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Sample records for hypoxia responsive elements

  1. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (human herpesvirus 8) contains hypoxia response elements: relevance to lytic induction by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Haque, Muzammel; Davis, David A; Wang, Victoria; Widmer, Isabelle; Yarchoan, Robert

    2003-06-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), also known as human herpesvirus 8, is an etiologic agent of KS, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and multicentric Castleman's disease. We recently demonstrated that hypoxia can induce lytic replication of KSHV in PEL cell lines. Hypoxia induces the accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF), and we hypothesized that the KSHV genome may respond to hypoxia through functional hypoxia response elements (HREs). Here, we demonstrate the presence of at least two promoters within the KSHV genome that are activated by hypoxia or hypoxia mimics. One is in the promoter region of the gene for Rta, the main lytic switch gene, and the other is within the promoter region of ORF34, a lytic gene of unknown function. The ORF34 promoter contains three putative consensus HREs oriented in the direction of the gene. Dissection and site-directed mutagenesis studies confirmed that one of the HREs of the ORF34 promoter is functional. Under conditions of hypoxia, the ORF34 promoter was strongly upregulated by HIF-1 alpha and HIF-2 alpha. By contrast, the promoter of the gene for Rta appeared to be preferentially upregulated by HIF-2 alpha. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that specific messages for ORF34 and ORF50 are upregulated in BCBL-1 cells exposed to hypoxia. An HIF-1 binding and competition assay demonstrated that the HRE sequence from the ORF34 promoter can compete for HIF-1 alpha binding to an erythropoietin HRE oligonucleotide while a mutant sequence cannot. Thus, we demonstrated that a viral gene can be activated by hypoxia through activation of a functional viral HRE. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a functional HRE in a viral promoter. PMID:12767996

  2. Gene expression promoted by the SV40 DNA targeting sequence and the hypoxia-responsive element under normoxia and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Sacramento, C B; Moraes, J Z; Denapolis, P M A; Han, S W

    2010-08-01

    The main objective of the present study was to find suitable DNA-targeting sequences (DTS) for the construction of plasmid vectors to be used to treat ischemic diseases. The well-known Simian virus 40 nuclear DTS (SV40-DTS) and hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) sequences were used to construct plasmid vectors to express the human vascular endothelial growth factor gene (hVEGF). The rate of plasmid nuclear transport and consequent gene expression under normoxia (20% O2) and hypoxia (less than 5% O2) were determined. Plasmids containing the SV40-DTS or HRE sequences were constructed and used to transfect the A293T cell line (a human embryonic kidney cell line) in vitro and mouse skeletal muscle cells in vivo. Plasmid transport to the nucleus was monitored by real-time PCR, and the expression level of the hVEGF gene was measured by ELISA. The in vitro nuclear transport efficiency of the SV40-DTS plasmid was about 50% lower under hypoxia, while the HRE plasmid was about 50% higher under hypoxia. Quantitation of reporter gene expression in vitro and in vivo, under hypoxia and normoxia, confirmed that the SV40-DTS plasmid functioned better under normoxia, while the HRE plasmid was superior under hypoxia. These results indicate that the efficiency of gene expression by plasmids containing DNA binding sequences is affected by the concentration of oxygen in the medium. PMID:20640386

  3. Killing of Brain Tumor Cells by Hypoxia-Responsive Element Mediated Expression of BAX1

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Hangjun; Wang, Jingli; Hu, Lily; Lin, Ching-Shwun; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Deen, Dennis F

    1999-01-01

    Abstract The presence of radioresistant hypoxic cells in human brain tumors limits the overall effectiveness of conventional fractionated radiation therapy. Tumor-specific therapies that target hypoxic cells are clearly needed. We have investigated the expression of suicide genes under hypoxia by a hypoxia-responsive element (HRE), which can be activated through hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). We transfected plasmids containing multiple copies of HRE into U-87 MG and U-251 MG-NCI human brain tumor cells and tested their ability to induce LacZ gene expression under anoxia. Gene expression under anoxia versus oxia was increased about 12-fold for U-87 MG cells and about fourfold for U-251 MG-NCI cells. At intermediate hypoxic conditions, increased LacZ gene expression in U-87 MG cells was induced by the plasmid that contained three HREs, but not by the plasmid with two HREs. Lastly, when we placed a suicide gene BAX under the control of HREs, cells transfected with the BAX plasmids were preferentially killed through apoptosis under anoxia. Our studies demonstrate that HRE-regulated gene expression is active in brain tumor cells, and that the amount of increased gene expression obtained is dependent on the cell line, the HRE copy number, and the degree of hypoxia. PMID:10933058

  4. Hypoxia-induced endothelial NO synthase gene transcriptional activation is mediated through the tax-responsive element in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Min, Jiho; Jin, Yoon-Mi; Moon, Je-Sung; Sung, Min-Sun; Jo, Sangmee Ahn; Jo, Inho

    2006-06-01

    Although hypoxia is known to induce upregulation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) gene expression, the underlying mechanism is largely unclear. In this study, we show that hypoxia increases eNOS gene expression through the binding of phosphorylated cAMP-responsive element binding (CREB) protein (pCREB) to the eNOS gene promoter. Hypoxia (1% O2) increased both eNOS expression and NO production, peaking at 24 hours, in bovine aortic endothelial cells, and these increases were accompanied by increases in pCREB. Treatment with the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 or transfection with dominant-negative inhibitor of CREB reversed the hypoxia-induced increases in eNOS expression and NO production, with concomitant inhibition of the phosphorylation of CREB induced by hypoxia, suggesting an involvement of protein kinase A/pCREB-mediated pathway. To map the regulatory elements of the eNOS gene responsible for pCREB binding under hypoxia, we constructed an eNOS gene promoter (-1600 to +22 nucleotides) fused with a luciferase reporter gene [pGL2-eNOS(-1600)]. Hypoxia (for 24-hour incubation) increased the promoter activity by 2.36+/-0.18-fold in the bovine aortic endothelial cells transfected with pGL2-eNOS(-1600). However, progressive 5'-deletion from -1600 to -873 completely attenuated the hypoxia-induced increase in promoter activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift, anti-pCREB antibody supershift, and site-specific mutation analyses showed that pCREB is bound to the Tax-responsive element (TRE) site, a cAMP-responsive element-like site, located at -924 to -921 of the eNOS promoter. Our data demonstrate that the interaction between pCREB and the Tax-responsive element site within the eNOS promoter may represent a novel mechanism for the mediation of hypoxia-stimulated eNOS gene expression. PMID:16651461

  5. Phosphorylation-dependent targeting of cAMP response element binding protein to the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway in hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Cormac T.; Furuta, Glenn T.; Synnestvedt, Kristin; Colgan, Sean P.

    2000-01-01

    Hypoxia activates a number of gene products through degradation of the transcriptional coactivator cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Other transcriptional regulators (e.g., β-catenin and NF-κB) are controlled through phosphorylation-targeted proteasomal degradation, and thus, we hypothesized a similar degradative pathway for CREB. Differential display analysis of mRNA derived from hypoxic epithelia revealed a specific and time-dependent repression of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), a serine phosphatase important in CREB dephosphorylation. Subsequent studies identified a previously unappreciated proteasomal-targeting motif within the primary structure of CREB (DSVTDS), which functions as a substrate for PP1. Ambient hypoxia resulted in temporally sequential CREB serine phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and degradation (in vitro and in vivo). HIV-tat peptide-facilitated loading of intact epithelia with phosphopeptides corresponding to this proteasome targeting motif resulted in inhibition of CREB ubiquitination. Further studies revealed that PP1 inhibitors mimicked hypoxia-induced gene expression, whereas proteasome inhibitors reversed the hypoxic phenotype. Thus, hypoxia establishes conditions that target CREB to proteasomal degradation. These studies may provide unique insight into a general mechanism of transcriptional regulation by hypoxia. PMID:11035795

  6. Hypoxia induces phosphorylation of the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein by a novel signaling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Beitner-Johnson, D; Millhorn, D E

    1998-07-31

    To investigate signaling mechanisms by which hypoxia regulates gene expression, we examined the effect of hypoxia on the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in PC12 cells. Exposure to physiological levels of hypoxia (5% O2, approximately 50 mm Hg) rapidly induced a persistent phosphorylation of CREB on Ser133, an event that is required for CREB-mediated transcriptional activation. Hypoxia-induced phosphorylation of CREB was more robust than that induced by any other stimulus tested, including forskolin, depolarization, and osmotic stress. Furthermore, this effect was not mediated by any of the previously known signaling pathways that lead to phosphorylation of CREB, including protein kinase A, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, protein kinase C, ribosomal S6 kinase-2, and mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase-2. Hypoxic activation of a CRE-containing reporter (derived from the 5'-flanking region of the tyrosine hydroxylase gene) was attenuated markedly by mutation of the CRE. Thus, a physiological reduction in O2 levels induces a functional phosphorylation of CREB at Ser133 via a novel signaling pathway. PMID:9677418

  7. Hypoxia-Response Element (HRE)–Directed Transcriptional Regulation of the Rat Lysyl Oxidase Gene in Response to Cobalt and Cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wande

    2013-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LO) catalyzes crosslink of collagen, elastin, and histone H1, stabilizing the extracellular matrix and cell nucleus. This enzyme displays dual functions for tumorigenesis, i.e., as a tumor suppressor inactivating the ras oncogene and as a tumor promoter enhancing malignant cell metastasis. To elucidate LO transcriptional regulation, we have cloned the 804 base pair region upstream of the translation start site (ATG) of the rat LO gene with the maximal promoter activity. Computer analysis indicated that at least four hypoxia-response element (HRE) consensuses (5′-ACGTG-3′) exist in the cloned LO promoter. Treatment of rat lung fibroblasts (RFL6) with CoCl2 (Co, 10–100 μM), a chemical hypoxia reagent, enhanced LO mRNA expression and promoter activities. Overexpression of LO was associated with upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α at mRNA levels in cobalt (Co)–treated cells. Thus, LO is a hypoxia-responsive gene. Dominant negative-HIF-1α inhibited LO promoter activities stimulated by Co. Electrophoretic mobility shift, oligonucleotide competition, and in vitro translated HIF-1α binding assays indicated that only one HRE mapped at −387/−383 relative to ATG was functionally active among four consensuses. Site-directed mutation of this HRE significantly diminished the Co-induced and LO promoter-directed expression of the reporter gene. Cadmium (Cd), an inducer of reactive oxygen species, inhibited HIF-1α mRNA expression and HIF-1α binding to the LO gene in Co-treated cells as revealed by RT-PCR and ChIP assays, respectively. Thus, modulation of the HRE activity by Co and Cd plays a critical role in LO gene transactivation. PMID:23161664

  8. Interaction of HIF and USF signaling pathways in human genes flanked by hypoxia-response elements and E-box palindromes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Junmin; Stiehl, Daniel P; Setzer, Claudia; Wichmann, Daniela; Shinde, Dheeraj A; Rehrauer, Hubert; Hradecky, Pavel; Gassmann, Max; Gorr, Thomas A

    2011-11-01

    Rampant activity of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 in cancer is frequently associated with the malignant progression into a harder-to-treat, increasingly aggressive phenotype. Clearly, anti-HIF strategies in cancer cells are of considerable clinical interest. One way to fine-tune, or inhibit, HIF's transcriptional outflow independently of hydroxylase activities could be through competing transcription factors. A CACGTG-binding activity in human hepatoma cells was previously found to restrict HIF's access to hypoxia response cis-elements (HRE) in a Daphnia globin gene promoter construct (phb2). The CACGTG factor, and its impact on hypoxia-responsive human genes, was analyzed in this study by genome-wide computational scans as well as gene-specific quantitative PCR, reporter and DNA-binding assays in hepatoma (Hep3B), cervical carcinoma (HeLa), and breast carcinoma (MCF7) cells. Among six basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors known to target CACGTG palindromes, we identified upstream stimulatory factor (USF)-1/2 as predominant phb2 CACGTG constituents in Hep3B, HeLa, and MCF7 cells. Human genes with adjacent or overlapping HRE and CACGTG motifs included with lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) and Bcl-2/E1B 19 kDa interacting protein 3 (BNIP3) hypoxia-induced HIF-1 targets. Parallel recruitment of HIF-1α and USF1/2a to the respective promoter chromatin was verified for all cell lines investigated. Mutual complementing (LDHA) or moderating (BNIP3) cross-talk was seen upon overexpression or silencing of HIF-1α and USF1/2a. Distinct (LDHA) or overlapping (BNIP3) promoter-binding sites for HIF-1 and USFs were subsequently characterized. We propose that, depending on abundance or activity of its protein constituents, O(2)-independent USF signaling can function to fine-tune or interfere with HIF-mediated transcription in cancer cells. PMID:21984181

  9. REST is a hypoxia-responsive transcriptional repressor

    PubMed Central

    Cavadas, Miguel A. S.; Mesnieres, Marion; Crifo, Bianca; Manresa, Mario C.; Selfridge, Andrew C.; Keogh, Ciara E.; Fabian, Zsolt; Scholz, Carsten C.; Nolan, Karen A.; Rocha, Liliane M. A.; Tambuwala, Murtaza M.; Brown, Stuart; Wdowicz, Anita; Corbett, Danielle; Murphy, Keith J.; Godson, Catherine; Cummins, Eoin P.; Taylor, Cormac T.; Cheong, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Cellular exposure to hypoxia results in altered gene expression in a range of physiologic and pathophysiologic states. Discrete cohorts of genes can be either up- or down-regulated in response to hypoxia. While the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF) is the primary driver of hypoxia-induced adaptive gene expression, less is known about the signalling mechanisms regulating hypoxia-dependent gene repression. Using RNA-seq, we demonstrate that equivalent numbers of genes are induced and repressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. We demonstrate that nuclear localization of the Repressor Element 1-Silencing Transcription factor (REST) is induced in hypoxia and that REST is responsible for regulating approximately 20% of the hypoxia-repressed genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays we demonstrate that REST-dependent gene repression is at least in part mediated by direct binding to the promoters of target genes. Based on these data, we propose that REST is a key mediator of gene repression in hypoxia. PMID:27531581

  10. REST is a hypoxia-responsive transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Cavadas, Miguel A S; Mesnieres, Marion; Crifo, Bianca; Manresa, Mario C; Selfridge, Andrew C; Keogh, Ciara E; Fabian, Zsolt; Scholz, Carsten C; Nolan, Karen A; Rocha, Liliane M A; Tambuwala, Murtaza M; Brown, Stuart; Wdowicz, Anita; Corbett, Danielle; Murphy, Keith J; Godson, Catherine; Cummins, Eoin P; Taylor, Cormac T; Cheong, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Cellular exposure to hypoxia results in altered gene expression in a range of physiologic and pathophysiologic states. Discrete cohorts of genes can be either up- or down-regulated in response to hypoxia. While the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF) is the primary driver of hypoxia-induced adaptive gene expression, less is known about the signalling mechanisms regulating hypoxia-dependent gene repression. Using RNA-seq, we demonstrate that equivalent numbers of genes are induced and repressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. We demonstrate that nuclear localization of the Repressor Element 1-Silencing Transcription factor (REST) is induced in hypoxia and that REST is responsible for regulating approximately 20% of the hypoxia-repressed genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays we demonstrate that REST-dependent gene repression is at least in part mediated by direct binding to the promoters of target genes. Based on these data, we propose that REST is a key mediator of gene repression in hypoxia. PMID:27531581

  11. Cognitive responses to hypobaric hypoxia: implications for aviation training

    PubMed Central

    Neuhaus, Christopher; Hinkelbein, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this narrative review is to provide an overview on cognitive responses to hypobaric hypoxia and to show relevant implications for aviation training. A principal element of hypoxia-awareness training is the intentional evocation of hypoxia symptoms during specific training sessions within a safe and controlled environment. Repetitive training should enable pilots to learn and recognize their personal hypoxia symptoms. A time span of 3–6 years is generally considered suitable to refresh knowledge of the more subtle and early symptoms especially. Currently, there are two different technical approaches available to induce hypoxia during training: hypobaric chamber training and reduced-oxygen breathing devices. Hypoxia training for aircrew is extremely important and effective, and the hypoxia symptoms should be emphasized clearly to aircrews. The use of tight-fitting masks, leak checks, and equipment checks should be taught to all aircrew and reinforced regularly. It is noteworthy that there are major differences in the required quality and quantity of hypoxia training for both military and civilian pilots. PMID:25419162

  12. The molecular response of mammalian cells to hypoxia and the potential for exploitation in cancer therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Dachs, G. U.; Stratford, I. J.

    1996-01-01

    In this review, reports of the increased expression of selected genes in response to hypoxia have been summarised. The best studied mammalian hypoxia response systems are those of the erythropoietin (Epo) and the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) genes, which will be described in some detail. Other genes discussed here include those encoding growth factors, cytokines, transcription factors, metabolic enzymes and DNA repair enzymes. Short DNA sequences (hypoxia response elements) governing the increased gene expression in response to hypoxia have been discovered in the vicinity of most of these genes. The review will end by analysing the possibility of exploiting tumour hypoxia via the use of hypoxia response elements for gene therapy of cancer. PMID:8763864

  13. Molecular mechanisms regulating macrophage response to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Rahat, Michal A; Bitterman, Haim; Lahat, Nitza

    2011-01-01

    Monocytes and Macrophages (Mo/Mɸ) exhibit great plasticity, as they can shift between different modes of activation and, driven by their immediate microenvironment, perform divergent functions. These include, among others, patrolling their surroundings and maintaining homeostasis (resident Mo/Mɸ), combating invading pathogens and tumor cells (classically activated or M1 Mo/Mɸ), orchestrating wound healing (alternatively activated or M2 Mo/Mɸ), and restoring homeostasis after an inflammatory response (resolution Mɸ). Hypoxia is an important factor in the Mɸ microenvironment, is prevalent in many physiological and pathological conditions, and is interdependent with the inflammatory response. Although Mo/Mɸ have been studied in hypoxia, the mechanisms by which hypoxia influences the different modes of their activation, and how it regulates the shift between them, remain unclear. Here we review the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that mediate this hypoxic regulation of Mɸ activation. Much is known about the hypoxic transcriptional regulatory network, which includes the master regulators hypoxia-induced factor-1 and NF-κB, as well as other transcription factors (e.g., AP-1, Erg-1), but we also highlight the role of post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. These mechanisms mediate hypoxic induction of Mɸ pro-angiogenic mediators, suppress M1 Mɸ by post-transcriptionally inhibiting pro-inflammatory mediators, and help shift the classically activated Mɸ into an activation state which approximate the alternatively activated or resolution Mɸ. PMID:22566835

  14. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Macrophage Response to Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Rahat, Michal A.; Bitterman, Haim; Lahat, Nitza

    2011-01-01

    Monocytes and Macrophages (Mo/Mɸ) exhibit great plasticity, as they can shift between different modes of activation and, driven by their immediate microenvironment, perform divergent functions. These include, among others, patrolling their surroundings and maintaining homeostasis (resident Mo/Mɸ), combating invading pathogens and tumor cells (classically activated or M1 Mo/Mɸ), orchestrating wound healing (alternatively activated or M2 Mo/Mɸ), and restoring homeostasis after an inflammatory response (resolution Mɸ). Hypoxia is an important factor in the Mɸ microenvironment, is prevalent in many physiological and pathological conditions, and is interdependent with the inflammatory response. Although Mo/Mɸ have been studied in hypoxia, the mechanisms by which hypoxia influences the different modes of their activation, and how it regulates the shift between them, remain unclear. Here we review the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that mediate this hypoxic regulation of Mɸ activation. Much is known about the hypoxic transcriptional regulatory network, which includes the master regulators hypoxia-induced factor-1 and NF-κB, as well as other transcription factors (e.g., AP-1, Erg-1), but we also highlight the role of post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. These mechanisms mediate hypoxic induction of Mɸ pro-angiogenic mediators, suppress M1 Mɸ by post-transcriptionally inhibiting pro-inflammatory mediators, and help shift the classically activated Mɸ into an activation state which approximate the alternatively activated or resolution Mɸ. PMID:22566835

  15. The HIF1alpha-inducible pro-cell death gene BNIP3 is a novel target of SIM2s repression through cross-talk on the hypoxia response element.

    PubMed

    Farrall, A L; Whitelaw, M L

    2009-10-15

    The short isoform of single-minded 2 (SIM2s), a basic helix-loop-helix/PAS (bHLH/PAS) transcription factor, is upregulated in pancreatic and prostate tumours; however, a mechanistic role for SIM2s in these cancers is unknown. Microarray studies in prostate DU145 cells identified the pro-cell death gene, BNIP3 (Bcl-2/adenovirus E1B 19 kDa interacting protein 3), as a novel putative target of SIM2s repression. Further validation showed BNIP3 repression in several prostate and pancreatic carcinoma-derived cell lines with ectopic expression of human SIM2s. BNIP3 levels are enhanced in prostate carcinoma cells upon short interfering (si)RNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous SIM2s. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and promoter studies show that SIM2s represses BNIP3 through its activities at the proximal promoter hypoxia response element (HRE), the site through which the bHLH/PAS family member, hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha (HIF1alpha), induces BNIP3. SIM2s attenuates BNIP3 hypoxic induction via the HRE, and increased hypoxic induction of BNIP3 occurs with siRNA knockdown of endogenous SIM2s in prostate PC3AR+ cells. BNIP3 is implicated in hypoxia-induced cell death processes. Prolonged treatment of PC3AR+ cells with hypoxia mimetics, DP and DMOG, confers hypoxia-induced autophagy, measured by enhanced LC3-II levels and SQSTM1/p62 turnover. We show that PC3AR+ cells expressing ectopic SIM2s have enhanced survival in these conditions. Induction of LC3-II and turnover of SQSTM1/p62 are attenuated in PC3AR+/SIM2s DMOG and hypoxia-treated cells, suggesting that SIM2s may attenuate autophagic cell death processes, perhaps through BNIP3 repression. These data show, for the first time, SIM2s cross-talk on an endogenous HRE. SIM2s' functional interference with HIF1alpha activities on BNIP3 may indicate a novel role for SIM2s in promoting tumourigenesis. PMID:19668230

  16. The ternary complex factor net is downregulated by hypoxia and regulates hypoxia-responsive genes.

    PubMed

    Gross, Christian; Buchwalter, Gilles; Dubois-Pot, Hélène; Cler, Emilie; Zheng, Hong; Wasylyk, Bohdan

    2007-06-01

    Hypoxia and the Net ternary complex factor (TCF) regulate similar processes (angiogenesis, wound healing, and cellular migration) and genes (PAI-1, c-fos, erg-1, NOS-2, HO-1, and vascular endothelial growth factor genes), suggesting that they are involved in related pathways. We show here that hypoxia regulates Net differently from the other TCFs and that Net plays a role in the hypoxic response in vivo in mice and in cells. Hypoxia induces Net depletion from target promoters, nuclear export, ubiquitylation, and proteasomal degradation. Key mediators of the hypoxic response, the prolyl-4-hydroxylases containing domain proteins (PHDs), regulate Net. PHD downregulation in normoxia leads to Net degradation, and PHD overexpression delays Net downregulation by hypoxia. Net inhibition by RNA interference or mutation leads to altered regulation by hypoxia of the Net targets PAI-1, c-fos, and egr-1. We propose that hypoxia stimulates transcription of target promoters through removal of the repressor function of Net. Interestingly, the hematocrit response to a chemical inducer of hypoxia-like responses (cobalt chloride) is strongly altered in Net mutant mice. Our results show that the Net TCF is part of the biological response to hypoxia, adding a new component to an important pathological and physiological process. PMID:17403894

  17. Hypoxia Responsive Drug Delivery Systems in Tumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Alimoradi, Houman; Matikonda, Siddharth S; Gamble, Allan B; Giles, Gregory I; Greish, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is a common characteristic of solid tumors. It is mainly determined by low levels of oxygen resulting from imperfect vascular networks supplying most tumors. In an attempt to improve the present chemotherapeutic treatment and reduce associated side effects, several prodrug strategies have been introduced to achieve hypoxia-specific delivery of cytotoxic anticancer agents. With the advances in nanotechnology, novel delivery systems activated by the consequent outcomes of hypoxia have been developed. However, developing hypoxia responsive drug delivery systems (which only depend on low oxygen levels) is currently naïve. This review discusses four main hypoxia responsive delivery systems: polymeric based drug delivery systems, oxygen delivery systems combined with radiotherapy and chemotherapy, anaerobic bacteria which are used for delivery of genes to express anticancer proteins such as tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α) and hypoxia-inducible transcription factors 1 alpha (HIF1α) responsive gene delivery systems. PMID:26898739

  18. Role of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, α Subunit and cAMP-Response Element Binding Protein 1 in Synergistic Release of Interleukin 8 by Prostaglandin E2 and Nickel in Lung Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Fabisiak, James P.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have linked exposure to particulate matter (PM) air pollution with acute respiratory infection and chronic respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. We have previously shown that soluble nickel (Ni), a common component of PM, alters the release of CXC chemokines from cultured human lung fibroblasts (HLF) in response to microbial stimuli via a pathway dependent on disrupted prostaglandin (PG)E2 signaling. The current study sought to identify the molecular events underlying Ni-induced alterations in PGE2 signaling and its effects on IL-8 production. PGE2 synergistically enhances Ni-induced IL-8 release from HLF in a concentration-dependent manner. The effects of PGE2 were mimicked by butaprost and PGE1-alcohol and inhibited with antagonists AH6809 and L-161,982, indicating PGE2 signals via PGE2 receptors 2 and 4. PGE2 and forskolin stimulated cAMP, but it was only in the presence of Ni-induced hypoxia-inducible factor 1, α subunit (HIF1A) that these agents stimulated IL-8 release. The Ni-induced HIF1A DNA binding was enhanced by PGE2 and mediated, in part, by activation of p38 MAPK. Negation of cAMP-response element binding protein 1 or HIF1A using short interfering RNA blocked the synergistic interactions between Ni and PGE2. The results of the current study provide novel information on the ability of atmospheric hypoxia-mimetic metals to disrupt the release of immune-modulating chemokines by HLF in response to PGE2. Moreover, in the presence of HIF1A, cAMP-mediated signaling pathways may be altered to exacerbate inflammatory-like processes in lung tissue, imparting a susceptibility of PM-exposed populations to adverse respiratory health effects. PMID:23526216

  19. Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular responses to acute hypoxia following exposure to intermittent hypoxia in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Glen E; Brugniaux, Julien V; Pialoux, Vincent; Duggan, Cailean T C; Hanly, Patrick J; Ahmed, Sofia B; Poulin, Marc J

    2009-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) is thought to be responsible for many of the long-term cardiovascular consequences associated with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Experimental human models of IH can aid in investigating the pathophysiology of these cardiovascular complications. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of IH on the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular response to acute hypoxia and hypercapnia in an experimental human model that simulates the hypoxaemia experienced by OSA patients. We exposed 10 healthy, male subjects to IH for 4 consecutive days. The IH profile involved 2 min of hypoxia (nadir = 45.0 mmHg) alternating with 2 min of normoxia (peak = 88.0 mmHg) for 6 h. The cerebral blood flow response and the pressor responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia were assessed after 2 days of sham exposure, after each day of IH, and 4 days following the discontinuation of IH. Nitric oxide derivatives were measured at baseline and following the last exposure to IH. After 4 days of IH, mean arterial pressure increased by 4 mmHg (P < 0.01), nitric oxide derivatives were reduced by 55% (P < 0.05), the pressor response to acute hypoxia increased (P < 0.01), and the cerebral vascular resistance response to hypoxia increased (P < 0.01). IH alters blood pressure and cerebrovascular regulation, which is likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease in patients with OSA. PMID:19417094

  20. Melatonin modulates the fetal cardiovascular defense response to acute hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Thakor, Avnesh S; Allison, Beth J; Niu, Youguo; Botting, Kimberley J; Serón-Ferré, Maria; Herrera, Emilio A; Giussani, Dino A

    2015-08-01

    Experimental studies in animal models supporting protective effects on the fetus of melatonin in adverse pregnancy have prompted clinical trials in human pregnancy complicated by fetal growth restriction. However, the effects of melatonin on the fetal defense to acute hypoxia, such as that which may occur during labor, remain unknown. This translational study tested the hypothesis, in vivo, that melatonin modulates the fetal cardiometabolic defense responses to acute hypoxia in chronically instrumented late gestation fetal sheep via alterations in fetal nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Under anesthesia, 6 fetal sheep at 0.85 gestation were instrumented with vascular catheters and a Transonic flow probe around a femoral artery. Five days later, fetuses were exposed to acute hypoxia with or without melatonin treatment. Fetal blood was taken to determine blood gas and metabolic status and plasma catecholamine concentrations. Hypoxia during melatonin treatment was repeated during in vivo NO blockade with the NO clamp. This technique permits blockade of de novo synthesis of NO while compensating for the tonic production of the gas, thereby maintaining basal cardiovascular function. Melatonin suppressed the redistribution of blood flow away from peripheral circulations and the glycemic and plasma catecholamine responses to acute hypoxia. These are important components of the fetal brain sparing response to acute hypoxia. The effects of melatonin involved NO-dependent mechanisms as the responses were reverted by fetal treatment with the NO clamp. Melatonin modulates the in vivo fetal cardiometabolic responses to acute hypoxia by increasing NO bioavailability. PMID:25908097

  1. Melatonin modulates the fetal cardiovascular defense response to acute hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Thakor, Avnesh S; Allison, Beth J; Niu, Youguo; Botting, Kimberley J; Serón-Ferré, Maria; Herrera, Emilio A; Giussani, Dino A

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies in animal models supporting protective effects on the fetus of melatonin in adverse pregnancy have prompted clinical trials in human pregnancy complicated by fetal growth restriction. However, the effects of melatonin on the fetal defense to acute hypoxia, such as that which may occur during labor, remain unknown. This translational study tested the hypothesis, in vivo, that melatonin modulates the fetal cardiometabolic defense responses to acute hypoxia in chronically instrumented late gestation fetal sheep via alterations in fetal nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Under anesthesia, 6 fetal sheep at 0.85 gestation were instrumented with vascular catheters and a Transonic flow probe around a femoral artery. Five days later, fetuses were exposed to acute hypoxia with or without melatonin treatment. Fetal blood was taken to determine blood gas and metabolic status and plasma catecholamine concentrations. Hypoxia during melatonin treatment was repeated during in vivo NO blockade with the NO clamp. This technique permits blockade of de novo synthesis of NO while compensating for the tonic production of the gas, thereby maintaining basal cardiovascular function. Melatonin suppressed the redistribution of blood flow away from peripheral circulations and the glycemic and plasma catecholamine responses to acute hypoxia. These are important components of the fetal brain sparing response to acute hypoxia. The effects of melatonin involved NO-dependent mechanisms as the responses were reverted by fetal treatment with the NO clamp. Melatonin modulates the in vivo fetal cardiometabolic responses to acute hypoxia by increasing NO bioavailability. PMID:25908097

  2. Thermoregulatory and metabolic responses of Japanese quail to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Atchley, Dylan S.; Foster, Jennifer A.; Bavis, Ryan W.

    2008-01-01

    Common responses to hypoxia include decreased body temperature (Tb) and decreased energy metabolism. In this study, the effects of hypoxia and hypercapnia on Tb and metabolic oxygen consumption (V̇o2) were investigated in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica). When exposed to hypoxia (15, 13, 11 and 9% O2), Tb decreased only at 11% and 9% O2 compared to normoxia; quail were better able to maintain Tb during acute hypoxia after a one-week acclimation to 10% O2. V̇o2 also decreased during hypoxia, but at 9% O2 this was partially offset by increased anaerobic metabolism. Tb and V̇o2 responses to 9% O2 were exaggerated at lower ambient temperature (Ta), reflecting a decreased lower critical temperature during hypoxia. Conversely, hypoxia had little effect on Tb or V̇o2 at higher Ta (36°C). We conclude that Japanese quail respond to hypoxia in much the same way as mammals, by reducing both Tb and V̇o2. No relationship was found between the magnitudes of decreases in Tb and V̇o2 during 9% O2, however. Since metabolism is the source of heat generation, this suggests that Japanese quail increase thermolysis to reduce Tb. During hypercapnia (3, 6 and 9% CO2), Tb was reduced only at 9% CO2 while V̇o2 was unchanged. PMID:18727957

  3. Transcriptional response to hypoxia in the aquatic fungus Blastocladiella emersonii.

    PubMed

    Camilo, César M; Gomes, Suely L

    2010-06-01

    Global gene expression analysis was carried out with Blastocladiella emersonii cells subjected to oxygen deprivation (hypoxia) using cDNA microarrays. In experiments of gradual hypoxia (gradual decrease in dissolved oxygen) and direct hypoxia (direct decrease in dissolved oxygen), about 650 differentially expressed genes were observed. A total of 534 genes were affected directly or indirectly by oxygen availability, as they showed recovery to normal expression levels or a tendency to recover when cells were reoxygenated. In addition to modulating many genes with no putative assigned function, B. emersonii cells respond to hypoxia by readjusting the expression levels of genes responsible for energy production and consumption. At least transcriptionally, this fungus seems to favor anaerobic metabolism through the upregulation of genes encoding glycolytic enzymes and lactate dehydrogenase and the downregulation of most genes coding for tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes. Furthermore, genes involved in energy-costly processes, like protein synthesis, amino acid biosynthesis, protein folding, and transport, had their expression profiles predominantly downregulated during oxygen deprivation, indicating an energy-saving effort. Data also revealed similarities between the transcriptional profiles of cells under hypoxia and under iron(II) deprivation, suggesting that Fe(2+) ion could have a role in oxygen sensing and/or response to hypoxia in B. emersonii. Additionally, treatment of fungal cells prior to hypoxia with the antibiotic geldanamycin, which negatively affects the stability of mammalian hypoxia transcription factor HIF-1alpha, caused a significant decrease in the levels of certain upregulated hypoxic genes. PMID:20418381

  4. Pre- and Perinatal Ischemia-Hypoxia, the Ischemia-Hypoxia Response Pathway, and ADHD Risk.

    PubMed

    Smith, Taylor F; Schmidt-Kastner, Rainald; McGeary, John E; Kaczorowski, Jessica A; Knopik, Valerie S

    2016-05-01

    This review focuses on how measured pre- and perinatal environmental and (epi)genetic risk factors are interrelated and potentially influence one, of many, common developmental pathway towards ADHD. Consistent with the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease hypothesis, lower birth weight is associated with increased ADHD risk. Prenatal ischemia-hypoxia (insufficient blood and oxygen supply in utero) is a primary pathway to lower birth weight and produces neurodevelopmental risk for ADHD. To promote tissue survival in the context of ischemia-hypoxia, ischemia-hypoxia response (IHR) pathway gene expression is altered in the developing brain and peripheral tissues. Although altered IHR gene expression is adaptive in the context of ischemia-hypoxia, lasting IHR epigenetic modifications may lead to increased ADHD risk. Taken together, IHR genetic vulnerability to ischemia-hypoxia and IHR epigenetic alterations following prenatal ischemia-hypoxia may result in neurodevelopmental vulnerability for ADHD. Limitations of the extant literature and future directions for genetically-informed research are discussed. PMID:26920003

  5. Circulatory responses to hypoxia in experimental myocardial infarction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroll, M.; Robison, S. C.; Harrison, D. C.

    1971-01-01

    Three levels of decreased arterial oxygen saturation elicited a graded circulatory response in dogs, manifested by stepwise increases in cardiac output, left ventricular dp/dt, and stroke volume, and decreases in systemic vascular resistance. Responses to similar hypoxia challenges after experimental myocardial infarction were qualitatively similar but quantitatively less. Although the circulatory compensation for hypoxia was less effective after myocardial infarction, no further deterioration of the haemodynamics was noted.

  6. Cardiac responses to hypoxia and reoxygenation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zarndt, Rachel; Piloto, Sarah; Powell, Frank L; Haddad, Gabriel G; Bodmer, Rolf; Ocorr, Karen

    2015-12-01

    An adequate supply of oxygen is important for the survival of all tissues, but it is especially critical for tissues with high-energy demands, such as the heart. Insufficient tissue oxygenation occurs under a variety of conditions, including high altitude, embryonic and fetal development, inflammation, and thrombotic diseases, often affecting multiple organ systems. Responses and adaptations of the heart to hypoxia are of particular relevance in human cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, in which the effects of hypoxic exposure can range in severity from transient to long-lasting. This study uses the genetic model system Drosophila to investigate cardiac responses to acute (30 min), sustained (18 h), and chronic (3 wk) hypoxia with reoxygenation. Whereas hearts from wild-type flies recovered quickly after acute hypoxia, exposure to sustained or chronic hypoxia significantly compromised heart function upon reoxygenation. Hearts from flies with mutations in sima, the Drosophila homolog of the hypoxia-inducible factor alpha subunit (HIF-α), exhibited exaggerated reductions in cardiac output in response to hypoxia. Heart function in hypoxia-selected flies, selected over many generations for survival in a low-oxygen environment, revealed reduced cardiac output in terms of decreased heart rate and fractional shortening compared with their normoxia controls. Hypoxia-selected flies also had smaller hearts, myofibrillar disorganization, and increased extracellular collagen deposition, consistent with the observed reductions in contractility. This study indicates that longer-duration hypoxic insults exert deleterious effects on heart function that are mediated, in part, by sima and advances Drosophila models for the genetic analysis of cardiac-specific responses to hypoxia and reoxygenation. PMID:26377557

  7. Prolonged lobar hypoxia in vivo enhances the responsivity of isolated pulmonary veins to hypoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheehan, D. W.; Farhi, L. E.; Russell, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The hypoxic response of pulmonary vessels isolated from eight sheep whose right apical lobes (RAL) had inspired 100% N2 for 20 h was studied. The RAL of these conscious sheep inspired hypoxic gas and the remainder of the lung inspired air. During hypoxia, RAL perfusion was 33 +/- 3% of its air value, carotid arterial PO2 averaged 86 +/- 3 mm Hg and pulmonary perfusion pressure was not significantly different from the initial control period when the RAL inspired air. At the end of the hypoxic exposure, the sheep were killed, and pulmonary artery and vein rings (0.5 to 2 mm inner diameter) were isolated from both the RAL and the right cardiac lobe, which served as the control lobe (CL). Arteries from the RAL and CL did not contract in response to 6% O2/6% CO2/88% N2 (hypoxia). In contrast, RAL veins did contract vigorously in response to hypoxia, whereas CL veins did not contract or contracted only minimally. Rubbing of the endothelium or prior incubation of RAL veins with catalase (1,200 units/ml), indomethacin (10(-5) M), or the thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 (TxA2/PGH2) receptor antagonist, SQ 29,548 (3 X 10(-6) M) each significantly reduced the response to hypoxia. RAL veins were also found to be more reactive than CL veins to the prostaglandin endoperoxide analogue U46619. We conclude that prolonged lobar hypoxia in vivo increases the responsivity of isolated pulmonary veins to hypoxia. These contractions may result from an increase in reactive O2 species, which in turn modify production of, metabolism of, and/or tissue responsivity to TxA2/PGH2.

  8. MURINE PULMONARY RESPONSE TO CHRONIC HYPOXIA IS STRAIN SPECIFIC

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Yuji; Laudi, Sven; Harral, Julie; Carr, Michelle; Ivester, Charles; Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Takiguchi, Yuichi; Tatsumi, Koichiro; Kuriyama, Takayuki; Nichols, William C.; West, James

    2013-01-01

    Information concerning the effects of genetic variation between different background strains on hemodynamic, morphometric, and gene expression response to hypoxia would be useful. Three strains of mice were kept in hypoxia and phenotyped followed by gene profiling analysis. Among the variables examined, hematocrit, right heart muscularization, and right ventricular systolic pressure showed a strain-specific effect. Increased gene expression of inflammatory, muscle, and angiogenesis genes were seen in all strains, though the specific genes changed varied among groups. These results suggest that different strains use different gene expression mechanisms to adapt to the challenge of chronic hypoxia, resulting in modified phenotypic changes. PMID:18600498

  9. Yeast Transcriptome and In Vivo Hypoxia Detection Reveals Histoplasma capsulatum Response to Low Oxygen Tension.

    PubMed

    DuBois, Juwen C; Pasula, Rajamouli; Dade, Jessica E; Smulian, A George

    2016-01-01

    Although there is growing understanding of the microenvironmental conditions fungal pathogens encounter as they colonize their host, nothing is known about Histoplasma capsulatum's response to hypoxia. Here we characterized hypoxia during murine histoplasmosis using an in vivo hypoxia detection agent, Hypoxyprobe-2 (HP-2); and analyzed H. capsulatum's transcriptional profile in response to in vitro hypoxia. Immunohistopathology and flow cytometry analyses revealed distinct regions of hypoxia during infection. Granuloma cells, enriched with macrophages and T-cells isolated from infected livers were 66-76% positive for HP-2, of which, 95% of macrophages and 55% of T-cells were hypoxic. Although inhibited, H. capsulatum was able to survive under in vitro hypoxic conditions (<1% O2), and restored growth when replaced in normoxia. Next-generation sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis after 24 hours of hypoxia demonstrated a significant increase in NIT50 (swirm domain DNA binding protein), a predicted ABC transporter (ABC), NADPH oxidoreductase (NADP/FAD), and guanine nucleotide exchange factor (RSP/GEF); and other genes with no known designated function. Computational transcription factor binding site analysis predicted human sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) binding sites upstream of NIT50, ABC, NADP/FAD and RSP/GEF. Hypoxia resulted in a time-dependent increase in the H. capsulatum homolog of SREBP, here named Srb1. Srb1 peaked at 8 hours and returned to basal levels by 24 hours. Our findings demonstrate that H. capsulatum encounters and survives severe hypoxia during infection. Additionally, the hypoxic response may be regulated at the level of transcription, and these studies contribute to the understanding of hypoxic regulation and adaptation in H. capsulatum. PMID:26483436

  10. The Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1/NOR-1 Axis Regulates the Survival Response of Endothelial Cells to Hypoxia▿

    PubMed Central

    Martorell, Lluis; Gentile, Maurizio; Rius, Jordi; Rodríguez, Cristina; Crespo, Javier; Badimon, Lina; Martínez-González, José

    2009-01-01

    Hypoxia induces apoptosis but also triggers adaptive mechanisms to ensure cell survival. Here we show that the prosurvival effects of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) in endothelial cells are mediated by neuron-derived orphan receptor 1 (NOR-1). The overexpression of NOR-1 decreased the rate of endothelial cells undergoing apoptosis in cultures exposed to hypoxia, while the inhibition of NOR-1 increased cell apoptosis. Hypoxia upregulated NOR-1 mRNA levels in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Blocking antibodies against VEGF or SU5614 (a VEGF receptor 2 inhibitor) did not prevent hypoxia-induced NOR-1 expression, suggesting that NOR-1 is not induced by the autocrine secretion of VEGF in response to hypoxia. The reduction of HIF-1α protein levels by small interfering RNAs, or by inhibitors of the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway or mTOR, significantly counteracted hypoxia-induced NOR-1 upregulation. Intracellular Ca2+ was involved in hypoxia-induced PI3K/Akt activation and in the downstream NOR-1 upregulation. A hypoxia response element mediated the transcriptional activation of NOR-1 induced by hypoxia as we show by transient transfection and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Finally, the attenuation of NOR-1 expression reduced both basal and hypoxia-induced cIAP2 (cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein 2) mRNA levels, while NOR-1 overexpression upregulated cIAP2. Therefore, NOR-1 is a downstream effector of HIF-1 signaling involved in the survival response of endothelial cells to hypoxia. PMID:19720740

  11. Cycling hypoxia and free radicals regulate angiogenesis and radiotherapy response

    PubMed Central

    Dewhirst, Mark W.; Cao, Yiting; Moeller, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia and free radicals, such as reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, can alter the function and/or activity of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1). Interplay between free radicals, hypoxia and HIF1 activity is complex and can influence the earliest stages of tumour development. The hypoxic environment of tumours is heterogeneous, both spatially and temporally, and can change in response to cytotoxic therapy. Free radicals created by hypoxia, hypoxia–reoxygenation cycling and immune cell infiltration after cytotoxic therapy strongly influence HIF1 activity. HIF1 can then promote endothelial and tumour cell survival. As discussed here, a constant theme emerges: inhibition of HIF1 activity will have therapeutic benefit. PMID:18500244

  12. Repeated acute hypoxia temporarily attenuates the ventilatory respiratory response to hypoxia in conscious newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, T; Yoda, T; Ushikubo, S; Matsuzawa, S; Sasano, T; Komiyama, A

    1999-07-01

    We asked whether repeated hypoxic exposures during the early neonatal periods could affect the ventilatory control, such as the lung volume-dependent ventilatory inhibition (HBR), pulmonary ventilation (VE), and CO2 production (VCO2). Within each litter of rats, one group of pups (experimental group H) was exposed to 6% O2 (30-min duration twice a day from postnatal d 1 to 4). The other group (control group C) was exposed to air. At 5 d after birth, the HBR was triggered by lung inflation via negative body surface pressure (10 cm H2O). Measurements of VE and VCO2 were done by plethysmography and the inflow-outflow CO2 difference, respectively. At 2 wk of age, VE and VCO2 measurements were repeated by the barometric technique and the inflow-outflow CO2 difference, respectively. Each conscious pup was breathing normoxia (21% O2) and then hypoxia (10% O2). Results were as follows: 1) during normoxia, HBR was stronger and both VE and VCO2 were higher in H pups than in C pups; 2) during hypoxia, the HBR of C was as in normoxia, whereas that of H was increased above the normoxic value; 3) during hypoxia, C maintained VE, whereas H decreased it; 4) in hypoxia, VCO2 was reduced significantly in both groups; 5) at 2 wk of age, VE and VCO2 did not differ between H and C during normoxia or in response to 10% hypoxia. We conclude that in rat pups, repeated hypoxic episodes can modify the HBR and, at least temporarily, reduce the VE response to hypoxia with a decrease in VCO2. The findings are in agreement with the view that repeated hypoxic exposures in the neonatal period could interfere with the development of respiratory control and could possibly be involved in the mechanisms of neonatal apnea or sudden infant death syndrome. PMID:10400145

  13. Aging, Tolerance to High Altitude, and Cardiorespiratory Response to Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Richalet, Jean-Paul; Lhuissier, François J

    2015-06-01

    Richalet, Jean-Paul, and François J. Lhuissier. Aging, tolerance to high altitude, and cardiorespiratory response to hypoxia. High Alt Med Biol. 16:117-124, 2015.--It is generally accepted that aging is rather protective, at least at moderate altitude. Some anecdotal reports even mention successful ascent of peaks over 8000 m and even Everest by elderly people. However, very few studies have explored the influence of aging on tolerance to high altitude and prevalence of acute high altitude related diseases, taking into account all confounding factors such as speed of ascent, altitude reached, sex, training status, and chemo-responsiveness. Changes in physiological responses to hypoxia with aging were assessed through a cross-sectional 20-year study including 4675 subjects (2789 men, 1886 women; 14-85 yrs old) and a longitudinal study including 30 subjects explored at a mean 10.4-year interval. In men, ventilatory response to hypoxia increased, while desaturation was less pronounced with aging. Cardiac response to hypoxia was blunted with aging in both genders. Similar results were found in the longitudinal study, with a decrease in cardiac and an increase in ventilatory response to hypoxia with aging. These adaptive responses were less pronounced or absent in post-menopausal untrained women. In conclusion, in normal healthy and active subjects, aging has no deleterious effect on cardiac and ventilatory responses to hypoxia, at least up to the eighth decade. Aging is not a contraindication for high altitude, as far as no pathological condition interferes and physical fitness is compatible with the intensity of the expected physical demand of one's individual. Physiological evaluation through hypoxic exercise testing before going to high altitude is helpful to detect risk factors of severe high altitude-related diseases. PMID:25946570

  14. Hypoxia-induced protein binding to O2-responsive sequences on the tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

    PubMed

    Norris, M L; Millhorn, D E

    1995-10-01

    We reported recently that the gene that encodes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of catecholamines, is regulated by hypoxia in the dopaminergic cells of the mammalian carotid body (Czyzyk-Krzeska, M. F., Bayliss, D. A., Lawson, E. E. & Millhorn, D. E. (1992) J. Neurochem. 58, 1538-1546) and in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells (Czyzyk-Krzeska, M. F., Furnari, B. A., Lawson, E. E. & Millhorn, D. E. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 760-764). Regulation of this gene during low O2 conditions occurs at both the level of transcription and RNA stability. Increased transcription during hypoxia is regulated by a region of the proximal promoter that extends from -284 to + 27 bases, relative to transcription start site. The present study was undertaken to further characterize the sequences that confer O2 responsiveness of the TH gene and to identify hypoxia-induced protein interactions with these sequences. Results from chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assays identified a region between bases -284 and -150 that contains the essential sequences for O2 regulation. This region contains a number of regulatory elements including AP1, AP2, and HIF-1. Gel shift assays revealed enhanced protein interactions at the AP1 and HIF-1 elements of the native gene. Further investigations using supershift and shift-Western analysis showed that c-Fos and JunB bind to the AP1 element during hypoxia and that these protein levels are stimulated by hypoxia. Mutation of the AP1 sequence prevented stimulation of transcription of the TH-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene by hypoxia. PMID:7559551

  15. Chronic intermittent hypoxia alters ventilatory and metabolic responses to acute hypoxia in rats.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Barbara J; Adrian, Russell; Wang, Zun-Yi; Bates, Melissa L; Dopp, John M

    2016-05-15

    We determined the effects of chronic exposure to intermittent hypoxia (CIH) on chemoreflex control of ventilation in conscious animals. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to CIH [nadir oxygen saturation (SpO2), 75%; 15 events/h; 10 h/day] or normoxia (NORM) for 21 days. We assessed the following responses to acute, graded hypoxia before and after exposures: ventilation (V̇e, via barometric plethysmography), V̇o2 and V̇co2 (analysis of expired air), heart rate (HR), and SpO2 (pulse oximetry via neck collar). We quantified hypoxia-induced chemoreceptor sensitivity by calculating the stimulus-response relationship between SpO2 and the ventilatory equivalent for V̇co2 (linear regression). An additional aim was to determine whether CIH causes proliferation of carotid body glomus cells (using bromodeoxyuridine). CIH exposure increased the slope of the V̇e/V̇co2/SpO2 relationship and caused hyperventilation in normoxia. Bromodeoxyuridine staining was comparable in CIH and NORM. Thus our CIH paradigm augmented hypoxic chemosensitivity without causing glomus cell proliferation. PMID:26917692

  16. Genome-Wide Analysis of Hypoxia-Responsive Genes in the Rice Blast Fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gir-Won; Koh, Sun-Ki; Chae, Suhn-Kee; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae, is the most destructive pathogen in the rice-growing area. This fungus has a biotrophic phase early in infection and later switches to a necrotrophic lifestyle. During the biotrophic phase, the fungus competes with its host for nutrients and oxygen. Continuous uptake of oxygen is essential for successful establishment of blast disease of this pathogen. Here, we report transcriptional responses of the fungus to oxygen limitation. Transcriptome analysis using RNA-Seq identified that 1,047 genes were up-regulated in response to hypoxia. Those genes are involved in mycelial development, sterol biosynthesis, and metal ion transport based on hierarchical GO terms, and are well-conserved among three fungal species. In addition, null mutants of two hypoxia-responsive genes were generated and their roles in fungal development and pathogenicity tested. The mutant for the sterol regulatory element-binding protein gene, MoSRE1, exhibited increased sensitivity to a hypoxia-mimicking agent, increased conidiation, and delayed invasive growth within host cells, which is suggestive of important roles in fungal development. However, such defects did not cause any significant decrease in disease severity. The other null mutant, for the alcohol dehydrogenase gene MoADH1, showed no defect in the hypoxia-mimicking condition (using cobalt chloride) and fungal development. Taken together, this comprehensive transcriptional profiling in response to a hypoxic condition with experimental validations would provide new insights into fungal development and pathogenicity in plant pathogenic fungi. PMID:26241858

  17. Impaired response of mature adipocytes of diabetic mice to hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Seok Jong Jin, Da P.; Buck, Donald W.; Galiano, Robert D.; Mustoe, Thomas A.

