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Sample records for hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase

  1. Molecular and clonal analysis of in vivo hprt (hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase) mutations in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Albertini, R.J.; O'Neill, J.P.; Nicklas, J.A.; Allegretta, M. . Genetics Lab.); Recio, L.; Skopek, T.R. )

    1989-08-08

    There is no longer doubt that gene mutations occur in vivo in human somatic cells, and that methods can be developed to detect, quantify and study them. Four assays are now available for such purpose; two detecting mutations that arise in bone marrow erythroid stem cells and two defining mutations that occur in T-lymphocytes. The red cell assays measure changes in mature red blood cells that involve either the blood group glycophorin-A locus or the hemoglobin loci; the lymphocyte assays score for genetic events at either the X-chromosomal hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (hprt) locus. We describe here our attempts in studying in vivo gene mutations in human T-lymphocytes. 35 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Plasma Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase Activity in Bottlenose Dolphins Contributes to Avoiding Accumulation of Non-recyclable Purines.

    PubMed

    López-Cruz, Roberto I; Crocker, Daniel E; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal, Jaime A; Real-Valle, Roberto A; Lugo-Lugo, Orlando; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Marine mammals are exposed to ischemia/reperfusion and hypoxia/reoxygenation during diving. During oxygen deprivation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) breakdown implies purine metabolite accumulation, which in humans is associated with pathological conditions. Purine recycling in seals increases in response to prolonged fasting and ischemia. Concentrations of metabolites and activities of key enzymes in purine metabolism were examined in plasma and red blood cells from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and humans. Hypoxanthine and inosine monophosphate concentrations were higher in plasma from dolphins than humans. Plasma hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) activity in dolphins suggests an elevated purine recycling rate, and a mechanism for avoiding accumulation of non-recyclable purines (xanthine and uric acid). Red blood cell concentrations of hypoxanthine, adenosine diphosphate, ATP and guanosine triphosphate were lower in dolphins than in humans; adenosine monophosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations were higher in dolphins. HGPRT activity in red blood cells was higher in humans than in dolphins. The lower concentrations of purine catabolism and recycling by-products in plasma from dolphins could be beneficial in providing substrates for recovery of ATP depleted during diving or vigorous swimming. These results suggest that purine salvage in dolphins could be a mechanism for delivering nucleotide precursors to tissues with high ATP and guanosine triphosphate requirements. PMID:27375492

  3. Plasma Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase Activity in Bottlenose Dolphins Contributes to Avoiding Accumulation of Non-recyclable Purines

    PubMed Central

    López-Cruz, Roberto I.; Crocker, Daniel E.; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal, Jaime A.; Real-Valle, Roberto A.; Lugo-Lugo, Orlando; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Marine mammals are exposed to ischemia/reperfusion and hypoxia/reoxygenation during diving. During oxygen deprivation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) breakdown implies purine metabolite accumulation, which in humans is associated with pathological conditions. Purine recycling in seals increases in response to prolonged fasting and ischemia. Concentrations of metabolites and activities of key enzymes in purine metabolism were examined in plasma and red blood cells from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and humans. Hypoxanthine and inosine monophosphate concentrations were higher in plasma from dolphins than humans. Plasma hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) activity in dolphins suggests an elevated purine recycling rate, and a mechanism for avoiding accumulation of non-recyclable purines (xanthine and uric acid). Red blood cell concentrations of hypoxanthine, adenosine diphosphate, ATP and guanosine triphosphate were lower in dolphins than in humans; adenosine monophosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations were higher in dolphins. HGPRT activity in red blood cells was higher in humans than in dolphins. The lower concentrations of purine catabolism and recycling by-products in plasma from dolphins could be beneficial in providing substrates for recovery of ATP depleted during diving or vigorous swimming. These results suggest that purine salvage in dolphins could be a mechanism for delivering nucleotide precursors to tissues with high ATP and guanosine triphosphate requirements. PMID:27375492

  4. Radioprotector WR1065 reduces radiation-induced mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus in V79 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J.; Hill, C.K.; Peraino, C. ); Biserka, N. ); Wells, R.L. . Dept. of Radiology and Radiation Biology)

    1985-06-01

    N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane (WR1065) protects against radiation-induced cell killing and mutagenesis at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus in V79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cells. WR1065 (4 mm) was found to be effective in protecting against radiation-induced cell lethality only if present during irradiation. No protective effect was observed if the protector was added within 5 min after irradiation or 3 h later. The effect of WR1065 on radiation-induced mutation, expressed as resistance to the cytotoxic purine analogue 6-thioguanine (HGPRT), was also investigated. This agent was effective in reducing radiation-induced mutations regardless of when it was administered. Following 10 Gy of /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays, the mutation frequencies observed per 10/sup 6/ survivors were 77 +- 8, 27 +- 6, 42 +- 7, and 42 +- 7 for radiation only, and WR1065 present during, immediately after, or 3 h after irradiation. These data suggest that although a segment of radiation-induced damage leading to reproductive death cannot be modulated through the postirradiation action of WR1065, processes leading to the fixation of gross genetic damage and mutation induction in surviving cells can be effectively altered and interfered with leading to a marked reduction in mutation frequency.

  5. Quantifaction of mutagens at the Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-ATPase and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) gene loci in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, A.P.

    1982-01-01

    The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell/hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) mutagen assay developed by Hsie et al., was simplified by culturing the cells as unattached cultures, and also modified to include mutation at the Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ ATPase (ouabain resistance) gene locus. The cost and time involved were decreased by culturing the CHO cells unattached on nontissue culture plates during the expression period. The inclusion of a second gene locus ensures that mutagenicities observed were not due to the peculiar properties of a specific gene locus. These procedures are now used in our laboratory for routine testing of environmental chemicals and complex mixtures.

  6. Assay of SF/sub 6/ and spark-decomposed SF/sub 6/ for mutagenic activity in the CHO/HGPRT (Chinese hamster ovary/hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase) mammalian cell system

    SciTech Connect

    Kurka, K.; Griffin, G.D.

    1987-01-01

    The potential mutagenic (and cytotoxic) activity of SF/sub 6/ and spark-decomposed SF/sub 6/ was investigated in an in vitro mammalian cell culture system using Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. The CHO cells were exposed to the gases in vacutainer tubes which were constantly rotated. After a 4 h exposure the mutagenic and cytotoxic activity was assayed with the CHO/hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (CHO/HGPRT) system. Results indicated that SF/sub 6/ was neither cytotoxic nor mutagenic to CHO cells. Spark-decomposed SF/sub 6/ was found to be strongly cytotoxic (-80% cell death following 4 h exposure to 2 kJ spark discharge in 60 cm/sup 3/ at 1000 torr of SF/sub 6/) but not mutagenic. Increasing spark energy increased cytotoxicity but the spark samples remained nonmutagenic. The CHO/HGPRT system was coupled with a metabolic activation (S9 fraction) system used for detecting promutagens. When exposures were carried out in the presence of S9 fraction, SF/sub 6/ was still neither cytotoxic nor mutagenic; spark-decomposed SF/sub 6/ was again strongly cytotoxic but not mutagenic. It appears that SF/sub 6/ and sparked SF/sub 6/ are neither promutagens nor direct acting mutagens in the CHO/HGPRT system. Studies have begun using a more mutagenically sensitive subclone of the CHO cells known as CHO-AS/sub 52/. The results of initial experiments using the CHO-AS/sub 52/ cells remain unchanged. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Determination of Activity of the Enzymes Hypoxanthine Phosphoribosyl Transferase (HPRT) and Adenine Phosphoribosyl Transferase (APRT) in Blood Spots on Filter Paper.

    PubMed

    Auler, Kasie; Broock, Robyn; Nyhan, William L

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) deficiency is the cause of Lesch-Nyhan disease. Adenine phosphoribosyl-transferase (APRT) deficiency causes renal calculi. The activity of each enzyme is readily determined on spots of whole blood on filter paper. This unit describes a method for detecting deficiencies of HPRT and APRT. PMID:26132002

  8. Hydrophilic-interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric determination of erythrocyte 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate in patients with hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Shinohara, Yoshihiko; Nozaki, Sayako; Nakamura, Makiko; Oh, Koei; Namiki, Osamu; Suzuki, Kiyotaka; Nakahara, Akihiko; Miyazawa, Mari; Ishikawa, Ken; Himeno, Takahiro; Yoshida, Sayaka; Ueda, Takanori; Yamada, Yasukazu; Ichida, Kimiyoshi

    2015-01-22

    Mutations in the gene encoding hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) cause Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) and its variants (LNV). Due to the technical problems for measuring the HPRT activity in vitro, discordances between the residual HPRT activity and the clinical severity were found. 5-Phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) is a substrate for HPRT. Since increased PRPP concentrations were observed in erythrocytes from patients with LND and LNV, we have turned our attention to erythrocyte PRPP as a biomarker for the phenotype classification. In the present work, a method for determination of PRPP concentration in erythrocyte was developed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). Packed erythrocyte samples were deproteinized by heating and the supernatants were injected into the LC-MS/MS system. All measurement results showed good precision with RSD <6%. PRPP concentrations of nine normal male subjects, four male patents with LND and six male patients with LNV were compared. The PRPP concentrations in erythrocyte from patients with LND were markedly increased compared with those from normal subjects, and those from patients with LNV were also increased but the degree was smaller than those with LND. The increase pattern of PRPP concentration in erythrocyte from patients with HPRT deficiency was consistent with the respective phenotypes and was correlated with the disease severity. PRPP concentration was suggested to give us supportive information for the diagnosis and the phenotype classification of LND and LNV. PMID:25482009

  9. INDUCTION OF MUTATIONS BY CHEMICAL AGENTS AT THE HYPOXANTHINE-GUANINE PHOSPHORIBOSYL TRANSFERASE LOCUS IN HUMAN EPITHELIAL TERATOMA CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induction of 6-thioguanine (TG) resistance by chemical mutagens was examined in a line of cells derived from a human epithelial teratocarcinoma cell clone. The cells, designated as P3 cells, have a stable diploid karyotype with 46(XX) chromosomes, including a translocation betwee...

  10. Kinetic mechanism of Plasmodium falciparum hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sourav; Nagappa, Lakshmeesha K; Prahladarao, Vasudeva S; Balaram, Hemalatha

    2015-12-01

    Plasmodium falciparum hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (PfHGXPRT) exhibits a kinetic mechanism that differs from that of the human homolog. Human HGPRT follows a steady-state ordered mechanism, wherein PRPP binding precedes the binding of hypoxanthine/guanine and release of product IMP/GMP is the rate limiting step. In the current study, initial velocity kinetics with PfHGXPRT indicates a steady-state ordered mechanism, wherein xanthine binding is conditional to the binding of PRPP. The value of the rate constant for IMP dissociation is greater by 183-fold than the kcat for hypoxanthine phosphoribosylation and this results in the absence of burst in progress curves from pre-steady-state kinetics. Further, IMP binding is 1000 times faster (4s(-1) at 0.5μM IMP) when compared to the kcat (3.9±0.2×10(-3)s(-1)) for the reverse IMP pyrophosphorolysis reaction. These results lend support to the fact that in both forward and reverse reactions, the process of chemical conversion (formation of IMP/hypoxanthine) is slow and the events of ligand association and dissociation are faster. PMID:26902413

  11. The use of primary rat hepatocytes to achieve metabolic activation of promutagens in the Chinese hamster ovary/hypoxantine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase mutational assay

    SciTech Connect

    Bermudez, E.; Couch, D.B.; Tillery, D.

    1982-01-01

    A method is described in which primary rat hepatocytes have been cocultured with chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells to provide metabolic activation of promutgens in the Chinese hamster ovary/hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (CHO/HGPRT) mutational assay. Single cell hepatocyte suspensions were prepared from male Fisher-344 rats using the in situ collagenase perfusion technique. Hepatocytes were allowed to attach for 1.5 hours in tissue culture dishes containing an approximately equal number of CHO cells in log growth. The cocultures were exposed to promutagens for up to 20 hours in serum-free medium. The survival and 6-thioguanine-resistant fraction of treated CHO cells were then determined as in the standard CHO/HGPRT assay. Aflatoxin B/sub 1/ (AFB/sub 1/) 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) were found to produce increases in the mutant fractions of treated CHO cells as a function of concentration. The time required for optimum expression of the mutant phenotype following exposure to DMBA and AFB/sub 1/ was approximately 8 days. Primary cell-mediated mutagenesis may be useful in elucidating methobolic pathways important in the production and detoxification of genotoxic products in vivo.

  12. Crystal structures of Apo and GMP bound hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase from Legionella pneumophila and the implications in gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nannan; Gong, Xiaojian; Lu, Min; Chen, Xiaofang; Qin, Ximing; Ge, Honghua

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) (EC 2.4.2.8) reversibly catalyzes the transfer of the 5-phophoribosyl group from 5-phosphoribosyl-alpha-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to hypoxanthine or guanine to form inosine monophosphate (IMP) or guanosine monophosphate (GMP) in the purine salvage pathway. To investigate the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme in the intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila, we determined the crystal structures of the L. pneumophila HGPRT (LpHGPRT) both in its apo-form and in complex with GMP. The structures reveal that LpHGPRT comprises a core domain and a hood domain which are packed together to create a cavity for GMP-binding and the enzymatic catalysis. The binding of GMP induces conformational changes of the stable loop II. This new binding site is closely related to the Gout arthritis-linked human HGPRT mutation site (Ser103Arg). Finally, these structures of LpHGPRT provide insights into the catalytic mechanism of HGPRT. PMID:26968365

  13. Differential Distortion of Purine Substrates by Human and Plasmodium falciparum Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase to Catalyse the Formation of Mononucleotides.

    PubMed

    Karnawat, Vishakha; Gogia, Spriha; Balaram, Hemalatha; Puranik, Mrinalini

    2015-07-20

    Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) is a potential therapeutic target. Compared to structurally homologous human enzymes, it has expanded substrate specificity. In this study, 9-deazapurines are used as in situ probes of the active sites of human and Pf HGPRTs. Through the use of these probes it is found that non-covalent interactions stabilise the pre-transition state of the HGPRT-catalysed reaction. Vibrational spectra reveal that the bound substrates are extensively distorted, the carbonyl bond of nucleobase moiety is weakened and the substrate is destabilised along the reaction coordinate. Raman shifts of the human and Pf enzymes are used to quantify the differing degrees of hydrogen bonding in the homologues. A decreased Raman cross-section in enzyme-bound 9-deazaguanine (9DAG) shows that the phenylalanine residue (Phe186 in human and Phe197 in Pf) of HGPRT stacks with the nucleobase. Differential loss of the Raman cross-section suggests that the active site is more compact in human HGPRT as compared to the Pf enzyme, and is more so in the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (PRPP) complex 9DAG-PRPP-HGPRT than in 9-deazahypoxanthine (9DAH)-PRPP-HGPRT. PMID:25944719

  14. Absence of hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity in murine Dunn osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Abelson, H.T.; Gorka, C.

    1983-09-01

    The transplantable murine Dunn osteosarcoma has no detectable hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.8) activity. This was established from the tumors directly and from tissue culture cell lines derived from the tumor using a variety of assays: e.g., no (3H)hypoxanthine uptake into tumor or tissue culture cells, no conversion of (3H)hypoxanthine to (3H)IMP by cell extracts from tumors or tissue culture cells, no growth of tissue culture cells in hypoxanthine:aminopterin:thymidine medium, and normal growth of these cells in 10 microM 6-mercaptopurine. Ten human osteosarcomas have been assayed, and two have no apparent hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase enzyme activity. After high-dose methotrexate treatment in vivo, murine tumors could be selectively killed and normal tissues could be spared by using a rescue regimen of hypoxanthine-thymidine-allopurinol.

  15. Effect of salicylates on histamine and L-histidine metabolism. Inhibition of imidazoleacetate phosphoribosyl transferase.

    PubMed Central

    Moss, J; De Mello, M C; Vaughan, M; Beaven, M A

    1976-01-01

    In man and other animals, urinary excretion of the histidine and histamine metabolite, imidazoleacetate, is increased and that of its conjugated metabolite, ribosylimidazoleacetate, decreased by salicylates. Imidazoleacetate has been reported to produce analgesia and narcosis. Its accumulation as a result of transferase inhibition could play a part in the therapeutic effects of salicylates. To determine the locus of salicylate action, we have investigated the effect of anti-inflammatory drugs on imidazoleacetate phosphoribosyl transferase, the enzyme that catalyzes the ATP-dependent conjugation of imidazoleacetate with phosphoribosylpyrophosphate. As little as 0.2 mM aspirin produced 50% inhibition of the rat liver transferase. In vivo, a 30% decrease in the urinary excretion of ribosylimidazoleacetate has been observed with plasma salicylate concentrations of 0.4 mM. The enzyme was also inhibited by sodium salicylate but not by salicylamide, sodium gentisate, aminopyrine, phenacetin, phenylbutazone, or indomethacin. The last four drugs have been shown previously not to alter the excretion of ribosylimidazoleacetate when administered in vivo. Since both the drug specificity and inhibitory concentrations are similar in vivo and in vitro, it seems probable that the effect of salicylates on imidazoleacetate conjugation results from inhibition of imidazoleacetate phosphoribosyl transferase. PMID:180057

  16. Acyclic phosph(on)ate inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Clinch, Keith; Crump, Douglas R.; Evans, Gary B.; Hazleton, Keith Z.; Mason, Jennifer M.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenic protozoa responsible for malaria lack enzymes for the de novo synthesis of purines and rely on purine salvage from the host. In Plasmodium falciparum (Pf), hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGXPRT) converts hypoxanthine to inosine monophosphate and is essential for purine salvage making the enzyme an anti-malarial drug target. We have synthesized a number of simple acyclic aza-C- nucleosides and shown that some are potent inhibitors of Pf HGXPRT while showing excellent selectivity for the Pf versus the human enzyme. PMID:23810424

  17. Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase Deficiency: Activity in Normal, Mutant, and Heterozygote-Cultured Human Skin Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Wilfred Y.; Seegmiller, J. Edwin

    1970-01-01

    Cultured skin fibroblasts from patients deficient for the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (PRT) activity show very low but nevertheless significant levels of apparent PRT enzyme despite absence of detectable activity (<0.004% of normal) in erythrocytes of the same patients. In fibroblasts this mutant enzyme is more heat labile than the normal enzyme. These findings indicate that PRT deficiency in this disorder is not due to a deletion mutation of the PRT locus. Individual cultured skin fibroblasts from heterozygote females for PRT deficiency show normal, intermediate, or very low levels of PRT activity. The mosaicism demonstrated in the heterozygotes for this X-linked disorder accounts for the cells with normal and very low activities of PRT. Intermediate activity can best be explained by the phenomenon of metabolic cooperation presumably from the transfer of either PRT enzyme or messenger RNA, from normal to mutant cells. Images PMID:5267139

  18. Acyclic Immucillin Phosphonates. Second-Generation Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Hypoxanthine- Guanine-Xanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Hazelton, Keith Z.; Ho, Meng-Chaio; Cassera, Maria B.; Clinch, Keith; Crump, Douglas R.; Rosario Jr., Irving; Merino, Emilio F.; Almo, Steve C.; Tyler, Peter C.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2012-06-22

    We found that Plasmodium falciparum is the primary cause of deaths from malaria. It is a purine auxotroph and relies on hypoxanthine salvage from the host purine pool. Purine starvation as an antimalarial target has been validated by inhibition of purine nucleoside phosphorylase. Hypoxanthine depletion kills Plasmodium falciparum in cell culture and in Aotus monkey infections. Hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGXPRT) from P. falciparum is required for hypoxanthine salvage by forming inosine 5'-monophosphate, a branchpoint for all purine nucleotide synthesis in the parasite. We present a class of HGXPRT inhibitors, the acyclic immucillin phosphonates (AIPs), and cell permeable AIP prodrugs. The AIPs are simple, potent, selective, and biologically stable inhibitors. The AIP prodrugs block proliferation of cultured parasites by inhibiting the incorporation of hypoxanthine into the parasite nucleotide pool and validates HGXPRT as a target in malaria.

  19. Herpes simplex virus-mediated human hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene transfer into neuronal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Palella, T.D.; Silverman, L.J.; Schroll, C.T.; Homa, F.L.; Levine, M.; Kelley, W.N.

    1988-01-01

    The virtually complete deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) results in a devastating neurological disease, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Transfer of the HPRT gene into fibroblasts and lymphoblasts in vitro and into hematopoietic cells in vivo has been accomplished by other groups with retroviral-derived vectors. It appears to be necessary, however, to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal cells to correct the neurological dysfunction of this disorder. The neurotropic virus herpes simplex virus type 1 has features that make it suitable for use as a vector to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal tissue. This report describes the isolation of an HPRT-deficient rat neuroma cell line, designated B103-4C, and the construction of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 that contained human HPRT cDNA. These recombinant viruses were used to infect B103-4C cells. Infected cells expressed HPRT activity which was human in origin.

  20. Comprehensive X-Ray Structural Studies of the Quinolinate Phosphoribosyl Transferase (BNA6) From Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    di Luccio, E.; Wilson, D.K.

    2009-05-14

    Quinolinic acid phosphoribosyl transferase (QAPRTase, EC 2.4.2.19) is a 32 kDa enzyme encoded by the BNA6 gene in yeast and catalyzes the formation of nicotinate mononucleotide from quinolinate and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP). QAPRTase plays a key role in the tryptophan degradation pathway via kynurenine, leading to the de novo biosynthesis of NAD{sup +} and clearing the neurotoxin quinolinate. To improve our understanding of the specificity of the eukaryotic enzyme and the course of events associated with catalysis, we have determined the crystal structures of the apo and singly bound forms with the substrates quinolinate and PRPP. This reveals that the enzyme folds in a manner similar to that of various prokaryotic forms which are {approx}30% identical in sequence. In addition, the structure of the Michaelis complex is approximated by PRPP and the quinolinate analogue phthalate bound to the active site. These results allow insight into the kinetic mechanism of QAPRTase and provide an understanding of structural diversity in the active site of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae enzyme when compared to prokaryotic homologues.

  1. Discovery of a novel nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase (NAMPT) inhibitor via in silico screening.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Mikio; Niimi, Tatsuya; Masumoto, Mari; Orita, Masaya; Yokota, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Tomoko

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase (NAMPT) is a key enzyme in the salvage pathway of mammalian nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) biosynthesis, catalyzing the synthesis of nicotinamide mononucleotide from nicotinamide (Nam). The diverse functions of NAD suggest that NAMPT inhibitors are potential drug candidates as anticancer agents, immunomodulators, or other agents. However, difficulty in conducting high-throughput NAMPT assay with good sensitivity has hampered the discovery of novel anti-NAMPT drugs with improved profiles. We combined an in silico screening strategy with a radioisotope (RI)-based enzyme assay and rationally identified promising NAMPT inhibitors with novel structures. AS1604498 was the most potent inhibitor, with an IC50 of 44 nM, and inhibited THP-1 and K562 cell line growth with the IC50 of 198 nM and 673 nM, respectively. The mode of action was found to reduce intracellular NAD following apoptosis, suggesting that these compounds inhibit NAMPT in cell-based assay. This strategy can be used to discover new drug candidates with targets which are difficult to assess through high-throughput screening. Our hit compounds may be used as seed compounds for developing new therapeutics with NAMPT. PMID:24389478

  2. AMP-activated protein kinase regulates nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase expression in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Brandauer, Josef; Vienberg, Sara G; Andersen, Marianne A; Ringholm, Stine; Risis, Steve; Larsen, Per S; Kristensen, Jonas M; Frøsig, Christian; Leick, Lotte; Fentz, Joachim; Jørgensen, Sebastian; Kiens, Bente; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F P; Richter, Erik A; Zierath, Juleen R; Goodyear, Laurie J; Pilegaard, Henriette; Treebak, Jonas T

    2013-01-01

    Deacetylases such as sirtuins (SIRTs) convert NAD to nicotinamide (NAM). Nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase (Nampt) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the NAD salvage pathway responsible for converting NAM to NAD to maintain cellular redox state. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) increases SIRT activity by elevating NAD levels. As NAM directly inhibits SIRTs, increased Nampt activation or expression could be a metabolic stress response. Evidence suggests that AMPK regulates Nampt mRNA content, but whether repeated AMPK activation is necessary for increasing Nampt protein levels is unknown. To this end, we assessed whether exercise training- or 5-amino-1-β-d-ribofuranosyl-imidazole-4-carboxamide (AICAR)-mediated increases in skeletal muscle Nampt abundance are AMPK dependent. One-legged knee-extensor exercise training in humans increased Nampt protein by 16% (P < 0.05) in the trained, but not the untrained leg. Moreover, increases in Nampt mRNA following acute exercise or AICAR treatment (P < 0.05 for both) were maintained in mouse skeletal muscle lacking a functional AMPK α2 subunit. Nampt protein was reduced in skeletal muscle of sedentary AMPK α2 kinase dead (KD), but 6.5 weeks of endurance exercise training increased skeletal muscle Nampt protein to a similar extent in both wild-type (WT) (24%) and AMPK α2 KD (18%) mice. In contrast, 4 weeks of daily AICAR treatment increased Nampt protein in skeletal muscle in WT mice (27%), but this effect did not occur in AMPK α2 KD mice. In conclusion, functional α2-containing AMPK heterotrimers are required for elevation of skeletal muscle Nampt protein, but not mRNA induction. These findings suggest AMPK plays a post-translational role in the regulation of skeletal muscle Nampt protein abundance, and further indicate that the regulation of cellular energy charge and nutrient sensing is mechanistically related. PMID:23918774

  3. Mouse model for somatic mutation at the HPRT (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl-transferase) gene: Molecular and cellular analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhart-Schultz, K.; Strout, C.L.; Jones, I.M.

    1989-07-11

    Our goal is to use the mouse to model the organismal, cellular and molecular factors that affect somatic mutagenesis in vivo. A fundamental tenet of genetic toxicology is that the principles of mutagenesis identified in one system can be used to predict the principles of mutagenesis in another system. The validity of this tenet depends upon the comparability of the systems involved. To begin to achieve an understanding of somatic mutagenesis in vivo, we have been studying mutations that occur in the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) gene of lymphocytes of mice. Our in vivo model for somatic mutation allows us to analyse factors that affect somatic mutation. Having chosen the mouse, we are working with cells in which the karyotype is normal, and metabolic and DNA repair capacity are defined by the mouse strain chosen. At the organismal level, we can vary sex, age, the exposure history, and the tissue source of cells analysed. (All studies reported here have, however, used male mice.) At the cellular level, T lymphocytes and their precursors are the targets and reporters of mutation. 26 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Orotate phosphoribosyl transferase MoPyr5 is involved in uridine 5'-phosphate synthesis and pathogenesis of Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhongqiang; Liu, Muxing; Dong, Yanhan; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Haifeng; Zheng, Xiaobo; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2016-04-01

    Orotate phosphoribosyl transferase (OPRTase) plays an important role in de novo and salvage pathways of nucleotide synthesis and is widely used as a screening marker in genetic transformation. However, the function of OPRTase in plant pathogens remains unclear. In this study, we characterized an ortholog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ura5, the OPRTase MoPyr5, from the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. Targeted gene disruption revealed that MoPyr5 is required for mycelial growth, appressorial turgor pressure and penetration into plant tissues, invasive hyphal growth, and pathogenicity. Interestingly, the ∆Mopyr5 mutant is also involved in mycelial surface hydrophobicity. Exogenous uridine 5'-phosphate (UMP) restored vegetative growth and rescued the defect in pathogenicity on detached barley and rice leaf sheath. Collectively, our results show that MoPyr5 is an OPRTase for UMP biosynthesis in M. oryzae and indicate that UTP biosynthesis is closely linked with vegetative growth, cell wall integrity, and pathogenicity of fungus. Our results also suggest that UMP biosynthesis would be a good target for the development of novel fungicides against M. oryzae. PMID:26810198

  5. The Housekeeping Gene Hypoxanthine Guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) Regulates Multiple Developmental and Metabolic Pathways of Murine Embryonic Stem Cell Neuronal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Joel S.; Friedmann, Theodore

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which mutations of the purinergic housekeeping gene hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) cause the severe neurodevelopmental Lesch Nyhan Disease (LND) are poorly understood. The best recognized neural consequences of HPRT deficiency are defective basal ganglia expression of the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) and aberrant DA neuronal function. We have reported that HPRT deficiency leads to dysregulated expression of multiple DA-related developmental functions and cellular signaling defects in a variety of HPRT-deficient cells, including human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. We now describe results of gene expression studies during neuronal differentiation of HPRT-deficient murine ESD3 embryonic stem cells and report that HPRT knockdown causes a marked switch from neuronal to glial gene expression and dysregulates expression of Sox2 and its regulator, genes vital for stem cell pluripotency and for the neuronal/glial cell fate decision. In addition, HPRT deficiency dysregulates many cellular functions controlling cell cycle and proliferation mechanisms, RNA metabolism, DNA replication and repair, replication stress, lysosome function, membrane trafficking, signaling pathway for platelet activation (SPPA) multiple neurotransmission systems and sphingolipid, sulfur and glycan metabolism. We propose that the neural aberrations of HPRT deficiency result from combinatorial effects of these multi-system metabolic errors. Since some of these aberrations are also found in forms of Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease, we predict that some of these systems defects play similar neuropathogenic roles in diverse neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases in common and may therefore provide new experimental opportunities for clarifying pathogenesis and for devising new potential therapeutic targets in developmental and genetic disease. PMID:24130677

  6. Fine structure mapping of the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene region of the human X chromosome (Xq26).

    PubMed Central

    Nicklas, J A; Hunter, T C; O'Neill, J P; Albertini, R J

    1991-01-01

    The Xq26-q27 region of the X chromosome is interesting, as an unusually large number of genes and anonymous RFLP probes have been mapped in this area. A number of studies have used classical linkage analysis in families to map this region. Here, we use mutant human T-lymphocyte clones known to be deleted for all or part of the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) gene, to order anonymous probes known to map to Xq26. Fifty-seven T-cell clones were studied, including 44 derived from in vivo mutation and 13 from in vitro irradiated T-lymphocyte cultures. Twenty anonymous probes (DXS10, DXS11, DXS19, DXS37, DXS42, DXS51, DXS53, DXS59, DXS79, DXS86, DXS92, DXS99, DXS100d, DXS102, DXS107, DXS144, DXS172, DXS174, DXS177, and DNF1) were tested for codeletion with the hprt gene by Southern blotting methods. Five of these probes (DXS10, DXS53, DXS79, DXS86 and DXS177) showed codeletion with hprt in some mutants. The mutants established the following unambiguous ordering of the probes relative to the hprt gene: DXS53-DXS79-5'hprt3'-DXS86-DXS10-DXS177 . The centromere appears to map proximal to DXS53. These mappings order several closely linked but previously unordered probes. In addition, these studies indicate that rather large deletions of the functionally haploid X chromosome can occur while still retaining T-cell viability. Images Figure 1 PMID:1678246

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Lesch-Nyhan syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... HA. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase regulates early developmental programming of dopamine neurons: implications for Lesch-Nyhan disease pathogenesis. Hum Mol Genet. 2009 Jul 1;18(13):2317-27. doi: 10.1093/hmg/ ...

  8. Allopurinol enhances the activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase in inflammatory bowel disease patients during low-dose thiopurine therapy: preliminary data of an ongoing series.

    PubMed

    Seinen, Margien L; de Boer, Nanne K H; Smid, Kees; van Asseldonk, Dirk P; Bouma, Gerd; van Bodegraven, Adriaan A; Peters, Godefridus J

    2011-12-01

    Thiopurines are crucial in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. The phenotype of pivotal metabolic enzymes determines whether thioguanine nucleotides (6-TGN) are generated in clinically sufficiently high levels. The first step in activation of thiopurine prodrugs to 6-TGN is catalysis by hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT). Often, patients exhibit a clinically unfavorable metabolism, leading to discontinuation of conventional thiopurine therapy. The combination of allopurinol and low-dose thiopurine therapy may optimize this variant metabolism, presumably by affecting enzyme activities. We performed a prospective pharmacodynamic study to determine the effect of combination therapy on the activity of HGPRT. The activity of HGPRT and 6-TGN concentrations was measured in red blood cells during thiopurine monotherapy and after 4 weeks of combination therapy. The activity of HGPRT was also measured after 12 weeks of combination therapy. From the results, we conclude that combination therapy increases the activity of HGPRT and subsequently 6-TGN concentrations. PMID:22132961

  9. Effect of glutathione S-transferase M1 polymorphisms on biomarkers of exposure and effects.

    PubMed Central

    Srám, R J

    1998-01-01

    Genotypes responsible for interindividual differences in ability to activate or detoxify genotoxic agents are recognized as biomarkers of susceptibility. Among the most studied genotypes are human glutathione transferases. The relationship of genetic susceptibility to biomarkers of exposure and effects was studied especially in relation to the genetic polymorphism of glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1). For this review papers reporting the effect of GSTM1 genotype on DNA adducts, protein adducts, urine mutagenicity, Comet assay parameters, chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), micronuclei, and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase mutations were assessed. Subjects in groups occupationally exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, benzidine, pesticides, and 1,3-butadiene were included. As environmentally exposed populations, autopsy donors, coal tar-treated patients, smokers, nonsmokers, mothers, postal workers, and firefighters were followed. From all biomarkers the effect of GSTM1 and N-acetyl transferase 2 was seen in coke oven workers on mutagenicity of urine and of glutathione S-transferase T1 on the chromosomal aberrations in subjects from 1,3-butadiene monomer production units. Effects of genotypes on DNA adducts were found from lung tissue of autopsy donors and from placentas of mothers living in an air-polluted region. The GSTM1 genotype affected mutagenicity of urine in smokers and subjects from polluted regions, protein adducts in smokers, SCE in smokers and nonsmokers, and Comet assay parameters in postal workers. A review of all studies on GSTM1 polymorphisms suggests that research probably has not reached the stage where results can be interpreted to formulate preventive measures. The relationship between genotypes and biomarkers of exposure and effects may provide an important guide to the risk assessment of human exposure to mutagens and carcinogens. PMID:9539016

  10. The role of the C-terminal region on the oligomeric state and enzymatic activity of Trypanosoma cruzi hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase.

