Science.gov

Sample records for hysdrodynamic lattice-gas simulations

  1. Lattice gas simulations of replicating domains

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, S.P.; Hasslacher, B.; Pearson, J.E.

    1993-12-31

    We use the lattice gas cellular automation (LGCA) developed to simulate a process of pattern-formation recently observed in reaction-diffusion systems. We study the reaction mechanism, which is an extension of the Selkov model for glycolytic oscillations. We are able to reproduce the self-replicating domains observed in this work. We use the LGCA simulation to estimate the smallest length-scale on which this process can occur under conditions encountered in the cell. These estimates are similar to those obtained for Turing patterns in the same setting.

  2. Lattice gas hydrodynamics: Theory and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hasslacher, B.

    1993-01-01

    The first successful application of a microscopic analogy to create a skeleton cellular automaton and analyze it with statistical mechanical tools, was the work of Frisch, Hasslacher and Pomeau on the Navier-Stokes equation in two and three dimensions. This has become a very large research area with lattice gas models and methods being used for both fundamental investigations into the foundations of statistical mechanics and a large number of diverse applications. This present research was devoted to enlarging the fundamental scope of lattice gas models and proved quite successful. Since the beginning of this proposal, cellular automata have been constructed for statistical mechanical models, fluids, diffusion and shock systems in fundamental investigations. In applied areas, there are now excellent lattice gas models for complex flows through porous media, chemical reaction and combustion dynamics, multiphase flow systems, and fluid mixtures with natural boundaries. With extended cellular fluid models, one can do problems with arbitrary pairwise potentials. Recently, these have been applied to such problems as non-newtonian or polymeric liquids and a mixture of immiscible fluids passing through fractal or spongelike media in two and three dimensions. This proposal has contributed to and enlarged the scope of this work.

  3. Lattice gas hydrodynamics: Theory and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hasslacher, B.

    1993-01-01

    The first successful application of a microscopic analogy to create a skeleton cellular automaton and analyze it with statistical mechanical tools, was the work of Frisch, Hasslacher and Pomeau on the Navier-Stokes equation in two and three dimensions. This has become a very large research area with lattice gas models and methods being used for both fundamental investigations into the foundations of statistical mechanics and a large number of diverse applications. This present research was devoted to enlarging the fundamental scope of lattice gas models and proved successful. Since the beginning of this proposal, cellular automata have been constructed for statistical mechanical models, fluids, diffusion and shock systems in fundamental investigations. In applied areas, there are now excellent lattice gas models for complex flows through porous media, chemical reaction and combustion dynamics, multiphase flow systems, and fluid mixtures with natural boundaries. With extended cellular fluid models, one can do problems with arbitrary pairwise potentials. Recently, these have been applied to such problems as non-newtonian or polymeric liquids and a mixture of immiscible fluids passing through fractal or spongelike media in two and three dimensions. This proposal has contributed to and enlarged the scope of this work.

  4. Lattice-gas approach to semiconductor device simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancona, M. G.

    1990-12-01

    A new approach to semiconductor device simulation is presented which is based on a lattice-gas or cellular-automata model and is quite similar to methods recently explored in fluid dynamics. The approach obtains a stochastic solution to the diffusion-drift partial differential equations describing electron transport in semiconductors. The lattice-gas method appears to be fairly well-suited to electron transport simulation with its ability to handle complex geometry, its ease of programming and its stability being some key advantages. In addition, we show that the structure of the model itself—its Boolean character—leads to a partial inclusion of electron degeneracy effects. Finally, we make a preliminary assessment of the performance of the diffusion-drift lattice-gas model, finding it to be competitive with conventional approaches when its inherent parallelism is fully exploited.

  5. Simulation of Wave Motion Using a Lattice Gas Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buick, J.; Easson, W.; Greated, C.

    1996-02-01

    The lattice gas model for simulating two-phase flow, proposed by Appert and Zaleski, has been modified by the introduction of gravitational interactions and the new model has been used to simulate standing wave patterns on the free surface of a fluid. The results compare well with linear theory.

  6. Lattice gas simulations of dynamical geometry in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klales, Anna; Cianci, Donato; Needell, Zachary; Meyer, David A.; Love, Peter J.

    2010-10-01

    We present a hydrodynamic lattice gas model for two-dimensional flows on curved surfaces with dynamical geometry. This model is an extension to two dimensions of the dynamical geometry lattice gas model previously studied in one dimension. We expand upon a variation of the two-dimensional flat space Frisch-Hasslacher-Pomeau (FHP) model created by Frisch [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 56, 1505 (1986)]10.1103/PhysRevLett.56.1505 and independently by Wolfram, and modified by Boghosian [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 360, 333 (2002)]10.1098/rsta.2001.0933. We define a hydrodynamic lattice gas model on an arbitrary triangulation whose flat space limit is the FHP model. Rules that change the geometry are constructed using the Pachner moves, which alter the triangulation but not the topology. We present results on the growth of the number of triangles as a function of time. Simulations show that the number of triangles grows with time as t1/3 , in agreement with a mean-field prediction. We also present preliminary results on the distribution of curvature for a typical triangulation in these simulations.

  7. Lattice gas simulations of dynamical geometry in two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Klales, Anna; Cianci, Donato; Needell, Zachary; Meyer, David A; Love, Peter J

    2010-10-01

    We present a hydrodynamic lattice gas model for two-dimensional flows on curved surfaces with dynamical geometry. This model is an extension to two dimensions of the dynamical geometry lattice gas model previously studied in one dimension. We expand upon a variation of the two-dimensional flat space Frisch-Hasslacher-Pomeau (FHP) model created by Frisch [Phys. Rev. Lett. 56, 1505 (1986)] and independently by Wolfram, and modified by Boghosian [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 360, 333 (2002)]. We define a hydrodynamic lattice gas model on an arbitrary triangulation whose flat space limit is the FHP model. Rules that change the geometry are constructed using the Pachner moves, which alter the triangulation but not the topology. We present results on the growth of the number of triangles as a function of time. Simulations show that the number of triangles grows with time as t(1/3), in agreement with a mean-field prediction. We also present preliminary results on the distribution of curvature for a typical triangulation in these simulations. PMID:21230410

  8. A heterogeneous lattice gas model for simulating pedestrian evacuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiwei; Chen, Jianqiao; Zheng, Yaochen; Wei, Junhong

    2012-02-01

    Based on the cellular automata method (CA model) and the mobile lattice gas model (MLG model), we have developed a heterogeneous lattice gas model for simulating pedestrian evacuation processes in an emergency. A local population density concept is introduced first. The update rule in the new model depends on the local population density and the exit crowded degree factor. The drift D, which is one of the key parameters influencing the evacuation process, is allowed to change according to the local population density of the pedestrians. Interactions including attraction, repulsion, and friction between every two pedestrians and those between a pedestrian and the building wall are described by a nonlinear function of the corresponding distance, and the repulsion forces increase sharply as the distances get small. A critical force of injury is introduced into the model, and its effects on the evacuation process are investigated. The model proposed has heterogeneous features as compared to the MLG model or the basic CA model. Numerical examples show that the model proposed can capture the basic features of pedestrian evacuation, such as clogging and arching phenomena.

  9. Lattice gas hydrodynamics: Theory and simulations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hasslacher, B.

    1993-05-01

    The first successful application of a microscopic analogy to create a skeleton cellular automaton and analyze it with statistical mechanical tools, was the work of Frisch, Hasslacher and Pomeau on the Navier-Stokes equation in two and three dimensions. This has become a very large research area with lattice gas models and methods being used for both fundamental investigations into the foundations of statistical mechanics and a large number of diverse applications. This present research was devoted to enlarging the fundamental scope of lattice gas models and proved quite successful. Since the beginning of this proposal, cellular automata have been constructed for statistical mechanical models, fluids, diffusion and shock systems in fundamental investigations. In applied areas, there are now excellent lattice gas models for complex flows through porous media, chemical reaction and combustion dynamics, multiphase flow systems, and fluid mixtures with natural boundaries. With extended cellular fluid models, one can do problems with arbitrary pairwise potentials. Recently, these have been applied to such problems as non-newtonian or polymeric liquids and a mixture of immiscible fluids passing through fractal or spongelike media in two and three dimensions. This proposal has contributed to and enlarged the scope of this work.

  10. Lattice gas hydrodynamics of one and two-phase fluids in two and three dimensions: Theory and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Diemer, K.L.

    1992-01-01

    Lattice gas automata models for hydrodynamics offer a method for simulating fluids in between the standard molecular dynamic models and finite difference schemes. The algorithm is especially suited to low Mach number flow around complex boundaries and can be implemented in a fully parallelizable, memory efficient manner using only boolean operations. The simplest lattice gas automata is reviewed. The modification of the standard Chapmann-Enskog expansion lattice gas case is reviewed. In the long wavelength and long time limit, the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation is derived. Analytic calculations of shear viscosity [eta], mean free path [lambda], and a reduced Reynolds number R are presented for a number of 2D and 3D lattice gas models. Comparisons of lattice gas results with analytical predictions and other numerical methods are reviewed. This is followed by a discussion of the zero velocity limit used in deriving the above analytic results. Lattice gas hydrodynamic models for flows through porous media in two and three dimensions are described. The computational method easily handles arbitrary boundaries and a large range of Reynolds numbers. Darcy's law is confirmed for Poiseuille flow and for complicated boundary flows. Lattice gas simulation results for permeability for one geometry are compared with experimental results and found to agree to within 10%. Lattice gas hydrodynamic models for two dimensional binary fluids are described. The scaling of the correlation function during late stage growth is examined. The domain growth kinetics during this period is also explored and compared with the work of Furukawa. A local lattice gas model for binary fluids with an adjustable parameter [lambda] which allows degree of miscibility is introduced. For [lambda] < [lambda][sub c] the fluids are immiscible while for [lambda] > [lambda][sub c] the fluids are miscible. Theoretical and numerical studies on the diffusive properties of this lattice gas are presented.

  11. Pair interaction lattice gas simulations: Flow past obstacles in two and three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Vogeler, A.; Wolf-Gladrow, D.A. )

    1993-04-01

    Apart from the FCHC (face-centered hypercube), Nasilowski's pair interaction lattice gas (PI) is the only known lattice gas automaton for three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. Unfortunately, the viscosity of PI is not isotropic. In order to determine the degree anisotropy, the authors derive fluid dynamic equations for the regime of compressible viscid flow. From relaxation measurements of waves propagating in various directions they compute the physically relevant dissipation coefficients and compare their results with theoretical predictions. Although PI shows a high degree of anisotropy, they define the mean value of the dissipation tensor as effective shear viscosity. Using this value of v[sub eff][sup 2D] = 0.35, two-dimensional simulations of flow past a cylinder yield drag coefficients in quantitative agreement with wind tunnel measurements over a range of Reynolds numbers of 5-50. Three-dimensional simulations of flow past a sphere yield qualitative agreement with various references. A fit of the results to a semi-empirical curve provides an effective value of v[sub eff][sup 2D] = 0.21 for a range of Reynolds numbers from 0.19 to 40. In order to check for finite-size effects, the authors measured the mean free path [lambda] and computed the Knudsen numbers. They obtained [lambda] [approx]1 lattice unit, corresponding to Kn = 0.01 (2D) and Kn = 0.1 (3D). They found no significant finite-size effects. 44 refs., 10 figs.

  12. Simulating the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation with a quantum lattice-gas algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prezkuta, Zachary; Coffey, Mark

    2007-03-01

    Quantum computing algorithms promise remarkable improvements in speed or memory for certain applications. Currently, the Type II (or hybrid) quantum computer is the most feasible to build. This consists of a large number of small Type I (pure) quantum computers that compute with quantum logic, but communicate with nearest neighbors in a classical way. The arrangement thus formed is suitable for computations that execute a quantum lattice gas algorithm (QLGA). We report QLGA simulations for both the linear and nonlinear time-dependent Schr"odinger equation. These evidence the stable, efficient, and at least second order convergent properties of the algorithm. The simulation capability provides a computational tool for applications in nonlinear optics, superconducting and superfluid materials, Bose-Einstein condensates, and elsewhere.

  13. Lattice gas hydrodynamics: Theory and simulations. Final report, [February 1, 1989--March 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Hasslacher, B.

    1993-05-01

    The first successful application of a microscopic analogy to create a skeleton cellular automaton and analyze it with statistical mechanical tools, was the work of Frisch, Hasslacher and Pomeau on the Navier-Stokes equation in two and three dimensions. This has become a very large research area with lattice gas models and methods being used for both fundamental investigations into the foundations of statistical mechanics and a large number of diverse applications. This present research was devoted to enlarging the fundamental scope of lattice gas models and proved successful. Since the beginning of this proposal, cellular automata have been constructed for statistical mechanical models, fluids, diffusion and shock systems in fundamental investigations. In applied areas, there are now excellent lattice gas models for complex flows through porous media, chemical reaction and combustion dynamics, multiphase flow systems, and fluid mixtures with natural boundaries. With extended cellular fluid models, one can do problems with arbitrary pairwise potentials. Recently, these have been applied to such problems as non-newtonian or polymeric liquids and a mixture of immiscible fluids passing through fractal or spongelike media in two and three dimensions. This proposal has contributed to and enlarged the scope of this work.

  14. Effect of porosity on flow of miscible fluid mixture by a lattice gas Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cueva, Luis; Pandey, Ras; Stauffer, Dietrich; Seyfarth, Ray; Gettrust, Joe; Wood, Warren

    2002-03-01

    Using an interacting lattice gas model, flow of a fluid mixture through porous media is studied in three dimensions. The porous medium is generated by a random distribution of barriers (sediments) on a discrete lattice with porosity p above the percolation threshold p_c. The fluid mixture consists of constituents A and B with their mass ratios, 1, 1/2, 1/3, etc. We consider a set of interactions: AB attractive, AA and BB repulsive, A and B with pore attractive, and a hard-core interaction with the sediment barrier. A source of fluid mixture is connected to the bottom where the fluid constituents may enter the porous matrix but they can escape the system from bottom or top. The Metropolis algorithm is used to move fluid particles. While the sedimentation is caused by the gravity, the concentration gradient drives the fluid from bottom to top. The flow rate density is examined as a function of porosity and is found to scale with p-pc with a power-law exponent close to 2.

  15. Modeling dynamical geometry with lattice gas automata

    SciTech Connect

    Hasslacher, B.; Meyer, D.A.

