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Sample records for hypothermia improves outcome

  1. Hypothermia improves outcome from cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Bernard, S A

    2005-12-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is common and patients who are initially resuscitated by ambulance officers and transported to hospital are usually admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). In the past, the treatment in the ICU consisted of supportive care only, and most patients remained unconscious due to the severe anoxic neurological injury. It was this neurological injury rather than cardiac complications that caused the high rate of morbidity and mortality. However, in the early 1990's, a series of animal experiments demonstrated convincingly that mild hypothermia induced after return of spontaneous circulation and maintained for several hours dramatically reduced the severity of the anoxic neurological injury. In the mid-1990's, preliminary human studies suggested that mild hypothermia could be induced and maintained in post-cardiac arrest patients without an increase in the rate of cardiac or other complications. In the late 1990's, two prospective, randomised, controlled trials were conducted and the results confirmed the animal data that mild hypothermia induced after resuscitation and maintained for 12 - 24 hours dramatically improved neurological and overall outcomes. On the basis of these studies, mild hypothermia was endorsed in 2003 by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation as a recommended treatment for comatose patients with an initial cardiac rhythm of ventricular fibrillation. However, the application of this therapy into routine clinical critical care practice has been slow. The reasons for this are uncertain, but may relate to the relative complexity of the treatment, unfamiliarity with the pathophysiology of hypothermia, lack of clear protocols and/or uncertainty of benefit in particular patients. Therefore, recent research in this area has focused on the development of feasible, inexpensive techniques for the early, rapid induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Currently, the most promising strategy is a rapid

  2. Improving neurological outcome after cardiac arrest: Therapeutic hypothermia the best treatment

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Suchitra; Dhama, Satyavir S.; Kumar, Mohinder; Jain, Gaurav

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac arrest, irrespective of its etiology, has a high mortality. This event is often associated with brain anoxia which frequently causes severe neurological damage and persistent vegetative state. Only one out of every six patients survives to discharge following in-hospital cardiac arrest, whereas only 2-9% of patients who experience out of hospital cardiac arrest survive to go home. Functional outcomes of survival are variable, but poor quality survival is common, with only 3-7% able to return to their previous level of functioning. Therapeutic hypothermia is an important tool for the treatment of post-anoxic coma after cardiopulmonary resuscitation. It has been shown to reduce mortality and has improved neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest. Nevertheless, hypothermia is underused in critical care units. This manuscript aims to review the mechanism of hypothermia in cardiac arrest survivors and to propose a simple protocol, feasible to be implemented in any critical care unit. PMID:25885714

  3. Short Duration Combined Mild Hypothermia Improves Resuscitation Outcomes in a Porcine Model of Prolonged Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tao; Yang, Zhengfei; Li, Heng; Ding, Youde; Huang, Zitong; Li, Yongqin

    2015-01-01

    Objective. In this study, our aim was to investigate the effects of combined hypothermia with short duration maintenance on the resuscitation outcomes in a porcine model of ventricular fibrillation (VF). Methods. Fourteen porcine models were electrically induced with VF and untreated for 11 mins. All animals were successfully resuscitated manually and then randomized into two groups: combined mild hypothermia (CH group) and normothermia group (NT group). A combined hypothermia of ice cold saline infusion and surface cooling was implemented in the animals of the CH group and maintained for 4 hours. The survival outcomes and neurological function were evaluated every 24 hours until a maximum of 96 hours. Neuron apoptosis in hippocampus was analyzed. Results. There were no significant differences in baseline physiologies and primary resuscitation outcomes between both groups. Obvious improvements of cardiac output were observed in the CH group at 120, 180, and 240 mins following resuscitation. The animals demonstrated better survival at 96 hours in the CH group when compared to the NT group. In comparison with the NT group, favorable neurological functions were observed in the CH group. Conclusion. Short duration combined cooling initiated after resuscitation improves survival and neurological outcomes in a porcine model of prolonged VF. PMID:26558261

  4. Improving neurological outcomes post-cardiac arrest in a rat model: immediate hypothermia and quantitative EEG monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiaofeng; Koenig, Matthew A.; Shin, Hyun-Chool; Zhen, Gehua; Pardo, Carlos A.; Hanley, Daniel F.; Thakor, Nitish V.; Geocadin, Romergryko G.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Objectives Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) after cardiac arrest (CA) improves outcomes in a fraction of patients. To enhance the administration of TH, we studied brain electrophysiological monitoring in determining the benefit of early initiation of TH compared to conventional administration in a rat model. Methods Using an asphyxial CA model, we compared the benefit of immediate hypothermia (IH, T=33°C, immediately post-resuscitation, maintained 6 hours) to conventional hypothermia (CH, T=33°C, starting 1 hour post-resuscitation, maintained 12 hours) via surface cooling. We tracked quantitative EEG using relative entropy (qEEG) with outcome verification by serial Neurological Deficit Score (NDS) and quantitative brain histopathological damage scoring (HDS). Thirty-two rats were divided into 4 groups based on CH/IH and 7/9-minute duration of asphyxial CA. Four sham rats were included for evaluation of the effect of hypothermia on qEEG. Results The 72-hour NDS of the IH group was significantly better than the CH group for both 7-minute (74/63; Median, IH/CH, p<0.001) and 9-minute (54/47, p=0.022) groups. qEEG showed greater recovery with IH (p<0.001) and significantly less neuronal cortical injury by HDS (IH: 18.9±2.5% versus CH: 33.2±4.4%, p=0.006). The 1-hour post-resuscitation qEEG correlated well with 72-hour NDS (p<0.05) and 72-hour behavioral subgroup of NDS (p<0.01). No differences in qEEG were noted in the sham group. Conclusions Immediate but shorter hypothermia compared to CH leads to better functional outcome in rats after 7- and 9- minute CA. The beneficial effect of IH was readily detected by neuro-electrophysiological monitoring and histological changes supported the value of this observation. PMID:17936492

  5. Concurrent erythropoietin and hypothermia treatment improve outcomes in a term nonhuman primate model of perinatal asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    Traudt, Christopher M.; McPherson, Ronald J.; Bauer, Larry A.; Richards, Todd L.; Burbacher, Thomas M.; McAdams, Ryan M.; Juul, Sandra E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Up to 65% of untreated infants suffering from moderate to severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) are at risk of death or major disability. Therapeutic hypothermia (HT) reduces this risk to approximately 50% (number needed to treat 7-9). Erythropoietin (Epo) is a neuroprotective treatment that is promising as an adjunctive therapy to decrease HIE-induced injury because Epo decreases apoptosis, inflammation, and oxidative injury, and promotes glial cell survival, and angiogenesis. We hypothesized that HT and concurrent Epo will be safe, effective, improve survival and reduce moderate-severe cerebral palsy (CP) in a term nonhuman primate model of perinatal asphyxia. Methodology 35 Macaca nemestrina were delivered after 15-18 min of umbilical cord occlusion (UCO) and randomized to saline (n=14), HT only (n=9) or HT+Epo (n=12). There were 12 unasphyxiated controls. Epo (3500 U/kg × 1 followed by 3 doses of 2500 U/Kg, or Epo 1000 U/kg/d × 4 doses) was given on days 1, 2, 3, and 7. Timed blood samples were collected to measure plasma Epo concentrations. Animals underwent MRI/MRS and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) at < 72 hours of age and again at 9 months. A battery of weekly developmental assessments was performed. Results UCO resulted in death or moderate-severe CP in 43% of saline, 44% of HT, and 0% of HT+Epo treated animals. Compared to non-UCO control animals, UCO animals exhibit poor weight gain, behavioral impairment, poor cerebellar growth and abnormal brain DTI. Compared to UCO saline, UCO HT+Epo improved motor and cognitive responses, cerebellar growth, DTI measures, and produced a death/disability relative risk reduction of 0.911 (95% CI −0.429 to 0.994), an absolute risk reduction of 0.395 (95% CI 0.072 to 0.635), and a number needed to treat of 2 (95% CI 14 to 2). HT+Epo effects on DTI included improved mode of anisotropy, fractional anisotropy, relative anisotropy and volume ratio as compared to UCO saline treated infants. No adverse

  6. Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest: outcome predictors

    PubMed Central

    Leão, Rodrigo Nazário; Ávila, Paulo; Cavaco, Raquel; Germano, Nuno; Bento, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Objective The determination of coma patient prognosis after cardiac arrest has clinical, ethical and social implications. Neurological examination, imaging and biochemical markers are helpful tools accepted as reliable in predicting recovery. With the advent of therapeutic hypothermia, these data need to be reconfirmed. In this study, we attempted to determine the validity of different markers, which can be used in the detection of patients with poor prognosis under hypothermia. Methods Data from adult patients admitted to our intensive care unit for a hypothermia protocol after cardiac arrest were recorded prospectively to generate a descriptive and analytical study analyzing the relationship between clinical, neurophysiological, imaging and biochemical parameters with 6-month outcomes defined according to the Cerebral Performance Categories scale (good 1-2, poor 3-5). Neuron-specific enolase was collected at 72 hours. Imaging and neurophysiologic exams were carried out in the 24 hours after the rewarming period. Results Sixty-seven patients were included in the study, of which 12 had good neurological outcomes. Ventricular fibrillation and electroencephalographic theta activity were associated with increased likelihood of survival and improved neurological outcomes. Patients who had more rapid cooling (mean time of 163 versus 312 minutes), hypoxic-ischemic brain injury on magnetic resonance imaging or neuron-specific enolase > 58ng/mL had poor neurological outcomes (p < 0.05). Conclusion Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury on magnetic resonance imaging and neuron-specific enolase were strong predictors of poor neurological outcomes. Although there is the belief that early achievement of target temperature improves neurological prognoses, in our study, there were increased mortality and worse neurological outcomes with earlier target-temperature achievement. PMID:26761469

  7. Hypothermia improves disease manifestations in SMA mice via SMN augmentation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Li-Kai; Chen, Chien-Lin; Tsai, Yi-Chieh; Ting, Chen-Hung; Chien, Yin-Hsio; Lee, Ni-Chong; Hwu, Wuh-Liang

    2016-02-15

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a progressive motor neuron disease caused by a deficiency of survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of intermittent transient hypothermia in a mouse model of SMA. SMA mice were exposed to ice for 50 s to achieve transient hypothermia (below 25°C) daily beginning on postnatal day 1. Neonatal SMA mice (Smn(-/-)SMN2(+/-)) who received daily transient hypothermia exhibited reduced motor neuron degeneration and muscle atrophy and preserved the architecture of neuromuscular junction when compared with untreated controls at day 8 post-treatment. Daily hypothermia also prolonged the lifespan, increased body weight and improved motor coordination in SMA mice. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses showed that transient hypothermia led to an increase in SMN transcript and protein levels in the spinal cord and brain. In in vitro studies using an SMN knockdown motor neuron-like cell-line, transient hypothermia increased intracellular SMN protein expression and length of neurites, confirming the direct effect of hypothermia on motor neurons. These data indicate that the efficacy of intermittent transient hypothermia in improving outcome in an SMA mouse model may be mediated, in part, via an upregulation of SMN levels in the motor neurons. PMID:26647309

  8. Hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Azzopardi, D; Edwards, A D

    2007-08-01

    Experimental studies show that, following hypoxic ischaemic injury, mild induced hypothermia-a reduction of body temperature by about 3 degrees C -- preserves cerebral energy metabolism, reduces cerebral tissue injury and improves neurological function. Randomized trials in full-term and near-full-term newborns suggest that treatment with mild hypothermia is safe and improves survival without disabilities up to 18 months of age. Although the optimal time of initiation, the depth and duration, and the method of cooling are uncertain, in the absence of specific treatments many clinicians will wish to consider treating asphyxiated infants with hypothermia. Guidance now needs to be provided to promote uniform practice, to avoid inappropriate treatment and to foster continuing collaboration in future studies of neuroprotection following asphyxia. If the promising results of the current trials are confirmed by the findings from other on-going studies, with longer follow-up, the impact of such a treatment on the babies, their families and health resources in the shorter and longer terms will be considerable. PMID:17392043

  9. Hypothermia

    MedlinePlus

    ... hypothermia if you are: Very old or very young Chronically ill, especially persons who have heart or blood flow problems Malnourished Overly tired Taking certain prescription medicines Under the influence of alcohol or drugs

  10. Hypothermia

    MedlinePlus

    Cold weather can affect your body in different ways. You can get frostbite, which is frozen body tissue. Your ... Anyone who spends much time outdoors in cold weather can get hypothermia. You can also get it ...

  11. Hypothermia

    MedlinePlus

    ... That can cause hypothermia, or abnormally low body temperature. It can make you sleepy, confused, and clumsy. ... help. That makes it especially dangerous. A body temperature below 95° F is a medical emergency and ...

  12. Short- and Long-Term Outcomes in Very Low Birth Weight Infants with Admission Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shwu-Meei; Lung, Hou-Ling; Chang, Jui-Hsing; Hsu, Chyong-Hsin; Jim, Wai-Tim; Lee, Ching-Hsiao; Hung, Hsiao-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Background Neonatal hypothermia remains a common problem and is related to elevated morbidities and mortality. However, the long-term neurodevelopmental effects of admission hypothermia are still unknown. This study attempted to determine the short-term and long-term consequences of admission hypothermia in VLBW preterm infants. Study Design This retrospective study measured the incidence and compared the outcomes of admission hypothermia in very low birth weight (VLBW) preterm infants in a tertiary-level neonatal intensive care unit. Infants were divided into the following groups: normothermia (36.5–37.5°C), mild hypothermia (36.0–36.4°C), moderate hypothermia (32.0–35.9°C), and severe hypothermia (< 32°C). We compared the distribution, demographic variables, short-term outcomes, and neurodevelopmental outcomes at 24 months of corrected age among groups. Results We studied 341 infants: 79 with normothermia, 100 with mild hypothermia, 162 with moderate hypothermia, and 0 with severe hypothermia. Patients in the moderate hypothermia group had significantly lower gestational ages (28.1 wk vs. 29.7 wk, P < .02) and smaller birth weight (1004 g vs. 1187 g, P < .001) compared to patients in the normothermia group. Compared to normothermic infants, moderately hypothermic infants had significantly higher incidences of 1-min Apgar score < 7 (63.6% vs. 31.6%, P < .001), respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) (58.0% vs. 39.2%, P = .006), and mortality (18.5% vs. 5.1%, P = .005). Moderate hypothermia did not affect neurodevelopmental outcomes at 2 years’ corrected age. Mild hypothermia had no effect on short-term or long-term outcomes. Conclusions Admission hypothermia was common in VLBW infants and correlated inversely with birth weight and gestational age. Although moderate hypothermia was associated with higher RDS and mortality rates, it may play a limited role among multifactorial causes of neurodevelopmental impairment. PMID:26193370

  13. Extending the duration of hypothermia does not further improve white matter protection after ischemia in term-equivalent fetal sheep

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Joanne O.; Yuill, Caroline A.; Zhang, Frank G.; Wassink, Guido; Bennet, Laura; Gunn, Alistair J.

    2016-01-01

    A major challenge in modern neonatal care is to further improve outcomes after therapeutic hypothermia for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. In this study we tested whether extending the duration of cooling might reduce white matter damage. Term-equivalent fetal sheep (0.85 gestation) received either sham ischemia followed by normothermia (n = 8) or 30 minutes of bilateral carotid artery occlusion followed by three days of normothermia (n = 8), three days of hypothermia (n = 8) or five days of hypothermia (n = 8) started three hours after ischemia. Histology was assessed 7 days after ischemia. Ischemia was associated with loss of myelin basic protein (MBP) and Olig-2 positive oligodendrocytes and increased Iba-1-positive microglia compared to sham controls (p < 0.05). Three days and five days of hypothermia were associated with a similar, partial improvement in MBP and numbers of oligodendrocytes compared to ischemia-normothermia (p < 0.05). Both hypothermia groups had reduced microglial activation compared to ischemia-normothermia (p < 0.05). In the ischemia-five-day hypothermia group, but not ischemia-three-day, numbers of microglia remained higher than in sham controls (p < 0.05). In conclusion, delayed cerebral hypothermia partially protected white matter after global cerebral ischemia in fetal sheep. Extending cooling from 3 to 5 days did not further improve outcomes, and may be associated with greater numbers of residual microglia. PMID:27121655

  14. Improved Therapeutic Benefits by Combining Physical Cooling With Pharmacological Hypothermia After Severe Stroke in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Hwan; Wei, Ling; Gu, Xiaohuan; Won, Soonmi; Wei, Zheng Zachory; Dix, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Therapeutic hypothermia is a promising strategy for treatment of acute stroke. Clinical translation of therapeutic hypothermia, however, has been hindered because of the lack of efficiency and adverse effects. We sought to enhance the clinical potential of therapeutic hypothermia by combining physical cooling (PC) with pharmacologically induced hypothermia after ischemic stroke. Methods— Wistar rats were subjected to 90-minute middle cerebral artery occlusion by insertion of an intraluminal filament. Mild-to-moderate hypothermia was induced 120 minutes after the onset of stroke by PC alone, a neurotensin receptor 1 (NTR1) agonist HPI-201 (formally ABS-201) alone or the combination of both. The outcomes of stroke were evaluated at 3 and 21 days after stroke. Results— PC or HPI-201 each showed hypothermic effect and neuroprotection in stroke rats. The combination of PC and HPI-201 exhibited synergistic effects in cooling process, reduced infarct formation, cell death, and blood-brain barrier damages and improved functional recovery after stroke. Importantly, coapplied HPI-201 completely inhibited PC-associated shivering and tachycardia. Conclusions— The centrally acting hypothermic drug HPI-201 greatly enhanced the efficiency and efficacy of conventional PC; this combined cooling therapy may facilitate clinical translation of hypothermic treatment for stroke. PMID:27301934

  15. Intra-arrest Hypothermia: Both Cold Liquid Ventilation with Perfluorocarbons and Cold Intravenous Saline Rapidly Achieve Hypothermia, but Only Cold Liquid Ventilation Improves Resumption of Spontaneous Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Riter, Henry G.; Brooks, Leonard A.; Pretorius, Andrew M.; Ackermann, Laynez W.; Kerber, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    Background Rapid intra-arrest induction of hypothermia using total liquid ventilation (TLV) with cold perfluorocarbons improves resuscitation outcome from ventricular fibrillation (VF). Cold saline intravenous infusion during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a simpler method of inducing hypothermia. We compared these 2 methods of rapid hypothermia induction for cardiac resuscitation. Methods Three groups of swine were studied: cold preoxygenated TLV (TLV, n=8), cold intravenous saline infusion (S, n=8), and control (C, n=8). VF was electrically induced. Beginning at 8 minutes of VF, TLV and S animals received 3 minutes of cold TLV or rapid cold saline infusion. After 11 minutes of VF, all groups received standard air ventilation and closed chest massage. Defibrillation was attempted after 3 minutes of CPR (14 minutes of VF). The end point was resumption of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Results Pulmonary arterial (PA) temperature decreased after 1 minute of CPR from 37.2°C to 32.2°C in S and from 37.1°C to 34.8°C in TLV (S or TLV vs. C p<0.0001). Coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) was higher in TLV than S animals during the initial 3 minutes of CPR. Arterial pO2 was higher in the preoxygenated TLV animals. ROSC was achieved in 7 of 8 TLV, 2 of 8 S, and 1 of 8 C (TLV vs. C, p=0.03). Conclusions Moderate hypothermia was achieved rapidly during VF and CPR using both cold saline infusion and cold TLV, but ROSC was higher than control only in cold TLV animals, probably due to better CPP and pO2. The method by which hypothermia is achieved influences ROSC. PMID:19249149

  16. Hypothermia improves oral and gastric mucosal microvascular oxygenation during hemorrhagic shock in dogs.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Christian; Schwartges, Ingo; Swertz, Meike; Beck, Christopher; Bauer, Inge; Picker, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Hypothermia is known to improve tissue function in different organs during physiological and pathological conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of hypothermia on oral and gastric mucosal microvascular oxygenation (μHbO2) and perfusion (μflow) under physiological and hemorrhagic conditions. Five dogs were repeatedly anesthetized. All animals underwent each experimental protocol (randomized cross-over design): hypothermia (34°C), hypothermia during hemorrhage, normothermia, and normothermia during hemorrhage. Microcirculatory and hemodynamic variables were recorded. Systemic (DO2) and oral mucosal (μDO2) oxygen delivery were calculated. Hypothermia increased oral μ HbO2 with no effect on gastric μHbO2. Hemorrhage reduced oral and gastric μHbO2 during normothermia (-36 ± 4% and -27 ± 7%); however, this effect was attenuated during additional hypothermia (-15 ± 5% and -11 ± 5%). The improved μ HbO2 might be based on an attenuated reduction in μ flow during hemorrhage and additional hypothermia (-51 ± 21 aU) compared to hemorrhage and normothermia (-106 ± 19 aU). μDO2 was accordingly attenuated under hypothermia during hemorrhage whereas DO2 did not change. Thus, in this study hypothermia alone improves oral μHbO2 and attenuates the effects of hemorrhage on oral and gastric μ HbO2. This effect seems to be mediated by an increased μDO2 on the basis of increased μ flow. PMID:24327826

  17. BIOMARKERS S100B AND NSE PREDICT OUTCOME IN HYPOTHERMIA-TREATED ENCEPHALOPATHIC NEWBORNS

    PubMed Central

    Massaro, An N.; Chang, Taeun; Baumgart, Stephen; McCarter, Robert; Nelson, Karin B.; Glass, Penny

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate if serum S100B protein and neuron specific enolase (NSE) measured during therapeutic hypothermia are predictive of neurodevelopmental outcome at 15 months in children with neonatal encephalopathy (NE). Design Prospective longitudinal cohort study Setting A level IV neonatal intensive care unit in a free-standing children’s hospital. Patients Term newborns with moderate to severe NE referred for therapeutic hypothermia during the study period. Interventions Serum NSE and S100B were measured at 0, 12, 24 and 72 hrs of hypothermia. Measurements and Main Reseults Of the 83 infants were enrolled, fifteen (18%) died in the newborn period. Survivors were evaluated by the Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID-II) at 15 months of age. Outcomes were assessed in 49/68 (72%) survivors at a mean age of 15.2±2.7 months. Neurodevelopmental outcome was classified by BSID-II Mental (MDI) and Psychomotor (PDI) Developmental Index scores, reflecting cognitive and motor outcomes respectively. Four-level outcome classifications were defined a priori: normal= MDI/PDI within 1SD (>85), mild= MDI/PDI <1SD (70–85), moderate/severe= MDI/PDI <2SD (<70), or died. Elevated serum S100B and NSE levels measured during hypothermia were associated with increasing outcome severity after controlling for baseline and soceioeconomic characteristics in ordinal regression models. Adjusted odds ratios for cognitive outcome were: S100B 2.5 (95% CI 1.3–4.8) and NSE 2.1 (1.2–3.6); for motor outcome: S100B 2.6 (1.2–5.6) and NSE 2.1 (1.2–3.6). Conclusions Serum S100B and NSE levels in babies with NE are associated with neurodevelopmental outcome at 15 months. These putative biomarkers of brain injury may help direct care during therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:24777302

  18. Outcome-related metabolomic patterns from 1H/31P NMR after mild hypothermia treatments of oxygen–glucose deprivation in a neonatal brain slice model of asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Litt, Lawrence; Segal, Mark R; Kelly, Mark J S; Yoshihara, Hikari A I; James, Thomas L

    2011-01-01

    Human clinical trials using 72 hours of mild hypothermia (32°C–34°C) after neonatal asphyxia have found substantially improved neurologic outcomes. As temperature changes differently modulate numerous metabolite fluxes and concentrations, we hypothesized that 1H/31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of intracellular metabolites can distinguish different insults, treatments, and recovery stages. Three groups of superfused neonatal rat brain slices underwent 45 minutes oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD) and then were: treated for 3 hours with mild hypothermia (32°C) that began with OGD, or similarly treated with hypothermia after a 15-minute delay, or not treated (normothermic control group, 37°C). Hypothermia was followed by 3 hours of normothermic recovery. Slices collected at different predetermined times were processed, respectively, for 14.1 Tesla NMR analysis, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) cell-death quantification, and superoxide production. Forty-nine NMR-observable metabolites underwent a multivariate analysis. Separated clustering in scores plots was found for treatment and outcome groups. Final ATP (adenosine triphosphate) levels, severely decreased at normothermia, were restored equally by immediate and delayed hypothermia. Cell death was decreased by immediate hypothermia, but was equally substantially greater with normothermia and delayed hypothermia. Potentially important biomarkers in the 1H spectra included PCr-1H (phosphocreatine in the 1H spectrum), ATP-1H (adenosine triphosphate in the 1H spectrum), and ADP-1H (adenosine diphosphate in the 1H spectrum). The findings suggest a potential role for metabolomic monitoring during therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:20717124

  19. Outcome-related metabolomic patterns from 1H/31P NMR after mild hypothermia treatments of oxygen-glucose deprivation in a neonatal brain slice model of asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Litt, Lawrence; Segal, Mark R; Kelly, Mark J S; Yoshihara, Hikari A I; James, Thomas L

    2011-02-01

    Human clinical trials using 72 hours of mild hypothermia (32°C-34°C) after neonatal asphyxia have found substantially improved neurologic outcomes. As temperature changes differently modulate numerous metabolite fluxes and concentrations, we hypothesized that (1)H/(31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of intracellular metabolites can distinguish different insults, treatments, and recovery stages. Three groups of superfused neonatal rat brain slices underwent 45 minutes oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and then were: treated for 3 hours with mild hypothermia (32°C) that began with OGD, or similarly treated with hypothermia after a 15-minute delay, or not treated (normothermic control group, 37°C). Hypothermia was followed by 3 hours of normothermic recovery. Slices collected at different predetermined times were processed, respectively, for 14.1 Tesla NMR analysis, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) cell-death quantification, and superoxide production. Forty-nine NMR-observable metabolites underwent a multivariate analysis. Separated clustering in scores plots was found for treatment and outcome groups. Final ATP (adenosine triphosphate) levels, severely decreased at normothermia, were restored equally by immediate and delayed hypothermia. Cell death was decreased by immediate hypothermia, but was equally substantially greater with normothermia and delayed hypothermia. Potentially important biomarkers in the (1)H spectra included PCr-(1)H (phosphocreatine in the (1)H spectrum), ATP-(1)H (adenosine triphosphate in the (1)H spectrum), and ADP-(1)H (adenosine diphosphate in the (1)H spectrum). The findings suggest a potential role for metabolomic monitoring during therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:20717124

  20. Feasibility and Safety of Therapeutic Hypothermia and Short Term Outcome in Neonates with Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Purkayastha, Jayashree; Lewis, Leslie Edward; Bhat, Ramesh Y; Anusha, K M

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is well known for neuroprotection in asphyxiated neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. The authors aimed to study the feasibility and safety of therapeutic hypothermia and short term outcome in neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Total 31 neonates with moderate to severe HIE were enrolled in the study. Continuous temperature recording was noted in 31 neonates; 17 neonates were studied prospectively while 14 neonates were studied retrospectively. Rectal temperature was monitored in 31 neonates and maintained between 33 and 34 °C by switching off the warmer and using ice packs. Reusable ice packs were used which were inexpensive. Therapeutic hypothermia was maintained for 72 h and babies were then rewarmed 0.5 °C every hour. Therapeutic hypothermia was feasible and inexpensive. There was no major complication during the study. MRI was done in 17 neonates; 52 % were found to have normal MRI at the end of first week. Among the study neonates (n = 31) 64.5 % were neurologically normal at the time of discharge. To conclude, therapeutic hypothermia is feasible in a low resource setting and is a safe way of neuroprotection. Short term outcome was also favourable in these neonates. PMID:26141549

  1. Effects of prehospital hypothermia on transfusion requirements and outcomes: a retrospective observatory trial

    PubMed Central

    Klauke, Nora; Gräff, Ingo; Fleischer, Andreas; Boehm, Olaf; Guttenthaler, Vera; Baumgarten, Georg; Meybohm, Patrick; Wittmann, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Prehospital hypothermia is defined as a core temperature <36.0°C and has been shown to be an independent risk factor for early death in patients with trauma. In a retrospective study, a possible correlation between the body temperature at the time of admission to the emergency room and subsequent in-hospital transfusion requirements and the in-hospital mortality rate was explored. Setting This is a retrospective single-centre study at a primary care hospital in Germany. Participants 15 895 patients were included in this study. Patients were classified by admission temperature and transfusion rate. Excluded were ambulant patients and patients with missing data. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome values were length of stay (LOS) in days, in-hospital mortality, the transferred amount of packed red blood cells (PRBCs), and admission to an intensive care unit. Secondary influencing variables were the patient's age and the Glasgow Coma Scale. Results In 22.85% of the patients, hypothermia was documented. Hypothermic patients died earlier in the course of their hospital stay than non-hypothermic patients (p<0.001). The administration of 1–3 PRBC increased the LOS significantly (p<0.001) and transfused patients had an increased risk of death (p<0.001). Prehospital hypothermia could be an independent risk factor for mortality (adjusted OR 8.521; p=0.001) and increases the relative risk for transfusion by factor 2.0 (OR 2.007; p=0.002). Conclusions Low body temperature at hospital admission is associated with a higher risk of transfusion and death. Hence, a greater awareness of prehospital temperature management should be established. PMID:27029772

  2. Temperature Profile and Outcomes of Neonates Undergoing Whole Body Hypothermia for Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Seetha; Laptook, Abbot R.; McDonald, Scott A.; Higgins, Rosemary D.; Tyson, Jon E.; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Das, Abhik; Sant’Anna, Guilherme; Goldberg, Ronald N.; Bara, Rebecca; Walsh, Michele C.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Decreases below target temperature were noted among neonates undergoing cooling in the NICHD Neonatal Research Network Trial of whole body hypothermia for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. OBJECTIVE To examine the temperature profile and impact on outcome among ≥ 36 week gestation neonates randomized at ≤ 6 hours of age targeting esophageal temperature of 33.5°C for 72 hours. DESIGN/SETTING/PATIENTS Infants with intermittent temperatures recorded < 32.0°C during induction and maintenance of cooling were compared to all other cooled infants and relationship with outcome at 18 months was evaluated. RESULTS There were no differences in stage of encephalopathy, acidosis, or 10 minute Apgar scores between infants with temperatures < 32.0°C during induction (n=33) or maintenance (n=10) and all other infants who were cooled (n=58); however birth weight was lower and need for blood pressure support higher among infants with temperatures < 32.0 °C compared to all other cooled infants. No increase in acute adverse events were noted among infants with temperatures < 32.0 °C and hours spent < 32°C were not associated with the primary outcome of death or moderate/severe disability or the Bayley II Mental Developmental Index at 18 months. CONCLUSION Term infants with a lower birth weight are at risk for decreasing temperatures < 32.0°C while undergoing body cooling using a servo controlled system. This information suggests extra caution during the application of hypothermia as these lower birth weight infants are at risk for overcooling. Our findings may assist in planning additional trials of lower target temperature for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. PMID:21499182

  3. Mechanisms of Hypothermia, Delayed Hyperthermia and Fever Following CNS Injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Central nervous system (CNS) damage is often associated with robust body temperature changes, such as hypothermia and delayed hyperthermia. Hypothermia is one of the most common body temperature changes to CNS insults in rodents and is often associated with improved outcome. Alth...

  4. Unintended Perioperative Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Stuart R.; Bordes, Brianne; Hart, Jennifer; Corsino, Daniel; Harmon, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Background Hypothermia, defined as a core body temperature less than 36°C (96.8°F), is a relatively common occurrence in the unwarmed surgical patient. A mild degree of perioperative hypothermia can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A threefold increase in the frequency of surgical site infections is reported in colorectal surgery patients who experience perioperative hypothermia. As part of the Surgical Care Improvement Project, guidelines aim to decrease the incidence of this complication. Methods We review the physiology of temperature regulation, mechanisms of hypothermia, effects of anesthetics on thermoregulation, and consequences of hypothermia and summarize recent recommendations for maintaining perioperative normothermia. Results Evidence suggests that prewarming for a minimum of 30 minutes may reduce the risk of subsequent hypothermia. Conclusions Monitoring of body temperature and avoidance of unintended perioperative hypothermia through active and passive warming measures are the keys to preventing its complications. PMID:21960760

  5. Intra-arrest hypothermia during cardiac arrest: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Therapeutic hypothermia is largely used to protect the brain following return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after cardiac arrest (CA), but it is unclear whether we should start therapeutic hypothermia earlier, that is, before ROSC. Methods We performed a systematic search of PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and Ovid/Medline databases using "arrest" OR "cardiac arrest" OR "heart arrest" AND "hypothermia" OR "therapeutic hypothermia" OR "cooling" as keywords. Only studies using intra-arrest therapeutic hypothermia (IATH) were selected for this review. Three authors independently assessed the validity of included studies and extracted data regarding characteristics of the studied cohort (animal or human) and the main outcomes related to the use of IATH: Mortality, neurological status and cardiac function (particularly, rate of ROSC). Results A total of 23 animal studies (level of evidence (LOE) 5) and five human studies, including one randomized controlled trial (LOE 1), one retrospective and one prospective controlled study (LOE 3), and two prospective studies without a control group (LOE 4), were identified. IATH improved survival and neurological outcomes when compared to normothermia and/or hypothermia after ROSC. IATH was also associated with improved ROSC rates and with improved cardiac function, including better left ventricular function, and reduced myocardial infarct size, when compared to normothermia. Conclusions IATH improves survival and neurological outcome when compared to normothermia and/or conventional hypothermia in experimental models of CA. Clinical data on the efficacy of IATH remain limited. PMID:22397519

  6. Neurological outcomes at 18 months of age after moderate hypothermia for perinatal hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy: synthesis and meta-analysis of trial data

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, A David; Brocklehurst, Peter; Gunn, Alistair J; Halliday, Henry; Juszczak, Edmund; Levene, Malcolm; Strohm, Brenda; Thoresen, Marianne; Whitelaw, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether moderate hypothermia after hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy in neonates improves survival and neurological outcome at 18 months of age. Design A meta-analysis was performed using a fixed effect model. Risk ratios, risk difference, and number needed to treat, plus 95% confidence intervals, were measured. Data sources Studies were identified from the Cochrane central register of controlled trials, the Oxford database of perinatal trials, PubMed, previous reviews, and abstracts. Review methods Reports that compared whole body cooling or selective head cooling with normal care in neonates with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy and that included data on death or disability and on specific neurological outcomes of interest to patients and clinicians were selected. Results We found three trials, encompassing 767 infants, that included information on death and major neurodevelopmental disability after at least 18 months’ follow-up. We also identified seven other trials with mortality information but no appropriate neurodevelopmental data. Therapeutic hypothermia significantly reduced the combined rate of death and severe disability in the three trials with 18 month outcomes (risk ratio 0.81, 95% confidence interval 0.71 to 0.93, P=0.002; risk difference −0.11, 95% CI −0.18 to −0.04), with a number needed to treat of nine (95% CI 5 to 25). Hypothermia increased survival with normal neurological function (risk ratio 1.53, 95% CI 1.22 to 1.93, P<0.001; risk difference 0.12, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.18), with a number needed to treat of eight (95% CI 5 to 17), and in survivors reduced the rates of severe disability (P=0.006), cerebral palsy (P=0.004), and mental and the psychomotor developmental index of less than 70 (P=0.01 and P=0.02, respectively). No significant interaction between severity of encephalopathy and treatment effect was detected. Mortality was significantly reduced when we assessed all 10 trials (1320 infants; relative risk 0

  7. Therapeutic Hypothermia for Cardioprotection in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kang, In Sook; Fumiaki, Ikeno

    2016-01-01

    Mild therapeutic hypothermia of 32–35℃ improved neurologic outcomes in outside hospital cardiac arrest survivor. Furthermore, in experimental studies on infarcted model and pilot studies on conscious patients with acute myocardial infarction, therapeutic hypothermia successfully reduced infarct size and microvascular resistance. Therefore, mild therapeutic hypothermia has received an attention as a promising solution for reduction of infarction size after acute myocardial infarction which are not completely solved despite of optimal reperfusion therapy. Nevertheless, the results from randomized clinical trials failed to prove the cardioprotective effects of therapeutic hypothermia or showed beneficial effects only in limited subgroups. In this article, we reviewed rationale for therapeutic hypothermia and possible mechanisms from previous studies, effective methods for clinical application to the patients with acute myocardial infarction, lessons from current clinical trials and future directions. PMID:26847278

  8. Prolonged Local Hypothermia Has No Long-Term Adverse Effect on the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Vipin, Ashwati; Kortelainen, Jukka; Al-Nashash, Hasan; Chua, Soo Min; Thow, Xinyuan; Manivannan, Janani; Astrid; Thakor, Nitish V.; Kerr, Candace L.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothermia is known to be neuroprotective and is one of the most effective and promising first-line treatments for central nervous system (CNS) trauma. At present, induction of local hypothermia, as opposed to general hypothermia, is more desired because of its ease of application and safety; fewer side effects and an absence of severe complications have been noted. Local hypothermia involves temperature reduction of a small and specific segment of the spinal cord. Our group has previously shown the neuroprotective effect of short-term, acute moderate general hypothermia through improvements in electrophysiological and motor behavioral assessments, as well as histological examination following contusive spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. We have also shown the benefit of using short-term local hypothermia versus short-term general hypothermia post-acute SCI. The overall neuroprotective benefit of hypothermia can be categorized into three main components: (1) induction modality, general versus local, (2) invasive, semi-invasive or noninvasive, and (3) duration of hypothermia induction. In this study, a series of experiments were designed to investigate the feasibility, long-term safety, as well as eventual complications and side effects of prolonged, semi-invasive, moderate local hypothermia (30°C±0.5°C for 5 and 8 hours) in rats with uninjured spinal cord while maintaining their core temperature at 37°C±0.5°C. The weekly somatosensory evoked potential and motor behavioral (Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan) assessments of rats that underwent 5 and 8 hours of semi-invasive local hypothermia, which revealed no statistically significant changes in electrical conductivity and behavioral outcomes. In addition, 4 weeks after local hypothermia induction, histological examination showed no anatomical damages or morphological changes in their spinal cord structure and parenchyma. We concluded that this method of prolonged local hypothermia is feasible, safe, and has the

  9. Management of neonatal morbidities during hypothermia treatment.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Subrata; Barks, John

    2015-04-01

    Although the primary goal of therapeutic hypothermia is to improve the neurodevelopmental outcome in asphyxiated infants, optimal management of the full range of multi-organ system complications typically presented by such infants during cooling treatment is necessary for improvement of the overall outcome. For this reason, adequate knowledge of how cooling affects all organ systems of asphyxiated infants with multi-organ hypoxic-ischemic injury is essential. Adequate diagnostic resources, readily available subspecialty consultant services and trained multidisciplinary staff to monitor and manage multi-organ system complications in asphyxiated infants during therapeutic cooling must be ensured during implementation of a cooling program. As therapeutic hypothermia is being used more widely, centers should consider participation in national or international benchmarking of outcomes and short-term adverse events during cooling to facilitate continuous quality improvement efforts. PMID:25701292

  10. Hypothermia and the trauma patient

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Chun, Rosaleen; Brown, Ross; Simons, Richard K.

    Hypothermia has profound effects on every system in the body, causing an overall slowing of enzymatic reactions and reduced metabolic requirements. Hypothermic, acutely injured patients with multisystem trauma have adverse outcomes when compared with normothermic control patients. Trauma patients are inherently predisposed to hypothermia from a variety of intrinsic and iatrogenic causes. Coagulation and cardiac sequelae are the most pertinent physiological concerns. Hypothermia and coagulopathy often mandate a simplified approach to complex surgical problems. A modification of traditional classification systems of hypothermia, applicable to trauma patients is suggested. There are few controlled investigations, but clinical opinion strongly supports the active prevention of hypothermia in the acutely traumatized patient. Preventive measures are simple and inexpensive, but the active reversal of hypothermia is much more complicated, often invasive and controversial. The ideal method of rewarming is unclear but must be individualized to the patient and is institution specific. An algorithm reflecting newer approaches to traumatic injury and technical advances in equipment and techniques is suggested. Conversely, hypothermia has selected clinical benefits when appropriately used in cases of trauma. Severe hypothermia has allowed remarkable survivals in the course of accidental circulatory arrest. The selective application of mild hypothermia in severe traumatic brain injury is an area with promise. Deliberate circulatory arrest with hypothermic cerebral protection has also been used for seemingly unrepairable injuries and is the focus of ongoing research. PMID:10526517

  11. Brain tissue partial pressure of oxygen predicts the outcome of severe traumatic brain injury under mild hypothermia treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongtao; Zheng, Maohua; Wang, Yanmin; Diao, Yunfeng; Zhao, Wanyong; Wei, Zhengjun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance and changes of brain tissue partial pressure of oxygen (PbtO2) in the course of mild hypothermia treatment (MHT) for treating severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI). Methods There were 68 cases with sTBI undergoing MHT. PbtO2, intracranial pressure (ICP), jugular venous oxygen saturation (SjvO2), and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) were continuously monitored, and clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Glasgow Outcome Scale score. Results Of 68 patients with sTBI, PbtO2, SjvO2, and CPP were obviously increased, but decreased ICP level was observed throughout the MHT. PbtO2 and ICP were negatively linearly correlated, while there was a positive linear correlation between PbtO2 and SjvO2. Monitoring CPP and SjvO2 was performed under normal circumstances, and a large proportion of patients were detected with low PbtO2. Decreased PbtO2 was also found after MHT. Conclusion Continuous PbtO2 monitoring could be introduced to evaluate the condition of regional cerebral oxygen metabolism, thereby guiding the clinical treatment and predicting the outcome. PMID:27601907

  12. Prehospital therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest--from current concepts to a future standard.

    PubMed

    Kämäräinen, Antti; Hoppu, Sanna; Silfvast, Tom; Virkkunen, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve survival and neurological outcome after prehospital cardiac arrest. Existing experimental and clinical evidence supports the notion that delayed cooling results in lesser benefit compared to early induction of mild hypothermia soon after return of spontaneous circulation. Therefore a practical approach would be to initiate cooling already in the prehospital setting. The purpose of this review was to evaluate current clinical studies on prehospital induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Most reported studies present data on cooling rates, safety and feasibility of different methods, but are inconclusive as regarding to outcome effects. PMID:19821967

  13. Prehospital therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest - from current concepts to a future standard

    PubMed Central

    Kämäräinen, Antti; Hoppu, Sanna; Silfvast, Tom; Virkkunen, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve survival and neurological outcome after prehospital cardiac arrest. Existing experimental and clinical evidence supports the notion that delayed cooling results in lesser benefit compared to early induction of mild hypothermia soon after return of spontaneous circulation. Therefore a practical approach would be to initiate cooling already in the prehospital setting. The purpose of this review was to evaluate current clinical studies on prehospital induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Most reported studies present data on cooling rates, safety and feasibility of different methods, but are inconclusive as regarding to outcome effects. PMID:19821967

  14. Teleophthalmology: improving patient outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Sreelatha, Omana Kesary; Ramesh, Sathyamangalam VenkataSubbu

    2016-01-01

    Teleophthalmology is gaining importance as an effective eye care delivery modality worldwide. In many developing countries, teleophthalmology is being utilized to provide quality eye care to the underserved urban population and the unserved remote rural population. Over the years, technological innovations have led to improvement in evidence and teleophthalmology has evolved from a research tool to a clinical tool. The majority of the current teleophthalmology services concentrate on patient screening and appropriate referral to experts. Specialty care using teleophthalmology services for the pediatric group includes screening as well as providing timely care for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Among geriatric eye diseases, specialty teleophthalmology care is focused toward screening and referral for diabetic retinopathy (DR), glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), and other sight-threatening conditions. Comprehensive vision screening and refractive error services are generally covered as part of most of the teleophthalmology methods. Over the past decades, outcome assessment of health care system includes patients’ assessments on their health, care, and services they receive. Outcomes, by and large, remain the ultimate validators of the effectiveness and quality of medical care. Teleophthalmology produces the same desired clinical outcome as the traditional system. Remote portals allow specialists to provide care over a larger region, thereby improving health outcomes and increasing accessibility of specialty care to a larger population. A high satisfaction level and acceptance is reported in the majority of the studies because of increased accessibility and reduced traveling cost and time. Considering the improved quality of patient care and patient satisfaction reported for these telemedicine services, this review explores how teleophthalmology helps to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26929592

  15. Teleophthalmology: improving patient outcomes?

    PubMed

    Sreelatha, Omana Kesary; Ramesh, Sathyamangalam VenkataSubbu

    2016-01-01

    Teleophthalmology is gaining importance as an effective eye care delivery modality worldwide. In many developing countries, teleophthalmology is being utilized to provide quality eye care to the underserved urban population and the unserved remote rural population. Over the years, technological innovations have led to improvement in evidence and teleophthalmology has evolved from a research tool to a clinical tool. The majority of the current teleophthalmology services concentrate on patient screening and appropriate referral to experts. Specialty care using teleophthalmology services for the pediatric group includes screening as well as providing timely care for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Among geriatric eye diseases, specialty teleophthalmology care is focused toward screening and referral for diabetic retinopathy (DR), glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), and other sight-threatening conditions. Comprehensive vision screening and refractive error services are generally covered as part of most of the teleophthalmology methods. Over the past decades, outcome assessment of health care system includes patients' assessments on their health, care, and services they receive. Outcomes, by and large, remain the ultimate validators of the effectiveness and quality of medical care. Teleophthalmology produces the same desired clinical outcome as the traditional system. Remote portals allow specialists to provide care over a larger region, thereby improving health outcomes and increasing accessibility of specialty care to a larger population. A high satisfaction level and acceptance is reported in the majority of the studies because of increased accessibility and reduced traveling cost and time. Considering the improved quality of patient care and patient satisfaction reported for these telemedicine services, this review explores how teleophthalmology helps to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26929592

  16. Simulation: improving patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Abi; Siassakos, Dimitrios; Crofts, Joanna; Draycott, Tim

    2013-06-01

    Effective training has been shown to improve perinatal care and outcome, decrease litigation claims and reduce midwifery sick leave. To be effective, training should be incentivised, in a realistic context, and delivered to inter-professional teams similar to those delivering actual care. Teamwork training is a useful addition, but it should be based on the characteristics of effective teamwork as derived from the study of frontline teams. Implementation of simulation and teamwork training is challenging, with constraints on staff time, facilities and finances. Local adoption and adaptation of effective programmes can help keep costs down, and make them locally relevant whilst maintaining effectiveness. Training programmes need to evolve continually in line with new evidence. To do this, it is vital to monitor outcomes and robustly evaluate programmes for their impact on patient care and outcome, not just on participants. PMID:23721770

  17. Handling Hypothermia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saho, S. Bamba

    1996-01-01

    Presents a unit on the body's response to hypothermia. Includes activities in which students measure the amount of heat absorbed by a white piece of cloth and a black piece of the same material, use cooperative-learning techniques to design a graphic organizer that explains metabolic responses to cold stress, and study the effect of temperature on…

  18. Prevention of inadvertent perioperative hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Burger, Leona; Fitzpatrick, Jane

    All patients undergoing surgery are at risk of developing hypothermia; up to 70% develop hypothermia perioperatively. Inadvertent hypothermia is associated with complications such as impaired wound healing, increased blood loss, cardiac arrest and increased risk of wound infection. Anaesthesia increases the risk as the normal protective shivering reflex is absent. Ambient temperature also has a major effect on the patient's body temperature. Prevention of hypothermia not only reduces the incidence of complications, but patients also experience a greater level of comfort, and avoid postoperative shivering and the unpleasant sensation of feeling cold. Nurses should be aware of the risks of hypothermia so that preventative interventions can be employed to minimize the risk of hypothermia. Preoperative assessment is essential to enable identification of at-risk patients. Simple precautionary measures initiated by nurses can considerably reduce the amount of heat lost, minimize the risk of associated complications and ultimately improve patients' short- and long-term recovery. Minimizing skin exposure, providing adequate bed linen for the transfer to theatre and educating patients about the importance of keeping warm perioperatively are all extremely important. It is also worth considering using forced-air warmers preoperatively as research suggests that initiating active warming preoperatively may be successful in preventing hypothermia during the perioperative period. PMID:19966730

  19. Electroencephalogram and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Comparison as a Predicting Factor for Neurodevelopmental Outcome in Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy Infant Treated with Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Del Balzo, Francesca; Maiolo, Stella; Papoff, Paola; Giannini, Luigi; Moretti, Corrado; Properzi, Enrico; Spalice, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is an important cause of acute neurological damage in newborns at (or near) term. Several trials in recent years have shown that moderate hypothermia by total body cooling or selective head is an effective intervention to reduce mortality and major disability in infants survived a perinatal hypoxic-ischemic attack. Follow-up in these patients is very important to establish neurodevelopmental outcome, and specific markers can lead us to detect predicting sign for good or poor outcome. We reported a few cases of newborn with HIE treated with hypothermia, in whom the comparison between electroencephalogram (EEG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represents the first marker for neurodevelopment outcome prediction. The continuous EEG monitoring showed a depressed EEG activity with diffuse burst depression in 7 patients. No epileptic abnormalities were registered. In 10 out of 20 patients no abnormalities of the background activity and no epileptic abnormalities were observed. We found that a depressed EEG activity during the first 72 h of life and a diffused alteration of basal ganglia at MRI were correlated with a poor neurodevelopmental outcome at 18 months of follow-up. PMID:25635216

  20. Electroencephalogram and magnetic resonance imaging comparison as a predicting factor for neurodevelopmental outcome in hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy infant treated with hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Del Balzo, Francesca; Maiolo, Stella; Papoff, Paola; Giannini, Luigi; Moretti, Corrado; Properzi, Enrico; Spalice, Alberto

    2014-08-12

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is an important cause of acute neurological damage in newborns at (or near) term. Several trials in recent years have shown that moderate hypothermia by total body cooling or selective head is an effective intervention to reduce mortality and major disability in infants survived a perinatal hypoxic-ischemic attack. Follow-up in these patients is very important to establish neurodevelopmental outcome, and specific markers can lead us to detect predicting sign for good or poor outcome. We reported a few cases of newborn with HIE treated with hypothermia, in whom the comparison between electroencephalogram (EEG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represents the first marker for neurodevelopment outcome prediction. The continuous EEG monitoring showed a depressed EEG activity with diffuse burst depression in 7 patients. No epileptic abnormalities were registered. In 10 out of 20 patients no abnormalities of the background activity and no epileptic abnormalities were observed. We found that a depressed EEG activity during the first 72 h of life and a diffused alteration of basal ganglia at MRI were correlated with a poor neurodevelopmental outcome at 18 months of follow-up. PMID:25635216

  1. Sex-specific effects of N-acetylcysteine in neonatal rats treated with hypothermia after severe hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Nie, Xingju; Lowe, Danielle W; Rollins, Laura Grace; Bentzley, Jessica; Fraser, Jamie L; Martin, Renee; Singh, Inderjit; Jenkins, Dorothea

    2016-07-01

    Approximately half of moderate to severely hypoxic-ischemic (HI) newborns do not respond to hypothermia, the only proven neuroprotective treatment. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidant and glutathione precursor, shows promise for neuroprotection in combination with hypothermia, mitigating post-HI neuroinflammation due to oxidative stress. As mechanisms of HI injury and cell death differ in males and females, sex differences must be considered in translational research of neuroprotection. We assessed the potential toxicity and efficacy of NAC in combination with hypothermia, in male and female neonatal rats after severe HI injury. NAC 50mg/kg/d administered 1h after initiation of hypothermia significantly decreased iNOS expression and caspase 3 activation in the injured hemisphere versus hypothermia alone. However, only females treated with hypothermia +NAC 50mg/kg showed improvement in short-term infarct volumes compared with saline treated animals. Hypothermia alone had no effect in this severe model. When NAC was continued for 6 weeks, significant improvement in long-term neuromotor outcomes over hypothermia treatment alone was observed, controlling for sex. Antioxidants may provide insufficient neuroprotection after HI for neonatal males in the short term, while long-term therapy may benefit both sexes. PMID:26851769

  2. Better Glasgow outcome score, cerebral perfusion pressure and focal brain oxygenation in severely traumatized brain following direct regional brain hypothermia therapy: A prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Zamzuri; Zenian, Mohd Sofan; Muzaimi, Mustapha; Hamid, Wan Zuraida Wan Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Background: Induced hypothermia for treatment of traumatic brain injury is controversial. Since many pathways involved in the pathophysiology of secondary brain injury are temperature dependent, regional brain hypothermia is thought capable to mitigate those processes. The objectives of this study are to assess the therapeutic effects and complications of regional brain cooling in severe head injury with Glasgow coma scale (GCS) 6-7. Materials and Methods: A prospective randomized controlled pilot study involving patients with severe traumatic brain injury with GCS 6 and 7 who required decompressive craniectomy. Patients were randomized into two groups: Cooling and no cooling. For the cooling group, analysis was made by dividing the group into mild and deep cooling. Brain was cooled by irrigating the brain continuously with cold Hartmann solution for 24-48 h. Main outcome assessments were a dichotomized Glasgow outcome score (GOS) at 6 months posttrauma. Results: A total of 32 patients were recruited. The cooling-treated patients did better than no cooling. There were 63.2% of patients in cooling group attained good GOS at 6 months compared to only 15.4% in noncooling group (P = 0.007). Interestingly, the analysis at 6 months post-trauma disclosed mild-cooling-treated patients did better than no cooling (70% vs. 15.4% attained good GOS, P = 0.013) and apparently, the deep-cooling-treated patients failed to be better than either no cooling (P = 0.074) or mild cooling group (P = 0.650). Conclusion: Data from this pilot study imply direct regional brain hypothermia appears safe, feasible and maybe beneficial in treating severely head-injured patients. PMID:25685201

  3. Therapeutic Hypothermia and Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in a Child with Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Spurkeland, Nancy; Bennett, Gregory; Alexander, Chandran; Chang, Dennis; Ceneviva, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Neurologic outcomes following pediatric cardiac arrest are consistently poor. Early initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation has been shown to have positive effects on both survival to hospital discharge, and improved neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest. Additionally, the use of therapeutic hypothermia may improve survival in pediatric cardiac arrest patients admitted to the intensive care unit. We report a child with congenital hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, in whom the early initiation of effective prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation and subsequent administration of therapeutic hypothermia contributed to a positive outcome with no gross neurologic sequelae. Continuing efforts should be made to promote and employ high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which likely contributed to the positive outcome of this case. Further research will be necessary to develop and solidify national guidelines for the implementation of therapeutic hypothermia in selected subpopulations of children with OHCA. PMID:25861505

  4. Glibenclamide enhances the effects of delayed hypothermia after experimental stroke in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhou; Zhu, Shu-Zhen; Hu, Ya-Fang; Gu, Yong; Wang, Sheng-Nan; Lin, Zhen-Zhou; Xie, Zuo-Shan; Pan, Su-Yue

    2016-07-15

    In order to evaluate whether glibenclamide can extend the therapeutic window during which induced hypothermia can protect against stroke, we subjected adult male Sprague-Dawley rats to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). We first verified the protective effects of hypothermia induced at 0, 2, 4 or 6h after MCAO onset, and then we assessed the effects of the combination of glibenclamide and hypothermia at 6, 8 or 10h after MCAO onset. At 24h after MCAO, we assessed brain edema, infarct volume, modified neurological severity score, Evans Blue leakage and expression of Sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) protein and pro-inflammatory factors. No protective effects were observed when hypothermia was induced too long after MCAO. At 6h after MCAO onset, hypothermia alone failed to decrease cerebral edema and infarct volume, but the combination of glibenclamide and hypothermia decreased both. The combination also improved neurological outcome, ameliorated blood-brain barrier damage and decreased levels of COX-2, TNF-α and IL-1β. These results suggest that glibenclamide enhances and extends the therapeutic effects of delayed hypothermia against ischemia stroke, potentially by ameliorating blood-brain barrier damage and declining levels of pro-inflammatory factors. PMID:27134036

  5. Out-of-hospital therapeutic hypothermia in cardiac arrest victims

    PubMed Central

    Behringer, Wilhelm; Arrich, Jasmin; Holzer, Michael; Sterz, Fritz

    2009-01-01

    Despite many years of research, outcome after cardiac arrest is dismal. Since 2005, the European Resuscitation Council recommends in its guidelines the use of mild therapeutic hypothermia (32-34°) for 12 to 24 hours in patients successfully resuscitated from cardiac arrest. The benefit of resuscitative mild hypothermia (induced after resuscitation) is well established, while the benefit of preservative mild to moderate hypothermia (induced during cardiac arrest) needs further investigation before recommending it for clinical routine. Animal data and limited human data suggest that early and fast cooling might be essential for the beneficial effect of resuscitative mild hypothermia. Out-of-hospital cooling has been shown to be feasible and safe by means of intravenous infusion with cold fluids or non-invasively with cooling pads. A combination of these cooling methods might further improve cooling efficacy. If out-of-hospital cooling will further improve functional outcome as compared with in-hospital cooling needs to be determined in a prospective, randomised, sufficiently powered clinical trial. PMID:19821966

  6. Neonatal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Pattern of Brain Injury as a Biomarker of Childhood Outcomes following a Trial of Hypothermia for Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Seetha; McDonald, Scott A.; Laptook, Abbot R.; Hintz, Susan R.; Barnes, Patrick D.; Das, Abhik; Pappas, Athina; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patterns of neonatal brain injury defined by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network to predict death or IQ at 6–7 years of age following hypothermia for neonatal encephalopathy. Study design Out of 208 participants, 124 had MRI and primary outcome (death or IQ <70) data. The relationship between injury pattern and outcome was assessed. Results Death or IQ <70 occurred in 4 of 50 (8%) of children with pattern 0 (normal MRI), 1 of 6 (17%) with 1A (minimal cerebral lesions), 1 of 4 (25%) with 1B (extensive cerebral lesions), 3 of 8 (38%) with 2A (basal ganglia thalamic, anterior or posterior limb of internal capsule, or watershed infarction), 32 of 49 (65%) with 2B (2A with cerebral lesions), and 7 of 7 (100%) with pattern 3 (hemispheric devastation), P < .001; this association was also seen within hypothermia and control subgroups. IQ was 90 ± 13 among the 46 children with a normal MRI and 69 ± 25 among the 50 children with an abnormal MRI. In childhood, for a normal outcome, a normal neonatal MRI had a sensitivity of 61%, specificity of 92%, a positive predictive value of 92%, and a negative predictive value of 59%; for death or IQ <70, the 2B and 3 pattern combined had a sensitivity of 81%, specificity of 78%, positive predictive value of 70%, and a negative predictive value of 87%. Conclusions The Neonatal Research Network MRI pattern of neonatal brain injury is a biomarker of neurodevelopmental outcome at 6–7 years of age. PMID:26387012

  7. Better lactate clearance associated with good neurologic outcome in survivors who treated with therapeutic hypothermia after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Several methods have been proposed to evaluate neurological outcome in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. Blood lactate has been recognized as a reliable prognostic marker for trauma, sepsis, or cardiac arrest. The objective of this study was to examine the association between initial lactate level or lactate clearance and neurologic outcome in OHCA survivors who were treated with therapeutic hypothermia. Methods This retrospective cohort study included patients who underwent protocol-based 24-hour therapeutic hypothermia after OHCA between January 2010 and March 2012. Serum lactate levels were measured at the start of therapy (0 hours), and after 6 hours, 12 hours, 24 hours, 48 hours and 72 hours. The 6 hour and 12 hour lactate clearance were calculated afterwards. Patients’ neurologic outcome was assessed at one month after cardiac arrest; good neurological outcome was defined as Cerebral Performance Category one or two. The primary outcome was an association between initial lactate level and good neurologic outcome. The secondary outcome was an association between lactate clearance and good neurologic outcome in patients with initial lactate level >2.5 mmol/l. Results Out of the 76 patients enrolled, 34 (44.7%) had a good neurologic outcome. The initial lactate level showed no significant difference between good and poor neurologic outcome groups (6.07 ±4 .09 mmol/L vs 7.13 ± 3.99 mmol/L, P = 0.42), However, lactate levels at 6 hours, 12 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours in the good neurologic outcome group were lower than in the poor neurologic outcome group (3.81 ± 2.81 vs 6.00 ± 3.22 P <0.01, 2.95 ± 2.07 vs 5.00 ± 3.49 P <0.01, 2.17 ± 1.24 vs 3.86 ± 3.92 P <0.01, 1.57 ± 1.02 vs 2.21 ± 1.35 P = 0.03, respectively). The secondary analysis showed that the 6-hour and 12-hour lactate clearance was higher for good neurologic outcome patients (35.3 ± 34.6% vs 6.89

  8. [Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. A cold intravenous fluid, a cooling helmet and a cooling blanket efficiently reduce body temperature].

    PubMed

    Friberg, Hans; Nielsen, Niklas; Karlsson, Torbjörn; Cronberg, Tobias; Widner, Håkan; Englund, Elisabet; Ersson, Anders

    2004-07-22

    Two controlled randomized trials have shown that mild systemic hypothermia after cardiac arrest is beneficial for neurological outcome and one of the studies shows an improved survival rate. A pilot study was performed to evaluate a model of induced hypothermia after cardiac arrest, using cold intravenous fluids and surface cooling with a cold helmet and a coldwater blanket (Thermowrap). The main purpose was to evaluate our cooling method regarding efficacy, safety and usability. Five unconscious patients after cardiac arrest were treated with induced hypothermia of whom three survived with good recovery to six-month follow up. Two patients died in the ICU without regaining consciousness. There were no adverse events during treatment. We conclude that our method is reasonably fast compared to other published methods, it is easy to perform and it offers a good temperature control during cooling and rewarming. Routines for evaluating prognosis and neurological outcome after cardiac arrest and hypothermia treatment need to be revised. PMID:15314936

  9. Coagulopathy induced by acidosis, hypothermia and hypocalcaemia in severe bleeding.

    PubMed

    De Robertis, E; Kozek-Langenecker, S A; Tufano, R; Romano, G M; Piazza, O; Zito Marinosci, G

    2015-01-01

    Acidosis, hypothermia and hypocalcaemia are determinants for morbidity and mortality during massive hemorrhages. However, precise pathological mechanisms of these environmental factors and their potential additive or synergistic anticoagulant and/or antiplatelet effects are not fully elucidated and are at least in part controversial. Best available evidences from experimental trials indicate that acidosis and hypothermia progressively impair platelet aggregability and clot formation. Considering the cell-based model of coagulation physiology, hypothermia predominantly prolongs the initiation phase, while acidosis prolongs the propagation phase of thrombin generation. Acidosis increases fibrinogen breakdown while hypothermia impairs its synthesis. Acidosis and hypothermia have additive effects. The effect of hypocalcaemia on coagulopathy is less investigated but it appears that below the cut-off of 0.9 mmol/L, several enzymatic steps in the plasmatic coagulation system are blocked while above that cut-off effects remain without clinical sequalae. The impact of environmental factor on hemostasis is underestimated in clinical practice due to our current practice of using routine coagulation laboratory tests such as partial thromboplastin time or prothrombin time, which are performed at standardized test temperature, after pH correction, and upon recalcification. Temperature-adjustments are feasible in viscoelastic point-of-care tests such as thrombelastography and thromboelastometry which may permit quantification of hypothermia-induced coagulopathy. Rewarming hypothermic bleeding patients is highly recommended because it improves patient outcome. Despite the absence of high-quality evidence, calcium supplementation is clinical routine in bleeding management. Buffer administration may not reverse acidosis-induced coagulopathy but may be essential for the efficacy of coagulation factor concentrates such as recombinant activated factor VII. PMID:24608516

  10. Activation of mitochondrial STAT-3 and reduced mitochondria damage during hypothermia treatment for post-cardiac arrest myocardial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Hua; Tsai, Min-Shan; Chiang, Chih-Yen; Su, Yu-Jen; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Chang, Wei-Tien; Chen, Huei-Wen; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2015-11-01

    While therapeutic hypothermia improves the outcomes of individuals in cardiac arrest, the hemodynamic responses and mechanisms which underlie hypothermia-induced cardioprotection are not fully understood. Therefore, we investigated the mechanism by which induced hypothermia preserves cardiac function and protects against mitochondrial damage following cardiac arrest. Cardiac arrest was induced in adult male Wistar rats by asphyxiation for 8.5 min. Following resuscitation, the animals were randomly assigned to a hypothermia (32 °C) or normothermia (37 °C) group. Monitoring results showed that cardiac output at the fourth hour after resuscitation was significantly better in rats treated with hypothermia when compared to rats treated with normothermia (P < 0.01). Examinations by transmission electron microscopy showed that mitochondria in the left ventricle of rats in the hypothermia group were significantly less swollen compared to such mitochondria in the normothermia group (P < 0.001). Additionally, opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pores occurred less frequently in the hypothermic group. While complex I/III activity in the electron transport reaction was damaged after cardiac arrest and resuscitation, the degree of injury was ameliorated by hypothermia treatment (P < 0.05). The amount of STAT-3 phosphorylated at tyrosine 705 and its expression in mitochondria were significantly higher under hypothermia treatment compared to normothermia treatment. In vitro studies showed that inhibition STAT-3 activation abolished the ability of hypothermia to protect H9C2 cardiomyocytes against injury produced by simulated ischemia and reperfusion. Therapeutic hypothermia treatment can ameliorate cardiac dysfunction and help preserve both mitochondrial integrity and electron transport activity. PMID:26471891

  11. Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest and myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Michael; Behringer, Wilhelm

    2008-12-01

    About 17 million people worldwide die from cardiovascular diseases each year. Impaired neurologic function after sudden cardiac arrest is a major cause of death in these patients. Up to now, no specific post-arrest therapy was available to improve outcome. Recently, two randomized clinical trials of mild therapeutic hypothermia after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest showed improvement of neurological outcome and reduced mortality. A broad implementation of this new therapy could save thousands of lives worldwide, as only 6 patients have to be treated to get one additional patient with favourable neurological recovery. At present, myocardial reperfusion by thrombolytic therapy or primary PCI as early as possible is the most effective therapy in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Mild therapeutic hypothermia might be a promising new therapy to prevent reperfusion injury after myocardial infarction, but its use in daily clinical routine cannot be recommended with the available evidence. PMID:19137812

  12. What is Hypothermia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Weather! Heath and Aging Stay Safe in Cold Weather! What is hypothermia? If you are like most ... Keep warm inside Related Publications Hypothermia: A Cold Weather Hazard There's No Place Like Home - For Growing ...

  13. The Practice of Therapeutic Hypothermia after Cardiac Arrest in France: A National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Orban, Jean-Christophe; Cattet, Florian; Lefrant, Jean-Yves; Leone, Marc; Jaber, Samir; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Allaouchiche, Bernard; Ichai, Carole

    2012-01-01

    Aims Cardiac arrest is a major health concern worldwide accounting for 375,000 cases per year in Europe with a survival rate of <10%. Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve patients’ neurological outcome and is recommended by scientific societies. Despite these guidelines, different surveys report a heterogeneous application of this treatment. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical practice of therapeutic hypothermia in cardiac arrest patients. Methods This self-declarative web based survey was proposed to all registered French adult intensive care units (ICUs) (n = 357). Paediatrics and neurosurgery ICUs were excluded. The different questions addressed the structure, the practical modalities of therapeutic hypothermia and the use of prognostic factors in patients admitted after cardiac arrest. Results One hundred and thirty-two out of 357 ICUs (37%) answered the questionnaire. Adherence to recommendations regarding the targeted temperature and hypothermia duration were 98% and 94% respectively. Both guidelines were followed in 92% ICUs. During therapeutic hypothermia, sedative drugs were given in 99% ICUs, mostly midazolam (77%) and sufentanil (59%). Neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA) were used in 97% ICUs, mainly cisatracurium (77%). Numerous prognostic factors were used after cardiac arrest such as clinical factors (95%), biomarkers (53%), electroencephalography (78%) and evoked potentials (35%). Conclusions In France, adherence to recommendations for therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest is higher than those previously reported in other countries. Numerous prognostic factors are widely used even if their reliability remains controversial. PMID:23049783

  14. Renal Insufficiency and Early Bystander CPR Predict In-Hospital Outcomes in Cardiac Arrest Patients Undergoing Mild Therapeutic Hypothermia and Cardiac Catheterization: Return of Spontaneous Circulation, Cooling, and Catheterization Registry (ROSCCC Registry)

    PubMed Central

    Chelvanathan, Anjala; Allen, David; Bews, Hilary; Ducas, John; Minhas, Kunal; Ravandi, Amir; Jassal, Davinder S.; Hussain, Farrukh

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients are a critically ill patient population with high mortality. Combining mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) with early coronary intervention may improve outcomes in this population. The aim of this study was to evaluate predictors of mortality in OHCA patients undergoing MTH with and without cardiac catheterization. Design. A retrospective cohort of OHCA patients who underwent MTH with catheterization (MTH + C) and without catheterization (MTH + NC) between 2006 and 2011 was analyzed at a single tertiary care centre. Predictors of in-hospital mortality and neurologic outcome were determined. Results. The study population included 176 patients who underwent MTH for OHCA. A total of 66 patients underwent cardiac catheterization (MTH + C) and 110 patients did not undergo cardiac catheterization (MTH + NC). Immediate bystander CPR occurred in approximately half of the total population. In the MTH + C and MTH + NC groups, the in-hospital mortality was 48% and 78%, respectively. The only independent predictor of in-hospital mortality for patients with MTH + C, after multivariate analysis, was baseline renal insufficiency (OR = 8.2, 95% CI 1.8–47.1, and p = 0.009). Conclusion. Despite early cardiac catheterization, renal insufficiency and the absence of immediate CPR are potent predictors of death and poor neurologic outcome in patients with OHCA. PMID:26885436

  15. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2003-04-15

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  16. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2005-11-08

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  17. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2008-09-09

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  18. Therapeutic hypothermia in neonatal asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    Cornette, L.