    PubMed

    Valsecchi, Wanda M; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Defelipe, Lucas A; Mitschler, André; Podjarny, Alberto; Santos, Javier; Delfino, José M

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase from Trypanosoma cruzi (TcHPRT) is a critical enzyme for the survival of the parasite. This work demonstrates that the full-length form in solution adopts a stable and enzymatically active tetrameric form, exhibiting large inter-subunit surfaces. Although this protein irreversibly aggregates during unfolding, oligomerization is reversible and can be modulated by low concentrations of urea. When the C-terminal region, which is predicted as a disordered stretch, is excised by proteolysis, TcHPRT adopts a dimeric state, suggesting that the C-terminal region acts as a main guide for the quaternary arrangement. These results are in agreement with X-ray crystallographic data presented in this work. On the other hand, the C-terminal region exhibits a modulatory role on the enzyme, as attested by the enhanced activity observed for the dimeric form. Bisphosphonates act as substrate-mimetics, uncovering long-range communications among the active sites. All in all, this work contributes to establish new ways applicable to the design of novel inhibitors that could eventually result in new drugs against parasitic diseases. PMID:26969784

  11. A survey of splice variants of the human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase and DNA polymerase beta genes: products of alternative or aberrant splicing?

    PubMed Central

    Skandalis, Adonis; Uribe, Elke

    2004-01-01

    Errors during the pre-mRNA splicing of metazoan genes can degrade the transmission of genetic information, and have been associated with a variety of human diseases. In order to characterize the mutagenic and pathogenic potential of mis-splicing, we have surveyed and quantified the aberrant splice variants in the human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) and DNA polymerase β (POLB) in the presence and the absence of the Nonsense Mediated Decay (NMD) pathway, which removes transcripts with premature termination codons. POLB exhibits a high frequency of splice variants (40–60%), whereas the frequency of HPRT splice variants is considerably lower (∼1%). Treatment of cells with emetine to inactivate NMD alters both the spectrum and frequency of splice variants of POLB and HPRT. It is not certain at this point, whether POLB and HPRT splice variants are the result of regulated alternative splicing processes or the result of aberrant splicing, but it appears likely that at least some of the variants are the result of splicing errors. Several mechanisms that may contribute to aberrant splicing are discussed. PMID:15601998

  12. Amplification of Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase Suppresses the Conditionally Lethal Growth and Virulence Phenotype of Leishmania donovani Mutants Lacking Both Hypoxanthine-guanine and Xanthine Phosphoribosyltransferases*

    PubMed Central

    Boitz, Jan M.; Ullman, Buddy

    2010-01-01

    Leishmania donovani cannot synthesize purines de novo and obligatorily scavenge purines from the host. Previously, we described a conditional lethal Δhgprt/Δxprt mutant of L. donovani (Boitz, J. M., and Ullman, B. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 16084–16089) that establishes that L. donovani salvages purines primarily through hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) and xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (XPRT). Unlike wild type L. donovani, the Δhgprt/Δxprt knock-out cannot grow on 6-oxypurines and displays an absolute requirement for adenine or adenosine and 2′-deoxycoformycin, an inhibitor of parasite adenine aminohydrolase activity. Here, we demonstrate that the ability of Δhgprt/Δxprt parasites to infect mice was profoundly compromised. Surprisingly, mutant parasites that survived the initial passage through mice partially regained their virulence properties, exhibiting a >10-fold increase in parasite burden in a subsequent mouse infection. To dissect the mechanism by which Δhgprt/Δxprt parasites persisted in vivo, suppressor strains that had regained their capacity to grow under restrictive conditions were cloned from cultured Δhgprt/Δxprt parasites. The ability of these suppressor clones to grow in and metabolize 6-oxypurines could be ascribed to a marked amplification and overexpression of the adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) gene. Moreover, transfection of Δhgprt/Δxprt cells with an APRT episome recapitulated the suppressor phenotype in vitro and enabled growth on 6-oxypurines. Biochemical studies further showed that hypoxanthine, unexpectedly, was an inefficient substrate for APRT, evidence that could account for the ability of the suppressors to metabolize hypoxanthine. Subsequent analysis implied that APRT amplification was also a potential contributory mechanism by which Δhgprt/Δxprt parasites displayed persistence and increased virulence in mice. PMID:20363738

  13. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris), semi-aquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens) and terrestrial (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Barjau Pérez-Milicua, Myrna; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Crocker, Daniel E; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea) diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens) can hold their breath for about 30 s. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and reduced blood supply (ischemia) to tissues. Production of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal) (n = 11), semiaquatic (neotropical river otter) (n = 4), and terrestrial (domestic pig) (n = 11). Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX), inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP), guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP), and xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP, and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise), aquatic, and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts. PMID:26283971

  14. Temporal order of replication of genes responsible for hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase and Na/sup +//K/sup +/ ATPase in chemically transformed human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutsui, T.; Suzuki, N.; Elmore, E.; Maizumi, H.

    1986-06-01

    The cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of a direct perturbation of DNA during various portions of the DNA synthetic period (S phase) of a chemically induced, transformed line (Hut-11A cells) derived from diploid human skin fibroblasts were examined. The cells were synchronized by a period of growth in low serum with a subsequent blockage of the cells at the G1/S boundary by hydroxyurea. This method resulted in over 90% synchrony, although approximately 20% of the cells were noncycling. Synchronized cells were treated for each of four 2-h periods during the S phase with 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) followed by irradiation with near-ultraviolet (UV). The BrdU-plus-irradiation treatment was cytotoxic and mutagenic, while treatment with BrdU alone or irradiation alone was neither cytotoxic nor mutagenic. The cytotoxicity was dependent upon the periods of S phase during which treatment was administered. The highest lethality was observed for treatment in early to middle S phase, particularly in the first 2 h of S phase, whereas scare lethality was observed in late S phase. The BrdU-plus-irradiation treatment induced ouabain- and 6-thioguanine-resistant mutants, while BrdU alone or irradiation alone was not mutagenic. Ouabain-resistant mutants were induced during early S phase by the BrdU-plus-irradiation treatment. 6-Thioguanine-resistant mutants, however, were induced during middle to late S phase. These results suggest that a certain region or regions in the DNA of Hut-11A cells, as designated by their specific temporal relationship in the S phase, may be more sensitive to the DNA perturbation by BrdU treatment plus near-UV irradiation for cell survival and that gene(s) responsible for Na/sup +//K/sup +/ ATPase is replicated during early S phase and gene(s) for hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase is replicated during middle to late S phase.

  15. Method for protection against genotoxic mutagenesis

    DOEpatents

    Grdina, D.J.

    1996-01-30

    A method and pharmaceutical for protecting against genotoxic damage in irradiated cells are disclosed. Reduction of mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus is accomplished by administering an effective dose of a compound having protected sulfhydryl groups which metabolize in vivo to produce both free sulfhydryl groups and disulfides. 10 figs.

  16. Method for protection against genotoxic mutagenesis

    DOEpatents

    Grdina, David J.

    1996-01-01

    A method and pharmaceutical for protecting against genotoxic damage in irradiated cells. Reduction of mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus is accomplished by administering an effective dose of a compound having protected sulfhydryl groups which metabolize in vivo to produce both free sulfhydryl groups and disulfides.

  17. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris), semi-aquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens) and terrestrial (Sus scrofa)

    PubMed Central

    Barjau Pérez-Milicua, Myrna; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Crocker, Daniel E.; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea) diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens) can hold their breath for about 30 s. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and reduced blood supply (ischemia) to tissues. Production of adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal) (n = 11), semiaquatic (neotropical river otter) (n = 4), and terrestrial (domestic pig) (n = 11). Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX), inosine 5′-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP), adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine 5′-diphosphate (GDP), guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP), and xanthosine 5′-monophosphate (XMP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP, and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise), aquatic, and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts. PMID:26283971

  18. Morin, a dietary bioflavonol suppresses monosodium urate crystal-induced inflammation in an animal model of acute gouty arthritis with reference to NLRP3 inflammasome, hypo-xanthine phospho-ribosyl transferase, and inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekar, Chitra; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2016-09-01

    The anti-inflammatory effect of morin, a dietary bioflavanol was explored on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced inflammation in rats, an experimental model for acute gouty arthritis. Morin treatment (30mg/kg b.wt) significantly attenuated the ankle swelling and the levels of lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide, serum pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF) -α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and articular elastase along with an increased anti-oxidant status (catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) in the joint homogenate of MSU crystal-induced rats. Histological assessment revealed that morin limited the diffusion of joint space, synovial hyperplasia, and inflammatory cell infiltrations. The mRNA expression of NLRP3 (nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3) inflammasome, caspase-1, pro-inflammatory cytokines, MCP-1, inflammatory enzymes (inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)), and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65 was found downregulated and HPRT (hypo-xanthine phospho-ribosyl transferase) mRNA expression was upregulated in morin treated MSU crystal-induced rats. In addition, morin treatment reduced the protein expression of NF-κB p65, p-NF-κB p65, iNOS, COX-2, and TNF-α. The results clearly demonstrated that morin exert a potent anti-inflammatory effect on MSU crystal-induced inflammation in rats. PMID:27268719

  19. The development of in vitro mutagenicity testing systems using T-lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Albertini, R.J.

    1992-05-01

    This work has focused on the development of in vitro T-cell mutation assays. Conditions have been defined to measure the in vitro induction of mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in human T-lymphocytes. This assay is a parallel to our in vivo hprt assay, in that the same cells are utilized. However, the in vitro assay allows for carefully controlled dose response studies. 21 refs., 16 figs., 13 tabs.

  20. Human somatic mutation assays as biomarkers of carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, P.J.E.; Smith, M.T. ); Hooper, K. )

    1991-08-01

    This paper describes four assays that detect somatic gene mutations in humans: the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase assay, the glycophorin A assay, the HLA-A assay, and the sickle cell hemoglobin assay. Somatic gene mutations can be considered a biomarker of carcinogenesis, and assays for somatic mutation may assist epidemiologists in studies that attempt to identify factors associated with increased risks of cancer. Practical aspects of the use of these assays are discussed.

  1. The development of in vitro mutagenicity testing systems using T-lymphocytes. Research progress report, November 1, 1989--April 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Albertini, R.J.

    1992-05-01

    This work has focused on the development of in vitro T-cell mutation assays. Conditions have been defined to measure the in vitro induction of mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in human T-lymphocytes. This assay is a parallel to our in vivo hprt assay, in that the same cells are utilized. However, the in vitro assay allows for carefully controlled dose response studies. 21 refs., 16 figs., 13 tabs.

  2. Quantitative assay for mutation in diploid human lymphoblasts using microtiter plates

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, E.A.; Thilly, W.G.; Penman, B.W.; Liber, H.L.; Rand, W.M.

    1981-01-01

    A microtiter plating technique which eliminates the need for soft agar and fibroblast feeder layers to determine the colony-forming ability of diploid human lymphoblast lines was described. The calculation of cloning efficiency is based on the Poisson distribution, and a statistical method for calculating confidence intervals is presented. This technique has been applied to the comcomitant examination of induced mutation at the putative loci for hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase, thymidine, kinase, and Na/sup +//K/sup +/ adenosine triphosphatase.

  3. Application of an in vivo mutagenesis system to assess aminothiol effects on neutron-induced genotoxic damage in mouse spleenocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Basic, I. . Dept. of Animal Physiology); Grdina, D.J.; Lyons, T. )

    1989-01-01

    A cloning technique has been developed to quantitate and study {ital in vivo} somatic mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus in human lymphocytes. In this paper we describe a modification of this assay to quantify HGPRT mutations in mouse spleenocytes. In particular, we have investigated the effects of the aminothiol on mutagenesis induced by single doses of whole body exposures to fission-spectrum neutrons from the JANUS reactor at Argonne National Laboratory. 7 refs., 3 tabs.

  4. Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of the fungicides captan and folpet in cultured mammalian cells (CHO/HGPRT system)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, J.P.; Forbes, N.L; Hsie, A.W.

    1981-01-01

    The cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of the fungicides captan and folpet were determined in the CHO/HGPRT system which utilizes Chinese hamster ovary cells and resistance to 6-thioguanine to estimate mutation induction at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus. Treatment of cultures with each compound for 5 hr in serum-free medium resulted in reproducible, significant, concentration-dependent increases in the frequency of 6-thioguanine-resistant mutants.

  5. Quantitative mutagenesis and mutagen screening with Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hsie, A.W.; San Sebastian, J.R.; Tan, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    A summary is presented on the development of a specific gene mutation assay, the Chinese hamster ovary cells/hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (CHO/HGPRT) system, and the utilization of this system to study structure-activity relationship affecting cytotoxicity and gene mutation by various carcinogens. Then, preliminary development and validation of a Multiplex CHO System for the simultaneous determination of chromosome aberration, sister chromatid exchange in addition to cytotoxicity and gene mutation is presented. The potential use of a CHO/human cell hybrid system for measuring chromosomal deletion and loss is discussed.

  6. X-ray induction of persistent hypersensitivity to mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, J.P.; Williams, J.R.

    1982-04-16

    The progeny of x-irradiated V79 cells are hypersensitive to PUVA-(8-methoxypsoralen plus longwave ultraviolet light) induced mutation at the locus for hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase. This hypersensitivity is most evident at low doses of pUVA that do not induce mutation in non-x-irradiated cells. The hypersensitivity is evoked by x-irradiation delivered as a single dose or as multiple fractions over a long period and persists for at least 108 days of exponential growth. This radiation-induced hypersensitivity to subsequent mutation is a new phenomenon that may be relevant to multistage carcinogenesis.

  7. Mutagenicity and cytotoxicity of ethylene oxide in the CHO/HGPRT system

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, E.L.; Cumming, R.B.; Hsie, A.W.

    1981-01-01

    Ethylene oxide (EO) is made on an industrial scale (2.5 billion pounds per year) and is used not only to prepare a number of commercially important compounds but also as a widely used fumigant to sterilize foodstuffs, textiles, and medical instruments. EO is an alkylating agent that has been shown to interact with proteins and nucleic acids and is mutagenic in a number of test systems, eg, rodents, bacteria, rice, and Drosophila. Reported is the cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of EO in a mammalian cel culture system, the Chinese hamster ovary cell/hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (CHO/HGPRT) system.

  8. Pre-thymic somatic mutation leads to high mutant frequency at hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.

    1994-12-01

    While characterizing the background mutation spectrum of the Hypoxathine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene in a healthy population, an outlier with a high mutant frequency of thioguanine resistant lymphocytes was found. When studied at the age of 46, this individual had been smoking 60 cigarettes per day for 38 years. His mutant frequency was calculated at 3.6 and 4.2x10{sup {minus}4} for two sampling periods eight months apart. Sequencing analysis of the HPRT gene in his mutant thioguanine resistant T lymphocytes was done to find whether the cells had a high rate of mutation, or if the mutation was due to a single occurrence of mutation and, if so, when in the T lymphocyte development the mutation occurred. By T-cell receptor analysis it has been found that out of 35 thioguanine resistant clones there was no dominant gamma T cell receptor gene rearrangement. During my appointment in the Science & Engineering Research Semester, I found that 34 of those clones have the same base substitution of G{yields}T at cDNA position 197. Due to the consistent mutant frequency from both sampling periods and the varying T cell receptors, the high mutant frequency cannot be due to recent proliferation of a mature mutant T lymphocyte. From the TCR and DNA sequence analysis we conclude that the G{yields}T mutation must have occurred in a T lymphocyte precursor before thymic differentiation so that the thioguanine resistant clones share the same base substitution but not the same gamma T cell receptor gene.

  9. Relative photomutagenicity of furocoumarins and limettin in the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase assay in V79 cells.

    PubMed

    Raquet, Nicole; Schrenk, Dieter

    2009-09-01

    Furocoumarins are phototoxic and photomutagenic natural plant constituents found in many medicinal plants and food items. Because plants contain mixtures of several furocoumarins, there is a need for a comparative risk assessment of a large number of furocoumarins. Little is known about the photomutagenicity of the structurally related family of coumarins, which are also abundant in many plant species. In this study, we analyzed the photomutagenic potency of the linear furocoumarins 5-methoxypsoralen (5-MOP) and 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP), the angular furocoumarin angelicin, and the coumarin limettin. Above certain concentrations, all test compounds were more or less phototoxic in the presence of UVA doses between 50 and 200 mJ/cm(2), 5-MOP being the most phototoxic compound. At nonphototoxic concentrations, linear correlations were found between concentration and mutagenicity at a UVA dose of 125 mJ/cm(2) for all test compounds including limettin. For 5-MOP, strictly linear correlations were also found for the relationships of mutagenicity vs concentration at various UVA doses or vs UVA dose at given concentrations, respectively. These data indicate that the photomutagenicity of 5-MOP is proportional to the UVA dose x concentration product for noncytotoxic combinations of both factors. They also suggest that the slope of the concentration-photomutagenicity correlation at a given UVA dose may provide a basis for comparison between individual compounds. Applying this concept, in vitro photomutagenicity equivalency factors at 125 mJ/cm(2) were as follows: 1.0 (5-MOP, reference compound), 0.25 (8-MOP), and 0.02 (angelicin and limettin, respectively). These findings provide a new concept for the description of the relative photomutagenic potency of coumarins and furocoumarins and indicate that, in V79 cells, 8-MOP is less photomutagenic and limettin and angelicin are much less photomutagenic than 5-MOP. PMID:19725558

  10. Generation of Hprt-disrupted rat through mouse←rat ES chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Isotani, Ayako; Yamagata, Kazuo; Okabe, Masaru; Ikawa, Masahito

    2016-01-01

    We established rat embryonic stem (ES) cell lines from a double transgenic rat line which harbours CAG-GFP for ubiquitous expression of GFP in somatic cells and Acr3-EGFP for expression in sperm (green body and green sperm: GBGS rat). By injecting the GBGS rat ES cells into mouse blastocysts and transplanting them into pseudopregnant mice, rat spermatozoa were produced in mouse←rat ES chimeras. Rat spermatozoa from the chimeric testis were able to fertilize eggs by testicular sperm extraction combined with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (TESE-ICSI). In the present paper, we disrupted rat hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (Hprt) gene in ES cells and produced a Hprt-disrupted rat line using the mouse←rat ES chimera system. The mouse←rat ES chimera system demonstrated the dual advantages of space conservation and a clear indication of germ line transmission in knockout rat production. PMID:27062982

  11. Basal Ganglia Dopamine Loss Due to Defect in Purine Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Egami, Kiyoshi; Yitta, Silaja; Kasim, Suhail; Lewers, J. Chris; Roberts, Rosalinda C.; Lehar, Mohamed; Jinnah, H. A.

    2007-01-01

    Several rare inherited disorders have provided valuable experiments of nature highlighting specific biological processes of particular importance to the survival or function of midbrain dopamine neurons. In both humans and mice, deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) is associated with profound loss of striatal dopamine, with relative preservation of other neurotransmitters. In the current studies of knockout mice, no morphological signs of abnormal development or degeneration were found in an exhaustive battery that included stereological and morphometric measures of midbrain dopamine neurons, electron microscopic studies of striatal axons and terminals, and stains for degeneration or gliosis. A novel culture model involving HPRT-deficient dopaminergic neurons also exhibited significant loss of dopamine without a morphological correlate. These results suggest dopamine loss in HPRT deficiency has a biochemical rather than anatomical basis, and imply purine recycling to be a biochemical process of particular importance to the function of dopaminergic neurons. PMID:17374562

  12. Estimates of cellular mutagenesis from cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.

    1994-01-01

    A parametric track structure model is used to estimate the cross section as a function of particle velocity and charge for mutations at the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus in human fibroblast cell cultures. Experiments that report the fraction of mutations per surviving cell for human lung and skin fibroblast cells indicate small differences in the mutation cross section for these two cell lines when differences in inactivation rates between these cell lines are considered. Using models of cosmic ray transport, the mutation rate at the HGPRT locus is estimated for cell cultures in space flight and rates of about 2 to 10 x 10(exp -6) per year are found for typical spacecraft shielding. A discussion of how model assumptions may alter the predictions is also presented.

  13. Use of PCR amplification of cDNA to study mechanisms of human cell mutagenesis and malignant transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, V.M.; Yang, Jialing; Chen, Rueyhwa; McGregor, W.G.; Lukash, L.; Scheid, J.M.; Reinhold, D.S.; McCormick, J.J. )

    1991-01-01

    PCR is widely employed to amplify short segments of genomic DNA to determine if a specific change has occurred. But some investigators need to sequence the entire coding region of mammalian genes to determine what specific changes have occurred. In 1989, the authors described a method to copy mRNA of the hypoxanthine (guanine) phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene directly from the lysate of a clone of 6-thioguanine-resistant mutant diploid human fibroblasts without the need for RNA extraction or DNA template purification. The consensus sequence of the cDNA is determined by direct nucleotide sequencing. Using this method, they have investigated the kinds of mutations induced by carcinogens in the coding region of the HPRT gene and their location in the gene and examined the role of DNA repair were exposed to mutagens in exponential growth or synchronized and exposed at the beginning of S phase or in G{sub 1} phase several hr prior to DNA replication.

  14. Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome in an Indian Child.

    PubMed

    Chandekar, Priyanka; Madke, Bhushan; Kar, Sumit; Yadav, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase-1 (HGPRT-1) leading to Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS) is one of the important causes of self-mutilation. Hereby, we report a case of LNS in a three and half-year-old male child, who presented with characteristic self-mutilating behavior. He had history of developmental delay, difficulty in social interaction, attention deficit and features of autism. His serum blood biochemistry was normal except for low hemoglobin levels and raised serum uric acid levels. With a diagnosis of LNS, the child was treated with allopurinol. With various modalities of physical restraint, his self-mutilating behavior came under control and currently the patient is being followed up. PMID:26120162

  15. Dependence of antimutagenic activity of simple phenols on the number of hydroxyl groups

    SciTech Connect

    Pashin, Yu.V.; Bakhitova, L.M.; Bentkhen, T.I.

    1987-01-01

    The authors seek to establish the antioxidative and antimutagenetic effects of three phenols--phenol itself, resorcinol, and pyrogallol--on benzopyrene and its metabolic activation both in vivo and in vitro. In the in vivo system the mutagenic activity of the chemicals and their mixtures was tested relative to induction of micronuclei in polychromatophylic bone marrow erythrocytes of mice. The action of the phenols on the mutagenic activity of benzopyrene in an in vitro system was studied by counting induced direct gene mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus in cultures of Chinese hamster V-70 somatic cells. It is found that the inhibition of the mutagenic activity of benzopyrene by polyhydric phenols is evidently connected with the presence of reactable hydrogen atoms in these compounds which inhibit free-radical self-oxidation of the mutagen.

  16. Genotoxicity of alpha particles in human embryonic skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.; Strniste, G.F.; Tokita, N.

    1984-11-01

    Cell inactivation and induced mutation frequencies at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus have been measured in cultured human fibroblasts (GM10) exposed to ..cap alpha.. particles from /sup 238/ Pu and 250 kVp X rays. The survival curves resulting from exposure to ..cap alpha.. particles are exponential. The mean lethal dose, D/sub 0/, is approximately 1.3 Gy for X rays and 0.25 Gy for ..cap alpha.. particles. As a function of radiation dose, mutation induction at the HGPRT locus was linear for ..cap alpha.. particles whereas the X-ray-induced mutation data were better fitted by a quadratic function. When mutation frequencies were plotted against the log of survival, mutation frequency at a given survival level was greater in cells exposed to ..cap alpha.. particles than to X rays.

  17. Molecular analysis of mutations in the human HPRT gene.

    PubMed

    Keohavong, Phouthone; Xi, Liqiang; Grant, Stephen G

    2014-01-01

    The HPRT assay uses incorporation of toxic nucleotide analogues to select for cells lacking the purine scavenger enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase. A major advantage of this assay is the ability to isolate mutant cells and determine the molecular basis for their functional deficiency. Many types of analyses have been performed at this locus: the current protocol involves generation of a cDNA and multiplex PCR of each exon, including the intron/exon junctions, followed by direct sequencing of the products. This analysis detects point mutations, small deletions and insertions within the gene, mutations affecting RNA splicing, and products of illegitimate V(D)J recombination within the gene. Establishment of and comparisons with mutational spectra hold the promise of identifying exposures to mutation-inducing genotoxicants from their distinctive pattern of gene-specific DNA damage at this easily analyzed reporter gene. PMID:24623237

  18. Generation of Hprt-disrupted rat through mouse←rat ES chimeras.

    PubMed

    Isotani, Ayako; Yamagata, Kazuo; Okabe, Masaru; Ikawa, Masahito

    2016-01-01

    We established rat embryonic stem (ES) cell lines from a double transgenic rat line which harbours CAG-GFP for ubiquitous expression of GFP in somatic cells and Acr3-EGFP for expression in sperm (green body and green sperm: GBGS rat). By injecting the GBGS rat ES cells into mouse blastocysts and transplanting them into pseudopregnant mice, rat spermatozoa were produced in mouse←rat ES chimeras. Rat spermatozoa from the chimeric testis were able to fertilize eggs by testicular sperm extraction combined with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (TESE-ICSI). In the present paper, we disrupted rat hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (Hprt) gene in ES cells and produced a Hprt-disrupted rat line using the mouse←rat ES chimera system. The mouse←rat ES chimera system demonstrated the dual advantages of space conservation and a clear indication of germ line transmission in knockout rat production. PMID:27062982

  19. Sodium arsenite potentiates the clastogenicity and mutagenicity of DNA cross linking agents

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.C.; Lee, K.C.; Tzeng, Y.J.; Huang, R.Y.; Jan, K.Y.

    1986-01-01

    To see if sodium arsenite enhances the clastogenicity and the mutagenicity of DNA crosslinking agents, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and human skin fibroblasts were exposed to cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) (cis-Pt(II)) or 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) plus long-wave ultraviolet light (UVA) and then to sodium arsenite. The results indicate that the clastogenicity of cis-Pt(II) and 8-MOP pllus UVA are enhanced by the post-treatment with sodium arsenite. Chromatid breaks and exchanges are predominantly increased in doubly treated cells. Furthermore, the mutagenicity of cis-Pt(II) at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus is also potentiated by sodium arsenite in CHO cells

  20. Use of Aroclor 1254-induced rat liver homogenate in the assaying of promutagens in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, A.P.

    1984-01-01

    Seven promutagens belonging to two chemical classes - polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and alkyl nitrosamines - were studied in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Findings of practical importance in the use of Aroclor 1254-induced rat liver homogenate (S9) in the CHO/hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) mutation assay were made. Novel findings are (1) the inclusion of CaCl/sub 2/ in the S9 cofactor mixture dramatically decreased the cytotoxicity of S9, and (2) different S9 optimum concentrations were observed for struturally similar promutagens. The inclusion of CaCl/sub 2/ in the S9 cofactor mixture and the testing of each chemical of unknown S9 requirement at several S9 concentrations are therefore recommended for assaying promutagens in the CHO/HGPRT mutation assay.

  1. Quantitative and molecular analyses of radiation-induced mutation in AS52 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stankowski, L.F. Jr.; Hsie, A.W.

    1986-01-01

    pSV2gpt-Transformed and wild-type Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines have been used to study radiation-induced mutation at the molecular level. The transformant, designated AS52, was constructed from a hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT)-deficient CHO cell line and contains a single, functional copy of the Escherichia coli xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (XPRT) gene (gpt) stably integrated into the Chinese hamster genome. AS52 and wild-type CHO-K1-BH4 cells exhibit similar cytotoxic responses to uv light and X rays; however, significant differences occur in mutation induction at the gpt and hprt loci. A number of HPRT and XPRT mutants which arose following irradiation were analyzed by Southern-blot hybridization. Most XPRT (21/26) and all HPRT (23/23) mutants induced by uv light exhibited hybridization patterns indistinguishable from their parental cell lines. In contrast, all XPRT (26/26) and most HPRT mutants (15/21) induced by X irradiation contained deletion mutations affecting some or all of the gpt and hprt loci, respectively. These results indicate that X rays induce predominantly deletion mutations, while uv light is likely to induce point mutations at both loci.

  2. Corynebacterium glutamicum ATP-phosphoribosyl transferases suitable for L-histidine production--Strategies for the elimination of feedback inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kulis-Horn, Robert K; Persicke, Marcus; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2015-07-20

    L-Histidine biosynthesis in Corynebacterium glutamicum is mainly regulated by L-histidine feedback inhibition of the ATP-phosphoribosyltransferase HisG that catalyzes the first step of the pathway. The elimination of this feedback inhibition is the first and most important step in the development of an L-histidine production strain. For this purpose, a combined approach of random mutagenesis and rational enzyme redesign was performed. Mutants spontaneously resistant to the toxic L-histidine analog β-(2-thiazolyl)-DL-alanine (2-TA) revealed novel and unpredicted mutations in the C-terminal regulatory domain of HisG resulting in increased feedback resistance. Moreover, deletion of the entire C-terminal regulatory domain in combination with the gain of function mutation S143F in the catalytic domain resulted in a HisG variant that is still highly active even at L-histidine concentrations close to the solubility limit. Notably, the S143F mutation on its own provokes feedback deregulation, revealing for the first time an amino acid residue in the catalytic domain of HisG that is involved in the feedback regulatory mechanism. In addition, we investigated the effect of hisG mutations for L-histidine production on different levels. This comprised the analysis of different expression systems, including plasmid- and chromosome-based overexpression, as well as the importance of codon choice for HisG mutations. The combination of domain deletions, single amino acid exchanges, codon choice, and chromosome-based overexpression resulted in production strains accumulating around 0.5 g l(-1) L-histidine, demonstrating the added value of the different approaches. PMID:25892668

  3. The 1.25 Å resolution structure of phosphoribosyl-ATP pyrophosphohydrolase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Javid-Majd, Farah; Yang, Dong; Ioerger, Thomas R.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2008-06-01

    The crystal structure of M. tuberculosis phosphoribosyl-ATP pyrophosphohydrolase, the second enzyme in the histidine-biosynthetic pathway, is presented. The structural and inferred functional relationships between M. tuberculosis phosphoribosyl-ATP pyrophosphohydrolase and other members of the nucleoside-triphosphate pyrophosphatase-fold family are described. Phosphoribosyl-ATP pyrophosphohydrolase is the second enzyme in the histidine-biosynthetic pathway, irreversibly hydrolyzing phosphoribosyl-ATP to phosphoribosyl-AMP and pyrophosphate. It is encoded by the hisE gene, which is present as a separate gene in many bacteria and archaea but is fused to hisI in other bacteria, fungi and plants. Because of its essentiality for growth in vitro, HisE is a potential drug target for tuberculosis. The crystal structures of two native (uncomplexed) forms of HisE from Mycobacterium tuberculosis have been determined to resolutions of 1.25 and 1.79 Å. The structure of the apoenzyme reveals that the protein is composed of five α-helices with connecting loops and is a member of the α-helical nucleoside-triphosphate pyrophosphatase superfamily. The biological unit of the protein is a homodimer, with an active site on each subunit composed of residues exclusively from that subunit. A comparison with the Campylobacter jejuni dUTPase active site allowed the identification of putative metal- and substrate-binding sites in HisE, including four conserved glutamate and glutamine residues in the sequence that are consistent with a motif for pyrophosphohydrolase activity. However, significant differences between family members are observed in the loop region between α-helices H1 and H3. The crystal structure of M. tuberculosis HisE provides insights into possible mechanisms of substrate binding and the diversity of the nucleoside-triphosphate pyrophosphatase superfamily.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from E. Coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, V. I.; Abramchik, Yu. A.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes of the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase family (PRPPS, EC 2.7.6.1) catalyze the formation of 5-phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (5-PRPP) from adenosine triphosphate and ribose 5-phosphate. 5-Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate is an important intermediate in the synthesis of purine, pyrimidine, and pyridine nucleotides, as well as of the amino acids histidine and tryptophan. The crystallization conditions for E. coli PRPPS were found by the vapor-diffusion technique and were optimized to apply the capillary counter-diffusion technique. The X-ray diffraction data set was collected from the crystals grown by the counter-diffusion technique using a synchrotron radiation source to 3.1-Å resolution. The crystals of PRPPS belong to sp. gr. P6322 and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = b = 104.44 Å, c = 124.98 Å, α = β = 90°, γ = 120°. The collected X-ray diffraction data set is suitable for the solution of the three-dimensional structure of PRPPS at 3.1-Å resolution.

  5. The 1.25 Å resolution structure of phosphoribosyl-ATP pyrophosphohydrolase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Javid-Majd, Farah; Yang, Dong; Ioerger, Thomas R.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2008-06-23

    Phosphoribosyl-ATP pyrophosphohydrolase is the second enzyme in the histidine-biosynthetic pathway, irreversibly hydrolyzing phosphoribosyl-ATP to phosphoribosyl-AMP and pyrophosphate. It is encoded by the hisE gene, which is present as a separate gene in many bacteria and archaea but is fused to hisI in other bacteria, fungi and plants. Because of its essentiality for growth in vitro, HisE is a potential drug target for tuberculosis. The crystal structures of two native (uncomplexed) forms of HisE from Mycobacterium tuberculosis have been determined to resolutions of 1.25 and 1.79 {angstrom}. The structure of the apoenzyme reveals that the protein is composed of five -helices with connecting loops and is a member of the {alpha}-helical nucleoside-triphosphate pyrophosphatase superfamily. The biological unit of the protein is a homodimer, with an active site on each subunit composed of residues exclusively from that subunit. A comparison with the Campylobacter jejuni dUTPase active site allowed the identification of putative metal- and substrate-binding sites in HisE, including four conserved glutamate and glutamine residues in the sequence that are consistent with a motif for pyrophosphohydrolase activity. However, significant differences between family members are observed in the loop region between {alpha}-helices H1 and H3. The crystal structure of M. tuberculosis HisE provides insights into possible mechanisms of substrate binding and the diversity of the nucleoside-triphosphate pyrophosphatase superfamily.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from E. Coli

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeev, V. I. Abramchik, Yu. A. Zhukhlistova, N. E. Kuranova, I. P.

