=48). Results: As described in the original PANDAS cohort, males outnumbered females (95:45) by ∼ 2:1, and symptoms began in early childhood (7.3±2.7 years). Clinical presentations were remarkably similar across sites, with all children reporting acute onset of OCD symptoms and multiple comorbidities, including separation anxiety (86–92%), school issues (75–81%), sleep disruptions (71%), tics (60–65%), urinary symptoms (42–81%), and others. Twenty of the community cases (22%) failed to meet PANDAS criteria because of an absence of documentation of GAS infections. Conclusions: The diagnostic criteria for PANDAS can be used by clinicians to accurately identify patients with common clinical features and shared etiology of symptoms. Although difficulties in documenting an association between GAS infection and symptom onset/exacerbations may preclude a diagnosis of PANDAS in some children with acute-onset OCD, they do appear to meet criteria for pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS). PMID:25695941

  7. Clinical presentation and treatment outcome for children with comorbid externalizing and internalizing symptoms.

    PubMed

    Chase, Rhea M; Eyberg, Sheila M

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effects of comorbid separation anxiety disorder (SAD) on the expression of externalizing symptoms in children presenting with oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) as well as the treatment effects on anxiety and internalizing symptoms. Participants were 64 children with ODD seen in parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT), including 15 children with comorbid SAD. Children with ODD+SAD did not differ from children with ODD only in disruptive behavior severity at pre-treatment assessment, and children with ODD+SAD showed significant decreases in SAD symptoms at post-treatment. Additionally, children with clinical levels of internalizing behavior demonstrated significant reductions in these symptoms, along with reduction of externalizing symptoms targeted in treatment. We discuss the possibility that treatments focusing on parent-child interactions and certain parenting skills may generalize across specific child symptom constellations. PMID:17467229

  8. Sex differences in stroke: epidemiology, clinical presentation, medical care, and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Mathew J; Bushnell, Cheryl D; Howard, George; Gargano, Julia Warner; Duncan, Pamela W; Lynch, Gwen; Khatiwoda, Arya; Lisabeth, Lynda

    2009-01-01

    Stroke has a greater effect on women than men because women have more events and are less likely to recover. Age-specific stroke rates are higher in men, but, because of their longer life expectancy and much higher incidence at older ages, women have more stroke events than men. With the exception of subarachnoid haemorrhage, there is little evidence of sex differences in stroke subtype or severity. Although several reports found that women are less likely to receive some in-hospital interventions, most differences disappear after age and comorbidities are accounted for. However, sex disparities persist in the use of thrombolytic treatment (with alteplase) and lipid testing. Functional outcomes and quality of life after stroke are consistently poorer in women, despite adjustment for baseline differences in age, prestroke function, and comorbidities. Here, we comprehensively review the epidemiology, clinical presentation, medical care, and outcomes of stroke in women. PMID:18722812

  9. The clinical presentation and diagnosis of ketamine-associated urinary tract dysfunction in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Yek, Jacklyn; Sundaram, Palaniappan; Aydin, Hakan; Kuo, Tricia; Ng, Lay Guat

    2015-12-01

    Ketamine is a short-acting anaesthetic agent that has gained popularity as a 'club drug' due to its hallucinogenic effects. Substance abuse should be considered in young adult patients who present with severe debilitating symptoms such as lower urinary tract symptoms, even though the use of controlled substances is rare in Singapore. Although the natural history of disease varies from person to person, a relationship between symptom severity and frequency/dosage of abuse has been established. It is important to be aware of this condition and have a high degree of clinical suspicion to enable early diagnosis and immediate initiation of multidisciplinary and holistic treatment. A delayed diagnosis can lead to irreversible pathological changes and increased morbidity among ketamine abusers. PMID:26702160

  10. Anterior Sacral Meningocele Masquerading as an Ovarian Cyst: A Rare Clinical Presentation Associated with Marfan Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Neslin; Genc, Mine; Kasap, Esin; Solak, Aynur; Korkut, Berrin; Yilmaz, Erkan

    2015-01-01

    Anterior sacral meningocele is a very rare clinical entity characterized by herniation of a meningeal sac through a sacrococcygeal defect. We report a case of a 20-year old female with Marfan syndrome who presented with abdominal distention that was misdiagnosed as an ovarian cyst on pelvic ultrasound. Pelvic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed large, well-defined multiloculated intrasacral and presacral cysts communicating via two separate broad necks and extending through defects in anterior aspect of sacral vertebrae. This case emphasizes that anterior sacral meningocele should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cases with pelvic cysts particularly in patients with underlying connective tissue disorders. Because severe neurologic complications or even death may occur without proper preoperative planning in such cases, MR imaging should always be performed for evaluation and characterization of pelvis cystic lesions. PMID:26236457

  11. The clinical presentation and diagnosis of ketamine-associated urinary tract dysfunction in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Yek, Jacklyn; Sundaram, Palaniappan; Aydin, Hakan; Kuo, Tricia; Ng, Lay Guat

    2015-01-01

    Ketamine is a short-acting anaesthetic agent that has gained popularity as a ‘club drug’ due to its hallucinogenic effects. Substance abuse should be considered in young adult patients who present with severe debilitating symptoms such as lower urinary tract symptoms, even though the use of controlled substances is rare in Singapore. Although the natural history of disease varies from person to person, a relationship between symptom severity and frequency/dosage of abuse has been established. It is important to be aware of this condition and have a high degree of clinical suspicion to enable early diagnosis and immediate initiation of multidisciplinary and holistic treatment. A delayed diagnosis can lead to irreversible pathological changes and increased morbidity among ketamine abusers. PMID:26702160

  12. Aligning new interventions with developing country health systems: Target product profiles, presentation, and clinical trial design

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Alan; Nunes, Julia K.; Garnett, Andrew; Biellik, Robin; Leboulleux, Didier; Birkett, Ashley J.; Loucq, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Many new interventions are being created to address health problems of the developing world. However, many developing countries have fragile health systems and find it difficult to accommodate change. Consequently, it is essential that new interventions are well aligned with health systems and their users. Establishing target product profiles (TPPs) is a critical, early step towards tailoring interventions to suit both of these constituencies. Specific analyses can help identify and establish relevant TPP criteria such as optimal formulation, presentation and packaging. Clinical trials for a new intervention should be designed to address both TPP-specific questions and anticipated use of the intervention in target countries. Examples are provided from research on malaria vaccines that are also applicable to other new public health interventions. PMID:22783872

  13. Clinical presentation of human C1q deficiency: How much of a lupus?

    PubMed

    Stegert, Mihaela; Bock, Merete; Trendelenburg, Marten

    2015-09-01

    Hereditary human C1q deficiency has been well described to be associated with high susceptibility for the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The majority of subjects present a clinical syndrome closely related to SLE. However, limited information is available about the primary diagnosis and particular clinical manifestations of SLE in this specific subgroup of patients. In this review, we performed a comprehensive search of electronic databases up to November 2014 to identify and analyze reports on patients with C1q deficiency. We identified 71 C1q-deficient patients descending from 45 families that had been published. According to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) diagnostic criteria for SLE 39/71 (55%) subjects could be classified as having SLE. Another 16/71 (22.5%) presented a SLE-like syndrome (defined as 3 positive ACR criteria) whereas in 16/71 (22.5%) no SLE could be diagnosed at time of publication. Symptoms began at a median age of 5 years, male and females being equally affected. Discoid rash (56% versus 10%, p<0.001) and oral ulcers (49% versus 24%, p<0.001) occurred significantly more frequent in C1q deficiency-associated SLE/SLE-like disease than in sporadic SLE, whereas arthritis (38% versus 84%, p<001) and anti-ds-DNA (18% versus 78%, p<0.001) occurred less frequently. Renal and neurological manifestations were found to occur similarly frequent. The severe course of disease in some patients seemed to be mostly due to severe infections at early ages and not in particular due to more aggressive SLE manifestations. PMID:25846716

  14. Clinical presentation in patients more than 80 years of age at the start of peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Sueyoshi, Keita; Inoue, Tsutomu; Kojima, Eriko; Sato, Takahiko; Tsuda, Masahiro; Kikuta, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Yusuke; Takane, Hiroshi; Takenaka, Tsuneo; Suzuki, Hiromichi

    2011-01-01

    The age of new dialysis patients is rapidly increasing. In the present study, we examined clinical presentation in new peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients 80 years of age or older at our hospital. Data were collected from the records of patients newly starting continuous ambulatory PD (CAPD) therapy between January 2005 and July 2010. During that period, 11 patients 80 years of age or older (average age: 83.1 +/- 3.8 years) were introduced to PD therapy. The reason for dialysis was hypertensive nephrosclerosis in 8 patients, and chronic glomerulonephritis, chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, and an unknown primary disease in 1 patient each; there were no cases of diabetic nephropathy. At dialysis start, average serum creatinine was 6.1 +/- 1.4 mg/dL, arterial wall calcification was found by computed tomography or chest radiography in 10 of 11 patients (90.9%), and aortic or mitral valve calcification, or both, was found by echocardiography in 3 patients (27.3%). By the end of January 2011, 8 patients had died. Average survival after the start of PD was 31.9 +/- 22.3 months. Hypertensive nephrosclerosis, a cause less often seen in younger patients, was the most common primary disease among our elderly dialysis patients. As we previously reported, vascular and valvular calcification are important factors for determining prognosis; however, no significant relationships were observed in the present study, probably because almost all the patients had such calcifications. PMID:22073833

  15. Fatal Outcome of Multiple Clinical Presentations of Human Herpesvirus 8-related Disease After Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vijgen, Sandrine; Wyss, Caroline; Meylan, Pascal; Bisig, Bettina; Letovanec, Igor; Manuel, Oriol; Pascual, Manuel; de Leval, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is the most common human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8)-related disease described after solid organ transplantation. Multicentric Castleman disease and hemophagocytic syndrome are other potential HHV-8-induced entities but are less frequently reported. We describe the case of a liver transplant recipient who presented with an acute febrile illness 1 year after transplantation with a rapidly fatal outcome. Autopsy revealed 3 distinct HHV-8-related entities: Kaposi sarcoma, HHV-8-associated multicentric Castleman disease with microlymphomas and a severe hemophagocytic syndrome. Retrospective serologic tests suggested that HHV-8 was likely transmitted by the seropositive donor at the time of transplantation. To our knowledge, this is the first case of copresentation of 3 clinical presentations of HHV-8-mediated human disease in the post-transplant setting. Considering the absence of systematic screening of organ donors/recipients for HHV-8 infection, HHV-8-related illness should be suspected in transplant recipients who present with acute febrile illness, systemic symptoms, lymphadenopathies, and/or multiorgan failure to rapidly document the diagnosis and provide timely an adequate treatment. PMID:26120765

  16. The Etiology, Associated Injuries and Clinical Presentation of Post Traumatic Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Gaine, Farooq Ahmad; Lone, Ghulam Nabi; Chowdhary, Mushtaq Ahmad; Lone, Hafeezula

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the etiology, associated injurers and clinical presentation of post traumatic diaphragmatic hernia. Methods: This study was a cross-sectional study being conducted in the department of Cardiovascular, thoracic surgery (CVTS) and Pediatric Surgery, Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences (SKIMS), Srinagar, Kashmir, India. All patients of post traumatic diaphragmatic hernia who were admitted in the department of CVTS and Pediatric Surgery, SKIMS, during the course of study (May 2009 to Nov. 2011) were included. Results: From the commencement of the study 21 patients had traumatic diaphragmatic hernia. Most common presenting symptoms in traumatic diaphragmatic hernia were, chest discomfort and pain abdomen presented in 81% of patients, followed by breathlessness in 61.9% and vomiting in 47.6%. Common associated injuries in traumatic diaphragmatic hernia in our study group were, rib fracture in 47.6%, splenic injury in 28.6%, head injury in 23.8%, soft tissue injury in 23.8%, gut perforation in 19%, limb fracture in 14.3%, liver injury in 9.5%, pancreatic injury in 4.8% and renal injury in 4.8%. Conclusion: Usually the patients of Post traumatic diaphragmatic hernia presents as emergency, early recognition and prompt surgical treatment is needed for better outcome. The Incidence of post traumatic diaphragmatic hernia when associated with blunt trauma abdomen and chest is very high (81%). A high level of suspicion is needed in these injuries. The 9.5% of traumatic diaphragmatic hernia may have delayed presentation. Early diagnosis of traumatic diaphragmatic hernia is most difficult when herniation is delayed.

  17. Menstrual disorders in a Paediatric and Adolescent Gynaecology Clinic: patient presentations and longitudinal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chung, P W; Chan, Symphorosa S C; Yiu, K W; Lao, Terence T H; Chung, Tony K H

    2011-10-01

    OBJECTIVE. To study the presentations, diagnoses, and outcomes in adolescents with menstrual disorders. DESIGN. Prospective cohort study. SETTING. Paediatric and Adolescent Gynaecology Clinic, Hong Kong. PARTICIPANTS. A total of 577 adolescents aged 14 to 19 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES. The presentations and diagnoses of adolescents with menstrual disorders were reviewed and their menstrual outcomes determined by a telephone survey. RESULTS. In all, 47% presented with menorrhagia, prolonged menstruation, and short menstrual cycles; 27% had secondary amenorrhoea, 12% had dysmenorrhoea, 11% had oligomenorrhoea, and 3% had primary amenorrhoea. Significant diagnoses included congenital genital tract anomalies, premature ovarian failure, anorexia nervosa, and polycystic ovarian syndrome. Polycystic ovarian syndrome was diagnosed in 16% of the cohort. In all, 24% of these 577 patients had abnormal menstrual cycles 4 years later. Direct logistic regression analysis indicated a cycle length of more than 35 days at presentation (adjusted odds ratio=2.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-4.5), previous diagnosis of polycystic ovarian syndrome (adjusted odds ratio=2.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-3.4), and current body mass index of 23 kg/m(2) or higher (adjusted odds ratio=1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-3.0) were risk factors for persistently long menstrual cycle exceeding 35 days. Adolescents who were screened out with a definitive diagnosis after initial assessment were at low risk of persistently long menstrual cycles at follow-up (adjusted odds ratio=0.3; 95% confidence interval, 0.1-0.8). CONCLUSIONS. Adolescent menstrual disorders should not be ignored. Long cycle, diagnosis of polycystic ovarian syndrome at first consultation, and a current body mass index of 23 kg/m(2) or higher were statistically associated with persistent problems. PMID:21979477

  18. Profile of the patients who present to immunology outpatient clinics because of frequent infections

    PubMed Central

    Aldırmaz, Sonay; Yücel, Esra; Kıykım, Ayça; Çokuğraş, Haluk; Akçakaya, Necla; Camcıoğlu, Yıldız

    2014-01-01

    Aim: We aimed to determine the rate of primary immune deficiency (PID) among children presenting to our immunology outpatient clinic with a history of frequent infections and with warning signs of primary immune deficiency. Material and Methods: The files of 232 children aged between 1 and 18 years with warning signs of primary immune deficiency who were referred to our pediatric immunology outpatient clinic with a complaint of frequent infections were selected and evaluated retrospectively. Results: Thirty-six percent of the subjects were female (n=84) and 64% were male (n=148). PID was found in 72.4% (n=164). The most common diagnosis was selective IgA deficiency (26.3%, n=61). The most common diseases other than primary immune deficiency included reactive airway disease and/or atopy (34.4%, n=22), adenoid vegetation (12.3%, n=8), chronic disease (6.3%, n=4) and periodic fever, aphtous stomatitis and adenopathy (4.6%, n=3). The majortiy of the subjects (90.5%, n=210) presented with a complaint of recurrent upper respiratory tract infection. PID was found in all subjects who had bronchiectasis. The rates of the diagnoses of variable immune deficiency and Bruton agammaglubulinemia (XLA) were found to be significantly higher in the subjects who had lower respiratory tract infection, who were hospitalized because of infection and who had a history of severe infection compared to the subjects who did not have these properties (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively). Growth and developmental failure was found with a significantly higher rate in the patients who had a diagnosis of severe combined immune deficiency or hyper IgM compared to the other subjects (p<0.01). No difference was found in the rates of PID between the age groups, but the diagnosis of XLA increased as the age of presentation increased and this was considered an indicator which showed that patients with XLA were being diagnosed in a late period. Conclusions: It was found that the rate of diagnosis was considerably high (72.4%), when the subjects who had frequent infections were selected by the warning signs of PID. PMID:26078665

  19. A Review of Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Its Presentation in Different Clinical Settings

    PubMed Central

    Mufaddel, Amir; Osman, Ossama T.; Almugaddam, Fadwa

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a relatively common psychiatric disorder characterized by preoccupations with perceived defects in physical appearance. This review aimed to explore epidemiology, clinical features, comorbidities, and treatment options for BDD in different clinical settings. Data Source and Study Selection: A search of the literature from 1970 to 2011 was performed using the MEDLINE search engine. English-language articles, with no restriction regarding the type of articles, were identified using the search terms body dysmorphic disorder, body dysmorphic disorder clinical settings, body dysmorphic disorder treatment, and body dysmorphic disorder & psychodermatology. Results: BDD occurs in 0.7% to 2.4% of community samples and 13% of psychiatric inpatients. Etiology is multifactorial, with recent findings indicating deficits in visual information processing. There is considerable overlap between BDD and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in symptom etiology and response to treatment, which has led to suggestions that BDD can be classified with anxiety disorders and OCD. A recent finding indicated genetic overlap between BDD and OCD. Over 60% of patients with BDD had a lifetime anxiety disorder, and 38% had social phobia, which tends to predate the onset of BDD. Studies reported a high level of comorbidity with depression and social phobia occurring in > 70% of patients with BDD. Individuals with BDD present frequently to dermatologists (about 9%–14% of dermatologic patients have BDD). BDD co-occurs with pathological skin picking in 26%–45% of cases. BDD currently has 2 variants: delusional and nondelusional, and both variants respond similarly to serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs), which may have effect on obsessive thoughts and rituals. Cognitive-behavioral therapy has the best established treatment results. Conclusions: A considerable overlap exists between BDD and other psychiatric disorders such as OCD, anxiety, and delusional disorder, and this comorbidity should be considered in evaluation, management, and long-term follow-up of the disorder. Individuals with BDD usually consult dermatologists and cosmetic surgeons rather than psychiatrists. Collaboration between different specialties (such as primary care, dermatology, cosmetic surgery, and psychiatry) is required for better treatment outcome. PMID:24392251

  20. Variable clinical presentation of lysosomal beta-mannosidosis in patients with null mutations.

    PubMed

    Bedilu, Rebecca; Nummy, Katherine A; Cooper, Alan; Wevers, Ron; Smeitink, Jan; Kleijer, Wim J; Friderici, Karen H

    2002-12-01

    Beta-mannosidosis is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease resulting from a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme beta-mannosidase. The clinical manifestations of this disease in reported human cases are very heterogeneous ranging from relatively mild to moderately severe. This is in contrast with the severe prenatal onset seen in ruminant beta-mannosidosis. In humans, mental retardation, hearing loss, frequent infections, and behavioral problems are relatively common. Dysmorphology and skeletal involvement such as those seen in ruminants are unusual. The purpose of this study is to determine the range of clinical expression in human beta-mannosidosis resulting from null mutations. We determined that the beta-mannosidase gene consists of 17 exons. Intron-based PCR primers were designed and used to amplify each of the exons in genomic DNA isolated from patient fibroblasts. We identified two patients with null mutations. Results of the analysis showed that one patient was heterozygous for nonsense mutations G334T (E83X) in exon 2 and C1363T (Q426X) in exon 10, resulting in truncation of the deduced peptide sequence from 879 to 82 and 425 amino acids, respectively. The second patient was homozygous for a deletion mutation in exon 11 (1541delAT). This deletion causes a reading frame shift and 26 out of frame amino acids before a stop codon occurs in exon 12, resulting in truncation of the deduced peptide sequence from 879 to 510 amino acids. Because disease presentation in these patients with null mutations is very variable, ranging from mild to severe, we conclude that beta-mannosidosis in humans may indeed be milder than typical of other lysosomal storage disorders. PMID:12468273

  1. Additional diverse findings expand the clinical presentation of DOCK8 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Ozden; Jing, Huie; Ozgur, Tuba; Ayvaz, Deniz; Strauss-Albee, Dara M; Ersoy-Evans, Sibel; Tezcan, Ilhan; Turkkani, Gulten; Matthews, Helen F; Haliloglu, Goknur; Yuce, Aysel; Yalcin, Bilgehan; Gokoz, Ozay; Oguz, Kader K; Su, Helen C

    2012-08-01

    We describe seven Turkish children with DOCK8 deficiency who have not been previously reported. Three patients presented with typical features of recurrent or severe cutaneous viral infections, atopic dermatitis, and recurrent respiratory or gastrointestinal tract infections. However, four patients presented with other features. Patient 1-1 featured sclerosing cholangitis and colitis; patient 2-1, granulomatous soft tissue lesion and central nervous system involvement, with primary central nervous system lymphoma found on follow-up; patient 3-1, a fatal metastatic leiomyosarcoma; and patient 4-2 showed no other symptoms initially besides atopic dermatitis. Similar to other previously reported Turkish patients, but in contrast to patients of non-Turkish ethnicity, the patients' lymphopenia was primarily restricted to CD4(+) T cells. Patients had homozygous mutations in DOCK8 that altered splicing, introduced premature terminations, destabilized protein, or involved large deletions within the gene. Genotyping of remaining family members showed that DOCK8 deficiency is a fully penetrant, autosomal recessive disease. In our patients, bone marrow transplantation resulted in rapid improvement followed by disappearance of viral skin lesions, including lesions resembling epidermodysplasia verruciformis, atopic dermatitis, and recurrent infections. Particularly for patients who feature unusual clinical manifestations, immunological testing, in conjunction with genetic testing, can prove invaluable in diagnosing DOCK8 deficiency and providing potentially curative treatment. PMID:22476911

  2. Clinical presentation of a patient with cutis laxa with systemic involvement: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tofolean, Doina Ecaterina; Mazilu, Laura; Stăniceanu, Florica; Mocanu, Liliana; Suceveanu, Andra Iulia; Baz, Radu Octavian; Parepa, Raluca Irinel; Suceveanu, Adrian Paul; Bondari, Simona; Bondari, Dan; Voinea, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Cutis laxa (CL) or elastolysis is a rare inherited or acquired connective tissue disorder in which the skin becomes inelastic and hangs loosely in folds (Mitra et al., 2013). The clinical presentation and the type of inheritance show considerable heterogeneity (Shehzad et al., 2010). We aimed to present the atypical case of a young male patient diagnosed at 36-year-old with CL with systemic involvement. The complex medical history, with a suspected but unconfirmed progeria at nine months, repeated lung and urinary infections, complicated inguinoscrotal hernia, prostatic hypertrophy, bilateral entropion, colorectal diverticula and heart failure, suggested a systemic genetic disease, but the absence of family history made the diagnosis of CL difficult. The skin biopsy and the characteristic features discovered during anatomopathological exam made possible the positive and differential diagnosis, creating the link between the various organ involvement and CL diagnosis. Because of the age of our patient, of normal growth and mental development, and negative family history, we suspected an autosomal dominant form of CL with early onset and severe manifestation. Of course, we cannot exclude a recessive form, due to the heterogeneity of this disease. PMID:26662161

  3. Fetal Ventricular Hypertrabeculation/Noncompaction: Clinical Presentation, Genetics, Associated Cardiac and Extracardiac Abnormalities and Outcome.