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy is a serious condition affecting newborn infants which can result in death and disability. There is now strong clinical evidence that moderate post-asphyxial total body cooling or hypothermia in full term neonates results in long-term neuroprotection, allowing us to proclaim this innovative therapy as “standard of care.” The treatment is a time-critical emergency and should be started within 6 hours after the insult. Such requires optimal collaboration among local hospitals, transport teams and the closest neonatal intensive care unit. The technique is only safe when applied according to published clinical trial protocols, and with admission of these patients to a neonatal intensive care unit. Future studies should be aimed at optimizing the onset, duration, and depth of hypothermia. Combination of hypothermia and drugs may further improve neuroprotection in asphyxiated full term neonates. PMID:24753900

  19. Pharmacologic options for reducing the shivering response to therapeutic hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Weant, Kyle A; Martin, Julia E; Humphries, Roger L; Cook, Aaron M

    2010-08-01

    Recent literature has demonstrated significant improvements in neurologic outcomes in patients who have received induced hypothermia in the setting of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Through multiple metabolic mechanisms, the induction of hypothermia slows the progression and devastation of transient cerebral hypoxia. Despite these benefits, the desired reduction in core temperature is often a challenging venture as the body attempts to maintain homeostasis through the induction of thermoregulatory processes aimed at elevating body temperature. Shivering is an involuntary muscular activity that enhances heat production in an attempt to restore homeostasis. For successful induction and maintenance of induced hypothermia, shivering, as well as other thermoregulatory responses, must be overcome. Several pharmacologic options are available, either used alone or in combination, that safely and effectively prevent or treat shivering after the induction of hypothermia. We conducted a PubMed search (1966-March 2009) to identify all human investigations published in English that discussed pharmacologic mechanisms for the control of shivering. Among these options, clonidine, dexmedetomidine, and meperidine have demonstrated the greatest and most clinically relevant impact on depression of the shivering threshold. More research in this area is needed, however, and the role of the clinical pharmacist in the development and implementation of this therapy needs to be defined. PMID:20653360

  20. Guideline Implementation: Preventing Hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Bashaw, Marie A

    2016-03-01

    The updated AORN "Guideline for prevention of unplanned patient hypothermia" provides guidance for identifying factors associated with intraoperative hypothermia, preventing hypothermia, educating perioperative personnel on this topic, and developing relevant policies and procedures. This article focuses on key points of the guideline, which addresses performing a preoperative assessment for factors that may contribute to hypothermia, measuring and monitoring the patient's temperature in all phases of perioperative care, and implementing interventions to prevent hypothermia. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures. PMID:26924369

  1. Clinical hypothermia temperatures increase complement activation and cell destruction via the classical pathway

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Therapeutic hypothermia is a treatment modality that is increasingly used to improve clinical neurological outcomes for ischemia-reperfusion injury-mediated diseases. Antibody-initiated classical complement pathway activation has been shown to contribute to ischemia-reperfusion injury in multiple disease processes. However, how therapeutic hypothermia affects complement activation is unknown. Our goal was to measure the independent effect of temperature on complement activation, and more specifically, examine the relationship between clinical hypothermia temperatures (31–33°C), and complement activation. Methods Antibody-sensitized erythrocytes were used to assay complement activation at temperatures ranging from 0-41°C. Individual complement pathway components were assayed by ELISA, Western blot, and quantitative dot blot. Peptide Inhibitor of complement C1 (PIC1) was used to specifically inhibit activation of C1. Results Antibody-initiated complement activation resulting in eukaryotic cell lysis was increased by 2-fold at 31°C compared with 37°C. Antibody-initiated complement activation in human serum increased as temperature decreased from 37°C until dramatically decreasing at 13°C. Quantitation of individual complement components showed significantly increased activation of C4, C3, and C5 at clinical hypothermia temperatures. In contrast, C1s activation by heat-aggregated IgG decreased at therapeutic hypothermia temperatures consistent with decreased enzymatic activity at lower temperatures. However, C1q binding to antibody-coated erythrocytes increased at lower temperatures, suggesting that increased classical complement pathway activation is mediated by increased C1 binding at therapeutic hypothermia temperatures. PIC1 inhibited hypothermia-enhanced complement-mediated cell lysis at 31°C by up to 60% (P = 0.001) in a dose dependent manner. Conclusions In summary, therapeutic hypothermia temperatures increased antibody

  2. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Froehler, Michael T; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2010-04-01

    Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator remains the only US FDA-approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke. However, the very limited time window for its administration restricts its usefulness. Furthermore, it is becoming increasingly clear that, given the numerous pathways via which cerebral ischemia causes cell death, the capacity to inhibit multiple mechanisms simultaneously may provide additive or synergistic beneficial clinical effects for stroke patients. Although no clinical trials have yet investigated the efficacy of therapeutic hypothermia in focal cerebral ischemia, its pleiotropic neuroprotective actions, positive results in preclinical studies, as well as proven enhancement of neurologic outcomes in survivors of cardiac arrest and newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, make this neuroprotective strategy highly promising. This review presents an overview of the potential role of hypothermia in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke and discusses ischemic cell death pathophysiology, neuroprotective mechanisms of hypothermia, methodologies employed for the induction of hypothermia, results from animal models of cerebral ischemia, and finally, currently available clinical trial data. Two valuable lessons learned thus far are that first, rapid induction of hypothermia is key and is best accomplished with a combination of ice-cold saline infusion and the use of endovascular cooling devices, and second, that shivering can be overcome with aggressive anti-shivering protocols including meperidine, buspirone and surface warming. We await the results of clinical trials to determine the utility of therapeutic hypothermia in acute ischemic stroke. If proven efficacious, hypothermia would be a welcome complement to established reperfusion therapies for ischemic stroke patients. PMID:20397832

  3. Still cooling after all these years: Meta-analysis of pre-clinical trials of therapeutic hypothermia for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Dumitrascu, Oana M; Lamb, Jessica; Lyden, Patrick D

    2016-07-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is the most potent neuroprotectant for experimental cerebral ischemia, illustrated in a 2007 meta-analysis published in this journal. To address recent therapeutic nihilism, we systematically reviewed recent experimental literature. Quality scoring showed considerable improvement in study design. Using several outcome measures in a variety of models and species, therapeutic hypothermia was protective compared with normothermia, with powerful and statistically significant normalized treatment effect sizes, in 60 papers comprising 216 comparisons. In the past 5 years, preclinical studies of ischemic stroke re-emphasize that therapeutic hypothermia is potently effective, justifying further development in larger human clinical trials. PMID:27089911

  4. Temperature Control During Therapeutic Hypothermia for Newborn Encephalopathy Using Different Blanketrol Devices

    PubMed Central

    Kilbride, Howard; Shepherd, Edward; McDonald, Scott A.; Shankaran, Seetha; Truog, William; Das, Abhik; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia improves the survival and neurodevelopmental outcome of infants with newborn encephalopathy of a hypoxic-ischemic origin. The NICHD Neonatal Research Network (NRN) Whole Body Cooling trial used the Cincinnati Sub-Zero Blanketrol II to achieve therapeutic hypothermia. The Blanketrol III is now available and provides additional cooling modes that may result in better temperature control. This report is a retrospective comparison of infants undergoing hypothermia using two different cooling modes of the Blanketrol device. Infants from the NRN trial were cooled with the Blanketrol II using the Automatic control mode (B2 cohort) and were compared with infants from two new NRN centers that adopted the NRN protocol and used the Blanketrol III in a gradient mode (B3 cohort). The primary outcome was the percent time the esophageal temperature stayed between 33°C and 34°C (target 33.5°C) during maintenance of hypothermia. Cohorts had similar birth weight, gestational age, and level of encephalopathy at the initiation of therapy. Baseline esophageal temperature differed between groups (36.6°C±1.0°C for B2 vs. 33.9°C±1.2°C for B3, p<0.0001) reflecting the practice of passive cooling during transport prior to initiation of active device cooling in the B3 cohort. This difference prevented comparison of temperatures during induction of hypothermia. During maintenance of hypothermia the mean and standard deviation of the percent time between 33°C and 34°C was similar for B2 compared to B3 cohorts (94.8%±0.1% vs. 95.8%±0.1%, respectively). Both the automatic and gradient control modes of the Blanketrol devices appear comparable in maintaining esophageal temperature within the target range during maintenance of therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:25285767

  5. MicroRNA-155 potentiates the inflammatory response in hypothermia by suppressing IL-10 production.

    PubMed

    Billeter, Adrian T; Hellmann, Jason; Roberts, Henry; Druen, Devin; Gardner, Sarah A; Sarojini, Harshini; Galandiuk, Susan; Chien, Sufan; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Spite, Matthew; Polk, Hiram C

    2014-12-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is commonly used to improve neurological outcomes in patients after cardiac arrest. However, therapeutic hypothermia increases sepsis risk and unintentional hypothermia in surgical patients increases infectious complications. Nonetheless, the molecular mechanisms by which hypothermia dysregulates innate immunity are incompletely understood. We found that exposure of human monocytes to cold (32°C) potentiated LPS-induced production of TNF and IL-6, while blunting IL-10 production. This dysregulation was associated with increased expression of microRNA-155 (miR-155), which potentiates Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling by negatively regulating Ship1 and Socs1. Indeed, Ship1 and Socs1 were suppressed at 32°C and miR-155 antagomirs increased Ship1 and Socs1 and reversed the alterations in cytokine production in cold-exposed monocytes. In contrast, miR-155 mimics phenocopied the effects of cold exposure, reducing Ship1 and Socs1 and altering TNF and IL-10 production. In a murine model of LPS-induced peritonitis, cold exposure potentiated hypothermia and decreased survival (10 vs. 50%; P < 0.05), effects that were associated with increased miR-155, suppression of Ship1 and Socs1, and alterations in TNF and IL-10. Importantly, miR-155-deficiency reduced hypothermia and improved survival (78 vs. 32%, P < 0.05), which was associated with increased Ship1, Socs1, and IL-10. These results establish a causal role of miR-155 in the dysregulation of the inflammatory response to hypothermia. PMID:25231976

  6. Neurological Outcome Scale for Traumatic Brain Injury: III. Criterion-Related Validity and Sensitivity to Change in the NABIS Hypothermia-II Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Elisabeth A.; Moretti, Paolo; MacLeod, Marianne C.; Pedroza, Claudia; Drever, Pamala; Fourwinds, Sierra; Frisby, Melisa L.; Beers, Sue R.; Scott, James N.; Hunter, Jill V.; Traipe, Elfrides; Valadka, Alex B.; Okonkwo, David O.; Zygun, David A.; Puccio, Ava M.; Clifton, Guy L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The Neurological Outcome Scale for Traumatic Brain Injury (NOS-TBI) is a measure assessing neurological functioning in patients with TBI. We hypothesized that the NOS-TBI would exhibit adequate concurrent and predictive validity and demonstrate more sensitivity to change, compared with other well-established outcome measures. We analyzed data from the National Acute Brain Injury Study: Hypothermia-II clinical trial. Participants were 16–45 years of age with severe TBI assessed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postinjury. For analysis of criterion-related validity (concurrent and predictive), Spearman's rank-order correlations were calculated between the NOS-TBI and the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS), GOS-Extended (GOS-E), Disability Rating Scale (DRS), and Neurobehavioral Rating Scale-Revised (NRS-R). Concurrent validity was demonstrated through significant correlations between the NOS-TBI and GOS, GOS-E, DRS, and NRS-R measured contemporaneously at 3, 6, and 12 months postinjury (all p<0.0013). For prediction analyses, the multiplicity-adjusted p value using the false discovery rate was <0.015. The 1-month NOS-TBI score was a significant predictor of outcome in the GOS, GOS-E, and DRS at 3 and 6 months postinjury (all p<0.015). The 3-month NOS-TBI significantly predicted GOS, GOS-E, DRS, and NRS-R outcomes at 6 and 12 months postinjury (all p<0.0015). Sensitivity to change was analyzed using Wilcoxon's signed rank-sum test of subsamples demonstrating no change in the GOS or GOS-E between 3 and 6 months. The NOS-TBI demonstrated higher sensitivity to change, compared with the GOS (p<0.038) and GOS-E (p<0.016). In summary, the NOS-TBI demonstrated adequate concurrent and predictive validity as well as sensitivity to change, compared with gold-standard outcome measures. The NOS-TBI may enhance prediction of outcome in clinical practice and measurement of outcome in TBI research. PMID:23617608

  7. [Recent treatment of postischaemic anoxic brain damage after cardiac arrest by using therapeutic hypothermia].

    PubMed

    Andjelić, Sladjana

    2008-01-01

    Organ injury caused by ischaemia and anoxia during prolonged cardiac arrest is compounded by reperfusion injury that occurs when spontaneous circulation is restored. Mild hypothermia (32-35 degrees C) is neuroprotective through several mechanisms, including suppression of apoptosis, reduced production of excitotoxins and free radicals, and anti-inflammatory actions. Experimental studies show that hypothermia is more effective the earlier it is started after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Two randomised clinical trials show improved survival and neurological outcome in adults who remained comatose after initial resuscitation from prehospital VF cardiac arrest, and who were cooled after ROSC. Different strategies can be used to induce hypothermia. Optimal timing of therapeutic hypothermia for cardiac ischaemia is unknown. In patients who failed to respond to standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation, intra-arrest cooling using ice-cold intravenous (i.v.) fluid improved the chance of survival. Recently, fasudil, a Rho kinase inhibitor, was reported to prevent cerebral ischaemia in vivo by increasing cerebral blood flow and inhibiting inflammatory responses. In future, two different kinds of protective therapies, BCL-2 overexpression and hypothermia,will both inhibit aspects of apoptotic cell death cascades, and that combination treatment can prolong the temporal "therapeutic window" for gene therapy. PMID:19069351

  8. Avoidance of Profound Hypothermia During Initial Reperfusion Improves the Functional Recovery of Hearts Donated After Circulatory Death.

    PubMed

    White, C W; Ambrose, E; Müller, A; Li, Y; Le, H; Thliveris, J; Arora, R C; Lee, T W; Dixon, I M C; Tian, G; Nagendran, J; Hryshko, L V; Freed, D H

    2016-03-01

    The resuscitation of hearts donated after circulatory death (DCD) is gaining widespread interest; however, the method of initial reperfusion (IR) that optimizes functional recovery has not been elucidated. We sought to determine the impact of IR temperature on the recovery of myocardial function during ex vivo heart perfusion (EVHP). Eighteen pigs were anesthetized, mechanical ventilation was discontinued, and cardiac arrest ensued. A 15-min standoff period was observed and then hearts were reperfused for 3 min at three different temperatures (5°C; N = 6, 25°C; N = 5, and 35°C; N = 7) with a normokalemic adenosine-lidocaine crystalloid cardioplegia. Hearts then underwent normothermic EVHP for 6 h during which time myocardial function was assessed in a working mode. We found that IR coronary blood flow differed among treatment groups (5°C = 483 ± 53, 25°C = 722 ± 60, 35°C = 906 ± 36 mL/min, p < 0.01). During subsequent EVHP, less myocardial injury (troponin I: 5°C = 91 ± 6, 25°C = 64 ± 16, 35°C = 57 ± 7 pg/mL/g, p = 0.04) and greater preservation of endothelial cell integrity (electron microscopy injury score: 5°C = 3.2 ± 0.5, 25°C = 1.8 ± 0.2, 35°C = 1.7 ± 0.3, p = 0.01) were evident in hearts initially reperfused at warmer temperatures. IR under profoundly hypothermic conditions impaired the recovery of myocardial function (cardiac index: 5°C = 3.9 ± 0.8, 25°C = 6.2 ± 0.4, 35°C = 6.5 ± 0.6 mL/minute/g, p = 0.03) during EVHP. We conclude that the avoidance of profound hypothermia during IR minimizes injury and improves the functional recovery of DCD hearts. PMID:26780159

  9. Subdural haemorrhage and severe coagulopathy resulting in transtentorial uncal herniation in a neonate undergoing therapeutic hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dianna; McMillan, Hugh; Bariciak, Erika

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to be efficacious for improving long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes following perinatal asphyxia. Thus, cooling protocols have been adopted at most tertiary neonatal centres. We present a case of a term neonate who underwent therapeutic whole-body cooling for hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy following a difficult forceps delivery. She abruptly deteriorated, exhibiting signs of transtentorial uncal herniation and severe disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. CT of the head confirmed a life-threatening subdural haematoma and a concealed skull fracture. Hypothermia has been shown to impair haemostasis in vivo and thus may potentially exacerbate occult haemorrhages in a clinical setting. Newborns that require instrument-assisted delivery are a particularly high-risk group for occult head injuries and should undergo careful clinical assessment for fractures and intracranial haemorrhage prior to initiation of therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:25100805

  10. Prevention of perioperative hypothermia in plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Young, V Leroy; Watson, Marla E

    2006-01-01

    While inadvertent perioperative hypothermia has received serious attention in many surgical specialties, few discussions of hypothermia have been published in the plastic surgery literature. This article reviews the physiology of thermoregulation, describes how both general and regional anesthesia alter the normal thermoregulatory mechanisms, indicates risk factors particularly associated with hypothermia, and discusses the most effective current methods for maintaining normothermia. Hypothermia is typically defined as a core body temperature of outcomes are reportedly better when a temperature of >/=36.5 degrees C is maintained. Unless preventive measures are instituted, inadvertent hypothermia occurs in 50% to 90% of surgical patients, even those undergoing relatively short procedures lasting one to one-and-a-half hours. During either general or regional anesthesia, a patient's natural behavioral and autonomic responses to cold are unavailable or impaired, and the combination of general and neuraxial anesthesia produces the highest risk for inadvertent perioperative hypothermia. Unless hypothermia is prevented, the restoration of normothermia can take more than 4 hours once anesthesia is stopped. Consequences of hypothermia are serious and affect surgical outcomes in plastic surgery patients. Potential complications include morbid cardiac events, coagulation disorders and blood loss, increased incidence of surgical wound infection, postoperative shivering, longer hospital stays, and increased costs associated with surgery. Measures for preventing hypothermia are emphasized in this article, especially those proven most effective in prospective and controlled clinical studies. Perhaps the most important step in maintaining normothermia is to prewarm patients in the preoperative area with forced-air heating systems. Intraoperative warming with forced-air and fluid warming are also essential. Other strategies

  11. Therapeutic hypothermia impacts leukocyte kinetics after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Dufner, Matthias C.; Andre, Florian; Stiepak, Jan; Zelniker, Thomas; Chorianopoulos, Emmanuel; Preusch, Michael; Katus, Hugo A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients admitted to the hospital after primarily successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are at a very high risk for neurologic deficits and death. Targeted temperature management (TTM) for mild therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve survival compared to standard treatment. Acute cardiovascular events, such as myocardial infarction (MI), are a major cause for cardiac arrest (CA) in patients who undergo CPR. Recent findings have demonstrated the importance and impact of the leukocyte response following acute MI. Methods In this retrospective, single center study we enrolled 169 patients with CA due to non-traumatic causes and primarily successful CPR. A total of 111 subjects (66%) underwent TTM aiming for a target temperature of 32–34 °C. Results Analysis of 30 day follow up showed a significantly improved survival of all patients who received TTM compared to patients without hypothermia (P=0.0001). Furthermore TTM was an independent variable of good neurological outcome after 6 months (P=0.0030). Therapeutic hypothermia was found to be beneficial independent of differences in age and sex between both groups. While a higher rate of pneumonia was observed with TTM, this diagnosis had no additional impact on survival or neurological outcome. The beneficial effect on mortality remained significant in patients with the diagnosis of an acute cardiac event (P=0.0145). Next, we evaluated the kinetics of leukocytes in this group over the course of 7 days after CA. At presentation, patients showed a mean level of 16.5±6.7 of leukocytes per microliter. While this level stayed stable in the group of patients without hypothermia, patients who received TTM showed a significant decline of leukocyte levels resulting in significantly lower numbers of leukocytes on days 3 and 5 after CPR. Interestingly, these differences in leukocyte counts remained beyond the time period of TTM while C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were suppressed only during

  12. Effects of Cannabidiol and Hypothermia on Short-Term Brain Damage in New-Born Piglets after Acute Hypoxia-Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Lafuente, Hector; Pazos, Maria R; Alvarez, Antonia; Mohammed, Nagat; Santos, Martín; Arizti, Maialen; Alvarez, Francisco J; Martinez-Orgado, Jose A

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia is a standard treatment for neonatal encephalopathy, but nearly 50% of treated infants have adverse outcomes. Pharmacological therapies can act through complementary mechanisms with hypothermia improving neuroprotection. Cannabidiol could be a good candidate. Our aim was to test whether immediate treatment with cannabidiol and hypothermia act through complementary brain pathways in hypoxic-ischemic newborn piglets. Hypoxic-ischemic animals were randomly divided into four groups receiving 30 min after the insult: (1) normothermia and vehicle administration; (2) normothermia and cannabidiol administration; (3) hypothermia and vehicle administration; and (4) hypothermia and cannabidiol administration. Six hours after treatment, brains were processed to quantify the number of damaged neurons by Nissl staining. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were obtained and analyzed for lactate, N-acetyl-aspartate and glutamate. Metabolite ratios were calculated to assess neuronal damage (lactate/N-acetyl-aspartate) and excitotoxicity (glutamate/Nacetyl-aspartate). Western blot studies were performed to quantify protein nitrosylation (oxidative stress), content of caspase-3 (apoptosis) and TNFα (inflammation). Individually, the hypothermia and the cannabidiol treatments reduced the glutamate/Nacetyl-aspartate ratio, as well as TNFα and oxidized protein levels in newborn piglets subjected to hypoxic-ischemic insult. Also, both therapies reduced the number of necrotic neurons and prevented an increase in lactate/N-acetyl-aspartate ratio. The combined effect of hypothermia and cannabidiol on excitotoxicity, inflammation and oxidative stress, and on cell damage, was greater than either hypothermia or cannabidiol alone. The present study demonstrated that cannabidiol and hypothermia act complementarily and show additive effects on the main factors leading to hypoxic-ischemic brain damage if applied shortly after the insult. PMID:27462203

  13. Effects of Cannabidiol and Hypothermia on Short-Term Brain Damage in New-Born Piglets after Acute Hypoxia-Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Lafuente, Hector; Pazos, Maria R.; Alvarez, Antonia; Mohammed, Nagat; Santos, Martín; Arizti, Maialen; Alvarez, Francisco J.; Martinez-Orgado, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia is a standard treatment for neonatal encephalopathy, but nearly 50% of treated infants have adverse outcomes. Pharmacological therapies can act through complementary mechanisms with hypothermia improving neuroprotection. Cannabidiol could be a good candidate. Our aim was to test whether immediate treatment with cannabidiol and hypothermia act through complementary brain pathways in hypoxic-ischemic newborn piglets. Hypoxic-ischemic animals were randomly divided into four groups receiving 30 min after the insult: (1) normothermia and vehicle administration; (2) normothermia and cannabidiol administration; (3) hypothermia and vehicle administration; and (4) hypothermia and cannabidiol administration. Six hours after treatment, brains were processed to quantify the number of damaged neurons by Nissl staining. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were obtained and analyzed for lactate, N-acetyl-aspartate and glutamate. Metabolite ratios were calculated to assess neuronal damage (lactate/N-acetyl-aspartate) and excitotoxicity (glutamate/Nacetyl-aspartate). Western blot studies were performed to quantify protein nitrosylation (oxidative stress), content of caspase-3 (apoptosis) and TNFα (inflammation). Individually, the hypothermia and the cannabidiol treatments reduced the glutamate/Nacetyl-aspartate ratio, as well as TNFα and oxidized protein levels in newborn piglets subjected to hypoxic-ischemic insult. Also, both therapies reduced the number of necrotic neurons and prevented an increase in lactate/N-acetyl-aspartate ratio. The combined effect of hypothermia and cannabidiol on excitotoxicity, inflammation and oxidative stress, and on cell damage, was greater than either hypothermia or cannabidiol alone. The present study demonstrated that cannabidiol and hypothermia act complementarily and show additive effects on the main factors leading to hypoxic-ischemic brain damage if applied shortly after the insult. PMID:27462203

  14. Proteomic analysis of global protein expression changes in the endothelin-1 rat model for cerebral ischemia: rescue effect of mild hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Zgavc, Tine; Hu, Tjing-Tjing; Van de Plas, Babs; Vinken, Mathieu; Ceulemans, An-Gaëlle; Hachimi-Idrissi, Said; Sarre, Sophie; Michotte, Yvette; Arckens, Lutgarde

    2013-11-01

    Mild hypothermia is a promising neuroprotective therapy in stroke management. However, little is known about its effects on the global protein expression patterns in brain regions affected by ischemic stroke. We investigated protein expression changes associated with the neuroprotective effects of hypothermia via a functional proteomics approach through the analysis of the core (striatum) and the penumbra (cortex) after an ischemic insult in rats induced by endothelin-1 (Et-1). Functional outcome, infarct volume and related global protein expression changes were assessed 24h after the insult using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis. Mild hypothermia, induced 20 min after endothelin-1 infusion, improved the neurological outcome, reflected by a 36% reduction in infarct volume and a significantly better neurological deficit score. Hypothermia was typically associated with opposite protein expression changes inthe cortex to those induced by stroke under normothermic conditions, but not in the striatum. The main cellular processes rescued by hypothermia and potentially involved in the protection of the cortex are cellular assembly and organization, followed by cell signaling, thereby confirming that hypothermia is neuroprotective through multiple molecular and cellular pathways. PMID:23927863

  15. Therapeutic Hypothermia for Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Karnatovskaia, Lioudmila V.; Wartenberg, Katja E.

    2014-01-01

    The earliest recorded application of therapeutic hypothermia in medicine spans about 5000 years; however, its use has become widespread since 2002, following the demonstration of both safety and efficacy of regimens requiring only a mild (32°C-35°C) degree of cooling after cardiac arrest. We review the mechanisms by which hypothermia confers neuroprotection as well as its physiological effects by body system and its associated risks. With regard to clinical applications, we present evidence on the role of hypothermia in traumatic brain injury, intracranial pressure elevation, stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, spinal cord injury, hepatic encephalopathy, and neonatal peripartum encephalopathy. Based on the current knowledge and areas undergoing or in need of further exploration, we feel that therapeutic hypothermia holds promise in the treatment of patients with various forms of neurologic injury; however, additional quality studies are needed before its true role is fully known. PMID:24982721

  16. Therapeutic Hypothermia for Neonatal Encephalopathy and Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Massaro, An; Rais-Bahrami, Khodayar; Chang, Taeun; Glass, Penny; Short, Billie Lou; Baumgart, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This case series describes clinical management of five infants who received whole-body cooling during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). We maintained systemic hypothermia during ECMO with acceptable clinical outcomes. PMID:20472254

  17. Neonatal Encephalopathy: Update on Therapeutic Hypothermia and Other Novel Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    McAdams, Ryan M; Juul, Sandra E

    2016-09-01

    Neonatal encephalopathy (NE) is a major cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity. Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is standard treatment for newborns at 36 weeks of gestation or greater with intrapartum hypoxia-related NE. Term and late preterm infants with moderate to severe encephalopathy show improved survival and neurodevelopmental outcomes at 18 months of age after TH. TH can increase survival without increasing major disability, rates of an IQ less than 70, or cerebral palsy. Neonates with severe NE remain at risk of death or severe neurodevelopmental impairment. This review discusses the evidence supporting TH for term or near term neonates with NE. PMID:27524449

  18. Using Chronic Pain Outcomes Data to Improve Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Neel; Inturrisi, Charles E; Horn, Susan D; Witkin, Lisa R

    2016-06-01

    Standardization of care that is derived from analysis of outcomes data can lead to improvements in quality and efficiency of care. The outcomes data should be validated, standardized, and integrated into ongoing patient care with minimal burden on the patient and health care team. This article describes the organization and workflow of a chronic pain clinic registry designed to collect and analyze patient data for quality improvement and dissemination. Future efforts in using mobile technology and integrating patient-reported outcome data in the electronic health records have the potential to offer new and improved models of comprehensive pain management. PMID:27208717

  19. Posttraumatic hypothermia increases doublecortin expressing neurons in the dentate gyrus after traumatic brain injury in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Bregy, Amade; Nixon, Ryan; Lotocki, George; Alonso, Ofelia F.; Atkins, Coleen M.; Tsoulfas, Pantelis; Bramlett, Helen M.; Dietrich, W. Dalton

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that moderate hypothermia reduces histopathological damage and improves behavioral outcome after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI). Further investigations have clarified the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of hypothermia by showing that cooling reduces multiple cell injury cascades. The purpose of this study was to determine whether hypothermia could also enhance endogenous reparative processes following TBI such as neurogenesis and the replacement of lost neurons. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent moderate fluid-percussion brain injury and then were randomized into normothermia (37°C) or hypothermia (33°C) treatment. Animals received injections of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to detect mitotic cells after brain injury. After 3 or 7 days, animals were perfusion-fixed and processed for immunocytochemistry and confocal analysis. Sections were stained for markers selective for cell proliferation (BrdU), neuroblasts and immature neurons (doublecortin), and mature neurons (NeuN) and then analyzed using non-biased stereology to quantify neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG). At 7 days after TBI, both normothermic and hypothermic TBI animals demonstrated a significant increase in the number of BrdU-immunoreactive cells in the DG as compared to sham-operated controls. At 7 days post-injury, hypothermia animals had a greater number of BrdU (ipsilateral cortex) and doublecortin (ipsilateral and contralateral cortex) immunoreactive cells in the DG as compared to normothermia animals. Because adult neurogenesis following injury may be associated with enhanced functional recovery, these data demonstrate that therapeutic hypothermia sustains the increase in neurogenesis induced by TBI and this may one of the mechanisms by which hypothermia promotes reparative strategies in the injured nervous system. PMID:22197046

  20. Induced hypothermia for trauma-related ARDS

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Gagandeep; Gopal, Palepu B.; Kamat, Akshata S.; Mulavisala, K.P.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of 27-year-old male with lung contusions related acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) managed by ARDSNet guidelines and additional hypothermia. On 4th day, post trauma partial pressure of oxygen dropped to 38 mm of mercury (Hg), not improving even on high positive end-expiratory pressure of 18 cm water (H2O), inverse ratio ventilation and fraction of inspired oxygen of 1. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was ruled out due to the risk of hemorrhage from trauma sites. Thereafter, hypothermia along with muscle paralysis was considered to reduce total body oxygen consumption. Patient's condition improved under hypothermia, and he was extubated and taken up for fracture fixation surgeries and discharged later in stable condition. PMID:26195862

  1. Hypothermia: A Cold Weather Hazard

    MedlinePlus

    ... Weather Hazard Heath and Aging Hypothermia: A Cold Weather Hazard What Are The Signs Of Hypothermia? Taking ... cold air. But, not everyone knows that cold weather can also lower the temperature inside your body. ...

  2. Rescue hypothermia for refractory hypercapnia.

    PubMed

    Pietrini, Domenico; Pennisi, Mariano; Vitale, Francesca; Pulitanò, Silvia Maria; Conti, Giorgio; Mancino, Aldo; Piastra, Marco; De Luca, Daniele

    2012-12-01

    Hypothermia may reduce the CO(2) production by decreasing the metabolism of the cooled tissue. We describe the first clinical use of hypothermia to lower hypercarbia in a case of bronchiolitis related respiratory failure unresponsive to maximal respiratory support. In this case, hypothermia allowed sparing the use of extracorporeal life support. Conclusion Hypothermia might be useful for severe acute respiratory failure unresponsive to aggressive respiratory support. PMID:22692802

  3. Hypothermia as a clinical neuroprotectant.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Andrew L; Wang, Michael Y

    2014-08-01

    Applying therapeutic hypothermia (TH) for the purposes of neuroprotection, originally termed "hibernation," started nearly 100 years ago. Because TH cooling systems have improved to the point where it is practical and safe for general application, interest in providing such treatment in conditions such as spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, stroke, and cardiac arrest has increased. This article reviews the mechanisms by which TH mitigates secondary neurologic injury, the clinical scenarios where TH is being applied, and reviews selected published studies using TH for central nervous system neuroprotection. PMID:25064786

  4. Mild hypothermia attenuates post-resuscitation brain injury through a V-ATPase mechanism in a rat model of cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J C; Lu, W; Xie, X M; Pan, H; Wu, Z Q; Yang, G T

    2016-01-01

    Although therapeutic hypothermia is an effective treatment for post-resuscitation brain injury after cardiac arrest (CA), the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) plays a key role in cellular adaption to a hypoxic environment. This study sought to evaluate the effect of mild hypothermia on V-ATPase and its involvement in neuroprotection after CA. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a 6-min CA, resuscitated successfully, and then assigned to either the normothermia (NT) group or the hypothermia (HT) group. Rats were further divided into 2 subgroups based on the time of euthanasia, either 3 or 24 h after CA (NT-3 h, HT-3 h; NT-24 h, HT-24 h). Mild hypothermia was induced following CA and maintained at 33°C for 2 h. Neurologic deficit scores were used to determine the status of neurological function. Brain specimens were analyzed by TUNEL assay, western blotting, and immunohistochemistry. V-ATPase activity was estimated by subtracting total ATP hydrolysis from the bafilomycin-sensitive activity. Mild hypothermia improved the neurological outcome (HT-24 h: 34.3 ± 16.4 vs NT-24 h: 50.3 ± 17.4) and significantly decreased neurocyte apoptosis 24 h after resuscitation. Mild hypothermia significantly increased V0a1 compared to NT-3 h; V0a1 expression was associated with a decrease in the cleaved caspase 3 expression. These findings suggested that mild hypothermia inhibits CA-induced apoptosis in the hippocampus, which may be associated with reduced V-ATPase impairment. These data provide new insights into the protective effects of hypothermia in vivo. PMID:27323115

  5. When, where and how to initiate hypothermia after adult cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Taccone, F S; Donadello, K; Beumier, M; Scolletta, S

    2011-09-01

    Therapeutich hypothermia (TH) has been shown to improve neurological outcome and survival after witnessed cardiac arrest (CA) that is due to ventricular fibrillation. Although TH is widely used following witnessed CA as well as all forms of initial rhythm, the mortality rate after CA remains unacceptably high, and additional study is needed to understand when and how to implement hypothermia in the post-resuscitation phase. Experimental studies have emphasized the importance of initiating cooling soon after the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) or even during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Clinical studies have shown that pre-hospital induction of hypothermia is feasible and has no major adverse events-even when used intra-arrest-and may provide some additional benefits compared to delayed in-hospital cooling. Thus, hypothermia use should not be limited to the Intensive Care Unit but can be initiated in the field/ambulance or in the Emergency Department, then continued after hospital admission- even during specific procedures such as coronary angiography-as part of the global management of CA patients. Various methods (both non-invasive and invasive) are available to achieve and maintain the target temperature; however, only some of these methods-which include cold fluids, ice packs, iced pads and helmet and trans-nasal cooling- are easily deployed in the pre-hospital setting. PMID:21878875

  6. Therapeutic Hypothermia for Neonatal Hypoxic–Ischemic Encephalopathy – Where to from Here?

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Joanne O.; Wassink, Guido; van den Heuij, Lotte G.; Bennet, Laura; Gunn, Alistair J.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia–ischemia before or around the time of birth occurs in approximately 2/1000 live births and is associated with a high risk of death or lifelong disability. Therapeutic hypothermia is now well established as standard treatment for infants with moderate to severe hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy but is only partially effective. There is compelling preclinical and clinical evidence that hypothermia is most protective when it is started as early as possible after hypoxia–ischemia. Further improvements in outcome from therapeutic hypothermia are very likely to arise from strategies to reduce the delay before starting treatment of affected infants. In this review, we examine evidence that current protocols are reasonably close to the optimal depth and duration of cooling, but that the optimal rate of rewarming after hypothermia is unclear. The potential for combination treatments to augment hypothermic neuroprotection has considerable promise, particularly with endogenous targets such as melatonin and erythropoietin, and noble gases such as xenon. We dissect the critical importance of preclinical studies using realistic delays in treatment and clinically relevant cooling protocols when examining combination treatment, and that for many strategies overlapping mechanisms of action can substantially attenuate any effects. PMID:26441818

  7. Melatonin Improves Outcomes of Heatstroke in Mice by Reducing Brain Inflammation and Oxidative Damage and Multiple Organ Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Shu-Fen; Lin, Mao-Tsun

    2013-01-01

    We report here that when untreated mice underwent heat stress, they displayed thermoregulatory deficit (e.g., animals display hypothermia during room temperature exposure), brain (or hypothalamic) inflammation, ischemia, oxidative damage, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis impairment (e.g., decreased plasma levels of both adrenocorticotrophic hormone and corticosterone during heat stress), multiple organ dysfunction or failure, and lethality. Melatonin therapy significantly reduced the thermoregulatory deficit, brain inflammation, ischemia, oxidative damage, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis impairment, multiple organ dysfunction, and lethality caused by heat stroke. Our data indicate that melatonin may improve outcomes of heat stroke by reducing brain inflammation, oxidative damage, and multiple organ dysfunction. PMID:24369441

  8. Orthogeriatric care: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tarazona-Santabalbina, Francisco José; Belenguer-Varea, Ángel; Rovira, Eduardo; Cuesta-Peredó, David

    2016-01-01

    Hip fractures are a very serious socio-economic problem in western countries. Since the 1950s, orthogeriatric units have introduced improvements in the care of geriatric patients admitted to hospital because of hip fractures. During this period, these units have reduced mean hospital stays, number of complications, and both in-hospital mortality and mortality over the middle term after hospital discharge, along with improvements in the quality of care and a reduction in costs. Likewise, a recent clinical trial has reported greater functional gains among the affected patients. Studies in this field have identified the prognostic factors present upon admission or manifesting themselves during admission and that increase the risk of patient mortality or disability. In addition, improved care afforded by orthogeriatric units has proved to reduce costs. Nevertheless, a number of management issues remain to be clarified, such as the optimum anesthetic, analgesic, and thromboprophylactic protocols; the type of diagnostic and therapeutic approach best suited to patients with cognitive problems; or the efficiency of the programs used in convalescence units or in home rehabilitation care. Randomized clinical trials are needed to consolidate the evidence in this regard. PMID:27445466

  9. Effects of therapeutic hypothermia on the glial proteome and phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Heon; Seo, Minchul; Suk, Kyoungho

    2013-02-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is a useful intervention against brain injury in experimental models and patients, but its therapeutic applications are limited due to its ill-defined mode of action. Glia cells maintain homeostasis and protect the central nervous system from environmental change, but after brain injury, glia are activated and induce glial scar formation and secondary injury. On the other hand, therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to modulate glial hyperactivation under various brain injury conditions. We considered that knowledge of the effect of hypothermia on the molecular profiles of glia and on their phenotypes would improve our understanding of the neuroprotective mechanism of hypothermia. Here, we review the findings of recent studies that examined the effect of hypothermia on proteome changes in reactive glial cells in vitro and in vivo. The therapeutic effects of hypothermia are associated with the inhibition of reactive oxygen species generation, the maintenance of ion homeostasis, and the protection of neurovascular units in cultured glial cells. In an animal model, a distinct pattern of protein alterations was detected in glia following hypothermia under ischemic/reperfusion conditions. In particular, hypothermia was found to exert a neuroprotective effect against ischemic brain injury by regulating specific glial signaling pathways, such as, glutamate signaling, cell death, and stress response, and by influencing neural dysfunction, neurogenesis, neural plasticity, cell differentiation, and neurotrophic activity. Furthermore, the proteins that were differentially expressed belonged to various pathways and could mediate diverse phenotypic changes of glia in vitro or in vivo. Therefore, hypothermia-modulated glial proteins and subsequent phenotypic changes may form the basis of the therapeutic effects of hypothermia. PMID:23441897

  10. Pharmacologically induced hypothermia via TRPV1 channel agonism provides neuroprotection following ischemic stroke when initiated 90 min after reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhijuan; Balasubramanian, Adithya

    2013-01-01

    Traditional methods of therapeutic hypothermia show promise for neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R), however, with limitations. We examined effectiveness and specificity of pharmacological hypothermia (PH) by transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel agonism in the treatment of focal cerebral I/R. Core temperature (Tcore) was measured after subcutaneous infusion of TRPV1 agonist dihydrocapsaicin (DHC) in conscious C57BL/6 WT and TRPV1 knockout (KO) mice. Acute measurements of heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and cerebral perfusion were measured before and after DHC treatment. Focal cerebral I/R (1 h ischemia + 24 h reperfusion) was induced by distal middle cerebral artery occlusion. Hypothermia (>8 h) was initiated 90 min after start of reperfusion by DHC infusion (osmotic pump). Neurofunction (behavioral testing) and infarct volume (TTC staining) were measured at 24 h. DHC (1.25 mg/kg) produced a stable drop in Tcore (33°C) in naive and I/R mouse models but not in TRPV1 KO mice. DHC (1.25 mg/kg) had no measurable effect on HR and cerebral perfusion but produced a slight transient drop in MAP (<6 mmHg). In stroke mice, DHC infusion produced hypothermia, decreased infarct volume by 87%, and improved neurofunctional score. The hypothermic and neuroprotective effects of DHC were absent in TRPV1 KO mice or mice maintained normothermic with heat support. PH via TRPV1 agonist appears to be a well-tolerated and effective method for promoting mild hypothermia in the conscious mouse. Furthermore, TRPV1 agonism produces effective hypothermia in I/R mice and significantly improves outcome when initiated 90 min after start of reperfusion. PMID:24305062

  11. The “Neurovascular Unit approach” to Evaluate Mechanisms of Dysfunctional Autoregulation in Asphyxiated Newborns in the era of Hypothermia Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chalak, Lina F.; Tarumi, Takashi; Zhang, Rong

    2014-01-01

    Despite improvements in obstetrical and neonatal care, and introduction of hypothermia as a neuroprotective therapy, perinatal brain injury remains a frequent cause of cerebral palsy, mental retardation and epilepsy. The recognition of dysfunction of cerebral autoregulation is essential for a real time measure of efficacy to identify those who are at highest risk for brain injury. This article will focus on the “neurovascular unit” approach to the care of asphyxiated neonates to review 1) potential mechanisms of dysfunctional cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation, 2) optimal monitoring methodology such as NIRS (near infrared spectroscopy), and TCD (transcutaneous Doppler), and 3) clinical implications of monitoring in the neonatal intensive care setting in asphyxiated newborns undergoing hypothermia and rewarming. Critical knowledge of the functional regulation of the neurovascular unit may lead to improved ability to predict outcomes in real time during hypothermia, as well as differentiate nonresponders who might benefit from additional therapies. PMID:25062804

  12. A team approach to the prevention of unplanned postoperative hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Bitner, Jason; Hilde, Leana; Hall, Kenneth; Duvendack, Tammy

    2007-05-01

    Postoperative hypothermia (ie, a core temperature lower than 96.8 degrees F [36 degrees C]), is a problem frequently seen in surgical patients, especially those undergoing total joint replacement. Patients who experience hypothermia may have increased recovery times and postoperative complications. A team of clinical staff members and personnel from the performance improvement (PI) department of a hospital used a PI model to incorporate use of preoperative forced-air warming blankets that resulted in improved postoperative core temperatures. PMID:17499055

  13. Rapid induction of therapeutic hypothermia using convective-immersion surface cooling: Safety, efficacy and outcomes☆

    PubMed Central

    Howes, Daniel; Ohley, William; Dorian, Paul; Klock, Cathy; Freedman, Robert; Schock, Robert; Krizanac, Danica; Holzer, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has become an accepted part of post-resuscitation care. Efforts to shorten the time from return of spontaneous circulation to target temperature have led to the exploration of different cooling techniques. Convective-immersion uses a continuous shower of 2°C water to rapidly induce hypothermia. The primary purpose of this multi-center trial was to evaluate the feasibility and speed of convective-immersion cooling in the clinical environment. The secondary goal was to examine the impact of rapid hypothermia induction on patient outcome. 24 post-cardiac arrest patients from 3 centers were enrolled in the study; 22 agreed to participate until the 6-month evaluations were completed. The median rate of cooling was 3.0°C/h. Cooling times were shorter than reported in previous studies. The median time to cool the patients to target temperature (<34°C) was 37 min (range 14–81 min); and only 27 min in a subset of patients sedated with propofol. Survival was excellent, with 68% surviving to 6 months; 87% of survivors were living independently at 6 months. Conductive-immersion surface cooling using the ThermoSuit® System is a rapid, effective method of inducing therapeutic hypothermia. Although the study was not designed to demonstrate impact on outcomes, survival and neurologic function were superior to those previously reported, suggesting comparative studies should be undertaken. Shortening the delay from return of spontaneous circulation to hypothermic target temperature may significantly improve survival and neurologic outcome and warrants further study. PMID:20122778

  14. Rethinking Ovarian Cancer: Recommendations for Improving Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Sebastian; Coward, Jermaine I.; Bast Jr., Robert C.; Berchuck, Andy; Berek, Jonathan S.; Brenton, James D.; Coukos, George; Crum, Christopher C.; Drapkin, Ronny; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; Friedlander, Michael; Gabra, Hani; Kaye, Stan B.; Lord, Chris J.; Lengyel, Ernst; Levine, Douglas A.; McNeish, Iain A.; Menon, Usha; Mills, Gordon B.; Nephew, Kenneth P.; Oza, Amit M.; Sood, Anil K.; Stronach, Euan A.; Walczak, Henning; Bowtell, David D.; Balkwill, Frances R.

    2012-01-01

    There have been major advances in our understanding of the cellular and molecular biology of the human malignancies collectively referred to as ovarian cancer. At a recent Helene Harris Memorial Trust meeting, an international group of researchers considered actions that should be taken to improve the outcome for women with ovarian cancer. Nine major recommendations are outlined in this Perspective. PMID:21941283

  15. Staff Development for Improving Student Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asayesh, Gelareh

    1993-01-01

    Several educators highlight aspects of effective staff development programs that have resulted in improved student outcomes, agreeing that staff development is an important ingredient in the elusive formula of success. The article includes a list of eight examples of what experts say about staff development. (SM)

  16. Will Interventions Targeting Conscientiousness Improve Aging Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Tammy; Carstensen, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    The articles appearing in this special section discuss the role that conscientiousness may play in healthy aging. Growing evidence suggests that conscientious individuals live longer and healthier lives. However, the question remains whether this personality trait can be leveraged to improve long-term health outcomes. We argue that even though it…

  17. Paclitaxel improves outcome from traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Donna J.; Garwin, Gregory G.; Cline, Marcella M.; Richards, Todd L.; Yarnykh, Vasily; Mourad, Pierre D.; Ho, Rodney J.Y.; Minoshima, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacologic interventions for traumatic brain injury (TBI) hold promise to improve outcome. The purpose of this study was to determine if the microtubule stabilizing therapeutic paclitaxel used for more than 20 years in chemotherapy would improve outcome after TBI. We assessed neurological outcome in mice that received direct application of paclitaxel to brain injury from controlled cortical impact (CCI). Magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess injury-related morphological changes. Catwalk Gait analysis showed significant improvement in the paclitaxel group on a variety of parameters compared to the saline group. MRI analysis revealed that paclitaxel treatment resulted in significantly reduced edema volume at site-of-injury (11.92 ± 3.0 and 8.86 ± 2.2 mm3 for saline vs. paclitaxel respectively, as determined by T2-weighted analysis; p ≤ 0.05), and significantly increased myelin tissue preservation (9.45 ± 0.4 vs. 8.95 ± 0.3, p ≤ 0.05). Our findings indicate that paclitaxel treatment resulted in improvement of neurological outcome and MR imaging biomarkers of injury. These results could have a significant impact on therapeutic developments to treat traumatic brain injury. PMID:26086366

  18. Mild hypothermia causes differential, time-dependent changes in cytokine expression and gliosis following endothelin-1-induced transient focal cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Stroke is an important cause of morbidity and mortality and few therapies exist thus far. Mild hypothermia (33°C) is a promising neuroprotective strategy to improve outcome after ischemic stroke. However, its complete mechanism of action has not yet been fully elaborated. This study is the first to investigate whether this neuroprotection occurs through modulation of the neuroinflammatory response after stroke in a time-dependent manner. Methods The Endothelin-1 (Et-1) model was used to elicit a transient focal cerebral ischemia in male Wistar rats. In this model, the core and penumbra of the insult are represented by the striatum and the cortex respectively. We assessed the effects of 2 hours of hypothermia, started 20 minutes after Et-1 injection on neurological outcome and infarct volume. Furthermore, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine expression was determined using ELISA. Microgliosis and astrogliosis were investigated using CD-68 and GFAP staining respectively. All parameters were determined 8, 24, 72 hours and 1 week after the administration of Et-1. Results Et-1 infusion caused neurological deficit and a reproducible infarct size which increased up to 3 days after the insult. Both parameters were significantly reduced by hypothermia. The strongest reduction in infarct volume with hypothermia, at 3 days, corresponded with increased microglial activation. Reducing the brain temperature affected the stroke induced increase in interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor α in the striatum, 8 hours after its induction, but not at later time points. Transforming growth factor β increased as a function of time after the Et-1-induced insult and was not influenced by cooling. Hypothermia reduced astrogliosis at 1 and 3 days after stroke onset. Conclusions The beneficial effects of hypothermia after stroke on infarct volume and functional outcome coincide with a time-dependent modulation of the cytokine expression and gliosis. PMID:21627837

  19. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute ischemic stroke: ready to start large randomized trials?

    PubMed Central

    van der Worp, H Bart; Macleod, Malcolm R; Kollmar, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is a means of neuroprotection well established in the management of acute ischemic brain injuries such as anoxic encephalopathy after cardiac arrest and perinatal asphyxia. As such, it is the only neuroprotective strategy for which there is robust evidence for efficacy. Although there is overwhelming evidence from animal studies that cooling also improves outcome after focal cerebral ischemia, this has not been adequately tested in patients with acute ischemic stroke. There are still some uncertainties about crucial factors relating to the delivery of hypothermia, and the resolution of these would allow improvements in the design of phase III studies in these patients and improvements in the prospects for successful translation. In this study, we discuss critical issues relating first to the targets for therapy including the optimal depth and duration of cooling, second to practical issues including the methods of cooling and the management of shivering, and finally, of factors relating to the design of clinical trials. Consideration of these factors should inform the development of strategies to establish beyond doubt the place of hypothermia in the management of acute ischemic stroke. PMID:20354545

  20. A multidisciplinary approach for improving outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sierchio, Grace P

    2003-01-01

    The healthcare environment has been impacted tremendously by higher patient acuity, cost-cutting measures, an increase in litigation, and increased expectations by an educated generation of healthcare consumers. This has led to the need to continually measure, assess, and improve quality. These activities must consider not only patient clinical outcomes, but also customer service ratings and financial outcomes. Quality improvement requires a collaborative approach to succeed, and the need to build a cohesive and effective multidisciplinary team is critical for positive outcomes. Strategies to build a culture of teamwork include incorporating total quality management principles into every level of the organization, seeking participation from every discipline and level of the organization, and recognizing employees for their efforts. Infusion nurses have an excellent opportunity to contribute their expertise to any multidisciplinary team that impacts the outcomes of infusion patients. In addition, team-building and quality improvement may prove to be excellent career moves for infusion nurses looking to further specialize their practice. PMID:12544365

  1. Successful Use of Therapeutic Hypothermia in a Pregnant Patient.

    PubMed

    Oguayo, Kevin N; Oyetayo, Ola O; Stewart, David; Costa, Steven M; Jones, Richard O

    2015-08-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in the United States. Pregnant women are not immune to cardiac arrest, and the treatment of such patients can be difficult. Pregnancy is a relative contraindication to the use of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. A 20-year-old woman who was 18 weeks pregnant had an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Upon her arrival at the emergency department, she was resuscitated and her circulation returned spontaneously, but her score on the Glasgow Coma Scale was 3. After adequate family discussion of the risks and benefits of therapeutic hypothermia, a decision was made to initiate therapeutic hypothermia per established protocol for 24 hours. The patient was successfully cooled and rewarmed. By the time she was discharged, she had experienced complete neurologic recovery, apart from some short-term memory loss. Subsequently, at 40 weeks, she delivered vaginally a 7-lb 3-oz girl whose Apgar scores were 8 and 9, at 1 and 5 minutes respectively. To our knowledge, this is only the 3rd reported case of a successful outcome following the initiation of therapeutic hypothermia for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a pregnant woman. On the basis of this and previous reports of successful outcomes, we recommend that therapeutic hypothermia be considered an option in the management of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the pregnant population. To facilitate a successful outcome, a multidisciplinary approach involving cardiology, emergency medicine, obstetrics, and neurology should be used. PMID:26413021

  2. Therapeutic hypothermia achieves neuroprotection via a decrease in acetylcholine with a concurrent increase in carnitine in the neonatal hypoxia-ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Takenouchi, Toshiki; Sugiura, Yuki; Morikawa, Takayuki; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Nagahata, Yoshiko; Sugioka, Tadao; Honda, Kurara; Kubo, Akiko; Hishiki, Takako; Matsuura, Tomomi; Hoshino, Takao; Takahashi, Takao; Suematsu, Makoto; Kajimura, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    Although therapeutic hypothermia is known to improve neurologic outcomes after perinatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia, etiology remains unknown. To decipher the mechanisms whereby hypothermia regulates metabolic dynamics in different brain regions, we used a two-step approach: a metabolomics to target metabolic pathways responding to cooling, and a quantitative imaging mass spectrometry to reveal spatial alterations in targeted metabolites in the brain. Seven-day postnatal rats underwent the permanent ligation of the left common carotid artery followed by exposure to 8% O2 for 2.5 hours. The pups were returned to normoxic conditions at either 38°C or 30°C for 3 hours. The brain metabolic states were rapidly fixed using in situ freezing. The profiling of 107 metabolites showed that hypothermia diminishes the carbon biomass related to acetyl moieties, such as pyruvate and acetyl-CoA; conversely, it increases deacetylated metabolites, such as carnitine and choline. Quantitative imaging mass spectrometry demarcated that hypothermia diminishes the acetylcholine contents specifically in hippocampus and amygdala. Such decreases were associated with an inverse increase in carnitine in the same anatomic regions. These findings imply that hypothermia achieves its neuroprotective effects by mediating the cellular acetylation status through a coordinated suppression of acetyl-CoA, which resides in metabolic junctions of glycolysis, amino-acid catabolism, and ketolysis. PMID:25586144

  3. 13C NMR Metabolomic Evaluation of Immediate and Delayed Mild Hypothermia in Cerebrocortical Slices After Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Segal, Mark; Kelly, Mark J.S.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Kim, Myungwon; James, Thomas L.; Litt, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Background Mild brain hypothermia (32°C–34°C) after human neonatal asphyxia improves neurodevelopmental outcomes. Astrocytes but not neurons have pyruvate carboxylase (PC) and an acetate uptake transporter. 13C NMR spectroscopy of rodent brain extracts after administering [1-13C]glucose and [1,2-13C]acetate can distinguish metabolic differences between glia and neurons, and tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle) entry via pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) and PC. Methods Neonatal rat cerebrocortical slices receiving a 13C-acetate/glucose mixture underwent a 45-min asphyxia simulation via oxygen-glucose-deprivation (OGD) followed by 6 h of recovery. Protocols in three groups of N = 3 experiments were identical except for temperature management. The three temperature groups were: normothermia (37°C), hypothermia (32°C for 3.75 h beginning at OGD start), and delayed hypothermia (32°C for 3.75 h, beginning 15 min after OGD start). Multivariate analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance metabolite quantifications included principal component analyses and the L1-Penalized Regularized Regression algorithm known as the Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO). Results The most significant metabolite difference (p < 0.0056) was [2-13C]glutamine’s higher final/control ratio for the Hypothermia group (1.75 ± 0.12) compared to ratios for the Delayed (1.12 ± 0.12) and Normothermia group (0.94 ± 0.06), implying a higher PC/PDH ratio for glutamine formation. LASSO found the most important metabolites associated with adenosine triphosphate preservation: [3,4-13C]glutamate—produced via PDH entry, [2-13C]taurine--an important osmolyte, and phosphocreatine. Final principal component analyses scores plots suggested separate cluster formation for the hypothermia group, but with insufficient data for statistical significance. Conclusions Starting mild hypothermia simultaneously with OGD, compared with delayed starting or no hypothermia, has higher PC throughput

  4. Rethinking ovarian cancer: recommendations for improving outcomes.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Sebastian; Coward, Jermaine I; Bast, Robert C; Berchuck, Andy; Berek, Jonathan S; Brenton, James D; Coukos, George; Crum, Christopher C; Drapkin, Ronny; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; Friedlander, Michael; Gabra, Hani; Kaye, Stan B; Lord, Chris J; Lengyel, Ernst; Levine, Douglas A; McNeish, Iain A; Menon, Usha; Mills, Gordon B; Nephew, Kenneth P; Oza, Amit M; Sood, Anil K; Stronach, Euan A; Walczak, Henning; Bowtell, David D; Balkwill, Frances R

    2011-10-01

    There have been major advances in our understanding of the cellular and molecular biology of the human malignancies that are collectively referred to as ovarian cancer. At a recent Helene Harris Memorial Trust meeting, an international group of researchers considered actions that should be taken to improve the outcome for women with ovarian cancer. Nine major recommendations are outlined in this Opinion article. PMID:21941283

  5. Trading water to improve environmental flow outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Jeffery D.; Franklin, Brad; Loch, Adam; Kirby, Mac; Wheeler, Sarah Ann

    2013-07-01

    As consumptive extractions and water scarcity pressures brought about by climate change increase in many world river basins, so do the risks to water-dependent ecological assets. In response, public or not for profit environmental water holders (EWHs) have been established in many areas and bestowed with endowments of water and mandates to manage water for ecological outcomes. Water scarcity has also increasingly spawned water trade arrangements in many river basins, and in many instances, EWHs are now operating in water markets. A number of EWHs, especially in Australia, begin with an endowment of permanent water entitlements purchased from irrigators. Such water entitlements typically have relatively constant interannual supply profiles that often do not match ecological water demand involving flood pulses and periods of drying. This article develops a hydrologic-economic simulation model of the Murrumbidgee catchment within the Murray-Darling Basin to assess the scope of possibilities to improve environmental outcomes through EWH trading on an annual water lease market. We find that there are some modest opportunities for EWHs to improve environmental outcomes through water trade. The best opportunities occur in periods of drought and for ecological outcomes that benefit from moderately large floods. We also assess the extent to which EWH trading in annual water leases may create pecuniary externalities via bidding up or down the water lease prices faced by irrigators. Environmental water trading is found to have relatively small impacts on water market price outcomes. Overall our results suggest that the benefits of developing EWH trading may well justify the costs.

  6. Neuroprotective effect of therapeutic hypothermia versus standard care alone after convulsive status epilepticus: protocol of the multicentre randomised controlled trial HYBERNATUS.

    PubMed

    Legriel, Stephane; Pico, Fernando; Tran-Dinh, Yves-Roger; Lemiale, Virginie; Bedos, Jean-Pierre; Resche-Rigon, Matthieu; Cariou, Alain

    2016-12-01

    Convulsive status epilepticus (CSE) is a major medical emergency associated with a 50 % morbidity rate. CSE guidelines have recommended prompt management for many years, but there is no evidence to date that they have significantly improved practices or outcomes. Developing neuroprotective strategies for use after CSE holds promise for diminishing morbidity and mortality rates. Hypothermia has been shown to afford neuroprotection in various health conditions. We therefore designed a trial to determine whether 90-day outcomes in mechanically ventilated patients with CSE requiring management in the intensive care unit (ICU) are improved by early therapeutic hypothermia (32-34 °C) for 24 h with propofol sedation. We are conducting a multicentre, open-label, parallel-group, randomised, controlled trial (HYBERNATUS) of potential neuroprotective effects of therapeutic hypothermia and routine propofol sedation started within 8 h after CSE onset in ICU patients requiring mechanical ventilation. Included patients are allocated to receive therapeutic hypothermia (32-34 °C) plus standard care or standard care alone. We plan to enrol 270 patients in 11 ICUs. An interim analysis is scheduled after the inclusion of 135 patients. The main study objective is to evaluate the effectiveness of therapeutic hypothermia (32-34 °C) for 24 h in diminishing 90-day morbidity and mortality (defined as a Glasgow Outcome Scale score <5). The HYBERNATUS trial is expected to a decreased proportion of patients with a Glasgow Outcome Scale score lower than 5 after CSE requiring ICU admission and mechanical ventilation. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01359332 (registered on 23 May 2011). PMID:27325409

  7. The geography of hypothermia in the United States: An analysis of mortality, morbidity, thresholds, and messaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Jeremy M.

    is known concerning heat and cold mortality. A lack of health outcome or health information to develop website information/wind chill alerts was noted. Overall, it was determined that hypothermia is a good metric for assessing cold weather-related vulnerability and that implementing health outcome-based information will help limit the hazards associated with this public health problem.

  8. Does wound eversion improve cosmetic outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Kappel, Stefani; Kleinerman, Rebecca; King, Thomas H.; Sivamani, Raja; Taylor, Sandra; Nguyen, UyenThao; Eisen, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Wound edge eversion has been hypothesized to improve aesthetic outcomes after cutaneous wound closure. Data supporting this assertion are sparse. Objective We sought to determine if wound eversion, achieved with interrupted subcuticular sutures, improves aesthetic outcome compared with planar closures. Methods We undertook a prospective, randomized, split-scar intervention in patients who underwent cutaneous surgery. Half of the wound was randomized to an everted or planar repair; the other side received the opposite one. At 3- and 6-month follow-up, both the patient and 2 blinded observers evaluated the wound using the Patient Observer Self-Assessment Scale (POSAS). Results The total observer POSAS score for the everted (13.59, 12.26) and planar (12.91, 12.98) sides did not differ significantly at 3 or 6 months, respectively. Similarly, there was not a significant difference in patient assessment between the everted (16.23, 12.84) and planar (15.07, 12.79) sides at 3 or 6 months, respectively. Finally, there was no significant difference between the 2 closure methods in terms of scar height or width at follow-up. Limitations This was a single-center trial, which used a validated but still subjective scar assessment instrument. Conclusion Wound eversion was not significantly associated with improved overall scar assessments by blinded observers or patient assessment. PMID:25619206

  9. The effect of therapeutic hypothermia on the expression of inflammatory response genes following moderate traumatic brain injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Truettner, Jessie S; Suzuki, Takamoto; Dietrich, W Dalton

    2005-08-18

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) initiates a cascade of cellular and molecular responses including both pro- and anti-inflammatory. Although post-traumatic hypothermia has been shown to improve outcome in various models of brain injury, the underlying mechanisms responsible for these effects have not been clarified. In this study, inflammation cDNA arrays and semi-quantitative RT-PCR were used to detect genes that are differentially regulated after TBI. In addition, the effect of post-traumatic hypothermia on the expression of selective genes was also studied. Rats (n = 6-8 per group) underwent moderate fluid-percussion (F-P) brain injury with and without hypothermic treatment (33 degrees C/3 h). RNA from 3-h or 24-h survival was analyzed for the expression of IL1-beta, IL2, IL6, TGF-beta2, growth-regulated oncogene (GRO), migration inhibitory factor (MIF), and MCP (a transcription factor). The interleukins IL-1beta, IL-2, and IL-6 and TGF-beta and GRO were strongly upregulated early and transiently from 2- to 30-fold over sham at 3 h, with normalization by 24 h. In contrast, the expressions of MIF and MCP were both reduced by TBI compared to sham. Post-traumatic hypothermia had no significant effect on the acute expression of the majority of genes investigated. However, the expression of TGF-beta2 at 24 h was significantly reduced by temperature manipulation. The mechanism by which post-traumatic hypothermia is protective may not involve a general genetic response of the inflammatory genes. However, specific genes, including TGF-beta2, may be altered and effect cell death mechanisms after TBI. Hypothermia differentially regulates certain genes and may target more delayed responses underlying the secondary damage following TBI. PMID:15922484

  10. Environmental hypothermia in porcine polytrauma and hemorrhagic shock is safe.

    PubMed

    Iyegha, Uroghupatei P; Greenberg, Joseph J; Mulier, Kristine E; Chipman, Jeffrey; George, Mark; Beilman, Greg J

    2012-10-01

    We have previously demonstrated survival benefit to induced hypothermia in a porcine model of controlled hemorrhagic shock simulating an associated delay to definitive care. In the current study, we wished to evaluate the effects of environmental hypothermia in a porcine model of hemorrhagic shock with the addition of polytrauma. Sixteen pigs were randomized to normothermic (39°C, n = 7) or hypothermic (34°C, n = 9) groups. The model included instrumentation, chest injury (captive bolt device), hemorrhage to systolic blood pressure (SBP) of ∼50 mmHg, and crush liver injury. Animals received limited fluid resuscitation for a 1-h period with goal SBP of greater than 80 mmHg and ice packs or warming blankets to achieve goal temperatures, followed by full resuscitation with goal SBP of greater than 90 mmHg, adequate urine output, and hemoglobin by protocol for 20 h. Survivors were observed for an additional 24 h with end points including mortality, markers of organ injury, and neurologic function. There were no differences in survival between the groups (mortality = 1/9, hypothermia group vs. 2/7, normothermia group, P = 0.39). Markers of organ injury were elevated in the hypothermia group at 24 h after injury but were identical between groups at the end of the experimental protocol (48 h after injury). There were no noted differences in neurologic function between the two groups. Environmental hypothermia in a model of polytrauma and hemorrhagic shock was not associated with worse outcomes. PMID:22777118

  11. Pharmacological hypothermia: a potential for future stroke therapy?

    PubMed

    Liu, Kaiyin; Khan, Hajra; Geng, Xiaokun; Zhang, Jun; Ding, Yuchuan

    2016-06-01

    Mild physical hypothermia after stroke has been associated with positive outcomes. Despite the well-studied beneficial effects of hypothermia in the treatment of stroke, lack of precise temperature control, intolerance for the patient, and immunosuppression are some of the reasons which limit its clinical translation. Pharmacologically induced hypothermia has been explored as a possible treatment option following stroke in animal models. Currently, there are eight classes of pharmacological agents/agonists with hypothermic effects affecting a multitude of systems including cannabinoid, opioid, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), neurotensin, thyroxine derivatives, dopamine, gas, and adenosine derivatives. Interestingly, drugs in the TRPV1, neurotensin, and thyroxine families have been shown to have effects in thermoregulatory control in decreasing the compensatory hypothermic response during cooling. This review will briefly present drugs in the eight classes by summarizing their proposed mechanisms of action as well as side effects. Reported thermoregulatory effects of the drugs will also be presented. This review offers the opinion that these agents may be useful in combination therapies with physical hypothermia to achieve faster and more stable temperature control in hypothermia. PMID:27320243

  12. [Severe accidental hypothermia in an elderly woman].

    PubMed

    Knobel, B; Mikhlin, A

    2001-11-01

    Profound hypothermia (core temperature of less than 28 degrees C) is a life threatening state and a medical emergency associated with a high mortality rate. The prognosis depends on underlying diseases, advanced or very early age, the duration prior to treatment, the degree of hemodynamic deterioration, and especially, the methods of treatment, including active external or internal rewarming. This is a case study of an 80-year-old female patient with severe accidental hypothermia (core temperature 27 degrees C). She was found in her home lying immobile on the cold floor after a fall. The patient was in a profound coma with cardiocirculatory collapse, and the medical staff treating her was inclined to pronounce her deceased. On her arrival at the hospital, she was resuscitated, put on a respirator and actively warmed. Very severe metabolic disorders were found, including a marked metabolic acidosis composed of diabetic ketoacidosis (she had suffered from insulin treated type 2 diabetes mellitus) and lactic acidosis with a very high anion gap (42) and a hyperosmotic state (blood glucose 1202 mg/dl). There were pathognomonic electrocardiographic abnormalities, J-wave of Osborn and prolonged repolarization. Slow atrial fibrillation with a ventricular response of 30 bpm followed by a nodal rhythm of 12 bpm and reversible cardiac arrest were recorded. The pulse and blood pressure were unobtainable. Despite the successful resuscitation and hemodynamic and cognitive improvement, rhabdomyolysis (CKP 6580 u/L), renal failure and hepatic damage developed. She was extubated and treated with intravenous fluids containing dopamine, bicarbonate, insulin and antibiotics. Her medical condition gradually improved, and she was discharged clear minded, functioning very well and independent. Renal and liver tests returned eventually to normal limits. Progressive bradycardia, hypotension and death due to ventricular fibrillation or asystole commonly occur during severe hypothermia

  13. Method to improve cosmetic outcome following craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Sato, S; Sato, M; Nishizawa, M; Oizumi, T; Hiwatari, M; Kajiwara, T; Ishikawa, M; Inamasu, G; Kawase, T

    2001-06-01

    This technical note describes a simple method for reducing the dead space created by craniotome due to the loss of bone dust and improving the cosmetic outcome following a craniotomy. After drilling the burr holes for the craniotomy, the bone between the holes is drilled away in a standard fashion except that multiple regions of about 1 cm in length are left intact. These intact regions are broken using a periosteal elevator and fixed like a bridge when the bone is replaced. The resulting bone flap is readily returned to its original position without making the dead space created by regular craniotomy. The amount of the dead space caused by losing the bone dust is reduced and a good cosmetic recovery is obtained. This technique is useful for both craniotomy and facial bone surgery, which requires cosmetic results. PMID:11428512

  14. Improving outcome in severe trauma: trauma systems and initial management: intubation, ventilation and resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Harris, Tim; Davenport, Ross; Hurst, Tom; Jones, Jonathan

    2012-10-01

    Severe trauma is an increasing global problem mainly affecting fit and healthy younger adults. Improvements in the entire pathway of trauma care have led to improvements in outcome. Development of a regional trauma system based around a trauma centre is associated with a 15-50% reduction in mortality. Trauma teams led by senior doctors provide better care. Although intuitively advantageous, the involvement of doctors in the pre-hospital care of trauma patients currently lacks clear evidence of benefit. Poor airway management is consistently identified as a cause of avoidable morbidity and mortality. Rapid sequence induction/intubation is frequently indicated but the ideal drugs have yet to be identified. The benefits of cricoid pressure are not clear cut. Dogmas in the management of pneumothoraces have been challenged: chest x-ray has a role in the diagnosis of tension pneumothoraces, needle aspiration may be ineffective, and small pneumothoraces can be managed conservatively. Identification of significant haemorrhage can be difficult and specific early resuscitation goals are not easily definable. A hypotensive approach may limit further bleeding but could worsen significant brain injury. The ideal initial resuscitation fluid remains controversial. In appropriately selected patients early aggressive blood product resuscitation is beneficial. Hypothermia can exacerbate bleeding and the benefit in traumatic brain injury is not adequately studied for firm recommendations. PMID:23014941

  15. Halting Hypothermia: Cold Can Be Dangerous

    MedlinePlus

    ... who spends much time outdoors in very cold weather can get hypothermia. But hypothermia can happen anywhere— ... just outside and not just in bitter winter weather. It can strike when temperatures are cool—for ...

  16. Hypothermia followed by rapid rewarming exacerbates ischemia-induced brain injury and augments inflammatory response in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu-Zhen; Gu, Yong; Wu, Zhou; Hu, Ya-Fang; Pan, Su-Yue

    2016-05-20

    Hypothermia followed by slow rewarming is neuroprotective for ischemic stroke. However, slow rewarming causes patients' longer stay in intensive care unit and increases the risk of hypothermic complications. Hypothermia followed by rapid rewarming (HTRR) is more convenient; but it exacerbates intracranial hypertension for patients with massive hemispheric infarcts. The present study aims to investigate in detail how HTRR exacerbates ischemic brain injury and what are underlying mechanisms. Rats subjected to transient focal ischemia by middle cerebral artery occlusion were treated with normothermia or hypothermia followed by rapid rewarming. Neurological outcome, neuronal injury, blood-brain barrier integrity and expressions of inflammatory cytokines were observed. Results showed that HTRR at a rate of 3 °C/20 min increased both neurological deficit score and Longa score, enhanced the loss of neurons and the plasma level of neuron-specific enolase. Rapid rewarmed rats also displayed increased Evans blue dye extravasation, matrix metalloproteinase 9 level and tight junction impairment. Meanwhile, interleukin-1β, -6, tumor necrosis factor α and cyclooxygenase-2 were markedly elevated in rapid rewarmed rats. Anti-inflammatory agent minocycline suppressed HTRR-induced elevation of inflammatory cytokines and improved neurological outcome. These results indicated that HTRR significantly impaired neurovascular unit and augmented proinflammatory response in stroke. PMID:27107700

  17. Can Probiotics Improve Your Surgical Outcomes?

    PubMed

    Ward, Tina; Nichols, Misty; Nutter, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Despite ongoing advances in medical technology, postoperative infections and infectious complications continue to be a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Surgical trauma and prophylactic antibiotics disrupt the balance of the intestinal microbiota and barrier function of the gut, potentiating an enhanced inflammatory response and further immune system depression. With the increasing costs of health care and emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria, alternative approaches must be explored. Many clinical studies have demonstrated that the use of probiotics, prebiotics, or a combination of both (synbiotics) as a part of innovative strategies can improve outcomes of elective abdominal and gastrointestinal surgical procedures. It has been demonstrated that probiotics play a role in gut barrier improvement and immunomodulation. However, it is evident that additional research is needed including larger, multicenter, randomized controlled trials to validate the safety and efficacy of their use in surgical patients. The purpose of this article is to discuss background of probiotic use in abdominal/gastrointestinal surgery, risk and benefits, clinical relevance for health care providers, and further implications for research. PMID:27254237

  18. Improving Outcomes for Pulmonary Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Ivan M.; Blaisdell, Carol J.; Abman, Steven H.