    2011-10-01

    Adipose tissue contains various cells such as infiltrated monocytes/macrophages, endothelial cells, preadipocytes, and adipocytes. Adipocytes have an endocrine function by secreting adipokines such as interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, leptin, and adiponectin. Dysregulation of adipokines in adipose tissues leads to a chronic low-grade inflammation which could result in atherosclerosis, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. A sustained inflammatory state, which is characterized by prolonged persistence of macrophages and neutrophils, is found in diabetic wounds. In addition, subcutaneous adipocytes are enormously increased in amount clinically in type 2 diabetes. However, the function of subcutaneous adipocytes, which play an important role in injured tissue subjected to hypoxia, has not been well characterized in vitro due to the difficulty of maintaining mature adipocytes in culture using conventional methods because of their buoyancy. In this study, we established a novel in vitro culture method of mature adipocytes by enclosing them in a hyaluronan (HA) based hydrogel to study their role in response to stress such as hypoxia. BrdU labeling and Ki67 immunostaining experiments showed that hydrogel enclosed mature adipocytes proliferate in vitro. Both mRNA and protein expression analyses for hypoxia regulated genes, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO1), showed that mature adipocytes of wild type mice respond to hypoxia. In contrast, mature adipocytes of diabetic db/db and TallyHo mice did not efficiently respond to hypoxia. Our studies suggest that mature adipocytes are functionally active cells, and their abnormal function to hypoxia can be one of underlining mechanisms in type 2 diabetes.

  18. Transcriptomic responses of marine medaka's ovary to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Lai, Keng Po; Li, Jing Woei; Tse, Anna Chung Kwan; Cheung, Angela; Wang, Simon; Chan, Ting Fung; Kong, Richard Yuen Chong; Wu, Rudolf Shiu Sun

    2016-08-01

    Hypoxia, an endocrine disruptor, is pressing global problem affecting marine organisms in over 400 "Dead Zones" worldwide. There is growing evident demonstrated the disruptive effect of hypoxia on reproductive systems of marine fish through the impairments of steroidogenic gene expression, leading to the alteration of sex hormone production in gonads. But the detailed molecular mechanism underlying the responses of female reproductive systems to hypoxic stress remains largely unknown. In the present report, we used marine medaka Oryzias melastigma as a model, together with high-throughput transcriptome sequencing and bioinformatics analysis, aiming to determine the changes in transcriptional signature in the ovary of marine fish under hypoxic stress. Our result discovered over two hundred differential expressed genes in ovary in response to hypoxia. The bioinformatics analysis together with quantitative RT-PCR validation on the deregulated genes highlighted the dysregulations of a number of female reproductive functions including interruptions of ovarian follicle development, gonad development and steroid metabolic process. Additionally, we revealed that these deregulations are through the modulation of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). The result of this work complements previous studies and provides additional insights into the underlying molecular mechanism of hypoxia-induced impairment of female reproductive system. PMID:27423118

  19. Sympathoadrenal responses to acute and chronic hypoxia in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, T S; Young, J B; Landsberg, L

    1983-01-01

    The sympathoadrenal responses to acute and chronic hypoxic exposure at 10.5 and 7.5% oxygen were determined in the rat. Cardiac norepinephrine (NE) turnover was used to assess sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity, and urinary excretion of epinephrine (E) was measured as an index of adrenal medullary activity. The responses of the adrenal medulla and SNS were distinct and dependent upon the degree and duration of hypoxic exposure. Chronic hypoxia at 10.5% oxygen increased cardiac NE turnover by 130% after 3, 7, and 14 d of hypoxic exposure. Urinary excretion of NE was similarly increased over this time interval, while urinary E excretion was marginally elevated. In contrast, acute exposure to moderate hypoxia at 10.5% oxygen was not associated with an increase in SNS activity; in fact, decreased SNS activity was suggested by diminished cardiac NE turnover and urinary NE excretion over the first 12 h of hypoxic exposure, and by a rebound increase in NE turnover after reexposure to normal oxygen tension. Adrenal medullary activity, on the other hand, increased substantially during acute exposure to moderate hypoxia (2-fold increase in urinary E excretion) and severe hypoxia (greater than 10-fold). In distinction to the lack of effect of acute hypoxic exposure (10.5% oxygen), the SNS was markedly stimulated during the first day of hypoxia exposure at 7.5% oxygen, an increase that was sustained throughout at least 7 d at 7.5% oxygen. These results demonstrate that chronic exposure to moderate and severe hypoxia increases the activity of the SNS and adrenal medulla, the effect being greater in severe hypoxic exposure. The response to acute hypoxic exposure is more complicated; during the first 12 h of exposure at 10.5% oxygen, the SNS is not stimulated and appears to be restrained, while adrenal medullary activity is enhanced. Acute exposure to a more severe degree of hypoxia (7.5% oxygen), however, is associated with stimulation of both the SNS and adrenal medulla

  20. Clinical iron deficiency disturbs normal human responses to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Frise, Matthew C.; Cheng, Hung-Yuan; Nickol, Annabel H.; Curtis, M. Kate; Pollard, Karen A.; Roberts, David J.; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Dorrington, Keith L.; Robbins, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Iron bioavailability has been identified as a factor that influences cellular hypoxia sensing, putatively via an action on the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway. We therefore hypothesized that clinical iron deficiency would disturb integrated human responses to hypoxia. METHODS. We performed a prospective, controlled, observational study of the effects of iron status on hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Individuals with absolute iron deficiency (ID) and an iron-replete (IR) control group were exposed to two 6-hour periods of isocapnic hypoxia. The second hypoxic exposure was preceded by i.v. infusion of iron. Pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) was serially assessed with Doppler echocardiography. RESULTS. Thirteen ID individuals completed the study and were age- and sex-matched with controls. PASP did not differ by group or study day before each hypoxic exposure. During the first 6-hour hypoxic exposure, the rise in PASP was 6.2 mmHg greater in the ID group (absolute rises 16.1 and 10.7 mmHg, respectively; 95% CI for difference, 2.7–9.7 mmHg, P = 0.001). Intravenous iron attenuated the PASP rise in both groups; however, the effect was greater in ID participants than in controls (absolute reductions 11.1 and 6.8 mmHg, respectively; 95% CI for difference in change, –8.3 to –0.3 mmHg, P = 0.035). Serum erythropoietin responses to hypoxia also differed between groups. CONCLUSION. Clinical iron deficiency disturbs normal responses to hypoxia, as evidenced by exaggerated hypoxic pulmonary hypertension that is reversed by subsequent iron administration. Disturbed hypoxia sensing and signaling provides a mechanism through which iron deficiency may be detrimental to human health. TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01847352). FUNDING. M.C. Frise is the recipient of a British Heart Foundation Clinical Research Training Fellowship (FS/14/48/30828). K.L. Dorrington is supported by the Dunhill Medical Trust (R178/1110). D.J. Roberts was

  1. ASSESSING THE EFFECTS OF HYPOXIA ON FISH POPULATION ECOLOGY USING ELEMENTS AND ISOTOPES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Linking hypoxic exposure to trophic dynamics of Atlantic croaker, an abundant fish and integral component in Gulf of Mexico food webs, will provide information on ecosystem structure and functioning in response to seasonal hypoxia. Additionally, validating a natural permane...

  2. A hypoxia complement differentiates the muscle response to endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Schmutz, Silvia; Däpp, Christoph; Wittwer, Matthias; Durieux, Anne-Cécile; Mueller, Matthias; Weinstein, Felix; Vogt, Michael; Hoppeler, Hans; Flück, Martin

    2010-06-01

    Metabolic stress is believed to constitute an important signal for training-induced adjustments of gene expression and oxidative capacity in skeletal muscle. We hypothesized that the effects of endurance training on expression of muscle-relevant transcripts and ultrastructure would be specifically modified by a hypoxia complement during exercise due to enhanced glycolytic strain. Endurance training of untrained male subjects in conditions of hypoxia increased subsarcolemmal mitochondrial density in the recruited vastus lateralis muscle and power output in hypoxia more than training in normoxia, i.e. 169 versus 91% and 10 versus 6%, respectively, and tended to differentially elevate sarcoplasmic volume density (42 versus 20%, P = 0.07). The hypoxia-specific ultrastructural adjustments with training corresponded to differential regulation of the muscle transcriptome by single and repeated exercise between both oxygenation conditions. Fine-tuning by exercise in hypoxia comprised gene ontologies connected to energy provision by glycolysis and fat metabolism in mitochondria, remodelling of capillaries and the extracellular matrix, and cell cycle regulation, but not fibre structure. In the untrained state, the transcriptome response during the first 24 h of recovery from a single exercise bout correlated positively with changes in arterial oxygen saturation during exercise and negatively with blood lactate. This correspondence was inverted in the trained state. The observations highlight that the expression response of myocellular energy pathways to endurance work is graded with regard to metabolic stress and the training state. The exposed mechanistic relationship implies that the altitude specificity of improvements in aerobic performance with a 'living low-training high' regime has a myocellular basis. PMID:20176680

  3. Hypercapnia Suppresses the HIF-dependent Adaptive Response to Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Selfridge, Andrew C; Cavadas, Miguel A S; Scholz, Carsten C; Campbell, Eric L; Welch, Lynn C; Lecuona, Emilia; Colgan, Sean P; Barrett, Kim E; Sporn, Peter H S; Sznajder, Jacob I; Cummins, Eoin P; Taylor, Cormac T

    2016-05-27

    Molecular oxygen and carbon dioxide are the primary gaseous substrate and product of oxidative metabolism, respectively. Hypoxia (low oxygen) and hypercapnia (high carbon dioxide) are co-incidental features of the tissue microenvironment in a range of pathophysiologic states, including acute and chronic respiratory diseases. The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is the master regulator of the transcriptional response to hypoxia; however, little is known about the impact of hypercapnia on gene transcription. Because of the relationship between hypoxia and hypercapnia, we investigated the effect of hypercapnia on the HIF pathway. Hypercapnia suppressed HIF-α protein stability and HIF target gene expression both in mice and cultured cells in a manner that was at least in part independent of the canonical O2-dependent HIF degradation pathway. The suppressive effects of hypercapnia on HIF-α protein stability could be mimicked by reducing intracellular pH at a constant level of partial pressure of CO2 Bafilomycin A1, a specific inhibitor of vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase that blocks lysosomal degradation, prevented the hypercapnic suppression of HIF-α protein. Based on these results, we hypothesize that hypercapnia counter-regulates activation of the HIF pathway by reducing intracellular pH and promoting lysosomal degradation of HIF-α subunits. Therefore, hypercapnia may play a key role in the pathophysiology of diseases where HIF is implicated. PMID:27044749

  4. Modulation of the sympathetic response to acute hypoxia by the caudal ventrolateral medulla in rats

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Daniel A; Schreihofer, Ann M

    2009-01-01

    Hypoxia elevates splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) with differential effects during inspiration and expiration by unresolved central mechanisms. We examined the hypothesis that cardiovascular-related neurones in the caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM) contribute to the complex sympathetic response to hypoxia. In chloralose-anaesthetized, ventilated, vagotomized rats, acute hypoxia (10% O2, 60 s) evoked an increase in SNA (103 ± 12%) that was characterized by a decrease in activity during early inspiration followed by a prominent rise during expiration. Some recorded baro-activated CVLM neurones (n= 13) were activated by hypoxia, and most of these neurones displayed peak activity during inspiration that was enhanced during hypoxia. In contrast, other baro-activated CVLM neurones were inhibited during hypoxia (n= 6), and most of these neurones showed peak activity during expiration prior to the onset of hypoxia. Microinjection of the glutamate antagonist kynurenate into the CVLM eliminated the respiratory-related fluctuations in SNA during hypoxia and exaggerated the magnitude of the sympathetic response. In contrast, microinjection of a GABAA antagonist (bicuculline or gabazine) into the CVLM dramatically attenuated the sympathetic response to hypoxia. These data suggest the response to hypoxia in baro-activated CVLM neurones is related to their basal pattern of respiratory-related activity, and changes in the activity of these neurones is consistent with a contribution to the respiratory-related sympathetic responses to hypoxia. Furthermore, both glutamate and GABA in the CVLM contribute to the complex sympathetic response to acute hypoxia. PMID:19047207

  5. Senescence responsive transcriptional element

    DOEpatents

    Campisi, Judith; Testori, Alessandro

    1999-01-01

    Recombinant polynucleotides have expression control sequences that have a senescence responsive element and a minimal promoter, and which are operatively linked to a heterologous nucleotide sequence. The molecules are useful for achieving high levels of expression of genes in senescent cells. Methods of inhibiting expression of genes in senescent cells also are provided.

  6. Senescence responsive transcriptional element

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, J.; Testori, A.

    1999-10-12

    Recombinant polynucleotides have expression control sequences that have a senescence responsive element and a minimal promoter, and which are operatively linked to a heterologous nucleotide sequence. The molecules are useful for achieving high levels of expression of genes in senescent cells. Methods of inhibiting expression of genes in senescent cells also are provided.

  7. Redox- and Hypoxia-Responsive MRI Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Do, Quyen N.; Ratnakar, James S.; Kovács, Zoltán

    2014-01-01

    The development of responsive or “smart” magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents that can report specific biomarker or biological events has been the focus of MRI contrast agent research over the past 20 years. Among various biological hallmarks of interest, tissue redox and hypoxia are particularly important owing to their roles in disease states and metabolic consequences. Herein we review the development of redox-/hypoxia-sensitive T1 shortening and paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST) MRI contrast agents. Traditionally, the relaxivity of redox-sensitive Gd3+-based complexes is modulated through changes in the ligand structure or molecular rotation, while PARACEST sensors exploit the sensitivity of the metal-bound water exchange rate to electronic effects of the ligand-pendant arms and alterations in the coordination geometry. Newer designs involve complexes of redox-active metal ions in which the oxidation states have different magnetic properties. The challenges of translating redox- and hypoxia-sensitive agents in vivo are also addressed. PMID:24825674

  8. Redox- and hypoxia-responsive MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Do, Quyen N; Ratnakar, James S; Kovács, Zoltán; Sherry, A Dean

    2014-06-01

    The development of responsive or "smart" magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents that can report specific biomarker or biological events has been the focus of MRI contrast agent research over the past 20 years. Among various biological hallmarks of interest, tissue redox and hypoxia are particularly important owing to their roles in disease states and metabolic consequences. Herein we review the development of redox-/hypoxia-sensitive T1 shortening and paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST) MRI contrast agents. Traditionally, the relaxivity of redox-sensitive Gd(3+) -based complexes is modulated through changes in the ligand structure or molecular rotation, while PARACEST sensors exploit the sensitivity of the metal-bound water exchange rate to electronic effects of the ligand-pendant arms and alterations in the coordination geometry. Newer designs involve complexes of redox-active metal ions in which the oxidation states have different magnetic properties. The challenges of translating redox- and hypoxia-sensitive agents in vivo are also addressed. PMID:24825674

  9. ADAPTIVE AND MALADAPTIVE CARDIORESPIRATORY RESPONSES TO CONTINUOUS AND INTERMITTENT HYPOXIA MEDIATED BY HYPOXIA-INDUCIBLE FACTORS 1 AND 2

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, Nanduri R.; Semenza, Gregg L.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is a fundamental stimulus that impacts cells, tissues, organs, and physiological systems. The discovery of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and subsequent identification of other members of the HIF family of transcriptional activators has provided insight into the molecular underpinnings of oxygen homeostasis. This review focuses on the mechanisms of HIF activation and their roles in physiological and pathophysiological responses to hypoxia, with an emphasis on the cardiorespiratory systems. HIFs are heterodimers comprised of an O2-regulated HIF-1α or HIF-2α subunit and a constitutively expressed HIF-1β subunit. Induction of HIF activity under conditions of reduced O2 availability requires stabilization of HIF-1α and HIF-2α due to reduced prolyl hydroxylation, dimerization with HIF-1β, and interaction with coactivators due to decreased asparaginyl hydroxylation. Stimuli other than hypoxia, such as nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species, can also activate HIFs. HIF-1 and HIF-2 are essential for acute O2 sensing by the carotid body, and their coordinated transcriptional activation is critical for physiological adaptations to chronic hypoxia including erythropoiesis, vascularization, metabolic reprogramming, and ventilatory acclimatization. In contrast, intermittent hypoxia, which occurs in association with sleep-disordered breathing, results in an imbalance between HIF-1α and HIF-2α that causes oxidative stress, leading to cardiorespiratory pathology. PMID:22811423

  10. The fetal brain sparing response to hypoxia: physiological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Giussani, Dino A

    2016-03-01

    How the fetus withstands an environment of reduced oxygenation during life in the womb has been a vibrant area of research since this field was introduced by Joseph Barcroft, a century ago. Studies spanning five decades have since used the chronically instrumented fetal sheep preparation to investigate the fetal compensatory responses to hypoxia. This defence is contingent on the fetal cardiovascular system, which in late gestation adopts strategies to decrease oxygen consumption and redistribute the cardiac output away from peripheral vascular beds and towards essential circulations, such as those perfusing the brain. The introduction of simultaneous measurement of blood flow in the fetal carotid and femoral circulations by ultrasonic transducers has permitted investigation of the dynamics of the fetal brain sparing response for the first time. Now we know that major components of fetal brain sparing during acute hypoxia are triggered exclusively by a carotid chemoreflex and that they are modified by endocrine agents and the recently discovered vascular oxidant tone. The latter is determined by the interaction between nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species. The fetal brain sparing response matures as the fetus approaches term, in association with the prepartum increase in fetal plasma cortisol, and treatment of the preterm fetus with clinically relevant doses of synthetic steroids mimics this maturation. Despite intense interest into how the fetal brain sparing response may be affected by adverse intrauterine conditions, this area of research has been comparatively scant, but it is likely to take centre stage in the near future. PMID:26496004

  11. Development and pathological changes of neurovascular unit regulated by hypoxia response in the retina.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, T

    2016-01-01

    Retina is a highly vascularized tissue with a high oxygen and metabolic demand receiving light located in the back of the eye. The development and the maintenance of the retinal vasculature are important to regulate the homeostasis in the tissue. α Subunits of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) are key molecules in hypoxia response inducing genes required for cell survival such as vascular endothelial growth factor under hypoxia. Neurons, glia, and vascular endothelium cells interdependently form neurovascular unit in the retina tightly regulated by hypoxia response via HIF expression. A corruption of the precise hypoxia response in the developmental or matured retinal tissue may lead congenital vascular anomalies or adult neovascular ocular diseases. To regulate hypoxia response through HIF activity would be an ideal therapeutic target for these vision-threatening eye diseases. PMID:27130417

  12. A 24-base-pair sequence 3' to the human erythropoietin gene contains a hypoxia-responsive transcriptional enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Madan, A; Curtin, P T

    1993-01-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) synthesis increases in response to hypoxia. The hepatoma cell line Hep 3B produces low basal levels of Epo mRNA which increase markedly with hypoxia. To define the sequences necessary for this response, we linked fragments of the human Epo gene to a luciferase vector, introduced these plasmids into Hep 3B cells and assayed for luciferase activity after growth in 1% or 21% oxygen. A 621-bp Epo promoter fragment resulted in a 2.4-fold increase in luciferase activity with hypoxia. We tested several Epo gene fragments upstream of this Epo promoter fragment and found that a 613-bp Bgl II-Pvu II 3' fragment had a 10-fold increase in activity with hypoxia regardless of orientation. This fragment had a similar level of activity when linked to a simian virus 40 promoter. Portions of this fragment retained activity, including a 38-bp Apa I-Taq I fragment that had a 17-fold increase in activity with hypoxia. Deletion of nt 4-13 or 19-28 from this 38-bp fragment resulted in a loss of activity. The 24-bp upstream portion of the 38-bp fragment showed an 8-fold increase in activity with hypoxia. However, deletion of nt 19-24 or mutagenesis of nt 21 or 22 in this 24-bp fragment resulted in loss of activity. Our studies indicate that the transcriptional response of the human Epo gene to hypoxia is mediated in part by promoter sequences and to a greater degree by an enhancer element located in a 24-bp portion of the 3' flanking sequence of the gene. PMID:8387202

  13. Assessment of tumour hypoxia for prediction of response to therapy and cancer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Jubb, Adrian M; Buffa, Francesca M; Harris, Adrian L

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Tumour cells exploit both genetic and adaptive means to survive and proliferate in hypoxic microenvironments, resulting in the outgrowth of more aggressive tumour cell clones. Direct measurements of tumour oxygenation, and surrogate markers of the hypoxic response in tumours (for instance, hypoxia inducible factor-1α, carbonic anhydrase 9 and glucose transporter-1) are well-established prognostic markers in solid cancers. However, individual markers do not fully capture the complex, dynamic and heterogeneous hypoxic response in cancer. To overcome this, expression profiling has been employed to identify hypoxia signatures in cohorts or models of human cancer. Several of these hypoxia signatures have demonstrated prognostic significance in independent cancer datasets. Nevertheless, individual hypoxia markers have been shown to predict the benefit from hypoxia-modifying or anti-angiogenic therapies. This review aims to discuss the clinical impact of translational work on hypoxia markers and to explore future directions for research in this area. PMID:19840191

  14. Anaemia in kidney disease: harnessing hypoxia responses for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Koury, Mark J.; Haase, Volker H.

    2015-01-01

    Improved understanding of the oxygen-dependent regulation of erythropoiesis has provided new insights into the pathogenesis of anaemia associated with renal failure and has led to the development of novel therapeutic agents for its treatment. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2 is a key regulator of erythropoiesis and iron metabolism. HIF-2 is activated by hypoxic conditions and controls the production of erythropoietin by renal peritubular interstitial fibroblast-like cells and hepatocytes. In anaemia associated with renal disease, erythropoiesis is suppressed due to inadequate erythropoietin production in the kidney, inflammation and iron deficiency; however, pharmacologic agents that activate the HIF axis could provide a physiologic approach to the treatment of renal anaemia by mimicking hypoxia responses that coordinate erythropoiesis with iron metabolism. This Review discusses the functional inter-relationships between erythropoietin, iron and inflammatory mediators under physiologic conditions and in relation to the pathogenesis of renal anaemia, as well as recent insights into the molecular and cellular basis of erythropoietin production in the kidney. It furthermore provides a detailed overview of current clinical experience with pharmacologic activators of HIF signalling as a novel comprehensive and physiologic approach to the treatment of anaemia. PMID:26055355

  15. Anaemia in kidney disease: harnessing hypoxia responses for therapy.

    PubMed

    Koury, Mark J; Haase, Volker H

    2015-07-01

    Improved understanding of the oxygen-dependent regulation of erythropoiesis has provided new insights into the pathogenesis of anaemia associated with renal failure and has led to the development of novel therapeutic agents for its treatment. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2 is a key regulator of erythropoiesis and iron metabolism. HIF-2 is activated by hypoxic conditions and controls the production of erythropoietin by renal peritubular interstitial fibroblast-like cells and hepatocytes. In anaemia associated with renal disease, erythropoiesis is suppressed due to inadequate erythropoietin production in the kidney, inflammation and iron deficiency; however, pharmacologic agents that activate the HIF axis could provide a physiologic approach to the treatment of renal anaemia by mimicking hypoxia responses that coordinate erythropoiesis with iron metabolism. This Review discusses the functional inter-relationships between erythropoietin, iron and inflammatory mediators under physiologic conditions and in relation to the pathogenesis of renal anaemia, as well as recent insights into the molecular and cellular basis of erythropoietin production in the kidney. It furthermore provides a detailed overview of current clinical experience with pharmacologic activators of HIF signalling as a novel comprehensive and physiologic approach to the treatment of anaemia. PMID:26055355

  16. Treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, attenuates the fish hypoxia response.

    PubMed

    Panlilio, Jennifer M; Marin, Sara; Lobl, Marissa B; McDonald, M Danielle

    2016-01-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine (FLX), the active ingredient of the antidepressant drug Prozac, inhibits reuptake of the neurotransmitter, serotonin (5-HT; 5-hydroxytryptamine), into cells by the 5-HT transporter (SERT). Given the role of 5-HT in oxygen detection and the cardiovascular and ventilatory responses of fish to hypoxia, we hypothesized that treatment of the Gulf toadfish, Opsanus beta, with FLX would interfere with their response to hypoxia. Toadfish treated intra-arterially with 3.4 μg.g(-1) FLX under normoxic conditions displayed a transient tachycardia and a biphasic caudal arterial blood pressure (PCA) response that are in direct conflict with the typical hypoxia response. Fish injected intraperitoneally with FLX under normoxia had resting cardiovascular and ventilatory parameters similar to controls. Upon exposure to hypoxia, control toadfish exhibit a significant bradycardia, reduction in PCA and an increase in ventilatory amplitude (VAMP) without any changes in ventilatory frequency (fV). Fish treated IP with 10 μg.g(-1) FLX showed an interference in the cardiovascular and ventilatory response to hypoxia. Interestingly, when treated with 25 μg.g(-1) FLX, the bradycardia and VAMP response to hypoxia were similar to control fish while the PCA response to hypoxia was further inhibited. These results suggest that SERT inhibition by FLX may hinder survival in hypoxia. PMID:27499056

  17. Treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, attenuates the fish hypoxia response

    PubMed Central

    Panlilio, Jennifer M.; Marin, Sara; Lobl, Marissa B.; McDonald, M. Danielle

    2016-01-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine (FLX), the active ingredient of the antidepressant drug Prozac, inhibits reuptake of the neurotransmitter, serotonin (5-HT; 5-hydroxytryptamine), into cells by the 5-HT transporter (SERT). Given the role of 5-HT in oxygen detection and the cardiovascular and ventilatory responses of fish to hypoxia, we hypothesized that treatment of the Gulf toadfish, Opsanus beta, with FLX would interfere with their response to hypoxia. Toadfish treated intra-arterially with 3.4 μg.g−1 FLX under normoxic conditions displayed a transient tachycardia and a biphasic caudal arterial blood pressure (PCA) response that are in direct conflict with the typical hypoxia response. Fish injected intraperitoneally with FLX under normoxia had resting cardiovascular and ventilatory parameters similar to controls. Upon exposure to hypoxia, control toadfish exhibit a significant bradycardia, reduction in PCA and an increase in ventilatory amplitude (VAMP) without any changes in ventilatory frequency (fV). Fish treated IP with 10 μg.g−1 FLX showed an interference in the cardiovascular and ventilatory response to hypoxia. Interestingly, when treated with 25 μg.g−1 FLX, the bradycardia and VAMP response to hypoxia were similar to control fish while the PCA response to hypoxia was further inhibited. These results suggest that SERT inhibition by FLX may hinder survival in hypoxia. PMID:27499056

  18. Platelets are not essential for the pulmonary vascular pressor response to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Weir, E K; Seavy, J; Mlczoch, J; Genton, E; Reeves, J T

    1976-09-01

    The literature suggests that platelets might help mediate the pulmonary vascular pressor response to hypoxia. This study evaluated the hypoxic response in thrombocytopenic dogs. Platet depletion was achieved in five dogs by the use of platelet antiserum. In the normoxic state these dogs had lower cardiac outputs and higher pulmonary and systemic vascular resistances than five control dogs. The pressor response to hypoxia in these dogs was not only preserved but considerably enhanced in comparison to the control dogs. Hypoxia increased the pulmonary vascular resistance 146 +/- 17% above its normoxic value in the thrombocytopenic dogs and 64 +/- 21% in the control dogs. Thus platelets may normally produce a dilator substance or inactivate a pressor substance during hypoxia. The mechanism of the effect is not apparent but it is clear tha the pulmonary pressor response to hypoxia in the dog is not mediated by platelets. PMID:956693

  19. Developmental plasticity of the hypoxic ventilatory response in rats induced by neonatal hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Bavis, R W; Olson, E B; Vidruk, E H; Fuller, D D; Mitchell, G S

    2004-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxia alters the development of the hypoxic ventilatory response in rats and other mammals. Here we demonstrate that neonatal hypoxia impairs the hypoxic ventilatory response in adult male, but not adult female, rats. Rats were raised in 10% O2 for the first postnatal week, beginning within 12 h after birth. Subsequently, ventilatory responses were assessed in 7- to 9-week-old unanaesthetized rats via whole-body plethysmography. In response to 12% O2, male rats exposed to neonatal hypoxia increased ventilation less than untreated control rats (mean ±s.e.m. 35.2 ± 7.7%versus 67.4 ± 9.1%, respectively; P = 0.01). In contrast, neonatal hypoxia had no lasting effect on hypoxic ventilatory responses in female rats (67.9 ± 12.6%versus 61.2 ± 11.7% increase in hypoxia-treated and control rats, respectively; P > 0.05). Normoxic ventilation was unaffected by neonatal hypoxia in either sex at 7–9 weeks of age (P > 0.05). Since we hypothesized that neonatal hypoxia alters the hypoxic ventilatory response at the level of peripheral chemoreceptors or the central neural integration of chemoafferent activity, integrated phrenic responses to isocapnic hypoxia were investigated in urethane-anaesthetized, paralysed and ventilated rats. Phrenic responses were unaffected by neonatal hypoxia in rats of either sex (P > 0.05), suggesting that neonatal hypoxia-induced plasticity occurs between the phrenic nerve and the generation of airflow (e.g. neuromuscular junction, respiratory muscles or respiratory mechanics) and is not due to persistent changes in hypoxic chemosensitivity or central neural integration. The basis of sex differences in this developmental plasticity is unknown. PMID:15020695

  20. Hypoxia-responsive nanocarriers for cancer imaging and therapy: recent approaches and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Thambi, Thavasyappan; Park, Jae Hyung; Lee, Doo Sung

    2016-06-30

    Hypoxia, a condition in which the tissue is deprived of adequate oxygen supply, is a salient feature of various intractable diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, ischemic stroke, and solid tumors. In particular, hypoxic regions in tumors are often associated with invasiveness, metastasis, and resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Given its unique role in tumor progression, hypoxia has been considered to be a primary target for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Owing to their sizes and tailorable physicochemical characteristics, nanocarriers are an emerging class of materials that are increasingly utilized in biomedical applications. Particularly, stimuli-responsive nanocarriers, which release their payloads specifically at the tumor-microenvironment, are materials of interest. Owing to the aberrant vascular properties of tumors, the transportation of anticancer drugs to hypoxic regions is challenging because they are distant from blood vessels. In addition, hypoxia upregulates various genes involved in drug resistance such as P-glycoprotein. To surmount the issues associated with hypoxia, nanocarriers that can release imaging agents or anticancer drugs in hypoxic regions must be developed. This review focuses on recently developed hypoxia-responsive conjugates or nanocarriers and their potential applications in cancer imaging and therapy. Low oxygen levels bring forth conformational changes in hypoxia-responsive nanocarriers through the cleavage or reduction of hypoxia-responsive functional groups. A greater understanding of these changes will help to design more efficient nanocarriers to address the challenges encountered with hypoxia in conventional chemotherapy. PMID:27225824

  1. Network-based association of hypoxia-responsive genes with cardiovascular diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui-Sheng; Oldham, William M.; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2014-10-01

    Molecular oxygen is indispensable for cellular viability and function. Hypoxia is a stress condition in which oxygen demand exceeds supply. Low cellular oxygen content induces a number of molecular changes to activate regulatory pathways responsible for increasing the oxygen supply and optimizing cellular metabolism under limited oxygen conditions. Hypoxia plays critical roles in the pathobiology of many diseases, such as cancer, heart failure, myocardial ischemia, stroke, and chronic lung diseases. Although the complicated associations between hypoxia and cardiovascular (and cerebrovascular) diseases (CVD) have been recognized for some time, there are few studies that investigate their biological link from a systems biology perspective. In this study, we integrate hypoxia genes, CVD genes, and the human protein interactome in order to explore the relationship between hypoxia and cardiovascular diseases at a systems level. We show that hypoxia genes are much closer to CVD genes in the human protein interactome than that expected by chance. We also find that hypoxia genes play significant bridging roles in connecting different cardiovascular diseases. We construct a hypoxia-CVD bipartite network and find several interesting hypoxia-CVD modules with significant gene ontology similarity. Finally, we show that hypoxia genes tend to have more CVD interactors in the human interactome than in random networks of matching topology. Based on these observations, we can predict novel genes that may be associated with CVD. This network-based association study gives us a broad view of the relationships between hypoxia and cardiovascular diseases and provides new insights into the role of hypoxia in cardiovascular biology.

  2. Tibetans living at sea level have a hyporesponsive hypoxia-inducible factor system and blunted physiological responses to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Petousi, Nayia; Croft, Quentin P. P.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Cheng, Hung-Yuan; Formenti, Federico; Ishida, Koji; Lunn, Daniel; McCormack, Mark; Shianna, Kevin V.; Talbot, Nick P.; Ratcliffe, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Tibetan natives have lived on the Tibetan plateau (altitude ∼4,000 m) for at least 25,000 years, and as such they are adapted to life and reproduction in a hypoxic environment. Recent studies have identified two genetic loci, EGLN1 and EPAS1, that have undergone natural selection in Tibetans, and further demonstrated an association of EGLN1/EPAS1 genotype with hemoglobin concentration. Both genes encode major components of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) transcriptional pathway, which coordinates an organism's response to hypoxia. Patients living at sea level with genetic disease of the HIF pathway have characteristic phenotypes at both the integrative-physiology and cellular level. We sought to test the hypothesis that natural selection to hypoxia within Tibetans results in related phenotypic differences. We compared Tibetans living at sea level with Han Chinese, who are Tibetans' most closely related major ethnic group. We found that Tibetans had a lower hemoglobin concentration, a higher pulmonary ventilation relative to metabolism, and blunted pulmonary vascular responses to both acute (minutes) and sustained (8 h) hypoxia. At the cellular level, the relative expression and hypoxic induction of HIF-regulated genes were significantly lower in peripheral blood lymphocytes from Tibetans compared with Han Chinese. Within the Tibetans, we found a significant correlation between both EPAS1 and EGLN1 genotype and the induction of erythropoietin by hypoxia. In conclusion, this study provides further evidence that Tibetans respond less vigorously to hypoxic challenge. This is evident at sea level and, at least in part, appears to arise from a hyporesponsive HIF transcriptional system. PMID:24030663

  3. Common responses of tumors and wounds to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Payen, Valéry L; Brisson, Lucie; Dewhirst, Mark W; Sonveaux, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is a characteristic of tumors and wounds. Hypoxic cells develop 2 common strategies to face hypoxia: the glycolytic switch and the angiogenic switch. At the onset of hypoxia, alleviation of the Pasteur effect ensures short-term cell survival. Long-term hypoxic cell survival requires a further acceleration of the glycolytic flux under the control of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 that stimulates the expression of most glycolytic transporters and enzymes, uncouples glycolysis from the TCA cycle, and rewires glycolysis to lactic fermentation. Hypoxic cells also trigger angiogenesis, a process that aims to restore normal microenvironmental conditions. Transcription factors (hypoxia-inducible factor 1, nuclear factor κB, activator protein 1) and lactate cooperate to stimulate the expression of proangiogenic agents. Cancer cells differ from normal hypoxic cells by their proliferative agenda and by a high metabolic heterogeneity. These effects in tumor account for further molecular and metabolic changes and for a persistent stimulation of angiogenesis. PMID:25815847

  4. Characterization of the Paracoccidioides Hypoxia Response Reveals New Insights into Pathogenesis Mechanisms of This Important Human Pathogenic Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Patrícia de Sousa; Chung, Dawoon; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Cramer, Robert A.; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypoxic microenvironments are generated during fungal infection. It has been described that to survive in the human host, fungi must also tolerate and overcome in vivo microenvironmental stress conditions including low oxygen tension; however nothing is known how Paracoccidioides species respond to hypoxia. The genus Paracoccidioides comprises human thermal dimorphic fungi and are causative agents of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), an important mycosis in Latin America. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work, a detailed hypoxia characterization was performed in Paracoccidioides. Using NanoUPLC-MSE proteomic approach, we obtained a total of 288 proteins differentially regulated in 12 and 24 h of hypoxia, providing a global view of metabolic changes during this stress. In addition, a functional characterization of the homologue to the most important molecule involved in hypoxia responses in other fungi, the SREBP (sterol regulatory element binding protein) was performed. We observed that Paracoccidioides species have a functional homologue of SREBP, named here as SrbA, detected by using a heterologous genetic approach in the srbA null mutant in Aspergillus fumigatus. Paracoccidioides srbA (PbsrbA), in addition to involvement in hypoxia, is probable involved in iron adaptation and azole drug resistance responses. Conclusions/Significance In this study, the hypoxia was characterized in Paracoccidioides. The first results can be important for a better understanding of the fungal adaptation to the host and improve the arsenal of molecules for the development of alternative treatment options in future, since molecules related to fungal adaptation to low oxygen levels are important to virulence and pathogenesis in human pathogenic fungi. PMID:26659387

  5. Molecular response and association analysis of Megalobrama amblycephala fih-1 with hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bao; Chen, Nan; Huang, Cuihong; Huang, Chunxiao; Chen, Boxiang; Liu, Hong; Wang, Weimin; Gul, Yasmeen; Wang, Huanling

    2016-08-01

    Hypoxia is one of the most important environmental factors which affect fish growth, development and survival, but regulation mechanisms of hypoxia in fish remain unclear. Therefore, to further understand molecular functions of factor inhibiting HIF-1 (Fih-1), an essential hypoxia sensor, the full-length cDNA of fih-1 was cloned from Megalobrama amblycephala, a hypoxia-sensitive cyprinid fish. The deduced amino acid sequence showed high homology with that of other vertebrates, and all structural and functional domains were highly conserved. The mRNA level in different tissues and developmental stages indicated that M. amblycephala fih-1 expression was higher in liver and muscle, followed by gill, intestine and spleen. During embryogenesis, the fih-1 mRNA was highly expressed in the early embryonic development, then decreased to a very low level, and maintained a relative high level of expression after hatching. In most tissues, the fih-1 mRNA was down-regulated at 2 h but up-regulated at 4 h after hypoxia treatment. In addition, the promoter sequence of M. amblycephala fih-1 was obtained using thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR. Three single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites were found in the cDNA and promoter sequences, and identified significant association with hypoxia trait by correlation analysis in hypoxia-sensitive group and hypoxia-tolerant group. These results demonstrated that M. amblycephala fih-1 plays important roles in embryo development and hypoxia response, which will contribute to systematic understanding of the molecular mechanisms of fish in response to hypoxia, and provide help for fish genetic breeding with hypoxia-tolerant strains or breeds. PMID:27112926

  6. Effects of brief hypoxia and hyperoxia on tissue element levels in the development chick embryo

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, M.P.; Stock, M.K.; Metcalfe, J. Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland )

    1991-03-15

    Brief hypoxia or hyperoxia has been shown to affect growth and metabolism of chick embryos during the later stages of development. The objective of this experiment was to alter the availability of oxygen to chick embryos developing in ovo and to determine the effects on tissue levels of Zn, Cu, Fe and Mn. Hypoxia reduced embryo, heart, brain and liver wts (wet wt), whereas, hyperoxia increased embryo, heart, lung and liver wts compared to normoxic controls. Chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) wt was increased by hypoxia and reduced by hyperoxia. Livers from hyperoxic embryos contained more Zn, Fe and Mn and less Cu than livers from hypoxic or normoxic embryos. Tissue levels of Zn, Cu, Fe and Mn were reduced in brains from hypoxic compared to hyperoxic or normoxic embryos. Hyperoxia increased the concentrations of Zn and Cu in CAM; whereas, hypoxia reduced the levels of Zn and Fe. The amounts of Zn and Cu were increased in hyperoxic compared to normoxic lungs. Hearts from hyperoxic embryos had more Zn, Cu and Mn than hypoxic or normoxic hearts. Hypoxic yolk sac contained more Zn, Cu and Mn than hyperoxic or normoxic yolk sac. Except for yolk sac, the amounts of Zn, Cu, Fe and Mn in tissues from normoxic embryos increased from day 15 to day 18 of incubation in concert with tissue growth. The authors conclude that the availability of O{sub 2} to the developing chick embryo affects tissue trace element levels either through its effects on tissue growth or via effects on the regulation of trace element uptake and assimilation by the tissues.