    1998-06-27

    Conventional lattice gas automata consist of particles moving discretely on a fixed lattice. While such models have been quite successful for a variety of fluid flow problems, there are other systems, e.g., flow in a flexible membrane or chemical self-assembly, in which the geometry is dynamical and coupled to the particle flow. Systems of this type seem to call for lattice gas models with dynamical geometry. The authors construct such a model on one dimensional (periodic) lattices and describe some simulations illustrating its nonequilibrium dynamics.

  16. Generalized hydrodynamic transport in lattice-gas automata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Li-Shi; Chen, Hudong; Chen, Shiyi; Doolen, Gary D.; Lee, Yee-Chun

    1991-01-01

    The generalized hydrodynamics of two-dimensional lattice-gas automata is solved analytically in the linearized Boltzmann approximation. The dependence of the transport coefficients (kinematic viscosity, bulk viscosity, and sound speed) upon wave number k is obtained analytically. Anisotropy of these coefficients due to the lattice symmetry is studied for the entire range of wave number, k. Boundary effects due to a finite mean free path (Knudsen layer) are analyzed, and accurate comparisons are made with lattice-gas simulations.

  17. Generalized hydrodynamic transport in lattice-gas automata

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, L. School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0430 ); Chen, H. Department of Physics, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 ); Chen, S. Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 ); Doolen, G.D.; Lee, Y. )

    1991-06-15

    The generalized hydrodynamics of two-dimensional lattice-gas automata is solved analytically in the linearized Boltzmann approximation. The dependence of the transport coefficients (kinematic viscosity, bulk viscosity, and sound speed) upon wave number {bold k} is obtained analytically. Anisotropy of these coefficients due to the lattice symmetry is studied for the entire range of wave number, {bold k}. Boundary effects due to a finite mean free path (Knudsen layer) are analyzed, and accurate comparisons are made with lattice-gas simulations.

  18. Realistic multisite lattice-gas modeling and KMC simulation of catalytic surface reactions: Kinetics and multiscale spatial behavior for CO-oxidation on metal (100) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Dajiang; Evans, James W.

    2013-12-01

    A realistic molecular-level description of catalytic reactions on single-crystal metal surfaces can be provided by stochastic multisite lattice-gas (msLG) models. This approach has general applicability, although in this report, we will focus on the example of CO-oxidation on the unreconstructed fcc metal (100) or M(100) surfaces of common catalyst metals M = Pd, Rh, Pt and Ir (i.e., avoiding regimes where Pt and Ir reconstruct). These models can capture the thermodynamics and kinetics of adsorbed layers for the individual reactants species, such as CO/M(100) and O/M(100), as well as the interaction and reaction between different reactant species in mixed adlayers, such as (CO + O)/M(100). The msLG models allow population of any of hollow, bridge, and top sites. This enables a more flexible and realistic description of adsorption and adlayer ordering, as well as of reaction configurations and configuration-dependent barriers. Adspecies adsorption and interaction energies, as well as barriers for various processes, constitute key model input. The choice of these energies is guided by experimental observations, as well as by extensive Density Functional Theory analysis. Model behavior is assessed via Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulation. We also address the simulation challenges and theoretical ramifications associated with very rapid diffusion and local equilibration of reactant adspecies such as CO. These msLG models are applied to describe adsorption, ordering, and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) for individual CO/M(100) and O/M(100) reactant adlayers. In addition, they are also applied to predict mixed (CO + O)/M(100) adlayer structure on the nanoscale, the complete bifurcation diagram for reactive steady-states under continuous flow conditions, temperature programmed reaction (TPR) spectra, and titration reactions for the CO-oxidation reaction. Extensive and reasonably successful comparison of model predictions is made with experimental data. Furthermore

  19. Realistic multisite lattice-gas modeling and KMC simulation of catalytic surface reactions: Kinetics and multiscale spatial behavior for CO-oxidation on metal (1 0 0) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Da-Jiang; Evans, James W.

    2013-12-01

    A realistic molecular-level description of catalytic reactions on single-crystal metal surfaces can be provided by stochastic multisite lattice-gas (msLG) models. This approach has general applicability, although in this report, we will focus on the example of CO-oxidation on the unreconstructed fcc metal (1 0 0) or M(1 0 0) surfaces of common catalyst metals M = Pd, Rh, Pt and Ir (i.e., avoiding regimes where Pt and Ir reconstruct). These models can capture the thermodynamics and kinetics of adsorbed layers for the individual reactants species, such as CO/M(1 0 0) and O/M(1 0 0), as well as the interaction and reaction between different reactant species in mixed adlayers, such as (CO + O)/M(1 0 0). The msLG models allow population of any of hollow, bridge, and top sites. This enables a more flexible and realistic description of adsorption and adlayer ordering, as well as of reaction configurations and configuration-dependent barriers. Adspecies adsorption and interaction energies, as well as barriers for various processes, constitute key model input. The choice of these energies is guided by experimental observations, as well as by extensive Density Functional Theory analysis. Model behavior is assessed via Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulation. We also address the simulation challenges and theoretical ramifications associated with very rapid diffusion and local equilibration of reactant adspecies such as CO. These msLG models are applied to describe adsorption, ordering, and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) for individual CO/M(1 0 0) and O/M(1 0 0) reactant adlayers. In addition, they are also applied to predict mixed (CO + O)/M(1 0 0) adlayer structure on the nanoscale, the complete bifurcation diagram for reactive steady-states under continuous flow conditions, temperature programmed reaction (TPR) spectra, and titration reactions for the CO-oxidation reaction. Extensive and reasonably successful comparison of model predictions is made with experimental

  20. Lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann computational physics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.

    1993-05-01

    Recent developments of the lattice gas automata method and its extension to the lattice Boltzmann method have provided new computational schemes for solving a variety of partial differential equations and modeling different physics systems. The lattice gas method, regarded as the simplest microscopic and kinetic approach which generates meaningful macroscopic dynamics, is fully parallel and can be easily programmed on parallel machines. In this talk, the author will review basic principles of the lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann method, its mathematical foundation and its numerical implementation. A detailed comparison of the lattice Boltzmann method with the lattice gas technique and other traditional numerical schemes, including the finite-difference scheme and the pseudo-spectral method, for solving the Navier-Stokes hydrodynamic fluid flows, will be discussed. Recent achievements of the lattice gas and the the lattice Boltzmann method and their applications in surface phenomena, spinodal decomposition and pattern formation in chemical reaction-diffusion systems will be presented.

  1. Quantum lattice gas algorithm for the telegraph equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffey, Mark W.; Colburn, Gabriel G.

    2009-06-01

    The telegraph equation combines features of both the diffusion and wave equations and has many applications to heat propagation, transport in disordered media, and elsewhere. We describe a quantum lattice gas algorithm (QLGA) for this partial differential equation with one spatial dimension. This algorithm generalizes one previously known for the diffusion equation. We present an analysis of the algorithm and accompanying simulation results. The QLGA is suitable for simulation on combined classical-quantum computers.

  2. Quantum mechanics of lattice gas automata: One-particle plane waves and potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, D.A.

    1997-05-01

    Classical lattice gas automata effectively simulate physical processes, such as diffusion and fluid flow (in certain parameter regimes), despite their simplicity at the microscale. Motivated by current interest in quantum computation we recently defined {ital quantum} lattice gas automata; in this paper we initiate a project to analyze which physical processes these models can effectively simulate. Studying the single particle sector of a one-dimensional quantum lattice gas we find discrete analogs of plane waves and wave packets, and then investigate their behavior in the presence of inhomogeneous potentials. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Lattice-gas automata for the Navier-Stokes equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, U.; Hasslacher, B.; Pomeau, Y.

    1986-04-01

    It is shown that a class of deterministic lattice gases with discrete Boolean elements simulates the Navier-Stokes equations, and can be used to design simple, massively parallel computing machines. A hexagonal lattice gas (HLG) model consisting of a triangular lattice with hexagonal symmetry is developed, and is shown to lead to the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. The three-dimensional formulation is obtained by a splitting method in which the nonlinear term in the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equation is recasts as the sum of two terms, each containing spurious elements and each realizable on a different lattice. Freed slip and rigid boundary conditions are easily implemented. It is noted that lattice-gas models must be run at moderate Mach numbers to remain incompressible, and to avoid spurious high-order nonlinear terms. The model gives a concrete hydrodynamical example of how cellular automata can be used to simulate classical nonlinear fields.

  4. Lattice gas hydrodynamics in two and three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, U.; d'Humieres, D.; Hasslacher, B.; Lallemand, P.; Pomeau, Y.; Rivet, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    Hydrodynamical phenomena can be simulated by discrete lattice gas models obeing cellular automata rules (U. Frisch, B. Hasslacher, and Y. Pomeau, Phys. Rev. Lett. 56, 1505, (1986); D. d'Humieres, P. Lallemand, and U. Frisch, Europhys. Lett. 2, 291, (1986)). It is here shown for a class of D-dimensional lattice gas models how the macrodynamical (large-scale) equations for the densities of microscopically conserved quantities can be systematically derived from the underlying exact ''microdynamical'' Boolean equations. With suitable restrictions on the crystallographic symmetries of the lattice and after proper limits are taken, various standard fluid dynamical equations are obtained, including the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in two and three dimensions. The transport coefficients appearing in the macrodynamical equations are obtained using variants of fluctuation-dissipation and Boltzmann formalisms adapted to fully discrete situations.

  5. Measurement-based quantum lattice gas model of fluid dynamics in 2+1 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micci, Michael M.; Yepez, Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Presented are quantum simulation results using a measurement-based quantum lattice gas algorithm for Navier-Stokes fluid dynamics in 2+1 dimensions. Numerical prediction of the kinematic viscosity was measured by the decay rate of an initial sinusoidal flow profile. Due to local quantum entanglement in the quantum lattice gas, the minimum kinematic viscosity in the measurement-based quantum lattice gas is lower than achievable in a classical lattice gas. The numerically predicted viscosities precisely match the theoretical predictions obtained with a mean field approximation. Uniform flow profile with double shear layers, on a 16 K ×8 K lattice, leads to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, breaking up the shear layer into pairs of counter-rotating vortices that eventually merge via vortex fusion and dissipate because of the nonzero shear viscosity.

  6. Measurement-based quantum lattice gas model of fluid dynamics in 2+1 dimensions.

    PubMed

    Micci, Michael M; Yepez, Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Presented are quantum simulation results using a measurement-based quantum lattice gas algorithm for Navier-Stokes fluid dynamics in 2+1 dimensions. Numerical prediction of the kinematic viscosity was measured by the decay rate of an initial sinusoidal flow profile. Due to local quantum entanglement in the quantum lattice gas, the minimum kinematic viscosity in the measurement-based quantum lattice gas is lower than achievable in a classical lattice gas. The numerically predicted viscosities precisely match the theoretical predictions obtained with a mean field approximation. Uniform flow profile with double shear layers, on a 16K×8K lattice, leads to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, breaking up the shear layer into pairs of counter-rotating vortices that eventually merge via vortex fusion and dissipate because of the nonzero shear viscosity. PMID:26465581

  7. A lattice gas model for thermohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shiyi; Chen, Hudong; Doolen, G.D.; Gutman, S.; Lee, M.

    1990-05-03

    The FHP lattice gas model is extended to include a temperature variable in order to study thermohydrodynamics. The compressible Navier-Stokes equations are derived using a Chapman-Enskog expansion. Heat conduction and convention problems are investigated, including Benard convention. It is shown that the usual FHP rescaling procedure can be avoided by controlling the temperature. 20 refs., 12 figs.

  8. Lattice Gas Model with Nonlocal Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Shankar P.

    We analyze the nature of the hydrodynamic modes in a Lattice Gas Automata (LGA) model defined on a hexagonal lattice and having nonlocal interactions of attractive and repulsive type simultaneously. The model is similar in spirit to the liquid gas model of Appert and Zaleski [Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 1 (1990)]. The phase diagram for the model is computed using the kinetic pressure. The dynamics is studied with a mean field type approach in the Boltzmann approximation ignoring effects of correlated collisions. We compute the transport coefficients and the speed of sound propagation. The presence of attractive interactions show increase in the transport coefficients at intermediate densities.

  9. Quantum learning in a quantum lattice gas computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrman, Elizabeth; Steck, James

    2015-04-01

    Quantum lattice gas is the logical generalization of quantum cellular automata. At low energy the dynamics are well described by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in the mean field limit, which is an effective nonlinear interaction model of a Bose-Einstein condensate. In previous work, we have shown in simulation that both spatial and temporal models of quantum learning computers can be used to ``design'' non-trivial quantum algorithms. The advantages of quantum learning over the usual practice of using quantum gate building blocks are, first, the rapidity with which the problem can be solved, without having to decompose the problem; second, the fact that our technique can be used readily even when the problem, or the operator, is not well understood; and, third, that because the interactions are a natural part of the physical system, connectivity is automatic. The advantage to quantum learning obviously grows with the size and the complexity of the problem. We develop and present our learning algorithm as applied to the mean field lattice gas equation, and present a few preliminary results.

  10. Quantum learning for a quantum lattice gas computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrman, Elizabeth; Steck, James

    2015-03-01

    Quantum lattice gas is the logical generalization of quantum cellular automata. In low energy the dynamics are well described by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in the mean field limit, which is an effective nonlinear interaction model of a Bose-Einstein condensate. In previous work, we have shown in simulation that both spatial and temporal models of quantum learning computers can be used to ``design'' non-trivial quantum algorithms. The advantages of quantum learning over the usual practice of using quantum gate building blocks are, first, the rapidity with which the problem can be solved, without having to decompose the problem; second, the fact that our technique can be used readily even when the problem, or the operator, is not well understood; and, third, that because the interactions are a natural part of the physical system, connectivity is automatic. The advantage to quantum learning obviously grows with the size and the complexity of the problem. We develop and present our learning algorithm as applied to the mean field lattice gas equation, and present a few preliminary results.

  11. Dynamic behavior of multirobot systems using lattice gas automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stantz, Keith M.; Cameron, Stewart M.; Robinett, Rush D., III; Trahan, Michael W.; Wagner, John S.