    2012-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of improving lung health through lung disease research, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) convened a workshop of multidisciplinary experts for the following purpose: (1) to review the current scientific knowledge underlying the basis for treatment of adults and children with pulmonary vascular diseases (PVDs); (2) to identify gaps, barriers, and emerging scientific opportunities in translational PVD research and the means to capitalize on these opportunities; (3) to prioritize new research directions that would be expected to affect the clinical course of PVDs; and (4) to make recommendations to the NHLBI on how to fill identified gaps in adult and pediatric PVD clinical research. Workshop participants reviewed experiences from previous PVD clinical trials and ongoing clinical research networks with other lung disorders, including acute respiratory distress syndrome, chronic obstructive lung disease, and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, as well. Bioinformatics experts discussed strategies for applying cutting-edge health information technology to clinical studies. Participants in the workshop considered approaches in the following broad concept areas: (1) improved phenotyping to identify potential subjects for appropriate PVD clinical studies; (2) identification of potential new end points for assessing key outcomes and developing better-designed PVD clinical trials; and (3) the establishment of priorities for specific clinical research needed to advance care of patients with various subsets of PVDs from childhood through adulthood. This report provides a summary of the objectives and recommendations to the NHLBI concentrating on clinical research efforts that are needed to better diagnose and treat PVDs. PMID:22335936

  19. Inadvertent Perianesthetic Hypothermia in Small Animal Patients.

    PubMed

    Clark-Price, Stuart

    2015-09-01

    Inadvertent perianesthetic hypothermia is one of the most common complications in anesthesia of dogs and cats. Hypothermia during anesthesia can lead to altered pharmacokinetics of anesthetic and analgesic drugs, dysfunction of organ systems, increased patient susceptibility to infection, reduced wound healing, altered coagulation, hypotension, and delayed recovery. An understanding of the pathophysiology, complications, and techniques to minimize hypothermia during anesthesia can help veterinarians optimize care of patients. This article provides an overview of inadvertent perianesthetic hypothermia. PMID:26014270

  20. Improving Alcohol Withdrawal Outcomes in Acute Care

    PubMed Central

    Melson, Jo; Kane, Michelle; Mooney, Ruth; McWilliams, James; Horton, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Context Excessive alcohol consumption is the nation’s third leading cause of preventable deaths. If untreated, 6% of alcohol-dependent patients experience alcohol withdrawal, with up to 10% of those experiencing delirium tremens (DT), when they stop drinking. Without routine screening, patients often experience DT without warning. Objective: Reduce the incidence of alcohol withdrawal advancing to DT, restraint use, and transfers to the intensive care unit (ICU) in patients with DT. Design: In October 2009, the alcohol withdrawal team instituted a care management guideline used by all disciplines, which included tools for screening, assessment, and symptom management. Data were obtained from existing datasets for three quarters before and four quarters after implementation. Follow-up data were analyzed and showed a great deal of variability in transfers to the ICU and restraint use. Percentage of patients who developed DT showed a downward trend. Main Outcome Measures: Incidence of alcohol withdrawal advancing to DT and, in patients with DT, restraint use and transfers to the ICU. Results: Initial data revealed a decrease in percentage of patients with alcohol withdrawal who experienced DT (16.4%–12.9%). In patients with DT, restraint use decreased (60.4%–44.4%) and transfers to the ICU decreased (21.6%–15%). Follow-up data indicated a continued downward trend in patients with DT. Changes were not statistically significant. Restraint use and ICU transfers maintained postimplementation levels initially but returned to preimplementation levels by third quarter 2012. Conclusion: Early identification of patients for potential alcohol withdrawal followed by a standardized treatment protocol using symptom-triggered dosing improved alcohol withdrawal management and outcomes. PMID:24867561

  1. Therapeutic hypothermia and targeted temperature management in traumatic brain injury: Clinical challenges for successful translation.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, W Dalton; Bramlett, Helen M

    2016-06-01

    The use of therapeutic hypothermia (TH) and targeted temperature management (TTM) for severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been tested in a variety of preclinical and clinical situations. Early preclinical studies showed that mild reductions in brain temperature after moderate to severe TBI improved histopathological outcomes and reduced neurological deficits. Investigative studies have also reported that reductions in post-traumatic temperature attenuated multiple secondary injury mechanisms including excitotoxicity, free radical generation, apoptotic cell death, and inflammation. In addition, while elevations in post-traumatic temperature heightened secondary injury mechanisms, the successful implementation of TTM strategies in injured patients to reduce fever burden appear to be beneficial. While TH has been successfully tested in a number of single institutional clinical TBI studies, larger randomized multicenter trials have failed to demonstrate the benefits of therapeutic hypothermia. The use of TH and TTM for treating TBI continues to evolve and a number of factors including patient selection and the timing of the TH appear to be critical in successful trial design. Based on available data, it is apparent that TH and TTM strategies for treating severely injured patients is an important therapeutic consideration that requires more basic and clinical research. Current research involves the evaluation of alternative cooling strategies including pharmacologically-induced hypothermia and the combination of TH or TTM approaches with more selective neuroprotective or reparative treatments. This manuscript summarizes the preclinical and clinical literature emphasizing the importance of brain temperature in modifying secondary injury mechanisms and in improving traumatic outcomes in severely injured patients. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:Brain injury and recovery. PMID:26746342

  2. Using AMLO to Improve the Quality of Teacher Education Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Shammari, Zaid

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to find ways to improve learning outcomes in teacher education courses by using an Analysis Model for Learning Outcomes (AMLO). It addresses the improvement of the quality of teacher education by analyzing learning outcomes and implementing curriculum modifications related to specific learning objectives and their effects on…

  3. Safety and efficacy of topiramate in neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy treated with hypothermia (NeoNATI)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite progresses in neonatal care, the mortality and the incidence of neuro-motor disability after perinatal asphyxia have failed to show substantial improvements. In countries with a high level of perinatal care, the incidence of asphyxia responsible for moderate or severe encephalopathy is still 2–3 per 1000 term newborns. Recent trials have demonstrated that moderate hypothermia, started within 6 hours after birth and protracted for 72 hours, can significantly improve survival and reduce neurologic impairment in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. It is not currently known whether neuroprotective drugs can further improve the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Topiramate has been proven to reduce brain injury in animal models of neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. However, the association of mild hypothermia and topiramate treatment has never been studied in human newborns. The objective of this research project is to evaluate, through a multicenter randomized controlled trial, whether the efficacy of moderate hypothermia can be increased by concomitant topiramate treatment. Methods/Design Term newborns (gestational age ≥ 36 weeks and birth weight ≥ 1800 g) with precocious metabolic, clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG) signs of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy will be randomized, according to their EEG pattern, to receive topiramate added to standard treatment with moderate hypothermia or standard treatment alone. Topiramate will be administered at 10 mg/kg once a day for the first 3 days of life. Topiramate concentrations will be measured on serial dried blood spots. 64 participants will be recruited in the study. To evaluate the safety of topiramate administration, cardiac and respiratory parameters will be continuously monitored. Blood samplings will be performed to check renal, liver and metabolic balance. To evaluate the efficacy of topiramate, the neurologic outcome of enrolled newborns will be evaluated by serial

  4. Do microfractures improve high tibial osteotomy outcome?

    PubMed

    Pascale, Walter; Luraghi, Simone; Perico, Laura; Pascale, Valerio

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if microfractures improve the outcome of high tibial osteotomy in patients with medial compartmental osteoarthritis in genu varum. Forty patients presenting with Outerbridge grade III and IV chondropathies on the femoral and/or the tibial joint surface underwent high tibial osteotomy with Puddu plates (Arthrex, Inc, Naples, Florida) for primary medial compartment osteoarthritis in genu varum at our institution. Patients were randomly assigned to either the high tibial osteotomy plus microfractures group (A; n=20) or the high tibial osteotomy alone group (B; n=20). Final assessment was conducted 5 years postoperatively, including clinical response measured by the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), Lysholm score, and patient satisfaction score. All patients were blinded to the treatment received and followed the same rehabilitation protocol. A statistically significant improvement between pre- and postoperative values was observed for Lysholm and IKDC scores in both groups, without any statistically significant difference between them. Regarding the satisfaction score, there were no differences between the 2 groups in terms of preoperative self-assessment (P>.05), whereas postoperative subjective satisfaction at 5-year follow-up was significantly higher in group A than in group B (P=.0036).Our study results provide further evidence that medial tibial osteotomy is an effective surgical option for treating a varus knee associated with medial degenerative arthritis in patients wishing to continue accustomed levels of physical activity. In particular, patient satisfaction was higher among those who underwent the combined treatment involving high tibial osteotomy to correct femorotibial angle and microfractures. PMID:21717984

  5. Improving maternal nutrition for better pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Nnam, N M

    2015-11-01

    Much has been learned during the past several decades about the role of maternal nutrition in the outcome of pregnancy. While the bulk of the data is derived from animal models, human observations are gradually accumulating. There is need to improve maternal nutrition because of the high neonatal mortality rate especially in developing countries. The author used a conceptual framework which took both primary and secondary factors into account when interpreting study findings. Nutrition plays a vital role in reducing some of the health risks associated with pregnancy such as risk of fetal and infant mortality, intra-uterine growth retardation, low birth weight and premature births, decreased birth defects, cretinism, poor brain development and risk of infection. Adequate nutrition is essential for a woman throughout her life cycle to ensure proper development and prepare the reproductive life of the woman. Pregnant women require varied diets and increased nutrient intake to cope with the extra needs during pregnancy. Use of dietary supplements and fortified foods should be encouraged for pregnant women to ensure adequate supply of nutrients for both mother and foetus. The author concludes that nutrition education should be a core component of Mother and Child Health Clinics and every opportunity should be utilised to give nutrition education on appropriate diets for pregnant women. PMID:26264457

  6. Motivational tools to improve probationer treatment outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Taxman, Faye S.; Walters, Scott T.; Sloas, Lincoln B.; Lerch, Jennifer; Rodriguez, Mayra

    2015-01-01

    Background Motivational interviewing (MI) is a promising practice to increase motivation, treatment retention, and reducing recidivism among offender populations. Computer-delivered interventions have grown in popularity as a way to change behaviors associated with drug and alcohol use. Methods/Design Motivational Assistance Program to Initiate Treatment (MAPIT) is a three arm, multisite, randomized controlled trial, which examines the impact of Motivational Interviewing (MI), a Motivational Computer Program (MC), and Supervision as Usual (SAU) on addiction treatment initiation, engagement, and retention. Secondary outcomes include drug/alcohol use, probation progress, recidivism (i.e., criminal behavior) and HIV/AIDS testing and treatment among probationers. Participant characteristics are measured at baseline, 2, and 6 months after assignment. The entire study will include 600 offenders, with each site recruiting 300 offenders (Baltimore City, Maryland and Dallas, Texas). All participants will go through standard intake procedures for probation and participate in probation requirements as usual. After standard intake, participants will be recruited and screened for eligibility. Discussion The results of this clinical trial will fill a gap in knowledge about ways to motivate probationers to participate in addiction treatment and HIV care. This randomized clinical trial is innovative in the way it examines the use of in-person vs. technological approaches to improve probationer success. Trial Registration NCT01891656 PMID:26009023

  7. Hypothermia-related deaths--Wisconsin, 2014, and United States, 2003-2013.

    PubMed

    Meiman, Jon; Anderson, Henry; Tomasallo, Carrie

    2015-02-20

    Hypothermia is defined as a core body temperature of <95°F (<35°C) and is caused by environmental exposure, drug intoxication, or metabolic or nervous system dysfunction. Exposure to cold is a leading cause of weather-related mortality and is responsible for approximately twice the number of deaths annually as exposure to heat in the United States. To understand the risk factors for hypothermia-related death and improve prevention efforts, during January 1-April 30, 2014, a period of record low temperatures, the Wisconsin Division of Public Health began active surveillance for hypothermia. Suspected hypothermia-related deaths were reported by coroners or medical examiners and identified in death records. Hypothermia was confirmed as the cause of death by review of death investigation narratives. This report describes three selected cases of hypothermia-related deaths in Wisconsin and summarizes characteristics of all cases that occurred in the state during the period of active surveillance. A summary of hypothermia-related deaths for the United States during 2003-2013 also is presented for comparison and to assess national mortality trends. Hypothermia continues to be an important cause of weather-related death. Key risk factors include drug intoxication, mental illness, and social isolation. State and local health agencies might need to focus outreach on vulnerable populations and target interventions for groups at highest risk for death. PMID:25695318

  8. Hypothermia as a cause of coagulopathy during hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Lau, Albert Wai-Cheung; Chen, Chia-Chen; Wu, Rick Sai-Chuen; Poon, Kin-Shing

    2010-06-01

    We report a 27-year-old hemostatically competent female scheduled for partial hepatectomy. During the operation, she experienced an accidental inferior vena cava tear and suffered acute blood loss. After fluid resuscitation and blood transfusion, she developed hypothermia, with a temperature of 33.8 degrees C, and severe coagulopathy with activated clotting time exceeding 1500 seconds measured using the Hemochron Response system (ITC, Edison, NJ, USA). Despite sufficient blood transfusion and correction of her electrolyte imbalance, the poor hemostasis persisted. After per-forming peritoneal lavage with warm saline, her condition dramatically improved and her hypothermia and severe coagulopathy were reversed. PMID:20643371

  9. A recommended early goal-directed management guideline for the prevention of hypothermia-related transfusion, morbidity, and mortality in severely injured trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Ryan; Callum, Jeannie; Laflamme, Claude; Tien, Homer; Nascimento, Barto; Beckett, Andrew; Alam, Asim

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia is present in up to two-thirds of patients with severe injury, although it is often disregarded during the initial resuscitation. Studies have revealed that hypothermia is associated with mortality in a large percentage of trauma cases when the patient's temperature is below 32 °C. Risk factors include the severity of injury, wet clothing, low transport unit temperature, use of anesthesia, and prolonged surgery. Fortunately, associated coagulation disorders have been shown to completely resolve with aggressive warming. Selected passive and active warming techniques can be applied in damage control resuscitation. While treatment guidelines exist for acidosis and bleeding, there is no evidence-based approach to managing hypothermia in trauma patients. We synthesized a goal-directed algorithm for warming the severely injured patient that can be directly incorporated into current Advanced Trauma Life Support guidelines. This involves the early use of warming blankets and removal of wet clothing in the prehospital phase followed by aggressive rewarming on arrival at the hospital if the patient's injuries require damage control therapy. Future research in hypothermia management should concentrate on applying this treatment algorithm and should evaluate its influence on patient outcomes. This treatment strategy may help to reduce blood loss and improve morbidity and mortality in this population of patients. PMID:27095272

  10. Therapeutic hypothermia protects against ischemia-induced impairment of synaptic plasticity following juvenile cardiac arrest in sex-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Dietz, R M; Deng, G; Orfila, J E; Hui, X; Traystman, R J; Herson, P S

    2016-06-14

    Pediatric cardiac arrest (CA) often leads to poor neurologic outcomes, including deficits in learning and memory. The only approved treatment for CA is therapeutic hypothermia, although its utility in the pediatric population remains unclear. This study analyzed the effect of mild therapeutic hypothermia after CA in juvenile mice on hippocampal neuronal injury and the cellular model of learning and memory, termed long-term potentiation (LTP). Juvenile mice were subjected to cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CA/CPR) followed by normothermia (37°C) and hypothermia (30°C, 32°C). Histological injury of hippocampal CA1 neurons was performed 3days after resuscitation using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Field excitatory post-synaptic potentials (fEPSPs) were recorded from acute hippocampal slices 7days after CA/CPR to determine LTP. Synaptic function was impaired 7days after CA/CPR. Mice exposed to hypothermia showed equivalent neuroprotection, but exhibited sexually dimorphic protection against ischemia-induced impairment of LTP. Hypothermia (32°C) protects synaptic plasticity more effectively in females, with males requiring a deeper level of hypothermia (30°C) for equivalent protection. In conclusion, male and female juvenile mice exhibit equivalent neuronal injury following CA/CPR and hypothermia protects both males and females. We made the surprising finding that juvenile mice have a sexually dimorphic response to mild therapeutic hypothermia protection of synaptic function, where males may need a deeper level of hypothermia for equivalent synaptic protection. PMID:27033251

  11. Improving Outcomes for Workers with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fornes, Sandra; Rocco, Tonette S.; Rosenberg, Howard

    2008-01-01

    This research presents an analysis of factors predicting job retention, job satisfaction, and job performance of workers with mental retardation. The findings highlight self-determination as a critical skill in predicting the three important employee outcomes. The study examined a hypothesized job retention model and the outcome of the three…

  12. Does Cooperative Learning Improve Student Learning Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamarik, Steven

    2007-01-01

    What is the effect of small-group learning on student learning outcomes in economic instruction? In spring 2002 and fall 2004, the author applied cooperative learning to one section of intermediate macroeconomics and taught another section using a traditional lecture format. He identified and then tracked measures of student learning outcomes.…

  13. Functional dysphonia: strategies to improve patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Behlau, Mara; Madazio, Glaucya; Oliveira, Gisele

    2015-01-01

    Functional dysphonia (FD) refers to a voice problem in the absence of a physical condition. It is a multifaceted voice disorder. There is no consensus with regard to its definition and inclusion criteria for diagnosis. FD has many predisposing and precipitating factors, which may include genetic susceptibility, psychological traits, and the vocal behavior itself. The assessment of voice disorders should be multidimensional. In addition to the clinical examination, auditory-perceptual, acoustic, and self-assessment analyses are very important. Self-assessment was introduced in the field of voice 25 years ago and has produced a major impact in the clinical and scientific scenario. The choice of treatment for FD is vocal rehabilitation by means of direct therapy; however, compliance has been an issue, except for cases of functional aphonia or when an intensive training is administered. Nevertheless, there are currently no controlled studies that have explored the different options of treatment regimens for these patients. Strategies to improve patient outcome involve proper multidisciplinary diagnosis in order to exclude neurological and psychiatric disorders, careful voice documentation with quantitative measurement and qualitative description of the vocal deviation for comparison after treatment, acoustic evaluation to gather data on the mechanism involved in voice production, self-assessment questionnaires to map the impact of the voice problem on the basis of the patient's perspective, referral to psychological evaluation in cases of suspected clinical anxiety and/or depression, identification of dysfunctional coping strategies, self-regulation data to assist patients with their vocal load, and direct and intensive vocal rehabilitation to reduce psychological resistance and to reassure patient's recovery. An international multicentric effort, involving a large population of voice-disordered patients with no physical pathology, could produce enough data for

  14. Functional dysphonia: strategies to improve patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Behlau, Mara; Madazio, Glaucya; Oliveira, Gisele

    2015-01-01

    Functional dysphonia (FD) refers to a voice problem in the absence of a physical condition. It is a multifaceted voice disorder. There is no consensus with regard to its definition and inclusion criteria for diagnosis. FD has many predisposing and precipitating factors, which may include genetic susceptibility, psychological traits, and the vocal behavior itself. The assessment of voice disorders should be multidimensional. In addition to the clinical examination, auditory-perceptual, acoustic, and self-assessment analyses are very important. Self-assessment was introduced in the field of voice 25 years ago and has produced a major impact in the clinical and scientific scenario. The choice of treatment for FD is vocal rehabilitation by means of direct therapy; however, compliance has been an issue, except for cases of functional aphonia or when an intensive training is administered. Nevertheless, there are currently no controlled studies that have explored the different options of treatment regimens for these patients. Strategies to improve patient outcome involve proper multidisciplinary diagnosis in order to exclude neurological and psychiatric disorders, careful voice documentation with quantitative measurement and qualitative description of the vocal deviation for comparison after treatment, acoustic evaluation to gather data on the mechanism involved in voice production, self-assessment questionnaires to map the impact of the voice problem on the basis of the patient’s perspective, referral to psychological evaluation in cases of suspected clinical anxiety and/or depression, identification of dysfunctional coping strategies, self-regulation data to assist patients with their vocal load, and direct and intensive vocal rehabilitation to reduce psychological resistance and to reassure patient’s recovery. An international multicentric effort, involving a large population of voice-disordered patients with no physical pathology, could produce enough data for

  15. Incidence and effect of hypothermia in seriously injured patients.

    PubMed

    Luna, G K; Maier, R V; Pavlin, E G; Anardi, D; Copass, M K; Oreskovich, M R

    1987-09-01

    Hypothermia is a well recognized consequence of severe injury, even in temperate climates, and the physiologic consequences of hypothermia are known to be detrimental. To analyze the frequency and risk factors for hypothermia and its effect on patient outcome, we prospectively studied 94 intubated injured patients at a regional trauma center during a 16-month period. Esophageal temperature probes were placed in the field or ER and core temperatures (T) were followed for 24 hours or until rewarming. Patients were designated as normothermic (greater than 36 degrees C), mildly hypothermic (34 degrees C-36 degrees C) or severely hypothermic (less than 34 degrees C) based on initial T. The risk factors for hypothermia evaluated included age, severity and location of injuries, blood alcohol level, blood transfusion requirements, and time spent in the field, ER, or OR. The average initial T was 35 degrees C, with no seasonal variation. Injury severity and survival correlated with severe hypothermia. Normothermic patients had an average ISS of 28 with a 78% survival. Severely hypothermic patients had an average ISS of 36 with a 41% survival (p less than 0.05). Patient age strongly correlated with outcome although there was no relationship between age and initial temperature. Sixty-two per cent of patients tested were positive for blood alcohol, and one half were legally intoxicated (BAC greater than 100 mg%). However, no consistent correlation was found between alcohol intoxication and initial temperature or patient survival. Blood transfusion requirements paralleled injury severity and patients receiving greater than 10 unit transfusions had significantly lower core temperature (p less than 0.05). The average temperature change was positive in the ER, OR, and ICU with time to rewarming correlating with the aggressiveness of warming measures.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3656463

  16. [Pathophysiology and management of perioperative hypothermia].

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Wojciech; Maj, Jakub

    2006-06-01

    The paper is a review of pathophysiology and management of perioperative hypothermia. The advanced methods of rewarming, such as passive and active: external and core used in clinic allow for efficient management ant prophylactics of hypothermia. Thermotherapy with use of infrared ceiling heaters CTS and mobile MTC as well as Infutherm system applying by authors are desirable and even indispensable in contemporary equipment of surgery clinics, cardiovascular surgery clinics and burn centers. The ideal rewarming method should be safe and enable fast, reliable and predictable warming or rewarming. The clinical parameter to determine the efficacy of rewarming is the change of core temperature. There is no doubt that active warming with forced-air warmers (Warm Touch 5700 and Bair Hugger 500) or radiative heaters (IR-A:Hydrosun 500, IR-C radiation: CTC X, MTC) is more effective than use of standard, passive insulation hospital blankets or convectional heaters. Actually the forced-air warmers are counted to be more useful in cardiovascular surgery hypothermia management, because of fast rate core temperature rise and faster rise in mean skin temperature compared to the control group. CTC X and MTC Aragona radiative heaters are useful in burn management being the most effective when the distance of heater from the patient body is less than 80 cm. The observation of 60 consecutive extensive burns leads to conclusion that long-lasting dressings in burn patients when the whole body is not covered and protected, can be performed safely only in conditions excluding heat losses and core temperature drop. While the cold intravenous fluids may significantly contribute to the temperature drop depending on the volume infused, the use of fluids warming systems as well as external heat application is absolutely indicated to improve the heat balance of the patient body. PMID:17007255

  17. The Cold Blooded Killer: Hypothermia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Rosanne

    Part of a series of home literacy readers with conversational text and sketches, this booklet depicts the subarctic Alaskan environment where cold makes extreme demands on body metabolism. Body temperature must be maintained above 80F (26.7C). A condition of too little body-heat is termed hypo- ('deficit') thermia ('heat'). Hypothermia is the…

  18. Association between thymoma and persistent hypothermia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Thymomas are rare, slow-growing tumours that present in a variety of ways such as incidental findings on chest radiographs following symptoms of cough and dyspnoea. Thymomas may also present with symptoms due to intrathoracic spread such as superior vena cava obstruction, or with symptoms of an associated paraneoplastic disorder. Such paraneoplastic disorders are typified by the generation of autoantibodies directed against a variety of self antigens including myasthenia gravis, neuromyotonia, and hypogammaglobulinaemia. Significant hypothermia in association with thymoma has been described previously in one published case report. The basis for hypothermia in that case was not clear, but was postulated to relate to abnormal central thermal regulation and was resolved completely following treatment with intravenous gammablobulin, thus suggesting an autoimmune aetiology. Case presentation We present the case of an 88-year-old man with Type A thymoma and persistent hypothermia. An extensive investigation of the hypothermia revealed no aetiology other than the thymoma itself. Symptoms of hypothermia were treated effectively with passive and active external rewarming. The patient's dyspnoea was much improved by intercostal drainage of a left-sided pleural effusion and talc pleurodesis. He was not offered definitive treatment for the thymoma in view of its relatively favourable prognosis, and because his symptoms were well controlled at the time of discharge. Conclusion We suggest that the possibility of thymoma be investigated once the more common causes of hypothermia have been excluded in an appropriate clinical context. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second published case report describing such an association. PMID:19946549

  19. Evaluating Practice: Does It Improve Treatment Outcome?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slonim-Nevo, Vered; Anson, Yonatan

    1998-01-01

    Single-case design methodology is evaluated for its effect on treatment outcomes. Participants were juvenile delinquents treated by probation officers with social work degrees in Israel. A quasi-experimental design used measures of the functioning of participants in several settings as dependent variables. Results are presented and discussed. (EMK)

  20. The therapeutic potential of regulated hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J

    2001-03-01

    Reducing body temperature of rodents has been found to improve their survival to ischaemia, hypoxia, chemical toxicants, and many other types of insults. Larger species, including humans, may also benefit from a lower body temperature when recovering from CNS ischaemia and other traumatic insults. Rodents subjected to these insults undergo a regulated hypothermic response (that is, decrease in set point temperature) characterised by preference for cooler ambient temperatures, peripheral vasodilatation, and reduced metabolic rate. However, forced hypothermia (that is, body temperature forced below set point) is the only method used in the study and treatment of human pathological insults. The therapeutic efficacy of the hypothermic treatment is likely to be influenced by the nature of the reduction in body temperature (that is, forced versus regulated). Homeostatic mechanisms counter forced reductions in body temperature resulting in physiological stress and decreased efficacy of the hypothermic treatment. On the other hand, regulated hypothermia would seem to be the best means of achieving a therapeutic benefit because thermal homeostatic systems mediate a controlled reduction in core temperature. PMID:11300205

  1. Professional Development of Preceptors Improves Nurse Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cotter, Elizabeth; Dienemann, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    This hospital preceptor program includes processes to recruit, select, and provide ongoing evaluation of preceptor function. After volunteering, candidates are chosen by peer vote. A blended training program includes online, commercially available modules and nursing professional development practitioner-led sessions that engage preceptors in reflection and problem-solving. Preceptor education allows nurses to further develop their skills over 2 years. Formal evaluation found that preceptors gained efficiency in their role with low turnover rate and positive patient outcomes. PMID:27434318

  2. How regional trauma systems improve outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cole, Elaine

    2015-10-01

    Management of severely injured patients is complex and requires organised, expert care. Regionalised trauma systems are relatively new in the UK and aim to deliver optimal, timely care to injured patients at the most appropriate location. This article discusses the drivers, organisation, processes and outcomes of regionalised trauma care. It also describes the challenges and benefits of working within a trauma system to enable emergency practitioners to reflect on their roles in contemporary trauma care. PMID:26451941

  3. Myocardial protection with mild hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Tissier, Renaud; Ghaleh, Bijan; Cohen, Michael V; Downey, James M; Berdeaux, Alain

    2012-05-01

    Mild hypothermia, 32-35° C, is very potent at reducing myocardial infarct size in rabbits, dogs, sheep, pigs, and rats. The benefit is directly related to reduction in normothermic ischaemic time, supporting the relevance of early and rapid cooling. The cardioprotective effect of mild hypothermia is not limited to its recognized reduction of infarct size, but also results in conservation of post-ischaemic contractile function, prevention of no-reflow or microvascular obstruction, and ultimately attenuation of left ventricular remodelling. The mechanism of the anti-infarct effect does not appear to be related to diminished energy utilization and metabolic preservation, but rather to survival signalling that involves either the extracellular signal-regulated kinases and/or the Akt/phosphoinositide 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin pathways. Initial clinical trials of hypothermia in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction were disappointing, probably because cooling was too slow to shorten normothermic ischaemic time appreciably. New approaches to more rapid cooling have recently been described and may soon be available for clinical use. Alternatively, it may be possible to pharmacologically mimic the protection provided by cooling soon after the onset of ischaemia with an activator of mild hypothermia signalling, e.g. extracellular signal-regulated kinase activator, that could be given by emergency medical personnel. Finally, the protection afforded by cooling can be added to that of pre- and post-conditioning because their mechanisms differ. Thus, myocardial salvage might be greatly increased by rapidly cooling patients as soon as possible and then giving a pharmacological post-conditioning agent immediately prior to reperfusion. PMID:22131353

  4. The big chill: accidental hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Davis, Robert Allan

    2012-01-01

    A potential cause of such emergent issues as cardiac arrhythmias, hypotension, and fluid and electrolyte shifts, accidental hypothermia can be deadly, is common among trauma patients, and is often difficult to recognize. The author discusses predisposing conditions, the classic presentation, and the effects on normal thermoregulatory processes; explains how to conduct a systems assessment of the hypothermic patient; and describes crucial management strategies. PMID:22186703

  5. Improving outcomes in anaesthesiology education on research.

    PubMed

    Nagle, Pamela C

    2011-12-01

    For more than 30 years in the United States, we have been lamenting the fate of the clinician-scientist in anaesthesiology. In the past 5 years, attention to the issues has escalated and a number of new training pathways have emerged. This chapter summarizes programs which have innovative curricula, analyzes current research needs and discusses the limited studies in regards to best practices for research training in graduate medical education. It also proposes further development of residency research curricula through the application of basic educational concepts and explores funding issues and resources that remain relevant to all faculty and departments training the residents. We hope the ideas proposed here will promote the academic caliber of our profession; however, much more data and outcomes research needs to be done to determine our best practices for the future. PMID:22099917

  6. Improved Cardiovascular Disease Outcomes in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Daniel E.; Alexander, Karen; Brindis, Ralph G.; Curtis, Anne B.; Maurer, Mathew; Rich, Michael W.; Sperling, Laurence; Wenger, Nanette K.

    2016-01-01

    Longevity is increasing and the population of older adults is growing. The biology of aging is conducive to cardiovascular disease (CVD), such that prevalence of coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease, arrhythmia and other disorders are increasing as more adults survive into old age.  Furthermore, CVD in older adults is distinctive, with management issues predictably complicated by multimorbidity, polypharmacy, frailty and other complexities of care that increase management risks (e.g., bleeding, falls, and rehospitalization) and uncertainty of outcomes.  In this review, state-of-the-art advances in heart failure, acute coronary syndromes, transcatheter aortic valve replacement, atrial fibrillation, amyloidosis, and CVD prevention are discussed.  Conceptual benefits of treatments are considered in relation to the challenges and ambiguities inherent in their application to older patients. PMID:26918183

  7. Improved Cardiovascular Disease Outcomes in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Forman, Daniel E; Alexander, Karen; Brindis, Ralph G; Curtis, Anne B; Maurer, Mathew; Rich, Michael W; Sperling, Laurence; Wenger, Nanette K

    2016-01-01

    Longevity is increasing and the population of older adults is growing. The biology of aging is conducive to cardiovascular disease (CVD), such that prevalence of coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease, arrhythmia and other disorders are increasing as more adults survive into old age.  Furthermore, CVD in older adults is distinctive, with management issues predictably complicated by multimorbidity, polypharmacy, frailty and other complexities of care that increase management risks (e.g., bleeding, falls, and rehospitalization) and uncertainty of outcomes.  In this review, state-of-the-art advances in heart failure, acute coronary syndromes, transcatheter aortic valve replacement, atrial fibrillation, amyloidosis, and CVD prevention are discussed.  Conceptual benefits of treatments are considered in relation to the challenges and ambiguities inherent in their application to older patients. PMID:26918183

  8. Role of hypothermia in ethanol-induced conditioned taste aversion.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, C L; Hawks, D M; Niehus, D R

    1988-01-01

    Two experiments examined the effect of ambient temperature during ethanol exposure on development of conditioned taste aversion to saccharin. In both studies, male albino rats receiving saccharin-ethanol (1.5 g/kg, IP) pairings followed by 6-h exposure to a 32 degrees C environment developed a weaker saccharin aversion than did rats experiencing ethanol at room temperature. Exposure to the warm environment reduced ethanol-induced hypothermia, but enhanced ethanol's motor-impairing effect. The influence of ambient temperature on ethanol-induced taste aversion may be due to changes in body temperature, neural sensitivity, or elimination rate. Although alternative accounts cannot be entirely dismissed, this outcome suggests that ethanol-induced hypothermia plays a role in determining strength of conditioned taste aversion and thus may be involved in the regulation of oral ethanol intake in rats. PMID:3137617

  9. Improving STEM Student Learning Outcomes with GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, W. W.

    2013-12-01

    Longitudinal data collection initiated a decade ago as part of a successful NSF-CCLI grant proposal has resulted in a large - and growing - sample (200+) of students who report on their perceptions of self-improvement in Technology, Critical Thinking, and Quantitative Reasoning proficiencies upon completion of an introductory (200-level) GIS course at New Jersey City University, a Hispanic-Serving and Minority Institution in Jersey City, NJ. Results from student satisfaction surveys indicate that, not surprisingly, 80% of respondents report improved confidence in Technology Literacy. Critical Thinking proficiency is judged to be significantly improved by 60% of respondents. On the other hand, Quantitative Reasoning proficiency confidence is improved in only 30% of students. This latter finding has prompted the instructor to search for more easily recognizable (to the student) ways of embedding quantitative reasoning into the course, as it is obvious to any GIS professional that there is an enormous amount of quantitative reasoning associated with this technology. A second post-course questionnaire asks students to rate themselves in these STEM proficiency areas using rubrics. Results mirror those from the self-satisfaction surveys. On a 5-point Likkert scale, students tend to see themselves improving about one letter grade on average in each proficiency area. The self-evaluation rubrics are reviewed by the instructor and are judged to be accurate for about 75% of the respondents.

  10. Prevention and Management of Neonatal Hypothermia in Rural Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Lunze, Karsten; Yeboah-Antwi, Kojo; Marsh, David R.; Kafwanda, Sarah Ngolofwana; Musso, Austen; Semrau, Katherine; Waltensperger, Karen Z.; Hamer, Davidson H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Neonatal hypothermia is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for newborn survival. The World Health Organization recommends maintaining a warm chain and skin-to-skin care for thermoprotection of newborn children. Since little is known about practices related to newborn hypothermia in rural Africa, this study's goal was to characterize relevant practices, attitudes, and beliefs in rural Zambia. Methods and Findings We conducted 14 focus group discussions with mothers and grandmothers and 31 in-depth interviews with community leaders and health officers in Lufwanyama District, a rural area in the Copperbelt Province, Zambia, enrolling a total of 171 participants. We analyzed data using domain analysis. In rural Lufwanyama, community members were aware of the danger of neonatal hypothermia. Caregivers' and health workers' knowledge of thermoprotective practices included birthplace warming, drying and wrapping of the newborn, delayed bathing, and immediate and exclusive breastfeeding. However, this warm chain was not consistently maintained in the first hours postpartum, when newborns are at greatest risk. Skin-to-skin care was not practiced in the study area. Having to assume household and agricultural labor responsibilities in the immediate postnatal period was a challenge for mothers to provide continuous thermal care to their newborns. Conclusions Understanding and addressing community-based practices on hypothermia prevention and management might help improve newborn survival in resource-limited settings. Possible interventions include the implementation of skin-to-skin care in rural areas and the use of appropriate, low-cost newborn warmers to prevent hypothermia and support families in their provision of newborn thermal protection. Training family members to support mothers in the provision of thermoprotection for their newborns could facilitate these practices. PMID:24714630

  11. Role of Video Games in Improving Health-Related Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Primack, Brian A.; Carroll, Mary V.; McNamara, Megan; Klem, Mary Lou; King, Brandy; Rich, Michael O.; Chan, Chun W.; Nayak, Smita

    2012-01-01

    Context Video games represent a multibillion-dollar industry in the U.S. Although video gaming has been associated with many negative health consequences, it may also be useful for therapeutic purposes. The goal of this study was to determine whether video games may be useful in improving health outcomes. Evidence acquisition Literature searches were performed in February 2010 in six databases: the Center on Media and Child Health Database of Research, MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Reference lists were hand-searched to identify additional studies. Only RCTs that tested the effect of video games on a positive, clinically relevant health consequence were included. Study selection criteria were strictly defined and applied by two researchers working independently. Study background information (e.g., location, funding source), sample data (e.g., number of study participants, demographics), intervention and control details, outcomes data, and quality measures were abstracted independently by two researchers. Evidence synthesis Of 1452 articles retrieved using the current search strategy, 38 met all criteria for inclusion. Eligible studies used video games to provide physical therapy, psychological therapy, improved disease self-management, health education, distraction from discomfort, increased physical activity, and skills training for clinicians. Among the 38 studies, a total of 195 health outcomes were examined. Video games improved 69% of psychological therapy outcomes, 59% of physical therapy outcomes, 50% of physical activity outcomes, 46% of clinician skills outcomes, 42% of health education outcomes, 42% of pain distraction outcomes, and 37% of disease self-management outcomes. Study quality was generally poor; for example, two thirds (66%) of studies had follow-up periods of <12 weeks, and only 11% of studies blinded researchers. Conclusions There is potential promise for video games to improve

  12. Improving Learning Outcome Using Six Sigma Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetteh, Godson A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research paper is to apply the Six Sigma methodology to identify the attributes of a lecturer that will help improve a student's prior knowledge of a discipline from an initial "x" per cent knowledge to a higher "y" per cent of knowledge. Design/methodology/approach: The data collection method…

  13. Is hypothermia in the victim of major trauma protective or harmful? A randomized, prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Gentilello, L M; Jurkovich, G J; Stark, M S; Hassantash, S A; O'Keefe, G E

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this randomized, prospective clinical trial was to determine whether hypothermia during resuscitation is protective or harmful to critically injured trauma patients. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Hypothermia has both protective and harmful clinical effects. Retrospective studies show higher mortality in patients with hypothermia; however, hypothermia is more common in more severely injured patients, which makes it difficult to determine whether hypothermia contributes to mortality independently of injury severity. There are no randomized, prospective treatment studies to assess hypothermia's impact as an independent variable. METHODS: Fifty-seven hypothermic (T < or = 34.5 C), critically injured patients requiring a pulmonary artery catheter were randomized to a rapid rewarming protocol using continuous arteriovenous rewarming (CAVR) or to a standard rewarming (SR) control group. The primary outcome of interest was first 24-hour blood product and fluid resuscitation requirements. Other comparative analyses included coagulation assays, hemodynamic and oxygen transport measurements, length of stay, and mortality. RESULTS: The two groups were well matched for demographic and injury severity characteristics. CAVR rewarmed significantly faster than did SR (p < 0.01), producing two groups with different amounts of hypothermia exposure. The patients who underwent CAVR required less fluid during resuscitation to the same hemodynamic goals (24,702 mL vs. 32,540 mL, p = 0.05) and were significantly more likely to rewarm (p = 0.002). Only 2 (7%) of 29 patients who underwent CAVR failed to warm to 36 C and both died, whereas 12 (43%) of 28 patients who underwent SR failed to reach 36 C, and all 12 died. Patients who underwent CAVR had significantly less early mortality (p = 0.047). CONCLUSION: Hypothermia increases fluid requirements and independently increases acute mortality after major trauma. PMID:9351712

  14. Targeting Pannexin1 Improves Seizure Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Marcelo F.; Veliskova, Jana; Patel, Naman K.; Lutz, Sarah E.; Caille, Dorothee; Charollais, Anne; Meda, Paolo; Scemes, Eliana

    2011-01-01

    Imbalance of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate and of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA is one of several causes of seizures. ATP has also been implicated in epilepsy. However, little is known about the mechanisms involved in the release of ATP from cells and the consequences of the altered ATP signaling during seizures. Pannexin1 (Panx1) is found in astrocytes and in neurons at high levels in the embryonic and young postnatal brain, declining in adulthood. Panx1 forms large-conductance voltage sensitive plasma membrane channels permeable to ATP that are also activated by elevated extracellular K+ and following P2 receptor stimulation. Based on these properties, we hypothesized that Panx1 channels may contribute to seizures by increasing the levels of extracellular ATP. Using pharmacological tools and two transgenic mice deficient for Panx1 we show here that interference with Panx1 ameliorates the outcome and shortens the duration of kainic acid-induced status epilepticus. These data thus indicate that the activation of Panx1 in juvenile mouse hippocampi contributes to neuronal hyperactivity in seizures. PMID:21949881

  15. Platelet inhibition with prasugrel in patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing therapeutic hypothermia after cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Flierl, Ulrike; Röntgen, Philipp; Zauner, Florian; Tongers, Jörn; Berliner, Dominik; Bauersachs, Johann; Schäfer, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is the leading cause for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Therapeutic hypothermia improves neurological outcome in combination with early revascularisation, but seems to affect clopidogrel responsiveness. The more potent thienopyridine prasugrel has not yet been sufficiently evaluated during therapeutic hypothermia. We investigated 23 consecutive AMI patients (61 ± 11 years) following out-of-hospital resuscitation undergoing revascularisation and therapeutic hypothermia. Prasugrel efficacy was assessed by the platelet-reactivity-index (PRI) before and 2, 4, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours (h) following a loading dose of 60 mg via a gastric tube. Mean PRI (± SD) was 70 ± 12 % prior to loading and 60 ± 16 % (2 h, ns), 52 ± 21 % (4 h, p< 0.01), 42 ± 26 % (6 h, p< 0.01), 37 ± 21 % (12 h, p< 0.01), 27 ± 23 % (24 h, p< 0.01), 18 ± 14 % (48 h, p< 0.01), and 13 ± 10 % (72 h, p< 0.01) after loading. Sufficient platelet inhibition occurred later compared to stable AMI patients (6 h vs 2 h); however, high on-treatment platelet reactivity significantly decreased over time and was non-existent after 72 h (PRI> 50 %: 2 h: 72 %, 4 h: 52 %, 6 h: 43 %, 12 h: 29 %, 24 h: 17 %, 48 h: 5 %, 72 h: 0 %). There was no relation between 30-day mortality rate (26 %) and PRI values. Prasugrel significantly reduced platelet reactivity even during vasopressor use, analgosedation and therapeutic hypothermia. Despite a significant delay compared to stable AMI patients, sufficient platelet inhibition was reached in 83 % of patients within 24 h. Therefore, prasugrel administration via gastric tube might be a useful therapeutic strategy in these patients at high risk, providing potent and effective P2Y12 inhibition. PMID:26790884

  16. The Social Responsibility Performance Outcomes Model: Building Socially Responsible Companies through Performance Improvement Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim

    2000-01-01

    Considers the role of performance improvement professionals and human resources development professionals in helping organizations realize the ethical and financial power of corporate social responsibility. Explains the social responsibility performance outcomes model, which incorporates the concepts of societal needs and outcomes. (LRW)

  17. Implementing change: involving employees to improve outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wick, Jeannette Y

    2014-11-01

    Increasingly, pharmacy workplaces are larger organizations that rely on policy and clinical guidelines to direct professional practice. Often, cost-cutting, profit-making, service-improving, and process-streamlining ideas are needed but difficult to identify or implement. By involving employees more closely in the change process using participative management (PM), managers reap tremendous reward. PM focuses on employee collaboration to develop and implement consistent, effective policies and procedures. This process recognizes employees' creative, emotional and intellectual needs and often improves the organization's public face as well. In addition, consumers perceive this approach to be socially responsible management. Managers can implement PM in a number of ways, applying it to problems or processes. PM has some pitfalls, but overall, if the workplace culture adapts to accommodate its principles, PM usually provides numerous benefits for organizations, their employees, and their customers. PMID:25369185

  18. Innovative strategies to improve diabetes outcomes in disadvantaged populations.

    PubMed

    Ruddock, J S; Poindexter, M; Gary-Webb, T L; Walker, E A; Davis, N J

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes disproportionately affects disadvantaged populations. Eighty percent of deaths directly caused by diabetes occurred in low- and middle-income countries. In high-income countries, there are marked disparities in diabetes control among racial/ethnic minorities and those with low socio-economic status. Innovative, effective and cost-effective strategies are needed to improve diabetes outcomes in these populations. Technological advances, peer educators and community health workers have expanded methodologies to reach, educate and monitor individuals with diabetes. In the present manuscript we review the outcomes of these strategies, and describe the barriers to and facilitators of these approaches for improving diabetes outcomes. PMID:27194172

  19. Nutrition and Chronic Wounds: Improving Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Joseph A; Vlad, Lucian G; Gumus, Tuna

    2016-09-01

    There is increasing awareness that chronic wound healing is very dependent on the patient's nutritional status, but there are no clearly established and accepted assessment protocols or interventions in clinical practice. Much of the data used as guidelines for chronic wound patients are extrapolated from acutely wounded trauma patients, but the 2 groups are very different patient populations. While most trauma patients are young, healthy, and well-nourished before injury, the chronic wound patient is usually old, with comorbidities and frequently malnourished. We suggest the assumption that all geriatric wound patients are malnourished until proved otherwise. Evaluation should include complete history and physical and a formal nutritional evaluation should be obtained. Laboratory studies can be used in conjunction with this clinical information to confirm the assessment. While extensive studies are available in relation to prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers and perioperative nutrition, less is known of the effect of nutritional deficits and supplementation of the diabetic foot ulcer and venous stasis ulcer patient. This does not necessarily mean that nutritional support of these patients is not helpful. In the pursuit of wound healing, we provide systemic support of cardiac and pulmonary function and cessation of smoking, improve vascular inflow, improve venous outflow, decrease edema, and treat with hyperbaric oxygen. If we address all of these other conditions, why would we not wish to support the most basic of organismal needs in the form of nutrition? PMID:27556777

  20. Effective pain management and improvements in patients' outcomes and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Glowacki, Diane

    2015-06-01

    Adequate pain management is a compelling and universal requirement in health care. Despite considerable advancements, the adverse physiological and psychological implications of unmanaged pain remain substantially unresolved. Ineffective pain management can lead to a marked decrease in desirable clinical and psychological outcomes and patients' overall quality of life. Effective management of acute pain results in improved patient outcomes and increased patient satisfaction. Although research and advanced treatments in improved practice protocols have documented progressive improvements in management of acute and postoperative pain, little awareness of the effectiveness of best practices persists. Improved interventions can enhance patients' attitudes to and perceptions of pain. What a patient believes and understands about pain is critical in influencing the patient's reaction to the pain therapy provided. Use of interdisciplinary pain teams can lead to improvements in patients' pain management, pain education, outcomes, and satisfaction. PMID:26033099

  1. Improving outcomes in patients with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Tidman, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Psoriasis is a heterogeneous inflammatory disorder that targets the skin and joints. It affects 1.3-2% of the population. The diagnosis of plaque psoriasis is usually straightforward, a helpful diagnostic clue is the tendency for silver scales to appear after gentle scratching of a lesion. Stress, streptococcal infection and drugs including beta-blockers, antimalarials and lithium may precipitate or exacerbate psoriasis. Psoriasis, especially when severe, predisposes to metabolic syndrome, and patients with psoriasis are at increased risk of ischaemic heart disease, hypertension, stroke, type 2 diabetes and hyperlipidaemia. Additionally, psoriasis sufferers appear at increased risk of uveitis, inflammatory boweldisease, lymphoma, non-melanoma skin cancer, COPD and venous thromboembolism. Psoriasis should be assessed on the basis of: severity, impact on physical, psychological and social wellbeing, symptoms of arthritis and the presence of comorbidities. Poor response to topical therapy may be as much to do with lack of compliance as with lack of efficacy. The number of treatments each day should be kept to a minimum, and patients should be reviewed after four weeks when initiating or changing topical therapy to improve adherence to treatment and assess response. The majority of patients with psoriasis can be managed in primary care, although specialist care may be necessary at some point in up to 60% of cases. Patients with erythrodermic or generalised pustular psoriasis should be referred for a same day dermatological opinion, and if psoriatic arthritis is suspected, early referral for a rheumatological opinion is recommended. PMID:23469725

  2. Vitamin d and rehabilitation: improving functional outcomes.

    PubMed

    Shinchuk, Leonid M; Shinchuk, Leonid; Holick, Michael F

    2007-06-01

    Vitamin D inadequacy is pandemic among rehabilitation patients in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Male and female patients of all ages and ethnic backgrounds are affected. Vitamin D deficiency causes osteopenia, precipitates and exacerbates osteoporosis, causes the painful bone disease osteomalacia, and worsens proximal muscle strength and postural sway. Vitamin D inadequacy can be prevented by sensible sun exposure and adequate dietary intake with supplementation. Vitamin D status is determined by measurement of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D. The recommended healthful serum level is between 30 and 60 ng/mL. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D levels of >30 ng/mL are sufficient to suppress parathyroid hormone production and to maximize the efficiency of dietary calcium absorption from the small intestine. This can be accomplished by ingesting 1000 IU of vitamin D(3) per day, or by taking 50,000 IU of vitamin D(2) every 2 weeks. Vitamin D toxicity is observed when 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels exceed 150 ng/mL. Identification and treatment of vitamin D deficiency reduces the risk of vertebral and nonvertebral fractures by improving bone health and musculoskeletal function. Vitamin D deficiency and osteomalacia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with musculoskeletal pain, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, or myositis. There is a need for better education of health professionals and the general public regarding the optimization of vitamin D status in the care of rehabilitation patients. PMID:17507730

  3. Improving the Outcome of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Marco J

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is the most common indication for hospital admission and its incidence is rising. It has a variable prognosis, which is mainly dependent upon the development of persistent organ failure and infected necrotizing pancreatitis. In the past few years, based on large-scale multicenter randomized trials, some novel insights regarding clinical management have emerged. In patients with infected pancreatic necrosis, a step-up approach of percutaneous catheter drainage followed by necrosectomy only when the patient does not improve, reduces new-onset organ failure and prevents the need for necrosectomy in about a third of patients. A randomized pilot study comparing surgical to endoscopic necrosectomy in patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis showed a striking reduction of the pro-inflammatory response following endoscopic necrosectomy. These promising results have recently been tested in a large multicenter randomized trial whose results are eagerly awaited. Contrary to earlier data from uncontrolled studies, a large multicenter randomized trial comparing early (within 24 h) nasoenteric tube feeding compared with an oral diet after 72 h, did not show that early nasoenteric tube feeding was superior in reducing the rate of infection or death in patients with AP at high risk for complications. Although early ERCP does not have a role in the treatment of predicted mild pancreatitis, except in the case of concomitant cholangitis, it may ameliorate the disease course in patients with predicted severe pancreatitis. Currently, a large-scale randomized study is underway and results are expected in 2017. PMID:27336312

  4. Early diagnosis improves outcomes in hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michael H; Dillon, John F

    2015-11-01

    Chronic hepatitis C (HCV) infection affects 0.8-1.0% of the UK population, with up to 70% having ongoing chronic infection. HCV is curable but if left untreated can progress to end stage liver disease and potentially hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV management options have changed dramatically over the past five years, with improvement in cure rates and tolerability; cure rates of more than 90% can now be achieved. The main risk factors for acquiring HCV infection in the UK are injecting drug use and sharing drug using equipment. Other risk factors include receipt of blood products in the UK before 1991; tattooing or acupuncture with non-sterile equipment; medical procedures; needlestick injuries and contact with blood from an infected person. Acute hepatitis C infection has mild symptoms only and is likely to go undiagnosed. The estimated diagnosis rate in England is 35%, suggesting that 65% of the total HCV-positive population remains undiagnosed. The most common method of detecting HCV is case finding in high- risk groups. Those who test positive for HCV antibodies should be tested for persisting viral presence through HCV PCR testing - a positive result confirms active infection. GPs can play a major role in identifying those at risk of the disease, which includes patients with known risk factors and those with unexplained abnormal liver function tests, providing information and arranging testing. Patients with confirmed active HCV infection should be referred to the local specialist hepatology or infectious disease service in accordance with locally agreed pathways. PMID:26753270

  5. The Paradox of Reducing Class Size and Improving Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hattie, John

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses four questions: What are the effects of reducing class size? How important are these effects? How can we explain these effects? and How can we improve the outcomes when class sizes are reduced? A major aim is to provide directions for resolving the paradox as to "Why reducing class size has not led to major improvements in…

  6. Bullous Lesions After Use of a Commercial Therapeutic Hypothermia Temperature Management System: A Possible Burn Injury?

    PubMed Central

    Wells, James M.; Rizk, Dana V.

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is a novel technique for improving the likelihood of survival with good neurologic outcome after cardiopulmonary arrest. While commercial temperature management systems (TMS) are intended to facilitate cooling of the body during TH, their operation also involves body exposure to heat. We describe the case of a 72-year-old female postarrest patient who underwent TH using a commercial water-circulating TMS and concurrent continuous renal replacement therapy. The patient developed bullous lesions on the thigh and torso suspected to constitute a scald burn injury from the TMS. Clinicians must be aware of this important adverse event when providing TH, especially in the setting of concurrent hemodialysis therapy. PMID:24066269

  7. The Use of Pre-Hospital Mild Hypothermia after Resuscitation from Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Olsufka, Michele; Nichol, Graham; Copass, Michael K.; Cobb, Leonard A.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Hypothermia has emerged as a potent neuroprotective modality following resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Although delayed hospital cooling has been demonstrated to improve outcome after cardiac arrest, in-field cooling begun immediately following the return of spontaneous circulation may be more beneficial. Cooling in the field following resuscitation, however, presents new challenges, in that the cooling method has to be portable, safe, and effective. Rapid infusion of intravenous fluid at 4°C, the use of a cooling helmet, and cooling plates have all been proposed as methods for field cooling, and are all in various stages of clinical and animal testing. Whether field cooling will improve survival and neurologic outcome remains an important unanswered clinical question. PMID:19072587

  8. The use of pre-hospital mild hypothermia after resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Kim, Francis; Olsufka, Michele; Nichol, Graham; Copass, Michael K; Cobb, Leonard A

    2009-03-01

    Hypothermia has emerged as a potent neuroprotective modality following resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Although delayed hospital cooling has been demonstrated to improve outcome after cardiac arrest, in-field cooling begun immediately following the return of spontaneous circulation may be more beneficial. Cooling in the field following resuscitation, however, presents new challenges, in that the cooling method has to be portable, safe, and effective. Rapid infusion of intravenous fluid at 4 degrees C, the use of a cooling helmet, and cooling plates have all been proposed as methods for field cooling, and are all in various stages of clinical and animal testing. Whether field cooling will improve survival and neurologic outcome remains an important unanswered clinical question. PMID:19072587

  9. Dantrolene enhances the protective effect of hypothermia on cerebral cortex neurons

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Sui-yi; Hu, Feng-yun; Ren, Li-jie; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Zhu-qing; Zhang, Xie-jun; Li, Wei-ping

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is the most promising non-pharmacological neuroprotective strategy against ischemic injury. However, shivering is the most common adverse reaction. Many studies have shown that dantrolene is neuroprotective in in vitro and in vivo ischemic injury models. In addition to its neuroprotective effect, dantrolene neutralizes the adverse reaction of hypothermia. Dantrolene may be an effective adjunctive therapy to enhance the neuroprotection of hypothermia in treating ischemic stroke. Cortical neurons isolated from rat fetuses were exposed to 90 minutes of oxygen-glucose deprivation followed by reoxygenation. Neurons were treated with 40 μM dantrolene, hypothermia (at 33°C), or the combination of both for 12 hours. Results revealed that the combination of dantrolene and hypothermia increased neuronal survival and the mitochondrial membrane potential, and reduced intracellular active oxygen cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation, and apoptosis. Furthermore, improvements in cell morphology were observed. The combined treatment enhanced these responses compared with either treatment alone. These findings indicate that dantrolene may be used as an effective adjunctive therapy to enhance the neuroprotective effects of hypothermia in ischemic stroke. PMID:26487856

  10. Lean Participative Process Improvement: Outcomes and Obstacles in Trauma Orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    New, Steve; Hadi, Mohammed; Pickering, Sharon; Robertson, Eleanor; Morgan, Lauren; Griffin, Damian; Collins, Gary; Rivero-Arias, Oliver; Catchpole, Ken; McCulloch, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effectiveness of a “systems” approach using Lean methodology to improve surgical care, as part of a programme of studies investigating possible synergy between improvement approaches. Setting A controlled before-after study using the orthopaedic trauma theatre of a UK Trust hospital as the active site and an elective orthopaedic theatre in the same Trust as control. Participants All staff involved in surgical procedures in both theatres. Interventions A one-day “lean” training course delivered by an experienced specialist team was followed by support and assistance in developing a 6 month improvement project. Clinical staff selected the subjects for improvement and designed the improvements. Outcome Measures We compared technical and non-technical team performance in theatre using WHO checklist compliance evaluation, “glitch count” and Oxford NOTECHS II in a sample of directly observed operations, and patient outcome (length of stay, complications and readmissions) for all patients. We collected observational data for 3 months and clinical data for 6 months before and after the intervention period. We compared changes in measures using 2-way analysis of variance. Results We studied 576 cases before and 465 after intervention, observing the operation in 38 and 41 cases respectively. We found no significant changes in team performance or patient outcome measures. The intervention theatre staff focused their efforts on improving first patient arrival time, which improved by 20 minutes after intervention. Conclusions This version of “lean” system improvement did not improve measured safety processes or outcomes. The study highlighted an important tension between promoting staff ownership and providing direction, which needs to be managed in “lean” projects. Space and time for staff to conduct improvement activities are important for success. PMID:27124012

  11. Hypothermia

    MedlinePlus

    ... not possible, get the person out of the wind and use a blanket to provide insulation from ... protect your body. These include: Mittens (not gloves) Wind-proof, water-resistant, many-layered clothing Two pairs ...

  12. Efforts to Improve Perinatal Outcomes for Women Enrolled in Medicaid.

    PubMed

    Daniel-Robinson, Lekisha; Cha, Stephen; Lillie-Blanton, Marsha

    2015-08-01

    Improving women's health and perinatal health outcomes is a high priority for Medicaid, the jointly financed federal-state health coverage program. The authorities provided by the Affordable Care Act give Medicaid new resources and opportunities to improve coverage and perinatal care. Given that the Medicaid program currently covers almost half of all births in the United States, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, working in partnership with states and other stakeholders, is using new and existing authorities to improve birth outcomes. Quality measurement, quality-improvement projects, and expanded models of care underscore the major quality approach of the center. As an outgrowth of an expert panel that included membership of several state Medicaid medical directors, Medicaid providers, and consumer representatives, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' Center for Medicaid and CHIP Services launched the Maternal and Infant Health Initiative, which aims to increase postpartum visit rates and the use of effective contraception among women covered by Medicaid. This Initiative provides focus on key opportunities and strategies to improve the rate, measurement, timing, and content of postpartum visits. Additionally, a focus on contraception will serve to improve pregnancy planning and spacing and prevent unintended pregnancy. As the Initiative evolves, the Center for Medicaid and CHIP Services plans to identify policy, service delivery, and reimbursement policies to advance the Initiative's goals and improve outcomes for women covered by Medicaid. PMID:26241435

  13. Breast center's redesign improves outcomes, cuts costs, attracts MCOs.

    PubMed

    1997-07-01

    Slashing breast cancer screening costs and improving outcomes: Implementing an innovative multidisciplinary approach to diagnosing breast cancer and narrowing its team to dedicated "breast specialists" has helped this community hospital's breast center win more MCO contracts--despite its location in the shadow of a world-renowned center. Here's how the new program works. PMID:10175553

  14. Induced hypothermia in neurocatastrophes: feeling the chill.

    PubMed

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2004-01-01

    Reducing core temperature to protect the injured brain has become a new therapeutic measure. The scientific underpinnings based on animal experiments seem sound. Evidence of the therapy's effect in human trials is insufficient or even possibly absent, but the techniques to produce moderate hypothermia are available, without apparent significant complications, and are relatively easy to use for neurointensivists. This review summarizes the mechanisms of neuroprotection due to hypothermia and its application in clinical practice. PMID:16397446

  15. [Implementation of therapeutic hypothermia into clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Himmel, Friederike; Desch, Steffen; Wolfrum, Sebastian

    2015-08-01

    Implementation of mild therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest into clinical practice is a continuing process. Although ILCOR recommendation was given in 2003, only 24% of the German hospitals reported the use of hypothermia in this setting in 2005. Growing evidence and most importantly the implementation of hypothermia into the guidelines led to a significant increase of acceptance of this therapeutic option leading to a user rate of 69% in 2009. Encouraged by the new guidelines from 2010 86% of German hospitals finally reported to use hypothermia after cardiac arrest routinely in 2012, a decade after publication of the mile stone studies. The phenomenon of a delayed implementation of hypothermia into clinical practice can be seen throughout the world as many surveys from different countries at different time points have shown. When hypothermia is used, hospitals go with the guidelines quite strictly with respect to indication, duration of treatment and target temperature. This strengthens the importance of guidelines in the process to implement new therapeutic options. However, although a recent study still promotes a strict target temperature management it questions the need for a markedly reduced target temperature of 33°C. It remains to be elucidated how this study will affect the daily routine in the hospitals and most interestingly how this study will change the coming guidelines in 2015. PMID:26261928

  16. Improving outcome for mental disorders by enhancing memory for treatment.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Allison G; Lee, Jason; Smith, Rita L; Gumport, Nicole B; Hollon, Steven D; Rabe-Hesketh, Sophia; Hein, Kerrie; Dolsen, Michael R; Haman, Kirsten L; Kanady, Jennifer C; Thompson, Monique A; Abrons, Deidre

    2016-06-01

    Patients exhibit poor memory for treatment. A novel Memory Support Intervention, derived from basic science in cognitive psychology and education, is tested with the goal of improving patient memory for treatment and treatment outcome. Adults with major depressive disorder (MDD) were randomized to 14 sessions of cognitive therapy (CT)+Memory Support (n = 25) or CT-as-usual (n = 23). Outcomes were assessed at baseline, post-treatment and 6 months later. Memory support was greater in CT+Memory Support compared to the CT-as-usual. Compared to CT-as-usual, small to medium effect sizes were observed for recall of treatment points at post-treatment. There was no difference between the treatment arms on depression severity (primary outcome). However, the odds of meeting criteria for 'response' and 'remission' were higher in CT+Memory Support compared with CT-as-usual. CT+Memory Support also showed an advantage on functional impairment. While some decline was observed, the advantage of CT+Memory Support was evident through 6-month follow-up. Patients with less than 16 years of education experience greater benefits from memory support than those with 16 or more years of education. Memory support can be manipulated, may improve patient memory for treatment and may be associated with an improved outcome. PMID:27089159

  17. Purchasing population health: aligning financial incentives to improve health outcomes.

    PubMed Central

    Kindig, D A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the concept of population health, including its definition, measurement, and determinants, and to suggest an approach for aligning financial incentives toward this goal. DATA SOURCE, STUDY DESIGN, DATA EXTRACTION. Literature review, policy analysis PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The article presents the argument that a major reason for our slow progress toward health outcome improvement is that there is no operational definition of population health and that financial incentives are not aligned to this goal. Current attempts at process measures as indicators of quality or outcome are not adequate for the task. It is suggested that some measure of health-adjusted life expectancy be adopted for this purpose, and that integrated delivery systems and other agents responsible for nonmedical determinants be rewarded for improvement in this measure. This will require the development of an investment portfolio across the determinants of health based on relative marginal return to health, with horizontal integration strategies across sectoral boundaries. A 20-year three-phase development strategy is proposed, including components of research and acceptance, integrated health system implementation, and cross-sectoral integration. CONCLUSIONS: The U.S. healthcare system is a $1 trillion industry without a definition of its product. Until population outcome measures are developed and rewarded for, we will not solve the twenty-first century challenge of maximizing health outcome improvement for the resources available. Images Figure 1 PMID:9618669

  18. Interdisciplinary ICU Cardiac Arrest Debriefing Improves Survival Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Heather; Zebuhr, Carleen; Topjian, Alexis A.; Nishisaki, Akira; Niles, Dana E.; Meaney, Peter A.; Boyle, Lori; Giordano, Rita T.; Davis, Daniela; Priestley, Margaret; Apkon, Michael; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Sutton, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective In-hospital cardiac arrest is an important public health problem. High-quality resuscitation improves survival but is difficult to achieve. Our objective is to evaluate the effectiveness of a novel, interdisciplinary, postevent quantitative debriefing program to improve survival outcomes after in-hospital pediatric chest compression events. Design, Setting, and Patients Single-center prospective interventional study of children who received chest compressions between December 2008 and June 2012 in the ICU. Interventions Structured, quantitative, audiovisual, interdisciplinary debriefing of chest compression events with front-line providers. Measurements and Main Results Primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge. Secondary outcomes included survival of event (return of spontaneous circulation for ≥ 20 min) and favorable neurologic outcome. Primary resuscitation quality outcome was a composite variable, termed “excellent cardiopulmonary resuscitation,” prospectively defined as a chest compression depth ≥ 38 mm, rate ≥ 100/min, ≤ 10% of chest compressions with leaning, and a chest compression fraction > 90% during a given 30-second epoch. Quantitative data were available only for patients who are 8 years old or older. There were 119 chest compression events (60 control and 59 interventional). The intervention was associated with a trend toward improved survival to hospital discharge on both univariate analysis (52% vs 33%, p = 0.054) and after controlling for confounders (adjusted odds ratio, 2.5; 95% CI, 0.91–6.8; p = 0.075), and it significantly increased survival with favorable neurologic outcome on both univariate (50% vs 29%, p = 0.036) and multivariable analyses (adjusted odds ratio, 2.75; 95% CI, 1.01–7.5; p = 0.047). Cardiopulmonary resuscitation epochs for patients who are 8 years old or older during the debriefing period were 5.6 times more likely to meet targets of excellent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (95% CI, 2.9–10

  19. Improving Literacy Outcomes for Years 5-8 Boys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on a small action research project carried out by a Special Education Needs Coordinator (SENCO) in a small rural, full primary school in New Zealand. It focused on improving the literacy outcomes for Years 5-8 boys in the school by way of a boys'-only writing group. Results show that the boys'-only learning group had a positive…

  20. Music as intervention: a notable endeavor to improve patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    White, J M

    2001-03-01

    Music interventions have been used in medicine and nursing throughout history. Music therapy is an easy-to-administer, relatively inexpensive, noninvasive intervention that has been used to reduce heart rate, blood pressure, myocardial oxygen consumption, gastrointestinal function, anxiety, and pain. A review of theoretic and empirical base for the use of music therapy to improve patient outcomes in a variety of areas of clinical practice is presented. Implications for practice and future research are suggested. PMID:11342404

  1. Inadvertant hypothermia and active warming for surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Judith

    Inadvertant hypothermia is common among surgical patients and can result in serious complications. This article describes active warming systems which can be used preoperatively and intraoperatively to prevent hypothermia and maintain normothermia (normal body temperature). PMID:22067488

  2. First Use of a New Device for Administration of Buspirone and Acetaminophen to Suppress Shivering During Therapeutic Hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Honasoge, Akilesh; Parker, Braden; Wesselhoff, Kelly; Lyons, Neal; Kulstad, Erik

    2016-03-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia or targeted temperature management has been used after cardiac arrest to improve neurological outcomes and mortality. However, a side effect of temperature modulation is a centrally mediated shivering response. The Columbia Anti-Shivering Protocol sets up a systematic method of intravenous (IV) and oral medication escalation to suppress this response and preserve the benefits of this therapy. We present the case of a 59-year-old male who began shivering after therapeutic hypothermia for cardiac arrest, leading to a persistent rise in core temperature despite adequate sedation. He was also found to have gastric contents similar to coffee grounds through nasogastric tube suction. The shivering was effectively suppressed and the rising core temperature plateaued using rectal acetaminophen and buspirone administered by means of a novel device, the Macy Catheter. Also, when used in conjunction with other protocol-driven medications, the patient was able to achieve a core temperature of 33°C. The Macy Catheter appears to be a useful approach to rectally administer buspirone and acetaminophen, using an easy-to-place, nonsterile atraumatic device that requires no radiographic confirmation of placement. PMID:26807775

  3. First Use of a New Device for Administration of Buspirone and Acetaminophen to Suppress Shivering During Therapeutic Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Braden; Wesselhoff, Kelly; Lyons, Neal; Kulstad, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia or targeted temperature management has been used after cardiac arrest to improve neurological outcomes and mortality. However, a side effect of temperature modulation is a centrally mediated shivering response. The Columbia Anti-Shivering Protocol sets up a systematic method of intravenous (IV) and oral medication escalation to suppress this response and preserve the benefits of this therapy. We present the case of a 59-year-old male who began shivering after therapeutic hypothermia for cardiac arrest, leading to a persistent rise in core temperature despite adequate sedation. He was also found to have gastric contents similar to coffee grounds through nasogastric tube suction. The shivering was effectively suppressed and the rising core temperature plateaued using rectal acetaminophen and buspirone administered by means of a novel device, the Macy Catheter. Also, when used in conjunction with other protocol-driven medications, the patient was able to achieve a core temperature of 33°C. The Macy Catheter appears to be a useful approach to rectally administer buspirone and acetaminophen, using an easy-to-place, nonsterile atraumatic device that requires no radiographic confirmation of placement. PMID:26807775

  4. Data on the gene expression of cardiomyocyte exposed to hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Xue, Xiaodong; Xu, Yinli; Zhang, Yuji; Li, Zhi; Wang, Huishan

    2016-09-01

    Hypothermia is widely used in neurosurgery and cardiac surgeries. However, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms. We previously reported that the transcriptome responses of cardiomyocyte exposed to hypothermia, "The transcriptome responses of cardiomyocyte exposed to hypothermia" [4]. Herein, we provide the hypothermia inhibited proliferation of cardiomyocyte cells in vitro and the details of transcription factors in regulation of differentially expressed genes. PMID:27274530

  5. Dose-dependent effects of levetiracetam after hypoxia and hypothermia in the neonatal mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Katja; Lueckemann, Laura; Kluever, Verena; Thavaneetharajah, Sinthuya; Hoeber, Daniela; Bendix, Ivo; Fandrey, Joachim; Bertsche, Astrid; Felderhoff-Mueser, Ursula

    2016-09-01

    Perinatal asphyxia to the developing brain remains a major cause of morbidity. Hypothermia is currently the only established neuroprotective treatment available for term born infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, saving one in seven to eight infants from developing severe neurological deficits. Therefore, additional treatments with clinically applicable drugs are indispensable. This study investigates a potential additive neuroprotective effect of levetiracetam combined with hypothermia after hypoxia-induced brain injury in neonatal mice. 9-day-old C57BL/6-mice (P9) were subjected either to acute hypoxia or room-air. After 90min of systemic hypoxia (6% O2), pups were randomized into six groups: 1) vehicle, 2) low-dose levetiracetam (LEV), 3) high-dose LEV, 4) hypothermia (HT), 5) HT combined with low-dose LEV and 6) HT combined with high-dose LEV. Pro-apoptotic factors, neuronal structures, and myelination were analysed by histology and on protein level at appropriate time points. On P28 to P37 long-term outcome was assessed by neurobehavioral testing. Hypothermia confers acute and long-term neuroprotection by reducing apoptosis and preservation of myelinating oligodendrocytes and neurons in a model of acute hypoxia in the neonatal mouse brain. Low-dose LEV caused no adverse effects after neonatal hypoxic brain damage treated with hypothermia whereas administration of high-dose LEV alone or in combination with hypothermia increased neuronal apoptosis after hypoxic brain injury. LEV in low- dosage had no additive neuroprotective effect following acute hypoxic brain injury. PMID:27216570

  6. Study of therapeutic hypothermia (32 to 35°C) for intracranial pressure reduction after traumatic brain injury (the Eurotherm3235Trial): outcome of the pilot phase of the trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical trials in traumatic brain injury (TBI) are challenging. Previous trials of complex interventions were conducted in high-income countries, reported long lead times for site setup and low screened-to-recruitment rates. In this report we evaluate the internal pilot phase of an international, multicentre TBI trial of a complex intervention to assess: design and implementation of an online case report form; feasibility of recruitment (sites and patients); feasibility and effectiveness of delivery of the protocol. Methods All aspects of the pilot phase of the trial were conducted as for the main trial. The pilot phase had oversight by independent Steering and Data Monitoring committees. Results Forty sites across 12 countries gained ethical approval. Thirty seven of 40 sites were initiated for recruitment. Of these, 29 had screened patients and 21 randomized at least one patient. Lead times to ethics approval (6.8 weeks), hospital approval (18 weeks), interest to set up (61 weeks), set up to screening (11 weeks), and set up to randomization (31.6 weeks) are comparable with other international trials. Sixteen per cent of screened patients were eligible. We found 88% compliance rate with trial protocol. Conclusion The pilot data demonstrated good feasibility for this large international multicentre randomized controlled trial of hypothermia to control intracranial pressure. The sample size was reduced to 600 patients because of homogeneity of the patient group and we showed an optimized cooling intervention could be delivered. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN34555414. PMID:24004918

  7. Thermal management during anaesthesia and thermoregulation standards for the prevention of inadvertent perioperative hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Torossian, Alexander

    2008-12-01

    Incidence of inadvertent perioperative hypothermia is still high, and thus thermoregulatory standards are warranted. This review summarizes current evidence of thermal management during anaesthesia, referring to recognized clinical queries (temperature measurement, definition of hypothermia, risk factors, warming methods, implementation strategies). Body temperature is a vital sign, and 37 degrees C is the mean core temperature of a healthy human. Systematic review shows that for non-invasive temperature monitoring the oral route is the most reliable; infrared ear temperature measurement is inaccurate. Intraoperatively, acceptable semi-invasive temperature monitoring sites are the nasopharynx, oesophagus and urinary bladder. Clinically relevant hypothermia starts at 36 degrees C with regard to major adverse outcomes (increased infectious complications, morbid cardiac events, coagulation disorders, prolonged length of hospital stay, and increased costs). Skin surface warming for 20 min immediately before anaesthesia (pre-warming) minimizes initial redistribution hypothermia. Intraoperatively, active warming should be applied when anaesthesia time is > 60 min. Effective methods of active warming are forced-air warming or conductive warming, provided that enough skin surface is available. Infusion fluid warming, increasing the operating room temperature, and warming of irrigation fluids are adjunctive therapies. The patient's body temperature should be above 36 degrees C before induction of anaesthesia, and should be measured continuously throughout surgery. Active warming should be applied intraoperatively. Postoperative patient temperature and outcomes should be evaluated. PMID:19137809

  8. Quality improvement in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease: Moving forward to improve outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Quach, Pauline; Nguyen, Geoffrey C; Benchimol, Eric I

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, pediatric health care has embraced the concept of quality improvement to improve patient outcomes. As quality improvement efforts are implemented, network collaboration (where multiple centers and practices implement standardized programs) is a popular option. In a collaborative network, improvement in the conduct of structural, process and outcome quality measures can lead to improvements in overall health, and benchmarks can be used to assess and compare progress. In this review article, we provided an overview of the quality improvement movement and the role of quality indicators in this movement. We reviewed current quality improvement efforts in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), as well as other pediatric chronic illnesses. We discussed the need to standardize the development of quality indicators used in quality improvement networks to assess medical care, and the validation techniques which can be used to ensure that process indicators result in improved outcomes of clinical significance. We aimed to assess current quality improvement efforts in pediatric IBD and other diseases, such as childhood asthma, childhood arthritis, and neonatal health. By doing so, we hope to learn from their successes and failures and to move the field forward for future improvements in the care provided to children with IBD. PMID:24151355

  9. Acute Type A Aortic Dissection: for Further Improvement of Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Despite improved outcomes of acute type A aortic dissection (AAAD), many patients die at the moment of onset, and hospital mortality is still high. This article reviews the latest literature to seek the best possible way to optimize outcomes. Delayed diagnosis is caused by variation in or absence of typical symptoms, especially in patients with neurological symptoms. Misdiagnosis as acute myocardial infarction is another problem. Improved awareness by physicians is needed. On arrival, quick admission to the OR is desirable, followed by assessment with transesophageal echocardiography, and malperfusion already exists or newly develops in the OR; thus, timely diagnosis without delay with multimodality assessment is important. Although endovascular therapy is promising, careful introduction is mandatory so as not to cause complications. While various routes are used for the systemic perfusion, not a single route is perfect, and careful monitoring is essential. Surgical treatment on octogenarians is increasingly performed and produces better outcomes than conservative therapy. Complications are not rare, and consent from the family is essential. Prevention of AAAD is another important issue because more patients die at its onset than in the following treatment. In addition to hereditary diseases, including bicuspid aortic valve disease, the management of blood pressure is important. PMID:23555530

  10. Multidisciplinary in-hospital teams improve patient outcomes: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The use of multidisciplinary in-hospital teams limits adverse events (AE), improves outcomes, and adds to patient and employee satisfaction. Methods: Acting like “well-oiled machines,” multidisciplinary in-hospital teams include “staff” from different levels of the treatment pyramid (e.g. staff including nurses’ aids, surgical technicians, nurses, anesthesiologists, attending physicians, and others). Their enhanced teamwork counters the “silo effect” by enhancing communication between the different levels of healthcare workers and thus reduces AE (e.g. morbidity/mortality) while improving patient and healthcare worker satisfaction. Results: Multiple articles across diverse disciplines incorporate a variety of concepts of “teamwork” for staff covering emergency rooms (ERs), hospital wards, intensive care units (ICUs), and most critically, operating rooms (ORs). Cohesive teamwork improved communication between different levels of healthcare workers, and limited adverse events, improved outcomes, decreased the length of stay (LOS), and yielded greater patient “staff” satisfaction. Conclusion: Within hospitals, delivering the best medical/surgical care is a “team sport.” The goals include: Maximizing patient safety (e.g. limiting AE) and satisfaction, decreasing the LOS, and increasing the quality of outcomes. Added benefits include optimizing healthcare workers’ performance, reducing hospital costs/complications, and increasing job satisfaction. This review should remind hospital administrators of the critical need to keep multidisciplinary teams together, so that they can continue to operate their “well-oiled machines” enhancing the quality/safety of patient care, while enabling “staff” to optimize their performance and enhance their job satisfaction. PMID:25289149

  11. Systemic lupus erythematosus: strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yuriko; Aoki, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease with a high prevalence in females of childbearing age. Thus, reproduction in SLE patients is a major concern for clinicians. In the past, SLE patients were advised to defer pregnancy because of poor pregnancy outcomes and fear of SLE flares during pregnancy. Investigations to date show that maternal and fetal risks are higher in females with SLE than in the general population. However, with appropriate management of the disease, sufferers may have a relatively uncomplicated pregnancy course. Factors such as appropriate preconception counseling and medication adjustment, strict disease control prior to pregnancy, intensive surveillance during and after pregnancy by both the obstetrician and rheumatologist, and appropriate interventions when necessary play a key role. This review describes the strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes in SLE patients at different time points in the reproduction cycle (preconception, during pregnancy, and postpartum period) and also details the neonatal concerns. PMID:27468250

  12. Systemic lupus erythematosus: strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuriko; Aoki, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease with a high prevalence in females of childbearing age. Thus, reproduction in SLE patients is a major concern for clinicians. In the past, SLE patients were advised to defer pregnancy because of poor pregnancy outcomes and fear of SLE flares during pregnancy. Investigations to date show that maternal and fetal risks are higher in females with SLE than in the general population. However, with appropriate management of the disease, sufferers may have a relatively uncomplicated pregnancy course. Factors such as appropriate preconception counseling and medication adjustment, strict disease control prior to pregnancy, intensive surveillance during and after pregnancy by both the obstetrician and rheumatologist, and appropriate interventions when necessary play a key role. This review describes the strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes in SLE patients at different time points in the reproduction cycle (preconception, during pregnancy, and postpartum period) and also details the neonatal concerns. PMID:27468250

  13. New approaches for improving outcomes in breast cancer in Europe.

    PubMed

    Di Leo, Angelo; Curigliano, Giuseppe; Diéras, Véronique; Malorni, Luca; Sotiriou, Christos; Swanton, Charles; Thompson, Alastair; Tutt, Andrew; Piccart, Martine

    2015-08-01

    Considerable progress has been made in breast cancer treatment in Europe over the past three decades, yet survival rates for metastatic disease remain poor, underlining the need for further advances. While the use of predictive biomarkers for response to systemic therapy could improve drug development efficiency, progress in identifying such markers has been slow. The currently inadequate classification of breast cancer subtypes is a further challenge. Improved understanding of the molecular pathology of the disease has led to the identification of new targets for drug treatment, and evolving classifications should reflect these developments. Further ongoing challenges include difficulties in finding optimal combinations and sequences of systemic therapies, circumventing multidrug resistance and intra-tumor heterogeneity, problems associated with fragmentation in clinical trials and translational research efforts. Adoption of some of the strategies identified in this article may lead to further improvements in outcomes for patients with the disease. PMID:25840656

  14. Improving stroke outcome: the benefits of increasing availability of technology.

    PubMed Central

    Heller, R. F.; Langhorne, P.; James, E.