  7. Transcriptional Response to Hypoxia in the Aquatic Fungus Blastocladiella emersonii▿†

    PubMed Central

    Camilo, César M.; Gomes, Suely L.

    2010-01-01

    Global gene expression analysis was carried out with Blastocladiella emersonii cells subjected to oxygen deprivation (hypoxia) using cDNA microarrays. In experiments of gradual hypoxia (gradual decrease in dissolved oxygen) and direct hypoxia (direct decrease in dissolved oxygen), about 650 differentially expressed genes were observed. A total of 534 genes were affected directly or indirectly by oxygen availability, as they showed recovery to normal expression levels or a tendency to recover when cells were reoxygenated. In addition to modulating many genes with no putative assigned function, B. emersonii cells respond to hypoxia by readjusting the expression levels of genes responsible for energy production and consumption. At least transcriptionally, this fungus seems to favor anaerobic metabolism through the upregulation of genes encoding glycolytic enzymes and lactate dehydrogenase and the downregulation of most genes coding for tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes. Furthermore, genes involved in energy-costly processes, like protein synthesis, amino acid biosynthesis, protein folding, and transport, had their expression profiles predominantly downregulated during oxygen deprivation, indicating an energy-saving effort. Data also revealed similarities between the transcriptional profiles of cells under hypoxia and under iron(II) deprivation, suggesting that Fe2+ ion could have a role in oxygen sensing and/or response to hypoxia in B. emersonii. Additionally, treatment of fungal cells prior to hypoxia with the antibiotic geldanamycin, which negatively affects the stability of mammalian hypoxia transcription factor HIF-1α, caused a significant decrease in the levels of certain upregulated hypoxic genes. PMID:20418381

  8. Brainstem amino acid neurotransmitters and ventilatory response to hypoxia in piglets.

    PubMed

    Hehre, Dorothy A; Devia, Carlos J; Bancalari, Eduardo; Suguihara, Cleide

    2008-01-01

    The ventilatory response to hypoxia is influenced by the balance between inhibitory (GABA, glycine, and taurine) and excitatory (glutamate and aspartate) brainstem amino acid (AA) neurotransmitters. To assess the effects of AA in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) on the ventilatory response to hypoxia at 1 and 2 wk of age, inhibitory and excitatory AA were sampled by microdialysis in unanesthetized and chronically instrumented piglets. Microdialysis samples from the NTS area were collected at 5-min intervals and minute ventilation (VE), arterial blood pressure (ABP), and arterial blood gases (ABG) were measured while the animals were in quiet sleep. A biphasic ventilatory response to hypoxia was observed in wk 1 and 2, but the decrease in VE at 10 and 15 min was more marked in wk 1. This was associated with an increase in inhibitory AA during hypoxia in wk 1. Excitatory AA levels were elevated during hypoxia in wk 1 and 2. Changes in ABP, pH, and ABG during hypoxia were not different between weeks. These data suggest that the larger depression in the ventilatory response to hypoxia observed in younger piglets is mediated by predominance of the inhibitory AA neurotransmitters, GABA, glycine, and taurine, in the NTS. PMID:18043517

  9. Hypoxia-inducible factors in T lymphocyte differentiation and function. A Review in the Theme: Cellular Responses to Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jin-Hui; Barbi, Joseph; Pan, Fan

    2015-11-01

    Low oxygen concentrations or hypoxia is a trait common to inflamed tissues. Therefore it is not surprising that pathways of hypoxic stress response, largely governed by hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF), are highly relevant to the proper function of immune cells. HIF expression and stabilization in immune cells can be triggered not only by hypoxia, but also by a variety of stimuli and pathological stresses associated with leukocyte activation and inflammation. In addition to its role as a sensor of oxygen scarcity, HIF is also a major regulator of immune cell metabolic function. Rapid progress is being made in elucidating the roles played by HIF in diverse aspects of both innate and adaptive immunity. Here we discuss a number of breakthroughs that have shed light on how HIF expression and activity impact the differentiation and function of diverse T cell populations. The insights gained from these findings may serve as the foundation for future therapies aimed at fine-tuning the immune response. PMID:26354751

  10. Light-Activated Hypoxia-Responsive Nanocarriers for Enhanced Anticancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Qian, Chenggen; Yu, Jicheng; Chen, Yulei; Hu, Quanyin; Xiao, Xuanzhong; Sun, Wujin; Wang, Chao; Feng, Peijian; Shen, Qun-Dong; Gu, Zhen

    2016-05-01

    A light-activated hypoxia-responsive conjugated polymer-based nanocarrier is developed for efficiently producing singlet oxygen ((1) O2 ) and inducing hypoxia to promote release of its cargoes in tumor cells, leading to enhanced antitumor efficacy. This dual-responsive nanocarrier provides an innovative design guideline for enhancing traditional photodynamic therapeutic efficacy integrated with a controlled drug-release modality. PMID:26948067

  11. Relationship between mitochondrial haplogroup and physiological responses to hypobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Motoi, Midori; Nishimura, Takayuki; Egashira, Yuka; Kishida, Fumi; Watanuki, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the relationship between mtDNA polymorphism and physiological responses to hypobaric hypoxia. The study included 28 healthy male students, consisting of 18 students in haplogroup D and 10 in haplogroup M7+G. Measurement sensors were attached to the participants for approximately 30 min in an environment with a temperature of 28 °C. After resting for 15 min, the programmed operation of the hypobaric chamber decreased the atmospheric pressure by 11.9 Torr every minute to simulate an increase in altitude of 150 m until 9.7 Torr (equivalent to 2500 m) and then decreased 9.7 Torr every minute until 465 Torr (equivalent to 4000 m). At each altitude, the pressure was maintained for 15 min and various measurements were taken. Haplogroup D showed higher SpO2 (p < 0.05) and significantly higher SpO2 during the pressure recovery period when compared with haplogroup M7+G. The distal skin temperature was higher in haplogroup D when compared with M7+G. These results suggested that haplogroup D maintained SpO2 at a higher level with higher peripheral blood flow during acute hypobaric exposure. PMID:27130215

  12. Cancer drug troglitazone stimulates the growth and response of renal cells to hypoxia inducible factors.

    PubMed

    Taub, Mary

    2016-03-11

    Troglitazone has been used to suppress the growth of a number of tumors through apoptosis and autophagy. However, previous in vitro studies have employed very high concentrations of troglitazone (≥10(-5) M) in order to elicit growth inhibitory effects. In this report, when employing lower concentrations of troglitazone in defined medium, troglitazone was observed to stimulate the growth of primary renal proximal tubule (RPT) cells. Rosiglitazone, like troglitazone, is a thiazolidinedione (TZD) that is known to activate Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Υ (PPARΥ). Notably, rosiglitazone also stimulates RPT cell growth, as does Υ-linolenic acids, another PPARΥ agonist. The PPARΥ antagonist GW9662 inhibited the growth stimulatory effect of troglitazone. In addition, troglitazone stimulated transcription by a PPAR Response Element/Luciferase construct. These results are consistent with the involvement of PPARΥ as a mediator of the growth stimulatory effect of troglitazone. In a number of tumor cells, the expression of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) is increased, promoting the expression of HIF inducible genes, and vascularization. Troglitazone was observed to stimulate transcription by a HIF/luciferase construct. These observations indicate that troglitazone not only promotes growth, also the survival of RPT cells under conditions of hypoxia. PMID:26869517

  13. Electrical signaling, stomatal conductance, ABA and Ethylene content in avocado trees in response to root hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Gurovich, Luis; Schaffer, Bruce; García, Nicolás; Iturriaga, Rodrigo

    2009-01-01

    Avocado (Persea americana Mill.) trees are among the most sensitive of fruit tree species to root hypoxia as a result of flooded or poorly drained soil. Similar to drought stress, an early physiological response to root hypoxia in avocado is a reduction of stomatal conductance. It has been previously determined in avocado trees that an extracellular electrical signal between the base of stem and leaves is produced and related to reductions in stomatal conductance in response to drought stress. The current study was designed to determine if changes in the extracellular electrical potential between the base of the stem and leaves in avocado trees could also be detected in response to short-term (min) or long-term (days) root hypoxia, and if these signals could be related to stomatal conductance (gs), root and leaf ABA and ACC concentrations, ethylene emission from leaves and leaf abscission. In contrast to previous observations for drought-stressed trees, short-term or long-term root hypoxia did not stimulate an electrical potential difference between the base of the stem and leaves. Short-term hypoxia did not result in a significant decrease in gs compared with plants in the control treatment, and no differences in ABA concentration were found between plants subjected to hypoxia and control plants. Long-term hypoxia in the root zone resulted in a significant decrease in gs, increased leaf ethylene and increased leaf abscission. The results indicate that for avocado trees exposed to root hypoxia, electrical signals do not appear to be the primary root-to-shoot communication mechanism involved in signaling for stomatal closure as a result of hypoxia in the root zone. PMID:19649181

  14. Hypoxia attenuates anti-Aspergillus fumigatus immune responses initiated by human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Fliesser, Mirjam; Wallstein, Marion; Kurzai, Oliver; Einsele, Hermann; Löffler, Jürgen

    2016-08-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic mould that causes invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA), a life-threatening infection in immunocompromised patients. During the course of IPA, localised areas of tissue hypoxia occur. Bacterial infection models revealed that hypoxic microenvironments modulate the function of host immune cells. However, the influence of hypoxia on anti-fungal immunity has been largely unknown. We evaluated the impact of hypoxia on the human anti-A. fumigatus immune response. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) were stimulated in vitro with germ tubes of A. fumigatus under normoxia or hypoxia (1% O2 ), followed by analysis of DC viability, maturation and cytokine release. While DC viability was unaffected, hypoxia attenuated cytokine release from DCs and maturation of DCs upon stimulation with A. fumigatus. These data suggest that hypoxia at the site of A. fumigatus infection inhibits full activation and function of human DCs. Thereby, this study identified hypoxia as a crucial immune-modulating factor in the human anti-fungal immune response that might influence the course and outcome of IPA in immunocompromised patients. PMID:27005862

  15. Treatment of Mouse Limb Ischemia with an Integrative Hypoxia-Responsive Vector Expressing the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Gene

    PubMed Central

    Yasumura, Eduardo Gallatti; Stilhano, Roberta Sessa; Samoto, Vívian Yochiko; Matsumoto, Priscila Keiko; de Carvalho, Leonardo Pinto; Valero Lapchik, Valderez Bastos; Han, Sang Won

    2012-01-01

    Constitutive vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene expression systems have been extensively used to treat peripheral arterial diseases, but most of the results have not been satisfactory. In this study, we designed a plasmid vector with a hypoxia-responsive element sequence incorporated into it with the phiC31 integrative system (pVHAVI) to allow long-term VEGF gene expression and to be activated under hypoxia. Repeated activations of VEGF gene expression under hypoxia were confirmed in HEK293 and C2C12 cells transfected with pVHAVI. In limb ischemic mice, the local administration of pVHAVI promoted gastrocnemius mass and force recovery and ameliorated limb necrosis much better than the group treated with hypoxia-insensitive vector, even this last group had produced more VEGF in muscle. Histological analyses carried out after four weeks of gene therapy showed increased capillary density and matured vessels, and reduced number of necrotic cells and fibrosis in pVHAVI treated group. By our study, we demonstrate that the presence of high concentration of VEGF in ischemic tissue is not beneficial or is less beneficial than maintaining a lower but sufficient and long-term concentration of VEGF locally. PMID:22470498

  16. Cobaltous chloride and hypoxia inhibit aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated responses in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Shaheen; Liu Shengxi; Stoner, Matthew; Safe, Stephen

    2007-08-15

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is expressed in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive ZR-75 breast cancer cells. Treatment with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induces CYP1A1 protein and mRNA levels and also activates inhibitory AhR-ER{alpha} crosstalk associated with hormone-induced reporter gene expression. In ZR-75 cells grown under hypoxia, induction of these AhR-mediated responses by TCDD was significantly inhibited. This was not accompanied by decreased nuclear AhR levels or decreased interaction of the AhR complex with the CYP1A1 gene promoter as determined in a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Hypoxia-induced loss of Ah-responsiveness was not associated with induction of hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} or other factors that sequester the AhR nuclear translocation (Arnt) protein, and overexpression of Arnt under hypoxia did not restore Ah-responsiveness. The p65 subunit of NF{kappa}B which inhibits AhR-mediated transactivation was not induced by hypoxia and was primarily cytosolic in ZR-75 cells grown under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. In ZR-75 cells maintained under hypoxic conditions for 24 h, BRCA1 (an enhancer of AhR-mediated transactivation in breast cancer cells) was significantly decreased and this contributed to loss of Ah-responsiveness. In cells grown under hypoxia for 6 h, BRCA1 was not decreased, but induction of CYP1A1 by TCDD was significantly decreased. Cotreatment of ZR-75 cells with TCDD plus the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide for 6 h enhanced CYP1A1 expression in cells grown under hypoxia and normoxia. These results suggest that hypoxia rapidly induces protein(s) that inhibit Ah-responsiveness and these may be similar to constitutively expressed inhibitors of Ah-responsiveness (under normoxia) that are also inhibited by cycloheximide.

  17. Differences in in vitro cerebellar neuronal responses to hypoxia in eider ducks, chicken and rats.

    PubMed

    Ludvigsen, Stian; Folkow, Lars P

    2009-11-01

    Ducks are well-known to be more tolerant to asphyxia than non-diving birds, but it is not known if their defences include enhanced neuronal hypoxia tolerance. To test this, we compared extracellular recordings of spontaneous activity in the Purkinje cell layer of 400 mum thick isolated cerebellar slices from eider ducks, chickens and rats, before, during and after 60 min hypoxia (95%N(2)-5%CO(2)) or chemical anoxia (hypoxia + 2 mM NaCN). Most slices rapidly lost activity in hypoxia, with or without recovery after rinse and return to normoxia (95%O(2)-5%CO(2)), but some maintained spontaneous activity throughout the insult. Proportions of 'surviving' (i.e. recovering or active) duck slices were significantly higher than for chickens in anoxia, and relative activity levels were higher for ducks than for chickens during hypoxia, anoxia and recovery. Survival of rat slices was significantly poorer than for birds under all conditions. Results suggest that (1) duck cerebellar neurons are intrinsically more hypoxia-tolerant than chicken neurons; (2) avian neurons are more hypoxia-tolerant than rat neurons, and (3) the enhanced hypoxic tolerance of duck neurons largely depended on efficient anaerobiosis since it mainly manifested itself in chemical anoxia. Mechanisms underlying the observed differences in neuronal hypoxic responses remain to be elucidated. PMID:19779726

  18. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of the Aspergillus fumigatus hypoxia response using an oxygen-controlled fermenter

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Aspergillus fumigatus is a mold responsible for the majority of cases of aspergillosis in humans. To survive in the human body, A. fumigatus must adapt to microenvironments that are often characterized by low nutrient and oxygen availability. Recent research suggests that the ability of A. fumigatus and other pathogenic fungi to adapt to hypoxia contributes to their virulence. However, molecular mechanisms of A. fumigatus hypoxia adaptation are poorly understood. Thus, to better understand how A. fumigatus adapts to hypoxic microenvironments found in vivo during human fungal pathogenesis, the dynamic changes of the fungal transcriptome and proteome in hypoxia were investigated over a period of 24 hours utilizing an oxygen-controlled fermenter system. Results Significant increases in transcripts associated with iron and sterol metabolism, the cell wall, the GABA shunt, and transcriptional regulators were observed in response to hypoxia. A concomitant reduction in transcripts was observed with ribosome and terpenoid backbone biosynthesis, TCA cycle, amino acid metabolism and RNA degradation. Analysis of changes in transcription factor mRNA abundance shows that hypoxia induces significant positive and negative changes that may be important for regulating the hypoxia response in this pathogenic mold. Growth in hypoxia resulted in changes in the protein levels of several glycolytic enzymes, but these changes were not always reflected by the corresponding transcriptional profiling data. However, a good correlation overall (R2 = 0.2, p < 0.05) existed between the transcriptomic and proteomics datasets for all time points. The lack of correlation between some transcript levels and their subsequent protein levels suggests another regulatory layer of the hypoxia response in A. fumigatus. Conclusions Taken together, our data suggest a robust cellular response that is likely regulated both at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level in response to hypoxia

  19. Heart rate variability and arterial oxygen saturation response during extreme normobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Botek, Michal; Krejčí, Jakub; De Smet, Stefan; Gába, Aleš; McKune, Andrew J

    2015-07-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to assess the response of autonomic cardiac activity and changes in the arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) during normobaric hypoxia and subsequent recovery. Heart rate variability (HRV) and SpO2 were monitored in a supine position during hypoxia (FiO2=9.6%) for 10min, and normoxic recovery in 29 subjects. Spectral analysis of HRV quantified the autonomic cardiac activity by means of low frequency (LF) (0.05-0.15Hz) and high frequency (HF) (0.15-0.50Hz) power transformed by natural logarithm (Ln). Based on the SpO2 response to hypoxia, the subjects were divided into Resistant (RG, SpO2=80.8±7.0%) or Sensitive (SG, SpO2=67.2±2.9%) group. The SpO2 and vagal activity (LnHF) significantly decreased during hypoxia in both groups. A withdrawal in vagal activity was significantly greater in SG compared to RG. Moreover, only in SG, a relative increase in sympathetic modulation (Ln LF/HF) during hypoxia occurred. Correlations (r=-0.461, and r=0.595, both P<0.05) between ΔSpO2 (delta) and ΔLn LF/HF, and ΔLnHF were found. Based on results, it seems that SpO2 level could be an important factor that influences the autonomic cardiac response in hypoxia. PMID:25907329

  20. Afferent and efferent components of the cardiovascular reflex responses to acute hypoxia in term fetal sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Giussani, D A; Spencer, J A; Moore, P J; Bennet, L; Hanson, M A

    1993-01-01

    1. We studied the effects of acute isocapnic hypoxia on arterial and central venous pressures, carotid and femoral blood flows and heart rate in intact and carotid denervated fetal sheep between 118 and 125 days gestation, after pre-treatment with either saline, atropine or phentolamine. Electrocortical activity (ECoG) and the incidence of fetal breathing movements (FBM) were also compared between intact and carotid denervated fetuses. 2. There were no significant differences between intact and denervated fetuses in any variable measured during normoxia. Soon after the onset of hypoxia a marked bradycardia occurred in intact, but not in denervated fetuses. Femoral blood flow and femoral vascular resistance (perfusion pressure/femoral blood flow) increased in intact, but not in denervated fetuses. Carotid blood flow increased in both groups of fetuses during hypoxia, but carotid vascular resistance did not change. During hypoxia, the incidence of FBM and low-voltage ECoG was similarly reduced in both groups of fetuses. 3. Atropine produced a rise in fetal heart rate during the control period in intact but not in denervated fetuses. At the onset of hypoxia atropine prevented the initial bradycardia seen in intact fetuses. In denervated fetuses a further increase in heart rate occurred throughout the hypoxia. 4. All denervated fetuses treated with phentolamine died during the hypoxic challenge, but nine out of fourteen intact fetuses treated with phentolamine survived. 5. In intact fetuses which survived hypoxia after treatment with phentolamine, the increase in arterial blood pressure was smaller and the increase in femoral resistance did not occur. In these fetuses a rise in heart rate occurred in hypoxia. Carotid vascular resistance decreased during hypoxia after administration of phentolamine. 6. Our results indicate that the initial cardiovascular responses of the late gestation sheep fetus to hypoxia are reflex, and that the carotid chemoreceptors provide the

  1. Identification of Novel Hypoxia Response Genes in Human Glioma Cell Line A172

    PubMed Central

    Baghbani, Fatemeh; Raoofian, Reza; Hasanzadeh Nazarabadi, Mohammad; Hamzehloei, Tayebeh; Soukhtanloo, Mohammad; Heidari, Mansur; Afsharzadeh, Seyed Morteza; Shekouhi, Sahar; Moradi, Fahimeh; Sarli, Abdol-Azim; Zavar-Reza, Javad; Mojarrad, Majid

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Hypoxia is a serious challenge for treatment of solid tumors. This condition has been manifested to exert significant therapeutic effects on glioblastoma multiform or (WHO) astrocytoma grade IV. Hypoxia contributes numerous changes in cellular mechanisms such as angiogenesis, metastasis and apoptosis evasion. Furthermore, in molecular level, hypoxia can cause induction of DNA breaks in tumor cells. Identification of mechanisms responsible for these effects can lead to designing more efficient therapeutic strategies against tumor progression which results in improvement of patient prognosis. Materials and Methods : In order to identify more hypoxia regulated genes which may have a role in glioblastoma progression, cDNA-AFLP was optimized as a Differential display method which is able to identify and isolate transcripts with no prior sequence knowledge. Results: Using this method, the current study identified 120 Transcription Derived Fragments (TDFs) which were completely differentially regulated in response to hypoxia. By sequence homology searching, the current study could detect 22 completely differentially regulated known genes and two unknown sequence matching with two chromosome contig and four sequence matches with some Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs). Conclusion: Further characterizing of these genes may help to achieve better understanding of hypoxia mediated phenotype change in tumor cells. PMID:23826488

  2. Angiotensin II modulates respiratory and acid-base responses to prolonged hypoxia in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Heitman, S J; Jennings, D B

    1998-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that angiotensin II (ANG II) contributes to ventilatory and acid-base adaptations during 3-4 h of hypoxia (partial pressure of O2 in arterial blood approximately 43 Torr) in the conscious dog. Three protocols were carried out over 3-4 h in five dogs: 1) air control, 2) 12% O2 breathing, and 3) 12% O2 breathing with ANG II receptors blocked by infusion of saralasin (0. 5 microg . kg-1 . min-1). After 2 h of hypoxia, expired ventilation and alveolar ventilation progressively increased, and the partial pressure of CO2 in arterial blood and the difference between the arterial concentrations of strong cations and strong anions ([SID]) decreased. When the hypoxic chemoreceptor drive to breathe was abolished transiently for 30 s with 100% O2, the resultant central apneic time decreased between 0.5 and 2.5 h of hypoxia. All these adaptive responses to hypoxia were abolished by ANG II receptor block. Because plasma ANG II levels were lower during hypoxia and hypoxic release of arginine vasopressin from the pituitary into the plasma was prevented by ANG II receptor block, the brain renin-angiotensin system was likely involved. It is possible that ANG II mediates ventilatory and acid-base adaptive responses to prolonged hypoxia via alterations in ion transport to decrease [SID] in brain extracellular fluid rather than acting by a direct neural mechanism. PMID:9688673

  3. A Trihelix DNA Binding Protein Counterbalances Hypoxia-Responsive Transcriptional Activation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Licausi, Francesco; Kosmacz, Monika; Oosumi, Teruko; van Dongen, Joost T.; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional activation in response to hypoxia in plants is orchestrated by ethylene-responsive factor group VII (ERF-VII) transcription factors, which are stable during hypoxia but destabilized during normoxia through their targeting to the N-end rule pathway of selective proteolysis. Whereas the conditionally expressed ERF-VII genes enable effective flooding survival strategies in rice, the constitutive accumulation of N-end-rule–insensitive versions of the Arabidopsis thaliana ERF-VII factor RAP2.12 is maladaptive. This suggests that transcriptional activation under hypoxia that leads to anaerobic metabolism may need to be fine-tuned. However, it is presently unknown whether a counterbalance of RAP2.12 exists. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses identified an uncharacterized trihelix transcription factor gene, which we named HYPOXIA RESPONSE ATTENUATOR1 (HRA1), as highly up-regulated by hypoxia. HRA1 counteracts the induction of core low oxygen-responsive genes and transcriptional activation of hypoxia-responsive promoters by RAP2.12. By yeast-two-hybrid assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation we demonstrated that HRA1 interacts with the RAP2.12 protein but with only a few genomic DNA regions from hypoxia-regulated genes, indicating that HRA1 modulates RAP2.12 through protein–protein interaction. Comparison of the low oxygen response of tissues characterized by different levels of metabolic hypoxia (i.e., the shoot apical zone versus mature rosette leaves) revealed that the antagonistic interplay between RAP2.12 and HRA1 enables a flexible response to fluctuating hypoxia and is of importance to stress survival. In Arabidopsis, an effective low oxygen-sensing response requires RAP2.12 stabilization followed by HRA1 induction to modulate the extent of the anaerobic response by negative feedback regulation of RAP2.12. This mechanism is crucial for plant survival under suboptimal oxygenation conditions. The discovery of the feedback loop regulating the oxygen

  4. A trihelix DNA binding protein counterbalances hypoxia-responsive transcriptional activation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Giuntoli, Beatrice; Lee, Seung Cho; Licausi, Francesco; Kosmacz, Monika; Oosumi, Teruko; van Dongen, Joost T; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2014-09-01

    Transcriptional activation in response to hypoxia in plants is orchestrated by ethylene-responsive factor group VII (ERF-VII) transcription factors, which are stable during hypoxia but destabilized during normoxia through their targeting to the N-end rule pathway of selective proteolysis. Whereas the conditionally expressed ERF-VII genes enable effective flooding survival strategies in rice, the constitutive accumulation of N-end-rule-insensitive versions of the Arabidopsis thaliana ERF-VII factor RAP2.12 is maladaptive. This suggests that transcriptional activation under hypoxia that leads to anaerobic metabolism may need to be fine-tuned. However, it is presently unknown whether a counterbalance of RAP2.12 exists. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses identified an uncharacterized trihelix transcription factor gene, which we named HYPOXIA RESPONSE ATTENUATOR1 (HRA1), as highly up-regulated by hypoxia. HRA1 counteracts the induction of core low oxygen-responsive genes and transcriptional activation of hypoxia-responsive promoters by RAP2.12. By yeast-two-hybrid assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation we demonstrated that HRA1 interacts with the RAP2.12 protein but with only a few genomic DNA regions from hypoxia-regulated genes, indicating that HRA1 modulates RAP2.12 through protein-protein interaction. Comparison of the low oxygen response of tissues characterized by different levels of metabolic hypoxia (i.e., the shoot apical zone versus mature rosette leaves) revealed that the antagonistic interplay between RAP2.12 and HRA1 enables a flexible response to fluctuating hypoxia and is of importance to stress survival. In Arabidopsis, an effective low oxygen-sensing response requires RAP2.12 stabilization followed by HRA1 induction to modulate the extent of the anaerobic response by negative feedback regulation of RAP2.12. This mechanism is crucial for plant survival under suboptimal oxygenation conditions. The discovery of the feedback loop regulating the oxygen

  5. Cross-species comparison of genomewide gene expression profiles reveals induction of hypoxia-inducible factor-responsive genes in iron-deprived intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zihua; Gulec, Sukru

    2010-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms mediating the induction of metal ion homeostasis-related genes in the mammalian intestine during iron deficiency remain unknown. To elucidate relevant regulatory pathways, genomewide gene expression profiles were determined in fully differentiated human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells. Cells were deprived of iron (or not) for 6 or 18 h, and Gene Chip analyses were subsequently performed (Affymetrix). More than 2,000 genes were differentially expressed; genes related to monosaccharide metabolism, regulation of gene expression, hypoxia, and cell death were upregulated, while those related to mitotic cell cycle were downregulated. A large proportion of induced genes are hypoxia responsive, and promoter enrichment analyses revealed a statistical overrepresentation of hypoxia response elements (HREs). Immunoblot experiments demonstrated a >60-fold increase in HIF2α protein abundance in iron-deprived cells; HIF1α levels were unchanged. Furthermore, comparison of the Caco-2 cell data set with a Gene Chip data set from iron-deficient rat intestine revealed 29 common upregulated genes; the majority are hypoxia responsive, and their promoters are enriched for HREs. We conclude that the compensatory response of the intestinal epithelium to iron deprivation relates to hypoxia and that stabilization of HIF2α may be the primary event mediating metabolic and morphological changes observed during iron deficiency. PMID:20702690

  6. The ternary complex factor Net/Elk-3 participates in the transcriptional response to hypoxia and regulates HIF-1 alpha.

    PubMed

    Gross, C; Dubois-Pot, H; Wasylyk, B

    2008-02-21

    The ternary complex factor Net/Elk3 is downregulated in hypoxia and participates in the induction by hypoxia of several genes, including c-fos, vascular endothelial growth factor and egr-1. However, the global role of Net in hypoxia remains to be elucidated. We have identified, in a large-scale analysis of RNA expression using microarrays, more than 370 genes that are regulated by Net in hypoxia. In order to gain insights into the role of Net in hypoxia, we have analysed in parallel the genes regulated by HIF-1alpha, the classical factor involved in the response to hypoxia. We identified about 190 genes that are regulated by HIF-1alpha in hypoxia. Surprisingly, when we compare the genes induced by hypoxia that require either Net or HIF-1alpha, the majority are the same (75%), suggesting that the functions of both factors are closely linked. Interestingly, in hypoxia, Net regulates the expression of several genes known to control HIF-1alpha stability, including PHD2, PHD3 and Siah2, suggesting that Net regulates the stability of HIF-1alpha. We found that inhibition of Net by RNAi leads to decreased HIF-1alpha expression at the protein level in hypoxia. These results indicate that Net participates in the transcriptional response to hypoxia by regulation of HIF-1alpha protein stability. PMID:17704799

  7. Two long-lasting central respiratory responses following acute hypoxia in glomectomized cats.

    PubMed

    Gallman, E A; Millhorn, D E

    1988-01-01

    1. Central respiratory response to acute (10 min) hypoxia, as measured by phrenic nerve activity, was determined in peripheral chemo-denervated cats. 2. Hypoxia was induced by ventilating cats for 10 min at reduced inspired oxygen levels (inspired O2 fraction, FI,O2 = 0.06-0.15). The degree of hypoxaemia was determined from an arterial blood sample and ranged from 'severe' (arterial O2 pressure, Pa,O2 less than 26 Torr) to 'mild' (Pa,O2 greater than 35 Torr). The respiratory response was monitored for 1 h following return to ventilation with 100% oxygen. 3. The results confirmed the finding of prolonged (greater than 60 min) inhibition of respiration upon return to hyperoxic conditions following severe hypoxia, as reported previously (Millhorn, Eldridge, Kiley & Waldrop, 1984). A new finding was a long-lasting (greater than 60 min) facilitation of respiration following exposure to less severe (Pa,O2 greater than 35 Torr) hypoxia. 4. Medullary extracellular fluid pH was measured in six cats. Changes in pH could not explain either the prolonged inhibition following severe hypoxia or the long-lasting facilitation observed following mild hypoxia. 5. Ablation studies were performed in order to determine the locations of the neuronal substrates for the inhibitory and facilitatory mechanisms. The results of this series of experiments indicate that the mesencephalon is necessary for activation of the inhibitory mechanism, while the facilitatory mechanism requires the presence of higher brain structures, notably the diencephalon. 6. Following removal of the diencephalon, the inhibitory response was seen following even mild hypoxic insults, i.e. those shown to produce facilitation in animals with intact brains. In the absence of the mesencephalon, neither prolonged inhibition nor prolonged facilitation could be produced following hypoxia. 7. It is proposed that there are two centrally mediated long-lasting responses to acute hypoxia. Facilitation is seen following mild

  8. Proteomic responses to hypoxia at different temperatures in the great scallop (Pecten maximus)

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, Camille; Richard, Joëlle; Flye-Sainte-Marie, Jonathan; Bargelloni, Luca; Pichereau, Vianney

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia and hyperthermia are two connected consequences of the ongoing global change and constitute major threats for coastal marine organisms. In the present study, we used a proteomic approach to characterize the changes induced by hypoxia in the great scallop, Pecten maximus, subjected to three different temperatures (10 °C, 18 °C and 25 °C). We did not observe any significant change induced by hypoxia in animals acclimated at 10 °C. At 18 °C and 25 °C, 16 and 11 protein spots were differentially accumulated between normoxia and hypoxia, respectively. Moreover, biochemical data (octopine dehydrogenase activity and arginine assays) suggest that animals grown at 25 °C switched their metabolism towards anaerobic metabolism when exposed to both normoxia and hypoxia, suggesting that this temperature is out of the scallops’ optimal thermal window. The 11 proteins identified with high confidence by mass spectrometry are involved in protein modifications and signaling (e.g., CK2, TBK1), energy metabolism (e.g., ENO3) or cytoskeleton (GSN), giving insights into the thermal-dependent response of scallops to hypoxia. PMID:25861557

  9. Tf-PEG-PLL-PLGA nanoparticles enhanced chemosensitivity for hypoxia-responsive tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Zhang, Haijun; Wu, Xue; Guo, Liting; Wang, Fei; Xia, Guohua; Chen, Baoan; Yin, HaiXiang; Wang, Yonglu; Li, Xueming

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is an inseparable component of the solid tumor as well as the bone marrow microenvironment. In this study, we investigated the effect of the novel polyethylene glycol (PEG)-poly L-lysine (PLL)-poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) based nanoparticles (NPs) modified by transferrin (Tf) loaded with daunorubicin (DNR) (DNR-Tf-PEG-PLL-PLGA-NPs, abbreviated as DNR-Tf-NPs) on leukemia cells (K562) under hypoxia. In vitro and in vivo tests to determine the effect of the enhanced chemosensitivity were evaluated using the immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, 3,-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-tetrazoliumbromide assay, Western blot analysis, histopathological examination, and immunohistochemistry analysis. Under hypoxia, K562 cells were hypoxia-responsive with the inhibitory concentration 50% (IC50) of DNR increased, resulting in chemotherapy insensitivity. By targeting the transferrin receptor (TfR) on the surface of K562 cells, DNR-Tf-NPs led to an increased intracellular DNR level, enhancing drug sensitivity of K562 cells to DNR with a decreased IC50, even under hypoxia. We further detected the protein levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), Bcl-2, Bax, and caspase-3 in K562 cells. The results indicated that DNR-Tf-NPs downregulated HIF-1α and induced apoptosis to overcome hypoxia. In the xenograft model, injection of DNR-Tf-NPs significantly suppressed tumor growth, and the immunosignals of Ki67 in DNR-Tf-NPs group was significantly lower than the other groups. It was therefore concluded that DNR-Tf-NPs could be a promising candidate for enhancing drug sensitivity under hypoxia in tumor treatment. PMID:27574446

  10. Tf-PEG-PLL-PLGA nanoparticles enhanced chemosensitivity for hypoxia-responsive tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Zhang, Haijun; Wu, Xue; Guo, Liting; Wang, Fei; Xia, Guohua; Chen, Baoan; Yin, HaiXiang; Wang, Yonglu; Li, Xueming

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is an inseparable component of the solid tumor as well as the bone marrow microenvironment. In this study, we investigated the effect of the novel polyethylene glycol (PEG)-poly L-lysine (PLL)-poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) based nanoparticles (NPs) modified by transferrin (Tf) loaded with daunorubicin (DNR) (DNR-Tf-PEG-PLL-PLGA-NPs, abbreviated as DNR-Tf-NPs) on leukemia cells (K562) under hypoxia. In vitro and in vivo tests to determine the effect of the enhanced chemosensitivity were evaluated using the immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, 3,-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-tetrazoliumbromide assay, Western blot analysis, histopathological examination, and immunohistochemistry analysis. Under hypoxia, K562 cells were hypoxia-responsive with the inhibitory concentration 50% (IC50) of DNR increased, resulting in chemotherapy insensitivity. By targeting the transferrin receptor (TfR) on the surface of K562 cells, DNR-Tf-NPs led to an increased intracellular DNR level, enhancing drug sensitivity of K562 cells to DNR with a decreased IC50, even under hypoxia. We further detected the protein levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), Bcl-2, Bax, and caspase-3 in K562 cells. The results indicated that DNR-Tf-NPs downregulated HIF-1α and induced apoptosis to overcome hypoxia. In the xenograft model, injection of DNR-Tf-NPs significantly suppressed tumor growth, and the immunosignals of Ki67 in DNR-Tf-NPs group was significantly lower than the other groups. It was therefore concluded that DNR-Tf-NPs could be a promising candidate for enhancing drug sensitivity under hypoxia in tumor treatment. PMID:27574446

  11. Hypoxia regulates the expression of tissue factor pathway signaling elements in a rat glioma model

    PubMed Central

    MONTEIRO, ROBSON Q.; LIMA, LUIZE G.; GONÇALVES, NATHÁLIA P.; DE SOUZA, MAYARA R. ARRUDA; LEAL, ANA C.; DEMASI, MARCOS A. ALMEIDA; SOGAYAR, MARI C.; CARNEIRO-LOBO, TATIANA C.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia and necrosis are fundamental features of glioma, and their emergence is critical for the rapid biological progression of this fatal tumor. The presence of vaso-occlusive thrombus is higher in grade IV tumors [glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)] compared with lower grade tumors, suggesting that the procoagulant properties of the tumor contribute to its aggressive behavior, as well as the establishment of tumor hypoxia and necrosis. Tissue factor (TF), the primary cellular initiator of coagulation, is overexpressed in GBMs and likely favors a thrombotic microenvironment. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) loss and hypoxia are two common alterations observed in glioma that may be responsible for TF upregulation. In the present study, ST1 and P7 rat glioma lines, with different levels of aggressiveness, were comparatively analyzed with the aim of identifying differences in procoagulant mechanisms. The results indicated that P7 cells display potent procoagulant activity compared with ST1 cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed less pronounced levels of TF in ST1 cells compared with P7 cells. Notably, P7 cells supported factor X (FX) activation via factor VIIa, whereas no significant FXa generation was observed in ST1 cells. Furthermore, the exposure of phosphatidylserine on the surface of P7 and ST1 cells was investigated. The results supported the assembly of prothrombinase complexes, accounting for the production of thrombin. Furthermore, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that CoCl2 (known to induce a hypoxic-like stress) led to an upregulation of TF levels in P7 and ST1 cells. Therefore, increased TF expression in P7 cells was accompanied by increased TF procoagulant activity. In addition, hypoxia increased the shedding of procoagulant TF-bearing microvesicles in both cell lines. Finally, hypoxic stress induced by treatment with CoCl2 upregulated the expression of the PAR1 receptor in both P7 and ST1 cells. In addition to PAR1

  12. Contrasting effects of ascorbate and iron on the pulmonary vascular response to hypoxia in humans

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Nick P.; Croft, Quentin P.; Curtis, M. Kate; Turner, Brandon E.; Dorrington, Keith L.; Robbins, Peter A.; Smith, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hypoxia causes an increase in pulmonary artery pressure. Gene expression controlled by the hypoxia‐inducible factor (HIF) family of transcription factors plays an important role in the underlying pulmonary vascular responses. The hydroxylase enzymes that regulate HIF are highly sensitive to varying iron availability, and iron status modifies the pulmonary vascular response to hypoxia, possibly through its effects on HIF. Ascorbate (vitamin C) affects HIF hydroxylation in a similar manner to iron and may therefore have similar pulmonary effects. This study investigated the possible contribution of ascorbate availability to hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in humans. Seven healthy volunteers undertook a randomized, controlled, double‐blind, crossover protocol which studied the effects of high‐dose intravenous ascorbic acid (total 6 g) on the pulmonary vascular response to 5 h of sustained hypoxia. Systolic pulmonary artery pressure (SPAP) was assessed during hypoxia by Doppler echocardiography. Results were compared with corresponding data from a similar study investigating the effect of intravenous iron, in which SPAP was measured in seven healthy volunteers during 8 h of sustained hypoxia. Consistent with other studies, iron supplementation profoundly inhibited hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (P < 0.001). In contrast, supraphysiological supplementation of ascorbate did not affect the increase in pulmonary artery pressure induced by several hours of hypoxia (P = 0.61). We conclude that ascorbate does not interact with hypoxia and the pulmonary circulation in the same manner as iron. Whether the effects of iron are HIF‐mediated remains unknown, and the extent to which ascorbate contributes to HIF hydroxylation in vivo is also unclear. PMID:25501423

  13. Evidence nitric oxide mediates the vasodepressor response to hypoxia in sino-denervated rats

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Miaokun; Reis, D.J. )

    1992-01-01

    Systemic hypoxia, produced in deeply anesthetized, paralyzed rats in which arterial chemoreceptors were denervated, elicited a decrease in arterial pressure (AP) averaging {minus}47 mmHg. Systemic administration of N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine (L-NO{sub 2}Arg), inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) synthase, attenuated the hypoxic depressor response by 79% and elevated AP by 21 mmHg. The effects of L-NO{sub 2}Arg on the hypoxic depressor response and arterial pressure were reversed by systemic administration of L- but not D-arginine. Elevation of AP with arginine-vasopressin or reduction of AP with nitroprusside to the pre-L-NO{sub 2}Arg levels did not modify the fall of AP to hypoxia. Endogenous NO synthesized in vivo from L-arginine, mediates most of the hypoxia depressor response.

  14. MicroRNA-210 Modulates Endothelial Cell Response to Hypoxia and Inhibits the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Ligand Ephrin-A3*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Fasanaro, Pasquale; D'Alessandra, Yuri; Di Stefano, Valeria; Melchionna, Roberta; Romani, Sveva; Pompilio, Giulio; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.; Martelli, Fabio

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-protein-coding RNAs that function as negative gene expression regulators. In the present study, we investigated miRNAs role in endothelial cell response to hypoxia. We found that the expression of miR-210 progressively increased upon exposure to hypoxia. miR-210 overexpression in normoxic endothelial cells stimulated the formation of capillary-like structures on Matrigel and vascular endothelial growth factor-driven cell migration. Conversely, miR-210 blockade via anti-miRNA transfection inhibited the formation of capillary-like structures stimulated by hypoxia and decreased cell migration in response to vascular endothelial growth factor. miR-210 overexpression did not affect endothelial cell growth in both normoxia and hypoxia. However, anti-miR-210 transfection inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis, in both normoxia and hypoxia. We determined that one relevant target of miR-210 in hypoxia was Ephrin-A3 since miR-210 was necessary and sufficient to down-modulate its expression. Moreover, luciferase reporter assays showed that Ephrin-A3 was a direct target of miR-210. Ephrin-A3 modulation by miR-210 had significant functional consequences; indeed, the expression of an Ephrin-A3 allele that is not targeted by miR-210 prevented miR-210-mediated stimulation of both tubulogenesis and chemotaxis. We conclude that miR-210 up-regulation is a crucial element of endothelial cell response to hypoxia, affecting cell survival, migration, and differentiation. PMID:18417479

  15. Response of channel x blue hybrid catfish to chronic diurnal hypoxia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Performance traits and metabolic responses of the channel x blue hybrid catfish (Ictalurus punctatus female x I. furcatus male) in response to chronic diurnal hypoxia were evaluated in this 197-d study. Sixteen 0.1-ha earthen ponds were stocked with 15,169 hybrid catfish/ha (47 g/fish) and managed t...

  16. Hypoxia responsive gene expression is mediated by various subsets of transcription factors and miRNAs that are determined by the actual oxygen availability.