    PubMed

    Stöllberger, Claudia; Wegner, Christian; Finsterer, Josef

    2015-10-01

    Left ventricular hypertrabeculation/noncompaction (LVHT) is a cardiac abnormality of unknown etiology. Aim of the review was to summarize the current knowledge about fetal LVHT, including clinical presentation, associated cardiac and extracardiac abnormalities and outcome. In 88 cases, LVHT was diagnosed by fetal echocardiography. In 36 %, no additional cardiac abnormalities were reported; in the remaining 64 %, one or more cardiac abnormalities were reported. Eight cases died prenatally, 17 were electively terminated, and 24 patients died after birth. Six patients were lost to follow-up, and 33 patients are alive at a mean age of 26 months. Surviving cases presented less frequently with fetal hydrops (13 vs. 62 %, p = 0.0004), complete heart block (27 vs. 78 %, p = 0.0076), more than three associated cardiac abnormalities (9 vs. 47 %, p = 0.0008) and more frequently with isolated LVHT (52 vs. 19 %, p = 0.009) than cases who died. Of the surviving patients, 16 received pharmacotherapy, three received pacemakers, eight underwent surgical procedures and four underwent heart transplantation. Postnatal regression of left ventricular hypertrophy and development of LVHT was found in four cases, improvement in cardiac function in two, and regression of right VHT in two. At autopsy, endocardial fibrosis was the most frequent abnormality in 92 %. Thirty-eight percentage of cases with fetal LVHT survived. Fetal and postnatal echocardiographic findings challenge the "embryonic pathogenetic" hypothesis of LVHT. Furthermore, fetal pathoanatomic findings like endocardial fibrosis might play a role in clarifying the still unsolved pathogenesis of LVHT. PMID:26008764

  4. Dental Erosion and Its Growing Importance in Clinical Practice: From Past to Present

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Ann-Katrin; Omar, Ridwaan; Carlsson, Gunnar E.; Johansson, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Since the mid-1990s, the focus of studies on tooth wear has steadily shifted from the general condition towards the more specific area of dental erosion; equally, a shift has occurred from studies in adults to those in children and adolescents. During this time, understanding of the condition has increased greatly. This paper attempts to provide a critical overview of the development of this body of knowledge, from earlier perceptions to the present. It is accepted that dental erosion has a multifactorial background, in which individual and lifestyle factors have great significance. Notwithstanding methodological differences across studies, data from many countries confirm that dental erosion is common in children and young people, and that, when present, it progresses rapidly. That the condition, and its ramifications, warrants serious consideration in clinical dentistry, is clear. It is important for the oral healthcare team to be able to recognize its early signs and symptoms and to understand its pathogenesis. Preventive strategies are essential ingredients in the management of patients with dental erosion. When necessary, treatment aimed at correcting or improving its effects might best be of a minimally invasive nature. Still, there remains a need for further research to forge better understanding of the subject. PMID:22505907

  5. Spectrum of mitochondrial genomic variation and associated clinical presentation of prostate cancer in South African men

    PubMed Central

    McCrow, John P.; Petersen, Desiree C.; Louw, Melanie; Chan, Eva K. F.; Harmeyer, Katherine; Vecchiarelli, Stefano; Lyons, Ruth J.; Bornman, M. S. Riana

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates are significantly increased in African–American men, but limited studies have been performed within Sub–Saharan African populations. As mitochondria control energy metabolism and apoptosis we speculate that somatic mutations within mitochondrial genomes are candidate drivers of aggressive prostate carcinogenesis. METHODS We used matched blood and prostate tissue samples from 87 South African men (77 with African ancestry) to perform deep sequencing of complete mitochondrial genomes. Clinical presentation was biased toward aggressive disease (Gleason score >7, 64%), and compared with men without prostate cancer either with or without benign prostatic hyperplasia. RESULTS We identified 144 somatic mtDNA single nucleotide variants (SNVs), of which 80 were observed in 39 men presenting with aggressive disease. Both the number and frequency of somatic mtDNA SNVs were associated with higher pathological stage. CONCLUSIONS Besides doubling the total number of somatic PCa‐associated mitochondrial genome mutations identified to date, we associate mutational load with aggressive prostate cancer status in men of African ancestry. Prostate 76:349–358, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. The Prostate published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26660354

  6. AML with t(10;11): A pathological entity with distinct clinical presentation

    PubMed Central

    DiNardo, CD; Tang, G; Pemmaraju, N; Wang, S; Pike, A; Garcia-Manero, G; Cortes, J; Bueso-Ramos, C; Kantarjian, H

    2016-01-01

    t(10;11)(p12;q23) is a rare recurrent MLL translocation, most commonly seen in pediatric and young adult AML, associated with early morbidity including diffuse intravascular coagulation and tumor lysis syndrome with multiorgan system failure from leukocytosis. With supportive care first remissions are frequently attained, but patients have a high risk of relapse, extramedullary disease and poor long term outcomes. Introduction Acute myeloid leukemias (AML) with MLL rearrangements are frequently associated with myelomonocytic and monoblastic/monocytic morphology, with an increased risk of leukocytosis and leukostasis-related complications. Yet little is known regarding the clinical presentation of adult AML patients with MLL translocations based on the specific translocation partner. Methods Two recent AML cases with t(10;11)(p12;q23) translocations are detailed, with their shared presenting symptoms highlighted, followed by a review of the current literature. Results The specific t(10;11)(p12;q23) MLL translocation is a rare recurrent translocation partner, most commonly seen in pediatric and young adult AML. A high incidence of early morbidity from leukocytosis-related complications are frequently seen, including diffuse intravascular coagulation (DIC) and tumor lysis syndrome with multiorgan system failure, even without a true leukocytosis. Conclusion With prompt therapy and intensive supportive care first remissions are frequently attained, however patients have a high risk of relapse, extramedullary disease and poor long term outcomes. PMID:25081372

  7. Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension in Parkinson's disease: evaluation, management, and emerging role of droxidopa.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, Stuart H; Skettini, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (nOH) is due to failure of the autonomic nervous system to regulate blood pressure in response to postural changes due to an inadequate release of norepinephrine, leading to orthostatic hypotension and supine hypertension. nOH is common in Parkinson's disease (PD). Prevalence varies throughout the course of PD, ranging from 40% to 60%, and resulting in symptomatic nOH in approximately half. Symptomatic nOH, including lightheadedness, can limit daily activities and lead to falls. Symptomatic nOH can also limit therapeutic options for treating PD motor symptoms. Clinical evaluation should routinely include symptom assessment and blood pressure measurement of supine, sitting, and 3-minute standing; 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring can also be helpful. Non-pharmacological management of symptomatic nOH involves education, physical maneuvers, and adequate hydration. Current pharmacological treatment of symptomatic nOH includes salt supplement, fludrocortisone, midodrine, pyridostigmine, and other empiric medications. Despite these options, treatment of symptomatic nOH remains suboptimal, often limited by severe increases in supine blood pressure. Droxidopa, an oral prodrug converted by decarboxylation to norepinephrine, is a promising therapeutic option for symptomatic nOH in PD, improving symptoms of nOH, daily activities, falls, and standing systolic blood pressure in several recent trials. These trials demonstrated short-term efficacy and tolerability, with comparable increases in standing and supine blood pressures. Longer-term studies are ongoing to confirm durability of treatment effect. PMID:24729712

  8. Cationic solid lipid nanoparticles enhance ocular hypotensive effect of melatonin in rabbit.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Antonio; Bucolo, Claudio; Drago, Filippo; Salomone, Salvatore; Pignatello, Rosario

    2015-01-15

    The study was aimed at evaluating whether the ocular hypotensive effect of melatonin (MEL) was enhanced by its encapsulation in cationic solid lipid nanoparticles (cSLN), as well as at determining the tolerability of these formulations on the ocular surface. MEL was loaded in cSLN that had already been shown to be suitable for ophthalmic use. The formulations were prepared using Softisan(®) 100 as the main lipid matrix, with the presence of either stearic (SA) or palmitic acid (PA) as lipid modifiers. A fixed positive charge was provided by the addition of a cationic lipid (didecyldimethylammonium bromide). The ocular hypotensive effect was evaluated by measuring the intraocular pressure (IOP) during 24h in albino rabbits. MEL elicited a significant (p<0.01) IOP reduction in rabbit eye. All the formulations tested in vivo demonstrated a good tolerability. The nanocarrier containing SA was the most effective in terms of IOP reduction (maximum IOP reduction: -7 mmHg), and its effect lasted approximately 24h. The experimental data indicate that the new formulations based on cSLN loaded with MEL represent a potent anti-glaucoma treatment with a safe profile, warranting further clinical evaluation of the proposed nanotechnological strategy. PMID:25448580

  9. Evaluation of intravenous lipid emulsion on haloperidol-induced hypotension in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Moshiri, Mohammad; Vahabzadeh, Maryam; Mohammadpour, Amir Hooshang; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2016-05-01

    There are many reports on the effects of intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) as an antidote in drug toxicity. Haloperidol (HAL) is a butyrophenone antipsychotic agent which is highly lipophilic. Hypotension is an important adverse effect of HAL administration and overdose. The aim of this study was to investigate the beneficial hemodynamic effects of ILE on acute HAL poisoning. We used six groups of five male rabbits. Two groups received aseptic distilled water intravenously followed by infusion of 18.6 ml/kg normal saline, as negative control group, or ILE 20% after 0.5 h. The third group received 18.6 ml/kg normal saline after HAL infusion (2.6 mg/kg). The other three groups received ILE 20% solution (6, 12, and 18.6 ml/kg) following HAL (2.6 mg/kg) administration. We measured blood pressure at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, and 24 h after starting HAL administration, from left forelimb using a noninvasive method that was carried out automatically with a neonatal intensive care unit bedside monitor. ILE 20% at the dose of 18 ml/kg could return the reduced mean arterial pressure and diastolic blood pressure sooner than the other doses and normal saline. In conclusion, ILE could reverse HAL-induced hypotension same as the other lipophilic drugs. However, the clinical use of ILE for this purpose needs more evaluation to determine its exact indication and safety. PMID:24444695

  10. Clinical profile and outcome of children presenting with poisoning or intoxication: a hospital based study.

    PubMed

    Budhathoki, S; Poudel, P; Shah, D; Bhatta, N K; Dutta, A K; Shah, G S; Bhurtyal, K K; Agrawal, B; Shrivastava, M K; Singh, M K

    2009-09-01

    Poisoning is a common preventable cause of morbidity and mortality in children. Most of the poisoning in children less than 5 years of age is accidental. Objective of the study was to study the clinical profile and outcome of childhood poisoning and intoxication. This was a retrospective study done in patients who were admitted in pediatric wards and pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) of BP Koirala Institute of Health Sciences with history of ingestion of poison or intoxication or envenomation firom January 2005 to June 2008. The data collected were analyzed with SPSS 12.0 software. There were 122 children enrolled in study. Male: female ratio was 1.4:1. The mean age of presentation was 5.8 years. Among 122 patients, 43.4% received pre-referral treatment in the form of gastric lavage, atropine etc. Organophosphorus poisoning was the commonest poisoning seen in 55 (45.1%) patients followed by hydrocarbon 12 (9.8%), mushroom 10 (8.2%) and organochlorine 10 (8.2%) poisoning. During treatment, 50.0% received antidotes. 55.7% received antibiotics, gastric lavage and anticonvulsants were required in 43.4% and 13.9% respectively. Overall survival was 87.4%. The time interval between intoxication and presentation to hospital, mean Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and presence of coma (GCS <8) were significantly different between survivors and expired cases. In conclusion, organophosphorus is the commonest agent involved in childhood poisoning. Overall, the outcome is good with 87.4% survival in our hospital. The time gap between the poisoning and presentation to hospital and presence of coma predict mortality. PMID:20334063

  11. Embryological, clinical and ultrastructural study of human oocytes presenting indented zona pellucida.

    PubMed

    Sousa, M; Teixeira da Silva, J; Silva, J; Cunha, M; Viana, P; Oliveira, E; Sá, R; Soares, C; Oliveira, C; Barros, A

    2015-02-01

    Human oocyte dysmorphisms attain a large proportion of retrieved oocytes from assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment cycles. Extracytoplasmic defects involve abnormal morphology of the zona pellucida (ZP), perivitelline space and first polar body. The aim of the present study was to describe a novel dysmorphism affecting the ZP, indented ZP. We also evaluated the clinical, embryological and ultrastructural features of these cases. We evaluated all ART treatment cycles during 7 consecutive years and found 13 treatment cycles (six patients) with all oocytes presenting an indented ZP. In addition, these oocytes presented total or partial absence of the perivitelline space, absence of resistance to ZP and oolemma penetration during microinjection, and low ooplasm viscosity during aspiration. This novel described dysmorphism was recurrent and attained all oocytes in three cases that had more than one treatment cycle. When compared with controls, data showed significant low oocyte maturity (42% versus 81.6%) and high cycle cancellation (30.8% versus 8.5%) rates, normal degeneration (3.4% versus 6.3%) and fertilization rates (69% versus 69.5%), and low pregnancy (15.4% versus 33.3%) and live-birth delivery (7.7% versus 27.7%) rates per cycle. Ultrastructure analysis revealed a zona pellucida structure with large empty electrolucent regions, an outer ZP layer with an indented surface with protuberances and a thick inner ZP that obliterated the perivitelline space. There was evidence of exocytosis of ZP material by the oocyte. In conclusion, oocytes with this novel described dysmorphism (indented ZP) are associated with low maturity, pregnancy and live-birth delivery rates. PMID:23992046

  12. Twenty years of human immunodeficiency virus care at the Mayo Clinic: Past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Nathan W; Badley, Andrew D; Kasten, Mary J; Sampath, Rahul; Temesgen, Zelalem; Whitaker, Jennifer A; Wilson, John W; Yao, Joseph D; Zeuli, John; Rizza, Stacey A

    2016-05-12

    The Mayo human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Clinic has been providing patient centered care for persons living with HIV in Minnesota and beyond for the past 20 years. Through multidisciplinary engagement, vital clinical outcomes such as retention in care, initiation of antiretroviral therapy and virologic suppression are maximized. In this commentary, we describe the history of the Mayo HIV Clinic and its best practices, providing a "Mayo Model" of HIV care that exceeds national outcomes and may be applicable in other settings. PMID:27175350

  13. Dose-dependent radiation-induced hypotension in the canine

    SciTech Connect

    Cockerham, L.G.; Hampton, J.D.; Doyle, T.F.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation-induced early transient incapacitation (ETI) is often accompanied by severe systemic hypotension. However, postradiation hypotension does not occur with equal frequency in all species and is not reported with consistency in the canine. In an attempt to clarify the differences in reported canine post-radiation blood pressures, canine systemic blood pressures were determined both before and after exposure to gamma radiation of either 80 or 100 Gy. Data obtained from six sham-radiated beagles and 12 radiated beagles indicated that 100-Gy, whole-body, gamma radiation produced a decrease in systemic mean blood pressure while 80-Gy, whole-body, gamma radiation did not. Analysis of this data could be consistent with a quantal response to a gamma radiation dose between 80 Gy and 100 Gy.

  14. Neurogenic hyperadrenergic orthostatic hypotension: a newly recognized variant of orthostatic hypotension in older adults with elevated norepinephrine (noradrenaline).

    PubMed

    Mar, Philip L; Shibao, Cyndya A; Garland, Emily M; Black, Bonnie K; Biaggioni, Italo; Diedrich, André; Paranjape, Sachin Y; Robertson, David; Raj, Satish R

    2015-07-01

    Patients with neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (OH) typically have impaired sympathetic nervous system tone and therefore low levels of upright plasma norepinephrine (NE) (noradrenaline). We report a subset of patients who clinically have typical neurogenic OH but who paradoxically have elevated upright levels of plasma NE. We retrospectively studied 83 OH patients evaluated at the Vanderbilt Autonomic Dysfunction Center between August 2007 and May 2013. Based on standing NE, patients were dichotomized into a hyperadrenergic OH group [hyperOH: upright NE ≥ 3.55 nmol/l (600 pg/ml), n=19] or a non-hyperadrenergic OH group [nOH: upright NE < 3.55 nmol/l (600 pg/ml), n=64]. Medical history and data from autonomic testing, including the Valsalva manoeuvre (VM), were analysed. HyperOH patients had profound orthostatic falls in blood pressure (BP), but less severe than in nOH [change in SBP (systolic blood pressure): -53 ± 31 mmHg compared with -68 ± 33 mmHg, P=0.050; change in DBP (diastolic blood pressure): -18 ± 23 mmHg compared with -30 ± 17 mmHg, P=0.01]. The expected compensatory increase in standing heart rate (HR) was similarly blunted in both hyperOH and nOH groups [84 ± 15 beats per minute (bpm) compared with 82 ± 14 bpm; P=0.6]. HyperOH patients had less severe sympathetic failure as evidenced by smaller falls in DBP during phase 2 of VM and a shorter VM phase 4 BP recovery time (16.5 ± 8.9 s compared with 31.6 ± 16.6 s; P<0.001) than nOH patients. Neurogenic hyperOH patients have severe neurogenic OH, but have less severe adrenergic dysfunction than nOH patients. Further work is required to understand whether hyperOH patients will progress to nOH or whether this represents a different disorder. PMID:25706983

  15. Maintained cerebrovascular function during post-exercise hypotension.

    PubMed

    Willie, Christopher K; Ainslie, Philip N; Taylor, Chloe E; Eves, Neil D; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh

    2013-06-01

    The post-exercise period is associated with hypotension, and an increased risk of syncope attributed to decreases in venous return and/or vascular resistance. Increased local and systemic vasodilators, sympatholysis, and attenuated baroreflex sensitivity following exercise are also manifest. Although resting cerebral blood flow is maintained, cerebrovascular regulation to acute decreases in blood pressure has not been characterized following exercise. We therefore aimed to assess cerebrovascular regulation during transient bouts of hypotension, before and after 40 min of aerobic exercise at 60 % of estimated maximum oxygen consumption. Beat to beat blood pressure (Finometer), heart rate (ECG), and blood velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCAv; transcranial Doppler ultrasound) were assessed in ten healthy young humans. The MCAv-mean arterial pressure relationship during a pharmacologically (i.v. sodium nitroprusside) induced transient hypotension was assessed before and at 10, 30, and 60 min following exercise. Despite a significant reduction in mean arterial pressure at 10 min post-exercise (-10 ± 6.9 mmHg; P < 0.05) and end-tidal PCO2 (10 min post: -2.9 ± 2.6 mmHg; 30 min post: -3.9 ± 3.5 mmHg; 60 min post: -2.7 ± 2.0 mmHg; all P < 0.05), neither resting MCAv nor the cerebrovascular response to hypotension differed between pre- and post-exercise periods (P > 0.05). These data indicate that cerebrovascular regulation remains intact following a moderate bout of aerobic exercise. PMID:23314684

  16. Case Report: Myelodysplastic syndrome- associated myeloid sarcoma: an unusual clinical presentation of a rare disease

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Emoke; Demian, Smaranda; Nagy, Elod

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma results from the extramedullary homing and proliferation of immature myeloid precursors. We present the timeline, events and diagnostic pitfalls related to a 66 year-old male patient’s case, admitted to the Hematology Clinic for pancytopenia, fever, weight loss and fatigue. The severe cytopenia and the few blasts observed in his blood smear indicated a bone marrow biopsy. The bone marrow showed hypercellularity and multilineage dysplasia with the presence of 15% myeloblasts. After the biopsy, he promptly developed paraplegia and nuclear magnetic resonance revealed an epidural tumour which was then resected.In the epidural tumour mass blast-like, round cells were observed with a complex immunophenotype, characterized by myeloperoxidase, CD117, CD15, CD99, leucocyte common antigen positivity and a high Ki-67 proliferation index. Considering the main differential diagnostic issues, the final diagnosis was stated as myelodysplastic syndrome-associated myeloid sarcoma. The prognosis was unfavourable, the bone marrow was quickly invaded by proliferating blast cells, and despite chemotherapy attempts, the patient died. PMID:27019694

  17. Clinical Presentation and Microarray Analysis of Peruvian Children with Atypical Development and/or Aberrant Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Merlin G.; Usrey, Kelly; Roberts, Jennifer L.; Schroeder, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    We report our experience with high resolution microarray analysis in infants and young children with developmental disability and/or aberrant behavior enrolled at the Centro Ann Sullivan del Peru in Lima, Peru, a low income country. Buccal cells were collected with cotton swabs from 233 participants for later DNA isolation and identification of copy number variation (deletions/duplications) and regions of homozygosity (ROH) for estimating consanguinity status in 15 infants and young children (12 males, 3 females; mean age ± SD = 28.1 m ±  7.9 m; age range 14 m–41 m) randomly selected for microarray analysis. An adequate DNA yield was found in about one-half of the enrolled participants. Ten participants showed deletions or duplications containing candidate genes reported to impact behavior or cognitive development. Five children had ROHs which could have harbored recessive gene alleles contributing to their clinical presentation. The coefficient of inbreeding was calculated and three participants showed first-second cousin relationships, indicating consanguinity. Our preliminary study showed that DNA isolated from buccal cells using cotton swabs was suboptimal, but yet in a subset of participants the yield was adequate for high resolution microarray analysis and several genes were found that impact development and behavior and ROHs identified to determine consanguinity status. PMID:25400949

  18. Chronic hepatitis in the English springer spaniel: clinical presentation, histological description and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bexfield, N. H.; Andres-Abdo, C.; Scase, T. J.; Constantino-Casas, F.; Watson, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Medical records and liver histology of 68 English springer spaniels (ESS) with a histological diagnosis of CH were reviewed retrospectively. PCR was performed on liver tissue for canine adenovirus-1 (CAV-1), canine parvovirus, canine herpesvirus and pathogenic Leptospira species. Follow-up information was obtained to calculate survival times. Median age at presentation was three years seven months (range, seven months to eight years five months) and there were 48 female and 20 male dogs. Clinical signs were non-specific and five dogs were asymptomatic. All dogs had an increase in serum activity of one or more hepatobiliary enzymes. Histopathology demonstrated hepatocyte necrosis and apoptosis with varying amounts of fibrosis. A predominantly lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate throughout the hepatic parenchyma was found in all 68 dogs, but 45 of these dogs also had a neutrophilic component to the inflammatory infiltrate. There was no significant copper accumulation and no aetiological agent was identified by PCR. The median survival time was 189 days (range, 1 to 1211 days), 38 dogs died within three months and 12 dogs survived more than a year following diagnosis. PMID:21852307

  19. [Present-day aspects (diagnosis, clinical course and treatment) of acute progressive pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Mishin, V Iu

    2000-01-01

    A total of 103 patients with acute progressive pulmonary tuberculosis whose age ranged from 18 to 60 years were examined. Caseous pneumonic, infiltrative-caseous, disseminated, and rapidly progressive fibrocavernous tuberculosis was found in 45.6, 17.5, 16.5, and 20.4% of cases, respectively. The clinical picture was characterized by its acute onset with significant intoxication syndrome. Moreover, all the patients had respiratory and immunological failure, varying disseminated intravascular coagulation syndrome, non-specific bronchopulmonary infection; some presented with pulmonary hemorrhage, spontaneous pneumothorax and pleural empyema. The sputum smear test was positive in all the patients. If there was no evidence for drug resistance, patients had a 4-month regimen using isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide, ethembutol, and kanamycin. In the subsequent 10-12 months, isoniazid, rifampicin, and ethambutol were given. The patients with multidrug resistant tuberculosis were administered protionamide, ofloxacin, amikacin, supplemented by pyrazinamide and ethambutol. The combined chemotherapy could stop bacterial isolation in more than 80% of patients, make the process stable, and prepare them for planned surgical treatment. When complications occurred and the disease was in steady progress, salvage operations were made, which was the only possible way of preventing the progression of disease at times and of saving life in the patient. PMID:11202638

  20. Clinical Presentation, Management, and Outcomes of Deep Vein Thrombosis Based on Doppler Ultrasonography Examination.

    PubMed

    Al-Thani, Hassan; El-Menyar, Ayman; Asim, Mohammad; Kiliyanni, Abdul Salim

    2016-07-01

    We studied the frequency, clinical presentation, and outcomes of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Serial Doppler ultrasonography was performed between 2008 and 2013 for 6420 patients with suspected DVT. Diagnosis was confirmed in 662 (10.3%) participants (mean age: 50 ± 17 years; 51% females). Obesity, diabetes mellitus, and malignancy were reported in 47%, 28%, and 16%, respectively. Abnormal protein C, protein S, factor V Leiden, or antithrombin III were found in 9%, 7%, 3.8%, and 4%, respectively. Left, right, and both legs were involved in 55%, 37%, and 8%, respectively. Common femoral, popliteal, and posterior tibial veins were affected in 48.5%, 72%, and 71%, respectively. Postthrombotic syndrome, pulmonary embolism, and death were reported in 50%, 12.2%, and 15% of cases, respectively. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Cox regression analysis showed that gender had no impact on mortality during follow-up; however, age (>50 years) was associated with greater risk of death (hazard ratio: 6.54; 95% confidence interval: 3.2-13.3). These findings will improve our understanding of the various risk factors and help develop institutional guidelines for the management of patients with DVT. PMID:26345414

  1. Clinical Presentation and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Contact Lens Associated Microbial Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Hedayati, Hesam; Ghaderpanah, Mahboubeh; Rasoulinejad, Seyed Ahmad; Montazeri, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. In recent years, the number of contact lens wearers has dramatically increased in Iran, particularly in youngsters. The purpose of current study was to assess the clinical presentation and antibiotic susceptibility of contact lens related microbial keratitis in Ahvaz, southwest of Iran. Methodology. A cross-sectional investigation of 26 patients (33 eyes) with contact lens induced corneal ulcers who were admitted to Imam Khomeini Hospital, Ahwaz City, from June 2012 to June 2013 was done. In order to study microbial culture and susceptibility of corneal ulcers, all of them were scraped. Results. Eight samples were reported as sterile. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (80%) in positive cultures was the most widely recognized causative organism isolated. This is followed by Staphylococcus aureus 12% and Enterobacter 8%. The results showed that 84% of the microorganism cases were sensitive to ciprofloxacin, while imipenem, meropenem, and ceftazidime were the second most effective antibiotics (76%). Conclusion. Results of current study show the importance of referring all contact lens wearers with suspected corneal infection to ophthalmologists for more cure. The corneal scraping culture and contact lens solution should be performed to guide antibiotic therapy. PMID:26770828

  2. [Human plague and pneumonic plague : pathogenicity, epidemiology, clinical presentations and therapy].

    PubMed

    Riehm, Julia M; Löscher, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Yersinia pestis is a highly pathogenic gram-negative bacterium and the causative agent of human plague. In the last 1500 years and during three dreaded pandemics, millions of people became victims of Justinian's plague, the Black Death, or modern plague. Today, Y. pestis is endemic in natural foci of Asian, African and American countries. Due to its broad dissemination in mammal species and fleas, eradication of the pathogen will not be possible in the near future. In fact, plague is currently classified as a "re-emerging disease". Infection may occur after the bite of an infected flea, but also after oral ingestion or inhalation of the pathogen. The clinical presentations comprise the bubonic and pneumonic form, septicemia, rarely pharyngitis, and meningitis. Most human cases can successfully be treated with antibiotics. However, the high transmission rate and lethality of pneumonic plague require international and mandatory case notification and quarantine of patients. Rapid diagnosis, therapy and barrier nursing are not only crucial for the individual patient but also for the prevention of further spread of the pathogen or of epidemics. Therefore, WHO emergency schedules demand the isolation of cases, identification and surveillance of contacts as well as control of zoonotic reservoir animals and vectors. These sanctions and effective antibiotic treatment usually allow a rapid containment of outbreaks. However, multiple antibiotic resistant strains of Y. pestis have been isolated from patients in the past. So far, no outbreaks with such strains have been reported. PMID:25963643

  3. Giardia duodenalis assemblage, clinical presentation and markers of intestinal inflammation in Brazilian children

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Anita; Bushen, Oluma Y.; Pinkerton, Relana C.; Houpt, Eric; Newman, Robert D.; Sears, Cynthia L.; Lima, Aldo A. M.; Guerrant, Richard L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Data on the relationship between the two genotypes of Giardia duodenalis that infect humans, assemblages A and B, their clinical presentation and intestinal inflammation are limited. We analyzed 108 stool samples previously collected for a diarrhoeal study among Brazilian children, representing 71 infections in 47 children. Assemblage B was most prevalent, accounting for 43/58 (74.1%) infections, while assemblage A accounted for 9/58 (15.5%) infections and 6/58 (10.3%) infections were mixed (contained both assemblage A and B). There was no significant difference in diarrhoeal symptoms experienced during assemblage A, B or mixed infections. Children with assemblage B demonstrated greater variability in G. duodenalis cyst shedding but at an overall greater level (n = 43, mean 3.6 105, range 5.3 1022.5 106 cysts/ml) than children infected with assemblage A (n = 9, mean 1.4 105, range 1.5 1044.6 105 cysts/ml; P = 0.009). Children with mixed infections shed more cysts (mean 8.3 105, range 3.1 1042.8 106 cysts/ml) than children with assemblage A or B alone (P = 0.069 and P = 0.046 respectively). This higher rate of cyst shedding in children with assemblage B may propagate its spread, accounting for its increased incidence. Additionally, second and third infections had decreasing faecal lactoferrin, suggesting some protection against severity, albeit not against infection, by prior infection. PMID:18485429

  4. Understanding pathogenetic aspects and clinical presentation of primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) through its derived cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Antonino; Cesarman, Ethel; Gloghini, Annunziata; Drexler, Hans G.