    2000-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A decision analysis was performed to explore the potential benefits of interventions to improve the outcome of patients admitted to hospital with a stroke, in the context of the technology available in different parts of the world. METHODS: The outcome of death or dependency was used with a six-month end-point. RESULTS: Four settings were identified that would depend on the resources available. The proportion of stroke patients who were dead or dependent at six months was 61.5% with no intervention at all. Setting 4, with the only intervention being the delayed introduction of aspirin, produced a 0.5% absolute improvement in outcome (death or dependency), and the addition of an organized stroke unit (Setting 3) produced the largest incremental improvement, of 2.7%. Extra interventions associated with non-urgent computed tomography and thus the ability to avoid anticoagulation or aspirin for those with a haemorrhagic stroke (Setting 2), and immediate computed tomography scanning to allow the use of thrombolytics in non-haemorrhagic stroke (Setting 1), produced only small incremental benefits of 0.4% in each case. DISCUSSION: To reduce the burden of illness due to stroke, efforts at primary prevention are essential and likely to have a greater impact than even the best interventions after the event. In the absence of good primary prevention, whatever is possible must be done to reduce the sequelae of stroke. This analysis provides a rational basis for beginning the development of clinical guidelines applicable to the economic setting of the patient. PMID:11143194

  15. Chemotherapy: Does Neoadjuvant or Adjuvant Therapy Improve Outcomes?

    PubMed

    Canter, Robert J

    2016-10-01

    Since preoperative chemotherapy has been clearly shown to improve outcomes for patients with Ewing sarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and osteosarcoma, practitioners have attempted to extend the use of adjuvant/neoadjuvant chemotherapy to other types of adult soft tissue sarcoma. Given the high risk of distant recurrence and disease-specific death for patients with soft tissue sarcoma tumors larger than 10 cm, these patients should be considered candidates for neoadjuvant chemotherapy as well as investigational therapies. Yet, potential toxicity from cytotoxic chemotherapy is substantial, and there remains little consensus and wide variation regarding the indications for use of chemotherapy in the adjuvant/neoadjuvant setting. PMID:27591503

  16. Free oscillation rheometry monitoring of haemodilution and hypothermia and correction with fibrinogen and factor XIII concentrates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    starch induced clot instability, but improved coagulation in blood diluted with Ringer’s acetate solution. Fibrinogen improved coagulation irrespective of hypothermia. PMID:23517637

  17. Prenatal emotion management improves obstetric outcomes: a randomized control study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian; Li, He-Jiang; Wang, Jue; Mao, Hong-Jing; Jiang, Wen-Ying; Zhou, Hong; Chen, Shu-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Negative emotions can cause a number of prenatal problems and disturb obstetric outcomes. We determined the effectiveness of prenatal emotional management on obstetric outcomes in nulliparas. Methods: All participants completed the PHQ-9 at the baseline assessment. Then, the participants were randomly assigned to the emotional management (EM) and usual care (UC) groups. The baseline evaluation began at 31 weeks gestation and the participants were followed up to 42 days postpartum. Each subject in the EM group received an extra EM program while the participants in the UC groups received routine prenatal care and education only. The PHQ-9 and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression scale (EPDS) were used for assessment. Results: The EM group had a lower PHQ-9 score at 36 weeks gestation, and 7 and 42 days after delivery (P < 0.01), and a lower EPDS score 42 days postpartum (P < 0.05). The rate of cesarean section in the EM group was lower than the UC group (P < 0.01), and the cesarean section rate without a medical indication was lower (P < 0.01). The duration of the second stage of labor in the EM group was shorter than the UC group (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Prenatal EM intervention could control anxiety and depressive feelings in nulliparas, and improve obstetric outcomes. It may serve as an innovative approach to reduce the cesarean section rate in China. PMID:26309641

  18. Improving Outcomes in State AIDS Drug Assistance Programs

    PubMed Central

    Linas, Benjamin P.; Losina, Elena; Rockwell, Annette; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Cranston, Kevin; Freedberg, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    Background State AIDS Drug Assistance Programs (ADAPs) provide antiretroviral medications to patients with no access to medications. Resource constraints limit many ADAPs' ability to meet demand for services. Objective To determine ADAP eligibility criteria that minimize morbidity and mortality and contain costs. Methods We used Discrete Event Simulation to model the progression of HIV-infected patients and track utilization of an ADAP. Outcomes included five-year mortality and incidence of first opportunistic infection or death, and time to starting ART. We compared expected outcomes for two policies: 1) first-come, first-served (FCFS) eligibility for all with CD4 count ≤350/μl (current standard), and 2) CD4 count prioritized eligibility for those with CD4 counts below a defined threshold. Results In the base case, prioritizing patients with CD4 counts ≤250/μl led to lower five-year mortality than FCFS eligibility [2.77 vs. 3.27 deaths/1,000 person months], and to a lower incidence of first opportunistic infection or death [5.55 vs. 6.98 events/1,000 person months]. CD4-based eligibility reduced the time to starting ART for patients with CD4 counts ≤200/μl. In sensitivity analyses, CD4-based eligibility consistently led to lower morbidity and mortality than FCFS eligibility. Conclusions When resources are limited, programs that provide ART can improve outcomes by prioritizing patients with low CD4 counts. PMID:19561518

  19. Fever After Rewarming: Incidence of Pyrexia in Post-Cardiac Arrest Patients who have Undergone Mild Therapeutic Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Cocchi, Michael N.; Boone, Myles D.; Giberson, Brandon; Giberson, Tyler; Farrell, Emily; Salciccioli, Justin D.; Talmor, Daniel; Williams, Donna; Donnino, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Among a cohort of patients who underwent mild therapeutic hypothermia after OHCA, more than half of these patients developed pyrexia in the first 24 hours after rewarming. While there were no significant differences in outcomes between febrile and non-febrile patients identified in this study, these findings should be further evaluated in a larger cohort. Future investigations may be needed to determine if post-rewarming temperature management will improve outcomes in this population. PMID:23783999

  20. Multiscale Entropy Analysis of EEG for Assessment of Post-Cardiac Arrest Neurological Recovery Under Hypothermia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xiaoxu; Jia, Xiaofeng; Geocadin, Romergryko G.; Maybhate, Anil

    2011-01-01

    Neurological complications after cardiac arrest (CA) can be fatal. Although hypothermia has been shown to be beneficial, understanding the mechanism and establishing neurological outcomes remains challenging because effects of CA and hypothermia are not well characterized. This paper aims to analyze EEG (and the α-rhythms) using multiscale entropy (MSE) to demonstrate the ability of MSE in tracking changes due to hypothermia and compare MSE during early recovery with long-term neurological examinations. Ten Wistar rats, upon post-CA resuscitation, were randomly subjected to hypothermia (32 °C–34 °C, N = 5) or normothermia (36.5 °C–37.5 °C, N = 5). EEG was recorded and analyzed using MSE during seven recovery phases for each experiment: baseline, CA, and five early recovery phases (R1–R5). Postresuscitation neurological examination was performed at 6, 24, 48, and 72 h to obtain neurological deficit scores (NDSs). Results showed MSE to be a sensitive marker of changes in α-rhythms. Significant difference (p < 0.05) was found between the MSE for two groups during recovery, suggesting that MSE can successfully reflect temperature modulation. A comparison of short-term MSE and long-term NDS suggested that MSE could be used for predicting favorability of long-term outcome. These experiments point to the role of cortical rhythms in reporting early neurological response to ischemia and therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:19174339

  1. Multiscale entropy analysis of EEG for assessment of post-cardiac arrest neurological recovery under hypothermia in rats.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xiaoxu; Jia, Xiaofeng; Geocadin, Romergryko G; Thakor, Nitish V; Maybhate, Anil

    2009-04-01

    Neurological complications after cardiac arrest (CA) can be fatal. Although hypothermia has been shown to be beneficial, understanding the mechanism and establishing neurological outcomes remains challenging because effects of CA and hypothermia are not well characterized. This paper aims to analyze EEG (and the alpha-rhythms) using multiscale entropy (MSE) to demonstrate the ability of MSE in tracking changes due to hypothermia and compare MSE during early recovery with long-term neurological examinations. Ten Wistar rats, upon post-CA resuscitation, were randomly subjected to hypothermia (32 degrees C-34 degrees C, N = 5) or normothermia (36.5 degrees C-37.5 degrees C, N = 5). EEG was recorded and analyzed using MSE during seven recovery phases for each experiment: baseline, CA, and five early recovery phases (R1-R5). Postresuscitation neurological examination was performed at 6, 24, 48, and 72 h to obtain neurological deficit scores (NDSs). Results showed MSE to be a sensitive marker of changes in alpha-rhythms. Significant difference (p < 0.05) was found between the MSE for two groups during recovery, suggesting that MSE can successfully reflect temperature modulation. A comparison of short-term MSE and long-term NDS suggested that MSE could be used for predicting favorability of long-term outcome. These experiments point to the role of cortical rhythms in reporting early neurological response to ischemia and therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:19174339

  2. Improving Outcome of Psychosocial Treatments by Enhancing Memory and Learning

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Allison G.; Lee, Jason; Williams, Joseph; Hollon, Steven D.; Walker, Matthew P.; Thompson, Monique A.; Smith, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Mental disorders are prevalent and lead to significant impairment. Progress toward establishing treatments has been good. However, effect sizes are small to moderate, gains may not persist, and many patients derive no benefit. Our goal is to highlight the potential for empirically-supported psychosocial treatments to be improved by incorporating insights from cognitive psychology and research on education. Our central question is: If it were possible to improve memory for content of sessions of psychosocial treatments, would outcome substantially improve? This question arises from five lines of evidence: (a) mental illness is often characterized by memory impairment, (b) memory impairment is modifiable, (c) psychosocial treatments often involve the activation of emotion, (d) emotion can bias memory and (e) memory for psychosocial treatment sessions is poor. Insights from scientific knowledge on learning and memory are leveraged to derive strategies for a transdiagnostic and transtreatment cognitive support intervention. These strategies can be applied within and between sessions and to interventions delivered via computer, the internet and text message. Additional novel pathways to improving memory include improving sleep, engaging in exercise and imagery. Given that memory processes change across the lifespan, services to children and older adults may benefit from cognitive support. PMID:25544856

  3. Improving Outcome of Psychosocial Treatments by Enhancing Memory and Learning.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Allison G; Lee, Jason; Williams, Joseph; Hollon, Steven D; Walker, Matthew P; Thompson, Monique A; Smith, Rita

    2014-03-01

    Mental disorders are prevalent and can lead to significant impairment. Some progress has been made toward establishing treatments; however, effect sizes are small to moderate, gains may not persist, and many patients derive no benefit. Our goal is to highlight the potential for empirically supported psychosocial treatments to be improved by incorporating insights from cognitive psychology and research on education. Our central question is: If it were possible to improve memory for the content of sessions of psychosocial treatments, would outcome substantially improve? We leverage insights from scientific knowledge on learning and memory to derive strategies for transdiagnostic and transtreatment cognitive support interventions. These strategies can be applied within and between sessions and to interventions delivered via computer, the Internet, and text message. Additional novel pathways to improving memory include improving sleep, engaging in exercise, and using imagery. Given that memory processes change across the lifespan, services to children and older adults may benefit from different types and amounts of cognitive support. PMID:25544856

  4. Mini incision open pyeloplasty - Improvement in patient outcome

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vishwajeet; Garg, Manish; Sharma, Pradeep; Sinha, Rahul Janak; Kumar, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To assess the subjective and objective outcomes of mini-incision dismembered Anderson-Hynes pyeloplasty in the treatment of primary ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO). Materials and Methods: Between January 2008 to January 2013, Anderson-Hynes pyeloplasty was performed in 71 patients diagnosed with primary UPJO. Small subcostal muscle splitting incision was used in all cases. Sixteen patients with renal calculi underwent concomitant pyelolithotomy. Subjective outcome was assessed using visual pain analogue score (VAS). For objective assessment, the improvement in differential renal function (DRF) and radio-tracer wash out time (T1/2) on Tc-99m DTPA scan and decrease in hydronephrosis (HDN) on renal ultrasound (USG) and urography (IVU) were assessed. Results: Mean incision length was 5.2 cm. The average operating time and postoperative hospital stay was 63 (52-124) minutes and 2.5 (2–6) days respectively. Concomitant renal calculi were successfully removed in all the patients. Overall complication rates were 8.4% and overall success rate was 98.6% at median follow-up of 16 months. There was significant improvement in pain score (p=0.0001) and significant decrease in HDN after the procedure. While preoperative mean T1/2 was 26.7±6.4 minutes, postoperative half-time decreased to 7.8±4.2 minutes at 6 months and to 6.7±3.3 minutes at 1 year. Mean pre-operative DRF was 26.45% and it was 31.38% and 33.19% at 6 months and 1 year respectively. Conclusions: Mini-incision pyeloplasty is a safe and effective technique with combined advantage of high success rates of standard open pyeloplasty with decreased morbidity of laparoscopic approach. Excellent functional and objective outcomes can be achieved without extra technical difficulty. PMID:26689518

  5. Translating research into improved outcomes in comprehensive cancer control.

    PubMed

    Kerner, Jon F; Guirguis-Blake, Janelle; Hennessy, Kevin D; Brounstein, Paul J; Vinson, Cynthia; Schwartz, Randy H; Myers, Bradford A; Briss, Peter

    2005-10-01

    A key question in moving comprehensive cancer control (CCC) plans into action is, to what extent should the knowledge gained from investments in cancer prevention and control research influence the actions taken by states, tribes, and territories during implementation? Underlying this 'should' is the assumption that evidence-based approaches (i.e., a public health or clinical intervention or policy that has resulted in improved outcomes when scientifically tested), when implemented in a real-world setting, will increase the likelihood of improved outcomes. This article elucidates the barriers and opportunities for integrating science with practice across the cancer control continuum. However, given the scope of CCC and the substantial investment in generating new knowledge through science, it is difficult for any one agency, on its own, to make a sufficient investment to ensure new knowledge is translated and implemented at a national, state, or local level. Thus, if greater demand for evidence-based interventions and increased resources for adopting them are going to support the dissemination initiatives described herein, new interagency partnerships must be developed to ensure that sufficient means are dedicated to integrating science with service. Furthermore, for these collaborations to increase both in size and in frequency, agency leaders must clearly articulate their support for these collaborative initiatives and explicitly recognize those collaborative efforts that are successful. In this way, the whole (in this context, comprehensive cancer control) can become greater than the sum of its parts. PMID:16208572

  6. Hypothermia and the Elderly: Perceptions and Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Carol E.; Pestle, Ruth E.

    1987-01-01

    Interviewed 381 older adults participating in Area Agency on Aging meal programs in Florida. Found that only 10 percent were aware of dangers of accidental hypothermia. Many low-income elderly are vulnerable to cold because of poorly insulated homes, inadequate heating, and lack of warm clothing. States need initiatives to increase comfort levels…

  7. [Hypothermia in people in situations of precarity].

    PubMed

    Bernard, Serge

    2011-05-01

    Human beings are physiologically warm blooded. Confronted with extreme cold, they become subject to hypothermia. Between a mountain climber and a person living in the street, the functions of resistance to a drop in external temperature are not the same. Studies on this subject remain to be carried out. PMID:21717680

  8. Improved facial outcome assessment using a 3D anthropometric mask.

    PubMed

    Claes, P; Walters, M; Clement, J

    2012-03-01

    The capacity to process three-dimensional facial surfaces to objectively assess outcomes of craniomaxillofacial care is urgently required. Available surface registration techniques depart from conventional facial anthropometrics by not including anatomical relationship in their analysis. Current registrations rely on the manual selection of areas or points that have not moved during surgery, introducing subjectivity. An improved technique is proposed based on the concept of an anthropometric mask (AM) combined with robust superimposition. The AM is the equivalent to landmark definitions, as used in traditional anthropometrics, but described in a spatially dense way using (∼10.000) quasi-landmarks. A robust superimposition is performed to align surface images facilitating accurate measurement of spatial differences between corresponding quasi-landmarks. The assessment describes magnitude and direction of change objectively and can be displayed graphically. The technique was applied to three patients, without any modification and prior knowledge: a 4-year-old boy with Treacher-Collins syndrome in a resting and smiling pose; surgical correction for hemimandibular hypoplasia; and mandibular hypoplasia with staged orthognathic procedures. Comparisons were made with a reported closest-point (CP) strategy. Contrasting outcomes were found where the CP strategy resulted in anatomical implausibility whilst the AM technique was parsimonious to expected differences. PMID:22103995

  9. Improved outcome of nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with conventional radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Palazzi, Mauro . E-mail: mauro.palazzi@istitutotumori.mi.it; Guzzo, Marco; Tomatis, Stefano Ph.D.; Cerrotta, Annamaria; Potepan, Paolo; Quattrone, Pasquale; Cantu, Giulio

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: To describe the outcome of patients with nonmetastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with conventional radiotherapy at a single institution. Methods and materials: From 1990 to 1999, 171 consecutive patients with NPC were treated with conventional (two-dimensional) radiotherapy. Tumor histology was undifferentiated in 82% of cases. Tumor-node-metastasis Stage (American Joint Committee on Cancer/International Union Against Cancer 1997 system) was I in 6%, II in 36%, III in 22%, and IV in 36% of patients. Mean total radiation dose was 68.4 Gy. Chemotherapy was given to 62% of the patients. The median follow-up for surviving patients was 6.3 years (range, 3.1-13.1 years). Results: The 5-year overall survival, disease-specific survival, and disease-free survival rates were 72%, 74%, and 62%, respectively. The 5-year local, regional, and distant control rates were 84%, 80%, and 83% respectively. Late effects of radiotherapy were prospectively recorded in 100 patients surviving without relapse; 44% of these patients had Grade 3 xerostomia, 33% had Grade 3 dental damage, and 11% had Grade 3 hearing loss. Conclusions: This analysis shows an improved outcome for patients treated from 1990 to 1999 compared with earlier retrospective series, despite the use of two-dimensional radiotherapy. Late toxicity, however, was substantial with conventional radiotherapy.

  10. Postoperative management of hip fractures: interventions associated with improved outcomes.

    PubMed

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S

    2012-01-01

    The annual number of hip fractures worldwide is expected to exceed 6 million by 2050. Currently, nearly 50% of hip fracture patients will develop at least one short-term complication including infection, delirium, venous thromboembolism (VTE), pressure ulcers or cardiovascular events. More than half will experience an adverse long-term outcomes including worsened ambulation or functional status, additional fractures and excess mortality. This paper summarizes current evidence for postoperative interventions attempting to improve these outcomes, including pain management, anemia management, delirium prevention strategies, VTE prophylaxis, rehabilitation type, nutritional supplements, anabolic steroids and secondary fracture prevention. Models of care that have been tested in this population including interdisciplinary orthogeriatric services, clinical pathways and hospitalist care are summarized. In general, good quality evidence supports routine use of VTE prophylaxis, and moderate quality evidence supports multifactorial delirium prevention protocols, and a conservative transfusion strategy. Aggressive pain control with higher doses of opiates and/or regional blocks are associated with lower delirium rates. Low-moderate quality evidence supports the use of clinical pathways, and dedicated orthogeriatric consultative services or wards. After hospital discharge, good quality evidence supports the use of bisphosphonates for secondary fracture prevention and mortality reduction. Rehabilitation services are important, but evidence to guide quantity, type or venue is lacking. Additional research is needed to clarify the role of nutritional supplements, anabolic steroids, home care and psychosocial interventions. PMID:24340216

  11. Valuing preferences over stormwater management outcomes including improved hydrologic function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LondoñO Cadavid, Catalina; Ando, Amy W.

    2013-07-01

    Stormwater runoff causes environmental problems such as flooding, soil erosion, and water pollution. Conventional stormwater management has focused primarily on flood reduction, while a new generation of decentralized stormwater solutions yields ancillary benefits such as healthier aquatic habitat, improved surface water quality, and increased water table recharge. Previous research has estimated values for flood reduction from stormwater management, but no estimates exist for the willingness to pay (WTP) for some of the other environmental benefits of alternative approaches to stormwater control. This paper uses a choice experiment survey of households in Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, to estimate the values of several attributes of stormwater management outcomes. We analyzed data from 131 surveyed households in randomly selected neighborhoods. We find that people value reduced basement flooding more than reductions in yard or street flooding, but WTP for basement flood reduction in the area only exists if individuals are currently experiencing significant flooding themselves. Citizens value both improved water quality and improved hydrologic function and aquatic habitat from runoff reduction. Thus, widespread investment in low impact development stormwater solutions could have very large total benefits, and stormwater managers should be wary of policies and infrastructure plans that reduce flooding at the expense of water quality and aquatic habitat.

  12. Can restoring incomplete microcirculatory reperfusion improve stroke outcome after thrombolysis?

    PubMed Central

    Dalkara, Turgay; Arsava, Ethem Murat

    2012-01-01

    Substantial experimental data and recent clinical evidence suggesting that tissue reperfusion is a better predictor of outcome after thrombolysis than recanalization necessitate that patency of microcirculation after recanalization should be reevaluated. If indeed microcirculatory blood flow cannot be sufficiently reinstituted despite complete recanalization as commonly observed in coronary circulation, it may be one of the factors contributing to low efficacy of thrombolysis in stroke. Although microvascular no-reflow is considered an irreversible process that prevents tissue recovery from injury, emerging evidence suggests that it might be reversed with pharmacological agents administered early during recanalization. Therefore, therapeutic approaches aiming at reducing microvascular obstructions may improve success rate of recanalization therapies. Importantly, promoting oxygen delivery to the tissue, where entrapped erythrocytes cannot circulate in capillaries, with ongoing serum flow may improve survival of the underreperfused tissue. Altogether, these developments bring about the exciting possibility that benefit of reperfusion therapies can be further improved by restoring microcirculatory function because survival in the penumbra critically depends on adequate blood supply. Here, we review the available evidence suggesting presence of an ‘incomplete microcirculatory reperfusion' (IMR) after focal cerebral ischemia and discuss potential means that may help investigate IMR in stroke patients after recanalization therapies despite technical limitations. PMID:23047270

  13. Preparing the patient for surgery to improve outcomes.

    PubMed

    Levett, Denny Z H; Edwards, Mark; Grocott, Mike; Mythen, Monty

    2016-06-01

    The time between contemplation of surgery and the procedure offers a window of opportunity to optimize patients' nutritional, functional and psychological state prior to surgery. Traditionally, preoperative pathways have focused on the underlying disease process and 'fitness for surgery' with physical pre-assessment and risk counselling late in the pathway when little time is available to intervene. With an increasingly elderly and co-morbid surgical population, early physiological assessment and multidisciplinary collaborative decision-making is increasingly important. Multimodal prehabilitation programmes may improve surgical outcome, facilitating rapid recovery from surgery and limiting post-operative functional dependence. Patient education and engagement is important if compliance with behavioural change is to be achieved and maintained. To date, there has been evidence supporting preoperative exercise training, smoking cessation, reduction in alcohol intake, anaemia management and psychosocial support. Further research is needed to identify the most effective elements of these complex preoperative interventions, as well as their optimum timing and duration. PMID:27396803

  14. Adaptive Programming Improves Outcomes in Drug Court: An Experimental Trial

    PubMed Central

    Marlowe, Douglas B.; Festinger, David S.; Dugosh, Karen L.; Benasutti, Kathleen M.; Fox, Gloria; Croft, Jason R.

    2011-01-01

    Prior studies in Drug Courts reported improved outcomes when participants were matched to schedules of judicial status hearings based on their criminological risk level. The current experiment determined whether incremental efficacy could be gained by periodically adjusting the schedule of status hearings and clinical case-management sessions in response to participants’ ensuing performance in the program. The adjustments were made pursuant to a priori criteria specified in an adaptive algorithm. Results confirmed that participants in the full adaptive condition (n = 62) were more than twice as likely as those assigned to baseline-matching only (n = 63) to be drug-abstinent during the first 18 weeks of the program; however, graduation rates and the average time to case resolution were not significantly different. The positive effects of the adaptive program appear to have stemmed from holding noncompliant participants more accountable for meeting their attendance obligations in the program. Directions for future research and practice implications are discussed. PMID:22923854

  15. Anti-lysophosphatidic acid antibodies improve traumatic brain injury outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid with a potentially causative role in neurotrauma. Blocking LPA signaling with the LPA-directed monoclonal antibody B3/Lpathomab is neuroprotective in the mouse spinal cord following injury. Findings Here we investigated the use of this agent in treatment of secondary brain damage consequent to traumatic brain injury (TBI). LPA was elevated in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with TBI compared to controls. LPA levels were also elevated in a mouse controlled cortical impact (CCI) model of TBI and B3 significantly reduced lesion volume by both histological and MRI assessments. Diminished tissue damage coincided with lower brain IL-6 levels and improvement in functional outcomes. Conclusions This study presents a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of TBI by blocking extracellular LPA signaling to minimize secondary brain damage and neurological dysfunction. PMID:24576351

  16. Improving MILSATCOM (Military Satellite Communication) acquisition outcomes: Lease versus buy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinneen, P. M.; Quinn, T. H.

    1985-01-01

    This study was requested by the Director of Space Systems and Command, Control, and Communications, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff (Research, Development, and Acquisition), Headquarters United States Air Force, to assist in improving the outcomes of military satellite communication (MILSATCOM) programs. In view of rapidly rising costs of military space systems, leasing has been suggested as one way of controlling these costs. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to identify and analyze the central considerations relevant to determining whether to lease or by MILSATCOM services. The results of this report should be of interest to members of MILSATCOM acquisition community and others concerned with making lease versus buy decisions in the public sector. The work was conducted under the MILSATCOM Acquisition Policy project of the Project Air Force Resource Management Program.

  17. Defining lactation acuity to improve patient safety and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mannel, Rebecca

    2011-05-01

    While substantial evidence exists identifying risks factors associated with premature weaning from breastfeeding, there are no previously published definitions of patient acuity in the lactation field. This article defines evidence-based levels of lactation acuity based on maternal and infant characteristics. Patient acuity, matching severity of illness to intensity of care required, is an important determinant of patient safety and outcomes. It is often used as part of a patient classification system to determine staffing needs and acceptable workloads in health care settings. As acuity increases, more resources, including more skilled clinicians, are needed to provide optimal care. Developing an evidence-based definition of lactation acuity can help to standardize terminology, more effectively distribute health care staff resources, encourage research to verify the validity and reliability of lactation acuity, and potentially improve breastfeeding initiation and duration rates. PMID:21527797

  18. Improving pregnancy outcome during imprisonment: a model residential care program.

    PubMed

    Siefert, K; Pimlott, S

    2001-04-01

    The female prison population has increased dramatically in recent years. Most women prisoners are involved with drugs, and as many as 25 percent are pregnant or have delivered within the past year. Reproductive health and drug treatment services for women in prison are inadequate, if they are available at all, and although illicit drugs are readily available in prison, drug-involved pregnant women often are incarcerated to protect fetal health. Studies of pregnancy outcome among women prisoners have demonstrated high rates of perinatal mortality and morbidity. This article examines issues related to pregnancy among women prisoners and describes an innovative residential program designed for pregnant, drug-dependent women in a state adult corrections system. Social workers can play an important role in promoting policy reform and improved services for this underserved population. PMID:11329642

  19. Integrating empowerment evaluation and quality improvement to achieve healthcare improvement outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wandersman, Abraham; Alia, Kassandra Ann; Cook, Brittany; Ramaswamy, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    While the body of evidence-based healthcare interventions grows, the ability of health systems to deliver these interventions effectively and efficiently lags behind. Quality improvement approaches, such as the model for improvement, have demonstrated some success in healthcare but their impact has been lessened by implementation challenges. To help address these challenges, we describe the empowerment evaluation approach that has been developed by programme evaluators and a method for its application (Getting To Outcomes (GTO)). We then describe how GTO can be used to implement healthcare interventions. An illustrative healthcare quality improvement example that compares the model for improvement and the GTO method for reducing hospital admissions through improved diabetes care is described. We conclude with suggestions for integrating GTO and the model for improvement. PMID:26178332

  20. Biomarkers of Brain Injury in Neonatal Encephalopathy Treated with Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Massaro, An N.; Chang, Taeun; Kadom, Nadja; Tsuchida, Tammy; Scafidi, Joseph; Glass, Penny; McCarter, Robert; Baumgart, Stephen; Vezina, Gilbert; Nelson, Karin B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine if early serum S100B and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) levels are associated with neuroradiographic and clinical evidence of brain injury in newborns with encephalopathy. Study design Patients who received therapeutic whole-body hypothermia were prospectively enrolled in this observational study. Serum specimens were collected at 0, 12, 24, and 72 hours of cooling. S100B and NSE levels were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in surviving infants at 7–10 days of life. Standardized neurologic examination was performed by a child neurologist at 14 days of life. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to evaluate the association between S100B and NSE levels and unfavorable outcome (death or severe magnetic resonance imaging injury/significant neurologic deficit). Cutoff values were determined by receiver operating curve analysis. Results Newborns with moderate to severe encephalopathy were enrolled (n = 75). Median pH at presentation was 6.9 (range, 6.5–7.35), and median Apgar scores of 1 at 1 minute, 3 at 5 minutes, and 5 at 10 minutes. NSE and S100B levels were higher in patients with unfavorable outcomes across all time points. These results remained statistically significant after controlling for covariables, including encephalopathy grade at presentation, Apgar score at 5 minutes of life, initial pH, and clinical seizures. Conclusion Elevated serum S100B and NSE levels measured during hypothermia were associated with neuroradiographic and clinical evidence of brain injury in encephalopathic newborns. These brain-specific proteins may be useful immediate biomarkers of cerebral injury severity. PMID:22494878

  1. Can States Simultaneously Improve Health Outcomes and Reduce Health Outcome Disparities?

    PubMed Central

    Lardinois, Nicholas; Chatterjee, Debanjana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Reducing racial health disparities is often stated as a population health goal, but specific targets for such improvement are seldom set. It is often assumed that improving overall health outcomes will be linked to disparity reduction, but this is not necessarily the case. Methods We compared the annual change from 1999 through 2013 in combined-race (black and white) mortality with the annual change in absolute and relative racial mortality disparities for US states. Results Median annual improvement in combined-race mortality was 1.08% per year. Annual overall mortality rate reductions ranged from 0.24% per year in Oklahoma to 1.83% per year in Maryland. For disparities, the median for the black–white absolute gap was 3.60% per year, and the median for the relative black-to-white ratio was 1.19% per year. There was no significant correlation between the combined-race measure and either the absolute (0.03) or relative disparity measure reductions (−0.17). Conclusion For mortality in US states over a recent period, improvement in the population mean and disparity reduction do not usually occur together. The disparity reduction rates observed may provide realistic guidance for public and private policy makers in setting goals for reducing population health disparity and creating investment priorities. As a starting point for discussion, the observed national median annual percentage improvement of 1.1 per year combined, 3.6% per year absolute gap reduction, and 1.2% per year relative gap reduction would be modest and reasonable goals. PMID:27560720

  2. DoMINO: Donor milk for improved neurodevelopmental outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Provision of mother’s own milk is the optimal way to feed infants, including very low birth weight infants (VLBW, <1500 g). Importantly for VLBW infants, who are at elevated risk of neurologic sequelae, mother’s own milk has been shown to enhance neurocognitive development. Unfortunately, the majority of mothers of VLBW infants are unable to provide an adequate supply of milk and thus supplementation with formula or donor milk is necessary. Given the association between mother’s own milk and neurodevelopment, it is important to ascertain whether provision of human donor milk as a supplement may yield superior neurodevelopmental outcomes compared to formula. Our primary hypothesis is that VLBW infants fed pasteurized donor milk compared to preterm formula as a supplement to mother’s own milk for 90 days or until hospital discharge, whichever comes first, will have an improved cognitive outcome as measured at 18 months corrected age on the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, 3rd ed. Secondary hypotheses are that the use of pasteurized donor milk will: (1) reduce a composite of death and serious morbidity; (2) support growth; and (3) improve language and motor development. Exploratory research questions include: Will use of pasteurized donor milk: (1) influence feeding tolerance and nutrient intake (2) have an acceptable cost effectiveness from a comprehensive societal perspective? Methods/Design DoMINO is a multi-centre, intent-to-treat, double blinded, randomized control trial. VLBW infants (n = 363) were randomized within four days of birth to either (1) pasteurized donor milk or (2) preterm formula whenever mother’s own milk was unavailable. Study recruitment began in October 2010 and was completed in December 2012. The 90 day feeding intervention is complete and long-term follow-up is underway. Discussion Preterm birth and its complications are a leading cause long-term morbidity among Canadian children. Strategies to mitigate this

  3. Improved outcome of referrals for intestinal transplantation in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, Girish L; Beath, Susan V; Protheroe, Sue; Murphy, M Stephen; Davies, Paul; Sharif, Khalid; McKiernan, Patrick J; de Ville de Goyet, Jean; Booth, Ian W; Kelly, Deirdre A

    2007-01-01

    Aim To describe the outcome of children with intestinal failure referred to Birmingham Children's Hospital (BCH) for consideration of intestinal transplantation (ITx), to determine factors for an adverse outcome and to analyse the impact of post‐1998 strategies on survival. Subjects and methods A retrospective analysis was performed of children referred for ITx assessment from January 1989 to December 2003. Children were assessed by a multidisciplinary team and categorised into: (a) stable on parenteral nutrition; (b) unsuitable for transplantation (Tx); and (c) recommended for Tx. To analyse the impact of the post‐1998 strategies on survival, a comparison was made between the two eras (pre‐1998 and post‐1998). Results 152 children with chronic intestinal failure were identified (63M:89F, median age 10 months (range 1–170)). After assessment, 69 children were considered stable on parenteral nutrition (5‐year survival 95%); 28 children were unsuitable for Tx (5‐year survival 4%); and 55 children were recommended for Tx (5‐year survival 35%, which includes 14 children who died waiting for size‐matched organs). Twenty three ITx and nine isolated liver transplants (iLTx) were performed. In a multivariate analysis, the following factors in combination had an adverse effect on survival: the presence of a primary mucosal disorder (p = 0.007, OR ratio 3.16, 95% CI 1.37 to 7.31); absence of involvement of a nutritional care team at the referring hospital (p = 0.001, OR ratio 2.55, 95% CI 1.44 to 4.52); and a serum bilirubin>100 µmol/l (p = 0.001, OR ratio 3.70, 95% CI 1.84 to 7.47). Earlier referral (median serum bilirubin 78 µmol/l in the post‐1998 era compared with 237 µmol/l in the pre‐1998 era, p = 0.001) may be a contributory factor to improved survival. The strategies of combined en bloc reduced liver/small bowel transplantation and iLTx resulted in fewer deaths on the waiting list in the post‐1998 era (2 deaths in

  4. [Improvement of outcomes by primary treatment for temporomandibular disorders].

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Shigeru; Kino, Koji; Iwaki, Hiroshi; Amagasa, Teruo

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to survey the current state of the temporomandibular joint disorder treatment in our clinic and to confirm the therapeutic outcomes. The subjects in this study were recruited from among the patients with temporomandibular disorders who attended the Temporomandibular Disorder Special Clinic, Department of Oral Surgery, Hitachi Yokohama Hospital during one year period from February 2007 to January 2008. A total of 100 consecutive outpatients diagnosed with temporomandibular disorders were selected for the study. Pain intensity and the degree to which daily function was limited before and after treatment were evaluated using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) score was evaluated simultaneously, and the correlation with changes in symptom was evaluated. The median (25th, 75th percentiles) of pain intensity (VAS value) before treated was 45 (25.0, 65.0) and the degree of limitation of daily function (VAS value) was 15 (0.0, 50.0). The median (25th, 75th percentiles) of pain intensity at 4 weeks after was 10 (0.0, 30.0), and significantly lower than that before treatment (p = 0.000). The degree of limitation of daily function was 0 (0.0, 10.0), also significantly lower than that before treatment (p = 0.000). The BDI-II score decreased from 8 (2.0, 11.8) before treatment to 5 (2.0, 11.0, p = 0.024) and showed no significant correlation with the improvement in outcomes by primary treatment for temporomandibular disorders. PMID:19044015

  5. Can prebiotics and probiotics improve therapeutic outcomes for undernourished individuals?

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, Paul O; Bindels, Laure B; Saulnier, Delphine M; Reid, Gregor; Nova, Esther; Holmgren, Kerstin; O'Toole, Paul W; Bunn, James; Delzenne, Nathalie; Scott, Karen P

    2014-01-01

    It has become clear in recent years that the human intestinal microbiota plays an important role in maintaining health and thus is an attractive target for clinical interventions. Scientists and clinicians have become increasingly interested in assessing the ability of probiotics and prebiotics to enhance the nutritional status of malnourished children, pregnant women, the elderly, and individuals with non-communicable disease-associated malnutrition. A workshop was held by the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP), drawing on the knowledge of experts from industry, medicine, and academia, with the objective to assess the status of our understanding of the link between the microbiome and under-nutrition, specifically in relation to probiotic and prebiotic treatments for under-nourished individuals. These discussions led to four recommendations:   (1) The categories of malnourished individuals need to be differentiated To improve treatment outcomes, subjects should first be categorized based on the cause of malnutrition, additional health-concerns, differences in the gut microbiota, and sociological considerations. (2) Define a baseline “healthy” gut microbiota for each category Altered nutrient requirement (for example, in pregnancy and old age) and individual variation may change what constitutes a healthy gut microbiota for the individual. (3) Perform studies using model systems to test the effectiveness of potential probiotics and prebiotics against these specific categories These should illustrate how certain microbiota profiles can be altered, as members of different categories may respond differently to the same treatment. (4) Perform robust well-designed human studies with probiotics and/or prebiotics, with appropriate, defined primary outcomes and sample size These are critical to show efficacy and understand responder and non-responder outcomes. It is hoped that these recommendations will lead to new approaches

  6. Social protection: potential for improving HIV outcomes among adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Cluver, Lucie D; Hodes, Rebecca J; Sherr, Lorraine; Mark Orkin, F; Meinck, Franziska; Lim Ah Ken, Patricia; Winder-Rossi, Natalia E; Wolfe, Jason; Vicari, Marissa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Advances in biomedical technologies provide potential for adolescent HIV prevention and HIV-positive survival. The UNAIDS 90–90–90 treatment targets provide a new roadmap for ending the HIV epidemic, principally through antiretroviral treatment, HIV testing and viral suppression among people with HIV. However, while imperative, HIV treatment and testing will not be sufficient to address the epidemic among adolescents in Southern and Eastern Africa. In particular, use of condoms and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) remain haphazard, with evidence that social and structural deprivation is negatively impacting adolescents’ capacity to protect themselves and others. This paper examines the evidence for and potential of interventions addressing these structural deprivations. Discussion New evidence is emerging around social protection interventions, including cash transfers, parenting support and educational support (“cash, care and classroom”). These interventions have the potential to reduce the social and economic drivers of HIV risk, improve utilization of prevention technologies and improve adherence to ART for adolescent populations in the hyper-endemic settings of Southern and Eastern Africa. Studies show that the integration of social and economic interventions has high acceptability and reach and that it holds powerful potential for improved HIV, health and development outcomes. Conclusions Social protection is a largely untapped means of reducing HIV-risk behaviours and increasing uptake of and adherence to biomedical prevention and treatment technologies. There is now sufficient evidence to include social protection programming as a key strategy not only to mitigate the negative impacts of the HIV epidemic among families, but also to contribute to HIV prevention among adolescents and potentially to remove social and economic barriers to accessing treatment. We urge a further research and programming agenda: to actively combine

  7. [Management of peri-operative hypothermia].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Meré, L A; Alvarez-Blanco, M

    2012-01-01

    Hypothermia (body temperature under 36°C) is the thermal disorder most frequently found in surgical patients, but should be avoided as a means of reducing morbidity and costs. Temperature should be considered as a vital sign and all staff involved in the care of surgical patients must be aware that it has to be maintained within normal limits. Maintaining body temperature is the result, as in any other system, of the balance between heat production and heat loss. Temperature regulation takes place through a system of positive and negative feedback in the central nervous system, being developed in three phases: thermal afferent, central regulation and efferent response. Prevention is the best way to ensure a normal temperature. The active warming of the patient during surgery is mandatory. Using warm air is the most effective, simple and cheap way to prevent and treat hypothermia. PMID:22789615

  8. The small chill: mild hypothermia for cardioprotection?

    PubMed

    Tissier, Renaud; Chenoune, Mourad; Ghaleh, Bijan; Cohen, Michael V; Downey, James M; Berdeaux, Alain

    2010-12-01

    Reducing the heart's temperature by 2-5°C is a potent cardioprotective treatment in animal models of coronary artery occlusion. The anti-infarct benefit depends upon the target temperature and the time at which cooling is instituted. Protection primarily results from cooling during the ischaemic period, whereas cooling during reperfusion or beyond offers little protection. In animal studies, protection is proportional to both the depth and duration of cooling. An optimal cooling protocol must appreciably shorten the normothermic ischaemic time to effectively salvage myocardium. Patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction could be candidates for mild hypothermia since the current door-to-balloon time is typically 90 min. But they would have to be cooled quickly shortly after their arrival. Several strategies have been proposed for ultra-fast cooling, but most like liquid ventilation and pericardial perfusion are too invasive. More feasible strategies might include cutaneous cooling, peritoneal lavage with cold solutions, and endovascular cooling with intravenous thermodes. This last option has been investigated clinically, but the results have been disappointing possibly because the devices lacked capacity to cool the patient quickly or cooling was not implemented soon enough. The mechanism of hypothermia's protection has been assumed to be energy conservation. However, whereas deep hypothermia clearly preserves ATP, mild hypothermia has only a modest effect on ATP depletion during ischaemia. Some evidence suggests that intracellular signalling pathways might be responsible for the protection. It is unknown how cooling could trigger these pathways, but, if true, then it might be possible to duplicate cooling's protection pharmacologically. PMID:20621922

  9. Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Activity in Hypothermia and Rewarming: Can RONS Modulate the Beneficial Effects of Therapeutic Hypothermia?

    PubMed Central

    Alva, Norma; Palomeque, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Hypothermia is a condition in which core temperature drops below the level necessary to maintain bodily functions. The decrease in temperature may disrupt some physiological systems of the body, including alterations in microcirculation and reduction of oxygen supply to tissues. The lack of oxygen can induce the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen free radicals (RONS), followed by oxidative stress, and finally, apoptosis and/or necrosis. Furthermore, since the hypothermia is inevitably followed by a rewarming process, we should also consider its effects. Despite hypothermia and rewarming inducing injury, many benefits of hypothermia have been demonstrated when used to preserve brain, cardiac, hepatic, and intestinal function against ischemic injury. This review gives an overview of the effects of hypothermia and rewarming on the oxidant/antioxidant balance and provides hypothesis for the role of reactive oxygen species in therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:24363826

  10. Does Functional Outcome Improve with Time Postsurgery for Hirschsprung Disease?

    PubMed

    Aworanti, Olugbenga Michael; McDowell, Dermot Thomas; Martin, Ian Michael; Quinn, Feargal

    2016-04-01

    Purpose Constipation and incontinence are significant problems following pull-through surgery for Hirschsprung disease (HD). There is evidence that these problems improve with time. However, there is also evidence showing no improvements and furthermore, significant long-term data are lacking for the newer endorectal pull-through. We aim to determine if there is clinical evidence that show improvements in functional outcomes with time after an endorectal pull-through surgery for HD. Methods We utilized the validated pediatric incontinence and constipation scoring system (PICSS) to score 51 consecutive children 3 months to 15 years posttransabdominal or transanal endorectal pull-through for HD. Cases of total colonic aganglionosis and Down syndrome were excluded. PICSS scores below the age-specific lower limit 95% confidence interval scores represent incomplete continence or constipation, respectively. We performed linear regression to analyze the relationship between PICSS scores and the follow-up duration and then compared the demographics of children with and without incomplete continence and constipation, respectively. Significance was set at p < 0.05. Results The median age at PICSS interview was 71 months (range, 6-191 months). Incontinence scores obtained from 42 children older than 35 months showed a positive relationship with the follow-up duration (p = 0.03). Constipation scores obtained from 51 children were unrelated to follow-up duration (p = 0.486). When demographics were compared, the continent children had longer follow-up than those with incomplete continence (mean, 111.64 vs. 69.19 months; p = 0.051), however follow-up duration did not differ in the group of constipated children compared with the nonconstipated group (mean, 61.88 vs. 71.80 months; p = 0.321). Conclusion These findings suggest that after an endorectal pull-through, improved continence should be expected with time but constipation often continues to be an

  11. Certified kitchen managers: do they improve restaurant inspection outcomes?

    PubMed

    Cates, Sheryl C; Muth, Mary K; Karns, Shawn A; Penne, Michael A; Stone, Carmily N; Harrison, Judy E; Radke, Vincent J

    2009-02-01

    Restaurants are associated with a significant number of foodborne illness outbreaks in the United States. Certification of kitchen managers through an accredited training and testing program may help improve food safety practices and thus prevent foodborne illness. In this study, relationships between the results of routine restaurant inspections and the presence of a certified kitchen manager (CKM) were examined. We analyzed data for 4461 restaurants in Iowa that were inspected during 2005 and 2006 (8338 total inspections). Using logistic regression analysis, we modeled the outcome variable (0 = no critical violations [CVs]; 1 = one or more CVs) as a function of presence or absence of a CKM and other explanatory variables. We estimated separate models for seven inspection categories. Restaurants with a CKM present during inspection were less likely to have a CV for personnel (P < 0.01), food source or handling (P < 0.01), facility or equipment requirements (P < 0.05), ware-washing (P < 0.10), and other operations (P < 0.10). However, restaurants with a CKM present during inspection were equally likely to have a CV for temperature or time control and plumbing, water, or sewage as were restaurants without a CKM present. Analyses by type of violation within the temperature and time control category revealed that restaurants with a CKM present during inspection were less likely to have a CV for hot holding (P < 0.05), but the presence of a CKM did not affect other types of temperature and time control violations. Our analyses suggest that the presence of a CKM is protective for most types of CVs, and we identify areas for improving training of CKMs. PMID:19350984

  12. Fertility Treatments in the United States: Improving Access and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kissin, Dmitry M; Boulet, Sheree L; Jamieson, Denise J

    2016-08-01

    The recently released National Public Health Action Plan for the Detection, Prevention, and Management of Infertility calls for better access to high-quality infertility services and improved safety of fertility treatments. Both assisted reproductive technology (ART) and non-ART fertility treatments have allowed millions of patients worldwide to overcome infertility-a disease of the reproductive system and important public health issue. However, there are substantial disparities in access to effective treatments in the United States, largely attributable to high out-of-pocket costs, especially for ART. Moreover, the outcomes of fertility treatments are often complicated by the large proportion of multiple births with substantial health risks for both neonates and mothers. Prevention of multiple births is difficult during non-ART fertility treatments but can be effective with single-embryo transfer during ART. Several U.S. states have enacted legislative mandates that require private insurers to cover some portion of the costs associated with fertility treatments and thus reduce the financial pressure to transfer multiple embryos during ART. Although studies have shown that insurance coverage reduces per-cycle multiple births to a certain degree, states with insurance mandates have more ART-related multiple births attributable to substantially larger number of ART-conceived neonates. Experience from other countries shows that access to ART can be improved without concomitant increases in multiple births by providing reimbursement for ART in combination with restrictions on the number of embryos transferred per cycle. Such approaches may or may not be successful in the United States with its unique and complex health care system. PMID:27399992

  13. Improving health outcomes with better patient understanding and education.

    PubMed

    Adams, Robert John

    2010-01-01

    A central plank of health care reform is an expanded role for educated consumers interacting with responsive health care teams. However, for individuals to realize the benefits of health education also requires a high level of engagement. Population studies have documented a gap between expectations and the actual performance of behaviours related to participation in health care and prevention. Interventions to improve self-care have shown improvements in self-efficacy, patient satisfaction, coping skills, and perceptions of social support. Significant clinical benefits have been seen from trials of self-management or lifestyle interventions across conditions such as diabetes, coronary heart disease, heart failure and rheumatoid arthritis. However, the focus of many studies has been on short-term outcomes rather that long term effects. There is also some evidence that participation in patient education programs is not spread evenly across socio economic groups. This review considers three other issues that may be important in increasing the public health impact of patient education. The first is health literacy, which is the capacity to seek, understand and act on health information. Although health literacy involves an individual's competencies, the health system has a primary responsibility in setting the parameters of the health interaction and the style, content and mode of information. Secondly, much patient education work has focused on factors such as attitudes and beliefs. That small changes in physical environments can have large effects on behavior and can be utilized in self-management and chronic disease research. Choice architecture involves reconfiguring the context or physical environment in a way that makes it more likely that people will choose certain behaviours. Thirdly, better means of evaluating the impact of programs on public health is needed. The Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework has been

  14. Premature ovarian insufficiency: how to improve reproductive outcome?

    PubMed

    Ben-Nagi, J; Panay, N

    2014-06-01

    Premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) is a life-changing condition that affects women in their reproductive age. The condition is not necessarily permanent but is associated with intermittent and unpredictable ovarian activity. Hence, spontaneous pregnancies have been reported to be 5-10%. However, pregnancy in patients with POI is still unlikely and rare. Although, there are reviews on POI in the literature, there is a lack of reports which focus on how to improve the reproductive outcome of these women who wish to conceive spontaneously or use assisted conception with their own oocytes. We found that there is no conclusive evidence of which treatment is optimal for women with POI who wish to conceive using their own gametes. However, one could surmise that it is important to lower gonadotropin levels into the physiological range before embarking on any treatment, even if natural conception is the only choice for the woman/couple. In the future, multi-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials should be carried out, which may entail recruitment of patients from various centers nationally and internationally to increase the sample size and therefore achieve a powered study. This may standardize the treatment of women with POI who wish to conceive and ultimately have their biological child. PMID:24341612

  15. Improving conservation outcomes with insights from local experts and bureaucracies.

    PubMed

    Haenn, Nora; Schmook, Birgit; Reyes, Yol; Calmé, Sophie

    2014-08-01

    We describe conservation built on local expertise such that it constitutes a hybrid form of traditional and bureaucratic knowledge. Researchers regularly ask how local knowledge might be applied to programs linked to protected areas. By examining the production of conservation knowledge in southern Mexico, we assert local expertise is already central to conservation. However, bureaucratic norms and social identity differences between lay experts and conservation practitioners prevent the public valuing of traditional knowledge. We make this point by contrasting 2 examples. The first is a master's thesis survey of local experts regarding the biology of the King Vulture (Sarcoramphus papa) in which data collection took place in communities adjacent to the Calakmul Biosphere Reserve. The second is a workshop sponsored by the same reserve that instructed farmers on how to monitor endangered species, including the King Vulture. In both examples, conservation knowledge would not have existed without traditional knowledge. In both examples, this traditional knowledge is absent from scientific reporting. On the basis of these findings, we suggest conservation outcomes may be improved by recognizing the knowledge contributions local experts already make to conservation programming. PMID:24628468

  16. Improving outcome of sensorimotor functions after traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Volker

    2016-01-01

    In the rehabilitation of a patient suffering a spinal cord injury (SCI), the exploitation of neuroplasticity is well established. It can be facilitated through the training of functional movements with technical assistance as needed and can improve outcome after an SCI. The success of such training in individuals with incomplete SCI critically depends on the presence of physiological proprioceptive input to the spinal cord leading to meaningful muscle activations during movement performances. Some actual preclinical approaches to restore function by compensating for the loss of descending input to spinal networks following complete/incomplete SCI are critically discussed in this report. Electrical and pharmacological stimulation of spinal neural networks is still in the experimental stage, and despite promising repair studies in animal models, translations to humans up to now have not been convincing. It is possible that a combination of techniques targeting the promotion of axonal regeneration is necessary to advance the restoration of function. In the future, refinement of animal models according to clinical conditions and requirements may contribute to greater translational success. PMID:27303641

  17. Improving periodontal outcomes: merging clinical and behavioral science.

    PubMed

    Wilder, Rebecca S; Bray, Kimberly S

    2016-06-01

    New data indicate that periodontal diseases are much more prevalent than previously thought, which means that there are large numbers of patients who will need to be diagnosed and treated for periodontal disease in a general dental practice. Oral hygiene procedures performed by patients between office visits are important for gingival health. No particular type of toothbrush has consistently been shown to have superior plaque-removal ability over another. Although studies on powered brushes have shown evidence for efficacy of biofilm removal and increased patient compliance, they are of short duration, making evaluation of long-term effects difficult to achieve. Interdental cleaning with dental floss can be effective but it is technique-sensitive. Interdental brushes have been shown to be superior to floss in plaque index scores, but not in gingival inflammation reduction. A systematic review of oral irrigation reported a beneficial adjunctive effect on bleeding and gingival indices and pocket depth. Antimicrobials in mouthrinses and toothpastes have shown significant reductions in plaque and gingivitis when used correctly. Even though it is considered essential for patients to utilize biofilm-removal techniques on a frequent basis, studies on adherence show that approximately 30-60% of health information is forgotten within 1 h, and 50% of health recommendations are not followed. Incorporating psychosocial aspects of behavioral change, including well-established counseling strategies, such as motivational interviewing, may elicit improved patient outcomes. PMID:27045431

  18. Improving outcomes in pancreatic cancer: key points in perioperative management.

    PubMed

    Alamo, José M; Marín, Luis M; Suarez, Gonzalo; Bernal, Carmen; Serrano, Juan; Barrera, Lydia; Gómez, Miguel A; Muntané, Jordi; Padillo, Francisco J

    2014-10-21

    This review focused in the perioperative management of patients with pancreatic cancer in order to improve the outcome of the disease. We consider that the most controversial points in pancreatic cancer management are jaundice management, vascular resection and neo-adjuvant therapy. Preoperative biliary drainage is recommended only in patients with severe jaundice, as it can lead to infectious cholangitis, pancreatitis and delay in resection, which can lead to tumor progression. The development of a phase III clinical trial is mandatory to clarify the role of neo-adjuvant radiochemotherapy in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Venous resection does not adversely affect postoperative mortality and morbidity, therefore, the need for venous resection should not be a contraindication to surgical resection in selected patients. The data on arterial resection alone, or combined with vascular resection at the time of pancreatectomy are more heterogeneous, thus, patient age and comorbidity should be evaluated before a decision on operability is made. In patients undergoing R0 resection, arterial resection can also be performed. PMID:25339810

  19. Hyperbilirubinemia exaggerates endotoxin-induced hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Pakai, Eszter; Garami, Andras; Nucci, Tatiane B; Ivanov, Andrei I; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2015-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is accompanied by an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and by either fever or hypothermia (or both). To study aseptic systemic inflammation, it is often induced in rats by the intravenous administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Knowing that bilirubin is a potent ROS scavenger, we compared responses to LPS between normobilirubinemic Gunn rats (heterozygous, asymptomatic; J/+) and hyperbilirubinemic Gunn rats (homozygous, jaundiced; J/J) to establish whether ROS mediate fever and hypothermia in aseptic systemic inflammation. These two genotypes correspond to undisturbed versus drastically suppressed (by bilirubin) tissue accumulation of ROS, respectively. A low dose of LPS (10 μg/kg) caused a typical triphasic fever in both genotypes, without any intergenotype differences. A high dose of LPS (1,000 μg/kg) caused a complex response consisting of early hypothermia followed by late fever. The hypothermic response was markedly exaggerated, whereas the subsequent fever response was strongly attenuated in J/J rats, as compared to J/+ rats. J/J rats also tended to respond to 1,000 μg/kg with blunted surges in plasma levels of all hepatic enzymes studied (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyl transferase), thus suggesting an attenuation of hepatic damage. We propose that the reported exaggeration of LPS-induced hypothermia in J/J rats occurs via direct inhibition of nonshivering thermogenesis by bilirubin and possibly via a direct vasodilatatory action of bilirubin in the skin. This hypothermia-exaggerating effect might be responsible, at least in part, for the observed tendency of J/J rats to be protected from LPS-induced hepatic damage. The attenuation of the fever response to 1,000 μg/kg could be due to either direct actions of bilirubin on thermoeffectors or the ROS-scavenging action of bilirubin. However, the experiments with 10 μg/kg strongly suggest that ROS signaling is

  20. Hyperbilirubinemia exaggerates endotoxin-induced hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Pakai, Eszter; Garami, Andras; Nucci, Tatiane B; Ivanov, Andrei I; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2015-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is accompanied by an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and by either fever or hypothermia (or both). To study aseptic systemic inflammation, it is often induced in rats by the intravenous administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Knowing that bilirubin is a potent ROS scavenger, we compared responses to LPS between normobilirubinemic Gunn rats (heterozygous, asymptomatic; J/+) and hyperbilirubinemic Gunn rats (homozygous, jaundiced; J/J) to establish whether ROS mediate fever and hypothermia in aseptic systemic inflammation. These two genotypes correspond to undisturbed versus drastically suppressed (by bilirubin) tissue accumulation of ROS, respectively. A low dose of LPS (10 μg/kg) caused a typical triphasic fever in both genotypes, without any intergenotype differences. A high dose of LPS (1,000 μg/kg) caused a complex response consisting of early hypothermia followed by late fever. The hypothermic response was markedly exaggerated, whereas the subsequent fever response was strongly attenuated in J/J rats, as compared to J/+ rats. J/J rats also tended to respond to 1,000 μg/kg with blunted surges in plasma levels of all hepatic enzymes studied (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyl transferase), thus suggesting an attenuation of hepatic damage. We propose that the reported exaggeration of LPS-induced hypothermia in J/J rats occurs via direct inhibition of nonshivering thermogenesis by bilirubin and possibly via a direct vasodilatatory action of bilirubin in the skin. This hypothermia-exaggerating effect might be responsible, at least in part, for the observed tendency of J/J rats to be protected from LPS-induced hepatic damage. The attenuation of the fever response to 1,000 μg/kg could be due to either direct actions of bilirubin on thermoeffectors or the ROS-scavenging action of bilirubin. However, the experiments with 10 μg/kg strongly suggest that ROS signaling is not

  1. A tale of two climbers: hypothermia, death, and survival on Mount Everest.

    PubMed

    Moore, G W Kent; Semple, John L

    2012-03-01

    Hypothermia is an acknowledged risk for those who venture into high altitude regions. There is however little quantitative information on this risk that can be used to implement mitigation strategies. Here we provide an analysis of the meteorological and hypothermic risk parameters, wind chill temperature, and facial frostbite time, during the spring 2006 Mount Everest climbing season. This season was marked by two high profile events where a solo climber was forced to spend the night in highly exposed conditions near the summit. One climber survived, while the other did not. Although this retrospective examination of two individual cases has admittedly a small sample size, and there are other factors that undoubtedly contributed to the difference in outcomes, we show that wind chill temperature and facial frostbite time experienced by the two climbers were dramatically different. In particular, the climber who did not survive experienced conditions that were approximately one standard deviation more severe that usual for that time of the year; while the climber who survived experienced conditions that were approximately one standard deviation less severe then usual. This suggests that the environmental conditions associated with hypothermia played an important role in the outcomes. This report confirms the importance of providing quantitative guidance to climbers as the risk of hypothermia on high mountains. PMID:22429233

  2. Aortic Center: specialized care improves outcomes and decreases mortality

    PubMed Central

    Sales, Marcela da Cunha; Frota Filho, José Dario; Aguzzoli, Cristiane; Souza, Leonardo Dornelles; Rösler, Álvaro Machado; Lucio, Eraldo Azevedo; Leães, Paulo Ernesto; Pontes, Mauro Ricardo Nunes; Lucchese, Fernando Antônio

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare in-hospital outcomes in aortic surgery in our cardiac surgery unit, before and after foundation of our Center for Aortic Surgery (CTA). Methods Prospective cohort with non-concurrent control. Foundation of CTA required specialized training of surgical, anesthetic and intensive care unit teams, routine neurological monitoring, endovascular and hybrid facilities, training of the support personnel, improvement of the registry and adoption of specific protocols. We included 332 patients operated on between: January/2003 to December/2007 (before-CTA, n=157, 47.3%); and January/2008 to December/2010 (CTA, n=175, 52.7%). Baseline clinical and demographic data, operative variables, complications and in-hospital mortality were compared between both groups. Results Mean age was 58±14 years, with 65% male. Group CTA was older, had higher rate of diabetes, lower rates of COPD and HF, more non-urgent surgeries, endovascular procedures, and aneurysms. In the univariate analysis, CTA had lower mortality (9.7 vs. 23.0%, P=0.008), which occurred consistently across different diseases and procedures. Other outcomes which were reduced in CTA included lower rates of reinterventions (5.7 vs 11%, P=0.046), major complications (20.6 vs. 33.1%, P=0.007), stroke (4.6 vs. 10.9%, P=0.045) and sepsis (1.7 vs. 9.6%, P=0.001), as compared to before-CTA. Multivariable analysis adjusted for potential counfounders revealed that CTA was independently associated with mortality reduction (OR=0.23, IC 95% 0.08 – 0.67, P=0.007). CTA independent mortality reduction was consistent in the multivariable analysis stratified by disease (aneurysm, OR=0.18, CI 95% 0.03 – 0.98, P=0.048; dissection, OR=0.31, CI 95% 0.09 – 0.99, P=0.049) and by procedure (hybrid, OR=0.07, CI 95% 0.007 – 0.72, P=0.026; Bentall, OR=0.18, CI 95% 0.038 – 0.904, P=0.037). Additional multivariable predictors of in-hospital mortality included creatinine (OR=1.7 [1.1-2.6], P=0.008), urgent surgery (OR=5