    PubMed

    Licausi, Francesco; Weits, Daan A; Pant, Bikram Datt; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger; Geigenberger, Peter; van Dongen, Joost T

    2011-04-01

    • Reduced oxygen availability is not only associated with flooding, but occurs also during growth and development. It is largely unknown how hypoxia is perceived and what signaling cascade is involved in activating adaptive responses. • We analysed the expression of over 1900 transcription factors (TFs) and 180 microRNA primary transcripts (pri-miRNAs) in Arabidopsis roots exposed to different hypoxic conditions by means of quantitative PCR. We also analysed the promoters of genes induced by hypoxia with respect to over-represented DNA elements that can act as potential TF binding sites and their in vivo interaction was verified. • We identified various subsets of TFs that responded differentially through time and in an oxygen concentration-dependent manner. The regulatory potential of selected TFs and their predicted DNA binding elements was validated. Although the expression of pri-miRNAs was differentially regulated under hypoxia, only one corresponding mature miRNA changed accordingly. Putative target transcripts of the miRNAs were not significantly affected. • Our results show that the regulation of hypoxia-induced genes is controlled via simultaneous interaction of various combinations of TFs. Under anoxic conditions, an additional set of TFs is induced. Regulation of gene expression via miRNAs appears to play a minor role during hypoxia. PMID:20840511

  17. Transcriptomics Modeling of the Late-Gestation Fetal Pituitary Response to Transient Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Charles E.; Chang, Eileen I.; Richards, Elaine M.; Rabaglino, Maria Belen; Keller-Wood, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Background The late-gestation fetal sheep responds to hypoxia with physiological, neuroendocrine, and cellular responses that aid in fetal survival. The response of the fetus to hypoxia represents a coordinated effort to maximize oxygen transfer from the mother and minimize wasteful oxygen consumption by the fetus. While there have been many studies aimed at investigating the coordinated physiological and endocrine responses to hypoxia, and while immunohistochemical or in situ hybridization studies have revealed pathways supporting the endocrine function of the pituitary, there is little known about the coordinated cellular response of the pituitary to the hypoxia. Results Thirty min hypoxia (from 17.0±1.7 to 8.0±0.8 mm Hg, followed by 30 min normoxia) upregulated 595 and downregulated 790 genes in fetal pituitary (123–132 days’ gestation; term = 147 days). Network inference of up- and down- regulated genes revealed a high degree of functional relatedness amongst the gene sets. Gene ontology analysis revealed upregulation of cellular metabolic processes (e.g., RNA synthesis, response to estrogens) and downregulation of protein phosphorylation, protein metabolism, and mitosis. Genes found to be at the center of the network of upregulated genes included genes important for purine binding and signaling. At the center of the downregulated network were genes involved in mRNA processing, DNA repair, sumoylation, and vesicular trafficking. Transcription factor analysis revealed that both up- and down-regulated gene sets are enriched for control by several transcription factors (e.g., SP1, MAZ, LEF1, NRF1, ELK1, NFAT, E12, PAX4) but not for HIF-1, which is known to be an important controller of genomic responses to hypoxia. Conclusions The multiple analytical approaches used in this study suggests that the acute response to 30 min of transient hypoxia in the late-gestation fetus results in reduced cellular metabolism and a pattern of gene expression that is

  18. Repetitive hypoxia rapidly depresses cardio-respiratory responses during active sleep but not quiet sleep in the newborn lamb

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Renea V; Grant, Daniel A; Wilkinson, Malcolm H; Walker, Adrian M

    1999-01-01

    Arousal from sleep is an important protective response to hypoxia that becomes rapidly depressed in active sleep (AS) when hypoxia is repeated. This study questioned whether there might also be selective depression of cardio-respiratory responses to hypoxia during AS. Nine newborn lambs (7-22 days of age) were studied over three successive nights. The first and third nights were baseline studies (inspired oxygen fraction, Fi,O2= 0.21). During the second night, during every epoch of sleep, lambs were exposed to 60 s episodes of isocapnic hypoxia (Fi,O2= 0.10). During quiet sleep (QS), the probability of arousal in hypoxia exceeded the probability of spontaneous arousal (P < 0.001) throughout repeated exposures to hypoxia. Similarly, there were persisting increases in ventilation (135 ± 25 %), blood pressure (3 ± 1 %) and heart rate (3 ± 1 %). By contrast, rapid depression of all responses occurred during repetitive hypoxia in AS. Thus, the probability of arousal in hypoxia exceeded the probability of spontaneous arousal during the first 10 hypoxia exposures (P < 0.001) but not thereafter. Similarly, during the first 10 exposures to hypoxia, the changes in ventilation (88 ± 15 %) and blood pressure (5 ± 1 %) were greater than subsequent responses (P < 0.05). We conclude that, when repeated, hypoxia rapidly becomes ineffective in stimulating protective arousal, ventilatory and blood pressure responses in AS, but not in QS. Selective depression of responses during AS may render the newborn particularly vulnerable to hypoxia in this state. PMID:10457072

  19. Elevation of iron storage in humans attenuates the pulmonary vascular response to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Bart, Nicole K; Curtis, M Kate; Cheng, Hung-Yuan; Hungerford, Sara L; McLaren, Ross; Petousi, Nayia; Dorrington, Keith L; Robbins, Peter A

    2016-08-01

    Sustained hypoxia over several hours induces a progressive rise in pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP). Administration of intravenous iron immediately prior to the hypoxia exposure abrogates this effect, suggesting that manipulation of iron stores may modify hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Iron (ferric carboxymaltose) administered intravenously has a plasma half-life of 7-12 h. Thus any therapeutic use of intravenous iron would require its effect on PASP to persist long after the iron-sugar complex has been cleared from the blood. To examine this, we studied PASP during sustained (6 h) hypoxia on 4 separate days (days 0, 1, 8, and 43) in 22 participants. On day 0, the rise in PASP with hypoxia was well matched between the iron and saline groups. On day 1, each participant received either 1 g of ferric carboxymaltose or saline in a double-blind manner. After administration of intravenous iron, the rise in PASP with hypoxia was attenuated by ∼50%, and this response remained suppressed on both days 8 and 43 (P < 0.001). Following administration of intravenous iron, values for ferritin concentration, transferrin saturation, and hepcidin concentration rose significantly (P < 0.001, P < 0.005, and P < 0.001, respectively), and values for transferrin concentration fell significantly (P < 0.001). These changes remained significant at day 43 We conclude that the attenuation of the pulmonary vascular response to hypoxia by elevation of iron stores persists long after the artificial iron-sugar complex has been eliminated from the blood. The persistence of this effect suggests that intravenous iron may be of benefit in some forms of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:27418684

  20. The earliest neuronal responses to hypoxia in the neocortical circuit are glutamate-dependent.

    PubMed

    Revah, Omer; Lasser-Katz, Efrat; Fleidervish, Ilya A; Gutnick, Michael J

    2016-11-01

    Soon after exposure to hypoxia or ischemia, neurons in cortical tissues undergo massive anoxic depolarization (AD). This precipitous event is preceded by more subtle neuronal changes, including enhanced excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmitter release. Here, we have used patch-in-slice techniques to identify the earliest effects of acute hypoxia on the synaptic and intrinsic properties of Layer 5 neurons, to determine their time course and to evaluate the role of glutamate receptors in their generation. Coronal slices of mouse somatosensory cortex were maintained at 36°C in an interface chamber and challenged with episodes of hypoxia. In recordings with cell-attached electrodes, the open probability of Ca(2+)-dependent BK channels began to increase within seconds of hypoxia onset, indicating a sharp rise in [Ca(2+)]i just beneath the membrane. By using a high concentration of K(+) in the pipette, we simultaneously monitored the membrane potential and showed that the [Ca(2+)]i rise was not associated with membrane depolarization. The earliest hypoxia-induced synaptic disturbance was a marked increase in the frequency of sPSCs, which also began soon after the removal of oxygen and long before AD. This synaptic effect was accompanied by depletion of the readily releasable transmitter pools, as demonstrated by a decreased response to hyperosmotic solutions. The early [Ca(2+)]i rise, the early increase in transmitter release and the subsequent AD itself were all prevented by bathing in a cocktail containing blockers of ionotropic glutamate receptors. We found no evidence for involvement of pannexin hemichannels or TRPM7 channels in the early responses to hypoxia in this experimental preparation. Our data indicate that the earliest cellular consequences of cortical hypoxia are triggered by activation of glutamate-gated channels. PMID:27443966

  1. Hypoxia: a key player in antitumor immune response. A Review in the Theme: Cellular Responses to Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Noman, Muhammad Zaeem; Hasmim, Meriem; Messai, Yosra; Terry, Stéphane; Kieda, Claudine; Janji, Bassam; Chouaib, Salem

    2015-11-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex system, playing an important role in tumor development and progression. Besides cellular stromal components, extracellular matrix fibers, cytokines, and other metabolic mediators are also involved. In this review we outline the potential role of hypoxia, a major feature of most solid tumors, within the tumor microenvironment and how it contributes to immune resistance and immune suppression/tolerance and can be detrimental to antitumor effector cell functions. We also outline how hypoxic stress influences immunosuppressive pathways involving macrophages, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, T regulatory cells, and immune checkpoints and how it may confer tumor resistance. Finally, we discuss how microenvironmental hypoxia poses both obstacles and opportunities for new therapeutic immune interventions. PMID:26310815

  2. The effect of hypoxia and exercise on heart rate variability, immune response, and orthostatic stress.

    PubMed

    Koelwyn, G J; Wong, L E; Kennedy, M D; Eves, N D

    2013-02-01

    Hypoxia with exercise is commonly used to enhance physiological adaptation in athletes, but may prolong recovery between training bouts. To investigate this, heart rate variability (HRV), systemic immune response, and response to an orthostatic challenge were measured following exercise in hypoxia and air. Eleven trained men performed a 10-km cycling time trial breathing hypoxia (16.5 ± 0.5% O(2)) or air. HRV and the heart rate response to an orthostatic challenge were measured for 3 days before and after each trial, while venous blood samples were collected pre-, 0, 2, and 24 h post-exercise. Hypoxia had no significant effect compared with air. Subgroup analysis of those who had a drop in oxyhemoglobin saturation (SpO(2)) > 10% between hypoxia and air compared with those who did not, demonstrated a significantly altered HRV response (△HFnu: -2.1 ± 0.9 vs 8.6 ± 9.3, △LFnu: 2.1 ± 1.0 vs -8.6 ± 9.4) at 24 h post-exercise and increased circulating monocytes (1.3 ± 0.2 vs 0.8 ± 0.2 × 10(9) /L) immediately post-hypoxic exercise. Exercise and hypoxia did not change HRV or the systemic immune response to exercise. However, those who had a greater desaturation during hypoxic exercise had an attenuate recovery 24 h post-exercise and may be more susceptible to accumulating fatigue with subsequent training bouts. PMID:23013143

  3. Translation of the human erythropoietin transcript is regulated by an upstream open reading frame in response to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Cristina; Romão, Luísa

    2014-05-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a key mediator hormone for hypoxic induction of erythropoiesis that also plays important nonhematopoietic functions. It has been shown that EPO gene expression regulation occurs at different levels, including transcription and mRNA stabilization. In this report, we show that expression of EPO is also regulated at the translational level by an upstream open reading frame (uORF) of 14 codons. As judged by comparisons of protein and mRNA levels, the uORF acts as a cis-acting element that represses translation of the main EPO ORF in unstressed HEK293, HepG2, and HeLa cells. However, in response to hypoxia, this repression is significantly released, specifically in HeLa cells, through a mechanism that involves processive scanning of ribosomes from the 5' end of the EPO transcript and enhanced ribosome bypass of the uORF. In addition, we demonstrate that in HeLa cells, hypoxia induces the phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) concomitantly with a significant increase of EPO protein synthesis. These findings provide a framework for understanding that production of high levels of EPO induced by hypoxia also involves regulation at the translational level. PMID:24647661

  4. Cardio-ventilatory responses to poikilocapnic hypoxia and hypercapnia in trained breath-hold divers.

    PubMed

    Costalat, Guillaume; Pichon, Aurélien; Coquart, Jeremy; Bauer, Fabrice; Lemaître, Frédéric

    2014-02-01

    Trained breath-hold divers (BHDs) are exposed to repeated bouts of intermittent hypoxia and hypercapnia during prolonged breath-holding. It has thus been hypothesized that their specific training may develop enhanced chemo-responsiveness to hypoxia associated with reduced ventilatory response to hypercapnia. Hypercapnic ventilatory responses (HCVR) and hypoxic ventilatory responses at rest (HVRr) and exercise (HVRe) were assessed in BHDs (n=7) and a control group of non-divers (NDs=7). Cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV) and heart rate (HR) were also recorded. BHDs presented carbon dioxide sensitivity similar to that of NDs (2.85±1.41 vs. 1.85±0.93Lmin(-1)mmHg(-1), p>0.05, respectively). However, both HVRr (+68%) and HVRe (+31%) were increased in BHDs. CO and HR reached lower values in BHDs than NDs during the hypoxic exercise test. These results suggest that the exposure to repeated bouts of hypoxia/hypercapnia frequently experienced by trained breath-hold divers only enhances their chemo-responsiveness to poikilocapnic hypoxia, without altering HCVR. PMID:24341998

  5. Influence of CO2 on cardiovascular response to hypoxia in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Koehler, R C; McDonald, B W; Krasney, J A

    1980-10-01

    The modulating effect of CO2 on the circulatory response to hypoxia in chronically instrumented conscious dogs was examined over a wide range of arterial partial pressure of O2 [PaO2 (from 80 to 25 Torr)] during a 41-min rebreathing period at three CO2 levels: hypocapnia (from PaCO2 of 32 to 18 Torr), eucapnia (32 Torr), and mild hypercapnia (40 Torr). Eucapnic and hypercapnic hypoxic responses were also measured after sinoaortic denervation (SAD) to assess the arterial chemoreceptor and baroreceptor reflex contributions. Elevating PaCO2 attenuated the tachycardia during hypoxia and produced progressively greater systemic, renal, and splanchnic vasoconstriction before but not after SAD. Vagal block converted the rises in renal and splanchnic flows observed during hypocapnic hypoxia to declines. The increase in left ventricular dP/dtmax was not affected by varying PaCO2 either before or after SAD. Coronary flow increased an additional onefold during hypoxia when PaCO2 was elevated both before and after SAD, but the tension-time indices did not differ significantly. These results indicate that: a) cardiopulmonary vagal afferents effectively counteract chemoreflex-induced vasoconstriction during hypocapnic hypoxia; b) chemoreflex vasoconstriction predominates in the renal and splanchnic beds when PaCO2 is elevated; c) the sinoaortic reflexes restrain the heart rate, but not the contractility response to hypoxia when PaCO2 is increased; and d) the augmented coronary vasodilation produced by CO2 is probably mediated by local CO2-hypoxic interactions. PMID:6775543

  6. The zinc transporter ZIP12 regulates the pulmonary vascular response to chronic hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lan; Oliver, Eduardo; Maratou, Klio; Atanur, Santosh S; Dubois, Olivier D; Cotroneo, Emanuele; Chen, Chien-Nien; Wang, Lei; Arce, Cristina; Chabosseau, Pauline L; Ponsa-Cobas, Joan; Frid, Maria G; Moyon, Benjamin; Webster, Zoe; Aldashev, Almaz; Ferrer, Jorge; Rutter, Guy A; Stenmark, Kurt R; Aitman, Timothy J; Wilkins, Martin R

    2015-08-20

    The typical response of the adult mammalian pulmonary circulation to a low oxygen environment is vasoconstriction and structural remodelling of pulmonary arterioles, leading to chronic elevation of pulmonary artery pressure (pulmonary hypertension) and right ventricular hypertrophy. Some mammals, however, exhibit genetic resistance to hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. We used a congenic breeding program and comparative genomics to exploit this variation in the rat and identified the gene Slc39a12 as a major regulator of hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodelling. Slc39a12 encodes the zinc transporter ZIP12. Here we report that ZIP12 expression is increased in many cell types, including endothelial, smooth muscle and interstitial cells, in the remodelled pulmonary arterioles of rats, cows and humans susceptible to hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. We show that ZIP12 expression in pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells is hypoxia dependent and that targeted inhibition of ZIP12 inhibits the rise in intracellular labile zinc in hypoxia-exposed pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells and their proliferation in culture. We demonstrate that genetic disruption of ZIP12 expression attenuates the development of pulmonary hypertension in rats housed in a hypoxic atmosphere. This new and unexpected insight into the fundamental role of a zinc transporter in mammalian pulmonary vascular homeostasis suggests a new drug target for the pharmacological management of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26258299

  7. Hypoxia-induced and calpain-dependent cleavage of filamin A regulates the hypoxic response.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaowei; Zhou, Alex-Xianghua; Rouhi, Pegah; Uramoto, Hidetaka; Borén, Jan; Cao, Yihai; Pereira, Teresa; Akyürek, Levent M; Poellinger, Lorenz

    2014-02-18

    The cellular response to hypoxia is regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and -2α (HIF-1α and -2α). We have discovered that filamin A (FLNA), a large cytoskeletal actin-binding protein, physically interacts with HIF-1α and promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis. Hypoxia induces a calpain-dependent cleavage of FLNA to generate a naturally occurring C-terminal fragment that accumulates in the cell nucleus. This fragment interacts with the N-terminal portion of HIF-1α spanning amino acid residues 1-390 but not with HIF-2α. In hypoxia this fragment facilitates the nuclear localization of HIF-1α, is recruited to HIF-1α target gene promoters, and enhances HIF-1α function, resulting in up-regulation of HIF-1α target gene expression in a hypoxia-dependent fashion. These results unravel an important mechanism that selectively regulates the nuclear accumulation and function of HIF-1α and potentiates angiogenesis and tumor progression. PMID:24550283

  8. [Individual typological features of EEG response in the sportsman to acute hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Balioz, N V; Krivoshchekov, S G

    2012-01-01

    The paper investigated variability of individual EEG parametres: frequency of the maximum peak, width of a range and depth of reaction desynchronization (reduction alpha-rhythm of EEG at opening of eyes) in slowly increasing hypoxia from 20.9% to 10%-s' O2 of the sportsman with various types of physical activity and features of temperament. There were investigated 24 first-class athletes (11 swimmers, 13 skiers) aged 18-26 years. It is shown that dynamics of EEG rhythms during hypoxia, unlike normoxia, characterised by instability of spectral structure and phase during time of hypoxia test. It is established, that individual typological features (typology of nervous system) influence EEG response during hypoxic test. The negative relations between a psychological construct "endurance" for questionnaire (FCB-Ti) and feature alpha-rhythm EEG during hypoxia test are shown. The type of physical training and re-structuring pattern of breath (phenotypic adaptation) modulates sensitivity of brain structures to hypoxia which is reflected in dynamics alpha-rhythm of EEG in hypoxic conditions. PMID:23101237

  9. Autophagy contributes to regulation of the hypoxia response during submergence in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Liao, Bin; Qi, Hua; Xie, Li-Juan; Huang, Li; Tan, Wei-Juan; Zhai, Ning; Yuan, Li-Bing; Zhou, Ying; Yu, Lu-Jun; Chen, Qin-Fang; Shu, Wensheng; Xiao, Shi

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy involves massive degradation of intracellular components and functions as a conserved system that helps cells to adapt to adverse conditions. In mammals, hypoxia rapidly stimulates autophagy as a cell survival response. Here, we examine the function of autophagy in the regulation of the plant response to submergence, an abiotic stress that leads to hypoxia and anaerobic respiration in plant cells. In Arabidopsis thaliana, submergence induces the transcription of autophagy-related (ATG) genes and the formation of autophagosomes. Consistent with this, the autophagy-defective (atg) mutants are hypersensitive to submergence stress and treatment with ethanol, the end product of anaerobic respiration. Upon submergence, the atg mutants have increased levels of transcripts of anaerobic respiration genes (alcohol dehydrogenase 1, ADH1 and pyruvate decarboxylase 1, PDC1), but reduced levels of transcripts of other hypoxia- and ethylene-responsive genes. Both submergence and ethanol treatments induce the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the rosettes of atg mutants more than in the wild type. Moreover, the production of ROS by the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases is necessary for plant tolerance to submergence and ethanol, submergence-induced expression of ADH1 and PDC1, and activation of autophagy. The submergence- and ethanol-sensitive phenotypes in the atg mutants depend on a complete salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway. Together, our findings demonstrate that submergence-induced autophagy functions in the hypoxia response in Arabidopsis by modulating SA-mediated cellular homeostasis. PMID:26566261

  10. Peripheral Chemoreception and Arterial Pressure Responses to Intermittent Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, Nanduri R.; Peng, Ying-Jie; Kumar, Ganesh K.; Nanduri, Jayasri

    2015-01-01

    Carotid bodies are the principal peripheral chemoreceptors for detecting changes in arterial blood oxygen levels, and the resulting chemoreflex is a potent regulator of blood pressure. Recurrent apnea with intermittent hypoxia (IH) is a major clinical problem in adult humans and infants born preterm. Adult patients with recurrent apnea exhibit heightened sympathetic nerve activity and hypertension. Adults born preterm are predisposed to early onset of hypertension. Available evidence suggests that carotid body chemoreflex contributes to hypertension caused by IH in both adults and neonates. Experimental models of IH provided important insights into cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying carotid body chemoreflex-mediated hypertension. This article provides a comprehensive appraisal of how IH affects carotid body function, underlying cellular, molecular, and epigenetic mechanisms, and the contribution of chemoreflex to the hypertension. PMID:25880505

  11. Anthracycline inhibits recruitment of hypoxia-inducible transcription factors and suppresses tumor cell migration and cardiac angiogenic response in the host.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tetsuhiro; Yamaguchi, Junna; Shoji, Kumi; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2012-10-12

    Anthracycline chemotherapeutic agents of the topoisomerase inhibitor family are widely used for the treatment of various tumors. Although targeted tumor tissues are generally situated in a hypoxic environment, the connection between efficacy of anthracycline agents and cellular hypoxia response has not been investigated in depth. Here, we report that doxorubicin (DXR) impairs the transcriptional response of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) by inhibiting the binding of the HIF heterodimer to the consensus -RCGTG- enhancer element. This pleiotropic effect retarded migration of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-defective renal cell carcinoma and that of VHL-competent renal cell carcinoma in hypoxia. This effect was accompanied by a coordinated down-regulation of HIF target lysyl oxidase (LOX) family members LOX, LOX-like2 (LOXL2), and LOXL4. Furthermore, DXR suppressed HIF target genes in tumor xenografts, inhibited cardiac induction of HIF targets in rats with acute anemia, and impaired the angiogenic response in the isoproterenol-induced heart failure model, which may account for the clinical fragility of doxorubicin cardiomyopathy. Collectively, these findings highlight the impaired hypoxia response by anthracycline agents affecting both tumors and organs of the cancer host and offer a promising opportunity to develop HIF inhibitors using DXR as a chemical template. PMID:22908232

  12. Role of central hydrogen sulfide on ventilatory and cardiovascular responses to hypoxia in spontaneous hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Sabino, João Paulo J; Traslaviña, Guillermo A Ariza; Branco, Luiz G S

    2016-09-01

    Central hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been reported to act as a gaseous neuromodulator involved in the ventilatory and cardiovascular control of normotensive rats, whereas no information is available in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). We recorded minute ventilation (VE), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) before and after blocking of enzyme Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) producing H2S in neural tissue by microinjection of aminooxyacetate (inhibitor of CBS) into the fourth ventricle of Wistar normotensive rats (WNR) and SHR followed by 30min of normoxia (21% inspired O2) or hypoxia (10% inspired O2) exposure. Microinjection of AOA or saline (1μL) did not change VE, MAP and HR during normoxia in both WNR and SHR. In WNR, hypoxia caused an increase in VE, HR and a decrease in MAP and these responses were unaltered by AOA. In SHR, hypoxia produced a higher increase of VE, and decrease in MAP and HR when compared to WNR, and these responses were all blunted by AOA. In conclusion, endogenous H2S plays important modulatory roles on hypoxia-induced ventilatory and cardiovascular responses, inhibiting the cardiovascular and stimulating the respiratory systems in SHR. PMID:27238370

  13. Anticancer Therapy: Light-Activated Hypoxia-Responsive Nanocarriers for Enhanced Anticancer Therapy (Adv. Mater. 17/2016).

    PubMed

    Qian, Chenggen; Yu, Jicheng; Chen, Yulei; Hu, Quanyin; Xiao, Xuanzhong; Sun, Wujin; Wang, Chao; Feng, Peijian; Shen, Qun-Dong; Gu, Zhen

    2016-05-01

    A light-activated hypoxia-responsive drug-delivery vehicle is described by Q.-D. Shen, Z. Gu, and co-workers on page 3313. This conjugated-polymer-based nanocarrier can be activated by photoirradiation, producing singlet oxygen ((1) O2 ) and inducing hypoxia to promote release of its cargo inside tumor cells for enhanced anticancer efficacy. PMID:27122110

  14. Molecular Response of Estuarine Fish to Hypoxia: A Comparative Study with Ruffe and Flounder from Field and Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Tiedke, Jessica; Thiel, Ralf; Burmester, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    On a global scale, the frequencies and magnitudes of hypoxic events in coastal and estuarine waters have increased dramatically over the past 20 years. Fish populations are suitable indicators for the assessment of the quality of aquatic ecosystems, as they are omnipresent and often comprise a variety of different lifestyles and adaption strategies. We have investigated on the molecular level the impact of hypoxia on two fish species typical of European estuaries. We monitored the expression of eleven putatively hypoxia-responsive genes by means of quantitative real-time RT-PCR in brains, gills and hearts of the ruffe (Gymnocephalus cernua) and the flounder (Platichthys flesus). We first investigated the effect of naturally occurring hypoxia in the Elbe estuary. In a second approach, expression changes in the response to hypoxia were monitored under controlled laboratory conditions. The genes that showed the strongest effect were two respiratory proteins, myoglobin and neuroglobin, as well as the apoptosis enzyme caspase 3. As previously observed in other fish, myoglobin, which was considered to be muscle-specific, was found in brain and gills as well. Comparison of field and laboratory studies showed that – with the exception of the heart of flounder – that mRNA levels of the selected genes were about the same, suggesting that laboratory conditions reflect natural conditions. Likewise, trends of gene expression changes under hypoxia were the same, although hypoxia response was more pronounced in the Elbe estuary. In general, the flounder displayed a stronger response to hypoxia than the ruffe, suggesting that the flounder is more susceptible to hypoxia. The most pronounced differences were found among tissues within a species, demonstrating that hypoxia response is largely tissue-specific. In summary, our data suggest that laboratory experiments essentially mimic field data, but additional environmental factors enhance hypoxia response in nature. PMID:24595439

  15. PITX1, a specificity determinant in the HIF-1α-mediated transcriptional response to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Mudie, Sharon; Bandarra, Daniel; Batie, Michael; Biddlestone, John; Moniz, Sonia; Ortmann, Brian; Shmakova, Alena; Rocha, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important developmental cue for multicellular organisms but it is also a contributing factor for several human pathologies, such as stroke, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. In cells, hypoxia activates a major transcriptional program coordinated by the Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF) family. HIF can activate more than one hundred targets but not all of them are activated at the same time, and there is considerable cell type variability. In this report we identified the paired-like homeodomain pituitary transcription factor (PITX1), as a transcription factor that helps promote specificity in HIF-1α dependent target gene activation. Mechanistically, PITX1 associates with HIF-1β and it is important for the induction of certain HIF-1 dependent genes but not all. In particular, PITX1 controls the HIF-1α-dependent expression of the histone demethylases; JMJD2B, JMJD2A, JMJD2C and JMJD1B. Functionally, PITX1 is required for the survival and proliferation responses in hypoxia, as PITX1 depleted cells have higher levels of apoptotic markers and reduced proliferation. Overall, our study identified PITX1 as a key specificity factor in HIF-1α dependent responses, suggesting PITX1 as a protein to target in hypoxic cancers. PMID:25558831

  16. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin: its response to hypoxia and association with acute mountain sickness.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Adrian; Boos, Christopher; Stacey, Mike; Hooper, Tim; Smith, Chris; Begley, Joe; Yarker, Jo; Piper, Rick; O'Hara, John; King, Rod; Turner, Steve; Woods, David R

    2013-01-01

    Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) is a common clinical challenge at high altitude (HA). A point-of-care biochemical marker for AMS could have widespread utility. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) rises in response to renal injury, inflammation and oxidative stress. We investigated whether NGAL rises with HA and if this rise was related to AMS, hypoxia or exercise. NGAL was assayed in a cohort (n = 22) undertaking 6 hours exercise at near sea-level (SL); a cohort (n = 14) during 3 hours of normobaric hypoxia (FiO2 11.6%) and on two trekking expeditions (n = 52) to over 5000 m. NGAL did not change with exercise at SL or following normobaric hypoxia. During the trekking expeditions NGAL levels (ng/ml, mean ± sd, range) rose significantly (P < 0.001) from 68 ± 14 (60-102) at 1300 m to 183 ± 107 (65-519); 143 ± 66 (60-315) and 150 ± 71 (60-357) at 3400 m, 4270 m and 5150 m respectively. At 5150 m there was a significant difference in NGAL between those with severe AMS (n = 7), mild AMS (n = 16) or no AMS (n = 23): 201 ± 34 versus 171 ± 19 versus 124 ± 12 respectively (P = 0.009 for severe versus no AMS; P = 0.026 for mild versus no AMS). In summary, NGAL rises in response to prolonged hypobaric hypoxia and demonstrates a relationship to the presence and severity of AMS. PMID:24227892

  17. Real-time photoacoustic imaging of rat deep brain: hemodynamic responses to hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Iwazaki, Hideaki; Ida, Taiichiro; Hosaka, Tomoya; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Sato, Shunichi

    2013-03-01

    Hemodynamic responses of the brain to hypoxia or ischemia are one of the major interests in neurosurgery and neuroscience. In this study, we performed real-time transcutaneous PA imaging of the rat brain that was exposed to a hypoxic stress and investigated depth-resolved responses of the brain, including the hippocampus. A linear-array 8ch 10-MHz ultrasonic sensor (measurement length, 10 mm) was placed on the shaved scalp. Nanosecond, 570-nm and 595- nm light pulses were used to excite PA signals indicating cerebral blood volume (CBV) and blood deoxygenation, respectively. Under spontaneous respiration, inhalation gas was switched from air to nitrogen, and then reswitched to oxygen, during which real-time PA imaging was performed continuously. High-contrast PA signals were observed from the depth regions corresponding to the scalp, skull, cortex and hippocampus. After starting hypoxia, PA signals at 595 nm increased immediately in both the cortex and hippocampus for about 1.5 min, showing hemoglobin deoxygenation. On the other hand, PA signals at 570 nm coming from these regions did not increase in the early phase but started to increase at about 1.5 min after starting hypoxia, indicating reactive hyperemia to hypoxia. During hypoxia, PA signals coming from the scalp decreased transiently, which is presumably due to compensatory response in the peripheral tissue to preserve blood perfusion in the brain. The reoxygenation caused a gradual recovery of these PA signals. These findings demonstrate the usefulness of PA imaging for real-time, depth-resolved observation of cerebral hemodynamics.

  18. Distinct Regulatory Mechanisms of the Human Ferritin Gene by Hypoxia and Hypoxia Mimetic Cobalt Chloride at the Transcriptional and Post-transcriptional Levels

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bo-Wen; Miyazawa, Masaki; Tsuji, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Cobalt chloride has been used as a hypoxia mimetic because it stabilizes hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1-α) and activates gene transcription through a hypoxia responsive element (HRE). However, differences between hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride in gene regulation remain elusive. Expression of ferritin, the major iron storage protein, is regulated at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels through DNA and RNA regulatory elements. Here we demonstrate that hypoxia and cobalt chloride regulate ferritin heavy chain (ferritin H) expression by two distinct mechanisms. Both hypoxia and cobalt chloride increased HIF1-α but a putative HRE in the human ferritin H gene was not activated. Instead, cobalt chloride but not hypoxia activated ferritin H transcription through an antioxidant responsive element (ARE), to which Nrf2 was recruited. Intriguingly, cobalt chloride downregulated ferritin H protein expression while upregulated other ARE-regulated antioxidant genes in K562 cells. Further characterization demonstrated that cobalt chloride increased interaction between iron regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2) and iron responsive element (IRE) in the 5′UTR of ferritin H mRNA, resulting in translational block of the accumulated ferritin H mRNA. In contrast, hypoxia had marginal effect on ferritin H transcription but increased its translation through decreased IRP1-IRE interaction. These results suggest that hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride employ distinct regulatory mechanisms through the interplay between DNA and mRNA elements at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. PMID:25172425

  19. A Hypoxia-Responsive Glial Cell–Specific Gene Therapy Vector for Targeting Retinal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Biswal, Manas R.; Prentice, Howard M.; Dorey, C. Kathleen; Blanks, Janet C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Müller cells, the major glial cell in the retina, play a significant role in retinal neovascularization in response to tissue hypoxia. We previously designed and tested a vector using a hypoxia-responsive domain and a glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) promoter to drive green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression in Müller cells in the murine model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). This study compares the efficacy of regulated and unregulated Müller cell delivery of endostatin in preventing neovascularization in the OIR model. Methods. Endostatin cDNA was cloned into plasmids with hypoxia-regulated GFAP or unregulated GFAP promoters, and packaged into self-complementary adeno-associated virus serotype 2 vectors (scAAV2). Before placement in hyperoxia on postnatal day (P)7, mice were given intravitreal injections of regulated or unregulated scAAV2, capsid, or PBS. Five days after return to room air, on P17, neovascular and avascular areas, as well as expression of the transgene and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), were compared in OIR animals treated with a vector, capsid, or PBS. Results. The hypoxia-regulated, glial-specific, vector-expressing endostatin reduced neovascularization by 93% and reduced the central vaso-obliteration area by 90%, matching the results with the unregulated GFAP-Endo vector. Retinas treated with the regulated endostatin vector expressed substantial amounts of endostatin protein, and significantly reduced VEGF protein. Endostatin production from the regulated vector was undetectable in retinas with undamaged vasculature. Conclusions. These findings suggest that the hypoxia-regulated, glial cell–specific vector expressing endostatin may be useful for treatment of neovascularization in proliferative diabetic retinopathy. PMID:25377223

  20. Response Gene to Complement 32 (RGC-32), a novel hypoxia-regulated angiogenic inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    An, Xiaojin; Jin, Yi; Guo, Hongnian; Foo, Shi-Yin; Cully, Brittany; Wu, Jiaping; Zeng, Huiyan; Rosenzweig, Anthony; Li, Jian

    2010-01-01

    Background Response Gene to Complement 32 (RGC-32) is induced by activation of complement and regulates cell proliferation. To determine the mechanism of RGC-32 in angiogenesis, we examined the role of RGC-32 in hypoxia-related endothelial cell function. Methods and Results Hypoxia/Ischemia is able to stimulate both angiogenesis and apoptosis. HIF-1α/VEGF is a key transcriptional regulatory pathway for angiogenesis during hypoxia. We demonstrated that the increased RGC-32 expression by hypoxia was via HIF-1α/VEGF induction in cultured endothelial cells. However, overexpression of RGC-32 reduced the proliferation and migration and destabilized vascular structure formation in vitro, and inhibited angiogenesis in Matrigel assays in vivo. Silencing RGC-32 had an opposing, stimulatory effect. RGC-32 also stimulated apoptosis as shown by the increased apoptotic cells and caspase-3 cleavage. Mechanistic studies revealed that RGC-32's effect on the anti-angiogenic response was via attenuating FGF2 expression and further inhibiting expression of cyclin E without impacting VEGF and FGF2 signaling in endothelial cells. In the mouse hindlimb ischemia model, RGC-32 inhibited capillary density with a significant attenuation in blood flow. Additionally, treatment with RGC-32 in the xenograft tumor model resulted in reduced growth of blood vessels that is consistent with reduced colon tumor size. Conclusions We provide the first direct evidence for RGC-32 as a hypoxia-inducible gene and antiangiogenic factor in endothelial cells. These data suggest that RGC-32 plays an important homeostatic role, as it contributes to differentiating the pathways for VEGF and FGF2 in angiogenesis, and provides a new target for ischemic disorder and tumor therapies. PMID:19652095

  1. MIBG scintigraphic assessment of cardiac adrenergic activity in response to altitude hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Richalet, J.P.; Merlet, P.; Bourguignon, M.; Le-Trong, J.L.; Keromes, A.; Rathat, C.; Jouve, B.; Hot, M.A.; Castaigne, A.; Syrota, A. )

    1990-01-01

    High altitude hypoxia induces a decrease in the cardiac chronotropic function at maximal exercise or in response to isoproterenol infusion, suggesting an alteration in the cardiac sympathetic activation. Iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (({sup 123}I)MIBG) was used to map scintigraphically the cardiac sympathetic neuronal function in six male subjects (aged 32 {plus minus} 7 yr) after an exposure to high altitude that created hypoxic conditions. Results obtained just after return to sea level (RSL) were compared with the normal values obtained after 2 or 3 mo of normoxia (N). A static image was created as the sum of the 16-EKG gated images recorded for 10 min in the anterior view of the chest at 20, 60, 120, and 240 min after injection. Regions of interest were located over the heart (H), lungs (L), and mediastinum (M) regions. There was a significant decrease in the H/M and the L/M ratios in RSL compared to N condition. Plasma norepinephrine concentration was elevated during the stay at altitude but not significantly different in RSL compared to N. In conclusion, cardiac ({sup 123}I)MIBG uptake is reduced after an exposure to altitude hypoxia, supporting the hypothesis of an hypoxia-induced reduction of adrenergic neurotransmitter reserve in the myocardium. Furthermore, the observed significant decrease in pulmonary MIBG uptake suggests an alteration of endothelial cell function after exposure to chronic hypoxia.

  2. Proteomic analysis of immature rat pups brain in response to hypoxia and ischemia challenge

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li-Jun; Ma, Dong-Qing; Cui, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia and ischemia significantly affects perinatal brain development, even worse in preterm infants. However, the details of the mechanism leading to permanent brain damage after hypoxia-ischemia attack have not been fully elucidated. Proteomics could provide insight into the potential mechanism and help to promote the clinical treatment. In this study, quantitative analysis was performed 24 hours after hypoxia-ischemia using liquid-chromatography mass spectrometry coupled to label-free analysis. Compared to control, 193 proteins were present only in hypoxic-ischemic group. In addition, 34 proteins were more than 2 folds up-regulated and 14 proteins were more than 2 folds down-regulated in hypoxia-ischemia group. Gene Ontology database showed that the majority of differentially expressed proteins comprised mitochondrial proteins et al. Molecular function analysis revealed that the majority of proteins were involved in ion binding et al. Biological process analysis showed that the majority of proteins were involved in response to organic substance et al. STRING 9.0 software analysis were used to explore the complex interactions existed among the proteins. Western blot were used to verify the fold changes of some proteins-microtubule-associated protein 2 and microtubule-associated protein tau. This novel study performed a full-scale screening of the proteomics research in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage of immature rat. PMID:25197337

  3. Hypoxia-Responsive Polymersomes for Drug Delivery to Hypoxic Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Prajakta; Haldar, Manas K; You, Seungyong; Choi, Yongki; Mallik, Sanku

    2016-08-01

    Hypoxia in tumors contributes to overall tumor progression by assisting in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, angiogenesis, and metastasis of cancer. In this study, we have synthesized a hypoxia-responsive, diblock copolymer poly(lactic acid)-azobenzene-poly(ethylene glycol), which self-assembles to form polymersomes in an aqueous medium. The polymersomes did not release any encapsulated contents for 50 min under normoxic conditions. However, under hypoxia, 90% of the encapsulated dye was released in 50 min. The polymersomes encapsulated the combination of anticancer drugs gemcitabine and erlotinib with entrapment efficiency of 40% and 28%, respectively. We used three-dimensional spheroid cultures of pancreatic cancer cells BxPC-3 to demonstrate hypoxia-mediated release of the drugs from the polymersomes. The vesicles were nontoxic. However, a significant decrease in cell viability was observed in hypoxic spheroidal cultures of BxPC-3 cells in the presence of drug encapsulated polymersomes. These polymersomes have potential for future applications in imaging and treatment of hypoxic tumors. PMID:27303825

  4. Hypoxia attenuates the proinflammatory response in colon cancer cells by regulating IκB

    PubMed Central

    Oertli, Carole; Mirsaidi, Ali; Richards, Peter J.; Rehrauer, Hubert; Spielmann, Patrick; Hoogewijs, David

    2015-01-01

    Two main features common to all solid tumors are tissue hypoxia and inflammation, both of which cause tumor progression, metastasis, therapy resistance and increased mortality. Chronic inflammation is associated with increased cancer risk, as demonstrated for inflammatory bowel disease patients developing colon cancer. However, the interplay between hypoxia and inflammation on the molecular level remains to be elucidated. We found that MC-38 mouse colon cancer cells contain functional hypoxic (HIF-1α) and inflammatory (p65/RelA) signaling pathways. In contrast to cells of the myeloid lineage, HIF-1α levels remained unaffected in MC-38 cells treated with LPS, and hypoxia failed to induce NF-κB. A similar regulation of canonical HIF and NF-κB target genes confirmed these results. RNA deep sequencing of HIF-1α and p65/RelA knock-down cells revealed that a surprisingly large fraction of HIF target genes required p65/RelA for hypoxic regulation and a number of p65/RelA target genes required HIF-1α for proinflammatory regulation, respectively. Hypoxia attenuated the inflammatory response to LPS by inhibiting nuclear translocation of p65/RelA independently of HIF-1α, which was associated with enhanced IκBα levels and decreased IKKβ phosphorylation. These data demonstrate that the interaction between hypoxic and inflammatory signaling pathways needs to be considered when designing cancer therapies targeting HIF or NF-κB. PMID:25978030

  5. Stress response of lead-exposed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) during swimming performance and hypoxia challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, K.A. |; Caldwell, C.A.; Sandheinrich, M.B.

    1995-12-31

    Contaminants often invoke a stress response in aquatic organisms, and may compromise their capacity to respond to secondary stressors. This may reduce growth, reproduction and survival. The authors objectives were to assess the effects of lead and secondary stressors on hematology and blood chemistry of rainbow trout. After a 7 to 8-week aqueous exposure to Pb(100{micro}g/L), rainbow trout were challenged with forced swimming or hypoxia. Lead significantly reduced concentrations of 5-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), but not other constituents in the blood. Lead did not affect the swimming endurance of the fish. Hematocrit, mean cell hemoglobin content, and mean cell volume were significantly lower in Pb-exposed trout following the swimming challenge. Although hypoxia resulted in increased hematocrit and plasma glucose concentrations, there were no significant differences between the Pb and control groups. Hypoxia did not affect plasma chloride concentrations, although concentrations increased in Pb-exposed trout. There was no difference in lactic acid concentrations between Pb-exposed and control fish after forced swimming or hypoxia.

  6. The p38 MAP kinase pathway modulates the hypoxia response and glutamate receptor trafficking in aging neurons

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Chan; Rongo, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Neurons are sensitive to low oxygen (hypoxia) and employ a conserved pathway to combat its effects. Here, we show that p38 MAP Kinase (MAPK) modulates this hypoxia response pathway in C. elegans. Mutants lacking p38 MAPK components pmk-1 or sek-1 resemble mutants lacking the hypoxia response component and prolyl hydroxylase egl-9, with impaired subcellular localization of Mint orthologue LIN-10, internalization of glutamate receptor GLR-1, and depression of GLR-1-mediated behaviors. Loss of p38 MAPK impairs EGL-9 protein localization in neurons and activates the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor HIF-1, suggesting that p38 MAPK inhibits the hypoxia response pathway through EGL-9. As animals age, p38 MAPK levels decrease, resulting in GLR-1 internalization; this age-dependent downregulation can be prevented through either p38 MAPK overexpression or removal of CDK-5, an antagonizing kinase. Our findings demonstrate that p38 MAPK inhibits the hypoxia response pathway and determines how aging neurons respond to hypoxia through a novel mechanism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12010.001 PMID:26731517

  7. Sex-specific response to hypoxia in a reduced brainstem preparation from Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Stéphanie; Kinkead, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Respiratory reflexes and tolerance to hypoxia show significant sexual dimorphism. However, the data supporting this notion originates exclusively from mammals. To determine whether this concept is limited to this group of vertebrates, we examined the sex-specific response to acute hypoxia in an adult reduced brainstem preparation from Xenopus laevis. Within the first 5min of exposure to hypoxic aCSF (98% N2/2% CO2), recordings of respiratory-related activity show a stronger increase in fictive breathing frequency in males than females. This initial response was followed by a decrease in respiratory-related activity; this depression occurred 6min sooner in males than females. These results represent new evidences of sexual dimorphism in respiratory control in amphibians and provide potential insight in understanding the homology with other groups of vertebrates, including mammals. PMID:26528898

  8. Role of Kv7 channels in responses of the pulmonary circulation to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Sedivy, Vojtech; Joshi, Shreena; Ghaly, Youssef; Mizera, Roman; Zaloudikova, Marie; Brennan, Sean; Novotna, Jana; Herget, Jan; Gurney, Alison M

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is a beneficial mechanism that diverts blood from hypoxic alveoli to better ventilated areas of the lung, but breathing hypoxic air causes the pulmonary circulation to become hypertensive. Responses to airway hypoxia are associated with depolarization of smooth muscle cells in the pulmonary arteries and reduced activity of K(+) channels. As Kv7 channels have been proposed to play a key role in regulating the smooth muscle membrane potential, we investigated their involvement in the development of HPV and hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Vascular effects of the selective Kv7 blocker, linopirdine, and Kv7 activator, flupirtine, were investigated in isolated, saline-perfused lungs from rats maintained for 3-5 days in an isobaric hypoxic chamber (FiO2 = 0.1) or room air. Linopirdine increased vascular resistance in lungs from normoxic, but not hypoxic rats. This effect was associated with reduced mRNA expression of the Kv7.4 channel α-subunit in hypoxic arteries, whereas Kv7.1 and Kv7.5 were unaffected. Flupirtine had no effect in normoxic lungs but reduced vascular resistance in hypoxic lungs. Moreover, oral dosing with flupirtine (30 mg/kg/day) prevented short-term in vivo hypoxia from increasing pulmonary vascular resistance and sensitizing the arteries to acute hypoxia. These findings suggest a protective role for Kv7.4 channels in the pulmonary circulation, limiting its reactivity to pressor agents and preventing hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. They also provide further support for the therapeutic potential of Kv7 activators in pulmonary vascular disease. PMID:25361569

  9. Role of Kv7 channels in responses of the pulmonary circulation to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shreena; Ghaly, Youssef; Mizera, Roman; Zaloudikova, Marie; Brennan, Sean; Novotna, Jana; Herget, Jan; Gurney, Alison M.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is a beneficial mechanism that diverts blood from hypoxic alveoli to better ventilated areas of the lung, but breathing hypoxic air causes the pulmonary circulation to become hypertensive. Responses to airway hypoxia are associated with depolarization of smooth muscle cells in the pulmonary arteries and reduced activity of K+ channels. As Kv7 channels have been proposed to play a key role in regulating the smooth muscle membrane potential, we investigated their involvement in the development of HPV and hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Vascular effects of the selective Kv7 blocker, linopirdine, and Kv7 activator, flupirtine, were investigated in isolated, saline-perfused lungs from rats maintained for 3–5 days in an isobaric hypoxic chamber (FiO2 = 0.1) or room air. Linopirdine increased vascular resistance in lungs from normoxic, but not hypoxic rats. This effect was associated with reduced mRNA expression of the Kv7.4 channel α-subunit in hypoxic arteries, whereas Kv7.1 and Kv7.5 were unaffected. Flupirtine had no effect in normoxic lungs but reduced vascular resistance in hypoxic lungs. Moreover, oral dosing with flupirtine (30 mg/kg/day) prevented short-term in vivo hypoxia from increasing pulmonary vascular resistance and sensitizing the arteries to acute hypoxia. These findings suggest a protective role for Kv7.4 channels in the pulmonary circulation, limiting its reactivity to pressor agents and preventing hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. They also provide further support for the therapeutic potential of Kv7 activators in pulmonary vascular disease. PMID:25361569

  10. Acute Effects of Normobaric Hypoxia on Hand-Temperature Responses During and After Local Cold Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kölegård, Roger; Mekjavic, Igor B.; Eiken, Ola

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Keramidas, Michail E, Roger Kölegård, Igor B. Mekjavic, and Ola Eiken. Acute effects of normobaric hypoxia on hand-temperature responses during and after local cold stress. High Alt Med Biol. 15:183–191, 2014.—The purpose was to investigate acute effects of normobaric hypoxia on hand-temperature responses during and after a cold-water hand immersion test. Fifteen males performed two right-hand immersion tests in 8°C water, during which they were inspiring either room air (Fio2: 0.21; AIR), or a hypoxic gas mixture (Fio2: 0.14; HYPO). The tests were conducted in a counterbalanced order and separated by a 1-hour interval. Throughout the 30-min cold-water immersion (CWI) and the 15-min spontaneous rewarming (RW) phases, finger-skin temperatures were measured continuously with thermocouple probes; infrared thermography was also employed during the RW phase to map all segments of the hand. During the CWI phase, the average skin temperature (Tavg) of the fingers did not differ between the conditions (AIR: 10.2±0.5°C, HYPO: 10.0±0.5°C; p=0.67). However, Tavg was lower in the HYPO than the AIR RW phase (AIR: 24.5±3.4°C; HYPO: 22.0±3.8°C; p=0.002); a response that was alike in all regions of the immersed hand. Accordingly, present findings suggest that acute exposure to normobaric hypoxia does not aggravate the cold-induced drop in hand temperature of normothermic males. Still, hypoxia markedly impairs the rewarming responses of the hand. PMID:24666109

  11. [INFLUENCE OF THE NORMOBARIC HYPOXIA ON VISUAL-MOTOR CHILDREN'S RESPONSE LIVED IN RADIOACTIVELY CONTAMINATED TERRITORIES].