    2013-01-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a very rare subgroup of B-cell lymphomas presenting as pleural, peritoneal and pericardial neoplastic effusions in the absence of a solid tumor mass or recognizable nodal involvement. There is strong evidence that Kaposi’s sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a causal agent of PEL. PEL tumor cells are latently infected by KSHV with consistent expression of several viral proteins and microRNAs that can affect cellular proliferation, differentiation and survival. The most relevant data on pathogenesis and biology of KSHV have been provided by studies on PEL derived cell lines. Fourteen continuous cell lines have been established from the malignant effusions of patients with AIDS-and non-AIDS-associated PEL. These KSHV+ EBV+/− cell lines are wellcharacterized, authenticated and mostly available from public biological ressource centers. The PEL cell lines display unique features and are clearly distinct from other lymphoma cell lines. PEL cell lines represent an indispensable tool for the understanding of KSHV biology and its impact on the clinical manifestation of PEL. Studies on PEL cell lines have shown that a number of viral genes, expressed during latency or lytic life cycle, have effects on cell binding, proliferation, angiogenesis and inflammation. Also PEL cell lines are important model systems for the study of the pathology of PEL including the lack of invasive or destructive growth patterns and the peculiar propensity of PEL to involve body cavity surfaces. PMID:20051807

  5. Women in treatment: within-gender differences in the clinical presentation of opioid-dependent women.

    PubMed

    McMahon, T J; Luthar, S S

    2000-10-01

    Despite consistent evidence of gender differences in the nature of drug dependence, there has been little consideration of within-gender differences in the clinical presentation of drug-abusing women. In this study, cluster analysis and standardized ratings obtained from 153 women seeking methadone maintenance treatment were used to define four groups of women with different profiles of problem severity. The four clusters were characterized as Unemployed, Medically Ill, Psychiatrically Distressed, and Higher Functioning. When the validity of this four-cluster solution was examined, there were significant differences in the ethnic composition of the four groups, and the four clusters differed in terms of a) psychiatric status, b) medical status, c) vocational-educational history, d) lifetime history of maltreatment, and e) perception of social support available from friends and family. The findings suggest that, although understanding of gender differences cannot be ignored, understanding of ways women differ from one another may be as important in the development of gender-sensitive treatment programs. PMID:11048817

  6. Pulmonary embolism as the initial clinical presentation of Kimura disease: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xu; Feng, Ying; Lin, Suxia

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary embolism is clinically critical in that if misdiagnosed or delayed, the mortality is very high. The recognition of its risk factor or underlying disease is important for prevention of recurrence. Kimura disease is a rare, chronic inflammatory disease, which is seldom associated with thrombosis. We reported a 47-year-old male case presenting with pleural pain and dyspnoea and was found to have pulmonary embolism. After successful management of pulmonary embolism, he was noticed to have eosinophilia and lymphadenopathy. Pathologic examination of a resected lymph node has confirmed the diagnosis of Kimura disease. The patient was treated with corticosteroid and cyclosporine A, with a significant improvement of the symptoms and signs of Kimura disease and no recurrence of any thromboembolism. Associated literatures were reviewed to explore the pathogenesis underlying the thrombotic event in Kimura disease cases. It is suggested that hypereosinophilia may play a key role in thrombosis formation. The control of hypereosinophilia may contribute to the prevention of thrombosis and its recurrence in patients with Kimura disease. PMID:25699606

  7. Two syringe spinal anesthesia technique for cesarean section: A controlled randomized study of a simple way to achieve more satisfactory block and less hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Keera, Amr Aly Ismail; Elnabtity, Ali Mohamed Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multiple trials have been tried to prevent hypotension during spinal anesthesia. However, the drug choice and mode of administration is still a matter of debate. Objectives: To compare the outcome of spinal injection of hyperbaric bupivacaine and fentanyl separately to standard injection of mixed fentanyl with hyperbaric bupivacaine. Settings and Design: A randomized, controlled clinical trial. Patients and Methods: One hundred twenty-four parturient scheduled for elective cesarean section were randomly allocated into two groups, each 62 parturient: Group M received spinal anesthesia using 10 mg bupivacaine 0.5% premixed with 25 μg fentanyl in the same syringe and Group S received 25 μg fentanyl in one syringe and 10 mg bupivacaine 0.5% without barbotage in a second syringe. Results: Patients with intraoperative pain that was controllable without the need for a shift to general anesthesia was significantly lower in Group S (3.2%) than in Group M (16.1%). The frequency of hypotension was significantly lower in Group S compared to Group M (P < 0.05). Time till the onset of sensory block was nonsignificantly shorter with nonsignificantly higher mean level of maximal sensory block in Group S compared to Group M (P > 0.05). There was no significant difference in the time till occurrence of hypotension, duration of hypotension, mean dose of ephedrine used for the treatment of hypotension and frequency of patients developed itching between the groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Separate intrathecal injection of fentanyl and hyperbaric bupivacaine provided a significant improvement in the quality of sensory block and significant reduction of the frequency of hypotension compared to injection of mixed medications.

  8. [Keloid scars (part I): Clinical presentation, epidemiology, histology and pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Philandrianos, C; Kerfant, N; Jaloux, C; Martinet, L; Bertrand, B; Casanova, D

    2016-04-01

    Keloid scars are a dysregulated response to cutaneous wound healing and are characterized by excessive deposition of collagen. Clinical and histological aspects are typical but they are often confused with hypertrophic scars. Principal pathogenesis is abnormal regulation of the collagen equilibrium because of TGFβ. In this first part, clinical characteristics, physiopathology and histology of keloid scars are explained. PMID:26545809

  9. Advance prediction of hypotension at cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, S M; Norris, M C

    1996-01-01

    Cardiovascular responses to supine inferior vena cava compression might predict hypotension risk during elective cesarean delivery using spinal anesthesia. In this pilot study we investigated 27 women before operation by taking blood pressure and heart rate measurements for 5 min in the left lateral position, 5 min supine, and then performed one further reading in the left lateral position and one sitting. Anesthesia with hyperbaric bupivacaine was rigorously standardised. A pre-operative 'supine stress test', combining an increase in maternal heart rate of greater than 10 beats/min or leg flexion movements while supine, was analysed. A positive supine stress test (SST) was 4.1 times more frequent in those with severe systolic hypotension below 70% of baseline (12 out of 16 women) than in those without (2 out of 11 women), with a sensitivity of 75% (95% C.I. 48% to 93%) and specificity of 82% (95% C.I. 48% to 98%). A positive test was associated with twice as much vasopressor use as a negative test (30.7 +/-/14.5 mg versus 13.5 +/-/ 9.9 mg; P = 0.0014). Unlike the SST, cardiovascular responses to the change from recumbent to sitting (tilt test) were not useful as a predictor of hypotension. PMID:15321375

  10. Hemofiltration and Hemodiafiltration Reduce Intradialytic Hypotension in ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Altieri, Paolo; Andrulli, Simeone; Bolasco, Piergiorgio; Sau, Giovanna; Pedrini, Luciano A.; Basile, Carlo; David, Salvatore; Feriani, Mariano; Montagna, Giovanni; Di Iorio, Biagio Raffaele; Memoli, Bruno; Cravero, Raffaella; Battaglia, Giovanni; Zoccali, Carmine

    2010-01-01

    Symptomatic intradialytic hypotension is a common complication of hemodialysis (HD). The application of convective therapies to the outpatient setting may improve outcomes, including intradialytic hypotension. In this multicenter, open-label, randomized controlled study, we randomly assigned 146 long-term dialysis patients to HD (n = 70), online predilution hemofiltration (HF; n = 36), or online predilution hemodiafiltration (HDF; n = 40). The primary end point was the frequency of intradialytic symptomatic hypotension (ISH). Compared with the run-in period, the frequency of sessions with ISH during the evaluation period increased for HD (7.1 to 7.9%) and decreased for both HF (9.8 to 8.0%) and HDF (10.6 to 5.2%) (P < 0.001). Mean predialysis systolic BP increased by 4.2 mmHg among those who were assigned to HDF compared with decreases of 0.6 and 1.8 mmHg among those who were assigned to HD and HF, respectively (P = 0.038). Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated significant risk reductions in ISH for both HF (odds ratio 0.69; 95% confidence interval 0.51 to 0.92) and HDF (odds ratio 0.46, 95% confidence interval 0.33 to 0.63). There was a trend toward higher dropout for those who were assigned to HF (P = 0.107). In conclusion, compared with conventional HD, convective therapies (HDF and HF) reduce ISH in long-term dialysis patients. PMID:20813866

  11. Implications of a Vasodilatory Human Monoclonal Autoantibody in Postural Hypotension*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongliang; Zuccolo, Jonathan; Kem, David C.; Zillner, Caitlin; Lee, Jiyeon; Smith, Kenneth; James, Judith A.; Cunningham, Madeleine W.; Yu, Xichun

    2013-01-01

    Functional autoantibodies to the autonomic receptors are increasingly recognized in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. To date, no human activating monoclonal autoantibodies to these receptors have been available. In this study, we describe for the first time a β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR)-activating monoclonal autoantibody (C5F2) produced from the lymphocytes of a patient with idiopathic postural hypotension. C5F2, an IgG3 isotype, recognizes an epitope in the N terminus of the second extracellular loop (ECL2) of β2AR. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed high binding affinity for the β2AR ECL2 peptide. Immunoblotting and immunofluorescence demonstrated specific binding to β2AR in H9c2 cardiomyocytes, CHO cells expressing human β2AR, and rat aorta. C5F2 stimulated cyclic AMP production in β2AR-transfected CHO cells and induced potent dilation of isolated rat cremaster arterioles, both of which were specifically blocked by the β2AR-selective antagonist ICI-118551 and by the β2AR ECL2 peptide. This monoclonal antibody demonstrated sufficient activity to produce postural hypotension in its host. Its availability provides a unique opportunity to identify previously unrecognized causes and new pharmacological management of postural hypotension and other cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24043632

  12. Hypotensive action of Nangapiry, a Paraguayan natural medicine, in rodents.

    PubMed

    Morioka, K; Nojima, H; Kurosaki, E; Arisawa, M; Kuraishi, Y; Momose, Y

    2000-04-01

    Hypotensive action mechanism of a cation exchange resin adsorbate (IR-120A) separated from a Paraguayan Natural Medicine, Nangapiry, was investigated. Blood pressures of normal and pithed rats and contractions of isolated thoracic aorta and atria of mice were measured. The blood pressure on normal rats was reduced by an intravenous injection of IR-120A (5 mg/kg). The hypotensive effect on the pithed rat appeared more lasting than that on normal rats by IR-120A. The IR-120A (100 microg-3 mg/ml) concentration-dependently depressed prostaglandin (PG) F2alpha (10 microM)- or KCl (40 mM)-induced aortic contractions and electrically-evoked contraction of left atria, and at a lesser extent spontaneous beating rate of right atria. The 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) for the PGF2alpha- and KCl-induced aortic contractions were 713 and 828 microg/ml, respectively, and the IC50 values for the muscle contraction and the beating rate were 1.04 and >3 mg/ml, respectively. These results suggest that the hypotensive action of IR-120A are peripherally elicited by the dilatation of artery and the depression of heart contraction, but not the reduction of heart rate. PMID:10839211

  13. Clinical Trials in Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy-Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Weydt, Patrick; Sagnelli, Anna; Rosenbohm, Angela; Fratta, Pietro; Pradat, Pierre-François; Ludolph, Albert C; Pareyson, Davide

    2016-03-01

    Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy (SBMA), also known as Kennedy's disease, is a rare adult-onset lower motor neuron disorder with a classic X-linked inheritance pattern. It is caused by the abnormal expansion of the CAG-repeat tract in the androgen receptor gene. Despite important progress in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis and the availability of a broad set of model organisms, successful translation of these insights into clinical interventions remains elusive. Here we review the available information on clinical trials in SBMA and discuss the challenges and pitfalls that impede therapy development. Two important factors are the variability of the complex neuro-endocrinological phenotype and the comparatively low incidence of the disease that renders recruitment for clinical trials demanding. We propose that these challenges can be and need to be overcome by fostering closer collaborations between clinical research centers, the patient communities and the industry and non-industry sponsors of clinical trials. PMID:26572537

  14. Demographic, epidemiologic and clinical profile of snake bite cases, presented to Emergency Medicine department, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

    PubMed Central

    Jarwani, Bhavesh; Jadav, Pradeep; Madaiya, Malhar

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Snake bite is a common medical emergency faced mainly by the rural populations in tropical and subtropical countries with heavy rainfall and humid climate. Although India is a single largest contributor of snake bite cases, reporting is very poor. There is hardly any publication of the same from Gujarat state that is developing at a good pace. Hence, we aimed to study the snake bite cases with particular attention to demography, epidemiology, and clinical profile. Settings and Design: The present descriptive, observational study was carried out at the Emergency Medicine Department of a tertiary care center in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. This department is one if the firsts to get recognized by the Medical Council of India. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional single-center study. Cases were entered into the prescribed form, and detailed information regarding demographic, epidemiologic, and clinical parameters was entered. Statistical Method: Data were analyzed using Epi2000. Means and frequencies for each variable were calculated. Results: Majority (67.4%) of the snake bite victims were in the age group between 15 and 45 years. Majority were male victims (74.2%). 71% victims of snake bite lived in rural areas. Farmers and laborers were the main victims. 61.2% incidents took place at night time or early morning (before 6 a.m.). 64% patients had bite mark on the lower limb. 40% victims had seen the snake. Eight patients had snake bite, but were asymptomatic. 52% had neuroparalytic manifestation, 34% were asymptomatic, and 9.6% had hemorrhagic manifestation. 14% cases received treatment within 1 h of the bite and 64.84% within 1-6 h after the bite. First aid given was in the form of application of tourniquet (16.2%), local application of lime, chillies, herbal medicine, etc., (1%). 2.20% cases were sensitive to anti-snake venom. Only three patients died. Conclusion: In this region (Gujarat), neuroparalytic manifestation of snake bite is more prevalent. Cobra and krait are the commonest types of poisonous snakes. The time of seeking treatment has reduced because of awareness about snake bite treatment and better transport and ambulance facility. Mortality is very less in well-equipped hospitals due to early initiation of treatment with anti-snake venom. PMID:23960378

  15. Portal hypertensive gastropathy: A systematic review of the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, natural history and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gjeorgjievski, Mihajlo; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To describe the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, natural history, and therapy of portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG) based on a systematic literature review. METHODS: Computerized search of the literature was performed via PubMed using the following medical subject headings or keywords: “portal” and “gastropathy”; or “portal” and “hypertensive”; or “congestive” and “gastropathy”; or “congestive” and “gastroenteropathy”. The following criteria were applied for study inclusion: Publication in peer-reviewed journals, and publication since 1980. Articles were independently evaluated by each author and selected for inclusion by consensus after discussion based on the following criteria: Well-designed, prospective trials; recent studies; large study populations; and study emphasis on PHG. RESULTS: PHG is diagnosed by characteristic endoscopic findings of small polygonal areas of variable erythema surrounded by a pale, reticular border in a mosaic pattern in the gastric fundus/body in a patient with cirrhotic or non-cirrhotic portal hypertension. Histologic findings include capillary and venule dilatation, congestion, and tortuosity, without vascular fibrin thrombi or inflammatory cells in gastric submucosa. PHG is differentiated from gastric antral vascular ectasia by a different endoscopic appearance. The etiology of PHG is inadequately understood. Portal hypertension is necessary but insufficient to develop PHG because many patients have portal hypertension without PHG. PHG increases in frequency with more severe portal hypertension, advanced liver disease, longer liver disease duration, presence of esophageal varices, and endoscopic variceal obliteration. PHG pathogenesis is related to a hyperdynamic circulation, induced by portal hypertension, characterized by increased intrahepatic resistance to flow, increased splanchnic flow, increased total gastric flow, and most likely decreased gastric mucosal flow. Gastric mucosa in PHG shows increased susceptibility to gastrotoxic chemicals and poor wound healing. Nitrous oxide, free radicals, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and glucagon may contribute to PHG development. Acute and chronic gastrointestinal bleeding are the only clinical complications. Bleeding is typically mild-to-moderate. Endoscopic therapy is rarely useful because the bleeding is typically diffuse. Acute bleeding is primarily treated with octreotide, often with concomitant proton pump inhibitor therapy, or secondarily treated with vasopressin or terlipressin. Nonselective β-adrenergic receptor antagonists, particularly propranolol, are used to prevent bleeding after an acute episode or for chronic bleeding. Iron deficiency anemia from chronic bleeding may require iron replacement therapy. Transjugular-intrahepatic-portosystemic-shunt and liver transplantation are highly successful ultimate therapies because they reduce the underlying portal hypertension. CONCLUSION: PHG is important to recognize in patients with cirrhotic or non-cirrhotic portal hypertension because it can cause acute or chronic GI bleeding that often requires pharmacologic therapy. PMID:26855694

  16. Impact of Controlled Induced Hypotension on Cognitive Functions of Patients Undergoing Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Stanislaw; Oldak, Anna; Kluzik, Anna; Drobnik, Leon

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Controlled induced hypotension guarantees less blood loss and better visibility of the surgical site. The impact of hypotension on post-operative cognitive functions is still being discussed. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of controlled induced hypotension on the cognitive functions of patients undergoing functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). MATERIAL AND METHODS We allocated 47 patients with a good grade of preoperative cognitive functions evaluated with the Mini-Mental State Examination to 3 groups (1 - mild hypotension, 2 - intermediate hypotension, 3 - severe hypotension) according to the degree of mean intraoperative arterial pressure compared with preoperative blood pressure. Cognitive functions were evaluated preoperatively, 6 h, and 30 h postoperatively with standardized tests: the Stroop Test, Trail Making Test (TMT), and Verbal Fluency Test (VFT). A decrease in the test results and increase in the number of mistakes made were considered an impairment of cognitive functions. RESULTS A total of 47 patients (group 1 - mild hypotension - 15, group 2 - intermediate hypotension - 19, group 3 - severe hypotension - 13) were included in the study. A significant decrease was observed in all the 3 groups after Stroop A test 6h postoperatively but it improved 30h postoperatively, without differences between the groups. Neither a significant decrease in the test results nor an increase in the number of mistakes was noted for Stroop B tests, TMT A&B tests and VFT. CONCLUSIONS The degree of controlled intraoperative hypotension during FESS did not influence the results of psychometric tests. PMID:26991989

  17. Twenty years of human immunodeficiency virus care at the Mayo Clinic: Past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Nathan W; Badley, Andrew D; Kasten, Mary J; Sampath, Rahul; Temesgen, Zelalem; Whitaker, Jennifer A; Wilson, John W; Yao, Joseph D; Zeuli, John; Rizza, Stacey A

    2016-01-01

    The Mayo human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Clinic has been providing patient centered care for persons living with HIV in Minnesota and beyond for the past 20 years. Through multidisciplinary engagement, vital clinical outcomes such as retention in care, initiation of antiretroviral therapy and virologic suppression are maximized. In this commentary, we describe the history of the Mayo HIV Clinic and its best practices, providing a “Mayo Model” of HIV care that exceeds national outcomes and may be applicable in other settings. PMID:27175350

  18. Sonography in Hypotension and Cardiac Arrest (SHoC): Rates of Abnormal Findings in Undifferentiated Hypotension and During Cardiac Arrest as a Basis for Consensus on a Hierarchical Point of Care Ultrasound Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Milne, James; Lewis, David; Fraser, Jacqueline; Diegelmann, Laura; Olszynski, Paul; Stander, Melanie; Lamprecht, Hein

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Point of care ultrasound (PoCUS) has become an established tool in the initial management of patients with undifferentiated hypotension. Current established protocols (RUSH and ACES) were developed by expert user opinion, rather than objective, prospective data. PoCUS also provides invaluable information during resuscitation efforts in cardiac arrest by determining presence/absence of cardiac activity and identifying reversible causes such as pericardial tamponade. There is no agreed guideline on how to safely and effectively incorporate PoCUS into the advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) algorithm. We wished to report disease incidence as a basis to develop a hierarchical approach to PoCUS in hypotension and during cardiac arrest. Methods We summarized the recorded incidence of PoCUS findings from the initial cohort during the interim analysis of two prospective studies. We propose that this will form the basis for developing a modified Delphi approach incorporating this data to obtain the input of a panel of international experts associated with five professional organizations led by the International Federation of Emergency Medicine (IFEM). The modified Delphi tool will be developed to reach an international consensus on how to integrate PoCUS for hypotensive emergency department patients as well as into cardiac arrest algorithms. Results Rates of abnormal PoCUS findings from 151 patients with undifferentiated hypotension included left ventricular dynamic changes (43%), IVC abnormalities (27%), pericardial effusion (16%), and pleural fluid (8%). Abdominal pathology was rare (fluid 5%, AAA 2%). During cardiac arrest there were no pericardial effusions, however abnormalities of ventricular contraction (45%) and valvular motion (39%) were common among the 43 patients included. Conclusions A prospectively collected disease incidence-based hierarchy of scanning can be developed based on the reported findings. This will inform an international consensus process towards the development of proposed SHoC protocols for hypotension and cardiac arrest, comprised of the stepwise clinical-indication based approach of Core, Supplementary, and Additional PoCUS views. We hope that such a protocol would be structured in a way that enables the clinician to only perform views that are clinically indicated, which limits exposure to the frequent incidental positive findings that accompany the current “one size fits all” standard protocols.

  19. Clinical presentation and treatment of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) in India.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Nagendra Nath

    2015-10-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is a chronic disease characterized by pelvic pain urgency and frequency. Patients with severe symptoms lead a very miserable life. North American, European and Asian guidelines have been recently promulgated but they differ on many important issues. There is no consensus on its name, definition, investigations and management. Indian guidelines have also been developed and they give more importance to the symptoms in relation to micturition. Though initially believed to be rare or non-existent in India the situation has changed. In Indian patients the presentation is more or less same as the rest of the world but a large percentage have obstructive symptoms and unusual urinary symptoms. Anal discomfort is also common. In India the commonest investigation in all cases of lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction is ultrasonography of kidney ureter and bladder with measurement of the post void residual urine volume. Cystoscopy is also done in all the cases to rule out presence of tuberculosis or carcinoma in situ. Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is not considered to be a clinical disease as it is difficult to rule out all differential diagnosis only from history. Hunner's lesion is very rare. Cystoscopy with hydro distension, oral therapy, intravesical therapy and surgical therapy form the back bone of management. It is difficult to know which treatment is best for a given patient. A staged protocol is followed and all the treatment modalities are applied to the patients in a sequential fashion-starting from the non-invasive to more invasive. Intravesical botox has not been found to be effective and there is no experience with interstim neuromodulation. PMID:26816851

  20. Traumatic odontoid process synchondrosis fracture with atlantoaxial instability in a calf: clinical presentation and imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Hülsmeyer, Velia-Isabel; Flatz, Katharina; Putschbach, Katrin; Bechter, Martina Ramona; Weiler, Sebastian; Fischer, Andrea; Feist, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    A 6-week-old female Simmental calf was evaluated for acute non-ambulatory tetraparesis. Physical and laboratory examinations revealed no clinically relevant abnormalities. Neurological findings were consistent with acute, progressive and painful cervical myelopathy. Radiographs displayed a fractured odontoid process (dens axis) and vertebral step misalignment at the fracture site. A traumatic origin was suspected. Advanced diagnostic imaging was considered to allow better planning of potential surgical stabilisation and to exclude any additional lesions of the cervical vertebral column. However, during trailer transportation to the advanced diagnostic imaging and surgery site, the calf deteriorated neurologically and was humanely euthanised. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were performed immediately post-mortem for scientific reasons. The MRI examination reflected the radiographic findings and confirmed severe spinal cord compression at the fracture site. In addition, a T2W-hyperintense signal change within the paravertebral soft tissue dorsal to the fracture site was indicative of a traumatic event. CT identified the fracture site at the synchondrosis between the odontoid process and the body of the axis, and this finding was confirmed by post-mortem examination. Advanced diagnostic imaging and post-mortem examination did not identify any other cervical lesion. In summary, this calf was diagnosed with a traumatic odontoid process synchondrosis fracture, which has not been reported previously in calves but presents a challenging and well-known fracture type in young children. This case report indicates that the odontoid process synchondrosis is a potential predisposed injury site and that traumatic odontoid process synchondrosis fractures should be considered as a potential differential in calves with acute cervical pain and/or signs of a cervical myelopathy. PMID:25937919

  1. Clinical presentation and treatment of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) in India

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is a chronic disease characterized by pelvic pain urgency and frequency. Patients with severe symptoms lead a very miserable life. North American, European and Asian guidelines have been recently promulgated but they differ on many important issues. There is no consensus on its name, definition, investigations and management. Indian guidelines have also been developed and they give more importance to the symptoms in relation to micturition. Though initially believed to be rare or non-existent in India the situation has changed. In Indian patients the presentation is more or less same as the rest of the world but a large percentage have obstructive symptoms and unusual urinary symptoms. Anal discomfort is also common. In India the commonest investigation in all cases of lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction is ultrasonography of kidney ureter and bladder with measurement of the post void residual urine volume. Cystoscopy is also done in all the cases to rule out presence of tuberculosis or carcinoma in situ. Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is not considered to be a clinical disease as it is difficult to rule out all differential diagnosis only from history. Hunner’s lesion is very rare. Cystoscopy with hydro distension, oral therapy, intravesical therapy and surgical therapy form the back bone of management. It is difficult to know which treatment is best for a given patient. A staged protocol is followed and all the treatment modalities are applied to the patients in a sequential fashion—starting from the non-invasive to more invasive. Intravesical botox has not been found to be effective and there is no experience with interstim neuromodulation. PMID:26816851

  2. Clinical Presentation and Birth Outcomes Associated with Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Helen Y.; Katz, Joanne; Tielsch, James; Khatry, Subarna K.; Shrestha, Laxman; LeClerq, Steven C.; Magaret, Amalia; Kuypers, Jane; Steinhoff, Mark C.; Englund, Janet A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important cause of viral pneumonia in children worldwide. A maternal vaccine may protect both the mother and infant from RSV illness. The epidemiology and clinical presentation of RSV in pregnant and postpartum women is not well-described. Methods Data were collected from a prospective, randomized trial of influenza immunization in pregnant women in rural southern Nepal. Women were enrolled in their second trimester of pregnancy and followed until six months postpartum. Active weekly home-based surveillance for febrile respiratory illness was performed. Mid-nasal swabs collected with episodes of respiratory illness were tested for RSV by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results RSV was detected in 14 (0.4%) illness episodes in 3693 women over 3554 person-years of surveillance from 2011–2014. RSV incidence was 3.9/1000 person-years overall, and 11.8/1000 person-years between September and December. Seven (50%) women sought care for RSV illness; none died. Of the 7 (50%) illness episodes during pregnancy, all had live births with 2 (29%) preterm births and a median birthweight of 3060 grams. This compares to 469 (13%) preterm births and a median birthweight of 2790 grams in women without RSV during pregnancy. Of the 7 mothers with postpartum RSV infection, RSV was detected in 4 (57%) of their infants. Conclusions RSV was an uncommon cause of febrile respiratory illness in mothers during pregnancy in Nepal. These data will inform prevention and therapeutic strategies against RSV in resource-limited settings. PMID:27031702

  3. Vocal cord dysfunction in athletes: clinical presentation and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Al-Alwan, Ali; Kaminsky, David

    2012-05-01

    Vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) is a syndrome characterized by the intermittent, abnormal paradoxical adduction of the true vocal cords during respiration resulting in variable upper airway obstruction. It is also commonly referred to as paradoxical vocal fold motion disorder. Patients with VCD usually present with intermittent shortness of breath of varying intensity, wheezing, stridor, choking, throat tightness, voice changes, or cough, and these symptoms often resolve quickly after relaxation or cessation of activity. Since first described as a distinct clinical entity in 1983, VCD remains underrecognized and the underlying cause(s) is not fully understood. Several studies suggest psychogenic or laryngeal hyperresponsiveness as possible underlying causes. Although VCD may have many causes, it can be a unique problem, especially in athletes because it often mimics and can be easily mistaken for exercise-induced bronchospasm, which may result in unnecessary medical treatment and delay in diagnosis. A detailed history, physical examination, and pulmonary function tests with flow-volume loops are important for excluding other diagnoses; however, the gold standard method for diagnosing VCD is by observation of the vocal cords with flexible laryngoscopy. The mainstay of treatment includes behavioral management guided by a speech-language pathologist, but optimal therapy often requires a multidisciplinary team involving a variety of specialties, including certified athletic training, pulmonology, otolaryngology, speech-language pathology, gastroenterology, allergy and immunology, and psychology, as appropriate. We reviewed the medical literature for VCD specifically in athletes, and this article discusses in detail the definition, epidemiology, possible pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment options. PMID:22759602

  4. Transient A-V dissociation and severe hypotension due to consumption of Ayurvedic medicine--Vatsanabha (aconitum ferox).

    PubMed

    Laddhad, Deepak; Sancheti, Saurabh R; Dinde, Yogita

    2014-05-01

    A 24 year old married, well educated, female patient presented with complaints of giddiness and blackouts. On evaluation, patient had hypotension and bradycardia. ECG findings were suggestive of complete A-V dissociation. On detailed history patient revealed consumption. of Ayurvedic medicine Vatsanabha for arthritis. This study impresses upon the need for complete history talking and generating awareness regarding the correct and observed use of any drug including alternative medicines. PMID:25438496

  5. Transient A-V dissociation and severe hypotension due to consumption of Ayurvedic medicine--Vatsanabha (aconitum ferox).

