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Sample records for hypoxic transcription gene

  1. Oxygen sensing in yeast: Evidence for the involvement of the respiratory chain in regulating the transcription of a subset of hypoxic genes

    PubMed Central

    Kwast, Kurt E.; Burke, Patricia V.; Staahl, Brett T.; Poyton, Robert O.

    1999-01-01

    Oxygen availability affects the transcription of a number of genes in nearly all organisms. Although the molecular mechanisms for sensing oxygen are not precisely known, heme is thought to play a pivotal role. Here, we address the possibility that oxygen sensing in yeast, as in mammals, involves a redox-sensitive hemoprotein. We have found that carbon monoxide (CO) completely blocks the anoxia-induced expression of two hypoxic genes, OLE1 and CYC7, partially blocks the induction of a third gene, COX5b, and has no effect on the expression of other hypoxic or aerobic genes. In addition, transition metals (Co and Ni) induce the expression of OLE1 and CYC7 in a concentration-dependent manner under aerobic conditions. These findings suggest that the redox state of an oxygen-binding hemoprotein is involved in controlling the expression of at least two hypoxic yeast genes. By using mutants deficient in each of the two major yeast CO-binding hemoproteins (cytochrome c oxidase and flavohemoglobin), respiratory inhibitors, and cob1 and ρ0 mutants, we have found that the respiratory chain is involved in the anoxic induction of these two genes and that cytochrome c oxidase is likely the hemoprotein “sensor.” Our findings also indicate that there are at least two classes of hypoxic genes in yeast (CO sensitive and CO insensitive) and imply that multiple pathways/mechanisms are involved in modulating the expression of hypoxic yeast genes. PMID:10318903

  2. Post-Transcriptional Control of the Hypoxic Response by RNA-Binding Proteins and MicroRNAs.

    PubMed

    Gorospe, Myriam; Tominaga, Kumiko; Wu, Xue; Fähling, Michael; Ivan, Mircea

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian gene expression patterns change profoundly in response to low oxygen levels. These changes in gene expression programs are strongly influenced by post-transcriptional mechanisms mediated by mRNA-binding factors: RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and microRNAs (miRNAs). Here, we review the RBPs and miRNAs that modulate mRNA turnover and translation in response to hypoxic challenge. RBPs such as HuR (human antigen R), PTB (polypyrimidine tract-binding protein), heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), tristetraprolin, nucleolin, iron-response element-binding proteins (IRPs), and cytoplasmic polyadenylation-element-binding proteins (CPEBs), selectively bind to numerous hypoxia-regulated transcripts and play a major role in establishing hypoxic gene expression patterns. MiRNAs including miR-210, miR-373, and miR-21 associate with hypoxia-regulated transcripts and further modulate the levels of the encoded proteins to implement the hypoxic gene expression profile. We discuss the potent regulation of hypoxic gene expression by RBPs and miRNAs and their integrated actions in the cellular hypoxic response. PMID:21747757

  3. Modeling the Transcriptional Regulatory Network That Controls the Early Hypoxic Response in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    van het Hoog, Marco; Tebbji, Faiza; Beaurepaire, Cécile; Whiteway, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    We determined the changes in transcriptional profiles that occur in the first hour following the transfer of Candida albicans to hypoxic growth conditions. The impressive speed of this response is not compatible with current models of fungal adaptation to hypoxia that depend on the depletion of sterol and heme. Functional analysis using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) identified the Sit4 phosphatase, Ccr4 mRNA deacetylase, and Sko1 transcription factor (TF) as potential regulators of the early hypoxic response. Cells mutated in these and other regulators exhibit a delay in their transcriptional responses to hypoxia. Promoter occupancy data for 29 TFs were combined with the transcriptional profiles of 3,111 in vivo target genes in a Network Component Analysis (NCA) to produce a model of the dynamic and highly interconnected TF network that controls this process. With data from the TF network obtained from a variety of sources, we generated an edge and node model that was capable of separating many of the hypoxia-upregulated and -downregulated genes. Upregulated genes are centered on Tye7, Upc2, and Mrr1, which are associated with many of the gene promoters that exhibit the strongest activations. The connectivity of the model illustrates the high redundancy of this response system and the challenges that lie in determining the individual contributions of specific TFs. Finally, treating cells with an inhibitor of the oxidative phosphorylation chain mimics most of the early hypoxic profile, which suggests that this response may be initiated by a drop in ATP production. PMID:24681685

  4. SP1 and USF differentially regulate ADAMTS1 gene expression under normoxic and hypoxic conditions in hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Turkoglu, Sumeyye Aydogan; Kockar, Feray

    2016-01-01

    ADAM metallopeptidase with thrombospondin type I motif, 1 (ADAMTS1) that has both antiangiogenic and aggrecanase activity was dysregulated in many pathophysiologic circumstances. However, there is limited information available on the transcriptional regulation of ADAMTS1 gene. Therefore, this study mainly aimed to identify regulatory regions important for the regulation of ADAMTS1 gene under normoxic and hypoxic conditions in human hepatoma cells (HEP3B). Cultured HEP3B cells were exposed to normal oxygen condition, and Cobalt chloride (CoCl2) induced the hypoxic condition, which is an HIF-1 inducer. The cocl2-induced hypoxic condition led to the induced ADAMTS1 mRNA and protein expression in Hepatoma cells. Differential regulation of SP1 and USF transcription factors on ADAMTS1 gene expression was determined by transcriptional activity, mRNA and protein level of ADAMTS1 gene. Ectopic expression of SP1 and USF transcription factors resulted in the decrease in ADAMTS1 transcriptional activity of all promoter constructs consistent with mRNA and protein level in normoxic condition. However, overexpression of SP1 and USF led to the increase of ADAMTS1 gene expressions at mRNA and protein level in hypoxic condition. On the other hand, C/EBPα transcription factor didn't show any statistically significant effect on ADAMTS1 gene expression at mRNA, protein and transcriptional level under normoxic and hypoxic condition. PMID:26299656

  5. The metal-responsive transcription factor-1 contributes to HIF-1 activation during hypoxic stress

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Brian J. . E-mail: brian.murphy@sri.com; Sato, Barbara G.; Dalton, Timothy P.; Laderoute, Keith R.

    2005-11-25

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), the major transcriptional regulator of the mammalian cellular response to low oxygen (hypoxia), is embedded within a complex network of signaling pathways. We have been investigating the importance of another stress-responsive transcription factor, MTF-1, for the adaptation of cells to hypoxia. This article reports that MTF-1 plays a central role in hypoxic cells by contributing to HIF-1 activity. Loss of MTF-1 in transformed Mtf1 null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) results in an attenuation of nuclear HIF-1{alpha} protein accumulation, HIF-1 transcriptional activity, and expression of an established HIF-1 target gene, glucose transporter-1 (Glut1). Mtf1 null (Mtf1 KO) MEFs also have constitutively higher levels of both glutathione (GSH) and the rate-limiting enzyme involved in GSH synthesis-glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit-than wild type cells. The altered cellular redox state arising from increased GSH may perturb oxygen-sensing mechanisms in hypoxic Mtf1 KO cells and decrease the accumulation of HIF-1{alpha} protein. Together, these novel findings define a role for MTF-1 in the regulation of HIF-1 activity.

  6. The Transcription Factor ZNF395 Is Required for the Maximal Hypoxic Induction of Proinflammatory Cytokines in U87-MG Cells

    PubMed Central

    Herwartz, Christine; Castillo-Juárez, Paola; Schröder, Linda; Barron, Blanca L.; Steger, Gertrud

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia activates the expression of proangiogenic and survival promoting factors as well as proinflammatory cytokines that support tissue inflammation. Hypoxia and inflammation are associated with tumor progression. The identification of the factors participating in the hypoxia associated inflammation is essential to develop strategies to control tumor hypoxia. The transcription factor ZNF395 was found to be overexpressed in various tumors including glioblastomas particularly in the network of a hypoxic response pointing to a functional role of ZNF395. On the other hand, ZNF395 was suggested to have tumor suppressor activities which may rely on its repression of proinflammatory factors. To address these conflictive observations, we investigated the role of ZNF395 in the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in the astrocytoma cell line U87-MG under hypoxia. We show that ZNF395 is a target gene of the hypoxia inducible factor HIF-1α. By gene expression analysis, RT-PCR and ELISA, we demonstrated that the siRNA-mediated suppression of ZNF395 impairs the hypoxic induction of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and LIF in U87-MG cells. At ambient oxygen concentrations, ZNF395 had no enhancing effect, indicating that this transcriptional activation by ZNF395 is restricted to hypoxic conditions. Our results suggest that ZNF395 contributes to hypoxia associated inflammation by superactivating proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:26229239

  7. Transcriptional signature of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASCs) preconditioned for chondrogenesis in hypoxic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pilgaard, L.; Lund, P.; Duroux, M.; Lockstone, H.; Taylor, J.; Emmersen, J.; Fink, T.; Ragoussis, J.; Zachar, V.

    2009-07-01

    Hypoxia is an important factor involved in the control of stem cells. To obtain a better insight into the phenotypical changes brought about by hypoxic preconditioning prior to chondrogenic differentiation; we have investigated growth, colony-forming and chondrogenic capacity, and global transcriptional responses of six adipose tissue-derived stem cell lines expanded at oxygen concentrations ranging from ambient to 1%. The assessment of cell proliferation and colony-forming potential revealed that the hypoxic conditions corresponding to 1% oxygen played a major role. The chondrogenic inducibility, examined by high-density pellet model, however, did not improve on hypoxic preconditioning. While the microarray analysis revealed a distinctive inter-donor variability, the exposure to 1% hypoxia superseded the biological variability and produced a specific expression profile with 2581 significantly regulated genes and substantial functional enrichment in the pathways of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Additionally, exposure to 1% oxygen resulted in upregulation of factors related to angiogenesis and cell growth. In particular, leptin (LEP), the key regulator of body weight and food intake was found to be highly upregulated. In conclusion, the results of this investigation demonstrate the significance of donor demographics and the importance of further studies into the use of regulated oxygen tension as a tool for preparation of ASCs in order to exploit their full potential.

  8. Selective enhancement of hypoxic cell killing by tempol-regulated suicide gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kagiya, Go; Ogawa, Ryohei; Choudhuri, Rajani; Cook, John A; Hatashita, Masanori; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Koda, Kana; Yamashita, Kei; Kubo, Makoto; Kawakami, Fumitaka; Mitchell, James B

    2015-08-01

    The presence of hypoxic regions within solid tumors is caused by an imbalance between cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Such regions may facilitate the onset of recurrence after radiation therapy and chemotherapy, as hypoxic cells show resistance to these treatments. We found that tempol, a nitroxide, strongly induces the accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, particularly under conditions of hypoxia. We, therefore, evaluated whether tempol enhances the gene expression via HIF-1α, potentially leading to various applications for cancer gene therapy targeting hypoxic cells. Consequently, following treatment with tempol under hypoxia, the luciferase (Luc) activity in the cells transfected with the plasmid containing the luc gene with the oxygen-dependent degradation domain and a promoter composed of hypoxia-responsive elements increased up to approximately 10-fold compared to that observed in cells treated identically with the exception of tempol. The plasmid constructed by replacing the luc gene with the fcy::fur fusion gene as a suicide gene, strongly induced the accumulation of the Fcy::Fur fusion protein, only when incubated in the presence of the hypoxic mimic CoCl2 and tempol. The transfected cells were successfully killed with the addition of 5-fluorocytosine to the cell culture according to the fcy::fur fusion gene expression. As similar but lesser enhancement of the Luc activity was also observed in solid tumor tissues in nude mice, this strategy may be applied for hypoxic cancer eradication. PMID:26034980

  9. Transcriptional gene silencing in humans.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Marc S; Morris, Kevin V

    2016-08-19

    It has been over a decade since the first observation that small non-coding RNAs can functionally modulate epigenetic states in human cells to achieve functional transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). TGS is mechanistically distinct from the RNA interference (RNAi) gene-silencing pathway. TGS can result in long-term stable epigenetic modifications to gene expression that can be passed on to daughter cells during cell division, whereas RNAi does not. Early studies of TGS have been largely overlooked, overshadowed by subsequent discoveries of small RNA-directed post-TGS and RNAi. A reappraisal of early work has been brought about by recent findings in human cells where endogenous long non-coding RNAs function to regulate the epigenome. There are distinct and common overlaps between the proteins involved in small and long non-coding RNA transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, suggesting that the early studies using small non-coding RNAs to modulate transcription were making use of a previously unrecognized endogenous mechanism of RNA-directed gene regulation. Here we review how non-coding RNA plays a role in regulation of transcription and epigenetic gene silencing in human cells by revisiting these earlier studies and the mechanistic insights gained to date. We also provide a list of mammalian genes that have been shown to be transcriptionally regulated by non-coding RNAs. Lastly, we explore how TGS may serve as the basis for development of future therapeutic agents. PMID:27060137

  10. Novel Genes Critical for Hypoxic Preconditioning in Zebrafish Are Regulators of Insulin and Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Manchenkov, Tania; Pasillas, Martina P.; Haddad, Gabriel G.; Imam, Farhad B.

    2015-01-01

    Severe hypoxia is a common cause of major brain, heart, and kidney injury in adults, children, and newborns. However, mild hypoxia can be protective against later, more severe hypoxia exposure via “hypoxic preconditioning,” a phenomenon that is not yet fully understood. Accordingly, we have established and optimized an embryonic zebrafish model to study hypoxic preconditioning. Using a functional genomic approach, we used this zebrafish model to identify and validate five novel hypoxia-protective genes, including irs2, crtc3, and camk2g2, which have been previously implicated in metabolic regulation. These results extend our understanding of the mechanisms of hypoxic preconditioning and affirm the discovery potential of this novel vertebrate hypoxic stress model. PMID:25840431

  11. Activation of vascular endothelial growth factor gene transcription by hypoxia-inducible factor 1.

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, J A; Jiang, B H; Iyer, N V; Agani, F; Leung, S W; Koos, R D; Semenza, G L

    1996-01-01

    Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is induced in cells exposed to hypoxia or ischemia. Neovascularization stimulated by VEGF occurs in several important clinical contexts, including myocardial ischemia, retinal disease, and tumor growth. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is a heterodimeric basic helix-loop-helix protein that activates transcription of the human erythropoietin gene in hypoxic cells. Here we demonstrate the involvement of HIF-1 in the activation of VEGF transcription. VEGF 5'-flanking sequences mediated transcriptional activation of reporter gene expression in hypoxic Hep3B cells. A 47-bp sequence located 985 to 939 bp 5' to the VEGF transcription initiation site mediated hypoxia-inducible reporter gene expression directed by a simian virus 40 promoter element that was otherwise minimally responsive to hypoxia. When reporters containing VEGF sequences, in the context of the native VEGF or heterologous simian virus 40 promoter, were cotransfected with expression vectors encoding HIF-1alpha and HIF-1beta (ARNT [aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator]), reporter gene transcription was much greater in both hypoxic and nonhypoxic cells than in cells transfected with the reporter alone. A HIF-1 binding site was demonstrated in the 47-bp hypoxia response element, and a 3-bp substitution eliminated the ability of the element to bind HIF-1 and to activate transcription in response to hypoxia and/or recombinant HIF-1. Cotransfection of cells with an expression vector encoding a dominant negative form of HIF-1alpha inhibited the activation of reporter transcription in hypoxic cells in a dose-dependent manner. VEGF mRNA was not induced by hypoxia in mutant cells that do not express the HIF-1beta (ARNT) subunit. These findings implicate HIF-1 in the activation of VEGF transcription in hypoxic cells. PMID:8756616

  12. Identification of Hypoxia-Inducible Target Genes of Aspergillus fumigatus by Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Cellular Respiration as an Important Contributor to Hypoxic Survival

    PubMed Central

    Kroll, Kristin; Pähtz, Vera; Hillmann, Falk; Vaknin, Yakir; Schmidt-Heck, Wolfgang; Roth, Martin; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Osherov, Nir; Brakhage, Axel A.

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic, airborne pathogen that causes invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients. During the infection process, A. fumigatus is challenged by hypoxic microenvironments occurring in inflammatory, necrotic tissue. To gain further insights into the adaptation mechanism, A. fumigatus was cultivated in an oxygen-controlled chemostat under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. Transcriptome analysis revealed a significant increase in transcripts associated with cell wall polysaccharide metabolism, amino acid and metal ion transport, nitrogen metabolism, and glycolysis. A concomitant reduction in transcript levels was observed with cellular trafficking and G-protein-coupled signaling. To learn more about the functional roles of hypoxia-induced transcripts, we deleted A. fumigatus genes putatively involved in reactive nitrogen species detoxification (fhpA), NAD+ regeneration (frdA and osmA), nitrogen metabolism (niaD and niiA), and respiration (rcfB). We show that the nitric oxygen (NO)-detoxifying flavohemoprotein gene fhpA is strongly induced by hypoxia independent of the nitrogen source but is dispensable for hypoxic survival. By deleting the nitrate reductase gene niaD, the nitrite reductase gene niiA, and the two fumarate reductase genes frdA and osmA, we found that alternative electron acceptors, such as nitrate and fumarate, do not have a significant impact on growth of A. fumigatus during hypoxia, but functional mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes are essential under these conditions. Inhibition studies indicated that primarily complexes III and IV play a crucial role in the hypoxic growth of A. fumigatus. PMID:25084861

  13. Transcriptional regulation of tenascin genes.

    PubMed

    Chiovaro, Francesca; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth; Chiquet, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins of the tenascin family resemble each other in their domain structure, and also share functions in modulating cell adhesion and cellular responses to growth factors. Despite these common features, the 4 vertebrate tenascins exhibit vastly different expression patterns. Tenascin-R is specific to the central nervous system. Tenascin-C is an "oncofetal" protein controlled by many stimuli (growth factors, cytokines, mechanical stress), but with restricted occurrence in space and time. In contrast, tenascin-X is a constituitive component of connective tissues, and its level is barely affected by external factors. Finally, the expression of tenascin-W is similar to that of tenascin-C but even more limited. In accordance with their highly regulated expression, the promoters of the tenascin-C and -W genes contain TATA boxes, whereas those of the other 2 tenascins do not. This article summarizes what is currently known about the complex transcriptional regulation of the 4 tenascin genes in development and disease. PMID:25793574

  14. Transcriptional regulation of tenascin genes

    PubMed Central

    Chiovaro, Francesca; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth; Chiquet, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins of the tenascin family resemble each other in their domain structure, and also share functions in modulating cell adhesion and cellular responses to growth factors. Despite these common features, the 4 vertebrate tenascins exhibit vastly different expression patterns. Tenascin-R is specific to the central nervous system. Tenascin-C is an “oncofetal” protein controlled by many stimuli (growth factors, cytokines, mechanical stress), but with restricted occurrence in space and time. In contrast, tenascin-X is a constituitive component of connective tissues, and its level is barely affected by external factors. Finally, the expression of tenascin-W is similar to that of tenascin-C but even more limited. In accordance with their highly regulated expression, the promoters of the tenascin-C and -W genes contain TATA boxes, whereas those of the other 2 tenascins do not. This article summarizes what is currently known about the complex transcriptional regulation of the 4 tenascin genes in development and disease. PMID:25793574

  15. HIF1A induces expression of the WASF3 metastasis-associated gene under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, Pushpankur; Teng, Yong; Lesoon, Leslie Ann; Cowell, John K

    2012-09-15

    The WASF3 (WAVE3) gene is an important mediator of cell motility, invasion and metastasis and is expressed at high levels in some advanced stage tumors. In our survey of breast cancer cells, we now demonstrate that exposure to hypoxic conditions increases WASF3 expression levels in MDA231, SKBR3 and MCF7 cells. The WASF3 promoter region contains HIF1A response elements (HRE). ChIP assays demonstrate that HIF1A binds to these HRE elements in the promoter region, and luciferase reporter assays using the WASF3 gene minimal promoter shows that hypoxia results in its upregulation. Phosphorylation of WASF3 is required for its ability to affect invasion and increased phosphoactivation of WASF3 is also seen in cells challenged with hypoxia. These cells also show increased motility in the scratch wound assay. Cells in which WASF3 has been knocked down show no response to hypoxia as expected, implicating the specificity of the hypoxic response to WASF3. Overall, these experiments demonstrate WASF3 is a HIF1A-regulated gene and suggests a mechanism to explain the observation of elevated expression of WASF3 in advanced stage tumors. PMID:22581642

  16. Massive transcriptional start site analysis of human genes in hypoxia cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Suzuki, Yutaka; Wakaguri, Hiroyuki; Irie, Takuma; Tanimoto, Kousuke; Hashimoto, Shin-ichi; Matsushima, Kouji; Mizushima-Sugano, Junko; Yamashita, Riu; Nakai, Kenta; Bentley, David; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Sugano, Sumio

    2009-04-01

    Combining our full-length cDNA method and the massively parallel sequencing technology, we developed a simple method to collect precise positional information of transcriptional start sites (TSSs) together with digital information of the gene-expression levels in a high throughput manner. We applied this method to observe gene-expression changes in a colon cancer cell line cultured in normoxic and hypoxic conditions. We generated more than 100 million 36-base TSS-tag sequences and revealed comprehensive features of hypoxia responsive alterations in the transcriptional landscape of the human genome. The features include presence of inducible 'hot regions' in 54 genomic regions, 220 novel hypoxia inducible promoters that may drive non-protein-coding transcripts, 191 hypoxia responsive alternative promoters and detailed views of 120 novel as well as known hypoxia responsive genes. We further analyzed hypoxic response of different cells using additional 60 million TSS-tags and found that the degree of the gene-expression changes were different among cell lines, possibly reflecting cellular robustness against hypoxia. The novel dynamic figure of the human gene transcriptome will deepen our understanding of the transcriptional program of the human genome as well as bringing new insights into the biology of cancer cells in hypoxia. PMID:19237398

  17. [Development genes encoding transcription factors and dysmorphology].

    PubMed

    Lacombe, Didier

    2009-04-01

    Studies of children with developmental abnormalities of genetic origin are necessary for accurate diagnosis, prognostication, patient management, and genetic counseling. Such studies can also help to identify genes involved in normal and abnormal morphogenesis, which often act as patterning genes and are also potential oncogenes. Many encode transcription factors that regulate other genes during embryonic development. PMID:20120282

  18. Does every transcript originate from a gene?

    PubMed

    Raabe, Carsten A; Brosius, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Outdated gene definitions favored regions corresponding to mature messenger RNAs, in particular, the open reading frame. In eukaryotes, the intergenic space was widely regarded nonfunctional and devoid of RNA transcription. Original concepts were based on the assumption that RNA expression was restricted to known protein-coding genes and a few so-called structural RNA genes, such as ribosomal RNAs or transfer RNAs. With the discovery of introns and, more recently, sensitive techniques for monitoring genome-wide transcription, this view had to be substantially modified. Tiling microarrays and RNA deep sequencing revealed myriads of transcripts, which cover almost entire genomes. The tremendous complexity of non-protein-coding RNA transcription has to be integrated into novel gene definitions. Despite an ever-growing list of functional RNAs, questions concerning the mass of identified transcripts are under dispute. Here, we examined genome-wide transcription from various angles, including evolutionary considerations, and suggest, in analogy to novel alternative splice variants that do not persist, that the vast majority of transcripts represent raw material for potential, albeit rare, exaptation events. PMID:25847549

  19. Neurotoxocarosis alters myelin protein gene transcription and expression.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Lea; Beyerbach, Martin; Lühder, Fred; Beineke, Andreas; Strube, Christina

    2015-06-01

    Neurotoxocarosis is an infection of the central nervous system caused by migrating larvae of the common dog and cat roundworms (Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati), which are zoonotic agents. As these parasites are prevalent worldwide and neuropathological and molecular investigations on neurotoxocarosis are scare, this study aims to characterise nerve fibre demyelination associated with neurotoxocarosis on a molecular level. Transcription of eight myelin-associated genes (Cnp, Mag, Mbp, Mog, Mrf-1, Nogo-A, Plp1, Olig2) was determined in the mouse model during six time points of the chronic phase of infection using qRT-PCR. Expression of selected proteins was analysed by Western blotting or immunohistochemistry. Additionally, demyelination and neuronal damage were investigated histologically. Significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) between transcription rates of T. canis-infected and uninfected control mice were detected for all analysed genes while T. cati affected five of eight investigated genes. Interestingly, 2', 3 ´-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (Cnp) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (Mog) were upregulated in both T. canis- and T. cati-infected mice preceding demyelination. Later, CNPase expression was additionally enhanced. As expected, myelin basic protein (Mbp) was downregulated in cerebra and cerebella of T. canis-infected mice when severe demyelination was present 120 days post infectionem (dpi). The transcriptional pattern observed in the present study appears to reflect direct traumatic and hypoxic effects of larval migration as well as secondary processes including host immune reactions, demyelination and attempts to remyelinate damaged areas. PMID:25773181

  20. Transcriptional regulation of secretin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Nishitani, J; Rindi, G; Lopez, M J; Upchurch, B H; Leiter, A B

    1995-01-01

    Expression of the gene encoding the hormone secretin is restricted to a specific enteroendocrine cell type and to beta-cells in developing pancreatic islets. To characterize regulatory elements in the secretin gene responsible for its expression in secretin-producing cells, we used a series of reporter genes for transient expression assays in transfection studies carried out in secretin-producing islet cell lines. Analysis of the transcriptional activity of deletion mutants identified a positive cis regulatory domain between 174 and 53 base pairs upstream from the transcriptional initiation site which was required for secretin gene expression in secretin-producing HIT insulinoma cells. Within this enhancer were sequences resembling two binding sites for the transcription factor Sp1, as well as a consensus sequence for binding to helix-loop-helix proteins. Analysis of these three elements by site-directed mutagenesis suggests that each is important for full transcriptional activity. The role of proximal enhancer sequences in directing secretin gene expression to appropriate tissues is further supported by studies in transgenic mice revealing that 1.6 kilobases of the secretin gene 5' flanking sequence were sufficient to direct the expression of either human growth hormone or simian virus 40 large T-antigen reporter genes to all major secretin-producing tissues. PMID:8774991

  1. Transcriptional Control of the TNF Gene

    PubMed Central

    Falvo, James V.; Tsytsykova, Alla V.; Goldfeld, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    The cytokine TNF is a critical mediator of immune and inflammatory responses. The TNF gene is an immediate early gene, rapidly transcribed in a variety of cell types following exposure to a broad range of pathogens and signals of inflammation and stress. Regulation of TNF gene expression at the transcriptional level is cell type- and stimulus-specific, involving the recruitment of distinct sets of transcription factors to a compact and modular promoter region. In this review, we describe our current understanding of the mechanisms through which TNF transcription is specifically activated by a variety of extracellular stimuli in multiple cell types, including T cells, B cells, macrophages, mast cells, dendritic cells, and fibroblasts. We discuss the role of nuclear factor of activated T cells and other transcription factors and coactivators in enhanceosome formation, as well as the contradictory evidence for a role for nuclear factor κB as a classical activator of the TNF gene. We describe the impact of evolutionarily conserved cis-regulatory DNA motifs in the TNF locus upon TNF gene transcription, in contrast to the neutral effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms. We also assess the regulatory role of chromatin organization, epigenetic modifications, and long-range chromosomal interactions at the TNF locus. PMID:20173386

  2. Topologies for perfect adaptation in gene transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wenjia; Tang, Chao

    2014-03-01

    Adaptation is commonly used in sensory systems and signaling networks to allow the detection of further stimuli. Despite enzymatic network topologies for adaptation have been investigated systematically, the topology of transcriptional network that could perform adaptation still remains unclear, due to the complexity of transcriptional regulation. Here, we systematically investigated all three-node transcriptional networks, and found the topologies of transcriptional networks for adaptation are different from that of enzymatic ones. While both negative feedback loop (NFBL) and incoherent feed forward loop (IFFL) are capable of performing adaptation analytically, a positive self-regulation on buffer node is necessary for NFBL topology and more flexible structures emerge for IFFL than that of enzymatic networks. Most of the simulation results agree with analytical predictions. This study may explain the mechanism of adapted gene regulation behavior and supply a design table for gene regulatory adaptation.

  3. Aeromonas hydrophila Lateral Flagellar Gene Transcriptional Hierarchy

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelms, Markus; Gonzalez, Victor; Merino, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila AH-3 lateral flagella are not assembled when bacteria grow in liquid media; however, lateral flagellar genes are transcribed. Our results indicate that A. hydrophila lateral flagellar genes are transcribed at three levels (class I to III genes) and share some similarities with, but have many important differences from, genes of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. A. hydrophila lateral flagellum class I gene transcription is σ70 dependent, which is consistent with the fact that lateral flagellum is constitutively transcribed, in contrast to the characteristics of V. parahaemolyticus. The fact that multiple genes are included in class I highlights that lateral flagellar genes are less hierarchically transcribed than polar flagellum genes. The A. hydrophila lafK-fliEJL gene cluster (where the subscript L distinguishes genes for lateral flagella from those for polar flagella) is exclusively from class I and is in V. parahaemolyticus class I and II. Furthermore, the A. hydrophila flgAMNL cluster is not transcribed from the σ54/LafK-dependent promoter and does not contain class II genes. Here, we propose a gene transcriptional hierarchy for the A. hydrophila lateral flagella. PMID:23335410

  4. Gene transcription and electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    Our overall aim is to obtain sufficient information to allow us to ultimately determine whether ELF EM field exposure is an initiating factor in neoplastic transformation and/or if exposure can mimic characteristics of the second-step counterpart in neoplastic disease. This aim is based on our previous findings that levels of some transcripts are increased in cells exposed to EM fields. While the research is basic in nature, the ramifications have bearing on the general safety of exposure to EM fields in industrial and everyday life. A large array of diverse biological effects are reported to occur as the result of exposure to elf EM fields, suggesting that the cell response to EM fields is at a basic level, presumably initiated by molecular and/or biophysical events at the cell membrane. The hypothesized route is a signal transduction pathway involving membrane calcium fluxes. Information flow resulting from signal transduction can mediate the induction of regulatory factors in the cell, and directly affect how transcription is regulated.

  5. Transcriptional enhancer from milk protein genes

    SciTech Connect

    Casperson, G.F.; Schmidhauser, C.T.; Bissell, M.J.

    1999-12-21

    The invention relates to novel enhancer nucleotide sequences which stimulate transcription of heterologous DNA in cells in culture. The enhancers are derived from major milk protein genes by the process of deletion mapping and functional analysis. The invention also relates to expression vectors containing the novel enhancers.

  6. Transcriptional enhancer from milk protein genes

    SciTech Connect

    Casperson, Gerald F.; Schmidhauser, Christian T.; Bissell, Mina J.

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates to novel enhancer nucleotide sequences which stimulate transcription of heterologous DNA in cells in culture. The enhancers are derived from major milk protein genes by the process of deletion mapping and functional analysis. The invention also relates to expression vectors containing the novel enhancers.

  7. Production of the 2400 kb Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene transcript; transcription time and cotranscriptional splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, C.N.; Worton, R.G.

    1994-09-01

    The largest known gene in any organism is the human DMD gene which has 79 exons that span 2400 kb. The extreme nature of the DMD gene raises questions concerning the time required for transcription and whether splicing begins before transcription is complete. DMD gene transcription is induced as cultured human myoblasts differentiate to form multinucleated myotubes, providing a system for studying the kinetics of transcription and splicing. Using quantitative RT-PCR, transcript accumulation was monitored from four different regions within the gene following induction of expression. By comparing the accumulation of transcripts from the 5{prime} and 3{prime} ends of the gene we have shown that approximately 12 hours are required to transcribe 1770 kb of the gene, extrapolating to a time of 16 hours for the transcription unit expressed in muscle. Comparison of accumulation profiles for spliced and total transcript demonstrated that transcripts are spliced at the 5{prime} end before transcription is complete, providing strong evidence for cotranscriptional splicing of DMD gene transcripts. Finally, the rate of transcript accumulation was reduced at the 3{prime} end of the gene relative to the 5{prime} end, perhaps due to premature termination of transcription complexes as they traverse this enormous transcription unit. The lag between transcription initiation and the appearance of complete transcripts could be important in limiting transcript production in dividing cells and to the timing of mRNA appearance in differentiating muscle.

  8. Transcriptional analysis of human survivin gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Li, F; Altieri, D C

    1999-01-01

    The preservation of tissue and organ homoeostasis depends on the regulated expression of genes controlling apoptosis (programmed cell death). In this study, we have investigated the basal transcriptional requirements of the survivin gene, an IAP (inhibitor of apoptosis) prominently up-regulated in cancer. Analysis of the 5' flanking region of the human survivin gene revealed the presence of a TATA-less promoter containing a canonical CpG island of approximately 250 nt, three cell cycle dependent elements, one cell cycle homology region and numerous Sp1 sites. PCR-based analysis of human genomic DNA, digested with methylation-sensitive and -insensitive restriction enzymes, indicated that the CpG island was unmethylated in both normal and neoplastic tissues. Primer extension and S1 nuclease mapping of the human survivin gene identified two main transcription start sites at position -72 and within -57/-61 from the initiating ATG. Transfection of cervical carcinoma HeLa cells with truncated or nested survivin promoter-luciferase constructs revealed the presence of both enhancer and repressor sequences and identified a minimal promoter region within the proximal -230 nt of the human survivin gene. Unbiased mutagenesis analysis of the human survivin promoter revealed that targeting the Sp1 sequences at position -171 and -151 abolished basal transcriptional activity by approximately 63-82%. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assay with DNA oligonucleotides confirmed formation of a DNA-protein complex between the survivin Sp1 sequences and HeLa cell extracts in a reaction abolished by mutagenesis of the survivin Sp1 sites. These findings identify the basal transcriptional requirements of survivin gene expression. PMID:10567210

  9. Hypoxic stress inhibits multiple aspects of the potato tuber wound response. [Solanum tuberosum L

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, W.; Cook, L.; Vayda, M.E. )

    1990-05-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers subjected to wounding under hypoxic stress do not synthesize RNA species that are induced in response to wounding in aerobic conditions. Further, wound-response proteins fail to be synthesized when wounded tubers are transferred to hypoxic conditions although messenger RNAs which encode them persist for many hours after transfer. Hypoxic stress also prevents the incorporation of ({sup 3}H)thymidine by wounded tubers that occurs in aerobic conditions. In contrast, hypoxic tubers accumulate and translate transcripts of genes whose products are involved in anaerobic metabolism whether or not they are wounded. Both the hypoxic response and the aerobic wound response preclude the synthesis of proteins encoded by messenger RNAs which accumulated during the tuberization process and which can be translated in vitro. Finally, wounding elicits the degradation of a subset of these tuberization-associated transcripts. These data indicate a complex and precise regulation of gene expression at several levels of macromolecular synthesis.