  3. Therapeutic hypothermia for cardiovascular collapse and severe respiratory distress after amniotic fluid embolism.

    PubMed

    Ocegueda-Pacheco, Cynthia; García, J Carlos; Varon, Joseph; Polderman, Kees H

    2014-06-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is one of the most catastrophic complications that can occur during pregnancy or in the immediate postpartum period, frequently complicated by profound shock and cardiovascular collapse as well as severe respiratory distress. Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is now commonly used to improve neurological outcomes after various types of hypoxic injury and is widely used in the treatment of postanoxic injury after cardiac arrest (CA). To our knowledge, no studies have evaluated whether TH could be effectively used in AFE, and its use for this indication has not been described previously. We describe the case of a 32-year-old woman, who developed clinical manifestations of AFE and suffered a CA in the 29th week of her pregnancy. She received prolonged CPR (40 minutes until ROSC) and remained comatose. TH was induced and maintained for a total of 60 hours using an endovascular device, followed by controlled rewarming and maintenance of strict normothermia. The patient survived and was neurologically intact (CPC 1) at 6 months of follow up. PMID:24670228

  4. Advanced Technology in Pediatric Intensive Care Units: Have They Improved Outcomes?

    PubMed

    Frederick, Sean A

    2016-04-01

    In medicine, providers strive to produce quality outcomes and work to continually improve those outcomes. Whether it is reducing cost, decreasing length of stay, mitigating nosocomial infections, or improving survival, there are a myriad of complex factors that contribute to each outcome. One of the greatest challenges to outcome improvement is in pediatric intensive care units, which tend to host the sickest, most complex, smallest, and frailest of pediatric patients. This article highlights some studies and advances in informatics that have influenced intensive care unit outcomes. PMID:27017036

  5. Assessment of Student Professional Outcomes for Continuous Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keshavarz, Mohsen; Baghdarnia, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a method for the assessment of professional student outcomes (performance-type outcomes or soft skills). The method is based upon group activities, research on modern electrical engineering topics by individual students, classroom presentations on chosen research topics, final presentations, and technical report writing.…

  6. Hypometabolism and hypothermia in the rat model of endotoxic shock: independence of circulatory hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Joshua J; Fonseca, Monique T; Flatow, Elizabeth A; Lewis, Kevin; Steiner, Alexandre A

    2014-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that development of hypothermia instead of fever in endotoxic shock is consequential to hypoxia. Endotoxic shock was induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 500 μg kg−1 i.v.) in rats at an ambient temperature of 22°C. A β3-adrenergic agonist known to activate metabolic heat production, CL316,243, was employed to evaluate whether thermogenic capacity could be impaired by the fall in oxygen delivery () during endotoxic shock. This possibility was rejected as CL316,243 (0.15 mg kg−1 i.v.) evoked similar rises in oxygen consumption () in the presence and absence of endotoxic shock. Next, to investigate whether a less severe form of circulatory hypoxia could be triggering hypothermia, the circulating volume of LPS-injected rats was expanded using 6% hetastarch with the intention of improving tissue perfusion and alleviating hypoxia. This intervention attenuated not only the fall in arterial pressure induced by LPS, but also the associated falls in and body temperature. These effects, however, occurred independently of hypoxia, as they were not accompanied by any detectable changes in NAD+/NADH ratios. Further experimentation revealed that even the earliest drops in cardiac output and during endotoxic shock did not precede the reduction in that brings about hypothermia. In fact, and fell in such a synchrony that the / ratio remained unaffected. Only when hypothermia was prevented by exposure to a warm environment (30°C) did an imbalance in the / ratio become evident, and such an imbalance was associated with reductions in the renal and hypothalamic NAD+/NADH ratios. In conclusion, hypometabolism and hypothermia in endotoxic shock are not consequential to hypoxia but serve as a pre-emptive strategy to avoid hypoxia in this model. PMID:24951620

  7. Localized hypothermia: impact on oxygenation, microregional perfusion, metabolic and bioenergetic status of subcutaneous rat tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, D. K.; Nauth, C.; Thews, O.; Krueger, W.; Vaupel, P.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of localized hypothermia on microcirculatory and metabolic parameters in s.c. DS sarcomas on the hind foot dorsum of Sprague-Dawley rats was investigated. Tumours were cooled by superfusion of the tumour surface with cooled saline solution to 25 degrees C or 15 degrees C. Control tumours remained at 35 degrees C. These temperatures were maintained for 30 min. In tumour oxygenation measurements, hypothermia at 25 degrees C and 15 degrees C caused progressive decreases in the size of the fraction of pO2 measurements between 0 and 2.5 mmHg together with a reduction in pO2 variability. No significant changes in median or mean pO2 or in the fraction of pO2 measurements between 0 and 5 mmHg, and 0 and 10 mmHg were observed. Using laser Doppler flowmetry, red blood cell flux was found to decrease significantly upon 25 degrees C or 15 degrees C hypothermia treatment to 67% and 37% of starting values respectively, whereas no significant changes were seen in control tumours over the whole observation period. Viscosity was measured in blood and plasma samples over a range of temperatures and was found to increase with decreasing temperature. Assessment of tumour glucose levels showed an increased concentration of glucose following 15 degrees C hypothermia, an observation consistent with a 'slowing down' of glycolysis. No changes in lactate or adenylate phosphate levels were observed. As a way of improving tumour oxygenation, localized hypothermia may therefore be a useful means of radiosensitization. PMID:9662251

  8. Can targeting glutamate receptors with long-term heat acclimation improve outcomes following hypoxic injury?

    PubMed Central

    Ely, Brett R; Brunt, Vienna E; Minson, Christopher T

    2015-01-01

    Long-term heat acclimation appears to improve tolerance to hypoxic insults in various tissues, including brain, providing a promising avenue to improve functional outcomes following cerebrovascular events. Glutamate discharge is implicated in dysfunction following hypoxic stress and thus, targeting glutamate receptors with heat acclimation could improve cognitive outcomes following hypoxic injury. PMID:27227003

  9. Early Absent Pupillary Light Reflexes After Cardiac Arrest in Patients Treated with Therapeutic Hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Laxmi P; Sen, Ayan; Stanko, Carlene M; Rawal, Bhupendra; Heckman, Michael G; Hoyne, Jonathan B; Dimberg, Elliot L; Freeman, Michelle L; Ng, Lauren K; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Freeman, William D

    2016-08-01

    Loss of pupillary light reactivity is one recognized indicator of poor prognosis after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, drug overdose, low cardiac output, and/or resuscitation drugs can lead to impaired pupillary light reflex. To investigate pupillary light reflex status before therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in relation to neurological outcome, we retrospectively reviewed the data of a prospectively implemented TH protocol in patients with cardiac arrest (CA) at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida (January 2006-January 2012), and Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona (August 2010-March 2014). During this period, all CA patients who underwent hypothermia were included. These patients were selected from an institutional database and hypothermia data set. The Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) at time of discharge was our primary outcome measure. A CPC of 1 to 2 was defined as good outcome and a CPC from 3 to 5 was defined as poor outcome. We identified 99 patients who had CA treated with TH. Twenty-nine patients (29%) had pupils that were nonreactive to light on admission examination before TH, eight of whom later had return of pupil reactivity by day 3. Two of these 29 patients (6.9%) had good outcome, compared to 24 of 70 patients (34.3%) with pupils that were reactive to light (p = 0.005). Both of these patients had CA after illicit drug overdose. Early nonreactive pupils occurred in almost a third of patients after CPR and before TH in our patient population. Recovery of pupillary light reactivity is possible, and in a small minority of those cases (particularly when CA is preceded by the use of illicit drugs), a good outcome can be achieved. PMID:27135180

  10. An Integrated Care Initiative to Improve Patient Outcome in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Mayer-Amberg, Norbert; Woltmann, Rainer; Walther, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    The optimal treatment of schizophrenia patients requires integration of medical and psychosocial inputs. In Germany, various health-care service providers and institutions are involved in the treatment process. Early and continuous treatment is important but often not possible because of the fragmented medical care system in Germany. The Integrated Care Initiative Schizophrenia has implemented a networked care concept in the German federal state of Lower Saxony that integrates various stakeholders of the health care system. In this initiative, office-based psychiatrists, specialized nursing staff, psychologists, social workers, hospitals, psychiatric institutional outpatient’s departments, and other community-based mental health services work together in an interdisciplinary approach. Much emphasis is placed on psychoeducation. Additional efforts cover socio-therapy, visiting care, and family support. During the period from October 2010 (start of the initiative) to December 2012, first experiences and results of quality indicators were collected of 713 registered patients and summarized in a quality monitoring report. In addition, standardized patient interviews were conducted, and duration of hospital days was recorded in 2013. By the end of 2012, patients had been enrolled for an average of 18.7 months. The overall patient satisfaction measured in a patient survey in June 2013 was high and the duration of hospital days measured in a pre–post analysis in July 2013 was reduced by 44%. Two years earlier than planned, the insurance fund will continue the successfully implemented Integrated Care Initiative and adopt it in the regular care setting. This initiative can serve as a learning case for how to set up and measure integrated care systems that may improve outcomes for patients suffering from schizophrenia. PMID:26779043

  11. Improving vascular access outcomes: attributes of arteriovenous fistula cannulation success

    PubMed Central

    Harwood, Lori E.; Wilson, Barbara M.; Oudshoorn, Abe

    2016-01-01

    Background Arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) are the preferred access for hemodialysis (HD) yet they are underutilized. Cannulation of the fistula is a procedure requiring significant skill development and refinement and if not done well can have negative consequences for patients. The nurses' approach, attitude and skill with cannulation impacts greatly on the patient experience. Complications from miscannulation or an inability to needle fistulas can result in the increased use of central venous catheters. Some nurses remain in a state of a ‘perpetual novice’ resulting in a viscous cycle of negative patient consequences (bruising, pain), further influencing patients' decisions not to pursue a fistula or abandon cannulation. Method This qualitative study used organizational development theory (appreciative inquiry) and research method to determine what attributes/activities contribute to successful cannulation. This can be applied to interventions to promote change and skill development in staff members who have not advanced their proficiency. Eighteen HD nurses who self-identified with performing successful cannulation participated in audio-recorded interviews. The recordings were transcribed verbatim. The data were analyzed using content analysis. Results Four common themes, including patient-centered care, teamwork, opportunity and skill and nurse self-awareness, represented successful fistula cannulation. Successful cannulation is more than a learned technique to correctly insert a needle, but rather represents contextual influences and interplay between the practice environment and personal attributes. Conclusions Practice changes based on these results may improve cannulation, decrease complications and result in better outcomes for patients. Efforts to nurture positive patient experiences around cannulation may influence patient decision-making regarding fistula use. PMID:26985384

  12. Early Combined Therapy with Pharmacologically Induced Hypothermia and Edaravone Exerts Neuroprotective Effects in a Rat Model of Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yonglin; Liu, Chunling; Sun, Zhikun

    2015-11-01

    In present study, we evaluated acute neuroprotective effects of combined therapy with pharmacologically induced hypothermia and edaravone in a rat model of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). ICH was caused by injection of 0.5 U of collagenase VII to the caudate nucleus of male Sprague-Dawley rats. Sham-treated animals receive injections of normal saline instead of collagenase VII. All animals were randomly divided into five groups: sham group, ICH group, hypothermia group, edavarone (10 mg/kg) group, and combined hypothermia + edavarone group. Hypothermia was induced by injection of the second-generation neurotensin receptor agonist HPI-201 (2 mg/kg at 1 h after ICH; 1 mg/kg at 4 and 7 h after ICH). Hypothermia was sustained for at least 6 h. The study outcomes were the extent of brain edema, permeability of the blood-brain barrier (Evan's blue dye), expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, and TNF-α), and expression of apoptosis-related proteins (caspase-3, cytochrome C, Bcl-2, and Bax). Brain edema, permeability of the blood-brain barrier, and expression of metalloproteinase-9 were increased, while expression of caspase-3 and Bcl-2 was decreased by ICH. We observed that the combined therapy was significantly more potent in reverting the above negative trends induced by ICH. In conclusion, our results indicate that a combination of pharmacologically induced hypothermia and edavarone leads to potentiation of their respective neuroprotective effects. PMID:27352357

  13. Therapeutic hypothermia and ischemic stroke: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Tahir, Rizwan A.; Pabaney, Aqueel H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ischemic stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the US. Clinical techniques aimed at helping to reduce the morbidity associated with stroke have been studied extensively, including therapeutic hypothermia. In this study, the authors review the literature regarding the role of therapeutic hypothermia in ischemic stroke to appreciate the evolution of hypothermia technology over several decades and to critically analyze several early clinical studies to validate its use in ischemic stroke. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was performed using PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Search terms included “hypothermia and ischemic stroke” and “therapeutic hypothermia.” A comprehensive search of the current clinical trials using clinicaltrials.gov was conducted using the keywords “stroke and hypothermia” to evaluate early and ongoing clinical trials utilizing hypothermia in ischemic stroke. Results: A comprehensive review of the evolution of hypothermia in stroke and the current status of this treatment was performed. Clinical studies were critically analyzed to appreciate their strengths and pitfalls. Ongoing and future registered clinical studies were highlighted and analyzed compared to the reported results of previous trials. Conclusion: Although hypothermia has been used for various purposes over several decades, its efficacy in the treatment of ischemic stroke is debatable. Several trials have proven its safety and feasibility; however, more robust, randomized clinical trials with large volumes of patients are needed to fully establish its utility in the clinical setting. PMID:27313963

  14. Gastric Mucosal Petechial Hemorrhages (Wischnewsky Lesions), Hypothermia, and Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kenneth Howard; Stoppacher, Robert

    2016-09-01

    For more than 100 years since their initial description, gastric mucosal petechial hemorrhages have been discovered at autopsy in cases where environmental hypothermia was determined to be the cause of death. Although these lesions are frequently seen in deaths caused by environmental hypothermia, they can also be seen in cases where hypothermia is not implicated; however, this has been seldom described. We present a series of autopsy cases where hypothermia has been conclusively ruled out as a cause of death, in which Wischnewsky lesions are found. In all of these cases, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) was determined to be the proximate cause of death, as confirmed through clinical history, laboratory analysis, and absence of other anatomic or toxicological findings. We provide a mechanism of Wischnewsky lesion formation and how that mechanism relates to both hypothermia and ketoacidosis. Our data show that gastric mucosal petechial hemorrhages are not specific for hypothermia-related deaths, and are likely indicative of a state in which hypothermia and DKA have a common underlying pathophysiology, most likely a coagulopathy. Our data also illustrate that in autopsy cases where Wischnewsky lesions are found, DKA should be seriously considered as the underlying cause of death, particularly in the absence of indications of environmental hypothermia. PMID:27356011

  15. Applying Quality Improvement into Systems-based Learning to Improve Diabetes Outcomes in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Moreo, Kathleen; Sapir, Tamar; Greene, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    In the U.S., where the prevalence of type 2 diabetes has reached epidemic proportions, many patients with this disease are treated by primary care physicians in community-based systems, including accountable care organisations (ACOs). To address gaps in the quality of diabetes care, national quality measures have been established, including patient-centered measures adopted by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for its Shared Savings Program for ACOs. From a patient-centered perspective, high-quality diabetes care depends on effective communication between clinicians and patients, along with patient education and counseling about medications and lifestyle. We designed and implemented a quality improvement (QI) program for 30 primary care physicians treating patients with type 2 diabetes in three structurally similar but geographically diverse ACOs. Retrospective chart audits were conducted before (n = 300) and after (n = 300) each physician participated in accredited continuing medical education (CME) courses that focused on QI strategies. Randomly selected charts were audited to measurably assess essential interventions for improved outcomes in type 2 diabetes including the physicians' documentation of patient counseling and assessment of side effects, and patients' medication adherence status and changes in hemoglobin A1C (A1C) and body mass index (BMI). Paced educational interventions included a private performance improvement Internet live course conducted for each physician, small-group Internet live courses involving peer discussion, and a set of enduring materials, which were also multi-accredited for all clinicians in the physician's practice. Continual improvement cycles were guided by analysis of the baseline chart audits, quantitative survey data, and qualitative feedback offered by participants. To extend the benefit of the education, the enduring materials were offered to the interprofessional team of clinicians throughout the U.S. who did

  16. Applying Quality Improvement into Systems-based Learning to Improve Diabetes Outcomes in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Moreo, Kathleen; Sapir, Tamar; Greene, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    In the U.S., where the prevalence of type 2 diabetes has reached epidemic proportions, many patients with this disease are treated by primary care physicians in community-based systems, including accountable care organisations (ACOs). To address gaps in the quality of diabetes care, national quality measures have been established, including patient-centered measures adopted by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for its Shared Savings Program for ACOs. From a patient-centered perspective, high-quality diabetes care depends on effective communication between clinicians and patients, along with patient education and counseling about medications and lifestyle. We designed and implemented a quality improvement (QI) program for 30 primary care physicians treating patients with type 2 diabetes in three structurally similar but geographically diverse ACOs. Retrospective chart audits were conducted before (n = 300) and after (n = 300) each physician participated in accredited continuing medical education (CME) courses that focused on QI strategies. Randomly selected charts were audited to measurably assess essential interventions for improved outcomes in type 2 diabetes including the physicians’ documentation of patient counseling and assessment of side effects, and patients’ medication adherence status and changes in hemoglobin A1C (A1C) and body mass index (BMI). Paced educational interventions included a private performance improvement Internet live course conducted for each physician, small-group Internet live courses involving peer discussion, and a set of enduring materials, which were also multi-accredited for all clinicians in the physician's practice. Continual improvement cycles were guided by analysis of the baseline chart audits, quantitative survey data, and qualitative feedback offered by participants. To extend the benefit of the education, the enduring materials were offered to the interprofessional team of clinicians throughout the U.S. who

  17. Using Cross-Cultural Dimensions Exercises to Improve and Measure Learning Outcomes in International Business Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zainuba, Mohamed; Rahal, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes an approach for using cross-cultural dimensions exercises to improve and measure learning outcomes in international business courses. The following key issues are highlighted: (a) what are the targeted learning outcomes to be assessed, (b) how to measure the accomplishment of these learning outcomes, (c) the input measures…

  18. A Meta-Analysis of Educational Data Mining on Improvements in Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AlShammari, Iqbal A.; Aldhafiri, Mohammed D.; Al-Shammari, Zaid

    2013-01-01

    A meta-synthesis study was conducted of 60 research studies on educational data mining (EDM) and their impacts on and outcomes for improving learning outcomes. After an overview, an examination of these outcomes is provided (Romero, Ventura, Espejo, & Hervas, 2008; Romero, "et al.", 2011). Then, a review of other EDM-related research…

  19. Therapeutic hypothermia in acute liver failure: a multi-center retrospective cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Karvellas, Constantine J.; Stravitz, R. Todd; Battenhouse, Holly; Lee, William M.; Schilsky, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Background The benefit of therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in Acute Liver Failure (ALF) has not been previously demonstrated in a controlled fashion. This study aimed to determine the impact of TH on 21-day survival and complications in ALF patients at high risk for cerebral edema. Methods Retrospective cohort study of ALF patients in the US ALFSG with Grade III or IV hepatic encephalopathy. TH (32°C – 35°C) was used in 97 (8%) patients; 1135 (92%) not cooled were controls. Results Intracranial pressure (ICP) was monitored in 38 (40%) TH ALF patients (vs. 22% controls, p=0.0001). Rates of bleeding (12% in both), bloodstream (17% vs. 18) and tracheal infections (21% vs. 23%, p> 0.5 for all) were similar. Unadjusted 21-day overall (62% vs. 60%) and transplant-free survival (45 vs. 39%, p>0.4 for both) were similar. Multivariable models were created for acetaminophen (APAP) (n= 582) and non-APAP (n=613) patients. For APAP patients, MELD (Odds ratio 0.91 per increment; 95% CI 0.89–0.94, p <0.001) and vasopressors (OR 0.16; 0.11–0.24, p < 0.0001) were associated with decreased 21-day spontaneous survival. Survival was improved with TH in APAP patients aged < 25y (Age 25: OR 2.735; 95% CI 1.001 – 7.467) but worsened in 64y or older APAP patients (Age = 64: OR 0.167; 95%CI 0.028 – 0.999). For non-APAP patients, MELD (OR 0.93 per increment; 0.91–0.95, p < 0.0001) and vasopressors (OR 0.60; 0.40–0.90, p=0.01) were associated with worse outcomes while TH had no impact (p= 0.93). Conclusions Therapeutic hypothermia in ALF was not associated with increased bleeding or infections. While young APAP-ALF patients may benefit, TH did not consistently impact 21-day survival. A prospective trial is required to clarify the utility of TH in ALF patients. PMID:25308108

  20. Implementation Methods for Delivery Room Management: A Quality Improvement Comparison Study

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Richard J.; Bennett, Mihoko V.; Finer, Neil N.; Halamek, Louis P.; Nisbet, Courtney; Crockett, Margaret; Chance, Kathy; Blackney, David; von Köhler, Connie; Kurtin, Paul; Sharek, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is little evidence to compare the effectiveness of large collaborative quality improvement versus individual local projects. METHODS: This was a prospective pre-post intervention study of neonatal resuscitation practice, comparing 3 groups of nonrandomized hospitals in the California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative: (1) collaborative, hospitals working together through face-to-face meetings, webcasts, electronic mailing list, and data sharing; (2) individual, hospitals working independently; and (3) nonparticipant hospitals. The collaborative and individual arms participated in improvement activities, focusing on reducing hypothermia and invasive ventilatory support. RESULTS: There were 20 collaborative, 31 individual, and 44 nonparticipant hospitals caring for 12 528 eligible infants. Each group had reduced hypothermia from baseline to postintervention. The collaborative group had the most significant decrease in hypothermia, from 39% to 21%, compared with individual hospital efforts of 38% to 33%, and nonparticipants of 42% to 34%. After risk adjustment, the collaborative group had twice the magnitude of decrease in rates of newborns with hypothermia compared with the other groups. Collaborative improvement also led to greater decreases in delivery room intubation (53% to 40%) and surfactant administration (37% to 20%). CONCLUSIONS: Collaborative efforts resulted in larger improvements in delivery room outcomes and processes than individual efforts or nonparticipation. These findings have implications for planning quality improvement projects for implementation of evidence-based practices. PMID:25332503

  1. Therapeutic Hypothermia after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Children

    PubMed Central

    Moler, Frank W.; Silverstein, Faye S.; Holubkov, Richard; Slomine, Beth S.; Christensen, James R.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Meert, Kathleen L.; Clark, Amy E.; Browning, Brittan; Pemberton, Victoria L.; Page, Kent; Shankaran, Seetha; Hutchison, Jamie S.; Newth, Christopher J.L.; Bennett, Kimberly S.; Berger, John T.; Topjian, Alexis; Pineda, Jose A.; Koch, Joshua D.; Schleien, Charles L.; Dalton, Heidi J.; Ofori-Amanfo, George; Goodman, Denise M.; Fink, Ericka L.; McQuillen, Patrick; Zimmerman, Jerry J.; Thomas, Neal J.; van der Jagt, Elise W.; Porter, Melissa B.; Meyer, Michael T.; Harrison, Rick; Pham, Nga; Schwarz, Adam J.; Nowak, Jeffrey E.; Alten, Jeffrey; Wheeler, Derek S.; Bhalala, Utpal S.; Lidsky, Karen; Lloyd, Eric; Mathur, Mudit; Shah, Samir; Wu, Theodore; Theodorou, Andreas A.; Sanders, Ronald C.; Dean, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic hypothermia is recommended for comatose adults after witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, but data about this intervention in children are limited. Methods We conducted this trial of two targeted temperature interventions at 38 children’s hospitals involving children who remained unconscious after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Within 6 hours after the return of circulation, comatose patients who were older than 2 days and younger than 18 years of age were randomly assigned to therapeutic hypothermia (target temperature, 33.0°C) or therapeutic normothermia (target temperature, 36.8°C). The primary efficacy outcome, survival at 12 months after cardiac arrest with a Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, second edition (VABS-II), score of 70 or higher (on a scale from 20 to 160, with higher scores indicating better function), was evaluated among patients with a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest. Results A total of 295 patients underwent randomization. Among the 260 patients with data that could be evaluated and who had a VABS-II score of at least 70 before cardiac arrest, there was no significant difference in the primary outcome between the hypothermia group and the normothermia group (20% vs. 12%; relative likelihood, 1.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.86 to 2.76; P = 0.14). Among all the patients with data that could be evaluated, the change in the VABS-II score from baseline to 12 months was not significantly different (P = 0.13) and 1-year survival was similar (38% in the hypothermia group vs. 29% in the normothermia group; relative likelihood, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.93 to 1.79; P = 0.13). The groups had similar incidences of infection and serious arrhythmias, as well as similar use of blood products and 28-day mortality. Conclusions In comatose children who survived out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, therapeutic hypothermia, as compared with therapeutic normothermia, did not confer a significant benefit in survival with a

  2. Mild hypothermia combined with a scaffold of NgR-silenced neural stem cells/Schwann cells to treat spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Liang, Jinhua; Zhang, Jianjun; Liu, Shuhong; Sun, Wenwen

    2014-01-01

    Because the inhibition of Nogo proteins can promote neurite growth and nerve cell differentiation, a cell-scaffold complex seeded with Nogo receptor (NgR)-silenced neural stem cells and Schwann cells may be able to improve the microenvironment for spinal cord injury repair. Previous studies have found that mild hypothermia helps to attenuate secondary damage in the spinal cord and exerts a neuroprotective effect. Here, we constructed a cell-scaffold complex consisting of a poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffold seeded with NgR-silenced neural stem cells and Schwann cells, and determined the effects of mild hypothermia combined with the cell-scaffold complexes on the spinal cord hemi-transection injury in the T9 segment in rats. Compared with the PLGA group and the NgR-silencing cells + PLGA group, hindlimb motor function and nerve electrophysiological function were clearly improved, pathological changes in the injured spinal cord were attenuated, and the number of surviving cells and nerve fibers were increased in the group treated with the NgR-silenced cell scaffold + mild hypothermia at 34°C for 6 hours. Furthermore, fewer pathological changes to the injured spinal cord and more surviving cells and nerve fibers were found after mild hypothermia therapy than in injuries not treated with mild hypothermia. These experimental results indicate that mild hypothermia combined with NgR gene-silenced cells in a PLGA scaffold may be an effective therapy for treating spinal cord injury. PMID:25657741

  3. Improving energy audit process and report outcomes through planning initiatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprau Coulter, Tabitha L.

    Energy audits and energy models are an important aspect of the retrofit design process, as they provide project teams with an opportunity to evaluate a facilities current building systems' and energy performance. The information collected during an energy audit is typically used to develop an energy model and an energy audit report that are both used to assist in making decisions about the design and implementation of energy conservation measures in a facility. The current lack of energy auditing standards results in a high degree of variability in energy audit outcomes depending on the individual performing the audit. The research presented is based on the conviction that performing an energy audit and producing a value adding energy model for retrofit buildings can benefit from a revised approach. The research was divided into four phases, with the initial three phases consisting of: 1.) process mapping activity - aimed at reducing variability in the energy auditing and energy modeling process. 2.) survey analysis -- To examine the misalignment between how industry members use the top energy modeling tools compared to their intended use as defined by software representatives. 3.) sensitivity analysis -- analysis of the affect key energy modeling inputs are having on energy modeling analysis results. The initial three phases helped define the need for an improved energy audit approach that better aligns data collection with facility owners' needs and priorities. The initial three phases also assisted in the development of a multi-criteria decision support tool that incorporates a House of Quality approach to guide a pre-audit planning activity. For the fourth and final research phase explored the impacts and evaluation methods of a pre-audit planning activity using two comparative energy audits as case studies. In each case, an energy audit professionals was asked to complete an audit using their traditional methods along with an audit which involved them first

  4. Alpha-lipoic acid protects mitochondrial enzymes and attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced hypothermia in mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Hypothermia is a key symptom of sepsis and the mechanism(s) leading to hypothermia during sepsis is largely unknown. To investigate a potential mechanism and find an effective treatment for hypothermia in sepsis, we induced hypothermia in mice by lipopolysaccharide (LP...

  5. Mild hypothermia inhibits systemic and cerebral complement activation in a swine model of cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ping; Zhao, Hong; Hua, Rong; Zhang, Mingyue; Tang, Ziren; Mei, Xue; Cui, Juan; Li, Chunsheng

    2015-01-01

    Complement activation has been implicated in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study aimed to determine whether mild hypothermia (HT) inhibits systemic and cerebral complement activation after resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Sixteen minipigs resuscitated from 8 minutes of untreated ventricular fibrillation were randomized into two groups: HT group (n=8), treated with HT (33°C) for 12 hours; and normothermia group (n=8), treated similarly as HT group except for cooling. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 0.5, 6, 12, and 24 hours after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). The brain cortex was harvested 24 hours after ROSC. Complement and pro-inflammatory markers were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neurologic deficit scores were evaluated 24 hours after ROSC. C1q, Bb, mannose-binding lectin (MBL), C3b, C3a, C5a, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels were significantly increased under normothermia within 24 hours after ROSC. However, these increases were significantly reduced by HT. Hypothermia decreased brain C1q, MBL, C3b, and C5a contents 24 hours after ROSC. Hypothermic pigs had a better neurologic outcome than normothermic pigs. In conclusion, complement is activated through classic, alternative, and MBL pathways after ROSC. Hypothermia inhibits systemic and cerebral complement activation, which may provide an additional mechanism of cerebral protection. PMID:25757755

  6. How does mild hypothermia affect monoclonal antibody glycosylation?

    PubMed

    Sou, Si Nga; Sellick, Christopher; Lee, Ken; Mason, Alison; Kyriakopoulos, Sarantos; Polizzi, Karen M; Kontoravdi, Cleo

    2015-06-01

    The application of mild hypothermic conditions to cell culture is a routine industrial practice used to improve recombinant protein production. However, a thorough understanding of the regulation of dynamic cellular processes at lower temperatures is necessary to enhance bioprocess design and optimization. In this study, we investigated the impact of mild hypothermia on protein glycosylation. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing a monoclonal antibody (mAb) were cultured at 36.5°C and with a temperature shift to 32°C during late exponential/early stationary phase. Experimental results showed higher cell viability with decreased metabolic rates. The specific antibody productivity increased by 25% at 32°C and was accompanied by a reduction in intracellular nucleotide sugar donor (NSD) concentrations and a decreased proportion of the more processed glycan structures on the mAb constant region. To better understand CHO cell metabolism at 32°C, flux balance analysis (FBA) was carried out and constrained with exometabolite data from stationary phase of cultures with or without a temperature shift. Estimated fluxomes suggested reduced fluxes of carbon species towards nucleotide and NSD synthesis and more energy was used for product formation. Expression of the glycosyltransferases that are responsible for N-linked glycan branching and elongation were significantly lower at 32°C. As a result of mild hypothermia, mAb glycosylation was shown to be affected by both NSD availability and glycosyltransferase expression. The combined experimental/FBA approach generated insight as to how product glycosylation can be impacted by changes in culture temperature. Better feeding strategies can be developed based on the understanding of the metabolic flux distribution. PMID:25545631

  7. Utilization of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy and Induced Hypothermia After Hydrogen Sulfide Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Mir J.; Exline, Matthew C.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is a toxic gas produced as a byproduct of organic waste and many industrial processes. Hydrogen sulfide exposure symptoms may vary from mild (dizziness, headaches, nausea) to severe lactic acidosis via its inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation, leading to cardiac arrhythmias and death. Treatment is generally supportive. We report the case of a patient presenting with cardiac arrest secondary to hydrogen sulfide exposure treated with both hyperbaric oxygen therapy and therapeutic hypothermia with great improvement in neurologic function. PMID:22004989

  8. Improving Education Outcomes in the Slovak Republic. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 578

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, David

    2007-01-01

    Improving education outcomes is vital for achieving convergence with GDP per capita levels in Western European countries and for reducing income inequality. While some education outcomes are favourable, such as the low secondary-school drop-out rate, others have room for improvement: education achievement is below the OECD average and strongly…

  9. Improving Student Performance Outcomes and Graduation Rates through Institutional Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roggow, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explores a grant-sponsored program and examines the role of departmental and institutional collaborations in advancing student performance outcomes. It provides a theoretical framework and a description of best practices for ensuring the success of first-generation urban community college students.

  10. Inside Quality Reform: Early Results on Using Outcomes for Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Khawas, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    This article offers evidence on ways in which assessment of student learning outcomes made a difference for some academic institutions in the United States. It offers perspectives on the internal changes that took place, especially within academic programmes. Even after the capacity for assessment was developed, challenges remained in evaluating…

  11. Improving Rural Cancer Patients' Outcomes: A Group-Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Thomas E.; Elliott, Barbara A.; Regal, Ronald R.; Renier, Colleen M.; Haller, Irina V.; Crouse, Byron J.; Witrak, Martha T.; Jensen, Patricia B.

    2004-01-01

    Significant barriers exist in the delivery of state-of-the-art cancer care to rural populations. Rural providers' knowledge and practices, their rural health care delivery systems, and linkages to cancer specialists are not optimal; therefore, rural cancer patient outcomes are less than achievable. Purpose: To test the effects of a strategy…

  12. Partnership for Improving Outcomes in Indigenous Education: Relationship or Business?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma Rhea, Zane

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the Australian government's Indigenous policy by interrogating the concept of partnership between governments and Indigenous communities through three examples. Increasingly, the Australian federal government is focusing attention on the poor literacy and numeracy outcomes for Indigenous children in remote and very remote…

  13. High-Leverage Leadership: Improving Outcomes in Educational Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mongon, Denis; Chapman, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Globalisation of world trade, international media, technological innovation and social change are creating opportunities and challenges that today's pupils will inherit and build on. A pupil's academic, technical and social capacity will define their success or failure. Therefore, educational outcomes and well-being for young people across…

  14. The Relationship between School Leadership and School Improvement Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silins, Halia C.

    This paper tests the degree of overlap between operational definitions of transformational and transactional leadership, the nature of the relationships between the constructs of transformational and transactional leadership, and specified outcomes in an empirically derived data set by the application of two forms of analysis. Based on Bass's…

  15. Mild hypothermia during advanced life support: a preliminary study in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Bruel, Cédric; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Marie, William; Arrot, Xavier; Daubin, Cédric; Du Cheyron, Damien; Massetti, Massimo; Charbonneau, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest may confer neuroprotection. We assessed the feasibility, safety and effectiveness of therapeutic infusion of 2 l of normal saline at 4°C before return of spontaneous circulation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation after out of hospital cardiac arrest. Methods This was a prospective, observational, multicenter clinical trial conducted in Emergency Medical Services units and in a medical intensive care unit at Caen University Hospital, Cen, France. Results In patients who had suffered out of hospital cardiac arrest, hypothermia was induced by infusing 2 l of 4°C NaCl 0.9% over 30 minutes during advanced life support prior to arrival at the hospital. A total of 33 patients were included in the study. Eight patients presented with ventricular fibrillation as the initial cardiac rhythm. Mild hypothermia was achieved after a median of 16 minutes (interquartile range 11.5 to 25.0 minutes) after return of spontaneous circulation. After intravenous cooling, the temperature decreased by 2.1°C (P < 0.0001) to a mean body temperature of 33.3°C (interquartile range 32.3 to 34.3°C). The only observed adverse event was pulmonary oedema, which occurred in one patient. Conclusion We concluded that prehospital induction of therapeutic hypothermia using infusion of 2 l of 4°C normal saline during advanced life support was feasible, effective and safe. Larger studies are required to assess the impact that this early cooling has on neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest. PMID:18312676

  16. Hypothermia during Carotid Endarterectomy: A Safety Study

    PubMed Central

    Candela, Serena; Dito, Raffaele; Casolla, Barbara; Silvestri, Emanuele; Sette, Giuliano; Filippi, Federico; Taurino, Maurizio; Brancadoro, Domitilla; Orzi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Background CEA is associated with peri-operative risk of brain ischemia, due both to emboli production caused by manipulation of the plaque and to potentially noxious reduction of cerebral blood flow by carotid clamping. Mild hypothermia (34–35°C) is probably the most effective approach to protect brain from ischemic insult. It is therefore a substantial hypothesis that hypothermia lowers the risk of ischemic brain damage potentially associated with CEA. Purpose of the study is to test whether systemic endovascular cooling to a target of 34.5–35°C, initiated before and maintained during CEA, is feasible and safe. Methods The study was carried out in 7 consecutive patients referred to the Vascular Surgery Unit and judged eligible for CEA. Cooling was initiated 60–90 min before CEA, by endovascular approach (Zoll system). The target temperature was maintained during CEA, followed by passive, controlled rewarming (0.4°C/h). The whole procedure was carried out under anesthesia. Results All the patients enrolled had no adverse events. Two patients exhibited a transient bradycardia (heart rate 30 beats/min). There were no significant differences in the clinical status, laboratory and physiological data measured before and after CEA. Conclusions Systemic cooling to 34.5–35.0°C, initiated before and maintained during carotid clamping, is feasible and safe. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02629653 PMID:27058874

  17. Immediate prehospital hypothermia protocol in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Laure; Vitrat, François; Savary, Dominique; Debaty, Guillaume; Santre, Charles; Durand, Michel; Dessertaine, Geraldine; Timsit, Jean-François

    2009-06-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) improves the outcomes of cardiac arrest (CA) survivors. The aim of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the efficacy and safety of an immediate prehospital cooling procedure implemented just after the return of spontaneous circulation with a prehospital setting. During 30 months, the case records of comatose survivors of out-of-hospital CA presumably due to a cardiac disease were studied. A routine protocol of immediate postresuscitation cooling had been tested by an emergency team, which consisted of an infusion of large-volume, ice-cold intravenous saline. We decided to assess the efficacy and tolerance of this procedure. A total of 99 patients were studied; 22 were treated with prehospital TH, and 77 consecutive patients treated with prehospital standard resuscitation served as controls. For all patients, TH was maintained for 12 to 24 hours. The demographic, clinical, and biological characteristics of the patients were similar in the 2 groups. The rate of patients with a body temperature of less than 35 degrees C upon admission was 41% in the cooling group and 18% in the control group. Rapid infusion of fluid was not associated with pulmonary edema. After 1 year of follow-up, 6 (27%) of 22 patients in the cooling group and 30 (39%) of 77 patients in the control group had a good outcome. Our preliminary observation suggests that in comatose survivors of CA, prehospital TH with infusion of large-volume, ice-cold intravenous saline is feasible and can be used safely by mobile emergency and intensive care units. PMID:19497463

  18. Iliac Arteries: How Registries Can Help Improve Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tapping, Charles Ross; Uberoi, Raman

    2014-01-01

    There are many publications reporting excellent short and long-term results with endovascular techniques. Patients included in trials are often highly selected and may not represent real world practice. Registries are important to interventional radiologists for several reasons; they reflect prevailing practice and can be used to establish real world standards of care and safety profiles. This information allows individuals and centers to evaluate their outcomes compared with national norms. The British Iliac Angioplasty and Stenting (BIAS) registry is an example of a mature registry that has been collecting data since 2000 and has been reporting outcomes since 2001. This article discusses the evidence to support both endovascular and surgical intervention for aortoiliac occlusive disease, the role of registries, and optimal techniques for aortoiliac intervention. PMID:25435659

  19. Preventing admission hypothermia in very low birth weight neonates.

    PubMed

    Fawcett, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal hypothermia, temperature < 36.5°C, is a major contributor to neonatal mortality and morbidity. hypothermia of preterm infants remains a challenge in the NiCU for many reasons. preterm very low birth weight (VlBW) infants, those infants born <1,500 g, are prone to very rapid heat losses through mechanisms of convection, evaporation, conduction, and radiation. this article reviews current research to reduce and prevent mortality and morbidity from hypothermia in preterm VlBW infants by implementing interventions in the delivery room to minimize heat loss and maintain core body temperatures. PMID:24816875

  20. Hypothermia induced by WR-2721 in the rat.

    PubMed

    Benova, D; Kiradzhiev, G; Nikolova, M A

    1987-01-01

    Hypothermic response to a range of doses of WR-2721 (S-2-/3 aminopropylamino/-ethylthiophosphate) was studied in the rat. Time of hypothermia appearance, time and extent of maximum hypothermia, and pattern of body temperature recovery were all observed to depend upon the level of drug dose administered. The role of such hypothermia in systemic toxicity of the drug is discussed. The authors believe it to result from insufficiency of thermoregulation in small mammals, and to be of no practical importance for clinical application of the drug. PMID:2834914

  1. Mechanisms responsible for decreased glomerular filtration in hibernation and hypothermia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tempel, G. E.; Musacchia, X. J.; Jones, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of blood pressure, heart rate, red blood cell and plasma volumes, and relative distribution of cardiac output were made on hibernating and hypothermic adult male and female golden hamsters weighing 120-140 g to study the mechanisms underlying the elimination or marked depression of renal function in hibernation and hypothermia. The results suggest that the elimination or marked depression in renal function reported in hibernation and hypothermia may partly be explained by alterations in cardiovascular system function. Renal perfusion pressure which decreases nearly 60% in both hibernation and hypothermia and a decrease in plasma volume of roughly 35% in the hypothermic animal might both be expected to markedly alter glomerular function.

  2. Outcome measures in MMN revisited: further improvement needed.

    PubMed

    Pruppers, Mariëlle H J; Draak, Thomas H P; Vanhoutte, Els K; Van der Pol, W-Ludo; Gorson, Kenneth C; Léger, Jean-Marc; Nobile-Orazio, Eduardo; Lewis, Richard A; van den Berg, Leonard H; Faber, Catharina G; Merkies, Ingemar S J

    2015-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to provide an overview of the outcome measures (OMs) applied in clinical trials in multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and to determine the responsiveness of a core set of selected OMs as part of the peripheral neuropathy outcome measures standardization (PeriNomS) study. The following OMs were serially applied in 26 patients with newly diagnosed or relapsing MMN, receiving intravenous immunoglobulin (assessments: T0/T3/T12 months): 14 muscle pairs MRC (Medical Research Council) scale, the Neuropathy Impairment Scale motor-subset, a self-evaluation scale, grip strength, and MMN-RODS© (Rasch-built overall disability scale). All data, except the grip strength, were subjected to Rasch analyses before determining responsiveness. For grip strength, responsiveness was examined using a combined anchor- (SF-36 question-2) and distribution-based (½ × SD) minimum clinically important difference (MCID) techniques, determining the proportion of patients exceeding both the identified cut-offs. For the remaining scales, the magnitude of change for each patient on each scale was determined using the MCID related to the individual SE (responder definition: MCID-SE ≥ 1.96). Overall, a great assortment of measures has been used in MMN trials with different responsiveness definitions. For the selected OMs, responsiveness was poor and only seen in one fourth to one third of the patients, the grip strength being more responsive. Despite the efforts taken to standardize outcome assessment, further clinimetric responsiveness studies are needed in MMN. PMID:26115442

  3. [The first application of therapeutic hypothermia in Poland--selective head cooling (Cool-Cap) with whole-body moderate hypothermia in a newborn with features of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Gulczyńska, Ewa; Kesiak, Marcin; Kryszczyńska, Joanna; Gadzinowski, Janusz; Oszukowski, Przemysław

    2012-05-01

    The authors present the first application of therapeutic hypothermia in a newborn in Poland. The female newborn, born with severe asphyxia, was transported to a referral perinatal center where the method of brain cooling was possible. Severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy was confirmed by an integrated EEG. During the cooling procedure (which lasted 72 hours), no important side effects were noticed. The neurodevelopmental outcome of the baby assessed during the first 2 years of her life is normal. PMID:22708339

  4. Neuroprotection and hypothermia in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Pietrini, Domenico; Piastra, Marco; Luca, Ersilia; Mancino, Aaldo; Conti, Giorgio; Cavaliere, Franco; De Luca, Daniele

    2012-06-01

    Brain injury is the leading cause of death in pediatric ICU. Current evidence supports the use of therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in unconscious patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest when the initial heart rhythm was ventricular fibrillation. TH has been proved to be also beneficial in term neonates after hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) and in children with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Recent reports have also investigated TH for the treatment of superrefractory status epilepticus. The clinical application of TH is based on the possibility to inhibit or lessen a myriad of destructive processes (including excitotoxicty, neuroinflammation, apoptosis, free radical production, seizure activity, blood- brain barrier disruption, blood vessel leakage) that take place in the injured tissue following ischemia-reperfusion. TH may also represent a useful tool when conventional therapy fails to achieve an effective control of elevated intracranial pressure. This review is aimed to provide an update of the available literature concerning this intriguing topic. PMID:22512392

  5. Combining Chemotherapy with Bevacizumab Improves Outcomes for Ovarian Cancer Patients

    Cancer.gov

    Results from two phase III randomized clinical trials suggest that, at least for some patients with ovarian cancer, adding the antiangiogenesis agent bevacizumab to chemotherapy increases the time to disease progression and may improve survival.

  6. Hibernation, Hypothermia and a Possible Therapeutic "Shifted Homeostasis" Induced by Central Activation of A1 Adenosine Receptor (A1AR).

    PubMed

    Tupone, Domenico; Cetas, Justin S; Morrison, Shaun F

    2016-04-01

    The positive outcome that hypothermia contributes to brain and cardiac protection following ischemia has stimulated research in the development of pharmacological approaches to induce a hypothermic/hypometabolic state. Pharmacological manipulation of central autonomic thermoregulatory circuits could represent a potential target for the induction of a hypothermic state. Here we present a brief description of the CNS thermoregulatory centers and how the manipulation of these circuits can be useful in the treatment of pathological conditions such as stroke or brain hemorrhage. PMID:27333659

  7. Cognitive behavioral therapy for suicidal behaviors: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mewton, Louise; Andrews, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    This systematic review provides an overview of the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in reducing suicidal cognitions and behavior in the adult population. We identified 15 randomized controlled trials of CBT for adults (aged 18 years and older) that included suicide-related cognitions or behaviors as an outcome measure. The studies were identified from PsycINFO searches, reference lists, and a publicly available database of psychosocial interventions for suicidal behaviors. This review identified some evidence of the use of CBT in the reduction of both suicidal cognitions and behaviors. There was not enough evidence from clinical trials to suggest that CBT focusing on mental illness reduces suicidal cognitions and behaviors. On the other hand, CBT focusing on suicidal cognitions and behaviors was found to be effective. Given the current evidence, clinicians should be trained in CBT techniques focusing on suicidal cognitions and behaviors that are independent of the treatment of mental illness. PMID:27042148

  8. Toward Improved Public Health Outcomes From Urban Nature

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Robert; Gaston, Kevin J.; Dean, Julie H.; Barber, Elizabeth; Fuller, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    There is mounting concern for the health of urban populations as cities expand at an unprecedented rate. Urban green spaces provide settings for a remarkable range of physical and mental health benefits, and pioneering health policy is recognizing nature as a cost-effective tool for planning healthy cities. Despite this, limited information on how specific elements of nature deliver health outcomes restricts its use for enhancing population health. We articulate a framework for identifying direct and indirect causal pathways through which nature delivers health benefits, and highlight current evidence. We see a need for a bold new research agenda founded on testing causality that transcends disciplinary boundaries between ecology and health. This will lead to cost-effective and tailored solutions that could enhance population health and reduce health inequalities. PMID:25602866

  9. Diabetic microvascular complications: possible targets for improved macrovascular outcomes

    PubMed Central

    D’Elia, John A; Bayliss, George; Roshan, Bijan; Maski, Manish; Gleason, Ray E; Weinrauch, Larry A

    2011-01-01

    The results of recent outcome trials challenge hypotheses that tight control of both glycohemoglobin and blood pressure diminishes macrovascular events and survival among type 2 diabetic patients. Relevant questions exist regarding the adequacy of glycohemoglobin alone as a measure of diabetes control. Are we ignoring mechanisms of vasculotoxicity (profibrosis, altered angiogenesis, hypertrophy, hyperplasia, and endothelial injury) inherent in current antihyperglycemic medications? Is the polypharmacy for lowering cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose, and systolic blood pressure producing drug interactions that are too complex to be clinically identified? We review angiotensin–aldosterone mechanisms of tissue injury that magnify microvascular damage caused by hyperglycemia and hypertension. Many studies describe interruption of these mechanisms, without hemodynamic consequence, in the preservation of function in type 1 diabetes. Possible interactions between the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system and physiologic glycemic control (through pulsatile insulin release) suggest opportunities for further clinical investigation. PMID:21694944

  10. Toward improved public health outcomes from urban nature.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, Danielle F; Lin, Brenda B; Bush, Robert; Gaston, Kevin J; Dean, Julie H; Barber, Elizabeth; Fuller, Richard A

    2015-03-01

    There is mounting concern for the health of urban populations as cities expand at an unprecedented rate. Urban green spaces provide settings for a remarkable range of physical and mental health benefits, and pioneering health policy is recognizing nature as a cost-effective tool for planning healthy cities. Despite this, limited information on how specific elements of nature deliver health outcomes restricts its use for enhancing population health. We articulate a framework for identifying direct and indirect causal pathways through which nature delivers health benefits, and highlight current evidence. We see a need for a bold new research agenda founded on testing causality that transcends disciplinary boundaries between ecology and health. This will lead to cost-effective and tailored solutions that could enhance population health and reduce health inequalities. PMID:25602866

  11. Improving Health Outcomes for Low Health Literacy Heart Failure Patients.

    PubMed

    Friel, Catherine J

    2016-09-01

    According to the National Assessment of Adult Literacy (2003), only 12% of U.S. adults have a proficient level of health literacy, with adults 65 years and older more likely to have a below basic or a basic health literacy level. An estimated 5.8 million individuals in the United States have heart failure (HF) and it is one of the most common reasons for those aged 65 and over to be hospitalized. Many patients with HF are at risk for poor health outcomes due to low health literacy. This article reviews the literature with regard to the effectiveness of methods used to address low health literacy among HF patients and describes a pilot study implemented by a home care agency in the northeast to address high HF readmission rates. PMID:27580282

  12. Does Cryotherapy Improve Outcomes With Soft Tissue Injury?

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Tricia J; Denegar, Craig R

    2004-09-01

    REFERENCE: Bleakley C, McDonough S, MacAuley D. The use of ice in the treatment of acute soft-tissue injury: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Am J Sport Med. 2004; 32:251-261. CLINICAL QUESTION: What is the clinical evidence base for cryotherapy use? DATA SOURCES: Studies were identified by using a computer-based literature search on a total of 8 databases: MEDLINE, Proquest, ISI Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL) on Ovid, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED) on Ovid, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness, and Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (Central). This was supplemented with citation tracking of relevant primary and review articles. Search terms included surgery,orthopaedics,sports injury,soft tissue injury,sprains and strains,contusions,athletic injury,acute,compression, cryotherapy,ice,RICE, andcold. STUDY SELECTION: To be included in the review, each study had to fulfill the following conditions: be a randomized, controlled trial of human subjects; be published in English as a full paper; include patients recovering from acute soft tissue or orthopaedic surgical interventions who received cryotherapy in inpatient, outpatient, or home-based treatment, in isolation or in combination with placebo or other therapies; provide comparisons with no treatment, placebo, a different mode or protocol of cryotherapy, or other physiotherapeutic interventions; and have outcome measures that included function (subjective or objective), pain, swelling, or range of motion. DATA EXTRACTION: The study population, interventions, outcomes, follow-up, and reported results of the assessed trials were extracted and tabulated. The primary outcome measures were pain, swelling, and range of motion. Only 2 groups reported adequate data for return to normal function. All eligible articles were rated for methodologic quality using the PEDro scale. The

  13. Does Cryotherapy Improve Outcomes With Soft Tissue Injury?

    PubMed Central

    Denegar, Craig R.

    2004-01-01

    Reference: Bleakley C, McDonough S, MacAuley D. The use of ice in the treatment of acute soft-tissue injury: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Am J Sport Med. 2004; 32:251–261. Clinical Question: What is the clinical evidence base for cryotherapy use? Data Sources: Studies were identified by using a computer-based literature search on a total of 8 databases: MEDLINE, Proquest, ISI Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL) on Ovid, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED) on Ovid, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness, and Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (Central). This was supplemented with citation tracking of relevant primary and review articles. Search terms included surgery,orthopaedics,sports injury,soft tissue injury,sprains and strains,contusions,athletic injury,acute,compression, cryotherapy,ice,RICE, andcold. Study Selection: To be included in the review, each study had to fulfill the following conditions: be a randomized, controlled trial of human subjects; be published in English as a full paper; include patients recovering from acute soft tissue or orthopaedic surgical interventions who received cryotherapy in inpatient, outpatient, or home-based treatment, in isolation or in combination with placebo or other therapies; provide comparisons with no treatment, placebo, a different mode or protocol of cryotherapy, or other physiotherapeutic interventions; and have outcome measures that included function (subjective or objective), pain, swelling, or range of motion. Data Extraction: The study population, interventions, outcomes, follow-up, and reported results of the assessed trials were extracted and tabulated. The primary outcome measures were pain, swelling, and range of motion. Only 2 groups reported adequate data for return to normal function. All eligible articles were rated for methodologic quality using the PEDro scale. The

  14. Providing Outcomes Information to Nursing Homes: Can It Improve Quality of Care?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined whether providing outcomes information to 120 nursing homes facilitated improvements in quality over a 12-month period, as compared with 1,171 facilities not receiving this information. The outcomes information provided consisted of a report mailed to administrators that examined six measures of care quality. These…

  15. The Effectiveness Of The Manchester Even Start Program In Improving Literacy Outcomes for Preschool Latino Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Andrew M.

    2005-01-01

    Although widely implemented, the effectiveness of the Even Start program and other programs involving home-visiting and bilingual education in improving preschool literacy outcomes, particularly among Latino students, is uncertain. This study used a non-equivalent groups design to compare preschool literacy outcomes (measured by the PALS-PreK…

  16. The ability of different thermal aids to reduce hypothermia in neonatal piglets.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, L J; Larsen, M L V; Malmkvist, J

    2016-05-01

    We investigated whether hypothermia in newborn piglets could be reduced by applying different thermal aids. The experiment was performed on 150 newborn piglets from 24 sows. Right after birth, the piglets were moved to a wire mesh cage for the first 2 h of life where they experienced 1 of 7 different combinations of flooring (solid vs. slatted) and treatments: control, with no additional thermal aids on a solid floor ( = 26) or a slatted floor ( = 26); built-in floor heating ( = 31) or floor heating as a radiant floor plate on solid floor (FloorPlate; = 19); radiant heater above a solid floor (RadiantC; = 22) or a slatted floor (RadiantSlat; = 18); and provision of straw on a solid floor (Straw; = 8). Piglets' rectal temperature was measured both continuously and manually every 10 min for the first 2 h after birth using a thermal sensor inserted in the rectum of the piglets. The rectal temperature curve was analyzed for differences in the slope of the drop in rectal temperature and the deflection tangent of the curve. Furthermore, differences in average rectal temperature, minimum rectal temperature, rectal temperature 2 h after birth, and time with rectal temperature below 35°C were analyzed. All statistical analyses were performed using a mixed model. All thermal aids/heat solutions resulted in a less steep drop in rectal temperature, a faster recovery, and, for the smaller piglets, also a greater average rectal temperature (except for built-in floor heating) and less time with rectal temperature below 35°C. The most efficient thermal aids to reduce hypothermia in newborn piglets were Straw and RadiantC. Furthermore, Straw, RadiantC, and FloorPlate also eliminated the effect of birth weight on some of these indicators of thermoregulatory success. Otherwise, FloorPlate and RadiantSlat showed an intermediate outcome for most measures. With no heating, piglets on a solid floor experienced more severe hypothermia than piglets on a slatted floor. In conclusion

  17. Automated analysis of background EEG and reactivity during therapeutic hypothermia in comatose patients after cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Noirhomme, Quentin; Lehembre, Rémy; Lugo, Zulay Del Rosario; Lesenfants, Damien; Luxen, André; Laureys, Steven; Oddo, Mauro; Rossetti, Andrea O

    2014-01-01

    Visual analysis of electroencephalography (EEG) background and reactivity during therapeutic hypothermia provides important outcome information, but is time-consuming and not always consistent between reviewers. Automated EEG analysis may help quantify the brain damage. Forty-six comatose patients in therapeutic hypothermia, after cardiac arrest, were included in the study. EEG background was quantified with burst-suppression ratio (BSR) and approximate entropy, both used to monitor anesthesia. Reactivity was detected through change in the power spectrum of signal before and after stimulation. Automatic results obtained almost perfect agreement (discontinuity) to substantial agreement (background reactivity) with a visual score from EEG-certified neurologists. Burst-suppression ratio was more suited to distinguish continuous EEG background from burst-suppression than approximate entropy in this specific population. Automatic EEG background and reactivity measures were significantly related to good and poor outcome. We conclude that quantitative EEG measurements can provide promising information regarding current state of the patient and clinical outcome, but further work is needed before routine application in a clinical setting. PMID:24452769

  18. The transcriptome responses of cardiomyocyte exposed to hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Xue, Xiaodong; Xu, Yinli; Zhang, Yuji; Li, Zhi; Wang, Huishan

    2016-06-01

    Hypothermia has positive and negative consequences on the body. Hypothermia depresses myocardial contraction, conduction, and metabolic rate in the heart. However, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms. Herein, we compared the gene expression of human adult ventricular cardiomyocytes (AC16) under hypothermia to find differences between different temperatures, and elucidate the candidate genes that may play important roles in the response to hypothermia. A total of 2413 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified by microarray hybridization, which provided abundant data for further analysis. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis revealed that genes related to transcription, and protein and lipid metabolism were significantly enriched. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis showed that DEGs were significantly enriched in TGF-β pathway and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, which may play important roles in changes affected by hypothermia. A set of transcription factors (TFs) (CPBP, Churchill, NF-AT1, GKLF, SRY, ZNF333, ING4, myogenin, DRI1 and CRX) was recognized to be the functional layer of key nodes, which mapped the signal of hypothermia to transcriptome. The identified DEGs, pathways and predicted TFs could facilitate further investigations of the detailed molecular mechanisms. PMID:27039159

  19. Hypothermia associated with clobazam use in adult epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Angela C; Quraishi, Imran H; Mattson, Richard H

    2016-01-01

    Clobazam, a 1,5-benzodiazepine FDA-approved in 2011, is commonly used to treat anxiety and epilepsy. It has not associated with hypothermia until very recently, in a case report involving two pediatric patients. Here, we report the first case of hypothermia development in an adult patient with epilepsy associated with clobazam use. A couple months after starting clobazam, the patient started developing episodes of hypothermia every several weeks, with temperatures ranging from 90 °F-95 °F. Normothermia was achieved with Bair Hugger therapy. Thyroid-stimulating hormone and cortisol levels were normal, and there was no evidence of infection in most instances. After 11 total episodes of hypothermia over a year of clobazam use, the drug was discontinued. It has now been 7 months after discontinuation, and the patient has not experienced any more episodes of hypothermia. Early recognition of the link between clobazam and hypothermia may prevent avoidable Emergency Department visits and hospitalizations. PMID:26870662

  20. An Association of Cancer Physicians' strategy for improving services and outcomes for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Baird, Richard; Banks, Ian; Cameron, David; Chester, John; Earl, Helena; Flannagan, Mark; Januszewski, Adam; Kennedy, Richard; Payne, Sarah; Samuel, Emlyn; Taylor, Hannah; Agarwal, Roshan; Ahmed, Samreen; Archer, Caroline; Board, Ruth; Carser, Judith; Copson, Ellen; Cunningham, David; Coleman, Rob; Dangoor, Adam; Dark, Graham; Eccles, Diana; Gallagher, Chris; Glaser, Adam; Griffiths, Richard; Hall, Geoff; Hall, Marcia; Harari, Danielle; Hawkins, Michael; Hill, Mark; Johnson, Peter; Jones, Alison; Kalsi, Tania; Karapanagiotou, Eleni; Kemp, Zoe; Mansi, Janine; Marshall, Ernie; Mitchell, Alex; Moe, Maung; Michie, Caroline; Neal, Richard; Newsom-Davis, Tom; Norton, Alison; Osborne, Richard; Patel, Gargi; Radford, John; Ring, Alistair; Shaw, Emily; Skinner, Rod; Stark, Dan; Turnbull, Sam; Velikova, Galina; White, Jeff; Young, Alison; Joffe, Johnathan; Selby, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Association of Cancer Physicians in the United Kingdom has developed a strategy to improve outcomes for cancer patients and identified the goals and commitments of the Association and its members. PMID:26913066

  1. An Association of Cancer Physicians’ strategy for improving services and outcomes for cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Richard; Banks, Ian; Cameron, David; Chester, John; Earl, Helena; Flannagan, Mark; Januszewski, Adam; Kennedy, Richard; Payne, Sarah; Samuel, Emlyn; Taylor, Hannah; Agarwal, Roshan; Ahmed, Samreen; Archer, Caroline; Board, Ruth; Carser, Judith; Copson, Ellen; Cunningham, David; Coleman, Rob; Dangoor, Adam; Dark, Graham; Eccles, Diana; Gallagher, Chris; Glaser, Adam; Griffiths, Richard; Hall, Geoff; Hall, Marcia; Harari, Danielle; Hawkins, Michael; Hill, Mark; Johnson, Peter; Jones, Alison; Kalsi, Tania; Karapanagiotou, Eleni; Kemp, Zoe; Mansi, Janine; Marshall, Ernie; Mitchell, Alex; Moe, Maung; Michie, Caroline; Neal, Richard; Newsom-Davis, Tom; Norton, Alison; Osborne, Richard; Patel, Gargi; Radford, John; Ring, Alistair; Shaw, Emily; Skinner, Rod; Stark, Dan; Turnbull, Sam; Velikova, Galina; White, Jeff; Young, Alison; Joffe, Johnathan; Selby, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Association of Cancer Physicians in the United Kingdom has developed a strategy to improve outcomes for cancer patients and identified the goals and commitments of the Association and its members. PMID:26913066

  2. Improving Outcomes for Learners through Self-Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This document supplements the advice given in "How good is our school?" (HGIOS)--third edition and "The Child at the Centre"--second edition which set out comprehensive quality frameworks and provide helpful advice on the process of improvement through self-evaluation. In particular, this document provides advice on the application of the three…

  3. A Measurement Model of Microgenetic Transfer for Improving Instructional Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlik, Philip I., Jr.; Yudelson, Michael; Koedinger, Kenneth R.

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to improve instructional task design often make reference to the mental structures, such as "schemas" (e.g., Gick & Holyoak, 1983) or "identical elements" (Thorndike & Woodworth, 1901), that are common to both the instructional and target tasks. This component based (e.g., Singley & Anderson, 1989) approach…

  4. Does residential mobility improve educational outcomes? Evidence from the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Haelermans, Carla; De Witte, Kristof

    2015-07-01

    This paper explores the impact of residential mobility on educational outcomes. By considering a large Dutch city with substantial internal residential mobility, we examine how residential mobility influences the decision of students to drop out of school. The paper exploits a rich administrative dataset with extensive information on educational, individual, family, housing and moving characteristics of students. It combines a matching design with a multivariate regression analysis, such that the evaluation draws on a well-comparable control group for the treated students. Accounting for individual, family, educational, neighborhood and housing characteristics, as well as for school and year fixed effects, we observe that residential mobility increases the probability of school dropout in the first few years after moving. The estimated effect changes, however, to a lower risk of early school leaving after an initial period, and then changes again to a higher risk after 6years. This effect remains, regardless the level of education the students attended, or whether the student moves to a better or a worse neighborhood. PMID:26004467

  5. Pediatric kidney disease: tracking onset and improving clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bates, Carlton M; Charlton, Jennifer R; Ferris, Maria E; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Hoshizaki, Deborah K; Warady, Bradley A; Moxey-Mims, Marva M

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies confirm that much of adult kidney disease may have its origins in childhood, often as a result of abnormal or suboptimal fetal kidney development. Understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of CKD in children is rapidly evolving because of robust longitudinal clinical data, identification of monogenic mutations related to common causes of CKD, and improved knowledge of factors that influence the onset and progression of CKD. The Kidney Research National Dialogue, supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, asked the research and clinical communities to formulate and prioritize research objectives that would improve understanding of kidney function and diseases. This commentary outlines high-priority research objectives to assess factors associated with the predisposition to develop renal disease in children, and address the unique challenges in treating this population. PMID:24651076

  6. Improving Patient Outcomes With Oral Heart Failure Medications.

    PubMed

    Sherrod, Melissa M; Cheek, Dennis J; Seale, Ashlie

    2016-05-01

    Hospitals are under immense pressure to reduce heart failure readmissions that occur within 30 days of discharge, and to improve the quality of care for these patients. Penalties mandated by the Affordable Care Act decrease hospital reimbursement and ultimately the overall cost of caring for these patients increases if they are not well managed. Approximately 25% of patients hospitalized for heart failure are at high risk for readmission and these rates have not changed over the past decade. As a result of an aging population, the incidence of heart failure is expected to increase to one in five Americans over the age of 65. Pharmacologic management can reduce the risk of death and help prevent unnecessary hospitalizations. Healthcare providers who have knowledge of heart failure medications and drug interactions and share this information with their patients contribute to improved long-term survival and physical functioning as well as fewer hospitalizations and a delay of progressive worsening of heart failure. PMID:27145405

  7. Febuxostat improves outcome in a rat model of cancer cachexia

    PubMed Central

    Konishi, Masaaki; Pelgrim, Loes; Tschirner, Anika; Baumgarten, Anna; von Haehling, Stephan; Palus, Sandra; Doehner, Wolfram; Anker, Stefan D; Springer, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Background Activity of xanthine oxidase is induced in cancer cachexia, and its inhibition by allopurinol or oxypurinol improves survival and reduces wasting in the Yoshida hepatoma cancer cachexia model. Here, we tested the effects of the second-generation xanthine oxidase inhibitor febuxostat compared with placebo in the same model as used previously by our group. Methods Wistar rats (∽200 g) were treated daily with febuxostat at 5 mg/kg/day or placebo via gavage for a maximum of 17 days. Weight change, quality of life, and body composition were analysed. After sacrifice, proteasome activity in the gastrocnemius muscle was measured. Muscle-specific proteins involved in metabolism were analysed by western blotting. Results Treatment of the tumour-bearing rats with febuxostat led to a significantly improved survival compared with placebo (hazard ratio: 0.45, 95% confidence interval: 0.22–0.93, P = 0.03). Loss of body weight was reduced (−26.3 ± 12.4 g) compared with placebo (−50.2 ± 2.1 g, P < 0.01). Wasting of lean mass was attenuated (−12.7 ± 10.8 g) vs. placebo (−31.9 ± 2.1 g, P < 0.05). While we did not see an effect of febuxostat on proteasome activity at the end of the study, the pAkt/Akt ratio was improved by febuxostat (0.94 ± 0.09) vs. placebo (0.41 ± 0.05, P < 0.01), suggesting an increase in protein synthesis. Conclusions Febuxostat attenuated cachexia progression and improved survival of tumour-bearing rats. PMID:26136193

  8. OPTIMIZED FLUID MANAGEMENT IMPROVES OUTCOMES OF PEDIATRIC BURN PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Robert; Herndon, David N; Branski, Ludwik K; Finnerty, Celeste C; Leonard, Katrina R; Jeschke, Marc G

    2012-01-01

    Background One of the major determinants for survival of severely burned patients is appropriate fluid resuscitation. At present, fluid resuscitation is calculated based on bodyweight or body surface area, burn size, and urinary output. However, recent evidence suggests that fluid calculation is inadequate and that over- and under-resuscitation is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. We hypothesize that optimizing fluid administration during the critical initial phase using a transcardiopulmonary thermo-dilution monitoring device (PiCCO) would have beneficial effects on the outcome of burned patients. Methods A cohort of seventy-six severely burned pediatric patients with burns over 30% total body surface area (TBSA) who received adjusted fluid resuscitation using the PiCCO (P) system were compared to 76 conventionally monitored patients (C). Clinical hemodynamic measurements, organ function (DENVER2 score), and biomarkers were recorded prospectively for the first 20 days after burn injury. Results Both cohorts were similar in demographic and injury characteristics. Patients in the PiCCO group received significantly less fluids (p<0.05) with similar urinary output, resulting in a significantly lower positive fluid balance (p<0.05). The central venous pressure (CVP) in the P group was maintained in a more controlled range (p<0.05), associated with a significantly lower heart rate and significantly lower incidence of cardiac and renal failure, p<0.05. Conclusions Fluid resuscitation guided by transcardiopulmonary thermo-dilution during hospitalization represents an effective adjunct and is associated with beneficial effects on post-burn morbidity. PMID:22703982

  9. Mild hypothermia combined with neural stem cell transplantation for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: neuroprotective effects of combined therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Jiang, Feng; Li, Qifeng; He, Xiaoguang; Ma, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem cell transplantation is a useful treatment for ischemic stroke, but apoptosis often occurs in the hypoxic-ischemic environment of the brain after cell transplantation. In this study, we determined if mild hypothermia (27–28°C) can increase the survival rate of neural stem cells (1.0 × 105/μL) transplanted into neonatal mice with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Long-term effects on neurological functioning of the mice were also examined. After mild hypothermia combined with neural stem cell transplantation, we observed decreased expression levels of inflammatory factor nuclear factor-kappa B and apoptotic factor caspase-3, reduced cerebral infarct volumes, increased survival rate of transplanted cells, and marked improvements in neurological function. Thus, the neuroprotective effects of mild hypothermia combined with neural stem cell transplantation are superior to those of monotherapy. Moreover, our findings suggest that the neuroprotective effects of mild hypothermia combined with neural stem cell transplantation on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy are achieved by anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic mechanisms. PMID:25422635

  10. Value Driven Outcomes (VDO): a pragmatic, modular, and extensible software framework for understanding and improving health care costs and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Kensaku; Martin, Cary J; Williams, Kip; Tu, Ming-Chieh; Park, Charlton G; Hunter, Cheri; Staes, Catherine J; Bray, Bruce E; Deshmukh, Vikrant G; Holbrook, Reid A; Morris, Scott J; Fedderson, Matthew B; Sletta, Amy; Turnbull, James; Mulvihill, Sean J; Crabtree, Gordon L; Entwistle, David E; McKenna, Quinn L; Strong, Michael B; Pendleton, Robert C; Lee, Vivian S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop expeditiously a pragmatic, modular, and extensible software framework for understanding and improving healthcare value (costs relative to outcomes). Materials and methods In 2012, a multidisciplinary team was assembled by the leadership of the University of Utah Health Sciences Center and charged with rapidly developing a pragmatic and actionable analytics framework for understanding and enhancing healthcare value. Based on an analysis of relevant prior work, a value analytics framework known as Value Driven Outcomes (VDO) was developed using an agile methodology. Evaluation consisted of measurement against project objectives, including implementation timeliness, system performance, completeness, accuracy, extensibility, adoption, satisfaction, and the ability to support value improvement. Results A modular, extensible framework was developed to allocate clinical care costs to individual patient encounters. For example, labor costs in a hospital unit are allocated to patients based on the hours they spent in the unit; actual medication acquisition costs are allocated to patients based on utilization; and radiology costs are allocated based on the minutes required for study performance. Relevant process and outcome measures are also available. A visualization layer facilitates the identification of value improvement opportunities, such as high-volume, high-cost case types with high variability in costs across providers. Initial implementation was completed within 6 months, and all project objectives were fulfilled. The framework has been improved iteratively and is now a foundational tool for delivering high-value care. Conclusions The framework described can be expeditiously implemented to provide a pragmatic, modular, and extensible approach to understanding and improving healthcare value. PMID:25324556

  11. Bariatric surgery is associated with improvement in kidney outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Alex R; Chen, Yuan; Still, Christopher; Wood, G Craig; Kirchner, H Lester; Lewis, Meredith; Kramer, Holly; Hartle, James E; Carey, David; Appel, Lawrence J; Grams, Morgan E

    2016-07-01

    Severe obesity is associated with increased risk of kidney disease. Whether bariatric surgery reduces the risk of adverse kidney outcomes is uncertain. To resolve this we compared the risk of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) decline of ≥30% and doubling of serum creatinine or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in 985 patients who underwent bariatric surgery with 985 patients who did not undergo such surgery. Patients were matched on demographics, baseline body mass index, eGFR, comorbidities, and previous nutrition clinic use. Mean age was 45 years, 97% were white, 80% were female, and 33% had baseline eGFR <90 ml/min per 1.73 m(2). Mean 1-year weight loss was 40.4 kg in the surgery group compared with 1.4 kg in the matched cohort. Over a median follow-up of 4.4 years, 85 surgery patients had an eGFR decline of ≥30% (22 had doubling of serum creatinine/ESRD). Over a median follow-up of 3.8 years, 177 patients in the matched cohort had an eGFR decline of ≥30% (50 had doubling of serum creatinine/ESRD). In adjusted analysis, bariatric surgery patients had a significant 58% lower risk for an eGFR decline of ≥30% (hazard ratio 0.42, 95% confidence interval 0.32-0.55) and 57% lower risk of doubling of serum creatinine or ESRD (hazard ratio 0.43, 95% confidence interval: 0.26-0.71) compared with the matched cohort. Results were generally consistent among subgroups of patients with and without eGFR <90 ml/min per 1.73 m(2), hypertension, and diabetes. Thus, bariatric surgery may be an option to prevent kidney function decline in severely obese individuals. PMID:27181999

  12. Effective colonoscopy training techniques: strategies to improve patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Papanikolaou, Ioannis S; Karatzas, Pantelis S; Varytimiadis, Lazaros T; Tsigaridas, Athanasios; Galanopoulos, Michail; Viazis, Nikos; Karamanolis, Dimitrios G

    2016-01-01

    Colonoscopy has substantially evolved during the last 20 years and many different training techniques have been developed in order to improve the performance of endoscopists. The most known are mechanical simulators, virtual reality simulators, computer-simulating endoscopy, magnetic endoscopic imaging, and composite and explanted animal organ simulators. Current literature generally indicates that the use of simulators improves performance of endoscopists and enhances safety of patients, especially during the initial phase of training. Moreover, newer endoscopes and imaging techniques such as high-definition colonoscopes, chromocolonoscopy with dyes spraying, and third-eye retroscope have been incorporated in everyday practice, offering better visualization of the colon and detection of polyps. Despite the abundance of these different technological features, training devices are not widely used and no official guideline or specified training algorithm or technique for lower gastrointestinal endoscopy has been evolved. In this review, we present the most important training methods currently available and evaluate these using existing literature. We also try to propose a training algorithm for novice endoscopists. PMID:27099542

  13. Improved renal ischemia tolerance in females influences kidney transplantation outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Aufhauser, David D.; Wang, Zhonglin; Murken, Douglas R.; Bhatti, Tricia R.; Wang, Yanfeng; Ge, Guanghui; Redfield, Robert R.; Abt, Peter L.; Wang, Liqing; Reese, Peter P.; Hancock, Wayne W.; Levine, Matthew H.