    PubMed

    Laddhad, Deepak; Sancheti, Saurabh R; Dinde, Yogita

    2014-05-01

    A 24 year old married, well educated, female patient presented with complaints of giddiness and blackouts. On evaluation, patient had hypotension and bradycardia. ECG findings were suggestive of complete A-V dissociation. On detailed history patient revealed consumption. of Ayurvedic medicine Vatsanabha for arthritis. This study impresses upon the need for complete history talking and generating awareness regarding the correct and observed use of any drug including alternative medicines. PMID:25508013

  6. 21 CFR 50.52 - Clinical investigations involving greater than minimal risk but presenting the prospect of direct...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... subjects. Any clinical investigation within the scope described in §§ 50.1 and 56.101 of this chapter in which more than minimal risk to children is presented by an intervention or procedure that holds out...

  7. Cheek and periorbital peculiar discoid lupus erythematosus: rare clinical presentation mimicking tinea faciei, cutaneous granulomatous disease or blepharitis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Satoshi; Yamada, Tomoko; Umemoto, Naoka; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Wakatabi, Koji; Iida, Eri; Masaki, Masumi; Kakurai, Maki; Demitsu, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    We present clinically peculiar facial discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) that mimicked tinea faciei. Although DLE is a chronic autoimmune dermatosis, it has a variety of rare clinical presentations, including periorbital DLE, comedonic DLE and hypertrophic DLE recently. In this case, a scaly, erythematous lesion on the eyelid and the central healed, mildly elevated, annularly distributed facial DLE mimicked tinea faciei, complicating our diagnosis. PMID:25969679

  8. Anaphylaxis to Iodinated Contrast Media: Clinical Characteristics Related with Development of Anaphylactic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Hye; Lee, Suh-Young; Lee, Seung-Eun; Yang, Min-Suk; Jung, Jae-Woo; Park, Chang Min; Lee, Whal; Cho, Sang-Heon; Kang, Hye-Ryun

    2014-01-01

    Objective Anaphylaxis is the most severe form of radiocontrast media (RCM) induced hypersensitivity and can be life-threatening if profound hypotension is combined. With increased use of iodine based RCM, related hypersensitivity is rapidly growing. However, the clinical characteristics and risk factors of RCM induced anaphylaxis accompanied by hypotension (anaphylactic shock) are not clearly defined. This study was performed to investigate the risk factors of RCM induced anaphylactic shock and the clinical value of RCM skin testing to identify causative agents in affected patients. Methods We analyzed the data of RCM induced anaphylaxis monitored by an inhospital pharmacovigilance center at a tertiary teaching hospital from January 2005 to December 2012 and compared the clinical features and skin test results according to the accompanying hypotension. Results Among total of 104 cases of RCM induced anaphylaxis, 34.6% of patients, developed anaphylaxis on their first exposure to RCM. Anaphylactic patients presenting with shock were older (57.4 vs. 50.1 years, p = 0.026) and had a history of more frequently exposure to RCM (5.1±7.8 vs. 1.9±3.3, p = 0.004) compared to those without hypotension. Among RCMs, hypotension was more frequent in anaphylaxis related to iopromide compared to other agents (85.0% vs. 61.4%, p = 0.011). Skin tests were performed in 51 patients after development of RCM induced anaphylaxis. Overall skin test positivity to RCM was 64.7% and 81.8% in patients with anaphylactic shock. Conclusion RCM induced anaphylactic shock is related to multiple exposures to RCM and most patients showed skin test positivity to RCM. PMID:24932635

  9. Topoisomerase I inhibitors: the relevance of prolonged exposure for present clinical development.

    PubMed Central

    Gerrits, C. J.; de Jonge, M. J.; Schellens, J. H.; Stoter, G.; Verweij, J.

    1997-01-01

    Topoisomerase I inhibitors constitute a new class of anti-cancer agents. Recently, topotecan and irinotecan were registered for clinical use in ovarian cancer and colorectal cancer respectively. Cytotoxicity of topoisomerase I inhibitors is S-phase specific, and in vitro and in vivo studies have suggested that, for efficacy, prolonged exposure might be more important than short-term exposure to high concentration. Clinical development of those topoisomerase I inhibitors that have reached this stage is also focused on schedules aiming to achieve prolonged exposure. In this review, we summarize all published preclinical studies on this topic for topoisomerase I inhibitors in clinical development, namely 20-S-camptothecin, 9-nitro-camptothecin, 9-amino-camptothecin, topotecan, irinotecan and GI147211. In addition, preliminary data on clinical studies concerning this topic are also reviewed. The data suggest that prolonged exposure may indeed be relevant for anti-tumour activity. However, the optimal schedule is yet to be determined. Finally, clinical data are yet too immature to draw definitive conclusions. PMID:9328159

  10. [Hypotension in the very preterm infant].

    PubMed

    Rigo, V; Beauduin, P; Rigo, J

    2007-02-01

    One out of four very preterm infants will present with circulatory maladaptation during the first two days of life, with an increased risk of early complications and long term sequelae. Appreciation of those transitional difficulties cannot be limited to blood pressure. Assesment of blood pressure itself must be done in relation with gestational age and birth weight adapted norms. The effects of therapies for low systemic blood flow on blood pressure, organs and cerebral circulations are better understood, but none of them has assessed for mortality or neurodevelopmental outcomes. PMID:17461297

  11. Sonography and hypotension: a change to critical problem solving in undergraduate medical education

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Richard; Stolz, Lori A; Hernandez, Nicholas C; Gaskin, Kevin; Baker, Nicola; Sanders, Arthur Barry; Adhikari, Srikar

    2016-01-01

    Study objectives Multiple curricula have been designed to teach medical students the basics of ultrasound; however, few focus on critical problem-solving. The objective of this study is to determine whether a theme-based ultrasound teaching session, dedicated to the use of ultrasound in the management of the hypotensive patient, can impact medical students’ ultrasound education and provide critical problem-solving exercises. Methods This was a cross-sectional study using an innovative approach to train 3rd year medical students during a 1-day ultrasound training session. The students received a 1-hour didactic session on basic ultrasound physics and knobology and were also provided with YouTube hyperlinks, and links to smart phone educational applications, which demonstrated a variety of bedside ultrasound techniques. In small group sessions, students learned how to evaluate patients for pathology associated with hypotension. A knowledge assessment questionnaire was administered at the end of the session and again 3 months later. Student knowledge was also assessed using different clinical scenarios with multiple-choice questions. Results One hundred and three 3rd year medical students participated in this study. Appropriate type of ultrasound was selected and accurate diagnosis was made in different hypotension clinical scenarios: pulmonary embolism, 81% (95% CI, 73%–89%); abdominal aortic aneurysm, 100%; and pneumothorax, 89% (95% CI, 82%–95%). The average confidence level in performing ultrasound-guided central line placement was 7/10, focused assessment with sonography for trauma was 8/10, inferior vena cava assessment was 8/10, evaluation for abdominal aortic aneurysm was 8/10, assessment for deep vein thrombus was 8/10, and cardiac ultrasound for contractility and overall function was 7/10. Student performance in the knowledge assessment portion of the questionnaire was an average of 74% (SD =11%) at the end of workshop and 74% (SD =12%) 3 months later (P=0.00). Conclusion At our institution, we successfully integrated ultrasound and critical problem-solving instruction, as part of a 1-day workshop for undergraduate medical education. PMID:26834502

  12. Idiopathic orthostatic hypotension: Recent data (eleven cases) and review of the literature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ninet, J.; Annat, G.; Boisson, D.; Holzhapfel, L.; Vincent, M.; Peyrin, L.; Michel, D.; Schott, B.; Devic, M.; Levrat, R.

    1981-01-01

    Eight cases of Shy-Drager syndrome and three of Bradbury-Eggleston idiopathic orthostatic hypotension were examined. In all cases, examination of circulatory reflexes showed major dysfunction of the sympathetic vasoconstrictor system. Anomalies in the vagal cardiomoderator system were less constant. Normal urinary elimination of catecholamines was recorded daily. Characteristically, no elevation of blood or urine norepinephrine levels were found in orthostatism. Insulin hypoglycemia normally raised urinary adrenalin elimination in three of ten patients. Plasma dopa-beta-hydroxylase activity was normal. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system showed variable activity at basal state but usually rose during orthostatism. On the average, very low homovanillic acid levels were found in cerebrospinal fluid before and after probenecid; hydroxyindolacetic acid was normal. Cerebral autoregulation had deteriorated in two of four cases. Physiopathologically the two clinical types are indistinguishable with or without central neurological signs.

  13. Intragenic deletion of RBFOX1 associated with neurodevelopmental/neuropsychiatric disorders and possibly other clinical presentations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background RBFOX1 is an important splicing factor regulating developmental and tissue-specific alternative splicing in heart, muscle, and neuronal tissues. Constitutional genetic defects in RBFOX1 are implicated in multiple medical conditions. Results We identified 14 copy number variants (CNV) involving RBFOX1 from 2,124 consecutive pediatric patients referred for chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA), including 13 intragenic deletions and a single intragenic duplication. The clinical significances of the intragenic deletions of RBFOX1 were evaluated. Conclusions Our data strongly supports the associations of intragenic deletions of RBFOX1 with a diversity of neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders, and possibly other clinical features. PMID:23822903

  14. Solar elastotic bands of the forearm: an unusual clinical presentation of actinic elastosis.

    PubMed

    Raimer, S S; Sanchez, R L; Hubler, W R; Dodson, R F

    1986-10-01

    Actinic damage of dermal tissues produces several distinct clinical patterns. Three patients are described as having discrete, soft, cordlike bands on the forearms that extend from dorsal areas of actinic damage and senile purpura to greatest prominence in flexural regions with less solar damage. Histochemical analyses and light and electron microscopy studies of the plaques showed changes consistent with solar elastosis. The clinical variants of actinic elastosis and the possible origins of the abnormal elastic fibrils found in the dermis of chronically sun-damaged skin are discussed. Solar elastotic bands are an unusual form of actinic degeneration. PMID:3771841

  15. Chronic graft-versus-host disease: clinical presentation of multiple lesions of lichenoid and atrophic pattern*

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Luiza; Vieira, Érica Cristina; Minicucci, Eliana Maria; Salvio, Ana Gabriela; de Souza, Mair Pedro; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar; Marques, Silvio Alencar

    2013-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease is observed mainly in recipients of hematopoietic cell transplantation and is expressed by cutaneous or systemic signals and symptoms. Graft-versus-host disease is clinically classified as acute or chronic. Chronic Graft-versus-host disease occurs in up to 70% of hematopoietic cell transplanted patients and its clinical manifestations have important impact on morbidity and quality of life. The authors report an expressive cutaneous, oral and adnexal involvement in a patient with chronic Graft-versus-host disease with multiple lesions of lichenoid and atrophic pattern. PMID:24173188

  16. A Learner-Centered Technique and Clinical Reasoning, Reflection, and Case Presentation Attributes in Athletic Training Students

    PubMed Central

    Heinerichs, Scott; Vela, Luzita I.; Drouin, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Providing opportunities to develop clinical decision-making skills, including clinical reasoning, is an important aspect of clinical education. The learner-centered technique of summarizing the history and findings, narrowing the differential, analyzing the differential, probing the instructor about uncertainties, plan management, and selecting an issue for self-directed study (SNAPPS) is used in medicine to express clinical reasoning. Objective: To investigate the effects of SNAPPS on the clinical reasoning, reflection, and 4 case presentation attributes (length, conciseness, case summary, and expression of clinical reasoning) in athletic training students. Design: Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting: Three undergraduate programs accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. Patients or Other Participants: We randomly assigned 38 athletic training students (17 men, 21 women; age = 21.53 ± 1.18 years, grade point average = 3.25 ± 0.31) who had completed at least 1 year of clinical education and all orthopaedic evaluation coursework to the SNAPPS group or the usual and customary group using a stratification scheme. Intervention(s): The SNAPPS group completed four 45-minute clinical reasoning and case presentation learning modules led by an investigator to learn the SNAPPS technique, whereas the usual and customary group received no formal instruction. Both groups audio recorded all injury evaluations performed over a 2-week period. Main Outcome Measures: Participants completed the Diagnostic Thinking Inventory and Reflection in Learning Scale twice. Case presentations were analyzed for 4 attributes: length, conciseness, case summary, and expression of clinical reasoning. Results: Case presentations were longer (t18.806 = −5.862, P < .001) but were more concise (t32 = 11.297, P < .001) for the SNAPPS group than for the usual and customary group. The SNAPPS group performed better on both the case summary subscale (t32 = 2.857, P = .007) and the clinical reasoning subscale (t25.773 = −14.162, P < .001) than the other group. We found a time effect for Diagnostic Thinking Inventory scores (F1,34 = 6.230, P = .02) but observed no group effects (F1,34 = 0.698, P = .41) or time-by-group interaction (F1,34 = 1.050, P = .31). The Reflection in Learning Scale scores analysis revealed no group-by-time interaction (F1,34 = 1.470, P = .23) and no group (F1,34 = 3.751, P = .06) or time (F1,34 = 0.835, P = .37) effects. Conclusions: The SNAPPS is an effective and feasible clinical education technique for case presentations. This learner-centered technique provides the opportunity for the expression of clinical reasoning skills. PMID:23675796

  17. Tender Endothelium Syndrome: Combination of Hypotension, Bradycardia, Contrast Induced Chest Pain, and Microvascular Angina

    PubMed Central

    Chiew, Soon Kwang; Syed, Jaffer

    2016-01-01

    Hypotension, bradycardia, and contrast induced chest pain are potential complications of cardiac catheterization and coronary angiography. Catheter-induced coronary spasm has been occasionally demonstrated, but its relationship to spontaneous coronary spasm is unclear. We describe a 64-year-old female who underwent coronary artery bypass surgery in 1998 on the basis of an angiographic diagnosis of severe left main disease, who recently presented with increasingly frequent typical angina. Repeat coronary angiography was immediately complicated by severe chest pain, hypotension, and bradycardia but demonstrated only mild disease of the left main artery and entire coronary tree with complete occlusion of her prior grafts. This reaction was almost identical to that observed during her original coronary angiogram. We now believe her original angiogram was complicated by severe catheter-induced left main spasm, with the accompanying contrast reaction attributed to left main disease, and the occlusion of coronary grafts explained by the absence of significant left main disease. The combination of these symptoms has not been documented in the literature. In this instance, these manifestations erroneously led to coronary bypass surgery. It is unknown whether routine, systematic injection of intracoronary nitroglycerin prior to angiography might blunt the severity of such reactions. PMID:26981290

  18. [Epidural blood patch treatment in a patient with chronic headache related to spontaneous intracranial hypotension].

    PubMed

    Gökçay, Figen; Eyigör, Can; Bayram, Ece; Dönmez, Ilknur; Uyar, Meltem

    2010-10-01

    Intracranial hypotension is usually seen in middle-aged adults and appears with orthostatic headache. It is characterized by low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure and pachymeningeal-dural thickening on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Lumbar puncture, dural rupture with CSF leakage secondary to spinal anesthesia or spinal traumas, and under-production or over-absorption of CSF due to some metabolic events such as dehydration, uremia and diabetic coma are the main etiologic factors. It is sometimes considered as idiopathic when no etiologic factor is present. In addition, some connective tissue disorders have risk of CSF leakage due to spontaneous dural rupture. Neck pain, tinnitus, nausea and vomiting, and diplopia may accompany headache. CSF leakage can be identified by computerized tomography (CT) myelography, CSF-flow MRI, and radionuclide cisternography. Bed rest, fluid resuscitation, caffeine, theophylline, and non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are important treatment options. In patients resistant to therapy, interventional measures such as epidural saline or blood patch can be applied. In this case report, we evaluated the results of pain treatment options in a patient having headache due to intracranial hypotension who was hospitalized in the Neurology Department of Ege University Hospital. PMID:21153936

  19. Idiopathic orthostatic hypotension from failure of noradrenaline release in a patient with vasomotor innervation.

    PubMed

    Nanda, R N; Boyle, F C; Gillespie, J S; Johnson, R H; Keogh, H J

    1977-01-01

    A 26 year old man is described with life-long orthostatic hypotension unrelated to autonomic nerve degeneration and apparently due to failure of peripheral noradrenaline realese. Tests of parasympathetic and sympathetic cholinergic nerve function were normal, but sympathetic adrenergic activity was defective. Thus blood pressure regulation was abnoraml. There was no pressor response to tyramine, an indirect sympathomimetic drug, but a marked pressor response to the directly acting sympathomimetic drugs phenylephrine and noradrenaline. On standing there was a progressive fall rather than a rise in circulating noradrenaline concentrations, although adrenaline levels rose normally. The pupils showed diminished responses to ephedrine and cocaine, and a normal response to phenylephrine. Fluorescence microscopy of blood bessels showed that they were innervated with adrenergic nerves. His orthostatic hypotenstion responded well to oral phenylephrine (50 mg five times daily) but not to other forms of therapy. It is suggested that this patient's symptoms were due to failure of noradrenaline release even though sympathetic adrenergic nerves were present. We therfore wish to draw attention to a further cause of orthostatic hypotension, failure of peripheral noradrenaline release without autonomic neuropathy. PMID:191566

  20. 21 CFR 50.54 - Clinical investigations not otherwise approvable that present an opportunity to understand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Clinical investigations not otherwise approvable... or welfare of children. 50.54 Section 50.54 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... alleviation of a serious problem affecting the health or welfare of children; and (b) The Commissioner of...

  1. Annual Research Review: Attachment Disorders in Early Childhood--Clinical Presentation, Causes, Correlates, and Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeanah, Charles H.; Gleason, Mary Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Background: Though noted in the clinical literature for more than 50 years, attachment disorders have been studied systematically only recently. In part because of the ubiquity of attachments in humans, determining when aberrant behavior is best explained as an attachment disorder as opposed to insecure attachment has led to some confusion. In…

  2. The Use of Student Time Task Measures in Pre Student Teaching Clinical Experiences: A Panel Presentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waimon, Morton D.; And Others

    Illinois State University's teacher education program's professional sequence is organized around separate teaching skills, each of which relates to student outcomes in classrooms. Initially, a group of University High (U-High) Laboratory School supervisors was formed to develop clinical experiences which would enable prospective teachers to…

  3. Clinical Profile of Childhood Onset Depression Presenting to Child Adolescent and Family Services in Northampton

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majumder, Pallab; Hammad, Hala

    2006-01-01

    Background: The clinical profile of depressive disorder in children and young people in Child Adolescent and Family Services (CAFS), Northampton was studied. Methods: Twenty-five patients who had attended the CAFS over a period of 2 years were analysed retrospectively. Results: The age range of subjects was 8 to 19 years. Majority of patients were…

  4. Dysarthria in Adults with Cerebral Palsy: Clinical Presentation and Impacts on Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schölderle, Theresa; Staiger, Anja; Lampe, Renée; Strecker, Katrin; Ziegler, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although dysarthria affects the large majority of individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) and can substantially complicate everyday communication, previous research has provided an incomplete picture of its clinical features. We aimed to comprehensively describe characteristics of dysarthria in adults with CP and to elucidate the impact of…

  5. Stiff Person Syndrome: A Rare Neurological Disorder, Heterogeneous in Clinical Presentation and Not Easy to Treat

    PubMed Central

    Buechner, Susanne; Florio, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Background. Stiff person syndrome (SPS) is a rare neurological disorder characterized by progressive rigidity of axial and limb muscles associated with painful spasms. SPS can be classified into classic SPS, paraneoplastic SPS, and SPS variants. Its underlying pathogenesis is probably autoimmune, as in most cases antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) are observed. Similarly, paraneoplastic SPS is usually linked to anti-amphiphysin antibodies. Treatment is based on drugs enhancing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transmission and immunomodulatory agents. Case Series. Patient 1 is a 45-year-old male affected by the classic SPS, Patient 2 is a 73-year-old male affected by paraneoplastic SPS, and Patient 3 is a 68-year-old male affected by the stiff limb syndrome, a SPS variant where symptoms are confined to the limbs. Symptoms, diagnostic findings, and clinical course were extremely variable in the three patients, and treatment was often unsatisfactory and not well tolerated, thus reducing patient compliance. Clinical manifestations also included some unusual features such as recurrent vomiting and progressive dysarthria. Conclusions. SPS is a rare disorder that causes significant disability. Because of its extensive clinical variability, a multitask and personalized treatment is indicated. A clearer understanding of uncommon clinical features and better-tolerated therapeutic strategies are still needed. PMID:26106494

  6. The past, present and future of stem cell clinical trials for ALS.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Gretchen M; Gowing, Genevieve; Svendsen, Soshana; Svendsen, Clive N

    2014-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by progressive degeneration of motor neurons in the cortex, brainstem and spinal cord. This leads to paralysis, respiratory insufficiency and death within an average of 3 to 5 years from disease onset. While the genetics of ALS are becoming more understood in familial cases, the mechanisms underlying disease pathology remain unclear and there are no effective treatment options. Without understanding what causes ALS it is difficult to design treatments. However, in recent years stem cell transplantation has emerged as a potential new therapy for ALS patients. While motor neuron replacement remains a focus of some studies trying to treat ALS with stem cells, there is more rationale for using stem cells as support cells for dying motor neurons as they are already connected to the muscle. This could be through reducing inflammation, releasing growth factors, and other potential less understood mechanisms. Prior to moving into patients, stringent pre-clinical studies are required that have at least some rationale and efficacy in animal models and good safety profiles. However, given our poor understanding of what causes ALS and whether stem cells may ameliorate symptoms, there should be a push to determine cell safety in pre-clinical models and then a quick translation to the clinic where patient trials will show if there is any efficacy. Here, we provide a critical review of current clinical trials using either mesenchymal or neural stem cells to treat ALS patients. Pre-clinical data leading to these trials, as well as those in development are also evaluated in terms of mechanisms of action, validity of conclusions and rationale for advancing stem cell treatment strategies for this devastating disorder. PMID:24613827

  7. Cortisol and 17-alpha-hydroxy-progesterone levels in infants with refractory hypotension born at 30 weeks of gestation or less.

    PubMed

    Martins, P G; Procianoy, R S

    2007-04-01

    Refractory hypotension is frequent in very low-birth weight infants, whose hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis has been suggested to be immature. The objective of the present study was to evaluate basal cortisol and 17-alpha-OH-progesterone in the first 36 h of life in preterm infants with and without refractory hypotension (mean arterial blood pressure below the lower limit for gestational age throughout the study despite aggressive volume expansion and use of vasopressors). Thirty-five infants with hypotensive (N = 15) and control (N = 20) groups. The groups were not different regarding type of delivery, use of prenatal corticosteroid, requirement of mechanical ventilation, use of vasopressor drugs, morphine, fentanyl, prophylactic indomethacin, and mean sample timing. Although refractory hypotensive newborns were more immature, were smaller, suffered more deaths after 48 h of life and had a higher SNAPPE-2 score, their cortisol and 17-alpha-OH-progesterone levels were not different from controls at 12 h and at 36 h. The increase of cortisol in newborns with refractory hypotension 36 h after birth was significantly higher than in controls. Despite the fact that refractory hypotensive very low-birth weight neonates were submitted to a very stressful condition, their cortisol and 17-alpha-OH-progesterone levels were similar to controls. PMID:17401502

  8. Clinical pathology of the shock syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Bonanno, Fabrizio Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    The clinical aspects of shock syndromes are described from their inception as compensated physiology to a stage of decompensation. The clinical significance of hypotension, fluid-responsive and non fluid-responsive hypotension, is discussed. Untimely or inadequate treatment leads to persistent subclinical shock despite adjustments of the macrohemodynamic variables, which evolves in a second hit of physiological deterioration if not aggressively managed. Irreversible shock ensues as consequence of direct hit or as result of inadequate or delayed treatment and is characterized by drug-resistant hypotension. PMID:21769211

  9. New developments in the management of neurogenic orthostatic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Biaggioni, Italo

    2014-11-01

    Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is defined as a sustained reduction of ≥ 20 mmHg systolic blood pressure or ≥ 10 mmHg diastolic blood pressure upon standing for ≤ 3 min. Orthostatic hypotension is commonly associated with hypertension, and its prevalence is highest in those with uncontrolled hypertension compared to those with controlled hypertension or normotensive community elderly subjects. Orthostatic hypotension can cause significant disability, with patients experiencing dizziness, lightheadedness or syncope, and other problems that potentially have a profound negative impact on activities of daily living that require standing or walking. Furthermore, OH increases the risk of falls and, importantly, is an independent risk factor of mortality. Despite its importance, there is a paucity of treatment options for this condition. Most of the advances in treatment options have relied on small studies of repurposed drugs done in patients with severe OH due to rare neurodegenerative conditions. Midodrine, an oral prodrug converted to the selective α1-adrenoceptor agonist desglymidodrine, was approved by the FDA for the treatment of OH in 1996. For almost two decades, no other pharmacotherapy was developed specifically for the treatment of OH until 2014, when droxidopa was approved by the FDA for the treatment of neurogenic OH associated with primary autonomic neuropathies including Parkinson disease, multiple system atrophy, and pure autonomic failure. These are neurodegenerative diseases ultimately characterized by failure of the autonomic nervous system to generate norepinephrine responses appropriate to postural challenge. Droxidopa is a synthetic amino acid that is converted to norepinephrine by dopa-decarboxylase, the same enzyme that converts levodopa into dopamine in the treatment of Parkinson disease. We will review this and other advances in the treatment of OH in an attempt to provide a practical guide to its management. PMID:25303896

  10. Diagnosing and treating neurogenic orthostatic hypotension in primary care.

    PubMed

    Kuritzky, Louis; Espay, Alberto J; Gelblum, Jeffrey; Payne, Richard; Dietrich, Eric

    2015-01-01

    In response to a change in posture from supine or sitting to standing, autonomic reflexes normally maintain blood pressure (BP) by selective increases in arteriovenous resistance and by increased cardiac output, ensuring continued perfusion of the central nervous system. In neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (NOH), inadequate vasoconstriction and cardiac output cause BP to drop excessively, resulting in inadequate perfusion, with predictable symptoms such as dizziness, lightheadedness and falls. The condition may represent a central failure of baroreceptor signals to modulate cardiovascular function, a peripheral failure of norepinephrine release from cardiovascular sympathetic nerve endings, or both. Symptomatic patients may benefit from both non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions. Among the latter, two pressor agents have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration: the sympathomimetic prodrug midodrine, approved in 1996 for symptomatic orthostatic hypotension, and the norepinephrine prodrug droxidopa, approved in 2014, which is indicated for the treatment of symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension caused by primary autonomic failure (Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy and pure autonomic failure). A wide variety of off-label options also have been described (e.g. the synthetic mineralocorticoid fludrocortisone). Because pressor agents may promote supine hypertension, NOH management requires monitoring of supine BP and also lifestyle measures to minimize supine BP increases (e.g. head-of-bed elevation). However, NOH has been associated with cognitive impairment and increases a patient's risk of syncope and falls, with the potential for serious consequences. Hence, concerns about supine hypertension - for which the long-term prognosis in patients with NOH is yet to be established - must sometimes be balanced by the need to address a patient's immediate risks. PMID:26012731