    1999-07-01

    Recent attention has been given to the deployment of an adaptable sensor array realized by multi-robotic systems (or swarms). Our group has been studying the collective, autonomous behavior of these such systems and their applications in the area of remote-sensing and emerging threats. To accomplish such tasks, an interdisciplinary research effort at Sandia National Laboratories are conducting tests in the fields of sensor technology, robotics, and multi- agents architectures. Our goal is to coordinate a constellation of point sensors using unmanned robotic vehicles (e.g., RATLERs, Robotic All-Terrain Lunar Exploration Rover- class vehicles) that optimizes spatial coverage and multivariate signal analysis. An overall design methodology evolves complex collective behaviors realized through local interaction (kinetic) physics and artificial intelligence. Learning objectives incorporate real-time operational responses to environmental changes. This paper focuses on our recent work understanding the dynamics of many-body systems according to the physics-based hydrodynamic model of lattice gas automata. Three design features are investigated. One, for single-speed robots, a hexagonal nearest-neighbor interaction topology is necessary to preserve standard hydrodynamic flow. Two, adaptability, defined by the swarm's rate of deformation, can be controlled through the hydrodynamic viscosity term, which, in turn, is defined by the local robotic interaction rules. Three, due to the inherent nonlinearity of the dynamical equations describing large ensembles, stability criteria ensuring convergence to equilibrium states is developed by scaling information flow rates relative to a swarm's hydrodynamic flow rate. An initial test case simulates a swarm of twenty-five robots maneuvering past an obstacle while following a moving target. A genetic algorithm optimizes applied nearest-neighbor forces in each of five spatial regions distributed over the simulation domain. Armed with

  12. Nondestructive imaging of an ultracold lattice gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Y. S.; Chakram, S.; Aycock, L. M.; Vengalattore, M.

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate the nondestructive imaging of a lattice gas of ultracold bosons. Atomic fluorescence is induced in the simultaneous presence of degenerate Raman sideband cooling. The combined influence of these processes controllably cycles an atom between a dark state and a fluorescing state while eliminating heating and loss. Through spatially resolved sideband spectroscopy following the imaging sequence, we demonstrate the efficacy of this imaging technique in various regimes of lattice depth and fluorescence acquisition rate. Our work provides an important extension of quantum gas imaging to the nondestructive detection, control, and manipulation of atoms in optical lattices. In addition, our technique can also be extended to atomic species that are less amenable to molasses-based lattice imaging.

  13. Unitary quantum lattice gas representation of 2D quantum turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Vahala, George; Vahala, Linda; Soe, Min

    2011-05-01

    Quantum vortex structures and energy cascades are examined for two dimensional quantum turbulence (2D QT) using a special unitary evolution algorithm. The qubit lattice gas (QLG) algorithm, is employed to simulate the weakly-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) governed by the Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equation. A parameter regime is uncovered in which, as in 3D QT, there is a very short Poincare recurrence time. This short recurrence time is destroyed as the nonlinear interaction energy is increased. Energy cascades for 2D QT are considered to examine whether 2D QT exhibits the inverse cascades of 2D classical turbulence. In the parameter regime considered, the spectra analysis reveals no such dual cascades---dual cascades being a hallmark of 2D classical turbulence.

  14. Modeling water infiltration in unsaturated porous media by interacting lattice gas-cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Pietro, L. B.; Melayah, A.; Zaleski, S.

    1994-10-01

    A two-dimensional lattice gas-cellular automaton fluid model with long-range interactions (Appert and Zaleski, 1990) is used to simulate saturated and unsaturated water infiltration in porous media. Water and gas within the porous medium are simulated by applying the dense and the light phase, respectively, of the cellular automaton fluid. Various wetting properties can be modeled when adjusting the corresponding solid-liquid interactions. The lattice gas rules include a gravity force step to allow buoyancy-driven flow. The model handles with ease complex geometries of the solid, and an algorithm for generating random porous media is presented. The results of four types of simulation experiments are presented: (1) We verified Poiseuille's law for steady and saturated flow between two parallel plates. (2) We analyzed transient water infiltration between two parallel plates of varying degrees of saturation and various apertures. (3) Philip's infiltration equation was adequately simulated in an unsaturated porous medium. (4) Infiltration into an aggregated medium containing one vertical parallel crack was simulated. Further applications of this lattice gas method for studying unsaturated flow in porous media are discussed.

  15. Residual entropy and waterlike anomalies in the repulsive one dimensional lattice gas

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Fernando Barbosa V. da; Oliveira, Fernando Albuquerque; Barbosa, Marco Aurélio A.

    2015-04-14

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of the one dimensional lattice gas with repulsive interaction are investigated using transfer matrix technique and Monte Carlo simulations. This simple model is shown to exhibit waterlike anomalies in density, thermal expansion coefficient, and self-diffusion. An unified description for the thermodynamic anomalies in this model is achieved based on the ground state residual entropy which appears in the model due to mixing entropy in a ground state phase transition.

  16. Transport of a lattice gas under continuous measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Hil F. H.; Patil, Yogesh Sharad; Madjarov, Ivaylo S.; Chen, Huiyao Y.; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2016-05-01

    The act of measurement has a profound consequence on a quantum system. While this backaction has hitherto been discussed as a limitation to the precision of measurements, it is increasingly being appreciated that measurement backaction is a powerful means of quantum control. We have previously demonstrated that backaction from position measurement can modify the coherent tunneling rate of a lattice gas through the Quantum Zeno effect. By suitably designing measurement landscapes we can control the transport properties of the lattice gas. We describe a quantitative study of lattice gas dynamics under continuous quantum measurement in the context of a quantum to classical transition where the atom dynamics goes from a quantum walk at low measurement strengths to classical diffusion at high measurement strengths. We further discuss the prospect of using disorder measurement landscapes to realize a new form of Anderson localization. This work is supported by the ARO MURI on non-equilibrium dynamics.

  17. Theory of multicolor lattice gas - A cellular automaton Poisson solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, H.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Klein, L. W.

    1990-01-01

    The present class of models for cellular automata involving a quiescent hydrodynamic lattice gas with multiple-valued passive labels termed 'colors', the lattice collisions change individual particle colors while preserving net color. The rigorous proofs of the multicolor lattice gases' essential features are rendered more tractable by an equivalent subparticle representation in which the color is represented by underlying two-state 'spins'. Schemes for the introduction of Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions are described, and two illustrative numerical test cases are used to verify the theory. The lattice gas model is equivalent to a Poisson equation solution.

  18. Knot invariants and the thermodynamics of lattice gas automata

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this project is to build on the understanding of the connections between knot invariants, exactly solvable statistical mechanics models and discrete dynamical systems that we have gained in earlier work, toward an answer to the question of how early and robust thermodynamic behavior appears in lattice gas automata.

  19. Invariance principle for the stochastic Lorentz lattice gas

    SciTech Connect

    Hollander, F. den ); Naudts, J.; Redig, F. )

    1992-03-01

    The authors prove scaling to nondegenerate Brownian motion for the path of a test particle in the stochastic Lorentz lattice gas on Z[sup d] under a weak ergodicity assumption on the scatterer distribution. They prove that recurrence holds almost surely in d [le] 2. Transience in d [ge] 3 remains open.

  20. Lattice-gas models of phase separation: interfaces, phase transitions, and multiphase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, D.H. ); Zaleski, S. )

    1994-10-01

    Momentum-conserving lattice gases are simple, discrete, microscopic models of fluids. This review describes their hydrodynamics, with particular attention given to the derivation of macroscopic constitutive equations from microscopic dynamics. Lattice-gas models of phase separation receive special emphasis. The current understanding of phase transitions in these momentum-conserving models is reviewed; included in this discussion is a summary of the dynamical properties of interfaces. Because the phase-separation models are microscopically time irreversible, interesting questions are raised about their relationship to real fluid mixtures. Simulation of certain complex-fluid problems, such as multiphase flow through porous media and the interaction of phase transitions with hydrodynamics, is illustrated.

  1. A lattice gas of prime numbers and the Riemann Hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vericat, Fernando

    2013-10-01

    In recent years, there has been some interest in applying ideas and methods taken from Physics in order to approach several challenging mathematical problems, particularly the Riemann Hypothesis. Most of these kinds of contributions are suggested by some quantum statistical physics problems or by questions originated in chaos theory. In this article, we show that the real part of the non-trivial zeros of the Riemann zeta function extremizes the grand potential corresponding to a simple model of one-dimensional classical lattice gas, the critical point being located at 1/2 as the Riemann Hypothesis claims.

  2. Lattice gas automata for flow and transport in geochemical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Janecky, D.R.; Chen, S.; Dawson, S.; Eggert, K.C.; Travis, B.J.

    1992-01-01

    Lattice gas automata models are described, which couple solute transport with chemical reactions at mineral surfaces within pore networks. Diffusion in a box calculations are illustrated, which compare directly with Fickian diffusion. Chemical reactions at solid surfaces, including precipitation/dissolution, sorption, and catalytic reaction, can be examined with the model because hydrodynamic transport, solute diffusion and mineral surface processes are all treated explicitly. The simplicity and flexibility of the approach provides the ability to study the interrelationship between fluid flow and chemical reactions in porous materials, at a level of complexity that has not previously been computationally possible.

  3. Stochastic lattice gas model describing the dynamics of the SIRS epidemic process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, David R.; Tomé, Tânia

    2010-03-01

    We study a stochastic process describing the onset of spreading dynamics of an epidemic in a population composed of individuals of three classes: susceptible (S), infected (I), and recovered (R). The stochastic process is defined by local rules and involves the following cyclic process: S → I → R → S (SIRS). The open process S → I → R (SIR) is studied as a particular case of the SIRS process. The epidemic process is analyzed at different levels of description: by a stochastic lattice gas model and by a birth and death process. By means of Monte Carlo simulations and dynamical mean-field approximations we show that the SIRS stochastic lattice gas model exhibit a line of critical points separating the two phases: an absorbing phase where the lattice is completely full of S individuals and an active phase where S, I and R individuals coexist, which may or may not present population cycles. The critical line, that corresponds to the onset of epidemic spreading, is shown to belong in the directed percolation universality class. By considering the birth and death process we analyze the role of noise in stabilizing the oscillations.

  4. Critical dynamics of the jamming transition in one-dimensional nonequilibrium lattice-gas models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyanka; Jain, Kavita

    2016-04-01

    We consider several one-dimensional driven lattice-gas models that show a phase transition in the stationary state between a high-density fluid phase in which the typical length of a hole cluster is of order unity and a low-density jammed phase where a hole cluster of macroscopic length forms in front of a particle. Using a hydrodynamic equation for an interface growth model obtained from the driven lattice-gas models of interest here, we find that in the fluid phase, the roughness exponent and the dynamic exponent that, respectively, characterize the scaling of the saturation width and the relaxation time of the interface with the system size are given by the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang exponents. However, at the critical point, we show analytically that when the equal-time density-density correlation function decays slower than inverse distance, the roughness exponent varies continuously with a parameter in the hop rates, but it is one-half otherwise. Using these results and numerical simulations for the density-density autocorrelation function, we further find that the dynamic exponent z =3 /2 in all cases.

  5. Thermodynamics of a lattice gas with linear attractive potential

    SciTech Connect

    Pirjol, Dan; Schat, Carlos

    2015-01-15

    We study the equilibrium thermodynamics of a one-dimensional lattice gas with interaction V(|i−j|)=−1/(μn) (ξ−1/n |i−j|) given by the superposition of a universal attractive interaction with strength −1/(μn) ξ<0, and a linear attractive potential 1/(μn{sup 2}) |i−j|. The interaction is rescaled with the lattice size n, such that the thermodynamical limit n → ∞ is well-behaved. The thermodynamical properties of the system can be found exactly, both for a finite size lattice and in the thermodynamical limit n → ∞. The lattice gas can be mapped to a system of non-interacting bosons which are placed on known energy levels. The exact solution shows that the system has a liquid-gas phase transition for ξ > 0. In the large temperature limit T ≫ T{sub 0}(ρ) = ρ{sup 2}/(4μ) with ρ the density, the system becomes spatially homogeneous, and the equation of state is given to a good approximation by a lattice version of the van der Waals equation, with critical temperature T{sub c}{sup (vdW)}=1/(12μ) (3ξ−1)

  6. Dynamical Behavior of Multi-Robot Systems Using Lattice Gas Automata

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, S.M.; Robinett, R.; Stantz, K.M.; Trahan, M.W.; Wagner, J.S.

    1999-03-11

    Recent attention has been given to the deployment of an adaptable sensor array realized by multi-robotic systems. Our group has been studying the collective behavior of autonomous, multi-agent systems and their applications in the area of remote-sensing and emerging threats. To accomplish such tasks, an interdisciplinary research effort at Sandia National Laboratories are conducting tests in the fields of sensor technology, robotics, and multi-robotic and multi-agents architectures. Our goal is to coordinate a constellation of point sensors that optimizes spatial coverage and multivariate signal analysis using unmanned robotic vehicles (e.g., RATLERs, Robotic All-ten-sin Lunar Exploration Rover-class vehicles). Overall design methodology is to evolve complex collective behaviors realized through simple interaction (kinetic) physics and artificial intelligence to enable real-time operational responses to emerging threats. This paper focuses on our recent work understanding the dynamics of many-body systems using the physics-based hydrodynamic model of lattice gas automata. Three design features are investigated. One, for single-speed robots, a hexagonal nearest-neighbor interaction topology is necessary to preserve standard hydrodynamic flow. Two, adaptability, defined by the swarm's deformation rate, can be controlled through the hydrodynamic viscosity term, which, in turn, is defined by the local robotic interaction rules. Three, due to the inherent non-linearity of the dynamical equations describing large ensembles, development of stability criteria ensuring convergence to equilibrium states is developed by scaling information flow rates relative to a swarm's hydrodynamic flow rate. An initial test case simulates a swarm of twenty-five robots that maneuvers past an obstacle while following a moving target. A genetic algorithm optimizes applied nearest-neighbor forces in each of five spatial regions distributed over the simulation domain. Armed with knowledge, the

  7. History dependent quantum random walks as quantum lattice gas automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeel, Asif; Meyer, David A.; Love, Peter J.

    2014-12-01

    Quantum Random Walks (QRW) were first defined as one-particle sectors of Quantum Lattice Gas Automata (QLGA). Recently, they have been generalized to include history dependence, either on previous coin (internal, i.e., spin or velocity) states or on previous position states. These models have the goal of studying the transition to classicality, or more generally, changes in the performance of quantum walks in algorithmic applications. We show that several history dependent QRW can be identified as one-particle sectors of QLGA. This provides a unifying conceptual framework for these models in which the extra degrees of freedom required to store the history information arise naturally as geometrical degrees of freedom on the lattice.