  10. Transcriptional regulation of the human biglycan gene.

    PubMed

    Ungefroren, H; Krull, N B

    1996-06-28

    The small leucine-rich proteoglycan biglycan is involved in several physiological and pathophysiological processes through the ability of its core protein to interact with other extracellular matrix molecules and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). To learn more about the regulation of biglycan core protein expression, we have cloned and sequenced 1218 base pairs from the 5'-flanking region of the human biglycan gene, demonstrated functional promoter activity, and investigated the molecular mechanisms through which various agents modulate its transcriptional activity. Sequencing revealed the presence of several cis-acting elements including multiple AP-2 sites and interleukin-6 response elements, a NF-kappaB site, a TGF-beta negative element, and an E-box. The TATA and CAAT box-lacking promoter possesses many features of a growth-related gene, e.g. a GC-rich immediate 5' region, many Sp1 sites, and the use of multiple transcriptional start sites. Transient transfections of the tumor cell lines MG-63, SK-UT-1, and T47D with various biglycan 5'-flanking region-luciferase reporter gene constructs showed that the proximal 78 base pairs are sufficient for full promoter activity. Several agents among them interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. were capable of altering biglycan promoter activity. However, in MG-63 cells, TGF-beta1 failed to increase either activity of the biglycan promoter constructs or specific transcription from the endogenous biglycan gene. Since TGF-beta1 also did not alter the stability of cytoplasmic biglycan mRNA as determined from Northern analysis after inhibition of transcription with 5,6-dichloro-1beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, an as yet unidentified nuclear post-transcriptional mechanism was considered responsible for the TGF-beta effect in this cell type. These results might help to elucidate the molecular pathways leading to pathological alterations of biglycan expression observed in atherosclerosis, glomerulonephritis

  11. Regulation of gene transcription by Polycomb proteins

    PubMed Central

    Aranda, Sergi; Mas, Gloria; Di Croce, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) of proteins defines a subset of factors that physically associate and function to maintain the positional identity of cells from the embryo to adult stages. PcG has long been considered a paradigmatic model for epigenetic maintenance of gene transcription programs. Despite intensive research efforts to unveil the molecular mechanisms of action of PcG proteins, several fundamental questions remain unresolved: How many different PcG complexes exist in mammalian cells? How are PcG complexes targeted to specific loci? How does PcG regulate transcription? In this review, we discuss the diversity of PcG complexes in mammalian cells, examine newly identified modes of recruitment to chromatin, and highlight the latest insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the function of PcGs in transcription regulation and three-dimensional chromatin conformation. PMID:26665172

  12. Intersecting transcription networks constrain gene regulatory evolution.

    PubMed

    Sorrells, Trevor R; Booth, Lauren N; Tuch, Brian B; Johnson, Alexander D

    2015-07-16

    Epistasis-the non-additive interactions between different genetic loci-constrains evolutionary pathways, blocking some and permitting others. For biological networks such as transcription circuits, the nature of these constraints and their consequences are largely unknown. Here we describe the evolutionary pathways of a transcription network that controls the response to mating pheromone in yeast. A component of this network, the transcription regulator Ste12, has evolved two different modes of binding to a set of its target genes. In one group of species, Ste12 binds to specific DNA binding sites, while in another lineage it occupies DNA indirectly, relying on a second transcription regulator to recognize DNA. We show, through the construction of various possible evolutionary intermediates, that evolution of the direct mode of DNA binding was not directly accessible to the ancestor. Instead, it was contingent on a lineage-specific change to an overlapping transcription network with a different function, the specification of cell type. These results show that analysing and predicting the evolution of cis-regulatory regions requires an understanding of their positions in overlapping networks, as this placement constrains the available evolutionary pathways. PMID:26153861

  13. Intersecting transcription networks constrain gene regulatory evolution

    PubMed Central

    Sorrells, Trevor R; Booth, Lauren N; Tuch, Brian B; Johnson, Alexander D

    2015-01-01

    Epistasis—the non-additive interactions between different genetic loci—constrains evolutionary pathways, blocking some and permitting others1–8. For biological networks such as transcription circuits, the nature of these constraints and their consequences are largely unknown. Here we describe the evolutionary pathways of a transcription network that controls the response to mating pheromone in yeasts9. A component of this network, the transcription regulator Ste12, has evolved two different modes of binding to a set of its target genes. In one group of species, Ste12 binds to specific DNA binding sites, while in another lineage it occupies DNA indirectly, relying on a second transcription regulator to recognize DNA. We show, through the construction of various possible evolutionary intermediates, that evolution of the direct mode of DNA binding was not directly accessible to the ancestor. Instead, it was contingent on a lineage-specific change to an overlapping transcription network with a different function, the specification of cell type. These results show that analyzing and predicting the evolution of cis-regulatory regions requires an understanding of their positions in overlapping networks, as this placement constrains the available evolutionary pathways. PMID:26153861

  14. Hypoxic culture conditions induce increased metabolic rate and collagen gene expression in ACL-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Tomasz J; Leong, Natalie L; Dar, Ayelet; Wu, Ling; Kabir, Nima; Khan, Adam Z; Eliasberg, Claire D; Pedron, Andrew; Karayan, Ashant; Lee, Siyoung; Di Pauli von Treuheim, Theodor; Jiacheng, Jin; Wu, Ben M; Evseenko, Denis; McAllister, David R; Petrigliano, Frank A

    2016-06-01

    There has been substantial effort directed toward the application of bone marrow and adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in the regeneration of musculoskeletal tissue. Recently, resident tissue-specific stem cells have been described in a variety of mesenchymal structures including ligament, tendon, muscle, cartilage, and bone. In the current study, we systematically characterize three novel anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-derived cell populations with the potential for ligament regeneration: ligament-forming fibroblasts (LFF: CD146(neg) , CD34(neg) CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) ), ligament perivascular cells (LPC: CD146(pos) CD34(neg) CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) ) and ligament interstitial cells (LIC: CD34(pos) CD146(neg) , CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) )-and describe their proliferative and differentiation potential, collagen gene expression and metabolism in both normoxic and hypoxic environments, and their trophic potential in vitro. All three groups of cells (LIC, LPC, and LFF) isolated from adult human ACL exhibited progenitor cell characteristics with regard to proliferation and differentiation potential in vitro. Culture in low oxygen tension enhanced the collagen I and III gene expression in LICs (by 2.8- and 3.3-fold, respectively) and LFFs (by 3- and 3.5-fold, respectively) and increased oxygen consumption rate and extracellular acidification rate in LICs (by 4- and 3.5-fold, respectively), LFFs (by 5.5- and 3-fold, respectively), LPCs (by 10- and 4.5-fold, respectively) as compared to normal oxygen concentration. In summary, this study demonstrates for the first time the presence of three novel progenitor cell populations in the adult ACL that demonstrate robust proliferative and matrix synthetic capacity; these cells may play a role in local ligament regeneration, and consequently represent a potential cell source for ligament engineering applications. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  15. Differential activities of murine single minded 1 (SIM1) and SIM2 on a hypoxic response element. Cross-talk between basic helix-loop-helix/per-Arnt-Sim homology transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Woods, Susan L; Whitelaw, Murray L

    2002-03-22

    The basic helix-loop-helix/Per-Arnt-Sim homology (bHLH/PAS) protein family comprises a group of transcriptional regulators that often respond to a variety of developmental and environmental stimuli. Two murine members of this family, Single Minded 1 (SIM1) and Single Minded 2 (SIM2), are essential for postnatal survival but differ from other prototypical family members such as the dioxin receptor (DR) and hypoxia-inducible factors, in that they behave as transcriptional repressors in mammalian one-hybrid experiments and have yet to be ascribed a regulating signal. In cell lines engineered to stably express SIM1 and SIM2, we show that both are nuclear proteins that constitutively complex with the general bHLH/PAS partner factor, ARNT. We report that the murine SIM factors, in combination with ARNT, attenuate transcription from the hypoxia-inducible erythropoietin (EPO) enhancer during hypoxia. Such cross-talk between coexpressed bHLH/PAS factors can occur through competition for ARNT, which we find evident in SIM repression of DR-induced transcription from a xenobiotic response element reporter gene. However, SIM1/ARNT, but not SIM2/ARNT, can activate transcription from the EPO enhancer at normoxia, implying that the SIM proteins have the ability to bind hypoxia response elements and affect either activation or repression of transcription. This notion is supported by co-immunoprecipitation of EPO enhancer sequences with the SIM2 protein. SIM protein levels decrease with hypoxia treatment in our stable cell lines, although levels of the transcripts encoding SIM1 and SIM2 and the approximately 2-h half-lives of each protein are unchanged during hypoxia. Inhibition of protein synthesis, known to occur in cells during hypoxic stress in order to decrease ATP utilization, appears to account for the fall in SIM levels. Our data suggest the existence of a hypoxic switch mechanism in cells that coexpress hypoxia-inducible factor and SIM proteins, where up-regulation and

  16. Transcriptional Silencing by Hairpin RNAs Complementary to a Gene Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yongjun; Kalantari, Roya; Dodd, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Double-stranded RNAs can target gene promoters and inhibit transcription. To date, most research has focused on synthetic RNA duplexes. Transcriptional silencing by hairpin RNAs would facilitate a better understanding of endogenous RNA-mediated regulation of transcription within cells. Here we examine transcriptional silencing of progesterone receptor (PR) expression by hairpin RNAs. We identify the guide strand as the strand complementary to an antisense transcript at the PR promoter and that hairpin RNAs are active transcriptional silencing agents. The sequence of the hairpin loop affects activity, with the highest activity achieved when the loop has the potential for full complementarity to the antisense transcript target. Introduction of centrally mismatched bases relative to the target transcript does not prevent transcriptional silencing unless the mismatches are present on both the guide and passenger strands. These data demonstrate that hairpin RNAs can cause transcriptional silencing and offer insights into the mechanism of gene modulation by RNAs that target gene promoters. PMID:22703280

  17. Imaging transcription dynamics at endogenous genes in living Drosophila tissues.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jie; Zobeck, Katie L; Lis, John T; Webb, Watt W

    2008-07-01

    How transcription of individual genes is regulated in a single, intact, three-dimensionally organized cell nucleus remains mysterious. Recently, live cell imaging has become an essential tool to dissect the in vivo mechanisms of gene transcription. It not only examines functions of transcription factors at their gene targets within the chromatin context, but it also provides a non-disruptive approach for observing the dynamics of a transcription cycle in real time. However, the identification of any endogenous gene loci and their associated transcription factors remains technically difficult. Here, we describe the method of imaging the transcriptional dynamics of heat shock genes in Drosophila polytene chromosomes in living salivary gland tissues by multiphoton microscopy (MPM). This method has provided the experimental capability to visualize the assembly and dynamics of individual transcription factors and regulators and to dissect their functions at their endogenous gene targets in living cells. PMID:18586105

  18. Notch1 is associated with the multidrug resistance of hypoxic osteosarcoma by regulating MRP1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Guo, D; Tang, B; Zhang, Y; Zhang, K; Nie, L

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia and Notch signaling pathway are closely related and both participate in cell proliferation and drug resistance of tumors. However, the molecular mechanisms of hypoxia and Notch signaling pathway in cell proliferation and drug resistance of osteosarcoma (OS) remain unclear. In this study, to further evaluate the role of hypoxia and Notch1 on drug resistance of OS, we investigated the influence of inhibiting Notch1 pathway by Notch1 small interference RNA (siRNA) on human MG-63 OS cells in hypoxia. Our data showed that hypoxia promoted OS cell proliferation, induced the G0/G1-S-G2/M phase transition, and increased multidrug resistance of human OS cells. Western blot analysis suggested that hypoxia increased the expression of HIF-1α, Notch1, and multidrug resistance protein-1 (MRP1) in human OS cells. Notch1 siRNA inhibits proliferation and increases apoptosis of hypoxic OS cells. Finally, these hypoxic OS cells can be sensitized to multidrug treatment through inhibition of the Notch protein expression by siRNA. Repression of the Notch protein expression resulted in down-regulation of MRP1 protein. These data support the conclusion that Notch signaling is up-regulated in human OS cells under hypoxia and Notch1 may represent a viable target to overcome chemoresistant OS cells in a hypoxic niche by regulating MRP1 gene expression. PMID:27468877

  19. Exposure of yeast cells to anoxia induces transient oxidative stress. Implications for the induction of hypoxic genes.

    PubMed

    Dirmeier, Reinhard; O'Brien, Kristin M; Engle, Marcella; Dodd, Athena; Spears, Erick; Poyton, Robert O

    2002-09-20

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain is required for the induction of some yeast hypoxic nuclear genes. Because the respiratory chain produces reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can mediate intracellular signal cascades, we addressed the possibility that ROS are involved in hypoxic gene induction. Recent studies with mammalian cells have produced conflicting results concerning this question. These studies have relied almost exclusively on fluorescent dyes to measure ROS levels. Insofar as ROS are very reactive and inherently unstable, a more reliable method for measuring changes in their intracellular levels is to measure their damage (e.g. the accumulation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) in DNA, and oxidative protein carbonylation) or to measure the expression of an oxidative stress-induced gene, e.g. SOD1. Here we used these approaches as well as a fluorescent dye, carboxy-H(2)-dichloro-dihydrofluorescein diacetate (carboxy-H(2)-DCFDA), to determine whether ROS levels change in yeast cells exposed to anoxia. These studies reveal that the level of mitochondrial and cytosolic protein carbonylation, the level of 8-OH-dG in mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, and the expression of SOD1 all increase transiently during a shift to anoxia. These studies also reveal that carboxy-H(2)-DCFDA is an unreliable reporter of ROS levels in yeast cells shifted to anoxia. By using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight), we have found that specific proteins become carbonylated during a shift to anoxia and that some of these proteins are the same proteins that become carbonylated during peroxidative stress. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is responsible for much of this carbonylation. Together, these findings indicate that yeast cells exposed to anoxia experience transient oxidative stress and raise the possibility that this initiates the induction of hypoxic genes. PMID:12089150

  20. Post-transcriptional gene silencing, transcriptional gene silencing and human immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Catalina; Ahlenstiel, Chantelle L; Kelleher, Anthony D

    2015-01-01

    While human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) infection is controlled through continuous, life-long use of a combination of drugs targeting different steps of the virus cycle, HIV-1 is never completely eradicated from the body. Despite decades of research there is still no effective vaccine to prevent HIV-1 infection. Therefore, the possibility of an RNA interference (RNAi)-based cure has become an increasingly explored approach. Endogenous gene expression is controlled at both, transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels by non-coding RNAs, which act through diverse molecular mechanisms including RNAi. RNAi has the potential to control the turning on/off of specific genes through transcriptional gene silencing (TGS), as well as fine-tuning their expression through post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). In this review we will describe in detail the canonical RNAi pathways for PTGS and TGS, the relationship of TGS with other silencing mechanisms and will discuss a variety of approaches developed to suppress HIV-1 via manipulation of RNAi. We will briefly compare RNAi strategies against other approaches developed to target the virus, highlighting their potential to overcome the major obstacle to finding a cure, which is the specific targeting of the HIV-1 reservoir within latently infected cells. PMID:26279984

  1. Altered Stra13 and Dec2 circadian gene expression in hypoxic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guillaumond, Fabienne; Lacoche, Samuel; Dulong, Sandrine; Grechez-Cassiau, Aline; Filipski, Elisabeth; Li, Xiao-Mei; Levi, Francis; Berra, Edurne; Delaunay, Franck; Teboul, Michele

    2008-05-16

    The circadian system regulates rhythmically most of the mammalian physiology in synchrony with the environmental light/dark cycle. Alteration of circadian clock gene expression has been associated with tumour progression but the molecular links between the two mechanisms remain poorly defined. Here we show that Stra13 and Dec2, two circadian transcriptional regulators which play a crucial role in cell proliferation and apoptosis are overexpressed and no longer rhythmic in serum shocked fibroblasts treated with CoCl{sub 2,} a substitute of hypoxia. This effect is associated with a loss of circadian expression of the clock genes Rev-erb{alpha} and Bmal1, and the clock-controlled gene Dbp. Consistently, cotransfection assays demonstrate that STRA13 and DEC2 both antagonize CLOCK:BMAL1 dependent transactivation of the Rev-erb{alpha} and Dbp promoters. Using a transplantable osteosarcoma tumour model, we show that hypoxia is associated with altered circadian expression of Stra13, Dec2, Rev-erb{alpha}, Bmal1 and Dbp in vivo. These observations collectively support the notion that overexpression of Stra13 and Dec2 links hypoxia signalling to altered circadian clock gene expression.

  2. Transcriptional interference among the murine β-like globin genes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao; Eszterhas, Susan; Pallazzi, Nicolas; Bouhassira, Eric E.; Fields, Jennifer; Tanabe, Osamu; Gerber, Scott A.; Bulger, Michael; Engel, James Douglas; Groudine, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian β-globin loci contain multiple genes that are activated at different developmental stages. Studies have suggested that the transcription of one gene in a locus can influence the expression of the other locus genes. The prevalent model to explain this transcriptional interference is that all potentially active genes compete for locus control region (LCR) activity. To investigate the influence of transcription by the murine embryonic genes on transcription of the other β-like genes, we generated mice with deletions of the promoter regions of Ey and βh1 and measured transcription of the remaining genes. Deletion of the Ey and βh1 promoters increased transcription of βmajor and βminor 2-fold to 3-fold during primitive erythropoiesis. Deletion of Ey did not affect βh1 nor did deletion of βh1 affect Ey, but Ey deletion uniquely activated transcription from βh0, a β-like globin gene immediately downstream of Ey. Protein analysis showed that βh0 encodes a translatable β-like globin protein that can pair with alpha globin. The lack of transcriptional interference between Ey and βh1 and the gene-specific repression of βh0 did not support LCR competition among the embryonic genes and suggested that direct transcriptional interference from Ey suppressed βh0. PMID:17077320

  3. The transcriptional regulation of regucalcin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi

    2011-01-01

    Regucalcin, which is discovered as a calcium-binding protein in 1978, has been shown to play a multifunctional role in many tissues and cell types; regucalcin has been proposed to play a pivotal role in keeping cell homeostasis and function for cell response. Regucalcin and its gene are identified in over 15 species consisting of regucalcin family. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of regucalcin from vertebrate species is highly conserved in their coding region with throughout evolution. The regucalcin gene is localized on the chromosome X in rat and human. The organization of rat regucalcin gene consists of seven exons and six introns and several consensus regulatory elements exist upstream of the 5'-flanking region. AP-1, NF1-A1, RGPR-p117, β-catenin, and other factors have been found to be a transcription factor in the enhancement of regucalcin gene promoter activity. The transcription activity of regucalcin gene is enhanced through intracellular signaling factors that are mediated through the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of nuclear protein in vitro. Regucalcin mRNA and its protein are markedly expressed in the liver and kidney cortex of rats. The expression of regucalcin mRNA in the liver and kidney cortex has been shown to stimulate by hormonal factors (including calcium, calcitonin, parathyroid hormone, insulin, estrogen, and dexamethasone) in vivo. Regucalcin mRNA expression is enhanced in the regenerating liver after partial hepatectomy of rats in vivo. The expression of regucalcin mRNA in the liver and kidney with pathophysiological state has been shown to suppress, suggesting an involvement of regucalcin in disease. Liver regucalcin expression is down-regulated in tumor cells, suggesting a suppressive role in the development of carcinogenesis. Liver regucalcin is markedly released into the serum of rats with chemically induced liver injury in vivo. Serum regucalcin has a potential sensitivity as a specific biochemical marker of chronic

  4. RNA Activation of the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Gene (VEGF) Promoter by Double-Stranded RNA and Hypoxia: Role of Noncoding VEGF Promoter Transcripts.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Pascal; Wagner, Kay-Dietrich; Hofman, Paul; Van Obberghen, Emmanuel

    2016-05-15

    RNA activation (RNAa) is a gene regulation process in which promoter-targeted short double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) or microRNAs (miRs) induce target gene expression at the transcriptional level. Here, we investigate the presence of cryptic promoter transcripts within the VEGF promoter. Single-strand sense and antisense noncoding vascular endothelial growth factor (NcVEGF) promoter transcripts are identified, and their respective expression is studied in cells transfected with a VEGF promoter targeted dsRNA, namely, dsVEGF706, in hypoxic cells and in human malignant lung tissues. Interestingly, in dsVEGF706-transfected, as well as in hypoxic cells, NcVEGF expression levels increase coordinately with coding VEGF expression. Ago2 interaction with both sense and antisense NcVEGFs is increased in hypoxic cells, whereas in dsVEGF706-transfected cells, Ago2 and the antisense strand of the dsRNA interact specifically with the sense NcVEGF transcript. Furthermore, both dsVEGF706 and ectopic NcVEGF transcripts are able to activate the VEGF promoter endogenously present or in a reporter construct. Finally, using small interfering RNA targeting Ago2, we show that RNAa plays a role in the maintenance of increased VEGF and NcVEGF expression after hypoxia. Given the central role of VEGF in major human diseases, including cancer, this novel molecular mechanism is poised to reveal promising possibilities for therapeutic interventions. PMID:26976645

  5. Gene expression in plant mitochondria: transcriptional and post-transcriptional control.

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Stefan; Brennicke, Axel

    2003-01-01

    The informational content of the mitochondrial genome in plants is, although small, essential for each cell. Gene expression in these organelles involves a number of distinct transcriptional and post-transcriptional steps. The complex post-transcriptional processes of plant mitochondria such as 5' and 3' RNA processing, intron splicing, RNA editing and controlled RNA stability extensively modify individual steady-state RNA levels and influence the mRNA quantities available for translation. In this overview of the processes in mitochondrial gene expression, we focus on confirmed and potential sites of regulatory interference and discuss the evolutionary origins of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional processes. PMID:12594926

  6. Correlation of gene expression with physiological functions: Examples of pulmonary blood vessel rheology, hypoxic hypertension, and tissue remodeling.

    PubMed

    Huang, W; Sher, Y P; Peck, K; Fung, Y C

    2001-01-01

    Microarray gene chip technology is a powerful invention looking for applications. A general principle is proposed here to direct the power of the technology toward physiology, medicine, and pharmacology. Our principle is to match quantitative measures of gene expression with the trend of mathematical parameters that describe biological functions. Mathematical parameterization is the heart. The procedure is illustrated by lung physiology, including the hypoxic hypertension, rheological properties of the tissues, and the remodeling of the pulmonary arterial wall under hypertensive stress. We show first how to reduce the experimental results on these physiological functions into mathematical formulas, and how the parameters of these formulas describe the functional trends precisely. Then under the assumption that the microarray reveals gene activities quantitatively, we match the trends of the gene activity with the trends of the functional parameters. Genes whose trends do match are interpreted as relevant to the functions. Those that do not match are considered irrelevant to the functions. The more functions we consider, the fewer will be the number of genes that are relevant to all functions. Thus we learn about the generality and specificity of the influence of genes on physiology. PMID:11381166

  7. Mechanisms of specificity in neuronal activity-regulated gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Michelle R.; West, Anne E.

    2011-01-01

    The brain is a highly adaptable organ that is capable of converting sensory information into changes in neuronal function. This plasticity allows behavior to be accommodated to the environment, providing an important evolutionary advantage. Neurons convert environmental stimuli into long-lasting changes in their physiology in part through the synaptic activity-regulated transcription of new gene products. Since the neurotransmitter-dependent regulation of Fos transcription was first discovered nearly 25 years ago, a wealth of studies have enriched our understanding of the molecular pathways that mediate activity-regulated changes in gene transcription. These findings show that a broad range of signaling pathways and transcriptional regulators can be engaged by neuronal activity to sculpt complex programs of stimulus-regulated gene transcription. However, the shear scope of the transcriptional pathways engaged by neuronal activity raises the question of how specificity in the nature of the transcriptional response is achieved in order to encode physiologically relevant responses to divergent stimuli. Here we summarize the general paradigms by which neuronal activity regulates transcription while focusing on the molecular mechanisms that confer differential stimulus-, cell-type-, and developmental-specificity upon activity-regulated programs of neuronal gene transcription. In addition, we preview some of the new technologies that will advance our future understanding of the mechanisms and consequences of activity-regulated gene transcription in the brain. PMID:21620929

  8. Transcriptional regulation of bacterial virulence gene expression by molecular oxygen and nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jeffrey; Rolfe, Matthew D; Smith, Laura J

    2014-01-01

    Molecular oxygen (O2) and nitric oxide (NO) are diatomic gases that play major roles in infection. The host innate immune system generates reactive oxygen species and NO as bacteriocidal agents and both require O2 for their production. Furthermore, the ability to adapt to changes in O2 availability is crucial for many bacterial pathogens, as many niches within a host are hypoxic. Pathogenic bacteria have evolved transcriptional regulatory systems that perceive these gases and respond by reprogramming gene expression. Direct sensors possess iron-containing co-factors (iron–sulfur clusters, mononuclear iron, heme) or reactive cysteine thiols that react with O2 and/or NO. Indirect sensors perceive the physiological effects of O2 starvation. Thus, O2 and NO act as environmental cues that trigger the coordinated expression of virulence genes and metabolic adaptations necessary for survival within a host. Here, the mechanisms of signal perception by key O2- and NO-responsive bacterial transcription factors and the effects on virulence gene expression are reviewed, followed by consideration of these aspects of gene regulation in two major pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:25603427

  9. Cold shock protein YB-1 is involved in hypoxia-dependent gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Rauen, Thomas; Frye, Bjoern C; Wang, Jialin; Raffetseder, Ute; Alidousty, Christina; En-Nia, Abdelaziz; Floege, Jürgen; Mertens, Peter R

    2016-09-16

    Hypoxia-dependent gene regulation is largely orchestrated by hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), which associate with defined nucleotide sequences of hypoxia-responsive elements (HREs). Comparison of the regulatory HRE within the 3' enhancer of the human erythropoietin (EPO) gene with known binding motifs for cold shock protein Y-box (YB) protein-1 yielded strong similarities within the Y-box element and 3' adjacent sequences. DNA binding assays confirmed YB-1 binding to both, single- and double-stranded HRE templates. Under hypoxia, we observed nuclear shuttling of YB-1 and co-immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that YB-1 and HIF-1α physically interact with each other. Cellular YB-1 depletion using siRNA significantly induced hypoxia-dependent EPO production at both, promoter and mRNA level. Vice versa, overexpressed YB-1 significantly reduced EPO-HRE-dependent gene transcription, whereas this effect was minor under normoxia. HIF-1α overexpression induced hypoxia-dependent gene transcription through the same element and accordingly, co-expression with YB-1 reduced HIF-1α-mediated EPO induction under hypoxic conditions. Taken together, we identified YB-1 as a novel binding factor for HREs that participates in fine-tuning of the hypoxia transcriptome. PMID:27524241

  10. Modular Composition of Gene Transcription Networks

    PubMed Central

    Gyorgy, Andras; Del Vecchio, Domitilla

    2014-01-01

    Predicting the dynamic behavior of a large network from that of the composing modules is a central problem in systems and synthetic biology. Yet, this predictive ability is still largely missing because modules display context-dependent behavior. One cause of context-dependence is retroactivity, a phenomenon similar to loading that influences in non-trivial ways the dynamic performance of a module upon connection to other modules. Here, we establish an analysis framework for gene transcription networks that explicitly accounts for retroactivity. Specifically, a module's key properties are encoded by three retroactivity matrices: internal, scaling, and mixing retroactivity. All of them have a physical interpretation and can be computed from macroscopic parameters (dissociation constants and promoter concentrations) and from the modules' topology. The internal retroactivity quantifies the effect of intramodular connections on an isolated module's dynamics. The scaling and mixing retroactivity establish how intermodular connections change the dynamics of connected modules. Based on these matrices and on the dynamics of modules in isolation, we can accurately predict how loading will affect the behavior of an arbitrary interconnection of modules. We illustrate implications of internal, scaling, and mixing retroactivity on the performance of recurrent network motifs, including negative autoregulation, combinatorial regulation, two-gene clocks, the toggle switch, and the single-input motif. We further provide a quantitative metric that determines how robust the dynamic behavior of a module is to interconnection with other modules. This metric can be employed both to evaluate the extent of modularity of natural networks and to establish concrete design guidelines to minimize retroactivity between modules in synthetic systems. PMID:24626132

  11. Modular composition of gene transcription networks.

    PubMed

    Gyorgy, Andras; Del Vecchio, Domitilla

    2014-03-01

    Predicting the dynamic behavior of a large network from that of the composing modules is a central problem in systems and synthetic biology. Yet, this predictive ability is still largely missing because modules display context-dependent behavior. One cause of context-dependence is retroactivity, a phenomenon similar to loading that influences in non-trivial ways the dynamic performance of a module upon connection to other modules. Here, we establish an analysis framework for gene transcription networks that explicitly accounts for retroactivity. Specifically, a module's key properties are encoded by three retroactivity matrices: internal, scaling, and mixing retroactivity. All of them have a physical interpretation and can be computed from macroscopic parameters (dissociation constants and promoter concentrations) and from the modules' topology. The internal retroactivity quantifies the effect of intramodular connections on an isolated module's dynamics. The scaling and mixing retroactivity establish how intermodular connections change the dynamics of connected modules. Based on these matrices and on the dynamics of modules in isolation, we can accurately predict how loading will affect the behavior of an arbitrary interconnection of modules. We illustrate implications of internal, scaling, and mixing retroactivity on the performance of recurrent network motifs, including negative autoregulation, combinatorial regulation, two-gene clocks, the toggle switch, and the single-input motif. We further provide a quantitative metric that determines how robust the dynamic behavior of a module is to interconnection with other modules. This metric can be employed both to evaluate the extent of modularity of natural networks and to establish concrete design guidelines to minimize retroactivity between modules in synthetic systems. PMID:24626132

  12. Evolution of gene regulation during transcription and translation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Sun, Xuepeng; Zhao, Yi; Guo, Xiaoxian; Jiang, Huifeng; Li, Hongye; Gu, Zhenglong

    2015-04-01

    Understanding how gene regulation evolves is a key area in the current evolutionary field. Gene regulation occurs at various levels. Previous work on the evolution of gene regulation has largely focused on gene transcription. In this study, we used a recently developed ribosomal footprint profiling method to investigate how gene regulation evolves at both the transcription (mRNA abundance) and translation (ribosomal density) levels. By constructing a hybrid between Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Scer) and Saccharomyces bayanus (Sbay), which diverged ∼20 Ma, and quantifying transcriptome and translatome in both parental strains and their hybrid, we showed that translation is much more conserved than transcription, mostly due to the buffering effect of translational regulation for the transcriptional divergence. More conservation in translation than transcription is also confirmed by the inheritance mode of transcription and translation between two species. Furthermore, cis and trans effects are widely involved in changes at both transcription and translation levels. Finally, our results showed that genes with certain functions and sequence features might employ specific modes for evolution at these two critical levels of gene regulation. Our results demonstrated that it is essential to investigate the evolution of gene regulation at various levels from different genetic backgrounds to obtain a complete picture of its evolutionary modes in nature. PMID:25877616

  13. Transcriptional Regulation of Gene Expression in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Reinke, Valerie; Krause, Michael; Okkema, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Protein coding gene sequences are converted to mRNA by the highly regulated process of transcription. The precise temporal and spatial control of transcription for many genes is an essential part of development in metazoans. Thus, understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying transcriptional control is essential to understanding cell fate determination during embryogenesis, post-embryonic development, many environmental interactions, and disease-related processes. Studies of transcriptional regulation in C. elegans exploit its genomic simplicity and physical characteristics to define regulatory events with single cell and minute time scale resolution. When combined with the genetics of the system, C. elegans offers a unique and powerful vantage point from which to study how chromatin-associated protein and their modifications interact with transcription factors and their binding sites to yield precise control of gene expression through transcriptional regulation. PMID:23801596

  14. The relationship between gene transcription and combinations of histone modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiangjun; Li, Hong; Luo, Liaofu

    2012-09-01

    Histone modification is an important subject of epigenetics which plays an intrinsic role in transcriptional regulation. It is known that multiple histone modifications act in a combinatorial fashion. In this study, we demonstrated that the pathways within constructed Bayesian networks can give an indication for the combinations among 12 histone modifications which have been studied in the TSS+1kb region in S. cerevisiae. After Bayesian networks for the genes with high transcript levels (H-network) and low transcript levels (L-network) were constructed, the combinations of modifications within the two networks were analyzed from the view of transcript level. The results showed that different combinations played dissimilar roles in the regulation of gene transcription when there exist differences for gene expression at transcription level.

  15. Structural basis of eukaryotic gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Boeger, Hinrich; Bushnell, David A; Davis, Ralph; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Lorch, Yahli; Strattan, J Seth; Westover, Kenneth D; Kornberg, Roger D

    2005-02-01

    An RNA polymerase II promoter has been isolated in transcriptionally activated and repressed states. Topological and nuclease digestion analyses have revealed a dynamic equilibrium between nucleosome removal and reassembly upon transcriptional activation, and have further shown that nucleosomes are removed by eviction of histone octamers rather than by sliding. The promoter, once exposed, assembles with RNA polymerase II, general transcription factors, and Mediator in a approximately 3 MDa transcription initiation complex. X-ray crystallography has revealed the structure of RNA polymerase II, in the act of transcription, at atomic resolution. Extension of this analysis has shown how nucleotides undergo selection, polymerization, and eventual release from the transcribing complex. X-ray and electron crystallography have led to a picture of the entire transcription initiation complex, elucidating the mechanisms of promoter recognition, DNA unwinding, abortive initiation, and promoter escape. PMID:15680971

  16. Abscisic acid represses the transcription of chloroplast genes*

    PubMed Central

    Yamburenko, Maria V.; Zubo, Yan O.; Börner, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown effects of abscisic acid (ABA) on nuclear genes encoding chloroplast-localized proteins. ABA effects on the transcription of chloroplast genes, however, have not been investigated yet thoroughly. This work, therefore, studied the effects of ABA (75 μM) on transcription and steady-state levels of transcripts in chloroplasts of basal and apical segments of primary leaves of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Basal segments consist of young cells with developing chloroplasts, while apical segments contain the oldest cells with mature chloroplasts. Exogenous ABA reduced the chlorophyll content and caused changes of the endogenous concentrations not only of ABA but also of cytokinins to different extents in the basal and apical segments. It repressed transcription by the chloroplast phage-type and bacteria-type RNA polymerases and lowered transcript levels of most investigated chloroplast genes drastically. ABA did not repress the transcription of psbD and a few other genes and even increased psbD mRNA levels under certain conditions. The ABA effects on chloroplast transcription were more pronounced in basal vs. apical leaf segments and enhanced by light. Simultaneous application of cytokinin (22 μM 6-benzyladenine) minimized the ABA effects on chloroplast gene expression. These data demonstrate that ABA affects the expression of chloroplast genes differentially and points to a role of ABA in the regulation and coordination of the activities of nuclear and chloroplast genes coding for proteins with functions in photosynthesis. PMID:24078671

  17. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of nucleotide excision repair genes in human cells.

    PubMed

    Lefkofsky, Hailey B; Veloso, Artur; Ljungman, Mats

    2015-06-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes DNA helix-distorting lesions induced by UV light and various chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. These lesions efficiently block the elongation of transcription and need to be rapidly removed by transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) to avoid the induction of apoptosis. Twenty-nine genes have been classified to code for proteins participating in nucleotide excision repair (NER) in human cells. Here we explored the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of these NER genes across 13 human cell lines using Bru-seq and BruChase-seq, respectively. Many NER genes are relatively large in size and therefore will be easily inactivated by UV-induced transcription-blocking lesions. Furthermore, many of these genes produce transcripts that are rather unstable. Thus, these genes are expected to rapidly lose expression leading to a diminished function of NER. One such gene is ERCC6 that codes for the CSB protein critical for TC-NER. Due to its large gene size and high RNA turnover rate, the ERCC6 gene may act as dosimeter of DNA damage so that at high levels of damage, ERCC6 RNA levels would be diminished leading to the loss of CSB expression, inhibition of TC-NER and the promotion of cell death. PMID:26255935

  18. Transcriptional and Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Nucleotide Excision Repair Genes in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lefkofsky, Hailey B.; Veloso, Artur; Ljungman, Mats

    2014-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes DNA helix-distorting lesions induced by UV light and various chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. These lesions efficiently block the elongation of transcription and need to be rapidly removed by transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) to avoid the induction of apoptosis. Twenty-nine genes have been classified to code for proteins participating in nucleotide excision repair (NER) in human cells. Here we explored the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of these NER genes across 13 human cell lines using Bru-seq and BruChase-seq, respectively. Many NER genes are relatively large in size and therefore will be easily inactivated by UV-induced transcription-blocking lesions. Furthermore, many of these genes produce transcripts that are rather unstable. Thus, these genes are expected to rapidly lose expression leading to a diminished function of NER. One such gene is ERCC6 that codes for the CSB protein critical for TC-NER. Due to its large gene size and high RNA turnover rate, the ERCC6 gene may act as dosimeter of DNA damage so that at high levels of damage, ERCC6 RNA levels would be diminished leading to the loss of CSB expression, inhibition of TC-NER and the promotion of cell death. PMID:26255935

  19. Meta-Analysis and Gene Set Analysis of Archived Microarrays Suggest Implication of the Spliceosome in Metastatic and Hypoxic Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Bareke, Eric; Depiereux, Sophie; Michiels, Carine; Depiereux, Eric

    2014-01-01

    We propose to make use of the wealth of underused DNA chip data available in public repositories to study the molecular mechanisms behind the adaptation of cancer cells to hypoxic conditions leading to the metastatic phenotype. We have developed new bioinformatics tools and adapted others to identify with maximum sensitivity those genes which are expressed differentially across several experiments. The comparison of two analytical approaches, based on either Over Representation Analysis or Functional Class Scoring, by a meta-analysis-based approach, led to the retrieval of known information about the biological situation – thus validating the model – but also more importantly to the discovery of the previously unknown implication of the spliceosome, the cellular machinery responsible for mRNA splicing, in the development of metastasis. PMID:24497970

  20. Gene transcription and chromosome replication in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, P; Bogan, J A; Welch, K; Pickett, S R; Wang, H J; Zaritsky, A; Helmstetter, C E

    1997-01-01

    Transcript levels of several Escherichia coli genes involved in chromosome replication and cell division were measured in dnaC2(Ts) mutants synchronized for chromosome replication by temperature shifts. Levels of transcripts from four of the genes, dam, nrdA, mukB, and seqA, were reduced at a certain stage during chromosome replication. The magnitudes of the decreases were similar to those reported previously ftsQ and ftsZ (P. Zhou and C. E. Helmstetter, J. Bacteriol. 176:6100-6106, 1994) but considerably less than those seen with dnaA, gidA, and mioC (P. W. Theisen, J. E. Grimwade, A. C. Leonard, J. A. Bogan, and C. E. Helmstetter, Mol. Microbiol. 10:575-584, 1993). The decreases in transcripts appeared to correlate with the estimated time at which the genes replicated. This same conclusion was reached in studies with synchronous cultures obtained with the baby machine in those instances in which periodicities in transcript levels were clearly evident. The transcriptional levels for two genes, minE and tus, did not fluctuate significantly, whereas the transcripts for one gene, iciA, appeared to increase transiently. The results support the idea that cell cycle timing in E. coli is not governed by timed bursts of gene expression, since the overall findings summarized in this report are generally consistent with cell cycle-dependent transient inhibitions of transcription rather than stimulations. PMID:8981994

  1. Transcription mediated insulation and interference direct gene cluster expression switches

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tania; Brown, David; Murray, Struan C; Haenni, Simon; Halstead, James M; O'Connor, Leigh; Shipkovenska, Gergana; Steinmetz, Lars M; Mellor, Jane

    2014-01-01

    In yeast, many tandemly arranged genes show peak expression in different phases of the metabolic cycle (YMC) or in different carbon sources, indicative of regulation by a bi-modal switch, but it is not clear how these switches are controlled. Using native elongating transcript analysis (NET-seq), we show that transcription itself is a component of bi-modal switches, facilitating reciprocal expression in gene clusters. HMS2, encoding a growth-regulated transcription factor, switches between sense- or antisense-dominant states that also coordinate up- and down-regulation of transcription at neighbouring genes. Engineering HMS2 reveals alternative mono-, di- or tri-cistronic and antisense transcription units (TUs), using different promoter and terminator combinations, that underlie state-switching. Promoters or terminators are excluded from functional TUs by read-through transcriptional interference, while antisense TUs insulate downstream genes from interference. We propose that the balance of transcriptional insulation and interference at gene clusters facilitates gene expression switches during intracellular and extracellular environmental change. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03635.001 PMID:25407679

  2. Characterizing transcriptional heterogeneity through pathway and gene set overdispersion analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jean; Salathia, Neeraj; Liu, Rui; Kaeser, Gwendolyn E.; Yung, Yun C.; Herman, Joseph L.; Kaper, Fiona; Fan, Jian-Bing; Zhang, Kun; Chun, Jerold; Kharchenko, Peter V.

    2016-01-01

    The transcriptional state of a cell reflects a variety of biological factors, from persistent cell-type specific features to transient processes such as cell cycle. Depending on biological context, all such aspects of transcriptional heterogeneity may be of interest, but detecting them from noisy single-cell RNA-seq data remains challenging. We developed PAGODA to resolve multiple, potentially overlapping aspects of transcriptional heterogeneity by testing gene sets for coordinated variability amongst measured cells. PMID:26780092

  3. Gene Transcription Profile of the Detached Retina (An AOS Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Zacks, David N.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Separation of the neurosensory retina from the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) yields many morphologic and functional consequences, including death of the photoreceptor cells, Müller cell hypertrophy, and inner retinal rewiring. Many of these changes are due to the separation-induced activation of specific genes. In this work, we define the gene transcription profile within the retina as a function of time after detachment. We also define the early activation of kinases that might be responsible for the detachment-induced changes in gene transcription. Methods: Separation of the retina from the RPE was induced in Brown-Norway rats by the injection of 1% hyaluronic acid into the subretinal space. Retinas were harvested at 1, 7, and 28 days after separation. Gene transcription profiles for each time point were determined using the Affymetrix Rat 230A gene microarray chip. Transcription levels in detached retinas were compared to those of nondetached retinas with the BRB-ArrayTools Version 3.6.0 using a random variance analysis of variance (ANOVA) model. Confirmation of the significant transcriptional changes for a subset of the genes was performed using microfluidic quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays. Kinase activation was explored using Western blot analysis to look for early phosphorylation of any of the 3 main families of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK): the p38 family, the Janus kinase family, and the p42/p44 family. Results: Retinas separated from the RPE showed extensive alterations in their gene transcription profile. Many of these changes were initiated as early as 1 day after separation, with significant increases by 7 days. ANOVA analysis defined 144 genes that had significantly altered transcription levels as a function of time after separation when setting a false discovery rate at ≤0.1. Confirmatory RT-PCR was performed on 51 of these 144 genes. Differential transcription detected on the microarray

  4. Stochastic models of gene expression and post-transcriptional regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendar, Hodjat; Kulkarni, Rahul; Jia, Tao

    2011-10-01

    The intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression can give rise to phenotypic heterogeneity in a population of genetically identical cells. Correspondingly, there is considerable interest in understanding how different molecular mechanisms impact the 'noise' in gene expression. Of particular interest are post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms involving genes called small RNAs, which control important processes such as development and cancer. We propose and analyze general stochastic models of gene expression and derive exact analytical expressions quantifying the noise in protein distributions [1]. Focusing on specific regulatory mechanisms, we analyze a general model for post-transcriptional regulation of stochastic gene expression [2]. The results obtained provide new insights into the role of post-transcriptional regulation in controlling the noise in gene expression. [4pt] [1] T. Jia and R. V. Kulkarni, Phys. Rev. Lett.,106, 058102 (2011) [0pt] [2] T. Jia and R. V. Kulkarni, Phys. Rev. Lett., 105, 018101 (2010)

  5. Transcription factor trapping by RNA in gene regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Sigova, Alla A; Abraham, Brian J; Ji, Xiong; Molinie, Benoit; Hannett, Nancy M; Guo, Yang Eric; Jangi, Mohini; Giallourakis, Cosmas C; Sharp, Phillip A; Young, Richard A

    2015-11-20

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind specific sequences in promoter-proximal and -distal DNA elements to regulate gene transcription. RNA is transcribed from both of these DNA elements, and some DNA binding TFs bind RNA. Hence, RNA transcribed from regulatory elements may contribute to stable TF occupancy at these sites. We show that the ubiquitously expressed TF Yin-Yang 1 (YY1) binds to both gene regulatory elements and their associated RNA species across the entire genome. Reduced transcription of regulatory elements diminishes YY1 occupancy, whereas artificial tethering of RNA enhances YY1 occupancy at these elements. We propose that RNA makes a modest but important contribution to the maintenance of certain TFs at gene regulatory elements and suggest that transcription of regulatory elements produces a positive-feedback loop that contributes to the stability of gene expression programs. PMID:26516199

  6. Transcription factor trapping by RNA in gene regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Sigova, Alla A.; Abraham, Brian J.; Ji, Xiong; Molinie, Benoit; Hannett, Nancy M.; Eric Guo, Yang; Jangi, Mohini; Giallourakis, Cosmas C.; Sharp, Phillip A.; Young, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind specific sequences in promoter-proximal and distal DNA elements in order to regulate gene transcription. RNA is transcribed from both of these DNA elements, and some DNA-binding TFs bind RNA. Hence, RNA transcribed from regulatory elements may contribute to stable TF occupancy at these sites. We show that the ubiquitously expressed TF YY1 binds to both gene regulatory elements and also to their associated RNA species genome-wide. Reduced transcription of regulatory elements diminishes YY1 occupancy whereas artificial tethering of RNA enhances YY1 occupancy at these elements. We propose that RNA makes a modest but important contribution to the maintenance of certain TFs at gene regulatory elements and suggest that transcription of regulatory elements produces a positive feedback loop that contributes to the stability of gene expression programs. PMID:26516199

  7. Two control regions for eukaryotic tRNA gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    DeFranco, D; Schmidt, O; Söll, D

    1980-01-01

    Two Drosophila tRNALys genes with identical coding sequences were shown to transcribe with very different efficiences in nuclear extracts from Xenopus oocytes. The use of recombinant plasmids in which the 5'-flanking sequences of these genes were either "switched" or replaced by defined pBR322 sequences revealed two control regions for tRNA gene transcription. An internal control region comprising the mature tRNA coding sequence (and possibly its 3'-flanking sequences) is sufficient for transcription initiation, and an external control region comprising the 5'-flanking sequences represses this transcription. All transcripts have short leader sequences. Altered precursor tRNAs transcribed from truncated tRNALys genes (missing a single base pair in the acceptor stem) are not processed well in vitro. Images PMID:6774336

  8. Higher plant mitochondrial DNA: Genomes, genes, mutants, transcription, translation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains brief summaries of 63 presentations given at the International Workshop on Higher Plant Mitochondrial DNA. The presentations are organized into topical discussions addressing plant genomes, mitochondrial genes, cytoplasmic male sterility, transcription, translation, plasmids and tissue culture. (DT)

  9. Genomewide Identification of Genes Under Directional Selection: Gene Transcription QST Scan in Diverging Atlantic Salmon Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Roberge, C.; Guderley, H.; Bernatchez, L.