    2016-01-01

    Experimentally, females show an improved ability to recover from ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) compared with males; however, this sex-dependent response is less established in humans. Here, we developed a series of murine renal ischemia and transplant models to investigate sex-specific effects on recovery after IRI. We found that IRI tolerance is profoundly increased in female mice compared with that observed in male mice and discovered an intermediate phenotype after neutering of either sex. Transplantation of adult kidneys from either sex into a recipient of the opposite sex followed by ischemia at a remote time resulted in ischemia recovery that reflected the sex of the recipient, not the donor, revealing that the host sex determines recovery. Likewise, renal IRI was exacerbated in female estrogen receptor α–KO mice, while female mice receiving supplemental estrogen before ischemia were protected. We examined data from the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) to determine whether there is an association between sex and delayed graft function (DGF) in patients who received deceased donor renal transplants. A multivariable logistic regression analysis determined that there was a greater association with DGF in male recipients than in female recipients. Together, our results demonstrate that sex affects renal IRI tolerance in mice and humans and indicate that estrogen administration has potential as a therapeutic intervention to clinically improve ischemia tolerance. PMID:27088798

  14. Routine outcomes monitoring to support improving care for schizophrenia: report from the VA Mental Health QUERI.

    PubMed

    Young, Alexander S; Niv, Noosha; Chinman, Matthew; Dixon, Lisa; Eisen, Susan V; Fischer, Ellen P; Smith, Jeffrey; Valenstein, Marcia; Marder, Stephen R; Owen, Richard R

    2011-04-01

    In schizophrenia, treatments that improve outcomes have not been reliably disseminated. A major barrier to improving care has been a lack of routinely collected outcomes data that identify patients who are failing to improve or not receiving effective treatments. To support high quality care, the VA Mental Health QUERI used literature review, expert interviews, and a national panel process to increase consensus regarding outcomes monitoring instruments and strategies that support quality improvement. There was very good consensus in the domains of psychotic symptoms, side-effects, drugs and alcohol, depression, caregivers, vocational functioning, and community tenure. There are validated instruments and assessment strategies that are feasible for quality improvement in routine practice. PMID:20658320

  15. Combination of Temperature-Sensitive Stem Cells and Mild Hypothermia: A New Potential Therapy for Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Yue; Chen, Chong; Sun, Hong-Tao; Cheng, Shi-Xiang; Liu, Xiao-Zhi; Qu, Yang; Li, Xiao-hong

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Stem cell transplantation holds great potential for the treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, the micro-environment of reduced oxygen and accumulated toxins leads to low survival rates of grafted cells, which dramatically limits their clinical application. Mild hypothermia has been demonstrated to improve the micro-environment after severe TBI. Thus, we speculate that combinational therapy of mild hypothermia may promote survival of grafted cells, especially temperature-sensitive stem cells, which show the most activity in mild temperatures. In this study, we first isolated mesenchymal stem cells from umbilical cord (UCSMCs) and generated the temperature-sensitive UCSMCs (tsUCSMCs) by infection with a retrovirus carrying the temperature-sensitive tsA58 SV40 LT antigen gene. We demonstrated that tsUCSMCs grew and proliferated with more activity at 33°C than at 37°C by counting cell numbers with a hematocytometer, measuring the cell cycle with flow cytometry, and detecting proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) with immunofluorescence staining. Thereafter, we established the rat severe TBI model by fluid percussion, and injected PBS, UCSMCs, or tsUCSMCs into the injured region, and subject the animals to normothermia or mild hypothermia (33°C). We found that, compared with UCSMC or tsUCSMC treatment alone, their combination with hypothermia could significantly improve motor and cognitive function with more survival of the grafted cells. Furthermore, we observed that combined therapy with hypothermia and tsUCSMCs exerted the most protective effect on the recovery of neurological function of all the tested treatments, with the highest survival and proliferation rates, and the lowest apoptosis rate. Thus this may represent a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of severe TBI. PMID:22655683

  16. Engaging with blended learning to improve students' learning outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Rebecca; Shannon, Susan J.

    2013-08-01

    When blended learning is embraced to enhance learning in engineering (architectural), design and architecture, we argue it is a best-practice instructional mode. Blended learning is the seamless amalgamation of carefully selected online modules with face-to-face instruction. This paper evaluates case studies of the introduction of blended learning in these disciplines. It demonstrates that students who do not engage with blended learning are academically disadvantaged. Alignment of the blended mode of delivery and the mode of assessment is next considered. Two case studies of the introduction of blended modes of assessment, for improved student satisfaction with feedback, are evaluated. Finally, the reliance upon non-faculty to provide both blended learning and assessment is evaluated using qualitative research methods to establish the barriers to adoption of what is now considered best educational practice.

  17. Long-Term Effects of Induced Hypothermia on Local and Systemic Inflammation - Results from a Porcine Long-Term Trauma Model

    PubMed Central

    Horst, K.; Eschbach, D.; Pfeifer, R.; Relja, B.; Sassen, M.; Steinfeldt, T.; Wulf, H.; Vogt, N.; Frink, M.; Ruchholtz, S.; Pape, H. C.; Hildebrand, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypothermia has been discussed as playing a role in improving the early phase of systemic inflammation. However, information on the impact of hypothermia on the local inflammatory response is sparse. We therefore investigated the kinetics of local and systemic inflammation in the late posttraumatic phase after induction of hypothermia in an established porcine long-term model of combined trauma. Materials & Methods Male pigs (35 ± 5kg) were mechanically ventilated and monitored over the study period of 48 h. Combined trauma included tibia fracture, lung contusion, liver laceration and pressure-controlled hemorrhagic shock (MAP < 30 ± 5 mmHg for 90 min). After resuscitation, hypothermia (33°C) was induced for a period of 12 h (HT-T group) with subsequent re-warming over a period of 10 h. The NT-T group was kept normothermic. Systemic and local (fracture hematoma) cytokine levels (IL-6, -8, -10) and alarmins (HMGB1, HSP70) were measured via ELISA. Results Severe signs of shock as well as systemic and local increases of pro-inflammatory mediators were observed in both trauma groups. In general the local increase of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediator levels was significantly higher and prolonged compared to systemic concentrations. Induction of hypothermia resulted in a significantly prolonged elevation of both systemic and local HMGB1 levels at 48 h compared to the NT-T group. Correspondingly, local IL-6 levels demonstrated a significantly prolonged increase in the HT-T group at 48 h. Conclusion A prolonged inflammatory response might reduce the well-described protective effects on organ and immune function observed in the early phase after hypothermia induction. Furthermore, local immune response also seems to be affected. Future studies should aim to investigate the use of therapeutic hypothermia at different degrees and duration of application. PMID:27144532

  18. Hypothesis: selective phosphodiesterase-5 inhibition improves outcome in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Downing, J W; Ramasubramanian, R; Johnson, R F; Minzter, B H; Paschall, R L; Sundell, H W; Engelhardt, B; Lewis, R

    2004-01-01

    The pathogenesis of preeclampsia stems from aberrant changes at the placental interface. The trophoblastic endovascular invasion of tonic spiral arteries that converts them to passive conduits falters. Uteroplacental insufficiency and fetoplacental hypoxemia result. Secondary maternal oxidative stress and an excessive inflammatory response to pregnancy generate the clinical syndrome of preeclampsia. Current treatment focuses on preventing seizures, controlling hypertension, preserving renal function and delivering the baby. We propose that the pathophysiological changes induced by preeclampsia in the placenta parallel those caused by persistent hypoxemia in the lungs at high altitude or with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Unrelenting pulmonary hypoxic vasoconstriction induces pulmonary hypertension and cor pulmonale. Inhalation of nitric oxide and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors opposes pulmonary hypoxic vasoconstriction, alleviates pulmonary hypertension and improves systemic oxygenation. Notably nitric oxide donor therapy also counters hypoxemic fetoplacental vasoconstriction, a biological response analogous to pulmonary hypoxic vasoconstriction. Fetal oxygenation and nutrition improve. Placental upstream resistance to umbilical arterial blood flow decreases. Fetal right ventricular impedance falls. Heart failure (cor placentale) is avoided. Emergency preterm delivery can be postponed. Other than low dose aspirin and antioxidants vitamins C and E no available therapy specifically targets the underlying disease profile. We hypothesize that, like nitric oxide donation, pharmacological inhibition of placental phosphodiesterase-5 will also protect the fetus but for a longer time. Biological availability of guanosine 3'5'-cyclic monophosphate is boosted due to slowed hydrolysis. Adenosine 3'5'-cyclic monphosphate levels increase in parallel. Cyclic nucleotide accumulation dilates intact tonic spiral arteries and counters hypoxemic fetoplacental vasoconstriction

  19. Thrombomodulin Improves Early Outcomes After Intraportal Islet Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, W.; Wilson, J. T.; Wen, J.; Angsana, J.; Qu, Z.; Haller, C. A.; Chaikof, E. L.

    2009-01-01

    Primary islet nonfunction due to an instant blood mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR) leads to an increase in donor islet mass required to achieve euglycemia. In the presence of thrombin, thrombomodulin generates activated protein C (APC), which limits procoagulant and proinflammatory responses. In this study, we postulated that liposomal formulations of thrombomodulin (lipo-TM), due to its propensity for preferential uptake in the liver, would enhance intraportal engraftment of allogeneic islets by inhibiting the IBMIR. Diabetic C57BL/6J mice underwent intraportal transplantation with B10.BR murine islets. In the absence of treatment, conversion to euglycemia was observed among 29% of mice receiving 250 allo-islets. In contrast, a single infusion of lipo-TM led to euglycemia in 83% of recipients (p = 0.0019). Fibrin deposition (p< 0.0001), neutrophil infiltration (p < 0.0001), as well as expression TNF-α and IL-β (p<0.03)were significantly reduced. Significantly, thrombotic responses mediated by human islets in contact with human blood were also reduced by this approach. Lipo-TM improves the engraftment of allogeneic islets through a reduction in local thrombotic and inflammatory processes. As an enzyme-based pharmacotherapeutic, this strategy offers the potential for local generation of APC at the site of islet infusion, during the initial period of elevated thrombin production. PMID:19459803

  20. Smoking cessation strategies for patients with asthma: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Perret, Jennifer L; Bonevski, Billie; McDonald, Christine F; Abramson, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is common in adults with asthma, yet a paucity of literature exists on smoking cessation strategies specifically targeting this subgroup. Adverse respiratory effects from personal smoking include worse asthma control and a predisposition to lower lung function and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Some data suggest that individuals with asthma are more likely than their non-asthmatic peers to smoke regularly at an earlier age. While quit attempts can be more frequent in smokers with asthma, they are also of shorter duration than in non-asthmatics. Considering these asthma-specific characteristics is important in order to individualize smoking cessation strategies. In particular, asthma-specific information such as “lung age” should be provided and longer-term follow-up is advised. Promising emerging strategies include reminders by cellular phone and web-based interventions using consumer health informatics. For adolescents, training older peers to deliver asthma education is another promising strategy. For smokers who are hospitalized for asthma, inpatient nicotine replacement therapy and counseling are a priority. Overall, improving smoking cessation rates in smokers with asthma may rely on a more personalized approach, with the potential for substantial health benefits to individuals and the population at large. PMID:27445499

  1. Nursing home-acquired pneumonia: outcomes from a clinical process improvement program.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, C L

    1995-01-01

    At EHS Christ Hospital and Medical Center, an eight-step process improvement model was developed that incorporates continuous quality improvement concepts for monitoring, evaluating and improving patient care. Nursing home residents admitted with pneumonia were identified as the group having the most influence on mortality and costs associated with treatment of pneumonia at our hospital. A multidisciplinary team evaluated clinical resource use and patient care processes, and identified root causes of various influencing treatment. Clinical guidelines were created and outcomes were defined, resulting in significant improvement in the clinical management of these patients. Average length of stay decreased from 8.6 days in 1992 to 7.6 days in 1993, with a charge reduction of $1830 per patient. The methodologic framework of a process improvement program combines epidemiologic, clinical, and quality improvement sciences. This mix is essential in improving patient care and quantifying outcomes. PMID:7753691

  2. Using Outcome to Improve a Career Development Course: Closing the Scientist-Practitioner Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Robert J.; Miller, Charles D.

    2010-01-01

    The use of outcome data can serve as an important catalyst for improving career interventions. A follow-up to the Reese and Miller study was conducted over a 2-year period to assess whether modifications made to the course using the Reese and Miller data as a baseline resulted in subsequent improvements. Using a prepost group design that compared…

  3. A Measurement Feedback System (MFS) Is Necessary to Improve Mental Health Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickman, Leonard

    2008-01-01

    The importance of measurement feedback system (MFS) for the improvement of mental health services for youths is discussed. As feedback obtained from clients and families is subject to distortions, a standardized MFS including clinical processes, contexts, outcomes, and feedback to clinicians and supervisors is necessary for improvement in quality…

  4. Identifying patients at high risk of breast cancer recurrence: strategies to improve patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Martei, Yehoda M; Matro, Jennifer M

    2015-01-01

    Identifying patients at high risk of breast cancer recurrence has important implications not only for enabling the ability to provide accurate information to patients but also the potential to improve patient outcomes. Patients at high recurrence risk can be offered appropriate treatment to improve the overall survival. However, the major challenge is identifying patients with early-stage breast cancer at lower risk who may be spared potentially toxic therapy. The successful integration of molecular assays into clinical practice may address the problem of overtreatment and improve overall patient outcomes. PMID:26504408

  5. Platlet Rich Plasma (PRP) Improves Fat Grafting Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Modarressi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Autologous fat transfer offers many qualities of a ideal soft tissue filler. Main advantages of fat grafting ensue from the fact that the lipoaspirate tissue is an abundant source of regenerative pluripotential cells. However, the reported rates of fat cell survival vary greatly in the medical literature (10-90%). Different techniques of harvesting, processing, and reinjecting the fat cells are so claimed to be responsible for these differences, without any agreement concerning the best way to process. To address this important disadvantage, we propose the addition of autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) which is known as a natural reservoir of growth factors stimulating tissue repair and regeneration. This approach is completely autologous and immediately employed without any type of preconditioning. Platelets rich plasma (PRP) preparation included bleeding of 8 ml of blood from patient's peripheral vein in Regen Lab© tubes containing sodium citrate anticoagulant. The whole blood was centrifugated at 1500 g during 3 min. As Regen-tubes contained a special gel separator, 99 % of red blood cells were discarded from the plasma at the bottom of the gel, and >90% of platelets were harvested in 4 ml of plasma on the top of the gel, called the platelet-rich plasma (PRP). The purified fat prepared by Coleman technique was mixed with different amount of PRP for in vitro, in vivo (mice) and clinical experiments: >50% of PRP for skin rejuvenation, superficial scars correction, infraorbital region, ..., and for 20% of PRP with 80% of purified fat for deep filler indication (nasolabial folds, lips, or soft tissue defect). In vitro studies demonstrated that PRP increased fat cells survival rate and stem cells differentiation. Animal models showed that fat graft survival rate was significantly increased by addition of PRP. Several clinical cases confirmed the improvement of wound healing and fat grafting survival in facial reconstruction and aesthetic cases by association of

  6. Platlet Rich Plasma (PRP) Improves Fat Grafting Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Modarressi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Autologous fat transfer offers many qualities of a ideal soft tissue filler. Main advantages of fat grafting ensue from the fact that the lipoaspirate tissue is an abundant source of regenerative pluripotential cells. However, the reported rates of fat cell survival vary greatly in the medical literature (10-90%). Different techniques of harvesting, processing, and reinjecting the fat cells are so claimed to be responsible for these differences, without any agreement concerning the best way to process. To address this important disadvantage, we propose the addition of autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) which is known as a natural reservoir of growth factors stimulating tissue repair and regeneration. This approach is completely autologous and immediately employed without any type of preconditioning. Platelets rich plasma (PRP) preparation included bleeding of 8 ml of blood from patient’s peripheral vein in Regen Lab© tubes containing sodium citrate anticoagulant. The whole blood was centrifugated at 1500 g during 3 min. As Regen-tubes contained a special gel separator, 99 % of red blood cells were discarded from the plasma at the bottom of the gel, and >90% of platelets were harvested in 4 ml of plasma on the top of the gel, called the platelet-rich plasma (PRP). The purified fat prepared by Coleman technique was mixed with different amount of PRP for in vitro, in vivo (mice) and clinical experiments: >50% of PRP for skin rejuvenation, superficial scars correction, infraorbital region, ..., and for 20% of PRP with 80% of purified fat for deep filler indication (nasolabial folds, lips, or soft tissue defect). In vitro studies demonstrated that PRP increased fat cells survival rate and stem cells differentiation. Animal models showed that fat graft survival rate was significantly increased by addition of PRP. Several clinical cases confirmed the improvement of wound healing and fat grafting survival in facial reconstruction and aesthetic cases by association of

  7. Enhanced Physical Activity Improves Selected Outcomes in Children With ADHD: Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Song, MinKyoung; Lauseng, Deborah; Lee, Soohee; Nordstrom, Megan; Katch, Victor

    2016-09-01

    This review examines associations between physical activity (PA) and cognitive, behavioral, and physiological outcomes in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We reviewed studies on participants ≤18 years old, published in English between January 1998 and December 2014, in PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Cochrane Reviews. Twenty-six studies were grouped into two categories: those that did and did not account for effects of ADHD medications. The first category showed lower levels of PA and improved cognitive and behavioral outcomes in youth whose ADHD was treated with medications. The second category showed a positive association between PA levels and cognitive and behavioral outcomes in youth whose ADHD was not treated with medications. For both categories of studies, results were inconclusive regarding physiological outcomes. Randomized controlled trials are needed to better clarify the relationship between PA and outcomes in youth with ADHD, and particularly to understand the impact of ADHD medications on that relationship. PMID:27226208

  8. Visual working memory in deaf children with diverse communication modes: improvement by differential outcomes.

    PubMed

    López-Crespo, Ginesa; Daza, María Teresa; Méndez-López, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    Although visual functions have been proposed to be enhanced in deaf individuals, empirical studies have not yet established clear evidence on this issue. The present study aimed to determine whether deaf children with diverse communication modes had superior visual memory and whether their performance was improved by the use of differential outcomes. Severely or profoundly deaf children who employed spoken Spanish, Spanish Sign Language (SSL), and both spoken Spanish and SSL modes of communication were tested in a delayed matching-to-sample task for visual working memory assessment. Hearing controls were used to compare performance. Participants were tested in two conditions, differential outcome and non-differential outcome conditions. Deaf groups with either oral or SSL modes of communication completed the task with less accuracy than bilingual and control hearing children. In addition, the performances of all groups improved through the use of differential outcomes. PMID:22119682

  9. Improving post-intensive care unit neuropsychiatric outcomes: understanding cognitive effects of physical activity.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Ramona O; Suchyta, Mary R; Farrer, Thomas J; Needham, Dale

    2012-12-15

    Critical illness and its treatment often result in long-term neuropsychiatric morbidities. Consequently, there is a need to focus on means to prevent or ameliorate these morbidities. Animal models provide important data regarding the neurobiological effects of physical activity, including angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and release of neurotrophic factors that enhance plasticity. Studies in noncritically ill patients demonstrate that exercise is associated with increased cerebral blood flow, neurogenesis, and brain volume, which are associated with improved cognition. Clinically, research in both healthy and diseased human subjects suggests that exercise improves neuropsychiatric outcomes. In the critical care setting, early physical rehabilitation and mobilization are safe and feasible, with demonstrated improvements in physical functional outcomes. Such activity may also reduce the duration of delirium in the intensive care unit (ICU) and improve neuropsychiatric outcomes, although data are limited. Barriers exist regarding implementing ICU rehabilitation in routine care, including use of sedatives and lack of awareness of post-ICU cognitive impairments. Further research is necessary to determine whether prior animal and human research, in conjunction with preliminary results from existing ICU studies, can translate into improvements for neuropsychiatric outcomes in critically ill patients. Studies are needed to evaluate biological mechanisms, risk factors, the role of pre-ICU functional level, and the timing, duration, and type of physical activity for optimal patient outcomes. PMID:23065013

  10. Functional laser speckle imaging of cerebral blood flow under hypothermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Minheng; Miao, Peng; Zhu, Yisheng; Tong, Shanbao

    2011-08-01

    Hypothermia can unintentionally occur in daily life, e.g., in cardiovascular surgery or applied as therapeutics in the neurosciences critical care unit. So far, the temperature-induced spatiotemporal responses of the neural function have not been fully understood. In this study, we investigated the functional change in cerebral blood flow (CBF), accompanied with neuronal activation, by laser speckle imaging (LSI) during hypothermia. Laser speckle images from Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 8, male) were acquired under normothermia (37°C) and moderate hypothermia (32°C). For each animal, 10 trials of electrical hindpaw stimulation were delivered under both temperatures. Using registered laser speckle contrast analysis and temporal clustering analysis (TCA), we found a delayed response peak and a prolonged response window under hypothermia. Hypothermia also decreased the activation area and the amplitude of the peak CBF. The combination of LSI and TCA is a high-resolution functional imaging method to investigate the spatiotemporal neurovascular coupling in both normal and pathological brain functions.

  11. [Acetaminophen-induced hypothermia, an AIDS related side-effect? About 4 cases].

    PubMed

    Denes, Eric; Amaniou, Monique; Rogez, Jean-Philippe; Weinbreck, Pierre; Merle, Louis

    2002-10-01

    Hypothermia is an uncommon side effect of acetaminophen. We report 4 cases of HIV-infected patients who developed hypothermia after intravenous injection of propacetamol (the parenteral formulation of acetaminophen). The mechanism of this hypothermia is unknown. AIDS-induced changes in the metabolism of acetaminophen, could be an explanation. AIDS-associated opportunistic diseases may account for part of the mechanism. These hypothermias occur within 6 hours after the injection, are well tolerated and regress spontaneously. PMID:12486392

  12. Improving outcomes in lung cancer: the value of the multidisciplinary health care team

    PubMed Central

    Denton, Eve; Conron, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a major worldwide health burden, with high disease-related morbidity and mortality. Unlike other major cancers, there has been little improvement in lung cancer outcomes over the past few decades, and survival remains disturbingly low. Multidisciplinary care is the cornerstone of lung cancer treatment in the developed world, despite a relative lack of evidence that this model of care improves outcomes. In this article, the available literature concerning the impact of multidisciplinary care on key measures of lung cancer outcomes is reviewed. This includes the limited observational data supporting improved survival with multidisciplinary care. The impact of multidisciplinary care on other benchmark measures of quality lung cancer treatment is also examined, including staging accuracy, access to diagnostic investigations, improvements in clinical decision making, better utilization of radiotherapy and palliative care services, and improved quality of life for patients. Health service research suggests that multidisciplinary care improves care coordination, leading to a better patient experience, and reduces variation in care, a problem in lung cancer management that has been identified worldwide. Furthermore, evidence suggests that the multidisciplinary model of care overcomes barriers to treatment, promotes standardized treatment through adherence to guidelines, and allows audit of clinical services and for these reasons is more likely to provide quality care for lung cancer patients. While there is strengthening evidence suggesting that the multidisciplinary model of care contributes to improvements in lung cancer outcomes, more quality studies are needed. PMID:27099511

  13. Plastic Bags for Prevention of Hypothermia in Preterm and Low Birth Weight Infants

    PubMed Central

    Leadford, Alicia E.; Warren, Jamie B.; Manasyan, Albert; Chomba, Elwyn; Salas, Ariel A.; Schelonka, Robert

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Hypothermia contributes to neonatal mortality and morbidity, especially in preterm and low birth weight infants in developing countries. Plastic bags covering the trunk and extremities of very low birth weight infants reduces hypothermia. This technique has not been studied in larger infants or in many resource-limited settings. The objective was to determine if placing preterm and low birth weight infants inside a plastic bag at birth maintains normothermia. METHODS: Infants at 26 to 36 weeks’ gestational age and/or with a birth weight of 1000 to 2500 g born at the University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka, Zambia, were randomized by using a 1:1 allocation and parallel design to standard thermoregulation (blanket or radiant warmer) care or to standard thermoregulation care plus placement inside a plastic bag at birth. The primary outcome measure was axillary temperature in the World Health Organization–defined normal range (36.5–37.5°C) at 1 hour after birth. RESULTS: A total of 104 infants were randomized. At 1 hour after birth, infants randomized to plastic bag (n = 49) were more likely to have a temperature in the normal range as compared with infants in the standard thermoregulation care group (n = 55; 59.2% vs 32.7%; relative risk 1.81; 95% confidence interval 1.16–2.81; P = .007). The temperature at 1 hour after birth in the infants randomized to plastic bag was 36.5 ± 0.5°C compared with 36.1 ± 0.6°C in standard care infants (P < .001). Hyperthermia (>38.0°C) did not occur in any infant. CONCLUSIONS: Placement of preterm/low birth weight infants inside a plastic bag at birth compared with standard thermoregulation care reduced hypothermia without resulting in hyperthermia, and is a low-cost, low-technology tool for resource-limited settings. PMID:23733796

  14. Influence of hypothermia and subsequent rewarming upon leukocyte-endothelial interactions and expression of Junctional-Adhesion-Molecules A and B

    PubMed Central

    Bogert, Nicolai V.; Werner, Isabella; Kornberger, Angela; Meybohm, Patrick; Moritz, Anton; Keller, Till; Stock, Ulrich A.; Beiras-Fernandez, Andres

    2016-01-01

    Patients with risks of ischemic injury, e.g. during circulatory arrest in cardiac surgery, or after resuscitation are subjected to therapeutic hypothermia. For aortic surgery, the body is traditionally cooled down to 18 °C and then rewarmed to body temperature. The role of hypothermia and the subsequent rewarming process on leukocyte-endothelial interactions and expression of junctional-adhesion-molecules is not clarified yet. Thus, we investigated in an in-vitro model the influence of temperature modulation during activation and transendothelial migration of leukocytes through human endothelial cells. Additionally, we investigated the expression of JAMs in the rewarming phase. Exposure to low temperatures alone during transmigration scarcely affects leukocyte extravasation, whereas hypothermia during treatment and transendothelial migration improves leukocyte-endothelial interactions. Rewarming causes a significant up-regulation of transmigration with falling temperatures. JAM-A is significantly modulated during rewarming. Our data suggest that transendothelial migration of leukocytes is not only modulated by cell-activation itself. Activation temperatures and the rewarming process are essential. Continued hypothermia significantly inhibits transendothelial migration, whereas the rewarming process enhances transmigration strongly. The expression of JAMs, especially JAM-A, is strongly modulated during the rewarming process. Endothelial protection prior to warm reperfusion and mild hypothermic conditions reducing the difference between hypothermia and rewarming temperatures should be considered. PMID:26912257

  15. 5′-Adenosine Monophosphate-Induced Hypothermia Attenuates Brain Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in a Rat Model by Inhibiting the Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yi-Feng; Wu, Hui; Yang, Shao-Feng; Dai, Jiong; Qiu, Yong-Ming; Tao, Zhen-Yi; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Hypothermia treatment is a promising therapeutic strategy for brain injury. We previously demonstrated that 5′-adenosine monophosphate (5′-AMP), a ribonucleic acid nucleotide, produces reversible deep hypothermia in rats when the ambient temperature is appropriately controlled. Thus, we hypothesized that 5′-AMP-induced hypothermia (AIH) may attenuate brain ischemia/reperfusion injury. Transient cerebral ischemia was induced by using the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model in rats. Rats that underwent AIH treatment exhibited a significant reduction in neutrophil elastase infiltration into neuronal cells and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R), tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR), and Toll-like receptor (TLR) protein expression in the infarcted area compared to euthermic controls. AIH treatment also decreased the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling- (TUNEL-) positive neuronal cells. The overall infarct volume was significantly smaller in AIH-treated rats, and neurological function was improved. By contrast, rats with ischemic brain injury that were administered 5′-AMP without inducing hypothermia had ischemia/reperfusion injuries similar to those in euthermic controls. Thus, the neuroprotective effects of AIH were primarily related to hypothermia. PMID:25873763

  16. The role of expectations in patients' reports of post-operative outcomes and improvement following therapy.

    PubMed

    Flood, A B; Lorence, D P; Ding, J; McPherson, K; Black, N A

    1993-11-01

    Outcomes research typically focuses on the technical capabilities associated with treatment that predicts patients' post-therapy outcomes adjusting for health-related factors. Research on the ability of placebo therapy to alter outcomes suggests that a patient's expectations about therapy can also influence outcomes. Few studies have examined the effects of expectations and their implications for assessing outcomes. This study followed 348 patients who had surgery for benign prostatic hyperplasia. Four hypotheses are tested: whether positive expectations about improvement influence: 1) patients' postoperative reports of symptoms; 2) their belief that they have improved; 3) their overall health after treatment; and 4) whether these effects persist during the year following treatment. Using step-wise regression to control for sociodemographic and clinical factors, we found positive expectations did not appear to strongly influence a patient's report of postoperative symptoms or their overall health. However, we found strong support for positive expectations increasing the likelihood of reporting they felt better after surgery, even after controlling for symptom changes. This effect persisted throughout the postoperative year. We conclude that positive expectations result in a more optimistic view of improvement after surgery rather than altering reports of outcomes or health. PMID:7694013

  17. Improving lung cancer outcomes by improving the quality of surgical care

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Surgical resection remains the most important curative treatment modality for non-small cell lung cancer, but variations in short- and long-term surgical outcomes jeopardize the benefit of surgery for certain patients, operated on by certain types of surgeons, at certain types of institutions. We discuss current understanding of surgical quality measures, and their role in promoting understanding of the causes of outcome disparities after lung cancer surgery. We also discuss the use of minimally invasive surgical resection approaches to expand the playing field for surgery in lung cancer care, and end with a discussion of the future role of surgery in a world of alternative treatment possibilities. PMID:26380183

  18. Urine Output Changes During Postcardiac Arrest Therapeutic Hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Raper, Jaron D; Wang, Henry E

    2013-12-01

    While commonly described, no studies have characterized cold-induced diuresis or rewarm anti-diuresis occurring during the delivery of therapeutic hypothermia (TH). We sought to determine urine output changes during the provision of postcardiac arrest TH. We analyzed clinical data on patients receiving postcardiac arrest TH at an urban tertiary care center. TH measures included cooling by cold intravenous fluid, external ice packs, and a commercial external temperature management system. TH treatment was divided into phases: (1) induction, (2) maintenance, (3) rewarm, and (4) post-rewarm. The primary outcome measure was the mean urine output rate (mL/hour). We compared urine output rates between TH phases using a Generalized Estimating Equations model, defining urine output rate (mL/hour) as the dependent variable and TH phase (induction, maintenance, rewarm, and post-rewarm) as the primary exposure variable. We adjusted for age, sex, initial ECG rhythm, location of arrest, shock, acute kidney injury, rate of intravenous fluid input, and body mass index. Complete urine output data were available on 33 patients. Mean urine output rates during induction, maintenance, rewarm, and post-rewarm phases were 157 mL/hour (95% CI: 104-210), 103 mL/hour (95% CI: 82-125), 70 mL/hour (95% CI: 51-88), and 91 mL/hour (95% CI: 65-117), respectively. Compared with the post-rewarm phase, adjusted urine output was higher during the TH induction phase (output rate difference +51 mL/hour; 95% CI: 3-99). Adjusted urine output during the maintenance and rewarm phases did not differ from the post-rewarm phase. In this preliminary study, we observed modest increases in urine output during TH induction. We did not observe urine output changes during TH maintenance or rewarming. PMID:24380030

  19. The improving outcomes in intermittent exotropia study: outcomes at 2 years after diagnosis in an observational cohort

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate current patterns of management and outcomes of intermittent distance exotropia [X(T)] in the UK. Methods This was an observational cohort study which recruited 460 children aged < 12 years with previously untreated X(T). Eligible subjects were enrolled from 26 UK hospital ophthalmology clinics between May 2005 and December 2006. Over a 2-year period of follow-up, clinical data were prospectively recorded at standard intervals from enrolment. Data collected included angle, near stereoacuity, visual acuity, control of X(T) measured with the Newcastle Control Score (NCS), and treatment. The main outcome measures were change in clinical outcomes (angle, stereoacuity, visual acuity and NCS) in treated and untreated X(T), 2 years from enrolment (or, where applicable, 6 months after surgery). Change over time was tested using the chi-square test for categorical, Wilcoxon test for non-parametric and paired-samples t-test for parametric data. Results At follow-up, data were available for 371 children (81% of the original cohort). Of these: 53% (195) had no treatment; 17% (63) had treatment for reduced visual acuity only (pure refractive error and amblyopia); 13% (50) had non surgical treatment for control (spectacle lenses, occlusion, prisms, exercises) and 17% (63) had surgery. Only 0.5% (2/371) children developed constant exotropia. The surgically treated group was the only group with clinically significant improvements in angle or NCS. However, 8% (5) of those treated surgically required second procedures for overcorrection within 6 months of the initial procedure and at 6-month follow-up 21% (13) were overcorrected. Conclusions Many children in the UK with X(T) receive active monitoring only. Deterioration to constant exotropia, with or without treatment, is rare. Surgery appears effective in improving angle of X(T) and NCS, but rates of overcorrection are high. PMID:22257496

  20. Nitrous oxide-induced hypothermia in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Quock, R.M.; Panek, R.W.; Kouchich, F.J.; Rosenthal, M.A.

    1987-08-10

    Exposure of rats to high levels of nitrous oxide (N2O) in oxygen reduced body temperature in a concentration-related manner. The hypothermia was partly reversed by pretreatment with naloxone but not naltrexone. But in rats rendered tolerant to morphine by pellet implantation, exposure to 75% N2O/25% O2 evoked a marked hypothermia similar to that observed in morphine-naive animals. In another experiment, the hypothermic effect of chloral hydrate was also sensitive to antagonism by pretreatment with naloxone but not naltrexone. These observations lead the authors to suspect that N2O-induced hypothermia in rats is possibly not mediated by opiate receptors. The thermotropic activity of N2O may result from some non-opioid action of N2O. Its selective antagonism by naloxone (but not naltrexone) may be due to a unique non-opioid analeptic action of naloxone. 32 references, 4 figures.

  1. Breast Reconstruction Using Contour Fenestrated AlloDerm: Does Improvement in Design Translate to Improved Outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Jordan D.; Alperovich, Michael; Weichman, Katie E.; Wilson, Stelios C.; Hazen, Alexes; Saadeh, Pierre B.; Levine, Jamie P.; Choi, Mihye

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acellular dermal matrices are used in implant-based breast reconstruction. The introduction of contour fenestrated AlloDerm (Life-Cell, Branchburg, N.J.) offers sterile processing, a crescent shape, and prefabricated fenestrations. However, any evidence comparing reconstructive outcomes between this newer generation acellular dermal matrices and earlier versions is lacking. Methods: Patients undergoing implant-based breast reconstruction from 2010 to 2014 were identified. Reconstructive outcomes were stratified by 4 types of implant coverage: aseptic AlloDerm, sterile “ready-to-use” AlloDerm, contour fenestrated AlloDerm, or total submuscular coverage. Outcomes were compared with significance set at P < 0.05. Results: A total of 620 patients (1019 reconstructions) underwent immediate, implant-based breast reconstruction; patients with contour fenestrated AlloDerm were more likely to have nipple-sparing mastectomy (P = 0.0001, 0.0004, and 0.0001) and immediate permanent implant reconstructions (P = 0.0001). Those with contour fenestrated AlloDerm coverage had lower infection rates requiring oral (P = 0.0016) and intravenous antibiotics (P = 0.0012) compared with aseptic AlloDerm coverage. Compared with sterile “ready-to-use” AlloDerm coverage, those with contour fenestrated AlloDerm had similar infection outcomes but significantly more minor mastectomy flap necrosis (P = 0.0023). Compared with total submuscular coverage, those with contour fenestrated AlloDerm coverage had similar infection outcomes but significantly more explantations (P = 0.0001), major (P = 0.0130) and minor mastectomy flap necrosis (P = 0.0001). Significant independent risk factors for increased infection were also identified. Conclusions: Contour fenestrated AlloDerm reduces infections compared with aseptic AlloDerm, but infection rates are similar to those of sterile, ready-to-use AlloDerm and total submuscular coverage. PMID:26495218

  2. The RAISE Connection Program for Early Psychosis: Secondary Outcomes and Mediators and Moderators of Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Leslie; Nossel, Ilana; Choi, Jean C.; Nuechterlein, Keith; Wang, Yuanjia; Essock, Susan; Bennett, Melanie; McNamara, Karen; Mendon, Sapna; Dixon, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to explore secondary outcomes of a coordinated specialty care program for persons with early psychosis, including quality of life and recovery, as well as to explore mediators and moderators of improvement in occupational and social functioning and symptoms. Sixty-five individuals across two sites were enrolled and received services for up to two years. Trajectories for individuals’ outcomes, over time were examined using linear and quadratic mixed-effects models with repeated measures. In addition, baseline prognostic factors of participant improvement in social and occupational functioning were explored based on previous literature and expert opinion of the analytic team. Results demonstrate that the program was effective in improving quality of life and recovery, over time. Furthermore, processing speed was identified as a significant moderator of improvement in occupational GAF, and treatment fidelity, engagement, and family involvement were identified as mediators of improvement in social and occupational functioning. PMID:25900546

  3. Ethanol versus lipopolysaccharide-induced hypothermia: involvement of urocortin.

    PubMed

    Turek, V F; Ryabinin, A E

    2005-01-01

    The urocortin1 (Ucn1) neurons of the mid-brain-localized Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EW) are robustly responsive to ethanol (EtOH) administration, and send projections to the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), which contains corticotropin-releasing factor type 2 receptors (CRF2) that are responsive to Ucn1. In addition, the DRN has been shown to be involved in regulation of body temperature, a function greatly affected by EtOH administration. The goal of the present study was to identify the role that the urocortinergic projections from the EW to the DRN have in mediating EtOH-induced and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced hypothermia. Male C57BL6/J mice were used. Groups of mice underwent cannulation of the DRN, and then received i.p. injections of EtOH (2g/kg) or LPS (600 microg/kg or 400 microg/kg), followed by intra-DRN injections of artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) or anti-sauvagine (aSVG) (55 pmol), a CRF2 antagonist. Separate groups of mice received single intra-DRN injections of Ucn1 (20 pmol), CRF (20 pmol) or aCSF. For all experiments, core temperatures were monitored rectally every 30 min for several hours post-injection. Both EtOH and LPS induced hypothermia, and aSVG significantly attenuated this effect after EtOH; however, there was no significant attenuation of hypothermia after either dose of LPS. Ucn1 injection also caused hypothermia, while CRF injection did not. These data demonstrate that EtOH-induced hypothermia, but not LPS-induced hypothermia, may involve Ucn1 from EW acting at CRF2 receptors in the DRN. PMID:15964490

  4. Dominique-Jean Larrey: the effects of therapeutic hypothermia and the first ambulance.

    PubMed

    Remba, Salomon Jasqui; Varon, Joseph; Rivera, Alma; Sternbach, George L

    2010-03-01

    The fields of emergency medicine and resuscitation are indebted to the Baron Dominique-Jean Larrey (1766-1842) for significant advances in patient care. Larrey was a great surgeon who served in the French army during Napoleon's rule. He developed one of the first ambulance services, utilized positive pressure ventilation, and introduced hypothermia as a form of therapy. He dedicated his professional life to improving the care of wounded soldiers on the battlefield. Larrey coined the term "Triage" to allocate resources to those most in need of emergent care. Today, many of his techniques still prevail in modern medicine. PMID:20036046

  5. Health Care Improvement and Continuing Interprofessional Education: Continuing Interprofessional Development to Improve Patient Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcock, Peter M.; Janes, Gillian; Chambers, Alison

    2009-01-01

    Health care improvement and continuing professional education must be better understood if we are to promote continuous service improvement through interprofessional learning in the workplace. We propose that situating interprofessional working, interprofessional learning, work-based learning, and service improvement within a framework of social…

  6. Improving patient outcomes with technology and social media in paediatric diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Sze May

    2015-01-01

    The UK has the highest number of children and young people with diagnosed Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in Europe, but the lowest numbers attaining good diabetes control (1, 2). Novel strategies and incorporation of digital strategies were identified in the team for development to improve overall patient care and outcomes in our population of children and young people with T1DM. Within a dual-site integrated care organisation, 3 digital initiatives were proposed from 2012-2013 to 1) establish Facebook communications with parents/patients, 2) to implement an electronic diabetes information management system (using Twinkle.Net) and 3) to undertake routine uploading of blood glucose meters and insulin pumps (using DIASEND®) with the aim to improve outcomes in paediatric diabetes care. Key objectives for the three initiatives were aimed to optimise the following outcomes: • Reduce HbA1c levels • Decrease emergency admissions, reduce diabetes-related complications and minimise the length of hospital stays • Improve patient satisfaction and communication • Improve efficiencies with mandatory audit submissions • Empower patients, parents, and the multidisciplicnary team with accurate, real-time information. These digital initiatives showed effective use of technology and social media in achieving significant improvements in all the outcomes within the objectives. PMID:26734405

  7. Differential outcomes training improves face recognition memory in children and in adults with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Laura; Plaza, Victoria; López-Crespo, Ginesa; Vivas, Ana B; Estévez, Angeles F

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the differential outcomes procedure (DOP), which involves paring a unique reward with a specific stimulus, enhances discriminative learning and memory performance in several populations. The present study aimed to further investigate whether this procedure would improve face recognition memory in 5- and 7-year-old children (Experiment 1) and adults with Down syndrome (Experiment 2). In a delayed matching-to-sample task, participants had to select the previously shown face (sample stimulus) among six alternatives faces (comparison stimuli) in four different delays (1, 5, 10, or 15s). Participants were tested in two conditions: differential, where each sample stimulus was paired with a specific outcome; and non-differential outcomes, where reinforcers were administered randomly. The results showed a significantly better face recognition in the differential outcomes condition relative to the non-differential in both experiments. Implications for memory training programs and future research are discussed. PMID:24713518

  8. Parental Leave Policy as a Strategy to Improve Outcomes among Premature Infants.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, Jennifer C; Klawetter, Susanne

    2016-02-01

    Although gains have been made in premature birth rates among racial and ethnic minority and low socioeconomic status populations, tremendous disparities still exist in both prematurity rates and health outcomes for preterm infants. Parental involvement is known to improve health outcomes for preterm babies. However, a gap in evidence exists around whether parental involvement can help ameliorate the disparities in both short- and long-term out-comes for their preterm children. Families more likely to experience preterm birth are also less likely to have access to paid leave and thus experience significant systemic barriers to involvement, especially when their newborns are hospitalized. This article describes the research gap in this area and explores pathways by which social workers may ameliorate disparities in preterm birth outcomes through practice, policy, and research. PMID:26946882

  9. Do larger femoral heads improve the functional outcome in total hip arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Allen, Charlotte L; Hooper, Gary J; Frampton, Christopher M A

    2014-02-01

    Use of larger diameter femoral heads has been popularised in total hip arthroplasty (THA). Recent studies have implicated larger femoral heads in early failure. We evaluated what effect the size of the femoral head had on the early functional outcome in order to determine the optimal head size for the maximal functional outcome. There were 726 patients who underwent elective THA and were divided into 3 groups according to head size then compared with respect to functional outcome scores and dislocation rates. This study failed to show that increasing the size of the femoral head significantly improved the functional outcome at 1 year after total hip arthroplasty but that the use of a 36 mm or greater femoral head did reduce the dislocation rate. PMID:23891058

  10. Effects of improved patient participation in primary care on health-related outcomes: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Ariëtte R J; van Weeghel, Inge; Vogelaar, Maartje; Verheul, William; Pieters, Ron H M; de Wit, Niek J; Bensing, Jozien M

    2013-01-01

    Background. In primary care, many consultations address symptom-based complaints. Recovery from these complaints seldom exceeds placebo effects. Patient participation, because of its supposed effects on trust and patient expectancies, is assumed to benefit patients’ recovery. While the idea is theoretically promising, it is still unclear what the effects of increased patient participation are on patient outcomes. Aim. To review the effects of controlled intervention studies aiming to improve patient participation in face-to-face primary care consultations on patient-oriented and/or disease-oriented outcomes. Methods. This study is a systematic review. A systematic search was undertaken for randomized controlled trials designed to measure the effects of interventions that aimed to improve adult patients’ participation in primary care visits. The CINAHL, Cochrane, EMBASE, PsycINFO and PubMed databases were searched. Results. Seven different trials fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Three of the studies were related to symptom-based complaints. Five studies measured patient-oriented outcomes, the primary outcome of interest for this review. All studies suffered from substantial bias. Studies varied widely in their aims, types of complaints/diseases, strength of the interventions and their outcomes. The effects on patient-oriented outcomes and disease-oriented outcomes were ambiguous. Conclusion. Little research has been performed on health outcomes of interventions aiming to increase patient participation in general practice visits among patients suffering from symptom-based complaints. The results still are non-conclusive. The quality of the trials has been weak, possibly due to the complexity of the concept. This weak quality may explain the lack of conclusive results. Proposals for future research designs are offered. PMID:23629738

  11. Effect of Smoking on Joint Replacement Outcomes: Opportunities for Improvement Through Preoperative Smoking Cessation.

    PubMed

    Wright, Erik; Tzeng, Tony H; Ginnetti, Michael; El-Othmani, Mouhanad M; Saleh, Jamal K; Saleh, Jasmine; Lane, J M; Mihalko, William M; Saleh, Khaled J

    2016-01-01

    Because orthopaedic surgeons focus on identifying serious potential complications, such as heart attack, stroke, and deep vein thrombosis, during the preoperative assessment, correctable factors, such as smoking, may be overlooked. Chronic exposure to nicotine has been correlated with perioperative complications that lead to worse outcomes, including decreased patient satisfaction, longer hospitalization periods, and an increased rate of hospital readmission. It has been proven that smoking is a negative risk factor for decreased bone mineral density, which leads to increased fracture risk, heightened pain, postoperative wound and bone healing complications, decreased fusion rates, and postoperative tendon and ligament healing complications. Physician-led preoperative smoking cessation programs that include, but are not limited to, pharmacotherapy plans have been shown to improve primary surgical outcomes and smoking cessation rates. Smoking has detrimental effects on specialty-specific physiology; however, there are many effective options for intervention that can improve primary outcomes. PMID:27049216

  12. Integrating Hospital Administrative Data to Improve Health Care Efficiency and Outcomes: “The Socrates Story”

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Justin; Delaney, Conor P.

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of health care outcomes has become increasingly important as we strive to improve quality and efficiency while controlling cost. Many groups feel that analysis of large datasets will be useful in optimizing resource utilization; however, the ideal blend of clinical and administrative data points has not been developed. Hospitals and health care systems have several tools to measure cost and resource utilization, but the data are often housed in disparate systems that are not integrated and do not permit multisystem analysis. Systems Outcomes and Clinical Resources AdministraTive Efficiency Software (SOCRATES) is a novel data merging, warehousing, analysis, and reporting technology, which brings together disparate hospital administrative systems generating automated or customizable risk-adjusted reports. Used in combination with standardized enhanced care pathways, SOCRATES offers a mechanism to improve the quality and efficiency of care, with the ability to measure real-time changes in outcomes. PMID:24436649

  13. Cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease. A clinical update from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO).

    PubMed

    Herzog, Charles A; Asinger, Richard W; Berger, Alan K; Charytan, David M; Díez, Javier; Hart, Robert G; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Kasiske, Bertram L; McCullough, Peter A; Passman, Rod S; DeLoach, Stephanie S; Pun, Patrick H; Ritz, Eberhard

    2011-09-01

    Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is high, and the presence of CKD worsens outcomes of cardiovascular disease (CVD). CKD is associated with specific risk factors. Emerging evidence indicates that the pathology and manifestation of CVD differ in the presence of CKD. During a clinical update conference convened by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO), an international group of experts defined the current state of knowledge and the implications for patient care in important topic areas, including coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, atrial fibrillation, peripheral arterial disease, and sudden cardiac death. Although optimal strategies for prevention, diagnosis, and management of these complications likely should be modified in the presence of CKD, the evidence base for decision making is limited. Trials targeting CVD in patients with CKD have a large potential to improve outcomes. PMID:21750584

  14. Integrating hospital administrative data to improve health care efficiency and outcomes: "the socrates story".

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Justin; Delaney, Conor P

    2013-03-01

    Evaluation of health care outcomes has become increasingly important as we strive to improve quality and efficiency while controlling cost. Many groups feel that analysis of large datasets will be useful in optimizing resource utilization; however, the ideal blend of clinical and administrative data points has not been developed. Hospitals and health care systems have several tools to measure cost and resource utilization, but the data are often housed in disparate systems that are not integrated and do not permit multisystem analysis. Systems Outcomes and Clinical Resources AdministraTive Efficiency Software (SOCRATES) is a novel data merging, warehousing, analysis, and reporting technology, which brings together disparate hospital administrative systems generating automated or customizable risk-adjusted reports. Used in combination with standardized enhanced care pathways, SOCRATES offers a mechanism to improve the quality and efficiency of care, with the ability to measure real-time changes in outcomes. PMID:24436649

  15. Guidance on feedback of outcome data to improve performance in vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Li, Mimi M; Shalhoub, Joseph; Davies, Alun H; Maruthappu, Mahiben

    2016-08-01

    Feedback of performance data is a well-established method of performance improvement in the health-care setting, although guidance has been limited in the context of surgical performance. This article outlines how optimal feedback can be achieved using surgeon outcome data. PMID:27487059

  16. Improved Characters and Student Learning Outcomes through Development of Character Education Based General Physics Learning Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derlina; Sabani; Mihardi, Satria

    2015-01-01

    Education Research in Indonesia has begun to lead to the development of character education and is no longer fixated on the outcomes of cognitive learning. This study purposed to produce character education based general physics learning model (CEBGP Learning Model) and with valid, effective and practical peripheral devices to improve character…

  17. Improving the Transition Outcomes of Low-Income Minority Youth with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balcazar, Fabricio E.; Taylor-Ritzler, Tina; Dimpfl, Shawn; Portillo-Pena, Nelson; Guzman, Alberto; Schiff, Rachel; Murvay, Michele

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the results of a program developed to improve the transition outcomes of low-income minority youth with disabilities. The program relies on case management support to facilitate interagency collaboration. The participants included 164 graduates from special education and 26 youth from an equivalent comparison group. Two case…

  18. Increased Preclass Preparation Underlies Student Outcome Improvement in the Flipped Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, David; Pietri, Evava S.; Anderson, Gordon; Moyano-Camihort, Karin; Graham, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Active-learning environments such as those found in a flipped classroom are known to increase student performance, although how these gains are realized over the course of a semester is less well understood. In an upper-level lecture course designed primarily for biochemistry majors, we examine how students attain improved learning outcomes, as…

  19. The LLEN: The Purpose of Local Partnerships in the Provision of Improved Outcomes for Young People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Sue

    2002-01-01

    Local Learning and Employment Networks (LLENs) are incorporated organizations and groups whose mission is to facilitate local partnerships for the purpose of improving young people's education and training outcomes in Australia. LLENs are supported by grants from Australia's Department of Education and Training. Of the 31 LLENs currently existing…

  20. How Can Placement Policy Improve Math Remediation Outcomes? Evidence from Experimentation in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngo, Federick; Melguizo, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Changing placement policy may help to improve developmental education student outcomes in community colleges, but there is little understanding of the impacts of these reforms. We take advantage of heterogeneous placement policy in a large urban community college district in California to compare the effects of math remediation under different…

  1. Improving Education Outcomes in Germany. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 611

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, David

    2008-01-01

    Improving education outcomes is important for Germany's long-term economic performance and social cohesion. While student achievement is above the OECD average in science and at the OECD average in reading and mathematics according to the 2006 OECD PISA study, weaker students tend to do badly by international comparison and socio-economic and/or…

  2. Pregnancy Medical Home Care Pathways Improve Quality of Perinatal Care and Birth Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Berrien, Kate; Ollendorff, Arthur; Menard, M Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    The clinical leadership of the Pregnancy Medical Home (PMH) program develops and disseminates clinical pathways to promote evidence-based practice and to improve quality of care and outcomes. PMH pathways represent the first standardized clinical guidance for obstetric providers statewide across all care settings. PMID:26509523

  3. How Learning and Cognitive Science Can Improve Student Outcomes. Middle School Matters Program No. 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graesser, Art; Rodriguez, Gina; Brasiel, Sarah J.

    2013-01-01

    There are research-based principles and practices from the learning and cognitive sciences that can be applied to all content areas in middle grades education to improve student outcomes. Even teachers of courses like Physical Education can consider these strategies for assisting students in remembering rules of sports, different sports…

  4. Information Landscapes and Exploratory User Interfaces: Redesigning To Improve Learning Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedberg, John G.; And Others

    This paper examines improving learning outcomes through redesigning information landscapes. The concept of information landscapes has been a constant theme in the development of interactive multimedia packages. For the user interface to this information to be effective and efficient, consideration must be given to the cognitive load placed on the…

  5. Revised Models and Conceptualisation of Successful School Principalship for Improved Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulford, Bill; Silins, Halia

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to present revised models and a reconceptualisation of successful school principalship for improved student outcomes. Design/methodology/approach: The study's approach is qualitative and quantitative, culminating in model building and multi-level statistical analyses. Findings: Principals who promote both capacity building…

  6. Does Prison-Based Adult Basic Education Improve Postrelease Outcomes for Male Prisoners in Florida?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Rosa Minhyo; Tyler, John H.

    2013-01-01

    The authors use administrative data from Florida to determine the extent to which prison-based adult basic education (ABE) improves inmate's postrelease labor market outcomes, such as earnings and employment. Using two nonexperimental comparison groups, the authors find evidence that ABE participation is associated with higher postrelease…

  7. Induced Hypothermia Does Not Harm Hemodynamics after Polytrauma: A Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Weuster, Matthias; Mommsen, Philipp; Pfeifer, Roman; Mohr, Juliane; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Flohé, Sascha; Fröhlich, Matthias; Keibl, Claudia; Seekamp, Andreas; van Griensven, Martijn; Witte, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Background. The deterioration of hemodynamics instantly endangers the patients' life after polytrauma. As accidental hypothermia frequently occurs in polytrauma, therapeutic hypothermia still displays an ambivalent role as the impact on the cardiopulmonary function is not yet fully understood. Methods. We have previously established a porcine polytrauma model including blunt chest trauma, penetrating abdominal trauma, and hemorrhagic shock. Therapeutic hypothermia (34°C) was induced for 3 hours. We documented cardiovascular parameters and basic respiratory parameters. Pigs were euthanized after 15.5 hours. Results. Our polytrauma porcine model displayed sufficient trauma impact. Resuscitation showed adequate restoration of hemodynamics. Induced hypothermia had neither harmful nor major positive effects on the animals' hemodynamics. Though heart rate significantly decreased and mixed venous oxygen saturation significantly increased during therapeutic hypothermia. Mean arterial blood pressure, central venous pressure, pulmonary arterial pressure, and wedge pressure showed no significant differences comparing normothermic trauma and hypothermic trauma pigs during hypothermia. Conclusions. Induced hypothermia after polytrauma is feasible. No major harmful effects on hemodynamics were observed. Therapeutic hypothermia revealed hints for tissue protective impact. But the chosen length for therapeutic hypothermia was too short. Nevertheless, therapeutic hypothermia might be a useful tool for intensive care after polytrauma. Future studies should extend therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:26170533

  8. Achievement for All: improving psychosocial outcomes for students with special educational needs and disabilities.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Neil; Lendrum, Ann; Barlow, Alexandra; Wigelsworth, Michael; Squires, Garry

    2013-04-01

    Students with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) are at a greatly increased risk of experiencing poor psychosocial outcomes. Developing effective interventions that address the cause of these outcomes has therefore become a major policy priority in recent years. We report on a national evaluation of the Achievement for All (AfA) programme that was designed to improve outcomes for students with SEND through: (1) academic assessment, tracking and intervention, (2) structured conversations with parents, and (3) developing provision to improve wider outcomes (e.g. positive relationships). Using a quasi-experimental, pre-test-post-test control group design, we assessed the impact of AfA on teacher ratings of the behaviour problems, positive relationships and bullying of students with SEND over an 18-month period. Participants were 4758 students with SEND drawn from 323 schools across England. Our main impact analysis demonstrated that AfA had a significant impact on all three response variables when compared to usual practice. Hierarchical linear modelling of data from the intervention group highlighted a range of school-level contextual factors and implementation activities and student-level individual differences that moderated the impact of AfA on our study outcomes. The implications of our findings are discussed, and study strengths and limitations are noted. PMID:23380579

  9. Do high rates of OSCAR deficiencies prompt improved nursing facility processes and outcomes?

    PubMed

    Klopfenstein, Kristin; Lockhart, Charles; Giles-Sims, Jean

    2011-10-01

    Recently, some researchers have argued that high state rates of Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Online Survey, Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) nursing facility deficiencies indicate stringent enforcement, leaving the impression of better-quality care soon to follow; others maintain that the rank ordering of states' quality of nursing facility care remains fairly constant, resting on deep-seated state characteristics that change slowly, so that short-term improvement in poor-quality care is unlikely. The authors examine change in the process and outcome quality of states' Medicare nursing facility long-term care programs across 1999 to 2005, using linear and two-stage least squares regression. They find that (1) nationally, process quality generally falls across this period while outcome quality generally increases; (2) neither a prominent enforcement stringency index nor state culture, a relatively stable state characteristic, exerts much influence on state process and outcome quality scores over time, but (3) the relative costs and benefits for CMS compliance appear to contribute to explaining change in states' quality of resident outcomes over time; and (4) states' process quality is much less stable than outcome quality, and outcome indices distinct from OSCAR deficiency data provide more reliable and possibly more valid measures of care quality. PMID:21985066

  10. Contingency management improves outcomes in cocaine-dependent outpatients with depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, Gloria; Secades-Villa, Roberto; García-Rodríguez, Olaya; Peña-Suárez, Elsa; Sánchez-Hervás, Emilio

    2013-12-01

    Despite depressive symptoms being very common among patients seeking treatment for cocaine dependence, few studies have examined the effects of depressive symptoms on cocaine outpatient treatment outcomes, and there is even less research in the context of Contingency Management (CM). The purpose of this study was to assess the main and interactive effects of co-occurring depressive symptoms on CM outcomes. Cocaine-dependent individuals (N = 108) were randomized to Community Reinforcement Approach (CRA) or CRA plus CM in two outpatient community clinical settings. Participants were categorized according to depression symptoms, self-reported by means of the BDI at treatment entry. Outcome measures included treatment retention and documented cocaine abstinence over a 6-month treatment period. Depressive symptoms were more commonly found in females and in unemployed participants, and were associated with more drug-related, social, and psychiatric problems at treatment entry. Individuals with baseline depressive symptoms had poorer treatment outcomes than patients without depressive symptoms. The addition of CM to CRA made the program more effective than with CRA alone, regardless of depressive symptoms. CM was associated with better abstinence treatment outcomes, while the interaction between unemployment and depressive symptoms was associated with negative retention treatment outcomes. This study supports the efficacy of CM for cocaine-dependent outpatients with and without depressive symptoms, and highlights its importance for improving treatment for unemployed and depressed cocaine-dependent individuals. PMID:24080020

  11. Patient or treatment centre? Where are efforts invested to improve cancer patients' psychosocial outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Carey, ML; Clinton-McHarg, T; Sanson-Fisher, RW; Campbell, S; Douglas, HE

    2011-01-01

    The psychosocial outcomes of cancer patients may be influenced by individual-level, social and treatment centre predictors. This paper aimed to examine the extent to which individual, social and treatment centre variables have been examined as predictors or targets of intervention for psychosocial outcomes of cancer patients. Medline was searched to find studies in which the psychological outcomes of cancer patient were primary variables. Papers published in English between 1999 and 2009 that reported primary data relevant to psychosocial outcomes for cancer patients were included, with 20% randomly selected for further coding. Descriptive studies were coded for inclusion of individual, social or treatment centre variables. Intervention studies were coded to determine if the unit of intervention was the individual patient, social unit or treatment centre. After random sampling, 412 publications meeting the inclusion criteria were identified, 169 were descriptive and 243 interventions. Of the descriptive papers 95.0% included individual predictors, and 5.0% social predictors. None of the descriptive papers examined treatment centre variables as predictors of psychosocial outcomes. Similarly, none of the interventions evaluated the effectiveness of treatment centre interventions for improving psychosocial outcomes. Potential reasons for the overwhelming dominance of individual predictors and individual-focused interventions in psychosocial literature are discussed. PMID:20646035

  12. Outcome of arthroscopic subscapularis tendon repair: Are the results improving with improved techniques and equipment?: A retrospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Arun, G R; Kumar, Pradeep; Patnaik, Sarthak; Selvaraj, Karthik; Rajan, David; Singh, Anant; Kumaraswamy, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff tears are a common cause of shoulder pain and dysfunction. More recently, there has been a renewed interest in understanding the subscapularis tears. There are multiple articles in the literature showing the short term results of isolated subscapularis tendon repair. However, the midterm and long term outcome studies for arthroscopic subscapularis repair are few. This study evaluates the functional outcome after arthroscopic subscapularis repair. Materials and Methods: The records of 35 patients who underwent an arthroscopic subscapularis repair between May 2008 and June 2012 were included in this retrospective study. The records of all patients were reviewed. There were 22 males and 13 female patients with mean age of 58.2 years (range 41-72 years). All patients had a complete history, physical examination, and radiographs of their shoulders. Visual analogue scale (VAS), range of movements, power of cuff muscles, and modified University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) score were assessed. Results: The mean followup was 2.8 years (range 2-4 year). Functional outcome after arthroscopic subscapularis repair has an excellent outcome as analysed by clinical outcome, VAS score and UCLA score. Results were analyzed and had statistically significant values. The VAS for pain improved significantly (P < 0.001), and the mean modified UCLA score improved significantly (P < 0.001) from 14.24 ± 4.72 preoperatively to 33.15 ± 2.29 at 2 years postoperative. According to the UCLA system, there were 22 excellent, 11 good, and 2 fair results. Around 95% of patients returned to their usual work after surgery. Conclusion: At a median followup of 2 years, 95% of patients had a good to excellent result after an arthroscopic subscapularis tendon repair. We conclude that the midterm results show that arthroscopic subscapularis repair remains a good option for the treatment of patients with subscapularis tendon repair. PMID:27293291

  13. Individual prediction of treatment outcome in patients with temporomandibular disorders. A quality improvement model.

    PubMed

    Sundqvist, Bertil

    2007-01-01

    The general aim of this thesis was to create and evaluate a quality improvement model for prediction of treatment outcome in patients diagnosed with Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) of either Muscle or Mainly TMJ (Temporomandibular Joint) origin, treated with interocclusal appliances and/or occlusal adjustment. The model was assumed to generate negative predictors of treatment outcome through evaluating all patients predicted Good reaching an objective treatment goal but not having an improvement of 50% or more. The model was created and evaluated by one TMD specialist. The questions were: (I) Was it possible for the TMD specialist to predict treatment outcome individually in patients diagnosed with TMD and, from the results, create a quality improvement model? (II) Was it possible for eight TMD-trained general dental practitioners, under the supervision of the TMD specialist, to treat TMD patients with similar results to the TMD specialist if the TMD specialist had examined, treatment planned, and individually predicted the treatment outcome? (III) Was it possible for the TMD specialist to improve the possibility to predict individual treatment outcome overtime? (IV) Was it possible for one TMD-trained general dental practitioner to copy the clinical part of the model and achieve the same results as the TMD specialist, in patients selected by the TMD specialist? Out of 5165 patients subjected to a functional examination of the masticatory system, 3602 were diagnosed with TMD and subgrouped as either Muscle or Mainly TMJ symptoms. The patients were predicted to have a Good, Dubious, or Poor possibility to have an improvement of 50% or more after treatment. Patients predicted Poor were not offered any treatment. A correct prediction of actual treatment outcome Good was defined as an improvement of 50% or more for muscle and/or TMJ symptoms. A total of 2625 patients began treatment at the specialist clinic for TMD and 2128 completed the full course of treatment. The

  14. Capillary leakage in post-cardiac arrest survivors during therapeutic hypothermia - a prospective, randomised study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Fluids are often given liberally after the return of spontaneous circulation. However, the optimal fluid regimen in survivors of cardiac arrest is unknown. Recent studies indicate an increased fluid requirement in post-cardiac arrest patients. During hypothermia, animal studies report extravasation in several organs, including the brain. We investigated two fluid strategies to determine whether the choice of fluid would influence fluid requirements, capillary leakage and oedema formation. Methods 19 survivors with witnessed cardiac arrest of primary cardiac origin were allocated to either 7.2% hypertonic saline with 6% poly (O-2-hydroxyethyl) starch solution (HH) or standard fluid therapy (Ringer's Acetate and saline 9 mg/ml) (control). The patients were treated with the randomised fluid immediately after admission and continued for 24 hours of therapeutic hypothermia. Results During the first 24 hours, the HH patients required significantly less i.v. fluid than the control patients (4750 ml versus 8010 ml, p = 0.019) with comparable use of vasopressors. Systemic vascular resistance was significantly reduced from 0 to 24 hours (p = 0.014), with no difference between the groups. Colloid osmotic pressure (COP) in serum and interstitial fluid (p < 0.001 and p = 0.014 respectively) decreased as a function of time in both groups, with a more pronounced reduction in interstitial COP in the crystalloid group. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain did not reveal vasogenic oedema. Conclusions Post-cardiac arrest patients have high fluid requirements during therapeutic hypothermia, probably due to increased extravasation. The use of HH reduced the fluid requirement significantly. However, the lack of brain oedema in both groups suggests no superior fluid regimen. Cardiac index was significantly improved in the group treated with crystalloids. Although we do not associate HH with the renal failures that developed, caution should be taken when using hypertonic

  15. The Social Epidemiology of Accidental Hypothermia among the Aged.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rango, Nicholas

    1985-01-01

    Describes the 1970-1979 incidence of exposure-related hypothermia deaths in the United States. Showed nonwhite men at highest and white women at lowest risk at all ages. Age-related impairment in theromoregulation, functional disability, poverty, and social isolation were found to increase elderly individual's susceptibility to this environmental…

  16. Trans-sodium crocetinate improves outcomes in rodent models of occlusive and hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Yoshimura, Ryo; Manabe, Hiroaki; Schretter, Catherine; Clarke, Ryon; Cai, Yu; Fitzgerald, Mark; Lee, Kevin S

    2014-10-01

    Trans-sodium crocetinate (TSC) is a novel carotenoid compound capable of enhancing the diffusion of small molecules in aqueous solutions. TSC improves the diffusion of oxygen and glucose, and increases oxygenation in ischemic brain tissue. TSC also dampens the intensity of an ischemic challenge during an ongoing ischemic event. The current study examined the impact of TSC in rat models of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Rat three vessel occlusion (3VO), and combined 3VO and one vessel occlusion (3VO/1VO) models of ischemic stroke were evaluated for structural and behavioral outcomes. The effects of TSC were also tested in a rat model of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Delayed treatment with TSC reduced infarct volume in a rodent model of transient focal ischemia involving either 2 or 6h of ischemia. Neurological outcomes, based on a multi-scale assessment and automated gait analysis, also were improved by TSC treatment. Additionally, TSC reduced edema and hemorrhagic volume in a rat model of ICH. An optimal therapeutic candidate for early intervention in ischemic stroke should be effective when administered on a delayed basis and should not aggravate outcomes associated with hemorrhagic stroke. The current findings demonstrate that delayed TSC treatment improves outcomes in experimental models of both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Together, these findings suggest that TSC may be a safe and beneficial therapeutic modality for early stroke intervention, irrespective of the type of stroke involved. PMID:25128603

  17. Presurgical navigated TMS motor cortex mapping improves outcome in glioblastoma surgery: a controlled observational study.