    PubMed

    Lisukha, L M; Berezovskiy, V A

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the influence of intermittent normobaric hypoxia of sanogenic varying levels on the latent period of a complex visual-motor reaction in terms of choice in children - residents of radioactive contaminated territories. Indicators of anxiety were assessed with Spielberg - Hanin test. The study involved 48 children aged 6 to 17 years. The children were divided into two groups: the first one included the group from 6 to 11 years, and the second group from 12 to 17 years. It is shown that the intermittent normobaric hypoxia course sessions (12% O2 in nitrogen) reduced the latent period of complex visual-motor response of one of three colors (RC(1-3)) choice--23 % and complex visual-motor response of two of the three colors (RC(2-3)) choice--27%. It was revealed that the latent period RC(1-3) lasts longer than the latent period RC(2-3). The boys in both cases tend to have more rapid response than girl. It was found that after the sessions of varying normobaric hypoxia personal anxiety in both groups of children decreased by 20 and 23% respectively. PMID:26387159

  12. Effects of nitric oxide gas on cat carotid body chemosensory response to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Iturriaga, R; Mosqueira, M; Villanueva, S

    2000-02-14

    It has been proposed that nitric oxide (NO) is an inhibitory modulator of carotid body (CB) chemoreception to hypoxia. However, the effects of NO gas on carotid chemoreception have not been tested yet. The role played by NO has been revealed by the use of pharmacological tools (i.e., NO donors and NO synthase inhibitors). Here, we studied the effects of NO gas (25 ppm in N(2)) on the chemosensory response to hypoxia (PO(2) approximately 30 Torr) in the cat CB perfused in vitro. During steady hypoxic chemoreceptor excitation, bolus injections or perfusion of Tyrode equilibrated with NO reduced the increased frequency of carotid chemosensory discharges (f(x)). Perfusion for 2 min of Tyrode equilibrated with NO also reduced the rate of the rise of the chemosensory response, as well as the maximal amplitude, as compared with the normal chemosensory response to hypoxia. Present results provide direct evidence that NO gas is an inhibitory modulator of CB hypoxic chemoreception. PMID:10677601

  13. Molecular characterization and mRNA expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1 and cognate inhibiting factor in Macrobrachium nipponense in response to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shengming; Xuan, Fujun; Fu, Hongtuo; Ge, Xianping; Zhu, Jian; Qiao, Hui; Jin, Shubo; Zhang, Wenyi

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) are considered to be the master switches of oxygen-dependent gene expression in mammalian species. Currently, very little is known about the function of this important pathway or the molecular structures of key players in the hypoxia-sensitive Oriental River Prawn Macrobrachium nipponense. In this study, HIFs-1α (HIF-1α), -1β (HIF-1β) and HIF 1-alpha inhibitor (FIH-1) from M. nipponense were cloned. The 4903-bp cDNA of M. nipponense HIF-1α (MnHIF-1α) encodes a protein of 1088 aa, M. nipponense HIF-1β (MnHIF-1β) spans 2042bp encoding 663 aa and the 1163bp M. nipponense FIH-1 (MnFIH-1) specifies a polypeptide of 345 aa. MnHIF-1 and MnFIH-1 homologs exhibit significant sequence similarity and share key functional domains with previously described vertebrate and invertebrate isoforms. Phylogenetic analysis identifies that genetic diversification of HIF-1 and FIH-1 occurred within the invertebrate lineage, indicating functional specialization of the oxygen sensing pathways in this group. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that MnHIF-1 and MnFIH-1 mRNA are expressed in different tissues and exhibit transcriptional responses to severe hypoxia in gill and muscle tissue, consistent with their putative role in oxygen sensing and the adaptive response to hypoxia. The role of HIF-1α in response to hypoxia was further investigated in the gills and muscles of prawns using in situ hybridization. These results suggested that HIF-1α plays an important role in oxygen sensing and homeostasis in M. nipponense. PMID:26883381

  14. Role of. alpha. sub 2 -adrenergic receptors in the carotid body response to hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Kou, Y.R.; Ernsberger, P.; Cherniack, N.S.; Prabhakar, N.R. )

    1990-02-26

    Clonidine, which acts in part as an {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor agonist, depresses ventilation. The authors examined the role of {alpha}{sub 2}-receptors in carotid chemoreceptor activity. The density of {alpha}{sub 2}-receptors was determined in membrane fractions of 18 cat carotid bodies using {sup 125}I-iodoclonidine with 0.1 mM epinephrine or 10 {mu}M SKF-86466 defining nonspecific binding. {alpha}{sub 2}-Adrenergic receptor density averaged 0.6{plus minus}0.1 fmol/carotid body (mean {plus minus} SEM) and was comparable to other sympathetic target tissues. The authors then studied the effects of an agonist (guanabenz) and an antagonist (SKF-86466; 6-Cl-N-methyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1-H3-benzazepine) specific for {alpha}{sub 2}-receptors on baseline and hypoxia-stimulated carotid body discharge, in 10 anesthetized, paralyzed and artificially ventilated cats. Intracarotid infusion of guanabenz for 5 minutes caused a dose-dependent depression of the baseline activity and reduced the chemoreceptor response to hypoxia by 88.0{plus minus}5.8% of the vehicle-injected controls. Intravenous administration of SKF-86466 reversed the effects of guanabenz on the carotid body activity. in contrast, chemoreceptor depression caused by dopamine was unaffected by SKF-86466. SKF-86466 alone increased baseline discharge and potentiated the chemoreceptor response to hypoxia by 34.0 {plus minus} 9.6% of the controls. These results demonstrate that {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptors are present in the cat carotid body and they exert an inhibitory influence on the chemoreceptor response to hypoxia.

  15. Comparative studies of hemolymph physiology response and HIF-1 expression in different strains of Litopenaeus vannamei under acute hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lin; Li, Yuhu; Qiu, Liguo; Zhou, Hailong; Han, Qian; Diao, Xiaoping

    2016-06-01

    Litopenaeus vannamei has a high commercial value and is the primary cultured shellfish species globally. In this study, we have compared the hemolymph physiological responses between two L. vannamei strains under acute hypoxia. The results showed that hemocyanin concentration (HC) of strain A6410 was significantly higher than strain Zhengda; Total hemocyte counts (THC) decreased significantly in both strains under hypoxic stress (p < 0.05). We also investigated the temporal and spatial variations of hypoxia inducible factors 1 (HIF-1) by qRT-PCR. The results showed that hypoxia for 12 h increased the expression levels of HIF-1α in tissues of muscle and gill from the two strains (p < 0.05). In the hepatopancreas, the expression levels of HIF-1 increased significantly in strain Zhengda and decreased significantly in strain A6410 (p < 0.05). No significant changes of HIF-1 expression were detected in the same tissues between the two strains under hypoxia for 6 h (p > 0.05), but in the gills and hepatopancreas under hypoxia for 12 h (p < 0.05). Additionally, the expression level of HIF-1 was higher in the strain Zhengda than A6410 in the same tissue under hypoxia for 12 h. It was indicated that the hypoxic tolerance of Litopenaeus vannamei was closely correlated with the expression level of HIF-1, and the higher expression level of HIF-1 to hypoxia, the lower tolerance to hypoxia in the early stage of hypoxia. These results can help to better understand the molecular mechanisms of hypoxic tolerance and speed up the selective breeding process of hypoxia tolerance in L. vannamei. PMID:27016815

  16. Differential Responses of Hippocampal Neurons and Astrocytes to Nicotine and Hypoxia in the Fetal Guinea Pig

    PubMed Central

    Blutstein, Tamara; Castello, Michael A.; Viechweg, Shaun S.; Hadjimarkou, Maria M.; McQuail, Joseph A.; Holder, Mary; Thompson, Loren P.; Mong, Jessica A.

    2012-01-01

    In utero exposure to cigarette smoke has severe consequences for the developing fetus, including increased risk of birth complications and behavioral and learning disabilities later in life. Evidence from animal models suggests that the cognitive deficits may be a consequence of in utero nicotine exposure in the brain during critical developmental periods. However, maternal smoking exposes the fetus to not only nicotine but also a hypoxic intrauterine environment. Thus, both nicotine and hypoxia are capable of initiating cellular cascades, leading to long-term changes in synaptic patterning that have the potential to affect cognitive functions. The present study investigates the combined effect of in utero exposure to nicotine and hypoxia on neuronal and glial elements in the hippocampal CA1 field. Fetal guinea pigs were exposed in utero to normoxic or hypoxic conditions in the presence or absence of nicotine. Hypoxia increased the protein levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and synaptophysin and decreased the neural density as measured by NeuN immunoreactivity (ir). Nicotine exposure had no effect on these neuronal parameters but dramatically increased the density of astrocytes immunopositive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Further investigation into the effects of in utero nicotine exposure revealed that both GFAP-ir and NeuN-ir in the CA1 field were significantly reduced in adulthood. Taken together, our data suggest that prenatal exposure to nicotine and hypoxia not only alters synaptic patterning acutely during fetal development, but that nicotine also has long-term consequences that are observed well into adulthood. Moreover, these effects most likely take place through distinct mechanisms. PMID:23192463

  17. Hypoxia Responsive, Tumor Penetrating Lipid Nanoparticles for Delivery of Chemotherapeutics to Pancreatic Cancer Cell Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Prajakta; Haldar, Manas K; Katti, Preeya; Dawes, Courtney; You, Seungyong; Choi, Yongki; Mallik, Sanku

    2016-08-17

    Solid tumors are often poorly irrigated due to structurally compromised microcirculation. Uncontrolled multiplication of cancer cells, insufficient blood flow, and the lack of enough oxygen and nutrients lead to the development of hypoxic regions in the tumor tissues. As the partial pressure of oxygen drops below the necessary level (10 psi), the cancer cells modulate their genetic makeup to survive. Hypoxia triggers tumor progression by enhancing angiogenesis, cancer stem cell production, remodeling of the extracellular matrix, and epigenetic changes in the cancer cells. However, the hypoxic regions are usually located deep in the tumors and are usually inaccessible to the intravenously injected drug carrier or the drug. Considering the designs of the reported nanoparticles, it is likely that the drug is delivered to the peripheral tumor tissues, close to the blood vessels. In this study, we prepared lipid nanoparticles (LNs) comprising the synthesized hypoxia-responsive lipid and a peptide-lipid conjugate. We observed that the resultant LNs penetrated to the hypoxic regions of the tumors. Under low oxygen partial pressure, the hypoxia-responsive lipid undergoes reduction, destabilizing the lipid membrane, and releasing encapsulated drugs from the nanoparticles. We demonstrated the results employing spheroidal cultures of the pancreatic cancer cells BxPC-3. We observed that the peptide-decorated, drug encapsulated LNs reduced the viability of pancreatic cancer cells of the spheroids to 35% under hypoxic conditions. PMID:27391789

  18. Arousal and ventilatory responses to mild hypoxia in sleeping preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, Marjan M A; Richardson, Heidi L; Parslow, Peter M; Walker, Adrian M; Harding, Richard; Horne, Rosemary S C

    2008-09-01

    A failure to adequately respond to hypoxia has been implicated in the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Preterm infants are at increased risk for SIDS, thus we compared ventilatory and arousal responses to mild hypoxia [15% oxygen (O2)] in preterm and term infants. Eight preterm and 15 term infants were serially studied with daytime polysomnography during which nasal airflow was monitored by pneumotachograph at 2-5 weeks, 2-3 and 5-6 months. At each age, in both groups, hypoxia induced a significant decrease in oxygen saturation (SpO2) during both active sleep (AS) and quiet sleep (QS). Infants invariably aroused in AS; and in QS either aroused or failed to arouse. In preterm infants arousal latency in AS was longer than in term infants (P < 0.05) at 2-5 weeks. Compared with term infants, preterm infants reached significantly lower SpO2 levels at 2-5 weeks in both AS and QS non-arousing tests and at 2-3 months in QS. A biphasic hypoxic ventilatory response was observed in QS non-arousing tests in both groups of infants at all three ages. We conclude that the greater desaturation during a hypoxic challenge combined with the longer arousal latency in preterm infants could contribute to greater risk for SIDS. PMID:18503514

  19. Hypoxic alligator embryos: chronic hypoxia, catecholamine levels and autonomic responses of in ovo alligators.

    PubMed

    Eme, John; Altimiras, Jordi; Hicks, James W; Crossley, Dane A

    2011-11-01

    Hypoxia is a naturally occurring environmental challenge for embryonic reptiles, and this is the first study to investigate the impact of chronic hypoxia on the in ovo development of autonomic cardiovascular regulation and circulating catecholamine levels in a reptile. We measured heart rate (f(H)) and chorioallantoic arterial blood pressure (MAP) in normoxic ('N21') and hypoxic-incubated ('H10'; 10% O(2)) American alligator embryos (Alligator mississippiensis) at 70, 80 and 90% of development. Embryonic alligator responses to adrenergic blockade with propranolol and phentolamine were very similar to previously reported responses of embryonic chicken, and demonstrated that embryonic alligator has α and β-adrenergic tone over the final third of development. However, adrenergic tone originates entirely from circulating catecholamines and is not altered by chronic hypoxic incubation, as neither cholinergic blockade with atropine nor ganglionic blockade with hexamethonium altered baseline cardiovascular variables in N21 or H10 embryos. In addition, both atropine and hexamethonium injection did not alter the generally depressive effects of acute hypoxia - bradycardia and hypotension. However, H10 embryos showed significantly higher levels of noradrenaline and adrenaline at 70% of development, as well as higher noradrenaline at 80% of development, suggesting that circulating catecholamines reach maximal levels earlier in incubation for H10 embryos, compared to N21 embryos. Chronically elevated levels of catecholamines may alter the normal balance between α and β-adrenoreceptors in H10 alligator embryos, causing chronic bradycardia and hypotension of H10 embryos measured in normoxia. PMID:21798363

  20. Novel roles of hypoxia response system in glucose metabolism and obesity.

    PubMed

    Ichiki, Toshihiro; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2014-07-01

    Oxygen is essential for ATP production in mitochondria through oxidative phosphorylation. Metazoans are equipped with the hypoxia response system that includes hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), prolyl hydroxylase domain protein (PHD), and von Hippel-Lindau ubiquitin ligase system to combat or adapt hypoxic conditions. PHD is an oxygen-sensing enzyme that is responsible for HIF-α hydroxylation and subsequent proteasomal degradation at normoxic conditions. In hypoxic conditions, PHD activity is inhibited and transcriptional activity of HIF is increased, resulting in the induction of a broad range of genes that are involved in glucose metabolism, angiogenesis, and erythropoiesis. A worldwide epidemic of obesity, a critical risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, has led to intense studies on adipose tissue biology, which revealed that adipose tissue functions as an endocrine organ that affects the whole body. Recent studies also suggest that inflammation and hypoxia of adipose tissue that occur as adipose tissue mass expands play an important role in the development of insulin resistance, in which PHD/HIF pathway is critically involved. The PHD/HIF pathway may be an attractive and potential target for the treatment of obesity and associated diseases. PMID:24774124

  1. Effects of prolonged head-down bed rest on physiological responses to moderate hypoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeppky, J. A.; Roach, R. C.; Selland, M. A.; Scotto, P.; Greene, E. R.; Luft, U. C.

    1993-01-01

    To determine the effects of hypoxia on physiological responses to simulated zero-gravity cardiopulmonary and fluid balance measurements were made in 6 subjects before and during 5-degree head-down bed rest (HDBR) over 8 d at 10,678 ft and a second time at this altitude as controls (CON). The V-dot(O2)(max) increased by 9 percent after CON, but fell 3 percent after HDBR. This reduction in work capacity during HDBR could be accounted for by inactivity. The heart rate response to a head-up tilt was greatly enhanced following HDBR, while mean blood pressure was lower. No significant negative impact of HDBR was noted on the ability to acclimatize to hypoxia in terms of pulmonary mechanics, gas exchange, circulatory or mental function measurements. No evidence of pulmonary interstitial edema or congestion was noted during HDBR at the lower PIO2 and blood rheology properties were not negatively altered. Symptoms of altitude illness were more prevalent, but not marked, during HDBR and arterial blood gases and oxygenation were not seriously effected by simulated microgravity. Declines in base excess with altitude were similar in both conditions. The study demonstrated a minimal effect of HDBR on the ability to adjust to this level of hypoxia.

  2. Epigenetic Programming of Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy in Response to Fetal Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qingyi; Zhang, Lubo

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is a major stress to the fetal development and may result in irreversible injury in the developing brain, increased risk of central nervous system (CNS) malformations in the neonatal brain and long-term neurological complications in offspring. Current evidence indicates that epigenetic mechanisms may contribute to the development of hypoxic/ischemic-sensitive phenotype in the developing brain in response to fetal stress. However, the causative cellular and molecular mechanisms remain elusive. In the present review, we summarize the recent findings of epigenetic mechanisms in the development of the brain and their roles in fetal hypoxia-induced brain developmental malformations. Specifically, we focus on DNA methylation and active demethylation, histone modifications and microRNAs in the regulation of neuronal and vascular developmental plasticity, which may play a role in fetal stress-induced epigenetic programming of hypoxic/ischemic-sensitive phenotype in the developing brain. PMID:25450949

  3. Effects of hypoxia on muscle protein synthesis and anabolic signaling at rest and in response to acute resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Etheridge, Timothy; Atherton, Philip J; Wilkinson, Daniel; Selby, Anna; Rankin, Debbie; Webborn, Nick; Smith, Kenneth; Watt, Peter W

    2011-10-01

    Chronic reductions in tissue O(2) tension (hypoxia) are associated with muscle atrophy and blunted hypertrophic responses to resistance exercise (RE) training. However, the effect of hypoxia on muscle protein synthesis (MPS) at rest and after RE is unknown. In a crossover study, seven healthy men (21.4 ± 0.7 yr) performed unilateral leg RE (6 × 8 repetitions at 70% 1-repetition maximum) under normoxic (20.9% inspired O(2)) and normobaric hypoxic (12% inspired O(2) for 3.5 h) postabsorptive conditions. Immediately after RE the rested leg was biopsied, and a primed continuous infusion of [1,2-(13)C(2)]leucine was maintained for 2.5 h before final biopsies from both legs to measure tracer incorporation and signaling responses (i.e., ribosomal S6 kinase 1). After 3.5 h of hypoxia, MPS was not different from normoxia in the rested leg (normoxia 0.033 ± 0.016 vs. hypoxia 0.043 ± 0.016%/h). MPS increased significantly from baseline 2.5 h after RE in normoxia (0.033 ± 0.016 vs. 0.104 ± 0.038%/h) but not hypoxia (0.043 ± 0.016 vs. 0.060 ± 0.063%/h). A significant linear relationship existed between MPS 2.5 h after RE in hypoxia and mean arterial blood O(2) saturation during hypoxia (r(2) = 0.49, P = 0.04). Phosphorylation of p70S6K(Thr389) remained unchanged in hypoxia at rest but increased after RE in both normoxia and hypoxia (2.6 ± 1.2-fold and 3.4 ± 1.1-fold, respectively). Concentrations of the hypoxia-responsive mTOR inhibitor regulated in development and DNA damage-1 were unaltered by hypoxia or RE. We conclude that normobaric hypoxia does not reduce MPS over 3.5 h at rest but blunts the increased MPS response to acute RE to a degree dependent on extant SpO(2). PMID:21750270

  4. Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin: Its Response to Hypoxia and Association with Acute Mountain Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Boos, Christopher; Stacey, Mike; Hooper, Tim; Smith, Chris; Yarker, Jo; Piper, Rick; O'Hara, John; King, Rod; Turner, Steve; Woods, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) is a common clinical challenge at high altitude (HA). A point-of-care biochemical marker for AMS could have widespread utility. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) rises in response to renal injury, inflammation and oxidative stress. We investigated whether NGAL rises with HA and if this rise was related to AMS, hypoxia or exercise. NGAL was assayed in a cohort (n = 22) undertaking 6 hours exercise at near sea-level (SL); a cohort (n = 14) during 3 hours of normobaric hypoxia (FiO2 11.6%) and on two trekking expeditions (n = 52) to over 5000 m. NGAL did not change with exercise at SL or following normobaric hypoxia. During the trekking expeditions NGAL levels (ng/ml, mean ± sd, range) rose significantly (P < 0.001) from 68 ± 14 (60–102) at 1300 m to 183 ± 107 (65–519); 143 ± 66 (60–315) and 150 ± 71 (60–357) at 3400 m, 4270 m and 5150 m respectively. At 5150 m there was a significant difference in NGAL between those with severe AMS (n = 7), mild AMS (n = 16) or no AMS (n = 23): 201 ± 34 versus 171 ± 19 versus 124 ± 12 respectively (P = 0.009 for severe versus no AMS; P = 0.026 for mild versus no AMS). In summary, NGAL rises in response to prolonged hypobaric hypoxia and demonstrates a relationship to the presence and severity of AMS. PMID:24227892

  5. Gestational diabetes induces chronic hypoxia stress and excessive inflammatory response in murine placenta

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hua-Ping; Chen, Xuan; Li, Ming-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic impairments in maternal obesity and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) induce an abnormal environment in peripheral blood and cause vascular structure alterations which affect the placental development and function. A GDM model was developed using C57BL/6J female mice fed with high fat food (HF) (40% energy from fat) and a control group with control food (CF) (14% energy from fat) for 14 weeks before mating and throughout the gestation period. A subset of dams was sacrificed at gestational day (GD) 18.5 to evaluate the fetal and placental development. HF-fed dams exhibited significant increase in the maternal weight gain and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), impaired insulin secretion of glucose stimulus and glucose clearance of insulin stimulus before pregnancy; in addition, they also had the increase in the fetal and placental weight. HF-fed dams at GD 18.5 showed the high level of circulating maternal inflammation factors and were associated with increased oxidative stress and hypoxia in the labyrinth, abnormal vascular development with a high level of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and VEGF-A expression, but without a parallel increase in CD31 level; were induced an exaggerated inflammatory response in placental vascular endothelial cell. Our findings show that GDM induces more maternal weight gain and fetus weight, with abnormal maternal circulating metabolic and inflammation factors, and forms a placental hypoxia environment and impacts the placental vascular development. Our findings indicate that gestational diabetes induce excessive chronic hypoxia stress and inflammatory response in placentas which may contribute mechanisms to the high risks of perinatal complications of obesity and GDM mothers. PMID:23573311

  6. A dynamic analysis of the ventilatory response to hypoxia in man.

    PubMed

    Bertholon, J F; Eugene, M; Labeyrie, E; Teillac, A

    1989-01-01

    1. The dynamics of the ventilatory response to isocapnic hypoxia were studied in seven healthy subjects using four different levels of hypoxia, (inspired oxygen pressures, PI,O2 equal to 110, 100, 80 and 60 mmHg) successively increasing and decreasing stepwise. 2. Five such progressions were performed for each subject, corresponding to five different durations of the steps (t) ranging between 0.33 and 5.00 min. The overall duration of one test (T) was taken as the sum of the seven successive PI,O2 hypoxic steps (t) plus one step t of air breathing. Thus, the values of T ranged between 2.6 and 40.0 min. 3. End-tidal CO2 pressure was maintained constant (+/- 1 mmHg) throughout the test by manipulation of inspired CO2 pressure. 4. We measured, as a function of T, (i) the magnitude of the loops formed by the ventilatory response curves (PA,O2-VE) as measured by their surface area (S), (ii) the magnitude of ventilatory response to each rising hypoxic step, and (iii) the difference between resting VE and VE observed at PA,O2 equal to 50 mmHg (delta V50). On average, we found one maximum in absolute value of S at T = 8 min and one minimum at T = 12 min, along with two maxima of ventilatory response at T values of 8 and 24 min. 5. The same measurements were made on tidal volume response curves (PA,O2-VT) and ventilatory frequency response curves (PA,O2-f): on average we observed two non-significant peaks in the progression with T of VT and S(VT) and two significant peaks in that of delta VT,50 for T = 8 and T = 24 min. No significant peak was observed in the progression with T of f curve parameters. 6. These results are discussed together with the current dynamic model of the ventilatory control system, which includes a central neural controller with no dynamics of its own and a linear response to chemoreceptor inputs. We discuss the physiological meaning of a negative loop area in relation to the previously described depressant effect of hypoxia upon the brain stem. 7. We

  7. The Circulatory and Metabolic Responses to Hypoxia in Humans - With Special Reference to Adipose Tissue Physiology and Obesity.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Ilkka H A; Boushel, Robert; Kalliokoski, Kari K

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue metabolism and circulation play an important role in human health. It is well-known that adipose tissue mass is increased in response to excess caloric intake leading to obesity and further to local hypoxia and inflammatory signaling. Acute exercise increases blood supply to adipose tissue and mobilization of fat stores for energy. However, acute exercise during systemic hypoxia reduces subcutaneous blood flow in healthy young subjects, but the response in overweight or obese subjects remains to be investigated. Emerging evidence also indicates that exercise training during hypoxic exposure may provide additive benefits with respect to many traditional cardiovascular risk factors as compared to exercise performed in normoxia, but unfavorable effects of hypoxia have also been documented. These topics will be covered in this brief review dealing with hypoxia and adipose tissue physiology. PMID:27621722

  8. The Circulatory and Metabolic Responses to Hypoxia in Humans – With Special Reference to Adipose Tissue Physiology and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Heinonen, Ilkka H. A.; Boushel, Robert; Kalliokoski, Kari K.

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue metabolism and circulation play an important role in human health. It is well-known that adipose tissue mass is increased in response to excess caloric intake leading to obesity and further to local hypoxia and inflammatory signaling. Acute exercise increases blood supply to adipose tissue and mobilization of fat stores for energy. However, acute exercise during systemic hypoxia reduces subcutaneous blood flow in healthy young subjects, but the response in overweight or obese subjects remains to be investigated. Emerging evidence also indicates that exercise training during hypoxic exposure may provide additive benefits with respect to many traditional cardiovascular risk factors as compared to exercise performed in normoxia, but unfavorable effects of hypoxia have also been documented. These topics will be covered in this brief review dealing with hypoxia and adipose tissue physiology. PMID:27621722

  9. Effects of hyperoxia and hypoxia on the physiological traits responsible for obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Bradley A; Sands, Scott A; Owens, Robert L; White, David P; Genta, Pedro R; Butler, James P; Malhotra, Atul; Wellman, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen therapy is known to reduce loop gain (LG) in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), yet its effects on the other traits responsible for OSA remain unknown. Therefore, we assessed how hyperoxia and hypoxia alter four physiological traits in OSA patients. Eleven OSA subjects underwent a night of polysomnography during which the physiological traits were measured using multiple 3-min ‘drops’ from therapeutic continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) levels. LG was defined as the ratio of the ventilatory overshoot to the preceding reduction in ventilation. Pharyngeal collapsibility was quantified as the ventilation at CPAP of 0 cmH2O. Upper airway responsiveness was defined as the ratio of the increase in ventilation to the increase in ventilatory drive across the drop. Arousal threshold was estimated as the level of ventilatory drive associated with arousal. On separate nights, subjects were submitted to hyperoxia (n = 9; FiO2 ∼0.5) or hypoxia (n = 10; FiO2 ∼0.15) and the four traits were reassessed. Hyperoxia lowered LG from a median of 3.4 [interquartile range (IQR): 2.6–4.1] to 2.1 (IQR: 1.3–2.5) (P < 0.01), but did not alter the remaining traits. By contrast, hypoxia increased LG [median: 3.3 (IQR: 2.3–4.0) vs. 6.4 (IQR: 4.5–9.7); P < 0.005]. Hypoxia additionally increased the arousal threshold (mean ± s.d. 10.9 ± 2.1 l min−1 vs. 13.3 ± 4.3 l min−1; P < 0.05) and improved pharyngeal collapsibility (mean ± s.d. 3.4 ± 1.4 l min−1 vs. 4.9 ± 1.3 l min−1; P < 0.05), but did not alter upper airway responsiveness (P = 0.7). This study demonstrates that the beneficial effect of hyperoxia on the severity of OSA is primarily based on its ability to reduce LG. The effects of hypoxia described above may explain the disappearance of OSA and the emergence of central sleep apnoea in conditions such as high altitude. PMID:25085887

  10. CCN1 suppresses pulmonary vascular smooth muscle contraction in response to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seon-jin; Zhang, Meng; Hu, Kebin; Lin, Ling; Zhang, Duo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary vasoconstriction and increased vascular resistance are common features in pulmonary hypertension (PH). One of the contributing factors in the development of pulmonary vasoconstriction is increased pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) contraction. Here we report that CCN1, an extracellular matrix molecule, suppressed PASMC contraction in response to hypoxia. CCN1 (Cyr61), discovered in past decade, belongs to the Cyr61-CTGF-Nov (CCN) family. It carries a variety of cellular functions, including angiogenesis and cell adhesion, death, and proliferation. Hypoxia robustly upregulated the expression of CCN1 in the pulmonary vessels and lung parenchyma. Given that CCN1 is a secreted protein and functions in a paracine manner, we examined the potential effects of CCN1 on the adjacent smooth muscle cells. Interestingly, bioactive recombinant CCN1 significantly suppressed hypoxia-induced contraction in human PASMCs in vitro. Consistently, in the in vivo functional studies, administration of bioactive CCN1 protein significantly decreased right ventricular pressure in three different PH animal models. Mechanistically, protein kinase A–pathway inhibitors abolished the effects of CCN1 in suppressing PASMC contraction. Furthermore, CCN1-inhibited smooth muscle contraction was independent of the known vasodilators, such as nitric oxide. Taken together, our studies indicated a novel cellular function of CCN1, potentially regulating the pathogenesis of PH. PMID:26697179

  11. Temperature and the Ventilatory Response to Hypoxia in Gromphadorhina portentosa (Blattodea: Blaberidae).

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jon F; Manoucheh, Milad; Klok, C Jaco; Campbell, Jacob B

    2016-04-01

    In general, insects respond to hypoxia by increasing ventilation frequency, as seen in most other animals. Higher body temperatures usually also increase ventilation rates, likely due to increases in metabolic rates. In ectothermic air-breathing vertebrates, body temperatures and hypoxia tend to interact significantly, with an increasing responsiveness of ventilation to hypoxia at higher temperatures. Here, we tested whether the same is true in insects, using the Madagascar hissing cockroach, Gromphadorhina portentosa (Schaum) (Blattodea: Blaberidae). We equilibrated individuals to a temperature (beginning at 20°C), and animals were exposed to step-wise decreases in PO2 (21, 15, 10, and 5 kPa, in that order), and we measured ventilation frequencies from videotapes of abdominal pumping after 15 min of exposure to the test oxygen level. We then raised the temperature by 5°C, and the protocol was repeated, with tests run at 20, 25, 30, and 35°C. The 20°C animals had high initial ventilation rates, possibly due to handling stress, so these animals were excluded from subsequent analyses. Across all temperatures, ventilation increased in hypoxia, but only significantly at 5 kPa PO2 Surprisingly, there was no significant interaction between temperature and oxygen, and no significant effect of temperature on ventilation frequency from 25 to 35°C. Plausibly, the rise in metabolic rates at higher temperatures in insects is made possible by increasing other aspects of gas exchange, such as decreasing internal PO2, or increases in tidal volume, spiracular opening (duration or amount), or removal of fluid from the tracheoles. PMID:26721296

  12. Neuron-derived orphan receptor 1 transduces survival signals in neuronal cells in response to hypoxia-induced apoptotic insults.

    PubMed

    Chio, Chung-Ching; Wei, Li; Chen, Tyng Guey; Lin, Chien-Min; Shieh, Ja-Ping; Yeh, Poh-Shiow; Chen, Ruei-Ming

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Hypoxia can induce cell death or trigger adaptive mechanisms to guarantee cell survival. Neuron-derived orphan receptor 1 (NOR-1) works as an early-response protein in response to a variety of environmental stresses. In this study, the authors evaluated the roles of NOR-1 in hypoxia-induced neuronal insults. METHODS Neuro-2a cells were exposed to oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD). Cell viability, cell morphology, cas-pase-3 activity, DNA fragmentation, and cell apoptosis were assayed to determine the mechanisms of OGD-induced neuronal insults. RNA and protein analyses were carried out to evaluate the effects of OGD on expressions of NOR-1, cAMP response element-binding (CREB), and cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein 2 (cIAP2) genes. Translations of these gene expressions were knocked down using RNA interference. Mice subjected to traumatic brain injury (TBI) and NOR-1 was immunodetected. RESULTS Exposure of neuro-2a cells to OGD decreased cell viability in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, OGD led to cell shrinkage, DNA fragmentation, and cell apoptosis. In parallel, treatment of neuro-2a cells with OGD time dependently increased cellular NOR-1 mRNA and protein expressions. Interestingly, administration of TBI also augmented NOR-1 levels in the impacted regions of mice. As to the mechanism, exposure to OGD increased nuclear levels of the transcription factor CREB protein. Downregulating CREB expression using RNA interference simultaneously inhibited OGD-induced NOR-1 mRNA expression. Also, levels of cIAP2 mRNA and protein in neuro-2a cells were augmented by OGD. After reducing cIAP2 translation, OGD-induced cell death was reduced. Sequentially, application of NOR-1 small interfering RNA to neuro-2a cells significantly inhibited OGD-induced cIAP2 mRNA expression and concurrently alleviated hypoxia-induced alterations in cell viability, caspase-3 activation, DNA damage, and cell apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS This study shows that NOR-1 can transduce survival

  13. Adenosine receptors mediate the hypoxic ventilatory response but not the hypoxic metabolic response in the naked mole rat during acute hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Pamenter, Matthew E; Dzal, Yvonne A; Milsom, William K

    2015-02-01

    Naked mole rats are the most hypoxia-tolerant mammals identified; however, the mechanisms underlying this tolerance are poorly understood. Using whole-animal plethysmography and open-flow respirometry, we examined the hypoxic metabolic response (HMR), hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) and hypoxic thermal response in awake, freely behaving naked mole rats exposed to 7% O₂ for 1 h. Metabolic rate and ventilation each reversibly decreased 70% in hypoxia (from 39.6 ± 2.9 to 12.1 ± 0.3 ml O₂ min(-1) kg(-1), and 1412 ± 244 to 417 ± 62 ml min(-1) kg(-1), respectively; p < 0.05), whereas body temperature was unchanged and animals remained awake and active. Subcutaneous injection of the general adenosine receptor antagonist aminophylline (AMP; 100 mg kg(-1), in saline), but not control saline injections, prevented the HVR but had no effect on the HMR. As a result, AMP-treated naked mole rats exhibited extreme hyperventilation in hypoxia. These animals were also less tolerant to hypoxia, and in some cases hypoxia was lethal following AMP injection. We conclude that in naked mole rats (i) hypoxia tolerance is partially dependent on profound hypoxic metabolic and ventilatory responses, which are equal in magnitude but occur independently of thermal changes in hypoxia, and (ii) adenosine receptors mediate the HVR but not the HMR. PMID:25520355

  14. Adenosine receptors mediate the hypoxic ventilatory response but not the hypoxic metabolic response in the naked mole rat during acute hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Pamenter, Matthew E.; Dzal, Yvonne A.; Milsom, William K.

    2015-01-01

    Naked mole rats are the most hypoxia-tolerant mammals identified; however, the mechanisms underlying this tolerance are poorly understood. Using whole-animal plethysmography and open-flow respirometry, we examined the hypoxic metabolic response (HMR), hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) and hypoxic thermal response in awake, freely behaving naked mole rats exposed to 7% O2 for 1 h. Metabolic rate and ventilation each reversibly decreased 70% in hypoxia (from 39.6 ± 2.9 to 12.1 ± 0.3 ml O2 min−1 kg−1, and 1412 ± 244 to 417 ± 62 ml min−1 kg−1, respectively; p < 0.05), whereas body temperature was unchanged and animals remained awake and active. Subcutaneous injection of the general adenosine receptor antagonist aminophylline (AMP; 100 mg kg−1, in saline), but not control saline injections, prevented the HVR but had no effect on the HMR. As a result, AMP-treated naked mole rats exhibited extreme hyperventilation in hypoxia. These animals were also less tolerant to hypoxia, and in some cases hypoxia was lethal following AMP injection. We conclude that in naked mole rats (i) hypoxia tolerance is partially dependent on profound hypoxic metabolic and ventilatory responses, which are equal in magnitude but occur independently of thermal changes in hypoxia, and (ii) adenosine receptors mediate the HVR but not the HMR. PMID:25520355

  15. Hypoxia Promotes the Inflammatory Response and Stemness Features in Visceral Fat Stem Cells From Obese Subjects.

    PubMed

    Petrangeli, Elisa; Coroniti, Giuseppe; Brini, Anna T; de Girolamo, Laura; Stanco, Deborah; Niada, Stefania; Silecchia, Gianfranco; Morgante, Emanuela; Lubrano, Carla; Russo, Matteo A; Salvatori, Luisa

    2016-03-01

    Low-grade chronic inflammation is a salient feature of obesity and many associated disorders. This condition frequently occurs in central obesity and is connected to alterations of the visceral adipose tissue (AT) microenvironment. Understanding how obesity is related to inflammation may allow the development of therapeutics aimed at improving metabolic parameters in obese patients. To achieve this aim, we compared the features of two subpopulations of adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) isolated from both subcutaneous and visceral AT of obese patients with the features of two subpopulations of ASC from the same isolation sites of non-obese individuals. In particular, the behavior of ASC of obese versus non-obese subjects during hypoxia, which occurs in obese AT and is an inducer of the inflammatory response, was evaluated. Obesity deeply influenced ASC from visceral AT (obV-ASC); these cells appeared to exhibit clearly distinguishable morphology and ultrastructure as well as reduced proliferation, clonogenicity and expression of stemness, differentiation and inflammation-related genes. These cells also exhibited a deregulated response to hypoxia, which induced strong tissue-specific NF-kB activation and an NF-kB-mediated increase in inflammatory and fibrogenic responses. Moreover, obV-ASC, which showed a less stem-like phenotype, recovered stemness features after hypoxia. Our findings demonstrated the peculiar behavior of obV-ASC, their influence on the obese visceral AT microenvironment and the therapeutic potential of NF-kB inhibitors. These novel findings suggest that the deregulated hyper-responsiveness to hypoxic stimulus of ASC from visceral AT of obese subjects may contribute via paracrine mechanisms to low-grade chronic inflammation, which has been implicated in obesity-related morbidity. PMID:26224080

  16. Correction of Hypoxia, a Critical Element for Wound Bed Preparation Guidelines: TIMEO2 Principle of Wound Bed Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jayesh B.

    2011-01-01

    Wound bed preparation is an organized approach to create an optimal environment for wound healing by the use of the most cost-effective therapeutic options. It has become an essential part of wound management and seeks to use the latest findings from molecular and cellular research to maximize the benefits of today’s advanced wound care products. The international advisory panel on wound bed preparation met in 2002 to develop a systemic approach to wound management. These principles of this approach are referred to by the mnemonic TIME, which stands for the management of nonviable or deficient tissue (T), infection or inflammation (I), prolonged moisture imbalance (M), and nonadvancing or undermined epidermal edge (E). One critical element of pathophysiology, understanding of the hypoxic nature of the wound and correction of hypoxia as a critical element of wound bed preparation, is not covered. This article proposes to add correction of hypoxia to the TIME principle (TIMEO2 principle) based on the evidence. The evidence that will support the reason and the need for modification of the wound bed preparation protocol is discussed. PMID:24527166

  17. Hypoxia Promotes Glycogen Accumulation through Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF)-Mediated Induction of Glycogen Synthase 1

    PubMed Central

    Pescador, Nuria; Garcia-Rocha, Mar; Ortiz-Barahona, Amaya; Vazquez, Silvia; Ordoñez, Angel; Cuevas, Yolanda; Saez-Morales, David; Garcia-Bermejo, Maria Laura; Landazuri, Manuel O.; Guinovart, Joan; del Peso, Luis

    2010-01-01

    When oxygen becomes limiting, cells reduce mitochondrial respiration and increase ATP production through anaerobic fermentation of glucose. The Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIFs) play a key role in this metabolic shift by regulating the transcription of key enzymes of glucose metabolism. Here we show that oxygen regulates the expression of the muscle glycogen synthase (GYS1). Hypoxic GYS1 induction requires HIF activity and a Hypoxia Response Element within its promoter. GYS1 gene induction correlated with a significant increase in glycogen synthase activity and glycogen accumulation in cells exposed to hypoxia. Significantly, knockdown of either HIF1α or GYS1 attenuated hypoxia-induced glycogen accumulation, while GYS1 overexpression was sufficient to mimic this effect. Altogether, these results indicate that GYS1 regulation by HIF plays a central role in the hypoxic accumulation of glycogen. Importantly, we found that hypoxia also upregulates the expression of UTP:glucose-1-phosphate urydylyltransferase (UGP2) and 1,4-α glucan branching enzyme (GBE1), two enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of glycogen. Therefore, hypoxia regulates almost all the enzymes involved in glycogen metabolism in a coordinated fashion, leading to its accumulation. Finally, we demonstrated that abrogation of glycogen synthesis, by knock-down of GYS1 expression, impairs hypoxic preconditioning, suggesting a physiological role for the glycogen accumulated during chronic hypoxia. In summary, our results uncover a novel effect of hypoxia on glucose metabolism, further supporting the central importance of metabolic reprogramming in the cellular adaptation to hypoxia. PMID:20300197

  18. Post-traumatic hypoxia exacerbates brain tissue damage: analysis of axonal injury and glial responses.

    PubMed

    Hellewell, Sarah C; Yan, Edwin B; Agyapomaa, Doreen A; Bye, Nicole; Morganti-Kossmann, M Cristina

    2010-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) resulting in poor neurological outcome is predominantly associated with diffuse brain damage and secondary hypoxic insults. Post-traumatic hypoxia is known to exacerbate primary brain injury; however, the underlying pathological mechanisms require further elucidation. Using a rat model of diffuse traumatic axonal injury (TAI) followed by a post-traumatic hypoxic insult, we characterized axonal pathology, macrophage/microglia accumulation, and astrocyte responses over 14 days. Rats underwent TAI alone, TAI followed by 30 min of hypoxia (TAI + Hx), hypoxia alone, or sham-operation (n = 6/group). Systemic hypoxia was induced by ventilating rats with 12% oxygen in nitrogen, resulting in a ∼ 50% reduction in arterial blood oxygen saturation. Brains were assessed for axonal damage, macrophage/microglia accumulation, and astrocyte activation at 1, 7, and 14 days post-treatment. Immunohistochemistry with axonal damage markers (β-amyloid precursor protein [β-APP] and neurofilament) showed strong positive staining in TAI + Hx rats, which was most prominent in the corpus callosum (retraction bulbs 69.8 ± 18.67; swollen axons 14.2 ± 5.25), and brainstem (retraction bulbs 294 ± 118.3; swollen axons 50.3 ± 20.45) at 1 day post-injury. Extensive microglia/macrophage accumulation detected with the CD68 antibody was maximal at 14 days post-injury in the corpus callosum (macrophages 157.5 ± 55.48; microglia 72.71 ± 20.75), and coincided with regions of axonal damage. Astrocytosis assessed with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) antibody was also abundant in the corpus callosum and maximal at 14 days, with a trend toward an increase in TAI + Hx animals (18.99 ± 2.45 versus 13.56 ± 0.81; p = 0.0617). This study demonstrates for the first time that a hypoxic insult following TAI perpetuates axonal pathology and cellular inflammation, which may account for the poor neurological outcomes seen in TBI patients who experience post

  19. Hypoxia-mediated tumour targeting.

    PubMed

    Binley, K; Askham, Z; Martin, L; Spearman, H; Day, D; Kingsman, S; Naylor, S

    2003-04-01

    Hypoxia is a common physiological feature of tumours. It activates a signalling cascade that culminates in the stabilization of the HIF-1 transcription factor and activation of genes that possess a hypoxia response element (HRE). We have used an optimized hypoxia responsive promoter (OBHRE) to investigate hypoxia-targeted gene expression in vivo in the context of an adenovirus vector. The OBHRE promoter showed limited activity in the liver or spleen such that expression was 1000-fold lower than that driven by the strong CMV/IE promoter. However, in the context of the tumour microenvironment, the OBHRE promoter achieved expression levels comparable to that of the CMV/IE promoter. Next, we showed that an adenovirus expressing the human cytochrome P450 (CYP2B6) regulated by the OBHRE promoter delays tumour growth in response to the prodrug cyclophosphamide (CPA). Finally, we exploited the hepatotropism of adenovirus to investigate whether the OBHRE promoter could mitigate the hepatotoxicity of a recombinant adenovirus expressing thymidine kinase (TK) in the context of the prodrug ganciclovir (GCV). High-dose Ad.CMVTK/GCV treatment caused significant liver necrosis whereas the same dose of Ad.HRETK was well tolerated. These in vivo data demonstrate that hypoxia-targeted gene expression via the OBHRE promoter can be used to increase the therapeutic window of cytotoxic cancer gene therapy. PMID:12646859

  20. Cerebral Hypoxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Hypoxia Information Page Synonym(s): Hypoxia, Anoxia Table of Contents ( ... Trials Organizations Publicaciones en Español What is Cerebral Hypoxia? Cerebral hypoxia refers to a condition in which ...