    2015-09-15

    Enzymes of the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase family (PRPPS, EC 2.7.6.1) catalyze the formation of 5-phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (5-PRPP) from adenosine triphosphate and ribose 5-phosphate. 5-Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate is an important intermediate in the synthesis of purine, pyrimidine, and pyridine nucleotides, as well as of the amino acids histidine and tryptophan. The crystallization conditions for E. coli PRPPS were found by the vapor-diffusion technique and were optimized to apply the capillary counter-diffusion technique. The X-ray diffraction data set was collected from the crystals grown by the counter-diffusion technique using a synchrotron radiation source to 3.1-Å resolution. The crystals of PRPPS belong to sp. gr. P6{sub 3}22 and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = b = 104.44 Å, c = 124.98 Å, α = β = 90°, γ = 120°. The collected X-ray diffraction data set is suitable for the solution of the three-dimensional structure of PRPPS at 3.1-Å resolution.

  7. Coupled optical assay for adenine phosphoribosyltransferase and its extension for the spectrophotometric and radioenzymatic determination of 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate in mixtures and in tissue extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Ipata, P.L.; Mura, U.; Camici, M.; Giovannitti, M.P.

    1987-08-01

    A reliable assay was developed to characterize crude cell homogenates with regard to their adenine phosphoribosyltransferase activities. The 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP)-dependent formation of AMP from adenine is followed spectrophotometrically at 265 nm by coupling it with the following two-stage enzymatic conversion: AMP + H/sub 2/O----adenosine + Pi (5'-nucleotidase); adenosine + H/sub 2/O----inosine + NH/sub 3/ (adenosine deaminase). The same principle was applied to develop a spectrophotometric and a radioenzymatic assay for PRPP. The basis of the spectrophotometric assay is the absorbance change at 265 nm associated with the enzymatic conversion of PRPP into inosine, catalyzed by the sequential action of partially purified adenine phosphoribosyltransferase, commercial 5'-nucleotidase, and commercial adenosine deaminase, in the presence of excess adenine. In the radiochemical assay PRPP is quantitatively converted into (/sup 14/C)inosine via the same combined reaction. Tissue extracts are incubated with excess (/sup 14/C)adenine. The radioactivity of inosine, separated by a thin-layer chromatographic system, is a measure of PRPP present in tissue extracts. The radioenzymatic assay is at least as sensitive as other methods based on the use of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase. However, it overcomes the reversibility of the reaction and the need to use transferase preparations free of any phosphatase and adenosine deaminase activities.

  8. The genotoxicity of lucidin, a natural component of Rubia tinctorum L., and lucidinethylether, a component of ethanolic Rubia extracts.

    PubMed

    Westendorf, J; Poginsky, B; Marquardt, H; Groth, G; Marquardt, H

    1988-06-01

    The genotoxic activity of lucidin (1,3-dihydroxy-2-hydroxymethyl-9,10-anthraquinone), a natural component of Rubia tinctorum L., was tested in a battery of short-term tests. The compound was mutagenic in five Salmonella typhimurium strains without metabolic activation, but the mutagenicity was increased after addition of rat liver S9 mix. In V79 cells, lucidin was mutagenic at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase gene locus and active at inducing DNA single-strand breaks and DNA-protein cross-links as assayed by the alkaline elution method. Lucidin also induced DNA repair synthesis in primary rat hepatocytes and transformed C3H/M2-mouse fibroblasts in culture. We also investigated lucidinethylether, which is formed from lucidin by extraction of madder roots with boiling ethanol. This compound was also mutagenic in Salmonella, but only after addition of rat liver S9 mix. Lucidinethylether was weakly mutagenic to V79 cells which were cocultivated with rat hepatocytes. The compound did not induce DNA repair synthesis in hepatocytes from untreated rats, but positive results were obtained when hepatocytes from rats pretreated with phenobarbital were used. We conclude that lucidin and its derivatives are genotoxic. PMID:3069188

  9. A Modified Intraoral Resin Mouthguard to Prevent Self-Mutilations in Lesch-Nyhan Patients

    PubMed Central

    Delucchi, Alessia; Calcagno, Enrico; Servetto, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, described in 1964 by Lesch and Nyhan, is a X-linked recessive disorder, occurring in 1 : 100000 to 1 : 380000 live births. LNS is characterized by a decrease in activity of hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase, an enzyme involved in purine metabolism, resulting in overproduction of uric acid. Hyperuricemia and neurological features including choreoathetoid spasticity, self-mutilation, and mental retardation clinically characterize this syndrome. In LNS patients the typical feature is loss of tissue from biting themselves with partial or complete amputation of fingers, lips, and tongue. The self-mutilation compares with the eruption of the deciduous teeth. Several drugs trials have been administered to improve self-destructive behavior and invasive treatment approaches, such as extractions of teeth and orthognathic surgery, have been suggested with variable effectiveness. Nowadays prevention is, therefore, the standard of care. The role of dentistry is essential in the management of the self-mutilating behavior, because the teeth represent the main self-injury instrument. This report presents a revision of various therapeutic approaches to manage self-destruction, highlighting the effectiveness of a preventive treatment. It describes a new technique: a resin mouthguard, realized at Gaslini Hospital, to obtain immediate healing of the oral lesions, confirmed in the follow-up period. PMID:25101126

  10. Selection of Reliable Reference Genes for Real-time qRT-PCR Analysis of Zi Geese (Anser anser domestica) Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hong; Wang, Jianfa; Liu, Juxiong; Guo, Jingru; Wang, Zhongwei; Zhang, Xu; Guo, Li; Yang, Huanmin

    2013-01-01

    Zi geese (Anser anser domestica) belong to the white geese and are excellent layers with a superior feed-to-egg conversion ratio. Quantitative gene expression analysis, such as Real-time qRT-PCR, will provide a good understanding of ovarian function during egg-laying and consequently improve egg production. However, we still don’t know what reference genes in geese, which show stable expression, should be used for such quantitative analysis. In order to reveal such reference genes, the stability of seven genes were tested in five tissues of Zi geese. Methodology/Principal Findings: The relative transcription levels of genes encoding hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase 1 (HPRT1), β-actin (ACTB), β-tubulin (TUB), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GADPH), succinate dehydrogenase flavoprotein (SDH), 28S rRNA (28S) and 18S rRNA (18S) have been quantified in heart, liver, kidney, muscle and ovary in Zi geese respectively at different developmental stages (1 d, 2, 4, 6 and 8 months). The expression stability of these genes was analyzed using geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper software. Conclusions: The expression of 28S in heart, GAPDH in liver and ovary, ACTB in kidney and HPRT1 in muscle are the most stable genes as identified by the three different analysis methods. Thus, these genes are recommended for use as candidate reference genes to compare mRNA transcription in various developmental stages of geese. PMID:25049806

  11. Metabolism and toxicological evaluation of the aromatic amide herbicide propanil and its derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    McMillian, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    Since propanil is structurally similar to other carcinogenic arylamides, the potential chronic toxicity of propanil and its derivatives were examined in short-term assays for genotoxicity. Propanil, 3,4-dichloroaniline, and their N-oxidized derivatives were inactive in the Salmonella typhimurium reversion, Chinese hamster ovary/hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (CHO/HGPRT), and rat hepatocyte/DNA repair assays. The metabolism of propanil and 3,4-dichloroaniline was subsequently examined in liver microsomes from males Sprague-Dawley rats to identify metabolites that may be involved in the acute toxicity of propanil. The major pathway of propanil metabolism was acylamidase-catalyzed hydrolysis to 3,4-dichloroaniline. Oxidized metabolites were isolated by high performance liquid chromatography, and identified as 2{prime}-hydroxy-propanil and 6-hydroxy-propanil by comparison of their mass and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra to synthetic standards. Experiments were performed to determine if propanil exposure could be monitored by the analysis of hemoglobin binding. Administration of (ring-U-{sup 14}C)propanil to rats increased methemoglobin formation in a dose-dependent manner. Concomitant with methemoglobin formation, dose-dependent covalent binding of radiolabeled propanil to hemoglobin was detected. HPLC analysis indicated that the hemoglobin adducts were sulfinic acid esters, and these data suggest that human exposure to propanil may be monitored by the analysis of propanil metabolites bound to hemoglobin.

  12. Calculation of Heavy Ion Inactivation and Mutation Rates in Radial Dose Model of Track Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Shavers, Mark R.; Katz, Robert

    1997-01-01

    In the track structure model, the inactivation cross section is found by summing an inactivation probability over all impact parameters from the ion to the sensitive sites within the cell nucleus. The inactivation probability is evaluated by using the dose response of the system to gamma rays and the radial dose of the ions and may be equal to unity at small impact parameters. We apply the track structure model to recent data with heavy ion beams irradiating biological samples of E. Coli, B. Subtilis spores, and Chinese hamster (V79) cells. Heavy ions have observed cross sections for inactivation that approach and sometimes exceed the geometric size of the cell nucleus. We show how the effects of inactivation may be taken into account in the evaluation of the mutation cross sections in the track structure model through correlation of sites for gene mutation and cell inactivation. The model is fit to available data for HPRT (hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase) mutations in V79 cells, and good agreement is found. Calculations show the high probability for mutation by relativistic ions due to the radial extension of ions track from delta rays. The effects of inactivation on mutation rates make it very unlikely that a single parameter such as LET (linear energy transfer) can be used to specify radiation quality for heavy ion bombardment.

  13. The mutagenic potential of high flash aromatic naphtha.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, C A; Edwards, D A; McKee, R H; Swanson, M; Wong, Z A; Schmitt, S; Beatty, P

    1989-06-01

    Catalytic reforming is a refining process that converts naphthenes to aromatics by dehydrogenation to make higher octane gasoline blending components. A portion of this wide boiling range hydrocarbon stream can be separated by distillation and used for other purposes. One such application is a mixture of predominantly 9-carbon aromatic molecules (C9 aromatics, primarily isomers of ethyltoluene and trimethylbenzene), which is removed and used as a solvent--high-flash aromatic naphtha. A program was initiated to assess the toxicological properties of high-flash aromatic naphtha since there may be human exposure through inhalation or external body contact. The current study was conducted partly to assess the potential for mutagenic activity and also to assist in an assessment of carcinogenic potential. The specific tests utilized included the Salmonella/mammalian microsome mutagenicity assay, the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) forward mutation assay in CHO cells, in vitro chromosome aberration and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assays in CHO cells, and an in vivo chromosome aberration assay in rat bone marrow. PMID:2670086

  14. Locations and contexts of sequences that hybridize to poly(dG-dT).(dC-dA) in mammalian ribosomal DNAs and two X-linked genes.

    PubMed Central

    Braaten, D C; Thomas, J R; Little, R D; Dickson, K R; Goldberg, I; Schlessinger, D; Ciccodicola, A; D'Urso, M

    1988-01-01

    Sequences located several kilobases both 5' and 3' of the stably transcribed portion of several genes hybridize to radio-labeled pure fragments of the alternating sequence poly (dG-dT) (dC-dA) ["poly(GT)"]. The genes include the ribosomal DNA of mouse, rat, and human, and also human glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and mouse hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT). HPRT has additional hybridizing sequences in introns. Fragments that include the hybridizing sequences and up to 300 bp of adjoining DNA show perfect runs of poly(GT) (greater than 30bp) in all but the human 5' region of rDNA, which shows a somewhat different alternating purine:pyrimidine sequence, poly(GTAT) (36bp). Within 150 bp of these sequences in various instances are found a number of other sequences reported to affect DNA conformation in model systems. Most marked is an enhancement of sequences matching at least 67% to the consensus binding sequence for topoisomerase II. Two to ten-fold less of such sequences were found in other sequenced portions of the nontranscribed spacer or in the transcribed portion of rDNA. The conservation of the locations of tracts of alternating purine:pyrimidine between evolutionarily diverse species is consistent with a possible functional role for these sequences. Images PMID:3267216

  15. Effects of 2.45 GHz electromagnetic fields with a wide range of SARs on bacterial and HPRT gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shin; Takashima, Yoshio; Sakurai, Tomonori; Suzuki, Yukihisa; Taki, Masao; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2007-01-01

    Present day use of mobile phones is ubiquitous. This causes some concern for human health due to exposure to high-frequency electromagnetic fields (HFEMF) from mobile phones. Consequently, we have examined the effects of 2.45 GHz electromagnetic fields on bacterial mutations and the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene mutations. Using the Ames test, bacteria were exposed to HFEMF for 30 min at specific absorption rates (SARs) from 5 to 200 W/kg. In all strains, there was no significant difference in the frequency of revertant colonies between sham exposure and HFEMF-exposed groups. In examination of mutations of the HPRT gene, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells were exposed to HFEMF for 2 h at SARs from 5 to 200 W/kg. We detected a combination effect of simultaneous exposure to HFEMF and bleomycin at the respective SARs. A statistically significant difference was observed between the cells exposed to HFEMF at the SAR of 200 W/kg. Cells treated with the combination of HFEMF at SARs from 50 to 200 W/kg and bleomycin exhibited increased HPRT mutations. As the exposure to HFEMF induced an increase in temperature, these increases of mutation frequency may be a result of activation of bleomycin by heat. We consider that the increase of mutation frequency may be due to a thermal effect. PMID:17179647

  16. Mutation induction by charged particles of defined linear energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Hei, T K; Chen, D J; Brenner, D J; Hall, E J

    1988-07-01

    The mutagenic potential of charged particles of defined linear energy transfer (LET) was assessed using the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus (HGPRT) in primary human fibroblasts. Exponentially growing cultures of early passaged fibroblasts were grown as monolayers on thin mylar sheets and were irradiated with accelerated protons, deuterons or helium-3 ions. The mutation rates were compared with those generated by 137Cs gamma-rays. LET values for charged particles accelerated at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility, using the track segment mode, ranged from 10 to 150 keV/micron. After irradiation, cells were trypsinized, subcultured and assayed for both cytotoxicity and 6-thioguanine resistance. For gamma-rays, and for the charged particles of lower LET, the dose-response curves for cell survival were characterized by a marked initial shoulder, but approximated to an exponential function of dose for higher LETs. Mutation frequencies, likewise, showed a direct correlation to LET over the dose range examined. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for mutagenesis, based on the initial slopes of the dose-response curves, ranged from 1.30 for 10 keV/micron protons to 9.40 for 150 keV/micron helium-3 ions. Results of the present studies indicate that high-LET radiations, apart from being efficient inducers of cell lethality, are even more efficient in mutation induction as compared to low-LET ionizing radiation. These data are consistent with results previously obtained with both rodent and human fibroblast cell lines. PMID:3383341

  17. Phenotypic expression time of mutagen-induced 6-thioguanine resistance in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO/HGPRT system): expression in division-arrested cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, J.P.; Machanoff, R.; Hsie, A.W.

    1982-01-01

    The phenotypic expression time of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) induced 6-thioguanine-resistant mutants was studied with Chinese hamster ovary cells in culture (CHO/HGPRT system). After mutagen treatment of exponential phase cultures, the cells were maintained either in the exponential phase through subculture in medium containing 5% dialyzed fetal bovine serum (FBS) or in a nondividing viable state by use of medium containing 0-1% dialyzed FBS. The time course of expression of the 6-thioguanine-resistant phenotype was similar with both exponential phase division-arrested cultures showing maximum expression by 9 days after mutagen event is fixed, the expression of the mutant phenotype does not require continued cell division since it occurs in division-arrested cultures. These results also suggest that both dilution of pre-existing hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) enzyme by cell division and turnover by protein degradation are involved in the phenotypic expression. These results separate genetic damage and phenotypic expression in a temporal sense, and point out the need to consider the mechanisms responsible for each process involved in the induction and expression of mutations.

  18. Evaluation of the genotoxicity of process stream extracts from a coal gasification system

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, R.W.; Benson, J.M.; Li, A.P.; Henderson, R.F.; Brooks, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    Extracts of three complex organic environmental mixtures, two from an experimental coal gasifier (a raw gas and a clean gas sample) and one from a coke oven main, were examined for genotoxicity. Three short-term genotoxicity assay systems were used: Ames Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation assay, Chinese hamster ovary cell/hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (CHO/HGPRT) gene locus mutation assay, and the Chinese hamster lung primary culture/sister chromatid exchange (CHL/SCE) assay. Aroclor-1254-induced rat liver homogenate fraction (S-9) was required to observe genotoxicity in both gene locus mutation assays (CHO/HGPRT and Ames). The relative survival of CHO cells exposed to extracts was highest in cells exposed to clean gas samples, with the raw gas sample being the most cytotoxic either with or without the addition of S-9. All three complex mixtures induced sister chromatid exchanges in primary lung cell cultures without the addition of S-9. The relative genotoxicity ranking of the samples varied between the mammalian and prokaryotic assay systems. The results of all three assays indicate that the cleanup process used in the experimental gasifier was effective in decreasing the genotoxic materials in the process stream. These data also reemphasize the necessity of evaluating genotoxicity of complex mixtures in a variety of short-term systems.

  19. Cytotoxic and mutagenic properties of shale oil byproducts. I. Activation of retort process waters with near ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Strniste, G.F.; Chen, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    Cultured Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were exposed to dilutions of shale oil retort process waters obtained from three different retorting processes located in the Green River oil shale formations in the western part of the United States. Although the intensity of the response was dictated by the process water used, all induced a cytotoxic (reduction in colony-forming ability) and mutagenic (induced at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus) response in cells pretreated with dilutions of the waters and subsequent exposure to near ultraviolet light (NUV). Combinations of process water plus NUV yielded mutation frequencies as great as 50% that witnessed for the mutation frequency induced by the potent carcinogen far ultraviolet light. NUV alone was nontoxic and nonmutagenic at the doses of radiation used. Exposure of CHO cells in the dark to nontoxic dilutions of the process waters resulted in small but significant increases in 6-thioguanine resistent mutants (1-2 times background rates). The biological consequences resulting from the disposal of retort process waters into the delcate environment present in this oil shale region could be further complicated by this photoactivating process.

  20. Biological availability of nickel arsenides: cellular response to soluble Ni/sub 5/As/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Gurley, L.R.; Valdez, J.G.; Miglio, J.J.; Cox, S.H.; Tobey, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    It has been determined that particulate Ni/sub 5/As/sub 2/ that might be produced during oil-shale retorting could be mobilized to the environment and made available to the cells of living organisms, including humans. Particulate Ni/sub 5/As/sub 2/ was found to be 12 times more soluble in culture growth medium than in distilled water, and much more soluble in solutions of amino acids, inorganic salts, organic constituents of culture medium, and 15% calf serum. These observations suggest Ni/sub 5/As/sub 2/ particles in airborne dust would be dissolved when they came in contact with the biological fluids of the lung and gastrointestinal tract. The availability to cells of the soluble products of Ni/sub 5/As/sub 2/ was demonstrated by measuring its effects on cell proliferation. As little as 1 ppm soluble Ni/sub 5/As/sub 2/ retarded Chinese hamster (CHO) cell proliferation in culture, and 4 ppm resulted in cell death. Flow cytometry measurements indicated there was a preferential cytotoxic effect on S-phase cells. Despite this, many cells survived to form colonies, causing cell generations. This did not appear to be the case, however, for no mutations could be detected at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus in cells that survived the cytotoxic effects.

  1. Mutagenesis testing with mammalian cells: validating and adapting a multiple-marker bioassay to activate and detect mutagens in crude samples for energy technology. Progress report, July 1975-September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Carver, J.H.; Hatch, F.T.

    1980-11-05

    The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) assay developed during this period offers the unique capability of measuring forward mutation at four gene loci within a single cell line - the autosomal adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (aprt) and thymidine kinase (tk) loci quantified by mutant resistance to azaadenine and fluorodeoxyuridine, as well as the genes involved in resistance to ouabain (Na-K-ATPase) and thioguanine (hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase, hgprt). This multiple-marker system combines and expands the attributes of the two major mammalian mutagenesis assays currently in use: CHO systems employing the single-locus hgprt assay and mouse L5178Y systems assaying mutation only at the tk locus. Extensive validation carried out during the course of this study indicates that using a combination of loci may increase the reliability and generality of in vitro mammalian mutagenesis assays to detect a variety of mutagens. In particular, the aprt locus offers rapid expression kinetics and minimal technical problems with cell density artifacts and dilution procedures and provides a data base obtained with a known marker for single gene mutation. Preliminary evidence from experiments with plant flavonols suggests that these clastogens producing chromosome aberrations and tetraploidy are detected as mutagens at the tk locus but not at the other three markers. The rapid expression of tk mutants and the possibility that this locus detects a broader spectrum of genetic lesions than do the other markers argues for using tk and aprt loci in combination.

  2. The effect of phorbols on metabolic cooperation between human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Mosser, D.D.; Bols, N.C.

    1982-01-01

    Autoradiography has been used to study the effect of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), 4-O-methyl TPA, and phorbol on metabolic cooperation between human diploid fibroblasts. When the donors, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase+ (HGPRT+) cells, and recipients, HGPRT- cells, were plated together in the presence of (/sup 3/H)hypoxanthine and either 4-O-methyl TPA or phorbol, nearly all interactions that developed in 4 h were positive for metabolic cooperation whereas when high concentrations of TPA were used, the number of positive interactions was significantly less than the control. If the phorbol analogs were added after the donors and recipients had made contact, the number of positive interactions was the same as the control in all cases. However, although primary recipients in the cultures that had been treated with phorbol had the same number of grains as those in the control, primary recipients in cultures that had been treated with TPA or high concentrations of 4-O-methyl TPA had significantly fewer grains than those in the control. TPA treatment for 4 h had no effect on total (/sup 3/H)hypoxanthine incorporation or incorporation into acid-soluble and acid-insoluble fractions. Thus, the effect of TPA on metabolic cooperation is interpreted as a reduction in the transfer of (/sup 3/H)nucleotides and is an indication of an interference with intercellular communication.

  3. A modified intraoral resin mouthguard to prevent self-mutilations in lesch-nyhan patients.

    PubMed

    Ragazzini, Giulia; Delucchi, Alessia; Calcagno, Enrico; Servetto, Roberto; Denotti, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, described in 1964 by Lesch and Nyhan, is a X-linked recessive disorder, occurring in 1 : 100000 to 1 : 380000 live births. LNS is characterized by a decrease in activity of hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase, an enzyme involved in purine metabolism, resulting in overproduction of uric acid. Hyperuricemia and neurological features including choreoathetoid spasticity, self-mutilation, and mental retardation clinically characterize this syndrome. In LNS patients the typical feature is loss of tissue from biting themselves with partial or complete amputation of fingers, lips, and tongue. The self-mutilation compares with the eruption of the deciduous teeth. Several drugs trials have been administered to improve self-destructive behavior and invasive treatment approaches, such as extractions of teeth and orthognathic surgery, have been suggested with variable effectiveness. Nowadays prevention is, therefore, the standard of care. The role of dentistry is essential in the management of the self-mutilating behavior, because the teeth represent the main self-injury instrument. This report presents a revision of various therapeutic approaches to manage self-destruction, highlighting the effectiveness of a preventive treatment. It describes a new technique: a resin mouthguard, realized at Gaslini Hospital, to obtain immediate healing of the oral lesions, confirmed in the follow-up period. PMID:25101126

  4. Lack of evidence for an association between the frequency of mutants or translocations in circulating lymphocytes and exposure to radon gas in the home

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, J.; Green, M.H.L.; Bridges, B.A.

    1996-01-01

    Radon measurements in the living room and main bedroom of 41 houses in the town of Street, Somerset, England have been made. Exposure levels, weighted using the formula of the UK National Radiological Protection Board, of 19-484 Bq m{sup -3} (about half >100 Bq m{sup -3}) were found. Blood samples were obtained from a total of 66 occupants in these homes, and the frequency of genetic alterations in lymphocytes was estimated using two different end points. Gene mutations at the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus were determined in T lymphocytes for 65 subjects using a clonal assay, and the frequency of the BCL-2 t(14;18) translocation, a chromosomal event associated with leukemia/lymphoma, was estimated in lymphocytes using a polymerase chain reaction-based technique for 64 subjects. In neither case was a significant correlation with radon levels in the home found, in contrast to our earlier observation with a smaller series. 52 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Cytotoxic and mutagenic properties of shale oil byproducts. I. Activation of retort process waters with near ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Strniste, G.F.; Chen, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    Cultured Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were exposed to dilutions of shale oil retort process waters obtained from three different retorting processes located in the Green River oil shale formations in the western part of the United States. Although the intensity of the response was dictated by thd process water used, all induced a cytotoxic (reduction in colony-forming ability) and mutagenic (induced at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus) response in cells pretreated with dilutions of the waters and subsequent exposure to near ultraviolet light (NUV). Combinations of process water plus NUV yielded mutation frequencies as great as 50% that witnessed for the mutation frequency induced by the potent carcinogen far ultraviolet light. NUV alone was nontoxic and nonmutagenic at the doses of radiation used. Exposure of CHO cells in the dark to nontoxic dilutions of the process waters resulted in small but significant increases in 6-thioguanine resistant mutants. (1-2 time background rates). The biological consequences resulting from the disposal of retort process waters into the delicate environment present in this oil shale region could be further complicated by this photoactivating process.

  6. Selection of suitable reference genes for expression analysis in human glioma using RT-qPCR.

    PubMed

    Grube, Susanne; Göttig, Tatjana; Freitag, Diana; Ewald, Christian; Kalff, Rolf; Walter, Jan

    2015-05-01

    In human glioma research, quantitative real-time reverse-transcription PCR is a frequently used tool. Considering the broad variation in the expression of candidate reference genes among tumor stages and normal brain, studies using quantitative RT-PCR require strict definition of adequate endogenous controls. This study aimed at testing a panel of nine reference genes [beta-2-microglobulin, cytochrome c-1 (CYC1), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), hydroxymethylbilane synthase, hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase 1, ribosomal protein L13a (RPL13A), succinate dehydrogenase, TATA-box binding protein and 14-3-3 protein zeta] to identify and validate the most suitable reference genes for expression studies in human glioma of different grades (World Health Organization grades II-IV). After analysis of the stability values calculated using geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper algorithms, GAPDH, RPL13A, and CYC1 can be indicated as reference genes applicable for accurate normalization of gene expression in glioma compared with normal brain and anaplastic astrocytoma or glioblastoma alone within this experimental setting. Generally, there are no differences in expression levels and variability of candidate genes in glioma tissue compared to normal brain. But stability analyses revealed just a small number of genes suitable for normalization in each of the tumor subgroups and across these groups. Nevertheless, our data show the importance of validation of adequate reference genes prior to every study. PMID:25862007

  7. Low-radiation environment affects the development of protection mechanisms in V79 cells.

    PubMed

    Fratini, E; Carbone, C; Capece, D; Esposito, G; Simone, G; Tabocchini, M A; Tomasi, M; Belli, M; Satta, L

    2015-05-01

    Very little is known about the influence of environmental radiation on living matter. In principle, important information can be acquired by analysing possible differences between parallel biological systems, one in a reference-radiation environment (RRE) and the other in a low-radiation environment (LRE). We took advantage of the unique opportunity represented by the cell culture facilities at the Gran Sasso National Laboratories of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, where environment dose rate reduction factors in the underground (LRE), with respect to the external laboratory (RRE), are as follows: 10(3) for neutrons, 10(7) for directly ionizing cosmic rays and 10 for total γ-rays. Chinese hamster V79 cells were cultured for 10 months in both RRE and LRE. At the end of this period, all the cultures were kept in RRE for another 6 months. Changes in the activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT; glutathione peroxidase, GPX) and spontaneous mutation frequency at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus were investigated. The results obtained suggest that environmental radiation might act as a trigger of defence mechanisms in V79 cells, specifically those in reference conditions, showing a higher degree of defence against endogenous damage as compared to cells grown in a very low-radiation environment. Our findings corroborate the hypothesis that environmental radiation contributes to the development of defence mechanisms in today living organisms/systems. PMID:25636513

  8. Analysis of in vivo mutation in the Hprt and Tk genes of mouse lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Shaddock, Joseph G; Heflich, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    Assays measuring mutant frequencies in endogenous reporter genes are used for identifying potentially genotoxic environmental agents and discovering phenotypes prone to genomic instability and diseases, such as cancer. Here, we describe methods for identifying mouse spleen lymphocytes with mutations in the endogenous X-linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (Hprt) gene and the endogenous autosomal thymidine kinase (Tk) gene. The selective clonal expansion of mutant lymphocytes is based upon the phenotypic properties of HPRT- and TK-deficient cells. The same procedure can be utilized for quantifying Hprt mutations in most strains of mice (and, with minor changes, in other mammalian species), while mutations in the Tk gene can be determined only in transgenic mice that are heterozygous for inactivation of this gene. Expanded mutant clones can be further analyzed to classify the types of mutations in the Tk gene (small intragenic mutations vs. large chromosomal mutations) and to determine the nature of intragenic mutation in both the Hprt and Tk genes. PMID:24623234

  9. Comparative mutagenicity of a coal combustion fly ash extract in Salmonella typhimurium and Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, A.P.; Clark, C.R.; Hanson, R.L.; Henderson, T.R.; Hobbs, C.H.

    1983-01-01

    The dichloromethane extract of a coal combustion fly ash sample obtained from an experimental fluidized bed coal combustor was tested for mutagenicity in Salmonella typhimurium and cultured Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The extract was directly mutagenic in S typhimurium strain TA98 and the nitroreductase deficient strains TA98NR and TA98/1,8DNP/sub 6/. The mutagenicity observed in TA98NR and TA98/1,8DNP/sub 6/ was lower than that in TA98. Addition of exogenous Aroclor 1254-induced rat liver supernatant (liver S9) decreased the bacterial mutagenicity of the extract. A different mutagenic response was observed in CHO cells. In the absence of liver S9, although the extract was cytotoxic to CHO cells, no significant mutagenicity was observed. Addition of exogenous liver S9 decreased the cytotoxicity and increased the mutagenicity at both Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-ATPase and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) gene loci in CHO cells. Using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and tandem quadruple mass spectrometry, a number of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitrated PAHs (nitro-PAHs) were tentatively identified and quantitated. A possible explanation of the difference in bacterial and mammalian mutagenicity of the extract is that the bacterial mutagenicity was induced by the nitro-PAHs that are potent bacterial mutagens and mammalian mutagenicity was induced by both PAHs and nitro-PAHs that are promutagens.

  10. Effects of cell cycle position on ionizing radiation mutagenesis. I. Quantitative assays of two genetic loci in a human lymphoblastoid cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Yao-Yu; Liber, H.L.

    1996-11-01

    Relatively little work has been done on the influence of the position of the cell in the cell cycle on ionizing radiation-induced mutagenesis. We synchronized WTK1 human lymphoblastoid cells with 200 {mu}M lovastatin for 48 h; under these conditions more than 80% of the cells were arrested in G{sub 1} phase. Upon release, there was a 12-15-h lag followed by movement of a large fraction into S phase. We irradiated cells with either 1.5 Gy X rays at 1, 15, 18, 21 or 24 h or 1.5 Gy {gamma} rays at 1, 5, 10, 15 or 24 h after release from lovastatin. We showed that WTK1 cells were most sensitive to ionizing radiation-induced toxicity in G{sub 1} and into S phase, and more resistant in mid to late S and G{sub 2}/M phase. Somewhat surprisingly, we found that the two different gene loci had different sensitivities to radiation-induced mutation through the cell cycle. Cells in late G{sub 1} through mid-S phase were most sensitive to radiation-induced mutations at the autosomal thymidine kinase (TK) locus, whereas G{sub 1} phase was the most sensitive phase at the X-linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus. 29 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Genotype-phenotype correlations in neurogenetics: Lesch-Nyhan disease as a model disorder.

    PubMed

    Fu, Rong; Ceballos-Picot, Irene; Torres, Rosa J; Larovere, Laura E; Yamada, Yasukazu; Nguyen, Khue V; Hegde, Madhuri; Visser, Jasper E; Schretlen, David J; Nyhan, William L; Puig, Juan G; O'Neill, Patrick J; Jinnah, H A

    2014-05-01

    Establishing meaningful relationships between genetic variations and clinical disease is a fundamental goal for all human genetic disorders. However, these genotype-phenotype correlations remain incompletely characterized and sometimes conflicting for many diseases. Lesch-Nyhan disease is an X-linked recessive disorder that is caused by a wide variety of mutations in the HPRT1 gene. The gene encodes hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase, an enzyme involved in purine metabolism. The fine structure of enzyme has been established by crystallography studies, and its function can be measured with very precise biochemical assays. This rich knowledge of genetic alterations in the gene and their functional effect on its protein product provides a powerful model for exploring factors that influence genotype-phenotype correlations. The present study summarizes 615 known genetic mutations, their influence on the gene product, and their relationship to the clinical phenotype. In general, the results are compatible with the concept that the overall severity of the disease depends on how mutations ultimately influence enzyme activity. However, careful evaluation of exceptions to this concept point to several additional genetic and non-genetic factors that influence genotype-phenotype correlations. These factors are not unique to Lesch-Nyhan disease, and are relevant to most other genetic diseases. The disease therefore serves as a valuable model for understanding the challenges associated with establishing genotype-phenotype correlations for other disorders. PMID:23975452

  12. Protection against radiation-induced mutations at the hprt locus by spermine and N,N{double_prime}-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278)

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J.; Schwartz, J.L. |; Shigematsu, N.