  11. Epidemic hypotension in a dialysis center caused by sodium azide.

    PubMed

    Gordon, S M; Drachman, J; Bland, L A; Reid, M H; Favero, M; Jarvis, W R

    1990-01-01

    The water used for dialysate (dialysis fluid) in hemodialysis centers is produced by water treatment systems (WTS), which require careful and frequent monitoring. On November 3, 1988, nine patients receiving hemodialysis treatments at a single dialysis center suddenly developed hypotension within 30 minutes of onset of dialysis. Eight patients exhibited symptoms and two experienced syncopal episodes; there were no deaths. The incidence of dialysis-associated hypotension occurring within 30 minutes after dialysis onset for these patients was significantly higher during outbreak treatments than during preoutbreak (September 1 through November 2, 1988) treatments, (9 of 9 vs. 0 of 238, P less than 0.00001, Fisher's t-test). Sodium azide, a potent hypotensive agent, was identified as the probable contaminant within the WTS of the dialysis center at the time of the outbreak because: 1) it was mixed with glycerine as the preservative solution of each of the four ultrafilters that were put on-line in the WTS without rinsing, 12 hours before the outbreak; and 2) high levels of total organic carbons were detected from dialysis water collected at point-of-use sites at the time of the outbreak, suggesting contamination of the WTS with the sodium azide-glycerine preservative solution. To prevent similar occurrences, we recommend that ultrafilters (and other components of the WTS) be rinsed free of potentially toxic chemicals prior to use. Dialysis center personnel need to be aware of the potential affects that each modification of disinfection of the WTS may have upon the product water used to prepare dialysate for patient treatments. PMID:2299796

  12. How clinically effective is intravascular ultrasound in interventional cardiology? Present and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Shimpei; Proniewska, Klaudia; Pociask, Elżbieta; Paoletti, Giulia; de Winter, Sebastiaan; Muramatsu, Takashi; Bruining, Nico

    2013-11-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) has been clinically available for almost 25 years now and showed us valuable information regarding the coronary vessel lumen, its dimensions, the plaque burden and plaque characteristics that we were not able to assess by angiography alone. Using these abilities, IVUS has helped us to start, understand the atherosclerotic process in the coronary vessels. Further technical innovations partially overcame the somewhat limited image resolution of IVUS allowing more in-depth characterization and quantification of coronary plaque components. In addition, IVUS has been shown to be helpful to guide interventional procedures including optimal stent deployment in many clinical situations. In this review, we focus on the potential role of IVUS technology in interventional cardiology and on the valuable role of IVUS usage in percutaneous coronary interventions. PMID:24195458

  13. Presentation of patients with asthma at an allergy clinic in Cape Town.

    PubMed

    Walls, R S; Ordman, L J

    1983-12-01

    A prospective study of 304 asthmatic patients attending the allergy clinic of a large teaching hospital in Cape Town was undertaken. Symptoms were overwhelmingly perennial despite a Mediterranean climate and the wealth of local flora. Allergic asthma started at any age and was frequently associated with other allergic symptoms which required treatment in their own right. Asthma in Coloured patients started later in life than in Whites and seasonal asthma was more frequent in the former group. Precipitating factors, the pattern of skin-prick test reactivity, the severity of asthma and its treatment were similar in the two groups. Serum IgE levels were higher and peripheral blood eosinophilia was more frequent in Coloureds than in Whites. Too few Black patients attended the clinic to allow for analysis. PMID:6648730

  14. Proteomics in clinical trials and practice: present uses and future promise.

    PubMed

    Azad, Nilofer S; Rasool, Nabila; Annunziata, Christina M; Minasian, Lori; Whiteley, Gordon; Kohn, Elise C

    2006-10-01

    The study of clinical proteomics is a promising new field that has the potential to have many applications, including the identification of biomarkers and monitoring of disease, especially in the field of oncology. Expression proteomics evaluates the cellular production of proteins encoded by a particular gene and exploits the differential expression and post-translational modifications of proteins between healthy and diseased states. These biomarkers may be applied towards early diagnosis, prognosis, and prediction of response to therapy. Functional proteomics seeks to decipher protein-protein interactions and biochemical pathways involved in disease biology and targeted by newer molecular therapeutics. Advanced spectrometry technologies and new protein array formats have improved these analyses and are now being applied prospectively in clinical trials. Further advancement of proteomics technology could usher in an era of personalized molecular medicine, where diseases are diagnosed at earlier stages and where therapies are more effective because they are tailored to the protein expression of a patient's malignancy. PMID:16737951

  15. Regulatory Framework for Clinical Decision Support Software: Present Uncertainty and Prospective Proposition.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y Tony; Thompson, Bradley Merrill

    2015-07-01

    US regulators have been slow to provide meaningful guidance to industry participants on the issue of clinical decision support (CDS) software. It is crucial that regulators soon clarify the differences between regulated medical devices and unregulated health management software that nevertheless has the potential to affect patient care. Future CDS regulation in the United States should aim to reduce ambiguity by establishing detailed and simple criteria for manufacturers to use in deciding if a CDS product will be regulated. Clear standards will help ensure the safety of CDS that is brought to market. In addition, clarification will facilitate technological innovation, delivering clinical benefits to needy patients. To this end, the regulatory framework implemented in the United States with respect to CDS should consider the "substantial dependence" standard. PMID:25776925

  16. Variation in clinical presentation and genotype of causative Leishmania major strain in cutaneous leishmaniasis in north and south Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    van Thiel, Pieter-Paul A M; van Gool, Tom; Faber, William R; Leenstra, Tjalling; Kager, Piet A; Bart, Aldert

    2011-07-01

    A different clinical picture and therapeutic response were observed when data from Leishmania major-infected Dutch military personnel stationed in southern (N = 8) and northern (N = 169) Afghanistan were analyzed. Clinical presentation of cutaneous leishmaniasis in personnel in the south was milder and seemed to respond better to antileishmanial treatment; molecular analyses of parasite isolates seem to indicate that these differences may be genetic. PMID:21734125

  17. Cognitive Behavioral Treatment of Panic Disorder and Agoraphobia in a Multiethnic Urban Outpatient Clinic: Initial Presentation and Treatment Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Steven; Braunstein, Jeffrey W.; Halpern, Beth

    2006-01-01

    Few studies examine the effectiveness of panic control treatment across diverse ethnic groups. In this paper we present data on 40 patients (African American, n = 24; Caucasian, n = 16) with panic disorder and comorbid agoraphobia who presented at an anxiety disorder clinic in an inner-city area. On initial assessment both groups were similar on…

  18. Role of the median preoptic nucleus in the chronic hypotensive effect of losartan in sodium-replete normal rats.

    PubMed

    Ployngam, Trasida; Katz, Stephen S; Collister, John P

    2010-01-01

    1. We have shown previously that the chronic hypotensive effect of the angiotensin II AT1 receptor antagonist losartan is mediated, in part, by the subfornical organ (SFO). However, the neural pathway(s) mediating this central effect of losartan downstream from the SFO has not been completely elucidated. 2. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) is a crucial part of the neural pathway necessary for the chronic hypotensive effect of losartan. To test this hypothesis, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either Sham or electrolytic lesion of the MnPO (MnPOx). Rats were instrumented with radiotelemetric transducers and aortic flow probes for the continuous measurement of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate and cardiac output (CO), respectively. Total peripheral resistance (TPR) was calculated as MAP/CO. After 3 days of baseline measurements, rats were infused intraperitoneally with losartan (10 mg/kg per day) via an osmotic minipump at a rate of 5 microL/min. 3. The data revealed that, by Day 9 of losartan treatment, MAP had decreased 34 +/- 2 mmHg in MnPOx rats (n = 9), whereas the MAP of Sham-lesioned rats (n = 8) had only decreased 24 +/- 3 mmHg. These findings were accompanied by a greater decrease in TPR in MnPOx compared with Sham rats (-0.464 vs-0.237 mmHg/mL per min, respectively), whereas CO remained unchanged throughout the study protocol. 4. These results do not support the hypothesis that an intact MnPO is necessary to mediate the full chronic hypotensive effect of losartan in normal rats. Instead, they appear to suggest that the MnPO may play an important role in buffering the profound hypotension induced by losartan. PMID:19793103

  19. Kallikrein-kinin system activation by Lonomia obliqua caterpillar bristles: involvement in edema and hypotension responses to envenomation.

    PubMed

    Bohrer, C B; Reck Junior, J; Fernandes, D; Sordi, R; Guimarães, J A; Assreuy, J; Termignoni, C

    2007-04-01

    Lonomia obliqua envenomation induces an intense burning sensation at the site of contact and severe hemorrhage followed by edema and hypotension, and after few days death can occur usually due to acute renal failure. In order to understand more about the envenomation syndrome, the present study investigates the role played by kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) in edematogenic and hypotensive responses to the envenomation by L. obliqua. The incubation of L. obliqua caterpillar bristles extract (LOCBE) with plasma results in kallikrein activation, measured by cromogenic assay using the kallikrein synthetic substrate S-2302 (H-D-Pro-Phe-Arg-pNA). It was also showed that LOCBE was able to release kinins from low-molecular weight kininogen (LMWK). Moreover, it was demonstrated that previous administration of a kallikrein inhibitor (aprotinin) or bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist (HOE-140) significantly reduces the edema and hypotension in response to LOCBE, using mouse paw edema bioassay and mean arterial blood pressure analysis, respectively. The results demonstrate a direct involvement of the KKS in the edema formation and in the fall of arterial pressure that occur in the L. obliqua envenomation syndrome. PMID:17188732

  20. Biochemical characterization of mutant phenylalanine hydroxylase enzymes and correlation with clinical presentation in hyperphenylalaninaemic patients.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, S F; Pey, A L; Koch, R; Levy, H; Ellingson, C C; Naylor, E W; Martinez, A

    2009-02-01

    The biochemical properties of mutant phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) enzymes and clinical characteristics of hyperphenylalaninaemic patients who bear these mutant enzymes were investigated. Biochemical characterization of mutant PAH enzymes p.D143G, p.R155H, p.L348V, p.R408W and p.P416Q included determination of specific activity, substrate activation, V(max), K(m) for (6R)-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)), K (d) for BH(4), and protein stabilization by BH(4). Clinical data from 22 patients either homozygous, functionally hemizygous, or compound heterozygous for the mutant enzymes of interest were correlated with biochemical parameters of the mutant enzymes. The p.L348V and p.P416Q enzymes retain significant catalytic activity yet were observed in classic and moderate PKU patients. Biochemical studies demonstrated that BH(4) rectified the stability defects in p.L348V and p.P416Q; additionally, patients with these variants responded to BH(4) therapy. The p.R155H mutant displayed low PAH activity and decreased apparent affinity for L-Phe yet was observed in mild hyperphenylalaninaemia. The p.R155H mutant does not display kinetic instability, as it is stabilized by BH(4) similarly to wild-type PAH; thus the residual activity is available under physiological conditions. The p.R408W enzyme is dysfunctional in nearly all biochemical parameters, as evidenced by disease severity in homozygous and hemizygous patients. Biochemical assessment of mutant PAH proteins, especially parameters involving interaction with BH(4) that impact protein folding, appear useful in clinical correlation. As additional patients and mutant proteins are assessed, the utility of this approach will become apparent. PMID:18937047

  1. [Anatomic-clinical presentation. Testicular teratocarcinoma with thoracic-abdominal adenopathy].

    PubMed

    Dassy, S; Coibion-Jossa, V; Demelenne, A; Jehaes, C; Weerts, J; Sakalihassan, N; Closon-Dejardin, M T; Focan, C

    2001-11-01

    This case report of a young man with a testicular germ cell-teratoma tumor illustrates the necessity of a multidisciplinary sequential approach to ensure chance of cure. The outcome of patients with advanced germ cell tumor depends on the optimal clinical management. Residual masses are frequent, and their histology can be different than the initial one (i.e., only residual mature teratoma cells or necrosis-fibrosis). Therefore a second surgery on residual masses with curative intent, may be important to optimalize the treatment and follow up. PMID:11789392

  2. Clinical reasoning assessment through medical expertise theories: past, present and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Boushehri, Elham; Soltani Arabshahi, Kamran; Monajemi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Exploration into the concept of "medical expert" dates back to more than 50 years ago, yet yielding three leading theories in the area of clinical reasoning, namely, knowledge structure, hypotheticdeductive, and dual process. Each theory defines "medical expert" in a dissimilar way. Therefore, the methods of assessment through which the experts are identified have been changed during the time. In this paper, we tried to categorize and introduce some widely used tests for identification of experts within the framework of existing main theories. Implementation of the proposed categorization for providing future assessment tools is discussed. PMID:26478880

  3. Agitation in the inpatient psychiatric setting: a review of clinical presentation, burden, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hankin, Cheryl S; Bronstone, Amy; Koran, Lorrin M

    2011-05-01

    Agitation among psychiatric inpatients (particularly those diagnosed with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder) is common and, unless recognized early and managed effectively, can rapidly escalate to potentially dangerous behaviors, including physical violence. Inpatient aggression and violence have substantial adverse psychological and physical consequences for both patients and providers, and they are costly to the healthcare system. In contrast to the commonly held view that inpatient violence occurs without warning or can be predicted by "static" risk factors, such as patient demographics or clinical characteristics, research indicates that violence is usually preceded by observable behaviors, especially non-violent agitation. When agitation is recognized, staff should employ nonpharmacological de-escalation strategies and, if the behavior continues, offer pharmacological treatment to calm patients rapidly. Given the poor therapeutic efficacy and potential for adverse events associated with physical restraint and seclusion, and the potential adverse sequelae of involuntary drug treatment, these interventions should be considered last resorts. Pharmacological agents used to treat agitation include benzodiazepines and first- and second-generation antipsychotic drugs. Although no currently available agent is ideal, recommendations for selecting among them are provided. There remains an unmet need for a non-invasive and rapidly acting agent that effectively calms without excessively sedating patients, addresses the patient's underlying psychiatric symptoms, and is reasonably safe and tolerable. A treatment with these characteristics could substantially reduce the clinical and economic burden of agitation in the inpatient psychiatric setting. PMID:21586995

  4. Colorectal adenomatous polyposis syndromes: Genetic determinism, clinical presentation and recommendations for care.

    PubMed

    Buecher, Bruno

    2016-02-01

    Colorectal adenomatous polyposis constitutes a diverse group of disorders with different modes of inheritance. Molecular diagnosis of this condition has become more complex. In fact, somatic mosaicism for APC mutations now appears to be more frequent than previously thought and rare germline alterations of this gene may be implicated in patients tested negative for "classical" APC mutations (point mutations and large genomic rearrangements). Moreover, the knowledge concerning several aspects of the MUTYH-associated polyposis has improved since its first description in 2002 and germline mutations in new genes have recently been implicated in some cases of unexplained adenomatous polyposis. Genetic testing in probands and their relatives should be conducted in the context of pre- and post-test genetic counseling. The recent advent of New Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques affords the opportunity to rapidly screen patients for a comprehensive panel of colorectal cancer susceptibility genes in a cost-effective fashion. This type of approach will probably replace the classical sequential approach based on clinical presumptive diagnoses in the near future. The risk of colorectal cancer is very high in affected patients in the absence of appropriate care. Clinical management is complex and should be provided in centers with special expertise in these diseases. This review focuses on the various colorectal adenomatous polyposis syndromes with special attention to more innovative and important aspects. PMID:26805944

  5. An atypical case of neuro-Whipple: Clinical presentation, magnetic resonance spectroscopy and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Pauletti, Caterina; Pujia, Francesco; Accorinti, Massimo; Pauri, Flavia; Tinelli, Emanuele; Bianco, Federico; Morocutti, Cristoforo; Fattapposta, Francesco

    2010-10-15

    We report a case of a 53-year-old man with a 2-year history of progressive gait and balance disturbance, supranuclear ophthalmoparesis, mild dysarthria and dysmetria. EMG revealed a lower limb axonal sensory-motor neuropathy, while MR imaging demonstrated a small focal lesion in the right frontal lobe, mild diffuse hyperintensity of the periventricular white matter and diffuse brain atrophy. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed a mild decrease in N-acetyl-aspartate peak and an increase in the choline peak in the small right frontal lesion and within 6 voxels of interest in normal appearing cerebral tissue. According to the clinical picture the diagnosis of WD was made by the positivity of PCR for T. whipplei DNA on CSF. After treatment the patient showed a mild clinical improvement although MR images and laboratory test remained unchanged. The MRS findings suggest that the pathological process of the disease diffusely involves the brain. Despite the absence of gastrointestinal involvement WD should be suspected in all complex and atypical neurological pictures, even in presence of peripheral involvement, in order to be able to start treatment promptly. PMID:20674936

  6. The Impact of Specific Viruses on Clinical Outcome in Children Presenting with Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, Maria Giulia; Fierabracci, Alessandra; Pilati, Mara; Chinali, Marcello; Bassano, Carlo; Saura, Francesca; Giovannoni, Isabella; Francalanci, Paola

    2016-01-01

    The presence and type of viral genomes have been suggested as the main etiology for inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy. Information on the clinical implication of this finding in a large population of children is lacking. We evaluated the prevalence, type, and clinical impact of specific viral genomes in endomyocardial biopsies (EMB) collected between 2001 and 2013 among 63 children admitted to our hospital for acute heart failure (median age 2.8 years). Viral genome was searched by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Patients underwent a complete two-dimensional echocardiographic examination at hospital admission and at discharge and were followed-up for 10 years. Twenty-seven adverse events (7 deaths and 20 cardiac transplantations) occurred during the follow-up. Viral genome was amplified in 19/63 biopsies (35%); PVB19 was the most commonly isolated virus. Presence of specific viral genome was associated with a significant recovery in ejection fraction, compared to patients without viral evidence (p < 0.05). In Cox-regression analysis, higher survival rate was related to virus-positive biopsies (p < 0.05). When comparing long-term prognosis among different viral groups, a trend towards better prognosis was observed in the presence of isolated Parvovirus B19 (PVB19) (p = 0.07). In our series, presence of a virus-positive EMB (mainly PVB19) was associated with improvement over time in cardiac function and better long-term prognosis. PMID:27043551

  7. The Impact of Specific Viruses on Clinical Outcome in Children Presenting with Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Gagliardi, Maria Giulia; Fierabracci, Alessandra; Pilati, Mara; Chinali, Marcello; Bassano, Carlo; Saura, Francesca; Giovannoni, Isabella; Francalanci, Paola

    2016-01-01

    The presence and type of viral genomes have been suggested as the main etiology for inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy. Information on the clinical implication of this finding in a large population of children is lacking. We evaluated the prevalence, type, and clinical impact of specific viral genomes in endomyocardial biopsies (EMB) collected between 2001 and 2013 among 63 children admitted to our hospital for acute heart failure (median age 2.8 years). Viral genome was searched by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Patients underwent a complete two-dimensional echocardiographic examination at hospital admission and at discharge and were followed-up for 10 years. Twenty-seven adverse events (7 deaths and 20 cardiac transplantations) occurred during the follow-up. Viral genome was amplified in 19/63 biopsies (35%); PVB19 was the most commonly isolated virus. Presence of specific viral genome was associated with a significant recovery in ejection fraction, compared to patients without viral evidence (p < 0.05). In Cox-regression analysis, higher survival rate was related to virus-positive biopsies (p < 0.05). When comparing long-term prognosis among different viral groups, a trend towards better prognosis was observed in the presence of isolated Parvovirus B19 (PVB19) (p = 0.07). In our series, presence of a virus-positive EMB (mainly PVB19) was associated with improvement over time in cardiac function and better long-term prognosis. PMID:27043551

  8. Exome sequencing and directed clinical phenotyping diagnose cholesterol ester storage disease presenting as autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Stitziel, Nathan O.; Fouchier, Sigrid W.; Sjouke, Barbara; Peloso, Gina M.; Moscoso, Alessa M.; Auer, Paul L.; Goel, Anuj; Gigante, Bruna; Barnes, Timothy A.; Melander, Olle; Orho-Melander, Marju; Duga, Stefano; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Nikpay, Majid; Martinelli, Nicola; Girelli, Domenico; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Kooperberg, Charles; Lange, Leslie A.; Ardissino, Diego; McPherson, Ruth; Farrall, Martin; Watkins, Hugh; Reilly, Muredach P.; Rader, Daniel J.; de Faire, Ulf; Schunkert, Heribert; Erdmann, Jeanette; Samani, Nilesh J.; Charnas, Lawrence; Altshuler, David; Gabriel, Stacey; Kastelein, John J.P.; Defesche, Joep C.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Hovingh, G. Kees

    2014-01-01

    Objective Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia (ARH) is a rare inherited disorder characterized by extremely high total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels that has been previously linked to mutations in LDLRAP1. We identified a family with ARH not explained by mutations in LDLRAP1 or other genes known to cause monogenic hypercholesterolemia. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular etiology of ARH in this family. Approach and Results We used exome sequencing to assess all protein coding regions of the genome in three family members and identified a homozygous exon 8 splice junction mutation (c.894G>A, also known as E8SJM) in LIPA that segregated with the diagnosis of hypercholesterolemia. Since homozygosity for mutations in LIPA is known to cause cholesterol ester storage disease (CESD), we performed directed follow-up phenotyping by non-invasively measuring hepatic cholesterol content. We observed abnormal hepatic accumulation of cholesterol in the homozygote individuals, supporting the diagnosis of CESD. Given previous suggestions of cardiovascular disease risk in heterozygous LIPA mutation carriers, we genotyped E8SJM in >27,000 individuals and found no association with plasma lipid levels or risk of myocardial infarction, confirming a true recessive mode of inheritance. Conclusions By integrating observations from Mendelian and population genetics along with directed clinical phenotyping, we diagnosed clinically unapparent CESD in the affected individuals from this kindred and addressed an outstanding question regarding risk of cardiovascular disease in LIPA E8SJM heterozygous carriers. PMID:24072694

  9. Genetic testing and the clinical laboratory improvement amendments of 1988: present and future.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, M K

    1999-05-01

    CLIA '88 superseded CLIA '67. CLIA '88 set standards designed to improve quality and expanded federal oversight to virtually all clinical laboratories in the United States. Presumably because genetics testing was then in its infancy, CLIA '88 did not devote a special section to genetics testing. Biochemical and immunochemical tests used to evaluate inborn errors of metabolism and other genetic entities were categorized as analytes in the Clinical Chemistry section, and DNA probes used primarily in infectious disease were included in Microbiology. The legal, social, economic, and ethical implications of genetic testing and the rapid commercialization of these tests led to recommendations that genetic testing be defined as a laboratory specialty with a subsection in CLIA. The advisory committee created under CLIA was assigned to review these recommendations. The committee agreed that genetics testing was sufficiently different from other areas already included in CLIA to warrant a separate section. Two definitions were adopted. The more clear-cut one is for molecular genetic and cytogenic tests. This includes the analysis of human DNA/RNA in evaluating genetic diseases. The second definition is not as clear-cut and is for the analysis of proteins and metabolites used predominantly to detect inborn errors of metabolism. Many of these analytes already are categorized according to their uses for other purposes. The recommendations for genetic testing include detailed and specific proposals concerning personnel, confidentiality and informed consent, quality control, contamination, proficiency testing, validation of tests, special reporting, retention of records, and reuse of tested specimens. PMID:10222376

  10. Ultrawide-band electromagnetic pulses induced hypotension in rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, S T; Mathur, S P; Akyel, Y; Lee, J C

    The ultrawide-band (UWB) electromagnetic pulses are used as a new modality in radar technology. Biological effects of extremely high peak E-field, fast rise time, ultrashort pulse width, and ultrawide band have not been investigated heretofore due to the lack of animal exposure facilities. A new biological effects database is needed to establish personnel protection guidelines for these new type of radiofrequency radiation. Functional indices of the cardiovascular system (heart rate, systolic, mean, and diastolic pressures) were selected to represent biological end points that may be susceptible to the UWB radiation. A noninvasive tail-cuff photoelectric sensor sphygmomanometer was used. Male Wistar-Kyoto rats were subjected to sham exposure, 0.5-kHz (93 kV/m, 180 ps rise time, 1.00 ns pulse width, whole-body averaged specific absorption rate, SAR = 70 mW/kg) or a 1-kHz (85 kV/m, 200 ps rise time, 1.03 ns pulse width, SAR = 121 mW/kg) UWB fields in a tapered parallel plate GTEM cell for 6 min. Cardiovascular functions were evaluated from 45 min to 4 weeks after exposures. Significant decrease in arterial blood pressures (hypotension) was found. In contrast, heart rate was not altered by these exposures. The UWB radiation-induced hypotension was a robust, consistent, and persistent effect. PMID:10073476

  11. Ultrawide-band electromagnetic pulses induced hypotension in rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, S T; Mathur, S P; Akyel, Y; Lee, J C

    1999-09-01

    The ultrawide-band (UWB) electromagnetic pulses are used as a new modality in radar technology. Biological effects of extremely high peak E-field, fast rise time, ultrashort pulse width, and ultrawide band have not been investigated heretofore due to the lack of animal exposure facilities. A new biological effects database is needed to establish personnel protection guidelines for these new type of radiofrequency radiation. Functional indices of the cardiovascular system (heart rate, systolic, mean, and diastolic pressures) were selected to represent biological end points that may be susceptible to the UWB radiation. A noninvasive tail-cuff photoelectric sensor sphygmomanometer was used. Male Wistar-Kyoto rats were subjected to sham exposure, 0.5-kHz (93 kV/m, 180 ps rise time, 1.00 ns pulse width, whole-body averaged specific absorption rate, SAR = 70 mW/kg) or a 1-kHz (85 kV/m, 200 ps rise time, 1.03 ns pulse width, SAR = 121 mW/kg) UWB fields in a tapered parallel plate GTEM cell for 6 min. Cardiovascular functions were evaluated from 45 min to 4 weeks after exposures. Significant decrease in arterial blood pressures (hypotension) was found. In contrast, heart rate was not altered by these exposures. The UWB radiation-induced hypotension was a robust, consistent, and persistent effect. PMID:10497968

  12. Leishmania-HIV Co-infection: Clinical Presentation and Outcomes in an Urban Area in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cota, Gláucia F.; de Sousa, Marcos R.; de Mendonça, Andrea Laender Pessoa; Patrocinio, Allan; Assunção, Luiza Siqueira; de Faria, Sidnei Rodrigues; Rabello, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is an emerging condition affecting HIV-infected patients living in Latin America, particularly in Brazil. Leishmania-HIV coinfection represents a challenging diagnosis because the clinical picture of VL is similar to that of other disseminated opportunistic diseases. Additionally, coinfection is related to treatment failure, relapse and high mortality. Objective To assess the clinical-laboratory profile and outcomes of VL-HIV-coinfected patients using a group of non HIV-infected patients diagnosed with VL during the same period as a comparator. Methods The study was conducted at a reference center for infectious diseases in Brazil. All patients with suspected VL were evaluated in an ongoing cohort study. Confirmed cases were divided into two groups: with and without HIV coinfection. Patients were treated according to the current guidelines of the Ministry of Health of Brazil, which considers antimony as the first-choice therapy for non HIV-infected patients and recommends amphotericin B for HIV-infected patients. After treatment, all patients with CD4 counts below 350 cells/mm3 received secondary prophylaxis with amphotericin B. Results Between 2011 and 2013, 168 patients with suspected VL were evaluated, of whom 90 were confirmed to have VL. In total, 51% were HIV coinfected patients (46 patients). HIV-infected patients had a lower rate of fever and splenomegaly compared with immunocompetent patients. The VL relapse rate in 6 months was 37% among HIV-infected patients, despite receiving secondary prophylaxis. The overall case-fatality rate was 6.6% (4 deaths in the HIV-infected group versus 2 deaths in the non HIV-infected group). The main risk factors for a poor outcome at 6 months after the end of treatment were HIV infection, bleeding and a previous VL episode. Conclusion Although VL mortality rates among HIV-infected individuals are close to those observed among immunocompetent patients treated with amphotericin B, HIV coinfection is related to a low clinical response and high relapse rates within 6 months. PMID:24743472

  13. Cell therapy clinical trials in Germany--Critical aspects of quality data content: Summary of meeting presentation.

    PubMed

    Renner, Matthias

    2015-09-01

    This article is summarizing a presentation given by the author at the International Alliance for Biological Standardization and Japan Science and Technology Agency (IABS-JST) Joint Workshop on "Challenges towards sound scientific regulation of cell therapy products" held at the Kyoto International Conference Center, Kyoto Japan on March 7-8, 2014. The main topics of the presentation were to give a short overview about the regulatory approval process for clinical trials in Germany and to summarize important manufacturing aspects of cell based medicinal products (CBMPs) which are intended to be studied in clinical trials in Germany. PMID:26044762

  14. Melioidosis in animals: a review on epizootiology, diagnosis and clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Sprague, L D; Neubauer, H

    2004-09-01

    Melioidosis, an infectious disease caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei is an emerging disease with high impact on animals and man. In different animal species, the clinical course varies and delayed diagnosis poses risks for the dissemination of the agent in non-endemic areas. Not only migration and transport of animals around the world but also tourism increases the risk that melioidosis can leave its endemic boundaries and establish itself elsewhere. Detection of the agent is a major challenge, as the agent has to be handled in laboratories of biosafety level 3 and test kits are not yet commercially available. Veterinarians and doctors should be aware of melioidosis not only as an agent of public interest but also in terms of a bioterrorist attack. The aim of this review is to describe the agent, its aetiology, the manifestation in a variety of animal species as well as to describe diagnostic procedures, typing techniques and countermeasures. PMID:15525357

  15. Clinical applications for magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU): present and future.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Samantha; Rieke, Viola; Kohi, Maureen; Westphalen, Antonio C

    2013-08-01

    It has been well known for decades that high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) generates heat in tissues resulting in coagulative necrosis. Implementation, however, has been slow, due to difficulties with finding an appropriate imaging modality that could not only guide treatment, but also provide real-time thermal feedback. These problems have been overcome with the newest magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound systems (MRgHIFU). With its superior spatial resolution enabling accurate image guidance coupled with its ability to provide real-time thermography during treatments, MRI is moving further into the realm of therapeutics for oncologic patient care. This article will discuss the implementation of an MR-guided HIFU system, current clinical indications and touch on future directions. PMID:23870333

  16. Challenging present concepts in compression therapy: static stiffness index is not consistent and not clinically relevant.