  1. Dsc orthologs are required for hypoxia adaptation, triazole drug responses, and fungal virulence in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Willger, Sven D; Cornish, E Jean; Chung, Dawoon; Fleming, Brittany A; Lehmann, Margaret M; Puttikamonkul, Srisombat; Cramer, Robert A

    2012-12-01

    Hypoxia is an environmental stress encountered by Aspergillus fumigatus during invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). The ability of this mold to adapt to hypoxia is important for fungal virulence and genetically regulated in part by the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) SrbA. SrbA is required for fungal growth in the murine lung and to ultimately cause lethal disease in murine models of IPA. Here we identified and partially characterized four genes (dscA, dscB, dscC, and dscD, here referred to as dscA-D) with previously unknown functions in A. fumigatus that are orthologs of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe genes dsc1, dsc2, dsc3, and dsc4 (dsc1-4), which encode a Golgi E3 ligase complex critical for SREBP activation by proteolytic cleavage. A. fumigatus null dscA-D mutants displayed remarkable defects in hypoxic growth and increased susceptibility to triazole antifungal drugs. Consistent with the confirmed role of these genes in S. pombe, both ΔdscA and ΔdscC resulted in reduced cleavage of the SrbA precursor protein in A. fumigatus. Inoculation of corticosteroid immunosuppressed mice with ΔdscA and ΔdscC strains revealed that these genes are critical for A. fumigatus virulence. Reintroduction of SrbA amino acids 1 to 425, encompassing the N terminus DNA binding domain, into the ΔdscA strain was able to partially restore virulence, further supporting a mechanistic link between DscA and SrbA function. Thus, we have shown for the first time the importance of a previously uncharacterized group of genes in A. fumigatus that mediate hypoxia adaptation, fungal virulence, and triazole drug susceptibility and that are likely linked to regulation of SrbA function. PMID:23104569

  2. Maturation of the initial ventilatory response to hypoxia in sleeping infants.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Heidi L; Parslow, Peter M; Walker, Adrian M; Harding, Richard; Horne, Rosemary S C

    2007-03-01

    In infants most previous studies of the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) have been conducted only during quiet sleep (QS) and arousal responses have not been considered. Our aim was to quantify the maturation of the HVR in term infants during both active sleep (AS) and QS over the first 6 months of life. Daytime polysomnography was performed on 15 healthy term infants at 2-5 weeks, 2-3 and 5-6 months after birth and infants were challenged with hypoxia (15% O2, balance N2). Tests in AS always resulted in arousal; in QS tests infants either aroused or did not arouse. A biphasic HVR was observed in non arousing tests at all three ages studied. The fall in SpO2 was more rapid in arousal tests at all three ages. At 2-5 weeks, in non-arousing QS tests, there was a greater fall in respiratory frequency (f) despite a smaller fall in SpO2 compared with 2-3 and 5-6 months. When infants aroused there was no difference in the HVR between sleep states or with postnatal age. However, when infants failed to arouse from QS, arterial desaturation was less in the younger infants despite a poorer HVR. We suggest that arousal in response to hypoxia, particularly in AS, is a vital survival mechanism throughout the first 6 months of life. PMID:17309771

  3. Abnormal autonomic cardiac response to transient hypoxia in sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Sangkatumvong, S; Coates, T D; Khoo, M C K

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to non-invasively assess cardiac autonomic control in subjects with sickle cell anemia (SCA) by tracking the changes in heart rate variability (HRV) that occur following brief exposure to a hypoxic stimulus. Five African–American SCA patients and seven healthy control subjects were recruited to participate in this study. Each subject was exposed to a controlled hypoxic stimulus consisting of five breaths of nitrogen. Time-varying spectral analysis of HRV was applied to estimate the cardiac autonomic response to the transient episode of hypoxia. The confounding effects of changes in respiration on the HRV spectral indices were reduced by using a computational model. A significant decrease in the parameters related to parasympathetic control was detected in the post-hypoxic responses of the SCA subjects relative to normal controls. The spectral index related to sympathetic activity, on the other hand, showed a tendency to increase the following hypoxic stimulation, but the change was not significant. This study suggests that there is some degree of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in SCA that is revealed by the response to transient hypoxia. PMID:18460753

  4. Sulforaphane reduces molecular response to hypoxia in ovarian tumor cells independently of their resistance to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    PASTOREK, MICHAL; SIMKO, VERONIKA; TAKACOVA, MARTINA; BARATHOVA, MONIKA; BARTOSOVA, MARIA; HUNAKOVA, LUBA; SEDLAKOVA, OLGA; HUDECOVA, SONA; KRIZANOVA, OLGA; DEQUIEDT, FRANCK; PASTOREKOVA, SILVIA; SEDLAK, JAN

    2015-01-01

    One of the recently emerging anticancer strategies is the use of natural dietary compounds, such as sulforaphane, a cancer-chemopreventive isothiocyanate found in broccoli. Based on the growing evidence, sulforaphane acts through molecular mechanisms that interfere with multiple oncogenic pathways in diverse tumor cell types. Herein, we investigated the anticancer effects of bioavailable concentrations of sulforaphane in ovarian carcinoma cell line A2780 and its two derivatives, adriamycin-resistant A2780/ADR and cisplatin-resistant A2780/CP cell lines. Since tumor microenvironment is characterized by reduced oxygenation that induces aggressive tumor phenotype (such as increased invasiveness and resistance to chemotherapy), we evaluated the effects of sulforaphane in ovarian cancer cells exposed to hypoxia (2% O2). Using the cell-based reporter assay, we identified several oncogenic pathways modulated by sulforaphane in hypoxia by activating anticancer responses (p53, ARE, IRF-1, Pax-6 and XRE) and suppressing responses supporting tumor progression (AP-1 and HIF-1). We further showed that sulforaphane decreases the level of HIF-1α protein without affecting its transcription and stability. It can also diminish transcription and protein level of the HIF-1 target, CA IX, which protects tumor cells from hypoxia-induced pH imbalance and facilitates their migration/invasion. Accordingly, sulforaphane treatment leads to diminished pH regulation and reduced migration of ovarian carcinoma cells. These effects occur in all three ovarian cell lines suggesting that sulforaphane can overcome the chemoresistance of cancer cells. This offers a path potentially exploitable in sensitizing resistant cancer cells to therapy, and opens a window for the combined treatments of sulforaphane either with conventional chemotherapy, natural compounds, or with other small molecules. PMID:25955133

  5. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide in the rostral ventrolateral medulla/Bötzinger complex downregulates ventilatory responses to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Donatti, Alberto F; Soriano, Renato N; Sabino, João P; Branco, Luiz G S

    2014-08-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is now recognized as a new gaseous transmitter involved in several brain-mediated responses. The rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM)/Bötzinger complex is a region in the brainstem that is involved in cardiovascular and respiratory functions. Recently, it has been shown that exogenous H2S in the RVLM modulates autonomic function and thus blood pressure. In the present study, we investigated whether H2S, endogenously produced in the RVLM/Bötzinger complex, plays a role in the control of hypoxia-induced hyperventilation. Ventilation (VE) was measured before and after bilateral microinjection of Na2S (H2S donor, 0.04, 1 and 2 pmol/100 nl) or aminooxyacetate (AOA, 0.2, 1 and 2 pmol/100 nl, a cystathionine β-synthase, CBS, inhibitor) into the RVLM/Bötzinger complex followed by a 60-min period of hypoxia (7% inspired O2) or normoxia exposure. Control rats received microinjection of vehicle. Microinjection of vehicle, AOA or Na2S did not change VE in normoxic conditions. Exposure to hypoxia evoked a typical increase in VE. Microinjection of Na2S (2 pmol) followed by hypoxia exposure attenuated the hyperventilation. Conversely, microinjection of AOA (2 pmol) into the RVLM/Bötzinger complex caused an increase in the hypoxia-induced hyperventilation. Thus, endogenous H2S in the RVLM/Bötzinger complex seems to play no role in the maintenance of basal pulmonary ventilation during normoxia whereas during hypoxia H2S has a downmodulatory function. Homogenates of RVLM/Bötzinger complex of animals previously exposed to hypoxia for 60 min exhibited a decreased rate of H2S production. Our data are consistent with the notion that the gaseous messenger H2S synthesis is downregulated in the RVLM/Bötzinger complex during hypoxia favoring hyperventilation. PMID:24953676

  6. Neonatal epithelial hypoxia inducible factor-1α expression regulates the response of the lung to experimental asthma.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Krista K; Proper, Steven P; Saini, Yogesh; Bramble, Lori A; Jackson-Humbles, Daven N; Wagner, James G; Harkema, Jack R; LaPres, John J

    2012-03-01

    Allergic airway disease is characterized by a T helper type 2 cell-mediated airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. Little is known about the role of hypoxia-mediated signaling in the progression of the disease. To address this knowledge gap, a mouse model was created in which doxycycline exposure induces the functional deletion of hypoxia inducible factor-1α from alveolar type II and Clara cells of the lung. When hypoxia inducible factor-1α deletion was induced during the early postnatal development period of the lung, the mice displayed an enhanced response to the ovalbumin model of allergic airway disease. These hypoxia inducible factor-1α-deficient mice exhibit increased cellular infiltrates, eosinophilia in the lavage fluid and parenchyma, and T helper type 2 cytokines, as compared with ovalbumin-treated control mice. Moreover, these hypoxia inducible factor-1α-deficient mice display increased airway resistance when compared with their control counterparts. Interestingly, if the loss of hypoxia inducible factor-1α was induced in early adulthood, the exacerbated phenotype was not observed. Taken together, these results suggest that epithelial hypoxia inducible factor-1α plays an important role in establishing the innate immunity of the lung and epithelial-specific deficiency in the transcription factor, during early postnatal development, increases the severity of inflammation and functional airway resistance, following ovalbumin challenge. Finally, these results might explain some of the chronic respiratory pathology observed in premature infants, especially those that receive supplemental oxygen. This early hyperoxic exposure, from normal ambient and supplemental oxygen, would presumably inhibit normal hypoxia inducible factor-1α signaling, mimicking the functional deletion described. PMID:22180657

  7. [Reactions of neural elements of neocortex on action of hypoxia at the early neonatal period in rats].

    PubMed

    Otellin, V A; Khozhai, L I; Shishko, T T

    2014-01-01

    In this work we studied reactions of neural elements of various neocortex areas (sensomotor, visual, auditory) on action of acute normobaric hypoxia. The study is performed on the model of human premature pregnancy (action of normobaric hypoxia on rat pups at the 2nd postnatal day). There are revealed monotypical and monodirected structural reconstructions in all studied neocortex parts. The chosen parameters of hypoxic action initiate several direct reactions as early as at the next day: a decrease in sizes of cell bodies and in volume of the cytoplasm, as well as an enhancement, as compared with control, of the apoptotic cell death. By the end of the neonatal period (5 days), several ultrastructural alterations indicating deceleration of processes of differentiation of nerve cells are revealed: arrest of processes of complication of smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum and of Golgi apparatus, a small number of single ribosomes and polysomes in the cytoplasm, a decrease of the number of growth cones of axons and dendrites in neuropil, delay and disturbance of myelination processes in nerve fibers. The detected morphofunctional reconstructions can serve the structural ground for development of neonatal encephalopathies. PMID:25486820

  8. [Reactions of neural elements of neocortex on action of hypoxia at the early neonatal period in rats].

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    In this work we studied reactions of neural elements of various neocortex areas (sensomotor, visual, auditory) on action of acute normobaric hypoxia. The study is performed on the model of human premature pregnancy (action of normobaric hypoxia on rat pups at the 2nd postnatal day). There are revealed monotypical and monodirected structural reconstructions in all studied neocortex parts. The chosen parameters of hypoxic action initiate several direct reactions as early as at the next day: a decrease in sizes of cell bodies and in volume of the cytoplasm, as well as an enhancement, as compared with control, of the apoptotic cell death. By the end of the neonatal period (5 days), several ultrastructural alterations indicating deceleration of processes of differentiation of nerve cells are revealed: arrest of processes of complication of smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum and of Golgi apparatus, a small number of single ribosomes and polysomes in the cytoplasm, a decrease of the number of growth cones of axons and dendrites in neuropil, delay and disturbance of myelination processes in nerve fibers. The detected morphofunctional reconstructions can serve the structural ground for development of neonatal encephalopathies. PMID:25508951

  9. Metabolic and locomotor responses of juvenile paddlefish Polyodon spathula to hypoxia and temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hypoxia is an increasing problem in the natural habitats that the paddlefish (Polyodon spathula) has historically inhabited, and a potential problem in managed culture conditions. However, the effects of hypoxia on paddlefish are not well understood. In order to understand the effects of hypoxia on ...

  10. Development of a digital fluorescence sensing technique to monitor the response of macrophages to external hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asiedu, Jacob K.; Jin, Ji; Nguyen, Mai; Rosenzweig, Nitsa; Rosenzweig, Zeev

    2001-04-01

    Oxygen plays a very important role in living cells. The intracellular level of oxygen is under tight control, as even a small deviation from normal oxygen level affects major cellular metabolic processes and is likely to result in cellular damage or cell death. This paper describes the use of the oxygen sensitive fluorescent dye tris (1,10- phenanthroline) ruthenium chloride [Ru(phen)3] as an intracellular oxygen probe. Ru(phen)3 exhibits high photostability, a relatively high excitation coefficient at 450 nm (18000 M-1 cm-1), high emission quantum yield (approximately 0.5), and a large Stoke shift (peak emission at 604 nm). It is effectively quenched by molecular oxygen due to its long excited state lifetime of around 1 microsecond(s) . The luminescence of Ru(phen)3 decreases with increasing oxygen concentrations and the oxygen levels are determined using the Stern-Volmer equation. In our studies, J774 Murine Macrophages are loaded with Ru(phen)3, which passively permeates into the cells. Fluorescence spectroscopy and digital fluorescence imaging microscopy are used to observe the cells and monitor their response to changing oxygen levels. The luminescence intensity of the cells decreases when exposed to hypoxia and recovers once normal oxygen conditions are restored. The analytical properties of the probe and its application in monitoring the cellular response to hypoxia are described.

  11. Analysis of the early adaptive response of endothelial cells to hypoxia via a long serial analysis of gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Guang-Ping; Su, Yong-Yue; Chen, Jian; Yang, Zong-Cheng; Liu, You-Sheng; Luo, Xiang-Dong

    2009-07-10

    Activation of endothelial cells in humans is an early event in the response to hypoxia that may contribute to the endothelium's endogenous capacity to reduce tissue injury. To better understand the mechanism underlying this process, we utilized Long Serial Analysis of Gene Expression to study the transcriptome of human vein umbilical endothelial cells (EA.hy926) shortly after the induction of hypoxia. Of over 13,000 genes detected in each pool, 112 showed obvious differences in expression. Metabolic processes such as protein biosynthesis and proteolysis, aminoglycan metabolism, ribonucleotide biosynthesis, adenosine salvage, and lipid metabolism were reinforced. Pro-proliferation and pro-apoptotic states suggest the co-existence of pro- and anti-injury forces in endothelium shortly after the induction of hypoxia. Other adaptive responses include reinforced angiogenesis and vasodilation. Additionally, gene transcription in the endothelium shortly after the induction of hypoxia was regulated independently of HIF-1{alpha}. Our efforts to elucidate the adaptive response at an early post-hypoxia stage should contribute to further investigation of the protective processes that occur in the endothelium and has potential clinical implications.

  12. Cerebrovascular and ventilatory responses to acute isocapnic hypoxia in healthy aging and lung disease: effect of vitamin C.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Sara E; Waltz, Xavier; Kissel, Christine K; Szabo, Lian; Walker, Brandie L; Leigh, Richard; Anderson, Todd J; Poulin, Marc J

    2015-08-15

    Acute hypoxia increases cerebral blood flow (CBF) and ventilation (V̇e). It is unknown if these responses are impacted with normal aging, or in patients with enhanced oxidative stress, such as (COPD). The purpose of the study was to 1) investigate the effects of aging and COPD on the cerebrovascular and ventilatory responses to acute hypoxia, and 2) to assess the effect of vitamin C on these responses during hypoxia. In 12 Younger, 14 Older, and 12 COPD, we measured peak cerebral blood flow velocity (V̄p; index of CBF), and V̇e during two 5-min periods of acute isocapnic hypoxia, under conditions of 1) saline-sham; and 2) intravenous vitamin C. Antioxidants [vitamin C, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase, and catalase], oxidative stress [malondialdehyde (MDA) and advanced protein oxidation product], and nitric oxide metabolism end products (NOx) were measured in plasma. Following the administration of vitamin C, vitamin C, SOD, catalase, and MDA increased, while NOx decreased. V̄p and V̇e sensitivity to hypoxia was reduced in Older by ∼60% (P < 0.02). COPD patients exhibited similar V̄p and V̇e responses to Older (P > 0.05). Vitamin C did not have an effect on the hypoxic V̇e response but selectively decreased the V̄p sensitivity in Younger only. These findings suggest a reduced integrative reflex (i.e., cerebrovascular and ventilatory) during acute hypoxemia in healthy older adults. Vitamin C does not appear to have a large influence on the cerebrovascular or ventilatory responses during acute hypoxia. PMID:26089546

  13. Evaluating the Hypoxia Response of Ruffe and Flounder Gills by a Combined Proteome and Transcriptome Approach

    PubMed Central

    Tiedke, Jessica; Borner, Janus; Beeck, Hendrik; Kwiatkowski, Marcel; Schmidt, Hanno; Thiel, Ralf; Fabrizius, Andrej; Burmester, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia has gained ecological importance during the last decades, and it is the most dramatically increasing environmental factor in coastal areas and estuaries. The gills of fish are the prime target of hypoxia and other stresses. Here we have studied the impact of the exposure to hypoxia (1.5 mg O2/l for 48 h) on the protein expression of the gills of two estuarine fish species, the ruffe (Gymnocephalus cernua) and the European flounder (Platichthys flesus). First, we obtained the transcriptomes of mixed tissues (gills, heart and brain) from both species by Illumina next-generation sequencing. Then, the gill proteomes were investigated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Quantification of the normalized proteome maps resulted in a total of 148 spots in the ruffe, of which 28 (18.8%) were significantly regulated (> 1.5-fold). In the flounder, 121 spots were found, of which 27 (22.3%) proteins were significantly regulated. The transcriptomes were used for the identification of these proteins, which was successful for 15 proteins of the ruffe and 14 of the flounder. The ruffe transcriptome dataset comprised 87,169,850 reads, resulting in an assembly of 72,108 contigs (N50 = 1,828 bp). 20,860 contigs (26.93%) had blastx hits with E < 1e-5 in the human sequences in the RefSeq database, representing 14,771 unique accession numbers. The flounder transcriptome with 78,943,030 reads assembled into 49,241 contigs (N50 = 2,106 bp). 20,127 contigs (40.87%) had a hit with human proteins, corresponding to 14,455 unique accession numbers. The regulation of selected genes was confirmed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Most of the regulated proteins that were identified by this approach function in the energy metabolism, while others are involved in the immune response, cell signalling and the cytoskeleton. PMID:26273839

  14. Evaluating the Hypoxia Response of Ruffe and Flounder Gills by a Combined Proteome and Transcriptome Approach.

    PubMed

    Tiedke, Jessica; Borner, Janus; Beeck, Hendrik; Kwiatkowski, Marcel; Schmidt, Hanno; Thiel, Ralf; Fabrizius, Andrej; Burmester, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia has gained ecological importance during the last decades, and it is the most dramatically increasing environmental factor in coastal areas and estuaries. The gills of fish are the prime target of hypoxia and other stresses. Here we have studied the impact of the exposure to hypoxia (1.5 mg O2/l for 48 h) on the protein expression of the gills of two estuarine fish species, the ruffe (Gymnocephalus cernua) and the European flounder (Platichthys flesus). First, we obtained the transcriptomes of mixed tissues (gills, heart and brain) from both species by Illumina next-generation sequencing. Then, the gill proteomes were investigated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Quantification of the normalized proteome maps resulted in a total of 148 spots in the ruffe, of which 28 (18.8%) were significantly regulated (> 1.5-fold). In the flounder, 121 spots were found, of which 27 (22.3%) proteins were significantly regulated. The transcriptomes were used for the identification of these proteins, which was successful for 15 proteins of the ruffe and 14 of the flounder. The ruffe transcriptome dataset comprised 87,169,850 reads, resulting in an assembly of 72,108 contigs (N50 = 1,828 bp). 20,860 contigs (26.93%) had blastx hits with E < 1e-5 in the human sequences in the RefSeq database, representing 14,771 unique accession numbers. The flounder transcriptome with 78,943,030 reads assembled into 49,241 contigs (N50 = 2,106 bp). 20,127 contigs (40.87%) had a hit with human proteins, corresponding to 14,455 unique accession numbers. The regulation of selected genes was confirmed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Most of the regulated proteins that were identified by this approach function in the energy metabolism, while others are involved in the immune response, cell signalling and the cytoskeleton. PMID:26273839

  15. Hypoxia Exerts Dualistic Effects on Inflammatory and Proliferative Responses of Healthy and Asthmatic Primary Human Bronchial Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Keglowich, Laura; Baraket, Melissa; Tamm, Michael; Borger, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background For oxygen supply, airway wall cells depend on diffusion though the basement membrane, as well as on delivery by micro-vessels. In the asthmatic lung, local hypoxic conditions may occur due to increased thickness and altered composition of the basement membrane, as well as due to edema of the inflamed airway wall. Objective In our study we investigated the effect of hypoxia on proliferation and pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic parameter production by human bronchial smooth muscle cells (BSMC). Furthermore, conditioned media of hypoxia-exposed BSMC was tested for its ability to induce sprout outgrowth from endothelial cells spheroids. Methods BSMC were cultured in RPMI1640 (5% FCS) under normoxic (21% O2) and hypoxic (1% and 5% O2) conditions. Proliferation was determined by cell count and Western blot analysis for cyclin E and Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA). Secretion of IL-6, IL-8, ENA-78 and VEGF-A was analyzed by ELISA. BSMC conditioned medium was tested for its angiogenic capacity by endothelial cell (EC)-spheroid in vitro angiogenesis assay. Results Proliferation of BSMC obtained from asthmatic and non-asthmatic patients was significantly reduced in the presence of 1% O2, whereas 5% O2 reduced proliferation of asthmatic BSMC only. Hypoxia induced HIF-1α expression in asthmatic and non-asthmatic BSMC, which coincided with significantly increased release of IL-6, IL-8 and VEGF-A, but not ENA-78. Finally, endothelial sprout outgrowth from EC spheroids was increased when exposed to hypoxia conditioned BSMC medium. Conclusion Hypoxia had dualistic effects on proliferative and inflammatory responses of asthmatic and non-asthmatic BSMC. First, hypoxia reduced BSMC proliferation. Second, hypoxia induced a pro-inflammatory, pro-angiogenic response. BSMC and EC may thus be promising new targets to counteract and/or alleviate airway wall remodeling. PMID:24587090

  16. Reversible blunting of arousal from sleep in response to intermittent hypoxia in the developing rat.

    PubMed

    Darnall, R A; McWilliams, S; Schneider, R W; Tobia, C M

    2010-12-01

    Arousal is an important survival mechanism when infants are confronted with hypoxia during sleep. Many sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) infants are exposed to repeated episodes of hypoxia before death and have impaired arousal mechanisms. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to hypoxia would cause a progressive blunting of arousal, and that a reversal of this process would occur if the hypoxia was terminated at the time of arousal. P5 (postnatal age of 5 days), P15, and P25 rat pups were exposed to either eight trials of hypoxia (3 min 5% O(2) alternating with room air) (group A), or three hypoxia trials as in group A, followed by five trials in which hypoxia was terminated at arousal (group B). In both groups A and B, latency increased over the first four trials of hypoxia, but reversed in group B animals during trials 5-8. Progressive arousal blunting was more pronounced in the older pups. The effects of intermittent hypoxia on heart rate also depended on age. In the older pups, heart rate increased with each hypoxia exposure. In the P5 pups, however, heart rate decreased during hypoxia and did not return to baseline between exposures, resulting in a progressive fall of baseline values over successive hypoxia exposures. In the group B animals, heart rate changes during trials 1-4 also reversed during trials 5-8. We conclude that exposure to repeated episodes of hypoxia can cause progressive blunting of arousal, which is reversible by altering the exposure times to hypoxia and the period of recovery between hypoxia exposures. PMID:20930126

  17. Uncovering drug-responsive regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Luizon, Marcelo R; Ahituv, Nadav

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide changes in gene regulatory elements can have a major effect on interindividual differences in drug response. For example, by reviewing all published pharmacogenomic genome-wide association studies, we show here that 96.4% of the associated single nucleotide polymorphisms reside in noncoding regions. We discuss how sequencing technologies are improving our ability to identify drug response-associated regulatory elements genome-wide and to annotate nucleotide variants within them. We highlight specific examples of how nucleotide changes in these elements can affect drug response and illustrate the techniques used to find them and functionally characterize them. Finally, we also discuss challenges in the field of drug-responsive regulatory elements that need to be considered in order to translate these findings into the clinic. PMID:26555224

  18. Ventilatory, cardiovascular and metabolic responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia in the armadillo.

    PubMed

    Boggs, D F; Frappell, P B; Kilgore, D L

    1998-08-01

    Armadillos have a low resting metabolic rate and high hemoglobin affinity for their size, a rigid carapace and a semi-fossorial life style. These characteristics could contribute to unusual respiratory responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia which were investigated in this study. Ventilatory and oxygen consumption responses of six adult unanesthetized armadillos to 15, 12, 10 and 8% O2 and 1.5, 3, 5 and 7% CO2 were measured by barometric plethysmography and flow-through respirometry. A significant increase in ventilation occurred in response to 10 and 8% O2 but a decline in oxygen consumption only occurred at 8% inspired O2. The convection requirement response has a threshold at a PaO2 of approximately = 28 Torr which corresponds to a Hb saturation of approximately 70%. Ventilation increased in response to 3% and higher levels of CO2, with no change in oxygen consumption. The magnitude of the ventilatory response to CO2 was similar to other semi-fossorial mammals and less than that of nonburrowing species. However, the pattern of the response was unique in being largely a frequency response with little change in tidal volume, contrary to the tidal volume dominated response to hypercapnia typical of mammals. This feature, not shared by another Xenarthran, the sloth, who lacks a carapace, is likely attributable to the low respiratory system compliance and increased airway resistance resulting from the rigid carapace and small lungs of armadillos and emphasizes the importance of respiratory mechanics in determining breathing pattern. PMID:9832229

  19. The Response of Macrophages and Neutrophils to Hypoxia in the Context of Cancer and Other Inflammatory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Egners, Antje; Erdem, Merve; Cramer, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Lack of oxygen (hypoxia) is a hallmark of a multitude of acute and chronic diseases and can be either beneficial or detrimental for organ restitution and recovery. In the context of inflammation, hypoxia is particularly important and can significantly influence the course of inflammatory diseases. Macrophages and neutrophils, the chief cellular components of innate immunity, display distinct properties when exposed to hypoxic conditions. Virtually every aspect of macrophage and neutrophil function is affected by hypoxia, amongst others, morphology, migration, chemotaxis, adherence to endothelial cells, bacterial killing, differentiation/polarization, and protumorigenic activity. Prominent arenas of macrophage and neutrophil function, for example, acute/chronic inflammation and the microenvironment of solid tumors, are characterized by low oxygen levels, demonstrating the paramount importance of the hypoxic response for proper function of these cells. Members of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF) family emerged as pivotal molecular regulators of macrophages and neutrophils. In this review, we will summarize the molecular responses of macrophages and neutrophils to hypoxia in the context of cancer and other chronic inflammatory diseases and discuss the potential avenues for therapeutic intervention that arise from this knowledge. PMID:27034586

  20. The Response of Macrophages and Neutrophils to Hypoxia in the Context of Cancer and Other Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Egners, Antje; Erdem, Merve; Cramer, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Lack of oxygen (hypoxia) is a hallmark of a multitude of acute and chronic diseases and can be either beneficial or detrimental for organ restitution and recovery. In the context of inflammation, hypoxia is particularly important and can significantly influence the course of inflammatory diseases. Macrophages and neutrophils, the chief cellular components of innate immunity, display distinct properties when exposed to hypoxic conditions. Virtually every aspect of macrophage and neutrophil function is affected by hypoxia, amongst others, morphology, migration, chemotaxis, adherence to endothelial cells, bacterial killing, differentiation/polarization, and protumorigenic activity. Prominent arenas of macrophage and neutrophil function, for example, acute/chronic inflammation and the microenvironment of solid tumors, are characterized by low oxygen levels, demonstrating the paramount importance of the hypoxic response for proper function of these cells. Members of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF) family emerged as pivotal molecular regulators of macrophages and neutrophils. In this review, we will summarize the molecular responses of macrophages and neutrophils to hypoxia in the context of cancer and other chronic inflammatory diseases and discuss the potential avenues for therapeutic intervention that arise from this knowledge. PMID:27034586

  1. Transcriptome analysis of the response to chronic constant hypoxia in zebrafish hearts

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Ines J.; Leito, Jelani T. D.; Spaink, Herman P.; Testerink, Janwillem; Jaspers, Richard T.; Witte, Frans; van den Berg, Sjoerd

    2007-01-01

    Insufficient blood supply during acute infarction and chronic ischemia leads to tissue hypoxia which can significantly alter gene expression patterns in the heart. In contrast to most mammals, some teleost fishes are able to adapt to extremely low oxygen levels. We describe here that chronic constant hypoxia (CCH) leads to a smaller ventricular outflow tract, reduced lacunae within the central ventricular cavity and around the trabeculae and an increase in the number of cardiac myocyte nuclei per area in the hearts of two teleost species, zebrafish (Danio rerio) and cichlids (Haplochromis piceatus). In order to identify the molecular basis for the adaptations to CCH, we profiled the gene expression changes in the hearts of adult zebrafish. We have analyzed over 15,000 different transcripts and found 376 differentially regulated genes, of which 260 genes showed increased and 116 genes decreased expression levels. Two notch receptors (notch-2 and notch-3) as well as regulatory genes linked to cell proliferation were transcriptionally upregulated in hypoxic hearts. We observed a simultaneous increase in expression of IGF-2 and IGFbp1 and upregulation of several genes important for the protection against reactive oxygen species (ROS). We have identified here many novel genes involved in the response to CCH in the heart, which may have potential clinical implications in the future. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00360-007-0201-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:17828398

  2. Nuclear responses in INTOR plasma stabilization elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohar, Y.; Mattas, R. F.; Yang, S.; Wiffen, F. W.

    Nuclear responses in the plasma stabilization elements were studied in a parametric fashion as a part of the transient electromagnetics critical issue C of ETR/INTOR activity. The main responses are neutron fluence and radiation dose in the insulator material, induced resistively and atomic displacement in the conductor material, nuclear heating and life analysis for the elements. Copper and aluminum conductors with either MgAl2O4 or MgO insulating material were investigated. Radiation damage and life analysis for these elements were also discussed.

  3. A Year in Hypoxia: Epibenthic Community Responses to Severe Oxygen Deficit at a Subsea Observatory in a Coastal Inlet

    PubMed Central

    Matabos, Marjolaine; Tunnicliffe, Verena; Juniper, S. Kim; Dean, Courtney

    2012-01-01

    Changes in ocean ventilation driven by climate change result in loss of oxygen in the open ocean that, in turn, affects coastal areas in upwelling zones such as the northeast Pacific. Saanich Inlet, on the west coast of Canada, is a natural seasonally hypoxic fjord where certain continental shelf species occur in extreme hypoxia. One study site on the VENUS cabled subsea network is located in the hypoxic zone at 104 m depth. Photographs of the same 5 m2 area were taken with a remotely-controlled still camera every 2/3 days between October 6th 2009 and October 18th 2010 and examined for community composition, species behaviour and microbial mat features. Instruments located on a near-by platform provided high-resolution measurements of environmental variables. We applied multivariate ordination methods and a principal coordinate analysis of neighbour matrices to determine temporal structures in our dataset. Responses to seasonal hypoxia (0.1–1.27 ml/l) and its high variability on short time-scale (hours) varied among species, and their life stages. During extreme hypoxia, microbial mats developed then disappeared as a hippolytid shrimp, Spirontocaris sica, appeared in high densities (200 m−2) despite oxygen below 0.2 ml/l. The slender sole Lyopsetta exilis was abundant in severe hypoxia and diminished as oxygen increased in the summer. This planktivore may be responding to changes in the depth of the diurnal migration of zooplankton. While the squat lobster Munida quadrispina was common at all times, juveniles disappeared in fluctuating conditions. Despite low oxygen conditions, animal densities were high indicating that the risk from hypoxia is balanced by factors such as food availability and escape from less tolerant predators. As hypoxia increases on the continental shelf, we expect benthic communities to become dominated by low diversity, hypoxia-tolerant species of low commercial significance. PMID:23029145

  4. Synergistic Inhibitory Effects of Hypoxia and Iron Deficiency on Hepatic Glucose Response in Mouse Liver.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hyeyoung; Jones, Deborah; Cooksey, Robert C; Gao, Yan; Sink, Sandy; Cox, James; McClain, Donald A

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxia and iron both regulate metabolism through multiple mechanisms, including hypoxia-inducible transcription factors. The hypoxic effects on glucose disposal and glycolysis are well established, but less is known about the effects of hypoxia and iron deficiency on hepatic gluconeogenesis. We therefore assessed their effects on hepatic glucose production in mice. Weanling C57BL/6 male mice were fed an iron-deficient (4 ppm) or iron-adequate (35 ppm) diet for 14 weeks and were continued in normoxia or exposed to hypoxia (8% O2) for the last 4 weeks of that period. Hypoxic mice became hypoglycemic and displayed impaired hepatic glucose production after a pyruvate challenge, an effect accentuated by an iron-deficient diet. Stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factors under hypoxia resulted in most glucose being converted into lactate and not oxidized. Hepatic pyruvate concentrations were lower in hypoxic mice. The decreased hepatic pyruvate levels were not caused by increased utilization but rather were contributed to by decreased metabolism from gluconeogenic amino acids. Pyruvate carboxylase, which catalyzes the first step of gluconeogenesis, was also downregulated by hypoxia with iron deficiency. Hypoxia, and more so hypoxia with iron deficiency, results in hypoglycemia due to decreased levels of hepatic pyruvate and decreased pyruvate utilization for gluconeogenesis. These data highlight the role of iron levels as an important determinant of glucose metabolism in hypoxia. PMID:26993063

  5. ChIP-seq and In Vivo Transcriptome Analyses of the Aspergillus fumigatus SREBP SrbA Reveals a New Regulator of the Fungal Hypoxia Response and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Merriman, Brittney; Werner, Ernst R.; Lechner, Beatrix E.; Dhingra, Sourabh; Cheng, Chao; Xu, Wenjie; Blosser, Sara J.; Morohashi, Kengo; Mazurie, Aurélien; Mitchell, Thomas K.; Haas, Hubertus; Mitchell, Aaron P.; Cramer, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    The Aspergillus fumigatus sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) SrbA belongs to the basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) family of transcription factors and is crucial for antifungal drug resistance and virulence. The latter phenotype is especially striking, as loss of SrbA results in complete loss of virulence in murine models of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). How fungal SREBPs mediate fungal virulence is unknown, though it has been suggested that lack of growth in hypoxic conditions accounts for the attenuated virulence. To further understand the role of SrbA in fungal infection site pathobiology, chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by massively parallel DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) was used to identify genes under direct SrbA transcriptional regulation in hypoxia. These results confirmed the direct regulation of ergosterol biosynthesis and iron uptake by SrbA in hypoxia and revealed new roles for SrbA in nitrate assimilation and heme biosynthesis. Moreover, functional characterization of an SrbA target gene with sequence similarity to SrbA identified a new transcriptional regulator of the fungal hypoxia response and virulence, SrbB. SrbB co-regulates genes involved in heme biosynthesis and demethylation of C4-sterols with SrbA in hypoxic conditions. However, SrbB also has regulatory functions independent of SrbA including regulation of carbohydrate metabolism. Loss of SrbB markedly attenuates A. fumigatus virulence, and loss of both SREBPs further reduces in vivo fungal growth. These data suggest that both A. fumigatus SREBPs are critical for hypoxia adaptation and virulence and reveal new insights into SREBPs' complex role in infection site adaptation and fungal virulence. PMID:25375670

  6. Inhalation of the nerve gas sarin impairs ventilatory responses to hypercapnia and hypoxia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang Jianguo; Xu Fadi Campen, Matthew J.; Zhang Cancan; Pena-Philippides, Juan C.; Sopori, Mohan L.

    2008-11-01

    Sarin, a highly toxic nerve gas, is believed to cause bronchoconstriction and even death primarily through respiratory failure; however, the mechanism underlying the respiratory failure is not fully understood. The goals of this study were to ascertain whether sarin affects baseline ventilation (V{sub E}) and V{sub E} chemoreflexes as well as airway resistance and, if so, whether these changes are reversible. Four groups of F344 rats were exposed to vehicle (VEH) or sarin at 2.5, 3.5, and 4.0 mg h m{sup -3} (SL, SM, and SH, respectively). V{sub E} and V{sub E} responses to hypercapnia (7% CO{sub 2}) or hypoxia (10% O{sub 2}) were measured by plethysmography at 2 h and 1, 2, and 5 days after VEH or sarin exposure. Total pulmonary resistance (R{sub L}) also was measured in anesthetized VEH- and SH-exposed animals 2 h after exposure. Our results showed that within 2 h after exposure 11% of the SM- and 52% of the SH- exposed groups died. Although the SM and SH significantly decreased hypercapnic and hypoxic V{sub E} to similar levels (64 and 69%), SH induced greater respiratory impairment, characterized by lower baseline V{sub E} (30%; P < 0.05), and total loss of the respiratory frequency response to hypercapnia and hypoxia. V{sub E} impairment recovered within 1-2 days after sarin exposure; interestingly, SH did not significantly affect baseline R{sub L}. Moreover, sarin induced body tremors that were unrelated to the changes in the V{sub E} responses. Thus, LC{sub 50} sarin causes a reversible impairment of V{sub E} that is not dependent on the sarin-induced body tremors and not associated with changes in R{sub L}.

  7. Expression of EGFR Under Tumor Hypoxia: Identification of a Subpopulation of Tumor Cells Responsible for Aggressiveness and Treatment Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogsteen, Ilse J.; Marres, Henri A.M.; Hoogen, Franciscus J.A. van den

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and tumor hypoxia have been shown to correlate with worse outcome in several types of cancer including head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Little is known about the combination and possible interactions between the two phenomena. Methods and Materials: In this study, 45 cases of histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck were analyzed. All patients received intravenous infusions of the exogenous hypoxia marker pimonidazole prior to biopsy. Presence of EGFR, pimonidazole binding, and colocalization between EGFR and tumor hypoxia were examined using immunohistochemistry. Results: Of all biopsies examined, respectively, 91% and 60% demonstrated EGFR- and pimonidazole-positive areas. A weak but significant association was found between the hypoxic fractions of pimonidazole (HFpimo) and EGFR fractions (F-EGFR) and between F-EGFR and relative vascular area. Various degrees of colocalization between hypoxia and EGFR were found, increasing with distance from the vasculature. A high fraction of EGFR was correlated with better disease-free and metastasis-free survival, whereas a high degree of colocalization correlated with poor outcome. Conclusions: Colocalization of hypoxia and EGFR was demonstrated in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas, predominantly at longer distances from vessels. A large amount of colocalization was associated with poor outcome, which points to a survival advantage of hypoxic cells that are also able to express EGFR. This subpopulation of tumor cells might be indicative of tumor aggressiveness and be partly responsible for treatment resistance.

  8. Nutrient-Deprived Retinal Progenitors Proliferate in Response to Hypoxia: Interaction of the HIF-1 and mTOR Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Khaliullina, Helena; Love, Nicola K.; Harris, William A.

    2016-01-01

    At a cellular level, nutrients are sensed by the mechanistic Target of Rapamycin (mTOR). The response of cells to hypoxia is regulated via action of the oxygen sensor Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 (HIF-1). During development, injury and disease, tissues might face conditions of both low nutrient supply and low oxygen, yet it is not clear how cells adapt to both nutrient restriction and hypoxia, or how mTOR and HIF-1 interact in such conditions. Here we explore this question in vivo with respect to cell proliferation using the ciliary marginal zone (CMZ) of Xenopus. We found that both nutrient-deprivation and hypoxia cause retinal progenitors to decrease their proliferation, yet when nutrient-deprived progenitors are exposed to hypoxia there is an unexpected rise in cell proliferation. This increase, mediated by HIF-1 signalling, is dependent on glutaminolysis and reactivation of the mTOR pathway. We discuss how these findings in non-transformed tissue may also shed light on the ability of cancer cells in poorly vascularised solid tumours to proliferate. PMID:27280081

  9. Effects of short-term hypoxia and seawater acidification on hemocyte responses of the mussel Mytilus coruscus.

    PubMed

    Sui, Yanming; Kong, Hui; Shang, Yueyong; Huang, Xizhi; Wu, FangLi; Hu, Menghong; Lin, Daohui; Lu, Weiqun; Wang, Youji

    2016-07-15

    Hypoxia often intensifies with rising dissolved CO2, but the concurrent effects of hypoxia and acidification on bivalves are largely unknown. In this study, immune responses of hemocytes in the mussel Mytilus coruscus were examined under six combinations of pH (7.3, 7.7 and 8.1) and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations (2mgL(-1), 6mgL(-1)) for 72h. Generally, total hemocyte account, phagocytosis, esterase and lysosomal content were reduced under low DO and pH conditions, whereas hemocyte mortality and reactive oxygen species production increased under low DO and pH. Both hypoxia and low pH have negative effects on mussels, but the effects of pH are not as strong as DO. Moreover, significant interactions between DO and pH occurred. However, acidification generally doesn't aggravate the effects induced by hypoxia. Acidification and hypoxia may increase disease risk and impact the aquaculture of this species. PMID:27207025

  10. Cardiopulmonary responses to acute hypoxia, head-down tilt and fluid loading in anesthetized dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeppky, J. A.; Scotto, P.; Riedel, C.; Avasthi, P.; Koshukosky, V.; Chick, T. W.

    1991-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary responses to acute hypoxia (HY), fluid loading by saline infusion (FL), and head-down tilt (HD) of mechanically ventilated anesthetized dogs were investigated by measuring thermodynamics and pulmonary gas exchange. It was found that HD decreased the total respiratory compliance both during HY and normoxia (NO) and that the reduction in compliance by FL was twice as large as by HD. Superimposing HD on HY doubled the increase in vascular resistance due to HY alone. In the systemic circulation, HD lowered the resistance to below NO levels. There was a significant positive correlation between the changes in blood volume and in pulmonary artery pressure for experimental transitions, suggesting that a shift in blood volume from systemic to pulmonary circulations and changes in the total blood volume may contribute substantially to these apparent changes in resistance.

  11. Hypoxia-Responsive Mir-301a and Mir-301b Promote Radioresistance of Prostate Cancer Cells via Downregulating NDRG2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Mingbo; Guan, Yawei; Wu, Qingwu

    2016-01-01

    Background MiR-301a and miR-301b are 2 oncomiRs involved in multiple types of cancer. In this study, we explored the expression change of miR-301a and miR-301b in prostate cancer cells in hypoxia and studied their regulation of autophagy and radiosensitivity of prostate cancer cells. Material/Methods QRT-PCR was performed to quantify the expression change of miR-301a and miR-301b in hypoxia. Their effects on autophagy were measured by Western blot analysis, and their effects on radiosensitivity were measured by clonogenic assay and flow cytometry. In addition, the regulation of miR-301a and miR-301b on NDRG2, a tumor-suppressor gene in prostate cancer, was also studied. The effect of miR-301a/b-NDRG2 axis on autophagy and radiosensitivity of prostate cancer cells was further investigated. Results MiR-301a and miR-301b are 2 hypoxia responsive miRNAs that are significantly upregulated in hypoxia in prostate cancer cells. Higher level of miR-301a and miR-301b expression results in elevated autophagy and increased radioresistance in LNCaP cells. MiR-301a and miR-301b simultaneously target NDRG2 and decrease its expression. Knockdown of NDRG2 leads to increased autophagy and radioresistance. Conclusions MiR-301a and miR-301b are 2 hypoxia-responsive miRNAs that decrease autophagy of prostate cancer cells in hypoxia by targeting NDRG2. Through downregulating NDRG2, miR-301a and miR-301b can promote radioresistance of prostate cancer cells. PMID:27327120

  12. Tribute to R. G. Boutilier: the role for skeletal muscle in the hypoxia-induced hypometabolic responses of submerged frogs.