    1993-06-01

    The polyamine spermine and the disulfide NN{double_prime}-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278) are structurally similar agents capable of binding to DNA. WR-33278 is the disulfide moiety of the clinically studied radioprotective agent (WR-2721). Because of their structural similarities, it was of interest to characterize and compare their radioprotective properties using the endpoints of cell survival and mutation induction at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in Chinese hamster AA8 cells. In order to facilitate both the uptake of VM-33278 into cells and the direct comparison between the protective properties of WR-33278 and spermine, these agents were electroporated into cells. Electroporation alone reduced cell survival to 75% but had no effect on hprt mutation frequency. The electroporation of either spermine or WR-33278 at concentrations greater than 0.01 mM was extremely toxic. The exposure of cells to both electroporation and irradiation gave rise to enhanced cell killing and mutation induction. Cell survival values at a radiation dose of 750 cGy were enhanced by factors of 1.3 and 1.8 following electroporation of 0.01 mM of spermine and WR-33278, respectively, 30 min prior to irradiation. Neither agent was protective at a concentration of 0.001 mM. Protection against radiation-induced hprt mutations was observed for both spermine and WR-33278 under all experimental conditions tested.

  13. Induction of sister chromatid exchanges by direct and indirect chemical agents in a human teratoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Murison, G. . Dept. of Biological Sciences)

    1989-01-01

    In the present work, we have extended the characterization of the P3 cell line, derived from a human epithelial teratocarcinoma, by studying the induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) by direct and indirect carcinogens. Several direct-acting carcinogens produce a dose-dependent increase in SCEs. Most notably, N-methyl-N{prime}-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine and 7{beta}, 8{alpha}-dihydroxy-9 {alpha},10{alpha}-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo(a)pyrene produce increases in SCEs at dosages comparable to those used to induce mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus. The indirect carcinogens elicit SCEs only when the P3 cells are cocultured with cells capable of metabolizing the indirect carcinogens to the active form. Human breast carcinoma (BJ-015) and rat hepatoma (RL12) cells are equally efficient in activating polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to the active form. This cell-mediated induction of SCEs is obtained when P3 cells are incubated with live, x-irradiated, or UV-irradiated BJ or RL cells. This P3 cell line is thus equally suitable to study the induction of mutations or the induction of SCEs with direct and indirect carcinogens. 35 refs., 3 tabs.

  14. Validation of housekeeping genes in the brains of rats submitted to chronic intermittent hypoxia, a sleep apnea model.

    PubMed

    Julian, Guilherme Silva; de Oliveira, Renato Watanabe; Perry, Juliana Cini; Tufik, Sergio; Chagas, Jair Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a syndrome characterized by intermittent nocturnal hypoxia, sleep fragmentation, hypercapnia and respiratory effort, and it has been associated with several complications, such as diabetes, hypertension and obesity. Quantitative real-time PCR has been performed in previous OSA-related studies; however, these studies were not validated using proper reference genes. We have examined the effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), which is an experimental model mainly of cardiovascular consequences of OSA, on reference genes, including beta-actin, beta-2-microglobulin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase and eukaryotic 18S rRNA, in different areas of the brain. All stability analyses were performed using the geNorm, Normfinder and BestKeeper software programs. With exception of the 18S rRNA, all of the evaluated genes were shown to be stable following CIH exposure. However, gene stability rankings were dependent on the area of the brain that was analyzed and varied according to the software that was used. This study demonstrated that CIH affects various brain structures differently. With the exception of the 18S rRNA, all of the tested genes are suitable for use as housekeeping genes in expression analyses. PMID:25289636

  15. Ionizing radiation-induced 6-thioguanine-resistant clones in synchronous CHO cells

    SciTech Connect

    Burki, J.

    1980-01-01

    When cultured Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are exposed to acute doses of ionizing radiation at different times during the cell division cycle, there is a characteristic cell-cycle response for radiation-induced cell killing and induced resistance to 6-thio-guanine (6TG). For cell killing the sensitive periods of the cell cycle are the G1, G2, M, and early S periods, as others have reported. For mutation induction the sensitive stage is the G1 period with the maximum sensitivity near the boundary between the G1 and the S period. Cells appear to be very refractile to induction of 6TG resistance in other periods of the cell cycle. These results suggest that chromosomal rearrangements of the X chromosome are most likely to occur in the G1 period before the gene for hypoxanthine-guanine-phosphoribosyl-transferase replicates, most likely due to genetic recombination. Clones resistant to 6TG after exposure to x rays are most likely induced by a different mutagenic pathway than ones stimulated by ultraviolet (uv) or ethylnitrosourea treatments, since the mutation induction patterns in the cell cycle are quite different.

  16. The human T-cell cloning assay: identifying genotypes susceptible to drug toxicity and somatic mutation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Sai-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Humans exhibit marked genetic polymorphisms in drug metabolism that contribute to high incidence of adverse effects in susceptible individuals due to altered balance between metabolic activation and detoxification. The T-cell cloning assay, which detects mutations in the gene for hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT), is the most well-developed reporter system for studying specific locus mutation in human somatic cells. The assay is based on a mitogen- and growth factor-dependent clonal expansion of peripheral T-lymphocytes in which the 6-thioguanine-resistant HPRT mutants can be selected, enumerated, and collected for molecular analysis of the mutational nature. The assay provides a unique tool for studying in vivo and in vitro mutagenesis, for investigating the functional impact of common polymorphism in metabolism and repair genes, and for identifying risk genotypes for drug-induced toxicity and mutagenicity. This chapter presents a simple and reliable method for the enumeration of HPRT mutant frequency induced in vitro without using any source of recombinant interleukin-2. The other main feature is that only truly induced and unique mutants are collected for further analysis. PMID:24623236

  17. Comparative mutagenicity of a coal combustion fly ash extract in Salmonella typhimurium and chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, A.P.; Clark, C.R.; Hanson, R.L.; Henderson, T.R.; Hobbs, C.H.

    1983-01-01

    The dichloromethane extract of a coal combustion fly ash sample obtained from an experimental fluidized bed coal combustor was tested for mutagenicity in Salmonella typhimurium and cultured Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The extract was directly mutagenic in S typhimurium strain TA98 and the nitroreducatase deficient strains TA98NR and TA98/1,8DNP/sub 6/. The mutagenicity observed in TA98NR and TA98/1,8DNP/sub 6/ was lower than that in TA98. Addition of exogenous Aroclor 1254-induced rat liver supernatant (liver S9) decreased the bacterial mutagenicity of the extract. A different mutagenic response was observed in CHO cells. In the absence of liver S9, although the extract was cytotoxic to CHO cells, no significant mutagenicity was observed. Addition of exogenous liver S9 decreased the cytotoxicity and increased the mutagenicity at both Na/sup +/ -K/sup +/ -ATPase and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) gene loci in CHO cells. Using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and tandem quadruple mass spectrometry, a number of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitrated PAHs (nitro-PAHs) were tentatively identified and quantitated. A possible explanation of the difference in bacterial and mammalian mutagenicity of the extract is that the bacterial mutagenicity was induced by the nitro-PAHs that are potent bacterial mutagens and mammalian mutagenicity was induced by both PAHs and nitro-PAHs that are promutagens.

  18. Comparison of 6-thioguanine-resistant mutation and sister chromatid exchanges in Chinese hamster V79 cells with forty chemical and physical agents

    SciTech Connect

    Nishi, Y.; Hasegawa, M.M.; Taketomi, M.; Ohkawa, Y.; Inui, N.

    1984-08-01

    The induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) and mutation at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus and toxicities of 40 different chemical and physical agents were examined on Chinese hamster V79 cells. These agents included mono-, di-, tri-, and polyfunctional alkylating agents, intercalators, gamma-rays, and UV light irradiation. Mutation was measured as resistance to 6-thioguanine and toxicity as loss of cell-plating efficiency. SCE were examined 29 hr after treatment. With the agents examined, a highly positive correlation existed between SCE-inducing and mutagenic potencies, when expressed as increase in the number per a unit dose over the control values. But the great difference of the ratios of mutagenic potencies versus SCE-inducing potencies among agents was observed, the maximal difference in the ratios being about 200-fold. The agents that showed the higher values of the ratio (agents producing more mutations than SCE) were bleomycin, cobalt-60 gamma-rays, all ethylating agents (N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea, N-ethyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, ethyl methanesulfonate, and diethylsulfate), N-propyl-N-nitrosourea, N-butyl-N-nitrosourea, isopropyl methanesulfonate, intercalating acridine compounds (2-methoxy-6-chloro-9-(3-(ethyl-2-chloroethyl)aminopropylamino)-acridine X 2HCl and 2-methoxy-6-chloro-9-(3-(chloroethyl)-aminopropylamino)acridine 2HCl) and UV light at 254 nm.

  19. Toxicologic responses to a complex coal conversion by-product: mammalian cell mutagenicity and dermal carcinogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, M.L.; Haugen, D.A.; Kirchner, F.R.; Reilly, C.A. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    In the present study, we measured mutagenicity and cytotoxicity in hamster and human cells in vitro and tumorigenicity in mouse skin in vivo. The Chinese hamster ovary cell/hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (CHO/HGPRT) assay has proven useful in estimating the mutagenic activity of pure compounds but has been used only to a limited extent with complex mixtures. The human teratocarcinoma cell line, designated P/sub 3/, used in these studies has recently been adapted for use in mutagenesis assays of individual compounds but has not previously been used to evaluate mutagenesis by complex mixtures. In this report, we compare the responses of the hamster and human cell lines and the mouse skin to chemical class fractions of a complex organic by-product condensate (tar) of coal gasification. The composition of this complex tar is chemically similar to that of petroleum-derived tars and products of fossil fuel combustion. By testing basic, acidic, and neutral chemical class fractions of the complex tar, we demonstrated that the predominant genotoxic components were present in the neutral fraction as measured both in the CHO/HGPRT and dermal carcinogenicity assays. The human P/sub 3/ cells were less sensitive for mutagenesis and cytotoxicity than were the rodent cells. Furthermore, fractionation and bioassay provided evidence for interactive effects that indicate the importance of combining chemical characterization and toxicologic evaluation of complex mixtures. 25 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  20. Genotoxicity of phthalates.

    PubMed

    Erkekoglu, Pınar; Kocer-Gumusel, Belma

    2014-12-01

    Many of the environmental, occupational and industrial chemicals are able to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cause oxidative stress. ROS may lead to genotoxicity, which is suggested to contribute to the pathophysiology of many human diseases, including inflammatory diseases and cancer. Phthalates are ubiquitous environmental chemicals and are well-known peroxisome proliferators (PPs) and endocrine disruptors. Several in vivo and in vitro studies have been conducted concerning the carcinogenic and mutagenic effects of phthalates. Di(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate (DEHP) and several other phthalates are shown to be hepatocarcinogenic in rodents. The underlying factor in the hepatocarcinogenesis is suggested to be their ability to generate ROS and cause genotoxicity. Several methods, including chromosomal aberration test, Ames test, micronucleus assay and hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) mutation test and Comet assay, have been used to determine genotoxic properties of phthalates. Comet assay has been an important tool in the measurement of the genotoxic potential of many chemicals, including phthalates. In this review, we will mainly focus on the studies, which were conducted on the DNA damage caused by different phthalate esters and protection studies against the genotoxicity of these chemicals. PMID:25174766

  1. SERS internship: Fall 1994 abstracts and research papers

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, B.

    1994-12-01

    This publication is a collection of articles generated as a result of the fall 1994 Science and Engineering Research Semester program at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Research titles include: electrochemical cells in the reduction of hexavalent chromium; an automated system for studying the power distribution of electron beams; the mapping of novel genes to human chromosome 19; bolometer analysis comparisons; design and implementation of the LLNL Gigabit Testbed; in vitro synthesis and purification of PhIP-Deoxyguanosine and PhIP-DNA Covalent Complexes; pre-thymic somatic mutation leads to high mutant frequency hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase gene; characterization of thin film multi-layers with magnetization curves and modeling of low angle X-ray diffraction data; total least squares; determining the water content of the Geysers Graywacke of northern California; a general approach to sharing data between scientific representations; nanomechanical properties of SiC thin films grown from C{sub 60} precursors; advanced information technology, a tool set for building clean database applications; the design of an automated electrolytic enrichment procedure for tritium; fluvial terrace dating using in-situ cosmogenic {sup 21}Ne; computer- aided mapping of stream channels beneath the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA; X-ray spectroscopic technique for energetic electron transport studies in short-pulse laser/plasma interactions. Separate entries have been put in the energy data base for articles from this report. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  2. Escape from Het-6 Incompatibility in Neurospora Crassa Partial Diploids Involves Preferential Deletion within the Ectopic Segment

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M. L.; Yang, C. J.; Metzenberg, R. L.; Glass, N. L.

    1996-01-01

    Self-incompatible het-6(OR)/het-6(PA) partial diploids of Neurospora crassa were selected from a cross involving the translocation strain, T(IIL -> IIIR)AR18, and a normal sequence strain. About 25% of the partial diploids exhibited a marked increase in growth rate after 2 weeks, indicating that ``escape'' from het-6 incompatibility had occurred. Near isogenic tester strains with different alleles (het-6(OR) and het-6(PA)) were constructed and used to determine that 80 of 96 escape strains tested were het-6(PA), retaining the het-6 allele found in the normal-sequence LGII position; 16 were het-6(OR), retaining the allele in the translocated position. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms in 45 escape strains were examined with probes made from cosmids that spanned the translocated region. Along with electrophoretic analysis of chromosomes from three escape strains, RFLPs showed that escape is associated with deletion of part of one or the other of the duplicated DNA segments. Deletions ranged in size from ~70 kbp up to putatively the entire 270-kbp translocated region but always included a 35-kbp region wherein we hypothesize het-6 is located. The deletion spectrum at het-6 thus resembles other cases where mitotic deletions occur such as of tumor suppressor genes and of the hprt gene (coding for hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase) in humans. PMID:8889517

  3. A straightforward radiometric technique for measuring IMP dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Cooney, D A; Wilson, Y; McGee, E

    1983-04-15

    [2-3H]Inosinic acid ([2-3H]IMP) has been biosynthesized in good yield from [2-3H]hypoxanthine and PRPP via the action of a partially purified preparation of hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyl transferase from mouse brain. The product was purified in one step by ascending paper chromatography, and used to assess the activity of IMP dehydrogenase. To conduct the assay, tritiated substrate is admixed with enzyme in a final volume of 10 microliters; NAD is present to serve as cofactor for the reaction, and allopurinol to inhibit the oxidation of any hypoxanthine generated as a consequence of side reactions. After an appropriate period of incubation, the 3H2O arising from the oxidation of tritiated IMP via [3H]NAD is isolated by quantitative microdistillation. Performed as described, the assay is facile, sensitive, and accurate, with the capability of detecting the dehydrogenation of as little as 1 pmol of [3H]IMP. Using it, measurements have been made of IMP dehydrogenase in a comprehensive array of mouse organs. Of these, pancreas contained the enzyme at the highest specific activity. PMID:6135372

  4. Quantitative and molecular analyses of mutation in a pSV2gpt transformed CHO cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Stankowski, L.F. Jr.; Tindall, K.R.; Hsie, A.W.

    1983-01-01

    Following NDA-mediated gene transfer we have isolated a cell line useful for studying gene mutation at the molecular level. This line, AS52, derived from a hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line, carries a single copy of the E. coli xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (XGPRT) gene (gpt) and exhibits a spontaneous mutant frequency of 20 TG/sup r/ mutants/10/sup 6/ clonable cells. As with HGPRT/sup -/ mutants, XGPRT/sup -/ mutants can be selected in 6-thioguanine. AS52 (XGPRT/sup +/) and wild type CHO (HGPRT/sup +/) cell exhibit almost identical cytotoxic responses to various agents. We observed significant differences in mutation induction by UV light and ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). Ratios of XGPRT/sup -/ to HGPRT/sup -/ mutants induced per unit dose (J/m/sup 2/ for UV light and ..mu..g/ml for EMS) are 1.4 and 0.70, respectively. Preliminary Southern blot hybridization analyses has been performed on 30 XGPRT/sup -/ AS52 mutants. A majority of spontaneous mutants have deletions ranging in size from 1 to 4 kilobases (9/19) to complete loss of gpt sequences (4/19); the remainder have no detectable (5/19) or only minor (1/19) alterations. 5/5 UV-induced and 5/6 EMS-induced mutants do not show a detectable change. Similar analyses are underway for mutations induced by x-irradiation and ICR 191 treatment.

  5. Three-dimensional structure of phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from E. coli at 2.71 Å resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, V. I.; Abramchik, Yu. A.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Muravieva, T. I.; Esipov, R. S.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from Escherichia coli was cloned, purified, and crystallized. Single crystals of the enzyme were grown under microgravity. The X-ray diffraction data set was collected at the Spring-8 synchrotron facility and used to determine the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme by the molecular-replacement method at 2.71 Å resolution. The active and regulatory sites in the molecule of E. coli phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase were revealed by comparison with the homologous protein from Bacillus subtilis, the structure of which was determined in a complex with functional ligands. The conformations of polypeptide-chain fragments surrounding and composing the active and regulatory sites were shown to be identical in both proteins.

  6. Structural and biochemical analyses of the catalysis and potency impact of inhibitor phosphoribosylation by human nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Oh, Angela; Ho, Yen-Ching; Zak, Mark; Liu, Yongbo; Chen, Xukun; Yuen, Po-Wai; Zheng, Xiaozhang; Liu, Yichin; Dragovich, Peter S; Wang, Weiru

    2014-05-26

    Prolonged inhibition of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is a strategy for targeting cancer metabolism. Many NAMPT inhibitors undergo NAMPT-catalyzed phosphoribosylation (pRib), a property often correlated with their cellular potency. To understand this phenomenon and facilitate drug design, we analyzed a potent cellularly active NAMPT inhibitor (GNE-617). A crystal structure of pRib-GNE-617 in complex with NAMPT protein revealed a relaxed binding mode. Consistently, the adduct formation resulted in tight binding and strong product inhibition. In contrast, a biochemically equipotent isomer of GNE-617 (GNE-643) also formed pRib adducts but displayed significantly weaker cytotoxicity. Structural analysis revealed an altered ligand conformation of GNE-643, thus suggesting weak association of the adducts with NAMPT. Our data support a model for cellularly active NAMPT inhibitors that undergo NAMPT-catalyzed phosphoribosylation to produce pRib adducts that retain efficient binding to the enzyme. PMID:24797455

  7. Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase activity affects growth and riboflavin production in Ashbya gossypii

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Alberto; Santos, María A; Revuelta, José L

    2008-01-01

    Background Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (PRPP) is a central compound for cellular metabolism and may be considered as a link between carbon and nitrogen metabolism. PRPP is directly involved in the de novo and salvage biosynthesis of GTP, which is the immediate precursor of riboflavin. The industrial production of this vitamin using the fungus Ashbya gossypii is an important biotechnological process that is strongly influenced by substrate availability. Results Here we describe the characterization and manipulation of two genes of A. gossypii encoding PRPP synthetase (AGR371C and AGL080C). We show that the AGR371C and AGL080C gene products participate in PRPP synthesis and exhibit inhibition by ADP. We also observed a major contribution of AGL080C to total PRPP synthetase activity, which was confirmed by an evident growth defect of the Δagl080c strain. Moreover, we report the overexpression of wild-type and mutant deregulated isoforms of Agr371cp and Agl080cp that significantly enhanced the production of riboflavin in the engineered A. gossypii strains. Conclusion It is shown that alterations in PRPP synthetase activity have pleiotropic effects on the fungal growth pattern and that an increase in PRPP synthetase enzymatic activity can be used to enhance riboflavin production in A. gossypii. PMID:18782443

  8. In vivo footprint analysis and genomic sequencing of the human hypoxanthine-phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) 5 prime region on the active and inactive X chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Hornstra, I.K.; Yang, T.P. )

    1991-03-11

    In female placental mammals, one of the two X chromosome in each somatic cell is randomly inactivated during female embryogenesis as a mechanism for dosage compensation. Once a given X chromosome is inactivated, all mitotic progeny maintain the same X chromosome in the inactive state. DNA-protein interactions and DNA methylation are hypothesized to maintain this allele-specific system of differential gene expression. Ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction (LMPCR) in vivo footprinting and genomic sequencing were used to study DNA-protein interactions and DNA-methylation within the 5{prime} region of the X-linked human HPRT gene on the active and inactive X chromosomes. In vivo footprint analysis reveals at least one DNA-protein interaction specific to the active HPRT allele in human male fibroblast cells and hamster-human hybrid cells containing only the active human X chromosome. In the region examined, all CpG dinucleotides are methylated on the inactive HPRT allele and unmethylated on the active X allele in hamster-human hybrid cells carrying either the inactive or active human X chromosome, respectively. Thus, DNA-methylation may be mediating the differential binding of sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins to the active or inactive HPRT alleles.

  9. [Effect of co-expression of nicotinic acid phosphoribosyl transferase and pyruvate carboxylase on succinic acid production in Escherichia coli BA002].

    PubMed

    Cao, Weijia; Gou, Dongmei; Liang, Liya; Liu, Rongming; Chen, Kequan; Ma, Jiangfeng; Jiang, Min

    2013-12-01

    Escherichia coli BA002, in which the ldhA and pflB genes are deleted, cannot utilize glucose anaerobically due to the inability to regenerate NAD+. To restore glucose utilization, overexpression of nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRTase) encoded by the pncB gene, a rate-limiting enzyme of NAD(H) synthesis pathway, resulted in a significant increase in cell mass and succinate production under anaerobic conditions. However, a high concentration of pyruvate was accumulated. Thus, co-expression of NAPRTase and the heterologous pyruvate carboxylase (PYC) of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris NZ9000 in recombinant E. coli BA016 was investigated. Results in 3 L fermentor showed that OD600 is 4.64 and BA016 consumed 35.00 g/L glucose and produced 25.09 g/L succinate after 112 h under anaerobic conditions. Overexpression of pncB and pyc in BA016, the accumulation of pyruvic acid was further decreased, and the formation of succinic acid was further increased. PMID:24660633

  10. Identification and analysis of residues contained on β → α loops of the dual-substrate (βα)8 phosphoribosyl isomerase A specific for its phosphoribosyl anthranilate isomerase activity

    PubMed Central

    Noda-García, Lianet; Camacho-Zarco, Aldo R; Verdel-Aranda, Karina; Wright, Helena; Soberón, Xavier; Fülöp, Vilmos; Barona-Gómez, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    A good model to experimentally explore evolutionary hypothesis related to enzyme function is the ancient-like dual-substrate (βα)8 phosphoribosyl isomerase A (PriA), which takes part in both histidine and tryptophan biosynthesis in Streptomyces coelicolor and related organisms. In this study, we determined the Michaelis–Menten enzyme kinetics for both isomerase activities in wild-type PriA from S. coelicolor and in selected single-residue monofunctional mutants, identified after Escherichia coli in vivo complementation experiments. Structural and functional analyses of a hitherto unnoticed residue contained on the functionally important β → α loop 5, namely, Arg139, which was postulated on structural grounds to be important for the dual-substrate specificity of PriA, is presented for the first time. Indeed, enzyme kinetics analyses done on the mutant variants PriA_Ser81Thr and PriA_Arg139Asn showed that these residues, which are contained on β → α loops and in close proximity to the N-terminal phosphate-binding site, are essential solely for the phosphoribosyl anthranilate isomerase activity of PriA. Moreover, analysis of the X-ray crystallographic structure of PriA_Arg139Asn elucidated at 1.95 Å herein strongly implicates the occurrence of conformational changes in this β → α loop as a major structural feature related to the evolution of the dual-substrate specificity of PriA. It is suggested that PriA has evolved by tuning a fine energetic balance that allows the sufficient degree of structural flexibility needed for accommodating two topologically dissimilar substrates—within a bifunctional and thus highly constrained active site—without compromising its structural stability. PMID:20066665

  11. Functional specialization of one copy of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase in ureide production from symbiotically fixed nitrogen in Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Coleto, Inmaculada; Trenas, Almudena T; Erban, Alexander; Kopka, Joachim; Pineda, Manuel; Alamillo, Josefa M

    2016-08-01

    Purines are essential molecules formed in a highly regulated pathway in all organisms. In tropical legumes, the nitrogen fixed in the nodules is used to generate ureides through the oxidation of de novo synthesized purines. Glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase (PRAT) catalyses the first committed step of de novo purine synthesis. In Phaseolus vulgaris there are three genes coding for PRAT. The three full-length sequences, which are intron-less genes, were cloned, and their expression levels were determined under conditions that affect the synthesis of purines. One of the three genes, PvPRAT3, is highly expressed in nodules and protein amount and enzymatic activity in these tissues correlate with nitrogen fixation activity. Inhibition of PvPRAT3 gene expression by RNAi-silencing and subsequent metabolomic analysis of the transformed roots shows that PvPRAT3 is essential for the synthesis of ureides in P. vulgaris nodules. PMID:27004600

  12. Use of HeLa cell guanine nucleotides by Chlamydia psittaci.

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos, M M; Hatch, T P

    1979-01-01

    Exogenous guanine was found to be incorporated into the nucleic acids of Chlamydia psittaci when the parasite was grown in HeLa cells containing hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.8) activity but not when the parasite was grown in transferase-deficient HeLa cells. No evidence for a chlamydia-specific transferase activity was found in either transferase-containing or transferase-deficient infected HeLa cells. It is concluded that C. psittaci is incapable of metabolizing guanine, but that the parasite can use host-generated guanine nucleotides as precursors for nucleic acid synthesis. Images PMID:478649

  13. Charged-particle mutagenesis II. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high LET charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 micrometer2 and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(-3) micrometer2, respectively. The maximum values were obtained by 56Fe with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(-5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  14. WR-2721 protects against cytoxan-induced hprt mutagenesis without affecting therapeutic effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, Yasushi; Perrin, J.; Hunter, N.; Milas, L.; Grdina, D. ||

    1995-12-31

    The radioprotector S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) was evaluated for its ability to protect against cytoxan-induced mutagenesis at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in mouse splenocytes under conditions that would not interfere with the therapeutic effectiveness of cytoxan in the treatment of fibrosarcoma lung tumors. Mutations at the hprt locus increase in frequency as a function of the dose of cytoxan used. With a spontaneous mutation frequency in C3H mice of 1.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}, mutation frequencies increased from 6.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} as the dose of cytoxan increased from 50 to 200 mg/kg. C3H male mice were injected in their tail veins with 3.5 {times} 10{sup 5} viable fibrosarcoma (FSa) cells. This protocol gave rise to an average of 68 tumor colonies per mouse. Four days following injection animals were treated with cytoxan at a dose of 100 mg/kg, which gave rise to significant tumor cell killing and a reduction in tumor colony number to less than an average of one per animal. WR-2721 at a concentration of 100 mg/kg did not affect on cytoxan`s therapeutic effectiveness. However, a 100 mg/kg dose of WR-2721 was effective in reducing the cytoxan induced hprt mutation frequency in mice from 160 to 35 per 10{sup 5} viable cells regardless of whether it was administered 30 min before or 2 h following cytoxan treatment.

  15. Charged-particle mutagenesis II. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-10-01

    The biological effects of high LET charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/μm to 975 KeV/gmm with particle energy (on the cells) between 94 - 603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/μm. The inactivation cross-section (αi) and the action-section for mutant induction (αm) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 μm2 and 0.09 to 5.56 × 10-3 μm2, respectively. The maximum values were obtained by 56Fe with an LET of 200 keV/μm. The mutagenicity (αm/αi) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 × 10-5 with the maximum value at 150 keV/μm. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  16. Chemical characterization and mutagenic properties of polycyclic aromatic compounds in sediment from tributaries of the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fabacher, David L.; Schmitt, Christopher J.; Besser, John M.; Mac, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    Sediments from four inshore industrial sites and a reference site in the Great Lakes were extracted with solvents and characterized chemically for polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs). An aqueous phase and a crude organic extract were obtained. The crude organic extract was further resolved into fractions A-2 (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) and A-3 (nitrogen-containing polycyclic aromatic compounds), which were analyzed for PACs by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The extracts and fractions were tested for mutagenicity in three assays: Ames, rat hepatocyte unscheduled DNA synthesis, and Chinese hamster ovary hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (CHO/HGPRT). Sediments from the industrial sites contained 27 to 363 μg/g total PACs; the reference site, less than 1 μg/g. Qualitative differences in the residue profiles among the sites were attributable to the probable sources of the PACs (petroleum versus combustion). Only one industrial site yielded measurable (0.1 μg/g or more) concentrations of individual nitrogen-containing PACs. In the Ames assay, only the highest doses of the A-2 fractions from two sites approached positive results. Conversely, the crude organic extract and A-2 and A-3 fractions from all sites induced unscheduled DNA synthesis. Crude organic extracts and the A-2 and A-3 fractions from all industrial sites gave well-defined dose-response relations in the CHO/HGPRT assay. We established the presence of chemical mutagens in sediment that could be correlated with neoplasms in fish from many of the sites; however, the mutagenicity of the sediment extracts was not completely related to the degree of contamination by PACs. We also discuss the utility of mutagenicity assays in the evaluation of complex chemical mixtures and recommend the use of a CHO/HGPRT-type assay in which cells are not required to proliferate in the presence of potential interfering chemicals.

  17. Evaluation of the genotoxicity of process stream extracts from a coal gasification system.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, R W; Benson, J M; Li, A P; Henderson, R F; Brooks, A L

    1984-01-01

    Extracts of three complex organic environmental mixtures, two from an experimental coal gasifier (a raw gas and a clean gas sample) and one from a coke oven main, were examined for genotoxicity. Three short-term genotoxicity assay systems were used: Ames Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation assay, Chinese hamster ovary cell/hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (CHO/HGPRT) gene locus mutation assay, and the Chinese hamster lung primary culture/sister chromatid exchange (CHL/SCE) assay. Aroclor-1254-induced rat liver homogenate fraction (S-9) was required to observe genotoxicity in both gene locus mutation assays (CHO/HGPRT and Ames). The relative survival of CHO cells exposed to extracts was highest in cells exposed to clean gas samples, with the raw gas sample being the most cytotoxic either with or without the addition of S-9. All three complex mixtures induced sister chromatid exchanges in primary lung cell cultures without the addition of S-9. The relative genotoxicity ranking of the samples varied between the mammalian and prokaryotic assay systems. Coke oven main extract produced fewer revertants in bacteria than the raw gas sample. However, the coke oven main extract was more genotoxic in the two eukaryotic systems (CHL/SCE and CHO/HGPRT) than was the raw gas sample. The results of all three assays indicate that the cleanup process used in the experimental gasifier was effective in decreasing the genotoxic materials in the process stream. These data also reemphasize the necessity of evaluating genotoxicity of complex mixtures in a variety of short-term systems. PMID:6389110

  18. Charged-particle mutagenesis 2. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 sq micrometer and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(exp -3) sq micrometer respectively. The maximum values were obtained by Fe-56 with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(exp -5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  19. Fluorescent light irradiation and its mutagenic potential in cultured mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pant, K.; Thilager, A.

    1994-12-31

    The photobiological effect of light is characterized by its energy emission at different wave lengths. Therefore by studying the energy emission spectra at different light sources and their photobiological activities, one can relate wavelength range(s) of the spectrum to a particular photobiological effect. We studied the potential of light irradiation from standard fluorescent bulbs (Sylvania 34WT-12) used in offices and laboratories to induce unscheduled DNA Synthesis (UDS) and mutations in cultured mammalian cells. The energy emission spectrum of the bulbs was determined at every 10 nanometers from 300nM to 700nM. The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were used to study the induction of mutations at the Hypoxanthine Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase (HGPRT) locus. Primary rat hepatocyte cultures were used to study the effect of light irradiation on UDS. The CHO cells were cultured in tissue culture flasks in minimum light conditions (.02mw/cm{sup 2}) and exposed to light irradiations with durations from 0 to 40 minutes. The cultures were maintained in darkness during the expression period and evaluated for HGPRT mutant frequencies. Similarly, the primary rat hepatocyte cultures were cultured on cover slips under minimal light conditions except for light irradiation and evaluated for UDS using 3H-thymidine labelled auto-radiography. The results of the study indicate that irradiation from fluorescent lights caused a slight elevation in the HGPRT mutant frequency in CHO cells. However a significant increase in UDS was not observed even at the maximum light irradiation dose. These results were compared to data obtained from similar experiments conducted with fluorescent bulbs with different energy emission spectra.

  20. Comparative investigation of antimutagenic activity of sterically hindered phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Pashin, Yu.V.; Bakhitova, L.M.; Bentkhen, T.I.

    1985-07-01

    Mutagenic properties of primarily inactive carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are manifested after metabolic oxidation by microsomal enzymes. It has been established that activation of carcinogens in biological systems is accompanied by intensification of free-radical processes, effective inhibition of which is achieved by sterically hindered phenols (SHP). The authors studied the effect of SHP on the mutagenic activity of benzo(a)pyrene (BP) using estimation of induced direct gene mutation at the locus for hypoxanthine-guanine-phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) in somatic Chinese hamster cells of line V-79 cultured in vitro and with estimation of the induction of micronuclei in polychromatophilic erythrocytes of mouse bone marrow in vivo. The reference mutagen was BP from Fluka and the following SHP were used: dibunol, F-800, and F-804. Genetic activity of each substance tested and their combination was studied in an in vitro system under conditions of metabolic activation by mouse liver microsomes and in vivo according to induction of micronuclei in polychromatophilic bone marrow erythrocytes in (CBA x C57B1/6J)F/sub 1/ mice 60-80 days old, which reflects gross defects of chromosomes at the erythroblast stage. In order to establish optimal time for recording the frequency of induction of micronuclei, bone marrow samples were taken from the animals, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h after a single intraperitoneal injection of the agents. The BP was dissolved in sunflower oil and used in a concentration constituting 1/3 of the lowest lethal dose in mice. The SHP was then dissolved in water or dimethyl sulfoxide and administered in a ratio with BP of 1:1 or 1:0.5. The smears were then stained in methanol, washed with twice-distilled water, and stained in 7% Giemsa solution.