    PubMed

    Picht, Thomas; Frey, Dietmar; Thieme, Stefan; Kliesch, Stefan; Vajkoczy, Peter

    2016-02-01

    The authors report on an observational study designed to isolate the impact of navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) on surgical outcome in glioblastoma treatment. We undertook a controlled observational study to identify the additive impact of presurgical nTMS in patients scheduled for surgical treatment of glioblastoma in or near motor eloquent locations. The trial data is derived from a large university hospital with a differential availability of its nTMS mapping service at its two campuses, both equally served by a single neurosurgical department. When available, the nTMS cortical mapping data and nTMS-based fiber tractography are used for surgical planning and patient counseling as well as intraoperative identification of the primary motor cortex and guidance in subcortical motor mapping. The addition of preoperative nTMS mapping data to a clinical routine already incorporating preoperative fiber tractography and intraoperative neuronavigation and electrophysiology was shown to improve surgical outcomes by increasing the extent of resection, without compromising patient safety or long-term functional outcomes in comparison to the concurrent non-TMS control group. This study is the first to prove that the improved surgical outcomes observed in previous studies after the implementation of nTMS to presurgical work-up are not caused by any overall improvement in patient care or a paradigm shift toward more aggressive resection but by the additional functional data provided by nTMS. PMID:26566653

  18. Improving the estimation of flavonoid intake for study of health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Johanna T.; Jacques, Paul F.; McCullough, Marjorie L.

    2015-01-01

    Imprecision in estimating intakes of non-nutrient bioactive compounds such as flavonoids is a challenge in epidemiologic studies of health outcomes. The sources of this imprecision, using flavonoids as an example, include the variability of bioactive compounds in foods due to differences in growing conditions and processing, the challenges in laboratory quantification of flavonoids in foods, the incompleteness of flavonoid food composition tables, and the lack of adequate dietary assessment instruments. Steps to improve databases of bioactive compounds and to increase the accuracy and precision of the estimation of bioactive compound intakes in studies of health benefits and outcomes are suggested. PMID:26084477

  19. Major liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma in the morbidly obese: A proposed strategy to improve outcome

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Omar; Skolkin, Mark D; Toombs, Barry D; Fischer, John H; Ozaki, Claire F; Wood, R Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Background Morbid obesity strongly predicts morbidity and mortality in surgical patients. However, obesity's impact on outcome after major liver resection is unknown. Case presentation We describe the management of a large hepatocellular carcinoma in a morbidly obese patient (body mass index >50 kg/m2). Additionally, we propose a strategy for reducing postoperative complications and improving outcome after major liver resection. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report of major liver resection in a morbidly obese patient with hepatocellular carcinoma. The approach we used could make this operation nearly as safe in obese patients as it is in their normal-weight counterparts. PMID:18783621

  20. The use of individually tailored environmental supports to improve medication adherence and outcomes in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Velligan, Dawn I; Diamond, Pamela M; Mintz, Jim; Maples, Natalie; Li, Xueying; Zeber, John; Ereshefsky, Larry; Lam, Yui-Wing F; Castillo, Desiree; Miller, Alexander L

    2008-05-01

    Cognitive adaptation training (CAT) is a psychosocial treatment that uses environmental supports such as signs, checklists, alarms, and the organization of belongings to cue and sequence adaptive behaviors in the home. Ninety-five outpatients with schizophrenia (structured clinical interview for diagnosis, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition) were randomly assigned to (1) Full-CAT (CAT focused on many aspects of community adaptation including grooming, care of living quarters, leisure skills, social and role performance, and medication adherence), (2) Pharm-CAT (CAT focused only on medication and appointment adherence), or (3) treatment as usual (TAU). Treatment lasted for 9 months, and patients were followed for 6 months after the withdrawal of home visits. Medication adherence (assessed during unannounced, in-home pill counts) and functional outcomes were assessed at 3-month intervals. Results of mixed-effects regression models indicated that both CAT and Pharm-CAT treatments were superior to TAU for improving adherence to prescribed medication (P < .0001). Effects on medication adherence remained significant when home visits were withdrawn. Full-CAT treatment improved functional outcome relative to Pharm-CAT and TAU (P < .0001). However, differences for functional outcome across groups decreased following the withdrawal of home visits and were no longer statistically significant at the 6-month follow-up. Survival time to relapse or significant exacerbation was significantly longer in both CAT and Pharm-CAT in comparison to TAU (.004). Findings indicate that supports targeting medication adherence can improve and maintain this behavior. Comprehensive supports targeting multiple domains of functioning are necessary to improve functional outcomes. Maintenance of gains in functional outcome may require some form of continued intervention. PMID:17932089

  1. The Improvement and Completion of Outcome index: A new assessment system for quality of orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Mihee; Kook, Yoon-Ah; Kim, Myeng-Ki; Lee, Jae-Il; Kim, Hong-Gee

    2016-01-01

    Objective Given the considerable disagreement between the Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) index and the American Board of Orthodontics Cast-Radiograph Evaluation, we aimed to develop a novel assessment system―the Improvement and Completion of Outcome (ICO) index―to evaluate the outcome of orthodontic treatment. Methods Sixteen criteria from 4 major categories were established to represent the pretreatment malocclusion status, as well as the degree of improvement and level of completion of outcome during/after treatment: dental relationship (arch length discrepancy, irregularity, U1-SN, and IMPA); anteroposterior relationship (overjet, right and left molar position, ANB); vertical relationship (anterior overbite, anterior open-bite, lateral open-bite, SN-MP); and transverse relationship (dental midline discrepancy, chin point deviation, posterior cross-bite, occlusal plane cant). The score for each criterion was defined from 0 or −1 (worst) to 5 (ideal value or normal occlusion) in gradations of 1. The sum of the scores in each category indicates the area and extent of the problems. Improvement and completion percentages were estimated based on the pre- and post-treatment total scores and the maximum total score. If the completion percentage exceeded 80%, treatment outcome was considered successful. Results Two cases, Class I malocclusion and skeletal Class III malocclusion, are presented to represent the assessment procedure using the ICO index. The difference in the level of improvement and completion of treatment outcome can be clearly explained by using 2 percentage values. Conclusions Thus, the ICO index enables the evaluation of the quality of orthodontic treatment objectively and consecutively throughout the entire treatment process. PMID:27478797

  2. Elbow ulnar collateral ligament injuries in athletes: Can we improve our outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Redler, Lauren H; Degen, Ryan M; McDonald, Lucas S; Altchek, David W; Dines, Joshua S

    2016-01-01

    Injury to the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) most commonly occurs in the overhead throwing athlete. Knowledge surrounding UCL injury pathomechanics continues to improve, leading to better preventative treatment strategies and rehabilitation programs. Conservative treatment strategies for partial injuries, improved operative techniques for reconstruction in complete tears, adjunctive treatments, as well as structured sport specific rehabilitation programs including resistive exercises for the entire upper extremity kinetic chain are all important factors in allowing for a return to throwing in competitive environments. In this review, we explore each of these factors and provide recommendations based on the available literature to improve outcomes in UCL injuries in athletes. PMID:27114930

  3. Elbow ulnar collateral ligament injuries in athletes: Can we improve our outcomes?

    PubMed

    Redler, Lauren H; Degen, Ryan M; McDonald, Lucas S; Altchek, David W; Dines, Joshua S

    2016-04-18

    Injury to the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) most commonly occurs in the overhead throwing athlete. Knowledge surrounding UCL injury pathomechanics continues to improve, leading to better preventative treatment strategies and rehabilitation programs. Conservative treatment strategies for partial injuries, improved operative techniques for reconstruction in complete tears, adjunctive treatments, as well as structured sport specific rehabilitation programs including resistive exercises for the entire upper extremity kinetic chain are all important factors in allowing for a return to throwing in competitive environments. In this review, we explore each of these factors and provide recommendations based on the available literature to improve outcomes in UCL injuries in athletes. PMID:27114930

  4. Effect of haemodilution, acidosis, and hypothermia on the activity of recombinant factor VIIa (NovoSeven®)

    PubMed Central

    Viuff, D.; Lauritzen, B.; Pusateri, A. E.; Andersen, S.; Rojkjaer, R.; Johansson, P. I.

    2008-01-01

    Background A range of plasma volume expanders is used clinically, often in settings where haemostasis may already be impaired. The haemostatic agent, recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa, NovoSeven®), may be used to improve haemostasis but potential interactions with different volume expanders are poorly understood. Methods Clot formation was measured by thromboelastography (TEG) using blood from healthy volunteers. In vitro effects of rFVIIa with haemodilution, acidosis, and hypothermia were examined. Conditions were induced by dilution with NaCl (0.9%), lactated Ringer's solution, albumin 5%, or hydroxyethyl starch (HES) solutions [MW (molecular weight) 130–670 kDa]; by adjusting pH to 6.8 with 1 M HEPES (N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N′-2-ethanesulphonic acid) buffer; or by reducing temperature to 32°C. We also studied the effect of low vs high MW HES (MW 200 vs 600 kDa) and rFVIIa on in vivo bleeding time (BT) in rabbits. Results Haemodilution progressively altered TEG parameters. rFVIIa improved TEG parameters in the presence of acidosis, hypothermia or 20% haemodilution (P<0.05). At 40% haemodilution, the rFVIIa effect was diminished particularly with high MW HES. In vivo, rFVIIa shortened the BT (P<0.05) with low but not high MW HES. Conclusions Efficacy of rFVIIa was affected by the degree of haemodilution and type of volume expander, but not by acidosis or hypothermia. PMID:18565966

  5. Neuroprotective effect of N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate in combination with mild hypothermia in the endothelin-1 rat model of focal cerebral ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Van Hemelrijck, An; Hachimi-Idrissi, Said; Sarre, Sophie; Ebinger, Guy; Michotte, Yvette

    2005-12-01

    Previously we showed that treatment with mild hypothermia (34 degrees C for 2 h) after a focal cerebral infarct was neuroprotective by reducing apoptosis in the penumbra (cortex), but not in the core (striatum) of the infarct. In this study we examined whether administration of N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG) in combination with mild hypothermia could improve striatal neuroprotection in the endothelin-1 rat model. NAAG (10 mg/kg i.p.) was injected under normothermic (37 degrees C) or mild hypothermic conditions, either 40 min before or 20 min after the insult. NAAG reduced caspase 3 immunoreactivity in the striatum, irrespective of the time of administration and brain temperature. This neuroprotective effect could be explained, at least partially, by decreased nitric oxide synthase activity in the striatum and was blocked by the group II metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist, LY341495. Hypothermia applied together with NAAG reduced both cortical and striatal caspase 3 immunoreactivity, as well as the overall ischaemic damage in these areas. However, no pronounced improvement was seen in total damaged brain volume. Extracellular glutamate levels did not correlate with the observed protection, whatever treatment protocol was applied. We conclude that treatment with NAAG causes the same degree of neuroprotection as treatment with hypothermia. Combination of the two treatments, although reducing apoptosis, does not considerably improve ischaemic damage. PMID:16135071

  6. Provider and patient directed financial incentives to improve care and outcomes for patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lorincz, Ilona S; Lawson, Brittany C T; Long, Judith A

    2013-04-01

    Incentive programs directed at both providers and patients have become increasingly widespread. Pay-for-performance (P4P) where providers receive financial incentives to carry out specific care or improve clinical outcomes has been widely implemented. The existing literature indicates they probably spur initial gains which then level off or partially revert if incentives are withdrawn. The literature also indicates that process measures are easier to influence through P4P programs but that intermediate outcomes such as glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol control are harder to influence, and the long-term impact of P4P programs on health is largely unknown. Programs directed at patients show greater promise as a means to influence patient behavior and intermediate outcomes such as weight loss; however, the evidence for long-term effects are lacking. In combination, both patient and provider incentives are potentially powerful tools but whether they are cost-effective has yet to be determined. PMID:23225214

  7. Wilms’ tumour in African children: Can an institutional approach improve outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Anyanwu, Lofty-John Chukwuemeka; Atanda, Akinfenwa Taoheed; Atanda, Jareenat Oladoyin

    2015-01-01

    Background: The poor outcome for patients with Wilms’ tumour (WT) in developing countries has been predicated on late presentation, poverty and low rate of chemotherapeutic access. This study aims to evaluate the effects of an institutionalised approach to improving outcome for patients managed in a tertiary hospital in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Oncology records of children diagnosed with WT between 2009 and 2013 were analysed for therapy completion and other prognostic parameters. Ensuing data were then compared with those from other centres in Africa. Results: Compared with results from some local and African studies, the therapy completion rate was higher (60%) with a survival rate among this group being between 1 and 4 years. No patient was lost to follow-up because of unavailability or unaffordability of cytotoxic agents. Conclusion: This study shows that an institutionalised approach can help to improve access to anti-cancer drugs, reduce the rate of loss to follow-up and thus improve outcome. There is however need to improve on patient-doctor communication, form support groups and establish a WT registry. PMID:25659542

  8. Using public policy to improve outcomes for asthmatic children in schools.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Jewlya; Oppenheimer, Sophie; Zimmer, Lorena

    2014-12-01

    School-based services to improve asthma management need to be accompanied by public policies that can help sustain services, scale effective interventions, create greater equity across schools, and improve outcomes for children. Several national organizations, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, have recommended specific public policies the adoption of which in school settings can improve asthma outcomes for children. Although many states and school districts have adopted some of these policies, adoption is not universal, and implementation is not always successful, leaving inequities in children's access to asthma services and supports. These issues can be addressed by changing public policy. Policy change is a complex process, but it is one that will benefit from greater involvement by asthma experts, including the researchers who generate the knowledge base on what services, supports, and policies have the best outcomes for children. Asthma experts can participate in the policy process by helping to build awareness of the need for school-based asthma policy, estimating the costs associated with policy options and with inaction, advocating for the selection of specific policies, assisting in implementation (including providing feedback), conducting the research that can evaluate the effectiveness of implementation, and ultimately providing information back into the policy process to allow for improvements to the policies. PMID:25482868

  9. Manual Therapy and Exercise to Improve Outcomes in Patients With Muscle Tension Dysphonia: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Kristin R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Muscle tension dysphonia (MTD), a common voice disorder that is not commonly referred for physical therapy intervention, is characterized by excessive muscle recruitment, resulting in incorrect vibratory patterns of vocal folds and an alteration in voice production. This case series was conducted to determine whether physical therapy including manual therapy, exercise, and stress management education would be beneficial to this population by reducing excess muscle tension. Case Description Nine patients with MTD completed a minimum of 9 sessions of the intervention. Patient-reported outcomes of pain, function, and quality of life were assessed at baseline and the conclusion of treatment. The outcome measures were the numeric rating scale (NRS), Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), and Voice Handicap Index (VHI). Cervical and jaw range of motion also were assessed at baseline and postintervention using standard goniometric measurements. Outcomes Eight of the patients had no pain after treatment. All 9 of the patients demonstrated an improvement in PSFS score, with 7 patients exceeding a clinically meaningful improvement at the conclusion of the intervention. Three of the patients also had a clinically meaningful change in VHI scores. All 9 of the patients demonstrated improvement in cervical flexion and lateral flexion and jaw opening, whereas 8 patients improved in cervical extension and rotation postintervention. Discussion The findings suggest that physical therapists can feasibly implement an intervention to improve outcomes in patients with MTD. However, a randomized clinical trial is needed to confirm the results of this case series and the efficacy of the intervention. A clinical implication is the expansion of physical therapy to include referrals from voice centers for the treatment of MTD. PMID:25256740

  10. Optimizing healthcare at the population level: results of the improving cardiovascular outcomes in Nova Scotia partnership.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jafna; Johnstone, David; Nemis-White, Joanna; Montague, Terrence

    2008-01-01

    Disease management is increasingly considered a valid strategy in the chronic care of our aging patient populations with multiple diseases. The Improving Cardiovascular Outcomes in Nova Scotia (ICONS) project examined whether a community-oriented health management partnership would lead to enhanced care and improved outcomes across an entire healthcare system. ICONS was a prospective cohort study, with baseline and repeated measurements of care and outcomes fed back to all project partners, along with other interventions aimed at optimizing care; preceding interval cohorts served as controls to post-intervention cohorts. The setting was the province of Nova Scotia, whose population is approximately 950,000. All 34,060 consecutive adult patients hospitalized in Nova Scotia with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), unstable angina (UA) or congestive heart failure (CHF) October 1997-March 2002 were included. Interventions were a combination of serial audits and feedbacks of practices and outcomes, web-based publication of findings, newsletter-based education and reminders, physician small-group workshops, pharmacy monitoring and compliance programs, care maps, algorithms, discharge forms and patient information cards. Rates of use of evidence-based marker therapies were the primary outcome measure. Secondary measures included one-year, all-cause mortality and re-hospitalization. Evidence-based prescription practices, for all target diseases, continuously and markedly improved over time. At the population level, there were no changes in one-year mortality for any disease state, although use of proven therapies predicted survival at the individual level throughout the five-year period for all disease states. Rates of re-hospitalization decreased significantly for all disease states over the course of ICONS; but most traditional positive and negative predictors of this outcome, like advanced age and use of proven therapies, respectively, were not predictive. ICONS

  11. Deciding when to "cash in" when outcomes are continuously improving: an escalating interest task.

    PubMed

    Young, Michael E; Webb, Tara L; Jacobs, Eric A

    2011-10-01

    A first-person shooter video game was adapted for the study of choice between smaller sooner and larger later outcomes. Participants chose when to fire a weapon that increased in damage potential over a 10s interval, an escalating interest situation. Across two experiments, participants demonstrated sensitivity to the nature of the mathematical function that defined the relationship between waiting and damage potential. In Experiment 1, people tended to wait longer when doing so allowed them to eliminate targets more quickly. In Experiment 2, people tended to wait longer to increase the probability of a constant magnitude outcome than to increase the magnitude of a 100% certain outcome that was matched for the same expected value (i.e., probability times magnitude). The two experiments demonstrated sensitivity to the way in which an outcome improves when the outcome is continuously available. The results also demonstrate that this new video game task is useful for generating sensitivity to delay to reinforcement over time scales that are typically used in nonhuman animal studies. PMID:21871951

  12. Outcomes Improvement is Not Continuous Along the Learning Curve for Pancreaticoduodenectomy at the Hospital Level

    PubMed Central

    Coe, Taylor M.; Fong, Zhi Ven; Wilson, Samuel E.; Talamini, Mark A; Lillemoe, Keith D.; Chang, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Most studies on learning curves for pancreaticoduodenectomy have been based on single-surgeon series at tertiary academic centers or are inferred indirectly from volume-outcome relationships. Our aim is to describe mortality rates associated with cumulative surgical experience among non-teaching hospitals. Study Design Observational study of a statewide in-patient database. Analysis included hospitals that began performing pancreaticoduodenectomy between 1996–2010, as captured by the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development database. Cases were numbered sequentially within each hospital. The same sequential series (e.g. first 10 cases, 11th through 20th cases) were identified across hospitals. The outcome measure was in-hospital mortality. Results A total of 1,210 cases from 143 non-teaching hospitals were analyzed. The average age was 63 years and the majority of patients were non-Hispanic white. The median overall mortality rate was 9.75%. The mortality rate for the first ten aggregated cases was 11.3%. This improved for subsequent cases, reaching 7.1% for the 21st-30th cases. However, the mortality rate then increased, reaching 16.7% by the 41st-50th cases before falling to 0.0% by the 61st-70th cases. Conclusions Initial improvement in surgical outcomes relative to cumulative surgical experience is not sustained. It is likely that factors other than surgical experience affect outcomes, such as less rigorous assessment of comorbidities or changes in support services. Vigilance regarding outcomes should be maintained even after initial improvements. PMID:26438484

  13. Moderate hypothermia within 6 h of birth plus inhaled xenon versus moderate hypothermia alone after birth asphyxia (TOBY-Xe): a proof-of-concept, open-label, randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Azzopardi, Denis; Robertson, Nicola J; Bainbridge, Alan; Cady, Ernest; Charles-Edwards, Geoffrey; Deierl, Aniko; Fagiolo, Gianlorenzo; Franks, Nicholas P; Griffiths, James; Hajnal, Joseph; Juszczak, Edmund; Kapetanakis, Basil; Linsell, Louise; Maze, Mervyn; Omar, Omar; Strohm, Brenda; Tusor, Nora; Edwards, A David

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Moderate cooling after birth asphyxia is associated with substantial reductions in death and disability, but additional therapies might provide further benefit. We assessed whether the addition of xenon gas, a promising novel therapy, after the initiation of hypothermia for birth asphyxia would result in further improvement. Methods Total Body hypothermia plus Xenon (TOBY-Xe) was a proof-of-concept, randomised, open-label, parallel-group trial done at four intensive-care neonatal units in the UK. Eligible infants were 36–43 weeks of gestational age, had signs of moderate to severe encephalopathy and moderately or severely abnormal background activity for at least 30 min or seizures as shown by amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG), and had one of the following: Apgar score of 5 or less 10 min after birth, continued need for resuscitation 10 min after birth, or acidosis within 1 h of birth. Participants were allocated in a 1:1 ratio by use of a secure web-based computer-generated randomisation sequence within 12 h of birth to cooling to a rectal temperature of 33·5°C for 72 h (standard treatment) or to cooling in combination with 30% inhaled xenon for 24 h started immediately after randomisation. The primary outcomes were reduction in lactate to N-acetyl aspartate ratio in the thalamus and in preserved fractional anisotropy in the posterior limb of the internal capsule, measured with magnetic resonance spectroscopy and MRI, respectively, within 15 days of birth. The investigator assessing these outcomes was masked to allocation. Analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00934700, and with ISRCTN, as ISRCTN08886155. Findings The study was done from Jan 31, 2012, to Sept 30, 2014. We enrolled 92 infants, 46 of whom were randomly assigned to cooling only and 46 to xenon plus cooling. 37 infants in the cooling only group and 41 in the cooling plus xenon group underwent magnetic resonance assessments

  14. Therapeutic Hypothermia after Prolonged Cardiac Arrest: Case Report with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Sankalp; Garg, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    Patients who survive cardiac arrest often develop severe neurological dysfunction due to the hypoxic brain injury and reperfusion induced cell death. Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) has become a standard therapy of cerebral protection following the successful return of spontaneous circulation in patients of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, according to American heart association guidelines. This is a case report of a 30-year-old patient who developed in-hospital cardiac arrest and was revived after prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and also required primary angioplasty. TH was then established with local measures for 24 hours for cerebral protection. The patient was gradually and successfully weaned off from ventilator with no neurological impairment. There is an increasing evidence of TH and its protective mechanisms in patients with non-shockable arrest rhythms with particular emphasis on neurological outcomes. This article emphasizes the role of TH in every successful CPR irrespective of the cardiac rhythm. PMID:26500937

  15. Highlights in basic autonomic neurosciences: Central adenosine A1 receptor – The key to a hypometabolic state and therapeutic hypothermia?

    PubMed Central

    Tupone, D.; Madden, C.J.; Morrison, S.F.

    2016-01-01

    The positive outcome that hypothermia contributes to brain and cardiac protection following ischemia has stimulated research in the development of pharmacological approaches to induce a hypothermic/hypometabolic state. Here we review three papers to highlight the role of the adenosine 1 receptor (A1AR) as a potential mediator and physiological regulator of a hypothermic state in both hibernating and non-hibernating mammals. We would like to emphasize the importance of comparative studies between hibernating and non-hibernating species that could lead to important discoveries on the mechanisms inducing hibernation and how they might be translated to induce a clinically useful hypothermic state. PMID:23465354

  16. Hibernation, Hypothermia and a Possible Therapeutic “Shifted Homeostasis” Induced by Central Activation of A1 Adenosine Receptor (A1AR)*

    PubMed Central

    Tupone, Domenico; Cetas, Justin S.; Morrison, Shaun F.

    2016-01-01

    The positive outcome that hypothermia contributes to brain and cardiac protection following ischemia has stimulated research in the development of pharmacological approaches to induce a hypothermic/hypometabolic state. Pharmacological manipulation of central autonomic thermoregulatory circuits could represent a potential target for the induction of a hypothermic state. Here we present a brief description of the CNS thermoregulatory centers and how the manipulation of these circuits can be useful in the treatment of pathological conditions such as stroke or brain hemorrhage. PMID:27333659

  17. Improving maternal and infant health outcomes in Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program.

    PubMed

    Applegate, Mary; Gee, Rebekah E; Martin, James N

    2014-07-01

    Maternal and infant health is critical to our nation's health. Disparities remain unacceptably high, particularly in the areas of prematurity and infant mortality. In 2012, traditionally distant partners such as federal and state governments, Medicaid and commercial payers, patients, public health and private clinicians, and multiple advocacy groups collaborated to focus on improving birth outcomes. To catalyze the alignment, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services convened an Expert Panel on Improving Maternal and Infant Health Outcomes in Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program. Over a year's time, the Expert Panel assimilated the best available evidence in clinical science and policy from content leaders and patients. These recommendations culminated in the present report, which challenges us as a nation to implement strategies to help all children have the best chance to survive and thrive comparable to that of other westernized nations. PMID:24901270

  18. Improvement in clinical outcomes after dry needling in a patient with occipital neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Bond, Bryan M; Kinslow, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    The primary purpose of this case report is to outline the diagnosis, intervention and clinical outcome of a patient presenting with occipital neuralgia. Upon initial presentation, the patient described a four-year history of stabbing neck pain and headaches. After providing informed consent, the patient underwent a total of four dry needling (DN) sessions over a two-week duration. During each of the treatment sessions, needles were inserted into the trapezii and suboccipital muscles. Post-intervention, the patient reported a 32-point change in her neck disability index score along with a 28-point change in her headache disability index score. Thus, it appears that subsequent four sessions of DN over two weeks, our patient experienced meaningful improvement in her neck pain and headaches. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report describing DN to successfully improve clinical outcomes in a patient diagnosed with occipital neuralgia. PMID:26136602

  19. Improvement in clinical outcomes after dry needling in a patient with occipital neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Bryan M.; Kinslow, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The primary purpose of this case report is to outline the diagnosis, intervention and clinical outcome of a patient presenting with occipital neuralgia. Upon initial presentation, the patient described a four-year history of stabbing neck pain and headaches. After providing informed consent, the patient underwent a total of four dry needling (DN) sessions over a two-week duration. During each of the treatment sessions, needles were inserted into the trapezii and suboccipital muscles. Post-intervention, the patient reported a 32-point change in her neck disability index score along with a 28-point change in her headache disability index score. Thus, it appears that subsequent four sessions of DN over two weeks, our patient experienced meaningful improvement in her neck pain and headaches. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report describing DN to successfully improve clinical outcomes in a patient diagnosed with occipital neuralgia. PMID:26136602

  20. Ultrasound combined with electrodiagnosis improves lesion localization and outcome in posterior interosseous neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wininger, Yevgeniya Dvorkin; Buckalew, Neilly A.; Kaufmann, Robert A.; Munin, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) syndrome is a rare compression neuropathy. Electrodiagnostic studies (EDX) combined with neuromuscular ultrasound (US) enable precise lesion localization and may improve patient outcome. METHODS In 4 patients with finger extension weakness, US was used to accurately localize concentric EMG needle placement in PIN muscles and to visualize the lesion site. RESULTS EMG with US guidance showed decreased recruitment with abnormal configuration in PIN muscles. Active denervation was not always observed. US scanning demonstrated larger PIN diameter in the affected arm. All patients had surgical intervention to confirm EDX and US findings with improved outcome on follow-up. CONCLUSION These cases demonstrate the benefits of augmenting EDX with US by guiding accurate electrode localization and providing diagnostic information about lesion location. PMID:26206065

  1. Liver transplantation at the Ochsner Clinic: programmatic expansion and outcomes improvement.

    PubMed

    Carmody, Ian C; Reichman, Trevor W; Bohorquez, Humberto; Cohen, Ari J; Bruce, David S; Therapondos, George; Girgrah, Nigel; Joshi, Shobha; Loss, George E

    2012-01-01

    Liver transplantation has become the best and most durable treatment for both acute and chronic liver disease. Over 1400 liver transplants have been performed at the Ochsner Clinic since the first successful transplant in 1987. Since its inception, the program has gone through several changes and advancements and has become one of the largest liver transplant programs in the United States. We have helped evolve steroid sparing immunosuppression and the use of extended criteria, donor organs. Establishment of criteria for the selection of recipients for re-transplantation has resulted in better than expected short and long-term results. Our center has faced the challenge of Hurricane Katrina and overcome it. We have improved steadily in both outcomes and transplants performed. The Ochnser Clinic Liver Transplant program will continue to improve access and outcomes for all patients with liver disease. PMID:23721014

  2. Does supplementation of in-vitro culture medium with melatonin improve IVF outcome in PCOS?

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Kyoung; Park, Eun A; Kim, Hyung Joon; Choi, Won Yun; Cho, Jung Hyun; Lee, Woo Sik; Cha, Kwang Yul; Kim, You Shin; Lee, Dong Ryul; Yoon, Tae Ki

    2013-01-01

    Human pre-ovulatory follicular fluid (FF) contains a higher concentration of melatonin than serum. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of melatonin supplementation of culture medium on the clinical outcomes of an in-vitro maturation (IVM) IVF-embryo transfer programme for patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Melatonin concentrations in the culture media of granulosa cells (GC) or cumulus-oocyte-complexes (COC) were measured and the clinical outcomes after using IVM media with or without melatonin were analysed. In the culture media of GC or COC, melatonin concentrations gradually increased. When human chorionic gonadotrophin priming protocols were used, implantation rates in the melatonin-supplemented group were higher than those of the non-supplemented control group (P<0.05). Pregnancy rates were also higher, although not significantly. The findings suggest that the addition of melatonin to IVM media may improve the cytoplasmic maturation of human immature oocytes and subsequent clinical outcomes. It is speculated that follicular melatonin may be released from luteinizing GC during late folliculogenesis and that melatonin supplementation may be used to improve the clinical outcomes of IVM IVF-embryo transfer. Melatonin is primarily produced by the pineal gland and regulates a variety of important central and peripheral actions related to circadian rhythms and reproduction. Interestingly, human pre-ovulatory follicular fluid contains a higher concentration of melatonin than serum. However, in contrast to animal studies, the direct role of melatonin on oocyte maturation in the human system has not yet been investigated. So, the aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of melatonin supplementation of culture medium on the clinical outcome of an in-vitro maturation (IVM) IVF-embryo transfer programme for PCOS patients. The melatonin concentrations in culture medium of granulosa cells (GC) or cumulus-oocyte-complexes (COC) were measured and

  3. Acid ceramidase improves the quality of oocytes and embryos and the outcome of in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Eliyahu, Efrat; Shtraizent, Nataly; Martinuzzi, Kurt; Barritt, Jason; He, Xingxuan; Wei, Hong; Chaubal, Sanjeev; Copperman, Alan B; Schuchman, Edward H

    2010-04-01

    A major challenge of assisted reproduction technologies (ARTs) is to mimic the natural environment required to sustain oocyte and embryo survival. Herein, we show that the ceramide-metabolizing enzyme, acid ceramidase (AC), is expressed in human cumulus cells and follicular fluid, essential components of this environment, and that the levels of this enzyme are positively correlated with the quality of human embryos formed in vitro. These observations led us to develop a new approach for oocyte and embryo culture that markedly improved the outcome of in vitro fertilization (IVF). The addition of recombinant AC (rAC) to human and mouse oocyte culture medium maintained their healthy morphology in vitro. Following fertilization, the number of mouse embryos formed in the presence of rAC also was improved (from approximately 40 to 88%), leading to approximately 5-fold more healthy births. To confirm these observations, immature bovine oocytes were matured in vitro and subjected to IVF in the presence of rAC. Significantly more high-grade blastocysts were formed, and the number of morphologically intact, hatched embryos was increased from approximately 24 to 70%. Overall, these data identify AC as an important component of the in vivo oocyte and embryo environment, and provide a novel technology for enhancing the outcome of assisted fertilization. Eliyahu, E., Shtraizent, N., Martinuzzi, K., Barritt, J., He, X., Wei, H., Chaubal, S., Copperman, A. B., Schuchman, E. H. Acid ceramidase improves the quality of oocytes and embryos and the outcome of in vitro fertilization. PMID:20007509

  4. Comparing the Efficacy of Interventions that use environmental supports to Improve Outcomes in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Velligan, Dawn I.; Diamond, Pamela M.; Maples, Natalie J.; Mintz, James; Li, Xueying; Glahn, David C.; Miller, Alexander L.

    2008-01-01

    We examined the efficacy of 2 treatments using environmental supports (e.g. signs, alarms, pill containers, checklists) to improve functional outcomes in individuals with schizophrenia. 120 participants were randomized into one of 3 treatment groups 1) Cognitive Adaptation Training (CAT; supports customized to individual cognitive impairments and behaviors and maintained on weekly home visits 2) Generic Environmental Supports (GES; a generic set of supports given to patients at a routine clinic visit and replaced on a monthly basis) and 3) treatment as usual (TAU). Functional outcomes, positive symptoms and motivation were assessed at baseline, 3, 6, 9, 18 and 24 months. After 9 months of intensive treatment with CAT, visits were decreased from weekly to monthly to examine whether treatment gains could be maintained. Results of a mixed effects regression model with repeated measures indicated a significant main effect of group (CAT>GES>TAU) with non-significant time and group by time interactions. Post-hoc analyses indicated that while individuals in CAT remained significantly better than those in TAU when treatment frequency was reduced, gains in CAT decreased to the level of those seen in GES. While group differences for positive symptoms were not significant, motivation improved in CAT and GES relative to TAU. The highest intensity treatment produced the best outcomes with respect to functioning. However, some improvements were seen with a relatively inexpensive, clinic-based treatment using a package of generic environmental supports. PMID:18374542

  5. Increasing Patient Activation Could Improve Outcomes for Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shawn L; Siegel, Corey A

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a complex disease process that often requires the integration of skills from various health care providers to adequately meet the needs of patients with IBD. The medical and surgical treatment options for IBD have become more complicated and are frequently a source of angst for both the patient and provider. However, it has become more important than ever to engage patients in navigating the treatment algorithm. Although novel in the IBD world, the concept of patients' becoming more active and effective managers of their care has been well studied in other disease processes such as diabetes mellitus and mental illness. This idea of patient activation refers to a patient understanding his or her role in the care process and having the skill sets and self-reliance necessary to manage his or her own health care. Over the past decade, evidence supporting the role of patient activation in chronic illness has grown, revealing improved health outcomes, enhanced patient experiences, and lower overall costs. Patient activation can be measured, and interventions have been shown to improve levels of activation over time and influence outcomes. A focus on patient activation is very appropriate for patients with IBD because this may potentially serve as a tool for IBD providers to not only improve patient outcomes and experience but also reduce health care costs. PMID:26422517

  6. Effect of wet-cold weather transportation conditions on thermoregulation and the development of accidental hypothermia in pullets under tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Minka, Ndazo S; Ayo, Joseph O

    2016-03-01

    The present study examines onboard thermal microclimatic conditions and thermoregulation of pullets exposed to accidental hypothermia during wet-cold weather transportation conditions, and the effect of rewarming on colonic temperature (CT) of the birds immediately after transportation. A total of 2200 pullets were transportation for 5 h in two separate vehicles during the nighttime. The last 3 h of the transportation period was characterized by heavy rainfall. During the precipitation period, each vehicle was covered one fourth way from the top-roof with a tarpaulin. The onboard thermal conditions inside the vehicles during transportation, which comprised ambient temperature and relative humidity were recorded, while humidity ratio and specific enthalpy were calculated. The CT of the birds was recorded before and after transportation. During transportation, onboard thermal heterogeneity was observed inside the vehicles with higher (p < 0.05) values in the front and center, and lower values recorded at the air inlets at the sides and rear planes. The CT values recorded in birds at the front and center planes were between 42.2 and 42.5 °C, indicative of mild hypothermia; while lower CT values between 28 and 38 °C were recorded at the sides and rear planes, indicative of mild to severe hypothermia. Several hours of gradual rewarming returned the CT to normal range. The result, for the first time, demonstrated the occurrence of accidental hypothermia in transported pullets under tropical conditions and a successful rewarming outcome. In conclusion, transportation of pullets during wet weather at onboard temperature of 18-20 °C induced hypothermia on birds located at the air inlets, which recovered fully after several hours of gradual rewarming. PMID:26198381

  7. Effect of wet-cold weather transportation conditions on thermoregulation and the development of accidental hypothermia in pullets under tropical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minka, Ndazo S.; Ayo, Joseph O.

    2016-03-01

    The present study examines onboard thermal microclimatic conditions and thermoregulation of pullets exposed to accidental hypothermia during wet-cold weather transportation conditions, and the effect of rewarming on colonic temperature (CT) of the birds immediately after transportation. A total of 2200 pullets were transportation for 5 h in two separate vehicles during the nighttime. The last 3 h of the transportation period was characterized by heavy rainfall. During the precipitation period, each vehicle was covered one fourth way from the top-roof with a tarpaulin. The onboard thermal conditions inside the vehicles during transportation, which comprised ambient temperature and relative humidity were recorded, while humidity ratio and specific enthalpy were calculated. The CT of the birds was recorded before and after transportation. During transportation, onboard thermal heterogeneity was observed inside the vehicles with higher ( p < 0.05) values in the front and center, and lower values recorded at the air inlets at the sides and rear planes. The CT values recorded in birds at the front and center planes were between 42.2 and 42.5 °C, indicative of mild hypothermia; while lower CT values between 28 and 38 °C were recorded at the sides and rear planes, indicative of mild to severe hypothermia. Several hours of gradual rewarming returned the CT to normal range. The result, for the first time, demonstrated the occurrence of accidental hypothermia in transported pullets under tropical conditions and a successful rewarming outcome. In conclusion, transportation of pullets during wet weather at onboard temperature of 18-20 °C induced hypothermia on birds located at the air inlets, which recovered fully after several hours of gradual rewarming.

  8. Defining and Assessing Quality Improvement Outcomes: A Framework for Public Health

    PubMed Central

    McLees, Anita W.; Nawaz, Saira; Thomas, Craig; Young, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We describe an evidence-based framework to define and assess the impact of quality improvement (QI) in public health. Developed to address programmatic and research-identified needs for articulating the value of public health QI in aggregate, this framework proposes a standardized set of measures to monitor and improve the efficiency and effectiveness of public health programs and operations. We reviewed the scientific literature and analyzed QI initiatives implemented through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Public Health Improvement Initiative to inform the selection of 5 efficiency and 8 effectiveness measures. This framework provides a model for identifying the types of improvement outcomes targeted by public health QI efforts and a means to understand QI’s impact on the practice of public health. PMID:25689185

  9. The Use of Hypothermia Therapy in Traumatic Ischemic/Reperfusional Brain Injury: Review of the Literatures

    PubMed Central

    Frantzen, Janek; Bullock, Ross; Gajavelli, Shyam; Burks, Stephen; Bramlett, Helen; Dietrich, W. Dalton

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic mild hypothermia has been widely used in brain injury. It has been evaluated in numerous clinical trials, and there is strong evidence for the use of hypothermia in treating patients with several types of ischemic/reperfusional (I/R) injuries, the examples being cardiac arrest and neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. In spite of many basic research projects demonstrating effectiveness, therapeutic hypothermia has not been proved effective for the heterogeneous group of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in multicenter clinical trials. In the latest clinical trial, however, researchers were able to demonstrate the significant beneficial effects of hypothermia in one specific group; patients with mass evacuated lesions. This suggested that mild therapeutic hypothermia might be effective for I/R related TBI. In this article, we have reviewed much of the previous literature concerning the mechanisms of I/R injury to the protective effects of mild therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:23439678

  10. How hibernation and hypothermia help to improve anticoagulant control

    PubMed Central

    de Vrij, Edwin L; Henning, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    Winter is coming. Some animals successfully cope with the hostility of this season by hibernating. But how do hibernators survive the procoagulant state of months of immobility at very low body temperatures, with strongly decreased blood flow and increased blood viscosity? Changing the coagulation system seems crucial for preventing thromboembolic complications.

  11. Improving Heart Failure Outcomes: The Role of the Clinical Nurse Specialist.

    PubMed

    Coen, Jennifer; Curry, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    This article identifies and explains barriers to optimal outcomes of heart failure and the role of the clinical nurse specialist in overcoming these obstacles, improving patient outcomes and quality of life. In recent years, advances in heart failure management have increased survival rates, and as a result, the number of patients requiring services to manage disease progression and the complex array of symptoms associated with end-stage heart disease. Management of the heart failure patient is dependent on the severity of the disease and wide range of available treatment regimens. Disease progression can be unpredictable and treatment regimens increasingly complex. The authors present a typical case of a patient with heart failure, identify the barriers to optimal outcomes in managing heart failure, as well as describe the roles of the clinical nurse specialist in overcoming these barriers within 3 spheres of clinical nurse specialist influence: patient, health care provider, and health care systems. The clinical nurse specialist role is ideally suited to positively affect heart failure outcomes. These positive effects are drawn from the dynamic and unique nature of the clinical nurse specialist role and are perpetrated through the 3 spheres of clinical nurse specialist practice: patient, health care provider, and heath care system. PMID:27575796

  12. Is diabetes management in primary care improving clinical outcomes? A study in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Mochtar, I; Al-Monjed, M F

    2015-04-01

    There has been little research into the effectiveness of primary-care diabetes clinics in the Middle East. This study in Qatar compared patient outcomes at a primary-care facility with a dedicated diabetes clinic and one without. Using a cross-sectional method, data on demographics, diabetes status and 6 clinical outcomes of diabetes care were collected from the records of patients who visited the clinics during 2012. Diabetes management in both facilities improved clinical outcomes over the 1-year observation period. The mean total cholesterol of patients attending the special clinic (n = 102) decreased significantly from 4.66 to 4.27 mmol/dL and LDL cholesterol from 3.42 to 3.22 mmol/dL. The LDL cholesterol of patients receiving standard care (n = 108) reduced significantly from 3.41 to 3.22 mmol/dL and HDL cholesterol increased from 0.83 to 0.87 mmol/dL. Inter-provider comparisons indicated that the outcomes in the facility with a diabetes clinic were not superior to those in the facility with standard care. PMID:26077518

  13. Improved outcomes for emergency department patients whose ambulance off-stretcher time is not delayed

    PubMed Central

    Crilly, Julia; Keijzers, Gerben; Tippett, Vivienne; O’Dwyer, John; Lind, James; Bost, Nerolie; O’Dwyer, Marilla; Shiels, Sue; Wallis, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe and compare characteristics and outcomes of patients who arrive by ambulance to the ED. We aimed to (i) compare patients with a delayed ambulance offload time (AOT) >30 min with those who were not delayed; and (ii) identify predictors of an ED length of stay (LOS) of >4 h for ambulance-arriving patients. Methods A retrospective, multi-site cohort study was undertaken in Australia using 12 months of linked health data (September 2007–2008). Outcomes of AOT delayed and non-delayed presentations were compared. Logistic regression analysis was undertaken to identify predictors of an ED LOS of >4 h. Results Of the 40 783 linked, analysable ambulance presentations, AOT delay of >30 min was experienced by 15%, and 63% had an ED LOS of >4 h. Patients with an AOT <30 min had better outcomes for: time to triage; ambulance time at hospital; time to see healthcare professional; proportion seen within recommended triage time frame; and ED LOS for both admitted and non-admitted patients. In-hospital mortality did not differ. Strong predictors of an ED LOS >4 h included: hospital admission, older age, triage category, and offload delay >30 min. Conclusion Patients arriving to the ED via ambulance and offloaded within 30 min experience better outcomes than those delayed. Given that offload delay is a modifiable predictor of an ED LOS of >4 h, targeted improvements in the ED arrival process for ambulance patients might be useful. PMID:25940975

  14. MEASURING AND IMPROVING RESPIRATORY OUTCOMES IN CYSTIC FIBROSIS LUNG DISEASE: OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES TO THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Zemanick, Edith T.; Harris, J. Kirk; Conway, Steven; Konstan, Michael W.; Marshall, Bruce; Quittner, Alexandra L.; Retsch-Bogart, George; Saiman, Lisa; Accurso, Frank J.

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening disease with significant morbidity. Despite overall improvements in survival, patients with CF experience frequent pulmonary exacerbations and declining lung function, which often accelerates during adolescence. New treatments target steps in the pathogenesis of lung disease, such as the basic defect in CF (CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator [CFTR]), pulmonary infections, inflammation, and mucociliary clearance. These treatments offer hope but also present challenges to patients, clinicians, and researchers. Comprehensive assessment of efficacy is critical to identify potentially beneficial treatments. Lung function and pulmonary exacerbation are the most commonly used outcome measures in CF clinical research. Other outcome measures under investigation include measures of CFTR function; biomarkers of infection, inflammation, lung injury and repair; and patient-reported outcomes. Molecular diagnostics may help elucidate the complex CF airway microbiome. As new treatments are developed for patients with CF, efforts should be made to balance treatment burden with quality of life. This review highlights emerging treatments, obstacles to optimizing outcomes, and key future directions for research. PMID:19833563

  15. Individual and group based parenting programmes for improving psychosocial outcomes for teenage parents and their children

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Jane; Smailagic, Nadja; Bennett, Cathy; Huband, Nick; Jones, Hannah; Coren, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Background Parenting programmes are a potentially important means of supporting teenage parents and improving outcomes for their children, and parenting support is a priority across most Western countries. This review updates the previous version published in 2001. Objectives To examine the effectiveness of parenting programmes in improving psychosocial outcomes for teenage parents and developmental outcomes in their children. Search methods We searched to find new studies for this updated review in January 2008 and May 2010 in CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, ASSIA, CINAHL, DARE, ERIC, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts and Social Science Citation Index. The National Research Register (NRR) was last searched in May 2005 and UK Clinical Research Network Portfolio Database in May 2010. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials assessing short-term parenting interventions aimed specifically at teenage parents and a control group (no-treatment, waiting list or treatment-as-usual). Data collection and analysis We assessed the risk of bias in each study. We standardised the treatment effect for each outcome in each study by dividing the mean difference in post-intervention scores between the intervention and control groups by the pooled standard deviation. Main results We included eight studies with 513 participants, providing a total of 47 comparisons of outcome between intervention and control conditions. Nineteen comparisons were statistically significant, all favouring the intervention group. We conducted nine meta-analyses using data from four studies in total (each meta-analysis included data from two studies). Four meta-analyses showed statistically significant findings favouring the intervention group for the following outcomes: parent responsiveness to the child post-intervention (SMD −0.91, 95% CI −1.52 to −0.30, P = 0.04); infant responsiveness to mother at follow-up (SMD −0.65, 95% CI −1.25 to −0.06, P = 0.03); and an overall measure of parent

  16. Tolerance to ethanol hypothermia in HOT and COLD mice.

    PubMed

    Crabbe, J C

    1994-02-01

    COLD and HOT mice have been selected to be sensitive or resistant, respectively, to the acute hypothermic effect of ethanol. Previous studies have found HOT mice to be relatively resistant to the development of tolerance to this effect, whereas COLD mice readily develop tolerance. By administering several doses of ethanol and recording multiple postdrug temperatures, in the current study we equated the selected lines for area under the curve describing initial hypothermic response over time, a measure reflecting both maximal hypothermia achieved and the duration of total hypothermic response. The dose-response function for COLD mice was much steeper than that for HOT mice, and HOT mice recovered to baseline body temperatures more slowly. Doses were administered daily for 5 days. Both lines developed tolerance to ethanol hypothermia. The magnitude of tolerance developed was greater in COLD than in HOT mice. At higher doses, HOT mice showed a progressively enhanced hypothermic response over days (i.e., sensitization). PMID:8198225

  17. Facilitation of amphetamine-induced hypothermia in mice by GABA agonists and CCK-8.

    PubMed Central

    Boschi, G.; Launay, N.; Rips, R.

    1991-01-01

    1. Amphetamine-induced hypothermia in mice is facilitated by dopaminergic stimulation and 5-hydroxytryptaminergic inhibition. The present study was designed to investigate: (a) the involvement of other neuronal systems, such as the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the opioid and the cholecystokinin (CCK-8) systems; (b) the possible contribution of hydroxylated metabolites of amphetamine to the hypothermia; (c) the capacity of dopamine itself to induce hypothermia and its mechanisms, in order to clarify the resistance of amphetamine-induced hypothermia to certain neuroleptics. 2. Pretreatment with the GABA antagonists, bicuculline and picrotoxin, did not inhibit amphetamine-induced hypothermia. The GABAB agonist, baclofen (2.5 mg kg-1, i.p.) potentiated this hypothermia, whereas the GABAA agonist, muscimol, did not. gamma-Butyrolactone (GBL) (40 mg kg-1, i.p.) and the neuropeptide CCK-8 (0.04 mg kg-1, i.p.) also induced potentiation. The opioid antagonist, naloxone, was without effect. 3. Dopamine itself (3, 9, 16 and 27 micrograms, i.c.v.) induced less hypothermia than the same doses of amphetamine. Sulpiride did not block dopamine-induced hypothermia, but pimozide (4 mg kg-1, i.p.), cis(z)flupentixol (0.25 mg kg-1, i.p.) and haloperidol (5 micrograms, i.c.v.) did. The direct dopamine receptor agonist, apomorphine, did not alter the hypothermia. Neither the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor blocker, cyproheptadine, nor the inhibitor of 5-HT synthesis, p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA), modified dopamine-induced hypothermia. Fluoxetine, an inhibitor of 5-HT reuptake, had no effect, whereas quipazine (6 mg kg-1, i.p.), a 5-HT agonist, totally prevented the hypothermia. Hypothermia was unaffected by pretreatment with CCK-8.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1855128

  18. Improving Work Outcomes of Dysthymia (Persistent Depressive Disorder) in an Employed Population

    PubMed Central

    Adler, David A.; Lerner, Debra; Visco, Zachary L.; Greenhill, Annabel; Chang, Hong; Cymerman, Elina; Azocar, Francisca; Rogers, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the effectiveness of a work-focused intervention (WFI) on the work outcomes of employed adults with dysthymia. Method This subgroup analysis from a randomized controlled trial compares an initial sample of 167 employees (age ≥ 45 years), screened for dysthymia using the PC-SAD without current major depressive disorder randomized to WFI (n=85) or usual care (UC) (n=82). Study sites included 19 employers and five additional organizations. Telephone-based WFI counseling (eight, twice monthly 50-minute sessions) provided work coaching and modification, care coordination and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Adjusted mixed effects models compared the WFI versus UC group pre-intervention to four-month post-intervention change in at-work limitations measured by the Work Limitations Questionnaire. Secondary outcome analysis compared the change in self-reported absences and depression symptom severity (PHQ-9 scores). Results Work productivity loss scores improved 43.0% in the WFI group vs. 4.8% in UC (difference in change P < 0.001). Absence days declined by 58.3% in WFI vs. 0.0% in UC (difference in change P = .09). Mean PHQ-9 depression symptom severity declined 44.2% in WFI vs. 5.3% in UC (difference in change P < 0.001). Conclusion At four months, the WFI was more effective than UC on two of the three outcomes. It could be an important mental and functional health improvement resource for the employed dysthymic population. PMID:25892151

  19. Behavioral treatment of social phobia in youth: does parent education training improve the outcome?

    PubMed

    Öst, Lars-Göran; Cederlund, Rio; Reuterskiöld, Lena

    2015-04-01

    Social phobia is one of the most common anxiety disorders in children and adolescents, and it runs a fairly chronic course if left untreated. The goals of the present study were to evaluate if a parent education course would improve the outcome for children with a primary diagnosis of social phobia and if comorbidity at the start of treatment would impair the outcome of the social phobia. A total of 55 children, 8-14 years old, were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: 1) Child is treated, 2) Child is treated and parent participates in the course, or 3) A wait-list for 12 weeks. The treatment consisted of individual exposure and group social skills training based on the Beidel, Turner, and Morris (2000) SET-C. Children and parents were assessed pre-, post-, and at one year follow-up with independent assessor ratings and self-report measures. Results showed that there was no significant difference between the two active treatments and both were better than the wait-list. The treatment effects were maintained or furthered at the follow-up. Comorbidity did not lead to worse outcome of social phobia. Comorbid disorders improved significantly from pre-to post-treatment and from post-to follow-up assessment without being targeted in therapy. PMID:25727679

  20. Spiritual Awakening Predicts Improved Drinking Outcomes in a Polish Treatment Sample

    PubMed Central

    Strobbe, Stephen; Cranford, James A.; Wojnar, Marcin; Brower, Kirk J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study examined concurrent and longitudinal associations between two dimensions of affiliation in Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)—attendance and spiritual awakening—and drinking outcomes among adult patients who were in treatment for alcohol dependence in Warsaw, Poland. In a study conducted at four addiction treatment centers, male and female patients (n = 118) with a DSM-IV diagnosis of alcohol dependence were assessed at baseline (Time 1 or T1), one month (T2), and 6 to 12 months post-baseline (T3) for AA meeting attendance, various aspects of AA affiliation, and alcohol use. AA meeting attendance and alcohol consumption were measured using the Timeline Followback (TLFB) interview. Self-report of having had a spiritual awakening was measured using a modified version of the Alcoholics Anonymous Involvement (AAI) scale. Results There were no cross-sectional or longitudinal associations between AA meeting attendance and improved drinking outcomes. In contrast, self-report of a spiritual awakening between T2 and T3 was significantly associated with abstinence (OR = 2.4, p < .05) and the absence of any heavy drinking (OR = 3.0, p < .05) at T3, even when demographic and clinical characteristics were statistically controlled. Conclusions Self-reports of spiritual awakening predicted improved drinking outcomes in a Polish treatment sample. PMID:24335767

  1. A distinctive neurologic syndrome after induced profound hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Wical, B S; Tomasi, L G

    1990-01-01

    Four patients suffered a distinctive neurologic syndrome after undergoing profound hypothermia and complete circulatory arrest for congenital heart lesion repair. Symptom onset was delayed 24-120 hours postoperatively. The syndrome consists of choreoathetosis and oral-facial dyskinesias, hypotonia, affective changes, and pseudobulbar signs (CHAP). Precise anatomic localization is uncertain. Magnetic resonance imaging of 2 patients did not reveal basal ganglia lesions. Pathogenesis is obscure. PMID:2360962

  2. Selective hypothermia in repair of aneurysms of the descending aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, D A; Boyer, J W

    1999-01-01

    Since 1991, we have used a simple, single-clamp technique with open distal anastomosis to repair aneurysms of the descending aorta. To enhance the results of the single-clamp technique in a recent high-risk patient, we used selective hypothermia, cooling primarily the tissues and organs supplied by the aorta and tributaries distal to the left subclavian artery. This preliminary report describes the technique and gives the rationale for its use. PMID:10397431

  3. Hypothermia/rewarming disrupts excitation-contraction coupling in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Schaible, Niccole; Han, Young Soo; Hoang, Thuy; Arteaga, Grace; Tveita, Torkjel; Sieck, Gary

    2016-06-01

    Hypothermia/rewarming (H/R) is poorly tolerated by the myocardium; however, the underlying intracellular basis of H/R-induced cardiac dysfunction remains elusive. We hypothesized that in cardiomyocytes, H/R disrupts excitation-contraction coupling by reducing myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity due to an increase in cardiac troponin I (cTnI) phosphorylation. To test this hypothesis, isolated rat cardiomyocytes (13-15 cells from 6 rats per group) were electrically stimulated to evoke both cytosolic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]cyto) and contractile (sarcomere shortening) responses that were simultaneously measured using an IonOptix system. Cardiomyocytes were divided into two groups: 1) those exposed to hypothermia (15°C for 2 h) followed by rewarming (35°C; H/R); or 2) time-matched normothermic (35°C) controls (CTL). Contractile dysfunction after H/R was indicated by reduced velocity and extent of sarcomere length (SL) shortening compared with time-matched controls. Throughout hypothermia, basal [Ca(2+)]cyto increased and the duration of evoked [Ca(2+)]cyto transients was prolonged. Phase-loop plots of [Ca(2+)]cyto vs. contraction were shifted rightward in cardiomyocytes during hypothermia compared with CTL, indicating a decrease in Ca(2+) sensitivity. Using Western blot, we found that H/R increases cTnI phosphorylation. These results support our overall hypothesis and suggest that H/R disrupts excitation-contraction coupling of cardiomyocytes due to increased cTnI phosphorylation and reduced Ca(2+) sensitivity. PMID:26993227

  4. Discussing the Evidence for Upstream Palliative Care in Improving Outcomes in Advanced Cancer.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Thomas W; Nickolich, Myles S; El-Jawahri, Areej; Temel, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    Palliative care has received increasing attention at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting since the publication of its provisional clinical opinion on the topic in 2012. Despite frequent discussion, palliative care remains a source of some controversy and confusion in clinical practice, especially concerning who should provide it, what it encompasses, and when and how it can help patients and their families. In this article, we provide a formal definition of palliative care and review the state of the science of palliative care in oncology. Several randomized controlled trials now show that palliative care improves important outcomes for patients with cancer. Related outcome improvements include a reduction in symptoms, improved quality of life, better prognostic understanding, less depressed mood, less aggressive end-of-life care, reduced resource utilization, and even prolonged survival. As such, ASCO recommends early integration of palliative care into comprehensive cancer care for all patients with advanced disease and/or significant symptom burden. Our aim is that this summary will facilitate greater understanding about palliative care and encourage further integration of palliative care services into cancer care. More research is needed to illuminate the mechanisms of action of palliative care and to improve the specificity of palliative care applications to unique scenarios and populations in oncology. PMID:27249764

  5. Hypothermia-induced neurite outgrowth is mediated by tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Katharina R L; Boato, Francesco; Diestel, Antje; Hechler, Daniel; Kruglov, Andrei; Berger, Felix; Hendrix, Sven

    2010-07-01

    Systemic or brain-selective hypothermia is a well-established method for neuroprotection after brain trauma. There is increasing evidence that hypothermia exerts beneficial effects on the brain and may also support regenerative responses after brain damage. Here, we have investigated whether hypothermia influences neurite outgrowth in vitro via modulation of the post-injury cytokine milieu. Organotypic brain slices were incubated: deep hypothermia (2 h at 17 degrees C), rewarming (2 h up to 37 degrees C), normothermia (20 h at 37 degrees C). Neurite density and cytokine release (IL 1beta, IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-alpha) were investigated after 24 h. For functional analysis mice deficient in NT-3/NT-4 and TNF-alpha as well as the TNF-alpha inhibitor etanercept were used. Hypothermia led to a significant increase of neurite outgrowth, which was independent of neurotrophin signaling. In contrast to other cytokines investigated, TNF-alpha secretion by organotypic brain slices was significantly increased after deep hypothermia. Moreover, hypothermia-induced neurite extension was abolished after administration of the TNF-alpha inhibitor and in TNF-alpha knockout mice. We demonstrate that TNF-alpha is responsible for inducing neurite outgrowth in the context of deep hypothermia and rewarming. These data suggest that hypothermia not only exerts protective effects in the CNS but may also support neurite outgrowth as a potential mechanism of regeneration. PMID:20070303

  6. The neurovascular protection afforded by delayed local hypothermia after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Heon; Seo, Minchul; Han, Hyung Soo; Park, Jaechan; Suk, Kyoungho

    2013-05-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is a robust therapeutic tool in experimental stroke models but its clinical applications are limited. Furthermore, optimal conditions for therapeutic hypothermia, such as, temperature and the initiation and duration of cooling must be individualized. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of delayed local hypothermia, administered for 44 hr after 4 hr of reperfusion in a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo), using a cooling device that allowed controlled local hypothermia (31 °C) in brain. Histological data revealed that local hypothermia significantly reduced infarct volumes and glial hypertrophic activation. Brain water contents, IgG leakage, and Evans Blue extravasation were notably reduced by local hypothermia. Furthermore, local hypothermia had strong vasculoprotective effects, as determined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses for endothelial barrier antigen (EBA), laminin, aquaporin-4, and tight junction proteins in brain. Our data indicate that delayed/prolonged local hypothermia confers neurovascular protection, reduces brain edema, and inhibits inflammatory glial activation, and suggest that hypothermic conservation of vascular structures and functions account for the therapeutic effects of local hypothermia observed in this model of experimental stroke. PMID:23469955

  7. Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest and return of spontaneous circulation: it's complicated.

    PubMed

    Beseda, Ryan; Smith, Susan; Veenstra, Amy

    2014-12-01

    Providing evidence-based care to patients with return of spontaneous circulation after a cardiac arrest is a recent complex innovation. Once resuscitated patients must be assessed for appropriateness for therapeutic hypothermia, be cooled in a timely manner, maintained while hypothermic, rewarmed within a specified time frame, and then assessed for whether hypothermia was successful for the patient through neuroprognostication. Nurses caring for therapeutic hypothermia patients must be knowledgeable and prepared to provide care to the patient and family. This article provides an overview of the complexity of therapeutic hypothermia for patients with return of spontaneous circulation in the form of a case study. PMID:25438893

  8. Patient-specific instrumentation does not improve radiographic alignment or clinical outcomes after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Huijbregts, Henricus J T A M; Khan, Riaz J K; Sorensen, Emma; Fick, Daniel P; Haebich, Samantha

    2016-08-01

    Background and purpose - Patient-specific instrumentation (PSI) for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has been introduced to improve alignment and reduce outliers, increase efficiency, and reduce operation time. In order to improve our understanding of the outcomes of patient-specific instrumentation, we conducted a meta-analysis. Patients and methods - We identified randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing patient-specific and conventional instrumentation in TKA. Weighted mean differences and risk ratios were determined for radiographic accuracy, operation time, hospital stay, blood loss, number of surgical trays required, and patient-reported outcome measures. Results - 21 RCTs involving 1,587 TKAs were included. Patient-specific instrumentation resulted in slightly more accurate hip-knee-ankle axis (0.3°), coronal femoral alignment (0.3°, femoral flexion (0.9°), tibial slope (0.7°), and femoral component rotation (0.5°). The risk ratio of a coronal plane outlier (> 3° deviation of chosen target) for the tibial component was statistically significantly increased in the PSI group (RR =1.64). No significance was found for other radiographic measures. Operation time, blood loss, and transfusion rate were similar. Hospital stay was significantly shortened, by approximately 8 h, and the number of surgical trays used decreased by 4 in the PSI group. Knee Society scores and Oxford knee scores were similar. Interpretation - Patient-specific instrumentation does not result in clinically meaningful improvement in alignment, fewer outliers, or better early patient-reported outcome measures. Efficiency is improved by reducing the number of trays used, but PSI does not reduce operation time. PMID:27249110

  9. Protective Mechanisms of Hypothermia in Liver Surgery and Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Olthof, Pim B; Reiniers, Megan J; Dirkes, Marcel C; van Gulik, Thomas M; Heger, Michal; van Golen, Rowan F

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is a side effect of major liver surgery that often cannot be avoided. Prolonged periods of ischemia put a metabolic strain on hepatocytes and limit the tolerable ischemia and preservation times during liver resection and transplantation, respectively. In both surgical settings, temporarily lowering the metabolic demand of the organ by reducing organ temperature effectively counteracts the negative consequences of an ischemic insult. Despite its routine use, the application of liver cooling is predicated on an incomplete understanding of the underlying protective mechanisms, which has limited a uniform and widespread implementation of liver-cooling techniques. This review therefore addresses how hypothermia-induced hypometabolism modulates hepatocyte metabolism during ischemia and thereby reduces hepatic I/R injury. The mechanisms underlying hypothermia-mediated reduction in energy expenditure during ischemia and the attenuation of mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species during early reperfusion are described. It is further addressed how hypothermia suppresses the sterile hepatic I/R immune response and preserves the metabolic functionality of hepatocytes. Lastly, a summary of the clinical status quo of the use of liver cooling for liver resection and transplantation is provided. PMID:26552060

  10. The thermoregulatory mechanism of melatonin-induced hypothermia in chicken.

    PubMed

    Rozenboim, I; Miara, L; Wolfenson, D

    1998-01-01

    The involvement of melatonin (Mel) in body temperature (Tb) regulation was studied in White Leghorn layers. In experiment 1, 35 hens were injected intraperitoneally with seven doses of Mel (0, 5, 10, 20, 40, 80, or 160 mg Mel/kg body wt) dissolved in ethanol. Within 1 h, Mel had caused a dose-dependent reduction in Tb. To eliminate a possible vehicle effect, 0, 80, and 160 mg/kg body wt Mel dissolved in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) was injected. NMP had no effect on Tb, with Mel again causing a dose-dependent hypothermia. In experiment 2 (n = 30), Mel injected before exposure of layers to heat reduced Tb and prevented heat-induced hyperthermia. Injection after heat stress had begun did not prevent hyperthermia. Under cold stress, Mel induced hypothermia, which was not observed in controls. In experiment 3 (n = 12), Mel injection reduced Tb and increased metatarsal and comb temperatures (but not feathered-skin temperature), respiratory rate, and evaporative water loss. Heart rate rose and then declined, and blood pressure increased 1 h after Mel injection. Heat production rose slightly during the first hour, then decreased in parallel to the Tb decline. We conclude that pharmacological doses of Mel induce hypothermia in hens by increasing nonevaporative skin heat losses and slightly increasing respiratory evaporation. PMID:9458922

  11. Isolation Syndrome after Cardiac Arrest and Therapeutic Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Forgacs, Peter B.; Fridman, Esteban A.; Goldfine, Andrew M.; Schiff, Nicholas D.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the first description of an isolation syndrome in a patient who suffered prolonged cardiac arrest and underwent a standard therapeutic hypothermia protocol. Two years after the arrest, the patient demonstrated no motor responses to commands, communication capabilities, or visual tracking at the bedside. However, resting neuronal metabolism and electrical activity across the entire anterior forebrain was found to be normal despite severe structural injuries to primary motor, parietal, and occipital cortices. In addition, using quantitative electroencephalography, the patient showed evidence for willful modulation of brain activity in response to auditory commands revealing covert conscious awareness. A possible explanation for this striking dissociation in this patient is that altered neuronal recovery patterns following therapeutic hypothermia may lead to a disproportionate preservation of anterior forebrain cortico-thalamic circuits even in the setting of severe hypoxic injury to other brain areas. Compared to recent reports of other severely brain-injured subjects with such dissociation of clinically observable (overt) and covert behaviors, we propose that this case represents a potentially generalizable mechanism producing an isolation syndrome of blindness, motor paralysis, and retained cognition as a sequela of cardiac arrest and therapeutic hypothermia. Our findings further support that highly-preserved anterior cortico-thalamic integrity is associated with the presence of conscious awareness independent from the degree of injury to other brain areas. PMID:27375420

  12. Standardizing ICU management of pediatric traumatic brain injury is associated with improved outcomes at discharge.

    PubMed

    O'Lynnger, Thomas M; Shannon, Chevis N; Le, Truc M; Greeno, Amber; Chung, Dai; Lamb, Fred S; Wellons, John C

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT The goal of critical care in treating traumatic brain injury (TBI) is to reduce secondary brain injury by limiting cerebral ischemia and optimizing cerebral blood flow. The authors compared short-term outcomes as defined by discharge disposition and Glasgow Outcome Scale scores in children with TBI before and after the implementation of a protocol that standardized decision-making and interventions among neurosurgeons and pediatric intensivists. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective pre- and postprotocol study of 128 pediatric patients with severe TBI, as defined by Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores < 8, admitted to a tertiary care center pediatric critical care unit between April 1, 2008, and May 31, 2014. The preprotocol group included 99 patients, and the postprotocol group included 29 patients. The primary outcome of interest was discharge disposition before and after protocol implementation, which took place on April 1, 2013. Ordered logistic regression was used to assess outcomes while accounting for injury severity and clinical parameters. Favorable discharge disposition included discharge home. Unfavorable discharge disposition included discharge to an inpatient facility or death. RESULTS Demographics were similar between the treatment periods, as was injury severity as assessed by GCS score (mean 5.43 preprotocol, mean 5.28 postprotocol; p = 0.67). The ordered logistic regression model demonstrated an odds ratio of 4.0 of increasingly favorable outcome in the postprotocol cohort (p = 0.007). Prior to protocol implementation, 63 patients (64%) had unfavorable discharge disposition and 36 patients (36%) had favorable discharge disposition. After protocol implementation, 9 patients (31%) had unfavorable disposition, while 20 patients (69%) had favorable disposition (p = 0.002). In the preprotocol group, 31 patients (31%) died while 6 patients (21%) died after protocol implementation (p = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS Discharge disposition and mortality

  13. Improving the outcome of paediatric orthopaedic trauma: an audit of inpatient management in Southampton.

    PubMed

    Cox, P J; Clarke, N M

    1997-11-01

    The patterns, management and outcome of non-fatal orthopaedic injury in childhood was audited over a 1 year period in Southampton. A computer-based audit (1 September 1993 to 31 August 1994) was conducted of all children aged under 15 years who were admitted to the orthopaedic unit after accidental injury. Management was audited by studying the primary conservative and operative treatment methods employed. Treatment outcome was evaluated in terms of need for secondary operative treatment, salvage internal fixation, length of hospital stay and unplanned readmission. In all, 398 children, representing 50/10,000 of the local paediatric population, were admitted with a traumatic injury. There was a significant (P < 0.001, Kolmogorov-Smirnov) seasonal variation in admission rate. There were 87.3% admissions required for fractures, 8.5% after soft tissue injury and 2.2% after joint injury. The following areas were identified where management and outcome could be improved: 1 A 12.1% readmission rate (47/346) in children with fractures owing to a 16% incidence of loss of position after closed reduction of distal radial, forearm shaft and distal humeral fractures. 2 In all, 24% of internal fixation procedures were performed as 'salvage' after failure of conservative treatment, entailing either reoperation during the initial admission or a further unplanned readmission. 3 A prolonged inpatient stay for patients with femoral fractures owing to a wide variation in treatment method. The outcome of non-fatal orthopaedic injury can be improved through the selective use of primary internal fixation of distal radial and humeral fractures and the close adherence to a management algorithm in femoral fractures. There may be a role for more specialised supervision of primary treatment of these particular fractures. PMID:9422873

  14. Home Diuretic Protocol for Heart Failure: Partnering with Home Health to Improve Outcomes and Reduce Readmissions

    PubMed Central

    Veilleux, Richard P; Wight, Joseph N; Cannon, Ann; Whalen, Moira; Bachman, David

    2014-01-01

    Context: The management of heart failure (HF) is challenging, with high rates of readmission and no single solution. MaineHealth, a health care system serving southern Maine, has shown initial success with home health nurses partnering with physicians in the management of complex patients with HF using the MaineHealth Home Diuretic Protocol (HDP). Objective: To demonstrate that augmented diuretic therapy, both oral and intravenous, an evidence-based treatment for care of patients with HF experiencing fluid retention, can be delivered safely in the home setting using the HDP and can improve outcomes for recently hospitalized patients with HF. Design: In late 2011, the MaineHealth HDP was implemented in two hospitals and in the home health agency serving those hospitals. The patient population included recently hospitalized patients with a diagnosis of advanced HF, eligible for home health services and telemonitoring. Main Outcome Measures: Home health nurses reported data on the patients managed using the protocol, including interventions made, physical findings, lab values, and patient disposition after each episode of care. Questionnaires were used to determine patient and clinician satisfaction. Results: Sixty patients meeting the criteria above were enrolled between November 2011 and January 2014. The protocol was initiated 84 times for 30 of these patients. Sixteen patients had multiple activations. The readmission rate was 10% and no adverse outcomes were observed. Clinician and patient satisfaction was 97% or greater. Conclusion: The MaineHealth HDP can be delivered effectively and safely to improve outcomes, reducing readmissions and allowing patients to remain at home. PMID:25102518

  15. Fluorescently Labeled Peptide Increases Identification of Degenerated Facial Nerve Branches during Surgery and Improves Functional Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Timon; Mastrodimos, Melina B.; Raju, Sharat C.; Glasgow, Heather L.; Whitney, Michael; Friedman, Beth; Moore, Jeffrey D.; Kleinfeld, David; Steinbach, Paul; Messer, Karen; Pu, Minya; Tsien, Roger Y.; Nguyen, Quyen T.