    2007-01-01

    Evolutionary genomics has benefited from methods that allow identifying evolutionarily important genomic regions on a genomewide scale, including genome scans and QTL mapping. Recently, genomewide scanning by means of microarrays has permitted assessing gene transcription differences among species or populations. However, the identification of differentially transcribed genes does not in itself suffice to measure the role of selection in driving evolutionary changes in gene transcription. Here, we propose and apply a “transcriptome scan” approach to investigating the role of selection in shaping differential profiles of gene transcription among populations. We compared the genomewide transcription levels between two Atlantic salmon subpopulations that have been diverging for only six generations. Following assessment of normality and unimodality on a gene-per-gene basis, the additive genetic basis of gene transcription was estimated using the animal model. Gene transcription h2 estimates were significant for 1044 (16%) of all detected cDNA clones. In an approach analogous to that of genome scans, we used the distribution of the QST values estimated from intra- and intersubpopulation additive genetic components of the transcription profiles to identify 16 outlier genes (average QST estimate = 0.11) whose transcription levels are likely to have evolved under the influence of directional selection within six generations only. Overall, this study contributes both empirically and methodologically to the quantitative genetic exploration of gene transcription data. PMID:17720934

  10. Dynamic enhancer–gene body contacts during transcription elongation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kiwon; Hsiung, Chris C.-S.; Huang, Peng; Raj, Arjun; Blobel, Gerd A.

    2015-01-01

    Enhancers govern transcription through multiple mechanisms, including the regulation of elongation by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). We characterized the dynamics of looped enhancer contacts during synchronous transcription elongation. We found that many distal enhancers form stable contacts with their target promoters during the entire interval of elongation. Notably, we detected additional dynamic enhancer contacts throughout the gene bodies that track with elongating RNAPII and the leading edge of RNA synthesis. These results support a model in which the gene body changes its position relative to a stable enhancer–promoter complex, which has broad ramifications for enhancer function and architectural models of transcriptional elongation. PMID:26443845

  11. TransFind—predicting transcriptional regulators for gene sets

    PubMed Central

    Kiełbasa, Szymon M.; Klein, Holger; Roider, Helge G.; Vingron, Martin; Blüthgen, Nils

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of putative transcription factor binding sites in promoter regions of coregulated genes allows to infer the transcription factors that underlie observed changes in gene expression. While such analyses constitute a central component of the in-silico characterization of transcriptional regulatory networks, there is still a lack of simple-to-use web servers able to combine state-of-the-art prediction methods with phylogenetic analysis and appropriate multiple testing corrected statistics, which returns the results within a short time. Having these aims in mind we developed TransFind, which is freely available at http://transfind.sys-bio.net/. PMID:20511592

  12. Transcriptional landscape and essential genes of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Remmele, Christian W.; Xian, Yibo; Albrecht, Marco; Faulstich, Michaela; Fraunholz, Martin; Heinrichs, Elisabeth; Dittrich, Marcus T.; Müller, Tobias; Reinhardt, Richard; Rudel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The WHO has recently classified Neisseria gonorrhoeae as a super-bacterium due to the rapid spread of antibiotic resistant derivatives and an overall dramatic increase in infection incidences. Genome sequencing has identified potential genes, however, little is known about the transcriptional organization and the presence of non-coding RNAs in gonococci. We performed RNA sequencing to define the transcriptome and the transcriptional start sites of all gonococcal genes and operons. Numerous new transcripts including 253 potentially non-coding RNAs transcribed from intergenic regions or antisense to coding genes were identified. Strikingly, strong antisense transcription was detected for the phase-variable opa genes coding for a family of adhesins and invasins in pathogenic Neisseria, that may have regulatory functions. Based on the defined transcriptional start sites, promoter motifs were identified. We further generated and sequenced a high density Tn5 transposon library to predict a core of 827 gonococcal essential genes, 133 of which have no known function. Our combined RNA-Seq and Tn-Seq approach establishes a detailed map of gonococcal genes and defines the first core set of essential gonococcal genes. PMID:25143534

  13. Transcriptional analysis of Penaeus stylirostris densovirus genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Penaeus stylirostris densovirus (PstDNV) genome contains three open reading frames (ORFs), left, middle, and right, which encode a non-structural (NS) protein, an unknown protein, and a capsid protein (CP), respectively. Transcription mapping revealed that P2, P11 and P61 promoters transcribe the le...

  14. Transcriptional unit of the murine Thy-1 gene: different distribution of transcription initiation sites in brain.

    PubMed Central

    Spanopoulou, E; Giguere, V; Grosveld, F

    1988-01-01

    Structural analysis of the mouse Thy-1.2 gene has shown that the major promoter of the gene is characterized by a tissue-specific DNase I-hypersensitive site and is located within a methylation-free island. The gene is regulated at the transcriptional level, and steady-state mRNA analysis reveals that the previously reported exon Ib contributes at most 5% of the total mRNA. The major promoter uses several transcription initiation sites within a region of 100 base pairs. The frequency of usage of these sites in brain is markedly different from that in other tissues. Images PMID:2906111

  15. The Role of Multiple Transcription Factors In Archaeal Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Charles J. Daniels

    2008-09-23

    Since the inception of this research program, the project has focused on two central questions: What is the relationship between the 'eukaryal-like' transcription machinery of archaeal cells and its counterparts in eukaryal cells? And, how does the archaeal cell control gene expression using its mosaic of eukaryal core transcription machinery and its bacterial-like transcription regulatory proteins? During the grant period we have addressed these questions using a variety of in vivo approaches and have sought to specifically define the roles of the multiple TATA binding protein (TBP) and TFIIB-like (TFB) proteins in controlling gene expression in Haloferax volcanii. H. volcanii was initially chosen as a model for the Archaea based on the availability of suitable genetic tools; however, later studies showed that all haloarchaea possessed multiple tbp and tfb genes, which led to the proposal that multiple TBP and TFB proteins may function in a manner similar to alternative sigma factors in bacterial cells. In vivo transcription and promoter analysis established a clear relationship between the promoter requirements of haloarchaeal genes and those of the eukaryal RNA polymerase II promoter. Studies on heat shock gene promoters, and the demonstration that specific tfb genes were induced by heat shock, provided the first indication that TFB proteins may direct expression of specific gene families. The construction of strains lacking tbp or tfb genes, coupled with the finding that many of these genes are differentially expressed under varying growth conditions, provided further support for this model. Genetic tools were also developed that led to the construction of insertion and deletion mutants, and a novel gene expression scheme was designed that allowed the controlled expression of these genes in vivo. More recent studies have used a whole genome array to examine the expression of these genes and we have established a linkage between the expression of specific tfb

  16. Alpha-amylase gene transcription in tissues of normal dog.

    PubMed

    Mocharla, H; Mocharla, R; Hodes, M E

    1990-02-25

    We studied the distribution of alpha-amylase mRNA in normal dog tissues by northern blotting (NB) and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with human pancreatic (AMY2) and salivary (AMY1) alpha-amylase cDNA-specific primers. Analysis of poly(A+) RNA from various normal tissues by NB indicated the presence of detectable levels of alpha-amylase mRNA transcripts only in pancreas. Dot-blot analysis of DNA amplified with primers common to both (human) isoamylase mRNAs showed presence of alpha-amylase gene transcripts not only in pancreas but also in liver, small intestine, large intestine and fallopian tube. Traces of amylase gene transcripts were also observed in ovary, uterus and lung. Interestingly, amylase transcripts were not detectable in the parotid gland by NB or RT-PCR. We have also localized alpha-amylase mRNA transcripts to dog pancreas by in situ transcription and in situ hybridization. Our results suggest that there is high degree of homology between the alpha-amylase mRNA sequences in dog and human at least in the exon 3-4 regions of the human gene. PMID:2315015

  17. Alkane Biosynthesis Genes in Cyanobacteria and Their Transcriptional Organization

    PubMed Central

    Klähn, Stephan; Baumgartner, Desirée; Pfreundt, Ulrike; Voigt, Karsten; Schön, Verena; Steglich, Claudia; Hess, Wolfgang R.

    2014-01-01

    In cyanobacteria, alkanes are synthesized from a fatty acyl-ACP by two enzymes, acyl–acyl carrier protein reductase and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase. Despite the great interest in the exploitation for biofuel production, nothing is known about the transcriptional organization of their genes or the physiological function of alkane synthesis. The comparison of 115 microarray datasets indicates the relatively constitutive expression of aar and ado genes. The analysis of 181 available genomes showed that in 90% of the genomes both genes are present, likely indicating their physiological relevance. In 61% of them they cluster together with genes encoding acetyl-CoA carboxyl transferase and a short-chain dehydrogenase, strengthening the link to fatty acid metabolism and in 76% of the genomes they are located in tandem, suggesting constraints on the gene arrangement. However, contrary to the expectations for an operon, we found in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 specific promoters for the two genes, sll0208 (ado) and sll0209 (aar), which give rise to monocistronic transcripts. Moreover, the upstream located ado gene is driven by a proximal as well as a second, distal, promoter, from which a third transcript, the ~160 nt sRNA SyR9 is transcribed. Thus, the transcriptional organization of the alkane biosynthesis genes in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is of substantial complexity. We verified all three promoters to function independently from each other and show a similar promoter arrangement also in the more distant Nodularia spumigena, Trichodesmium erythraeum, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, Prochlorococcus MIT9313, and MED4. The presence of separate regulatory elements and the dominance of monocistronic mRNAs suggest the possible autonomous regulation of ado and aar. The complex transcriptional organization of the alkane synthesis gene cluster has possible metabolic implications and should be considered when manipulating the expression of these genes in cyanobacteria. PMID

  18. Gene looping facilitates TFIIH kinase-mediated termination of transcription

    PubMed Central

    Medler, Scott; Ansari, Athar

    2015-01-01

    TFIIH is a general transcription factor with kinase and helicase activities. The kinase activity resides in the Kin28 subunit of TFIIH. The role of Kin28 kinase in the early steps of transcription is well established. Here we report a novel role of Kin28 in the termination of transcription. We show that RNAPII reads through a termination signal upon kinase inhibition. Furthermore, the recruitment of termination factors towards the 3′ end of a gene was compromised in the kinase mutant, thus confirming the termination defect. A concomitant decrease in crosslinking of termination factors near the 5′ end of genes was also observed in the kinase-defective mutant. Simultaneous presence of termination factors towards both the ends of a gene is indicative of gene looping; while the loss of termination factor occupancy from the distal ends suggest the abolition of a looped gene conformation. Accordingly, CCC analysis revealed that the looped architecture of genes was severely compromised in the Kin28 kinase mutant. In a looping defective sua7-1 mutant, even the enzymatically active Kin28 kinase could not rescue the termination defect. These results strongly suggest a crucial role of Kin28 kinase-dependent gene looping in the termination of transcription in budding yeast. PMID:26286112

  19. Spatially coordinated dynamic gene transcription in living pituitary tissue

    PubMed Central

    Featherstone, Karen; Hey, Kirsty; Momiji, Hiroshi; McNamara, Anne V; Patist, Amanda L; Woodburn, Joanna; Spiller, David G; Christian, Helen C; McNeilly, Alan S; Mullins, John J; Finkenstädt, Bärbel F; Rand, David A; White, Michael RH; Davis, Julian RE

    2016-01-01

    Transcription at individual genes in single cells is often pulsatile and stochastic. A key question emerges regarding how this behaviour contributes to tissue phenotype, but it has been a challenge to quantitatively analyse this in living cells over time, as opposed to studying snap-shots of gene expression state. We have used imaging of reporter gene expression to track transcription in living pituitary tissue. We integrated live-cell imaging data with statistical modelling for quantitative real-time estimation of the timing of switching between transcriptional states across a whole tissue. Multiple levels of transcription rate were identified, indicating that gene expression is not a simple binary ‘on-off’ process. Immature tissue displayed shorter durations of high-expressing states than the adult. In adult pituitary tissue, direct cell contacts involving gap junctions allowed local spatial coordination of prolactin gene expression. Our findings identify how heterogeneous transcriptional dynamics of single cells may contribute to overall tissue behaviour. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08494.001 PMID:26828110

  20. Quantification of Yeast and Bacterial Gene Transcripts in Retail Cheeses by Reverse Transcription-Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Cécile; Castellote, Jessie; Onesime, Djamila; Bonnarme, Pascal; Irlinger, Françoise

    2013-01-01

    The cheese microbiota contributes to a large extent to the development of the typical color, flavor, and texture of the final product. Its composition is not well defined in most cases and varies from one cheese to another. The aim of the present study was to establish procedures for gene transcript quantification in cheeses by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Total RNA was extracted from five smear-ripened cheeses purchased on the retail market, using a method that does not involve prior separation of microbial cells. 16S rRNA and malate:quinone oxidoreductase gene transcripts of Corynebacterium casei, Brevibacterium aurantiacum, and Arthrobacter arilaitensis and 26S rRNA and beta tubulin gene transcripts of Geotrichum candidum and Debaryomyces hansenii could be detected and quantified in most of the samples. Three types of normalization were applied: against total RNA, against the amount of cheese, and against a reference gene. For the first two types of normalization, differences of reverse transcription efficiencies from one sample to another were taken into account by analysis of exogenous control mRNA. No good correlation was found between the abundances of target mRNA or rRNA transcripts and the viable cell concentration of the corresponding species. However, in most cases, no mRNA transcripts were detected for species that did not belong to the dominant species. The applications of gene expression measurement in cheeses containing an undefined microbiota, as well as issues concerning the strategy of normalization and the assessment of amplification specificity, are discussed. PMID:23124230

  1. Transcription of genes involved in sulfolipid and polyacyltrehalose biosynthesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in experimental latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Jimmy E; Ramírez, Ana S; Salas, Laura P; Helguera-Repetto, Cecilia; Gonzalez-y-Merchand, Jorge; Soto, Carlos Y; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio

    2013-01-01

    The Influence of trehalose-based glycolipids in the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is recognised; however, the actual role of these cell-wall glycolipids in latent infection is unknown. As an initial approach, we determined by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography the sulfolipid (SL) and diacyltrehalose/polyacyltrehalose (DAT/PAT) profile of the cell wall of hypoxic Mtb. Then, qRT-PCR was extensively conducted to determine the transcription profile of genes involved in the biosynthesis of these glycolipids in non-replicating persistent 1 (NRP1) and anaerobiosis (NRP2) models of hypoxia (Wayne model), and murine models of chronic and progressive pulmonary tuberculosis. A diminished content of SL and increased amounts of glycolipids with chromatographic profile similar to DAT were detected in Mtb grown in the NRP2 stage. A striking decrease in the transcription of mmpL8 and mmpL10 transporter genes and increased transcription of the pks (polyketidesynthase) genes involved in SL and DAT biosynthesis were detected in both the NRP2 stage and the murine model of chronic infection. All genes were found to be up-regulated in the progressive disease. These results suggest that SL production is diminished during latent infection and the DAT/PAT precursors can be accumulated inside tubercle bacilli and are possibly used in reactivation processes. PMID:23472191

  2. A transcription map of a yeast centromere plasmid: unexpected transcripts and altered gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Marczynski, G T; Jaehning, J A

    1985-01-01

    YCp19 is a yeast centromere plasmid capable of autonomous replication in both yeast and E. coli (J. Mol. Biol., 158: 157-179, 1982). It is stably maintained as a single copy in the yeast cell and is therefore a model yeast "minichromosome" and cloning vector. We have located the positions and measured the abundance of the in vivo yeast transcripts from YCp19. Transcripts from the selectable marker genes TRP1 and URA3 were present at increased levels relative to chromosomal copies of the genes. Unanticipated transcripts from the yeast CEN4 and E. coli pBR322 sequences were also found. Although much of the plasmid vector is actively transcribed in vivo, the regions around the most useful cloning sites (BamHI, EcoRI, SalI) are free of transcripts. We have analyzed transcription of BamHI inserts containing promoter variants of the HIS3 gene and determined that although initiation events are accurate, plasmid context may alter levels of gene expression. Images PMID:3909105

  3. Hypoxic stress-induced changes in ribosomes of maize seedling roots. [Zea mays L

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey-Serres, J.; Freeling, M. )

    1990-11-01

    The hypoxic stress response of Zea mays L. seedling roots involves regulation of gene expression at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. We investigated the effect of hypoxia on the translational machinery of seedling roots. The levels of monoribosomes and ribosomal subunits increased dramatically within 1 hour of stress. Prolonged hypoxia resulted in continued accumulation of nontranslating ribosomes, as well as increased levels of small polyribosomes. The return of seedlings to normal aerobic conditions resulted in recovery of normal polyribosome levels. Comparison of ribosomal proteins from control and hypoxic roots revealed differences in quantity and electrophoretic mobility. In vivo labeling of roots with ({sup 35}S)methionine revealed variations in newly synthesized ribosomal proteins. In vivo labeling of roots with ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate revealed a major reduction in the phosphorylation of a 31 kilodalton ribosomal protein in hypoxic stressed roots. In vitro phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins by endogenous kinases was used to probe for differences in ribosome structure and composition. The patterns of in vitro kinased phosphoproteins of ribosomes from control and hypoxic roots were not identical. Variation in phosphoproteins of polyribosomes from control and hypoxic roots, as well as among polyribosomes from hypoxic roots were observed. These results indicate that modification of the translational machinery occurs in response to hypoxic stress.

  4. Transcription of Inflammatory Genes: Long Noncoding RNA and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune system must coordinate elaborate signaling pathways to turn on expression of hundreds of genes to provide protection against pathogens and resolve acute inflammation. Multiple genes within distinct functional categories are coordinately and temporally regulated by transcriptional on and off switches in response to distinct external stimuli. Three classes of transcription factors act together with transcriptional coregulators and chromatin-modifying complexes to control these programs. In addition, newer studies implicate long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) as additional regulators of these responses. LncRNAs promote, fine-tune, and restrain the inflammatory program. In this study, we provide an overview of gene regulation and the emerging importance of lncRNAs in the immune system. PMID:25250698

  5. Transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhihong; Nör, Jacques E.

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that angiogenesis plays a critical role in the pathobiology of tumors. Recent clinical trials have shown that inhibition of angiogenesis can be an effective therapeutic strategy for patients with cancer. However, one of the outstanding issues in anti-angiogenic treatment for cancer is the development of toxicities related to off-target effects of drugs. Transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells involves the use of specific promoters for selective expression of therapeutic genes in the endothelial cells lining the blood vessels of tumors. Recently, several genes that are expressed specifically in tumor-associated endothelial cells have been identified and characterized. These discoveries have enhanced the prospectus of transcriptionaly targeting tumor endothelial cells for cancer gene therapy. In this manuscript, we review the promoters, vectors, and therapeutic genes that have been used for transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells, and discuss the prospects of such approaches for cancer gene therapy. PMID:19393703

  6. Synaptic, transcriptional, and chromatin genes disrupted in autism

    PubMed Central

    De Rubeis, Silvia; He, Xin; Goldberg, Arthur P.; Poultney, Christopher S.; Samocha, Kaitlin; Cicek, A Ercument; Kou, Yan; Liu, Li; Fromer, Menachem; Walker, Susan; Singh, Tarjinder; Klei, Lambertus; Kosmicki, Jack; Fu, Shih-Chen; Aleksic, Branko; Biscaldi, Monica; Bolton, Patrick F.; Brownfeld, Jessica M.; Cai, Jinlu; Campbell, Nicholas J.; Carracedo, Angel; Chahrour, Maria H.; Chiocchetti, Andreas G.; Coon, Hilary; Crawford, Emily L.; Crooks, Lucy; Curran, Sarah R.; Dawson, Geraldine; Duketis, Eftichia; Fernandez, Bridget A.; Gallagher, Louise; Geller, Evan; Guter, Stephen J.; Hill, R. Sean; Ionita-Laza, Iuliana; Gonzalez, Patricia Jimenez; Kilpinen, Helena; Klauck, Sabine M.; Kolevzon, Alexander; Lee, Irene; Lei, Jing; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Ma'ayan, Avi; Marshall, Christian R.; McInnes, Alison L.; Neale, Benjamin; Owen, Michael J.; Ozaki, Norio; Parellada, Mara; Parr, Jeremy R.; Purcell, Shaun; Puura, Kaija; Rajagopalan, Deepthi; Rehnström, Karola; Reichenberg, Abraham; Sabo, Aniko; Sachse, Michael; Sanders, Stephan J.; Schafer, Chad; Schulte-Rüther, Martin; Skuse, David; Stevens, Christine; Szatmari, Peter; Tammimies, Kristiina; Valladares, Otto; Voran, Annette; Wang, Li-San; Weiss, Lauren A.; Willsey, A. Jeremy; Yu, Timothy W.; Yuen, Ryan K.C.; Cook, Edwin H.; Freitag, Christine M.; Gill, Michael; Hultman, Christina M.; Lehner, Thomas; Palotie, Aarno; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Sklar, Pamela; State, Matthew W.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Walsh, Christopher A.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Zwick, Michael E.; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Cutler, David J.; Roeder, Kathryn; Devlin, Bernie; Daly, Mark J.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The genetic architecture of autism spectrum disorder involves the interplay of common and rare variation and their impact on hundreds of genes. Using exome sequencing, analysis of rare coding variation in 3,871 autism cases and 9,937 ancestry-matched or parental controls implicates 22 autosomal genes at a false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.05, and a set of 107 autosomal genes strongly enriched for those likely to affect risk (FDR < 0.30). These 107 genes, which show unusual evolutionary constraint against mutations, incur de novo loss-of-function mutations in over 5% of autistic subjects. Many of the genes implicated encode proteins for synaptic, transcriptional, and chromatin remodeling pathways. These include voltage-gated ion channels regulating propagation of action potentials, pacemaking, and excitability-transcription coupling, as well as histone-modifying enzymes and chromatin remodelers, prominently histone post-translational modifications involving lysine methylation/demethylation. PMID:25363760

  7. Impact of ACTH Signaling on Transcriptional Regulation of Steroidogenic Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Carmen; Lalli, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    The trophic peptide hormone adrenocorticotropic (ACTH) stimulates steroid hormone biosynthesis evoking both a rapid, acute response and a long-term, chronic response, via the activation of cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling. The acute response is initiated by the mobilization of cholesterol from lipid stores and its delivery to the inner mitochondrial membrane, a process that is mediated by the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein. The chronic response results in the increased coordinated transcription of genes encoding steroidogenic enzymes. ACTH binding to its cognate receptor, melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), stimulates adenylyl cyclase, thus inducing cAMP production, PKA activation, and phosphorylation of specific nuclear factors, which bind to target promoters and facilitate coactivator protein recruitment to direct steroidogenic gene transcription. This review provides a general view of the transcriptional control exerted by the ACTH/cAMP system on the expression of genes encoding for steroidogenic enzymes in the adrenal cortex. Special emphasis will be given to the transcription factors required to mediate ACTH-dependent transcription of steroidogenic genes. PMID:27065945

  8. Regulation of neural gene transcription by optogenetic inhibition of the RE1-silencing transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Paonessa, Francesco; Criscuolo, Stefania; Sacchetti, Silvio; Amoroso, Davide; Scarongella, Helena; Pecoraro Bisogni, Federico; Carminati, Emanuele; Pruzzo, Giacomo; Maragliano, Luca; Cesca, Fabrizia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics provides new ways to activate gene transcription; however, no attempts have been made as yet to modulate mammalian transcription factors. We report the light-mediated regulation of the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), a master regulator of neural genes. To tune REST activity, we selected two protein domains that impair REST-DNA binding or recruitment of the cofactor mSin3a. Computational modeling guided the fusion of the inhibitory domains to the light-sensitive Avena sativa light–oxygen–voltage-sensing (LOV) 2-phototrophin 1 (AsLOV2). By expressing AsLOV2 chimeras in Neuro2a cells, we achieved light-dependent modulation of REST target genes that was associated with an improved neural differentiation. In primary neurons, light-mediated REST inhibition increased Na+-channel 1.2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription and boosted Na+ currents and neuronal firing. This optogenetic approach allows the coordinated expression of a cluster of genes impinging on neuronal activity, providing a tool for studying neuronal physiology and correcting gene expression changes taking place in brain diseases. PMID:26699507

  9. Regulation of neural gene transcription by optogenetic inhibition of the RE1-silencing transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Paonessa, Francesco; Criscuolo, Stefania; Sacchetti, Silvio; Amoroso, Davide; Scarongella, Helena; Pecoraro Bisogni, Federico; Carminati, Emanuele; Pruzzo, Giacomo; Maragliano, Luca; Cesca, Fabrizia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics provides new ways to activate gene transcription; however, no attempts have been made as yet to modulate mammalian transcription factors. We report the light-mediated regulation of the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), a master regulator of neural genes. To tune REST activity, we selected two protein domains that impair REST-DNA binding or recruitment of the cofactor mSin3a. Computational modeling guided the fusion of the inhibitory domains to the light-sensitive Avena sativa light-oxygen-voltage-sensing (LOV) 2-phototrophin 1 (AsLOV2). By expressing AsLOV2 chimeras in Neuro2a cells, we achieved light-dependent modulation of REST target genes that was associated with an improved neural differentiation. In primary neurons, light-mediated REST inhibition increased Na(+)-channel 1.2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription and boosted Na(+) currents and neuronal firing. This optogenetic approach allows the coordinated expression of a cluster of genes impinging on neuronal activity, providing a tool for studying neuronal physiology and correcting gene expression changes taking place in brain diseases. PMID:26699507

  10. Gene duplication of type-B ARR transcription factors systematically extends transcriptional regulatory structures in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seung Hee; Hyeon, Do Young; Lee, ll Hwan; Park, Su Jin; Han, Seungmin; Lee, In Chul; Hwang, Daehee; Nam, Hong Gil

    2014-01-01

    Many of duplicated genes are enriched in signaling pathways. Recently, gene duplication of kinases has been shown to provide genetic buffering and functional diversification in cellular signaling. Transcription factors (TFs) are also often duplicated. However, how duplication of TFs affects their regulatory structures and functions of target genes has not been explored at the systems level. Here, we examined regulatory and functional roles of duplication of three major ARR TFs (ARR1, 10, and 12) in Arabidopsis cytokinin signaling using wild-type and single, double, and triple deletion mutants of the TFs. Comparative analysis of gene expression profiles obtained from Arabidopsis roots in wild-type and these mutants showed that duplication of ARR TFs systematically extended their transcriptional regulatory structures, leading to enhanced robustness and diversification in functions of target genes, as well as in regulation of cellular networks of target genes. Therefore, our results suggest that duplication of TFs contributes to robustness and diversification in functions of target genes by extending transcriptional regulatory structures. PMID:25425016

  11. The CREB Transcription Factor Controls Transcriptional Activity of the Human RIC8B Gene.

    PubMed

    Maureira, Alejandro; Sánchez, Rodolfo; Valenzuela, Nicole; Torrejón, Marcela; Hinrichs, María V; Olate, Juan; Gutiérrez, José L

    2016-08-01

    Proper regulation of gene expression is essential for normal development, cellular growth, and differentiation. Differential expression profiles of mRNA coding for vertebrate Ric-8B during embryo and adult stages have been observed. In addition, Ric-8B is expressed in few cerebral nuclei subareas. These facts point to a dynamic control of RIC8B gene expression. In order to understand the transcriptional regulation of this gene, we searched for cis-elements in the sequence of the human RIC8B promoter region, identifying binding sites for the basic/leucine zipper (bZip) CREB transcription factor family (CRE sites) and C/EBP transcription factor family (C/EBP sites). CRE sites were found clustered near the transcription start site, while the C/EBP sites were found clustered at around 300 bp upstream the CRE sites. Here, we demonstrate the ability of CREB1 and C/EBPβ to bind their respective elements identified in the RIC8B promoter. Comparative protein-DNA interaction analyses revealed only the proximal elements as high affinity sites for CREB1 and only the distal elements as high affinity sites for C/EBPβ. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses, carried out using a human neuroblastoma cell line, confirmed the preferential association of CREB to the proximal region of the RIC8B promoter. By performing luciferase reporter assays, we found the CRE sites as the most relevant elements for its transcriptional activity. Taken together, these data show the existence of functional CREB and C/EBP binding sites in the human RIC8B gene promoter, a particular distribution of these sites and demonstrate a relevant role of CREB in stimulating transcriptional activity of this gene. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1797-1805, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26729411

  12. A Shoot-Specific Hypoxic Response of Arabidopsis Sheds Light on the Role of the Phosphate-Responsive Transcription Factor PHOSPHATE STARVATION RESPONSE11[W

    PubMed Central

    Klecker, Maria; Gasch, Philipp; Peisker, Helga; Dörmann, Peter; Schlicke, Hagen; Grimm, Bernhard; Mustroph, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    Plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses are often very specific, but signal transduction pathways can partially or completely overlap. Here, we demonstrate that in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the transcriptional responses to phosphate starvation and oxygen deficiency stress comprise a set of commonly induced genes. While the phosphate deficiency response is systemic, under oxygen deficiency, most of the commonly induced genes are found only in illuminated shoots. This jointly induced response to the two stresses is under control of the transcription factor PHOSPHATE STARVATION RESPONSE1 (PHR1), but not of the oxygen-sensing N-end rule pathway, and includes genes encoding proteins for the synthesis of galactolipids, which replace phospholipids in plant membranes under phosphate starvation. Despite the induction of galactolipid synthesis genes, total galactolipid content and plant survival are not severely affected by the up-regulation of galactolipid gene expression in illuminated leaves during hypoxia. However, changes in galactolipid molecular species composition point to an adaptation of lipid fluxes through the endoplasmic reticulum and chloroplast pathways during hypoxia. PHR1-mediated signaling of phosphate deprivation was also light dependent. Because a photoreceptor-mediated PHR1 activation was not detectable under hypoxia, our data suggest that a chloroplast-derived retrograde signal, potentially arising from metabolic changes, regulates PHR1 activity under both oxygen and phosphate deficiency. PMID:24753539

  13. Transcriptional promiscuity of the human /alpha/-globin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Whitelaw, E.; Hogben, P.; Hanscombe, O.; Proudfoot, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    The human /alpha/-globin gene displays the unusual property of transcriptional promiscuity: that is, it functions in the absence of an enhancer when transfected into nonerythroid cell lines. It is also unusual in that its promoter region lies in a hypomethylated HpaII tiny fragment (HTF) island containing multiple copies of the consensus sequence for the SP1-binding site. The authors have investigated whether there is a relationship between these two observations. First, they investigated the mouse /alpha/-globin gene since it does not lie in an HTF island. They have demonstrated that it was not transcriptionally promiscuous. Second, they studied the transcriptional activity of the human /alpha/-globin gene in the absence of the GC-rich region containing putative SP1-binding sites and found a small (two- to threefold) but consistent positive effect of this region on transcriptional activity in both nonerythroid and erythroid cell lines. However, this effect did not account for the promiscuous nature of the human /alpha/-globin gene. They found that in a nonreplicating system, the human //a/-globin gene, like that of the mouse, required a simian virus 40 enhancer in order to be transcriptionally active in nonerythroid and erythroid cell lines. Since they only observed enhancer independence of the human /alpha/-globin gene in a high-copy-number replicating system, they suggest that competition for trans-acting factors could explain these results. Finally, the authors' experiments with the erythroid cell line Putko suggest that there are no tissue-specific enhancers within 1 kilobase 5' of the human /alpha/-globin cap site or within the gene itself.

  14. Gene Expression Suggests Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats May Have Altered Metabolism and Reduced Hypoxic Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Ritz, Marie-Françoise; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar; Engelter, Stefan; Lyrer, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is an important cause of stroke, cognitive decline and vascular dementia (VaD). It is associated with diffuse white matter abnormalities and small deep cerebral ischemic infarcts. The molecular mechanisms involved in the development and progression of SVD are unclear. As hypertension is a major risk factor for developing SVD, Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR) are considered an appropriate experimental model for SVD. Prior work suggested an imbalance between the number of blood microvessels and astrocytes at the level of the neurovascular unit in 2-month-old SHR, leading to neuronal hypoxia in the brain of 9-month-old animals. To identify genes and pathways involved in the development of SVD, we compared the gene expression profile in the cortex of 2 and 9-month-old of SHR with age-matched normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats using microarray-based technology. The results revealed significant differences in expression of genes involved in energy and lipid metabolisms, mitochondrial functions, oxidative stress and ischemic responses between both groups. These results strongly suggest that SHR suffer from chronic hypoxia, and therefore are unable to tolerate ischemia-like conditions, and are more vulnerable to high-energy needs than WKY. This molecular analysis gives new insights about pathways accounting for the development of SVD. PMID:22272763

  15. Transcriptional regulation of human small nuclear RNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Jawdekar, Gauri W.; Henry, R. William

    2009-01-01

    The products of human snRNA genes have been frequently described as performing housekeeping functions and their synthesis refractory to regulation. However, recent studies have emphasized that snRNA and other related non-coding RNA molecules control multiple facets of the central dogma, and their regulated expression is critical to cellular homeostasis during normal growth and in response to stress. Human snRNA genes contain compact and yet powerful promoters that are recognized by increasingly well-characterized transcription factors, thus providing a premier model system to study gene regulation. This review summarizes many recent advances deciphering the mechanism by which the transcription of human snRNA and related genes are regulated. PMID:18442490

  16. Asymmetric Regulation of Peripheral Genes by Two Transcriptional Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing-Ru; Suzuki, Takahiro; Nishimura, Hajime; Kishima, Mami; Maeda, Shiori; Suzuki, Harukazu

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional regulatory network (TRN) reconstitution and deconstruction occur simultaneously during reprogramming; however, it remains unclear how the starting and targeting TRNs regulate the induction and suppression of peripheral genes. Here we analyzed the regulation using direct cell reprogramming from human dermal fibroblasts to monocytes as the platform. We simultaneously deconstructed fibroblastic TRN and reconstituted monocytic TRN; monocytic and fibroblastic gene expression were analyzed in comparison with that of fibroblastic TRN deconstruction only or monocytic TRN reconstitution only. Global gene expression analysis showed cross-regulation of TRNs. Detailed analysis revealed that knocking down fibroblastic TRN positively affected half of the upregulated monocytic genes, indicating that intrinsic fibroblastic TRN interfered with the expression of induced genes. In contrast, reconstitution of monocytic TRN showed neutral effects on the majority of fibroblastic gene downregulation. This study provides an explicit example that demonstrates how two networks together regulate gene expression during cell reprogramming processes and contributes to the elaborate exploration of TRNs. PMID:27483142

  17. The 26S Proteasome and Initiation of Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Durairaj, Geetha; Kaiser, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Transcription activation is the foremost step of gene expression and is modulated by various factors that act in synergy. Misregulation of this process and its associated factors has severe effects and hence requires strong regulatory control. In recent years, growing evidence has highlighted the 26S proteasome as an important contributor to the regulation of transcription initiation. Well known for its role in protein destruction, its contribution to protein synthesis was initially viewed with skepticism. However, studies over the past several years have established the proteasome as an important component of transcription initiation through proteolytic and non-proteolytic activities. In this review, we discuss findings made so far in understanding the connections between transcription initiation and the 26S proteasome complex. PMID:25211636

  18. The Transcription Factor Titration Effect Dictates Level of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Brewster, Robert C.; Weinert, Franz M.; Garcia, Hernan G.; Song, Dan; Rydenfelt, Mattias; Phillips, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Models of transcription are often built around a picture of RNA polymerase and transcription factors (TFs) acting on a single copy of a promoter. However, most TFs are shared between multiple genes with varying binding affinities. Beyond that, genes often exist at high copy number; in multiple, identical copies on the chromosome or on plasmids or viral vectors with copy numbers in the hundreds. Using a thermodynamic model, we characterize the interplay between TF copy number and the demand for that TF. We demonstrate the parameter-free predictive power of this model as a function of the copy number of the TF and the number and affinities of the available specific binding sites; such predictive control is important for the understanding of transcription and the desire to quantitatively design the output of genetic circuits. Finally we use these experiments to dynamically measure plasmid copy number through the cell cycle. PMID:24612990

  19. Involvement of GATA transcription factors in the regulation of endogenous bovine interferon-tau gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hanako; Sakurai, Toshihiro; Kim, Min-Su; Muroi, Yoshikage; Ideta, Atsushi; Aoyagi, Yoshito; Nakajima, Hiromi; Takahashi, Masashi; Nagaoka, Kentaro; Imakawa, Kazuhiko

    2009-12-01

    Expression of interferon-tau (IFNT), necessary for pregnancy establishment in ruminant ungulates, is regulated in a temporal and spatial manner. However, molecular mechanisms by which IFNT gene transcription is regulated in this manner have not been firmly established. In this study, DNA microarray/RT-PCR analysis between bovine trophoblast CT-1 and Mardin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells was initially performed, finding that transcription factors GATA2, GATA3, and GATA6 mRNAs were specific to CT-1 cells. These mRNAs were also found in Days 17, 20, and 22 (Day 0 = day of estrus) bovine conceptuses. In examining other bovine cell lines, ovary cumulus granulosa (oCG) and ear fibroblast (EF) cells, GATA2 and GATA3, but not GATA6, were found specific to the bovine trophoblast cells. In transient transfection analyses using the upstream region (-631 to +59 bp) of bovine IFNT gene (bIFNT, IFN-tau-c1), over-expression of GATA2/GATA3 did not affect the transcription of bIFNT-reporter construct in human choriocarcinoma JEG3 cells. Transfection of GATA2, GATA3, ETS2, and/or CDX2, however, was effective in the up-regulation of the bIFNT construct transfected into bovine oCG and EF cells. One Point mutation studies revealed that among six potential GATA binding sites located on the upstream region of the bIFNT gene, the one next to ETS2 site exhibited reduced luciferase activity. In CT-1 cells, endogenous bIFNT gene transcription was up-regulated by over-expression of GATA2 or GATA3, but down-regulated by siRNA specific to GATA2 mRNA. These data suggest that GATA2/3 is involved in trophoblast-specific regulation of bIFNT gene transcription. PMID:19598245

  20. Dietary control of late trypsin gene transcription in Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Noriega, F G; Barillas-Mury, C; Wells, M A

    1994-06-01

    In Aedes aegypti the levels of midgut trypsin activity after feeding are directly proportional to the protein concentration in the meal. The mechanisms of this up-regulatory event were investigated by analyzing the expression of the late trypsin gene under different dietary conditions. Transcription of the gene was dependent on both the quality and quantity of protein in the meal. As measured by Northern blot analysis, the levels of late trypsin gene expression increased up to 100-fold 24 h after feeding on gamma-globulin, hemoglobin or albumin (100 mg/ml). In contrast, gelatin, histone, amino acids, saline or agarose were very poor inducers of transcription. The rates of late trypsin transcription induced during the first 24 h were directly proportional to the concentration of protein in the meal. These data further support the suggestion that the primary mechanism that regulates the synthesis of trypsin in the mosquito midgut is transcriptional regulation of the gene. This regulatory mechanism enables the midgut to maintain the appropriate balance between protease synthesis and the protein content of the meal. PMID:7519098

  1. Dendritic cell reprogramming by the hypoxic environment.

    PubMed

    Bosco, Maria Carla; Varesio, Luigi

    2012-12-01

    Myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells central to the orchestration of innate and acquired immunity and the maintenance of self-tolerance. The local microenvironment contributes to the regulation of DC development and functions, and deregulated DC responses may result in amplification of inflammation, loss of tolerance, or establishment of immune escape mechanisms. DC generation from monocytic precursors recruited at sites of inflammation, tissue damage, or neoplasia occurs under condition of low partial oxygen pressure (pO(2), hypoxia). We reviewed the literature addressing the phenotypic and functional changes triggered by hypoxia in monocyte-derived immature (i) and mature (m) DCs. The discussion will revolve around in vitro studies of gene expression profile, which give a comprehensive representation of the complexity of response of these cells to low pO(2). The gene expression pattern of hypoxic DC will be discussed to address the question of the relationship with a specific maturation stage. We will summarize data relative to the regulation of the chemotactic network, which points to a role for hypoxia in promoting a migratory phenotype in iDCs and a highly proinflammatory state in mDCs. Current knowledge of the strict regulatory control exerted by hypoxia on the expression of immune-related cell surface receptors will also be addressed, with a particular focus on a newly identified marker of hypoxic DCs endowed with proinflammatory properties. Furthermore, we discuss the literature on the transcription mechanisms underlying hypoxia-regulated gene expression in DCs, which support a major role for the HIF/HRE pathway. Finally, recent advances shedding light on the in vivo influence of the local hypoxic microenvironment on DCs infiltrating the inflamed joints of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients are outlined. PMID:22901977

  2. Transcriptional regulation of Bacillus subtilis citrate synthase genes.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, S; Sonenshein, A L

    1994-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis citrate synthase genes citA and citZ were repressed during early exponential growth phase in nutrient broth medium and were induced as cells reached the end of exponential phase. Both genes were also induced by treatment of cells with the drug decoyinine. After induction, the steady-state level of citZ mRNA was about five times higher than that of citA mRNA. At least some of the citZ transcripts read through into the isocitrate dehydrogenase (citC) gene. Transcription from an apparent promoter site located near the 3' end of the citZ gene also contributed to expression of citC. In minimal medium, citA transcription was about 6-fold lower when glucose was the sole carbon source than it was when succinate was the carbon source. Expression of the citZ gene was repressed 2-fold by glucose and 10-fold when glucose and glutamate were present simultaneously. This latter synergistic repression is similar to the effect of glucose and glutamate on steady-state citrate synthase enzyme activity. CitR, a protein of the LysR family, appeared to be a repressor of citA but not of citZ. Images PMID:8045899

  3. Cohesin: genomic insights into controlling gene transcription and development

    PubMed Central

    Dorsett, Dale

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade it has emerged that the cohesin protein complex, which functions in sister chromatid cohesion, chromosome segregation and DNA repair, also regulates gene expression and development. Even minor changes in cohesin activity alter several aspects of development. Genome-wide analysis indicates that cohesin directly regulates transcription of genes involved in cell proliferation, pluripotency, and differentiation through multiple mechanisms. These mechanisms are poorly understood, but involve both partial gene repression in concert with Polycomb group proteins, and facilitating long-range looping, both between enhancers and promoters, and between CTCF protein binding sites. PMID:21324671

  4. Transcriptional control of human p53-regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Riley, Todd; Sontag, Eduardo; Chen, Patricia; Levine, Arnold

    2008-05-01

    The p53 protein regulates the transcription of many different genes in response to a wide variety of stress signals. Following DNA damage, p53 regulates key processes, including DNA repair, cell-cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis, in order to suppress cancer. This Analysis article provides an overview of the current knowledge of p53-regulated genes in these pathways and others, and the mechanisms of their regulation. In addition, we present the most comprehensive list so far of human p53-regulated genes and their experimentally validated, functional binding sites that confer p53 regulation. PMID:18431400

  5. Gene transcription in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from disparate populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowen, Lizabeth; Miles, A. Keith; Waters, Shannon C.; Meyerson, Randi; Rode, Karyn D.; Atwood, Todd C.