  1. Effects of asbestos fibers on cell division, cell survival, and formation of thioguanine-resistant mutants in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kenne, K.; Ljungquist, S.; Ringertz, N.R.

    1986-04-01

    The ability of crocidolite fibers to induce point mutations and mitotic abnormalities in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells was examined in cell cultures. The purpose has been to study the possibilities for establishing in vitro test methods to quantify genetic damage induced by asbestos and other mineral fibers. Results obtained with the CHO/hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase system indicated that crocidolite fibers per se do not significantly increase the number of thioguanine-resistant mutants. Crocidolite fibers also failed to potentiate the mutagenicity of benzo(a)pyrene. Time-lapse cinematography and microscopy showed that asbestos (crocidolite) fibers were markedly cytotoxic. Among surviving cells some underwent abnormal cell divisions which resulted in multi- and micronucleate cells. Many cells that contained a few asbestos fibers, however, underwent mitosis and successfully formed two mononucleate daughter cells capable of further divisions. Individual, fiber-containing cells were examined by time-lapse television recordings for 4-5 days. During this time period some cells underwent six divisions and generated an almost normal number of daughter cells. Cells which contained fibers that were longer or equivalent to the diameter of the mitotic cell (20 ..mu..m), showed different forms of mitotic abnormalities. The frequency of multinucleate cells was drastically increased following exposure to asbestos fibers. Only rarely, however, did these cells divide to produce viable daughter cells capable of continued cell multiplication. The frequency of multinucleate cells was dependent on the dose of exposure to asbestos fibers and could possible be used as an index of the degree of mitotic disturbances induced by mineral fibers.

  2. Genotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Yan, Jian; Li, Yan

    2014-03-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO(2)-NPs, <100 nm) are increasingly being used in pharmaceuticals and cosmetics due to the unique properties derived from their small sizes. However, their large surface-area to mass ratio and high redox potential may negatively impact human health and the environment. TiO(2)-NPs can cause inflammation, pulmonary damage, fibrosis, and lung tumors and they are possibly carcinogenic to humans. Because cancer is a disease involving mutation, there are a large number of studies on the genotoxicity of TiO(2)-NPs. In this article, we review the results that have been reported in the literature, with a focus on data generated from the standard genotoxicity assays. The data include genotoxicity results from the Ames test, in vitro and in vivo Comet assay, in vitro and in vivo micronucleus assay, sister chromatid exchange assay, mammalian cell hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase gene assay, the wing somatic mutation and recombination assay, and the mouse phosphatidylinositol glycan, class A gene assay. Inconsistent results have been found in these assays, with both positive and negative responses being reported. The in vitro systems for assessing the genotoxicity of TiO(2)-NPs have generated a greater number of positive results than the in vivo systems, and tests for DNA and chromosome damage have produced more positive results than the assays measuring gene mutation. Nearly all tests for measuring the mutagenicity of TiO(2)-NPs were negative. The current data indicate that the genotoxicity of TiO(2)-NPs is mediated mainly through the generation of oxidative stress in cells. PMID:24673907

  3. Genotoxic evaluation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhangjian; Wang, Yun; Ba, Te; Li, Yang; Pu, Ji; Chen, Tian; Song, Yanshuang; Gu, Yongen; Qian, Qin; Yang, Jinglin; Jia, Guang

    2014-05-01

    With the extensive application of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) in food industry, there is a rising debate concerning the possible risk associated with exposure to TiO2 NPs. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the genotoxicity of TiO2 NPs using in vivo and in vitro test systems. In vivo study, the adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to anatase TiO2 NPs (75 ± 15 nm) through intragastric administration at 0, 10, 50 and 200mg/kg body weight every day for 30 days. The γ-H2AX assay showed TiO2 NPs could induce DNA double strand breaks in bone marrow cells after oral administration. However, the micronucleus test revealed that the oral-exposed TiO2 NPs did not cause damage to chromosomes or mitotic apparatus observably in rat bone marrow cells. In vitro study, Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts (V79 cells) were exposed to TiO2 NPs at the dose of 0, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 μg/mL. Significant decreases in cell viability were detected in all the treated groups after 24h and 48h exposure. Significant DNA damage was only observed at the concentration of 100 μg/mL after 24h treatment using the comet assay. The obvious gene mutation was observed at the concentration of 20 and 100 μg/mL after 2h treatment using hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene mutation assay. This study presented a comprehensive genotoxic evaluation of TiO2 NPs, and TiO2 NPs were shown to be genotoxic both in vivo and in vitro tests. The gene mutation and DNA strand breaks seem to be more sensitive genetic endpoints for the detection of TiO2 NPs induced genotoxic effects. PMID:24594277

  4. Protection against radiation-induced mutations at the hprt locus by spermine and N,N{double_prime}-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278). WR-33278 and spermine protect against mutation induction

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J.; Shigematsu, N.; Schwartz, J.L.

    1994-08-01

    The polyamine spermine and the disulfide N,N{double_prime}-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278) are structurally similar agents capable of binding to DNA. WR-33278 is the disulfide moiety of the clinically studied radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721). Because of their reported structural and functional similarities, it was of interest to characterize and compare their radioprotective properties using the endpoints of cell survival and mutation induction at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in Chinese hamster AA8 cells. In order to facilitate both the uptake of WR-33278 into cells and the direct comparison between the protective properties of WR-33278 and spermine, these agents (at concentrations of 0.01 mM and 0.001 mM) were electroporated into cells. The exposure of cells to both electroporation and irradiation gave rise to enhanced cell killing and mutation induction, with the sequence of irradiation followed 3 h later by electroporation being the more toxic protocol. Enhanced cell survival was observed following electroporation of 0.01 mM of spermine and WR-33278 30 min prior to irradiation; protection factors (PF) of 1.3 and 1.8, respectively. Neither agent was protective at a concentration of 0.001 mM. Protection against radiation-induced hprt mutations was observed for both spermine and WR-33278 under all experimental conditions tested. These data suggest that the properties of radioprotection and chemoprevention exhibited by the phosphorothioate (WR-2721) and associated aminothiol (WR-1065) and disulfide (WR-33278) metabolites may be mediated via endogenous spermine-like polyamine processes. Such a mechanism would have important implications with respect to the design and development of new generation drugs for use in radioprotection and chemoprevention.

  5. Low dopamine activity in Lesch Nyhan Disease. An 18-fluorodopa PET study

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, M.; Zametkin, A.; Matochik, J.

    1996-05-01

    Lesch-Nyhan Disease (LND) is a rare devastating X-linked recessive disorder characterized by the virtual absence of hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT), a major enzyme of the salvage pathway of purine metabolism. The clinical presentation includes hyperuricemia choreoathetosis, dystonia, aggression and self-injurious behavior. The genetic and biochemical abnormalities are fully identified. However, the neuropathophysiological process by which the lack of HPRT produces the neuropsychiatric syndrome of LND in unclear. Presynaptic uptake of 18-Fluorodopa (FD) in basal ganglia, substantia nigra, and frontal and occipital cortices was measured by PET in 12 patients with LND, 10 to 20 years old, and 15 health controls, 12 to 23 years old. Radioactive counts (mCi/cc), recorded between 90 and 130 minutes after tracer injection, were measured in regions of interest by a rater blind to subjects` identities. Results were expressed as ratios of FD uptake in specific to non-specific (occipital cortex) brain areas. Presynaptic dopamine activity was significantly lower by 69% in putamen (p<0.0001), 61% in caudate (p<0.0001), 56% in frontal cortex (p=0.003) and 43% in substantiat nigra (p<0.016) in LND patients than in control subjects. Absolute FD measures in occipital regions did not differ between the two groups. Activity of FD in the basal ganglia was stable over time in the LND group and tended to increase in the control group (r=0.50, n=15, p=0.060). In the LND group, aggressive behavior was worse as FD activity was higher (r=0.60, n=12, p=0.40). LND is associated with a striking reduction of presynaptic dopamine activity that is not region-specific. The temporal stability of FD measures and of the severity of LND symptomatology is consistent with a developmental rather than degenerative process.

  6. Evaluation of the genotoxicity of process stream extracts from a coal gasification system

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, R.W.; Benson, J.M.; Li, A.P.; Henderson, R.F.; Brooks, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    Extracts of three complex organic environmental mixtures, two from an experimental coal gasifier (a raw gas and a clean gas sample) and one from a coke oven main, were examined for genotoxicity. Three short-term genotoxicity assay systems were used: Ames Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation assay, Chinese hamster ovary cell/hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (CHO/HGPRT) gene locus mutation assay, and the Chinese hamster lung primary culture/sister chromatid exchange (CHL/SCE) assay. Aroclor-1254-induced rat liver homogenate fraction (S-9) was required to observe genotoxicity in both gene locus mutation assays. The relative survival of CHO cells exposed to extracts was highest in cells exposed to clean gas samples, with the raw gas sample being the most cytotoxic either with or without the addition of S-9. All three complex mixtures induced sister chromatid exchanges in primary lung cell cultures without the addition of S-9. The relative genotoxicity ranking of the samples varied between the mammalian and prokaryotic assay systems. Coke oven main extract produced fewer revertants in bacteria than the raw gas sample. However, the coke oven main extract was more genotoxic in the two eukaryotic systems (CHL/SCE and CHO/HGPRT) than was the raw gas sample. The results of all three assays indicate that the cleanup process used in the experimental gasifier was effective in decreasing the genotoxic materials in the process stream. These data also reemphasize the necessity of evaluating genotoxicity of complex mixtures in a variety of short-term systems. 24 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  7. Assessment of mercaptopurine (6MP) metabolites and 6MP metabolic key-enzymes in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wojtuszkiewicz, Anna; Barcelos, Ana; Dubbelman, Boas; De Abreu, Ronney; Brouwer, Connie; Bökkerink, Jos P; de Haas, Valerie; de Groot-Kruseman, Hester; Jansen, Gerrit; Kaspers, Gertjan L; Cloos, Jacqueline; Peters, G J

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is treated with combination chemotherapy including mercaptopurine (6MP) as an important component. Upon its uptake, 6MP undergoes a complex metabolism involving many enzymes and active products. The prognostic value of all the factors engaged in this pathway still remains unclear. This study attempted to determine which components of 6MP metabolism in leukemic blasts and red blood cells are important for 6MP's sensitivity and toxicity. In addition, changes in the enzymatic activities and metabolite levels during the treatment were analyzed. In a cohort (N=236) of pediatric ALL patients enrolled in the Dutch ALL-9 protocol, we studied the enzymes inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT), hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT), and purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) as well as thioguanine nucleotides (TGN) and methylthioinosine nucleotides (meTINs). Activities of selected enzymes and levels of 6MP derivatives were measured at various time points during the course of therapy. The data obtained and the toxicity related parameters available for these patients were correlated with each other. We found several interesting relations, including high concentrations of two active forms of 6MP--TGN and meTIN--showing a trend toward association with better in vitro antileukemic effect of 6MP. High concentrations of TGN and elevated activity of HGPRT were found to be significantly associated with grade III/IV leucopenia. However, a lot of data of enzymatic activities and metabolite concentrations as well as clinical toxicity were missing, thereby limiting the number of assessed relations. Therefore, although a complex study of 6MP metabolism in ALL patients is feasible, it warrants more robust and strict data collection in order to be able to draw more reliable conclusions. PMID:24940700

  8. Metabolism of 2-acetylaminofluorene in the Chinese hamster ovary cell mutation assay

    SciTech Connect

    Heflich, R.H.; Djuric, Z.; Zhuo, Z.; Fullerton, N.F.; Casciano, D.A.; Beland, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were exposed to 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF) and 2-aminofluorene (2-AF), and several of their N-oxidized metabolites in order to study the mechanisms by which arylamides and arylamines produce mutations in mammalian cells. The number of mutations induced at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus by each compound was estimated to be: N-acetoxy-2-AAF, 310; N-hydroxy-2-AF, 3; N-hydroxy-2-AAF, 0.7; 2-AAF, 0.1; and 2-AF, 0.09. With each compound, DNA adducts were also identified and quantified, and in all cases the major adduct was N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-AF. The relationship between mutation induction and adduct formation for each of the derivatives was similar to that previously reported for N-hydroxy-2-AF. Inclusion of the deacetylase inhibitor, paraoxon, reduced the mutagenicity of 2-AFF, N-hydroxy-2-AAF and N-acetoxy-2-AAF, and the DNA adducts produced by N-acetoxy-2-AAF to background levels. Taken together, these data indicate that CHO cells metabolized N-acetoxy-2-AAF to a reactive derivative by N-deacetylation to N-acetoxy-2-AF, while N-hydroxy-2-AF reacted directly with DNA. The major pathway of N-hydroxy-2-AAF activation appeared to be an initial O-acetylation to N-acetoxy-2-AAF and this occurred to only a limited extent in the CHO cells. The initial step in the activation of 2-AAF and 2-AF was an N-oxidation to N-hydroxy-2-AAF and N-hydroxy-2-AF, respectively. The limited O-acetylase activity in CHO cells appeared to contribute to the low sensitivity of these cells toward mutation induction by arylamines and arylamides.

  9. The induction of sister chromatid exchanges by environmental pollutants: relationship of SCE to other measures of genetic damage

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, A.L.; Shimizu, R.W.; Li, A.P.; Benson, J.M.; Dutcher, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), induced by environmental pollutants from fossil fuel use, were measured in 2 cell systems, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and Chinese hamster primary lung cell cultures. The frequency of SCEs induced in these cell systems was related to other measures of genetic damage, namely mutations in CHO cells at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) gene locus and in bacteria (Salmonella mutagenicity test TA-98), produced by the same pollutants. The pollutants were divided into 2 classes: those produced in oxidizing combustion environments--extracts of particles from light-duty diesel cars, spark-ignition cars, and an automotive tunnel; and those produced in reducing environments--extracts from coke oven mains and condensates from a low BTU coal gasifier obtained either before or after cleanup of the process stream. Sister chromatid exchanges were induced by all pollutants without the addition of a rat liver microsomal fraction (S-9 mix), whereas S-9 mix was required to induce a positive response in the CHO/HGPRT assay for all pollutants. The pollutants produced in a reducing environment required metabolic activation by S-9 mix to be mutagenic in the Salmonella mutation assay. The addition of S-9 mix to pollutants produced in an oxidizing environment reduced the response in the Salmonella test. The relative genotoxic potency for each pollutant was determined for all 3 endpoints. The slopes of dose-response curves for each pollutant were plotted for each assay to compare relative potency. When the bacterial mutagenicity test was compared to either mammalian cell assay, SCE or CHO/HGPRT, there was little correlation between relative potencies. However, the data indicated that the responses in the 2 mammalian cell assays, SCE and CHO/HGPRT, showed similar relative responses to the pollutants.

  10. Mutagenic effects of alpha particles in normal human skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.; Carpenter, S.; Hanks, T.

    1992-12-31

    Alpha-irradiation to the bronchial airways from inhaled radon progeny increases the risk of developing lung cancer. The molecular mechanism of radon-induced lung cancer is not clear, but one of the most important genetic effects of ionizing radiation is the induction of gene mutation. Mutations, especially those associated with visible chromosome abnormalities in humans, have been associated with cancer. Therefore, our objective is to use a well-defined model system to determine the mutagenic potential of alpha particles in normal human skin cells and to define this action at the molecular level. Normal human skin fibroblasts were irradiated with alpha particles (3.59 MeV, LET 115 keV {mu}m{sup {minus}1}) emitted from the decay of {sup 238}Pu. Mutagenicity was determined at the X-linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus. Results from this study indicate that beta particles were more efficient in mutation induction than gamma rays. Based on the initial slopes of the dose-response curves, the RBE for mutation is about 8 for alpha particles. HPRT-deficient mutants which are resistant to 6-thioguanine have been isolated and analyzed by the Southern blot technique. To date, we have characterized 69 gamma-ray-induced and 195 alpha-particle-induced HPRT-deficient mutants. Our data indicate that more than 50% of all gamma-ray-induced mutants have band patterns identical to that observed for the normal structural HPRT gene, whereas the remaining mutants (45%) contain either a rearrangement, partial deletion, or total deletion of the HPRT gene. In contrast, only 30% of alpha-particle-induced human HPRT mutants contain a normal Southern blot pattern, and about 50% indicate total deletion of the HPRT gene. Our results support the notion that high-LET radiation produces more unrepaired or misrepaired DNA damage than do gamma rays.

  11. Purine metabolism in response to hypoxic conditions associated with breath-hold diving and exercise in erythrocytes and plasma from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    del Castillo Velasco-Martínez, Iris; Hernández-Camacho, Claudia J; Méndez-Rodríguez, Lía C; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    In mammalian tissues under hypoxic conditions, ATP degradation results in accumulation of purine metabolites. During exercise, muscle energetic demand increases and oxygen consumption can exceed its supply. During breath-hold diving, oxygen supply is reduced and, although oxygen utilization is regulated by bradycardia (low heart rate) and peripheral vasoconstriction, tissues with low blood flow (ischemia) may become hypoxic. The goal of this study was to evaluate potential differences in the circulating levels of purine metabolism components between diving and exercise in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). Blood samples were taken from captive dolphins following a swimming routine (n=8) and after a 2min dive (n=8). Activity of enzymes involved in purine metabolism (hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT), inosine monophosphate deshydrogenase (IMPDH), xanthine oxidase (XO), purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP)), and purine metabolite (hypoxanthine (HX), xanthine (X), uric acid (UA), inosine monophosphate (IMP), inosine, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), adenosine, adenosine monophosphate (AMP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine diphosphate (GDP), guanosine triphosphate (GTP)) concentrations were quantified in erythrocyte and plasma samples. Enzymatic activity and purine metabolite concentrations involved in purine synthesis and degradation, were not significantly different between diving and exercise. Plasma adenosine concentration was higher after diving than exercise (p=0.03); this may be related to dive-induced ischemia. In erythrocytes, HGPRT activity was higher after diving than exercise (p=0.007), suggesting an increased capacity for purine recycling and ATP synthesis from IMP in ischemic tissues of bottlenose dolphins during diving. Purine recycling and physiological adaptations may maintain the ATP concentrations in bottlenose dolphins after diving and exercise. PMID:26506131

  12. Prolonged fasting increases purine recycling in post-weaned northern elephant seals

    PubMed Central

    Soñanez-Organis, José Guadalupe; Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Aguilar, Andres; Crocker, Daniel E.; Ortiz, Rudy M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Northern elephant seals are naturally adapted to prolonged periods (1–2 months) of absolute food and water deprivation (fasting). In terrestrial mammals, food deprivation stimulates ATP degradation and decreases ATP synthesis, resulting in the accumulation of purines (ATP degradation byproducts). Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) salvages ATP by recycling the purine degradation products derived from xanthine oxidase (XO) metabolism, which also promotes oxidant production. The contributions of HGPRT to purine recycling during prolonged food deprivation in marine mammals are not well defined. In the present study we cloned and characterized the complete and partial cDNA sequences that encode for HGPRT and xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) in northern elephant seals. We also measured XO protein expression and circulating activity, along with xanthine and hypoxanthine plasma content in fasting northern elephant seal pups. Blood, adipose and muscle tissue samples were collected from animals after 1, 3, 5 and 7 weeks of their natural post-weaning fast. The complete HGPRT and partial XOR cDNA sequences are 771 and 345 bp long and encode proteins of 218 and 115 amino acids, respectively, with conserved domains important for their function and regulation. XOR mRNA and XO protein expression increased 3-fold and 1.7-fold with fasting, respectively, whereas HGPRT mRNA (4-fold) and protein (2-fold) expression increased after 7 weeks in adipose tissue and muscle. Plasma xanthine (3-fold) and hypoxanthine (2.5-fold) levels, and XO (1.7- to 20-fold) and HGPRT (1.5- to 1.7-fold) activities increased during the last 2 weeks of fasting. Results suggest that prolonged fasting in elephant seal pups is associated with increased capacity to recycle purines, which may contribute to ameliorating oxidant production and enhancing the supply of ATP, both of which would be beneficial during prolonged food deprivation and appear to be adaptive in this species. PMID

  13. Structure of dimeric, recombinant Sulfolobus solfataricus phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthase: a bent dimer defining the adenine specificity of the substrate ATP.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Rune W; Leggio, Leila Lo; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Kadziola, Anders

    2015-03-01

    The enzyme 5-phosphoribosyl-1-α-diphosphate (PRPP) synthase (EC 2.7.6.1) catalyses the Mg(2+)-dependent transfer of a diphosphoryl group from ATP to the C1 hydroxyl group of ribose 5-phosphate resulting in the production of PRPP and AMP. A nucleotide sequence specifying Sulfolobus solfataricus PRPP synthase was synthesised in vitro with optimised codon usage for expression in Escherichia coli. Following expression of the gene in E. coli PRPP synthase was purified by heat treatment and ammonium sulphate precipitation and the structure of S. solfataricus PRPP synthase was determined at 2.8 Å resolution. A bent dimer oligomerisation was revealed, which seems to be an abundant feature among PRPP synthases for defining the adenine specificity of the substrate ATP. Molecular replacement was used to determine the S. solfataricus PRPP synthase structure with a monomer subunit of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii PRPP synthase as a search model. The two amino acid sequences share 35 % identity. The resulting asymmetric unit consists of three separated dimers. The protein was co-crystallised in the presence of AMP and ribose 5-phosphate, but in the electron density map of the active site only AMP and a sulphate ion were observed. Sulphate ion, reminiscent of the ammonium sulphate precipitation step of the purification, seems to bind tightly and, therefore, presumably occupies and blocks the ribose 5-phosphate binding site. The activity of S. solfataricus PRPP synthase is independent of phosphate ion. PMID:25605536

  14. Substitutions in hamster CAD carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase alter allosteric response to 5-phosphoribosyl-alpha-pyrophosphate (PRPP) and UTP.

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Christine Q; Simmons, Alan J; Haubner, Aaron; Ream, Amber; Davidson, Jeffrey N

    2004-01-01

    CPSase (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase II), a component of CAD protein (multienzymic protein with CPSase, aspartate transcarbamylase and dihydro-orotase activities), catalyses the regulated steps in the de novo synthesis of pyrimidines. Unlike the orthologous Escherichia coli enzyme that is regulated by UMP, inosine monophosphate and ornithine, the mammalian CPSase is allosterically inhibited by UTP, and activated by PRPP (5-phosphoribosyl-a-pyrophosphate) and phosphorylation. Four residues (Thr974, Lys993, Lys954 and Thr977) are critical to the E. coli inosine monophosphate/UMP-binding pocket. In the present study, three of the corresponding residues in the hamster CPSase were altered to determine if they affect either PRPP activation or UTP inhibition. Substitution of the hamster residue, positionally equivalent to Thr974 in the E. coli enzyme, with alanine residue led to an enzyme with 5-fold lower activity and a near loss of PRPP activation. Whereas replacement of the tryptophan residue at position 993 had no effect, an Asp992-->Asn substitution yielded a much-activated enzyme that behaved as if PRPP was present. The substitution Lys954-->Glu had no effect on PRPP stimulation. Only modest decreases in UTP inhibitions were observed with each of the altered CPSases. The results also show that while PRPP and UTP can act simultaneously, PRPP activation is dominant. Apparently, UTP and PRPP have distinctly different associations within the mammalian enzyme. The findings of the present study may prove relevant to the neuropathology of Lesch-Nyhan syndrome PMID:14651476

  15. Roles for glutathione transferases in antioxidant recycling

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, David P; Steel, Patrick G

    2011-01-01

    Uniquely among the plant glutathione transferases, two classes possess a catalytic cysteine capable of performing glutathione-dependent reductions. These are the dehydroascorbate reductases (DHARs) and the lambda-class glutathione transferases (GSTLs). Using immobilized GSTLs probed with crude plant extracts we have identified flavonols as high affinity ligands and subsequently demonstrated a novel glutathione-dependent role for these enzymes in recycling oxidized quercetin. By comparing the activities of DHARs and GSTLs we now propose a unified catalytic mechanism that suggests oxidized anthocyanidins and tocopherols may be alternative polyphenolic substrates of GSTLs. PMID:21778824

  16. Purification and characterization of the Oligosaccharyl transferase

    SciTech Connect

    Kapoor, T.M.

    1990-11-01

    Oligosaccharyl transferase was characterized to be a glycoprotein with at least one saccharide unit that had a D-manno or D- glucopyranose configuration with unmodified hydroxy groups at C-3, C-4 and C-6, using a Concanavalin A affinity column. This afforded a 100 fold increase in the transferase purity in the solubilized microsomal sample and also removed over 90% of the microsomal proteins (the cytosolic ones being removed before solubilization). The detergent, N,N-Dimethyldodecylamine N-oxide (LDAO) was used for solubilization and it yielded a system compatible with the assay and the purification steps. An efficient method for detergent extraction without dilution of sample or protein precipitation was also developed.

  17. Nomenclature for mammalian soluble glutathione transferases.

    PubMed

    Mannervik, Bengt; Board, Philip G; Hayes, John D; Listowsky, Irving; Pearson, William R

    2005-01-01

    The nomenclature for human soluble glutathione transferases (GSTs) is extended to include new members of the GST superfamily that have been discovered, sequenced, and shown to be expressed. The GST nomenclature is based on primary structure similarities and the division of GSTs into classes of more closely related sequences. The classes are designated by the names of the Greek letters: Alpha, Mu, Pi, etc., abbreviated in Roman capitals: A, M, P, and so on. (The Greek characters should not be used.) Class members are distinguished by Arabic numerals and the native dimeric protein structures are named according to their subunit composition (e.g., GST A1-2 is the enzyme composed of subunits 1 and 2 in the Alpha class). Soluble GSTs from other mammalian species can be classified in the same manner as the human enzymes, and this chapter presents the application of the nomenclature to the rat and mouse GSTs. PMID:16399376

  18. Single prenyl-binding site on protein prenyl transferases

    PubMed Central

    Desnoyers, Luc; Seabra, Miguel C.

    1998-01-01

    Three distinct protein prenyl transferases, one protein farnesyl transferase (FTase) and two protein geranylgeranyl transferases (GGTase), catalyze prenylation of many cellular proteins. One group of protein substrates contains a C-terminal CAAX motif (C is Cys, A is aliphatic, and X is a variety of amino acids) in which the single cysteine residue is modified with either farnesyl or geranylgeranyl (GG) by FTase or GGTase type-I (GGTase-I), respectively. Rab proteins constitute a second group of substrates that contain a C-terminal double-cysteine motif (such as XXCC in Rab1a) in which both cysteines are geranylgeranylated by Rab GG transferase (RabGGTase). Previous characterization of CAAX prenyl transferases showed that the enzymes form stable complexes with their prenyl pyrophosphate substrates, acting as prenyl carriers. We developed a prenyl-binding assay and show that RabGGTase has a prenyl carrier function similar to the CAAX prenyl transferases. Stable RabGGTase:GG pyrophosphate (GGPP), FTase:GGPP, and GGTase-I:GGPP complexes show 1:1 (enzyme:GGPP) stoichiometry. Chromatographic analysis of prenylated products after single turnover reactions by using isolated RabGGTase:GGPP complex revealed that Rab is mono-geranylgeranylated. This study establishes that all three protein prenyl transferases contain a single prenyl-binding site and suggests that RabGGTase transfers two GG groups to Rabs in independent and consecutive reactions. PMID:9770475

  19. The Genetic Architecture of Murine Glutathione Transferases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lu; Pandey, Ashutosh K.; Houseal, M. Trevor; Mulligan, Megan K.

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes play a protective role against oxidative stress and may influence disease risk and drug pharmacokinetics. In this study, massive multiscalar trait profiling across a large population of mice derived from a cross between C57BL/6J (B6) and DBA2/J (D2)—the BXD family—was combined with linkage and bioinformatic analyses to characterize mechanisms controlling GST expression and to identify downstream consequences of this variation. Similar to humans, mice show a wide range in expression of GST family members. Variation in the expression of Gsta4, Gstt2, Gstz1, Gsto1, and Mgst3 is modulated by local expression QTLs (eQTLs) in several tissues. Higher expression of Gsto1 in brain and liver of BXD strains is strongly associated (P < 0.01) with inheritance of the B6 parental allele whereas higher expression of Gsta4 and Mgst3 in brain and liver, and Gstt2 and Gstz1 in brain is strongly associated with inheritance of the D2 parental allele. Allele-specific assays confirmed that expression of Gsto1, Gsta4, and Mgst3 are modulated by sequence variants within or near each gene locus. We exploited this endogenous variation to identify coexpression networks and downstream targets in mouse and human. Through a combined systems genetics approach, we provide new insight into the biological role of naturally occurring variants in GST genes. PMID:26829228

  20. Detection of glutathione transferase activity on polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed

    Ricci, G; Lo Bello, M; Caccuri, A M; Galiazzo, F; Federici, G

    1984-12-01

    A simple and sensitive assay for glutathione transferase activity on polyacrylamide gel is described. The method is based on the fast reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium salt by glutathione. Blue insoluble formazan colors the gel except in the glutathione transferase area. The stable and defined colorless zone is still detectable with 0.005 unit enzyme. This technique has been successfully applied with enzyme preparations of human heart and other tissues. PMID:6532239

  1. Identification and sequence analysis of Escherichia coli purE and purK genes encoding 5'-phosphoribosyl-5-amino-4-imidazole carboxylase for de novo purine biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, W; Sampei, G; Aiba, A; Mizobuchi, K

    1989-01-01

    It has been shown that the Escherichia coli purE locus specifying 5'-phosphoribosyl-5-amino-4-imidazole carboxylase in de novo purine nucleotide synthesis is divided into two cistrons. We cloned and determined a 2,449-nucleotide sequence including the purE locus. This sequence contains two overlapped open reading frames, ORF-18 and ORF-39, encoding proteins with molecular weights of 18,000 and 39,000, respectively. The purE mutations of CSH57A and DCSP22 were complemented by plasmids carrying ORF-18, while that of NK6051 was complemented by plasmids carrying ORF-39. Thus, the purE locus consists of two distinct genes, designated purE and purK for ORF-18 and ORF-39, respectively. These genes constitute a single operon. A highly conserved 16-nucleotide sequence, termed the PUR box, was found in the upstream region of purE by comparing the sequences of the purF and purMN operons. We also found three entire and one partial repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) sequences in the downstream region of purK. Roles of the PUR box and REP sequences are discussed in relation to the genesis of the purEK operon. Images PMID:2644189

  2. N-(5′-Phosphoribosyl)anthranilate isomerase–indol-3-ylglycerol phosphate synthetase of tryptophan biosynthesis. Relationship between the two activities of the enzyme from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Creighton, Thomas E.