    PubMed

    West, T G; Donohoe, P H; Staples, J F; Askew, G N

    2006-04-01

    Much of Bob Boutilier's research characterised the subcellular, organ-level and in vivo behavioural responses of frogs to environmental hypoxia. His entirely integrative approach helped to reveal the diversity of tissue-level responses to O(2) lack and to advance our understanding of the ecological relevance of hypoxia tolerance in frogs. Work from Bob's lab mainly focused on the role for skeletal muscle in the hypoxic energetics of overwintering frogs. Muscle energy demand affects whole-body metabolism, not only because of its capacity for rapid increases in ATP usage, but also because hypometabolism of the large skeletal muscle mass in inactive animals impacts so greatly on in vivo energetics. The oxyconformance and typical hypoxia-tolerance characteristics (e.g. suppressed heat flux and preserved membrane ion gradients during O(2) lack) of skeletal muscle in vitro suggest that muscle hypoperfusion in vivo is possibly a key mechanism for (i) downregulating muscle and whole-body metabolic rates and (ii) redistributing O(2) supply to hypoxia-sensitive tissues. The gradual onset of a low-level aerobic metabolic state in the muscle of hypoxic, cold-submerged frogs is indeed important for slowing depletion of on-board fuels and extending overwintering survival time. However, it has long been known that overwintering frogs cannot survive anoxia or even severe hypoxia. Recent work shows that they remain sensitive to ambient O(2) and that they emerge rapidly from quiescence in order to actively avoid environmental hypoxia. Hence, overwintering frogs experience periods of hypometabolic quiescence interspersed with episodes of costly hypoxia avoidance behaviour and exercise recovery. In keeping with this flexible physiology and behaviour, muscle mechanical properties in frogs do not deteriorate during periods of overwintering quiescence. On-going studies inspired by Bob Boutilier's integrative mindset continue to illuminate the cost-benefit(s) of intermittent locomotion in

  13. Superoxide scavengers augment contractile but not energetic responses to hypoxia in rat diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Wright, V P; Klawitter, P F; Iscru, D F; Merola, A J; Clanton, T L

    2005-05-01

    Acute exposure to severe hypoxia depresses contractile function and induces adaptations in skeletal muscle that are only partially understood. Previous studies have demonstrated that antioxidants (AOXs) given during hypoxia partially protect contractile function, but this has not been a universal finding. This study confirms that specific AOXs, known to act primarily as superoxide scavengers, protect contractile function in severe hypoxia. Furthermore, the hypothesis is tested that the mechanism of protection involves preservation of high-energy phosphates (ATP, creatine phosphate) and reductions of P(i). Rat diaphragm muscle strips were treated with AOXs and subjected to 30 min of hypoxia. Contractile function was examined by using twitch and tetanic stimulations and the degree of elevation in passive force occurring during hypoxia (contracture). High-energy phosphates were measured at the end of 30-min hypoxia exposure. Treatment with the superoxide scavengers 4,5-dihydroxy-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid (Tiron, 10 mM) or Mn(III)tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphyrin pentachloride (50 microM) suppressed contracture during hypoxia and protected maximum tetanic force. N-acetylcysteine (10 or 18 mM) had no influence on tetanic force production. Contracture during hypoxia without AOXs was also shown to be dependent on the extracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Although hypoxia resulted in only small reductions in ATP concentration, creatine phosphate concentration was decreased to approximately 10% of control. There were no consistent influences of the AOX treatments on high-energy phosphates during hypoxia. The results demonstrate that superoxide scavengers can protect contractile function and reduce contracture in hypoxia through a mechanism that does not involve preservation of high-energy phosphates. PMID:15640388

  14. Behavioral, Ventilatory and Thermoregulatory Responses to Hypercapnia and Hypoxia in the Wistar Audiogenic Rat (WAR) Strain

    PubMed Central

    Giusti, Humberto; Oliveira, José Antonio; Glass, Mogens Lesner; Garcia-Cairasco, Norberto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We investigated the behavioral, respiratory, and thermoregulatory responses elicited by acute exposure to both hypercapnic and hypoxic environments in Wistar audiogenic rats (WARs). The WAR strain represents a genetic animal model of epilepsy. Methods Behavioral analyses were performed using neuroethological methods, and flowcharts were constructed to illustrate behavioral findings. The body plethysmography method was used to obtain pulmonary ventilation (VE) measurements, and body temperature (Tb) measurements were taken via temperature sensors implanted in the abdominal cavities of the animals. Results No significant difference was observed between the WAR and Wistar control group with respect to the thermoregulatory response elicited by exposure to both acute hypercapnia and acute hypoxia (p>0.05). However, we found that the VE of WARs was attenuated relative to that of Wistar control animals during exposure to both hypercapnic (WAR: 133 ± 11% vs. Wistar: 243 ± 23%, p<0.01) and hypoxic conditions (WAR: 138 ± 8% vs. Wistar: 177 ± 8%; p<0.01). In addition, we noted that this ventilatory attenuation was followed by alterations in the behavioral responses of these animals. Conclusions Our results indicate that WARs, a genetic model of epilepsy, have important alterations in their ability to compensate for changes in levels of various arterial blood gasses. WARs present an attenuated ventilatory response to an increased PaCO2 or decreased PaO2, coupled to behavioral changes, which make them a suitable model to further study respiratory risks associated to epilepsy. PMID:27149672

  15. Inhibition of peripheral dopamine metabolism and the ventilatory response to hypoxia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Bialkowska, Monika; Zajac, Dominika; Mazzatenta, Andrea; Di Giulio, Camillo; Pokorski, Mieczyslaw

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is a putative neurotransmitter in the carotid body engaged in the generation of the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR). However, the action of endogenous DA is unsettled. This study seeks to determine the ventilatory effects of increased availability of endogenous DA caused by inhibition of DA enzymatic breakdown. The peripheral inhibitor of MAO - debrisoquine, or COMT - entacapone, or both combined were injected to conscious rats. Ventilation and its responses to acute 8 % O(2) in N(2) were investigated in a whole body plethysmograph. We found that inhibition of MAO augmented the hyperventilatory response to hypoxia. Inhibition of COMT failed to influence the hypoxic response. However, simultaneous inhibition of both enzymes, the case in which endogenous availability of DA should increase the most, reversed the hypoxic augmentation of ventilation induced by MAO-inhibition. The inference is that when MAO alone is blocked, COMT takes over DA degradation in a compensatory way, which lowers the availability of DA, resulting in a higher intensity of the HVR. We conclude that MAO is the enzyme predominantly engaged in the chemoventilatory effects of DA. Furthermore, the findings imply that endogenous DA is inhibitory, rather than stimulatory, for hypoxic ventilation. PMID:25310955

  16. Postnatal development of the pattern of respiratory and cardiovascular response to systemic hypoxia in the piglet: the roles of adenosine.

    PubMed Central

    Elnazir, B; Marshall, J M; Kumar, P

    1996-01-01

    1. In 3-day-old and 3-week-old spontaneously breathing piglets anaesthetized with Saffan, we have studied ventilatory and cardiovascular responses evoked by 5 min periods of hypoxia (breathing 10 and 6% O2). 2. In 3-day-old piglets both 10 and 6% O2 evoked an increase followed by a secondary fall in ventilation, a gradual tachycardia and a renal vasoconstriction, with an increase in femoral blood flow that was attributable to femoral vasodilatation. Arterial blood pressure rose initially but fell towards control values by the 5th minute of hypoxia. 3. The stable adenosine analogue 2-chloroadenosine (2-CA; 30 mg kg(-1) i.v.) evoked bradycardia and renal vasoconstriction, but had no effect on femoral vasculature. These responses were blocked by the adenosine receptor antagonist 8-phenyltheophylline (8-PT; 8 mg kg(-1) i.v.). 8-PT also abolished the secondary fall in ventilation evoked by 10 and 6% O2 and the renal vasoconstriction evoked by 10% O2, but had no effect on the tachycardia, or on the femoral vascular response. 4. By contrast, in 3-week-old piglets both 10 and 6% O2 evoked a sustained increase in ventilation, tachycardia and a rise in arterial pressure with renal vasoconstriction, but no change in renal blood flow and substantial femoral vasodilatation with an increase in femoral blood flow. 2-CA evoked bradycardia and renal vasoconstriction, as in 3-day-old piglets, but also evoked pronounced femoral vasodilatation. 8-PT blocked these responses and the hypoxia-induced femoral vasodilatation, but had no significant effect on other components of the hypoxia-induced response. 5. We propose that there is postnatal development of the ventilatory and cardiovascular responses evoked by systemic hypoxia and of the role of locally released adenosine in these responses: at 3 days, adenosine released within the central nervous system and within the kidney is a major contributor to the secondary fall in ventilation and renal vasoconstriction respectively, whereas at 3

  17. Metabolic Response of Dungeness Crab Larvae Exposed to Elevated CO2 and Hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Z.; Busch, S.; McElhany, P.

    2015-12-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) and deoxygenation, both resulting from rising atmospheric CO2 levels, are lowering the pH and oxygen levels of global oceans. Assessing the impacts of OA and deoxygenation on harvested species is crucial for guiding resource management with the aim of maintaining healthy and sustainable populations. The Dungeness crab, Cancer magister, is an important species ecologically and economically for the US West Coast. Crabs transition through four main stages: zoea, megalopa, juvenile, and adult. Each stage results in a different morphology and behavior, and as a result, is exposed to various environmental parameters, such as pH and dissolved oxygen (DO). The first two stages exhibit diel vertical migration while the final stages are benthic. Our study focused on the megalopae stage and their metabolic response to OA and hypoxia. We exposed wild-caught megalopae to a pH x DO cross, producing treatment waters with combinations of low or high pH and O2, all maintained at 12˚C. Closed-chamber respirometry was used to compare standard metabolic rates in a common garden setting with high pH/high DO conditions. We predict that the megalopae exposed to the low pH/high DO treatment will have a higher metabolic rate than those exposed to the high pH/high DO treatment. This may be a result of homeostatic processes increasing to return the megalopae's internal pH back to equilibrium. We predict that the high pH/low DO treatment will cause a decrease in metabolism when compared to the high pH/high DO treatment due to the megalopae conserving oxygen in a limiting environment. If results support our hypothesis, they would suggest that OA and hypoxia affects Dungeness crabs in sublethal ways.

  18. Systemic hypoxia enhances exercise-mediated bactericidal and subsequent apoptotic responses in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jong-Shyan; Chiu, Ya-Ting

    2009-10-01

    Phagocytosis and oxidative burst are critical host defense mechanisms in which neutrophils clear invading pathogens. Clearing phagocytic neutrophils by triggering apoptosis is an essential process for controlling inflammation. This study elucidates how various exercise bouts with/without hypoxia affected neutrophil bactericidal activity and subsequent apoptosis in humans. Fifteen sedentary males performed six distinct experimental tests in an air-conditioned normobaric hypoxia chamber: two normoxic exercises [strenuous exercise (SE; up to maximal O2 consumption) and moderate exercise (ME; 50% maximal O2 consumption for 30 min) while exposed to 21% O2], two hypoxic exercises (ME for 30 min while exposed to 12% and 15% O2), and two hypoxic exposures (resting for 30 min while exposed to 12% and 15% O2). The results showed that 1) plasma complement-C3a desArg/C4a desArg/C5a concentrations were increased, 2) expressions of L-selectin/lymphocyte functin-associated antigen-1/Mac-1/C5aR on neutrophils were enhanced, 3) phagocytosis of neutrophils to Esherichia coli and release of neutrophil oxidant products by E. coli were elevated, and 4) E. coli-induced phosphotidylserine exposure or caspase-3 activation of neutrophils were promoted immediately and 2 h after both 12% O2 exposure at rest and with ME as well as normoxic SE. Although neither normoxic ME nor breathing 15% O2 at rest influenced these complement- and neutrophil-related immune responses, ME at both 12% and 15% O2 resulted in enhanced complement activation in the blood, expressions of opsonic/complement receptors on neutrophils, or the bactericidal activity and apoptosis of neutrophils. Moreover, the increased neutrophil oxidant production and apoptosis by normoxic SE and hypoxic ME were ameliorated by treating neutrophils with diphenylene iodonium (a NADPH oxidase inhibitor). Therefore, we conclude that ME at 12-15% O2 enhances bactericidal capacity and facilitates the subsequent apoptosis of neutrophils. PMID

  19. Comparison of life history and genetic properties of cowpea bruchid strains and their response to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Weining; Lei, Jiaxin; Fox, Charles W; Johnston, J Spencer; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan

    2015-04-01

    The cowpea bruchid (Callosobruchus maculatus) is the most important storage pest of grain legumes and comprises geographically distinct strains. Storage under a modified atmosphere with decreased O2 content represents an alternative to chemical fumigants for pest control of stored grains. In this study, we compared reproduction, development and survival, as well as genome size of bruchid strains from South India (SI), Burkina Faso (BF), Niger (CmNnC) and the United States (OH), reared on mung bean (Vigna radiata). Fecundity and egg-to-adult duration varied significantly among these strains. Notably, strain BF had the highest fecundity, and strain SI displayed the fastest development whereas strain OH was the slowest. Differences in adult lifespan among strains were only detected in unmated but not in the mated group. Genome size of SI females was significantly larger than that of OH females, and for all four strains, the female genomes were larger than those of their corresponding males. Furthermore, we studied effects of exposure to 1% O2+99% N2 on strains SI and BF. Mortality caused by hypoxia was influenced by not only developmental stage but also by insect strain. Eggs were most sensitive, particularly at the early stage, whereas the 3rd and 4th instar larvae were most tolerant and could survive up to 15 days of low O2. Strain SI was slightly more resistant than BF in egg and larval stages. Proteolytic activity prior to, during and after hypoxia treatment revealed remarkable metabolic plasticity of cowpea bruchids in response to modified atmosphere. PMID:25733404

  20. Modification by Beta-Adrenergic Blockade of the Circulatory Responses to Acute Hypoxia in Man*

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, David W.; Kontos, Hermes A.; Raper, A. Jarrell; Patterson, John L.

    1967-01-01

    In 17 healthy men, beta-adrenergic blockade reduced significantly the tachycardia and the elevation of cardiac output associated with inhalation of 7.5% oxygen for 7 to 10 minutes. Hypoxia did not increase plasma concentrations of epinephrine or norepinephrine in six subjects. Furthermore, blockade of alpha and beta receptors in the forearm did not modify the vasodilation in the forearm induced by hypoxia, providing pharmacologic evidence that hypoxia of the degree and duration used was not associated with an increase in the concentrations of circulating catecholamines in man. Part of the increase in cardiac output and heart rate during acute hypoxia in man is produced by stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors, probably by cardiac sympathetic nerves. The mechanism of the vasodilation in the forearm during hypoxia remains uncertain. PMID:4381183

  1. Hypoxia-induced ventilatory responses in conscious mice: gender differences in ventilatory roll-off and facilitation.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Lisa A; May, Walter J; deRonde, Kimberly; Brown-Steinke, Kathleen; Gaston, Benjamin; Lewis, Stephen J

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the ventilatory responses of C57BL6 female and male mice during a 15 min exposure to a hypoxic-hypercapnic (H-H) or a hypoxic (10% O(2), 90% N(2)) challenge and subsequent return to room air. The ventilatory responses to H-H were similar in males and females whereas there were pronounced gender differences in the ventilatory responses during and following hypoxic challenge. In males, the hypoxic response included initial increases in minute volume via increases in tidal volume and frequency of breathing. These responses declined substantially (roll-off) during hypoxic exposure. Upon return to room-air, relatively sustained increases in these ventilatory parameters (short-term potentiation) were observed. In females, the initial responses to hypoxia were similar to those in males whereas roll-off was greater and post-hypoxia facilitation was smaller than in males. The marked differences in ventilatory roll-off and post-hypoxia facilitation between female and male C57BL6 mice provide evidence that gender is of vital importance to ventilatory control. PMID:23183420

  2. Roles for redox mechanisms controlling protein kinase G in pulmonary and coronary artery responses to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Neo, Boon Hwa; Kandhi, Sharath; Wolin, Michael S

    2011-12-01

    We previously reported that isolated endothelium-removed bovine pulmonary arteries (BPAs) contract to hypoxia associated with removal of peroxide- and cGMP-mediated relaxation. In contrast, bovine coronary arteries (BCAs) relax to hypoxia associated with cytosolic NADPH oxidation coordinating multiple relaxing mechanisms. Since we recently found that H(2)O(2) relaxes BPAs through PKG activation by both soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)/cGMP-dependent and cGMP-independent thiol oxidation/subunit dimerization mechanisms, we investigated if these mechanisms participate in BPA contraction and BCA relaxation to hypoxia. The contraction of BPA (precontracted with 20 mM KCl) to hypoxia was associated with decreased PKG dimerization and PKG-mediated vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation. In contrast, exposure of 20 mM KCl-precontracted endothelium-removed BCAs to hypoxia caused relaxation and increased dimerization and VASP phosphorylation. Depletion of sGC by organoid culture of BPAs with an oxidant of the sGC heme (10 μM 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one) increased aerobic force generation, decreased VASP phosphorylation, and inhibited further contraction to hypoxia and changes in VASP phosphorylation. Thiol reduction with dithiothreitol increased aerobic force in BPAs and decreased PKG dimerization, VASP phosphorylation, and the contraction to hypoxia. Furthermore, PKG-1α and sGC β(1)-subunit small interfering RNA-transfected BPAs demonstrated increased aerobic K(+) force and inhibition of further contraction to hypoxia, associated with an attenuation of H(2)O(2)-elicited relaxation and VASP phosphorylation. Thus, decreases in both a sGC/cGMP-dependent and a dimerization-dependent activation of PKG by H(2)O(2) appear to contribute to the contraction of BPAs elicited by hypoxia. In addition, stimulation of PKG activation by dimerization may be important in the relaxation of coronary arteries to hypoxia. PMID:21926339

  3. Integrated analysis of mRNA-seq and miRNA-seq in the liver of Pelteobagrus vachelli in response to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guosong; Yin, Shaowu; Mao, Jianqiang; Liang, Fenfei; Zhao, Cheng; Li, Peng; Zhou, Guoqin; Chen, Shuqiao; Tang, Zhonglin

    2016-01-01

    Pelteobagrus vachelli is a well-known commercial species in Asia. However, a sudden lack of oxygen will result in mortality and eventually to pond turnover. Studying the molecular mechanisms of hypoxia adaptation in fishes will not only help us to understand fish speciation and the evolution of the hypoxia-signaling pathway, but will also guide us in the breeding of hypoxia-tolerant fish strains. Despite this, the genetic regulatory network for miRNA-mRNA and the signaling pathways involved in hypoxia responses in fish have remained unexamined. In the present study, we used next-generation sequencing technology to characterise mRNA-seq and miRNA-seq of control- and hypoxia-treated P. vachelli livers to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of hypoxia adaptation. We were able to find miRNA-mRNA pairs using bioinformatics analysis and miRNA prediction algorithms. Furthermore, we compared several key pathways which were identified as involved in the hypoxia response of P. vachelli. Our study is the first report on integrated analysis of mRNA-seq and miRNA-seq in fishes and offers a deeper insight into the molecular mechanisms of hypoxia adaptation. qRT-PCR analysis further confirmed the results of mRNA-Seq and miRNA-Seq analysis. We provide a good case study for analyzing mRNA/miRNA expression and profiling a non-model fish species using next-generation sequencing technology. PMID:26961594

  4. Integrated analysis of mRNA-seq and miRNA-seq in the liver of Pelteobagrus vachelli in response to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guosong; Yin, Shaowu; Mao, Jianqiang; Liang, Fenfei; Zhao, Cheng; Li, Peng; Zhou, Guoqin; Chen, Shuqiao; Tang, Zhonglin

    2016-01-01

    Pelteobagrus vachelli is a well-known commercial species in Asia. However, a sudden lack of oxygen will result in mortality and eventually to pond turnover. Studying the molecular mechanisms of hypoxia adaptation in fishes will not only help us to understand fish speciation and the evolution of the hypoxia-signaling pathway, but will also guide us in the breeding of hypoxia-tolerant fish strains. Despite this, the genetic regulatory network for miRNA-mRNA and the signaling pathways involved in hypoxia responses in fish have remained unexamined. In the present study, we used next-generation sequencing technology to characterise mRNA-seq and miRNA-seq of control- and hypoxia-treated P. vachelli livers to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of hypoxia adaptation. We were able to find miRNA-mRNA pairs using bioinformatics analysis and miRNA prediction algorithms. Furthermore, we compared several key pathways which were identified as involved in the hypoxia response of P. vachelli. Our study is the first report on integrated analysis of mRNA-seq and miRNA-seq in fishes and offers a deeper insight into the molecular mechanisms of hypoxia adaptation. qRT-PCR analysis further confirmed the results of mRNA-Seq and miRNA-Seq analysis. We provide a good case study for analyzing mRNA/miRNA expression and profiling a non-model fish species using next-generation sequencing technology. PMID:26961594

  5. Response of C2C12 Myoblasts to Hypoxia: The Relative Roles of Glucose and Oxygen in Adaptive Cellular Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Hu, Zhen-Fu; Chen, Bin; Ni, Guo-Xin

    2013-01-01

    Background. Oxygen and glucose are two important nutrients for mammalian cell function. In this study, the effect of glucose and oxygen concentrations on C2C12 cellular metabolism was characterized with an emphasis on detecting whether cells show oxygen conformance (OC) in response to hypoxia. Methods. After C2C12 cells being cultured in the levels of glucose at 0.6 mM (LG), 5.6 mM (MG), or 23.3 mM(HG) under normoxic or hypoxic (1% oxygen) condition, cellular oxygen consumption, glucose consumption, lactate production, and metabolic status were determined. Short-term oxygen consumption was measured with a novel oxygen biosensor technique. Longer-term measurements were performed with standard glucose, lactate, and cell metabolism assays. Results. It was found that oxygen depletion in normoxia is dependent on the glucose concentration in the medium. Cellular glucose uptake and lactate production increased significantly in hypoxia than those in normoxia. In hypoxia the cellular response to the level of glucose was different to that in normoxia. The metabolic activities decreased while glucose concentration increased in normoxia, while in hypoxia, metabolic activity was reduced in LG and MG, but unchanged in HG condition. The OC phenomenon was not observed in the present study. Conclusions. Our findings suggested that a combination of low oxygen and low glucose damages the viability of C2C12 cells more seriously than low oxygen alone. In addition, when there is sufficient glucose, C2C12 cells will respond to hypoxia by upregulating anaerobic respiration, as shown by lactate production. PMID:24294605

  6. miR-190 Enhances HIF-Dependent Responses to Hypoxia in Drosophila by Inhibiting the Prolyl-4-hydroxylase Fatiga

    PubMed Central

    De Lella Ezcurra, Ana Laura; Bertolin, Agustina Paola; Kim, Kevin; Gándara, Lautaro; Luschnig, Stefan; Perrimon, Norbert; Melani, Mariana; Wappner, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Cellular and systemic responses to low oxygen levels are principally mediated by Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIFs), a family of evolutionary conserved heterodimeric transcription factors, whose alpha- and beta-subunits belong to the bHLH-PAS family. In normoxia, HIFα is hydroxylated by specific prolyl-4-hydroxylases, targeting it for proteasomal degradation, while in hypoxia the activity of these hydroxylases decreases due to low oxygen availability, leading to HIFα accumulation and expression of HIF target genes. To identify microRNAs required for maximal HIF activity, we conducted an overexpression screen in Drosophila melanogaster, evaluating the induction of a HIF transcriptional reporter. miR-190 overexpression enhanced HIF-dependent biological responses, including terminal sprouting of the tracheal system, while in miR-190 loss of function embryos the hypoxic response was impaired. In hypoxic conditions, miR-190 expression was upregulated and required for induction of HIF target genes by directly inhibiting the HIF prolyl-4-hydroxylase Fatiga. Thus, miR-190 is a novel regulator of the hypoxia response that represses the oxygen sensor Fatiga, leading to HIFα stabilization and enhancement of hypoxic responses. PMID:27223464

  7. Phrenic and sympathetic nerve responses to glutamergic blockade during normoxia and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Chae, L O; Melton, J E; Neubauer, J A; Edelman, N H

    1993-04-01

    Because hypoxia increases brain extracellular glutamate levels, we hypothesized that gasping and increased sympathetic activity during severe hypoxia result from glutamergic excitation. To test this hypothesis, we exposed anesthetized paralyzed vagotomized glomectomized cats to hypoxia before and after N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamergic blockade (MK-801, 1 mg/kg iv) or non-NMDA blockade (NBQX, 3 mg/kg iv) while monitoring phrenic neurogram (PN) and inspiratory-synchronous (ISSN) and tonic (TSN) activity in cervical sympathetic neurogram (SN). Before hypoxia, MK-801 caused apneusis and reduced PN and ISSN amplitude by 38 and 84%, respectively, but TSN activity was unaffected. During hypoxia, MK-801 had no effect on PN gasping or TSN activity but reduced ISSN amplitude during gasping. Before hypoxia, NBQX reduced PN and ISSN amplitude by 54 and 60%, respectively but did not affect inspiratory timing or TSN activity. Gasping activity in PN and ISSN and TSN activity during hypoxia were unaffected by NBQX. We conclude that 1) ionotropic glutamergic receptor activation is important for eupneic phrenic patterning but is not involved in genesis of gasping, 2) NMDA receptor activation is involved in integration of respiratory and sympathetic activity, and 3) changes in TSN activity are independent of ionotropic glutamergic receptor activation. PMID:8514717

  8. Bile Acids Repress Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 Signaling and Modulate the Airway Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Legendre, Claire; Reen, F. Jerry; Woods, David F.; Mooij, Marlies J.; Adams, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) frequently occurs in patients with respiratory disease and is particularly prevalent in patients with cystic fibrosis. GER is a condition in which the duodenogastric contents of the stomach leak into the esophagus, in many cases resulting in aspiration into the respiratory tract. As such, the presence of GER-derived bile acids (BAs) has been confirmed in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and sputum of affected patients. We have recently shown that bile causes cystic fibrosis-associated bacterial pathogens to adopt a chronic lifestyle and may constitute a major host trigger underlying respiratory infection. The current study shows that BAs elicit a specific response in humans in which they repress hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) protein, an emerging master regulator in response to infection and inflammation. HIF-1α repression was shown to occur through the 26S proteasome machinery via the prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD) pathway. Further analysis of the downstream inflammatory response showed that HIF-1α repression by BAs can significantly modulate the immune response of airway epithelial cells, correlating with a decrease in interleukin-8 (IL-8) production, while IL-6 production was strongly increased. Importantly, the effects of BAs on cytokine production can also be more dominant than the bacterium-mediated effects. However, the effect of BAs on cytokine levels cannot be fully explained by their ability to repress HIF-1α, which is not surprising, given the complexity of the immune regulatory network. The suppression of HIF-1 signaling by bile acids may have a significant influence on the progression and outcome of respiratory disease, and the molecular mechanism underpinning this response warrants further investigation. PMID:24914220

  9. Cerebral blood flow and oxygenation in ovine fetus: responses to superimposed hypoxia at both low and high altitude

    PubMed Central

    Peňa, Jorge Pereyra; Tomimatsu, Takuji; Hatran, Douglas P; McGill, Lisa L; Longo, Lawrence D

    2007-01-01

    For the fetus, although the roles of arterial blood gases are recognized to be critical in the regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral oxygenation, the relation of CBF, cortical tissue PO2 (t PO2), sagittal sinus PO2, and related indices of cerebral oxygenation to arterial blood gases are not well defined. This is particularly true for that fetus subjected to long-term hypoxia (LTH). In an effort to elucidate these interrelations, we tested the hypothesis that in the fetus acclimatized to high altitude, cerebral oxygenation is not compromised relative to that at low altitude. By use of a laser Doppler flowmeter with a fluorescent O2 probe, in near-term fetal sheep at low altitude (n = 8) and those acclimatized to high altitude hypoxia (3801 m for 90 ± 5 days; n = 6), we measured laser Doppler CBF (LD-CBF), t PO2, and related variables in response to 40 min superimposed hypoxia. At both altitudes, fetal LD-CBF, cerebral O2 delivery, t PO2, and several other variables including sagittal sinus PO2, correlated highly with arterial PO2 (Pa,O2). In response to superimposed hypoxia (Pa,O2 = 11 ± 1 Torr), LD-CBF was significantly blunted at high altitude, as compared with that at low altitude. In the two altitude groups fetal cerebral oxygenation was similar under both control conditions and with superimposed hypoxia, cortical t PO2 decreasing from 8 ± 1 and 6 ± 1 Torr, respectively, to 2 ± 1 Torr. Also, for these conditions sagittal sinus PO2 and [HbO2] values were similar. In response to superimposed hypoxia, cerebral metabolic rate for O2 decreased ∼50% in each group (P < 0.05). For both the fetus at low altitude and that acclimatized to high altitude LTH, we present the first dose–response data on the relation of LD-CBF, cortical t PO2, and sagittal sinus blood gas values to Pa,O2. In addition, despite differences in several variables, the fetus at high altitude showed evidence of successful acclimatization, supporting the hypothesis that such

  10. Hypoxia-inducible nuclear factors bind to an enhancer element located 3' to the human erythropoietin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Semenza, G L; Nejfelt, M K; Chi, S M; Antonarakis, S E

    1991-01-01

    Human erythropoietin gene expression in liver and kidney is inducible by anemia or hypoxia. DNase I-hypersensitive sites were identified 3' to the human erythropoietin gene in liver nuclei. A 256-base-pair region of 3' flanking sequence was shown by DNase I protection and electrophoretic mobility-shift assays to bind four or more different nuclear factors, at least two of which are induced by anemia in both liver and kidney, and the region functioned as a hypoxia-inducible enhancer in transient expression assays. These results provide insight into the molecular basis for the regulation of gene expression by a fundamental physiologic stimulus, hypoxia. Images PMID:2062846

  11. Interventricular heterogeneity in rat heart responses to hypoxia: the tuning of glucose metabolism, ion gradients, and function.

    PubMed

    Komniski, Milena Segato; Yakushev, Sergej; Bogdanov, Nikolai; Gassmann, Max; Bogdanova, Anna

    2011-05-01

    The matching of energy supply and demand under hypoxic conditions is critical for sustaining myocardial function. Numerous reports indicate that basal energy requirements and ion handling may differ between the ventricles. We hypothesized that ventricular response to hypoxia shows interventricular differences caused by the heterogeneity in glucose metabolism and expression and activity of ion transporters. Thus we assessed glucose utilization rate, ATP, sodium and potassium concentrations, Na, K-ATPase activity, and tissue reduced:oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) content in the right and left ventricles before and after the exposure of either the whole animals or isolated blood-perfused hearts to hypoxia. The hypoxia-induced boost in glucose utilization was more pronounced in the left ventricle compared with the right one. ATP levels in the right ventricle of hypoxic heart were lower than those in the left ventricle. Left ventricular sodium content was higher, and hydrolytic Na, K-ATPase activity was reduced compared with the right ventricle. Administration of the Na, K-ATPase blocker ouabain caused rapid increase in the right ventricular Na(+) and elimination of the interventricular Na(+) gradients. Exposure of the hearts to hypoxia made the interventricular heterogeneity in the Na(+) distribution even more pronounced. Furthermore, systemic hypoxia caused oxidative stress that was more pronounced in the right ventricle as revealed by GSH/GSSG ratios. On the basis of these findings, we suggest that the right ventricle is more prone to hypoxic damage, as it is less efficient in recruiting glucose as an alternative fuel and is particularly dependent on the efficient Na, K-ATPase function. PMID:21398597

  12. Heart rate and blood pressure responses during hypoxic cycles of a 3-week intermittent hypoxia breathing program in patients at risk for or with mild COPD

    PubMed Central

    Faulhaber, Martin; Gatterer, Hannes; Haider, Thomas; Linser, Tobias; Netzer, Nikolaus; Burtscher, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide information on heart rate and blood pressure responses during a 3-week intermittent hypoxia breathing program in COPD patients. Sixteen participants with COPD symptoms were randomly assigned to a hypoxia or control group and completed a 3-week intermittent hypoxia breathing program (five sessions per week, each consisting of three to five breathing cycles, each cycle lasting 3–5 minutes with 3-minute breaks between cycles). During the breathing cycles, the hypoxia group received hypoxic air (inspired fraction of oxygen 15%–12%), whereas the control group received normal air (sham hypoxia). During the breaks, all participants breathed normoxic room air. Arterial oxygen saturation, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate were measured during the normoxic and hypoxic/sham hypoxic periods. For each breathing cycle, changes from normoxia to hypoxia/sham hypoxia were calculated, and changes were averaged for each of the 15 sessions and for each week. Changes in arterial oxygen saturation were significantly different between groups in the course of the 3 weeks (two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures), with post hoc differences in weeks 1, 2, and 3. During the course of the intermittent hypoxia application, no between-group differences were detected for blood pressure or rate pressure product values. Changes in heart rate were significantly different between groups in the course of the 3 weeks (two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures), with post hoc differences only in week 3. Averages over all 15 sessions were significantly higher in the hypoxia group for heart rate and rate pressure product, and tended to be increased for systolic blood pressure. The applied intermittent hypoxia breathing program resulted in specific and moderate heart rate and blood pressure responses, and did not provoke a progressive increase in blood pressure during the hypoxic cycles in the course of the application. PMID

  13. Heart rate and blood pressure responses during hypoxic cycles of a 3-week intermittent hypoxia breathing program in patients at risk for or with mild COPD.

    PubMed

    Faulhaber, Martin; Gatterer, Hannes; Haider, Thomas; Linser, Tobias; Netzer, Nikolaus; Burtscher, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide information on heart rate and blood pressure responses during a 3-week intermittent hypoxia breathing program in COPD patients. Sixteen participants with COPD symptoms were randomly assigned to a hypoxia or control group and completed a 3-week intermittent hypoxia breathing program (five sessions per week, each consisting of three to five breathing cycles, each cycle lasting 3-5 minutes with 3-minute breaks between cycles). During the breathing cycles, the hypoxia group received hypoxic air (inspired fraction of oxygen 15%-12%), whereas the control group received normal air (sham hypoxia). During the breaks, all participants breathed normoxic room air. Arterial oxygen saturation, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate were measured during the normoxic and hypoxic/sham hypoxic periods. For each breathing cycle, changes from normoxia to hypoxia/sham hypoxia were calculated, and changes were averaged for each of the 15 sessions and for each week. Changes in arterial oxygen saturation were significantly different between groups in the course of the 3 weeks (two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures), with post hoc differences in weeks 1, 2, and 3. During the course of the intermittent hypoxia application, no between-group differences were detected for blood pressure or rate pressure product values. Changes in heart rate were significantly different between groups in the course of the 3 weeks (two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures), with post hoc differences only in week 3. Averages over all 15 sessions were significantly higher in the hypoxia group for heart rate and rate pressure product, and tended to be increased for systolic blood pressure. The applied intermittent hypoxia breathing program resulted in specific and moderate heart rate and blood pressure responses, and did not provoke a progressive increase in blood pressure during the hypoxic cycles in the course of the application. PMID

  14. Finite element simulation of pipe dynamic response

    SciTech Connect

    Slagis, G.C.; Litton, R.W.

    1996-12-01

    Nonlinear finite element dynamic analyses of the response of a pipe span to controlled-displacement, sinusoidal vibration have been performed. The objective of this preliminary study is to compare strain and acceleration response data to those generated by Beaney in the Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories experiments. Results for an unpressurized, 5 Hz, carbon steel pipe are in good agreement with the experiments. Hence, it appears that analytical simulation will be useful to assess seismic margins. Recommendations for additional studies are provided. The analyses confirm the test results--dynamic response is greatly attenuated by material plasticity. Analytical strains and accelerations are about 30% higher than test data. There are several possible explanations for the differences. To assess the effect of frequency on response, the length of the pipe span was increased. Analysis of the longer, 2 Hz, pipe span shows significantly greater cyclic strains than the 5 Hz span at the same input excitation levels.

  15. Copper and hypoxia modulate transcriptional and mitochondrial functional-biochemical responses in warm acclimated rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Sappal, Ravinder; Fast, Mark; Purcell, Sara; MacDonald, Nicole; Stevens, Don; Kibenge, Fred; Siah, Ahmed; Kamunde, Collins

    2016-04-01

    To survive in changing environments fish utilize a wide range of biological responses that require energy. We examined the effect of warm acclimation on the electron transport system (ETS) enzymes and transcriptional responses to hypoxia and copper (Cu) exposure in fish. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were acclimated to cold (11 °C; control) and warm (20 °C) temperatures for 3 weeks followed by exposure to Cu, hypoxia or both for 24 h. Activities of ETS enzyme complexes I-IV (CI-CIV) were measured in liver and gill mitochondria. Analyses of transcripts encoding for proteins involved in mitochondrial respiration (cytochrome c oxidase subunits 4-1 and 2: COX4-1 and COX4-2), metal detoxification/stress response (metallothioneins A and B: MT-A and MT-B) and energy sensing (AMP-activated protein kinase α1: AMPKα1) were done in liver mitochondria, and in whole liver and gill tissues by RT-qPCR. Warm acclimation inhibited activities of ETS enzymes while effects of Cu and hypoxia depended on the enzyme and thermal acclimation status. The genes encoding for COX4-1, COX4-2, MT-A, MT-B and AMPKα1 were strongly and tissue-dependently altered by warm acclimation. While Cu and hypoxia clearly increased MT-A and MT-B transcript levels in all tissues, their effects on COX4-1, COX4-2 and AMPKα1 mRNA levels were less pronounced. Importantly, warm acclimation differentially altered COX4-2/COX4-1 ratio in liver mitochondria and gill tissue. The three stressors showed both independent and joint actions on activities of ETS enzymes and transcription of genes involved in energy metabolism, stress response and metals homeostasis. Overall, we unveiled novel interactive effects that should not be overlooked in real world situations wherein fish normally encounter multiple stress factors. PMID:26774776

  16. Design and conduct of Xtreme Everest 2: An observational cohort study of Sherpa and lowlander responses to graduated hypobaric hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert-Kawai, Edward; Sheperdigian, Adam; Adams, Thomas; Mitchell, Kay; Feelisch, Martin; Murray, Andrew; Peters, Mark; Gilbert-Kawai, Grace; Montgomery, Hugh; Levett, Denny; Kumar, Rajendra; Mythen, Michael; Grocott, Michael; Martin, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Oxygen availability falls with ascent to altitude and also as a consequence of critical illness. Because cellular sequelae and adaptive processes may be shared in both circumstances, high altitude exposure (‘physiological hypoxia’) assists in the exploration of the response to pathological hypoxia. We therefore studied the response of healthy participants to progressive hypobaric hypoxia at altitude. The primary objective of the study was to identify differences between high altitude inhabitants (Sherpas) and lowland comparators. Methods: We performed an observational cohort study of human responses to progressive hypobaric hypoxia (during ascent) and subsequent normoxia (following descent) comparing Sherpas with lowlanders. Studies were conducted in London (35m), Kathmandu (1300m), Namche Bazaar (3500m) and Everest Base Camp (5300m). Of 180 healthy volunteers departing from Kathmandu, 64 were Sherpas and 116 were lowlanders. Physiological, biochemical, genetic and epigenetic data were collected. Core studies focused on nitric oxide metabolism, microcirculatory blood flow and exercise performance. Additional studies performed in nested subgroups examined mitochondrial and metabolic function, and ventilatory and cardiac variables. Of the 180 healthy participants who left Kathmandu, 178 (99%) completed the planned trek. Overall, more than 90% of planned testing was completed. Forty-four study protocols were successfully completed at altitudes up to and including 5300m. A subgroup of identical twins (all lowlanders) was also studied in detail. Conclusion: This programme of study (Xtreme Everest 2) will provide a rich dataset relating to human adaptation to hypoxia, and the responses seen on re-exposure to normoxia. It is the largest comprehensive high altitude study of Sherpas yet performed. Translational data generated from this study will be of relevance to diseases in which oxygenation is a major factor. PMID:26064476

  17. Antioxidant responses of triangle sail mussel Hyriopsis cumingii exposed to harmful algae Microcystis aeruginosa and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Hu, Menghong; Wu, Fangli; Yuan, Mingzhe; Li, Qiongzhen; Gu, Yedan; Wang, Youji; Liu, Qigen

    2015-11-01

    Bloom forming algae and hypoxia are considered to be two main co-occurred stressors associated with eutrophication. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interactive effects of harmful algae Microcystis aeruginosa and hypoxia on an ecologically important mussel species inhabiting lakes and reservoirs, the triangle sail mussel Hyriopsis cumingii, which is generally considered as a bio-management tool for eutrophication. A set of antioxidant enzymes involved in immune defence mechanisms and detoxification processes, i.e. glutathione-S-transferases (GST), glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), lysozyme (LZM) in mussel haemolymph were analyzed during 14days exposure along with 7days depuration duration period. GST, GSH, SOD, GPX and LZM were elevated by toxic M. aeruginosa exposure, while CAT activities were inhibited by such exposure. Hypoxia influenced the immune mechanisms through the activation of GSH and GPX, and the inhibition of SOD, CAT, and LZM activities. Meanwhile, some interactive effects of M. aeruginosa, hypoxia and time were observed. Independently of the presence or absence of hypoxia, toxic algal exposure generally increased the five tested enzyme activities of haemolymph, except CAT. Although half of microcystin could be eliminated after 7days depuration, toxic M. aeruginosa or hypoxia exposure history showed some latent effects on most parameters. These results revealed that toxic algae play an important role on haemolymph parameters alterations and its toxic effects could be affected by hypoxia. Although the microcystin depuration rate of H. cumingii is quick, toxic M. aeruginosa and/or hypoxia exposure history influenced its immunological mechanism recovery. PMID:26318116

  18. Modelling the interplay between hypoxia and proliferation in radiotherapy tumour response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, J.; Shoghi, K. I.; Deasy, J. O.

    2013-07-01

    A tumour control probability computational model for fractionated radiotherapy was developed, with the goal of incorporating the fundamental interplay between hypoxia and proliferation, including reoxygenation over a course of radiotherapy. The fundamental idea is that the local delivery of oxygen and glucose limits the amount of proliferation and metabolically-supported cell survival a tumour sub-volume can support. The model has three compartments: a proliferating compartment of cells receiving oxygen and glucose; an intermediate, metabolically-active compartment receiving glucose; and a highly hypoxic compartment of starving cells. Following the post-mitotic cell death of proliferating cells, intermediate cells move into the proliferative compartment and hypoxic cells move into the intermediate compartment. A key advantage of the proposed model is that the initial compartmental cell distribution is uniquely determined from the assumed local growth fraction (GF) and volume doubling time (TD) values. Varying initial cell state distributions, based on the local (voxel) GF and TD, were simulated. Tumour response was simulated for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma using relevant parameter values based on published sources. The tumour dose required to achieve a 50% local control rate (TCD50) was found for various GFs and TD’s, and the effect of fraction size on TCD50 was also evaluated. Due to the advantage of reoxygenation over a course of radiotherapy, conventional fraction sizes (2-2.4 Gy fx-1) were predicted to result in smaller TCD50's than larger fraction sizes (4-5 Gy fx-1) for a 10 cc tumour with GFs of around 0.15. The time to eliminate hypoxic cells (the reoxygenation time) was estimated for a given GF and decreased as GF increased. The extra dose required to overcome accelerated stem cell accumulation in longer treatment schedules was estimated to be 0.68 Gy/day (in EQD26.6), similar to published values derived from clinical data. The model predicts

  19. Targeted expression of heme oxygenase-1 prevents the pulmonary inflammatory and vascular responses to hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamino, Tohru; Christou, Helen; Hsieh, Chung-Ming; Liu, Yuxiang; Dhawan, Vijender; Abraham, Nader G.; Perrella, Mark A.; Mitsialis, S. Alex; Kourembanas, Stella

    2001-07-01

    Chronic hypoxia causes pulmonary hypertension with smooth muscle cell proliferation and matrix deposition in the wall of the pulmonary arterioles. We demonstrate here that hypoxia also induces a pronounced inflammation in the lung before the structural changes of the vessel wall. The proinflammatory action of hypoxia is mediated by the induction of distinct cytokines and chemokines and is independent of tumor necrosis factor- signaling. We have previously proposed a crucial role for heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in protecting cardiomyocytes from hypoxic stress, and potent anti-inflammatory properties of HO-1 have been reported in models of tissue injury. We thus established transgenic mice that constitutively express HO-1 in the lung and exposed them to chronic hypoxia. HO-1 transgenic mice were protected from the development of both pulmonary inflammation as well as hypertension and vessel wall hypertrophy induced by hypoxia. Significantly, the hypoxic induction of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines was suppressed in HO-1 transgenic mice. Our findings suggest an important protective function of enzymatic products of HO-1 activity as inhibitors of hypoxia-induced vasoconstrictive and proinflammatory pathways.

  20. Neonatal hyperoxic lung injury favorably alters adult right ventricular remodeling response to chronic hypoxia exposure

    PubMed Central

    Goss, Kara N.; Cucci, Anthony R.; Fisher, Amanda J.; Albrecht, Marjorie; Frump, Andrea; Tursunova, Roziya; Gao, Yong; Brown, Mary Beth; Petrache, Irina; Tepper, Robert S.; Ahlfeld, Shawn K.

    2015-01-01

    The development of pulmonary hypertension (PH) requires multiple pulmonary vascular insults, yet the role of early oxygen therapy as an initial pulmonary vascular insult remains poorly defined. Here, we employ a two-hit model of PH, utilizing postnatal hyperoxia followed by adult hypoxia exposure, to evaluate the role of early hyperoxic lung injury in the development of later PH. Sprague-Dawley pups were exposed to 90% oxygen during postnatal days 0–4 or 0–10 or to room air. All pups were then allowed to mature in room air. At 10 wk of age, a subset of rats from each group was exposed to 2 wk of hypoxia (Patm = 362 mmHg). Physiological, structural, and biochemical endpoints were assessed at 12 wk. Prolonged (10 days) postnatal hyperoxia was independently associated with elevated right ventricular (RV) systolic pressure, which worsened after hypoxia exposure later in life. These findings were only partially explained by decreases in lung microvascular density. Surprisingly, postnatal hyperoxia resulted in robust RV hypertrophy and more preserved RV function and exercise capacity following adult hypoxia compared with nonhyperoxic rats. Biochemically, RVs from animals exposed to postnatal hyperoxia and adult hypoxia demonstrated increased capillarization and a switch to a fetal gene pattern, suggesting an RV more adept to handle adult hypoxia following postnatal hyperoxia exposure. We concluded that, despite negative impacts on pulmonary artery pressures, postnatal hyperoxia exposure may render a more adaptive RV phenotype to tolerate late pulmonary vascular insults. PMID:25659904

  1. Neonatal hyperoxic lung injury favorably alters adult right ventricular remodeling response to chronic hypoxia exposure.