    2015-01-01

    Polar bears in the Beaufort (SB) and Chukchi (CS) Seas experience different environments due primarily to a longer history of sea ice loss in the Beaufort Sea. Ecological differences have been identified as a possible reason for the generally poorer body condition and reproduction of Beaufort polar bears compared to those from the Chukchi, but the influence of exposure to other stressors remains unknown. We use molecular technology, quantitative PCR, to identify gene transcription differences among polar bears from the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas as well as captive healthy polar bears. We identified significant transcriptional differences among a priori groups (i.e., captive bears, SB 2012, SB 2013, CS 2013) for ten of the 14 genes of interest (i.e., CaM, HSP70, CCR3, TGFβ, COX2, THRα, T-bet, Gata3, CD69, and IL17); transcription levels of DRβ, IL1β, AHR, and Mx1 did not differ among groups. Multivariate analysis also demonstrated separation among the groups of polar bears. Specifically, we detected transcript profiles consistent with immune function impairment in polar bears from the Beaufort Sea, when compared with Chukchi and captive polar bears. Although there is no strong indication of differential exposure to contaminants or pathogens between CS and SB bears, there are clearly differences in important transcriptional responses between populations. Further investigation is warranted to refine interpretation of potential effects of described stress-related conditions for the SB population.

  6. Transcriptional control in the segmentation gene network of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Mark D; Pearce, Michael; Fak, John; Fan, HongQing; Unnerstall, Ulrich; Emberly, Eldon; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Siggia, Eric D; Gaul, Ulrike

    2004-09-01

    The segmentation gene network of Drosophila consists of maternal and zygotic factors that generate, by transcriptional (cross-) regulation, expression patterns of increasing complexity along the anterior-posterior axis of the embryo. Using known binding site information for maternal and zygotic gap transcription factors, the computer algorithm Ahab recovers known segmentation control elements (modules) with excellent success and predicts many novel modules within the network and genome-wide. We show that novel module predictions are highly enriched in the network and typically clustered proximal to the promoter, not only upstream, but also in intronic space and downstream. When placed upstream of a reporter gene, they consistently drive patterned blastoderm expression, in most cases faithfully producing one or more pattern elements of the endogenous gene. Moreover, we demonstrate for the entire set of known and newly validated modules that Ahab's prediction of binding sites correlates well with the expression patterns produced by the modules, revealing basic rules governing their composition. Specifically, we show that maternal factors consistently act as activators and that gap factors act as repressors, except for the bimodal factor Hunchback. Our data suggest a simple context-dependent rule for its switch from repressive to activating function. Overall, the composition of modules appears well fitted to the spatiotemporal distribution of their positive and negative input factors. Finally, by comparing Ahab predictions with different categories of transcription factor input, we confirm the global regulatory structure of the segmentation gene network, but find odd skipped behaving like a primary pair-rule gene. The study expands our knowledge of the segmentation gene network by increasing the number of experimentally tested modules by 50%. For the first time, the entire set of validated modules is analyzed for binding site composition under a uniform set of

  7. Transcriptional Control in the Segmentation Gene Network of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Fan, HongQing; Unnerstall, Ulrich; Emberly, Eldon; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Siggia, Eric D

    2004-01-01

    The segmentation gene network of Drosophila consists of maternal and zygotic factors that generate, by transcriptional (cross-) regulation, expression patterns of increasing complexity along the anterior-posterior axis of the embryo. Using known binding site information for maternal and zygotic gap transcription factors, the computer algorithm Ahab recovers known segmentation control elements (modules) with excellent success and predicts many novel modules within the network and genome-wide. We show that novel module predictions are highly enriched in the network and typically clustered proximal to the promoter, not only upstream, but also in intronic space and downstream. When placed upstream of a reporter gene, they consistently drive patterned blastoderm expression, in most cases faithfully producing one or more pattern elements of the endogenous gene. Moreover, we demonstrate for the entire set of known and newly validated modules that Ahab's prediction of binding sites correlates well with the expression patterns produced by the modules, revealing basic rules governing their composition. Specifically, we show that maternal factors consistently act as activators and that gap factors act as repressors, except for the bimodal factor Hunchback. Our data suggest a simple context-dependent rule for its switch from repressive to activating function. Overall, the composition of modules appears well fitted to the spatiotemporal distribution of their positive and negative input factors. Finally, by comparing Ahab predictions with different categories of transcription factor input, we confirm the global regulatory structure of the segmentation gene network, but find odd skipped behaving like a primary pair-rule gene. The study expands our knowledge of the segmentation gene network by increasing the number of experimentally tested modules by 50%. For the first time, the entire set of validated modules is analyzed for binding site composition under a uniform set of

  8. From immunogenetics to immunomics: functional prospecting of genes and transcripts.

    PubMed

    Schönbach, Christian

    2003-01-01

    Human and mouse genome and transcriptome projects have expanded the field of 'immunogenetics' beyond the traditional study of the genetics and evolution of MHC, TCR and Ig loci into the new interdisciplinary area of 'immunomics'. Immunomics is the study of the molecular functions associated with all immune-related coding and non-coding mRNA transcripts. To unravel the function, regulation and diversity of the immunome requires that we identify and correctly categorize all immune-related transcripts. The importance of intercalated genes, antisense transcripts and non-coding RNAs and their potential role in regulation of immune development and function are only just starting to be appreciated. To better understand immune function and regulation, transcriptome projects (e.g. Functional Annotation of the Mouse, FANTOM), that focus on sequencing full-length transcripts from multiple tissue sources, ideally should include specific immune cells (e.g. T cell, B cells, macrophages, dendritic cells) at various states of development, in activated and unactivated states and in different disease contexts. Progress in deciphering immune regulatory networks will require the cooperative efforts of immunologists, immunogeneticists, molecular biologists and bioinformaticians. Although primary sequence analysis remains useful for annotation of new transcripts it is less useful for identifying novel functions of known transcripts in a new context (protein interaction network or pathway). The most efficient approach to mine useful information from the vast a priori knowledge contained in biological databases and the scientific literature, is to use a combination of computational and expert-driven knowledge discovery strategies. This paper will illustrate the challenges posed in attempts to functionally infer transcriptional regulation and interaction of immune-related genes from text and sequence-based data sources. PMID:14712938

  9. Mechanisms of post-transcriptional gene regulation in bacterial biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Luary C.; Vadyvaloo, Viveka

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are characterized by a dense multicellular community of microorganisms that can be formed by the attachment of bacteria to an inert surface and to each other. The development of biofilm involves the initial attachment of planktonic bacteria to a surface, followed by replication, cell-to-cell adhesion to form microcolonies, maturation, and detachment. Mature biofilms are embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix composed primarily of bacterial-derived exopolysaccharides, specialized proteins, adhesins, and occasionally DNA. Because the synthesis and assembly of biofilm matrix components is an exceptionally complex process, the transition between its different phases requires the coordinate expression and simultaneous regulation of many genes by complex genetic networks involving all levels of gene regulation. The finely controlled intracellular level of the chemical second messenger molecule, cyclic-di-GMP is central to the post-transcriptional mechanisms governing the switch between the motile planktonic lifestyle and the sessile biofilm forming state in many bacteria. Several other post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are known to dictate biofilm development and assembly and these include RNA-binding proteins, small non-coding RNAs, toxin-antitoxin systems, riboswitches, and RNases. Post-transcriptional regulation is therefore a powerful molecular mechanism employed by bacteria to rapidly adjust to the changing environment and to fine tune gene expression to the developmental needs of the cell. In this review, we discuss post-transcriptional mechanisms that influence the biofilm developmental cycle in a variety of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:24724055

  10. Sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate gene transcription in embryos.

    PubMed

    Teperek, Marta; Simeone, Angela; Gaggioli, Vincent; Miyamoto, Kei; Allen, George E; Erkek, Serap; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M; Zegerman, Philip; Bradshaw, Charles R; Peters, Antoine H F M; Gurdon, John B; Jullien, Jerome

    2016-08-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that the only role of sperm at fertilization is to introduce the male genome into the egg. Recently, ideas have emerged that the epigenetic state of the sperm nucleus could influence transcription in the embryo. However, conflicting reports have challenged the existence of epigenetic marks on sperm genes, and there are no functional tests supporting the role of sperm epigenetic marking on embryonic gene expression. Here, we show that sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate embryonic gene expression. By comparing the development of sperm- and spermatid-derived frog embryos, we show that the programming of sperm for successful development relates to its ability to regulate transcription of a set of developmentally important genes. During spermatid maturation into sperm, these genes lose H3K4me2/3 and retain H3K27me3 marks. Experimental removal of these epigenetic marks at fertilization de-regulates gene expression in the resulting embryos in a paternal chromatin-dependent manner. This demonstrates that epigenetic instructions delivered by the sperm at fertilization are required for correct regulation of gene expression in the future embryos. The epigenetic mechanisms of developmental programming revealed here are likely to relate to the mechanisms involved in transgenerational transmission of acquired traits. Understanding how parental experience can influence development of the progeny has broad potential for improving human health. PMID:27034506

  11. Sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate gene transcription in embryos

    PubMed Central

    Teperek, Marta; Simeone, Angela; Gaggioli, Vincent; Miyamoto, Kei; Allen, George E.; Erkek, Serap; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M.; Zegerman, Philip; Bradshaw, Charles R.; Peters, Antoine H.F.M.; Gurdon, John B.; Jullien, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that the only role of sperm at fertilization is to introduce the male genome into the egg. Recently, ideas have emerged that the epigenetic state of the sperm nucleus could influence transcription in the embryo. However, conflicting reports have challenged the existence of epigenetic marks on sperm genes, and there are no functional tests supporting the role of sperm epigenetic marking on embryonic gene expression. Here, we show that sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate embryonic gene expression. By comparing the development of sperm- and spermatid-derived frog embryos, we show that the programming of sperm for successful development relates to its ability to regulate transcription of a set of developmentally important genes. During spermatid maturation into sperm, these genes lose H3K4me2/3 and retain H3K27me3 marks. Experimental removal of these epigenetic marks at fertilization de-regulates gene expression in the resulting embryos in a paternal chromatin-dependent manner. This demonstrates that epigenetic instructions delivered by the sperm at fertilization are required for correct regulation of gene expression in the future embryos. The epigenetic mechanisms of developmental programming revealed here are likely to relate to the mechanisms involved in transgenerational transmission of acquired traits. Understanding how parental experience can influence development of the progeny has broad potential for improving human health. PMID:27034506

  12. Transcriptional Regulation of the p16 Tumor Suppressor Gene.

    PubMed

    Kotake, Yojiro; Naemura, Madoka; Murasaki, Chihiro; Inoue, Yasutoshi; Okamoto, Haruna

    2015-08-01

    The p16 tumor suppressor gene encodes a specific inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and 6 and is found altered in a wide range of human cancers. p16 plays a pivotal role in tumor suppressor networks through inducing cellular senescence that acts as a barrier to cellular transformation by oncogenic signals. p16 protein is relatively stable and its expression is primary regulated by transcriptional control. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins associate with the p16 locus in a long non-coding RNA, ANRIL-dependent manner, leading to repression of p16 transcription. YB1, a transcription factor, also represses the p16 transcription through direct association with its promoter region. Conversely, the transcription factors Ets1/2 and histone H3K4 methyltransferase MLL1 directly bind to the p16 locus and mediate p16 induction during replicative and premature senescence. In the present review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms by which these factors regulate p16 transcription. PMID:26168478

  13. Modular construction of mammalian gene circuits using TALE transcriptional repressors.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinqing; Jiang, Yun; Chen, He; Liao, Weixi; Li, Zhihua; Weiss, Ron; Xie, Zhen

    2015-03-01

    An important goal of synthetic biology is the rational design and predictable implementation of synthetic gene circuits using standardized and interchangeable parts. However, engineering of complex circuits in mammalian cells is currently limited by the availability of well-characterized and orthogonal transcriptional repressors. Here, we introduce a library of 26 reversible transcription activator-like effector repressors (TALERs) that bind newly designed hybrid promoters and exert transcriptional repression through steric hindrance of key transcriptional initiation elements. We demonstrate that using the input-output transfer curves of our TALERs enables accurate prediction of the behavior of modularly assembled TALER cascade and switch circuits. We also show that TALER switches using feedback regulation exhibit improved accuracy for microRNA-based HeLa cancer cell classification versus HEK293 cells. Our TALER library is a valuable toolkit for modular engineering of synthetic circuits, enabling programmable manipulation of mammalian cells and helping elucidate design principles of coupled transcriptional and microRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation. PMID:25643171

  14. ULTRAPETALA trxG genes interact with KANADI transcription factor genes to regulate Aradopsis Gynoecium patterning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organ formation relies upon precise patterns of gene expression that are under tight spatial and temporal regulation. Transcription patterns are specified by several cellular processes during development, including chromatin remodeling, but little is known about how chromatin remodeling factors cont...

  15. Demonstration of transcriptional regulation of specific genes by phytochrome action

    PubMed Central

    Silverthorne, Jane; Tobin, Elaine M.

    1984-01-01

    We have developed an in vitro transcription system that uses nuclei isolated from Lemna gibba G-3. The in vitro transcripts include sequences homologous to hybridization probes for the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase [3-phospho-D-glycerate carboxy-lyase (dimerizing), EC 4.1.1.39], the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-protein, and rRNA. Light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-protein sequences are transcribed to a greater extent in nuclei isolated from plants grown in darkness with 2 min of red light every 8 hr than in nuclei isolated from dark-treated plants. Furthermore, the amount of these transcripts measured in plants given a single minute of red light after dark treatment is increased over the amount measured in dark-treated plants. The effect of red light is at least partially reversible by 10 min of far-red light given immediately after the red light pulse. Transcription of both rRNA and small subunit sequences is also stimulated by a single minute of red light as compared to dark-treated tissue. However, the relative magnitudes of the increases compared to the dark levels are smaller than the increase seen for the chlorophyll a/b-protein, possibly because of the higher level of transcription of these sequences in the dark. The effect of red light on the transcription of small subunit and rRNA sequences is also reversible by immediate treatment with 10 min of far-red light. Pulse chase studies of dark-treated nuclei for up to 110 min do not show substantial turnover of in vitro labeled small subunit and chlorophyll a/b-protein transcripts. We therefore conclude that phytochrome action has induced specific changes in transcription of these genes. Images PMID:16593420

  16. Transcriptional regulatory elements downstream of the JunB gene.

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Albuerne, E D; Schatteman, G; Sanders, L K; Nathans, D

    1993-01-01

    JunB is an immediate early transcription factor that is induced by a variety of extracellular signaling agents, including growth factors, phorbol esters, and agents that elevate cyclic AMP. The mechanism of activation of the gene encoding JunB by these agents is not well understood. By using the JunB gene together with flanking DNA in transfection experiments, we show that a serum response element (SRE) and/or a cAMP response element (CRE) downstream of the gene mediate the response of the gene in mouse NIH 3T3 cells to serum, platelet-derived growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, phorbol ester, and forskolin. In addition, a segment of DNA just upstream of the TATA box is required for optimal activation of the gene. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 PMID:8265655

  17. A hormone-encoding gene identifies a pathway for cardiac but not skeletal muscle gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Grépin, C; Dagnino, L; Robitaille, L; Haberstroh, L; Antakly, T; Nemer, M

    1994-01-01

    In contrast to skeletal muscle, the mechanisms responsible for activation and maintenance of tissue-specific transcription in cardiac muscle remain poorly understood. A family of hormone-encoding genes is expressed in a highly specific manner in cardiac but not skeletal myocytes. This includes the A- and B-type natriuretic peptide (ANP and BNP) genes, which encode peptide hormones with crucial roles in the regulation of blood volume and pressure. Since these genes are markers of cardiac cells, we have used them to probe the mechanisms for cardiac muscle-specific transcription. Cloning and functional analysis of the rat BNP upstream sequences revealed unexpected structural resemblance to erythroid but not to muscle-specific promoters and enhancers, including a requirement for regulatory elements containing GATA motifs. A cDNA clone corresponding to a member of the GATA family of transcription factors was isolated from a cardiomyocyte cDNA library. Transcription of this GATA gene is restricted mostly to the heart and is undetectable in skeletal muscle. Within the heart, GATA transcripts are localized in ANP- and BNP-expressing myocytes, and forced expression of the GATA protein in heterologous cells markedly activates transcription from the natural cardiac muscle-specific ANP and BNP promoters. This GATA-dependent pathway defines the first mechanism for cardiac muscle-specific transcription. Moreover, the present findings reveal striking similarities between the mechanisms controlling gene expression in hematopoietic and cardiac cells and may have important implications for studies of cardiogenesis. Images PMID:8164667

  18. Predictive modelling of gene expression from transcriptional regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Budden, David M; Hurley, Daniel G; Crampin, Edmund J

    2015-07-01

    Predictive modelling of gene expression provides a powerful framework for exploring the regulatory logic underpinning transcriptional regulation. Recent studies have demonstrated the utility of such models in identifying dysregulation of gene and miRNA expression associated with abnormal patterns of transcription factor (TF) binding or nucleosomal histone modifications (HMs). Despite the growing popularity of such approaches, a comparative review of the various modelling algorithms and feature extraction methods is lacking. We define and compare three methods of quantifying pairwise gene-TF/HM interactions and discuss their suitability for integrating the heterogeneous chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-seq binding patterns exhibited by TFs and HMs. We then construct log-linear and ϵ-support vector regression models from various mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) and human lymphoblastoid (GM12878) data sets, considering both ChIP-seq- and position weight matrix- (PWM)-derived in silico TF-binding. The two algorithms are evaluated both in terms of their modelling prediction accuracy and ability to identify the established regulatory roles of individual TFs and HMs. Our results demonstrate that TF-binding and HMs are highly predictive of gene expression as measured by mRNA transcript abundance, irrespective of algorithm or cell type selection and considering both ChIP-seq and PWM-derived TF-binding. As we encourage other researchers to explore and develop these results, our framework is implemented using open-source software and made available as a preconfigured bootable virtual environment. PMID:25231769

  19. A Novel POK Family Transcription Factor, ZBTB5, Represses Transcription of p21CIP1 Gene*

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Dong-In; Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Lee, Choong-Eun; Yun, Chae-Ok; Hur, Man-Wook

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptional repression through chromatin remodeling and histone deacetylation has been postulated as a driving force for tumorigenesis. We isolated and characterized a novel POZ domain Krüppel-like zinc finger transcription repressor, ZBTB5 (zinc finger and BTB domain-containing 5). Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) analysis showed that ZBTB5 expression is higher in retinoblastoma and muscle cancer tissues. Immunocytochemistry showed that ZBTB5 was localized to the nucleus, particularly nuclear speckles. ZBTB5 directly repressed transcription of cell cycle arrest gene p21 by binding to the proximal GC-box 5/6 elements and the two distal p53-responsive elements (bp −2323 ∼ −2299; bp −1416 ∼ −1392). Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that ZBTB5 and p53 competed with each other in occupying the p53 binding elements. ZBTB5 interacted with co-repressor-histone deacetylase complexes such as BCoR (BCL-6-interacting corepressor), NCoR (nuclear receptor corepressor), and SMRT (silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid receptors) via its POZ domain. These interactions resulted in deacetylation of histones Ac-H3 and Ac-H4 at the proximal promoter, which is important in the transcriptional repression of p21. MTT (3-(4,5-di meth yl thi azol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assays and fluorescent-activated cell sorter analysis revealed that ZBTB5 stimulated both cell proliferation and cell cycle progression, significantly increasing the number of cells in S-phase. Overall, our data suggest that ZBTB5 is a potent transcription repressor of cell cycle arrest gene p21 and a potential proto-oncogene stimulating cell proliferation. PMID:19491398

  20. Transcriptional Characterization of Porcine Leptin and Leptin Receptor Genes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Montarelo, Dafne; Fernández, Almudena; Barragán, Carmen; Noguera, Jose L; Folch, Josep M; Rodríguez, M Carmen; Ovilo, Cristina; Silió, Luis; Fernández, Ana I

    2013-01-01

    The leptin (LEP) and its receptor (LEPR) regulate food intake and energy balance through hypothalamic signaling. However, the LEP-LEPR axis seems to be more complex and its expression regulation has not been well described. In pigs, LEP and LEPR genes have been widely studied due to their relevance. Previous studies reported significant effects of SNPs located in both genes on growth and fatness traits. The aim of this study was to determine the expression profiles of LEP and LEPR across hypothalamic, adipose, hepatic and muscle tissues in Iberian x Landrace backcrossed pigs and to analyze the effects of gene variants on transcript abundance. To our knowledge, non porcine LEPR isoforms have been described rather than LEPRb. A short porcine LEPR isoform (LEPRa), that encodes a protein lacking the intracellular residues responsible of signal transduction, has been identified for the first time. The LEPRb isoform was only quantifiable in hypothalamus while LEPRa appeared widely expressed across tissues, but at higher levels in liver, suggesting that both isoforms would develop different roles. The unique LEP transcript showed expression in backfat and muscle. The effects of gene variants on transcript expression revealed interesting results. The LEPRc.1987C>T polymorphism showed opposite effects on LEPRb and LEPRa hypothalamic expression. In addition, one out of the 16 polymorphisms identified in the LEPR promoter region revealed high differential expression in hepatic LEPRa. These results suggest a LEPR isoform-specific regulation at tissue level. Conversely, non-differential expression of LEP conditional on the analyzed polymorphisms could be detected, indicating that its regulation is likely affected by other mechanisms rather than gene sequence variants. The present study has allowed a transcriptional characterization of LEP and LEPR isoforms on a range of tissues. Their expression patterns seem to indicate that both molecules develop peripheral roles apart from

  1. Post-Transcriptional Control of Chloroplast Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    del Campo, Eva M.

    2009-01-01

    Chloroplasts contain their own genome, organized as operons, which are generally transcribed as polycistronic transcriptional units. These primary transcripts are processed into smaller RNAs, which are further modified to produce functional RNAs. The RNA processing mechanisms remain largely unknown and represent an important step in the control of chloroplast gene expression. Such mechanisms include RNA cleavage of pre-existing RNAs, RNA stabilization, intron splicing, and RNA editing. Recently, several nuclear-encoded proteins that participate in diverse plastid RNA processing events have been characterised. Many of them seem to belong to the pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein family that is implicated in many crucial functions including organelle biogenesis and plant development. This review will provide an overview of current knowledge of the post-transcriptional processing in chloroplasts. PMID:19838333

  2. Noninvasive Tracking of Gene Transcript and Neuroprotection after Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jiaqian; Chen, Y. Iris; Liu, Christina H.; Chen, Po-Chih; Prentice, Howard; Wu, Jang-Yen; Liu, Philip K.

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy holds exceptional potential for translational medicine by improving the products of defective genes in diseases and/or providing necessary biologics from endogenous sources during recovery processes. However, validating methods for the delivery, distribution and expression of the exogenous genes from such therapy can generally not be applicable to monitor effects over the long term because they are invasive. We report here that human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) cDNA encoded in scAAV-type 2 adeno-associated virus, as delivered through eye drops at multiple time points after cerebral ischemia using bilateral carotid occlusion for 60 min (BCAO-60) led to significant reduction in mortality rates, cerebral atrophy, and neurological deficits in C57black6 mice. Most importantly, we validated hG-CSF cDNA expression using translatable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in living brains. This noninvasive approach for monitoring exogenous gene expression in the brains has potential for great impact in the area of experimental gene therapy in animal models of heart attack, stroke, Alzheimer’s dementia, Parkinson’s disorder and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and the translation of such techniques to emergency medicine. PMID:26207935

  3. Noninvasive tracking of gene transcript and neuroprotection after gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ren, J; Chen, Y I; Liu, C H; Chen, P-C; Prentice, H; Wu, J-Y; Liu, P K

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy holds exceptional potential for translational medicine by improving the products of defective genes in diseases and/or providing necessary biologics from endogenous sources during recovery processes. However, validating methods for the delivery, distribution and expression of the exogenous genes from such therapy can generally not be applicable to monitor effects over the long term because they are invasive. We report here that human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) complimentary DNA (cDNA) encoded in self-complementary adeno-associated virus-type 2 adeno-associated virus, as delivered through eye drops at multiple time points after cerebral ischemia using bilateral carotid occlusion for 60 min (BCAO-60) led to significant reduction in mortality rates, cerebral atrophy and neurological deficits in C57black6 mice. Most importantly, we validated hG-CSF cDNA expression using translatable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in living brains. This noninvasive approach for monitoring exogenous gene expression in the brains has potential for great impact in the area of experimental gene therapy in animal models of heart attack, stroke, Alzheimer's dementia, Parkinson's disorder and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and the translation of such techniques to emergency medicine. PMID:26207935

  4. Glucocorticoid modulation of casein gene transcription in mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, R; Mehta, N M; Ganguly, N; Banerjee, M R

    1979-01-01

    The influence of cortisol and prolactin on casein gene expression in the mammary gland of lactating BALB/c mice was measured by using a specific cDNA probe to 15S casein mRNA (cDNAcsn). Casein mRNA (mRNAcsn) level in the mammary gland was decreased by 85% 5 days after adrenal ablation, but then was increased 4.4-fold 12 hr after a single injection of hydrocortisone-21-acetate. An 80% decrease in serum prolactin level, induced by the prolactin inhibitor 2-bromo-alpha-ergocryptin (CB-154), did not alter the level of mRNAcsn in the gland. Specific transcription of the casein gene in nuclei isolated from lactating mammary glands was measured by cDNAcsn hybridization to the in vitro synthesized Hg-CTP-containing RNA (Hg-RNA), which was purified by SH-agarose chromatography. The level of the mRNAcsn in Hg-RNA synthesized in the isolated nuclei was 0.09% and this was decreased 85% by alpha-amanitin, indicating that the mRNAcsn sequences in the Hg-RNA were the products of RNA polymerase II-directed DNA-dependent RNA synthesis. Transcription of the mRNAcsn in isolated nuclei was decreased by 70% 5 days after adrenalectomy and a single injection of the glucocorticoid then increased the transcription level 2-fold at 6 hr. Essentially no alteration of the level of transcription was detectable in mammary nuclei isolated from lactating mice with 80% decreased serum prolactin level, induced by CB-154 treatment. The results thus demonstrate a glucocorticoid involvement on the modulation of casein gene expression at the transcriptional level of control. PMID:293734

  5. Transcriptional Activation of the Cyclin A Gene by the Architectural Transcription Factor HMGA2

    PubMed Central

    Tessari, Michela A.; Gostissa, Monica; Altamura, Sandro; Sgarra, Riccardo; Rustighi, Alessandra; Salvagno, Clio; Caretti, Giuseppina; Imbriano, Carol; Mantovani, Roberto; Del Sal, Giannino; Giancotti, Vincenzo; Manfioletti, Guidalberto

    2003-01-01

    The HMGA2 protein belongs to the HMGA family of architectural transcription factors, which play an important role in chromatin organization. HMGA proteins are overexpressed in several experimental and human tumors and have been implicated in the process of neoplastic transformation. Hmga2 knockout results in the pygmy phenotype in mice and in a decreased growth rate of embryonic fibroblasts, thus indicating a role for HMGA2 in cell proliferation. Here we show that HMGA2 associates with the E1A-regulated transcriptional repressor p120E4F, interfering with p120E4F binding to the cyclin A promoter. Ectopic expression of HMGA2 results in the activation of the cyclin A promoter and induction of the endogenous cyclin A gene. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show that HMGA2 associates with the cyclin A promoter only when the gene is transcriptionally activated. These data identify the cyclin A gene as a cellular target for HMGA2 and, for the first time, suggest a mechanism for HMGA2-dependent cell cycle regulation. PMID:14645522

  6. Stochastic model for gene transcription on Drosophila melanogaster embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prata, Guilherme N.; Hornos, José Eduardo M.; Ramos, Alexandre F.

    2016-02-01

    We examine immunostaining experimental data for the formation of stripe 2 of even-skipped (eve) transcripts on D. melanogaster embryos. An estimate of the factor converting immunofluorescence intensity units into molecular numbers is given. The analysis of the eve dynamics at the region of stripe 2 suggests that the promoter site of the gene has two distinct regimes: an earlier phase when it is predominantly activated until a critical time when it becomes mainly repressed. That suggests proposing a stochastic binary model for gene transcription on D. melanogaster embryos. Our model has two random variables: the transcripts number and the state of the source of mRNAs given as active or repressed. We are able to reproduce available experimental data for the average number of transcripts. An analysis of the random fluctuations on the number of eves and their consequences on the spatial precision of stripe 2 is presented. We show that the position of the anterior or posterior borders fluctuate around their average position by ˜1 % of the embryo length, which is similar to what is found experimentally. The fitting of data by such a simple model suggests that it can be useful to understand the functions of randomness during developmental processes.

  7. Stochastic model for gene transcription on Drosophila melanogaster embryos.

    PubMed

    Prata, Guilherme N; Hornos, José Eduardo M; Ramos, Alexandre F

    2016-02-01

    We examine immunostaining experimental data for the formation of stripe 2 of even-skipped (eve) transcripts on D. melanogaster embryos. An estimate of the factor converting immunofluorescence intensity units into molecular numbers is given. The analysis of the eve dynamics at the region of stripe 2 suggests that the promoter site of the gene has two distinct regimes: an earlier phase when it is predominantly activated until a critical time when it becomes mainly repressed. That suggests proposing a stochastic binary model for gene transcription on D. melanogaster embryos. Our model has two random variables: the transcripts number and the state of the source of mRNAs given as active or repressed. We are able to reproduce available experimental data for the average number of transcripts. An analysis of the random fluctuations on the number of eves and their consequences on the spatial precision of stripe 2 is presented. We show that the position of the anterior or posterior borders fluctuate around their average position by ∼1% of the embryo length, which is similar to what is found experimentally. The fitting of data by such a simple model suggests that it can be useful to understand the functions of randomness during developmental processes. PMID:26986358

  8. Transcriptional Regulation of Tlr11 Gene Expression in Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhenyu; Shi, Zhongcheng; Sanchez, Amir; Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Mingyao; Yang, Jianghua; Wang, Fen; Zhang, Dekai

    2009-01-01

    As sensors of invading microorganisms, Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are expressed not only on macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) but also on epithelial cells. In the TLR family, Tlr11 appears to have the unique feature in that it is expressed primarily on epithelial cells, although it is also expressed on DCs and macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that transcription of the Tlr11 gene is regulated through two cis-acting elements, one Ets-binding site and one interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-binding site. The Ets element interacts with the epithelium-specific transcription factors, ESE-1 and ESE-3, and the IRF motif interacts with IRF-8. Thus, Tlr11 expression on epithelial cells is regulated by the transcription factors that are presumably distinct from transcription factors that regulate the expression of TLRs in innate immune cells such as macrophages and DCs. Our results imply that the distinctive transcription regulatory machinery for TLRs on epithelium may represent a promising new avenue for the development of epithelia-specific therapeutic interventions. PMID:19801549

  9. Manganese peroxidase gene transcription in Phanerochaete chrysosporium: Activation by manganese

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.A.; Alic, M. Gold, M.H. )

    1991-07-01

    The expression of manganese peroxidase in nitrogen-limited cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium is dependent on Mn, and initial work suggested that Mn regulates transcription of the mnp gene. In this study, using Northern (RNA) blot analysis of kinetic, dose-response, and inhibitor experiments, the authors demonstrate unequivocally that Mn regulates mnp gene transcription. The amount of mnp mRNA in cells of 4-day-old nitrogen-limited cultures is a direct function of the concentration of Mn in the culture medium up to a maximum of 180 {mu}M. Addition of Mn to nitrogen-limited Mn-deficient secondary metabolic (4-, 5-, and 6-day-old) cultures results in the appearance of mnp mRNA within 40 min. The appearance of this message is completely inhibited by the RNA synthesis inhibitor dactinomycin but not by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Furthermore, the amount of mnp mRNA produced is a direct function of the concentration of added Mn. In contrast, addition of Mn to low-nitrogen Mn-deficient 2- or 3-day-old cultures does not result in the appearance of mnp mRNA. Manganese peroxidase protein is detected by specific immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translation products of poly(A) RNA isolated from Mn-supplemented (but nor from Mn-deficient) cells. All of these results demonstrate that Mn, the substrate for the enzyme, regulates mnp gene transcription via a growth-stage-specific and concentration-dependent mechanism.