    1970-01-01

    Further evidence is presented to confirm the previous conclusion that the enzyme from Escherichia coli catalysing the two sequential reactions in tryptophan biosynthesis, N-(5′-phosphoribosyl)anthranilic acid (PRA) → 1-(o-carboxyphenyl-amino)-1-deoxyribulose 5-phosphate (CdRP) → indol-3-ylglycerol phosphate (InGP)+CO2+H2O, consists of a single polypeptide chain. The kinetic properties of the enzyme demonstrate that intermediate CdRP formed from PRA must dissociate from the enzyme before it can be converted into InGP. It is concluded that there are two distinct and non-overlapping catalytic sites on the enzyme for the two reactions. The expected complementation between a mutationally altered form of the enzyme lacking the first reaction and a mutationally altered form lacking the second reaction has been demonstrated in vitro by InGP formation from PRA. This system thus exhibits intracistronic complementation with a non-oligomeric protein gene product. PMID:4924490

  3. Expression of phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase genes in U87 glioma cells with ERN1 knockdown: effect of hypoxia and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Minchenko, O H; Garmash, I A; Kovalevska, O V; Tsymbal, D O; Minchenko, D O

    2014-01-01

    Activation of pentose phosphate pathway is an important factor of enhanced cell proliferation and tumor growth. Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase (PRPS) is a key enzyme of this pathway and plays a central role in the synthesis of purines and pyrimidines. Hypoxia as well as ERN1 (from endoplasmic reticulum to nuclei-1) mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress response-signalling pathway is linked to the proliferation because the blockade of ERN1 suppresses tumor growth, including glioma. We studied the expression of different PRPS genes in glioma cells with ERN1 knockdown under hypoxic condition. It was shown that hypoxia decreases the expression of PRPS1 and PRPS2 genes in both types of glioma cells, being more pronounced in cells without ERN1 function, but PRPSAP1 and PRPSAP2 gene expressions are suppressed by hypoxia only in glioma cells with blockade of ERN1. Moreover, the blockade of endoribonuclease activity of ERN1 does not affect the expression of PRPS1 and PRPS2 as well as PPRS-associated protein genes in U87 glioma cells. At the same time, the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress by tunicamycin in glioma cells with suppressed activity of ERN1 endoribonuclease decreases the expression level of PRPS1 and PRPS2 genes only. Results of this investigation clearly demonstrated that the expression of different genes encoding subunits of PRPS enzyme is affected by hypoxia in U87 glioma cells, but the effect of hypoxia is modified by suppression of endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling enzyme ERN1. PMID:25816608

  4. Increased frequency of in vivo hprt gene-mutated T cells in the peripheral blood of patients with systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sfikakis, P P; Tesar, J; Theocharis, S; Klipple, G L; Tsokos, G C

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--Activated T lymphocytes are involved in the pathogenesis of scleroderma (systemic sclerosis, SSc); such cells rapidly divide in vivo and are thus theoretically subject to random mutation more frequently than resting cells. To study whether SSc is associated with rapidly expanding T cell clones the frequency was determined of in vivo mutated T cells (MF) at the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) gene in the peripheral blood from patients with SSc. Specific clinical or serological associations were also investigated. METHODS--Peripheral blood lymphocytes from 16 healthy individuals and 20 patients with SSc were cultured using an hprt clonal assay; mutated and wild T cell clones were established to assess individual values of T cell MF. T cell clones were further expanded in vitro and their phenotype was determined by standard immunofluorescence technique. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used for simultaneous measurements of plasma levels of soluble Interleukin-2 receptors (s-IL-2R) and Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (s-ICAM-1). RESULT--Mean (SD) value of T cell MF in patients with SSc was 2.5-fold higher than the normal mean (SD) value [10.6 (6.6) x 10(-6) v [4.4 (2.8) x 10(-6), p = 0.0007]. Eleven of 20 patients with SSc (55%) had T cell MF values greater than two SD above the normal mean value. The majority (84%) of mutated T cells had a helper/inducer, memory phenotype while 12% were cytotoxic/suppressor T cells. There was no association between T cell MF and the extent of skin involvement or the duration of Raynaud's phenomenon. High individual T cell MF values were not related to a possible concurrent immune overactivity as assessed by plasma levels of s-IL-2R and s-ICAM-1. Patients with long standing skin disease, however, had almost double T cell MF values than patients with early skin disease [(13.6 (7.4)) x 10(-6) v (7.5 (4.3)) x 10(-6), p = 0.03], suggesting that increased T cell MF in SSc may reflect an ongoing

  5. Bilirubin UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) Gene Promoter Polymorphisms and HPRT, Glycophorin A, and Micronuclei Mutant Frequencies in Human Blood

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, D; Hall, I J; Eastmond, D; Jones, I M; Bell, D A

    2004-10-06

    A dinucleotide repeat polymorphism (5-, 6-, 7-, or 8-TA units) has been identified within the promoter region of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 gene (UGT1A1). The 7-TA repeat allele has been associated with elevated serum bilirubin levels that cause a mild hyperbilirubinemia (Gilbert's syndrome). Studies suggest that promoter transcriptional activity of UGT1A1 is inversely related to the number of TA repeats and that unconjugated bilirubin concentration increases directly with the number of TA repeat elements. Because bilirubin is a known antioxidant, we hypothesized that UGT1A1 repeats associated with higher bilirubin may be protective against oxidative damage. We examined the effect of UGT1A1 genotype on somatic mutant frequency in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) gene in human lymphocytes and the glycophorin A (GPA) gene of red blood cells (both N0, NN mutants), and the frequency of lymphocyte micronuclei (both kinetochore (K) positive or micronuclei K negative) in 101 healthy smoking and nonsmoking individuals. As hypothesized, genotypes containing 7-TA and 8-TA displayed marginally lower GPA{_}NN mutant frequency relative to 5/5, 5/6, 6/6 genotypes (p<0.05). In contrast, our analysis showed that lower expressing UGT1A1 alleles (7-TA and 8-TA) were associated with modestly increased HPRT mutation frequency (p<0.05) while the same low expression genotypes were not significantly associated with micronuclei frequencies (K-positive or K-negative) when compared to high expression genotypes (5-TA and 6-TA). We found weak evidence that UGT1A1 genotypes containing 7-TA and 8-TA were associated with increased GPA{_}N0 mutant frequency relative to 5/5, 5/6, 6/6 genotypes (p<0.05). These data suggest that UGT1A1 genotype may modulate somatic mutation of some types, in some cell lineages, by a mechanism not involving bilirubin antioxidant activity. More detailed studies examining UGT1A1 promoter variation, oxidant/antioxidant balance and genetic

  6. Inhibition of Mycoplasma pneumoniae growth by FDA-approved anticancer and antiviral nucleoside and nucleobase analogs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mpn) is a human pathogen that causes acute and chronic respiratory diseases and has been linked to many extrapulmonary diseases. Due to the lack of cell wall, Mpn is resistant to antibiotics targeting cell wall synthesis such as penicillin. During the last 10 years macrolide-resistant Mpn strains have been frequently reported in Asian countries and have been spreading to Europe and the United States. Therefore, new antibiotics are needed. In this study, 30 FDA-approved anticancer or antiviral drugs were screened for inhibitory effects on Mpn growth and selected analogs were further characterized by inhibition of target enzymes and metabolism of radiolabeled substrates. Results Sixteen drugs showed varying inhibitory effects and seven showed strong inhibition of Mpn growth. The anticancer drug 6-thioguanine had a MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration required to cause 90% of growth inhibition) value of 0.20 μg ml-1, whereas trifluorothymidine, gemcitabine and dipyridamole had MIC values of approximately 2 μg ml-1. In wild type Mpn culture the presence of 6-thioguanine and dipyridamole strongly inhibited the uptake and metabolism of hypoxanthine and guanine while gemcitabine inhibited the uptake and metabolism of all nucleobases and thymidine. Trifluorothymidine and 5-fluorodeoxyuridine, however, stimulated the uptake and incorporation of radiolabeled thymidine and this stimulation was due to induction of thymidine kinase activity. Furthermore, Mpn hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) was cloned, expressed, and characterized. The 6-thioguanine, but not other purine analogs, strongly inhibited HPRT, which may in part explain the observed growth inhibition. Trifluorothymidine and 5-fluorodeoxyuridine were shown to be good substrates and inhibitors for thymidine kinase from human and Mycoplasma sources. Conclusion We have shown that several anticancer and antiviral nucleoside and nucleobase analogs are potent

  7. Characterizing mutagenesis in the hprt gene of rat alveolar epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, K.E.; Deyo, L.C.; Howard, B.W.

    1995-12-31

    A clonal selection assay was developed for mutation in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) gene of rat alveolar epithelial cells. Studies were conducted to establish methods for isolation and long-term culture of rat alveolar epithelial cells. When isolated by pronase digestion purified on a Nycodenz gradient and cultured in media containing 7.5% fetal bovine serum (FBS), pituitary extract, EGF, insulin, and IGF-1, rat alveolar epithelial cells could be maintained in culture for several weeks with cell doubling times of 2-4 days. The rat alveolar epithelial cell cultures were exposed in vitro to the mutagens ethylnitrosourea (ENU) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, and mutation in the hprt gene was selected for by culture in the presence of the toxic purine analog, 6-thioguanine (6TG). In vitro exposure to ENU or H{sub 2}O produced a dose-dependent increase in hprt mutation frequency in the alveolar epithelial cells. To determine if the assay system could be used to evaluate mutagenesis in alveolar type II cells after in vivo mutagen or carcinogen exposure, cells were isolated from rats treated previously with ENU or {alpha}-quartz. A significant increase in hprt mutation frequency was detected in alveolar epithelial cells obtained from rats exposed to ENU or {alpha}-quartz; the latter observation is the first demonstration that crystalline silica exposure is mutagenic in vivo. In summary, these studies show that rat alveolar epithelial cells isolated by pronase digestion and Nycodenz separation techniques and cultured in a defined media can be used in a clonal selection assay for mutation in the hprt gene. This assay demonstrates that ENU and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in vitro and ENU and {alpha}-quartz in vivo are mutagenic for rat alveolar epithelial cells. This model should be useful for investigating the genotoxic effects of chemical and physical agents on an important lung cell target for neoplastic transformation. 41 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. On the quality of mutations in mammalian cells induced by high LET radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Rosendahl, Ilja M.; Rink, Hermann

    The deleterious effects of accelerated heavy ions as component of the space radiation environment on living cells are of increasing importance for long duration human space flight activities. The most important aspect of such densely ionizing particle radiation is attributed to the type and quality of biological damage induced by them. This issue is addressed by investigating cell inactivation and mutation induction at the Hprt locus (coding for hypoxanthine-guanine-phosphoribosyl-transferase) of cultured V79 Chinese hamster cells exposed to densely ionizing radiation (accelerated heavy ions with different LETs from oxygen to gold, specific energies ranging from 1.9 to 69.7 MeV/u, corresponding LET values range from 62 to 13,223 keV/μm) and to sparsely ionizing radiation (200 kV X-rays). 30 spontaneous, 40 X-ray induced and 196 heavy ion induced 6-thioguanine resistant Hprt mutant colonies were characterized by Southern technique using the restriction enzymes EcoRI, PstI and BglII and a full length Hprt cDNA probe isolated from the plasmid pHPT12. Restriction patterns of the spontaneous Hprt mutants were indistinguishable from the wild type pattern, as these mutants probably contain only small deletions or even point mutations in the Hprt locus. In contrast, the overall spectrum of heavy ion induced mutations revealed a majority of partial or total deletions of the Hprt gene. With constant particle fluence (3 × 10 6 particles/cm 2) the quality of heavy ion induced mutations in the Hprt locus depends on physical parameters of the beam (atomic number, specific energy, LET). This finding suggests a relationship between the type of DNA damage and track structure. The fraction of mutants with severe deletions in the Hprt locus after exposure to oxygen ions increases from 65% at 60 keV/μm up to a maximum (100%) at 300 keV/μm and declines with higher LET values to 75% at 750 keV/μm. With heavier ions (Ca- and Au-ions) and even higher LET-values this mutant fraction

  9. Effect of carbon monoxide on gene expression in cerebrocortical astrocytes: Validation of reference genes for quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Sara R; Vieira, Helena L A; Duarte, Carlos B

    2015-09-15

    Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is a widely used technique to characterize changes in gene expression in complex cellular and tissue processes, such as cytoprotection or inflammation. The accurate assessment of changes in gene expression depends on the selection of adequate internal reference gene(s). Carbon monoxide (CO) affects several metabolic pathways and de novo protein synthesis is crucial in the cellular responses to this gasotransmitter. Herein a selection of commonly used reference genes was analyzed to identify the most suitable internal control genes to evaluate the effect of CO on gene expression in cultured cerebrocortical astrocytes. The cells were exposed to CO by treatment with CORM-A1 (CO releasing molecule A1) and four different algorithms (geNorm, NormFinder, Delta Ct and BestKeeper) were applied to evaluate the stability of eight putative reference genes. Our results indicate that Gapdh (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) together with Ppia (peptidylpropyl isomerase A) is the most suitable gene pair for normalization of qRT-PCR results under the experimental conditions used. Pgk1 (phosphoglycerate kinase 1), Hprt1 (hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase I), Sdha (Succinate Dehydrogenase Complex, Subunit A), Tbp (TATA box binding protein), Actg1 (actin gamma 1) and Rn18s (18S rRNA) genes presented less stable expression profiles in cultured cortical astrocytes exposed to CORM-A1 for up to 60 min. For validation, we analyzed the effect of CO on the expression of Bdnf and bcl-2. Different results were obtained, depending on the reference genes used. A significant increase in the expression of both genes was found when the results were normalized with Gapdh and Ppia, in contrast with the results obtained when the other genes were used as reference. These findings highlight the need for a proper and accurate selection of the reference genes used in the quantification of qRT-PCR results

  10. The induction of sister chromatid exchanges by environmental pollutants: relationship of SCE to other measures of genetic damage.

    PubMed

    Brooks, A L; Shimizu, R W; Li, A P; Benson, J M; Dutcher, J S

    1984-01-01

    Sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), induced by environmental pollutants from fossil fuel use, were measured in 2 cell systems, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and Chinese hamster primary lung cell cultures. The frequency of SCEs induced in these cell systems was related to other measures of genetic damage, namely mutations in CHO cells at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) gene locus and in bacteria (Salmonella mutagenicity test TA-98), produced by the same pollutants. The pollutants were divided into 2 classes: those produced in oxidizing combustion environments--extracts of particles from light-duty diesel cars, spark-ignition cars, and an automotive tunnel; and those produced in reducing environments--extracts from coke oven mains and condensates from a low BTU coal gasifier obtained either before or after cleanup of the process stream. Sister chromatid exchanges were induced by all pollutants without the addition of a rat liver microsomal fraction (S-9 mix), whereas S-9 mix was required to induce a positive response in the CHO/HGPRT assay for all pollutants. The pollutants produced in a reducing environment required metabolic activation by S-9 mix to be mutagenic in the Salmonella mutation assay. The addition of S-9 mix to pollutants produced in an oxidizing environment reduced the response in the Salmonella test. The relative genotoxic potency for each pollutant was determined for all 3 endpoints. The slopes of dose-response curves for each pollutant were plotted for each assay to compare relative potency. When the bacterial mutagenicity test was compared to either mammalian cell assay, SCE or CHO/HGPRT, there was little correlation between relative potencies. However, the data indicated that the responses in the 2 mammalian cell assays, SCE and CHO/HGPRT, showed similar relative responses to the pollutants. Differences in the requirement for S-9 mix seem to be related to both the chemical nature of the mixture and the endpoint

  11. Interrelationship between anionic and cationic forms of glutathione S-transferases of human liver.

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Y C; Dao, D D; Saneto, R P

    1980-01-01

    Human liver glutathione S-transferases (GSH S-transferases) were fractionated into cationic and anionic proteins. During fractionation with (NH4)2SO4 the anionic GSH S-transferases are concentrated in the 65%-saturated-(NH4)2SO4 fraction, whereas the cationic GSH S-transferases separate in the 80%-saturated-(NH4)2SO4 fraction. From the 65%-saturated-(NH4)2SO4 fraction two new anionic GSH S-transferases, omega and psi, were purified to homogeneity by using ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, Sephadex G-200 gel filtration, affinity chromatography on GSH bound to epoxy-activated Sepharose and isoelectric focusing. By a similar procedure, cationic GSH S-transferases were purified from the 80%-saturated-(NH4)2SO4 fraction. Isoelectric points of GSH S-transferases omega and psi are 4.6 and 5.4 respectively. GSH S-transferase omega is the major anionic GSH S-transferase of human liver, whereas GSH S-transferase psi is present only in traces. The subunit mol.wt. of GSH S-transferase omega is about 22500, whereas that of cationic GSH S-transferases is about 24500. Kinetic and structural properties as well as the amino acid composition of GSH S-transferase omega are described. The antibodies raised against cationic GSH S-transferases cross-react with GSH S-transferase omega. There are significant differences between the catalytic properties of GSH S-transferase omega and the cationic GSH S-transferases. GSH peroxidase II activity is displayed by all five cationic GSH S-transferases, whereas both anionic GSH S-transferases do not display this activity. Images Fig. 3. PMID:7470087

  12. Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase: The Story of a Misguided DNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Motea, Edward A.; Berdis, Anthony J.

    2009-01-01

    Nearly every DNA polymerase characterized to date exclusively catalyzes the incorporation of mononucleotides into a growing primer using a DNA or RNA template as a guide to direct each incorporation event. There is, however, one unique DNA polymerase designated terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase that performs DNA synthesis using only single-stranded DNA as the nucleic acid substrate. In this chapter, we review the biological role of this enigmatic DNA polymerase and the biochemical mechanism for its ability to perform DNA synthesis in the absence of a templating strand. We compare and contrast the molecular events for template-independent DNA synthesis catalyzed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase with other well-characterized DNA polymerases that perform template-dependent synthesis. This includes a quantitative inspection of how terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase binds DNA and dNTP substrates, the possible involvement of a conformational change that precedes phosphoryl transfer, and kinetic steps that are associated with the release of products. These enzymatic steps are discussed within the context of the available structures of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase in the presence of DNA or nucleotide substrate. In addition, we discuss the ability of proteins involved in replication and recombination to regulate the activity of the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase. Finally, the biomedical role of this specialized DNA polymerase is discussed focusing on its involvement in cancer development and its use in biomedical applications such as labeling DNA for detecting apoptosis. PMID:19596089

  13. Inhibition of hepatic glutathione transferases by propylthiouracil and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Kariya, K; Sawahata, T; Okuno, S; Lee, E

    1986-05-01

    The effects of propylthiouracil (PTU) and its metabolites on the activity of GSH transferases were examined using rat liver cytosol. PTU inhibited the enzyme activity toward both CDNB and DCNB in a concentration-dependent manner. At the concentration of 10 mM, PTU caused 25% inhibition, which was the maximum effect. PTU derivatives such as propyluracil and thiouracil showed the same effect as the parent compound. On the other hand, S-oxides of PTU such as PTU-SO2 and PTU-SO3, which were chemically synthesized by the oxidation of PTU, were more potent inhibitors of GSH transferases than the parent PTU. A significant inhibition was observed at a concentration of 0.1 mM of PTU S-oxides. At a concentration of 10 mM the S-oxides caused an 80% inhibition of the enzyme activity. PTU inhibited the transferase activity by competing with GSH but the S-oxides of PTU acted by another mechanism. In contrast to the effect on GSH transferases, PTU-SO3 had a weak inhibitory effect on GSH peroxidase activity. Thus, oxidation of PTU leads to products which are potent inhibitors of GSH transferases. PMID:3707612

  14. Fluorescent techniques for discovery and characterization of phosphopantetheinyl transferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kosa, Nicolas M.; Foley, Timothy L.; Burkart, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphopantetheinyl transferase (E.C. 2.7.8.-) activates biosynthetic pathways that synthesize both primary and secondary metabolites in bacteria. Inhibitors of these enzymes have the potential to serve as antibiotic compounds that function through a unique mode of action and possess clinical utility. Here we report a direct and continuous assay for this enzyme class based upon monitoring polarization of a fluorescent phosphopantetheine analog as it is transferred from a low molecular weight coenzyme A substrate to higher molecular weight protein acceptor. We demonstrate the utility of this method for the biochemical characterization of phosphopantetheinyl transferase Sfp, a canonical representative from this class. We also establish the portability of this technique to other homologs by adapting the assay to function with the human phosphopantetheinyl transferase, a target for which a microplate detection method does not currently exist. Comparison of these targets provides a basis to predict therapeutic index of inhibitor candidates and offers a valuable characterization of enzyme activity. PMID:24192555

  15. Thioltransferase activity of bovine lens glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed Central

    Dal Monte, M; Cecconi, I; Buono, F; Vilardo, P G; Del Corso, A; Mura, U

    1998-01-01

    A Mu-class glutathione S-transferase purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from bovine lens displayed thioltransferase activity, catalysing the transthiolation reaction between GSH and hydroxyethyldisulphide. The thiol-transfer reaction is composed of two steps, the formation of GSSG occurring through the generation of an intermediate mixed disulphide between GSH and the target disulphide. Unlike glutaredoxin, which is only able to catalyse the second step of the transthiolation process, glutathioneS-transferase catalyses both steps of the reaction. Data are presented showing that bovine lens glutathione S-transferase and rat liver glutaredoxin, which was used as a thioltransferase enzyme model, can operate in synergy to catalyse the GSH-dependent reduction of hydroxyethyldisulphide. PMID:9693102

  16. GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE-MEDIATED METABOLISM OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    GLUTATHIONE s-TRANSFERASE-MEDIATED METABOLISM OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE. M K Ross1 and R A Pegram2. 1Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; 2Experimental Toxicology Division, NHEERL/ORD, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangl...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1535 - Ornithine carbamyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ornithine carbamyl transferase test system. 862.1535 Section 862.1535 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1535 Ornithine...

  18. Rational design of an organometallic glutathione transferase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, W.H.; Parker, L.J.; De Luca, A.; Juillerat-Jeanneret, L.; Morton, C.J.; LoBello, M.; Parker, M.W.; Dyson, P.J.

    2010-08-17

    A hybrid organic-inorganic (organometallic) inhibitor was designed to target glutathione transferases. The metal center is used to direct protein binding, while the organic moiety acts as the active-site inhibitor. The mechanism of inhibition was studied using a range of biophysical and biochemical methods.

  19. METAL-INDUCED INHIBITION OF GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The glutathione S-transferases comprise a group of multi-functional enzymes involved in the biotransformation/detoxication of a broad spectrum of hydrophobic compounds bearing an electrophilic center. The enzymes facilitate the nucleophilic attack of the -SH group of reduced glut...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase deficiency succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase deficiency Enable Javascript to view ... PDF Open All Close All Description Succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase (SCOT) deficiency is an inherited ...

  1. Developmental aspects of glutathione S-transferase B (ligandin) in rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Hales, B F; Neims, A H

    1976-01-01

    The postnatal development in male Sprague-Dawley rats of hepatic glutathione S-transferase B (ligandin) in relation to the other glutathione S-transferases is described. The concentration of glutathione S-transferase B in 1-day-old male rats is about one-fifth of that in adult animals. The enzyme reaches adult concentrations 4-5 weeks later. When assessed by substrate specificity or immunologically, the proportion of transferase B relative to the other glutathione S-transferases is high during the first week after birth. At this age, 67.5% of the transferase activity towards 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene is immunoprecipitable by anti-(transferase B), compared with about 50% in adults and older pups. Between the second and the fifth postnatal week, the fraction of transferase B increases in parallel fashion with the other transferases in hepatic cytosol. Neither L-thyroxine nor cortisol induce a precocious increase in glutathione S-transferase activity. Phenobarbital did induce transferase activity towards 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene in both pups and adults. The extent of induction by phenobarbital was a function of basal activity during development such that the percentage stimulation remained constant from 5 days postnatally to adulthood. PMID:1008852

  2. Purification and characterization of a DNA strand transferase from broccoli.

    PubMed

    Tissier, A F; Lopez, M F; Signer, E R

    1995-05-01

    A protein with DNA binding, renaturation, and strand-transfer activities has been purified to homogeneity from broccoli (Brassica oleracea var italica). The enzyme, broccoli DNA strand transferase, has a native molecular mass of at least 200 kD and an apparent subunit molecular mass of 95 kD and is isolated as a set of isoforms differing only in charge. All three activities are saturated at very low stoichiometry, one monomer per approximately 1000 nucleotides of single-stranded DNA. Strand transfer is not effected by nuclease activity and reannealing, is only slightly dependent on ATP, and is independent of added Mg2+. Transfer requires homologous single- and double-stranded DNA and at higher enzyme concentrations results in very high molecular mass complexes. As with Escherichia coli RecA, transfer by broccoli DNA strand transferase depends strongly on the presence of 3' homologous ends. PMID:7784508

  3. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315 Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. (a)...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315 Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. (a)...

  5. Glutathione transferase mimics: micellar catalysis of an enzymic reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Lindkvist, B; Weinander, R; Engman, L; Koetse, M; Engberts, J B; Morgenstern, R

    1997-01-01

    Substances that mimic the enzyme action of glutathione transferases (which serve in detoxification) are described. These micellar catalysts enhance the reaction rate between thiols and activated halogenated nitroarenes as well as alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyls. The nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction is enhanced by the following surfactants in descending order: poly(dimethyldiallylammonium - co - dodecylmethyldiallylammonium) bromide (86/14) >>cetyltrimethylammonium bromide>zwittergent 3-16 (n-hexadecyl-N,N-dimethyl-3-ammonio-1-propanesulphonate)>zwittergent+ ++ 3-14 (n-tetradecyl-N,N-dimethyl - 3 - ammonio -1 - propanesulphonate) approximately N,N - dimethyl - laurylamine N-oxide>N,N-dimethyloctylamine N-oxide. The most efficient catalyst studied is a polymeric material that incorporates surfactant properties (n-dodecylmethyldiallylammonium bromide) and opens up possibilities for engineering sequences of reactions on a polymeric support. Michael addition to alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyls is exemplified by a model substance, trans-4-phenylbut-3-en-2-one, and a toxic compound that is formed during oxidative stress, 4-hydroxy-2-undecenal. The latter compound is conjugated with the highest efficiency of those tested. Micellar catalysts can thus be viewed as simple models for the glutathione transferases highlighting the influence of a positive electrostatic field and a non-specific hydrophobic binding site, pertaining to two catalytic aspects, namely thiolate anion stabilization and solvent shielding. PMID:9173899

  6. Nucleotidyl transferase assisted DNA labeling with different click chemistries

    PubMed Central

    Winz, Marie-Luise; Linder, Eva Christina; André, Timon; Becker, Juliane; Jäschke, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present a simple, modular and efficient strategy that allows the 3′-terminal labeling of DNA, regardless of whether it has been chemically or enzymatically synthesized or isolated from natural sources. We first incorporate a range of modified nucleotides at the 3′-terminus, using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase. In the second step, we convert the incorporated nucleotides, using either of four highly efficient click chemistry-type reactions, namely copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition, strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition, Staudinger ligation or Diels-Alder reaction with inverse electron demand. Moreover, we create internal modifications, making use of either ligation or primer extension, after the nucleotidyl transferase step, prior to the click reaction. We further study the influence of linker variants on the reactivity of azides in different click reactions. We find that different click reactions exhibit distinct substrate preferences, a fact that is often overlooked, but should be considered when labeling oligonucleotides or other biomolecules with click chemistry. Finally, our findings allowed us to extend our previously published RNA labeling strategy to the use of a different copper-free click chemistry, namely the Staudinger ligation. PMID:26013812

  7. [Selective N-heterylazimine inhibition of reactions catalyzed by rat liver glutathione transferase].

    PubMed

    Stulovskiĭ, A V; Voznyĭ, I V; Rozengart, E V; Suvorov, A A; Khovanskikh, A E

    1992-01-01

    Three reactions (nucleophile substitution, thiolysis and N-deoxygenation) catalyzed by rat liver glutathione transferase have been studied using several N-heterylazimine inhibitors. The inhibitors are sharply different in their effectiveness in the transferase reactions. Their efficiency depends on their structure. The mechanism which underlies the found regularities is suggested. PMID:1413125

  8. Glutathione S-transferase class {pi} polymorphism in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Aivaliotis, M.J.; Cantu, T.; Gilligan, R.

    1995-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) comprises a family of isozymes with broad substrate specificities. One or more GST isozymes are present in most animal tissues and function in several detoxification pathways through the conjugation of reduced glutathione with various electrophiles, thereby reducing their potential toxicity. Four soluble GST isozymes encoded by genes on different chromosomes have been identified in humans. The acidic class pi GST, GSTP (previously designated GST-3), is widely distributed in adult tissues and appears to be the only GST isozyme present in leukocytes and placenta. Previously reported electrophoretic analyses of erythrocyte and leukocyte extracts revealed single bands of activity, which differed slightly in mobility between the two cell types, or under other conditions, a two-banded pattern. To our knowledge, no genetically determined polymorphisms have previously been reported in GSTP from any species. We now report a polymorphism of GSTP in baboon leukocytes, and present family data that verifies autosomal codominant inheritance. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Recombinant baculovirus vectors expressing glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Davies, A H; Jowett, J B; Jones, I M

    1993-08-01

    Recombinant baculoviruses are a popular means of producing heterologous protein in eukaryotic cells. Purification of recombinant proteins away from the insect cell background can, however, remain an obstacle for many developments. Recently, prokaryotic fusion protein expression systems have been developed allowing single-step purification of the heterologous protein and specific proteolytic cleavage of the affinity tag moiety from the desired antigen. Here we report the introduction of these attributes to the baculovirus system. "Baculo-GEX" vectors enable baculovirus production of fusion proteins with the above advantages, but in a eukaryotic post-translational processing environment. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusions are stable cytoplasmic proteins in insect cells and may therefore be released by sonication alone, avoiding the solubility problems and detergent requirements of bacterial systems. Thus large amounts of authentic antigen may be purified in a single, non-denaturing step. PMID:7763917

  10. Functional analysis and localisation of a delta-class glutathione S-transferase from Sarcoptes scabiei.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Eva U; Ljunggren, Erland L; Morrison, David A; Mattsson, Jens G

    2005-01-01

    The mite Sarcoptes scabiei causes sarcoptic mange, or scabies, a disease that affects both animals and humans worldwide. Our interest in S. scabiei led us to further characterise a glutathione S-transferase. This multifunctional enzyme is a target for vaccine and drug development in several parasitic diseases. The S. scabiei glutathione S-transferase open reading frame reported here is 684 nucleotides long and yields a protein with a predicted molecular mass of 26 kDa. Through phylogenetic analysis the enzyme was classified as a delta-class glutathione S-transferase, and our paper is the first to report that delta-class glutathione S-transferases occur in organisms other than insects. The recombinant S. scabiei glutathione S-transferase was expressed in Escherichia coli via three different constructs and purified for biochemical analysis. The S. scabiei glutathione S-transferase was active towards the substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, though the positioning of fusion partners influenced the kinetic activity of the enzyme. Polyclonal antibodies raised against S. scabiei glutathione S-transferase specifically localised the enzyme to the integument of the epidermis and cavities surrounding internal organs in adult parasites. However, some minor staining of parasite intestines was observed. No staining was seen in host tissues, nor could we detect any antibody response against S. scabiei glutathione S-transferase in sera from naturally S. scabiei infected dogs or pigs. Additionally, the polyclonal sera raised against recombinant S. scabiei glutathione S-transferase readily detected a protein from mites, corresponding to the predicted size of native glutathione S-transferase. PMID:15619514

  11. Inactivation of Anopheles gambiae Glutathione Transferase ε2 by Epiphyllocoumarin

    PubMed Central

    Marimo, Patience; Hayeshi, Rose; Mukanganyama, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are part of a major family of detoxifying enzymes that can catalyze the reductive dehydrochlorination of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT). The delta and epsilon classes of insect GSTs have been implicated in conferring resistance to this insecticide. In this study, the inactivation of Anopheles gambiae GSTε2 by epiphyllocoumarin (Tral 1) was investigated. Recombinant AgGSTε2 was expressed in Escherichia coli cells containing a pET3a-AGSTε2 plasmid and purified by affinity chromatography. Tral 1 was shown to inactivate GSTε2 both in a time-dependent manner and in a concentration-dependent manner. The half-life of GSTε2 in the presence of 25 μM ethacrynic acid (ETA) was 22 minutes and with Tral 1 was 30 minutes, indicating that Tral 1 was not as efficient as ETA as an inactivator. The inactivation parameters kinact and KI were found to be 0.020 ± 0.001 min−1 and 7.5 ± 2.1 μM, respectively, after 90 minutes of incubation. Inactivation of GSTε2 by Tral 1 implies that Tral 1 covalently binds to this enzyme in vitro and would be expected to exhibit time-dependent effects on the enzyme in vivo. Tral 1, therefore, would produce irreversible effects when used together with dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) in malaria control programmes where resistance is mediated by GSTs. PMID:26925266

  12. Crystal structure of E. coli lipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Guotao; Zhao, Yan; Kang, Xusheng; Li, Zhijie; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Xianping; Sun, Fei; Sankaran, Krishnan; Zhang, Xuejun C.