    PubMed

    Goss, Kara N; Cucci, Anthony R; Fisher, Amanda J; Albrecht, Marjorie; Frump, Andrea; Tursunova, Roziya; Gao, Yong; Brown, Mary Beth; Petrache, Irina; Tepper, Robert S; Ahlfeld, Shawn K; Lahm, Tim

    2015-04-15

    The development of pulmonary hypertension (PH) requires multiple pulmonary vascular insults, yet the role of early oxygen therapy as an initial pulmonary vascular insult remains poorly defined. Here, we employ a two-hit model of PH, utilizing postnatal hyperoxia followed by adult hypoxia exposure, to evaluate the role of early hyperoxic lung injury in the development of later PH. Sprague-Dawley pups were exposed to 90% oxygen during postnatal days 0-4 or 0-10 or to room air. All pups were then allowed to mature in room air. At 10 wk of age, a subset of rats from each group was exposed to 2 wk of hypoxia (Patm = 362 mmHg). Physiological, structural, and biochemical endpoints were assessed at 12 wk. Prolonged (10 days) postnatal hyperoxia was independently associated with elevated right ventricular (RV) systolic pressure, which worsened after hypoxia exposure later in life. These findings were only partially explained by decreases in lung microvascular density. Surprisingly, postnatal hyperoxia resulted in robust RV hypertrophy and more preserved RV function and exercise capacity following adult hypoxia compared with nonhyperoxic rats. Biochemically, RVs from animals exposed to postnatal hyperoxia and adult hypoxia demonstrated increased capillarization and a switch to a fetal gene pattern, suggesting an RV more adept to handle adult hypoxia following postnatal hyperoxia exposure. We concluded that, despite negative impacts on pulmonary artery pressures, postnatal hyperoxia exposure may render a more adaptive RV phenotype to tolerate late pulmonary vascular insults. PMID:25659904

  2. Volatile Anaesthetic Depression of the Carotid Body Chemoreflex-Mediated Ventilatory Response to Hypoxia: Directions for Future Research

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    In assessing whether volatile anaesthetics directly depress the carotid body response to hypoxia it is necessary to combine in meta-analysis studies of when it is “functionally isolated” (e.g., recordings are made from its afferent nerve). Key articles were retrieved (full papers in English) and subjected to quantitative analysis to yield an aggregate estimate of effect. Results from articles that did not use such methodology were assessed separately from this quantitative approach, to see what could be learned also from a nonquantitative overview. Just 7 articles met the inclusion criteria for hypoxia and just 6 articles for hypercapnia. Within these articles, the anaesthetic (mean dose 0.75, standard deviation (SD) 0.40 minimum alveolar concentration, MAC) statistically significantly depressed carotid body hypoxic response by 24% (P = 0.041), but a similar dose (mean 0.81 (0.42) MAC) did not affect the hypercapnic response. The articles not included in the quantitative analysis (31 articles), assessed qualitatively, also indicated that anaesthetics depress carotid body function. This conclusion helps direct future research on the anaesthetic effects on putative cellular/molecular processes that underlie the transduction of hypoxia in the carotid body. PMID:24808974

  3. Proinflammatory response of alveolar type II pneumocytes to in vitro hypoxia and reoxygenation.

    PubMed

    Farivar, Alexander S; Woolley, Steven M; Fraga, Charles H; Byrne, Karen; Mulligan, Michael S

    2004-03-01

    Type II pneumocytes (T2P) are integral in preserving the integrity of the alveolar space by modulating the fluid composition surrounding the alveolar epithelium. There is also mounting evidence supporting their contribution to the development of acute inflammatory lung injury subsequent to oxidative stress. This study characterized the response of T2P to in vitro hypoxia and reoxygenation (H&R). Rat T2P from a cultured cell line (RLE-6TN) were rendered hypoxic for 2 h, and reoxygenated for up to 6 h. Activation of signaling kinases, the nuclear translocation of proinflammatory transcription factors, and quantification of secreted cytokine and chemokine protein content were assessed. Type II pneumocytes expressed activated extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 maximally at 15 min of reoxygenation. C-jun n-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 activation was minimal at all time points studied. The nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) and activator protein (AP)-1 were dramatic after 15 min of reoxygenation. There was a significant increase in the protein secretion of CINC (p = 0.03), IL-1beta (p = 0.02), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (p < 0.001) at 6 h of reoxygenation. Type II pneumocytes respond directly to H&R. ERK 1/2 activity peaks at 15 min of reoxygenation, and correlates temporally with the nuclear translocation of NFkappaB and AP-1. These signaling cascades likely promote the elaboration of proinflammatory mediators. PMID:14961986

  4. The effect of adrenal medullectomy on metabolic responses to chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Shin, Mi-Kyung; Han, Woobum; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Jun, Jonathan C; Punjabi, Naresh M; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y

    2014-11-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea causes intermittent hypoxia (IH) and is associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. IH increases plasma catecholamine levels, which may increase insulin resistance and suppress insulin secretion. The objective of this study was to determine if adrenal medullectomy (MED) prevents metabolic dysfunction in IH. MED or sham surgery was performed in 60 male C57BL/6J mice, which were then exposed to IH or control conditions (intermittent air) for 6 weeks. IH increased plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine levels, increased fasting blood glucose and lowered basal and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. MED decreased baseline epinephrine and prevented the IH induced increase in epinephrine, whereas the norepinephrine response remained intact. MED improved glucose tolerance in mice exposed to IH, attenuated the impairment in basal and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, but did not prevent IH-induced fasting hyperglycemia or insulin resistance. We conclude that the epinephrine release from the adrenal medulla during IH suppresses insulin secretion causing hyperglycemia. PMID:25179887

  5. Growth and physiological responses of neotropical mangrove seedlings to root zone hypoxia.

    PubMed

    McKee, Karen L.

    1996-01-01

    Seedlings of Rhizophora mangle L., Avicennia germinans (L.) Stearn., and Laguncularia racemosa (L.) Gaertn. f. were cultured in aerated or N(2)-purged solution for 12 weeks to assess their relative responses to low oxygen tensions. All three species responded to low oxygen treatment by modifying physiological and morphological patterns to decrease carbon loss by root respiration. However, the extent to which seedling physiology and morphology were altered by low oxygen treatment differed among species. Maintenance of root oxygen concentrations, root respiration rates and root extension rates by R. mangle demonstrated an ability to avoid low oxygen stress with minimal changes in root morphology and physiology. In contrast, oxygen concentrations in A. germinans and L. racemosa roots declined from 16 to 5% or lower within 6 h of treatment. Root hypoxia led to significant decreases in respiration rates of intact root systems (31 and 53% below controls) and root extension rates (38 and 76% below controls) by A. germinans and L. racemosa, respectively, indicating a greater vulnerability of these species to low oxygen tensions in the root zone compared with R. mangle. I conclude that the relative performance of mangrove seedlings growing in anaerobic soils is influenced by interspecific differences in root aeration and concomitant effects on root morphology and physiology. PMID:14871780

  6. AtERF71/HRE2 transcription factor mediates osmotic stress response as well as hypoxia response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee-Yeon; Seok, Hye-Yeon; Woo, Dong-Hyuk; Lee, Sun-Young; Tarte, Vaishali N; Lee, Eun-Hye; Lee, Choon-Hwan; Moon, Yong-Hwan

    2011-10-14

    Various transcription factors are involved in the response to environmental stresses in plants. In this study, we characterized AtERF71/HRE2, a member of the Arabidopsis AP2/ERF family, as an important regulator of the osmotic and hypoxic stress responses in plants. Transcript level of AtERF71/HRE2 was highly increased by anoxia, NaCl, mannitol, ABA, and MV treatments. aterf71/hre2 loss-of-function mutants displayed higher sensitivity to osmotic stress such as high salt and mannitol, accumulating higher levels of ROS under high salt treatment. In contrast, AtERF71/HRE2-overexpressing transgenic plants showed tolerance to salt and mannitol as well as flooding and MV stresses, exhibiting lower levels of ROS under high salt treatment. AtERF71/HRE2 protein was localized in the nucleus, and the C-terminal region of AtERF71/HRE2 was required for transcription activation activity. Taken together, our results suggest that AtERF71/HRE2 might function as a transcription factor involved in the response to osmotic stress as well as hypoxia. PMID:21946064

  7. Brainstem PCO2 modulates phrenic responses to specific carotid body hypoxia in an in situ dual perfused rat preparation

    PubMed Central

    Day, Trevor A; Wilson, Richard J A

    2007-01-01

    Inputs from central (brainstem) and peripheral (carotid body) respiratory chemoreceptors are coordinated to protect blood gases against potentially deleterious fluctuations. However, the mathematics of the steady-state interaction between chemoreceptors has been difficult to ascertain. Further, how this interaction affects time-dependent phenomena (in which chemoresponses depend upon previous experience) is largely unknown. To determine how central PCO2 modulates the response to peripheral chemostimulation in the rat, we utilized an in situ arterially perfused, vagotomized, decerebrate preparation, in which central and peripheral chemoreceptors were perfused separately (i.e. dual perfused preparation (DPP)). We carried out two sets of experiments: in Experiment 1, we alternated steady-state brainstem PCO2 between 25 and 50 Torr in each preparation, and applied specific carotid body hypoxia (60 Torr PO2 and 40 Torr PCO2) under both conditions; in Experiment 2, we applied four 5 min bouts (separated by 5 min) of specific carotid body hypoxia (60 Torr PO2 and 40 Torr PCO2) while holding the brainstem at either 30 Torr or 50 Torr PCO2. We demonstrate that the level of brainstem PCO2 modulates (a) the magnitude of the phrenic responses to a single step of specific carotid body hypoxia and (b) the magnitude of time-dependent phenomena. We report that the interaction between chemoreceptors is negative (i.e. hypo-additive), whereby a lower brainstem PCO2 augments phrenic responses resulting from specific carotid body hypoxia. A negative interaction may underlie the pathophysiology of central sleep apnoea in populations that are chronically hypocapnic. PMID:17082232

  8. Hypoxia depresses CYP1A induction and enhances DNA damage, but has minimal effects on antioxidant responses in sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) larvae exposed to dispersed crude oil.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Subham; DiGiulio, Richard T; Drollette, Brian D; L Plata, Desire; Brownawell, Bruce J; McElroy, Anne E

    2016-08-01

    The growing incidence of hypoxic regions in coastal areas receiving high volumes of anthropogenic discharges requires more focused risk assessment of multiple stressors. One area needing further study is the combined effect of hypoxia and oil exposure. This study examined the short-term sublethal effects of co-exposure to hypoxia and water accommodated fractions (WAF) and chemically enhanced WAFs (CEWAFs) of Southern Louisiana Crude oil on detoxification, antioxidant defenses and genotoxicity in early life stage sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus). CYP1A induction (evaluated by measuring EROD activity), activity of a number of key antioxidant enzymes (GST, GR, GPx, SOD, CAT, and GCL), levels of antioxidants (tGSH, GSH, and GSSG), evidence of lipid peroxidation (evaluated using the TBARS assay), and DNA damage (evaluated using the comet assay) provided a broad assessment of responses. Contaminant detoxification pathways induced by oil exposure were inhibited by co-exposure to hypoxia, indicating a maladaptive response. The interactive effects of oil and hypoxia on antioxidant defenses were mixed, but generally indicated less pronounced alterations, with significant increases in lipid peroxidation not observed. Hypoxia significantly enhanced DNA damage induced by oil exposure indicating the potential for significant deleterious effects post exposure. This study demonstrates the importance of considering hypoxia as an enhanced risk factor in assessing the effects of contaminants in areas where seasonal hypoxia may be prevalent. PMID:27315012

  9. Size restricted silymarin suspension evokes integrated adaptive response against acute hypoxia exposure in rat lung.

    PubMed

    Paul, Subhojit; Arya, Aditya; Gangwar, Anamika; Bhargava, Kalpana; Ahmad, Yasmin

    2016-07-01

    Despite its extraordinary antioxidant capacity, the clinical usage of silymarin has remained restricted to amelioration of hepatic pathology. Perhaps its low bioavailability and uneven bio-distribution, owing to its poor aqueous solubility, are two main causes that have dampened the clinical applicability and scope of this preparation. We took these two challenges and suggested an unexplored application of silymarin. Apart from liver, two of the most susceptible vital organs at the highest risk of oxidative stress are brain and lung, especially during reduced oxygen saturation (hypoxia) at anatomical level. Hypoxia causes excess generation of radicals primarily in the lungs as it is the first organ at the interphase of atmosphere and organism making it the most prone and vulnerable to oxidative stress and the first responder against hypobaric hypoxia. As our first objective, we improved the silymarin formulation by restricting its size to the lower threshold and then successfully tested the prophylactic and therapeutic action in rat lung challenged with simulated hypobaric hypoxia. After dose optimization, we observed that 50mg/kg BW silymarin as size restricted and homogenous aqueous suspension successfully minimized the reactive oxygen species and augmented the antioxidant defense by significant upregulation of catalase and superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione. Moreover, the well-established hypoxia markers and proteins related to hypoxia adaptability, hif1a and VEGF were differentially regulated conferring significant reduction in the inflammation caused by hypobaric hypoxia. We therefore report,the unexplored potential benefits of silymarin for preventing high altitude associated pathophysiology further paving its road to clinical trials. PMID:27105952

  10. Increased SUMO-1 expression in response to hypoxia: Interaction with HIF-1α in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yongliang; Wang, Jing; Tian, Hua; Li, Guang; Zhu, Hao; Liu, Lei; Hu, Ruicheng; Dai, Aiguo

    2015-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) develops in 30-70% of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and increases morbidity and mortality. The present study aimed to investigate the regulation of small ubiquitin‑related modifier‑1 (SUMO‑1) expression in response to hypoxia. The experiments were carried out in vitro in rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) and in vivo using a rat hypoxic PH (HPH) model. A significant increase in SUMO‑1 mRNA and protein levels was observed following hypoxic stimulation in vivo and in vitro. SUMO‑1 is known to interact with various transcription factors, including hypoxia‑inducible factor‑1α (HIF‑1α) in vitro. Notably, the expression of HIF‑1α and its target gene, vascular endothelial growth factor, was increased by hypoxia in HPH. In addition, the present data suggest that SUMO‑1 regulated HIF‑1α in response to hypoxia (gene silencing and overexpression). Finally, the co‑immunoprecipitation assays suggest a direct and specific interaction between SUMO‑1 and HIF‑1α. In conclusion, SUMO‑1 may participate in the modulation of HIF‑1α through sumoylation in HPH. However, further studies are required to confirm this. PMID:25976847

  11. Dim light at night interacts with intermittent hypoxia to alter cognitive and affective responses.

    PubMed

    Aubrecht, Taryn G; Weil, Zachary M; Magalang, Ulysses J; Nelson, Randy J

    2013-07-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and dim light at night (dLAN) have both been independently associated with alterations in mood and cognition. We aimed to determine whether dLAN would interact with intermittent hypoxia (IH), a condition characteristic of OSA, to alter the behavioral, cognitive, and affective responses. Adult male mice were housed in either standard lighting conditions (14:10-h light-dark cycle; 150 lux:0 lux) or dLAN (150 lux:5 lux). Mice were then exposed to IH (15 cycles/h, 8 h/day, FiO2 nadir of 5%) for 3 wk, then tested in assays of affective and cognitive responses; brains were collected for dendritic morphology and PCR analysis. Exposure to dLAN and IH increased anxiety-like behaviors, as assessed in the open field, elevated plus maze, and the light/dark box. dLAN and IH increased depressive-like behaviors in the forced swim test. IH impaired learning and memory performance in the passive avoidance task; however, no differences were observed in spatial working memory, as assessed by y-maze or object recognition. IH combined with dLAN decreased cell body area in the CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus. Overall, IH decreased apical spine density in the CA3, whereas dLAN decreased spine density in the CA1 of the hippocampus. TNF-α gene expression was not altered by IH or lighting condition, whereas VEGF expression was increased by dLAN. The combination of IH and dLAN provokes negative effects on hippocampal dendritic morphology, affect, and cognition, suggesting that limiting nighttime exposure to light in combination with other established treatments may be of benefit to patients with OSA. PMID:23657638

  12. Dim light at night interacts with intermittent hypoxia to alter cognitive and affective responses

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Zachary M.; Magalang, Ulysses J.; Nelson, Randy J.

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and dim light at night (dLAN) have both been independently associated with alterations in mood and cognition. We aimed to determine whether dLAN would interact with intermittent hypoxia (IH), a condition characteristic of OSA, to alter the behavioral, cognitive, and affective responses. Adult male mice were housed in either standard lighting conditions (14:10-h light-dark cycle; 150 lux:0 lux) or dLAN (150 lux:5 lux). Mice were then exposed to IH (15 cycles/h, 8 h/day, FiO2 nadir of 5%) for 3 wk, then tested in assays of affective and cognitive responses; brains were collected for dendritic morphology and PCR analysis. Exposure to dLAN and IH increased anxiety-like behaviors, as assessed in the open field, elevated plus maze, and the light/dark box. dLAN and IH increased depressive-like behaviors in the forced swim test. IH impaired learning and memory performance in the passive avoidance task; however, no differences were observed in spatial working memory, as assessed by y-maze or object recognition. IH combined with dLAN decreased cell body area in the CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus. Overall, IH decreased apical spine density in the CA3, whereas dLAN decreased spine density in the CA1 of the hippocampus. TNF-α gene expression was not altered by IH or lighting condition, whereas VEGF expression was increased by dLAN. The combination of IH and dLAN provokes negative effects on hippocampal dendritic morphology, affect, and cognition, suggesting that limiting nighttime exposure to light in combination with other established treatments may be of benefit to patients with OSA. PMID:23657638

  13. PRDX2 and PRDX4 are negative regulators of hypoxia-inducible factors under conditions of prolonged hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Weibo; Chen, Ivan; Chen, Yan; Alkam, Duah; Wang, Yingfei; Semenza, Gregg L.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) control the transcription of genes that are crucial for the pathogenesis of cancer and other human diseases. The transcriptional activity of HIFs is rapidly increased upon exposure to hypoxia, but expression of some HIF target genes decreases during prolonged hypoxia. However, the underlying mechanism for feedback inhibition is not completely understood. Here, we report that peroxiredoxin 2 (PRDX2) and PRDX4 interact with HIF-1α and HIF-2α in vitro and in hypoxic HeLa cells. Prolonged hypoxia increases the nuclear translocation of PRDX2 and PRDX4. As a result, PRDX2 and PRDX4 impair HIF-1 and HIF-2 binding to the hypoxia response elements of a subset of HIF target genes, thereby inhibiting gene transcription in cells exposed to prolonged hypoxia. PRDX2 and PRDX4 have no effect on the recruitment of p300 and RNA polymerase II to HIF target genes and the enzymatic activity of PRDX2 and PRDX4 is not required for inhibition of HIF-1 and HIF-2. We also demonstrate that PRDX2 is a direct HIF target gene and that PRDX2 expression is induced by prolonged hypoxia. These findings uncover a novel feedback mechanism for inhibition of HIF transcriptional activity under conditions of prolonged hypoxia. PMID:26837221

  14. Behavioural, brain and cardiac responses to hypobaric hypoxia in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jessica E; Christensen, Karen; Vizzier-Thaxton, Yvonne; Mitchell, Malcolm A; McKeegan, Dorothy E F

    2016-09-01

    A novel approach to pre-slaughter stunning of chickens has been developed in which birds are rendered unconscious by progressive hypobaric hypoxia. Termed Low Atmospheric Pressure Stunning (LAPS), this approach involves application of gradual decompression lasting 280s according to a prescribed curve. We examined responses to LAPS by recording behaviour, electroencephalogram (EEG) and electrocardiogram (ECG) in individual male chickens, and interpreted these with regard to the welfare impact of the process. We also examined the effect of two temperature adjusted pressure curves on these responses. Broiler chickens were exposed to LAPS in 30 triplets (16 and 14 triplets assigned to each pressure curve). In each triplet, one bird was instrumented for recording of EEG and ECG while the behaviour of all three birds was observed. Birds showed a consistent sequence of behaviours during LAPS (ataxia, loss of posture, clonic convulsions and motionless) which were observed in all birds. Leg paddling, tonic convulsions, slow wing flapping, mandibulation, head shaking, open bill breathing, deep inhalation, jumping and vocalisation were observed in a proportion of birds. Spectral analysis of EEG responses at 2s intervals throughout LAPS revealed progressive decreases in median frequency at the same time as corresponding progressive increases in total power, followed later by decreases in total power as all birds exhibited isoelectric EEG and died. There was a very pronounced increase in total power at 50-60s into the LAPS cycle, which corresponded to dominance of the signal by high amplitude slow waves, indicating loss of consciousness. Slow wave EEG was seen early in the LAPS process, before behavioural evidence of loss of consciousness such as ataxia and loss of posture, almost certainly due to the fact that it was completely dark in the LAPS chamber. ECG recordings showed a pronounced bradycardia (starting on average 49.6s into LAPS), often associated with arrhythmia, until

  15. Aspergillus fumigatus mitochondrial electron transport chain mediates oxidative stress homeostasis, hypoxia responses, and fungal pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Grahl, Nora; Dinamarco, Taisa Magnani; Willger, Sven D.; Goldman, Gustavo H.; Cramer, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary We previously observed that hypoxia is an important component of host microenvironments during pulmonary fungal infections. However, mechanisms of fungal growth in these in vivo hypoxic conditions are poorly understood. Here, we report that mitochondrial respiration is active in hypoxia (1% oxygen) and critical for fungal pathogenesis. We generated Aspergillus fumigatus alternative oxidase (aoxA) and cytochrome C (cycA) null mutants and assessed their ability to tolerate hypoxia, macrophage killing, and virulence. In contrast to ΔaoxA, ΔcycA was found to be significantly impaired in conidia germination, growth in normoxia and hypoxia, and displayed attenuated virulence. Intriguingly, loss of cycA results in increased levels of AoxA activity, which results in increased resistance to oxidative stress, macrophage killing, and long-term persistence in murine lungs. Thus, our results demonstrate a previously unidentified role for fungal mitochondrial respiration in the pathogenesis of aspergillosis, and lay the foundation for future research into its role in hypoxia signaling and adaptation. PMID:22443190

  16. Modulation of the contractile responses of guinea pig isolated tracheal rings after chronic intermittent hypobaric hypoxia with and without cold exposure.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Kaveri; Fahim, M

    2005-09-01

    Previous studies have documented that repetitive exposure to intermittent hypoxia, such as that encountered in preparation to high-altitude ascent, influences breathing. However, the impact of intermittent hypoxia on airway smooth muscle has not been explored. Ascents to high altitude, in addition to hypoxia, expose individuals to cold air. The objective of the present study is to examine the effect of chronic intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (CIH) and CIH combined with cold exposure (CIHC) on tracheal smooth muscle responses to various contractile and relaxant agonists. Experiments were performed on tracheal rings harvested from adult guinea pigs exposed either to CIH or CIHC [14 days (6 h/day) at barometric pressure of 350 mmHg with and without cold exposure of 5 degrees C] or to room air (normoxia). CIH and CIHC attenuated maximum contractile responses to ACh compared with normoxia. The maximum contractile response to histamine decreased with CIH, whereas CIHC restored the response back to normoxia. Both CIH and CIHC attenuated maximum contractile responses to 5-HT. Altered contractile responses after CIH and CIHC were independent of epithelium. Isoproterenol-induced relaxation was not altered by CIH, whereas it was enhanced after CIHC, and these responses were independent of the epithelium. The data demonstrate that intermittent exposure to hypoxia profoundly influences contractile response of tracheal smooth muscle, and cold exposure can further modulate the response, implying the importance of cold at high altitude. PMID:16103517

  17. Regulation of CREB by moderate hypoxia in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Beitner-Johnson, D; Rust, R T; Hsieh, T; Millhorn, D E

    2000-01-01

    The mechanisms by which excitable cells adapt and respond to changes in O2 levels remain largely unknown. We have investigated the effect of hypoxia on the cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) transcription factor. PC12 cells were exposed to moderate levels of hypoxia (5% O2) for various times between 20 min and 6 hr. We found that hypoxia rapidly and persistently induced ser133 phosphorylation of CREB. This effect was more robust than that produced by exposing PC12 cells to either forskolin, KCl, or NGF. This effect was not due to activation of any of the previously known CREB kinases, including PKA, CaMK, PKC, p70s6k, or MAPKAP kinase-2. Thus, hypoxia may induce activation of a novel CREB kinase. To test whether phosphorylation of CREB was associated with an activation of CRE-dependent gene expression, cells were transfected with wild type and mutated regions of the 5'-flanking region of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene fused to a CAT reporter gene. Mutation of the CRE element in a TH reporter gene reduced, but did not abolish, the effects of hypoxia on TH gene expression. However, hypoxia did not induce transactivation of a GAL4-luciferase reporter by a GAL4-CREB fusion protein. Thus, the mechanism by which hypoxia regulates CREB is distinct, and more complex, than that induced by forskolin, depolarization, or nerve growth factor. PMID:10849656

  18. Cardiorespiratory control and cytokine profile in response to heat stress, hypoxia, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure during early neonatal period.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Fiona B; Chandrasekharan, Kumaran; Wilson, Richard J A; Hasan, Shabih U

    2016-02-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is one of the most common causes of postneonatal infant mortality in the developed world. An insufficient cardiorespiratory response to multiple environmental stressors (such as prone sleeping positioning, overwrapping, and infection), during a critical period of development in a vulnerable infant, may result in SIDS. However, the effect of multiple risk factors on cardiorespiratory responses has rarely been tested experimentally. Therefore, this study aimed to quantify the independent and possible interactive effects of infection, hyperthermia, and hypoxia on cardiorespiratory control in rats during the neonatal period. We hypothesized that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration will negatively impact cardiorespiratory responses to increased ambient temperature and hypoxia in neonatal rats. Sprague-Dawley neonatal rat pups were studied at postnatal day 6-8. Rats were examined at an ambient temperature of 33°C or 38°C. Within each group, rats were allocated to control, saline, or LPS (200 μg/kg) treatments. Cardiorespiratory and thermal responses were recorded and analyzed before, during, and after a hypoxic exposure (10% O2). Serum samples were taken at the end of each experiment to measure cytokine concentrations. LPS significantly increased cytokine concentrations (such as TNFα, IL-1β, MCP-1, and IL-10) compared to control. Our results do not support a three-way interaction between experimental factors on cardiorespiratory control. However, independently, heat stress decreased minute ventilation during normoxia and increased the hypoxic ventilatory response. Furthermore, LPS decreased hypoxia-induced tachycardia. Herein, we provide an extensive serum cytokine profile under various experimental conditions and new evidence that neonatal cardiorespiratory responses are adversely affected by dual interactions of environmental stress factors. PMID:26811056

  19. Integrin-linked kinase: a hypoxia-induced anti-apoptotic factor exploited by cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Elizabeth R; Coffelt, Seth B; Figueroa, Yanira G; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J; Nelson, Anne B; Sullivan, Deborah E; Morris, Cindy B; Tang, Yan; Beckman, Barbara S; Scandurro, Aline B

    2007-01-01

    Based on cDNA microarray results, integrin-linked kinase (ILK) emerged as an interesting candidate in hypoxia-mediated survival mechanisms employed by cancer cells. This notion was confirmed here by the following observations: the 5' promoter region of the ilk gene contains hypoxia responsive elements (HRE) that bind hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) transcription factor complexes and drive HRE-luciferase gene expression in reporter assays; ILK protein and kinase activity are induced following hypoxia; downstream targets of ILK signaling are induced following hypoxia treatment; inhibition of ILK leads to increased apoptosis; and HIF and ILK are co-localized within human cancer tissues. The identification of ILK as a player in hypoxia survival signaling employed by cancer cells further validates ILK as a unique target for cancer therapy. PMID:17143519

  20. Neurogenic mechanisms underlying the rapid onset of sympathetic responses to intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Mifflin, Steve; Cunningham, J Thomas; Toney, Glenn M

    2015-12-15

    Sleep apnea (SA) leads to metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular dysfunction. Rodent models of nocturnal intermittent hypoxia (IH) are used to mimic arterial hypoxemias that occur during SA. This mini-review focuses on our work examining central nervous system (CNS) mechanisms whereby nocturnal IH results in increased sympathetic nerve discharge (SND) and hypertension (HTN) that persist throughout the 24-h diurnal period. Within the first 1-2 days of IH, arterial pressure (AP) increases even during non-IH periods of the day. Exposure to IH for 7 days biases nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) neurons receiving arterial chemoreceptor inputs toward increased discharge, providing a substrate for persistent activation of sympathetic outflow. IH HTN is blunted by manipulations that reduce angiotensin II (ANG II) signaling within the forebrain lamina terminalis suggesting that central ANG II supports persistent IH HTN. Inhibition of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) reduces ongoing SND and acutely lowers AP in IH-conditioned animals. These findings support a role for the PVN, which integrates information ascending from NTS and descending from the lamina terminalis, in sustaining IH HTN. In summary, our findings indicate that IH rapidly and persistently activates a central circuit that includes the NTS, forebrain lamina terminalis, and the PVN. Our working model holds that NTS neuromodulation increases transmission of arterial chemoreceptor inputs, increasing SND via connections with PVN and rostral ventrolateral medulla. Increased circulating ANG II sensed by the lamina terminalis generates yet another excitatory drive to PVN. Together with adaptations intrinsic to the PVN, these responses to IH support rapid onset neurogenic HTN. PMID:25997944

  1. Oxidative stress response to acute hypobaric hypoxia and its association with indirect measurement of increased intracranial pressure: a field study.

    PubMed

    Strapazzon, Giacomo; Malacrida, Sandro; Vezzoli, Alessandra; Dal Cappello, Tomas; Falla, Marika; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Moretti, Sarah; Procter, Emily; Brugger, Hermann; Mrakic-Sposta, Simona

    2016-01-01

    High altitude is the most intriguing natural laboratory to study human physiological response to hypoxic conditions. In this study, we investigated changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress biomarkers during exposure to hypobaric hypoxia in 16 lowlanders. Moreover, we looked at the potential relationship between ROS related cellular damage and optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) as an indirect measurement of intracranial pressure. Baseline measurement of clinical signs and symptoms, biological samples and ultrasonography were assessed at 262 m and after passive ascent to 3830 m (9, 24 and 72 h). After 24 h the imbalance between ROS production (+141%) and scavenging (-41%) reflected an increase in oxidative stress related damage of 50-85%. ONSD concurrently increased, but regression analysis did not infer a causal relationship between oxidative stress biomarkers and changes in ONSD. These results provide new insight regarding ROS homeostasis and potential pathophysiological mechanisms of acute exposure to hypobaric hypoxia, plus other disease states associated with oxidative-stress damage as a result of tissue hypoxia. PMID:27579527

  2. Combined effects of toxic cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa and hypoxia on the physiological responses of triangle sail mussel Hyriopsis cumingii.

    PubMed

    Hu, Menghong; Wu, Fangli; Yuan, Mingzhe; Liu, Qigen; Wang, Youji

    2016-04-01

    The single and combined effects of toxic cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa and hypoxia on the energy budget of triangle sail mussel Hyriopsis cumingii were determined in terms of scope for growth (SfG). Mussels were exposed to different combinations of toxic M. aeruginosa (0%, 50%, and 100% of total dietary dry weight) and dissolved oxygen concentrations (1, 3, and 6.0mg O2l(-1)) with a 3×3 factorial design for 14 days, followed by a recovery period with normal conditions for 7 days. Microcystin contents in mussel tissues increased with the increase in the exposed M. aeruginosa concentration at each sampling time. Adverse physiological responses of H. cumingii under toxic M. aeruginosa and hypoxic exposure were found in terms of clearance rate, absorption efficiency, respiration rate, excretion rate, and SfG. Results emphasized the importance of combined effects of hypoxia and toxic cyanobacteria on H. cumingii bioenergetic parameters, highlighted the interactive effects of toxic algae and hypoxia, and implied that the two stressors affected H. cumingii during the exposure period and showed carryover effects later. Thus, if H. cumingii is used as a bioremediation tool to eliminate M. aeruginosa, the waters should be oxygenated. PMID:26686521

  3. Oxidative stress response to acute hypobaric hypoxia and its association with indirect measurement of increased intracranial pressure: a field study

    PubMed Central

    Strapazzon, Giacomo; Malacrida, Sandro; Vezzoli, Alessandra; Dal Cappello, Tomas; Falla, Marika; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Moretti, Sarah; Procter, Emily; Brugger, Hermann; Mrakic-Sposta, Simona

    2016-01-01

    High altitude is the most intriguing natural laboratory to study human physiological response to hypoxic conditions. In this study, we investigated changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress biomarkers during exposure to hypobaric hypoxia in 16 lowlanders. Moreover, we looked at the potential relationship between ROS related cellular damage and optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) as an indirect measurement of intracranial pressure. Baseline measurement of clinical signs and symptoms, biological samples and ultrasonography were assessed at 262 m and after passive ascent to 3830 m (9, 24 and 72 h). After 24 h the imbalance between ROS production (+141%) and scavenging (−41%) reflected an increase in oxidative stress related damage of 50–85%. ONSD concurrently increased, but regression analysis did not infer a causal relationship between oxidative stress biomarkers and changes in ONSD. These results provide new insight regarding ROS homeostasis and potential pathophysiological mechanisms of acute exposure to hypobaric hypoxia, plus other disease states associated with oxidative-stress damage as a result of tissue hypoxia. PMID:27579527

  4. Glycolysis determines dichotomous regulation of T cell subsets in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Chaudhury, Arindam; Zhang, Ming; Savoldo, Barbara; Metelitsa, Leonid S; Rodgers, John; Yustein, Jason T; Neilson, Joel R; Dotti, Gianpietro

    2016-07-01

    Hypoxia occurs in many pathological conditions, including chronic inflammation and tumors, and is considered to be an inhibitor of T cell function. However, robust T cell responses occur at many hypoxic inflammatory sites, suggesting that functions of some subsets are stimulated under low oxygen conditions. Here, we investigated how hypoxic conditions influence human T cell functions and found that, in contrast to naive and central memory T cells (TN and TCM), hypoxia enhances the proliferation, viability, and cytotoxic action of effector memory T cells (TEM). Enhanced TEM expansion in hypoxia corresponded to high hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) expression and glycolytic activity compared with that observed in TN and TCM. We determined that the glycolytic enzyme GAPDH negatively regulates HIF1A expression by binding to adenylate-uridylate-rich elements in the 3'-UTR region of HIF1A mRNA in glycolytically inactive TN and TCM. Conversely, active glycolysis with decreased GAPDH availability in TEM resulted in elevated HIF1α expression. Furthermore, GAPDH overexpression reduced HIF1α expression and impaired proliferation and survival of T cells in hypoxia, indicating that high glycolytic metabolism drives increases in HIF1α to enhance TEM function during hypoxia. This work demonstrates that glycolytic metabolism regulates the translation of HIF1A to determine T cell responses to hypoxia and implicates GAPDH as a potential mechanism for controlling T cell function in peripheral tissue. PMID:27294526

  5. Regulation of MMP-1 expression in response to hypoxia is dependent on the intracellular redox status of metastatic bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Hui; Dier, Usawadee; Melendez, Juan Andres; Hempel, Nadine

    2015-12-01

    High steady-state reactive oxygen species (ROS) production has been implicated with metastatic disease progression. We provide new evidence that this increased intracellular ROS milieu uniquely predisposes metastatic tumor cells to hypoxia-mediated regulation of the matrix metalloproteinase MMP-1. Using a cell culture metastatic progression model we previously reported that steady-state intracellular H2O2 levels are elevated in highly metastatic 253J-BV bladder cancer cells compared to their non-metastatic 253J parental cells. 253J-BV cells display higher basal MMP-1 expression, which is further enhanced under hypoxic conditions (1% O2). This hypoxia-mediated MMP-1 increase was not observed in the non-metastatic 253J cells. Hypoxia-induced MMP-1 increases are accompanied by the stabilization of hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs)-1α and HIF-2α, and a rise in intracellular ROS in metastatic 253J-BV cells. RNA interference studies show that hypoxia-mediated MMP-1 expression is primarily dependent on the presence of HIF-2α. Further, hypoxia promotes migration and spheroid outgrowth of only the metastatic 253J-BV cells and not the parental 253J cells. The observed HIF stabilization, MMP-1 expression and migration under hypoxia are dependent on increases in intracellular ROS, as these effects are attenuated by treatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine. These data show that ROS play an important role in hypoxia-mediated MMP-1 expression and that an elevated intracellular redox environment, as observed in metastasis, predisposes tumor cells to an enhanced hypoxic response. It further supports the notion that metastatic tumor cells are uniquely able to utilize intracellular increases in ROS to drive pro-metastatic signaling events and highlights the important interplay between ROS and hypoxia in malignancy. PMID:26343184

  6. Adenosine modulates hypoxia-induced responses in rat PC12 cells via the A2A receptor.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Conforti, L; Pun, R Y; Millhorn, D E

    1998-04-01

    1. The present study was undertaken to determine the role of adenosine in mediating the cellular responses to hypoxia in rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells, an oxygen-sensitive clonal cell line. 2. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction studies revealed that PC12 cells express adenosine deaminase (the first catalysing enzyme of adenosine degradation) and the A2A and A2B adenosine receptors, but not the A1 or A3 adenosine receptors. 3. Whole-cell current- and voltage-clamp experiments showed that adenosine attenuated the hypoxia-induced membrane depolarization. The hypoxia-induced suppression of the voltage-sensitive potassium current (IK(V)) was markedly reduced by adenosine. Furthermore, extracellularly applied adenosine increased the peak amplitudes of IK(V) in a concentration-dependent manner. This increase was blocked by pretreatment not only with a non-specific adenosine receptor antagonist, 8-phenyltheophylline (8-PT), but also with a selective A2A receptor antagonist, ZM241385. 4. Ca2+ imaging studies using fura-2 acetoxymethyl ester (fura-2 AM) revealed that the increase in intracellular free Ca2+ during hypoxic exposure was attenuated significantly by adenosine. Voltage-clamp studies showed that adenosine inhibited the voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents (ICa) in a concentration-dependent fashion. This inhibition was also abolished by both 8-PT and ZM241385. 5. The modulation of both IK(V) and ICa by adenosine was prevented by intracellular application of an inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA), PKA inhibitor fragment (6-22) amide. In addition, the effect of adenosine on either IK(V) or ICa was absent in PKA-deficient PC12 cells. 6. These results indicate that the modulatory effects of adenosine on the hypoxia-induced membrane responses of PC12 cells are likely to be mediated via activation of the A2A receptor, and that the PKA pathway is required for these modulatory actions. We propose that this modulation serves to regulate membrane excitability in

  7. Adenosine modulates hypoxia-induced responses in rat PC12 cells via the A2A receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shuichi; Conforti, Laura; Pun, Raymund Y K; Millhorn, David E

    1998-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the role of adenosine in mediating the cellular responses to hypoxia in rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells, an oxygen-sensitive clonal cell line. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction studies revealed that PC12 cells express adenosine deaminase (the first catalysing enzyme of adenosine degradation) and the A2A and A2B adenosine receptors, but not the A1 or A3 adenosine receptors. Whole-cell current- and voltage-clamp experiments showed that adenosine attenuated the hypoxia-induced membrane depolarization. The hypoxia-induced suppression of the voltage-sensitive potassium current (IK(V)) was markedly reduced by adenosine. Furthermore, extracellularly applied adenosine increased the peak amplitudes of IK(V) in a concentration-dependent manner. This increase was blocked by pretreatment not only with a non-specific adenosine receptor antagonist, 8-phenyltheophylline (8-PT), but also with a selective A2A receptor antagonist, ZM241385. Ca2+ imaging studies using fura-2 acetoxymethyl ester (fura-2 AM) revealed that the increase in intracellular free Ca2+ during hypoxic exposure was attenuated significantly by adenosine. Voltage-clamp studies showed that adenosine inhibited the voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents (ICa) in a concentration-dependent fashion. This inhibition was also abolished by both 8-PT and ZM241385. The modulation of both IK(V) and ICa by adenosine was prevented by intracellular application of an inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA), PKA inhibitor fragment (6–22) amide. In addition, the effect of adenosine on either IK(V) or ICa was absent in PKA-deficient PC12 cells. These results indicate that the modulatory effects of adenosine on the hypoxia-induced membrane responses of PC12 cells are likely to be mediated via activation of the A2A receptor, and that the PKA pathway is required for these modulatory actions. We propose that this modulation serves to regulate membrane excitability in PC12 cells and

  8. Microneedle-array patches loaded with hypoxia-sensitive vesicles provide fast glucose-responsive insulin delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jicheng; Zhang, Yuqi; Ye, Yanqi; DiSanto, Rocco; Sun, Wujin; Ranson, Davis; Ligler, Frances S.; Buse, John B.; Gu, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    A glucose-responsive “closed-loop” insulin delivery system mimicking the function of pancreatic cells has tremendous potential to improve quality of life and health in diabetics. Here, we report a novel glucose-responsive insulin delivery device using a painless microneedle-array patch (“smart insulin patch”) containing glucose-responsive vesicles (GRVs; with an average diameter of 118 nm), which are loaded with insulin and glucose oxidase (GOx) enzyme. The GRVs are self-assembled from hypoxia-sensitive hyaluronic acid (HS-HA) conjugated with 2-nitroimidazole (NI), a hydrophobic component that can be converted to hydrophilic 2-aminoimidazoles through bioreduction under hypoxic conditions. The local hypoxic microenvironment caused by the enzymatic oxidation of glucose in the hyperglycemic state promotes the reduction of HS-HA, which rapidly triggers the dissociation of vesicles and subsequent release of insulin. The smart insulin patch effectively regulated the blood glucose in a mouse model of chemically induced type 1 diabetes. The described work is the first demonstration, to our knowledge, of a synthetic glucose-responsive device using a hypoxia trigger for regulation of insulin release. The faster responsiveness of this approach holds promise in avoiding hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia if translated for human therapy. PMID:26100900

  9. Microneedle-array patches loaded with hypoxia-sensitive vesicles provide fast glucose-responsive insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jicheng; Zhang, Yuqi; Ye, Yanqi; DiSanto, Rocco; Sun, Wujin; Ranson, Davis; Ligler, Frances S; Buse, John B; Gu, Zhen

    2015-07-01

    A glucose-responsive "closed-loop" insulin delivery system mimicking the function of pancreatic cells has tremendous potential to improve quality of life and health in diabetics. Here, we report a novel glucose-responsive insulin delivery device using a painless microneedle-array patch ("smart insulin patch") containing glucose-responsive vesicles (GRVs; with an average diameter of 118 nm), which are loaded with insulin and glucose oxidase (GOx) enzyme. The GRVs are self-assembled from hypoxia-sensitive hyaluronic acid (HS-HA) conjugated with 2-nitroimidazole (NI), a hydrophobic component that can be converted to hydrophilic 2-aminoimidazoles through bioreduction under hypoxic conditions. The local hypoxic microenvironment caused by the enzymatic oxidation of glucose in the hyperglycemic state promotes the reduction of HS-HA, which rapidly triggers the dissociation of vesicles and subsequent release of insulin. The smart insulin patch effectively regulated the blood glucose in a mouse model of chemically induced type 1 diabetes. The described work is the first demonstration, to our knowledge, of a synthetic glucose-responsive device using a hypoxia trigger for regulation of insulin release. The faster responsiveness of this approach holds promise in avoiding hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia if translated for human therapy. PMID:26100900

  10. Dissociation between blood pressure and heart rate response to hypoxia after bilateral carotid body removal in men with systolic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Niewinski, Piotr; Janczak, Dariusz; Rucinski, Artur; Tubek, Stanislaw; Engelman, Zoar J; Jazwiec, Przemyslaw; Banasiak, Waldemar; Sobotka, Paul A; Hart, Emma C J; Paton, Julian F R; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2014-03-01

    While the ventilatory response to hypoxia is known to be mediated by the carotid bodies, the origin of the haemodynamic alterations evoked by hypoxia is less certain. Bilateral carotid body removal (CBR) performed to treat congestive heart failure may serve as a model to improve our understanding of haemodynamic responses to hypoxia in humans. We studied six congestive heart failure patients before and 1 month after CBR [median (interquartile range): age, 58.5 (56-61) years old; and ejection fraction, 32 (25-34)%]. Peripheral chemosensitivity (hypoxic ventilatory response) was equated to the slope relating lowest oxygen saturation to highest minute ventilation following exposures to hypoxia. Likewise, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate (HR) slopes were calculated as slopes relating the lowest oxygen saturations to the highest SBP, DBP and HR responses. We found that CBR reduces the hypoxic ventilatory response (91%, P < 0.05), SBP (71%, P < 0.05) and DBP slopes (59%, P = 0.07). In contrast, the HR slope remained unchanged. The dissociation between the blood pressure and HR responses after CBR shows involvement of a different chemoreceptive site(s) maintaining the response to acute hypoxia. We conclude that carotid bodies are responsible for ventilatory and blood pressure responses, while the HR response might be mediated by the aortic bodies. The significant reduction of the blood pressure response to hypoxia after CBR suggests a decrease in sympathetic tone, which is of particular clinical relevance in congestive heart failure. PMID:24243836