  10. Land use type significantly affects microbial gene transcription in soil.

    PubMed

    Nacke, Heiko; Fischer, Christiane; Thürmer, Andrea; Meinicke, Peter; Daniel, Rolf

    2014-05-01

    Soil microorganisms play an essential role in sustaining biogeochemical processes and cycling of nutrients across different land use types. To gain insights into microbial gene transcription in forest and grassland soil, we isolated mRNA from 32 sampling sites. After sequencing of generated complementary DNA (cDNA), a total of 5,824,229 sequences could be further analyzed. We were able to assign nonribosomal cDNA sequences to all three domains of life. A dominance of bacterial sequences, which were affiliated to 25 different phyla, was found. Bacterial groups capable of aromatic compound degradation such as Phenylobacterium and Burkholderia were detected in significantly higher relative abundance in forest soil than in grassland soil. Accordingly, KEGG pathway categories related to degradation of aromatic ring-containing molecules (e.g., benzoate degradation) were identified in high abundance within forest soil-derived metatranscriptomic datasets. The impact of land use type forest on community composition and activity is evidently to a high degree caused by the presence of wood breakdown products. Correspondingly, bacterial groups known to be involved in lignin degradation and containing ligninolytic genes such as Burkholderia, Bradyrhizobium, and Azospirillum exhibited increased transcriptional activity in forest soil. Higher solar radiation in grassland presumably induced increased transcription of photosynthesis-related genes within this land use type. This is in accordance with high abundance of photosynthetic organisms and plant-infecting viruses in grassland. PMID:24553913

  11. Synaptic, transcriptional and chromatin genes disrupted in autism.

    PubMed

    De Rubeis, Silvia; He, Xin; Goldberg, Arthur P; Poultney, Christopher S; Samocha, Kaitlin; Cicek, A Erucment; Kou, Yan; Liu, Li; Fromer, Menachem; Walker, Susan; Singh, Tarinder; Klei, Lambertus; Kosmicki, Jack; Shih-Chen, Fu; Aleksic, Branko; Biscaldi, Monica; Bolton, Patrick F; Brownfeld, Jessica M; Cai, Jinlu; Campbell, Nicholas G; Carracedo, Angel; Chahrour, Maria H; Chiocchetti, Andreas G; Coon, Hilary; Crawford, Emily L; Curran, Sarah R; Dawson, Geraldine; Duketis, Eftichia; Fernandez, Bridget A; Gallagher, Louise; Geller, Evan; Guter, Stephen J; Hill, R Sean; Ionita-Laza, Juliana; Jimenz Gonzalez, Patricia; Kilpinen, Helena; Klauck, Sabine M; Kolevzon, Alexander; Lee, Irene; Lei, Irene; Lei, Jing; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Ma'ayan, Avi; Marshall, Christian R; McInnes, Alison L; Neale, Benjamin; Owen, Michael J; Ozaki, Noriio; Parellada, Mara; Parr, Jeremy R; Purcell, Shaun; Puura, Kaija; Rajagopalan, Deepthi; Rehnström, Karola; Reichenberg, Abraham; Sabo, Aniko; Sachse, Michael; Sanders, Stephan J; Schafer, Chad; Schulte-Rüther, Martin; Skuse, David; Stevens, Christine; Szatmari, Peter; Tammimies, Kristiina; Valladares, Otto; Voran, Annette; Li-San, Wang; Weiss, Lauren A; Willsey, A Jeremy; Yu, Timothy W; Yuen, Ryan K C; Cook, Edwin H; Freitag, Christine M; Gill, Michael; Hultman, Christina M; Lehner, Thomas; Palotie, Aaarno; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Sklar, Pamela; State, Matthew W; Sutcliffe, James S; Walsh, Christiopher A; Scherer, Stephen W; Zwick, Michael E; Barett, Jeffrey C; Cutler, David J; Roeder, Kathryn; Devlin, Bernie; Daly, Mark J; Buxbaum, Joseph D

    2014-11-13

    The genetic architecture of autism spectrum disorder involves the interplay of common and rare variants and their impact on hundreds of genes. Using exome sequencing, here we show that analysis of rare coding variation in 3,871 autism cases and 9,937 ancestry-matched or parental controls implicates 22 autosomal genes at a false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.05, plus a set of 107 autosomal genes strongly enriched for those likely to affect risk (FDR < 0.30). These 107 genes, which show unusual evolutionary constraint against mutations, incur de novo loss-of-function mutations in over 5% of autistic subjects. Many of the genes implicated encode proteins for synaptic formation, transcriptional regulation and chromatin-remodelling pathways. These include voltage-gated ion channels regulating the propagation of action potentials, pacemaking and excitability-transcription coupling, as well as histone-modifying enzymes and chromatin remodellers-most prominently those that mediate post-translational lysine methylation/demethylation modifications of histones. PMID:25363760

  12. Housekeeping gene transcript abundance in bovine fertilized and cloned embryos.

    PubMed

    Ross, Pablo J; Wang, Kai; Kocabas, Arif; Cibelli, Jose B

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to compare housekeeping gene expression levels, relative to total mRNA, across different stages of bovine preimplantation development in embryos generated by IVF and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). We first analyzed the levels of total RNA recovered from different stages of preimplantation development. A similar RNA level was observed from oocytes to 16-cell stage embryos with a significant increase at morula and blastocyst stages. Then we used an absolute mRNA determination method that accounts for the RNA level in the embryo by quantifying copies of transcripts normalized to loaded cDNA amount. The number of housekeeping genes mRNA copies per nanogram of cDNA was compared among samples obtained from different stages of preimplantation IVF-derived embryos. None of the genes analyzed (GAPDH, PPIA, ACTB, RPL15, GUSB, and Histone H2A.2) maintained constant levels throughout preimplantation development, indicating that they are not suitable for normalizing gene expression across developmental stages. We then compared expression of housekeeping genes between IVF and SCNT embryos at different embryonic stages. We found different levels of transcript abundance between IVF and SCNT embryos for GAPDH, RPL15, GUSB, and ACTB. On the other hand, Histone H2A.2 and PPIA were similar between IVF and SCNT embryos at each stage analyzed, although they varied across stages as previously mentioned. PMID:20973679

  13. Transcriptional regulation of cathelicidin genes in chicken bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang In; Jang, Hyun June; Jeon, Mi-hyang; Lee, Mi Ock; Kim, Jeom Sun; Jeon, Ik-Soo; Byun, Sung June

    2016-04-01

    Cathelicidins form a family of vertebrate-specific immune molecules with an evolutionarily conserved gene structure. We analyzed the expression patterns of cathelicidin genes (CAMP, CATH3, and CATHB1) in chicken bone marrow cells (BMCs) and chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEFs). We found that CAMP and CATHB1 were significantly up-regulated in BMCs, whereas the expression of CATH3 did not differ significantly between BMCs and CEFs. To study the mechanism underlying the up-regulation of cathelicidin genes in BMCs, we predicted the transcription factors (TFs) that bind to the 5'-flanking regions of cathelicidin genes. CEBPA, EBF1, HES1, MSX1, and ZIC3 were up-regulated in BMCs compared to CEFs. Subsequently, when a siRNA-mediated knockdown assay was performed for MSX1, the expression of CAMP and CATHB1 was decreased in BMCs. We also showed that the transcriptional activity of the CAMP promoter was decreased by mutation of the MSX1-binding sites present within the 5'-flanking region of CAMP. These results increase our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms controlling cathelicidin genes in BMCs. PMID:26908883

  14. Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics of Gene Expression and Transcriptional Regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemus, Enrique Hernández

    2009-12-01

    In recent times whole-genome gene expression analysis has turned out to be a highly important tool to study the coordinated function of a very large number of genes within their corresponding cellular environment, especially in relation to phenotypic diversity and disease. A wide variety of methods of quantitative analysis has been developed to cope with high throughput data sets generated by gene expression profiling experiments. Due to the complexity associated with transcriptomics, especially in the case of gene regulation phenomena, most of these methods are of a probabilistic or statistical nature. Even if these methods have reached a central status in the development of an integrative, systematic understanding of the associated biological processes, they very rarely constitute a concrete guide to the actual physicochemical mechanisms behind biological function, and the role of these methods is more on a hypotheses generating line. An important improvement could lie in the development of a thermodynamic theory for gene expression and transcriptional regulation that will build the foundations for a proper integration of the vast amount of molecular biophysical data and could lead, in the future, to a systemic view of genetic transcription and regulation.

  15. Quantitative characterization of gene regulation by Rho dependent transcription termination.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Razika; Lee, Tiffany Y; Lim, Han N

    2015-08-01

    Rho factor dependent transcription termination (RTT) is common within the coding sequences of bacterial genes and it acts to couple transcription and translation levels. Despite the importance of RTT for gene regulation, its effects on mRNA and protein concentrations have not been quantitatively characterized. Here we demonstrate that the exogenous cfp gene encoding the cyan fluorescent protein can serve as a model for gene regulation by RTT. This was confirmed by showing that Psu and bicyclomycin decrease RTT and increase full length cfp mRNAs (but remarkably they have little effect on protein production). We then use cfp to characterize the relationship between its protein and full length mRNA concentrations when the translation initiation rate is varied by sequence modifications of the translation initiation region (TIR). These experiments reveal that the fold change in protein concentration (RP) and the fold change in full length mRNA concentration (Rm) have the relationship RP≈Rm(b), where b is a constant. The average value of b was determined from three separate data sets to be ~3.6. We demonstrate that the above power law function can predict how altering the translation initiation rate of a gene in an operon will affect the mRNA concentrations of downstream genes and specify a lower bound for the associated changes in protein concentrations. In summary, this study defines a simple phenomenological model to help program expression from single genes and operons that are regulated by RTT, and to guide molecular models of RTT. PMID:25982507

  16. Transcriptional Truncation of the Long Coding Imprinted Gene Usp29

    PubMed Central

    He, Hongzhi; Ye, An; Kim, Joomyeong

    2016-01-01

    Usp29 (Ubiquitin-specific protease 29) is a paternally expressed gene located upstream of another imprinted gene Peg3. In the current study, the transcription of this long coding gene spanning a 250-kb genomic distance was truncated using a knockin allele. According to the results, paternal transmission of the mutant allele resulted in reduced body and litter sizes whereas the maternal transmission caused no obvious effects. In the paternal mutant, the expression levels of Usp29 were reduced to 14–18% level of the wild-type littermates due to the Poly-A signal included in the knockin cassette. Expression analyses further revealed an unusual female-specific up-regulation of the adjacent imprinted gene Zfp264 in the mutant. Consistent with this, the promoter of Zfp264 was hypomethylated only in the female mutant. Interestingly, this female-specific hypomethylation by the knockin allele was not detected in the offspring of an interspecific crossing, indicating its sensitivity to genetic background. Overall, the results suggest that the transcription of Usp29 may be involved in DNA methylation setting of Zfp264 promoter in a sex-specific manner. PMID:27327533

  17. Transcriptional targets of the schizophrenia risk gene MIR137

    PubMed Central

    Collins, A L; Kim, Y; Bloom, R J; Kelada, S N; Sethupathy, P; Sullivan, P F

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have strongly implicated MIR137 (the gene encoding the microRNA miR-137) in schizophrenia. A parsimonious hypothesis is that a pathway regulated by miR-137 is important in the etiology of schizophrenia. Full evaluation of this hypothesis requires more definitive knowledge about biological targets of miR-137, which is currently lacking. Our goals were to expand knowledge of the biology of miR-137 by identifying its empirical targets, and to test whether the resulting lists of direct and indirect targets were enriched for genes and pathways involved in risk for schizophrenia. We overexpressed miR-137 in a human neural stem cell line and analyzed gene expression changes at 24 and 48 h using RNA sequencing. Following miR-137 overexpression, 202 and 428 genes were differentially expressed after 24 and 48 h. Genes differentially expressed at 24 h were enriched for transcription factors and cell cycle genes, and differential expression at 48 h affected a wider variety of pathways. Pathways implicated in schizophrenia were upregulated in the 48 h findings (major histocompatibility complex, synapses, FMRP interacting RNAs and calcium channels). Critically, differentially expressed genes at 48 h were enriched for smaller association P-values in the largest published schizophrenia GWAS. This work provides empirical support for a role of miR-137 in the etiology of schizophrenia. PMID:24984191

  18. WRKY transcription factor genes in wild rice Oryza nivara.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hengjian; Watanabe, Kenneth A; Zhang, Liyuan; Shen, Qingxi J

    2016-08-01

    The WRKY transcription factor family is one of the largest gene families involved in plant development and stress response. Although many WRKY genes have been studied in cultivated rice (Oryza sativa), the WRKY genes in the wild rice species Oryza nivara, the direct progenitor of O. sativa, have not been studied. O. nivara shows abundant genetic diversity and elite drought and disease resistance features. Herein, a total of 97 O. nivara WRKY (OnWRKY) genes were identified. RNA-sequencing demonstrates that OnWRKY genes were generally expressed at higher levels in the roots of 30-day-old plants. Bioinformatic analyses suggest that most of OnWRKY genes could be induced by salicylic acid, abscisic acid, and drought. Abundant potential MAPK phosphorylation sites in OnWRKYs suggest that activities of most OnWRKYs can be regulated by phosphorylation. Phylogenetic analyses of OnWRKYs support a novel hypothesis that ancient group IIc OnWRKYs were the original ancestors of only some group IIc and group III WRKYs. The analyses also offer strong support that group IIc OnWRKYs containing the HVE sequence in their zinc finger motifs were derived from group Ia WRKYs. This study provides a solid foundation for the study of the evolution and functions of WRKY genes in O. nivara. PMID:27345721

  19. WRKY transcription factor genes in wild rice Oryza nivara

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hengjian; Watanabe, Kenneth A.; Zhang, Liyuan; Shen, Qingxi J.

    2016-01-01

    The WRKY transcription factor family is one of the largest gene families involved in plant development and stress response. Although many WRKY genes have been studied in cultivated rice (Oryza sativa), the WRKY genes in the wild rice species Oryza nivara, the direct progenitor of O. sativa, have not been studied. O. nivara shows abundant genetic diversity and elite drought and disease resistance features. Herein, a total of 97 O. nivara WRKY (OnWRKY) genes were identified. RNA-sequencing demonstrates that OnWRKY genes were generally expressed at higher levels in the roots of 30-day-old plants. Bioinformatic analyses suggest that most of OnWRKY genes could be induced by salicylic acid, abscisic acid, and drought. Abundant potential MAPK phosphorylation sites in OnWRKYs suggest that activities of most OnWRKYs can be regulated by phosphorylation. Phylogenetic analyses of OnWRKYs support a novel hypothesis that ancient group IIc OnWRKYs were the original ancestors of only some group IIc and group III WRKYs. The analyses also offer strong support that group IIc OnWRKYs containing the HVE sequence in their zinc finger motifs were derived from group Ia WRKYs. This study provides a solid foundation for the study of the evolution and functions of WRKY genes in O. nivara. PMID:27345721

  20. Low-dose radiation suppresses Pokemon expression under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Whan; Yu, Kweon; Shin, Kee-Sun; Kwon, Kisang; Hwang, Tae-Sik; Kwon, O-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Our previous data demonstrated that CoCl2-induced hypoxia controls endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-associated and other intracellular factors. One of them, the transcription factor Pokemon, was differentially regulated by low-dose radiation (LDR). There are limited data regarding how this transcription factor is involved in expression of the unfolded protein response (UPR) under hypoxic conditions. The purpose of this study was to obtain clues on how Pokemon is involved in the UPR. Pokemon was selected as a differentially expressed gene under hypoxic conditions; however, its regulation was clearly repressed by LDR. It was also demonstrated that both expression of ER chaperones and ER stress sensors were affected by hypoxic conditions, and the same results were obtained when cells in which Pokemon was up- or down-regulated were used. The current state of UPR and LDR research associated with the Pokemon pathway offers an important opportunity to understand the oncogenesis, senescence, and differentiation of cells, as well as to facilitate introduction of new therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:24772825

  1. Zinc triggers a complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the metal homeostasis gene FRD3 in Arabidopsis relatives

    PubMed Central

    Charlier, Jean-Benoit; Polese, Catherine; Nouet, Cécile; Carnol, Monique; Bosman, Bernard; Krämer, Ute; Motte, Patrick; Hanikenne, Marc

    2015-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, FRD3 (FERRIC CHELATE REDUCTASE DEFECTIVE 3) plays a central role in metal homeostasis. FRD3 is among a set of metal homeostasis genes that are constitutively highly expressed in roots and shoots of Arabidopsis halleri, a zinc hyperaccumulating and hypertolerant species. Here, we examined the regulation of FRD3 by zinc in both species to shed light on the evolutionary processes underlying the evolution of hyperaccumulation in A. halleri. We combined gene expression studies with the use of β-glucuronidase and green fluorescent protein reporter constructs to compare the expression profile and transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of FRD3 in both species. The AtFRD3 and AhFRD3 genes displayed a conserved expression profile. In A. thaliana, alternative transcription initiation sites from two promoters determined transcript variants that were differentially regulated by zinc supply in roots and shoots to favour the most highly translated variant under zinc-excess conditions. In A. halleri, a single transcript variant with higher transcript stability and enhanced translation has been maintained. The FRD3 gene thus undergoes complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation in Arabidopsis relatives. Our study reveals that a diverse set of mechanisms underlie increased gene dosage in the A. halleri lineage and illustrates how an environmental challenge can alter gene regulation. PMID:25900619

  2. Regulation of HDL genes: transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and posttranslational.

    PubMed

    Kardassis, Dimitris; Gafencu, Anca; Zannis, Vassilis I; Davalos, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    HDL regulation is exerted at multiple levels including regulation at the level of transcription initiation by transcription factors and signal transduction cascades; regulation at the posttranscriptional level by microRNAs and other noncoding RNAs which bind to the coding or noncoding regions of HDL genes regulating mRNA stability and translation; as well as regulation at the posttranslational level by protein modifications, intracellular trafficking, and degradation. The above mechanisms have drastic effects on several HDL-mediated processes including HDL biogenesis, remodeling, cholesterol efflux and uptake, as well as atheroprotective functions on the cells of the arterial wall. The emphasis is on mechanisms that operate in physiologically relevant tissues such as the liver (which accounts for 80% of the total HDL-C levels in the plasma), the macrophages, the adrenals, and the endothelium. Transcription factors that have a significant impact on HDL regulation such as hormone nuclear receptors and hepatocyte nuclear factors are extensively discussed both in terms of gene promoter recognition and regulation but also in terms of their impact on plasma HDL levels as was revealed by knockout studies. Understanding the different modes of regulation of this complex lipoprotein may provide useful insights for the development of novel HDL-raising therapies that could be used to fight against atherosclerosis which is the underlying cause of coronary heart disease. PMID:25522987

  3. Novel Transcriptional Regulons for Autotrophic Cycle Genes in Crenarchaeota

    PubMed Central

    Leyn, Semen A.; Rodionova, Irina A.; Li, Xiaoqing

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autotrophic microorganisms are able to utilize carbon dioxide as their only carbon source, or, alternatively, many of them can grow heterotrophically on organics. Different variants of autotrophic pathways have been identified in various lineages of the phylum Crenarchaeota. Aerobic members of the order Sulfolobales utilize the hydroxypropionate-hydroxybutyrate cycle (HHC) to fix inorganic carbon, whereas anaerobic Thermoproteales use the dicarboxylate-hydroxybutyrate cycle (DHC). Knowledge of transcriptional regulation of autotrophic pathways in Archaea is limited. We applied a comparative genomics approach to predict novel autotrophic regulons in the Crenarchaeota. We report identification of two novel DNA motifs associated with the autotrophic pathway genes in the Sulfolobales (HHC box) and Thermoproteales (DHC box). Based on genome context evidence, the HHC box regulon was attributed to a novel transcription factor from the TrmB family named HhcR. Orthologs of HhcR are present in all Sulfolobales genomes but were not found in other lineages. A predicted HHC box regulatory motif was confirmed by in vitro binding assays with the recombinant HhcR protein from Metallosphaera yellowstonensis. For the DHC box regulon, we assigned a different potential regulator, named DhcR, which is restricted to the order Thermoproteales. DhcR in Thermoproteus neutrophilus (Tneu_0751) was previously identified as a DNA-binding protein with high affinity for the promoter regions of two autotrophic operons. The global HhcR and DhcR regulons reconstructed by comparative genomics were reconciled with available omics data in Metallosphaera and Thermoproteus spp. The identified regulons constitute two novel mechanisms for transcriptional control of autotrophic pathways in the Crenarchaeota. IMPORTANCE Little is known about transcriptional regulation of carbon dioxide fixation pathways in Archaea. We previously applied the comparative genomics approach for reconstruction of Dtx

  4. Targeting hypoxic response for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Paolicchi, Elisa; Gemignani, Federica; Krstic-Demonacos, Marija; Dedhar, Shoukat; Mutti, Luciano; Landi, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic tumor microenvironment (HTM) is considered to promote metabolic changes, oncogene activation and epithelial mesenchymal transition, and resistance to chemo- and radio-therapy, all of which are hallmarks of aggressive tumor behavior. Cancer cells within the HTM acquire phenotypic properties that allow them to overcome the lack of energy and nutrients supply within this niche. These phenotypic properties include activation of genes regulating glycolysis, glucose transport, acidosis regulators, angiogenesis, all of which are orchestrated through the activation of the transcription factor, HIF1A, which is an independent marker of poor prognosis. Moreover, during the adaptation to a HTM cancer cells undergo deep changes in mitochondrial functions such as “Warburg effect” and the “reverse Warburg effect”. This review aims to provide an overview of the characteristics of the HTM, with particular focus on novel therapeutic strategies currently in clinical trials, targeting the adaptive response to hypoxia of cancer cells. PMID:26859576

  5. The transcriptional terminator sequences downstream of the covR gene terminate covR/S operon transcription to generate covR monocistronic transcripts in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Chiang-Ni, Chuan; Tsou, Chih-Cheng; Lin, Yee-Shin; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Lin, Ming-T; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2008-12-31

    CovR/S is an important two component regulatory system, which regulates about 15% of the gene expression in Streptococcus pyogenes. The covR/S locus was identified as an operon generating an RNA transcript around 2.5-kb in size. In this study, we found the covR/S operon produced three RNA transcripts (around 2.5-, 1.0-, and 0.8-kb in size). Using RNA transcriptional terminator sequence prediction and transcriptional terminator analysis, we identified two atypical rho-independent terminator sequences downstream of the covR gene and showed these terminator sequences terminate RNA transcription efficiently. These results indicate that covR/S operon generates covR/S transcript and monocistronic covR transcripts. PMID:18824088

  6. Hypoxic control of metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Erinn B.; Giaccia, Amato J.

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic disease is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths and involves critical interactions between tumor cells and the microenvironment. Hypoxia is a potent microenvironmental factor promoting metastatic progression. Clinically, hypoxia and the expression of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factors HIF-1 and HIF-2 are associated with increased distant metastasis and poor survival in a variety of tumor types. Moreover, HIF signaling in malignant cells influences multiple steps within the metastatic cascade. Here we review research focused on elucidating the mechanisms by which the hypoxic tumor microenvironment promotes metastatic progression. These studies have identified potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets regulated by hypoxia that could be incorporated into strategies aimed at preventing and treating metastatic disease. PMID:27124451

  7. Hypoxic control of metastasis.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Erinn B; Giaccia, Amato J

    2016-04-01

    Metastatic disease is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths and involves critical interactions between tumor cells and the microenvironment. Hypoxia is a potent microenvironmental factor promoting metastatic progression. Clinically, hypoxia and the expression of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factors HIF-1 and HIF-2 are associated with increased distant metastasis and poor survival in a variety of tumor types. Moreover, HIF signaling in malignant cells influences multiple steps within the metastatic cascade. Here we review research focused on elucidating the mechanisms by which the hypoxic tumor microenvironment promotes metastatic progression. These studies have identified potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets regulated by hypoxia that could be incorporated into strategies aimed at preventing and treating metastatic disease. PMID:27124451

  8. From top to bottom: the two faces of HIPK2 for regulation of the hypoxic response.

    PubMed

    Calzado, Marco A; De La Vega, Laureano; Munoz, Eduardo; Schmitz, M Lienhard

    2009-06-01

    Oxygen deprivation (hypoxia) triggers a complex network of signaling pathways that result in changed gene expression patterns in order to cope with this challenge. Recent work has identified the serine/threonine kinase HIPK2 as a novel regulatory protein participating in hypoxic gene regulation. HIPK2 can affect apical as well as downstream events during the hypoxic response. Under normoxic conditions, HIPK2-mediated phosphorylation of the ubiquitin E3 ligase Siah2 weakens mutual binding and destabilizes the phosphorylated E3 ligase. Low oxygen levels result in strongly increased HIPK2/Siah2 interactions that lead to efficient polyubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation of the kinase. At the apical level, the Siah2 inhibiting phosphorylations are lost, thus allowing Siah2-dependent proteolysis of dioxygenases which in turn allows for activation of transcription factor HIF. Downstream events of the hypoxic response are affected by the proteasomal elimination of HIPK2 from gene repressing complexes, an event that allows for full induction of gene expression. Thus HIPK2 can regulate a subset of HIF-dependent and -independent genes during the hypoxic response. PMID:19448429

  9. Oxytocin Regulates Stress-Induced Crf Gene Transcription through CREB-Regulated Transcription Coactivator 3

    PubMed Central

    Jurek, Benjamin; Slattery, David A.; Hiraoka, Yuichi; Liu, Ying; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Aguilera, Greti; van den Burg, Erwin H.

    2015-01-01

    The major regulator of the neuroendocrine stress response in the brain is corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), whose transcription is controlled by CREB and its cofactors CRTC2/3 (TORC2/3). Phosphorylated CRTCs are sequestered in the cytoplasm, but rapidly dephosphorylated and translocated into the nucleus following a stressful stimulus. As the stress response is attenuated by oxytocin (OT), we tested whether OT interferes with CRTC translocation and, thereby, Crf expression. OT (1 nmol, i.c.v.) delayed the stress-induced increase of nuclear CRTC3 and Crf hnRNA levels in the paraventricular nucleus of male rats and mice, but did not affect either parameter in the absence of the stressor. The increase in Crf hnRNA levels at later time points was parallel to elevated nuclear CRTC2/3 levels. A direct effect of Thr4 Gly7-OT (TGOT) on CRTC3 translocation and Crf expression was found in rat primary hypothalamic neurons, amygdaloid (Ar-5), hypothalamic (H32), and human neuroblastoma (Be(2)M17) cell lines. CRTC3, but not CRCT2, knockdown using siRNA in Be(2)M17 cells prevented the effect of TGOT on Crf hnRNA levels. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation demonstrated that TGOT reduced CRTC3, but not CRTC2, binding to the Crf promoter after 10 min of forskolin stimulation. Together, the results indicate that OT modulates CRTC3 translocation, the binding of CRTC3 to the Crf promoter and, ultimately, transcription of the Crf gene. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The neuropeptide oxytocin has been proposed to reduce hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation during stress. The underlying mechanisms are, however, elusive. In this study we show that activation of the oxytocin receptor in the paraventricular nucleus delays transcription of the gene encoding corticotropin releasing factor (Crf), the main regulator of the stress response. It does so by sequestering the coactivator of the transcription factor CREB, CRTC3, in the cytosol, resulting in reduced binding of CRTC3 to the Crf

  10. Controlling for Gene Expression Changes in Transcription Factor Protein Networks*

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Charles A. S.; Lee, Zachary T.; Boanca, Gina; Lakshminarasimhan, Mahadevan; Groppe, Brad D.; Wen, Zhihui; Hattem, Gaye L.; Seidel, Chris W.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    The development of affinity purification technologies combined with mass spectrometric analysis of purified protein mixtures has been used both to identify new protein–protein interactions and to define the subunit composition of protein complexes. Transcription factor protein interactions, however, have not been systematically analyzed using these approaches. Here, we investigated whether ectopic expression of an affinity tagged transcription factor as bait in affinity purification mass spectrometry experiments perturbs gene expression in cells, resulting in the false positive identification of bait-associated proteins when typical experimental controls are used. Using quantitative proteomics and RNA sequencing, we determined that the increase in the abundance of a set of proteins caused by overexpression of the transcription factor RelA is not sufficient for these proteins to then co-purify non-specifically and be misidentified as bait-associated proteins. Therefore, typical controls should be sufficient, and a number of different baits can be compared with a common set of controls. This is of practical interest when identifying bait interactors from a large number of different baits. As expected, we found several known RelA interactors enriched in our RelA purifications (NFκB1, NFκB2, Rel, RelB, IκBα, IκBβ, and IκBε). We also found several proteins not previously described in association with RelA, including the small mitochondrial chaperone Tim13. Using a variety of biochemical approaches, we further investigated the nature of the association between Tim13 and NFκB family transcription factors. This work therefore provides a conceptual and experimental framework for analyzing transcription factor protein interactions. PMID:24722732

  11. Transcriptional Regulatory Network Analysis of MYB Transcription Factor Family Genes in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Smita, Shuchi; Katiyar, Amit; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Pandey, Dev M.; Bansal, Kailash C.

    2015-01-01

    MYB transcription factor (TF) is one of the largest TF families and regulates defense responses to various stresses, hormone signaling as well as many metabolic and developmental processes in plants. Understanding these regulatory hierarchies of gene expression networks in response to developmental and environmental cues is a major challenge due to the complex interactions between the genetic elements. Correlation analyses are useful to unravel co-regulated gene pairs governing biological process as well as identification of new candidate hub genes in response to these complex processes. High throughput expression profiling data are highly useful for construction of co-expression networks. In the present study, we utilized transcriptome data for comprehensive regulatory network studies of MYB TFs by “top-down” and “guide-gene” approaches. More than 50% of OsMYBs were strongly correlated under 50 experimental conditions with 51 hub genes via “top-down” approach. Further, clusters were identified using Markov Clustering (MCL). To maximize the clustering performance, parameter evaluation of the MCL inflation score (I) was performed in terms of enriched GO categories by measuring F-score. Comparison of co-expressed cluster and clads analyzed from phylogenetic analysis signifies their evolutionarily conserved co-regulatory role. We utilized compendium of known interaction and biological role with Gene Ontology enrichment analysis to hypothesize function of coexpressed OsMYBs. In the other part, the transcriptional regulatory network analysis by “guide-gene” approach revealed 40 putative targets of 26 OsMYB TF hubs with high correlation value utilizing 815 microarray data. The putative targets with MYB-binding cis-elements enrichment in their promoter region, functional co-occurrence as well as nuclear localization supports our finding. Specially, enrichment of MYB binding regions involved in drought-inducibility implying their regulatory role in drought

  12. Transcriptional analysis of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzyme S structural gene.

    PubMed Central

    Yahr, T L; Hovey, A K; Kulich, S M; Frank, D W

    1995-01-01

    The transcriptional regulation of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoS gene was investigated. Expression of exoS in P. aeruginosa PA103 was dependent upon growth in a low-cation environment and the presence of a functional exsA gene. Promoter fusion analysis indicated that a 285-bp PstI-NsiI fragment, located 5' of the exoS coding region, contained a functional promoter for exoS. Expression of the reporter gene was inducible in a low-cation growth environment and required a functional copy of exsA. Divergent promoters, coordinately regulated with exoS transcription, were identified within the PstI-NsiI fragment. A fusion derivative of ExsA, MALA3A2, was shown to bind directly to the PstI-NsiI probe. DNase I protection analysis demonstrated that MALA3A2 bound to the intergenic region between the postulated -35 boxes of each promoter region. Northern (RNA) blot analysis with probes internal to and upstream of exoS demonstrated that separate, coordinately regulated mRNAs were expressed in P. aeruginosa. These data suggested that a locus, coregulated with exoS transcription, was located upstream of exoS. DNA sequence analysis of the exoS upstream region revealed three open reading frames, ORF 1, ORF 2, and ORF 3. ORF 1 demonstrated significant homology to the SycE/YerA protein of Yersinia sp. SycE/YerA is postulated to function as a chaperone for the YopE cytotoxin. The loci encoding YopE and ExoS show similarities in genetic organization, protein composition, and regulation. PMID:7868588

  13. Estrogen Signaling Multiple Pathways to Impact Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Maria; Galluzzo, Paola; Ascenzi, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    Steroid hormones exert profound effects on cell growth, development, differentiation, and homeostasis. Their effects are mediated through specific intracellular steroid receptors that act via multiple mechanisms. Among others, the action mechanism starting upon 17β-estradiol (E2) binds to its receptors (ER) is considered a paradigmatic example of how steroid hormones function. Ligand-activated ER dimerizes and translocates in the nucleus where it recognizes specific hormone response elements located in or near promoter DNA regions of target genes. Behind the classical genomic mechanism shared with other steroid hormones, E2 also modulates gene expression by a second indirect mechanism that involves the interaction of ER with other transcription factors which, in turn, bind their cognate DNA elements. In this case, ER modulates the activities of transcription factors such as the activator protein (AP)-1, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and stimulating protein-1 (Sp-1), by stabilizing DNA-protein complexes and/or recruiting co-activators. In addition, E2 binding to ER may also exert rapid actions that start with the activation of a variety of signal transduction pathways (e.g. ERK/MAPK, p38/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC/PKC). The debate about the contribution of different ER-mediated signaling pathways to coordinate the expression of specific sets of genes is still open. This review will focus on the recent knowledge about the mechanism by which ERs regulate the expression of target genes and the emerging field of integration of membrane and nuclear receptor signaling, giving examples of the ways by which the genomic and non-genomic actions of ERs on target genes converge. PMID:18369406

  14. Harnessing hypoxic adaptation to prevent, treat, and repair stroke

    PubMed Central

    Siddiq, Ambreena; Smirnova, Natalya; Karpisheva, Ksenia; Haskew-Layton, Renee; McConoughey, Stephen; Langley, Brett; Estevez, Alvaro; Huerta, Patricio T.; Volpe, Bruce; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K.; Gazaryan, Irina; Cho, Sunghee; Fink, Matthew; LaManna, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The brain demands oxygen and glucose to fulfill its roles as the master regulator of body functions as diverse as bladder control and creative thinking. Chemical and electrical transmission in the nervous system is rapidly disrupted in stroke as a result of hypoxia and hypoglycemia. Despite being highly evolved in its architecture, the human brain appears to utilize phylogenetically conserved homeostatic strategies to combat hypoxia and ischemia. Specifically, several converging lines of inquiry have demonstrated that the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF1-1) mediates the activation of a large cassette of genes involved in adaptation to hypoxia in surviving neurons after stroke. Accordingly, pharmacological or molecular approaches that engage hypoxic adaptation at the point of one of its sensors (e.g., inhibition of HIF prolyl 4 hydroxylases) leads to profound sparing of brain tissue and enhanced recovery of function. In this review, we discuss the potential mechanisms that could subserve protective and restorative effects of augmenting hypoxic adaptation in the brain. The strategy appears to involve HIF-dependent and HIF-independent pathways and more than 70 genes and proteins activated transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally that can act at cellular, local, and system levels to compensate for oxygen insufficiency. The breadth and depth of this homeostatic program offers a hopeful alternative to the current pessimism towards stroke therapeutics. PMID:18043901

  15. Harnessing hypoxic adaptation to prevent, treat, and repair stroke.

    PubMed

    Ratan, Rajiv R; Siddiq, Ambreena; Smirnova, Natalya; Karpisheva, Ksenia; Haskew-Layton, Renee; McConoughey, Stephen; Langley, Brett; Estevez, Alvaro; Huerta, Patricio T; Volpe, Bruce; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K; Gazaryan, Irina; Cho, Sunghee; Fink, Matthew; LaManna, Joseph

    2007-12-01

    The brain demands oxygen and glucose to fulfill its roles as the master regulator of body functions as diverse as bladder control and creative thinking. Chemical and electrical transmission in the nervous system is rapidly disrupted in stroke as a result of hypoxia and hypoglycemia. Despite being highly evolved in its architecture, the human brain appears to utilize phylogenetically conserved homeostatic strategies to combat hypoxia and ischemia. Specifically, several converging lines of inquiry have demonstrated that the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF1-1) mediates the activation of a large cassette of genes involved in adaptation to hypoxia in surviving neurons after stroke. Accordingly, pharmacological or molecular approaches that engage hypoxic adaptation at the point of one of its sensors (e.g., inhibition of HIF prolyl 4 hydroxylases) leads to profound sparing of brain tissue and enhanced recovery of function. In this review, we discuss the potential mechanisms that could subserve protective and restorative effects of augmenting hypoxic adaptation in the brain. The strategy appears to involve HIF-dependent and HIF-independent pathways and more than 70 genes and proteins activated transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally that can act at cellular, local, and system levels to compensate for oxygen insufficiency. The breadth and depth of this homeostatic program offers a hopeful alternative to the current pessimism towards stroke therapeutics. PMID:18043901

  16. Identification of a novel transcript of human MD2 gene.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chen; Shen, A-Dong

    2016-09-15

    Myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD2) regulates bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) triggered anti-bacterial immune response as a broker between LPS and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). In this study, we identified a novel naturally occurring spliceosome of human MD2, termed as MD2-T3. This transcript lacked two exons of MD2 gene. By protein structure analysis and literature review, we predicted that MD2-T3 isoform might execute regulatory biological effects such as limiting LPS-triggered TLR4 signaling. PMID:27317890

  17. Epigenetic regulation of hypoxic sensing disrupts cardiorespiratory homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Nanduri, Jayasri; Makarenko, Vladislav; Reddy, Vaddi Damodara; Yuan, Guoxiang; Pawar, Anita; Wang, Ning; Khan, Shakil A.; Zhang, Xin; Kinsman, Brian; Peng, Ying-Jie; Kumar, Ganesh K.; Fox, Aaron P.; Godley, Lucy A.; Semenza, Gregg L.; Prabhakar, Nanduri R.

    2012-01-01

    Recurrent apnea with intermittent hypoxia is a major clinical problem in preterm infants. Recent studies, although limited, showed that adults who were born preterm exhibit increased incidence of sleep-disordered breathing and hypertension, suggesting that apnea of prematurity predisposes to autonomic dysfunction in adulthood. Here, we demonstrate that adult rats that were exposed to intermittent hypoxia as neonates exhibit exaggerated responses to hypoxia by the carotid body and adrenal chromaffin cells, which regulate cardio-respiratory function, resulting in irregular breathing with apneas and hypertension. The enhanced hypoxic sensitivity was associated with elevated oxidative stress, decreased expression of genes encoding antioxidant enzymes, and increased expression of pro-oxidant enzymes. Decreased expression of the Sod2 gene, which encodes the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase 2, was associated with DNA hypermethylation of a single CpG dinucleotide close to the transcription start site. Treating neonatal rats with decitabine, an inhibitor of DNA methylation, during intermittent hypoxia exposure prevented oxidative stress, enhanced hypoxic sensitivity, and autonomic dysfunction. These findings implicate a hitherto uncharacterized role for DNA methylation in mediating neonatal programming of hypoxic sensitivity and the ensuing autonomic dysfunction in adulthood. PMID:22232674

  18. Precisely modulated pathogenicity island interference with late phage gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Ram, Geeta; Chen, John; Ross, Hope F; Novick, Richard P

    2014-10-01

    Having gone to great evolutionary lengths to develop resistance to bacteriophages, bacteria have come up with resistance mechanisms directed at every aspect of the bacteriophage life cycle. Most genes involved in phage resistance are carried by plasmids and other mobile genetic elements, including bacteriophages and their relatives. A very special case of phage resistance is exhibited by the highly mobile phage satellites, staphylococcal pathogenicity islands (SaPIs), which carry and disseminate superantigen and other virulence genes. Unlike the usual phage-resistance mechanisms, the SaPI-encoded interference mechanisms are carefully crafted to ensure that a phage-infected, SaPI-containing cell will lyse, releasing the requisite crop of SaPI particles as well as a greatly diminished crop of phage particles. Previously described SaPI interference genes target phage functions that are not required for SaPI particle production and release. Here we describe a SaPI-mediated interference system that affects expression of late phage gene transcription and consequently is required for SaPI and phage. Although when cloned separately, a single SaPI gene totally blocks phage production, its activity in situ is modulated accurately by a second gene, achieving the required level of interference. The advantage for the host bacteria is that the SaPIs curb excessive phage growth while enhancing their gene transfer activity. This activity is in contrast to that of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs), which totally block phage growth at the cost of phage-mediated gene transfer. In staphylococci the SaPI strategy seems to have prevailed during evolution: The great majority of Staphylococcus aureus strains carry one or more SaPIs, whereas CRISPRs are extremely rare. PMID:25246539

  19. Structure and transcription of the actin gene of Trypanosoma brucei

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Amar, M.F.; Pays, A.; Tebabi, P.; Dero, B.; Seebeck, T.; Steinert, M.; Pays, E.

    1988-05-01

    In Trypanosoma brucei, the actin gene is present in a cluster of two, three, or four tandemly linked copies, depending on the strain. Each cluster seems to exist in two allelic versions, as suggested by the polymorphism of both gene number and restriction fragment length in the DNA from cloned trypanosomes. The amplification of the gene copy number probably occurs through unequal sister chromatic exchange. The chromosomes harboring the actin genes belong to the large size class. The coding sequence was 1,128 nucleotides long and showed 60 to 70% homology to other eucaryotic actin genes. Surprisingly, this homology seemed weaker with Trypanosoma congolense, Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma vivax, Trypanosoma mega, or Leishmania acting-specific sequences. The mRNA was around 1.6 kilobases long and was synthesized at the same level in bloodstream and procyclic forms of the parasite. Large RNA precursors, up to 7.7 kilobases, were found in a pattern identical in strains containing either two or three gene copies. Probing of the flanking regions of the gene with either steady-state or in vitro transcripts, as well as S1 nuclease protection and primer extension experiments, allowed mapping of the 3' splice site of the actin mRNA, 38 nucleotides upstream from the translation initiation codon. A variably sized poly(dT) tract was found about 30 base pairs ahead of the splice site. The largest detected actin mRNA precursor seemed to give rise to at least two additional stable mRNAs. The RNA polymerase transcribing the actin gene exhibited the same sensitivity to inhibition by ..cap alpha..-amanitin as that transcribing both the spliced leader and the bulk of polyadenylated mRNAs.