  8. History dependent quantum random walks as quantum lattice gas automata

    SciTech Connect

    Shakeel, Asif E-mail: dmeyer@math.ucsd.edu Love, Peter J. E-mail: dmeyer@math.ucsd.edu; Meyer, David A. E-mail: dmeyer@math.ucsd.edu

    2014-12-15

    Quantum Random Walks (QRW) were first defined as one-particle sectors of Quantum Lattice Gas Automata (QLGA). Recently, they have been generalized to include history dependence, either on previous coin (internal, i.e., spin or velocity) states or on previous position states. These models have the goal of studying the transition to classicality, or more generally, changes in the performance of quantum walks in algorithmic applications. We show that several history dependent QRW can be identified as one-particle sectors of QLGA. This provides a unifying conceptual framework for these models in which the extra degrees of freedom required to store the history information arise naturally as geometrical degrees of freedom on the lattice.

  9. Microscopic reversibility and macroscopic irreversibility: A lattice gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Cárdenas, Fernando C.; Resca, Lorenzo; Pegg, Ian L.

    2016-09-01

    We present coarse-grained descriptions and computations of the time evolution of a lattice gas system of indistinguishable particles, whose microscopic laws of motion are exactly reversible, in order to investigate how or what kind of macroscopically irreversible behavior may eventually arise. With increasing coarse-graining and number of particles, relative fluctuations of entropy rapidly decrease and apparently irreversible behavior unfolds. Although that behavior becomes typical in those limits and within a certain range, it is never absolutely irreversible for any individual system with specific initial conditions. Irreversible behavior may arise in various ways. We illustrate one possibility by replacing detailed integer occupation numbers at lattice sites with particle probability densities that evolve diffusively.

  10. Measurement-Induced Localization of an Ultracold Lattice Gas.

    PubMed

    Patil, Y S; Chakram, S; Vengalattore, M

    2015-10-01

    The process of measurement can modify the state of a quantum system and its subsequent evolution. Here, we demonstrate the control of quantum tunneling in an ultracold lattice gas by the measurement backaction imposed by the act of imaging the atoms, i.e., light scattering. By varying the rate of light scattering from the atomic ensemble, we show the crossover from the weak measurement regime, where position measurements have little influence on tunneling dynamics, to the strong measurement regime, where measurement-induced localization causes a large suppression of tunneling--a manifestation of the quantum Zeno effect. Our study realizes an experimental demonstration of the paradigmatic Heisenberg microscope and sheds light on the implications of measurement on the coherent evolution of a quantum system. PMID:26551797

  11. Imaginary time integration method using a quantum lattice gas approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oganesov, Armen; Flint, Christopher; Vahala, George; Vahala, Linda; Yepez, Jeffrey; Soe, Min

    2016-02-01

    By modifying the collision operator in the quantum lattice gas (QLG) algorithm one can develop an imaginary time (IT) integration to determine the ground state solutions of the Schrödinger equation and its variants. These solutions are compared to those found by other methods (in particular the backward-Euler finite-difference scheme and the quantum lattice Boltzmann). In particular, the ground state of the quantum harmonic oscillator is considered as well as bright solitons in the one-dimensional (1D) non-linear Schrödinger equation. The dark solitons in an external potential are then determined. An advantage of the QLG IT algorithm is the avoidance of any real/complex matrix inversion and that its extension to arbitrary dimensions is straightforward.

  12. Crackling sound generation during the formation of liquid bridges: A lattice gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Alexandre B.; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Alencar, Adriano M.

    2013-08-01

    Due to abnormal mechanical instabilities, liquid bridges may form in the small airways blocking airflow. Liquid bridge ruptures during inhalation are the major cause of the crackling adventitious lung sound, which can be heard using a simple stethoscope. Recently, Vyshedskiy and colleagues (2009) [1] described and characterized a crackle sound originated during expiration. However, the mechanism and origin of the expiratory crackle are still controversial. Thus, in this paper, we propose a mechanism for expiratory crackles. We hypothesize that the expiratory crackle sound is a result of the energy released in the form of acoustic waves during the formation of the liquid bridge. The magnitude of the energy released is proportional to the difference in free energy prior and after the bridge formation. We use a lattice gas model to describe the liquid bridge formation between two parallel planes. Specifically, we determine the surface free energy and the conditions of the liquid bridge formation between two parallel planes separated by a distance 2h by a liquid droplet of volume Ω and contact angle Θ, using both Monte Carlo simulation of a lattice gas model and variational calculus based on minimization of the surface area with the volume and the contact angle constrained. We numerically and analytically determine the phase diagram of the system as a function of the dimensionless parameter hΩ and Θ. We can distinguish two different phases: one droplet and one liquid bridge. We observe a hysteresis curve for the energy changes between these two states, and a finite size effect in the bridge formation. We compute the release of free energy during the formation of the liquid bridge and discuss the results in terms of system size. We also calculate the force exerted from liquid bridge on the planes by studying the dependence of the free energy on the separation between the planes 2h. The simulation results are in agreement with the analytical solution.

  13. Phase transitions and damage spreading in a nonequilibrium lattice gas model with mixed dynamic rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio Puzzo, M. Leticia; Saracco, Gustavo P.; Bab, Marisa A.

    2016-02-01

    Phase transitions and damage spreading for a lattice gas model with mixed driven lattice gas (DLG)-Glauber dynamics are studied by means of Monte Carlo simulations. In order to control the number of sites updated according to the nonconservative Glauber dynamics, a parameter pɛ [ 0 , 1 ] is defined. In this way, for p = 0 the system corresponds to the DLG model with biased Kawasaki conservative dynamics, while for p = 1 it corresponds to the Ising model with Glauber dynamics. The results obtained show that the introduction of nonconservative dynamics dramatically affects the behavior of the DLG model, leading to the existence of Ising-like phase transitions from fully occupied to disordered states. The short-time dynamics results suggest that this transition is second order for values of p = 0.1 and p > 0.6 and first order for 0.1 < p ≤ 0.6. On the other hand, damage always spreads within the investigated temperature range and reaches a saturation value Dsat that depends on the system size, the temperature, and p. The value of Dsat in the thermodynamic limit is estimated by performing a finite-size analysis. For p < 0.6 the results show a change in the behavior of Dsat with temperature, similar to those reported for the pure (p = 0) DLG model. However, for p ≥ 0.6 the data remind us of the Ising (p = 1) curves. In each case, a damage temperature TD(p) can be defined as the value where either Dsat reaches a maximum or it becomes nonzero. This temperature is, within error bars, similar to the reported values of the temperatures that characterize the mentioned phase transitions.

  14. Solution of an associating lattice-gas model with density anomaly on a Husimi lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Tiago J.; Stilck, Jürgen F.; Barbosa, Marco Aurélio A.

    2010-11-01

    We study a model of a lattice gas with orientational degrees of freedom which resemble the formation of hydrogen bonds between the molecules. In this model, which is the simplified version of the Henriques-Barbosa model, no distinction is made between donors and acceptors in the bonding arms. We solve the model in the grand-canonical ensemble on a Husimi lattice built with hexagonal plaquettes with a central site. The ground state of the model, which was originally defined on the triangular lattice, is exactly reproduced by the solution on this Husimi lattice. In the phase diagram, one gas and two liquid [high density liquid (HDL) and low density liquid (LDL)] phases are present. All phase transitions (GAS-LDL, GAS-HDL, and LDL-HDL) are discontinuous, and the three phases coexist at a triple point. A line of temperatures of maximum density in the isobars is found in the metastable GAS phase, as well as another line of temperatures of minimum density appears in the LDL phase, part of it in the stable region and another in the metastable region of this phase. These findings are at variance with simulational results for the same model on the triangular lattice, which suggested a phase diagram with two critical points. However, our results show very good quantitative agreement with the simulations, both for the coexistence loci and the densities of particles and of hydrogen bonds. We discuss the comparison of the simulations with our results.

  15. Studies of charge neutral FCC Lattice Gas with Yukawa Interaction and Accelerated Cartesian Expansion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, He

    In this thesis, I present the results of studies of the structural properties and phase transition of a charge neutral FCC Lattice Gas with Yukawa Interaction and discuss a novel fast calculation algorithm---Accelerated Cartesian Expansion (ACE) method. In the first part of my thesis, I discuss the results of Monte Carlo simulations carried out to understand the finite temperature (phase transition) properties and the ground state structure of a Yukawa Lattice Gas (YLG) model. In this model the ions interact via the potential q iqjexp(-kappar> ij)/rij where qi,j are the charges of the ions located at the lattice sites i and j with position vectors R i and Rj; rij = Ri-Rj, kappa is a measure of the range of the interaction and is called the screening parameter. This model approximates an interesting quaternary system of great current thermoelectric interest called LAST-m, AgSbPbmTem+2. I have also developed rapid calculation methods for the potential energy calculation in a lattice gas system with periodic boundary condition bases on the Ewald summation method and coded the algorithm to compute the energies in MC simulation. Some of the interesting results of the MC simulations are: (i) how the nature and strength of the phase transition depend on the range of interaction (Yukawa screening parameter kappa) (ii) what is the degeneracy of the ground state for different values of the concentration of charges, and (iii) what is the nature of two-stage disordering transition seen for certain values of x. In addition, based on the analysis of the surface energy of different nano-clusters formed near the transition temperature, the solidification process and the rate of production of these nano-clusters have been studied. In the second part of my thesis, we have developed two methods for rapidly computing potentials of the form R-nu. Both these methods are founded on addition theorems based on Taylor expansions. Taylor's series has a couple of inherent advantages: (i) it

  16. Lattice gas cellular automation model for rippling and aggregation in myxobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alber, Mark S.; Jiang, Yi; Kiskowski, Maria A.

    2004-05-01

    A lattice gas cellular automation (LGCA) model is used to simulate rippling and aggregation in myxobacteria. An efficient way of representing cells of different cell size, shape and orientation is presented that may be easily extended to model later stages of fruiting body formation. This LGCA model is designed to investigate whether a refractory period, a minimum response time, a maximum oscillation period and non-linear dependence of reversals of cells on C-factor are necessary assumptions for rippling. It is shown that a refractory period of 2-3 min, a minimum response time of up to 1 min and no maximum oscillation period best reproduce rippling in the experiments of Myxococcus xanthus. Non-linear dependence of reversals on C-factor is critical at high cell density. Quantitative simulations demonstrate that the increase in wavelength of ripples when a culture is diluted with non-signaling cells can be explained entirely by the decreased density of C-signaling cells. This result further supports the hypothesis that levels of C-signaling quantitatively depend on and modulate cell density. Analysis of the interpenetrating high density waves shows the presence of a phase shift analogous to the phase shift of interpenetrating solitons. Finally, a model for swarming, aggregation and early fruiting body formation is presented.

  17. Multiple phase transitions in extended hard-core lattice gas models in two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Nath, Trisha; Rajesh, R

    2014-07-01

    We study the k-NN hard-core lattice gas model in which the first k next-nearest-neighbor sites of a particle are excluded from occupation by other particles on a two-dimensional square lattice. This model is the lattice version of the hard-disk system with increasing k corresponding to decreasing lattice spacing. While the hard-disk system is known to undergo a two-step freezing process with increasing density, the lattice model has been known to show only one transition. Here, based on Monte Carlo simulations and high-density expansions of the free energy and density, we argue that for k = 4,10,11,14,⋯, the lattice model undergoes multiple transitions with increasing density. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we confirm the same for k = 4,...,11. This, in turn, resolves an existing puzzle as to why the 4-NN model has a continuous transition against the expectation of a first-order transition. PMID:25122264

  18. Velocity and density profiles of granular flow in channels using a lattice gas automaton

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, G.; Ohta, T.

    1997-06-01

    We have performed two-dimensional lattice-gas-automaton simulations of granular flow between two parallel planes. We find that the velocity profiles have nonparabolic distributions, while simultaneously the density profiles are nonuniform. Under nonslip boundary conditions, deviation of velocity profiles from the parabolic form of Newtonian fluids is found to be characterized solely by ratio of maximal velocity at the center to the average velocity, though the ratio depends on the model parameters in a complex manner. We also find that the maximal velocity (u{sub max}) at the center is a linear function of the driving force (g) as u{sub max}={alpha}g{minus}{delta} with nonzero {delta} in contrast with Newtonian fluids. Regarding density profiles, we observe that densities near the boundaries are higher than those in the center. The width of higher densities (above the average density) relative to the channel width is a decreasing function of a variable which scales with the driving force (g), energy dissipation parameter ({epsilon}), and the width of the system (L) as g{sup {mu}}L{sup {nu}}/{epsilon} with exponents {mu}=1.4{plus_minus}0.1 and {nu}=0.5{plus_minus}0.1. A phenomenological theory based on a scaling argument is presented to interpret these findings. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. When is a quantum cellular automaton (QCA) a quantum lattice gas automaton (QLGA)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeel, Asif; Love, Peter J.

    2013-09-01

    Quantum cellular automata (QCA) are models of quantum computation of particular interest from the point of view of quantum simulation. Quantum lattice gas automata (QLGA - equivalently partitioned quantum cellular automata) represent an interesting subclass of QCA. QLGA have been more deeply analyzed than QCA, whereas general QCA are likely to capture a wider range of quantum behavior. Discriminating between QLGA and QCA is therefore an important question. In spite of much prior work, classifying which QCA are QLGA has remained an open problem. In the present paper we establish necessary and sufficient conditions for unbounded, finite QCA (finitely many active cells in a quiescent background) to be QLGA. We define a local condition that classifies those QCA that are QLGA, and we show that there are QCA that are not QLGA. We use a number of tools from functional analysis of separable Hilbert spaces and representation theory of associative algebras that enable us to treat QCA on finite but unbounded configurations in full detail.