    PubMed

    Kravitz, S; Hegarty-Craver, M; Reid, L

    2016-02-01

    Once a circumferential force is delivered to a limb by a compression device, assuming the tension within the device remains constant, any change in the total force is dependent upon a change in circumference of the limb, with the rate of change (excluding fabric creep) being dependent on the stress strain curve of the device. This article addresses the pre-conceived and well-accepted principle that interface compression delivered by a compression device substantially increases with the position of the limb, based on the positions of sitting (non-weight bearing) to standing and/or during muscle activity (ankle dorsiflexion). Using engineering parameters and clinical measurements, the authors demonstrate that changes in interface pressure are minimal if any, and that the current concept should be modified accordingly. Declaration of interest: This study was sponsored by Carolon. L. Reid, and S. Kravitz are employees of Carolon. M. Hegarty-Craver has received monetary compensation as a researcher for Carolon. PMID:26878373

  17. "Addicted to Euphoria": The History, Clinical Presentation, and Management of Party Drug Misuse.

    PubMed

    Bearn, Jenny; O'Brien, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Eating, drinking, sexual activity, and parenting invoke pleasure, an emotion that promotes repetition of these behaviors, are essential for survival. Euphoria, a feeling or state of intense excitement and happiness, is an amplification of pleasure, aspired to one's essential biological needs that are satisfied. People use party drugs as a shortcut to euphoria. Ecstasy (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine), γ-hydroxybutyric acid, and ketamine fall under the umbrella of the term "party drugs," each with differing neuropharmacological and physiological actions. This chapter seeks to survey the history and epidemiology of party drug use; we will then discuss the pharmacological characteristics of each drug to provide a platform for understanding the difficulties that party drug users encounter through intoxication, harmful use, dependence, and withdrawal and how these should be clinically managed. PMID:26070759

  18. Cerebral neuroschistosomiasis: a rare clinical presentation and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Llenas-García, Jara; Guerra-Vales, Juan-Manuel; Alcalá-Galiano, Andrea; Domínguez, Cristina; Pérez-Nuñez, Angel; Lizasoaín, Manuel; Díaz-Pedroche, Carmen; Montes, Santiago; Martínez, Josefina; Sierra, Fernando; Salto, Efren

    2009-01-01

    The symptomatic presentation of cerebral schistosomiasis is uncommon. The case of a 25-year-old woman from Equatorial Guinea with headache and seizures secondary to cerebral neuroschistosomiasis, as confirmed by histopathological examination and microbiological study, is presented. A review of the literature on this subject is also provided. PMID:21852999

  19. Cerebral neuroschistosomiasis: a rare clinical presentation and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Llenas-García, Jara; Guerra-Vales, Juan-Manuel; Alcalá-Galiano, Andrea; Domínguez, Cristina; Pérez-Nuñez, Angel; Lizasoaín, Manuel; Díaz-Pedroche, Carmen; Montes, Santiago; Martínez, Josefina; Sierra, Fernando; Salto, Efren

    2009-01-01

    The symptomatic presentation of cerebral schistosomiasis is uncommon. The case of a 25-year-old woman from Equatorial Guinea with headache and seizures secondary to cerebral neuroschistosomiasis, as confirmed by histopathological examination and microbiological study, is presented. A review of the literature on this subject is also provided. PMID:21852999

  20. [Clinical case of the month. The "classic" triad presentation of mucinous bronchiolo-alveolar carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Figiel, S; de Leval, L; Rousié, C; Duysinx, B; Louis, R; Defraigne, J O; Radermecker, M

    2010-11-01

    The case of a 59-year-old female complaining of cough of recent onset, abundant salty expectoration and lung condensation is presented. This "triad" constitutes a rare but nearly pathognomonic presentation of mucinous bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) of the lung. PMID:21189525

  1. Clinical Intravoxel Incoherent Motion and Diffusion MR Imaging: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Iima, Mami; Le Bihan, Denis

    2016-01-01

    The concept of diffusion magnetic resonance (MR) imaging emerged in the mid-1980s, together with the first images of water diffusion in the human brain, as a way to probe tissue structure at a microscopic scale, although the images were acquired at a millimetric scale. Since then, diffusion MR imaging has become a pillar of modern clinical imaging. Diffusion MR imaging has mainly been used to investigate neurologic disorders. A dramatic application of diffusion MR imaging has been acute brain ischemia, providing patients with the opportunity to receive suitable treatment at a stage when brain tissue might still be salvageable, thus avoiding terrible handicaps. On the other hand, it was found that water diffusion is anisotropic in white matter, because axon membranes limit molecular movement perpendicularly to the nerve fibers. This feature can be exploited to produce stunning maps of the orientation in space of the white matter tracts and brain connections in just a few minutes. Diffusion MR imaging is now also rapidly expanding in oncology, for the detection of malignant lesions and metastases, as well as monitoring. Water diffusion is usually largely decreased in malignant tissues, and body diffusion MR imaging, which does not require any tracer injection, is rapidly becoming a modality of choice to detect, characterize, or even stage malignant lesions, especially for breast or prostate cancer. After a brief summary of the key methodological concepts beyond diffusion MR imaging, this article will give a review of the clinical literature, mainly focusing on current outstanding issues, followed by some innovative proposals for future improvements. PMID:26690990

  2. The artificial endocrine pancreas in clinical practice and research. The present position and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Marena, S; Imperiale, G; Pagano, G

    1993-06-01

    The artificial endocrine pancreas (AEP) is a controlled glucose and/or insulin infusion system in which continuously monitored blood sugar values are fed to a computerised analyser that uses predetermined algorithms to establish the doses to be administered. Since its first appearance in clinical practice and diabetological research during the Sixties, the AEP has been modified in various ways to overcome technical problems associated with the gluco-sensor and algorithms so as to make better use of the glucose-insulin feedback mechanism, and hence obtain a closer correspondence to physiological islet cell activity. As a result of these changes, the AEP can be employed in accordance with the physiopathological principles of insulin secretion in a variety of clinical conditions to secure the short-term control of metabolic alterations in the diabetic. Surgery is one field in which the AEP is used to great advantage, since this and its accompanying anaesthetics are the source of stress, which in turn may result in a rapid and sometimes serious postoperative metabolic derangement, including an increased secretion of anti-insulin hormones. The AEP has also been proposed for diabetic pregnancy and for the treatment of subjects in diabetic coma. It has proved useful in the diagnosis and management of hypoglycaemia due to organic hyperinsulinism, in diabetics with renal failure, in the honeymoon period, and in cases of unstable diabetes. The versatility of its application and its underlying physiopathological principles have enabled the AEP to be predominantly employed in research.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8414626

  3. Specific CD4+ T-Cell Reactivity and Cytokine Release in Different Clinical Presentations of Leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Volz, Magdalena Sarah; Moos, Verena; Allers, Kristina; Luge, Enno; Mayer-Scholl, Anne; Nöckler, Karsten; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Jansen, Andreas; Schneider, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Clinical manifestations of leptospirosis are highly variable: from asymptomatic to severe and potentially fatal. The outcome of the disease is usually determined in the immunological phase, beginning in the second week of symptoms. The underlying mechanisms, predictive factors, and individual immune responses that contribute to clinical variations are not well understood. The aim of this study was to determine the specifics of CD4(+) T-cell reactivity and cytokine release after stimulation with leptospiral antigens in patients with leptospirosis of different disease severities (patients with mild and severe symptoms) and in control subjects (with and without proven exposure to Leptospira). Whole-blood specimens were stimulated with Leptospira antigens in vitro. Subsequently, intracellular staining of cytokines was performed, and flow cytometry was used to assess the expression of CD40 ligand (CD40L) and the production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), interleukin-10 (IL-10), IL-2, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) by CD4(+) T cells. The production of inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α by CD4(+) T cells after stimulation with leptospiral antigens was highest in patients with severe disease. In contrast, the ratio of IL-10 production to TNF-α production was higher in exposed subjects than in patients with mild and severe disease. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α may be useful markers of the severity of the immunological phase of leptospirosis. IL-10 production by T cells after antigen-specific stimulation may indicate a more successful downregulation of the inflammatory response and may contribute to an asymptomatic course of the disease. PMID:26491036

  4. Pulmonary Embolism in Ischemic Stroke: Clinical Presentation, Risk Factors, and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Pongmoragot, Jitphapa; Rabinstein, Alejandro A.; Nilanont, Yongchai; Swartz, Richard H.; Zhou, Limei; Saposnik, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    Background Limited information is available on the frequency of pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients with an acute ischemic stroke (AIS). We evaluated clinical characteristics, predisposing factors, and outcomes in AIS patients with PE. Methods and Results We included all AIS patients admitted to participating institutions in the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network. Clinically PE was documented by a physician and confirmed by computed tomography pulmonary angiography within 30 days of the stroke case index. The primary outcome was death or disability at discharge. Secondary outcomes included disposition, length of hospital stay, mortality at 3 months and 1 year. Among 11 287 patients with AIS, PE was found in 89 (0.78%) patients. History of cancer, deep vein thrombosis (DVT)/PE, and DVT during the hospitalization were associated with PE. PE was associated with higher risk of death at 30 days (25.8% versus 13.6%; P<0.001), at 1 year (47.2% versus 24.6%; P<0.001), and disability at discharge (85.4% versus 63.6%; P<0.001). Mean length of stay was longer in stroke patients with PE (36 versus 16 days; P=0.001). After adjusting for age, sex, and stroke severity, PE remained associated with lower survival at 30 days and 1 year, and death or disability at discharge (OR 3.02; 95% CI 1.56 to 5.83). Conclusions In this large cohort study, PE occurred in nearly 1% of AIS patients. PE was more common in patients with severe stroke, history of cancer, previous DVT/PE or acute DVT and associated with lower short‐ and long‐term survival, greater disability, and longer length of stay. PMID:24275627

  5. Reward-Related Decision Making in Older Adults: Relationship to Clinical Presentation of Depression

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, Amanda R.; Alexopoulos, George S.; Yuen, Genevieve S.; Morimoto, Sarah Shizuko; Gunning, Faith M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Impairment in reward processes has been found in individuals with depression and in the aging population. The purpose of this study was twofold: 1. To use an affective neuroscience probe to identify abnormalities in reward-related decision making in late-life depression. 2. To examine the relationship of reward-related decision making abnormalities in depressed, older adults to the clinical expression of apathy in depression. We hypothesized that relative to elderly, healthy subjects, depressed, elderly patients would exhibit impaired decision making and that apathetic, depressed patients would show greater impairment in decision making than non-apathetic, depressed patients. Methods We used the Iowa Gambling Task to examine reward-related decision making in 60 non-demented, elderly patients with non-psychotic major depression and 36 elderly, psychiatrically healthy participants. Apathy was quantified using the Apathy Evaluation Scale. Of those with major depression, 18 individuals reported clinically significant apathy whereas 42 participants did not have apathy. Results Older adults with depression and healthy comparison participants did not differ in their performance on the IGT. However, apathetic, depressed older adults adopted an advantageous strategy and selected cards from the conservative decks compared to non-apathetic, depressed older adults. Non-apathetic, depressed patients showed a failure to adopt a conservative strategy and persisted in making risky decisions throughout the task. Conclusions This study indicates that apathy in older, depressed adults is associated with a conservative response style on a behavioral probe of the systems involved in reward-related decision making. This conservative response style may be the result of reduced sensitivity to rewards in apathetic individuals. PMID:25306937

  6. Comparison between nitroglycerin and remifentanil in acute hypervolemic hemodilution combined with controlled hypotension during intracranial aneurysm surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuekang; Hu, Qian; Liu, Zhiyi; Huang, Haijin; Zhang, Qin; Dai, Hanying

    2015-01-01

    Allogenetic transfusion has long been considered to be a relatively safe and extremely effective blood transfusion treatment. However, acute hypervolemic hemodilution (AHH) combined with the remifentanil-induced controlled hypotension (CH) have rarely been examined. Herein, 40 intracranial aneurysm surgery patients were randomly divided into nitroglycerin group (A group, n=20) and remifentanil group (B group, n=20). During intracranial aneurysm surgery, MAP, HR, Hb, and Hct were recorded. SjvO2, PjvO2, SaO2, PaO2 were measured, and CaO2, Da-jvO2, CjvO2, CERO2, VADL were calculated. In addition, The venous blood samples were collected for determining PT, TT, APTT, FBG, VIII, VWF and electrolytes. The results show that HR in nitroglycerin group dramatically accelerated and HR in remifentanil group slowed at 30 minutes after hypotension and 5 minutes after aneurysm occlusion (P<0.01) after hypotension. Compared with A group, the SjvO2 and CjvO2 of B group increased significantly and the Da-jvO2 and CERO2 decreased significantly at T3, T4. In addition, There were no significant differences between after AHH and before AHH in two groups (P>0.05) on TT, PT, APTT, FIB, VIII, VWF, Na+, Cl-, K+, Ca2+. These results suggest that AHH combined with remifentanil-based CH significantly lowered cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen and had effects on blood coagulation without clinical hemorrhagic signs increased and had important clinical significance for blood conservation. PMID:26770575

  7. A Clinical Case Presentation: Understanding and Interpreting Dreams while Working Through Developmental Trauma.

    PubMed

    Levy, Joshua; Finnegan, Paul

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the unique place of understanding and interpreting dreams in the psychoanalytic process while working through developmental trauma. This psychoanalytic process extended over six years and is presented in four phases: establishing the therapeutic alliance, a crisis, working through, and termination. Dreams from each of these four phases of the analysis are presented, and the collaborative work of understanding and interpreting these dreams is highlighted. Evidence is presented that from this analytic work there ensued an amelioration of the impact of developmental trauma and a furtherance of the development of internal psychic structure. PMID:26951293

  8. Deficient catecholamine release as the basis of orthostatic hypotension in pernicious anaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenhofer, G; Lambie, D G; Johnson, R H; Tan, E; Whiteside, E A

    1982-01-01

    A patient with peripheral neuropathy and orthostatic hypotension was found to have pernicious anaemia. Symptoms improved after vitamin B12 replacement therapy. Insulin tolerance testing showed that the patient lacked catecholamine, heart rate, and sweating responses to hypoglycaemia. This indicates that pernicious anaemia may cause orthostatic hypotension owing to failure of noradrenaline release. PMID:7175529

  9. Catecholamine-resistant hypotension and myocardial performance following patent ductus arteriosus ligation

    PubMed Central

    Noori, Shahab; McNamara, Patrick; Jain, Amish; Lavoie, Pascal M.; Wickremasinghe, Andrea; Merritt, T. Allen; Solomon, Tabitha; Sekar, Krishnamurthy; Attridge, Joshua T.; Swanson, Jonathan R.; Gillam-Krakauer, Maria; Reese, Jeff; Poindexter, Brenda B.; Brook, Michael; Auchus, Richard J.; Clyman, Ronald I.

    2014-01-01

    Objective We performed a multicenter study of preterm infants, who were about to undergo patent ductus arteriosus ligation, to determine if echocardiographic indices of impaired myocardial performance were associated with subsequent development of catecholamine-resistant hypotension following ligation. Study Design A standardized treatment approach for hypotension was followed at each center. Infants were considered to have catecholamine-resistant hypotension if their dopamine infusion was >15 µg/kg/min. Echocardiograms and cortisol measurements were obtained between 6 and 14 hours after the ligation (prior to the presence of catecholamine-resistant hypotension). Results 45 infants were enrolled: 10 received catecholamines (6 were catecholamine-responsive, 4 developed catecholamine-resistant hypotension). Catecholamine-resistant hypotension was not associated with decreased preload, shortening fraction or ventricular output. Infants with catecholamine-resistant hypotension had significantly lower levels of systemic vascular resistance and postoperative cortisol concentration. Conclusion We speculate that low cortisol levels and impaired vascular tone may play a more important role than impaired cardiac performance in post-ligation catecholamine-resistant hypotension. PMID:25118721

  10. A Rare Clinical Presentation of Giant Bilateral Labial Fibroepithelial Stromal Polyps in Patient with Psoriasis Disease.

    PubMed

    Avsar, Ayse Filiz; Islek, Elcin; Yildirim, Melahat; Ahsen, Hilal

    2016-01-01

    Fibroepithelial polyps (FEPs) are rarely seen lesions of the lower female genital tract with polypoid proliferations of stroma. These tumors usually present in the vulvovaginal region of the reproductive aged women. In this presentation, we report a case of a psoriatic woman who developed unusual multiple polypoid lesions approximately 15 cm in size arising from both left and right labia minora and unique connection of FEPs with psoriasis disease. PMID:26925277

  11. A Rare Clinical Presentation of Giant Bilateral Labial Fibroepithelial Stromal Polyps in Patient with Psoriasis Disease

    PubMed Central

    Avsar, Ayse Filiz; Islek, Elcin; Yildirim, Melahat; Ahsen, Hilal

    2016-01-01

    Fibroepithelial polyps (FEPs) are rarely seen lesions of the lower female genital tract with polypoid proliferations of stroma. These tumors usually present in the vulvovaginal region of the reproductive aged women. In this presentation, we report a case of a psoriatic woman who developed unusual multiple polypoid lesions approximately 15 cm in size arising from both left and right labia minora and unique connection of FEPs with psoriasis disease. PMID:26925277

  12. Clinical presentation, etiology, and survival in adult acute encephalitis syndrome in rural Central India

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Rajnish; Mishra, Pradyumna Kumar; Joshi, Deepti; Santhosh, SR; Parida, M.M.; Desikan, Prabha; Gangane, Nitin; Kalantri, S.P.; Reingold, Arthur; Colford, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) is a constellation of symptoms that includes fever and altered mental status. Most cases are attributed to viral encephalitis (VE), occurring either in outbreaks or sporadically. We conducted hospital-based surveillance for sporadic adult-AES in rural Central India in order to describe its incidence, spatial and temporal distribution, clinical profile, etiology and predictors of mortality. Methods All consecutive hospital admissions during the study period were screened to identify adult-AES cases and were followed until 30-days of hospitalization. We estimated incidence by administrative sub-division of residence and described the temporal distribution of cases. We performed viral diagnostic studies on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples to determine the etiology of AES. The diagnostic tests included RT-PCR (for enteroviruses, HSV 1 and 2), conventional PCR (for flaviviruses), CSF IgM capture ELISA (for Japanese encephalitis virus, dengue, West Nile virus, Varicella zoster virus, measles, and mumps). We compared demographic and clinical variables across etiologic subtypes and estimated predictors of 30-day mortality. Results A total of 183 AES cases were identified between January and October 2007, representing 2.38% of all admissions. The incidence of adult AES in the administrative subdivisions closest to the hospital was 16 per 100,000. Of the 183 cases, a non-viral etiology was confirmed in 31 (16.9%) and the remaining 152 were considered as VE suspects. Of the VE suspects, we could confirm a viral etiology in 31 cases: 17 (11.2%) enterovirus; 8 (5.2%) flavivirus; 3 (1.9%) Varicella zoster; 1 (0.6%) herpesvirus; and 2 (1.3%) mixed etiology); the etiology remained unknown in remaining 121 (79.6%) cases. 53 (36%) of the AES patients died; the case fatality proportion was similar in patients with a confirmed and unknown viral etiology (45.1 and 33.6% respectively). A requirement for assisted ventilation significantly increased mortality (HR 2.14 (95% CI 1.04.77)), while a high Glasgow coma score (HR 0.76 (95% CI 0.690.83)), and longer duration of hospitalization (HR 0.88 (95% CI 0.830.94)) were protective. Conclusion This study is the first description of the etiology of adult-AES in India, and provides a framework for future surveillance programs in India. PMID:23643180

  13. Plain X-ray diagnosis of the acute abdomen: A surgical handbook with notes on clinical presentation and differential diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Gough, M.H.; Gear, M.W.; Daar, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    Taken in conjunction with a history and clinical examination, the plain X-ray film may provide invaluable help in reaching or confirming a diagnosis in the patient with an acute abdomen. Designed for the casualty officer or trainee surgeon, this clinical handbook is a practical guide to the interpretation of the plain abdominal X-ray. The format of the first edition has been retained, providing typical examples of X-rays of the conditions which present as abdominal emergencies. Each X-ray is accompanied by a legend in four sections: the characteristic radiological signs demonstrated in the film; the differential diagnosis suggested by the X-ray; the presenting signs and symptoms of the condition under discussion; and a list of possible clinical differential diagnoses.

  14. Ophthalmic formulations of the intraocular hypotensive melatonin agent 5-MCA-NAT.

    PubMed

    Andrés-Guerrero, Vanessa; Alarma-Estrany, Pilar; Molina-Martínez, Irene T; Peral, Assumpta; Herrero-Vanrell, Rocío; Pintor, Jesús

    2009-03-01

    Melatonin is a hormone responsible for the regulation of circadian and seasonal rhythms. This hormone is synthesised in many tissues in the body including the eye, where it regulates important processes. During the recent years, the role of melatonin in the control of IOP has been investigated and it has been demonstrated that melatonin receptors are present and involved in the dynamics of the aqueous humour. 5-Methoxycarbonylamino-N-acetyltryptamine (5-MCA-NAT) is a selective MT3 melatonin receptor agonist. Topical application of this product produces a clear reduction in intraocular pressure (IOP) in New Zealand white rabbits and in glaucomatous monkeys. In this work, the potent ocular hypotensive 5-MCA-NAT has been dissolved in excipients used in currently marketed drug formulations. Until now, this melatonin analogue had been dissolved in either DMSO or ethanol neither of which is suitable for ocular topical application in humans. Solubility assays in the different solvents were performed by the observation of the presence of drug crystals under optical microscopy. 5-MCA-NAT was completely dissolved in propylene glycol (PG) and polyethylene glycol 300 (PEG 300) within 24h. Ophthalmic formulations were prepared from different ratios of PG:PBS and the commercialized Systane product. Quantification of 5-MCA-NAT in the vehicles was assessed by HPLC. In vitro cytotoxicity of the formulations was evaluated by the MTT method and in vivo tolerance of 5-MCA-NAT in the solvents was analyzed by biomicroscopy and specular microscopy. Systane and proportions of PG:PBS up to 10% of PG did not show cytotoxicity in human corneal limbal epithelial cells (HCLE). In vivo experiments showed that the higher the ocular tolerance, the less amount of PG present. The ocular hypotensive effect of 5-MCA-NAT dissolved in the new formulations was checked measuring IOP for 8h after instillation of the substance. The best effect lowering IOP was obtained with 5-MCA-NAT dissolved in PG and diluted with PBS (PG 1.43%) in which 5-MCA-NAT produced a reduction of 28.11+/-2.0% and the effect lasted about 7h. In conclusion, new formulations accepted for ocular topical treatments different from DMSO or ethanol were capable of dissolving the melatonin analogue 5-MCA-NAT, preserving its ocular hypotensive ability. Therefore, the use of 5-MCA-NAT may be possible in the treatment of ocular hypertension and glaucoma. PMID:19056382

  15. Clinical application of Electrical Impedance Tomography in the Present Health Scenario of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborti, K. L., Dr; Selvamurthy, W., Dr

    2010-04-01

    Early detection of Breast Cancer is currently emerging as a big clinical entity requiring a non invasive, radiation less, harmless, cost effective diagnostic technique. Survival is improved if detected early. Breast Cancer is the second most common cancer in India. Health corporate system of India is urgently requiring a cost effective, noninvasive novel technique like "Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT)" for screening large poor rural population of India for early diagnosis of Breast Cancer. EIT is the technique to visualize spatial distribution of Electro-impedance (or conductivity) inside the object, such as human body. A medical device which allows imaging of the distribution of conductivity in 3D in regions below the skin surface has been developed and tested. Its purpose is to enable early detection and preliminary diagnosis of breast tumors. The system uses a planar array consisting of 256 electrodes and enables obtaining images of the three-dimensional conductivity distribution in regions below the skin's surface up to several centimeters deep. The developed measuring system and image reconstruction algorithm can be used for breast tissue imaging and diagnostic, in particular for malignant tumor detection. Initially ten patients as control and ten patients with breast lesions have been studied with this new technique. It was found that electrical impedance mammograms from different groups has clear visual distinctions and statistically significant difference in breast glands conductivity. The results are quiet encouraging. EIT may emerge as the first line noninvasive imaging method of choice for screening large population for early detection of breast cancer.