  20. The Trypanosoma brucei protein phosphatase gene: polycistronic transcription with the RNA polymerase II largest subunit gene.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, R; Cornelissen, A W

    1990-01-01

    We have previously described the trypanosomal gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) and found that two almost identical genes are encoded within the Trypanosoma brucei genome. Here we show by Southern analyses that the 5' breakpoint between both loci is located approximately 7.5 kb upstream of the RNAP II genes. Northern analyses revealed that the 5' duplicated segment contains at least four other genes, which are transcribed in both bloodstream and procyclic trypanosomes. The gene located immediately upstream of the RNAP II gene in both loci was characterized by sequence analyses. The deduced amino acid sequences show a high degree of similarity to the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase class 1 (PP1) genes. S1 mapping provided strong evidence in support of the fact that the PP1 and RNAP II genes belong to a single transcription unit. Images PMID:2169604

  1. Transcriptomic changes in human renal proximal tubular cells revealed under hypoxic conditions by RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenmin; Li, Yiping; Wang, Zhi; Liu, Lei; Liu, Jing; Ding, Fengan; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Cheng, Zhengyuan; Chen, Pingsheng; Dou, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Chronic hypoxia often occurs among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Renal proximal tubular cells may be the primary target of a hypoxic insult. However, the underlying transcriptional mechanisms remain undefined. In this study, we revealed the global changes in gene expression in HK‑2 human renal proximal tubular cells under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. We analyzed the transcriptome of HK‑2 cells exposed to hypoxia for 24 h using RNA sequencing. A total of 279 differentially expressed genes was examined, as these genes could potentially explain the differences in HK‑2 cells between hypoxic and normoxic conditions. Moreover, 17 genes were validated by qPCR, and the results were highly concordant with the RNA seqencing results. Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analyses were performed to better understand the functions of these differentially expressed genes. The upregulated genes appeared to be significantly enriched in the pathyway of extracellular matrix (ECM)-receptor interaction, and in paticular, the pathway of renal cell carcinoma was upregulated under hypoxic conditions. The downregulated genes were enriched in the signaling pathway related to antigen processing and presentation; however, the pathway of glutathione metabolism was downregulated. Our analysis revealed numerous novel transcripts and alternative splicing events. Simultaneously, we also identified a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms, which will be a rich resource for future marker development. On the whole, our data indicate that transcriptome analysis provides valuable information for a more in depth understanding of the molecular mechanisms in CKD and renal cell carcinoma. PMID:27432315

  2. Transcription factor IIIB generates extended DNA interactions in RNA polymerase III transcription complexes on tRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Kassavetis, G A; Riggs, D L; Negri, R; Nguyen, L H; Geiduschek, E P

    1989-01-01

    Transcription complexes that assemble on tRNA genes in a crude Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell extract extend over the entire transcription unit and approximately 40 base pairs of contiguous 5'-flanking DNA. We show here that the interaction with 5'-flanking DNA is due to a protein that copurifies with transcription factor TFIIIB through several steps of purification and shares characteristic properties that are normally ascribed to TFIIIB: dependence on prior binding of TFIIIC and great stability once the TFIIIC-TFIIIB-DNA complex is formed. SUP4 gene (tRNATyr) DNA that was cut within the 5'-flanking sequence (either 31 or 28 base pairs upstream of the transcriptional start site) was no longer able to stably incorporate TFIIIB into a transcription complex. The TFIIIB-dependent 5'-flanking DNA protein interaction was predominantly not sequence specific. The extension of the transcription complex into this DNA segment does suggest two possible explanations for highly diverse effects of flanking-sequence substitutions on tRNA gene transcription: either (i) proteins that are capable of binding to these upstream DNA segments are also potentially capable of stimulating or interfering with the incorporation of TFIIIB into transcription complexes or (ii) 5'-flanking sequence influences the rate of assembly of TFIIIB into stable transcription complexes. Images PMID:2668737

  3. Hypoxic stress: impact on the modulation of TLR2, TLR4, NOD1 and NOD2 receptor and their down-stream signalling genes expression in catla (Catla catla).

    PubMed

    Basu, Madhubanti; Paichha, Mahismita; Lenka, Saswati S; Chakrabarty, Rina; Samanta, Mrinal

    2016-01-01

    The damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) released from the damaged tissue/cells are recently reported as endogenous ligands to activate toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain (NOD) receptors signaling pathways. In the aquatic environment, reduction in dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration causes hypoxic stress resulting in tissue damage and patho-biological changes in fish. We envisaged the critical role of TLR and NOD receptors in recognizing DAMPs as endogenous ligands during hypoxic stress in fish. Catla (Catla catla) fingerlings (avg. wt ~56 g) was exposed to hypoxic stress (DO: 1-3 mg/L) for 1 and 24 h. After the designated time course, total RNA was extracted from gill, liver, kidney and blood, and modulation of TLRs (TLR2 and TLR4), NOD (NOD1 and NOD2) receptors, MyD88 (myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88), RICK (receptor interacting serine-threonine protein kinase-2), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and IL-10 gene expression were analyzed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR assay. Significant (p < 0.05) up-regulation of some DAMPs {high-mobility group box 1 and heat shock protein-70}, TLRs and NOD receptors genes expressions were observed in the hypoxic fish tissues as compared to the control. Further investigation revealed inductive expression of MyD88, RICK, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 genes in the TLRs and NODs activated tissues of the hypoxic fish. These data together may suggest the important role of TLRs and NOD receptors signaling pathway in sterile inflammation and pathobiology of fish in hypoxic stress, and warrant further study to investigate the role of TLR and NOD receptors in abiotic stress management in aquaculture. PMID:26590162

  4. Separation of mutational and transcriptional enhancers in immunoglobulin genes

    PubMed Central

    Kothapalli, Naga Rama; Collura, Kaitlin M.; Norton, Darrell D.; Fugmann, Sebastian D.

    2011-01-01

    Secondary immunoglobulin (Ig) gene diversification relies on activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to create U:G mismatches that are subsequently fixed by mutagenic repair pathways. AID activity is focused to Ig loci by cis-regulatory DNA sequences named targeting elements. Here we show that in contrast to prevailing thought in the field, the targeting elements in the chicken IGL locus are distinct from classical transcriptional enhancers. These mutational enhancer elements (MEEs) are required over and above transcription to recruit AID-mediated mutagenesis to Ig loci. We identified a small 222 bp fragment in the chicken IGL locus that enhances mutagenesis without boosting transcription, and this sequence represents a key component of a MEE. Lastly, MEEs are evolutionarily conserved amongst birds, both in sequence and function, and contain several highly conserved sequence modules that are likely involved in recruiting trans-acting targeting factors. We propose that MEEs represent a novel class of cis-regulatory elements whose function is to control genomic integrity. PMID:21844395

  5. Separation of mutational and transcriptional enhancers in Ig genes.

    PubMed

    Kothapalli, Naga Rama; Collura, Kaitlin M; Norton, Darrell D; Fugmann, Sebastian D

    2011-09-15

    Secondary Ig gene diversification relies on activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to create U:G mismatches that are subsequently fixed by mutagenic repair pathways. AID activity is focused to Ig loci by cis-regulatory DNA sequences named targeting elements. In this study, we show that in contrast to prevailing thought in the field, the targeting elements in the chicken IGL locus are distinct from classical transcriptional enhancers. These mutational enhancer elements (MEEs) are required over and above transcription to recruit AID-mediated mutagenesis to Ig loci. We identified a small 222-bp fragment in the chicken IGL locus that enhances mutagenesis without boosting transcription, and this sequence represents a key component of an MEE. Lastly, MEEs are evolutionarily conserved among birds, both in sequence and function, and contain several highly conserved sequence modules that are likely involved in recruiting trans-acting targeting factors. We propose that MEEs represent a novel class of cis-regulatory elements for which the function is to control genomic integrity. PMID:21844395

  6. Differential sensitivities of transcription factor target genes underlie cell type-specific gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kirby D.; Kim, Shin-Il; Bresnick, Emery H.

    2006-01-01

    Changes in transcription factor levels and activities dictate developmental fate. Such a change might affect the full ensemble of target genes for a factor or only uniquely sensitive targets. We investigated the relationship among activity of the hematopoietic transcription factor GATA-1, chromatin occupancy, and target gene sensitivity. Graded activation of GATA-1 in GATA-1-null cells revealed high-, intermediate-, and low-sensitivity targets. GATA-1 activity requirements for occupancy and transcription often correlated. A GATA-1 amino-terminal deletion mutant severely deregulated the low-sensitivity gene Tac-2. Thus, cells expressing different levels of a cell type-specific activator can have qualitatively distinct target gene expression patterns, and factor mutations preferentially deregulate low-sensitivity genes. Unlike other target genes, GATA-1-mediated Tac-2 regulation was bimodal, with activation followed by repression, and the coregulator Friend of GATA-1 (FOG-1) selectively mediated repression. A GATA-1 mutant defective in FOG-1 binding occupied a Tac-2 regulatory region at levels higher than wild-type GATA-1, whereas FOG-1 facilitated chromatin occupancy at a distinct target site. These results indicate that FOG-1 is a determinant of GATA factor target gene sensitivity by either facilitating or opposing chromatin occupancy. PMID:17043224

  7. Genomewide identification of genes under directional selection: gene transcription Q(ST) scan in diverging Atlantic salmon subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Roberge, C; Guderley, H; Bernatchez, L

    2007-10-01

    Evolutionary genomics has benefited from methods that allow identifying evolutionarily important genomic regions on a genomewide scale, including genome scans and QTL mapping. Recently, genomewide scanning by means of microarrays has permitted assessing gene transcription differences among species or populations. However, the identification of differentially transcribed genes does not in itself suffice to measure the role of selection in driving evolutionary changes in gene transcription. Here, we propose and apply a "transcriptome scan" approach to investigating the role of selection in shaping differential profiles of gene transcription among populations. We compared the genomewide transcription levels between two Atlantic salmon subpopulations that have been diverging for only six generations. Following assessment of normality and unimodality on a gene-per-gene basis, the additive genetic basis of gene transcription was estimated using the animal model. Gene transcription h(2) estimates were significant for 1044 (16%) of all detected cDNA clones. In an approach analogous to that of genome scans, we used the distribution of the Q(ST) values estimated from intra- and intersubpopulation additive genetic components of the transcription profiles to identify 16 outlier genes (average Q(ST) estimate = 0.11) whose transcription levels are likely to have evolved under the influence of directional selection within six generations only. Overall, this study contributes both empirically and methodologically to the quantitative genetic exploration of gene transcription data. PMID:17720934

  8. The transcriptional repressor DREAM is involved in thyroid gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrea, Barbara; Di Palma, Tina; Mascia, Anna; Motti, Maria Letizia; Viglietto, Giuseppe; Nitsch, Lucio; Zannini, Mariastella . E-mail: stella@szn.it

    2005-04-15

    Downstream regulatory element antagonistic modulator (DREAM) was originally identified in neuroendocrine cells as a calcium-binding protein that specifically binds to downstream regulatory elements (DRE) on DNA, and represses transcription of its target genes. To explore the possibility that DREAM may regulate the endocrine activity of the thyroid gland, we analyzed its mRNA expression in undifferentiated and differentiated thyroid cells. We demonstrated that DREAM is expressed in the normal thyroid tissue as well as in differentiated thyroid cells in culture while it is absent in FRT poorly differentiated cells. In the present work, we also show that DREAM specifically binds to DRE sites identified in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of the thyroid-specific transcription factors Pax8 and TTF-2/FoxE1 in a calcium-dependent manner. By gel retardation assays we demonstrated that thapsigargin treatment increases the binding of DREAM to the DRE sequences present in Pax8 and TTF-2/Foxe1 5' UTRs, and this correlates with a significant reduction of the expression of these genes. Interestingly, in poorly differentiated thyroid cells overexpression of exogenous DREAM strongly inhibits Pax8 expression. Moreover, we provide evidence that a mutated form of DREAM unable to bind Ca{sup 2+} interferes with thyroid cell proliferation. Therefore, we propose that in thyroid cells DREAM is a mediator of the calcium-signaling pathway and it is involved in the regulation of thyroid cell function.

  9. Alternative promoters are used for genes within maize chloroplast polycistronic transcription units.

    PubMed

    Haley, J; Bogorad, L

    1990-04-01

    Many chloroplast genes are co-transcribed in polycistronic transcription units that give rise to numerous overlapping RNAs, but the significance of this pattern of transcript accumulation is not understood. An analysis of the transcripts of the adjacent and divergent maize psbE-psbF-psbL-ORF40 and ORF31-petE-ORF42 gene clusters indicates that transcription initiation at alternative promoters contributes to the generation of overlapping RNAs for both clusters. Furthermore, developmentally varying transcript ratios for the ORF31-petE-ORF42 gene cluster are determined at least in part by selective promoter usage. During light-induced plastid maturation, increased levels of primarily monocistronic petE transcripts accumulate from a promoter upstream of the internal petE gene. Dark-predominant and non-light-responsive bi- and tricistronic transcripts result from transcription initiation upstream of ORF31, the proximal gene of the cluster. In addition to the transcriptional overlap within gene clusters, divergent transcription units for the two gene clusters overlap and reciprocal antisense RNAs accumulate. The organization of the transcription units in this region raises the possibility of promoter interdependence or other functional interaction between transcription units. PMID:2152119

  10. VITELLOGENIN GENE TRANSCRIPTION: A RELATIVE QUANTITATIVE EXPOSURE INDICATOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report the development of a quantifiable exposure indicator for measuring the presence of environmental estrogens in aquatic systems. Synthetic oligonucleotides, designed specifically for the vitellogenin gene (Vg) transcription product, were used in a Reverse Transcription Po...

  11. LEF-1 Regulates Tyrosinase Gene Transcription In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueping; Liu, Yalan; Chen, Hongsheng; Mei, Lingyun; He, Chufeng; Jiang, Lu; Niu, Zhijie; Sun, Jie; Luo, Hunjin; Li, Jiada; Feng, Yong

    2015-01-01

    TYR, DCT and MITF are three important genes involved in maintaining the mature phenotype and producing melanin; they therefore participate in neural crest cell development into melanocytes. Previous studies have revealed that the Wnt signaling factor lymphoid enhancer-binding factor (LEF-1) can enhance DCT and MITF gene expression. However, whether LEF-1 also affects TYR gene expression remains unclear. In the present study, we found that LEF-1 regulated TYR transcription in vitro. LEF-1 overexpression increased TYR gene promoter activity, whereas LEF-1 knockdown by RNA interference significantly decreased TYR expression. Moreover, the core GTTTGAT sequence (-56 to -50) within the TYR promoter is essential for the effect of LEF-1 on TYR expression, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay indicated that endogenous LEF-1 interacts with the TYR promoter. In addition, we observed a synergistic transactivation of the TYR promoter by LEF-1 and MITF. These data suggest that Wnt signaling plays an important role in regulating melanocyte development and differentiation. PMID:26580798

  12. Extreme Hypoxic Conditions Induce Selective Molecular Responses and Metabolic Reset in Detached Apple Fruit.

    PubMed

    Cukrov, Dubravka; Zermiani, Monica; Brizzolara, Stefano; Cestaro, Alessandro; Licausi, Francesco; Luchinat, Claudio; Santucci, Claudio; Tenori, Leonardo; Van Veen, Hans; Zuccolo, Andrea; Ruperti, Benedetto; Tonutti, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    The ripening physiology of detached fruit is altered by low oxygen conditions with profound effects on quality parameters. To study hypoxia-related processes and regulatory mechanisms, apple (Malus domestica, cv Granny Smith) fruit, harvested at commercial ripening, were kept at 1°C under normoxic (control) and hypoxic (0.4 and 0.8 kPa oxygen) conditions for up to 60 days. NMR analyses of cortex tissue identified eight metabolites showing significantly different accumulations between samples, with ethanol and alanine displaying the most pronounced difference between hypoxic and normoxic treatments. A rapid up-regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate-related metabolism (lactate dehydrogenase, pyruvate decarboxylase, alanine aminotransferase) gene expression was detected under both hypoxic conditions with a more pronounced effect induced by the lowest (0.4 kPa) oxygen concentration. Both hypoxic conditions negatively affected ACC synthase and ACC oxidase transcript accumulation. Analysis of RNA-seq data of samples collected after 24 days of hypoxic treatment identified more than 1000 genes differentially expressed when comparing 0.4 vs. 0.8 kPa oxygen concentration samples. Genes involved in cell-wall, minor and major CHO, amino acid and secondary metabolisms, fermentation and glycolysis as well as genes involved in transport, defense responses, and oxidation-reduction appeared to be selectively affected by treatments. The lowest oxygen concentration induced a higher expression of transcription factors belonging to AUX/IAA, WRKY, HB, Zinc-finger families, while MADS box family genes were more expressed when apples were kept under 0.8 kPa oxygen. Out of the eight group VII ERF members present in apple genome, two genes showed a rapid up-regulation under hypoxia, and western blot analysis showed that apple MdRAP2.12 proteins were differentially accumulated in normoxic and hypoxic samples, with the highest level reached under 0.4 kPa oxygen. These data suggest

  13. Extreme Hypoxic Conditions Induce Selective Molecular Responses and Metabolic Reset in Detached Apple Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Cukrov, Dubravka; Zermiani, Monica; Brizzolara, Stefano; Cestaro, Alessandro; Licausi, Francesco; Luchinat, Claudio; Santucci, Claudio; Tenori, Leonardo; Van Veen, Hans; Zuccolo, Andrea; Ruperti, Benedetto; Tonutti, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    The ripening physiology of detached fruit is altered by low oxygen conditions with profound effects on quality parameters. To study hypoxia-related processes and regulatory mechanisms, apple (Malus domestica, cv Granny Smith) fruit, harvested at commercial ripening, were kept at 1°C under normoxic (control) and hypoxic (0.4 and 0.8 kPa oxygen) conditions for up to 60 days. NMR analyses of cortex tissue identified eight metabolites showing significantly different accumulations between samples, with ethanol and alanine displaying the most pronounced difference between hypoxic and normoxic treatments. A rapid up-regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate-related metabolism (lactate dehydrogenase, pyruvate decarboxylase, alanine aminotransferase) gene expression was detected under both hypoxic conditions with a more pronounced effect induced by the lowest (0.4 kPa) oxygen concentration. Both hypoxic conditions negatively affected ACC synthase and ACC oxidase transcript accumulation. Analysis of RNA-seq data of samples collected after 24 days of hypoxic treatment identified more than 1000 genes differentially expressed when comparing 0.4 vs. 0.8 kPa oxygen concentration samples. Genes involved in cell-wall, minor and major CHO, amino acid and secondary metabolisms, fermentation and glycolysis as well as genes involved in transport, defense responses, and oxidation-reduction appeared to be selectively affected by treatments. The lowest oxygen concentration induced a higher expression of transcription factors belonging to AUX/IAA, WRKY, HB, Zinc-finger families, while MADS box family genes were more expressed when apples were kept under 0.8 kPa oxygen. Out of the eight group VII ERF members present in apple genome, two genes showed a rapid up-regulation under hypoxia, and western blot analysis showed that apple MdRAP2.12 proteins were differentially accumulated in normoxic and hypoxic samples, with the highest level reached under 0.4 kPa oxygen. These data suggest

  14. Kinetics of transcription of infectious laryngotracheitis virus genes.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudian, Alireza; Markham, Philip F; Noormohammadi, Amir H; Browning, Glenn F

    2012-03-01

    The kinetics of expression of only a few genes of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) have been determined, using northern blot analysis. We used quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR to examine the kinetics of expression of 74 ILTV genes in LMH cells. ICP4 was the only gene fully expressed in the presence of cycloheximide, and thus classified as immediate-early. The genes most highly expressed early in infection, and thus classified as early, included UL1 (gL), UL2, UL3, UL4, UL5, UL6, UL7, UL8, UL13, UL14, UL19, UL20, UL23 (TK), UL25, UL28, UL29, UL31, UL33, UL34, UL38, UL39, UL40, UL42, UL43, UL44 (gC), UL47, UL48 (α-TIF), UL49, UL54 (ICP27), US3 and US10. ORF A, ORF B, ORF C, ORF E, sORF 4/3, UL[-1], UL0, UL3.5, UL9, UL10 (gM), UL11, UL15a, UL15b, UL18, UL22 (gH), UL24, UL26, UL30, UL32, UL36, UL45, UL49.5 (gN), UL52, US2, US4 (gG), US5 (gJ) and US9 were most highly expressed late in infection and were thus considered late genes. Several genes, including ORF D, UL12, UL17, UL21, UL27 (gB), UL35, UL37, UL41, UL46, UL50, UL51, UL53 (gK), US8 (gE), US6 (gD) and US7 (gI), had features of both early and late genes and were classified as early/late. Our findings suggest transcription from most of ILTV genes is leaky or subject to more complex patterns of regulation than those classically described for herpesviruses. This is the first study examining global expression of ILTV genes and the data provide a basis for future investigations of the pathogenesis of infection with ILTV. PMID:22195977

  15. Topics in Transcriptional Control of Lipid Metabolism: from Transcription Factors to Gene-Promoter Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Bergen, Werner G.; Burnett, Derris D.

    2013-01-01

    The central dogma of biology (DNA>>RNA>>Protein) has remained as an extremely useful scaffold to guide the study of molecular regulation of cellular metabolism. Molecular regulation of cellular metabolism has been pursued from an individual enzyme to a global assessment of protein function at the genomic (DNA), transcriptomic (RNA) and translation (Protein) levels. Details of a key role by inhibitory small RNAs and post-translational processing of cellular proteins on a whole cell/global basis are now just emerging. Below we emphasize the role of transcription factors (TF) in regulation of adipogenesis and lipogenesis. Additionally we have also focused on emerging additional TF that may also have hitherto unrecognized roles in adipogenesis and lipogenesis as compared to our present understanding. It is generally recognized that SNPs in structural genes can affect the final structure/function of a given protein. The implications of SNPs located in the non-transcribed promoter region on transcription have not been examined as extensively at this time. Here we have also summarized some emerging results on promoter SNPs for lipid metabolism and related cellular processes. PMID:25031651

  16. Single chromosome transcriptional profiling reveals chromosome-level regulation of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Levesque, Marshall J.; Raj, Arjun

    2013-01-01

    Here we report iceFISH, a multiplex imaging method for measuring gene expression and chromosome structure simultaneously on single chromosomes. We demonstrate that chromosomal translocations can alter transcription chromosome-wide, finding substantial differences in transcriptional frequency between genes located on a translocated chromosome in comparison to the normal chromosome in the same cell. Examination of correlations between genes on a single chromosome revealed a cis chromosome-level transcriptional interaction spanning 14.3 megabases. PMID:23416756

  17. Transcriptional regulation of the Arabidopsis thaliana chalcone synthase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Feinbaum, R.L.; Ausubel, F.M.

    1988-05-01

    The authors cloned an Arabiodpsis thaliana chalcone synthase (CHS) gene on the basis of cross-hybridization with a Petroselinum hortense CHS cDNA clone. The protein sequence deduced from the A. thaliana CHS DNA sequence is at least 85% homologous to the CHS sequences from P. hortense, Antirrhinum majus, and Petunia hybrida. Southern blot analysis indicated that CHS is a single-copy gene in A. thaliana. High-intensity light treatment of A. thaliana plants for 24 h caused a 50-fold increase in CHS enzyme activity and an accumulation of visibly detectable levels of anthocyanin pigments in the vegetative structures of these plants. A corresponding increase in the steady-state level of CHS mRNA was detected after high-intensity light treatment for the same period of time. The accumulation of CHS mRNA in response to high-intensity light was due, at least in part, to an increased rate of transcription of the CHS gene as demonstrated by nuclear runoff experiment.

  18. Transcriptional Targeting in the Airway Using Novel Gene Regulatory Elements

    PubMed Central

    Burnight, Erin R.; Wang, Guoshun; McCray, Paul B.

    2012-01-01

    The delivery of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) to airway epithelia is a goal of many gene therapy strategies to treat cystic fibrosis. Because the native regulatory elements of the CFTR are not well characterized, the development of vectors with heterologous promoters of varying strengths and specificity would aid in our selection of optimal reagents for the appropriate expression of the vector-delivered CFTR gene. Here we contrasted the performance of several novel gene-regulatory elements. Based on airway expression analysis, we selected putative regulatory elements from BPIFA1 and WDR65 to investigate. In addition, we selected a human CFTR promoter region (∼ 2 kb upstream of the human CFTR transcription start site) to study. Using feline immunodeficiency virus vectors containing the candidate elements driving firefly luciferase, we transduced murine nasal epithelia in vivo. Luciferase expression persisted for 30 weeks, which was the duration of the experiment. Furthermore, when the nasal epithelium was ablated using the detergent polidocanol, the mice showed a transient loss of luciferase expression that returned 2 weeks after administration, suggesting that our vectors transduced a progenitor cell population. Importantly, the hWDR65 element drove sufficient CFTR expression to correct the anion transport defect in CFTR-null epithelia. These results will guide the development of optimal vectors for sufficient, sustained CFTR expression in airway epithelia. PMID:22447971

  19. Nucleosome-driven transcription factor binding and gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Ballaré, Cecilia; Castellano, Giancarlo; Gaveglia, Laura; Althammer, Sonja; González-Vallinas, Juan; Eyras, Eduardo; Le Dily, Francois; Zaurin, Roser; Soronellas, Daniel; Vicent, Guillermo P; Beato, Miguel

    2013-01-10

    Elucidating the global function of a transcription factor implies the identification of its target genes and genomic binding sites. The role of chromatin in this context is unclear, but the dominant view is that factors bind preferentially to nucleosome-depleted regions identified as DNaseI-hypersensitive sites (DHS). Here we show by ChIP, MNase, and DNaseI assays followed by deep sequencing that the progesterone receptor (PR) requires nucleosomes for optimal binding and function. In breast cancer cells treated with progestins, we identified 25,000 PR binding sites (PRbs). The majority of these sites encompassed several copies of the hexanucleotide TGTYCY, which is highly abundant in the genome. We found that functional PRbs accumulate around progesterone-induced genes, mainly in enhancers. Most of these sites overlap with DHS but exhibit high nucleosome occupancy. Progestin stimulation results in remodeling of these nucleosomes with displacement of histones H1 and H2A/H2B dimers. Our results strongly suggest that nucleosomes are crucial for PR binding and hormonal gene regulation. PMID:23177737

  20. Current insights into the molecular mechanisms of hypoxic pre- and postconditioning using hypobaric hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Rybnikova, Elena; Samoilov, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    Exposure of organisms to repetitive mild hypoxia results in development of brain hypoxic/ischemic tolerance and cross-tolerance to injurious factors of a psycho-emotional nature. Such preconditioning by mild hypobaric hypoxia functions as a “warning” signal which prepares an organism, and in particular the brain, to subsequent more harmful conditions. The endogenous defense processes which are mobilized by hypoxic preconditioning and result in development of brain tolerance are based on evolutionarily acquired gene-determined mechanisms of adaptation and neuroprotection. They involve an activation of intracellular cascades including kinases, transcription factors and changes in expression of multiple regulatory proteins in susceptible areas of the brain. On the other hand they lead to multilevel modifications of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal endocrine axis regulating various functions in the organism. All these components are engaged sequentially in the initiation, induction and expression of hypoxia-induced tolerance. A special role belongs to the epigenetic regulation of gene expression, in particular of histone acetylation leading to changes in chromatin structure which ensure access of pro-adaptive transcription factors activated by preconditioning to the promoters of target genes. Mechanisms of another, relatively novel, neuroprotective phenomenon termed hypoxic postconditioning (an application of mild hypoxic episodes after severe insults) are still largely unknown but according to recent data they involve apoptosis-related proteins, hypoxia-inducible factor and neurotrophins. The fundamental data accumulated to date and discussed in this review open new avenues for elaboration of the effective therapeutic applications of hypoxic pre- and postconditioning. PMID:26557049

  1. Pairwise comparisons of ten porcine tissues identify differential transcriptional regulation at the gene, isoform, promoter and transcription start site level

    SciTech Connect

    Farajzadeh, Leila; Hornshøj, Henrik; Momeni, Jamal; Thomsen, Bo; Larsen, Knud; Hedegaard, Jakob; Bendixen, Christian; Madsen, Lone Bruhn

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: •Transcriptome sequencing yielded 223 mill porcine RNA-seq reads, and 59,000 transcribed locations. •Establishment of unique transcription profiles for ten porcine tissues including four brain tissues. •Comparison of transcription profiles at gene, isoform, promoter and transcription start site level. •Highlights a high level of regulation of neuro-related genes at both gene, isoform, and TSS level. •Our results emphasize the pig as a valuable animal model with respect to human biological issues. -- Abstract: The transcriptome is the absolute set of transcripts in a tissue or cell at the time of sampling. In this study RNA-Seq is employed to enable the differential analysis of the transcriptome profile for ten porcine tissues in order to evaluate differences between the tissues at the gene and isoform expression level, together with an analysis of variation in transcription start sites, promoter usage, and splicing. Totally, 223 million RNA fragments were sequenced leading to the identification of 59,930 transcribed gene locations and 290,936 transcript variants using Cufflinks with similarity to approximately 13,899 annotated human genes. Pairwise analysis of tissues for differential expression at the gene level showed that the smallest differences were between tissues originating from the porcine brain. Interestingly, the relative level of differential expression at the isoform level did generally not vary between tissue contrasts. Furthermore, analysis of differential promoter usage between tissues, revealed a proportionally higher variation between cerebellum (CBE) versus frontal cortex and cerebellum versus hypothalamus (HYP) than in the remaining comparisons. In addition, the comparison of differential transcription start sites showed that the number of these sites is generally increased in comparisons including hypothalamus in contrast to other pairwise assessments. A comprehensive analysis of one of the tissue contrasts, i

  2. Transcriptional regulation of the Bacillus subtilis glucitol dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ye, R; Wong, S L

    1994-01-01

    The regulatory region of the Bacillus subtilis glucitol dehydrogenase (gutB) gene was divided into three subregions: a promoter, an upstream positive regulatory region, and a downstream negative regulatory region. Data from primer extension, deletion, and site-directed mutagenesis analyses were consistent with two possible models for the gutB promoter. It is either a sigma A-type promoter with an unusually short spacer region (15 bp) or a special sigma A promoter which requires only the hexameric -10 sequence for its function. Sequence carrying just the promoter region (from -48 to +6) failed to direct transcription in vivo. An upstream regulatory sequence was essential for glucitol induction. When this sequence was inserted in a high-copy-number plasmid, an effect characteristic of titration of a transcriptional activator was seen. Downstream from the promoter, there is an imperfect, AT-rich inverted repeat sequence. Deletion of this element did not lead to constitutive expression of gutB. However, the induced gutB expression level was enhanced three- to fourfold. Images PMID:8195086

  3. Post-transcriptional gene silencing activity of human GIGYF2.

    PubMed

    Kryszke, Marie-Hélène; Adjeriou, Badia; Liang, Feifei; Chen, Hong; Dautry, François

    2016-07-01

    In mammalian post-transcriptional gene silencing, the Argonaute protein AGO2 indirectly recruits translation inhibitors, deadenylase complexes, and decapping factors to microRNA-targeted mRNAs, thereby repressing mRNA translation and accelerating mRNA decay. However, the exact composition and assembly pathway of the microRNA-induced silencing complex are not completely elucidated. As the GYF domain of human GIGYF2 was shown to bind AGO2 in pulldown experiments, we wondered whether GIGYF2 could be a novel protein component of the microRNA-induced silencing complex. Here we show that full-length GIGYF2 coimmunoprecipitates with AGO2 in human cells, and demonstrate that, upon tethering to a reporter mRNA, GIGYF2 exhibits strong, dose-dependent silencing activity, involving both mRNA destabilization and translational repression. PMID:27157137

  4. Dynamic Encounters of Genes and Transcripts with the Nuclear Pore.

    PubMed

    Ben-Yishay, Rakefet; Ashkenazy, Asaf J; Shav-Tal, Yaron

    2016-07-01

    Transcribed mRNA molecules must reach the cytoplasm to undergo translation. Technological developments in imaging have placed mRNAs under the spotlight, allowing the quantitative study of the spatial and temporal dynamics of the nucleocytoplasmic mRNA export process. Here, we discuss studies that have used such experimental approaches to demonstrate that gene tethering at the nuclear pore complex (NPC) regulates mRNA expression, and to characterize mRNA dynamics during transport in real time. The paths taken by mRNAs as they move from their sites of transcription and travel through the nucleoplasm, in between chromatin domains, and finally through the NPC, can now be observed in detail. PMID:27185238

  5. Transcriptional regulation of human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase genes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dong Gui; Meech, Robyn; McKinnon, Ross A; Mackenzie, Peter I

    2014-11-01

    Glucuronidation is an important metabolic pathway for many small endogenous and exogenous lipophilic compounds, including bilirubin, steroid hormones, bile acids, carcinogens and therapeutic drugs. Glucuronidation is primarily catalyzed by the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A and two subfamilies, including nine functional UGT1A enzymes (1A1, 1A3-1A10) and 10 functional UGT2 enzymes (2A1, 2A2, 2A3, 2B4, 2B7, 2B10, 2B11, 2B15, 2B17 and 2B28). Most UGTs are expressed in the liver and this expression relates to the major role of hepatic glucuronidation in systemic clearance of toxic lipophilic compounds. Hepatic glucuronidation activity protects the body from chemical insults and governs the therapeutic efficacy of drugs that are inactivated by UGTs. UGT mRNAs have also been detected in over 20 extrahepatic tissues with a unique complement of UGT mRNAs seen in almost every tissue. This extrahepatic glucuronidation activity helps to maintain homeostasis and hence regulates biological activity of endogenous molecules that are primarily inactivated by UGTs. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying tissue-specific UGT expression has been the subject of a large number of studies over the last two decades. These studies have shown that the constitutive and inducible expression of UGTs is primarily regulated by tissue-specific and ligand-activated transcription factors (TFs) via their binding to cis-regulatory elements (CREs) in UGT promoters and enhancers. This review first briefly summarizes published UGT gene transcriptional studies and the experimental models and tools utilized in these studies, and then describes in detail the TFs and their respective CREs that have been identified in the promoters and/or enhancers of individual UGT genes. PMID:25336387

  6. Transcriptional and Posttranscriptional Regulations of the HLA-G Gene

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Erick C.; Veiga-Castelli, Luciana C.; Yaghi, Layale; Donadi, Eduardo A.

    2014-01-01

    HLA-G has a relevant role in immune response regulation. The overall structure of the HLA-G coding region has been maintained during the evolution process, in which most of its variable sites are synonymous mutations or coincide with introns, preserving major functional HLA-G properties. The HLA-G promoter region is different from the classical class I promoters, mainly because (i) it lacks regulatory responsive elements for IFN-γ and NF-κB, (ii) the proximal promoter region (within 200 bases from the first translated ATG) does not mediate transactivation by the principal HLA class I transactivation mechanisms, and (iii) the presence of identified alternative regulatory elements (heat shock, progesterone and hypoxia-responsive elements) and unidentified responsive elements for IL-10, glucocorticoids, and other transcription factors is evident. At least three variable sites in the 3′ untranslated region have been studied that may influence HLA-G expression by modifying mRNA stability or microRNA binding sites, including the 14-base pair insertion/deletion, +3142C/G and +3187A/G polymorphisms. Other polymorphic sites have been described, but there are no functional studies on them. The HLA-G coding region polymorphisms might influence isoform production and at least two null alleles with premature stop codons have been described. We reviewed the structure of the HLA-G promoter region and its implication in transcriptional gene control, the structure of the HLA-G 3′UTR and the major actors of the posttranscriptional gene control, and, finally, the presence of regulatory elements in the coding region. PMID:24741620

  7. Transcriptional regulation of gilthead seabream bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2 gene by bone- and cartilage-related transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Marques, Cátia L; Cancela, M Leonor; Laizé, Vincent

    2016-01-15

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2 belongs to the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) superfamily of cytokines and growth factors. While it plays important roles in embryo morphogenesis and organogenesis, BMP2 is also critical to bone and cartilage formation. Protein structure and function have been remarkably conserved throughout evolution and BMP2 transcription has been proposed to be tightly regulated, although few data is available. In this work we report the cloning and functional analysis of gilthead seabream BMP2 promoter. As in other vertebrates, seabream BMP2 gene has a 5′ non-coding exon, a feature already present in DPP gene, the fruit fly ortholog of vertebrate BMP2 gene, and maintained throughout evolution. In silico analysis of seabream BMP2 promoter revealed several binding sites for bone and cartilage related transcription factors (TFs) and their functionality was evaluated using promoter-luciferase constructions and TF-expressing vectors. Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3) was shown to negatively regulate BMP2 transcription and combination with the core binding factor β (CBFβ) further reduced transcriptional activity of the promoter. Although to a lesser extent, myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) had also a negative effect on the regulation of BMP2 gene transcription, when associated with SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 (SOX9b). Finally, v-ets avian erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 1 (ETS1) was able to slightly enhance BMP2 transcription. Data reported here provides new insights toward the better understanding of the transcriptional regulation of BMP2 gene in a bone and cartilage context. PMID:26456102

  8. Mammalian Glutaminase Gls2 Gene Encodes Two Functional Alternative Transcripts by a Surrogate Promoter Usage Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Sandoval, José A.; Manzanares, Elisa; Lobo, Carolina; Segura, J. A.; Alonso, Francisco J.; Matés, José M.; Márquez, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Background Glutaminase is expressed in most mammalian tissues and cancer cells, but the regulation of its expression is poorly understood. An essential step to accomplish this goal is the characterization of its species- and cell-specific isoenzyme pattern of expression. Our aim was to identify and characterize transcript variants of the mammalian glutaminase Gls2 gene. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate for the first time simultaneous expression of two transcript variants from the Gls2 gene in human, rat and mouse. A combination of RT-PCR, primer-extension analysis, bioinformatics, real-time PCR, in vitro transcription and translation and immunoblot analysis was applied to investigate GLS2 transcripts in mammalian tissues. Short (LGA) and long (GAB) transcript forms were isolated in brain and liver tissue of human, rat and mouse. The short LGA transcript arises by a combination of two mechanisms of transcriptional modulation: alternative transcription initiation and alternative promoter. The LGA variant contains both the transcription start site (TSS) and the alternative promoter in the first intron of the Gls2 gene. The full human LGA transcript has two in-frame ATGs in the first exon, which are missing in orthologous rat and mouse transcripts. In vitro transcription and translation of human LGA yielded two polypeptides of the predicted size, but only the canonical full-length protein displayed catalytic activity. Relative abundance of GAB and LGA transcripts showed marked variations depending on species and tissues analyzed. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report demonstrating expression of alternative transcripts of the mammalian Gls2 gene. Transcriptional mechanisms giving rise to GLS2 variants and isolation of novel GLS2 transcripts in human, rat and mouse are presented. Results were also confirmed at the protein level, where catalytic activity was demonstrated for the human LGA protein. Relative abundance of GAB and LGA transcripts was

  9. Mapping functional transcription factor networks from gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Brian C.; Maier, Ezekiel J.; Kramer, Michael H.; Wang, Patricia I.; Brown, Holly; Brent, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    A critical step in understanding how a genome functions is determining which transcription factors (TFs) regulate each gene. Accordingly, extensive effort has been devoted to mapping TF networks. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, protein–DNA interactions have been identified for most TFs by ChIP-chip, and expression profiling has been done on strains deleted for most TFs. These studies revealed that there is little overlap between the genes whose promoters are bound by a TF and those whose expression changes when the TF is deleted, leaving us without a definitive TF network for any eukaryote and without an efficient method for mapping functional TF networks. This paper describes NetProphet, a novel algorithm that improves the efficiency of network mapping from gene expression data. NetProphet exploits a fundamental observation about the nature of TF networks: The response to disrupting or overexpressing a TF is strongest on its direct targets and dissipates rapidly as it propagates through the network. Using S. cerevisiae data, we show that NetProphet can predict thousands of direct, functional regulatory interactions, using only gene expression data. The targets that NetProphet predicts for a TF are at least as likely to have sites matching the TF's binding specificity as the targets implicated by ChIP. Unlike most ChIP targets, the NetProphet targets also show evidence of functional regulation. This suggests a surprising conclusion: The best way to begin mapping direct, functional TF-promoter interactions may not be by measuring binding. We also show that NetProphet yields new insights into the functions of several yeast TFs, including a well-studied TF, Cbf1, and a completely unstudied TF, Eds1. PMID:23636944

  10. Hypoxia responsive gene expression is mediated by various subsets of transcription factors and miRNAs that are determined by the actual oxygen availability.