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein biogenesis is essential for bacterial survival. Phosphatidylglycerol:prolipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase (Lgt) is an integral membrane enzyme that catalyses the first reaction of the three-step post-translational lipid modification. Deletion of the lgt gene is lethal to most Gram-negative bacteria. Here we present the crystal structures of Escherichia coli Lgt in complex with phosphatidylglycerol and the inhibitor palmitic acid at 1.9 and 1.6 Å resolution, respectively. The structures reveal the presence of two binding sites and support the previously reported structure–function relationships of Lgt. Complementation results of lgt-knockout cells with different mutant Lgt variants revealed critical residues, including Arg143 and Arg239, that are essential for diacylglyceryl transfer. Using a GFP-based in vitro assay, we correlated the activities of Lgt with structural observations. Together, the structural and biochemical data support a mechanism whereby substrate and product, lipid-modified lipobox-containing peptide, enter and leave the enzyme laterally relative to the lipid bilayer. PMID:26729647

  13. Crystal structure of E. coli lipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase.

    PubMed

    Mao, Guotao; Zhao, Yan; Kang, Xusheng; Li, Zhijie; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Xianping; Sun, Fei; Sankaran, Krishnan; Zhang, Xuejun C

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein biogenesis is essential for bacterial survival. Phosphatidylglycerol:prolipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase (Lgt) is an integral membrane enzyme that catalyses the first reaction of the three-step post-translational lipid modification. Deletion of the lgt gene is lethal to most Gram-negative bacteria. Here we present the crystal structures of Escherichia coli Lgt in complex with phosphatidylglycerol and the inhibitor palmitic acid at 1.9 and 1.6 Å resolution, respectively. The structures reveal the presence of two binding sites and support the previously reported structure-function relationships of Lgt. Complementation results of lgt-knockout cells with different mutant Lgt variants revealed critical residues, including Arg143 and Arg239, that are essential for diacylglyceryl transfer. Using a GFP-based in vitro assay, we correlated the activities of Lgt with structural observations. Together, the structural and biochemical data support a mechanism whereby substrate and product, lipid-modified lipobox-containing peptide, enter and leave the enzyme laterally relative to the lipid bilayer. PMID:26729647

  14. Benzene oxide is a substrate for glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed

    Zarth, Adam T; Murphy, Sharon E; Hecht, Stephen S

    2015-12-01

    Benzene is a known human carcinogen which must be activated to benzene oxide (BO) to exert its carcinogenic potential. BO can be detoxified in vivo by reaction with glutathione and excretion in the urine as S-phenylmercapturic acid. This process may be catalyzed by glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), but kinetic data for this reaction have not been published. Therefore, we incubated GSTA1, GSTT1, GSTM1, and GSTP1 with glutathione and BO and quantified the formation of S-phenylglutathione. Kinetic parameters were determined for GSTT1 and GSTP1. At 37 °C, the putative Km and Vmax values for GSTT1 were 420 μM and 450 fmol/s, respectively, while those for GSTP1 were 3600 μM and 3100 fmol/s. GSTA1 and GSTM1 did not exhibit sufficient activity for determination of kinetic parameters. We conclude that GSTT1 is a critical enzyme in the detoxification of BO and that GSTP1 may also play an important role, while GSTA1 and GSTM1 seem to be less important. PMID:26554337

  15. Modulation of Rab GTPase function by a protein phosphocholine transferase.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Shaeri; Liu, Xiaoyun; Arasaki, Kohei; McDonough, Justin; Galán, Jorge E; Roy, Craig R

    2011-09-01

    The intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila modulates the activity of host GTPases to direct the transport and assembly of the membrane-bound compartment in which it resides. In vitro studies have indicated that the Legionella protein DrrA post-translationally modifies the GTPase Rab1 by a process called AMPylation. Here we used mass spectrometry to investigate post-translational modifications to Rab1 that occur during infection of host cells by Legionella. Consistent with in vitro studies, DrrA-mediated AMPylation of a conserved tyrosine residue in the switch II region of Rab1 was detected during infection. In addition, a modification to an adjacent serine residue in Rab1 was discovered, which was independent of DrrA. The Legionella effector protein AnkX was required for this modification. Biochemical studies determined that AnkX directly mediates the covalent attachment of a phosphocholine moiety to Rab1. This phosphocholine transferase activity used CDP-choline as a substrate and required a conserved histidine residue located in the FIC domain of the AnkX protein. During infection, AnkX modified both Rab1 and Rab35, which explains how this protein modulates membrane transport through both the endocytic and exocytic pathways of the host cell. Thus, phosphocholination of Rab GTPases represents a mechanism by which bacterial FIC-domain-containing proteins can alter host-cell functions. PMID:21822290

  16. Glutathione S-transferase activity and glutathione S-transferase mu expression in subjects with risk for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Szarka, C E; Pfeiffer, G R; Hum, S T; Everley, L C; Balshem, A M; Moore, D F; Litwin, S; Goosenberg, E B; Frucht, H; Engstrom, P F

    1995-07-01

    The glutathione S-transferases (alpha, mu, and pi), a family of Phase II detoxication enzymes, play a critical role in protecting the colon mucosa by catalyzing the conjugation of dietary carcinogens with glutathione. We investigated the efficacy of using the glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity of blood lymphocytes and GST-mu expression as biomarkers of risk for colorectal cancer. GST activity was measured in the blood lymphocytes of control individuals (n = 67) and in the blood lymphocytes (n = 60) and colon tissue (n = 34) of individuals at increased risk for colon cancer. Total GST activity was determined spectrophotometrically with the use of 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as a substrate. The ability to express the um subclass of GST was determined with the use of an ELISA. Although interindividual variability in the GST activity of blood lymphocytes was greater than 8-fold (range, 16.7-146.8 nmol/min/mg), the GST activity of blood lymphocytes and colon tissue within an individual was constant over time and was unrelated to sex, age, or race. The GST activity of blood lymphocytes from high-risk individuals was significantly lower than that of blood lymphocytes from control individuals (P < or = 0.004). No association was observed between the frequency of GST-mu phenotype and risk for colorectal cancer. Blood lymphocytes from high-risk individuals unable to express GST-mu had lower levels of GST activity than did those from control subjects with the GST-mu null phenotype; however, this difference was significant in male subjects only (P < or = 0.006). Analysis of paired samples of blood lymphocytes and colon tissue indicated a strong correlation between the GST activity of the two tissue types (Spearman's rank correlation, r = 0.87; P < or = 0.0001). The GST activity of blood lymphocytes may be used to identify high-risk individuals with decreased protection from this Phase II detoxication enzyme who may benefit from clinical trials evaluating GST modulators

  17. Selection of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides against glutathione S-transferase Mu.

    PubMed Central

    't Hoen, Peter A C; Out, Ruud; Commandeur, Jan N M; Vermeulen, Nico P E; van Batenburg, F H D; Manoharan, Muthiah; van Berkel, Theo J C; Biessen, Erik A L; Bijsterbosch, Martin K

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify functional antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) against the rat glutathione S-transferase Mu (GSTM) isoforms, GSTM1 and GSTM2. These antisense ODNs would enable the study of the physiological consequences of GSTM deficiency. Because it has been suggested that the effectiveness of antisense ODNs is dependent on the secondary mRNA structures of their target sites, we made mRNA secondary structure predictions with two software packages, Mfold and STAR. The two programs produced only marginally similar structures, which can probably be attributed to differences in the algorithms used. The effectiveness of a set of 18 antisense ODNs was evaluated with a cell-free transcription/translation assay, and their activity was correlated with the predicted secondary RNA structures. Four phosphodiester ODNs specific for GSTM1, two ODNs specific for GSTM2, and four ODNs targeted at both GSTM isoforms were found to be potent, sequence-specific, and RNase H-dependent inhibitors of protein expression. The IC50 value of the most potent ODN was approximately 100 nM. Antisense ODNs targeted against regions that were predicted by STAR to be predominantly single stranded were more potent than antisense ODNs against double-stranded regions. Such a correlation was not found for the Mfold prediction. Our data suggest that simulation of the local folding of RNA facilitates the discovery of potent antisense sequences. In conclusion, we selected several promising antisense sequences, which, when synthesized as biologically stable oligonucleotides, can be applied for study of the physiological impact of reduced GSTM expression. PMID:12515389

  18. Analysis of Arabidopsis glutathione-transferases in yeast.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, Matthias P; Kanawati, Basem; Fekete, Agnes; Kowalski, Natalie; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Grill, Erwin

    2013-07-01

    The genome of Arabidopsis thaliana encodes 54 functional glutathione transferases (GSTs), classified in seven clades. Although plant GSTs have been implicated in the detoxification of xenobiotics, such as herbicides, extensive redundancy within this large gene family impedes a functional analysis in planta. In this study, a GST-deficient yeast strain was established as a system for analyzing plant GSTs that allows screening for GST substrates and identifying substrate preferences within the plant GST family. To this end, five yeast genes encoding GSTs and GST-related proteins were simultaneously disrupted. The resulting yeast quintuple mutant showed a strongly reduced conjugation of the GST substrates 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and 4-chloro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-Cl). Consistently, the quintuple mutant was hypersensitive to CDNB, and this phenotype was complemented by the inducible expression of Arabidopsis GSTs. The conjugating activity of the plant GSTs was assessed by in vitro enzymatic assays and via analysis of exposed yeast cells. The formation of glutathione adducts with dinitrobenzene was unequivocally verified by stable isotope labeling and subsequent accurate ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry (ICR-FTMS). Analysis of Arabidopsis GSTs encompassing six clades and 42 members demonstrated functional expression in yeast by using CDNB and NBD-Cl as model substrates. Subsequently, the established yeast system was explored for its potential to screen the Arabidopsis GST family for conjugation of the fungicide anilazine. Thirty Arabidopsis GSTs were identified that conferred increased levels of glutathionylated anilazine. Efficient anilazine conjugation was observed in the presence of the phi, tau, and theta clade GSTs including AtGSTF2, AtGSTF4, AtGSTF6, AtGSTF8, AtGSTF10, and AtGSTT2, none of which had previously been known to contribute to fungicide detoxification. ICR-FTMS analysis of yeast extracts allowed the simultaneous detection and

  19. Phosphonocarboxylates Inhibit the Second Geranylgeranyl Addition by Rab Geranylgeranyl Transferase*

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Rudi A.; Tavaré, Richard; Figueiredo, Ana C.; Błażewska, Katarzyna M.; Kashemirov, Boris A.; McKenna, Charles E.; Ebetino, Frank H.; Taylor, Adam; Rogers, Michael J.; Coxon, Fraser P.; Seabra, Miguel C.

    2009-01-01

    Rab geranylgeranyl transferase (RGGT) catalyzes the post-translational geranylgeranyl (GG) modification of (usually) two C-terminal cysteines in Rab GTPases. Here we studied the mechanism of the Rab geranylgeranylation reaction by bisphosphonate analogs in which one phosphonate group is replaced by a carboxylate (phosphonocarboxylate, PC). The phosphonocarboxylates used were 3-PEHPC, which was previously reported, and 2-hydroxy-3-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-3-yl-2-phosphonopropionic acid ((+)-3-IPEHPC), a >25-fold more potent related compound as measured by both IC50 and Ki.(+)-3-IPEHPC behaves as a mixed-type inhibitor with respect to GG pyrophosphate (GGPP) and an uncompetitive inhibitor with respect to Rab substrates. We propose that phosphonocarboxylates prevent only the second GG transfer onto Rabs based on the following evidence. First, geranylgeranylation of Rab proteins ending with a single cysteine motif such as CAAX, is not affected by the inhibitors, either in vitro or in vivo. Second, the addition of an -AAX sequence onto Rab-CC proteins protects the substrate from inhibition by the inhibitors. Third, we demonstrate directly that in the presence of (+)-3-IPEHPC, Rab-CC and Rab-CXC proteins are modified by only a single GG addition. The presence of (+)-3-IPEHPC resulted in a preference for the Rab N-terminal cysteine to be modified first, suggesting an order of cysteine geranylgeranylation in RGGT catalysis. Our results further suggest that the inhibitor binds to a site distinct from the GGPP-binding site on RGGT. We suggest that phosphonocarboxylate inhibitors bind to a GG-cysteine binding site adjacent to the active site, which is necessary to align the mono-GG-Rab for the second GG addition. These inhibitors may represent a novel therapeutic approach in Rab-mediated diseases. PMID:19074143

  20. 40 CFR 158.230 - Experimental use permit data requirements for toxicology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., thymidine kinase (tk) gene locus, maximizing assay conditions for small colony expression or detection; ii... phosphoribosyl transferase (hgprt) gene locus, accompanied by an appropriate in vitro test for clastogenicity; or iii. CHO cells strains AS52, xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (xprt) gene locus. 11....

  1. 40 CFR 158.230 - Experimental use permit data requirements for toxicology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., thymidine kinase (tk) gene locus, maximizing assay conditions for small colony expression or detection; ii... phosphoribosyl transferase (hgprt) gene locus, accompanied by an appropriate in vitro test for clastogenicity; or iii. CHO cells strains AS52, xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (xprt) gene locus. 11....

  2. 40 CFR 158.230 - Experimental use permit data requirements for toxicology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., thymidine kinase (tk) gene locus, maximizing assay conditions for small colony expression or detection; ii... phosphoribosyl transferase (hgprt) gene locus, accompanied by an appropriate in vitro test for clastogenicity; or iii. CHO cells strains AS52, xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (xprt) gene locus. 11....

  3. 40 CFR 158.230 - Experimental use permit data requirements for toxicology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., thymidine kinase (tk) gene locus, maximizing assay conditions for small colony expression or detection; ii... phosphoribosyl transferase (hgprt) gene locus, accompanied by an appropriate in vitro test for clastogenicity; or iii. CHO cells strains AS52, xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (xprt) gene locus. 11....

  4. 40 CFR 158.230 - Experimental use permit data requirements for toxicology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., thymidine kinase (tk) gene locus, maximizing assay conditions for small colony expression or detection; ii... phosphoribosyl transferase (hgprt) gene locus, accompanied by an appropriate in vitro test for clastogenicity; or iii. CHO cells strains AS52, xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (xprt) gene locus. 11....

  5. Post-transcriptional regulation of chloramphenicol acetyl transferase.

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, W H; Weisblum, B

    1984-01-01

    The +1 site for initiation of inducible chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) mRNA encoded by plasmid pC194 was determined experimentally by using [alpha-32P]ATP-labeled runoff transcripts partially digested with T1 RNase. By partial digestion of the in vitro transcripts with S1, T1, and cobra venom nucleases as probes of mRNA conformation, single- and double-stranded regions, respectively, were also identified. Thus, a prominent inverted complementary repeat sequence was demonstrated spanning the +14 to +50 positions, which contain the complementary sequences CCUCC and GGAGG (the Shine and Dalgarno sequence for synthesis of CAT) symmetrically apposed and paired as part of a perfect 12-base-pair inverted complementary repeat sequence (-19.5 kcal [ca. -81.7 kJ] per mol). The CAT mRNA was stable to digestion by T1 RNase at the four guanosine residues in the Shine and Dalgarno sequence GGAGG , even at 60 degrees C, suggesting that nascent CAT mRNA allows ribosomes to initiate protein synthesis inefficiently and that induction involves post-transcriptional unmasking of the Shine and Dalgarno sequence. Consistent with this model of regulation, we found that cells carrying pC194 , induced with chloramphenicol, contain about the same concentration of pulse-labeled CAT-specific RNA as do uninduced cells. Induction of CAT synthesis by the non- acetylatable chloramphenicol analog fluorothiamphenicol was tested by using minicells of Bacillus subtilis carrying pC194 as well as minicells containing the cloned pC194 derivatives in which parts of the CAT structural gene were deleted in vitro with BAL 31 exonuclease. Optimal induction of both full-length (active) and deleted (inactive) CAT required similar concentrations of fluorothiamphenicol, whereas induction by chloramphenicol required a higher concentration for the wild-type full-length (active) CAT than for the (inactive) deleted CAT. Because synthesis of deleted CAT was inducible, we infer that CAT plays no direct role

  6. Glucomannan synthesis in pea epicotyls: the mannose and glucose transferases.

    PubMed

    Piro, G; Zuppa, A; Dalessandro, G; Northcote, D H

    1993-01-01

    Membrane fractions and digitonin-solubilized enzymes prepared from stem segments isolated from the third internode of etiolated pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) catalyzed the synthesis of a beta-1,4-[14C]mannan from GDP-D-[U-14C]-mannose, a mixed beta-1,3- and beta-1,4-[14C]glucan from GDP-D-[U-14C]-glucose and a beta-1,4-[14C]-glucomannan from both GDP-D-[U-14C]mannose and GDP-D-[U-14C]glucose. The kinetics of the membrane-bound and soluble mannan and glucan synthases were determined. The effects of ions, chelators, inhibitors of lipid-linked saccharides, polyamines, polyols, nucleotides, nucleoside-diphosphate sugars, acetyl-CoA, group-specific chemical probes, phospholipases and detergents on the membrane-bound mannan and glucan synthases were investigated. The beta-glucan synthase had different properties from other preparations which bring about the synthesis of beta-1,3-glucans (callose) and mixed beta-1,3- and beta-1,4- glucans and which use UDP-D-glucose as substrate. It also differed from xyloglucan synthase because in the presence of several concentrations of UDP-D-xylose in addition to GDP-D-glucose no xyloglucan was formed. Using either the membrane-bound or the soluble mannan synthase, GDP-D-glucose acted competitively in the presence of GDP-D-mannose to inhibit the incorporation of mannose into the polymer. This was not due to an inhibition of the transferase activity but was a result of the incorporation of glucose residues from GDP-D-glucose into a glucomannan. The kinetics and the composition of the synthesized glucomannan depended on the ratio of the concentrations of GDP-D-glucose and GDP-D-mannose that were available. Our data indicated that a single enzyme has an active centre that can use both GDP-D-mannose and GDP-D-glucose to bring about the synthesis of the heteropolysaccharide. PMID:7685647

  7. Characterization of prenyl protein transferase enzymes in a human keratinocyte cell line.

    PubMed

    MacNulty, E E; Ryder, N S

    1996-02-01

    Prenylation is a post-translational modification of proteins that involves the attachment of an isoprenoid group derived from mevalonic acid, either 15-carbon farnesyl or 20-carbon geranylgeranyl, to a specific carboxy-terminal domain of acceptor proteins. Three prenyl transferase enzymes have been identified so far. In this paper we report the presence of two prenyl transferases in the HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line. Chromatography of a cytosolic extract from these cells resolved a farnesyl protein transferase (FPT) and geranylgeranyl protein transferase-I (GGPT-I) whose activities were measured using a novel peptide-based assay. Both enzymes were inhibited dose dependently by zaragozic acids A and C. Zaragozic acid C was more active towards the FPT than GGPT-I while zaragozic acid A inhibited both enzymes with similar potency. Incubation of HaCaT cell homogenates with [3H] prenyl precursors resulted in the labelling of a number of proteins which was increased when the cells were pretreated with an inhibitor of hydroxymethylglutaryl CoA reductase. Given the role of prenylated proteins in proliferative and inflammatory processes, our finding that prenyl transferases capable of prenylating endogenous substrates are also present in keratinocytes suggests that these enzymes might provide novel therapeutic targets of dermatological importance. PMID:8605230

  8. Mutation Induction in Mammalian Cells by Accelerated Heavy Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosendahl, I. M.; Baumstark-Khan, C.; Rink, H.

    The deleterious effects of accelerated heavy ions on living cells are of increasing importance for long duration human space flight activities. An important aspect of this field is attributed to the type and quality of biological damage induced by these densely ionizing particles. To address this aspect, cell inactivation and mutation induction at the hprt locus (coding for hypoxanthine-guanine-phosphoribosyl-transferase) was investigated in cultured V79 Chinese Hamster Cells irradiated with accelerated heavy ions (8-O, 20-Ca, 79-Au, and 92-U) and X-rays. Specific energies of the ions ranged from 1.9 to 69.7 MeV/u and corresponding LET values were between 62 band 15,580 keV/μ m. 30 spontaneous and 196 heavy-ion induced 6-thioguanine resistant hprt mutant colonies were characterized by Southern technique using the restriction enzymes EcoRI, PstI and BglII and a full length hprt cDNA probe isolated from the plasmid pHpt12 (kindly provided by Dr. J. Thacker). While inactivation cross sections (σ i) rise over the whole LET range, mutation induction cross sections (σ m) increase up to approximately 300 keV/μ m (O-ions) but decline with heavier ions and more extreme LET values. A similar behaviour is seen with mutation frequency dependent on particle fluence. After irradiation with accelerated uranium ions (8.8 MeV/u, 15,580 keV/μ m) a significant decrease of mutation frequency was found with higher particle fluences (3× 106 particles cm-2). Nearly no mutants were recovered with 8× 106 particles cm-2. All restriction patterns of the spontaneous hprt mutants were indistinguishable from the wild type pattern. These mutants probably contain small deletions or point mutations in the hprt locus. In contrast, the overall spectrum of heavy ion induced mutations revealed a majority (67%) of partial or complete deletions of the hprt gene. With constant particle fluence (3× 106 particles cm-2) the quality of heavy ion induced mutations in the hprt locus depends on physical

  9. O-GlcNAc transferase invokes nucleotide sugar pyrophosphate participation in catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Schimpl, Marianne; Zheng, Xiaowei; Borodkin, Vladimir S.; Blair, David E.; Ferenbach, Andrew T.; Schüttelkopf, Alexander W.; Navratilova, Iva; Aristotelous, Tonia; Albarbarawi, Osama; Robinson, David A.; Macnaughtan, Megan A.; van Aalten, Daan M.F.

    2012-01-01

    Protein O-GlcNAcylation is an essential post-translational modification on hundreds of intracellular proteins in metazoa, catalyzed by O-GlcNAc transferase using unknown mechanisms of transfer and substrate recognition. Through crystallographic snapshots and mechanism-inspired chemical probes, we define how human O-GlcNAc transferase recognizes the sugar donor and acceptor peptide and employs a novel catalytic mechanism of glycosyl transfer, involving the sugar donor α-phosphate as the catalytic base, as well as an essential lysine. This mechanism appears to be a unique evolutionary solution to the spatial constraints imposed by a bulky protein acceptor substrate, and explains the unexpected specificity of a recently reported metabolic O-GlcNAc transferase inhibitor. PMID:23103942

  10. The yeast WBP1 is essential for oligosaccharyl transferase activity in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    te Heesen, S; Janetzky, B; Lehle, L; Aebi, M

    1992-01-01

    Asparagine-linked N-glycosylation is a highly conserved and functionally important modification of proteins in eukaryotic cells. The central step in this process is a cotranslational transfer of lipid-linked core oligosaccharides to selected Asn-X-Ser/Thr-sequences of nascent polypeptide chains, catalysed by the enzyme N-oligosaccharyl transferase. In this report we show that the essential yeast protein WBP1 (te Heesen et al., 1991) is required for N-oligosaccharyl transferase in vivo and in vitro. Depletion of WBP1 correlates with a defect in transferring core oligosaccharides to carboxypeptidase Y and proteinase A in vivo. In addition, in vitro N-glycosylation of the acceptor peptide Tyr-Asn-Leu-Thr-Ser-Val using microsomal membranes from WBP1 depleted cells is reduced as compared with membranes from wild-type cells. We propose that WBP1 is an essential component of the oligosaccharyl transferase in yeast. Images PMID:1600939

  11. Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase in a Case of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    McCaffrey, Ronald; Smoler, Donna F.; Baltimore, David

    1973-01-01

    Cells from a patient with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia contain an apparent DNA polymerase activity that was not found in any other cells except thymus cells. The enzyme has the properties of terminal transferase, an enzyme known to be found in thymocytes. The cells also contain the three major DNA polymerases found in growing cells. The results suggest that these tumor cells arose from a block in the differentiation of thymocytes. Terminal transferase may be a marker for the origin of leukemic cells. PMID:4346893

  12. Type II Hydride Transferases from Different Microorganisms Yield Nitrite and Diarylamines from Polynitroaromatic Compounds▿ †

    PubMed Central

    van Dillewijn, Pieter; Wittich, Rolf-Michael; Caballero, Antonio; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2008-01-01

    Homogenous preparations of XenB of Pseudomonas putida, pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase of Enterobacter cloacae, and N-ethylmaleimide reductase of Escherichia coli, all type II hydride transferases of the Old Yellow Enzyme family of flavoproteins, are shown to reduce the polynitroaromatic compound 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). The reduction of this compound yields hydroxylaminodinitrotoluenes and Meisenheimer dihydride complexes, which, upon condensation, yield stoichiometric amounts of nitrite and diarylamines, implying that type II hydride transferases are responsible for TNT denitration, a process with important environmental implications for TNT remediation. PMID:18791007

  13. Purification and Biochemical Characterization of Glutathione S-Transferase from Down Syndrome and Normal Children Erythrocytes: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamed, Ragaa R.; Maharem, Tahany M.; Abdel-Meguid, Nagwa; Sabry, Gilane M.; Abdalla, Abdel-Monem; Guneidy, Rasha A.

    2011-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the phenotypic manifestation of trisomy 21. Our study was concerned with the characterization and purification of glutathione S-transferase enzyme (GST) from normal and Down syndrome (DS) erythrocytes to illustrate the difference in the role of this enzyme in the cell. Glutathione S-transferase and glutathione (GSH) was…

  14. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1030 - Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alanine amino transferase (ALT/SGPT) test system. 862.1030 Section 862.1030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1100 - Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system. 862.1100 Section 862.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1100 - Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system. 862.1100 Section 862.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1100 - Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system. 862.1100 Section 862.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1100 - Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system. 862.1100 Section 862.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  3. 21 CFR 862.1100 - Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aspartate amino transferase (AST/SGOT) test system. 862.1100 Section 862.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  4. 21 CFR 573.130 - Aminoglycoside 3′-phospho- transferase II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... genetically modified cotton, oilseed rape, and tomatoes in accordance with the following prescribed conditions... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aminoglycoside 3â²-phospho- transferase II. 573.130 Section 573.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  5. 21 CFR 573.130 - Aminoglycoside 3′-phospho- transferase II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... genetically modified cotton, oilseed rape, and tomatoes in accordance with the following prescribed conditions... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aminoglycoside 3â²-phospho- transferase II. 573.130 Section 573.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  6. 21 CFR 573.130 - Aminoglycoside 3′-phospho- transferase II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... genetically modified cotton, oilseed rape, and tomatoes in accordance with the following prescribed conditions... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aminoglycoside 3â²-phospho- transferase II. 573.130 Section 573.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  7. 21 CFR 573.130 - Aminoglycoside 3′-phospho- transferase II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... genetically modified cotton, oilseed rape, and tomatoes in accordance with the following prescribed conditions... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aminoglycoside 3â²-phospho- transferase II. 573.130 Section 573.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  8. 21 CFR 573.130 - Aminoglycoside 3′-phospho- transferase II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... genetically modified cotton, oilseed rape, and tomatoes in accordance with the following prescribed conditions... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aminoglycoside 3â²-phospho- transferase II. 573.130 Section 573.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  9. Structural and biochemical analyses reveal how ornithine acetyl transferase binds acidic and basic amino acid substrates.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Aman; Clifton, Ian J; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Ivison, David; Domene, Carmen; Schofield, Christopher J

    2011-09-21

    Structural and biochemical analyses reveal how ornithine acetyl-transferases catalyse the reversible transfer of an acetyl-group from a basic (ornithine) to an acidic (glutamate) amino acid by employing a common mechanism involving an acetyl-enzyme intermediate but using different side chain binding modes. PMID:21796301

  10. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. 862.1315 Section 862.1315 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. 862.1315 Section 862.1315 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... hereditary disease galactosemia (disorder of galactose metabolism) in infants. (b) Classification. Class II....

  12. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. 862.1315 Section 862.1315 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... hereditary disease galactosemia (disorder of galactose metabolism) in infants. (b) Classification. Class II....

  13. [(1)H] magnetic resonance spectroscopy of urine: diagnosis of a guanidinoacetate methyl transferase deficiency case.

    PubMed

    Tassini, Maria; Zannolli, Raffaella; Buoni, Sabrina; Engelke, Udo; Vivi, Antonio; Valensin, Gianni; Salomons, Gajja S; De Nicola, Anna; Strambi, Mirella; Monti, Lucia; Morava, Eva; Wevers, Ron A; Hayek, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    For the first time, the use of urine [(1)H] magnetic resonance spectroscopy has allowed the detection of 1 case of guanidinoacetate methyl transferase in a database sample of 1500 pediatric patients with a diagnosis of central nervous system impairment of unknown origin. The urine [(1)H] magnetic resonance spectroscopy of a 9-year-old child, having severe epilepsy and nonprogressive mental and motor retardation with no apparent cause, revealed a possible guanidinoacetic acid increase. The definitive assignment of guanidinoacetic acid was checked by addition of pure substance to the urine sample and by measuring [(1)H]-[(1)H] correlation spectroscopy. Diagnosis of guanidinoacetate methyl transferase deficiency was further confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, brain [(1)H] magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and mutational analysis of the guanidinoacetate methyl transferase gene. The replacement therapy was promptly started and, after 1 year, the child was seizure free. We conclude that for this case, urine [(1)H] magnetic resonance spectroscopy screening was able to diagnose guanidinoacetate methyl transferase deficiency. PMID:19461121

  14. Maize white seedling 3 results from disruption of homogentisate solanesyl transferase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize white seedling 3 (w3) has served as a model albino-seedling mutant since its discovery in 1923. We show here that the w3 phenotype is caused by disruptions in homogentisate solanesyl transferase (HST), an enzyme that catalyzes the committed step in plastoquinone-9 (PQ9) biosynthesis. This re...

  15. GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE THETA 1-1-DEPENDENT METABOLISM OF THE DISINFECTION BYPRODUCT BROMODICHLOROMETHANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    Bromodichloromethane (BDCM), a prevalent drinking water disinfection by-product, was previously shown to be mutagenic in Salmonella expressing glutathione S-transferase (GST) theta 1-1 (GST T1-1). In the present study, in vitro experiments were performed to study the...

  16. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of glutathione transferase zeta 1 (GSTZ1a-1a)

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, Christopher D.; Zhong, Guo; Smeltz, Marci; James, Margaret O. McKenna, Robert

    2014-01-21

    Crystals of glutathione transferase zeta 1 were grown and shown to diffract X-rays to 3.1 Å resolution. They belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.0, b = 49.6, c = 54.6 Å, α = 82.9, β = 69.9, γ = 73.4°.

  17. DNA BINDING POTENTIAL OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE MEDIATED BY GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE THETA 1-1

    EPA Science Inventory


    DNA BINDING POTENTIAL OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE MEDIATED BY GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE THETA 1-1. R A Pegram1 and M K Ross2. 2Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; 1Pharmacokinetics Branch, NHEERL, ORD, United States Environmental Protection Ag...

  18. A tyrosine-reactive irreversible inhibitor for glutathione S-transferase Pi (GSTP1).

    PubMed

    Crawford, L A; Weerapana, E

    2016-05-24

    Glutathione S-transferase Pi (GSTP1) mediates cellular defense against reactive electrophiles. Here, we report LAS17, a dichlorotriazine-containing compound that irreversibly inhibits GSTP1 and is selective for GSTP1 within cellular proteomes. Mass spectrometry and mutational studies identified Y108 as the site of modification, providing a unique mode of GSTP1 inhibition. PMID:27113843

  19. Glycosyl transferases in chondroitin sulphate biosynthesis. Effect of acceptor structure on activity.

    PubMed Central

    Gundlach, M W; Conrad, H E

    1985-01-01

    The D-glucuronosyl (GlcA)- and N-acetyl-D-galactosaminyl (GalNAc)-transferases involved in chondroitin sulphate biosynthesis were studied in a microsomal preparation from chick-embryo chondrocytes. Transfer of GlcA and GalNAc from their UDP derivatives to 3H-labelled oligosaccharides prepared from chondroitin sulphate and hyaluronic acid was assayed by h.p.l.c. of the reaction mixture. Conditions required for maximal activities of the two enzymes were remarkably similar. Activities were stimulated 3.5-6-fold by neutral detergents. Both enzymes were completely inhibited by EDTA and maximally stimulated by MnCl2 or CoCl2. MgCl2 neither stimulated nor inhibited. The GlcA transferase showed a sharp pH optimum between pH5 and 6, whereas the GalNAc transferase gave a broad optimum from pH 5 to 8. At pH 7 under optimal conditions, the GalNAc transferase gave a velocity that was twice that of the GlcA transferase. Oligosaccharides prepared from chondroitin 4-sulphate and hyaluronic acid were almost inactive as acceptors for both enzymes, whereas oligosaccharides from chondroitin 6-sulphate and chondroitin gave similar rates that were 70-80-fold higher than those observed with the endogenous acceptors. Oligosaccharide acceptors with degrees of polymerization of 6 or higher gave similar Km and Vmax. values, but the smaller oligosaccharides were less effective acceptors. These results are discussed in terms of the implications for regulation of the overall rates of the chain-elongation fractions in chondroitin sulphate synthesis in vivo. PMID:3921015

  20. Functional Dissection of the Bipartite Active Site of the Class I Coenzyme A (CoA)-Transferase Succinyl-CoA:Acetate CoA-Transferase.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Jesse R; Mullins, Elwood A; Kappock, T Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme A (CoA)-transferases catalyze the reversible transfer of CoA from acyl-CoA thioesters to free carboxylates. Class I CoA-transferases produce acylglutamyl anhydride intermediates that undergo attack by CoA thiolate on either the internal or external carbonyl carbon atoms, forming distinct tetrahedral intermediates <3 Å apart. In this study, crystal structures of succinyl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase (AarC) from Acetobacter aceti are used to examine how the Asn347 carboxamide stabilizes the internal oxyanion intermediate. A structure of the active mutant AarC-N347A bound to CoA revealed both solvent replacement of the missing contact and displacement of the adjacent Glu294, indicating that Asn347 both polarizes and orients the essential glutamate. AarC was crystallized with the nonhydrolyzable acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) analog dethiaacetyl-CoA (1a) in an attempt to trap a closed enzyme complex containing a stable analog of the external oxyanion intermediate. One active site contained an acetylglutamyl anhydride adduct and truncated 1a, an unexpected result hinting at an unprecedented cleavage of the ketone moiety in 1a. Solution studies confirmed that 1a decomposition is accompanied by production of near-stoichiometric acetate, in a process that seems to depend on microbial contamination but not AarC. A crystal structure of AarC bound to the postulated 1a truncation product (2a) showed complete closure of one active site per dimer but no acetylglutamyl anhydride, even with acetate added. These findings suggest that an activated acetyl donor forms during 1a decomposition; a working hypothesis involving ketone oxidation is offered. The ability of 2a to induce full active site closure furthermore suggests that it subverts a system used to impede inappropriate active site closure on unacylated CoA. PMID:27242998

  1. Functional Dissection of the Bipartite Active Site of the Class I Coenzyme A (CoA)-Transferase Succinyl-CoA:Acetate CoA-Transferase

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Jesse R.; Mullins, Elwood A.; Kappock, T. Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme A (CoA)-transferases catalyze the reversible transfer of CoA from acyl-CoA thioesters to free carboxylates. Class I CoA-transferases produce acylglutamyl anhydride intermediates that undergo attack by CoA thiolate on either the internal or external carbonyl carbon atoms, forming distinct tetrahedral intermediates <3 Å apart. In this study, crystal structures of succinyl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase (AarC) from Acetobacter aceti are used to examine how the Asn347 carboxamide stabilizes the internal oxyanion intermediate. A structure of the active mutant AarC-N347A bound to CoA revealed both solvent replacement of the missing contact and displacement of the adjacent Glu294, indicating that Asn347 both polarizes and orients the essential glutamate. AarC was crystallized with the nonhydrolyzable acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) analog dethiaacetyl-CoA (1a) in an attempt to trap a closed enzyme complex containing a stable analog of the external oxyanion intermediate. One active site contained an acetylglutamyl anhydride adduct and truncated 1a, an unexpected result hinting at an unprecedented cleavage of the ketone moiety in 1a. Solution studies confirmed that 1a decomposition is accompanied by production of near-stoichiometric acetate, in a process that seems to depend on microbial contamination but not AarC. A crystal structure of AarC bound to the postulated 1a truncation product (2a) showed complete closure of one active site per dimer but no acetylglutamyl anhydride, even with acetate added. These findings suggest that an activated acetyl donor forms during 1a decomposition; a working hypothesis involving ketone oxidation is offered. The ability of 2a to induce full active site closure furthermore suggests that it subverts a system used to impede inappropriate active site closure on unacylated CoA. PMID:27242998

  2. Functional dissection of the bipartite active site of the class I coenzyme A (CoA)-transferase succinyl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Jesse; Mullins, Elwood; Kappock, T.