  16. Streptococcus pyogenes Pneumonia in Adults: Clinical Presentation and Molecular Characterization of Isolates 2006-2015

    PubMed Central

    Tamayo, Esther; Montes, Milagrosa; Vicente, Diego; Pérez-Trallero, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In the preantibiotic era Streptococcus pyogenes was a common cause of severe pneumonia but currently, except for postinfluenza complications, it is not considered a common cause of community-acquired pneumonia in adults. Aim and Material and Methods This study aimed to identify current clinical episodes of S. pyogenes pneumonia, its relationship with influenza virus circulation and the genotypes of the involved isolates during a decade in a Southern European region (Gipuzkoa, northern Spain). Molecular analysis of isolates included emm, multilocus-sequence typing, and superantigen profile determination. Results Forty episodes were detected (annual incidence 1.1 x 100,000 inhabitants, range 0.29–2.29). Thirty-seven episodes were community-acquired, 21 involved an invasive infection and 10 developed STSS. The associated mortality rate was 20%, with half of the patients dying within 24 hours after admission. Influenza coinfection was confirmed in four patients and suspected in another. The 52.5% of episodes occurred outside the influenza seasonal epidemic. The 67.5% of affected persons were elderly individuals and adults with severe comorbidities, although 13 patients had no comorbidities, 2 of them had a fatal outcome. Eleven clones were identified, the most prevalent being emm1/ST28 (43.6%) causing the most severe cases. Conclusions S. pyogenes pneumonia had a continuous presence frequently unrelated to influenza infection, being rapidly fatal even in previously healthy individuals. PMID:27027618

  17. Quality assurance in radiation therapy: European experience - present and future clinical efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Dische, S.

    1984-06-01

    A high standard of radiotherapeutic practice must be sought in all phases of management of a patient with malignant disease. Radiation therapy must be appropriately chosen and integrated with surgery, cytotoxic chemotherapy and all other modes of treatment. The most suitable technique with a dose, fractionation and time regime must devised and executed with technical and personal care. Follow-up to truly assess tumor control and morbidity is essential so as to guide the management of future patients. To achieve this in Europe great reliance is placed upon the training and qualification of the therapist and staff. High standards are applied to the professional qualifications for radiation physicists, nurses and technical staff. In the countries belonging to the European economic union, a new Diploma in Radiation Therapy has been established to be a standard for consultant practice through all the countries included. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer has recently initiated a quality control study in some of the centers included in the Radiotherapy Group. A preliminary report has just appeared on the results of the clinical and dosimetric studies in 8 centers placed in 5 European countries.

  18. Masked polycythaemia vera: presenting features, response to treatment and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Larrán, Alberto; Angona, Anna; Ancochea, Agueda; García-Pallarols, Francesc; Fernández, Concepción; Longarón, Raquel; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Besses, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Masked polycythaemia vera (PV) has been proposed as a new entity with poorer outcome than overt PV. In this study, the initial clinical and laboratory characteristics, response to treatment and outcome of masked and overt PV were compared using red cell mass and haemoglobin or haematocrit levels for the distinction between both entities. Sixty-eight of 151 PV patients (45%) were classified as masked PV according to World Health Organisation diagnostic criteria, whereas 16 (11%) were classified as masked PV using the British Committee for Standards in Haematology (BCSH). In comparison with overt PV, a higher platelet count and a lower JAK2V617F allele burden at diagnosis were observed in masked PV. Patients with masked PV needed lower phlebotomies and responded faster to hydroxcarbamide than those with overt PV. Complete haematological response was more frequently achieved in masked than in overt PV (79% vs. 58%, P = 0.001). There were no significant differences in the duration of haematological response, the rate of resistance or intolerance to hydroxycarbamide and the probability of molecular response according to type of PV (masked vs. overt). Overall survival, rate of thrombosis and major bleeding, and probability of transformation was superimposable among patients with masked and overt PV. PMID:25810304

  19. Comparative study of three surgical treatments for two forms of the clinical presentation of bovine pododermatitis.

    PubMed

    Silva, L A F; Atayde, I B; Fioravanti, M C S; Eurides, D; Oliveira, K S; Silva, C A; Vieira, D; Araújo, E G

    2004-10-01

    In this study, 1013 animals showing signs of clinical pododermatitis were examined and divided into five unevenly numbered groups. Affected animals in Groups I and II showed only signs of vegetative interdigital pododermatitis. The lesions were surgically removed and either protected with bandages (in Group I) or cauterized with incandescent iron (Group II). The animals in Groups III, IV, and V, showed signs of necrotic pododermatitis. These were treated with different protocols after the necrotic tissue was surgically removed: in Group III, the lesion was cauterized; in Group IV, the wound was protected with bandages; and in Group V, both the second and the third phalanges were amputated. There was a statistically significant relapse difference between Group III and Group V, as well as a difference among Group IV and Group V animals, and there were fewer relapses among the latter. The treatment used in Groups II and III proved to be efficient and inexpensive. Amputation of the phalanges was the treatment that resulted in fewer relapses among all protocols, despite its mutilating effect. The association of a local and parenteral treatment with an antibiotic agent, as well as the use of foot baths, contributed greatly to a fast recovery. PMID:15604479

  20. Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State: A Historic Review of the Clinical Presentation, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pasquel, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    The hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS) is the most serious acute hyperglycemic emergency in patients with type 2 diabetes. von Frerichs and Dreschfeld described the first cases of HHS in the 1880s in patients with an “unusual diabetic coma” characterized by severe hyperglycemia and glycosuria in the absence of Kussmaul breathing, with a fruity breath odor or positive acetone test in the urine. Current diagnostic HHS criteria include a plasma glucose level >600 mg/dL and increased effective plasma osmolality >320 mOsm/kg in the absence of ketoacidosis. The incidence of HHS is estimated to be <1% of hospital admissions of patients with diabetes. The reported mortality is between 10 and 20%, which is about 10 times higher than the mortality rate in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Despite the severity of this condition, no prospective, randomized studies have determined best treatment strategies in patients with HHS, and its management has largely been extrapolated from studies of patients with DKA. There are many unresolved questions that need to be addressed in prospective clinical trials regarding the pathogenesis and treatment of pediatric and adult patients with HHS. PMID:25342831

  1. Epidemiology, Clinical Presentation, Laboratory Diagnosis, Antimicrobial Resistance, and Antimicrobial Management of Invasive Salmonella Infections.

    PubMed

    Crump, John A; Sjölund-Karlsson, Maria; Gordon, Melita A; Parry, Christopher M

    2015-10-01

    Salmonella enterica infections are common causes of bloodstream infection in low-resource areas, where they may be difficult to distinguish from other febrile illnesses and may be associated with a high case fatality ratio. Microbiologic culture of blood or bone marrow remains the mainstay of laboratory diagnosis. Antimicrobial resistance has emerged in Salmonella enterica, initially to the traditional first-line drugs chloramphenicol, ampicillin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Decreased fluoroquinolone susceptibility and then fluoroquinolone resistance have developed in association with chromosomal mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region of genes encoding DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV and also by plasmid-mediated resistance mechanisms. Resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins has occurred more often in nontyphoidal than in typhoidal Salmonella strains. Azithromycin is effective for the management of uncomplicated typhoid fever and may serve as an alternative oral drug in areas where fluoroquinolone resistance is common. In 2013, CLSI lowered the ciprofloxacin susceptibility breakpoints to account for accumulating clinical, microbiologic, and pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic data suggesting that revision was needed for contemporary invasive Salmonella infections. Newly established CLSI guidelines for azithromycin and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi were published in CLSI document M100 in 2015. PMID:26180063

  2. Data collection and information presentation for optimal decision making by clinical managers--the Autocontrol Project.

    PubMed

    Grant, A M; Richard, Y; Deland, E; Després, N; de Lorenzi, F; Dagenais, A; Buteau, M

    1997-01-01

    The Autocontrol methodology has been developed in order to support the optimisation of decision-making and the use of resources in the context of a clinical unit. The theoretical basis relates to quality assurance and information systems and is influenced by management and cognitive research in the health domain. The methodology uses population rather than individual decision making and because of its dynamic feedback design promises to have rapid and profound effect on practice. Most importantly the health care professional is the principle user of the Autocontrol system. In this methodology we distinguish three types of evidence necessary for practice change: practice based or internal evidence, best evidence derived from the literature or external evidence concerning the practice in question, and process based evidence on how to optimise the process of practice change. The software used by the system is of the executive decision support type which facilitates interrogation of large databases. The Autocontrol system is designed to interrogate the data of the patient medical record however the latter often lacks data on concomitant resource use and this must be supplemented. This paper reviews the Autocontrol methodology and gives examples from current studies. PMID:9357733

  3. Update Review and Clinical Presentation in Congenital Insensitivity to Pain and Anhidrosis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-López, L. M.; Cabrera-González, M.; Gutiérrez-de la Iglesia, D.; Ricart, S.; Knörr-Giménez, G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Congenital insensitivity to pain and anhidrosis (CIPA) or hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IV is an extremely rare syndrome. Three clinical findings define the syndrome: insensitivity to pain, impossibility to sweat, and mental retardation. This pathology is caused by a genetic mutation in the NTRK1 gene, which encodes a tyrosine receptor (TrkA) for nerve growth factor (NGF). Methods. The consultation of a child female in our center with CIPA and a tibia fracture in pseudoarthrosis encouraged us to carefully review literature and examine the therapeutic possibilities. A thorough review of literature published in Pubmed was done about CIPA and other connected medical issues mentioned in the paper. Conclusions. The therapeutic approach of CIPA remains unclear. The preventive approach remains the only possible treatment of CIPA. We propose two new important concepts in the therapeutic approach for these patients: (1) early surgical treatment for long bone fractures to prevent pseudoarthrosis and to allow early weight bearing, decreasing the risk of further osteopenia, and (2) bisphosphonates to avoid the progression of osteopenia and to reduce the number of consecutive fractures. PMID:26579324

  4. Clinical presentation and pharmacotherapy response in social anxiety disorder: The effect of etiological beliefs.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jonah N; Potter, Carrie M; Drabick, Deborah A G; Blanco, Carlos; Schneier, Franklin R; Liebowitz, Michael R; Heimberg, Richard G

    2015-07-30

    Therapies for social anxiety disorder (SAD) leave many patients symptomatic at the end of treatment and little is known about predictors of treatment response. This study investigated the predictive relationship of patients' etiological attributions to initial clinical features and response to pharmacotherapy. One hundred thirty-seven individuals seeking treatment for SAD received 12 weeks of open treatment with paroxetine. Participants completed the Attributions for the Etiology of Social Anxiety Scale at baseline in addition to measures of social anxiety and depression at baseline and over the course of treatment. A latent class analysis suggested four profiles of etiological beliefs about one's SAD that may be characterized as: Familial Factors, Need to be Liked, Bad Social Experiences, and Diffuse Beliefs. Patients in the more psychosocially-driven classes, Need to be Liked and Bad Social Experiences, had the most severe social anxiety and depression at baseline. Patients in the Familial Factors class, who attributed their SAD to genetic, biological, and early life experiences, had the most rapid response to paroxetine.These results highlight the effect of biological and genetically-oriented etiological beliefs on pharmacological intervention, have implications for person-specific treatment selection, and identify potential points of intervention to augment treatment response. PMID:25920804

  5. Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Diffuse Skin Thickening as Kaposi Sarcoma Clinical Presentation.

    PubMed

    Querido, Sara; Sousa, Henrique Silva; Pereira, Tiago Assis; Birne, Rita; Matias, Patrícia; Jorge, Cristina; Weigert, André; Adragão, Teresa; Bruges, Margarida; Machado, Domingos

    2015-01-01

    A 56-year-old African patient received a kidney from a deceased donor with 4 HLA mismatches in April 2013. He received immunosuppression with basiliximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone. Immediate diuresis and a good allograft function were soon observed. Six months later, the serum creatinine level increased to 2.6 mg/dL. A renal allograft biopsy revealed interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy grade II. Toxicity of calcineurin inhibitor was assumed and, after a switch for everolimus, renal function improved. However, since March 2014, renal function progressively deteriorated. A second allograft biopsy showed no new lesions. Two months later, the patient was admitted due to anuria, haematochezia with anaemia, requiring 5 units of packed red blood cells, and diffuse skin thickening. Colonoscopy showed haemorrhagic patches in the colon and the rectum; histology diagnosis was Kaposi sarcoma (KS). A skin biopsy revealed cutaneous involvement of KS. Rapid clinical deterioration culminated in death in June 2014. This case is unusual as less than 20 cases of KS with gross gastrointestinal bleeding have been reported and only 6 cases had the referred bleeding originating in the lower gastrointestinal tract. So, KS should be considered in differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding in some kidney transplant patients. PMID:26783491

  6. Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Diffuse Skin Thickening as Kaposi Sarcoma Clinical Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Querido, Sara; Sousa, Henrique Silva; Pereira, Tiago Assis; Birne, Rita; Matias, Patrícia; Jorge, Cristina; Weigert, André; Adragão, Teresa; Bruges, Margarida; Machado, Domingos

    2015-01-01

    A 56-year-old African patient received a kidney from a deceased donor with 4 HLA mismatches in April 2013. He received immunosuppression with basiliximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone. Immediate diuresis and a good allograft function were soon observed. Six months later, the serum creatinine level increased to 2.6 mg/dL. A renal allograft biopsy revealed interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy grade II. Toxicity of calcineurin inhibitor was assumed and, after a switch for everolimus, renal function improved. However, since March 2014, renal function progressively deteriorated. A second allograft biopsy showed no new lesions. Two months later, the patient was admitted due to anuria, haematochezia with anaemia, requiring 5 units of packed red blood cells, and diffuse skin thickening. Colonoscopy showed haemorrhagic patches in the colon and the rectum; histology diagnosis was Kaposi sarcoma (KS). A skin biopsy revealed cutaneous involvement of KS. Rapid clinical deterioration culminated in death in June 2014. This case is unusual as less than 20 cases of KS with gross gastrointestinal bleeding have been reported and only 6 cases had the referred bleeding originating in the lower gastrointestinal tract. So, KS should be considered in differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding in some kidney transplant patients. PMID:26783491

  7. Impact of gender, work, and clinical presentation on diagnostic delay in Italian patients with primary ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Bandinelli, F; Salvadorini, G; Sedie, A Delle; Riente, L; Bombardieri, S; Matucci-Cerinic, M

    2016-02-01

    The variability of demographic, social, genetic, and clinical factors might influence the time between the onset of symptoms and the diagnosis [diagnostic delay (DD)] of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in different geographic areas. Different clinical manifestations in men and women affected by AS might indicate a possible role of gender in DD. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of demographic, social, genetic, and clinical factors on DD and the differences of DD between men and women related to the presence of different demographic, social, clinical, and genetic parameters in an Italian cohort of primary AS patients. A total of 135 Italian primary AS patients (45 female and 90 male, 27.9 ± 0.89 years old at onset) were studied. The DD, gender, education and work (manual or non-manual) levels, and type of first clinical presentation (inflammatory back pain, arthritis, enthesitis) at onset, family history of AS, and HLA B27 presence were analyzed. The DD (8.744 mean ±0.6869) was significantly higher in men (p = 0.0023), in axial presentation (p = 0.0021), and in manual work (even if with low significance, p = 0.047). The lower DD in women in comparison to that in men was likely related to higher education (p = 0.0045) and work (p = 0.0186) levels, peripheral involvement (p = 0.0009), and HLA B27 positivity (p = 0.0231). DD was higher in AS patients: male, employed in manual jobs, and with axial symptoms at onset. In men, DD seemed to be negatively influenced by lower level of education and work, axial clinical presentation, and HLA B27. PMID:26238665

  8. Effect of Interval to Definitive Breast Surgery on Clinical Presentation and Survival in Early-Stage Invasive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vujovic, Olga; Yu, Edward; Cherian, Anil; Perera, Francisco; Dar, A. Rashid; Stitt, Larry; Hammond, A.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of clinical presentation and interval to breast surgery on local recurrence and survival in early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: The data from 397 patients with Stage T1-T2N0 breast carcinoma treated with conservative surgery and breast radiotherapy between 1985 and 1992 were reviewed at the London Regional Cancer Program. The clinical presentation consisted of a mammogram finding or a palpable lump. The intervals from clinical presentation to definitive breast surgery used for analysis were 0-4, >4-12, and >12 weeks. The Kaplan-Meier estimates of the time to local recurrence, disease-free survival, and cause-specific survival were determined for the three groups. Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate the effect of clinical presentation and interval to definitive surgery on survival. Results: The median follow-up was 11.2 years. No statistically significant difference was found in local recurrence as a function of the interval to definitive surgery (p = .424). A significant difference was noted in disease-free survival (p = .040) and cause-specific survival (p = .006) with an interval of >12 weeks to definitive breast surgery. However, the interval to definitive surgery was dependent on the presentation for cause-specific survival, with a substantial effect for patients with a mammographic presentation and a negligible effect for patients with a lump presentation (interaction p = .041). Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that an interval of >12 weeks to breast surgery might be associated with decreased survival for patients with a mammographic presentation, but it appeared to have no effect on survival for patients presenting with a palpable breast lump.

  9. Cantharidin Poisoning due to Blister Beetle Ingestion in Children: Two case reports and a review of clinical presentations.

    PubMed

    Al-Binali, Ali M; Shabana, Medhat; Al-Fifi, Suliman; Dawood, Sami; Shehri, Amer A; Al-Barki, Ahmed

    2010-08-01

    Cantharidin is an intoxicant found in beetles in the Meloidae (Coleoptera) family. Ingestion may result in haematemesis, impaired level of consciousness, electrolyte disturbance, haematurea and renal impairment. Here, we report two paediatric cases of meloid beetle ingestion resulting in cantharidin poisoning and the clinical presentation of the ensuing intoxication. PMID:21509239

  10. 21 CFR 50.52 - Clinical investigations involving greater than minimal risk but presenting the prospect of direct...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Clinical investigations involving greater than minimal risk but presenting the prospect of direct benefit to individual subjects. 50.52 Section 50.52 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Additional Safeguards...

  11. Past, Present, and Future Trends in Teaching Clinical Skills through Web-Based Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coe Regan, Jo Ann R.; Youn, Eric J.

    2008-01-01

    Distance education in social work has grown significantly due to the use of interactive television and computer networks. Given the recent developments in delivering distance education utilizing Web-based technology, this article presents a literature review focused on identifying generational trends in the development of Web-based learning…

  12. Excavated pulmonary nodules: an unusual clinical presentation of lung metastasis in two cases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Excavated pulmonary metastasis are rare. We present two cases of excavated pulmonary nodules proved to be metastases from osteosarcoma and gallblader lymphoma. Case presentation The first one is 39-year-old man in whom cholecystectomy made the diagnosis of primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the gallbladder. He presented in chest CT scan excavated nodules that had been biopsied and confirmed the diagnosis of non hodgkin lymphoma. He underwent 8 courses of chemotherapy CHOP 21 with complete remission. The second one is an 21 years old man who presented a right leg osteoblastic osteosarcoma with only excavated pulmonary nodules in extension assessment. He had 3 courses of polychemotherapy API (doxorubicin, platinum, and ifosfamide) with partial response. Unfortunately, he died following a septic shock. Review of the literature shows that excavated pulmonary nodules as metastasis are rare but we should consider this diagnosis every time we are in front of a cancer. Chest computed tomography is the best diagnosis imaging that could make this diagnosis. Differential diagnosis between benign and malignant bullous lesions is important because surgical excision affects survival in some malignancies. Conclusions Although pulmonary nodules are the most common cancer metastasis, a differential diagnosis of a concurrent primary malignancy should always be considered every time we have excavated lesions, even in patients with known malignant disease. Thorough chest evaluation is important, as multiple primary malignancies may occur concomitantly. PMID:20576147

  13. Early Motor Unit Disease Masquerading as Psychogenic Breathy Dysphonia: A Clinical Case Presentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Arnold E.

    1971-01-01

    Presented is a study of a 20-year-old girl with mild, breathy dysphonia, previously diagnosed as psychogenic. In actuality, her voice change was a sign of early myasthenia gravis. It is pointed out that voice changes can be a first and only sign of early neurologic disease. (Author/KW)

  14. Glanders in animals: a review on epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and countermeasures.

    PubMed

    Khan, I; Wieler, L H; Melzer, F; Elschner, M C; Muhammad, G; Ali, S; Sprague, L D; Neubauer, H; Saqib, M

    2013-06-01

    Glanders or farcy, caused by Burkholderia mallei, is an infectious and zoonotic disease of solipeds. Horses, donkeys and mules are the only known natural reservoir of B. mallei. Although glanders has been eradicated from most countries, it has regained the status of a re-emerging disease because of the numerous recent outbreaks. Pre-symptomatic or carrier animals are the potential source of infection for the healthy equine population and play a crucial role in the spreading of the infectious agent. Glanders is characterized by ulcerating nodular lesions of the skin and mucous membrane. Generalized symptoms include fever, malaise, depression, cough, anorexia and weight loss. Burkholderia mallei can invade its host through mucous membranes, gastrointestinal tract and the integument. Its virulence mechanisms and pathogenesis are not yet completely understood. A major problem when using serological tests for diagnosing glanders is the occurrence of false-positive and false-negative results leading to difficulties in international trade with equids and to the spread of glanders to disease-free regions. Moreover, poor tests critically result in poor control of disease. These tests are not only incapable of discriminating between B. mallei and B. pseudomallei antibodies, they are also unable to differentiate between malleinized and naturally infected animals. Combined use of both serological and molecular detection methods increases the detection rate of glanders. Countermeasures against glanders include early detection of disease in susceptible animals, stringent quarantine measures, testing and safe destruction of infected carcasses, adequate compensation to the animal owners, disinfection of infected premises and awareness about glanders and the zoonotic implications through veterinary extension services. An account of the clinical picture and successful experimental therapy of spontaneous equine glanders is also given. PMID:22630609

  15. Clinical Heterogeneity in Patients With FOXP3 Mutations Presenting With Permanent Neonatal Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Minton, Jayne A.L.; Caswell, Richard; Shield, Julian P.; Deiss, Dorothee; Sumnik, Zdenek; Cayssials, Amely; Herr, Mathias; Loew, Anja; Lewis, Vaughan; Ellard, Sian; Hattersley, Andrew T.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome is caused by FOXP3 mutations. We aimed to determine the prevalence, genetics, and clinical phenotype of FOXP3 mutations in a large cohort with permanent neonatal diabetes (PNDM). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—The 11 coding exons and the polyadenylation region of FOXP3 were sequenced in 26 male subjects with diabetes diagnosed before 6 months of age in whom common genetic causes of PNDM had been excluded. Ten subjects had at least one additional immune-related disorder, and the remaining 16 had isolated diabetes. RESULTS—We identified four hemizygous FOXP3 mutations in 6 of 10 patients with associated immune-related disorders and in 0 of 16 patients with isolated diabetes (P = 0.002). Three patients with two novel mutations (R337Q and P339A) and the previously reported L76QfsX53 developed classic IPEX syndrome and died within the first 13 months. The novel mutation V408M was found in three patients from two unrelated families and had a mild phenotype with hypothyroidism and autoimmune enteropathy (n = 2) or nephrotic syndrome (n = 1) and survival to 12–15 years. CONCLUSIONS—FOXP3 mutations result in ∼4% of cases of male patients with permanent diabetes diagnosed before 6 months. Patients not only have classic IPEX syndrome but, unexpectedly, may have a more benign phenotype. FOXP3 sequencing should be performed in any male patient with the diagnosis of diabetes in the first 6 months who develops other possible autoimmune-associated conditions, even in the absence of full IPEX syndrome. PMID:18931102

  16. Clinical Spectrum and Management of Caustic Ingestion: A Case Series Presenting Three Opposing Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Vezakis, Antonios I; Pantiora, Eirini V; Kontis, Elissaios A; Sakellariou, Vasileios; Theodorou, Dimitrios; Gkiokas, Georgios; Polydorou, Andreas A; Fragulidis, Georgios P

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Ingestion of caustic substances is a medical emergency in both the adult and pediatric population and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. The extent of injuries after ingestion of caustic substances depends on the nature, amount, and concentration of the agent and on the exposure time. Acutely, caustic substances may cause massive hemorrhage and gastrointestinal tract perforation; the most markedly affected cases require urgent surgical treatment. Patients surviving the initial event may present with aorto-enteric or gastrocolic fistulae, esophageal strictures, dysphagia, and increased risk of esophageal cancer as long term sequelae. CASE REPORT The features of three cases of caustic ingestion are reported to demonstrate significantly different complaints presented at the emergency department. Two patients had free gastric perforation, one at presentation, and one delayed. The third patient presented with late severe strictures of the esophagus and pylorus. The outcomes of the three patients are discussed in detail along with the most current management strategies. CONCLUSIONS Among adults, ingestion of caustic substances is usually associated with more severe lesions due to the increased amount of ingested substance, as compared with pediatric patients. The most serious presentation is that of visceral perforation, most commonly of the stomach and rarely of the esophagus. Management involves urgent resuscitation with correction of fluid and electrolyte and acid-base abnormalities and immediate surgical exploration in those patients with signs of perforation. Once the perioperative period is managed successfully, the long-term results can be satisfactory. Managing of strictures or else reconstructive procedures must be well timed to allow for psychological and nutritional rehabilitation. PMID:27197994

  17. Arterial hypotension triggers perifocal depolarizations and aggravates secondary damage in focal brain injury.

    PubMed

    Trabold, Raimund; Schueler, Olaf G; Eriskat, Joerg; Plesnila, Nikolaus; Baethmann, Alexander J; Back, Tobias

    2006-02-01

    Perifocal depolarizations (PFD) have been observed after traumatic brain injury, are known to disturb cerebrovascular reactivity and thus may contribute to the morphological consequences of brain injury. In this investigation, the role of PFD was studied in focal brain lesions with/without induction of delayed hypotension. Cerebral freeze lesions were induced in anesthetized normotensive rats that underwent perfusion fixation of brains 5 min, 4 h or 24 h after lesioning, respectively, to obtain quantitative histopathology. In additional groups, a 45-min period of moderate hypobaric hypotension was applied 15 min post-trauma and brains were perfusion fixed after 4 h or 24 h. In a second series, the direct current (DC) potential and cortical laser-Doppler flow (LDF) were measured adjacent to lesions under normotensive or hypotensive conditions. Sham procedures were carried out in rats that underwent hypotension alone. Lesioning resulted in a significant LDF decrease to 50% of baseline, further decreased during hypotension to less than 40% of control (P < 0.05). Sham animals had LDF values between 60 and 70% of control when subjected to hypotension. Focal brain injury always induced a negative DC shift shortly after lesioning. In 6 of 8 rats that underwent cold lesion plus hypotension, a second PFD was observed approximately 2.5 min after onset of hypotension accompanied by a relative LDF increase by 25 +/- 12%. Lesion expansion was significantly worsened by hypotension (8.19 +/- 0.56 mm(3) at 24 h) compared with normotensive rats (7.01 +/- 0.3 mm(3) at 24 h, P < 0.01). We conclude that hypotension triggers depolarizations by an ischemic mechanism that contributes to final tissue damage. PMID:16412395