  20. Thermal phase transitions in a honeycomb lattice gas with three-body interactions.

    PubMed

    Lohöfer, Maximilian; Bonnes, Lars; Wessel, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    We study the thermal phase transitions in a classical (hard-core) lattice gas model with nearest-neighbor three-body interactions on the honeycomb lattice, based on parallel tempering Monte Carlo simulations. This system realizes incompressible low-temperature phases at fractional fillings of 9/16, 5/8, and 3/4 that were identified in a previous study of a related quantum model. In particular, both the 9/16 and the 5/8 phase exhibit an extensive ground-state degeneracy reflecting the frustrated nature of the three-body interactions on the honeycomb lattice. The thermal melting of the 9/16 phase is found to be a first-order, discontinuous phase transition. On the other hand, from the thermodynamic behavior we obtain indications for a four-states Potts-model thermal transition out of the 5/8 phase. We find that this thermal Potts-model transition relates to the selection of one out of four extensive sectors within the low-energy manifold of the 5/8 phase, which we obtain via an exact mapping of the ground-state manifold to a hard-core dimer model on an embedded honeycomb superlattice. PMID:24329242

  1. Vortex-antivortex pair in a Bose-Einstein condensate. Type-II quantum lattice gas as a nonlinear φ4 theory of a complex field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yepez, J.; Vahala, G.; Vahala, L.

    2009-04-01

    Presented is a type-II quantum algorithm for superfluid dynamics, used to numerically predict solutions of the GP equation for a complex scalar field (spinless bosons) in φ4 theory. The GP equation is a long wavelength effective field theory of a microscopic quantum lattice gas with nonlinear state reduction. The quantum lattice gas algorithm for modeling the dynamics of the one-body BEC state in 3+1 dimensions is presented. To demonstrate the method's strength as a computational physics tool, a difficult situation of filamentary singularities is simulated, the dynamics of solitary vortex-antivortex pairs, which are a basic building block of morphologies of quantum turbulence.

  2. Monte Carlo tests of nucleation concepts in the lattice gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Fabian; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2013-05-01

    The conventional theory of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation in a supersaturated vapor is tested by Monte Carlo simulations of the lattice gas (Ising) model with nearest-neighbor attractive interactions on the simple cubic lattice. The theory considers the nucleation process as a slow (quasistatic) cluster (droplet) growth over a free energy barrier ΔF*, constructed in terms of a balance of surface and bulk term of a critical droplet of radius R*, implying that the rates of droplet growth and shrinking essentially balance each other for droplet radius R=R*. For heterogeneous nucleation at surfaces, the barrier is reduced by a factor depending on the contact angle. Using the definition of physical clusters based on the Fortuin-Kasteleyn mapping, the time dependence of the cluster size distribution is studied for quenching experiments in the kinetic Ising model and the cluster size ℓ* where the cluster growth rate changes sign is estimated. These studies of nucleation kinetics are compared to studies where the relation between cluster size and supersaturation is estimated from equilibrium simulations of phase coexistence between droplet and vapor in the canonical ensemble. The chemical potential is estimated from a lattice version of the Widom particle insertion method. For large droplets it is shown that the physical clusters have a volume consistent with the estimates from the lever rule. Geometrical clusters (defined such that each site belonging to the cluster is occupied and has at least one occupied neighbor site) yield valid results only for temperatures less than 60% of the critical temperature, where the cluster shape is nonspherical. We show how the chemical potential can be used to numerically estimate ΔF* also for nonspherical cluster shapes.

  3. Atomistic lattice-gas modeling of CO oxidation on Pd(100): temperature-programmed spectroscopy and steady-state behavior.

    PubMed

    Liu, Da-Jiang; Evans, J W

    2006-04-21

    We have developed an atomistic lattice-gas model for the catalytic oxidation of CO on single-crystal Pd(100) surfaces under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. This model necessarily incorporates an detailed description of adlayer ordering and adsorption-desorption kinetics both for CO on Pd(100), and for oxygen on Pd(100). Relevant energetic parameters are determined by comparing model predictions with experiment, together with some guidance from density functional theory calculations. The latter also facilitates description of the interaction and reaction of adsorbed CO and oxygen. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of this reaction model are performed to predict temperature-programmed reaction spectra, as well as steady-state bifurcation behavior. PMID:16674249

  4. The Hidden Symmetries of Spin-1 Ising Lattice Gas for Usual Quantum Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payandeh, Farrin

    2016-02-01

    In this letter, the most common quantum Hamiltonian is exploited in order to compare the definite equivalences, corresponding to possible spin values in a lattice gas model, to those in a spin-1 Ising model. Our approach also requires interpolating both results in a p-state clock model, in order to find the hidden symmetries of both under consideration models.

  5. Self-similarity of phase-space networks of frustrated spin models and lattice gas models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yi; Wang, Feng; Han, Yilong

    2013-03-01

    We studied the self-similar properties of the phase-spaces of two frustrated spin models and two lattice gas models. The frustrated spin models included (1) the anti-ferromagnetic Ising model on a two-dimensional triangular lattice (1a) at the ground states and (1b) above the ground states and (2) the six-vertex model. The two lattice gas models were (3) the one-dimensional lattice gas model and (4) the two-dimensional lattice gas model. The phase spaces were mapped to networks so that the fractal analysis of complex networks could be applied, i.e. the box-covering method and the cluster-growth method. These phase spaces, in turn, establish new classes of networks with unique self-similar properties. Models 1a, 2, and 3 with long-range power-law correlations in real space exhibit fractal phase spaces, while models 1b and 4 with short-range exponential correlations in real space exhibit nonfractal phase spaces. This behavior agrees with one of untested assumptions in Tsallis nonextensive statistics. Hong Kong GRC grants 601208 and 601911

  6. Immiscible Lattice Gas with Long-Range Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumaya, Akira; Ohashi, Hirotada

    We developed a new LGA model which has the applicability for simulation of immiscible two phases with wide difference in density. We introduced long-range interparticle forces into the Rothman and Keller's ILG model to represent density difference between phases. We attempted some simulations of phase separation using our new model. Two-phase interfaces are stably made with density distribution coinciding with particle color distribution. Furthermore, the two-phase interface is clearer than that obtained by the Appert and Zaleski's LG model.

  7. Discontinuous phase transition in a dimer lattice gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, Ronald

    2012-05-01

    I study a dimer model on the square lattice with nearest neighbor exclusion as the only interaction. Detailed simulations using tomographic entropic sampling show that as the chemical potential is varied, there is a strongly discontinuous phase transition, at which the particle density jumps by about 18% of its maximum value, 1/4. The transition is accompanied by the onset of orientational order, to an arrangement corresponding to the {1/2, 0, 1/2} structure identified by Phares et al. [Physica B 409, 1096 (2011)] in a dimer model with finite repulsion at fixed density. Using finite-size scaling and Binder's cumulant, the expected scaling behavior at a discontinuous transition is verified in detail. The discontinuous transition can be understood qualitatively given that the model possesses eight equivalent maximum-density configurations, so that its coarse-grained description corresponds to that of the q = 8 Potts model.

  8. Beyond classical nucleation theory: A 2-D lattice-gas automata model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, Joseph

    Nucleation is the first step in the formation of a new phase in a thermodynamic system. The Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT) is the traditional theory used to describe this phenomenon. The object of this thesis is to investigate nucleation beyond one of the most significant limitations of the CNT: the assumption that the surface tension of a nucleating cluster of the new phase is independent of the cluster's size and has the same value that it would have in the bulk of the new phase. In order to accomplish this, we consider a microscopic, two-dimensional Lattice Gas Automata (LGA) model of precipitate nucleation in a supersaturated system, with model input parameters Ess (solid particle-to-solid particle bonding energy), Esw (solid particle-to-water particle bonding energy), eta (next-to-nearest neighbour bonding coeffiicent in solid phase), and Cin (initial solute concentration). The LGA method was chosen for its advantages of easy implementation, low memory requirements, and fast computation speed. Analytical results for the system's concentration and the crystal radius as functions of time are derived and the former is fit to the simulation data in order to determine the system's equilibrium concentration. A mean first-passage time (MFPT) technique is used to obtain the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size from the simulation data. The nucleation rate and supersaturation are evaluated using a modification to the CNT that incorporates a two-dimensional, radius-dependent surface tension term. The Tolman parameter, delta, which controls the radius-dependence of the surface tension, decreases (increases) as a function of the magnitude of Ess (Esw), at fixed values of eta and Esw (Ess). On the other hand, delta increases as eta increases while E ss and Esw are held constant. The constant surface tension term of the CNT, Sigma0, increases (decreases) with increasing magnitudes of Ess (Esw) fixed values of Esw (Ess), and increases as eta is increased. Together

  9. Common features in phase-space networks of frustrated spin models and lattice-gas models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Peng, Yi; Han, Yilong

    2012-02-01

    We mapped the phase spaces of the following four models into networks: (1a) the Ising antiferromagnet on triangular lattice at the ground state and (1b) above the ground state, (2) the six-vertex model (i.e. square ice or spin ice), (3) 1D lattice gas and (4) 2D lattice gas. Their phase-space networks share some common features including the Gaussian degree distribution, the Gaussian spectral density, and the small-world properties. Models 1a, 2 and 3 with long-range correlations in real space exhibit fractal phase spaces, while models 1b and 4 with short-range correlations in real space exhibit non-fractal phase spaces. This result supports one of the untested assumptions in Tsallis's non-extensive statistics.

  10. Effects of lateral diffusion on morphology and dynamics of a microscopic lattice-gas model of pulsed electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Stefan; Roberts, Daniel E.; Rikvold, Per Arne

    2005-02-01

    The influence of nearest-neighbor diffusion on the decay of a metastable low-coverage phase (monolayer adsorption) in a square lattice-gas model of electrochemical metal deposition is investigated by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The phase-transformation dynamics are compared to the well-established Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami theory. The phase transformation is accelerated by diffusion, but remains in accord with the theory for continuous nucleation up to moderate diffusion rates. At very high diffusion rates the phase-transformation kinetic shows a crossover to instantaneous nucleation. Then, the probability of medium-sized clusters is reduced in favor of large clusters. Upon reversal of the supersaturation, the adsorbate desorbs, but large clusters still tend to grow during the initial stages of desorption. Calculation of the free energy of subcritical clusters by enumeration of lattice animals yields a quasiequilibrium distribution which is in reasonable agreement with the simulation results. This is an improvement relative to classical droplet theory, which fails to describe the distributions, since the macroscopic surface tension is a bad approximation for small clusters.

  11. Liquid polymorphism and density anomaly in a three-dimensional associating lattice gas.

    PubMed

    Girardi, Mauricio; Balladares, Aline L; Henriques, Vera B; Barbosa, Marcia C

    2007-02-14

    The authors investigate the phase diagram of a three-dimensional associating lattice gas (ALG) model. This model combines orientational icelike interactions and "van der Waals" that might be repulsive, representing, in this case, a penalty for distortion of hydrogen bonds. These interactions can be interpreted as two competing distances, making the connection between this model and continuous isotropic soft-core potentials. The authors present Monte Carlo studies of the ALG model showing the presence of two liquid phases, two critical points, and density anomaly. PMID:17313225

  12. Quantum lattice-gas model for the many-particle Schr{umlt o}dinger equation in d dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Boghosian, B.M.; Taylor, W. IV

    1998-01-01

    We consider a general class of discrete unitary dynamical models on the lattice. We show that generically such models give rise to a wave function satisfying a Schr{umlt o}dinger equation in the continuum limit, in any number of dimensions. There is a simple mathematical relationship between the mass of the Schr{umlt o}dinger particle and the eigenvalues of a unitary matrix describing the local evolution of the model. Second quantized versions of these unitary models can be defined, describing in the continuum limit the evolution of a nonrelativistic quantum many-body theory. An arbitrary potential is easily incorporated into these systems. The models we describe fall in the class of quantum lattice-gas automata and can be implemented on a quantum computer with a speedup exponential in the number of particles in the system. This gives an efficient algorithm for simulating general nonrelativistic interacting quantum many-body systems on a quantum computer. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Quantum Control by Imaging: The Zeno Effect in an Ultracold Lattice Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Yogesh Sharad; Chakram, Srivatsan; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate the control of quantum tunneling in an ultracold lattice gas by the measurement backaction imposed by an imaging process. A in situ imaging technique is used to acquire repeated images of an ultracold gas confined in a shallow optical lattice. The backaction induced by these position measurements modifies the coherent quantum tunneling of atoms within the lattice. By varying the rate at which atoms are imaged, we observe the crossover from the weak measurement regime, where the measurement has a negligible effect on coherent dynamics, to the strong measurement regime, where measurement-induced localization leads to a dramatic suppression of tunneling. The latter effect is a manifestation of the Quantum Zeno effect. We thereby demonstrate the paradigmatic Heisenberg microscope in a lattice gas, and shed light on the implications of quantum measurement on the coherent evolution of a mesoscopic quantum system. Our technique demonstrates a powerful tool for the control of an interacting many-body quantum system via spatially resolved measurement backaction. This work is supported by the ARO MURI on non-equilibrium dynamics.

  14. Adsorption isotherm predicted from a lattice gas with general lateral interactions in a single-phase regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medved', I.; Trník, A.; Černý, Robert

    2014-12-01

    We investigate which isotherm equation arises when a lattice gas with rather general lateral interactions is used to model an adsorption of particles on a solid surface at subcritical temperatures. For simplicity, an energetically homogeneous surface is considered, and only a single phase is assumed to be stable in the system. We show that, up to a constant, the result is a sum of terms that have the same form as the Hill isotherm or, less accurately, as the Freundlich isotherm. Each of these terms contains three types of microscopic parameters whose relation to the details of the considered lattice gas, such as its lateral interactions, is provided. We also provide a formula for the heat of adsorption and discuss the phenomenon of adsorption compression. We illustrate the results for a simple lattice gas on a triangular lattice with pair and triple interactions. Possible extensions to inhomogeneous surfaces, multi-component adsorption, and phase coexistence regions are pointed out.

  15. Classical nucleation theory with a radius-dependent surface tension: A two-dimensional lattice-gas automata model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, Joseph; L'Heureux, Ivan

    2013-02-01

    The constant surface tension assumption of the Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT) is known to be flawed. In order to probe beyond this limitation, we consider a microscopic, two-dimensional Lattice-Gas Automata (LGA) model of nucleation in a supersaturated system, with model input parameters Ess (solid particle-to-solid particle bonding energy), Esw (solid particle-to-water bonding energy), η (next-to-nearest-neighbor bonding coefficient in solid phase), and Cin (initial solute concentration). The LGA method has the advantages of easy implementation, low memory requirements, and fast computation speed. Analytical results for the system's concentration and the crystal radius as functions of time are derived and the former is fit to the simulation data in order to determine the equilibrium concentration. The “Mean First-Passage Time” technique is used to obtain the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size from the simulation data. The nucleation rate and supersaturation data are evaluated using a modification to the CNT that incorporates a two-dimensional radius-dependent surface tension term. The Tolman parameter, δ, which controls the radius dependence of the surface tension, decreases (increases) as a function of the magnitude of Ess (Esw), at fixed values of η and Esw (Ess). On the other hand, δ increases as η increases while Ess and Esw are held constant. The constant surface tension term of the CNT, Σ0, increases (decreases) with increasing magnitudes of Ess (Esw) at fixed values of Esw (Ess) and increases as η is increased. Σ0 increases linearly as a function of the change in energy during an attachment or detachment reaction, |ΔE|, however, with a slope less than that predicted for a crystal that is uniformly packed at maximum density. These results indicate an increase in the radius-dependent surface tension, Σ, with respect to increasing magnitude of the difference between Ess and Esw.