    PubMed

    Licausi, Francesco; Weits, Daan A; Pant, Bikram Datt; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger; Geigenberger, Peter; van Dongen, Joost T

    2011-04-01

    • Reduced oxygen availability is not only associated with flooding, but occurs also during growth and development. It is largely unknown how hypoxia is perceived and what signaling cascade is involved in activating adaptive responses. • We analysed the expression of over 1900 transcription factors (TFs) and 180 microRNA primary transcripts (pri-miRNAs) in Arabidopsis roots exposed to different hypoxic conditions by means of quantitative PCR. We also analysed the promoters of genes induced by hypoxia with respect to over-represented DNA elements that can act as potential TF binding sites and their in vivo interaction was verified. • We identified various subsets of TFs that responded differentially through time and in an oxygen concentration-dependent manner. The regulatory potential of selected TFs and their predicted DNA binding elements was validated. Although the expression of pri-miRNAs was differentially regulated under hypoxia, only one corresponding mature miRNA changed accordingly. Putative target transcripts of the miRNAs were not significantly affected. • Our results show that the regulation of hypoxia-induced genes is controlled via simultaneous interaction of various combinations of TFs. Under anoxic conditions, an additional set of TFs is induced. Regulation of gene expression via miRNAs appears to play a minor role during hypoxia. PMID:20840511

  11. Accurate Gene Expression-Based Biodosimetry Using a Minimal Set of Human Gene Transcripts

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, James D.; Joiner, Michael C.; Thomas, Robert A.; Grever, William E.; Bakhmutsky, Marina V.; Chinkhota, Chantelle N.; Smolinski, Joseph M.; Divine, George W.; Auner, Gregory W.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Rapid and reliable methods for conducting biological dosimetry are a necessity in the event of a large-scale nuclear event. Conventional biodosimetry methods lack the speed, portability, ease of use, and low cost required for triaging numerous victims. Here we address this need by showing that polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on a small number of gene transcripts can provide accurate and rapid dosimetry. The low cost and relative ease of PCR compared with existing dosimetry methods suggest that this approach may be useful in mass-casualty triage situations. Methods and Materials: Human peripheral blood from 60 adult donors was acutely exposed to cobalt-60 gamma rays at doses of 0 (control) to 10 Gy. mRNA expression levels of 121 selected genes were obtained 0.5, 1, and 2 days after exposure by reverse-transcriptase real-time PCR. Optimal dosimetry at each time point was obtained by stepwise regression of dose received against individual gene transcript expression levels. Results: Only 3 to 4 different gene transcripts, ASTN2, CDKN1A, GDF15, and ATM, are needed to explain ≥0.87 of the variance (R{sup 2}). Receiver-operator characteristics, a measure of sensitivity and specificity, of 0.98 for these statistical models were achieved at each time point. Conclusions: The actual and predicted radiation doses agree very closely up to 6 Gy. Dosimetry at 8 and 10 Gy shows some effect of saturation, thereby slightly diminishing the ability to quantify higher exposures. Analyses of these gene transcripts may be advantageous for use in a field-portable device designed to assess exposures in mass casualty situations or in clinical radiation emergencies.

  12. Reactivation of apolipoprotein II gene transcription by cycloheximide reveals two steps in the deactivation of estrogen receptor-mediated transcription.

    PubMed

    Sensel, M G; Binder, R; Lazier, C B; Williams, D L

    1994-03-01

    In this report, we describe apolipoprotein II (apoII) gene expression in cell lines derived by stable expression of the chicken estrogen receptor in LMH chicken hepatoma cells. In cell lines expressing high levels of receptor (LMH/2A), apoII gene expression is increased by estrogen 300-fold compared with levels in the receptor-deficient parent LMH line. LMH/2A cells show apoII mRNA induction and turnover kinetics similar to those in chicken liver. Inhibition of protein synthesis with cycloheximide (CHX) or puromycin following estrogen withdrawal superinduces apoII mRNA without affecting apoII mRNA stability. Superinduction is due to an estrogen-independent reactivation of apoII gene transcription. The apoII gene can be reactivated by CHX for up to 24 h following hormone withdrawal, suggesting that the gene is in a repressed yet transcriptionally competent state. These results reveal two distinct events necessary for termination of estrogen receptor-mediated transcription. The first event, removal of hormone, is sufficient to stop transcription when translation is ongoing. The second event is revealed by the CHX-induced superinduction of apoII mRNA following hormone withdrawal. This superinduction suggests that deactivation of estrogen receptor-mediated transcription requires a labile protein. Furthermore, reactivation of apoII gene expression by CHX and estrogen is additive, suggesting that estrogen is unable to overcome repression completely. Thus, a labile protein may act to repress estrogen receptor-mediated transcription of the apoII gene. PMID:8114707

  13. Understanding the Role of Housekeeping and Stress-Related Genes in Transcription-Regulatory Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Allison; Kavraki, Lydia; Balázsi, Gábor

    2008-03-01

    Despite the increasing number of completely sequenced genomes, much remains to be learned about how living cells process environmental information and respond to changes in their surroundings. Accumulating evidence indicates that eukaryotic and prokaryotic genes can be classified in two distinct categories that we will call class I and class II. Class I genes are housekeeping genes, often characterized by stable, noise resistant expression levels. In contrast, class II genes are stress-related genes and often have noisy, unstable expression levels. In this work we analyze the large scale transcription-regulatory networks (TRN) of E. coli and S. cerevisiae and preliminary data on H. sapien. We find that stable, housekeeping genes (class I) are preferentially utilized as transcriptional inputs while stress related, unstable genes (class II) are utilized as transcriptional integrators. This might be the result of convergent evolution that placed the appropriate genes in the appropriate locations within transcriptional networks according to some fundamental principles that govern cellular information processing.

  14. E proteins are required to activate germline transcription of the TCR Vbeta8.2 gene.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jingquan; Dai, Meifang; Zhuang, Yuan

    2008-10-01

    Each TCR Vbeta gene is regulated by an individual Vbeta promoter, which becomes active prior to V(D) J recombination and drives germline transcription. It has been shown that Vbeta gene locus activation and recombination are dependent on the Vbeta promoter. However, transcription factors that regulate Vbeta germline transcription remain largely undefined. A major challenge in studying Vbeta gene germline transcription is the quantitative assessment of relatively low-level transcripts in T-cell progenitors. Here we used the established Vbeta8.2(CD2) knock-in mouse model to assess functions of E-protein transcription factors in Vbeta8.2 germline transcription. We show that E proteins are required for the activation but not the maintenance of the Vbeta8.2 germline transcription during thymocyte development. The activation of Vbeta8.2 germline transcription depends more on the E proteins encoded by the E2A gene than by the HEB gene. We further show that IL-7 receptor (IL-7R)-mediated signals are essential for Vbeta8.2 germline transcription. We provide evidence that IL-7R expression is only partially controlled by E2A, suggesting a role for E2A in driving Vbeta8.2 germline transcription independent of IL-7R activation. PMID:18958875

  15. Stochastic Gene Expression in Networks of Post-transcriptional Regulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Charles; Jia, Tao; Pendar, Hodjat; Kulkarni, Rahul

    2012-02-01

    Post-transcriptional regulators, such as small RNAs and microRNAs, are critical elements of diverse cellular pathways. It has been postulated that, in several important cases, the role of these regulators is to to modulate the noise in gene expression for the regulated target. Correspondingly, general stochastic models have been developed, and results obtained, for the case in which a single sRNA regulates a single mRNA target. We generalize these results to networks containing a single mRNA regulated by multiple sRNAs and to networks containing multiple mRNAs regulated by a single sRNA. For these systems, we obtain exact expressions relating the mean levels of the sRNAs to the mean levels of the mRNAs. Additionally, we consider the convergence of the original model to an approximate model which considers sRNA concentrations to be high; for the latter model we derive an analytic form for the generating function of the protein distribution. Finally, we discuss potential experimental protocols which, in combination with the derived results, can be used to infer the underlying gene expression parameters.

  16. Identification, Phylogeny, and Transcript of Chitinase Family Genes in Sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yachun; Xu, Liping; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Zhuqing; Yang, Yuting; Chen, Yun; Que, Youxiong

    2015-01-01

    Chitinases are pathogensis-related proteins, which play an important role in plant defense mechanisms. The role of the sugarcane chitinase family genes remains unclear due to the highly heterozygous and aneuploidy chromosome genetic background of sugarcane. Ten differentially expressed chitinase genes (belonging to class I~VII) were obtained from RNA-seq analysis of both incompatible and compatible sugarcane genotypes during Sporisorium scitamineum challenge. Their structural properties and expression patterns were analyzed. Seven chitinases (ScChiI1, ScChiI2, ScChiI3, ScChiIII1, ScChiIII2, ScChiIV1 and ScChiVI1) showed more positive with early response and maintained increased transcripts in the incompatible interaction than those in the compatible one. Three (ScChiII1, ScChiV1 and ScChiVII1) seemed to have no significant difference in expression patterns between incompatible and compatible interactions. The ten chitinases were expressed differentially in response to hormone treatment as well as having distinct tissue specificity. ScChiI1, ScChiIV1 and ScChiVII1 were induced by various abiotic stresses (NaCl, CuCl2, PEG and 4 °C) and their involvement in plant immunity was demonstrated by over-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. The results suggest that sugarcane chitinase family exhibit differential responses to biotic and abiotic stress, providing new insights into their function. PMID:26035173

  17. Expression of a Mutant kcnj2 Gene Transcript in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Ivone U. S.; Skinner, Jonathan R.; Shelling, Andrew N.; Love, Donald R.

    2013-01-01

    Long QT 7 syndrome (LQT7, also known as Andersen-Tawil syndrome) is a rare autosomal-dominant disorder that causes cardiac arrhythmias, periodic paralysis, and dysmorphic features. Mutations in the human KCNJ2 gene, which encodes for the subunit of the potassium inwardly-rectifying channel (IK1), have been associated with the disorder. The majority of mutations are considered to be dominant-negative as mutant proteins interact to limit the function of wild type KCNJ2 proteins. Several LQT7 syndrome mouse models have been created that vary in the physiological similarity to the human disease. To complement the LQT7 mouse models, we investigated the usefulness of the zebrafish as an alternative model via a transient approach. Initial bioinformatic analysis identified the zebrafish orthologue of the human KCNJ2 gene, together with a spatial expression profile that was similar to that of human. The expression of a kcnj2-12 transcript carrying an in-frame deletion of critical amino acids identified in human studies resulted in embryos that exhibited defects in muscle development, thereby affecting movement, a decrease in jaw size, pupil-pupil distance, and signs of scoliosis. These defects correspond to some phenotypes expressed by human LQT7 patients.

  18. Understanding Transcription Factor Regulation by Integrating Gene Expression and DNase I Hypersensitive Sites

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guohua; Wang, Fang; Huang, Qian; Li, Yu; Liu, Yunlong; Wang, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors are proteins that bind to DNA sequences to regulate gene transcription. The transcription factor binding sites are short DNA sequences (5–20 bp long) specifically bound by one or more transcription factors. The identification of transcription factor binding sites and prediction of their function continue to be challenging problems in computational biology. In this study, by integrating the DNase I hypersensitive sites with known position weight matrices in the TRANSFAC database, the transcription factor binding sites in gene regulatory region are identified. Based on the global gene expression patterns in cervical cancer HeLaS3 cell and HelaS3-ifnα4h cell (interferon treatment on HeLaS3 cell for 4 hours), we present a model-based computational approach to predict a set of transcription factors that potentially cause such differential gene expression. Significantly, 6 out 10 predicted functional factors, including IRF, IRF-2, IRF-9, IRF-1 and IRF-3, ICSBP, belong to interferon regulatory factor family and upregulate the gene expression levels responding to the interferon treatment. Another factor, ISGF-3, is also a transcriptional activator induced by interferon alpha. Using the different transcription factor binding sites selected criteria, the prediction result of our model is consistent. Our model demonstrated the potential to computationally identify the functional transcription factors in gene regulation. PMID:26425553

  19. Post-transcriptional gene regulation in the biology and virulence of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Traven, Ana

    2016-06-01

    In the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, remodelling of gene expression drives host adaptation and virulence. Recent studies revealed that in addition to transcription, post-transcriptional mRNA control plays important roles in virulence-related pathways. Hyphal morphogenesis, biofilm formation, stress responses, antifungal drug susceptibility and virulence in animal models require post-transcriptional regulators. This includes RNA binding proteins that control mRNA localization, decay and translation, as well as the cytoplasmic mRNA decay pathway. Comprehensive understanding of how modulation of gene expression networks drives C. albicans virulence will necessitate integration of our knowledge on transcriptional and post-transcriptional mRNA control. PMID:26999710

  20. Post transcriptional regulation of chloroplast gene expression by nuclear encoded gene products

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchka, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    Many individual chloroplast genes require the products of a collection of nuclear genes for their successful expression. These nuclear gene products apparently work with great specificity, each committed to the expression of a single chloroplast gene. We have chosen as a model nuclear mutants of Chlamydomonas affected in different stages in the expression of the chloroplast encoded Photosystem II polypeptide, D2. We have made the progress in understanding how nuclear gene products affect the translation of the D2 encoding MRNA. Two nuclear genes are required for this process which have been mapped genetically. In contrast to other examples of nuclear control of translation in the chloroplast, these nuclear gene products appear to be required either for specific stages in translation elongation or for the post-translational stabilization of the nascent D2 protein. Pseudoreversion analysis has led us to a locus which may be directly involved in D2 expression. We have made considerable progress in pursuing the molecular basis of psbd MRNA stabilization. psbD 5' UTR specific transcripts have been synthesized in vitro and used in gel mobility shift assays. UV-crosslinking studies are underway to identify the transacting factors which bind to these sequences. The continued examination of these mutants will help us to understand how nuclear gene products work in this specific case of chloroplast gene expression, and will elucidate how two distinct genomes can interact generally.

  1. Regulatory network of microRNAs, target genes, transcription factors and host genes in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Xue, Lu-Chen; Xu, Zhi-Wen; Wang, Kun-Hao; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Xiao-Xu; Wang, Shang

    2015-01-01

    Genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) have important roles in human oncology. However, most of the biological factors are reported in disperse form which makes it hard to discover the pathology. In this study, genes and miRNAs involved in human endometrial cancer(EC) were collected and formed into regulatory networks following their interactive relations, including miRNAs targeting genes, transcription factors (TFs) regulating miRNAs and miRNAs included in their host genes. Networks are constructed hierarchically at three levels: differentially expressed, related and global. Among the three, the differentially expressed network is the most important and fundamental network that contains the key genes and miRNAs in EC. The target genes, TFs and miRNAs are differentially expressed in EC so that any mutation in them may impact on EC development. Some key pathways in networks were highlighted to analyze how they interactively influence other factors and carcinogenesis. Upstream and downstream pathways of the differentially expressed genes and miRNAs were compared and analyzed. The purpose of this study was to partially reveal the deep regulatory mechanisms in EC using a new method that combines comprehensive genes and miRNAs together with their relationships. It may contribute to cancer prevention and gene therapy of EC. PMID:25684474

  2. The transcription factor c-Myc enhances KIR gene transcription through direct binding to an upstream distal promoter element

    PubMed Central

    Cichocki, Frank; Hanson, Rebecca J.; Lenvik, Todd; Pitt, Michelle; McCullar, Valarie; Li, Hongchuan; Anderson, Stephen K.

    2009-01-01

    The killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) repertoire of natural killer (NK) cells determines their ability to detect infected or transformed target cells. Although epigenetic mechanisms play a role in KIR gene expression, work in the mouse suggests that other regulatory elements may be involved at specific stages of NK-cell development. Here we report the effects of the transcription factor c-Myc on KIR expression. c-Myc directly binds to, and promotes transcription from, a distal element identified upstream of most KIR genes. Binding of endogenous c-Myc to the distal promoter element is significantly enhanced upon interleukin-15 (IL-15) stimulation in peripheral blood NK cells and correlates with an increase in KIR transcription. In addition, the overexpression of c-Myc during NK-cell development promotes transcription from the distal promoter element and contributes to the overall transcription of multiple KIR genes. Our data demonstrate the significance of the 5′ promoter element upstream of the conventional KIR promoter region and support a model whereby IL-15 stimulates c-Myc binding at the distal KIR promoter during NK-cell development to promote KIR transcription. This finding provides a direct link between NK-cell activation signals and KIR expression required for acquisition of effector function during NK-cell education. PMID:18987359

  3. Requirement of gene VII in cis for the expression of downstream genes on the major transcript of figwort mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Gowda, S; Scholthof, H B; Wu, F C; Shepherd, R J

    1991-12-01

    The six major conserved genes of figwort mosaic virus (FMV), a caulimovirus, appear in tandem array on an RNA transcript that spans the entire viral genome. Gene VI, the only cistron that appears as a separate subgenomic RNA, has been reported to transactivate the expression of downstream genes of the full-length transcript. This transcript has a long 5'-leader of about 600 nucleotides followed by a small nonconserved region (gene VII), a smaller intergenic region (57 nucleotides), and the major conserved genes in a closely spaced array. In our present experiments we have constructed expression units containing the promoter for the full-length transcript followed by the 5' leader region, gene VII, and a reporter gene. These have been tested for expression with and without gene VI as a separate plasmid by electroporation into plant protoplasts. A series of these expression units containing truncated versions of the 5' leader region placed upstream of a reporter gene (CAT) showed that gene VI transactivation occurred only when gene VII sequences were present in cis between the leader region and the reporter gene. In addition, a more complete version of the FMV genome containing the reporter gene further downstream (in viral gene IV) showed CAT expression only when gene VII sequences were present in an upstream position. A similar construct failed to express CAT activity when gene VII was absent. PMID:1962457

  4. Induction of AhR-Mediated Gene Transcription by Coffee

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Toshio; Takahashi, Satoshi; Morita, Koji; Okinaga, Hiroko; Teramoto, Tamio

    2014-01-01

    Background Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is classically known to be activated by xenobiotics such as dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Although it has been reported that PAHs are contained in roasted coffee beans, in general coffee beverages are not considered to be AhR activators. We tested whether exposure to coffee would activate AhR in cultured cells. Methods HepG2 cells stably expressing an AhR-responsive reporter gene were treated with coffee samples. Also, expression of CYP1A1, an endogenous AhR-responsive gene, was quantitated by RT-PCR and Western blotting in HepG2, Caco-2, and MCF-7 cells, after treatment with coffee. In order to obtain sensitive and reproducible results, all the experiments were performed with the cells placed in either phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or pure serum, instead of routinely-used culture medium, whose intrinsic AhR-stimulating activity turned out to be so strong as to interfere with the analyses. Results All the coffee samples tested robustly stimulated AhR-mediated transcription in the reporter gene assays. Of note, to what extent coffee and other AhR agonists activated AhR was different, depending on whether the experiments were done in PBS or serum. CYP1A1 mRNA was induced by coffee, in HepG2, Caco-2, and MCF-7 cells placed in either PBS or serum. CYP1A1 protein expression, which was not detected in these cells incubated in PBS, was also increased by coffee in cells placed in serum. Conclusions By using culture medium-free experimental settings, we have shown that coffee is a strong AhR activator. Our observation may help elucidate as-yet-unrecognized effects of coffee on human health. PMID:25007155

  5. A Photo-Degradable Gene Delivery System for Enhanced Nuclear Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hoyoung, Lee; Yeji, Kim; Patrick G., Schweickert; Stephen F., Konieczny; You-Yeon, Won

    2013-01-01

    There currently exists a significant gap in our understanding of how the detailed chemical characteristics of polycation gene carriers influence their delivery performances in overcoming an important cellular-level transport barrier, i.e., intranuclear gene transcription. In this study, a UV-degradable gene carrier material (ENE4-1) was synthesized by crosslinking low molecular weight branched polyethylenimine (bPEI-2k) molecules using UV-cleavable o-nitrobenzyl urethane (NBU) as the linker molecule. NBU degrades upon exposure to mild UV irradiation. Therefore, this UV-degradable carrier allows us to control the chemical characteristics of the polymer/DNA complex (polyplex) particles at desired locations within the intracellular environment. By using this photolytic DNA carrier, we found that the exact timing of the UV degradation significantly influences the gene transfection efficiencies of ENE4-1/DNA(pGL2) polyplexes in HeLa cells. Interestingly, even if the polyplexes were UV-degraded at different intracellular locations/times, their nuclear entry efficiency was not influenced by the location/timing of UV degradation. The UV treatment did not influence the size or binding strength of the polyplexes. However, we confirmed that the degradation of the carrier molecules impacts the chemical characteristics of the polyplexes (it produces carbamic acid and nitrosobenzyl aldehyde groups on ENE4-1). We believe that these anionic acid groups enhance the interaction of the polyplexes with nuclear transcription proteins and thus the final gene expression levels; this effect was found to occur, even though UV irradiation itself has a general effect of reducing transfection efficiencies. Excess (uncomplexed) ENE4-1 polymers appear to not play any role in the UV-enhanced gene transcription phenomenon. PMID:24172855

  6. Association of a transcription factor 21 gene polymorphism with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fujimaki, Tetsuo; Oguri, Mitsutoshi; Horibe, Hideki; Kato, Kimihiko; Matsuoka, Reiko; Abe, Shintaro; Tokoro, Fumitaka; Arai, Masazumi; Noda, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Sachiro; Yamada, Yoshiji

    2015-01-01

    Various loci and genes that confer susceptibility to coronary artery disease (CAD) have been identified mainly in Caucasian populations by genome-wide association studies (GWASs). As hypertension is a major risk factor for CAD, certain polymorphisms may contribute to the genetic susceptibility to CAD through affecting the predisposition to hypertension. The aim of the present study was to examine a possible association of hypertension with 29 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously identified by meta-analyses of GWASs as susceptibility loci for CAD. Study subjects comprised of 5,460 individuals (3,348 subjects with hypertension and 2,112 controls). The genotypes of SNPs were determined by the multiplex bead-based Luminex assay. The χ(2) test revealed that genotype distributions and allele frequencies for rs12190287 of the transcription factor 21 gene (TCF21) and rs1122608 of the SWI/SNF-related, matrix-associated, actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a, member 4 gene (SMARCA4) were significantly (P<0.05) associated with hypertension. Allele frequencies for rs9369640 of the phosphatase and actin regulator 1 gene (PHACTR1) and genotype distributions for rs599839 of the proline/serine-rich coiled-coil 1 gene (PSRC1) were also significantly associated with hypertension. Multivariable logistic regression analysis with adjustment for age, gender, body mass index and smoking status revealed that rs12190287 of TCF21 (P=0.0014; recessive model; odds ratio, 1.21) was significantly associated with hypertension, and the C allele represented a risk factor for this condition. Similar analyses revealed that rs1122608 of SMARCA4 (P=0.0305; dominant model; odds ratio, 0.86), rs9369640 of PHACTR1 (P=0.0119; dominant model; odds ratio, 0.82) and rs599839 of PSRC1 (P=0.0248; dominant model; odds ratio, 0.84) were also related to hypertension, with the minor T, C and G alleles, respectively, being protective against this condition. Thus, the present results

  7. Association of a transcription factor 21 gene polymorphism with hypertension

    PubMed Central

    FUJIMAKI, TETSUO; OGURI, MITSUTOSHI; HORIBE, HIDEKI; KATO, KIMIHIKO; MATSUOKA, REIKO; ABE, SHINTARO; TOKORO, FUMITAKA; ARAI, MASAZUMI; NODA, TOSHIYUKI; WATANABE, SACHIRO; YAMADA, YOSHIJI

    2015-01-01

    Various loci and genes that confer susceptibility to coronary artery disease (CAD) have been identified mainly in Caucasian populations by genome-wide association studies (GWASs). As hypertension is a major risk factor for CAD, certain polymorphisms may contribute to the genetic susceptibility to CAD through affecting the predisposition to hypertension. The aim of the present study was to examine a possible association of hypertension with 29 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously identified by meta-analyses of GWASs as susceptibility loci for CAD. Study subjects comprised of 5,460 individuals (3,348 subjects with hypertension and 2,112 controls). The genotypes of SNPs were determined by the multiplex bead-based Luminex assay. The χ2 test revealed that genotype distributions and allele frequencies for rs12190287 of the transcription factor 21 gene (TCF21) and rs1122608 of the SWI/SNF-related, matrix-associated, actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a, member 4 gene (SMARCA4) were significantly (P<0.05) associated with hypertension. Allele frequencies for rs9369640 of the phosphatase and actin regulator 1 gene (PHACTR1) and genotype distributions for rs599839 of the proline/serine-rich coiled-coil 1 gene (PSRC1) were also significantly associated with hypertension. Multivariable logistic regression analysis with adjustment for age, gender, body mass index and smoking status revealed that rs12190287 of TCF21 (P=0.0014; recessive model; odds ratio, 1.21) was significantly associated with hypertension, and the C allele represented a risk factor for this condition. Similar analyses revealed that rs1122608 of SMARCA4 (P=0.0305; dominant model; odds ratio, 0.86), rs9369640 of PHACTR1 (P=0.0119; dominant model; odds ratio, 0.82) and rs599839 of PSRC1 (P=0.0248; dominant model; odds ratio, 0.84) were also related to hypertension, with the minor T, C and G alleles, respectively, being protective against this condition. Thus, the present results

  8. Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor-Mediated Gene Transcription and Implications for Synaptic Plasticity and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hansen; Zhuo, Min

    2012-01-01

    Stimulation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) initiates a wide variety of signaling pathways. Group I mGluR activation can regulate gene expression at both translational and transcriptional levels, and induces translation or transcription-dependent synaptic plastic changes in neurons. The group I mGluR-mediated translation-dependent neural plasticity has been well reviewed. In this review, we will highlight group I mGluR-induced gene transcription and its role in synaptic plasticity. The signaling pathways (PKA, CaMKs, and MAPKs) which have been shown to link group I mGluRs to gene transcription, the relevant transcription factors (CREB and NF-κB), and target proteins (FMRP and ARC) will be documented. The significance and future direction for characterizing group I mGluR-mediated gene transcription in fragile X syndrome, schizophrenia, drug addiction, and other neurological disorders will also be discussed. PMID:23125836

  9. Trans-Reactivation: A New Epigenetic Phenomenon Underlying Transcriptional Reactivation of Silenced Genes.

    PubMed

    Onorati, Maria Cristina; Arancio, Walter; Cavalieri, Vincenzo; Ingrassia, Antonia M R; Pavesi, Giulio; Corona, Davide F V

    2015-08-01

    In order to study the role played by cellular RNA pools produced by homologous genomic loci in defining the transcriptional state of a silenced gene, we tested the effect of non-functional alleles of the white gene in the presence of a functional copy of white, silenced by heterochromatin. We found that non-functional alleles of white, unable to produce a coding transcript, could reactivate in trans the expression of a wild type copy of the same gene silenced by heterochromatin. This new epigenetic phenomenon of transcriptional trans-reactivation is heritable, relies on the presence of homologous RNA's and is affected by mutations in genes involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing. Our data suggest a general new unexpected level of gene expression control mediated by homologous RNA molecules in the context of heterochromatic genes. PMID:26292210

  10. Trans-Reactivation: A New Epigenetic Phenomenon Underlying Transcriptional Reactivation of Silenced Genes

    PubMed Central

    Cavalieri, Vincenzo; Ingrassia, Antonia M. R.; Pavesi, Giulio; Corona, Davide F. V.

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the role played by cellular RNA pools produced by homologous genomic loci in defining the transcriptional state of a silenced gene, we tested the effect of non-functional alleles of the white gene in the presence of a functional copy of white, silenced by heterochromatin. We found that non-functional alleles of white, unable to produce a coding transcript, could reactivate in trans the expression of a wild type copy of the same gene silenced by heterochromatin. This new epigenetic phenomenon of transcriptional trans-reactivation is heritable, relies on the presence of homologous RNA’s and is affected by mutations in genes involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing. Our data suggest a general new unexpected level of gene expression control mediated by homologous RNA molecules in the context of heterochromatic genes. PMID:26292210

  11. The novel hypoxic cytotoxin, TX-2098 has antitumor effect in pancreatic cancer; possible mechanism through inhibiting VEGF and hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} targeted gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, Kotaro; Nishioka, Masanori; Imura, Satoru; Batmunkh, Erdenebulgan; Uto, Yoshihiro; Nagasawa, Hideko; Hori, Hitoshi; Shimada, Mitsuo

    2012-08-01

    Tumor hypoxia has been considered to be a potential therapeutic target, because hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors and is associated with their malignant phenotype. In the present study, we investigated the antitumor effect of a novel hypoxic cytotoxin, 3-[2-hydroxyethyl(methyl)amino]-2-quinoxalinecarbonitrile 1,4-dioxide (TX-2098) in inhibiting the expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}), and consequently vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) expression in pancreatic cancer. The antitumor effects of TX-2098 under hypoxia were tested against various human pancreatic cancer cell lines using WST-8 assay. VEGF protein induced pancreatic cancer was determined on cell-free supernatant by ELISA. Moreover, nude mice bearing subcutaneously (s.c.) or orthotopically implanted human SUIT-2 were treated with TX-2098. Tumor volume, survival and expression of HIF-1 and associated molecules were evaluated in treatment versus control groups. In vitro, TX-2098 inhibited the proliferation of various pancreatic cancer cell lines. In s.c model, tumors from nude mice injected with pancreatic cancer cells and treated with TX-2098 showed significant reductions in volume (P < 0.01 versus control). Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that TX-2098 significantly inhibited mRNA expression of the HIF-1 associated molecules, VEGF, glucose transporter 1 and Aldolase A (P < 0.01 versus control). These treatments also prolong the survival in orthotopic models. These results suggest that the effect of TX-2098 in pancreatic cancer might be correlated with the expression of VEGF and HIF-1 targeted molecules. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We designed and synthesized novel hypoxic cytoxin, TX-2098. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098 inhibited the proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cells than TPZ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098 reduced VEGF protein level than TPZ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098

  12. Transcriptional Activation of Inflammatory Genes: Mechanistic Insight into Selectivity and Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Afsar U.; Williams, Bryan R. G.; Hannigan, Gregory E.

    2015-01-01

    Acute inflammation, an integral part of host defence and immunity, is a highly conserved cellular response to pathogens and other harmful stimuli. An inflammatory stimulation triggers transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes that carry out specific functions such as anti-microbial activity or tissue healing. Based on the nature of inflammatory stimuli, an extensive exploitation of selective transcriptional activations of pro-inflammatory genes is performed by the host to ensure a defined inflammatory response. Inflammatory signal transductions are initiated by the recognition of inflammatory stimuli by transmembrane receptors, followed by the transmission of the signals to the nucleus for differential gene activations. The differential transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory genes is precisely controlled by the selective binding of transcription factors to the promoters of these genes. Among a number of transcription factors identified to date, NF-κB still remains the most prominent and studied factor for its diverse range of selective transcriptional activities. Differential transcriptional activities of NF-κB are dictated by post-translational modifications, specificities in dimer formation, and variability in activation kinetics. Apart from the differential functions of transcription factors, the transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes is also governed by chromatin structures, epigenetic markers, and other regulators as the field is continuously expanding. PMID:26569329

  13. Transcriptional Activation of Inflammatory Genes: Mechanistic Insight into Selectivity and Diversity.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Afsar U; Williams, Bryan R G; Hannigan, Gregory E

    2015-01-01

    Acute inflammation, an integral part of host defence and immunity, is a highly conserved cellular response to pathogens and other harmful stimuli. An inflammatory stimulation triggers transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes that carry out specific functions such as anti-microbial activity or tissue healing. Based on the nature of inflammatory stimuli, an extensive exploitation of selective transcriptional activations of pro-inflammatory genes is performed by the host to ensure a defined inflammatory response. Inflammatory signal transductions are initiated by the recognition of inflammatory stimuli by transmembrane receptors, followed by the transmission of the signals to the nucleus for differential gene activations. The differential transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory genes is precisely controlled by the selective binding of transcription factors to the promoters of these genes. Among a number of transcription factors identified to date, NF-κB still remains the most prominent and studied factor for its diverse range of selective transcriptional activities. Differential transcriptional activities of NF-κB are dictated by post-translational modifications, specificities in dimer formation, and variability in activation kinetics. Apart from the differential functions of transcription factors, the transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes is also governed by chromatin structures, epigenetic markers, and other regulators as the field is continuously expanding. PMID:26569329

  14. Loss of CSL Unlocks a Hypoxic Response and Enhanced Tumor Growth Potential in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Braune, Eike-Benjamin; Tsoi, Yat Long; Phoon, Yee Peng; Landor, Sebastian; Silva Cascales, Helena; Ramsköld, Daniel; Deng, Qiaolin; Lindqvist, Arne; Lian, Xiaojun; Sahlgren, Cecilia; Jin, Shao-Bo; Lendahl, Urban

    2016-05-10

    Notch signaling is an important regulator of stem cell differentiation. All canonical Notch signaling is transmitted through the DNA-binding protein CSL, and hyperactivated Notch signaling is associated with tumor development; thus it may be anticipated that CSL deficiency should reduce tumor growth. In contrast, we report that genetic removal of CSL in breast tumor cells caused accelerated growth of xenografted tumors. Loss of CSL unleashed a hypoxic response during normoxic conditions, manifested by stabilization of the HIF1α protein and acquisition of a polyploid giant-cell, cancer stem cell-like, phenotype. At the transcriptome level, loss of CSL upregulated more than 1,750 genes and less than 3% of those genes were part of the Notch transcriptional signature. Collectively, this suggests that CSL exerts functions beyond serving as the central node in the Notch signaling cascade and reveals a role for CSL in tumorigenesis and regulation of the cellular hypoxic response. PMID:27066863

  15. The yeast Hot1 transcription factor is critical for activating a single target gene, STL1

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Chen; Tesker, Masha; Engelberg, David

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors are commonly activated by signal transduction cascades and induce expression of many genes. They therefore play critical roles in determining the cell's fate. The yeast Hog1 MAP kinase pathway is believed to control the transcription of hundreds of genes via several transcription factors. To identify the bona fide target genes of Hog1, we inducibly expressed the spontaneously active variant Hog1D170A+F318L in cells lacking the Hog1 activator Pbs2. This system allowed monitoring the effects of Hog1 by itself. Expression of Hog1D170A+F318L in pbs2∆ cells imposed induction of just 105 and suppression of only 26 transcripts by at least twofold. We looked for the Hog1-responsive element within the promoter of the most highly induced gene, STL1 (88-fold). A novel Hog1 responsive element (HoRE) was identified and shown to be the direct target of the transcription factor Hot1. Unexpectedly, we could not find this HoRE in any other yeast promoter. In addition, the only gene whose expression was abolished in hot1∆ cells was STL1. Thus Hot1 is essential for transcription of just one gene, STL1. Hot1 may represent a class of transcription factors that are essential for transcription of a very few genes or even just one. PMID:25904326

  16. Reconstitution of Heterochromatin-Dependent Transcriptional Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Aaron; Li, Geng; Sikorski, Timothy W.; Buratowski, Stephen; Woodcock, Christopher L.; Moazed, Danesh

    2009-01-01

    Summary Heterochromatin assembly in budding yeast requires the SIR complex, which contains the NAD-dependent deacetylase Sir2 and the Sir3 and Sir4 proteins. Sir3 binds to nucleosomes containing deacetylated histone H4 lysine 16 (H4K16) and, with Sir4, promotes spreading of Sir2 and deacetylation along the chromatin fiber. Combined action of histone modifying and binding activities is a conserved hallmark of heterochromatin, but the relative contribution of each activity to silencing has remained unclear. Here we reconstitute SIR-chromatin complexes using purified components and show that the SIR complex efficiently deacetylates chromatin templates and promotes the assembly of altered structures that silence Gal4-VP16-activated transcription. Silencing requires all three Sir proteins, even with fully deacetylated chromatin, and involves the specific association of Sir3 with deacetylated H4K16. These results define a minimal set of components that mediate heterochromatic gene silencing and demonstrate distinct contributions for histone deacetylation and nucleosome binding in the silencing mechanism. PMID:19782027

  17. MEF2 transcription factors: developmental regulators and emerging cancer genes

    PubMed Central

    Pon, Julia R.; Marra, Marco A.