  18. Impact of Controlled Induced Hypotension on Cognitive Functions of Patients Undergoing Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Stanisław; Ołdak, Anna; Kluzik, Anna; Drobnik, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Background Controlled induced hypotension guarantees less blood loss and better visibility of the surgical site. The impact of hypotension on post-operative cognitive functions is still being discussed. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of controlled induced hypotension on the cognitive functions of patients undergoing functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). Material/Methods We allocated 47 patients with a good grade of preoperative cognitive functions evaluated with the Mini-Mental State Examination to 3 groups (1 – mild hypotension, 2 – intermediate hypotension, 3 – severe hypotension) according to the degree of mean intraoperative arterial pressure compared with preoperative blood pressure. Cognitive functions were evaluated preoperatively, 6 h, and 30 h postoperatively with standardized tests: the Stroop Test, Trail Making Test (TMT), and Verbal Fluency Test (VFT). A decrease in the test results and increase in the number of mistakes made were considered an impairment of cognitive functions. Results A total of 47 patients (group 1 – mild hypotension – 15, group 2 – intermediate hypotension – 19, group 3 – severe hypotension – 13) were included in the study. A significant decrease was observed in all the 3 groups after Stroop A test 6h postoperatively but it improved 30h postoperatively, without differences between the groups. Neither a significant decrease in the test results nor an increase in the number of mistakes was noted for Stroop B tests, TMT A&B tests and VFT. Conclusions The degree of controlled intraoperative hypotension during FESS did not influence the results of psychometric tests. PMID:26991989

  19. Clinical presentation and management of suspected ribavirin toxicosis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Kimberly; Beckel, Nicole; Sharp, Claire; Stern, Laura

    2016-05-01

    A 5-month-old pit bull terrier was presented for evaluation of progressive lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, and anorexia 45 hours after ingestion of 625 mg/kg body weight (BW) (9000 mg) of the antiviral medication, ribavirin. Abnormalities that were detected included dehydration, tachycardia, elevated liver enzymes, and prolonged prothrombin time. The dog was discharged after 5 days of aggressive supportive care consisting of intravenous fluids, antiemetics, gastroprotectants, hepatoprotectants, dextrose supplementation, and vitamin B/K1 supplementation. PMID:27152039

  20. Paper-based microfluidic devices for analysis of clinically relevant analytes present in urine and saliva.

    PubMed

    Klasner, Scott A; Price, Alexander K; Hoeman, Kurt W; Wilson, Rashaun S; Bell, Kayla J; Culbertson, Christopher T

    2010-07-01

    We report the use of paper-based microfluidic devices fabricated from a novel polymer blend for the monitoring of urinary ketones, glucose, and salivary nitrite. Paper-based devices were fabricated via photolithography in less than 3 min and were immediately ready for use for these diagnostically relevant assays. Patterned channels on filter paper as small as 90 microm wide with barriers as narrow as 250 microm could be reliably patterned to permit and block fluid wicking, respectively. Colorimetric assays for ketones and nitrite were adapted from the dipstick format to this paper microfluidic chip for the quantification of acetoacetate in artificial urine, as well as nitrite in artificial saliva. Glucose assays were based on those previously demonstrated (Martinez et al., Angew Chem Int Ed 8:1318-1320, 1; Martinez et al., Anal Chem 10:3699-3707, 2; Martinez et al., Proc Nat Acad Sci USA 50:19606-19611, 3; Lu et al., Electrophoresis 9:1497-1500, 4; Abe et al., Anal Chem 18:6928-6934, 5). Reagents were spotted on the detection pad of the paper device and allowed to dry prior to spotting of samples. The ketone test was a two-step reaction requiring a derivitization step between the sample spotting pad and the detection pad, thus for the first time, confirming the ability of these paper devices to perform online multi-step chemical reactions. Following the spotting of the reagents and sample solution onto the paper device and subsequent drying, color images of the paper chips were recorded using a flatbed scanner, and images were converted to CMYK format in Adobe Photoshop CS4 where the intensity of the color change was quantified using the same software. The limit of detection (LOD) for acetoacetate in artificial urine was 0.5 mM, while the LOD for salivary nitrite was 5 microM, placing both of these analytes within the clinically relevant range for these assays. Calibration curves for urinary ketone (5 to 16 mM) and salivary nitrite (5 to 2,000 microM) were generated. The time of device fabrication to the time of test results was about 25 min. PMID:20425107

  1. What has changed in the clinical presentation of breast carcinoma in 15 years?

    PubMed Central

    Mersin, Hüsnü Hakan; Kınaş, Volkan; Gülben, Kaptan; İrkin, Fikret; Berberoğlu, Uğur

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate if there was a change in time in terms of age at diagnosis, menopausal status, pathologic tumor size, lymphatic metastasis and pathologic stage in patients with surgical treatment for breast carcinoma. Material and Methods: The clinical and pathological characteristics of 1223 patients with breast carcinoma who underwent surgical treatment between January 1994 and December 1998, and of 1346 patients who underwent surgical treatment with the same diagnosis between January 2004 and December 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Results: The median age at diagnosis was 48 (20–78) years during the first period, and 50 (20–91) years during the second period. While 27% of patients were 40 years of age or younger in the first period, this ratio decreased to 20% during the second period (p=0.0001). The rate of premenopausal patients was 54% in the first period and 46% in the second period (p=0.0001). The median tumor size at diagnosis was 3 cm at the first period, and 2.5 cm at the second period. The number of patients with tumor size ≤2 cm increased in time from 391 (32%) to 531 (39%) (p=0.0001). Among young patients (aged ≤40 years), the number of patients with tumor size 2 cm or smaller were 81 (24.5%) and 92 (33.8%) at the first and second periods, respectively (p=0.001). Lymphatic metastases rate of patients aged ≤40 years was higher than patients aged >40 years, in both study periods (p=0.0001). The number of patients staged as pN1 at the first period increased from 356 (50.8%) to 441 (56.3%) at the second interval, while those staged as pN3 decreased from 251 (35.8%) to 175 (22.3%) (p=0.0001). Conclusion: It may be concluded that recently, breast cancer is diagnosed at older ages, the rate of young and premenopausal patients and size on diagnosis has decreased, and breast-conserving surgery is used more often. PMID:26504418

  2. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension Treated with a Targeted CT-Guided Epidural Blood Patch

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Inês; Marques, Inês Brás; Ferreira, Rogério; Cordeiro, Miguel; Sousa, Lívia

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is an important cause of new daily persistent headache. It is thought to be due to spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks, which probably have a multifactorial etiology. The classic manifestation of SIH is an orthostatic headache, but other neurological symptoms may be present. An epidural blood patch is thought to be the most effective treatment, but a blind infusion may be ineffective. We describe the case of a young man who developed an acute severe headache, with pain worsening when assuming an upright posture and relief gained with recumbency. No history of previous headache, recent cranial or cervical trauma, or invasive procedures was reported. Magnetic resonance imaging showed pachymeningeal enhancement and other features consistent with SIH and pointed towards a cervical CSF leak site. After failure of conservative treatment, a targeted computer tomography-guided EBP was performed, with complete recovery. PMID:26981128

  3. Clinical profile of non-traumatic acute abdominal pain presenting to an adult emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Chanana, Lakshay; Jegaraj, Moses A. K.; Kalyaniwala, Kimmin; Yadav, Bijesh; Abilash, Kundavaram

    2015-01-01

    Background: Abdominal pain is one of the most common reasons for presenting to the emergency depatment (ED) and the etiology is varied. Materials and Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted in a large ED of a tertiary care center in India. All patients older than 15 years and presenting with non-traumatic abdominal pain to the ED from May 2012 to October 2012 were recruited and the demographic characteristics, diagnosis and outcome were analyzed. Results: The study cohort included 264 patients over a 6 month period. More than half (55.6%) were aged between 15 and 40 years. There was a male predominance (56.8%). Majority of the patients (76.9%) presented with abdominal pain of less than 72 hour duration. The pain was sudden in onset in 54.9% of patients. Dull type was the most common character of pain (36%) followed by colicky type (22.3%). The most common site of pain was the lower abdomen (45.8%). Upper abdominal pain was seen in 26.9% and the pain was generalized in 27.3% of patients. The common causes were uretericcolic (16.3%), urinary tract infection (12.5%), acute pancreatitis (11%), acute appendicitis (10.6%) and acute gastritis (8%). More than half (51.9%) discharged from ED and 37% of cases were managed by the emergency physicians. Surgical intervention was required in 25.8% of patients. The mortality rate was 2.3%. Conclusions: Abdominal pain is a common ED symptom and clinicians must consider multiple diagnoses, especially those that require immediate intervention to limit morbidity and mortality. PMID:26288785

  4. Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumour of the Maxilla and Paranasal Sinuses: A Rare Clinical Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Sathasivasubramanian, S.; Vedeswari, C. Ponranjini

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumours (pPNET) are rare aggressive tumours of neural crest cell origin. These tumours are more common in children and young adults. This is a unique report of one such presentation in a 23-year-old lady occurring in the left side posterior maxilla and Paranasal sinuses along with imaging characteristics, histopathologic features, immunohistochemical aspects and management. Though these tumours are rare, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of rapidly growing soft tissue masses in young adults. Precise diagnosis with timely management is necessary for good prognosis. PMID:26155586

  5. Eccrine Porocarcinoma Presenting with Unusual Clinical Manifestations: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang-Min; Cho, Hee-Ryung; Lew, Bark-Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Eccrine porocarcinoma is a rare neoplasm that originates from the intraepidermal ductal portion of the eccrine sweat gland, and it usually occurs on the pre-existing lesion of benign eccine poroma. Its occurrence is more common in females and elderly persons. We present a case of a 44-year-old man who suffered from eccrine porocarcinoma, which developed on the right scrotum and pelvic area with metastases to the lung, adrenal gland, esophagus, ureter, and distant lymph nodes. Here we report on a unique case of eccrine porocarcinoma that developed primarily on the scrotum, which is an uncommon site, and showed rapid metastasis to the internal organs. PMID:22028580

  6. The spectrum of clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of mitochondrial forms of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Karaa, Amel; Goldstein, Amy

    2015-02-01

    Primary mitochondrial diseases refer to a group of heterogeneous and complex genetic disorders affecting 1:5000 people. The true prevalence is anticipated to be even higher because of the complexity of achieving a diagnosis in many patients who present with multisystemic complaints ranging from infancy to adulthood. Diabetes is a prominent feature of several of these disorders which might be overlooked by the endocrinologist. We here review mitochondrial disorders and describe the phenotypic and pathogenetic differences between mitochondrial diabetes mellitus (mDM) and other more common forms of diabetes mellitus. PMID:25330715

  7. Acute lead encephalopathy in early infancy--clinical presentation and outcome.

    PubMed

    al Khayat, A; Menon, N S; Alidina, M R

    1997-03-01

    We studied 19 infants with a mean age of 3.8 months who presented with features consistent with acute lead encephalopathy following the use of traditional medicines. All presented with convulsions; CT scans of the brain on admission showed brain oedema in four, atrophy in four and normal findings in 11. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis in nine patients showed pleocytosis in six and a high protein content in eight. The median lead level in these 19 infants which encephalopathy was 3.6 mumol/l (74.5 micrograms/dl). Seven had a mean lead level of only 2.7 mumol/l (56.9 micrograms/dl) which is much below 70 micrograms/dl, the level usually proposed as the threshold for encephalopathy. Thirteen infants developed brain damage during follow-up; statistical analysis correlated the lead level at 2 months post chelation with an abnormal neurological outcome. Our findings indicate that in very young infants acute lead encephalopathy may occur at lead level lower than previously reported. PMID:9176576

  8. A study of clinical presentation and delays in management of acute myocardial infarction in community.

    PubMed

    Goel, Pravin K; Srivastava, Saurabh Kumar; Ashfaq, Fauzia; Gupta, P R; Saxena, P C; Agarwal, Rajeev; Kumar, Sudeep; Garg, Naveen; Tewari, Satyendra; Kapoor, Aditya

    2012-01-01

    To assess the medico social demographics of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in our community we studied 609 patients presenting between January 2008 to December 2008 with a detailed questionnaire in four centres of UP. Medical attention was sought late (> 6 hours) in 316 (51.6%), thrombolysis was obtained in 45.2% (275) and presentation was atypical in 16.3% (99). 36.2% (221) had pre-monitory symptoms of which 68% (150) ignored the same while of 32% (71) who did seek medical attention 47.9% (37) were brushed away as non-cardiac in origin. 20.3% (46/226) of hypertension, 23.2% (43/185) of diabetes and 83.4% (91/109) of hyperlipidaemia was diagnosed post event. We conclude that at least half of patients with AMI do not get definitive therapy, at least one in 10 patients do not have the classical symptoms, reasonable proportion are unaware of their risk factors, and a good majority have pre-monitory symptoms which get overlooked. PMID:22664814

  9. Clinical heterogeneity associated with KCNA1 mutations include cataplexy and nonataxic presentations.

    PubMed

    Brownstein, Catherine A; Beggs, Alan H; Rodan, Lance; Shi, Jiahai; Towne, Meghan C; Pelletier, Renee; Cao, Siqi; Rosenberg, Paul A; Urion, David K; Picker, Jonathan; Tan, Wen-Hann; Agrawal, Pankaj B

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the KCNA1 gene are known to cause episodic ataxia/myokymia syndrome type 1 (EA1). Here, we describe two families with unique presentations who were enrolled in an IRB-approved study, extensively phenotyped, and whole exome sequencing (WES) performed. Family 1 had a diagnosis of isolated cataplexy triggered by sudden physical exertion in multiple affected individuals with heterogeneous neurological findings. All enrolled affected members carried a KCNA1 c.941T>C (p.I314T) mutation. Family 2 had an 8-year-old patient with muscle spasms with rigidity for whom WES revealed a previously reported heterozygous missense mutation in KCNA1 c.677C>G (p.T226R), confirming the diagnosis of EA1 without ataxia. WES identified variants in KCNA1 that explain both phenotypes expanding the phenotypic spectrum of diseases associated with mutations of this gene. KCNA1 mutations should be considered in patients of all ages with episodic neurological phenotypes, even when ataxia is not present. This is an example of the power of genomic approaches to identify pathogenic mutations in unsuspected genes responsible for heterogeneous diseases. PMID:26395884

  10. Microbial communities present in the lower respiratory tract of clinically healthy birds in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Shabbir, Muhammad Zubair; Malys, Tyler; Ivanov, Yury V; Park, Jihye; Shabbir, Muhammad Abu Bakr; Rabbani, Masood; Yaqub, Tahir; Harvill, Eric Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Commercial poultry is an important agricultural industry worldwide. Although dense living conditions and large flocks increase meat and egg production, they also increase the risk of disease outbreaks and zoonoses. Current pathogen identification methods mostly rely on culture-dependent techniques and, therefore, are limited to a very small number of bacteria present in the environment. Next Generation Sequencing allows for culture-independent characterization of lower respiratory microbiome of birds including the identification of novel commensals and potentially emerging pathogens. In this study, we collected tracheo-bronchoalveolar lavage of 14 birds raised at 3 different farms in the Punjab province of Pakistan. To characterize the lower respiratory microbiome of these birds, we sequenced hyper-variable regions of the 16S ribosomal subunit gene. Although dominated by bacteria belonging to a small number of taxonomic classifications, the lower respiratory microbiome from each farm was far more diverse and novel than previously known. The differences in microbiome among farms suggest that inter-farm differences affect the microbiome of birds more than breed, geographic location, or management system. The presence of potential and known pathogens in genetically similar specialty breeds of chickens kept at unnaturally high densities and under variable conditions presents an extraordinary opportunity for the selection of highly pathogenic bacteria. In some instances, opportunistic respiratory pathogens were observed in apparently healthy birds. Understanding and monitoring the respiratory microbiome of such populations may allow the early detection of future disease threats. PMID:25667427

  11. [Clinical presentation of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder as a function of the gender].

    PubMed

    Montiel-Nava, Cecilia; Montiel-Barbero, Isabel; Peña, Joaquín A

    2007-12-01

    Results from studies comparing boys and girls diagnosed as having Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) have been non conclusive. In general, the results of such studies report boys as being more hyperactive and presenting more conduct problems, and girls as having more cognitive and learning problems. The aim of this study was to collect information about the characterization of the disorder depending on the gender. 169 children (123 males, 46 females), between 4 and 13 years of age with ADHD were studied. The assessment battery included Conners' rating scales-Revised for parents and teachers, short forms of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition (WISC-III) and Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Revised (WPPSI-R), academic achievement measures, developmental history and the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children-IV Version-Parents (DISC-IV). The results indicated the lack of significant differences between genders for the studied variables, ADHD boys and girls scored alike in the various behavioral and cognitive measures. The results presented describe homogeneity in the symptoms, demographic characteristics and neuropsychological functioning for children of both genders; suggesting a syndrome with the same criteria and independent of the gender. PMID:18271391

  12. A fishy cause of sudden near fatal hypotension.

    PubMed

    Borade, P S; Ballary, C C; Lee, D K C

    2007-01-01

    Seafood-borne illnesses are a common but under recognised source of morbidity. We report the case of an 80-year-old woman who presented to hospital after collapsing in a restaurant following lunch consisting of mackerel fish. A detailed food history and clinical exclusion helped diagnose the condition as scombroid poisoning. The patient made a complete recovery following antihistamine therapy. PMID:17084013

  13. Acquired hepatocerebral degeneration and hepatic encephalopathy: correlations and variety of clinical presentations in overt and subclinical liver disease.

    PubMed

    Romeiro, Fernando G; Américo, Madileine F; Yamashiro, Fábio S; Caramori, Carlos A; Schelp, Arthur O; Santos, Antonio C; Silva, Giovanni F

    2011-06-01

    Acquired hepatocerebral degeneration (AHD) and hepatolenticular degeneration can have similar clinical presentations, but when a chronic liver disease and atypical motor findings coexist, the distinction between AHD and hepatic encephalopathy (HE) can be even more complicated. We describe three cases of AHD (two having HE) with different neuroimaging findings, distinct hepatic diseases and similar motor presentations, all presenting chronic arterial hypertension and weight loss before the disease manifestations. The diagnosis and physiopathology are commented upon and compared with previous reports. In conclusion, there are many correlations among HE, hepatolenticular degeneration and AHD, but the overlapping of AHD and HE could be more common depending on the clinical knowledge and diagnostic criteria adopted for each condition. Since AHD is not considered a priority that affects the liver transplant list, the prognosis in AHD patients remains poor, and flow interruption in portosystemic shunts must always be taken into account. PMID:21755129

  14. Clinical and Genetic Characteristics of Mexican Patients with Juvenile Presentation of Niemann-Pick Type C Disease

    PubMed Central

    Piña-Aguilar, Raul E.; Vera-Loaiza, Aurea; Chacón-Camacho, Oscar F.; Zenteno, Juan Carlos; Nuñez-Orozco, Lilia; Santillán-Hernández, Yuritzi

    2014-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C disease (NPC) is a rare lysosomal disease with a protean presentation, ranging from a fatal neonatal course with visceromegaly to an adult presentation with only neurological or psychiatric symptomatology. In this report we describe the genetic and clinical characteristics of 3 Mexican patients from different families with juvenile presentation of NPC. Clinical examination, imaging of central nervous and gastrointestinal system, and EEG were performed. Genetic studies include sequencing and deletion/duplication analysis of NPC1 and NPC2 genes. All patients presented with cognitive impairment, ataxia, and supranuclear vertical gaze palsy; one case had gelastic cataplexy. Also they developed epilepsy and cortical atrophy and two patients had thinning of corpus callosum. The 3 patients were compound heterozygotes for NPC1 sequence variants, including 5 missense and 1 nonsense mutations: p.P1007A and p.F1087L in Case 1; p.Q921P and p.G992R in Case 2; and p.R348∗ and p.V1165M in case 3. Mexican patients with juvenile NPC presented with a variable clinical phenotype and compound heterozygosity. This suggests a relative high frequency of mutation carriers as it is reported for European population. Consequently, clinicians should consider NPC as a diagnosis possibility in any adolescent or young adult patient with juvenile dementia and/or ataxia, even in absence of gelastic cataplexy and supranuclear vertical gaze palsy. PMID:25349751

  15. Stingray envenomation: a retrospective review of clinical presentation and treatment in 119 cases.

    PubMed

    Clark, Richard F; Girard, Robyn Heister; Rao, Daniel; Ly, Binh T; Davis, Daniel P

    2007-07-01

    Stingray stings are common along coastal regions of this country and the world. The tail of the stingray contains a barbed stinger attached to a venom gland and contained within an integumentary sheath. During a sting, the stinger and sheath can become embedded in the soft tissue of the victim, and venom is injected into the wound. Stingray venom most often causes severe pain on contact, although the exact mechanism of toxicity is not certain. Hot water immersion of the stung extremity has been reported to be effective in relieving pain associated with the envenomation, but large studies of this therapy have not been performed. We retrospectively reviewed stingray stings presenting to our Emergency Department (ED) over an 8-year period. Cases were divided into acute (group 1, within 24 h of the sting) and subacute (group 2, 24 h or more after the sting) presentations. Charts were abstracted for information concerning the victim's history, physical examination, treatment, diagnostic imaging, and outcome, including the effectiveness of hot water immersion as analgesia, and use of antimicrobials. A total of 119 cases were identified and abstracted, 100 in group 1 and 19 in group 2. Of the group 1 patients initially treated with hot water immersion alone, 88% had complete relief of pain within 30 min without administration of any other analgesic. In the patients who initially received a dose of analgesic along with hot water immersion, none required a second dose of analgesics and all had complete pain relief before discharge. There were no adverse effects (such as thermal burns) with this therapy. Analysis of infectious complications in group 1 patients demonstrated a significant number of patients returning to the ED with wound infections when prophylactic antibiotics were not administered at initial presentation. Our findings suggest that hot water immersion was effective in decreasing or eliminating the pain associated with stingray envenomation in our series. Due to the high potential for bacterial contamination in these puncture wounds, standard antibiotic prophylaxis may be prudent. Although stingray barbs can be radio-opaque, radiography in our series failed to detect barbs or other foreign bodies in stung extremities, although no barbs or other stinger material were found on inspection of wounds. PMID:17630073

  16. [Peritoneal mesothelioma: an inusual clinical presentation in a patient without exposure to asbestos].

    PubMed

    Ponce Lorenzo, J; Giménez Ortiz, A; Aparisi Aparisi, F; Fleitas Kanonnikoff, T; Montalar Salcedo, J

    2007-02-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is an insidious neoplasm arising from the mesotelial surfaces, of the pleural and peritoneal cavities, the tunica vaginalis, or the pericardium. The predominant cause is inhalation exposure to asbestos. We present a rare case of primary malignant mesothelioma of the peritoneum in a 64 year old man without history of inhalation exposure to asbestos. The initial symptoms were constitutional syndrome and right pleural effusion. Positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/TC) was useful for a supporting diagnosis and to determine the extension. The patient received treatment with systemic palliative chemotherapy, cisplatin-pemetrexed. After three cycles, partial response was observed, but the evolution was fatal due to secondary toxicity of chemotherapy. PMID:17590095

  17. Retroperitoneal lymphatic malformation and transverse testicular ectopia: a unique clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Morris, Michael W; Cauthen, William; Bofill, James A; Blewett, Christopher J; Liechty, Kenneth W

    2013-04-01

    This case report presents a fetal patient diagnosed in utero with a retroperitoneal lymphatic malformation by ultrasound and followed through gestation. At birth the child was noted to have a right inguinal hernia with two palpable testicles. Plan for partial resection and hernia repair with postoperative sclerotherapy was made. At the time of hernia repair, transverse testicular ectopia was diagnosed, and subsequent extraperitoneal transposition orchiopexy was performed following partial resection of the lymphatic malformation. Delayed sclerotherapy in combination with partial resection afforded definitive treatment of the residual lymphatic malformation as the patient demonstrates no recurrence over one year later. This is the first reported case to suggest a direct relationship between transverse testicular ectopia and a retroperitoneal lymphatic malformation. PMID:23583159

  18. Neglect of the complex: why psychotherapy for post-traumatic clinical presentations is often ineffective†

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Frank M.; Hull, Alastair M.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of efficacy in studies of post-traumatic conditions is largely derived from studies in which variables are kept to a minimum. Extrapolation of treatments from uncomplicated disorders to complex conditions may therefore be called evidence-based without being evidenced. Complex conditions with polysymptomatic presentations and extensive comorbidity are being denied proper evaluation, and patients most severely traumatised from the early stages of their development are not provided with rigorously evaluated psychotherapies because they are more difficult to study in the manner approved by research protocols. Such evidence as there is suggests that the simple extension of treatments for uncomplicated disorders is seriously inadequate. This has significant implications for health services responsible for the provision of the most efficacious treatments to those whose disorders arise from severe trauma, often very early in their life. PMID:26191439

  19. Initial orthostatic hypotension: review of a forgotten condition.

    PubMed

    Wieling, Wouter; Krediet, C T Paul; van Dijk, Nynke; Linzer, Mark; Tschakovsky, Michael E

    2007-02-01

    Several studies have shown that standing up is a frequent (3-10%) trigger of loss of consciousness both in young and old subjects. An exaggerated transient BP (blood pressure) fall upon standing is the underlying cause. IOH (initial orthostatic hypotension) is defined as a transient BP decrease within 15 s after standing, >40 mmHg SBP (systolic BP) and/or >20 mmHg DBP (diastolic BP) with symptoms of cerebral hypoperfusion. It differs distinctly from typical orthostatic hypotension (i.e. BP decrease >20 mmHg SBP and/or >10 mmHg DBP after 3 min of standing) as the BP decrease is transient. Only continuous beat-to-beat BP measurement during an active standing-up manoeuvre can document this condition. As IOH is only associated with active rising, passive tilting is of no diagnostic value. The pathophysiology of IOH is thought to be a temporal mismatch between cardiac output and vascular resistance. The marked decrease of vascular resistance during rising is similar to that observed at the onset of leg exercise and is absent during head-up tilting. It is attributed to vasodilatation in the working muscle through local mechanisms. Standing up causes an initial increase in venous return through the effects of contraction of leg and abdominal muscles. The consequent sudden increase in right atrial pressure may contribute to the fall in systemic vascular resistance through a reflex effect. This review alerts clinicians and clinician scientists to a common, yet often neglected, condition that occurs only upon an active change of posture and discusses its epidemiology, pathophysiology and management. PMID:17199559

  20. Decrease in the reactivity of locus coeruleus neurons to hypotension after an increase in their tyrosine hydroxylase content: a subregional in vivo voltammetry study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Vachette, C; Bourde, O; Gillon, J Y; Pujol, J F; Renaud, B

    1993-03-01

    The aim of the present work was to determine if noradrenergic neurons of the anterior and the posterior subregions of the locus coeruleus exhibit a difference in reactivity in response to sodium nitroprusside-induced arterial hypotension, and if the pharmacological induction of tyrosine hydroxylase by RU24722 modifies the reactivity of locus coeruleus neurons to this hypotensive stimulus. Previous findings have demonstrated that administration of RU24722 increases the concentration of tyrosine hydroxylase in the rat locus coeruleus by two different mechanisms in the anterior and in the posterior locus coeruleus subregions. The goal of the present study was to measure in vivo the changes in catecholaminergic metabolism in the locus coeruleus after treatment with RU24722 using differential normal pulse voltammetry (DNPV). In vehicle-treated rats, arterial hypotension increased catecholaminergic metabolism with the same pattern in the two locus coeruleus subregions. However, the changes in the magnitude of the catechol oxidation current throughout the recording period were significantly smaller in the posterior subregion (P < 0.001). In the RU24722-pretreated rats, there was a 39% increase in tyrosine hydroxylase and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid in the locus coeruleus. The functional reactivity to hypotension measured by DNPV was significantly decreased (P < 0.001) in both the anterior and posterior locus coeruleus subregions with RU24722 treatment. Therefore, this study suggests that the response of locus coeruleus cells to a hypotensive stimulus depends upon the intracellular tyrosine hydroxylase concentration both in the basal condition and during pharmacological induction of tyrosine hydroxylase gene expression. PMID:7903186