  16. Competition of coarsening and shredding of clusters in a driven diffusive lattice gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunwar, Ambarish; Chowdhury, Debashish; Schadschneider, Andreas; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2006-06-01

    We investigate a driven diffusive lattice gas model with two oppositely moving species of particle. The model is motivated by bidirectional traffic of ants on a pre-existing trail. A third species, corresponding to pheromones used by the ants for communication, is not conserved and mediates interactions between the particles. Here we study the spatio-temporal organization of the particles. In the unidirectional variant of this model it is known to be determined by the formation and coarsening of 'loose clusters'. For our bidirectional model, we show that the interaction of oppositely moving clusters is essential. In the late stages of evolution the cluster size oscillates because of a competition between their 'shredding' during encounters with oppositely moving counterparts and subsequent 'coarsening' during collision-free evolution. We also establish a nontrivial dependence of the spatio-temporal organization on the system size.

  17. Glass transition in the quenched and annealed version of the frustrated lattice gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierro, Annalisa; de Candia, Antonio; Coniglio, Antonio

    2000-12-01

    In this paper we study the three-dimensional frustrated lattice gas model in the annealed version, where the disorder is allowed to evolve in time with a suitable kinetic constraint. Although the model does not exhibit any thermodynamic transition it shows a diverging peak at some characteristic time in the dynamical nonlinear susceptibility, similar to the results on the p-spin model in mean field and the Lennard-Jones mixture recently found by Donati et al. (e-print cond-mat/9905433). Comparing these results to those obtained in the model with quenched interactions, we conclude that the critical behavior of the dynamical susceptibility is reminiscent of the thermodynamic transition present in the quenched model, and signaled by the divergence of the static nonlinear susceptibility, suggesting therefore a similar mechanism also in supercooled glass-forming liquids.

  18. A lattice gas automata model for heterogeneous chemical reactions at mineral surfaces and in pore networks

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, J.T. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Janecky, D.R.; Travis, B.J. )

    1990-01-15

    A lattice gas automata (LGA) model is described, which couples solute transport with chemical reactions at mineral surfaces and in pore networks. Chemical reactions and transport are integrated into a FHP-I LGA code as a module so that the approach is readily transportable to other codes. Diffusion in a box calculations are compared to finite element Fickian diffusion results and provide an approach to quantifying space-time ratios of the models. Chemical reactions at solid surfaces, including precipitation/dissolution, sorption, and catalytic reaction, can be examined with the model because solute diffusion and mineral surface processes are all treated explicitly. The simplicity and flexibility of the LGA approach provides the ability to study the interrelationship between fluid flow and chemical reactions in porous materials, at a level of complexity that has not previously been computationally possible. 20 refs., 8 figs.

  19. Self-avoiding modes of motion in a deterministic Lorentz lattice gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, B. Z.; Cohen, E. G. D.

    2014-08-01

    We study the motion of a particle on the two-dimensional honeycomb lattice, whose sites are occupied by either flipping rotators or flipping mirrors, which scatter the particle according to a deterministic rule. For both types of scatterers we find a new type of motion that has not been observed in a Lorentz Lattice gas, where the particle's trajectory is a self-avoiding walk between returns to its initial position. We show that this behavior is a consequence of the deterministic scattering rule and the particular class of initial scatterer configurations we consider. Since self-avoiding walks are one of the main tools used to model the growth of crystals and polymers, the particle's motion in this class of systems is potentially important for the study of these processes.

  20. The high density phase of the k-NN hard core lattice gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Trisha; Rajesh, R.

    2016-07-01

    The k-NN hard core lattice gas model on a square lattice, in which the first k next nearest neighbor sites of a particle are excluded from being occupied by another particle, is the lattice version of the hard disc model in two dimensional continuum. It has been conjectured that the lattice model, like its continuum counterpart, will show multiple entropy-driven transitions with increasing density if the high density phase has columnar or striped order. Here, we determine the nature of the phase at full packing for k up to 820 302 . We show that there are only eighteen values of k, all less than k  =  4134, that show columnar order, while the others show solid-like sublattice order.

  1. Knot invariants and the thermodynamics of lattice gas automata. Final technical report, April 15, 1991--July 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, D.A.

    1995-12-01

    The goal of this project has been to build on the understanding of the connections between knot invariants, exactly solvable statistical mechanics models and discrete dynamical systems gained in earlier work, toward an answer to the question of how early and robust thermodynamic behavior appears in lattice gas automata. These investigations have recently become relevant, unanticipatedly, to crucial issues in quantum computation.

  2. Knot invariants and the thermodynamics of lattice gas automata. Technical progress report, 15 May 1991--14 April 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, D.A.

    1992-05-01

    The goal of this project is to build on the understanding of the connections between knot invariants, exactly solvable statistical mechanics models and discrete dynamical systems that we have gained in earlier work, toward an answer to the question of how early and robust thermodynamic behavior appears in lattice gas automata.

  3. Random texture simulation by multi-species lattice-gas models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Luc; Jeulin, Dominique

    1997-01-01

    Representation of set operators by artificial neural networks and design of such operators by interference of network parameters is a popular technique in binary image analysis. We propose an alternative to this technique: automatic programming of morphological machines (MMach) by the design of statistically optimal operators. We propose a formulation of the procedure for designing set operators that extends the one stated by Dougherty for binary image restoration, show the relation of this new formulation with the one stated by Haussler for learning Boolean concepts in the context of machine learning theory, present a new learning algorithm for Boolean concepts represented as MMach programs, and give some application examples in binary image analysis.

  4. Entanglement Properties of a Quantum Lattice-Gas Model on Square and Triangular Ladders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shu; Tamura, Ryo; Katsura, Hosho

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we review the entanglement properties of a quantum lattice-gas model according to our previous paper [S. Tanaka, R. Tamura, and H. Katsura, Phys. Rev. A 86, 032326 (2012)]. The ground state of the model under consideration can be exactly obtained and expressed by the Rokhsar-Kivelson type quantum superposition. The reduced density matrices of the model on square and triangular ladders are related to the transfer matrices of the classical hard-square and hard-hexagon models, respectively. In our previous paper, we investigated the entanglement properties including the entanglement entropy, the entanglement spectrum, and the nested entanglement entropy. We found that the entanglement spectra are critical when parameters are chosen so that the corresponding classical model is critical. In order to further investigate the entanglement properties, we also considered the nested entanglement entropy. As a result, the entanglement properties of the model on square and triangular ladders are described by the critical phenomena of the Ising model and the three-state ferromagnetic Potts model in two dimension, respectively.

  5. Pedestrian flow dynamics in a lattice gas model coupled with an evolutionary game.

    PubMed

    Hao, Qing-Yi; Jiang, Rui; Hu, Mao-Bin; Jia, Bin; Wu, Qing-Song

    2011-09-01

    This paper studies unidirectional pedestrian flow by using a lattice gas model with parallel update rules. Game theory is introduced to deal with conflicts that two or three pedestrians want to move into the same site. Pedestrians are either cooperators or defectors. The cooperators are gentle and the defectors are aggressive. Moreover, pedestrians could change their strategy. The fundamental diagram and the cooperator fraction at different system width W have been investigated in detail. It is found that a two-lane system exhibits a first-order phase transition while a multilane system does not. A microscopic mechanism behind the transition has been provided. Mean-field analysis is carried out to calculate the critical density of the transition as well as the probability of games at large value of W. The spatial distribution of pedestrians is investigated, which is found to be dependent (independent) on the initial cooperator fraction when W is small (large). Finally, the influence of the evolutionary game rule has been discussed. PMID:22060456

  6. Absorbing phase transition in a conserved lattice gas model with next-nearest-neighbor hopping in one dimension.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Bub

    2015-12-01

    The absorbing phase transition of the modified conserved lattice gas (m-CLG) model was investigated in one dimension. The m-CLG model was modified from the conserved lattice gas (CLG) model in such a way that each active particle hops to one of the nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor empty sites. The order parameter exponent, the dynamic exponent, and the correlation length exponent were estimated from the power-law behavior and finite-size scaling of the active particle densities. The exponents were found to differ considerably from those of the ordinary CLG model and were also distinct from those of the Manna model, suggesting that next-nearest-neighbor hopping is a relevant factor that alters the critical behavior in the one-dimensional CLG model. PMID:26764627

  7. Ground-state and quenched-state properties of a one-dimensional interacting lattice gas in a random potential

    SciTech Connect

    Fonk, Y.; Hilhorst, H.J.

    1987-12-01

    The authors determine the zero-temperature properties of a one-dimensional lattice gas of particles that interact via a nearest neighbor exclusion potential and are subject to a random external field. The model is a special limiting case of the random field Ising chain. We calculate (1) the energy and density of the ground state as well as the local energy-density correlation and (2) the pair correlation function. The latter calculation gives access to all higher order correlations. The structure factor is shown to be a squared Lorentzian. The authors also compare the ground state to the quenched state obtained by sequentially filling the lowest available energy levels.

  8. Dynamic mean field theory for lattice gas models of fluids confined in porous materials: Higher order theory based on the Bethe-Peierls and path probability method approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Edison, John R.; Monson, Peter A.

    2014-07-14

    Recently we have developed a dynamic mean field theory (DMFT) for lattice gas models of fluids in porous materials [P. A. Monson, J. Chem. Phys. 128(8), 084701 (2008)]. The theory can be used to describe the relaxation processes in the approach to equilibrium or metastable states for fluids in pores and is especially useful for studying system exhibiting adsorption/desorption hysteresis. In this paper we discuss the extension of the theory to higher order by means of the path probability method (PPM) of Kikuchi and co-workers. We show that this leads to a treatment of the dynamics that is consistent with thermodynamics coming from the Bethe-Peierls or Quasi-Chemical approximation for the equilibrium or metastable equilibrium states of the lattice model. We compare the results from the PPM with those from DMFT and from dynamic Monte Carlo simulations. We find that the predictions from PPM are qualitatively similar to those from DMFT but give somewhat improved quantitative accuracy, in part due to the superior treatment of the underlying thermodynamics. This comes at the cost of greater computational expense associated with the larger number of equations that must be solved.

  9. Quantum lattice-gas models for the many-body schroedinger equation

    SciTech Connect

    Boghosian, B.M.; Taylor, W. IV

    1997-08-01

    A general class of discrete unitary models are described whose behavior in the continuum limit corresponds to a many-body Schroedinger equation. On a quantum computer, these models could be used to simulate quantum many-body systems with an exponential speedup over analogous simulations on classical computers. On a classical computer, these models give an explicitly unitary and local prescription for discretizing the Schroedinger equation. It is shown that models of this type can be constructed for an arbitrary number of particles moving in an arbitrary number of dimensions with an arbitrary interparticle interaction.

  10. Quantum lattice gas algorithm for quantum turbulence and vortex reconnection in the Gross-Pitaevskii equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahala, George; Yepez, Jeffrey; Vahala, Linda

    2008-04-01

    The ground state wave function for a Bose Einstein condensate is well described by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. A Type-II quantum algorithm is devised that is ideally parallelized even on a classical computer. Only 2 qubits are required per spatial node. With unitary local collisions, streaming of entangled states and a spatially inhomogeneous unitary gauge rotation one recovers the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Quantum vortex reconnection is simulated - even without any viscosity or resistivity (which are needed in classical vortex reconnection).

  11. Initial-state dependence of the critical behavior in the conserved lattice gas model in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Bub

    2014-06-01

    The conserved lattice gas model in one dimension, generated from various initial states, was intensively studied. The dynamic critical exponents α and ν║ associated with the decay of activeparticle densities and the correlation time, respectively, were found to depend drastically on the initial states. The perfectly-ordered initial state prepared by repeatedly placing the block `0011' yielded a standard critical behavior, with the critical exponents satisfying all the scaling relations. On the other hand, the natural initial states and the ordered initial states of blocks of odd numbers of particles yielded an exponent α slightly larger than that of an ordered state of `0011', but the data for active-particle densities did not satisfy scaling function. The exponents α and ν║ were also calculated from, respectively, the autocorrelation function and the persistence distribution of the active-particle densities, both in the steady states. The value of α was found to be close to the value for an ordered state of `0011' whereas the value of ν║ was consistent with that for the random initial states.

  12. Lattice gas simulation of oxygen ordering in YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 6+x showing dynamical scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, H.F.; Andersen, J.V.; Mouritsen, O.G. ); Andersen, N.H. ); Bohr, H. )

    1991-05-20

    This paper reports on a 2-dimensional anisotropic lattice model for the oxygen ordering in the high T{sub c} superconductor of the YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} type shown to exhibit and ordering dynamics that obey algebraic growth laws which depend on whether it is an Ortho-I or Ortho-II phase. It is possible to relate this dynamical scaling behavior to a similar scaling in the experimentally observed temporal variation of the superconductivity transition temperature and hence suggesting a specific coupling between the coherence of oxygen order in the basal Cu-O planes and the superconducting state. Furthermore it is possible to explain the variation in the transition temperature with the oxygen density x by a phase mixing model of Ortho-II/Ortho-I domains and an assumption about the charge transfer between the basal and superconducting plane.

  13. A numerical theory of lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann methods in the computation of solutions to nonlinear advective-diffusive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Elton, A.B.H.