    2016-01-01

    The MEF2 transcription factors have roles in muscle, cardiac, skeletal, vascular, neural, blood and immune system cell development through their effects on cell differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, migration, shape and metabolism. Altered MEF2 activity plays a role in human diseases and has recently been implicated in the development of several cancer types. In particular, MEF2B, the most divergent and least studied protein of the MEF2 family, has a role unique from its paralogs in non-Hodgkin lymphomas. The use of genome-scale technologies has enabled comprehensive MEF2 target gene sets to be identified, contributing to our understanding of MEF2 proteins as nodes in complex regulatory networks. This review surveys the molecular interactions of MEF2 proteins and their effects on cellular and organismal phenotypes. We include a discussion of the emerging roles of MEF2 proteins as oncogenes and tumor suppressors of cancer. Throughout this article we highlight similarities and differences between the MEF2 family proteins, including a focus on functions of MEF2B. PMID:26506234

  18. dcp gene of Escherichia coli: cloning, sequencing, transcript mapping, and characterization of the gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, B; Becker, S; Schroeder, U; Plapp, R

    1993-01-01

    Dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase is a C-terminal exopeptidase of Escherichia coli. We have isolated the respective gene, dcp, from a low-copy-number plasmid library by its ability to complement a dcp mutation preventing the utilization of the unique substrate N-benzoyl-L-glycyl-L-histidyl-L-leucine. Sequence analysis of a 2.9-kb DNA fragment revealed an open reading frame of 2,043 nucleotides which was assigned to the dcp gene by N-terminal amino acid sequencing and electrophoretic molecular mass determination of the purified dcp product. Transcript mapping by primer extension and S1 protection experiments verified the physiological significance of potential initiation and termination signals for dcp transcription and allowed the identification of a single species of monocistronic dcp mRNA. The codon usage pattern and the effects of elevated gene copy number indicated a relatively low level of dcp expression. The predicted amino acid sequence of dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase, containing a potential zinc-binding site, is highly homologous (78.8%) to the corresponding enzyme from Salmonella typhimurium. It also displays significant homology to the products of the S. typhimurium opdA and the E. coli prlC genes and to some metalloproteases from rats and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. No potential export signals could be inferred from the amino acid sequence. Dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase was enriched 80-fold from crude extracts of E. coli and used to investigate some of its biochemical and biophysical properties. Images PMID:8226676

  19. Transcriptional Response of Selenopolypeptide Genes and Selenocysteine Biosynthesis Machinery Genes in Escherichia coli during Selenite Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Tetteh, Antonia Y.; Sun, Katherine H.; Kittur, Farooqahmed S.; Ibeanu, Gordon C.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria can reduce toxic selenite into less toxic, elemental selenium (Se0), but the mechanism on how bacterial cells reduce selenite at molecular level is still not clear. We used Escherichia coli strain K12, a common bacterial strain, as a model to study its growth response to sodium selenite (Na2SeO3) treatment and then used quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) to quantify transcript levels of three E. coli selenopolypeptide genes and a set of machinery genes for selenocysteine (SeCys) biosynthesis and incorporation into polypeptides, whose involvements in the selenite reduction are largely unknown. We determined that 5 mM Na2SeO3 treatment inhibited growth by ∼50% while 0.001 to 0.01 mM treatments stimulated cell growth by ∼30%. Under 50% inhibitory or 30% stimulatory Na2SeO3 concentration, selenopolypeptide genes (fdnG, fdoG, and fdhF) whose products require SeCys but not SeCys biosynthesis machinery genes were found to be induced ≥2-fold. In addition, one sulfur (S) metabolic gene iscS and two previously reported selenite-responsive genes sodA and gutS were also induced ≥2-fold under 50% inhibitory concentration. Our findings provide insight about the detoxification of selenite in E. coli via induction of these genes involved in the selenite reduction process. PMID:24839442

  20. Local potentiation of stress-responsive genes by upstream noncoding transcription

    PubMed Central

    Takemata, Naomichi; Oda, Arisa; Yamada, Takatomi; Galipon, Josephine; Miyoshi, Tomoichiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Hoffman, Charles S.; Hirota, Kouji; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2016-01-01

    It has been postulated that a myriad of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) contribute to gene regulation. In fission yeast, glucose starvation triggers lncRNA transcription across promoter regions of stress-responsive genes including fbp1 (fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase1). At the fbp1 promoter, this transcription promotes chromatin remodeling and fbp1 mRNA expression. Here, we demonstrate that such upstream noncoding transcription facilitates promoter association of the stress-responsive transcriptional activator Atf1 at the sites of transcription, leading to activation of the downstream stress genes. Genome-wide analyses revealed that ∼50 Atf1-binding sites show marked decrease in Atf1 occupancy when cells are treated with a transcription inhibitor. Most of these transcription-enhanced Atf1-binding sites are associated with stress-dependent induction of the adjacent mRNAs or lncRNAs, as observed in fbp1. These Atf1-binding sites exhibit low Atf1 occupancy and high histone density in glucose-rich conditions, and undergo dramatic changes in chromatin status after glucose depletion: enhanced Atf1 binding, histone eviction, and histone H3 acetylation. We also found that upstream transcripts bind to the Groucho-Tup1 type transcriptional corepressors Tup11 and Tup12, and locally antagonize their repressive functions on Atf1 binding. These results reveal a new mechanism in which upstream noncoding transcription locally magnifies the specific activation of stress-inducible genes via counteraction of corepressors. PMID:26945040

  1. Local potentiation of stress-responsive genes by upstream noncoding transcription.

    PubMed

    Takemata, Naomichi; Oda, Arisa; Yamada, Takatomi; Galipon, Josephine; Miyoshi, Tomoichiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Hoffman, Charles S; Hirota, Kouji; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2016-06-20

    It has been postulated that a myriad of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) contribute to gene regulation. In fission yeast, glucose starvation triggers lncRNA transcription across promoter regions of stress-responsive genes including fbp1 (fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase1). At the fbp1 promoter, this transcription promotes chromatin remodeling and fbp1 mRNA expression. Here, we demonstrate that such upstream noncoding transcription facilitates promoter association of the stress-responsive transcriptional activator Atf1 at the sites of transcription, leading to activation of the downstream stress genes. Genome-wide analyses revealed that ∼50 Atf1-binding sites show marked decrease in Atf1 occupancy when cells are treated with a transcription inhibitor. Most of these transcription-enhanced Atf1-binding sites are associated with stress-dependent induction of the adjacent mRNAs or lncRNAs, as observed in fbp1 These Atf1-binding sites exhibit low Atf1 occupancy and high histone density in glucose-rich conditions, and undergo dramatic changes in chromatin status after glucose depletion: enhanced Atf1 binding, histone eviction, and histone H3 acetylation. We also found that upstream transcripts bind to the Groucho-Tup1 type transcriptional corepressors Tup11 and Tup12, and locally antagonize their repressive functions on Atf1 binding. These results reveal a new mechanism in which upstream noncoding transcription locally magnifies the specific activation of stress-inducible genes via counteraction of corepressors. PMID:26945040

  2. Inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase expression: transcriptional regulation of the type I and type II genes.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, A; Gu, J J; Spychala, J; Mitchell, B S

    1996-01-01

    Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is an essential rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo guanine nucleotide synthetic pathway that catalyzes the conversion of IMP to XMP. Enzyme activity is accounted for by the expression of two distinct but closely related genes termed IMPDH I and II. Increased IMPDH activity has been linked to both cellular proliferation and neoplastic transformation and generally ascribed to an increase in the expression of the type II gene. We have characterized the type I and type II genes and identified elements important in the transcriptional regulation of both genes. The type II IMPDH gene contains a 466 bp 5' flanking region spanning the translation start site that contains several transcription factor binding sites and mediates increased transcription of a CAT reporter gene in peripheral blood T lymphocytes when these cells are induced to proliferate. The single functional IMPDH type I gene contains exon-intron boundaries and exon structures that are nearly identical to those in the type II gene. In contrast to the type II gene, however, it contains two putative promoter sites, each with the potential for transcriptional regulation. We conclude that these two genes most probably arose from an early gene duplication event and that their highly conserved structures and differential regulation at the transcriptional level argue strongly for a significant role for each gene in cellular metabolism, growth, and differentiation. PMID:8869741

  3. Hypoxia-inducible Factor-dependent Production of Profibrotic Mediators by Hypoxic Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Copple, Bryan L.; Bustamante, Juan J.; Welch, Timothy P.; Kim, Nam Deuk; Moon, Jeon-OK

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims During the development of liver fibrosis, mediators are produced that stimulate cells in the liver to differentiate into myofibroblasts and to produce collagen. Recent studies demonstrated that the transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), is critical for upregulation of profibrotic mediators, such as platelet-derived growth factor-A (PDGF-A), PDGF-B, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in the liver during the development of fibrosis. What remains unknown is the cell type-specific regulation of these genes by HIF-1α in liver cell types. Accordingly, the hypothesis was tested that HIF-1α is activated in hypoxic hepatocytes and regulates production of profibrotic mediators by these cells. Methods In this study, hepatocytes were isolated from the livers of control and HIF-1α or HIF-1β-Deficient mice and exposed to hypoxia. Results Exposure of primary mouse hepatocytes to 1% oxygen stimulated nuclear accumulation of HIF-1α and upregulated PAI-1, vascular endothelial cell growth factor, and the vasoactive peptides adrenomedullin-1 (ADM-1) and ADM-2. In contrast, levels of PDGF-A and PDGF-B mRNAs were unaffected in these cells by hypoxia. Exposure of HIF-1α-Deficient hepatocytes to 1% oxygen only partially prevented upregulation of these genes, suggesting that other hypoxia-regulated transcription factors, such as HIF-2α, may also regulate these genes. In support of this, HIF-2α was activated in hypoxic hepatocytes, and exposure of HIF-1β-Deficient hepatocytes to 1% oxygen completely prevented upregulation PAI-1, VEGF, and ADM-1, suggesting that HIF-2α may also contribute to upregulation of these genes in hypoxic hepatocytes. Conclusions Collectively, our results suggest that HIFs may be important regulators of profibrotic and vasoactive mediators by hypoxic hepatocytes. PMID:19302442

  4. Transcriptional and Posttranscriptional Regulation of Dormancy-Associated Gene Expression by Afterripening in Wild Oat.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bailin.; Foley, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    To investigate whether the afterripening-induced changes in gene expression are at the transcriptional or posttranscriptional level in wild oat (Avena fatua) seeds, we chose four dormancy-associated genes to estimate their relative transcription activities and the stability of their corresponding transcripts in afterripened and dormant embryos. The transcription activities for those genes were 1.5 to 7 times higher in dormant embryos than in afterripened embryos 24 h after incubation, as determined by nuclear run-on assays. The half-lives of the transcripts in afterripened and dormant embryos were estimated by the use of actinomycin D. The application of actinomycin D resulted in the stabilization of the transcripts. Nevertheless, the results indicated that the half-lives of the transcripts were much greater in dormant embryos than in afterripened embryos. Considering the great differences in the steady-state levels and the half-lives of the mRNAs, and the relatively small differences in transcription activities of the genes between afterripened and dormant embryos, we conclude that afterripening regulates the expression of dormancy-associated genes in excised embryos mainly at the posttranscriptional level and that transcriptional control plays a minor role. PMID:12226258

  5. Regulation of transcription of the human presenilin-1 gene by ets transcription factors and the p53 protooncogene.

    PubMed

    Pastorcic, M; Das, H K

    2000-11-10

    The expression of the human presenilin-1 cellular gene is suppressed by the p53 protooncogene. The rapid kinetic of the down-regulation has suggested that it may result from a primary mechanism. We show here that p53 also suppresses the transcription of a presenilin-1 promoter-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter synthetic gene in transient infection assays in neuroblastoma (SK-N-SH) and hepatoma (HepG2) cell lines. Only a minimum promoter including sequences from -35 to + 6 from the transcription initiation is sufficient to confer down-regulation. We have previously defined a crucial DNA element controlling 90% of the expression of the gene within the same short area, and the identification of the transcription factors involved should also provide insights into the regulation of PS1 by p53. This region contains an Ets transcription factor binding motif, and a 2-base pair alteration within the core sequence (GGAA to TTAA) of the Ets consensus also reduced transcription by more than 90%. We now show that Ets1 and Ets2 indeed transactivate a PS1 promoter-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter including the (-35 to +6) fragment. Furthermore, in vitro translated Ets2 binds specifically to the -10 Ets motif in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Therefore, Ets1/2 factors bind specifically to the -10 Ets element and activate PS1 transcription. We also show that the coactivator p300 enhances the activation by Ets1 and Ets2 as well as the repression by p53. p300 is known to interact with p53 as well as with Ets1 and Ets2. We show that p53 does not bind directly to the PS1 promoter. Hence the repression of PS1 transcription by p53 is likely to be mediated through protein-protein interactions. PMID:10942770

  6. Cohesin and Polycomb Proteins Functionally Interact to Control Transcription at Silenced and Active Genes

    PubMed Central

    Schaaf, Cheri A.; Misulovin, Ziva; Gause, Maria; Koenig, Amanda; Gohara, David W.; Watson, Audrey; Dorsett, Dale

    2013-01-01

    Cohesin is crucial for proper chromosome segregation but also regulates gene transcription and organism development by poorly understood mechanisms. Using genome-wide assays in Drosophila developing wings and cultured cells, we find that cohesin functionally interacts with Polycomb group (PcG) silencing proteins at both silenced and active genes. Cohesin unexpectedly facilitates binding of Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) to many active genes, but their binding is mutually antagonistic at silenced genes. PRC1 depletion decreases phosphorylated RNA polymerase II and mRNA at many active genes but increases them at silenced genes. Depletion of cohesin reduces long-range interactions between Polycomb Response Elements in the invected-engrailed gene complex where it represses transcription. These studies reveal a previously unrecognized role for PRC1 in facilitating productive gene transcription and provide new insights into how cohesin and PRC1 control development. PMID:23818863

  7. Regulation of Nitrogenase Gene Expression by Transcript Stability in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis

    PubMed Central

    Pratte, Brenda S.

    2014-01-01

    The nitrogenase gene cluster in cyanobacteria has been thought to comprise multiple operons; however, in Anabaena variabilis, the promoter for the first gene in the cluster, nifB1, appeared to be the primary promoter for the entire nif cluster. The structural genes nifHDK1 were the most abundant transcripts; however, their abundance was not controlled by an independent nifH1 promoter, but rather, by RNA processing, which produced a very stable nifH1 transcript and a moderately stable nifD1 transcript. There was also no separate promoter for nifEN1. In addition to the nifB1 promoter, there were weak promoters inside the nifU1 gene and inside the nifE1 gene, and both promoters were heterocyst specific. In an xisA mutant, which effectively separated promoters upstream of an 11-kb excision element in nifD1 from the downstream genes, the internal nifE1 promoter was functional. Transcription of the nif1 genes downstream of the 11-kb element, including the most distant genes, hesAB1 and fdxH1, was reduced in the xisA mutant, indicating that the nifB1 promoter contributed to their expression. However, with the exception of nifK1 and nifE1, which had no expression, the downstream genes showed low to moderate levels of transcription in the xisA mutant. The hesA1 gene also had a promoter, but the fdxH gene had a processing site just upstream of the gene. The processing of transcripts at sites upstream of nifH1 and fdxH1 correlated with increased stability of these transcripts, resulting in greater amounts than transcripts that were not close to processing sites. PMID:25092030

  8. Regulation of nitrogenase gene expression by transcript stability in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis.

    PubMed

    Pratte, Brenda S; Thiel, Teresa

    2014-10-01

    The nitrogenase gene cluster in cyanobacteria has been thought to comprise multiple operons; however, in Anabaena variabilis, the promoter for the first gene in the cluster, nifB1, appeared to be the primary promoter for the entire nif cluster. The structural genes nifHDK1 were the most abundant transcripts; however, their abundance was not controlled by an independent nifH1 promoter, but rather, by RNA processing, which produced a very stable nifH1 transcript and a moderately stable nifD1 transcript. There was also no separate promoter for nifEN1. In addition to the nifB1 promoter, there were weak promoters inside the nifU1 gene and inside the nifE1 gene, and both promoters were heterocyst specific. In an xisA mutant, which effectively separated promoters upstream of an 11-kb excision element in nifD1 from the downstream genes, the internal nifE1 promoter was functional. Transcription of the nif1 genes downstream of the 11-kb element, including the most distant genes, hesAB1 and fdxH1, was reduced in the xisA mutant, indicating that the nifB1 promoter contributed to their expression. However, with the exception of nifK1 and nifE1, which had no expression, the downstream genes showed low to moderate levels of transcription in the xisA mutant. The hesA1 gene also had a promoter, but the fdxH gene had a processing site just upstream of the gene. The processing of transcripts at sites upstream of nifH1 and fdxH1 correlated with increased stability of these transcripts, resulting in greater amounts than transcripts that were not close to processing sites. PMID:25092030

  9. Inhibition of human insulin gene transcription and MafA transcriptional activity by the dual leucine zipper kinase

    PubMed Central

    Stahnke, Marie-Jeannette; Dickel, Corinna; Schröder, Sabine; Kaiser, Diana; Blume, Roland; Stein, Roland; Pouponnot, Celio; Oetjen, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Insulin biosynthesis is an essential β-cell function and inappropriate insulin secretion and biosynthesis contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus type 2. Previous studies showed that the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) induces β-cell apoptosis. Since β-cell dysfunction precedes β-cell loss, in the present study the effect of DLK on insulin gene transcription was investigated in the HIT-T15 β-cell line. Downregulation of endogenous DLK increased whereas overexpression of DLK decreased human insulin gene transcription. 5′- and 3′-deletion human insulin promoter analyses resulted in the identification of a DLK responsive element that mapped to the DNA binding-site for the β-cell specific transcription factor MafA. Overexpression of DLK wild-type but not its kinase-dead mutant inhibited MafA transcriptional activity conferred by its transactivation domain. Furthermore, in the non-β-cell line JEG DLK inhibited MafA overexpression-induced human insulin promoter activity. Overexpression of MafA and DLK or its kinase-dead mutant into JEG cells revealed that DLK but not its mutant reduced MafA protein content. Inhibition of the down-stream DLK kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) by SP600125 attenuated DLK-induced MafA loss. Furthermore, mutation of the serine 65 to alanine, shown to confer MafA protein stability, increased MafA-dependent insulin gene transcription and prevented DLK-induced MafA loss in JEG cells. These data suggest that DLK by activating JNK triggers the phosphorylation and degradation of MafA thereby attenuating insulin gene transcription. Given the importance of MafA for β-cell function, the inhibition of DLK might preserve β-cell function and ultimately retard the development of diabetes mellitus type 2. PMID:24726898

  10. Inhibition of human insulin gene transcription and MafA transcriptional activity by the dual leucine zipper kinase.

    PubMed

    Stahnke, Marie-Jeannette; Dickel, Corinna; Schröder, Sabine; Kaiser, Diana; Blume, Roland; Stein, Roland; Pouponnot, Celio; Oetjen, Elke

    2014-09-01

    Insulin biosynthesis is an essential β-cell function and inappropriate insulin secretion and biosynthesis contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus type 2. Previous studies showed that the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) induces β-cell apoptosis. Since β-cell dysfunction precedes β-cell loss, in the present study the effect of DLK on insulin gene transcription was investigated in the HIT-T15 β-cell line. Downregulation of endogenous DLK increased whereas overexpression of DLK decreased human insulin gene transcription. 5'- and 3'-deletion human insulin promoter analyses resulted in the identification of a DLK responsive element that mapped to the DNA binding-site for the β-cell specific transcription factor MafA. Overexpression of DLK wild-type but not its kinase-dead mutant inhibited MafA transcriptional activity conferred by its transactivation domain. Furthermore, in the non-β-cell line JEG DLK inhibited MafA overexpression-induced human insulin promoter activity. Overexpression of MafA and DLK or its kinase-dead mutant into JEG cells revealed that DLK but not its mutant reduced MafA protein content. Inhibition of the down-stream DLK kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) by SP600125 attenuated DLK-induced MafA loss. Furthermore, mutation of the serine 65 to alanine, shown to confer MafA protein stability, increased MafA-dependent insulin gene transcription and prevented DLK-induced MafA loss in JEG cells. These data suggest that DLK by activating JNK triggers the phosphorylation and degradation of MafA thereby attenuating insulin gene transcription. Given the importance of MafA for β-cell function, the inhibition of DLK might preserve β-cell function and ultimately retard the development of diabetes mellitus type 2. PMID:24726898

  11. Gene activation by metazoan enhancers: Diverse mechanisms stimulate distinct steps of transcription.

    PubMed

    Beagrie, Robert A; Pombo, Ana

    2016-09-01

    Enhancers can stimulate transcription by a number of different mechanisms which control different stages of the transcription cycle of their target genes, from recruitment of the transcription machinery to elongation by RNA polymerase. These mechanisms may not be mutually exclusive, as a single enhancer may act through different pathways by binding multiple transcription factors. Multiple enhancers may also work together to regulate transcription of a shared target gene. Most of the evidence supporting different enhancer mechanisms comes from the study of single genes, but new high-throughput experimental frameworks offer the opportunity to integrate and generalize disparate mechanisms identified at single genes. This effort is especially important if we are to fully understand how sequence variation within enhancers contributes to human disease. PMID:27452946

  12. Stimulus-induced modulation of transcriptional bursting in a single mammalian gene.

    PubMed

    Molina, Nacho; Suter, David M; Cannavo, Rosamaria; Zoller, Benjamin; Gotic, Ivana; Naef, Félix

    2013-12-17

    Mammalian genes are often transcribed discontinuously as short bursts of RNA synthesis followed by longer silent periods. However, how these "on" and "off" transitions, together with the burst sizes, are modulated in single cells to increase gene expression upon stimulation is poorly characterized. By combining single-cell time-lapse luminescence imaging with stochastic modeling of the time traces, we quantified the transcriptional responses of the endogenous connective tissue growth factor gene to different physiological stimuli: serum and TGF-β1. Both stimuli caused a rapid and acute increase in burst sizes. Whereas TGF-β1 showed prolonged transcriptional activation mediated by an increase of transcription rate, serum stimulation resulted in a large and temporally tight first transcriptional burst, followed by a refractory period in the range of hours. Our study thus reveals how different physiological stimuli can trigger kinetically distinct transcriptional responses of the same gene. PMID:24297917

  13. NanoScript: A Nanoparticle-Based Artificial Transcription Factor for Effective Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) proteins are master regulators of transcriptional activity and gene expression. TF-based gene regulation is a promising approach for many biological applications; however, several limitations hinder the full potential of TFs. Herein, we developed an artificial, nanoparticle-based transcription factor, termed NanoScript, which is designed to mimic the structure and function of TFs. NanoScript was constructed by tethering functional peptides and small molecules called synthetic transcription factors, which mimic the individual TF domains, onto gold nanoparticles. We demonstrate that NanoScript localizes within the nucleus and initiates transcription of a reporter plasmid by over 15-fold. Moreover, NanoScript can effectively transcribe targeted genes on endogenous DNA in a nonviral manner. Because NanoScript is a functional replica of TF proteins and a tunable gene-regulating platform, it has great potential for various stem cell applications. PMID:25133310

  14. Fur-mediated activation of gene transcription in the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chunxiao; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2012-04-01

    It is well established that the ferric uptake regulatory protein (Fur) functions as a transcriptional repressor in diverse microorganisms. Recent studies demonstrated that Fur also functions as a transcriptional activator. In this study we defined Fur-mediated activation of gene transcription in the sexually transmitted disease pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Analysis of 37 genes which were previously determined to be iron induced and which contained putative Fur boxes revealed that only 30 of these genes exhibited reduced transcription in a gonococcal fur mutant strain. Fur-mediated activation was established by examining binding of Fur to the putative promoter regions of 16 Fur-activated genes with variable binding affinities observed. Only ∼50% of the newly identified Fur-regulated genes bound Fur in vitro, suggesting that additional regulatory circuits exist which may function through a Fur-mediated indirect mechanism. The gonococcal Fur-activated genes displayed variable transcription patterns in a fur mutant strain, which correlated with the position of the Fur box in each (promoter) region. These results suggest that Fur-mediated direct transcriptional activation is fulfilled by multiple mechanisms involving either competing with a repressor or recruiting RNA polymerase. Collectively, our studies have established that gonococcal Fur functions as an activator of gene transcription through both direct and indirect mechanisms. PMID:22287521

  15. Hypoxic regulation of the noncoding genome and NEAT1.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, Hani; Mole, David R

    2016-05-01

    Activation of hypoxia pathways is both associated with and contributes to an aggressive phenotype across multiple types of solid cancers. The regulation of gene transcription by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a key element in this response. HIF directly upregulates the expression of many hundreds of protein-coding genes, which act to both improve oxygen delivery and to reduce oxygen demand. However, it is now becoming apparent that many classes of noncoding RNAs are also regulated by hypoxia, with several (e.g. micro RNAs, long noncoding RNAs and antisense RNAs) under direct transcriptional regulation by HIF. These hypoxia-regulated, noncoding RNAs may act as effectors of the indirect response to HIF by acting on specific coding transcripts or by affecting generic RNA-processing pathways. In addition, noncoding RNAs may also act as modulators of the HIF pathway, either by integrating other physiological responses or, in the case of HIF-regulated, noncoding RNAs, by providing negative or positive feedback and feedforward loops that affect upstream or downstream components of the HIF cascade. These hypoxia-regulated, noncoding transcripts play important roles in the aggressive hypoxic phenotype observed in cancer. PMID:26590207

  16. Hypoxic regulation of the noncoding genome and NEAT1

    PubMed Central

    Choudhry, Hani

    2016-01-01

    Activation of hypoxia pathways is both associated with and contributes to an aggressive phenotype across multiple types of solid cancers. The regulation of gene transcription by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a key element in this response. HIF directly upregulates the expression of many hundreds of protein-coding genes, which act to both improve oxygen delivery and to reduce oxygen demand. However, it is now becoming apparent that many classes of noncoding RNAs are also regulated by hypoxia, with several (e.g. micro RNAs, long noncoding RNAs and antisense RNAs) under direct transcriptional regulation by HIF. These hypoxia-regulated, noncoding RNAs may act as effectors of the indirect response to HIF by acting on specific coding transcripts or by affecting generic RNA-processing pathways. In addition, noncoding RNAs may also act as modulators of the HIF pathway, either by integrating other physiological responses or, in the case of HIF-regulated, noncoding RNAs, by providing negative or positive feedback and feedforward loops that affect upstream or downstream components of the HIF cascade. These hypoxia-regulated, noncoding transcripts play important roles in the aggressive hypoxic phenotype observed in cancer. PMID:26590207

  17. Dexamethasone-mediated transcriptional regulation of rat carboxylesterase 2 gene.

    PubMed

    Hori, Takeshi; Jin, Liangjing; Fujii, Ayako; Furihata, Tomomi; Nagahara, Yuko; Chiba, Kan; Hosokawa, Masakiyo

    2012-07-01

    Rat carboxylesterase 2 (rCES2), which was previously identified as a methylprednisolone 21-hemisuccinate hydrolase, is highly inducible by dexamethasone in the liver. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which this induction occurs. Injection of dexamethasone (1 mg/kg weight) into rats resulted in increases in the expression of rCES2 mRNA in a time-dependent manner with a peak at 12 h after injection. In primary rat hepatocytes, the expression level of rCES2 mRNA was increased by treatment with 100 nM dexamethasone, and the increase was completely blocked in the presence of 10 µM mifepristone (RU-486), a potent inhibitor of glucocorticoid receptor (GR), or 10 µg/mL cycloheximide, a translation inhibitor. Luciferase assays revealed that 100 nM dexamethasone increased rCES2 promoter activities, although the effect of dexamethasone on the promoter activity was smaller than that on rCES2 mRNA expression. The increased activities were completely inhibited by treatment of the hepatocytes with 10 µM RU-486. Based on these results, it is concluded that dexamethasone enhances transcription of the rCES2 gene via GR in the rat liver and that the dexamethasone-mediated induction of rCES2 mRNA may be dependent on de novo protein synthesis. Our results provide clues to understanding what compounds induce rCES2. PMID:22235919

  18. Transcriptional regulation of bone sialoprotein gene expression by Osx.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya; Huang, Yehong; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Chi

    2016-08-01

    Osteoporosis is the most common metabolic bone disease characterized by decreased bone mass, decreased bone strength, and increased risk of fracture. It is due to unbalance between bone formation and bone resorption. Bone formation is a complex process which involves the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to osteoblasts. Osteoblasts produce a characteristic extracellular collagenous matrix that subsequently becomes mineralized. Osterix (Osx) is an osteoblast-specific transcription factor required for osteoblast differentiation. Bone sialoprotein (Bsp) is a member of the SIBLING gene family. Expression of Bsp correlates with the differentiation of osteoblasts and the onset of mineralization. Our preliminary data showed that Bsp was abolished in Osx-null mice; however, the detailed mechanism of Osx regulation on Bsp is not fully understood. In this study, regulation of Bsp expression by Osx was further characterized. It was shown that overexpression of Osx led to Bsp upregulation. Inhibition of Osx by small interfering RNA resulted in Bsp downregulation in osteoblast. Transfection assay demonstrated that Osx was able to activate Bsp promoter reporter in a dose-dependent manner. To define minimal region of Bsp promoter activated by Osx, a series of deletion mutants of Bsp promoter were generated, and the minimal region was narrowed down to the proximal 100 bp. Point-mutagenesis studies showed that one GC-rich site was required for Bsp promoter activation by Osx. ChIP assays demonstrated that endogenous Osx associated with native Bsp promoter in primary osteoblasts. Our observations provide evidence that Osx targets Bsp expression directly. PMID:27261434

  19. Different Expression of Hypoxic and Angiogenic Factors in Human Endometriotic Lesions.

    PubMed

    Filippi, Irene; Carrarelli, Patrizia; Luisi, Stefano; Batteux, Frederic; Chapron, Charles; Naldini, Antonella; Petraglia, Felice

    2016-04-01

    Endometriosis is associated with local angiogenic and hypoxic mechanisms. Indeed, peritoneal fluid of women with endometriosis generates a specific microenvironment to support the growth and development of ectopic endometrial tissues. The association between proangiogenic markers and hypoxic processes in different endometriosis phenotypes was investigated in the present study, analyzing the expression of several genes, related to hypoxic signaling pathway and involved in angiogenic processes, in nonpregnant women with different forms of endometriosis. Samples of ovarian endometrioma (OMA; n = 16) or deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE; n = 11) were collected, and in addition, control endometrium was collected from healthy women by hysteroscopy. The gene expression of the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF) 1/2α, protease-activated receptors (PARs) ¼, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) A was evaluated by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Ovarian endometrioma expresses high levels of HIF-1/2α, PAR-1/4, and VEGF-A, while DIE did not show significantly different gene expression compared to endometrium from unaffected women. A positive correlation between the expression of HIF-1/2α and VEGF-A mRNA was observed in OMA. The overall data point out that the heterogeneity of the disease reflects differences in expression levels of genes associated with hypoxia and angiogenesis, suggesting that such conditions may have an active role in the development of the disease. PMID:26408396

  20. Negative elongation factor NELF controls transcription of immediate early genes in a stimulus-specific manner

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Piuz, Isabelle; Schlegel, Werner

    2009-01-15

    The transcription rate of immediate early genes (IEGs) is controlled directly by transcription elongation factors at the transcription elongation step. Negative elongation factor (NELF) and 5,6-dichloro-1-{beta}-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) sensitivity-inducing factor (DSIF) stall RNA polymerase II (pol II) soon after transcription initiation. Upon induction of IEG transcription, DSIF is converted into an accelerator for pol II elongation. To address whether and how NELF as well as DSIF controls overall IEG transcription, its expression was reduced using stable RNA interference in GH4C1 cells. NELF knock-down reduced thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)-induced transcription of the IEGs c-fos, MKP-1, and junB. In contrast, epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced transcription of these IEGs was unaltered or even slightly increased by NELF knock-down. Thus, stable knock-down of NELF affects IEG transcription stimulation-specifically. Conversely, DSIF knock-down reduced both TRH- and EGF-induced transcription of the three IEGs. Interestingly, TRH-induced activation of the MAP kinase pathway, a pathway essential for transcription of the three IEGs, was down-regulated by NELF knock-down. Thus, stable knock-down of NELF, by modulating intracellular signaling pathways, caused stimulation-specific loss of IEG transcription. These observations indicate that NELF controls overall IEG transcription via multiple mechanisms both directly and indirectly.

  1. A yeast transcription system for the 5S rRNA gene.

    PubMed Central

    van Keulen, H; Thomas, D Y

    1982-01-01

    A cell-free extract of yeast nuclei that can specifically transcribe cloned yeast 5S rRNA genes has been developed. Optima for transcription of 5S rDNA were determined and conditions of extract preparation leading to reproducible activities and specificities established. The major in vitro product has the same size and oligonucleotide composition as in vivo 5S rRNA. The in vitro transcription extract does not transcribe yeast tRNA genes. The extract does increase the transcription of tRNA genes packaged in chromatin. Images PMID:7145700

  2. Methoprene-tolerant 1 regulates gene transcription to maintain insect larval status.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wen-Li; Liu, Chun-Yan; Liu, Wen; Wang, Di; Wang, Jin-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2014-08-01

    Insect molting and metamorphosis are regulated by two hormones: 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and juvenile hormone (JH). The hormone 20E regulates gene transcription via the nuclear receptor EcR to promote metamorphosis, whereas JH regulates gene transcription via its intracellular receptor methoprene-tolerant (Met) to prevent larval-pupal transition. However, the function and mechanism of Met in various insect developments are not well understood. We propose that Met1 plays a key role in maintaining larval status not only by promoting JH-responsive gene transcription but also by repressing 20E-responsive gene transcription in the Lepidopteran insect Helicoverpa armigera. Met1 protein is increased during feeding stage and decreased during molting and metamorphic stages. Met1 is upregulated by JH III and a low concentration of 20E independently, but is downregulated by a high concentration of 20E. Knockdown of Met1 in larvae causes precocious pupation, decrease in JH pathway gene expression, and increase in 20E pathway gene expression. Met1 interacts with heat shock protein 90 and binds to JH response element to regulate Krüppel homolog 1 transcription in JH III induction. Met1 interacts with ultraspiracle protein 1 (USP1) to repress 20E transcription complex EcRB1/USP1 formation and binding to ecdysone response element. These data indicate that JH via Met1 regulates JH pathway gene expression and represses 20E pathway gene expression to maintain the larval status. PMID:24872508

  3. RNase L Attenuates Mitogen-stimulated Gene Expression via Transcriptional and Post-transcriptional Mechanisms to Limit the Proliferative Response*

    PubMed Central

    Brennan-Laun, Sarah E.; Li, Xiao-Ling; Ezelle, Heather J.; Venkataraman, Thiagarajan; Blackshear, Perry J.; Wilson, Gerald M.; Hassel, Bret A.

    2014-01-01

    The cellular response to mitogens is tightly regulated via transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms to rapidly induce genes that promote proliferation and efficiently attenuate their expression to prevent malignant growth. RNase L is an endoribonuclease that mediates diverse antiproliferative activities, and tristetraprolin (TTP) is a mitogen-induced RNA-binding protein that directs the decay of proliferation-stimulatory mRNAs. In light of their roles as endogenous proliferative constraints, we examined the mechanisms and functional interactions of RNase L and TTP to attenuate a mitogenic response. Mitogen stimulation of RNase L-deficient cells significantly increased TTP transcription and the induction of other mitogen-induced mRNAs. This regulation corresponded with elevated expression of serum-response factor (SRF), a master regulator of mitogen-induced transcription. RNase L destabilized the SRF transcript and formed a complex with SRF mRNA in cells providing a mechanism by which RNase L down-regulates SRF-induced genes. TTP and RNase L proteins interacted in cells suggesting that RNase L is directed to cleave TTP-bound RNAs as a mechanism of substrate specificity. Consistent with their concerted function in RNA turnover, the absence of either RNase L or TTP stabilized SRF mRNA, and a subset of established TTP targets was also regulated by RNase L. RNase L deficiency enhanced mitogen-induced proliferation demonstrating its functional role in limiting the mitogenic response. Our findings support a model of feedback regulation in which RNase L and TTP target SRF mRNA and SRF-induced transcripts. Accordingly, meta-analysis revealed an enrichment of RNase L and TTP targets among SRF-regulated genes suggesting that the RNase L/TTP axis represents a viable target to inhibit SRF-driven proliferation in neoplastic diseases. PMID:25301952

  4. RNase L attenuates mitogen-stimulated gene expression via transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms to limit the proliferative response.

    PubMed

    Brennan-Laun, Sarah E; Li, Xiao-Ling; Ezelle, Heather J; Venkataraman, Thiagarajan; Blackshear, Perry J; Wilson, Gerald M; Hassel, Bret A

    2014-11-28

    The cellular response to mitogens is tightly regulated via transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms to rapidly induce genes that promote proliferation and efficiently attenuate their expression to prevent malignant growth. RNase L is an endoribonuclease that mediates diverse antiproliferative activities, and tristetraprolin (TTP) is a mitogen-induced RNA-binding protein that directs the decay of proliferation-stimulatory mRNAs. In light of their roles as endogenous proliferative constraints, we examined the mechanisms and functional interactions of RNase L and TTP to attenuate a mitogenic response. Mitogen stimulation of RNase L-deficient cells significantly increased TTP transcription and the induction of other mitogen-induced mRNAs. This regulation corresponded with elevated expression of serum-response factor (SRF), a master regulator of mitogen-induced transcription. RNase L destabilized the SRF transcript and formed a complex with SRF mRNA in cells providing a mechanism by which RNase L down-regulates SRF-induced genes. TTP and RNase L proteins interacted in cells suggesting that RNase L is directed to cleave TTP-bound RNAs as a mechanism of substrate specificity. Consistent with their concerted function in RNA turnover, the absence of either RNase L or TTP stabilized SRF mRNA, and a subset of established TTP targets was also regulated by RNase L. RNase L deficiency enhanced mitogen-induced proliferation demonstrating its functional role in limiting the mitogenic response. Our findings support a model of feedback regulation in which RNase L and TTP target SRF mRNA and SRF-induced transcripts. Accordingly, meta-analysis revealed an enrichment of RNase L and TTP targets among SRF-regulated genes suggesting that the RNase L/TTP axis represents a viable target to inhibit SRF-driven proliferation in neoplastic diseases. PMID:25301952

  5. Post transcriptional regulation of chloroplast gene expression by nuclear encoded gene products

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchka, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    The following is a review of research accomplished in the first two years of funding for the above mentioned project. The work performed is a molecular characterization of nuclear mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii which are deficient in different stages in the post-transcriptional expression of a single chloroplast encoded polypeptide, the D2 protein of Photosystem II. Our long-term goals are to understand the molecular mechanisms by which nuclear gene products affect the expression of chloroplast genes. Specifically, we which to understand how specific nuclear gene products affect the turnover rate of the D2 encoding mRNA (psbD), how other nuclear encoded factors work to promote the translation of psbD mRNA and/or stabilize the D2 protein, and what the role of the D2 protein itself is in Photosystem II assembly and in the control of expression of other chloroplast genes. This progress report will be organized into four major sections concerning (I) The characterization of nuclear mutants affected in D2 translation/turnover, (II) The study of trans-acting factors which associate with the 5{prime} end of the psbD mRNA, (III) In vitro mutagenesis of the psbD gene, and (IV) Additional studies.

  6. Global Profiling of Metabolic Adaptation to Hypoxic Stress in Human Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kucharzewska, Paulina; Christianson, Helena C.; Belting, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenetic events and unique phenomena of the tumor microenvironment together induce adaptive metabolic responses that may offer new diagnostic tools and therapeutic targets of cancer. Hypoxia, or low oxygen tension, represents a well-established and universal feature of the tumor microenvironment and has been linked to increased tumor aggressiveness as well as resistance to conventional oncological treatments. Previous studies have provided important insights into hypoxia induced changes of the transcriptome and proteome; however, how this translates into changes at the metabolite level remains to be defined. Here, we have investigated dynamic, time-dependent effects of hypoxia on the cancer cell metabolome across all families of macromolecules, i.e., carbohydrate, protein, lipid and nucleic acid, in human glioblastoma cells. Using GC/MS and LC/MS/MS, 345 and 126 metabolites were identified and quantified in cells and corresponding media, respectively, at short (6 h), intermediate (24 h), and prolonged (48 h) incubation at normoxic or hypoxic (1% O2) conditions. In conjunction, we performed gene array studies with hypoxic and normoxic cells following short and prolonged incubation. We found that levels of several key metabolites varied with the duration of hypoxic stress. In some cases, metabolic changes corresponded with hypoxic regulation of key pathways at the transcriptional level. Our results provide new insights into the metabolic response of glioblastoma cells to hypoxia, which should stimulate further work aimed at targeting cancer cell adaptive mechanisms to microenvironmental stress. PMID:25633823

  7. Metabolic and hypoxic adaptation to anti-angiogenic therapy: a target for induced essentiality

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Alan; Harris, Adrian L

    2015-01-01

    Anti-angiogenic therapy has increased the progression-free survival of many cancer patients but has had little effect on overall survival, even in colon cancer (average 6–8 weeks) due to resistance. The current licensed targeted therapies all inhibit VEGF signalling (Table1). Many mechanisms of resistance to anti-VEGF therapy have been identified that enable cancers to bypass the angiogenic blockade. In addition, over the last decade, there has been increasing evidence for the role that the hypoxic and metabolic responses play in tumour adaptation to anti-angiogenic therapy. The hypoxic tumour response, through the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), induces major gene expression, metabolic and phenotypic changes, including increased invasion and metastasis. Pre-clinical studies combining anti-angiogenics with inhibitors of tumour hypoxic and metabolic adaptation have shown great promise, and combination clinical trials have been instigated. Understanding individual patient response and the response timing, given the opposing effects of vascular normalisation versus reduced perfusion seen with anti-angiogenics, provides a further hurdle in the paradigm of personalised therapeutic intervention. Additional approaches for targeting the hypoxic tumour microenvironment are being investigated in pre-clinical and clinical studies that have potential for producing synthetic lethality in combination with anti-angiogenic therapy as a future therapeutic strategy. PMID:25700172

  8. Heterogeneity in the Polarity of Nra Regulatory Effects on Streptococcal Pilus Gene Transcription and Virulence▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Feng; Lizano, Sergio; Bessen, Debra E.

    2008-01-01

    Transcription of several key virulence factors of Streptococcus pyogenes is under the control of Mga and Nra/RofA. In an M serotype 49 (M49) strain, Nra is a negative regulator of pilus gene transcription; also, Nra represses mga expression, leading to downregulation of the M protein surface fibril and secreted cysteine protease SpeB. In this report, the role of Nra in the virulence of an M53 classical skin strain was investigated. In contrast to the case for the M49 strain, Nra functions as a positive regulator of pilus gene transcription in the M53 strain, and inactivation of nra leads to loss of virulence in a humanized mouse model of superficial skin infection. Furthermore, Nra has no measurable effect on mga transcription in the M53 strain; this finding is further supported by a lack of detectable Nra effects on M protein- and SpeB-dependent phenotypes. Whereas MsmR is reported to activate nra and pilus gene transcription in the M49 strain, in the M53 strain it acts as a repressor of these genes. In both strains, MsmR and Nra form a feed-forward loop network motif for pilus gene transcription, but their effects have opposite signs. The findings demonstrate key strain-specific differences in the transcriptional circuitry governing virulence gene expression in S. pyogenes and its impact on pathogenesis. PMID:18347035

  9. RNAi-directed post transcriptional gene silencing of an Arabidopsis Myb transgene in tobacco

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The AtMyb90 gene encodes the 'production of anthocyanin pigment 2' (PAP2) transcription factor of Arabidopsis thaliana and is able to induce a visible hyper-pigmented phenotype when expressed in tobacco. Based upon this phenotype, we have used the AtMyb90 gene as a reporter gene to examine RNAi-dire...

  10. Identification of liver receptor homolog-1 as a novel regulator of apolipoprotein AI gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Delerive, Philippe; Galardi, Cristin M; Bisi, John E; Nicodeme, Edwige; Goodwin, Bryan

    2004-10-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) has been reported to play a role in bile acid biosynthesis and reverse cholesterol transport. In this study, we examined the role of LRH-1 in the regulation of the apolipoprotein AI (APOAI) gene. Using RNA interference and adenovirus-mediated overexpression, we show that LRH-1 directly regulates APOAI gene transcription. Transient transfection experiments and EMSAs revealed that LRH-1 directly regulates APOAI transcription by binding to an LRH-1 response element located in the proximal APOAI promoter region. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that LRH-1 binds to the human APO AI promoter in vivo. Finally, we show that the transcriptional repressor SHP (small heterodimer partner) suppressed APOAI gene expression by inhibiting LRH-1 transcriptional activity. Taken together, our results demonstrate that LRH-1 is a novel regulator of APOAI transcription and underscore the role of this receptor in cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:15218078