    2016-05-01

    Coenzyme A (CoA)-transferases catalyze the reversible transfer of CoA from acyl-CoA thioesters to free carboxylates. Class I CoA-transferases produce acylglutamyl anhydride intermediates that undergo attack by CoA thiolate on either the internal or external carbonyl carbon atoms, forming distinct tetrahedral intermediates less than 3 Å apart. In this study, crystal structures of succinyl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase (AarC) from Acetobacter aceti are used to examine how the Asn347 carboxamide stabilizes the internal oxyanion intermediate. A structure of the active mutant AarC-N347A bound to CoA revealed both solvent replacement of the missing contact and displacement of the adjacent Glu294, indicating that Asn347 both polarizes and orients the essential glutamate. AarC was crystallized with the nonhydrolyzable acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) analogue dethiaacetyl-CoA (1a) in an attempt to trap a closed enzyme complex containing a stable analogue of the external oxyanion intermediate. One active site contained an acetylglutamyl anhydride adduct and truncated 1a, an unexpected result hinting at an unprecedented cleavage of the ketone moiety in 1a. Solution studies confirmed that 1a decomposition is accompanied by production of near-stoichiometric acetate, in a process that seems to depend on microbial contamination but not AarC. A crystal structure of AarC bound to the postulated 1a truncation product (2a) showed complete closure of one active site per dimer but no acetylglutamyl anhydride, even with acetate added. These findings suggest that an activated acetyl donor forms during 1a decomposition; a working hypothesis involving ketone oxidation is offered. The ability of 2a to induce full active site closure furthermore suggests that it subverts a system used to impede inappropriate active site closure on unacylated CoA.

  3. Radiographic changes and lung function in relation to activity of the glutathione transferases theta and mu among asbestos cement workers.

    PubMed

    Jakobsson, K; Rannug, A; Alexandrie, A K; Warholm, M; Rylander, L; Hagmar, L

    1995-05-01

    Experimental data indicate that active oxygen species may be casually involved in the development of asbestos-related disease. Thus, it was hypothesized that individual differences in glutathione transferase activity, which may affect the ability to inactivate molecules formed in relation to oxidative stress, could influence the biological response to asbestos exposure. We could, however, not demonstrate an increased risk for radiographic changes or reduced lung function among asbestos cement workers deficient for glutathione transferase theta (GSTT1), glutathione transferase mu (GSTM1), or having a combined deficiency of enzyme activity. PMID:7618163

  4. Regiospecificity of placental metabolism by cytochromes P450 and glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed

    McRobie, D J; Glover, D D; Tracy, T S

    1996-01-01

    The placenta possesses the ability to metabolize numerous xenobiotics and endogenous steroids. However, it is unknown whether regional differences in these enzymatic reactions exist in the human placenta. To this end, we undertook a study of four regions of the placenta, the chorionic plate, maternal surface, placental margin and whole tissue, to assess the activities of cytochrome P450 1A1 and 19A1 (aromatase) and glutathione S-stransferase in these fractions. No differences in either P450 1A1 or glutathione S-transferase activities were noted among any of the placental fractions. However, with respect to P450 19A1 activity, the placental margin differed significantly from all other fractions (p < 0.05). This study demonstrates that whole tissue samples of the human placenta are adequate for placental cytochrome P450 and glutathione S-transferase metabolism studies. PMID:8938464

  5. Identification of a diazinon-metabolizing glutathione S-transferase in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Yamada, Naotaka

    2016-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferase superfamily play key roles in the metabolism of numerous xenobiotics. We report herein the identification and characterization of a novel glutathione S-transferase in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. The enzyme (bmGSTu2) conjugates glutathione to 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, as well as metabolizing diazinon, one of the organophosphate insecticides. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of transcripts demonstrated that bmGSTu2 expression was induced 1.7-fold in a resistant strain of B. mori. Mutagenesis of putative amino acid residues in the glutathione-binding site revealed that Ile54, Glu66, Ser67, and Asn68 are crucial for enzymatic function. These results provide insights into the catalysis of glutathione conjugation in silkworm by bmGSTu2 and into the detoxification of organophosphate insecticides. PMID:27440377

  6. Identification of a diazinon-metabolizing glutathione S-transferase in the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Yamada, Naotaka

    2016-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferase superfamily play key roles in the metabolism of numerous xenobiotics. We report herein the identification and characterization of a novel glutathione S-transferase in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. The enzyme (bmGSTu2) conjugates glutathione to 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, as well as metabolizing diazinon, one of the organophosphate insecticides. Quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction analysis of transcripts demonstrated that bmGSTu2 expression was induced 1.7-fold in a resistant strain of B. mori. Mutagenesis of putative amino acid residues in the glutathione-binding site revealed that Ile54, Glu66, Ser67, and Asn68 are crucial for enzymatic function. These results provide insights into the catalysis of glutathione conjugation in silkworm by bmGSTu2 and into the detoxification of organophosphate insecticides. PMID:27440377

  7. Glutathione and gamma-glutamyl transferases are involved in the formation of cadmium-glutathione complex.

    PubMed

    Adamis, Paula Daniela Braga; Mannarino, Sérgio Cantú; Eleutherio, Elis Cristina Araújo

    2009-05-01

    In a wild-type strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cadmium induces the activities of both gamma-glutamyl transferase (gamma-GT) and glutathione transferase 2 (Gtt2). However, Gtt2 activity did not increase under gamma-GT or Ycf1 deficiencies, suggesting that the accumulation of glutathione-cadmium in the cytosol inhibits Gtt2. On the other hand, the balance between the cytoplasmic and vacuolar level of glutathione seems to regulate gamma-GT activity, since this enzyme was not activated in a gtt2 strain. Taken together, these results suggest that gamma-GT and Gtt2 work together to remove cadmium from the cytoplasm, a crucial mechanism for metal detoxification that is dependent on glutathione. PMID:19345220

  8. Glutathione transferase activity and formation of macromolecular adducts in two cases of acute methyl bromide poisoning.

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, R; Rambourg-Schepens, M O; Müller, A; Hallier, E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the activity of glutathione transferase and to measure the S-methylcysteine adducts in blood proteins, after acute inhalation exposure to methyl bromide. To examine the influence of the polymorphism of glutathione-S-transferase theta (GSTT1) on the neurotoxicity of methyl bromide. METHODS: Two workers acutely exposed to methyl bromide with inadequate respiratory protective devices were poisoned. Seven weeks after the accident, blood samples were drawn from both patients, for measurement of glutathione transferase activity in erythrocytes (conjugator status--that is, GSTT1 phenotype) and measurement of binding products of methyl bromide with blood proteins. Conjugator status was determined by a standard procedure. The binding product of methyl bromide, S-methylcysteine, was measured in globin and albumin. RESULTS: Duration and intensity of exposure were identical for both patients as they worked together with the same protective devices and with similar physical effort. However, one patient had very severe poisoning, whereas the other only developed mild neurotoxic symptoms. The first patient was a "conjugator" with normal glutathone transferase activity, whereas this activity was undetectable in the erythrocytes of the second patient, who consequently had higher concentrations of S-methylcysteine adduct in albumin (149 v 91 nmol/g protein) and in globin (77 v 30 nmol/g protein). CONCLUSIONS: Methyl bromide is genotoxic and neurotoxic. Its genotoxicity seems to be the consequence of the alkylating activity of the parent compound, and conjugation to glutathione has a protective effect. The data presented here suggest a different mechanism for methyl bromide neurotoxicity which could be related to the transformation of methylglutathione into toxic metabolites such as methanethiol and formaldehyde. If such metabolites are the ultimate toxic species, N-acetylcysteine treatment could have a toxifying rather than a detoxifying effect. PMID:8704864

  9. A comparison of erythrocyte glutathione S-transferase activity from human foetuses and adults.

    PubMed Central

    Strange, R C; Johnston, J D; Coghill, D R; Hume, R

    1980-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase activity was measured in partially purified haemolysates of erythrocytes from human foetuses and adults. Enzyme activity was present in erythrocytes obtained between 12 and 40 weeks of gestation. The catalytic properties of the enzyme from foetal cells were similar to those of the enzyme from adult erythrocytes, indicating that probably only one form of the erythrocytes enzyme exists throughout foetal and adult life. PMID:7396875

  10. Homology between O-linked GlcNAc transferases and proteins of the glycogen phosphorylase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Wrabl, J O; Grishin, N V

    2001-11-30

    The O-linked GlcNAc transferases (OGTs) are a recently characterized group of largely eukaryotic enzymes that add a single beta-N-acetylglucosamine moiety to specific serine or threonine hydroxyls. In humans, this process may be part of a sugar regulation mechanism or cellular signaling pathway that is involved in many important diseases, such as diabetes, cancer, and neurodegeneration. However, no structural information about the human OGT exists, except for the identification of tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) at the N terminus. The locations of substrate binding sites are unknown and the structural basis for this enzyme's function is not clear. Here, remote homology is reported between the OGTs and a large group of diverse sugar processing enzymes, including proteins with known structure such as glycogen phosphorylase, UDP-GlcNAc 2-epimerase, and the glycosyl transferase MurG. This relationship, in conjunction with amino acid similarity spanning the entire length of the sequence, implies that the fold of the human OGT consists of two Rossmann-like domains C-terminal to the TPR region. A conserved motif in the second Rossmann domain points to the UDP-GlcNAc donor binding site. This conclusion is supported by a combination of statistically significant PSI-BLAST hits, consensus secondary structure predictions, and a fold recognition hit to MurG. Additionally, iterative PSI-BLAST database searches reveal that proteins homologous to the OGTs form a large and diverse superfamily that is termed GPGTF (glycogen phosphorylase/glycosyl transferase). Up to one-third of the 51 functional families in the CAZY database, a glycosyl transferase classification scheme based on catalytic residue and sequence homology considerations, can be unified through this common predicted fold. GPGTF homologs constitute a substantial fraction of known proteins: 0.4% of all non-redundant sequences and about 1% of proteins in the Escherichia coli genome are found to belong to the GPGTF

  11. Imidazopyridine and Pyrazolopiperidine Derivatives as Novel Inhibitors of Serine Palmitoyl Transferase.

    PubMed

    Genin, Michael J; Gonzalez Valcarcel, Isabel C; Holloway, William G; Lamar, Jason; Mosior, Marian; Hawkins, Eric; Estridge, Thomas; Weidner, Jeffrey; Seng, Thomas; Yurek, David; Adams, Lisa A; Weller, Jennifer; Reynolds, Vincent L; Brozinick, Joseph T

    2016-06-23

    To develop novel treatments for type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia, we pursued inhibitors of serine palmitoyl transferase (SPT). To this end compounds 1 and 2 were developed as potent SPT inhibitors in vitro. 1 and 2 reduce plasma ceramides in rodents, have a slight trend toward enhanced insulin sensitization in DIO mice, and reduce triglycerides and raise HDL in cholesterol/cholic acid fed rats. Unfortunately these molecules cause a gastric enteropathy after chronic dosing in rats. PMID:27213958

  12. Chemoenzymatic synthesis of glycopeptides with PglB, a bacterial oligosaccharyl transferase from Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Glover, Kerney Jebrell; Weerapana, Eranthie; Numao, Shin; Imperiali, Barbara

    2005-12-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Campylobacter jejuni has a general N-linked glycosylation pathway encoded by the pgl gene cluster. One of the proteins in this cluster, PgIB, is thought to be the oligosaccharyl transferase due to its significant homology to Stt3p, a subunit of the yeast oligosaccharyl transferase complex. PgIB has been shown to be involved in catalyzing the transfer of an undecaprenyl-linked heptasaccharide to the asparagine side chain of proteins at the Asn-X-Ser/Thr motif. Using a synthetic disaccharide glycan donor (GaINAc-alpha1,3-bacillosamine-pyrophosphate-undecaprenyl) and a peptide acceptor substrate (KDFNVSKA), we can observe the oligosaccharyl transferase activity of PgIB in vitro. Furthermore, the preparation of additional undecaprenyl-linked glycan variants reveals the ability of PgIB to transfer a wide variety of saccharides. With the demonstration of PgIB activity in vitro, fundamental questions surrounding the mechanism of N-linked glycosylation can now be addressed. PMID:16356848

  13. Characterization of Affinity-Purified Isoforms of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Y1 Glutathione Transferases

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Chin-Soon; Tan, Irene Kit-Ping; Alias, Zazali

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GST) were purified from locally isolated bacteria, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Y1, by glutathione-affinity chromatography and anion exchange, and their substrate specificities were investigated. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the purified GST resolved into a single band with a molecular weight (MW) of 23 kDa. 2-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis showed the presence of two isoforms, GST1 (pI 4.5) and GST2 (pI 6.2) with identical MW. GST1 was reactive towards ethacrynic acid, hydrogen peroxide, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, and trans,trans-hepta-2,4-dienal while GST2 was active towards all substrates except hydrogen peroxide. This demonstrated that GST1 possessed peroxidase activity which was absent in GST2. This study also showed that only GST2 was able to conjugate GSH to isoproturon, a herbicide. GST1 and GST2 were suggested to be similar to F0KLY9 (putative glutathione S-transferase) and F0KKB0 (glutathione S-transferase III) of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain PHEA-2, respectively. PMID:24892084

  14. Characterization of affinity-purified isoforms of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Y1 glutathione transferases.

    PubMed

    Chee, Chin-Soon; Tan, Irene Kit-Ping; Alias, Zazali

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GST) were purified from locally isolated bacteria, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Y1, by glutathione-affinity chromatography and anion exchange, and their substrate specificities were investigated. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the purified GST resolved into a single band with a molecular weight (MW) of 23 kDa. 2-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis showed the presence of two isoforms, GST1 (pI 4.5) and GST2 (pI 6.2) with identical MW. GST1 was reactive towards ethacrynic acid, hydrogen peroxide, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, and trans,trans-hepta-2,4-dienal while GST2 was active towards all substrates except hydrogen peroxide. This demonstrated that GST1 possessed peroxidase activity which was absent in GST2. This study also showed that only GST2 was able to conjugate GSH to isoproturon, a herbicide. GST1 and GST2 were suggested to be similar to F0KLY9 (putative glutathione S-transferase) and F0KKB0 (glutathione S-transferase III) of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain PHEA-2, respectively. PMID:24892084

  15. Subfunctionality of Hydride Transferases of the Old Yellow Enzyme Family of Flavoproteins of Pseudomonas putida▿

    PubMed Central

    van Dillewijn, Pieter; Wittich, Rolf-Michael; Caballero, Antonio; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2008-01-01

    To investigate potential complementary activities of multiple enzymes belonging to the same family within a single microorganism, we chose a set of Old Yellow Enzyme (OYE) homologs of Pseudomonas putida. The physiological function of these enzymes is not well established; however, an activity associated with OYE family members from different microorganisms is their ability to reduce nitroaromatic compounds. Using an in silico approach, we identified six OYE homologs in P. putida KT2440. Each gene was subcloned into an expression vector, and each corresponding gene product was purified to homogeneity prior to in vitro analysis for its catalytic activity against 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). One of the enzymes, called XenD, lacked in vitro activity, whereas the other five enzymes demonstrated type I hydride transferase activity and reduced the nitro groups of TNT to hydroxylaminodinitrotoluene derivatives. XenB has the additional ability to reduce the aromatic ring of TNT to produce Meisenheimer complexes, defined as type II hydride transferase activity. The condensations of the primary products of type I and type II hydride transferases react with each other to yield diarylamines and nitrite; the latter can be further reduced to ammonium and serves as a nitrogen source for microorganisms in vivo. PMID:18791012

  16. Complementary DNA cloning, messenger RNA expression, and induction of alpha-class glutathione S-transferases in mouse tissues.

    PubMed

    Buetler, T M; Eaton, D L

    1992-01-15

    Glutathione S-transferases (EC 2.5.1.18) are a multigene family of related proteins divided into four classes. Each class has multiple isoforms that exhibit tissue-specific expression, which may be an important determinant of susceptibility of that tissue to toxic injury or cancer. Recent studies have suggested that alpha-class glutathione S-transferase isoforms may play an important role in the development of cancers. Several alpha-class glutathione S-transferase isozymes have been characterized, purified, and cloned from a number of species, including rats, mice, and humans. Here we report on the cloning, sequencing, and mRNA expression of two alpha-class glutathione S-transferases from mouse liver, termed mYa and mYc. While mYa was shown to be identical to the known alpha-class glutathione S-transferase complementary DNA clone pGT41 (W. R. Pearson et al., J. Biol. Chem., 263: 13324-13332, 1988), the other clone, mYc, was demonstrated to be a novel complementary DNA clone encoding a glutathione S-transferase homologous to rat Yc (subunit 2). The mRNA for this novel complementary DNA is expressed constitutively in mouse liver. It also is the major alpha-class glutathione S-transferase isoform expressed in lung. The levels of expression of the butylated hydroxyanisole-inducible form (mYa) are highest in kidney and intestine. Treatment of mice with butylated hydroxyanisole had little effect on the expression levels of mYc but strongly induced mYa expression in liver. Butylated hydroxyanisole treatment increased expression levels for both mYa and mYc to varying degrees in kidney, lung, and intestine. The importance of the novel mouse liver alpha-class glutathione S-transferase isoform (mYc) in the metabolism of aflatoxin B1 and other carcinogens is discussed. PMID:1728405

  17. Crystallographic trapping of the glutamyl-CoA thioester intermediate of family I CoA transferases

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan,E.; Li, Y.; Ajamian, E.; Iannuzzi, P.; Kernaghan, S.; Fraser, M.; Cygler, M.; Matte, A.

    2005-01-01

    Coenzyme A transferases are involved in a broad range of biochemical processes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and exhibit a diverse range of substrate specificities. The YdiF protein from Escherichia coli O157:H7 is an acyl-CoA transferase of unknown physiological function, and belongs to a large sequence family of CoA transferases, present in bacteria to humans, which utilize oxoacids as acceptors. In vitro measurements showed that YdiF displays enzymatic activity with short-chain acyl-CoAs. The crystal structures of YdiF and its complex with CoA, the first co-crystal structure for any Family I CoA transferase, have been determined and refined at 1.9 and 2.0 Angstrom resolution, respectively. YdiF is organized into tetramers, with each monomer having an open {alpha}/{beta} structure characteristic of Family I CoA transferases. Co-crystallization of YdiF with a variety of CoA thioesters in the absence of acceptor carboxylic acid resulted in trapping a covalent {gamma}-glutamyl-CoA thioester intermediate. The CoA binds within a well defined pocket at the N- and C-terminal domain interface, but makes contact only with the C-terminal domain. The structure of the YdiF complex provides a basis for understanding the different catalytic steps in the reaction of Family I CoA transferases.

  18. Probing the leucyl/phenylalanyl tRNA protein transferase active site with tRNA substrate analogues.

    PubMed

    Fung, Angela Wai Shan; Ebhardt, H Alexander; Krishnakumar, Kollappillil S; Moore, Jack; Xu, Zhizhong; Strazewski, Peter; Fahlman, Richard P

    2014-07-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA protein transferases post-translationally conjugate an amino acid from an aminoacyl-tRNA onto the N-terminus of a target polypeptide. The eubacterial aminoacyl-tRNA protein transferase, L/F transferase, utilizes both leucyl-tRNA(Leu) and phenylalanyl-tRNA(Phe) as substrates. X-ray crystal structures with substrate analogues, the minimal substrate phenylalanyl adenosine (rA-Phe) and inhibitor puromycin, have been used to characterize tRNA recognition by L/F transferase. However analyses of these two X-ray crystal structures reveal significant differences in binding. Through structural analyses, mutagenesis, and enzymatic activity assays, we rationalize and demonstrate that the substrate analogues bind to L/F transferase with similar binding affinities using a series of different interactions by the various chemical groups of the analogues. Our data also demonstrates that enlarging the hydrophobic pocket of L/F transferase selectively enhances puromycin inhibition and may aid in the development of improved inhibitors for this class of enzymes. PMID:24521222

  19. Immunolabeling of Gamma-glutamyl transferase 5 in Normal Human Tissues Reveals Expression and Localization Differs from Gamma-glutamyl transferase 1

    PubMed Central

    Hanigan, Marie H.; Gillies, Elizabeth M.; Wickham, Stephanie; Wakeham, Nancy; Wirsig-Wiechmann, Celeste R.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT5) was discovered due to its ability to convert leukotriene C4 (LTC4, a glutathione S-conjugate) to LTD4 and may have an important role in the immune system. However, it was not known which cells express the enzyme in humans. We have developed a sensitive and specific antibody that can be used to detect human GGT5 on western blots and in fixed tissue sections. We localized GGT5 expression in normal human tissues. We observed GGT5 expressed by macrophages present in many tissues, including tissue-fixed macrophages such as Kupffer cells in the liver and dust cells in the lung. GGT5 was expressed in some of the same tissues that have been shown to express gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT1), the only other enzymatically active protein in this family. But, the two enzymes were often expressed by different cell types within the tissue. For example, GGT5 was expressed by the interstitial cells of the kidney; whereas, GGT1 is expressed on the apical surface of the renal proximal tubules. Other tissues with GGT5-positive cells included: adrenal gland, salivary gland, pituitary, thymus, spleen, liver, bone marrow, small intestine, stomach, testis, prostate and placenta. GGT5 and GGT1 are cell surface enzymes. The different pattern of expression results in their access to different extracellular fluids and therefore different substrates. GGT5 has access to substrates in blood and intercellular fluids, while GGT1 has access primarily to fluids in ducts and glands throughout the body. These data provide new insights into the different functions of these two related enzymes. PMID:25377544

  20. Three CoA Transferases Involved in the Production of Short Chain Fatty Acids in Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Mitsunari; Yoshida, Yasuo; Nagano, Keiji; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Takebe, Jun; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2016-01-01

    Butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, which produces butyrate and acetyl-CoA from butyryl-CoA and acetate, is responsible for the final step of butyrate production in bacteria. This study demonstrates that in the periodontopathogenic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis this reaction is not catalyzed by PGN_1171, previously annotated as butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, but by three distinct CoA transferases, PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and spectrophotometric analyses were performed using crude enzyme extracts from deletion mutant strains and purified recombinant proteins. The experiments revealed that, in the presence of acetate, PGN_0725 preferentially utilized butyryl-CoA rather than propionyl-CoA. By contrast, this preference was reversed in PGN_1888. The only butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase activity was observed in PGN_1341. Double reciprocal plots revealed that all the reactions catalyzed by these enzymes follow a ternary-complex mechanism, in contrast to previously characterized CoA transferases. GC-MS analysis to determine the concentrations of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in culture supernatants of P. gingivalis wild type and mutant strains revealed that PGN_0725 and PGN_1888 play a major role in the production of butyrate and propionate, respectively. Interestingly, a triple deletion mutant lacking PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888 produced low levels of SCFAs, suggesting that the microorganism contains CoA transferase(s) in addition to these three enzymes. Growth rates of the mutant strains were mostly slower than that of the wild type, indicating that many carbon compounds produced in the SCFA synthesis appear to be important for the biological activity of this microorganism. PMID:27486457

  1. Three CoA Transferases Involved in the Production of Short Chain Fatty Acids in Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Mitsunari; Yoshida, Yasuo; Nagano, Keiji; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Takebe, Jun; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2016-01-01

    Butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, which produces butyrate and acetyl-CoA from butyryl-CoA and acetate, is responsible for the final step of butyrate production in bacteria. This study demonstrates that in the periodontopathogenic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis this reaction is not catalyzed by PGN_1171, previously annotated as butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, but by three distinct CoA transferases, PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and spectrophotometric analyses were performed using crude enzyme extracts from deletion mutant strains and purified recombinant proteins. The experiments revealed that, in the presence of acetate, PGN_0725 preferentially utilized butyryl-CoA rather than propionyl-CoA. By contrast, this preference was reversed in PGN_1888. The only butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase activity was observed in PGN_1341. Double reciprocal plots revealed that all the reactions catalyzed by these enzymes follow a ternary-complex mechanism, in contrast to previously characterized CoA transferases. GC-MS analysis to determine the concentrations of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in culture supernatants of P. gingivalis wild type and mutant strains revealed that PGN_0725 and PGN_1888 play a major role in the production of butyrate and propionate, respectively. Interestingly, a triple deletion mutant lacking PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888 produced low levels of SCFAs, suggesting that the microorganism contains CoA transferase(s) in addition to these three enzymes. Growth rates of the mutant strains were mostly slower than that of the wild type, indicating that many carbon compounds produced in the SCFA synthesis appear to be important for the biological activity of this microorganism. PMID:27486457

  2. MIF protein are theta-class glutathione S-transferase homologs.

    PubMed Central

    Blocki, F. A.; Ellis, L. B.; Wackett, L. P.

    1993-01-01

    MIF proteins are mammalian polypeptides of approximately 13,000 molecular weight. This class includes human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a rat liver protein that has glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity (TRANSMIF), and the mouse delayed early response gene 6 (DER6) protein. MIF proteins were previously linked to GSTs by demonstrating transferase activity and observing N-terminal sequence homology with a mu-class GST (Blocki, F.A., Schlievert, P.M., & Wackett, L.P., 1992, Nature 360, 269-270). In this study, MIF proteins are shown to be structurally related to the theta class of GSTs. This is established in three ways. First, unique primary sequence patterns are developed for each of the GST gene classes. The patterns identify the three MIF proteins as theta-like transferase homologs. Second, pattern analysis indicates that GST members of the theta class contain a serine residue in place of the N-terminal tyrosine that is implicated in glutathione deprotonation and activation in GSTs of known structure (Liu, S., et al., 1992, J. Biol. Chem. 267, 4296-4299). The MIF proteins contain a threonine at this position. Third, polyclonal antibodies raised against recombinant human MIF cross-react on Western blots with rat theta GST but not with alpha and mu GSTs. That MIF proteins have glutathione-binding ability may provide a common structural key toward understanding the varied functions of this widely distributed emerging gene family. Because theta is thought to be the most ancient evolutionary GST class, MIF proteins may have diverged early in evolution but retained a glutathione-binding domain. PMID:8298459

  3. Prediction of function for the polyprenyl transferase subgroup in the isoprenoid synthase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Wallrapp, Frank H.; Pan, Jian-Jung; Ramamoorthy, Gurusankar; Almonacid, Daniel E.; Hillerich, Brandan S.; Seidel, Ronald; Patskovsky, Yury; Babbitt, Patricia C.; Almo, Steven C.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Poulter, C. Dale

    2013-01-01

    The number of available protein sequences has increased exponentially with the advent of high-throughput genomic sequencing, creating a significant challenge for functional annotation. Here, we describe a large-scale study on assigning function to unknown members of the trans-polyprenyl transferase (E-PTS) subgroup in the isoprenoid synthase superfamily, which provides substrates for the biosynthesis of the more than 55,000 isoprenoid metabolites. Although the mechanism for determining the product chain length for these enzymes is known, there is no simple relationship between function and primary sequence, so that assigning function is challenging. We addressed this challenge through large-scale bioinformatics analysis of >5,000 putative polyprenyl transferases; experimental characterization of the chain-length specificity of 79 diverse members of this group; determination of 27 structures of 19 of these enzymes, including seven cocrystallized with substrate analogs or products; and the development and successful application of a computational approach to predict function that leverages available structural data through homology modeling and docking of possible products into the active site. The crystallographic structures and computational structural models of the enzyme–ligand complexes elucidate the structural basis of specificity. As a result of this study, the percentage of E-PTS sequences similar to functionally annotated ones (BLAST e-value ≤ 1e−70) increased from 40.6 to 68.8%, and the percentage of sequences similar to available crystal structures increased from 28.9 to 47.4%. The high accuracy of our blind prediction of newly characterized enzymes indicates the potential to predict function to the complete polyprenyl transferase subgroup of the isoprenoid synthase superfamily computationally. PMID:23493556

  4. The DinB Superfamily Includes Novel Mycothiol, Bacillithiol and Glutathione S-transferases

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Gerald L.; Leung, Stephan S.; Wakabayashi, Judy I.; Rawat, Mamta; Fahey, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    The superfamily of glutathione S-transferases has been the subject of extensive study but Actinobacteria produce mycothiol (MSH) in place of glutathione and no mycothiol S-transferase (MST) has been identified. Using mycothiol and monochlorobimane as substrates a MST activity was detected in extracts of Mycobacterium smegmatis and purified sufficiently to allow identification of MSMEG_0887, a member the DUF664 family of the DinB superfamily, as the MST. The identity of the M. smegmatis and homologous Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Rv0443) enzymes was confirmed by cloning and the expressed proteins were found to be active with MSH but not bacillithiol (BSH) or glutathione (GSH). Bacillus subtilis YfiT is another member of the DinB superfamily but this bacterium produces BSH. The YfiT protein was shown to have S-transferase activity with monochlorobimane when assayed with BSH but not with MSH or GSH. Enterococcus faecalis EF_3021 shares some homology with MSMEG_0887 but this organism produces GSH but not MSH or BSH. Cloned and expressed EF_0321 was active with monochlorobimane and GSH but not with MSH or BSH. MDMPI_2 is another member of the DinB superfamily and has been previously shown to have mycothiol-dependent maleylpyruvate isomerase activity. Three of the eight families of the DinB superfamily include proteins shown to catalyze thiol-dependent metabolic or detoxification activities. Since more than two-thirds of the sequences assigned to the DinB superfamily are members of these families it seems likely that such activity is dominant in the DinB superfamily. PMID:22059487

  5. Photoactivation of hypericin down-regulates glutathione S-transferase activity in nasopharyngeal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Du, H Y; Olivo, M; Tan, B K H; Bay, B H

    2004-04-30

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a new modality of treatment for cancer. Hypericin is a photosensitizer, which is known to generate reactive oxygen species upon activation with light. We observed that photoactivated hypericin induces the generation of reactive oxygen intermediates in nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) cells in vitro. There was also significant reduction of Glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in HK1 and CNE-2 NPC cells and in tumor tissues from the NPC/HK1 murine tumor model by hypericin-mediated PDT. As antioxidants protect cells against phototoxicity, down-regulation of GST activity would potentiate the efficacy of hypericin-PDT treatment. PMID:15072826

  6. Induction of glutathione-S-transferase activity by antioxidants in hepatocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Chen, L H; Shiau, C C

    1989-01-01

    Twelve male Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the study. Six rats were injected with benzo(a)pyrene (BP); the other six rats served as the control. Twenty-four hours after injection, hepatocytes were isolated and cultured. The cultured plates were divided into 5 groups and treated with absolute ethanol (control), butylated hydroxytoluene, vitamin E, ascorbic acid or vitamin Elascorbic acid. After 48 hours, the hepatocytes were harvested for enzyme activation determination. With both control and BP-injected rats, each antioxidant treatment significantly increased glutathione-S-transferase activity. The results suggest that antioxidants may have a detoxifying effect against BP-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:2817788

  7. The Phosphopantetheinyl Transferases: Catalysis of a Posttranslational Modification Crucial for Life

    PubMed Central

    Beld, Joris; Sonnenschein, Eva C.; Vickery, Christopher R.; Noel, Joseph P.; Burkart, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Although holo-acyl carrier protein synthase, AcpS, a phosphopantetheinyl transferase (PPTase), was characterized in the 1960s, it was not until the publication of the landmark paper by Lambalot et al. in 1996 that PPTases garnered wide-spread attention being classified as a distinct enzyme superfamily. In the past two decades an increasing number of papers has been published on PPTases ranging from identification, characterization, structure determination, mutagenesis, inhibition, and engineering in synthetic biology. In this review, we comprehensively discuss all current knowledge on this class of enzymes that post-translationally install a 4′-phosphopantetheine arm on various carrier proteins. PMID:24292120

  8. Fucosylation of xyloglucan: localization of the transferase in dictyosomes of pea stem cells. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Camirand, A.; Brummell, D.; MacLachlan, G.

    1987-07-01

    Microsomal membranes from elongating regions of etiolated Pisum sativum stems were separated by rate-zonal centrifugation on Renografin gradients. The transfer of labeled fucose and xylose from GDP-(/sup 14/C) fucose and UDP-(/sup 14/C)xylose to xyloglucan occurred mainly in dictyosome-enriched fractions. No transferase activity was detected in secretory vesicle fractions. Pulse-chase experiments using pea stem slices incubated with (/sup 3/H)fucose suggest that xyloglucan chains are fucosylated and their structure completed within the dictyosomes, before being transported to the cell wall by secretory vesicles.

  9. Glutathion S-transferase activity and DDT-susceptibility of Malaysian mosquitos.

    PubMed

    Lee, H L; Chong, W L

    1995-03-01

    Comparative DDT-susceptibility status and glutathion s-transferase (GST) activity of Malaysian Anopheles maculatus, Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes aegypti was investigated to ascertain the role of this enzyme in DDT resistance. The standardised WHO dose-mortality bioassay tests were used to determine DDT susceptibility in these mosquitos, whilst GST microassay (Brogdon and Barber, 1990) was conducted to measure the activity of this enzyme in mosquito homogenate. It appeared that DDT susceptibility status of Malaysian mosquitos was not correlated with GST activity. PMID:8525405

  10. Characterisation of the Candida albicans Phosphopantetheinyl Transferase Ppt2 as a Potential Antifungal Drug Target

    PubMed Central

    Dobb, Katharine S.; Kaye, Sarah J.; Beckmann, Nicola; Thain, John L.; Stateva, Lubomira; Birch, Mike; Oliver, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Antifungal drugs acting via new mechanisms of action are urgently needed to combat the increasing numbers of severe fungal infections caused by pathogens such as Candida albicans. The phosphopantetheinyl transferase of Aspergillus fumigatus, encoded by the essential gene pptB, has previously been identified as a potential antifungal target. This study investigated the function of its orthologue in C. albicans, PPT2/C1_09480W by placing one allele under the control of the regulatable MET3 promoter, and deleting the remaining allele. The phenotypes of this conditional null mutant showed that, as in A. fumigatus, the gene PPT2 is essential for growth in C. albicans, thus fulfilling one aspect of an efficient antifungal target. The catalytic activity of Ppt2 as a phosphopantetheinyl transferase and the acyl carrier protein Acp1 as a substrate were demonstrated in a fluorescence transfer assay, using recombinant Ppt2 and Acp1 produced and purified from E.coli. A fluorescence polarisation assay amenable to high-throughput screening was also developed. Therefore we have identified Ppt2 as a broad-spectrum novel antifungal target and developed tools to identify inhibitors as potentially new antifungal compounds. PMID:26606674