    1990-09-24

    A numerical theory for the massively parallel lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann methods for computing solutions to nonlinear advective-diffusive systems is introduced. The convergence theory is based on consistency and stability arguments that are supported by the discrete Chapman-Enskog expansion (for consistency) and conditions of monotonicity (in establishing stability). The theory is applied to four lattice methods: Two of the methods are for some two-dimensional nonlinear diffusion equations. One of the methods is for the one-dimensional lattice method for the one-dimensional viscous Burgers equation. And one of the methods is for a two-dimensional nonlinear advection-diffusion equation. Convergence is formally proven in the L{sub 1}-norm for the first three methods, revealing that they are second-order, conservative, conditionally monotone finite difference methods. Computational results which support the theory for lattice methods are presented. In addition, a domain decomposition strategy using mesh refinement techniques is presented for lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann methods. The strategy allows concentration of computational resources on regions of high activity. Computational evidence is reported for the strategy applied to the lattice gas method for the one-dimensional viscous Burgers equation. 72 refs., 19 figs., 28 tabs.

  14. Application of the lattice Boltzmann/lattice gas technique to multi-fluid flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Soll, W.E.; Chen, S.Y.; Eggert, K.G.; Grunau, D.W.; Janecky, D.R.

    1994-03-01

    The lattice Boltzmann approach to modeling fluid flow provides an efficient and reliable method for solving the Navier-Stokes equations and studying multi-fluid flow problems. In this paper, we report state of the art capabilities of our lattice Boltzmann simulator for single- and two-fluid flows in two- and three-dimensional problems. We review the development of the code and present some of the latest results. Some of the flexibility available in the model includes arbitrary pore space descriptions, wettability effects, surface tension relations, and chemical reactivity. Simulations of two-fluid flow through a digitized micromodel geometry, and through a high resolution, digitized sample of Berea sandstone are presented. Relative permeability as a function of wettability and capillary number is discussed. Integration of the lattice Boltzmann approach into larger scale models to build a more powerful tool for analyzing constitutive behavior is considered.

  15. Interface dynamics of immiscible two-phase lattice-gas cellular automata: A model with random dynamic scatterers and quenched disorder in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, R. M.; Montenegro-Filho, R. R.; Coutinho-Filho, M. D.

    2013-09-01

    We use a lattice gas cellular automata model in the presence of random dynamic scattering sites and quenched disorder in the two-phase immiscible model with the aim of producing an interface dynamics similar to that observed in Hele-Shaw cells. The dynamics of the interface is studied as one fluid displaces the other in a clean lattice and in a lattice with quenched disorder. For the clean system, if the fluid with a lower viscosity displaces the other, we show that the model exhibits the Saffman-Taylor instability phenomenon, whose features are in very good agreement with those observed in real (viscous) fluids. In the system with quenched disorder, we obtain estimates for the growth and roughening exponents of the interface width in two cases: viscosity-matched fluids and the case of unstable interface. The first case is shown to be in the same universality class of the random deposition model with surface relaxation. Moreover, while the early-time dynamics of the interface behaves similarly, viscous fingers develop in the second case with the subsequent production of bubbles in the context of a complex dynamics. We also identify the Hurst exponent of the subdiffusive fractional Brownian motion associated with the interface, from which we derive its fractal dimension and the universality classes related to a percolation process.

  16. Crystalline structures in a one-dimensional two-component lattice gas with 1/r α interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, Emanuele; Minář, Jiří; Lesanovsky, Igor

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the ground state of a one-dimensional lattice system that hosts two different kinds of excitations (species) which interact with a power-law potential. Interactions are only present between excitations of the same kind and the interaction strength can be species-dependent. For the case in which only one excitation is permitted per site we derive a prescription for determining the ground state configuration as a function of the filling fractions of the two species. We show that depending on the filling fractions compatible or incompatible phases emerge. Furthermore, we discuss in detail the case in which one species is strongly and the other one weakly interacting. In this case the configuration of the strongly interacting (strong) species can be considered frozen and forms an effective inhomogeneous lattice for the other (weak) species. In this limit we work out in detail the microscopic ground state configuration and show that by varying the density of the weak species a series of compatible-incompatible transitions occurs. Finally, we determine the stability regions of the weak species in the compatible phase and compare it with numerical simulations.

  17. Liquid filtration simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Corey, I.; Bergman, W.

    1996-06-01

    We have a developed a computer code that simulates 3-D filtration of suspended particles in fluids in realistic filter structures. This code, being the most advanced filtration simulation package developed to date, provides LLNL and DOE with new capabilities to address problems in cleaning liquid wastes, medical fluid cleaning, and recycling liquids. The code is an integrated system of commercially available and LLNL-developed software; the most critical are the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver and the particle transport program. For the CFD solver, we used a commercial package based on Navier-Stokes equations and a LLNL-developed package based on Boltzman-lattice gas equations. For the particle transport program, we developed a cod based on the 3-D Langevin equation of motion and the DLVO theory of electrical interactions. A number of additional supporting packages were purchased or developed to integrate the simulation tasks and to provide visualization output.

  18. Two-body recombination in a quantum-mechanical lattice gas: Entropy generation and probing of short-range magnetic correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Baur, Stefan K.; Mueller, Erich J.

    2010-08-15

    We study entropy generation in a one-dimensional (1D) model of bosons in an optical lattice experiencing two-particle losses. Such heating is a major impediment to observing exotic low temperature states, and 'simulating' condensed matter systems. Developing intuition through numerical simulations, we present a simple empirical model for the entropy produced in this 1D setting. We also explore the time evolution of one- and two-particle correlation functions, showing that they are robust against two-particle loss. Because of this robustness, induced two-body losses can be used as a probe of short-range magnetic correlations.

  19. Two-body recombination in a quantum-mechanical lattice gas: Entropy generation and probing of short-range magnetic correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baur, Stefan K.; Mueller, Erich J.

    2010-08-01

    We study entropy generation in a one-dimensional (1D) model of bosons in an optical lattice experiencing two-particle losses. Such heating is a major impediment to observing exotic low temperature states, and “simulating” condensed matter systems. Developing intuition through numerical simulations, we present a simple empirical model for the entropy produced in this 1D setting. We also explore the time evolution of one- and two-particle correlation functions, showing that they are robust against two-particle loss. Because of this robustness, induced two-body losses can be used as a probe of short-range magnetic correlations.

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of liquid bridge rupture: Application to lung physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alencar, Adriano M.; Wolfe, Elie; Buldyrev, Sergey V.

    2006-08-01

    In the course of certain lung diseases, the surface properties and the amount of fluids coating the airways changes and liquid bridges may form in the small airways blocking the flow of air, impairing gas exchange. During inhalation, these liquid bridges may rupture due to mechanical instability and emit a discrete sound event called pulmonary crackle, which can be heard using a simple stethoscope. We hypothesize that this sound is a result of the acoustical release of energy that had been stored in the surface of liquid bridges prior to its rupture. We develop a lattice gas model capable of describing these phenomena. As a step toward modeling this process, we address a simpler but related problem, that of a liquid bridge between two planar surfaces. This problem has been analytically solved and we use this solution as a validation of the lattice gas model of the liquid bridge rupture. Specifically, we determine the surface free energy and critical stability conditions in a system containing a liquid bridge of volume Ω formed between two parallel planes, separated by a distance 2h , with a contact angle Θ using both Monte Carlo simulation of a lattice gas model and variational calculus based on minimization of the surface area with the volume and the contact angle constraints. In order to simulate systems with different contact angles, we vary the parameters between the constitutive elements of the lattice gas. We numerically and analytically determine the phase diagram of the system as a function of the dimensionless parameters hΩ-1/3 and Θ . The regions of this phase diagram correspond to the mechanical stability and thermodynamical stability of the liquid bridge. We also determine the conditions for the symmetrical versus asymmetrical rupture of the bridge. We numerically and analytically compute the release of free energy during rupture. The simulation results are in agreement with the analytical solution. Furthermore, we discuss the results in connection

  1. Two-fluid flow in sedimentary rock: simulation, transport and complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, John F.; Rothman, Daniel H.

    1997-06-01

    The macroscopic properties and structure of the flow of two immiscible fluids through Fontainebleau sandstone are studied by numerical simulation. The pore space geometry was obtained by X-ray microtomography (Kinney et al. 1993) and the numerical simulations were performed by a new lattice-gas cellular automaton method (Olson & Rothman 1995). We first validate the numerical method by showing that the drag on a cubic array of spherical drops matches theoretical predictions. As a further test, we present a comparison between computed relative permeability and experimental measurements on the same rock. We then present a study of fluid fluid coupling; we find that it is significant, and that it appears to be reciprocal: the flux of one fluid due to forcing on the other is the same, regardless of which fluid is forced. Lastly, we characterize the complexity and organization of the flow by means of a statistical parameter, the skewness of the distribution of local velocities.

  2. Quantum lattice-gas model of spinor superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yepez, Jeffrey; Vahala, George; Vahala, Linda; Soe, Min

    2010-04-01

    Spinor Bose Einstein Condensates are intriguing because of their vast range of different topological vortices. These states occur when a BEC gas is trapped in an optical lattice rather than in a magnetic well (which would result in scalar BEC vortices). A spinor BEC states also occur in a quantum gas when several hyperfine states of the atom co-exist in the same trap. A unitary quantum lattice algorithm that is ideally parallelized to all available processors is used to solve the evolution of non-eigenstate Skyrmions in a coupled BEC system. The incompressible kinetic energy spectrum of the inner quantum vortex ring core rapidly deviates from the k-3 spectrum found in the evolution of scalar BECs.

  3. Nonequilibrium Quantum Magnetism in a Dipolar Lattice Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paz, A.; Sharma, A.; Chotia, A.; Maréchal, E.; Huckans, J. H.; Pedri, P.; Santos, L.; Gorceix, O.; Vernac, L.; Laburthe-Tolra, B.

    2013-11-01

    We report on the realization of quantum magnetism using a degenerate dipolar gas in an optical lattice. Our system implements a lattice model resembling the celebrated t-J model. It is characterized by a nonequilibrium spinor dynamics resulting from intersite Heisenberg-like spin-spin interactions provided by nonlocal dipole-dipole interactions. Moreover, due to its large spin, our chromium lattice gases constitute an excellent environment for the study of quantum magnetism of high-spin systems, as illustrated by the complex spin dynamics observed for doubly occupied sites.

  4. Lattice Gas and Thermodynamics in Models of Heredity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganikhodjaev, Nasir

    Quadratic stochastic operators frequently arise in many models of mathematical genetics. We propose a constructive description of quadratic stochastic operators that allows a natural introduction of thermodynamics in studying some models of heredity. This construction allows one to elucidate the role of the absolute temperature in the analysis of quadratic stochastic operators.

  5. Disappearance of quasiparticles in a Bose lattice gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, David; Meldgin, Carolyn; Russ, Philip; DeMarco, Brian; Mueller, Erich

    2016-08-01

    We use a momentum-space hole-burning technique implemented via stimulated Raman transitions to measure the momentum relaxation time for a gas of bosonic atoms trapped in an optical lattice. By changing the lattice potential depth, we observe a smooth crossover between relaxation times larger and smaller than the bandwidth. The latter condition violates the Mott-Ioffe-Regel bound and indicates a breakdown of the quasiparticle picture. We produce a simple kinetic model that quantitatively predicts these relaxation times. Finally, we introduce a cooling technique based upon our hole-burning technique.

  6. Nonequilibrium quantum magnetism in a dipolar lattice gas.

    PubMed

    de Paz, A; Sharma, A; Chotia, A; Maréchal, E; Huckans, J H; Pedri, P; Santos, L; Gorceix, O; Vernac, L; Laburthe-Tolra, B

    2013-11-01

    We report on the realization of quantum magnetism using a degenerate dipolar gas in an optical lattice. Our system implements a lattice model resembling the celebrated t-J model. It is characterized by a nonequilibrium spinor dynamics resulting from intersite Heisenberg-like spin-spin interactions provided by nonlocal dipole-dipole interactions. Moreover, due to its large spin, our chromium lattice gases constitute an excellent environment for the study of quantum magnetism of high-spin systems, as illustrated by the complex spin dynamics observed for doubly occupied sites. PMID:24237534

  7. Population dynamics of intraguild predation in a lattice gas system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanshi; Wu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    In the system of intraguild predation (IGP) we are concerned with, species that are in a predator-prey relationship, also compete for shared resources (space or food). While several models have been established to characterize IGP, mechanisms by which IG prey and IG predator can coexist in IGP systems with spatial competition, have not been shown. This paper considers an IGP model, which is derived from reactions on lattice and has a form similar to that of Lotka-Volterra equations. Dynamics of the model demonstrate properties of IGP and mechanisms by which the IGP leads to coexistence of species and occurrence of alternative states. Intermediate predation is shown to lead to persistence of the predator, while extremely big predation can lead to extinction of one/both species and extremely small predation can lead to extinction of the predator. Numerical computations confirm and extend our results. While empirical observations typically exhibit coexistence of IG predator and IG prey, theoretical analysis in this work demonstrates exact conditions under which this coexistence can occur. PMID:25447811

  8. Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of Epitaxial Thin Film Growth: Formation of Submonolayer Islands and Multilayer Mounds

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J. W.; Thiel, P. A.; Li, Maozhi

    2007-06-14

    We consider homoepitaxy (or low-misfit heteroepitaxy) via vapor deposition or MBE under UHV conditions. Thin film growth is initiated by nucleation and growth of 2D islands in the submonolayer regime. For atoms subsequently deposited on top of islands, a step edge barrier often inhibits downward transport and produces kinetic roughening during multilayer growth. Such unstable growth is characterized by the formation of 3D mounds (multilayer stacks of 2D islands). Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulation of suitable atomistic lattice-gas models can address fundamental or general issues related to both submonolayer and multilayer film evolution, and can also provide a predictive tool for morphological evolution in specific systems. Examples of the successes of KMC modeling are provided for metal homoepitaxial film growth, specifically for contrasting behavior in the classic Ag/Ag(100) and Ag/Ag(111) systems.

  9. Simulating tissue mechanics with agent-based models: concepts, perspectives and some novel results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Liedekerke, P.; Palm, M. M.; Jagiella, N.; Drasdo, D.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we present an overview of agent-based models that are used to simulate mechanical and physiological phenomena in cells and tissues, and we discuss underlying concepts, limitations, and future perspectives of these models. As the interest in cell and tissue mechanics increase, agent-based models are becoming more common the modeling community. We overview the physical aspects, complexity, shortcomings, and capabilities of the major agent-based model categories: lattice-based models (cellular automata, lattice gas cellular automata, cellular Potts models), off-lattice models (center-based models, deformable cell models, vertex models), and hybrid discrete-continuum models. In this way, we hope to assist future researchers in choosing a model for the phenomenon they want to model and understand. The article also contains some novel results.