    2015-01-01

    Nerve degeneration after transection injury decreases intraoperative visibility under white light (WL), complicating surgical repair. We show here that the use of fluorescently labeled nerve binding probe (F-NP41) can improve intraoperative visualization of chronically (up to 9 months) denervated nerves. In a mouse model for the repair of chronically denervated facial nerves, the intraoperative use of fluorescent labeling decreased time to nerve identification by 40% compared to surgeries performed under WL alone. Cumulative functional post-operative recovery was also significantly improved in the fluorescence guided group as determined by quantitatively tracking of the recovery of whisker movement at time intervals for 6 weeks post-repair. To our knowledge, this is the first description of an injectable probe that increases visibility of chronically denervated nerves during surgical repair in live animals. Future translation of this probe may improve functional outcome for patients with chronic denervation undergoing surgical repair. PMID:25751149

  16. Money matters: exploiting the data from outcomes research for quality improvement initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Bizzini, Mario; Leunig, Michael; Maffiuletti, Nicola A.; Mannion, Anne F.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increase in studies that have sought to identify predictors of treatment outcome and to examine the efficacy of surgical and non-surgical treatments. In addition to the scientific advancement associated with these studies per se, the hospitals and clinics where the studies are conducted may gain indirect financial benefit from participating in such projects as a result of the prestige derived from corporate social responsibility, a reputational lever used to reward such institutions. It is known that there is a positive association between corporate social performance and corporate financial performance. However, in addition to this, the research findings and the research staff can constitute resources from which the provider can reap a more direct benefit, by means of their contribution to quality control and improvement. Poor quality is costly. Patient satisfaction increases the chances that the patient will be a promoter of the provider to friends and colleagues. As such, involvement of the research staff in the improvement of the quality of care can ultimately result in economic revenue for the provider. The most advanced methodologies for continuous quality improvement (e.g., six-sigma) are data-driven and use statistical tools similar to those utilized in the traditional research setting. Given that these methods rely on the application of the scientific process to quality improvement, researchers have the adequate skills and mind-set to embrace them and thereby contribute effectively to the quality team. The aim of this article is to demonstrate by means of real-life examples how to utilize the findings of outcome studies for quality management in a manner similar to that used in the business community. It also aims to stimulate research groups to better understand that, by adopting a different perspective, their studies can be an additional resource for the healthcare provider. The change in perspective should stimulate

  17. Money matters: exploiting the data from outcomes research for quality improvement initiatives.

    PubMed

    Impellizzeri, Franco M; Bizzini, Mario; Leunig, Michael; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Mannion, Anne F

    2009-08-01

    In recent years, there has been an increase in studies that have sought to identify predictors of treatment outcome and to examine the efficacy of surgical and non-surgical treatments. In addition to the scientific advancement associated with these studies per se, the hospitals and clinics where the studies are conducted may gain indirect financial benefit from participating in such projects as a result of the prestige derived from corporate social responsibility, a reputational lever used to reward such institutions. It is known that there is a positive association between corporate social performance and corporate financial performance. However, in addition to this, the research findings and the research staff can constitute resources from which the provider can reap a more direct benefit, by means of their contribution to quality control and improvement. Poor quality is costly. Patient satisfaction increases the chances that the patient will be a promoter of the provider to friends and colleagues. As such, involvement of the research staff in the improvement of the quality of care can ultimately result in economic revenue for the provider. The most advanced methodologies for continuous quality improvement (e.g., six-sigma) are data-driven and use statistical tools similar to those utilized in the traditional research setting. Given that these methods rely on the application of the scientific process to quality improvement, researchers have the adequate skills and mind-set to embrace them and thereby contribute effectively to the quality team. The aim of this article is to demonstrate by means of real-life examples how to utilize the findings of outcome studies for quality management in a manner similar to that used in the business community. It also aims to stimulate research groups to better understand that, by adopting a different perspective, their studies can be an additional resource for the healthcare provider. The change in perspective should stimulate

  18. Transient lung-specific expression of the chemokine KC improves outcome in invasive aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Mehrad, Borna; Wiekowski, Maria; Morrison, Brad E; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Coronel, Elizabeth C; Manfra, Denise J; Lira, Sergio A

    2002-11-01

    Invasive aspergillosis is a common and devastating pneumonia in immunocompromised hosts. Neutrophils are critical for defense against this infection, and ELR+ CXC chemokines are potent neutrophil chemoattractants. We hypothesized that transient lung-specific overexpression of one such ligand, KC, in mice with invasive aspergillosis improves the outcome of disease. We generated mice in which transgenic expression of KC was limited to the lungs and occurred only upon exposure to tetracycline analogues, and we exposed them to doxycycline after the onset of invasive aspergillosis. Transgenic mice had a threefold greater survival, a 74% lower lung fungal burden, a greater magnitude of lung KC induction, and an earlier and higher peak of lung neutrophil influx compared with wild-type mice. In addition to a higher number of neutrophils, we found a 1.8-fold higher number of monocytes-macrophages in the lungs of transgenic mice as compared with wild-type mice. Furthermore, transgenic mice had greater lung expression of interferon-gamma and interleukin-12 in response to infection, suggesting that transgenic expression of KC indirectly regulated the expression of other cytokines associated with improved host defense against this pathogen. Taken together, these data suggest that overexpression of KC in the lung in the setting of established invasive aspergillosis results in improved host defense and outcome of disease. PMID:12403697

  19. Implementing chronic care for COPD: planned visits, care coordination, and patient empowerment for improved outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Fromer, Len

    2011-01-01

    Current primary care patterns for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) focus on reactive care for acute exacerbations, often neglecting ongoing COPD management to the detriment of patient experience and outcomes. Proactive diagnosis and ongoing multifactorial COPD management, comprising smoking cessation, influenza and pneumonia vaccinations, pulmonary rehabilitation, and symptomatic and maintenance pharmacotherapy according to severity, can significantly improve a patient’s health-related quality of life, reduce exacerbations and their consequences, and alleviate the functional, utilization, and financial burden of COPD. Redesign of primary care according to principles of the chronic care model, which is implemented in the patient-centered medical home, can shift COPD management from acute rescue to proactive maintenance. The chronic care model and patient-centered medical home combine delivery system redesign, clinical information systems, decision support, and self-management support within a practice, linked with health care organization and community resources beyond the practice. COPD care programs implementing two or more chronic care model components effectively reduce emergency room and inpatient utilization. This review guides primary care practices in improving COPD care workflows, highlighting the contributions of multidisciplinary collaborative team care, care coordination, and patient engagement. Each primary care practice can devise a COPD care workflow addressing risk awareness, spirometric diagnosis, guideline-based treatment and rehabilitation, and self-management support, to improve patient outcomes in COPD. PMID:22162647

  20. Shared medical appointments: improving access, outcomes, and satisfaction for patients with chronic cardiac diseases.

    PubMed

    Bartley, Kelly Bauer; Haney, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Improving access to care, health outcomes, and patient satisfaction are primary objectives for healthcare practices. This article outlines benefits, concerns, and possible challenges of shared medical appointments (SMAs) for patients and providers. The SMA model was designed to support providers' demanding schedules by allowing patients with the same chronic condition to be seen in a group setting. By concentrating on patient education and disease management, interactive meetings provide an opportunity for patients to share both successes and struggles with others experiencing similar challenges. Studies demonstrated that SMAs improved patient access, enhanced outcomes, and promoted patient satisfaction. This article describes the potential benefits of SMAs for patients with chronic heart disease, which consumes a large number of healthcare dollars related to hospital admissions, acute exacerbations, and symptom management. Education for self-management of chronic disease can become repetitive and time consuming. The SMA model introduces a fresh and unique style of healthcare visits, allowing providers to devote more time and attention to patients and improve productivity. The SMA model provides an outstanding method for nurse practitioners to demonstrate their role as a primary care provider, by leading patients in group discussions and evaluating their current health status. Patient selection, preparation, and facilitation of an SMA are discussed to demonstrate the complementary nature of an SMA approach in a healthcare practice. PMID:20134280

  1. Does surgical sympathectomy improve clinical outcomes in patients with refractory angina pectoris?

    PubMed

    Holland, Luke C; Navaratnarajah, Manoraj; Taggart, David P

    2016-04-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiothoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: In patients with angina pectoris refractory to medical therapy, does surgical sympathectomy improve clinical outcomes? A total of 528 papers were identified using the search protocol described, of which 6 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. There were 5 case series and 1 prospective cohort study. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. All 5 of the case series demonstrated an improvement in symptoms, exercise tolerance or quality of life in patients undergoing surgical sympathectomy. An early case series investigating an open approach had a high morbidity and mortality rate, but the 4 other series used a minimally invasive technique and had low morbidity and zero perioperative mortality rates. The cohort study compared surgical sympathectomy with transmyocardial laser revascularization (TMR) and concluded TMR to be superior. However, this study looked only at unilateral sympathectomy, whereas all 5 case series focused on bilateral surgery. We conclude that the best currently available evidence does suggest that patients report an improvement in their symptoms and quality of life following surgical sympathectomy, but the low level of this evidence does not allow for a statistically proved recommendation. PMID:26787727

  2. Primary health care contribution to improve health outcomes in Bogota-Colombia: a longitudinal ecological analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Colombia has a highly segmented and fragmented national health system that contributes to inequitable health outcomes. In 2004 the district government of Bogota initiated a Primary Health Care (PHC) strategy to improve health care access and population health status. This study aims to analyse the contribution of the PHC strategy to the improvement of health outcomes controlling for socioeconomic variables. Methods A longitudinal ecological analysis using data from secondary sources was carried out. The analysis used data from 2003 and 2007 (one year before and 3 years after the PHC implementation). A Primary Health Care Index (PHCI) of coverage intensity was constructed. According to the PHCI, localities were classified into two groups: high and low coverage. A multivariate analysis using a Poisson regression model for each year separately and a Panel Poisson regression model to assess changes between the groups over the years was developed. Dependent variables were infant mortality rate, under-5 mortality rate, infant mortality rate due to acute diarrheal disease and pneumonia, prevalence of acute malnutrition, vaccination coverage for diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus (DPT) and prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding. The independent variable was the PHCI. Control variables were sewerage coverage, health system insurance coverage and quality of life index. Results The high PHCI localities as compared with the low PHCI localities showed significant risk reductions of under-5 mortality (13.8%) and infant mortality due to pneumonia (37.5%) between 2003 and 2007. The probability of being vaccinated for DPT also showed a significant increase of 4.9%. The risk of infant mortality and of acute malnutrition in children under-5 years was lesser in the high coverage group than in the low one; however relative changes were not statistically significant. Conclusions Despite the adverse contextual conditions and the limitations imposed by the Colombian health

  3. The use of mobile apps to improve nutrition outcomes: A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    DiFilippo, Kristen N; Huang, Wen-Hao; Andrade, Juan E; Chapman-Novakofski, Karen M

    2015-07-01

    We conducted a systematic review to determine if the use of nutrition apps resulted in improved outcomes, including knowledge and behavior, among healthy adults. Using app(s), cellular phone, iPads, mobile phone, mobile telephone, smart phone, mobile and mHealth as search terms with diet, food and nutrition as qualifiers we searched PubMed, CINAHL (January 2008-October 2013) and Web of Science (January 2008-January 2014). Inclusion criteria were peer-reviewed randomized controlled trials, non-controlled trials, and cohort studies published in English that used apps to increase nutrition knowledge or improve behavior related to nutrition. Studies that were descriptive, did not include apps, focused on app development, app satisfaction app feasibility, text messaging, or digital photography were excluded. We evaluated article quality using the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Evidence Analysis Manual. Data was extracted for knowledge, behavior and weight change. Our initial search identified 12,010 titles from PubMed, 260 from CINAHL and 4762 from Web of Science; of these, only four articles met all search criteria. Positive quality ratings were given to three articles; only one reported knowledge outcomes (non-significant). All four articles evaluated weight loss and suggested an advantage to using nutrition apps. Behavioral changes in reviewed studies included increased adherence to diet monitoring (p < 0.001) and decreased effort to continue diet without app (p = 0.024). Few studies, however, have explored the use of nutrition apps as supportive educational interventions. Most apps focus on weight loss with inconsistent outcomes. We conclude that using apps for education needs additional research which includes behavior theory within the app and improved study design. PMID:25680388

  4. The unrecognized epidemic of blunt carotid arterial injuries: early diagnosis improves neurologic outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Biffl, W L; Moore, E E; Ryu, R K; Offner, P J; Novak, Z; Coldwell, D M; Franciose, R J; Burch, J M

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the benefit of screening for blunt carotid arterial injuries (BCI) in patients who are asymptomatic. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Blunt carotid arterial injuries have the potential for devastating complications. Published studies report 23% to 28% mortality rates, with 48% to 58% of survivors having permanent severe neurologic deficits. Most patients have neurologic deficits when the injury is diagnosed. The authors hypothesized that screening patients who are asymptomatic and instituting early therapy would improve neurologic outcome. METHODS: The Trauma Registry of the author's Level I Trauma Center identified patients with BCI from 1990 through 1997. Beginning in August 1996, the authors implemented a screening for BCI. Arteriography was used for diagnosis. Patients without specific contraindications were anticoagulated. Endovascular stents were deployed in the setting of pseudoaneurysms. RESULTS: Thirty-seven patients with BCI were identified among 15,331 blunt-trauma victims (0.24%). During the screening period, 25 patients were diagnosed with BCI among 2902 admissions (0.86%); 13 (52%) were asymptomatic. Overall, eight patients died, and seven of the survivors had permanent severe neurologic deficits. Excluding those dying of massive brain injury and patients admitted with coma and brain injury, mortality associated with BCI was 15%, with severe neurologic morbidity in 16% of survivors. The patients who were asymptomatic at diagnosis had a better neurologic outcome than those who were symptomatic. Symptomatic patients who were anticoagulated showed a trend toward greater neurologic improvement at the time of discharge than those who were not anticoagulated. CONCLUSIONS: Screening allows the identification of asymptomatic BCI and thereby facilitates early systemic anticoagulation, which is associated with improved neurologic outcome. The role of endovascular stents in the treatment of blunt traumatic pseudoaneurysms remains to be defined

  5. The GPVI-Fc Fusion Protein Revacept Improves Cerebral Infarct Volume and Functional Outcome in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Goebel, Silvia; Li, Zhongmin; Vogelmann, Jasmin; Holthoff, Hans-Peter; Degen, Heidrun; Hermann, Dirk M.; Gawaz, Meinrad; Ungerer, Martin; Münch, Götz

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We examined the effect of Revacept, an Fc fusion protein which is specifically linked to the extracellular domain of glycoprotein VI (GPVI), on thrombus formation after vessel wall injury and on experimental stroke in mice. Background Several antiplatelet drugs for the treatment of myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke with potent anti-ischemic effects have been developed, but all incur a significant risk of bleeding. Methods Platelet adhesion and thrombus formation after endothelial injury was monitored in the carotid artery by intra-vital fluorescence microscopy. The morphological and clinical consequences of stroke were investigated in a mouse model with a one hour-occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. Results Thrombus formation was significantly decreased after endothelial injury by 1 mg/kg Revacept IV, compared to Fc only. 1 mg/kg Revacept IV applied in mice with ischemic stroke immediately before reperfusion significantly improved functional outcome, cerebral infarct size and edema compared to Fc only. Also treatment with 10 mg/kg rtPA was effective, and functional outcome was similar in both treatment groups. The combination of Revacept with rtPA leads to increased reperfusion compared to treatment with either agent alone. In contrast to rtPA, however, there were no signs of increased intracranial bleeding with Revacept. Both rtPA and Revacept improved survival after stroke compared to placebo treatment. Revacept and vWF bind to collagen and Revacept competitively prevented the binding of vWF to collagen. Conclusions Revacept reduces arterial thrombus formation, reduces cerebral infarct size and edema after ischemic stroke, improves functional and prognostic outcome without intracranial bleeding. Revacept not only prevents GPVI-mediated, but probably also vWF-mediated platelet adhesion and aggregate formation. Therefore Revacept might be a potent and safe tool to treat ischemic complications of stroke. PMID:23935828

  6. The TOBY Study. Whole body hypothermia for the treatment of perinatal asphyxial encephalopathy: A randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Azzopardi, Dennis; Brocklehurst, Peter; Edwards, David; Halliday, Henry; Levene, Malcolm; Thoresen, Marianne; Whitelaw, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Background A hypoxic-ischaemic insult occurring around the time of birth may result in an encephalopathic state characterised by the need for resuscitation at birth, neurological depression, seizures and electroencephalographic abnormalities. There is an increasing risk of death or neurodevelopmental abnormalities with more severe encephalopathy. Current management consists of maintaining physiological parameters within the normal range and treating seizures with anticonvulsants. Studies in adult and newborn animals have shown that a reduction of body temperature of 3–4°C after cerebral insults is associated with improved histological and behavioural outcome. Pilot studies in infants with encephalopathy of head cooling combined with mild whole body hypothermia and of moderate whole body cooling to 33.5°C have been reported. No complications were noted but the group sizes were too small to evaluate benefit. Methods/Design TOBY is a multi-centre, prospective, randomised study of term infants after perinatal asphyxia comparing those allocated to "intensive care plus total body cooling for 72 hours" with those allocated to "intensive care without cooling". Full-term infants will be randomised within 6 hours of birth to either a control group with the rectal temperature kept at 37 +/- 0.2°C or to whole body cooling, with rectal temperature kept at 33–34°C for 72 hours. Term infants showing signs of moderate or severe encephalopathy +/- seizures have their eligibility confirmed by cerebral function monitoring. Outcomes will be assessed at 18 months of age using neurological and neurodevelopmental testing methods. Sample size At least 236 infants would be needed to demonstrate a 30% reduction in the relative risk of mortality or serious disability at 18 months. Recruitment was ahead of target by seven months and approvals were obtained allowing recruitment to continue to the end of the planned recruitment phase. 325 infants were recruited. Primary outcome Combined

  7. Acute care of older patients in the emergency department: strategies to improve patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, John J; Kennelly, Sean P

    2015-01-01

    Older patients in the emergency department (ED) are a vulnerable population who are at a higher risk of functional decline and hospital reattendance subsequent to an ED visit, and have a high mortality rate in the months following an ED attendance. The delivery of acute care in a busy environment to this population presents its own unique challenge. The purpose of this review is to detail the common geriatric syndromes encountered in the ED as well as the appropriate strategies and instruments, which can be utilized to support the clinical decision matrix and improve outcomes. PMID:27147890

  8. Improving patient outcomes with better care transitions: the role for home health.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Michael O; Haney, Tara Trahan

    2013-01-01

    Patients, particularly the old and frail, are especially vulnerable at the time of hospital discharge. Fragmentation of care, characterized by miscommunications and lack of follow-up, can lead to oversights in diagnosis and management. The frequent result is avoidable rehospitalization. Amedisys, a home health and hospice organization, created and tested a care transitions initiative for its impact on patients' quality of life and avoidable rehospitalizations. The initiative was carried out in three academic institutions with 12 months of observation. The results suggested reduced hospital readmissions and a critical role for the home health industry in improving patient outcomes and reducing costs. PMID:23420797

  9. Anti-acrolein treatment improves behavioral outcome and alleviates myelin damage in EAE mouse

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Gary; Sun, Wenjing; Zheng, Lingxing; Brookes, Sarah; Tully, Melissa; Shi, Riyi

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered a major contributor in the pathology of multiple sclerosis (MS). Acrolein, a highly reactive aldehyde byproduct of lipid peroxidation, is thought to perpetuate oxidative stress. In this study, we aimed to determine the role of acrolein in an animal model of MS, experimental autoimmune enchephalomyelitis (EAE) mice. We have demonstrated a significant elevation of acrolein protein adduct levels in EAE mouse spinal cord. Hydralazine, a known acrolein scavenger, significantly improved behavioral outcomes and lessened myelin damage in spinal cord. We postulate that acrolein is an important pathological factor and likely a novel therapeutic target in MS. PMID:21081153

  10. Enhanced Recovery Pathway in Gynecologic Surgery: Improving Outcomes Through Evidence-Based Medicine.

    PubMed

    Kalogera, Eleftheria; Dowdy, Sean C

    2016-09-01

    A paucity of data exists regarding traditional perioperative practices (bowel preparation, NPO at midnight, liberal narcotics, PCA use, liberal fluids, prolonged bowel and bed rest). Enhanced Recovery after Surgery (ERAS) is an evidence-based approach to peri-operative care associated with improved outcomes including earlier return of gastrointestinal function, reduced opioid use, shorter hospital stay, and substantial cost reductions with stable complication and readmission rates. Basic principles include patient education, minimizing preoperative fasting, avoiding bowel preparation, preemptive analgesia, nausea/vomiting prophylaxis, perioperative euvolemia, no routine use of drain and nasogastric tubes, early mobilization, oral intake, and catheter removal, non-opioid analgesics, and preemptive laxatives. PMID:27521884

  11. Managing pregnancy in chronic kidney disease: improving outcomes for mother and baby.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Alyssa; Mohammadi, Fadak; Jesudason, Shilpanjali

    2016-01-01

    Parenthood is a central focus for women with chronic kidney disease, but raises important fears and uncertainties about risks to their own and their baby's health. Pregnancy in women with background kidney disease, women receiving dialysis, or those with a functioning kidney transplant poses a challenging clinical scenario, associated with high maternal-fetal morbidity and potential impact on maternal renal health. Improvements in care over recent decades have led to a paradigm shift with cautious optimism and growing interest regarding pregnancies in women with chronic kidney disease. In this review, we discuss obstetric and renal outcomes, and practical aspects of management of pregnancy in this complex cohort. PMID:27471410

  12. Using microfiber and steam technology to improve cleaning outcomes in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Elizabeth; Williams, Natalie; Sloane, Tracy; Wright, Louise; Kotsanas, Despina; Stuart, Rhonda L

    2015-02-01

    The use of microfiber and steam technology may be seen as a novel cleaning method that can improve the outcome of cleaning. We describe its use in an intensive care setting, its impact on vancomycin-resistant enterococci acquisition, and the importance of ensuring adequate education of cleaning staff. Such new methods can have a significant impact on the transmission of multidrug-resistant organisms, provided systems are in place to ensure that the methodology is adhered to and that cleaning hours are adequate. PMID:25637118

  13. Managing pregnancy in chronic kidney disease: improving outcomes for mother and baby

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Alyssa; Mohammadi, Fadak; Jesudason, Shilpanjali

    2016-01-01

    Parenthood is a central focus for women with chronic kidney disease, but raises important fears and uncertainties about risks to their own and their baby’s health. Pregnancy in women with background kidney disease, women receiving dialysis, or those with a functioning kidney transplant poses a challenging clinical scenario, associated with high maternal–fetal morbidity and potential impact on maternal renal health. Improvements in care over recent decades have led to a paradigm shift with cautious optimism and growing interest regarding pregnancies in women with chronic kidney disease. In this review, we discuss obstetric and renal outcomes, and practical aspects of management of pregnancy in this complex cohort. PMID:27471410

  14. Setting the vision: Applied patient reported outcomes and smart, connected digital healthcare systems to improve patient-centered outcomes prediction in critical illness

    PubMed Central

    Wysham, Nicholas G.; Abernethy, Amy P.; Cox, Christopher E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Prediction models in critical illness are generally limited to short-term mortality and uncommonly include patient-centered outcomes. Current outcome prediction tools are also insensitive to individual context or evolution in healthcare practice, potentially limiting their value over time. Improved prognostication of patient-centered outcomes in critical illness could enhance decision making quality in the ICU. Recent Findings Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) have emerged as precise methodological measures of patient-centered variables and have been successfully employed using diverse platforms and technologies, enhancing the value of research in critical illness survivorship and in direct patient care. The learning health system is an emerging ideal characterized by integration of multiple data sources into a smart and interconnected health information technology infrastructure with the goal of rapidly optimizing patient care. We propose a vision of a smart, interconnected learning health system with integrated electronic PROs (ePRO) to optimize patient-centered care including critical care outcome prediction. Summary A learning health system infrastructure integrating ePROs may aid in the management of critical illness associated conditions and yield tools to improve prognostication of patient-centered outcomes in critical illness. PMID:25159475

  15. A mnemonic for Parkinson disease patients considering DBS: a tool to improve perceived outcome of surgery.

    PubMed

    Okun, Michael S; Foote, Kelly D

    2004-09-01

    Patients considering deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson disease (PD) may be exposed to videotapes, media coverage, or literature which show dramatic improvements in PD symptoms after surgical intervention. Based on this information, patients may seek a medical center with expertise in DBS for an evaluation and assessment of their candidacy for surgery. If patients receive a device, they may be disappointed or despondent following surgery because of a failure to achieve a preconceived and unrealistic outcome. In order to address the important issue of patient misconception of potential outcome, we have introduced a simple mnemonic device. The device may be taught and then reviewed with patients and families both before and after surgery. Use of this mnemonic device may allow the patient and family the time necessary to alter the perception of perceived benefit. This education can help to ensure that outcome meets or exceeds expectation, and as a result they become a more satisfied and easy-to-manage DBS patient. PMID:15335446

  16. Tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes improve clinical outcome of therapy-resistant neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Mina, Marco; Boldrini, Renata; Citti, Arianna; Romania, Paolo; D'Alicandro, Valerio; De Ioris, Maretta; Castellano, Aurora; Furlanello, Cesare; Locatelli, Franco; Fruci, Doriana

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma grows within an intricate network of different cell types including epithelial, stromal and immune cells. The presence of tumor-infiltrating T cells is considered an important prognostic indicator in many cancers, but the role of these cells in neuroblastoma remains to be elucidated. Herein, we examined the relationship between the type, density and organization of infiltrating T cells and clinical outcome within a large collection of neuroblastoma samples by quantitative analysis of immunohistochemical staining. We found that infiltrating T cells have a prognostic value greater than, and independent of, the criteria currently used to stage neuroblastoma. A variable in situ structural organization and different concurrent infiltration of T-cell subsets were detected in tumors with various outcomes. Low-risk neuroblastomas were characterized by a higher number of proliferating T cells and a more structured T-cell organization, which was gradually lost in tumors with poor prognosis. We defined an immunoscore based on the presence of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ infiltrating T cells that associates with favorable clinical outcome in MYCN-amplified tumors, improving patient survival when combined with the v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene neuroblastoma derived homolog (MYCN) status. These findings support the hypothesis that infiltrating T cells influence the behavior of neuroblastoma and might be of clinical importance for the treatment of patients. PMID:26405592

  17. Patients with comorbidities: what shall we do to improve the outcome.

    PubMed

    Rossi, M; Iemma, D

    2009-05-01

    The number of patients submitted to major surgery affected by one or more comorbidities is progressively increasing. Outcome is the final output measured as morbidity, mortality and quality of life, of diagnostic tests, procedures, therapy tools started in the preoperative period and fitted on single patients or groups of patients or typology of surgical acts. Strategies to improve outcome can be divided in some fundamental steps: preoperative evaluation; optimization and no discontinuation of preoperative drug treatments, mainly in cardiac patient; choice of adequate monitoring techniques, checking of patient metabolic state and oxidative balance; choice of the best anesthesia; postoperative care, particularly due to identify the best management of the critical patient between the different levels of assistance. In conclusion, a patient with comorbidities scheduled for major surgery needs a full anesthetist-intensivist involvement, which broadens the role of the anesthetist in the perioperative medicine. Outcome is the result of many interventions during patient course, including economic costs and the importance of an appropriate treatment. PMID:19412152

  18. Impact of Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Interventions on Improving Health Outcomes among School Children

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Ashish

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. This review was done to explore the impact of water treatment, hygiene, and sanitary interventions on improving child health outcomes such as absenteeism, infections, knowledge, attitudes, and practices and adoption of point-of-use water treatment. Methods. A literature search was conducted using the databases PubMed and Google scholar for studies published between 2009 and 2012 and focusing on the effects of access to safe water, hand washing facilities, and hygiene education among school-age children. Studies included were those that documented the provision of water and sanitation in schools for children less than 18 years of age, interventions which assessed WASH practices, and English-language, full-text peer reviewed papers. Results. Fifteen studies were included in the final analysis. 73% (n = 11) of the studies were conducted in developing countries and were rural based (53%, n = 8). The child's age, gender, grade level, socioeconomic index, access to hygiene and sanitary facilities, and prior knowledge of hygiene practices were significantly associated with the outcomes. Nutrition practices which are key factors associated with the outcomes were rarely assessed. Conclusion. Further research is required to assess the long-term impact of such interventions in different settings. PMID:24454415

  19. Intrathecal Opioid-Induced Hypothermia Following Subarachnoid Block With Morphine Injection for Elective Cesarean Delivery: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mach, John; Van Havel, Teresa; Gadwood, John; Biegner, M Andrew

    2016-02-01

    Opioids have been administered intrathecally with subarachnoid block for postoperative pain relief in parturients undergoing elective cesarean deliveries. This case report presents the uncommon occurrence of intrathecal opioid-induced hypothermia in the latent phase of recovery following elective cesarean delivery. There are few case reports on the occurrence of latent-phase postanesthesia care hypothermia in patients receiving subarachnoid block with morphine sulfate injection (Duramorph). Hypothermia can occur postoperatively for many reasons and can be life-threatening. In this case, hypothermia developed and progressed throughout the postoperative period. The causes of hypothermia were evaluated and treated without success initially. Thyroid dysfunction and alternative differential diagnoses were ruled out. Further assessment determined that the morphine injection might have been a contributing factor. Naloxone at 40-μg increments was administered intravenously and corrected the hypothermia. Awareness of hypothermia postoperatively with associated morphine administration through subarachnoid block must be ruled out in cases of progressing hypothermia. PMID:26939385

  20. Spontaneous hypothermia in human sepsis is a transient, self-limiting, and nonterminal response.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Monique T; Rodrigues, Abner C; Cezar, Luana C; Fujita, Andre; Soriano, Francisco G; Steiner, Alexandre A

    2016-06-15

    Hypothermia in sepsis is generally perceived as something dysregulated and progressive although there has been no assessment on the natural course of this phenomenon in humans. This was the first study on the dynamics of hypothermia in septic patients not subjected to active rewarming, and the results were surprising. A sample of 50 subjects presenting with spontaneous hypothermia during sepsis was drawn from the 2005-2012 database of an academic hospital. Hypothermia was defined as body temperature below 36.0°C for longer than 2 h, with at least one reading of 35.5°C or less. The patients presented with 138 episodes of hypothermia, 21 at the time of the sepsis diagnosis and 117 with a later onset. However, hypothermia was uncommon in the final 12 h of life of the patients that succumbed. The majority (97.1%) of the hypothermic episodes were transient and self-limited; the median recovery time was 6 h; body temperature rarely fell below 34.0°C. Bidirectional oscillations in body temperature were evident in the course of hypothermia. Nearly half of the hypothermic episodes had onset in the absence of shock or respiratory distress, and the incidence of hypothermia was not increased during either of these conditions. Usage of antipyretic drugs, sedatives, neuroleptics, or other medications did not predict the onset of hypothermia. In conclusion, hypothermia appears to be a predominantly transient, self-limiting, and nonterminal phenomenon that is inherent to human sepsis. These characteristics resemble those of the regulated hypothermia shown to replace fever in animal models of severe systemic inflammation. PMID:26989218

  1. Connecting the Disconnected: Improving Education and Employment Outcomes among Disadvantaged Youth. Discussion Paper No. 1412-13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelman, Peter B.; Holzer, Harry J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we will briefly review recent trends in employment outcomes for disadvantaged youth, focusing specifically on those who have become "disconnected" from school and the labor market, and why these trends have occurred. We then review a range of policy prescriptions that might improve those outcomes. These policies include: 1)…

  2. Improved outcomes in the non-operative management of liver injuries

    PubMed Central

    Saltzherr, Teun Peter; van der Vlies, Cees H; van Lienden, Krijn P; Beenen, Ludo F M; Ponsen, Kees Jan; van Gulik, Thomas M; Goslings, J Carel

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Non-operative management has become the treatment of choice in the majority of liver injuries. The aim of this study was to assess the changes in primary treatment and outcomes in a single Dutch Level 1 trauma centre with wide experience in angio-embolisation (AE). Methods The prospective trauma registry was retrospectively analysed for 7-year periods before (Period 1) and after (Period 2) the introduction of AE. The primary outcome was the failure rate of primary treatment defined as liver injury-related death or re-bleeding requiring radiologic or operative (re)interventions. Secondary outcomes were liver injury-related intra-abdominal complications. Results Despite an increase in high-grade liver injuries, the incidence of primary non-operative management more than doubled over the two periods, from 33% (20 of 61 cases) in Period 1 to 72% (84 of 116 cases) in Period 2 (P < 0.001). The failure rate of primary treatment in Period 1 was 18% (11/61), compared with 11% (13/116) in Period 2 (P = 0.21). Complication rates were 23% (14/61) and 16% (18/116) in Periods 1 and 2, respectively (P = 0.22). Liver-related mortality rates were 10% (6/61) and 3% (4/116) in Periods 1 and 2, respectively (P = 0.095). The increase in the frequency of non-operative management was even higher in high-grade injuries, in which outcomes were improved. In high-grade injuries in Periods 1 and 2, failure rates decreased from 45% (9/20) to 20% (11/55) (P = 0.041), liver-related mortality decreased from 30% (6/20) to 7% (4/55) (P = 0.019) and complication rates fell from 60% (12/20) to 27% (15/55) (P = 0.014). Liver infarction or necrosis and abscess formation seemed to occur more frequently with AE. Conclusions Overall, liver-related mortality, treatment failure and complication rates remained constant despite an increase in non-operative management. However, in high-grade injuries outcomes improved after the introduction of AE. PMID:21492335

  3. Shared Treatment Decision Making Improves Adherence and Outcomes in Poorly Controlled Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sandra R.; Strub, Peg; Buist, A. Sonia; Knowles, Sarah B.; Lavori, Philip W.; Lapidus, Jodi; Vollmer, William M.

    2010-01-01

    significantly improves adherence to asthma pharmacotherapy and clinical outcomes. Clinical trials registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00217945 and NCT00149526). PMID:20019345

  4. The effects of therapeutic hypothermia on cerebral metabolism in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: An in vivo 1H-MR spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Wisnowski, Jessica L; Wu, Tai-Wei; Reitman, Aaron J; McLean, Claire; Friedlich, Philippe; Vanderbilt, Douglas; Ho, Eugenia; Nelson, Marvin D; Panigrahy, Ashok; Blüml, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has emerged as the first empirically supported therapy for neuroprotection in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). We used magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) to characterize the effects of hypothermia on energy metabolites, neurotransmitters, and antioxidants. Thirty-one neonates with HIE were studied during hypothermia and after rewarming. Metabolite concentrations (mmol/kg) were determined from the thalamus, basal ganglia, cortical grey matter, and cerebral white matter. In the thalamus, phosphocreatine concentrations were increased by 20% during hypothermia when compared to after rewarming (3.49 ± 0.88 vs. 2.90 ± 0.65, p < 0.001) while free creatine concentrations were reduced to a similar degree (3.00 ± 0.50 vs. 3.74 ± 0.85, p < 0.001). Glutamate (5.33 ± 0.82 vs. 6.32 ± 1.12, p < 0.001), aspartate (3.39 ± 0.66 vs. 3.87 ± 1.19, p < 0.05), and GABA (0.92 ± 0.36 vs. 1.19 ± 0.41, p < 0.05) were also reduced, while taurine (1.39 ± 0.52 vs. 0.79 ± 0.61, p < 0.001) and glutathione (2.23 ± 0.41 vs. 2.09 ± 0.33, p < 0.05) were increased. Similar patterns were observed in other brain regions. These findings support that hypothermia improves energy homeostasis by decreasing the availability of excitatory neurotransmitters, and thereby, cellular energy demand. PMID:26661180

  5. Beyond Necrotizing Enterocolitis Prevention: Improving Outcomes with an Exclusive Human Milk–Based Diet

    PubMed Central

    Peluso, Allison M.; Hawthorne, Keli M.; Perez, Jose; Smith, Denise P.; Khan, Janine Y.; O'Donnell, Andrea; Powers, Richard J.; Lee, Martin L.; Abrams, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to compare outcomes of infants pre and post initiation of a feeding protocol providing an exclusive human milk–based diet (HUM). Materials and Methods: In a multicenter retrospective cohort study, infants with a birth weight <1,250 g who received a bovine-based diet (BOV) of mother's own milk fortified with bovine fortifier and/or preterm formula were compared to infants who received a newly introduced HUM feeding protocol. Infants were excluded if they had major congenital anomalies or died in the first 12 hours of life. Data were collected 2–3 years prior to and after introduction of an exclusive HUM diet. Primary outcomes were necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and mortality. Secondary outcomes included late-onset sepsis, retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Results: A total of 1,587 infants were included from four centers in Texas, Illinois, Florida, and California. There were no differences in baseline demographics or growth of infants. The HUM group had significantly lower incidence of proven NEC (16.7% versus 6.9%, p < 0.00001), mortality (17.2% versus 13.6%, p = 0.04), late-onset sepsis (30.3% versus 19.0%, p < 0.00001), ROP (9% versus 5.2%, p = 0.003), and BPD (56.3% versus 47.7%, p = 0.0015) compared with the BOV group. Conclusions: Extremely premature infants who received an exclusive HUM diet had a significantly lower incidence of NEC and mortality. The HUM group also had a reduction in late-onset sepsis, BPD, and ROP. This multicenter study further emphasizes the many benefits of an exclusive HUM diet, and demonstrates multiple improved outcomes after implementation of such a feeding protocol. PMID:26789484

  6. Improving access to psychological therapies (IAPT) and treatment outcomes: epistemological assumptions and controversies.

    PubMed

    Williams, C H J

    2015-06-01

    Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) is recommended as a primary treatment choice in England, for anxiety and depression, by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). It has been argued that CBT has enjoyed political and cultural dominance and this has arguably led to maintained government investment in England for the cognitive and behavioural treatment of mental health problems. The government programme 'Improving Access to Psychological Therapies' (IAPT) aims to improve the availability of CBT. The criticism of the NICE evidence-based guidelines supporting the IAPT programme, has been the dominance of the gold standard randomized controlled trial methodology, with a focus on numerical outcome data, rather than a focus on a recovery narrative. RCT-based research is influenced by a philosophical paradigm called positivism. The IAPT culture is arguably influenced by one research paradigm and such an influence can skew services only towards numerical outcome data as the only truth of 'recovery'. An interpretative paradigm could assist in shaping service-based cultures, alter how services are evaluated and improve the richness of CBT research. This paper explores the theory of knowledge (epistemology) that underpins the evidence-based perspective of CBT and how this influences service delivery. The paper argues that the inclusion of service user narrative (qualitative data) can assist the evaluation of CBT from the user's perspective and can understand the context in which people live and how they access services. A qualitative perspective is discussed as a research strategy, capturing the lived experience of under-represented groups, such as sexual, gender and ethnic minorities. Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) has enjoyed political and cultural dominance within mental healthcare, with renewed government investment in England for the'Improving Access to Psychological Therapies' (IAPT) programme. The criticism of the evidence-based guidelines

  7. Improving patient outcomes following glaucoma surgery: state of the art and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Van Bergen, Tine; Van de Velde, Sarah; Vandewalle, Evelien; Moons, Lieve; Stalmans, Ingeborg

    2014-01-01

    Of all the treatments currently used to lower intraocular pressure in glaucoma patients, filtration surgery is known to be the most effective. However, in a significant percentage of cases, the constructed channel closes due to excessive scar formation, resulting in surgical failure. The process of postoperative wound healing is characterized by the coagulative and inflammatory phase, followed by the proliferative and repair phase, and finally the remodeling phase. Perioperative antimitotic agents, such as mitomycin C and 5-fluorouracil, are known to modulate the process of wound healing and to improve surgical outcome, but they carry a risk of vision-threatening complications. New alternative strategies to prevent filtration failure, such as inhibition of transforming growth factor-β, vascular endothelial growth factor, and placental growth factor, have shown promising results in the improvement of surgical success. However, it remains necessary to broaden the therapeutic approach by focusing on combined therapies and on extended drug delivery. PMID:24833892

  8. Potential approaches to improve the outcomes of donation after cardiac death liver grafts

    PubMed Central

    Mahboub, Paria; Bozorgzadeh, Adel; Martins, Paulo N

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing discrepancy between the supply and demand of livers for transplantation resulting in high mortality rates on the waiting list. One of the options to decrease the mortality on the waiting list is to optimize organs with inferior quality that otherwise would be discarded. Livers from donation after cardiac death (DCD) donors are frequently discarded because they are exposed to additional warm ischemia time, and this might lead to primary-non-function, delayed graft function, or severe biliary complications. In order to maximize the usage of DCD livers several new preservation approaches have been proposed. Here, we will review 3 innovative organ preservation methods: (1) different ex vivo perfusion techniques; (2) persufflation with oxygen; and (3) addition of thrombolytic therapy. Improvement of the quality of DCD liver grafts could increase the pool of liver graft’s for transplantation, improve the outcomes, and decrease the mortality on the waiting list. PMID:27358776

  9. Neurocognitive, Neuroprotective, and Cardiometabolic Effects of Raloxifene: Potential for Improving Therapeutic Outcomes in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad M

    2016-07-01

    Raloxifene is a selective estrogen receptor modulator that has been approved for treating osteoporosis and breast cancer in high-risk postmenopausal women. However, recent evidence suggests that raloxifene adjunct therapy improves cognition and reduces symptom severity in men and women with schizophrenia. In animal models, raloxifene increases forebrain neurogenesis and enhances working memory and synaptic plasticity. It may consequently repair the neuronal and synaptic connectivity that is disrupted in schizophrenia. It also reduces oxidative stress and neuroinflammation, which are potent etiological factors in the neuropathology of schizophrenia. Furthermore, in postmenopausal women, raloxifene reduces the risks for atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, and weight gain, which are serious adverse effects associated with long-term antipsychotic treatment in schizophrenia; therefore, it may improve the safety and efficacy of antipsychotic drugs. In this review, recent insights into the neurocognitive, neuroprotective, and cardiometabolic effects of raloxifene in relation to therapeutic outcomes in schizophrenia are discussed. PMID:27193386

  10. Improving Outcomes with Surgical Resection and Other Ablative Therapies in HCC

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Rahul; O'Reilly, Derek; Sherlock, David

    2011-01-01

    With rising incidence and emergence of effective treatment options, the management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a complex multidisciplinary process. There is still little consensus and uniformity about clinicopathological staging systems. Resection and liver transplantation have been the cornerstone of curative surgical treatments with recent emergence of ablative techniques. Improvements in diagnostics, surgical techniques, and postoperative care have lead to dramatically improved results over the years. The most appropriate treatment plan has to be individualised and depends on a variety of patient and tumour-related factors. Very small HCCs discovered on surveillance have the best outcomes. Patients with advanced cirrhosis and tumours within Milan criteria should be offered transplantation. Resection is best for small solitary tumours with preserved liver function. Ablative techniques are suitable for low volume tumours in patients unfit for either resection or transplantation. The role of downstaging and bridging therapy is not clearly established. PMID:21994867

  11. Do Stimulant Medications Improve Educational and Behavioral Outcomes for Children with ADHD?

    PubMed Central

    Currie, Janet; Stabile, Mark; Jones, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    We examine the effects of a policy change in the province of Quebec, Canada which greatly expanded insurance coverage for prescription medications. We show that the change was associated with a sharp increase in the use of stimulant medications commonly prescribed for ADHD in Quebec relative to the rest of Canada. We ask whether this increase in medication use was associated with improvements in emotional functioning or academic outcomes among children with ADHD. We find little evidence of improvement in either the medium or the long run. Our results are silent on the effects on optimal use of medication for ADHD, but suggest that expanding medication in a community setting had little positive benefit and may have had harmful effects given the average way these drugs are used in the community. PMID:24954077

  12. Potential approaches to improve the outcomes of donation after cardiac death liver grafts.

    PubMed

    Mahboub, Paria; Bozorgzadeh, Adel; Martins, Paulo N

    2016-06-24

    There is a growing discrepancy between the supply and demand of livers for transplantation resulting in high mortality rates on the waiting list. One of the options to decrease the mortality on the waiting list is to optimize organs with inferior quality that otherwise would be discarded. Livers from donation after cardiac death (DCD) donors are frequently discarded because they are exposed to additional warm ischemia time, and this might lead to primary-non-function, delayed graft function, or severe biliary complications. In order to maximize the usage of DCD livers several new preservation approaches have been proposed. Here, we will review 3 innovative organ preservation methods: (1) different ex vivo perfusion techniques; (2) persufflation with oxygen; and (3) addition of thrombolytic therapy. Improvement of the quality of DCD liver grafts could increase the pool of liver graft's for transplantation, improve the outcomes, and decrease the mortality on the waiting list. PMID:27358776

  13. Early Warning/Track-and-Trigger Systems to Detect Deterioration and Improve Outcomes in Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Shiloh, Ariel L; Lominadze, George; Gong, Michelle N; Savel, Richard H

    2016-02-01

    As a global effort toward improving patient safety, a specific area of focus has been the early recognition and rapid intervention in deteriorating ward patients. This focus on "failure to rescue" has led to the construction of early warning/track-and-trigger systems. In this review article, we present a description of the data behind the creation and implementation of such systems, including multiple algorithms and strategies for deployment. Additionally, the strengths and weaknesses of the various systems and their evaluation in the literature are emphasized. Despite the limitations of the current literature, the potential benefit of these early warning/track-and-trigger systems to improve patient outcomes remains significant. PMID:26820276

  14. Transient antiangiogenic treatment improves delivery of cytotoxic compounds and therapeutic outcome in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sampurna; Wieczorek, Caroline; Schöttle, Jakob; Siobal, Maike; Hinze, Yvonne; Franz, Thomas; Florin, Alexandra; Adamczak, Joanna; Heukamp, Lukas C; Neumaier, Bernd; Ullrich, Roland T

    2014-05-15

    Extensive oncologic experience argues that the most efficacious applications of antiangiogenic agents rely upon a combination with cytotoxic drugs. Yet there remains a lack of clarity about how to optimize scheduling for such drug combinations. Prudent antiangiogenic therapy might transiently normalize blood vessels to improve tumor oxygenation and drug exposure. Using [(15)O]H2O positron emission tomography imaging in a preclinical mouse model of non-small cell lung cancer, we observed that short-term treatment with the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor/platelet-derived growth factor receptor inhibitor PTK787 licensed a transient window of improved tumor blood flow. The improvement observed was associated with a reduced leakiness from tumor vessels, consistent with induction of a vascular normalization process. Initiation of a cytotoxic treatment in this window of tumor vessel normalization resulted in increased efficacy, as illustrated by improved outcomes of erlotinib administration after initial PTK787 treatment. Notably, intermittent PTK787 treatment also facilitated long-term tumor regression. In summary, our findings offer strong evidence that short-term antiangiogenic therapy can promote a transient vessel normalization process that improves the delivery and efficacy of a targeted cytotoxic drug. PMID:24675359

  15. Does a Quality Improvement Intervention for Anxiety Result in Differential Outcomes for Lower Income Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Greer; Sherbourne, Cathy; Chavira, Denise A.; Craske, Michelle G.; Gollineli, Daniela; Han, Xiaotong; Rose, Raphael D.; Bystritsky, Alexander; Stein, Murray B.; Roy-Byrne, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study examined the effects of a collaborative care intervention for anxiety disorders in primary care on lower income participants relative to those with higher incomes. The authors hypothesized that lower income patients might show less improvement or improve at a lower rate given that they experience greater economic stress over the treatment course. Alternatively, lower income patients could improve at a higher rate because the intervention facilitates access to evidence-based treatment, which typically is less available to persons with lower incomes. Method The authors compared baseline demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with lower (n=287) and higher (n=717) income using t-tests and chi-square tests for continuous and categorical variables respectively. For the longitudinal analysis of intervention effects by income group, the authors jointly modeled the outcomes at the four assessment times by study site; income; time; intervention; time and intervention; income and time; income and intervention; and time, intervention and income. Results Although lower-income participants were more ill and disabled at baseline than those in the higher income group, the two income groups were very similar in their clinical response. The lower income participants experienced a comparable degree of clinical improvement, despite receiving fewer treatment sessions, less relapse prevention, and less continuous care. Conclusions These findings contribute to the ongoing discussion as to whether or not, and to what extent, quality improvement interventions work equally well across income groups or require tailoring for specific vulnerable populations. PMID:23377641

  16. Maternity waiting facilities for improving maternal and neonatal outcome in low-resource countries

    PubMed Central

    van Lonkhuijzen, Luc; Stekelenburg, Jelle; van Roosmalen, Jos

    2014-01-01

    Background A maternity waiting home (MWH) is a facility within easy reach of a hospital or health centre which provides emergency obstetric care (EmOC). Women may stay in the MWH at the end of their pregnancy and await labour. Once labour starts, women move to the health facility so that labour and giving birth can be assisted by a skilled birth attendant. The aim of the MWH is to improve accessibility to skilled care and thus reduce morbidity and mortality for mother and neonate should complications arise. Some studies report a favourable effect on the outcomes for women and their newborns. Others show that utilisation is low and barriers exist. However, these data are limited in their reliability. Objectives To assess the effects of a maternity waiting facility on maternal and perinatal health. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (27 January 2012), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 4 of 4), MEDLINE (1966 to January 2012), EMBASE (1980 to January 2012), CINAHL (1982 to January 2012), African Journals Online (AJOL) (January 2012), POPLINE (January 2012), Dissertation Abstracts (January 2012) and reference lists of retrieved papers. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials including quasi-randomised and cluster-randomised trials that compared perinatal and maternal outcome in women using a MWH and women who did not. Data collection and analysis There were no randomised controlled trials or cluster-randomised trials identified from the search. Main results There were no randomised controlled trials or cluster-randomised trials identified from the search. Authors’ conclusions There is insufficient evidence to determine the effectiveness of maternity waiting facilities for improving maternal and neonatal outcomes. PMID:23076927

  17. Thrice-weekly nocturnal hemodialysis: the overlooked alternative to improve patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chazot, Charles; Ok, Ercan; Lacson, Eduardo; Kerr, Peter G; Jean, Guillaume; Misra, Madhukar

    2013-10-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) therapy for patients suffering from end-stage renal disease (ESRD) has been a major breakthrough in medicine during the twentieth century. Empirically, the conventional treatment is prescribed as 3-4.5 h of dialysis, three times a week. However, this prescription is being questioned because of poor patient outcomes including a persistently high death rate. Over the past 30 years, K(t)/V(urea) has been recognized as the predominant marker of dialysis adequacy. However, other important markers of 'adequate' dialysis are increasingly being recognized, including fluid and phosphate balance, and middle molecule removal. Conventional HD therapy, as it exists today, is limited in its scope to make a significant impact on these markers. Consequently, there is an active debate on novel HD strategies to improve patient outcomes. Recently, two randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have highlighted potential benefits for patients with two such strategies, short or long nocturnal daily dialysis. These two trials did, however, highlight the difficulty in recruiting patients for such studies. A higher rate of blood access-related complications was also reported. Such novel strategies are also limited in their application by a higher economic burden and logistical difficulties. On the other hand, the thrice-weekly nocturnal HD prescription has been associated with excellent clinical results in observational reports published over recent years. Several non-randomized controlled studies support the clinical benefits of this approach. This prescription may overcome the limitations of daily dialysis and offer a potential for improving patient outcomes on HD. Even if the methodology of the latter studies may not be optimal, we underscore the point that this alternative dialysis prescription should be included in the current debate of novel dialysis strategies. PMID:23595292

  18. Improvement of debate competence: an outcome of an introductory course for medical humanities

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Kyung Hee; Lee, Young Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Academic debate is an effective method to enhance the competences of critical thinking, problem solving, communication skills and cooperation skills. The present study examined the improvement of debate competence which is an outcome of debate-based flipped learning. Methods: A questionnaire was administrated to second-year premedical school students at Yeungnam University. In total 45 students participated in the survey. The survey questionnaire was composed of 60 items of eight subfactors on debate competence. To investigate the homogeneous of low and high achievement groups, 18 items on empathy and 75 items on critical thinking scales were used. To compare the pretest with posttest scores, data was analyzed using paired sample t-test. Results: There were no significant differences between low and high achievement groups by average grade at the beginning of the semester. There was a significant improvement in high achievers on the logical argumentation (p<0.001), proficiency in inquiry (p<0.01), active participation (p<0.001), ability to investigate and analyze (p<0.001), observance of debate rules (p<0.05), and acceptability (p<0.05). Even in low achievers, active participation (p<0.05) and ability to investigate and analyze (p<0.01) were significantly improved. Conclusion: Results showed that students could improve their debate competence by the debate-based flipped learning. A prospective and comparative study on the communication and teamwork competences needs to be conducted in the future. It is suggested that in-depth discussion for the curriculum design and teaching will be needed in terms of the effectiveness and the outcomes of the medical humanities. PMID:26838572

  19. Reducing postpartum weight retention and improving breastfeeding outcomes in overweight women: a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Martin, Julia; MacDonald-Wicks, Lesley; Hure, Alexis; Smith, Roger; Collins, Clare E

    2015-03-01

    Overweight and obesity is prevalent among women of reproductive age (42% BMI > 25 kg/m2) and parity is associated with risk of weight gain. Weight gain greater than that recommended by the Institute of Medicine (IOM )is also associated with lower rates of breastfeeding initiation and duration in women. The aim of this pilot randomised controlled trial is to examine the feasibility of recruiting and maintaining a cohort of pregnant women with the view of reducing postpartum weight retention and improving breastfeeding outcomes. Women (BMI of 25-35 kg/m2 (n = 36)) were recruited from the John Hunter Hospital antenatal clinic in New South Wales, Australia. Participants were stratified by BMI and randomised to one of three groups with follow-up to six months postpartum. Women received a dietary intervention with or without breastfeeding support from a lactation consultant, or were assigned to a wait-list control group where the dietary intervention was issued at three months postpartum. Feasibility and acceptability was assessed by participation rates and questionnaire. Analysis of variance and covariance was conducted to determine any differences between groups. Sixty-nine per cent of the participants were still enrolled at six months postpartum. This pilot demonstrated some difficulties in recruiting women from antenatal clinics and retaining them in the trial. Although underpowered; the results on weight; biomarkers and breastfeeding outcomes indicated improved metabolic health. PMID:25723973

  20. Does fiscal decentralization improve health outcomes? Evidence from infant mortality in Italy.

    PubMed

    Cavalieri, Marina; Ferrante, Livio

    2016-09-01

    Despite financial and decision-making responsibilities having been increasingly devolved to lower levels of government worldwide, the potential impact of these reforms remains largely controversial. This paper investigates the hypothesis that a shift towards a higher degree of fiscal autonomy of sub-national governments could improve health outcomes, as measured by infant mortality rates. Italy is used as a case study since responsibilities for healthcare have been decentralized to regions, though the central government still retains a key role in ensuring all citizens uniform access to health services throughout the country. A linear fixed-effects regression model with robust standard errors is employed for a panel of 20 regions over the period 1996-2012 (340 observations in the full sample). Decentralization is proxied by two different indicators, capturing the degree of decision-making autonomy in the allocation of tax revenues and the extent to which regions rely on fiscal transfers from the central government. The results show that a higher proportion of tax revenues raised and/or controlled locally as well as a lower transfer dependency from the central government are consistently associated with lower infant mortality rates, ceteris paribus. The marginal benefit from fiscal decentralization, however, is not constant but depends on the level of regional wealth, favouring poorest regions. In terms of policy implications, this study outlines how the effectiveness of decentralization in improving health outcomes is contingent on the characteristics of the context in which the process takes place. PMID:27475054

  1. Interferon alpha 2b as maintenance therapy improves outcome in follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Avilés, Agustin; Neri, Natividad; Huerta-Guzmán, Judith; Pérez, Felipe; Sotelo, León

    2004-11-01

    The role of interferon alpha as maintenance therapy in follicular lymphoma (FL) remains unsolved. We started a controlled clinical trial to assess if interferon alpha 2b could improve outcome, measured with event free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with FL in complete remission after chemotherapy based anthracyclines and adjuvant radiotherapy to sites of initial bulky disease. Three hundred and eighty four patients in complete response after 6 cycles of CEOP-Bleo (cyclophosphamide, epirubicin, vincristine, prednisone and bleomycin, at standard doses), and adjuvant radiotherapy when necessary, were randomized to received Interferon alpha 2b, three times a week for 1 year or no treatment (control group). Median follow up was 9.8 years (range 7.0-15 years); actuarial curves showed that EFS was 64% (95% confidence interval (CI) 56-71%) in patients treated with interferon that was statistically significant to patients in the control group: 35% (95% CI: 28-43%) (p<.01). OS was also statistically significant: 81% in patients treated with interferon (95% CI: 74-93%) and 57% (95% CI: 50-63%) in the control group (p<.001). Toxicity was mild, all patients received the planned dose of interferon on time. The use of aggressive chemotherapy and maintenance therapy with interferon alpha 2b in follicular lymphoma improved outcome; more than 60% of patients remain alive free of disease at longer follow-up. PMID:15512813

  2. Improving Patient Outcomes: Effectively Training Healthcare Staff in Psychological Practice Skills: A Mixed Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Garzonis, Katherine; Mann, Eryn; Wyrzykowska, Aleksandra; Kanellakis, Pavlo

    2015-01-01

    Training is an important part of modern European healthcare services and is often cited as a way to improve care quality. To date, various training methods have been used to impart skills relevant to psychological practice in a variety of mental health professionals. However, patient outcomes are rarely used in evaluating the effectiveness of the different training methods used, making it difficult to assess true utility. In the present review, we consider methods of training that can effectively impact trainee and patient outcomes. To do so, PubMed, PsycNET, Scopus, CENTRAL and ERIC were searched for studies on training of healthcare staff in psychological practice approaches. In total, 24 studies were identified (16 quantitative and 8 qualitative). For the most part, group, individual, and web-based training was used. A variety of health professionals were trained in skills including ‘communication’, ‘diagnosis’, and ‘referral’ to name but a few. In the majority of studies staff skill level improved. These findings hold implications for the design, implementation, and evaluation of training for mental healthcare staff. PMID:27247676

  3. Can developing countries achieve adequate improvements in child health outcomes without engaging the private sector?

    PubMed Central

    Bustreo, Flavia; Harding, April; Axelsson, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    The private sector exerts a significant and critical influence on child health outcomes in developing countries, including the health of poor children. This article reviews the available evidence on private sector utilization and quality of care. It provides a framework for analysing the private sector's influence on child health outcomes. This influence goes beyond service provision by private providers and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). Pharmacies, drug sellers, private suppliers, and food producers also have an impact on the health of children. Many governments are experimenting with strategies to engage the private sector to improve child health. The article analyses some of the most promising strategies, and suggests that a number of constraints make it hard for policy-makers to emulate these approaches. Few experiences are clearly described, monitored, and evaluated. The article suggests that improving the impact of child health programmes in developing countries requires a more systematic analysis of how to engage the private sector most effectively. The starting point should include the evaluation of the presence and potential of the private sector, including actors such as professional associations, producer organizations, community groups, and patients' organizations. PMID:14997241

  4. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Sinonasal Cancer: Improved Outcome Compared to Conventional Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dirix, Piet; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Jorissen, Mark; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Nuyts, Sandra

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical outcome and toxicity of postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2008, 40 patients with cancer of the paranasal sinuses (n = 34) or nasal cavity (n = 6) received postoperative IMRT to a dose of 60 Gy (n = 21) or 66 Gy (n = 19). Treatment outcome and toxicity were retrospectively compared with that of a previous patient group (n = 41) who were also postoperatively treated to the same doses but with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy without intensity modulation, from 1992 to 2002. Results: Median follow-up was 30 months (range, 4-74 months). Two-year local control, overall survival, and disease-free survival were 76%, 89%, and 72%, respectively. Compared to the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy treatment, IMRT resulted in significantly improved disease-free survival (60% vs. 72%; p = 0.02). No grade 3 or 4 toxicity was reported in the IMRT group, either acute or chronic. The use of IMRT significantly reduced the incidence of acute as well as late side effects, especially regarding skin toxicity, mucositis, xerostomia, and dry-eye syndrome. Conclusions: Postoperative IMRT for sinonasal cancer significantly improves disease-free survival and reduces acute as well as late toxicity. Consequently, IMRT should be considered the standard treatment modality for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses.

  5. PEGylated liposomal vancomycin: a glimmer of hope for improving treatment outcomes in MRSA pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Pumerantz, Andrew S

    2012-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) plays a significant role in the pandemic of multidrug resistant bacterial infections and is a major cause of hospital-acquired pneumonia. MRSA pneumonia carries a high morbidity and mortality rate especially in elderly diabetics with chronic kidney disease. S. aureus is highly virulent and successful respiratory pathogen. Vancomycin and linezolid are the only two antimicrobial agents FDA-approved to treat MRSA pneumonia. Standard vancomycin dosing is associated with high clinical failure rates and higher dosages are associated with increased nephrotoxicity. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic limitations are major contributors to poor outcomes with vancomycin. New agents are needed to improve treatment outcomes with MRSA pneumonia. Recently released antimicrobials with in vitro activity are not FDA-approved for treating MRSA pneumonia. Other novel agents are being investigated though none are in late-stage development. Pharmaceutical industry perception of low returns on investment, a Sisyphean regulatory environment, and obstacles to patentability have contributed to declining interest in both the development of novel antibiotics and the improvement of existing generic formulations. Despite decades of investigation into liposomal encapsulation as a drug delivery system that would increase efficacy and decrease toxicity, only liposomal amphotericin B and doxorubicin are commercially available. In this article, the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of a novel PEGylated liposomal vancomycin formulation along with passive targeting and the enhanced permeability and retention effect of liposomal drug delivery; the pathogenesis of MRSA pneumonia; and recent patents of novel anti-MRSA agents, including inhalational liposomal vancomycin, are reviewed. PMID:22742394

  6. Using Dynamic Risk to Enhance Conditional Release Decisions in Prisoners to Improve Their Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Serin, Ralph C; Gobeil, Renée; Lloyd, Caleb D; Chadwick, Nick; Wardrop, Kaitlyn; Hanby, Laura

    2016-03-01

    Advances in criminal risk assessment have increased sufficiently that inclusion of valid risk measures to anchor assessments is considered a best practice in release decision-making and community supervision by many paroling authorities and probation agencies. This article highlights how decision accuracy at several key stages of the offender's release and supervision process could be further enhanced by the inclusion of dynamic factors. In cases where the timing of release is discretionary and not legislated, the utilization of a validated decision framework can improve transparency and potentially reduce decision errors. In cases where release is by statute, there is still merit in using dynamic risk assessment and case analysis to inform the assignment of release conditions, thereby attending to re-entry and public safety considerations. Finally, preliminary results from a recent study are presented to highlight the fact that community supervision outcomes may be improved by incorporating changes in dynamic risk into case planning and risk management, although this work requires replication with larger populations reflecting diverse groups of offenders. Nonetheless, these decision strategies have implications for both resource allocation and client outcomes, as outlined here. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26992091

  7. Integrating Surgery Into Treatment Paradigms for Organ Preservation: Tailoring Treatment to Biology Improves Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Gregory T.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was introduced into treatment paradigms for curable head and neck cancer in the early 1970s in an effort to reduce the magnitude of mutilating surgery and to provide a rationale for adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in patients who responded to initial chemotherapy. The large number of trials that followed failed to demonstrate improved survival when neoadjuvant chemotherapy was added to conventional surgery or radiation. Importantly, a consistent observation in these neoadjuvant trials was the significant association of clinical tumor response to neoadjuvant therapy and favorable prognosis. Results: The findings led to development of a new treatment paradigm that was based on the hypothesis that the biology of an individual cancer is more predictive of response to specific therapy and overall outcome than is anatomic tumor site or extent, and on the corollary that matching treatment modality to biology will improve overall survival rates. Conclusions: This report identifies key findings that are important in the design and analysis of organ preservation trials and biologic markers predictive of response and outcomes. Ongoing studies incorporating biomarkers such as p53, Bcl-xL, HPV, EGFR, COX-2, and tumor promoter gene methylation are underway and will identify new targets for molecular manipulation, response monitoring, and tumor imaging that could allow real-time changes in how we integrate the various components of multi-modal therapy.

  8. Adjunctive rifampicin may improve outcomes in Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Russell, Clark D; Lawson McLean, Aaron; Saunders, Christopher; Laurenson, Ian F

    2014-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. By surviving within leukocytes, S. aureus can evade both immunological defences and antimicrobial drugs, thus facilitating haematogenous dissemination. We performed a systematic review to determine whether antimicrobials with intracellular activity improve outcomes in SAB when used as an adjunct to β-lactam or glycopeptide monotherapy. The Pubmed/MEDLINE, Embase and Cochrane databases were systematically searched for eligible studies that reported on the use of first-line antimicrobials plus a single additional antimicrobial of interest in patients with SAB (any cause). Six relevant studies were identified, all reporting on rifampicin use. Four studies (three randomized controlled trials and one cohort) reported on adults with SAB, including 54 patients treated with adjunctive rifampicin and 44 standard-therapy controls. Estimated across all of these studies, adjunctive rifampicin was associated with trends towards reduced all-cause mortality and reduced clinical or bacteriological failure. The fifth study indicated that adjunctive rifampicin accelerates the resolution of persistent SAB in neonates. Data from the sixth study were considered flawed owing to differences in co-morbidities between groups. Limited data suggest that rifampicin-induced hepatitis is not clinically significant but that drug interactions are. In conclusion, adjunctive rifampicin may improve outcomes in SAB when used as an adjunct to β-lactam or glycopeptide monotherapy. PMID:24623637

  9. The importance of cold-reactive autoantibodies in an asphyxiated infant before therapeutic hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Beken, Serdar; Altuntaş, Nilgün; Koç, Esin; Yenicesu, Idil; Ergenekon, Ebru; Hirfanoğlu, Ibrahim Murat; Onal, Esra; Türkyilmaz, Canan; Atalay, Yildiz

    2013-11-01

    Perinatal asphyxia is an important cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Hypothermia is an effective treatment of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy in infants. Cold agglutination is a primary or acquired autoimmune disease that involves autoantibodies that lead to hemagglutination at low temperatures lower than that of the body. In this case the importance of cold agglutinins during therapeutic hypothermia is presented. PMID:23271311

  10. Hypothermia inhibits the propagation of acute ischemic injury by inhibiting HMGB1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Ho; Yoon, Eun Jang; Seo, Jeho; Kavoussi, Adriana; Chung, Yong Eun; Chung, Sung Phil; Park, Incheol; Kim, Chul Hoon; You, Je Sung

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke causes significant chronic disability worldwide. We designed this study to clarify the mechanism by which hypothermia helps alleviate acute ischemic stroke. In a middle cerebral artery occlusion model (4 h ischemia without reperfusion), hypothermia effectively reduces mean infarct volume. Hypothermia also prevents neurons in the infarct area from releasing high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), the most well-studied damage-associated molecular pattern protein. By preventing its release, hypothermia also prevents the typical middle cerebral artery occlusion-induced increase in serum HMGB1. We also found that both glycyrrhizin-mediated inhibition of HMGB1 and intracerebroventricular neutralizing antibody treatments before middle cerebral artery occlusion onset diminish infarct volume. This suggests a clear neuroprotective effect of HMGB1 inhibition by hypothermia in the brain. We next used real-time polymerase chain reaction to measure the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in peri-infarct regions. Although middle cerebral artery occlusion increases the expression of interleukin-1β and tissue necrosis factor-α, this elevation is suppressed by both hypothermia and glycyrrhizin treatment. We show that hypothermia reduces the production of inflammatory cytokines and helps salvage peri-infarct regions from the propagation of ischemic injury via HMGB1 blockade. In addition to suggesting a potential mechanism for hypothermia's therapeutic effects, our results suggest HMGB1 modulation may lengthen the therapeutic window for stroke treatments. PMID:27544687

  11. Regional analgesia for improvement of long-term functional outcome after elective large joint replacement

    PubMed Central

    Atchabahian, Arthur; Schwartz, Gary; Hall, Charles B; Lajam, Claudette M; Andreae, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    Background Regional analgesia is more effective than conventional analgesia for controlling pain and may facilitate rehabilitation after large joint replacement in the short term. It remains unclear if regional anaesthesia improves functional outcomes after joint replacement beyond three months after surgery. Objectives To assess the effects of regional anaesthesia and analgesia on long-term functional outcomes 3, 6 and 12 months after elective major joint (knee, shoulder and hip) replacement surgery. Search methods We performed an electronic search of several databases (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL), and handsearched reference lists and conference abstracts. We updated our search in June 2015. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing regional analgesia versus conventional analgesia in patients undergoing total shoulder, hip or knee replacement. We included studies that reported a functional outcome with a follow-up of at least three months after surgery. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We contacted study authors for additional information. Main results We included six studies with 350 participants followed for at least three months. All of these studies enrolled participants undergoing total knee replacement. Studies were at least partially blinded. Three studies had a high risk of performance bias and one a high risk of attrition bias, but the risk of bias was otherwise unclear or low. Only one study assessed joint function using a global score. Due to heterogeneity in outcome and reporting, we could only pool three out of six RCTs, with range of motion assessed at three months after surgery used as a surrogate for joint function. All studies had a high risk of detection bias. Using the random-effects model, there was no statistically significant difference between the experimental and control groups (mean difference 3.99 degrees, 95% confidence interval (CI)

  12. Can Comprehensive Chromosome Screening Technology Improve IVF/ICSI Outcomes? A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Song

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine whether comprehensive chromosome screening (CCS) for preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) has an effect on improving in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF/ICSI) outcomes compared to traditional morphological methods. Methods A literature search was conducted in PubMed, EMBASE, CNKI and ClinicalTrials.gov up to May 2015. Two reviewers independently evaluated titles and abstracts, extracted data and assessed quality. We included studies that compared the IVF/ICSI outcomes of CCS-based embryo selection with those of the traditional morphological method. Relative risk (RR) values with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated in RevMan 5.3, and subgroup analysis and Begg’s test were used to assess heterogeneity and potential publication bias, respectively. Results Four RCTs and seven cohort studies were included. A meta-analysis of the outcomes showed that compared to morphological criteria, euploid embryos identified by CCS were more likely to be successfully implanted (RCT RR 1.32, 95% CI 1.18–1.47; cohort study RR 1.74, 95% CI 1.35–2.24). CCS-based PGS was also related to an increased clinical pregnancy rate (RCT RR 1.26, 95% CI 0.83–1.93; cohort study RR 1.48, 95% CI 1.20–1.83), an increased ongoing pregnancy rate (RCT RR 1.31, 95% CI 0.64–2.66; cohort study RR 1.61, 95% CI 1.30–2.00), and an increased live birth