  10. Accelerating Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation through sequential updating and parallel computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Ruichao

    Monte Carlo simulation is a statistical sampling method used in studies of physical systems with properties that cannot be easily obtained analytically. The phase behavior of the Restricted Primitive Model of electrolyte solutions on the simple cubic lattice is studied using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations and finite-size scaling techniques. The transition between disordered and ordered, NaCl-like structures is continuous, second-order at high temperatures and discrete, first-order at low temperatures. The line of continuous transitions meets the line of first-order transitions at a tricritical point. A new algorithm-Random Skipping Sequential (RSS) Monte Carl---is proposed, justified and shown analytically to have better mobility over the phase space than the conventional Metropolis algorithm satisfying strict detailed balance. The new algorithm employs sequential updating, and yields greatly enhanced sampling statistics than the Metropolis algorithm with random updating. A parallel version of Markov chain theory is introduced and applied in accelerating Monte Carlo simulation via cluster computing. It is shown that sequential updating is the key to reduce the inter-processor communication or synchronization which slows down parallel simulation with increasing number of processors. Parallel simulation results for the two-dimensional lattice gas model show substantial reduction of simulation time by the new method for systems of large and moderate sizes.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation studies of diffusion in crowded environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandigrami, Prithviraj; Grove, Brandy; Konya, Andrew; Selinger, Robin

    Anomalous diffusion has been observed in protein solutions and other multi-component systems due to macromolecular crowding. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we investigate mechanisms that govern anomalous diffusive transport and pattern formation in a crowded mixture. We consider a multi-component lattice gas model with ``tracer'' molecules diffusing across a density gradient in a solution containing sticky ``crowder'' molecules that cluster to form dynamically evolving obstacles. The dependence of tracer flux on crowder density shows an intriguing re-entrant behavior as a function of temperature with three distinct temperature regimes. At high temperature, crowders segregate near the tracer sink but, for low enough overall crowder density, remain sufficiently disordered to allow continuous tracer flux. At intermediate temperature, crowders segregate and block tracer flux entirely, giving rise to complex pattern formation. At low temperature, crowders aggregate to form small, slowly diffusing obstacles. The resulting tracer flux shows scaling behavior near the percolation threshold, analogous to the scenario when the obstacles are fixed and randomly distributed. Our simulations predict distinct quantitative dependence of tracer flux on crowder density in these temperature limits.

  12. A cellular automaton simulation of contaminant transport in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Freed, D.M.; Simonson, S.A.

    1995-12-01

    A simulation tool to investigate radionuclide transport in porous groundwater flow is described. The flow systems of interest are those important in determining the fate of radionuclides emplaced in an underground repository, such as saturated matrix flow, matrix and fracture flow in the unsaturated zone, and viscous fingering in porous fractures. The work discussed here is confined to consideration of saturated flow in porous media carrying a dilute, sorptive species. The simulation technique is based on a special class of cellular automata known as lattice gas automata (LGA) which are capable of predicting hydrodynamic behavior. The original two-dimensional scheme (that of Frisch et. al. known as the FHP model) used particles of unit mass traveling on a triangular lattice with unit velocity and undergoing simple collisions which conserve mass and momentum at each node. These microscopic rules go over to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in the macroscopic limit. One of the strengths of this technique is the natural way that heterogeneities, such as boundaries, are accommodated. Complex geometries such as those associated with porous microstructures can be modeled effectively. Several constructions based on the FHP model have been devised, including techniques to eliminate statistical noise, extension to three dimensions, and the addition of surface tension which leads to multiphase flow.

  13. Statics and dynamics of halide sub-monolayer electrosorption on silver: Computer simulations with comparison to experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou Hamad, Ibrahim

    This dissertation investigates equilibrium and dynamical properties of sub-monolayer chemical adsorption of Br and Cl on single-crystal Ag(100) electrodes. Computational methods, such as Monte Carlo simulations with First-order Reversal Curve analysis, are used along with experimental data in this study. Monte Carlo simulations of a two-dimensional lattice-gas approximation for the adlayer are used to explore equilibrium properties of the system. Lateral interaction energies between adsorbates, as well other system parameters like the electrosorption valency, are determined by fitting simulations to experimental chronocoulometry isotherms. While neither the electrosorption valency nor the lateral interactions show any dependence on the adsorbate coverage for the Br/Ag(100) system, a model in which both are coverage dependent is required to adequately describe the Cl/Ag(100) system. A self-consistent, entirely electrostatic picture of the lateral interactions with coverage dependence is developed, and a relationship between the lateral interactions and the electrosorption valency is investigated for Cl on Ag(100). The adsorbates form a disordered adlayer at low electrochemical potentials. At a more positive elctrochemical potential the adlayer undergoes a disorder-order phase transition at to an ordered c(2 x 2) phase. This phase transition produces a peak in the current density observed in cyclic-voltammetry experiments. Kinetic Monte Carlo of the lattice-gas model are used to simulate cyclic-voltammetry experiments. The scan-rate dependence of the separation between positive- and negative-going peaks in cyclic voltammetry simulations are compared to experimental peak separations. This dynamics study identifies the inverse Monte Carlo attempt frequency with a physical timescale. Although kinetic Monte Carlo simulations can provide long-time simulations of the dynamics of physical and chemical systems, this identification is not yet possible in general. To further

  14. Pore-Scale Simulation for Predicting Material Transport Through Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Goichi Itoh; Jinya Nakamura; Koji Kono; Tadashi Watanabe; Hirotada Ohashi; Yu Chen; Shinya Nagasaki

    2002-07-01

    Microscopic models of real-coded lattice gas automata (RLG) method with a special boundary condition and lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) are developed for simulating three-dimensional fluid dynamics in complex geometry. Those models enable us to simulate pore-scale fluid dynamics that is an essential part for predicting material transport in porous media precisely. For large-scale simulation of porous media with high resolution, the RLG and LBM programs are designed for parallel computation. Simulation results of porous media flow by the LBM with different pressure gradient conditions show quantitative agreements with macroscopic relations of Darcy's law and Kozeny-Carman equation. As for the efficiency of parallel computing, a standard parallel computation by using MPI (Message Passing Interface) is compared with the hybrid parallel computation of MPI-node parallel technique. The benchmark tests conclude that in case of using large number of computing node, the parallel performance declines due to increase of data communication between nodes and the hybrid parallel computation totally shows better performance in comparison with the standard parallel computation. (authors)

  15. Digital Physics Simulation of Turbulent Wall-Bounded Flows Using a Wall Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, Chris

    1997-11-01

    Digital Physics is a method of simulating fluid dynamics that is a non-trivial extension of the particle-based lattice gas concept. Main attributes of the method are its efficient and stable reproduction of continuum time-dependent hydrodynamic equations on a rectilinear grid. This permits easy application to complex geometries. To allow simulation of turbulent wall-bounded flows, the method has been extended with a simple model of turbulence and a wall shear stress model, consistent with law of the wall, in order to reduce near wall resolution requirements. The model of turbulence employed is the standard Smagorinsky-type Boussinesq eddy-viscosity approximation, ν_turb = (l_mix)^2 : |S|. This is particularly easy to implement using a particle-based method since the mean field strain rate tensor, S, is available locally. The method is applied to a couple of standard benchmark problems. First, simulation results for two 3D circular pipes (Re # = 50 000 and 500 000) are compared with the experimental data of Laufer. Experimental velocity profiles and friction velocity are reproduced to within 5%. Next, we simulate flow over a backwards-facing-step with expansion ratio 1.25 at Re = 28 000. Comparison of reattachment length, velocity and pressure profiles with experiment are presented. Finally, to demonstrate application of the method to a complex geometry, simulation results of turbulent flow through a simple ducting system, utilizing O(10^7) grid points, is presented. Mass flux split and pressure drops are compared with experiment. Results agree within experimental error.

  16. Sorption Phase of Supercritical CO2 in Silica Aerogel: Experiments and Mesoscale Computer Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rother, Gernot; Vlcek, Lukas; Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S; Chialvo, Ariel A; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Banuelos, Jose Leo; Wallacher, Dirk; Grimm, Nico; Cole, David

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption of supercritical CO2 in nanoporous silica aerogel was investigated by a combination of experiments and molecular-level computer modeling. High-pressure gravimetric and vibrating tube densimetry techniques were used to measure the mean pore fluid density and excess sorption at 35 C and 50 C and pressures of 0-200 bar. Densification of the pore fluid was observed at bulk fluid densities below 0.7 g/cm3. Far above the bulk fluid density, near-zero sorption or weak depletion effects were measured, while broad excess sorption maxima form in the vicinity of the bulk critical density region. The CO2 sorption properties are very similar for two aerogels with different bulk densities of 0.1 g/cm3 and 0.2 g/cm3, respectively. The spatial distribution of the confined supercritical fluid was analyzed in terms of sorption- and bulk-phase densities by means of the Adsorbed Phase Model (APM), which used data from gravimetric sorption and small-angle neutron scattering experiments. To gain more detailed insight into supercritical fluid sorption, large-scale lattice gas GCMC simulations were utilized and tuned to resemble the experimental excess sorption data. The computed three-dimensional pore fluid density distributions show that the observed maximum of the excess sorption near the critical density originates from large density fluctuations pinned to the pore walls. At this maximum, the size of these fluctuations is comparable to the prevailing pore sizes.

  17. JASMINE simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Seiji; Yamada, Yoshiyuki; Kuwabara, Takashi; Gouda, Naoteru; Tsujimoto, Takuji; Kobayashi, Yukiyasu; Nakajima, Tadashi; Matsuhara, Hideo; Yano, Taihei; Suganuma, Masahiro; Jasmine Working Group

    2005-04-01

    We explain simulation tools in the JASMINE project (JASMINE simulator). The JASMINE project stands at the stage where its basic design will be determined in a few years. Therefore it is very important to simulate the data stream generated by astrometric fields at JASMINE in order to support investigations of error budgets, sampling strategy, data compression, data analysis, scientific performances, etc. We find that new software technologies, such as Object Oriented (OO) methodologies, are ideal tools for the simulation system of JASMINE (the JASMINE simulator). In this article, we explain the framework of the JASMINE simulator.

  18. Burnwire Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bummer, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    Fuse-containing device simulates pyrotechnic firing circuitry. Simulator includes housing receptacle connector at one end, and fuse at opposite end. Fuse circuit useful in any system having complex built-in wiring for current pulse applications.

  19. JASMINE simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Yoshiyuki; Gouda, Naoteru; Yano, Taihei; Kobayashi, Yukiyasu; Tsujimoto, Takuji; Suganuma, Masahiro; Niwa, Yoshito; Sako, Nobutada; Hatsutori, Yoichi; Tanaka, Takashi

    2006-06-01

    We explain simulation tools in JASMINE project (JASMINE simulator). The JASMINE project stands at the stage where its basic design will be determined in a few years. Then it is very important to simulate the data stream generated by astrometric fields at JASMINE in order to support investigations into error budgets, sampling strategy, data compression, data analysis, scientific performances, etc. Of course, component simulations are needed, but total simulations which include all components from observation target to satellite system are also very important. We find that new software technologies, such as Object Oriented(OO) methodologies are ideal tools for the simulation system of JASMINE(the JASMINE simulator). In this article, we explain the framework of the JASMINE simulator.

  20. Network Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Richard; Perumalla, Kalyan S; Riley, George F.

    2006-01-01

    A detailed introduction to the design, implementation and use of network simulation tools is presented. The requirements and issues faced in the design of simulators for wired and wireless networks are discussed. Abstractions such as packet- and fluid-level network models are covered. Several existing simulations are given as examples, with details and rationales regarding design decisions presented. Issues regarding performance and scalability are discussed in detail, describing how one can utilize distributed simulation methods to increase the scale and performance of a simulation environment. Finally, a case study of two simulation tools is presented that have been developed using distributed simulation techniques. This text is essential to any student, researcher or network architect desiring a detailed understanding of how network simulation tools are designed, implemented, and used.

  1. Ionic conductivity in a quantum lattice gas model with three-particle interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, J. H.; Muttalib, K. A.; Tanaka, T.

    2012-12-01

    A system of mesoscopic ions with dominant three-particle interactions is modeled by a quantum lattice liquid on the planar kagomé lattice. The two-parameter Hamiltonian contains localized attractive triplet interactions as potential energy and nearest neighbor hopping-type terms as kinetic energy. The dynamic ionic conductivity σ(ω) is theoretically investigated for ‘weak hopping’ via a quantum many-body perturbation expansion of the thermal (Matsubara) Green function (current-current correlation). A simple analytic continuation and mapping of the thermal Green function provide the temporal Fourier transform of the physical retarded Green function in the Kubo formula. Substituting pertinent exact solutions for static multi-particle correlations known from previous work, Arrhenius relations are revealed in zeroth-order approximation for the dc ionic conductivity σdc along special trajectories in density-temperature space. The Arrhenius plots directly yield static activation energies along the latter loci. Experimental possibilities relating to σdc are discussed in the presence of equilibrium aggregation. This article is part of ‘Lattice models and integrability’, a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of F Y Wu's 80th birthday.

  2. Probing spin dynamics from the Mott insulating to the superfluid regime in a dipolar lattice gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paz, A.; Pedri, P.; Sharma, A.; Efremov, M.; Naylor, B.; Gorceix, O.; Maréchal, E.; Vernac, L.; Laburthe-Tolra, B.

    2016-02-01

    We analyze the spin dynamics of an out-of-equilibrium large spin dipolar atomic Bose gas in an optical lattice. We observe a smooth crossover from a complex oscillatory behavior to an exponential behavior throughout the Mott-to-superfluid transition. While both of these regimes are well described by our theoretical models, we provide data in the intermediate regime where dipolar interactions, contact interactions, and superexchange mechanisms compete. In this strongly correlated regime, spin dynamics and transport are coupled, which challenges theoretical models for quantum magnetism.

  3. Recovery of the Navier-Stokes equations using a lattice-gas Boltzmann method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Hudong; Chen, Shiyi; Matthaeus, William H.

    1992-01-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model is presented which gives the complete Navier-Stokes equation and may provide an efficient parallel numerical method for solving various fluid problems. The model uses the single-time relaxation approximation and a particular Maxwell-type distribution. The model eliminates exactly (1) the non-Galilean invariance caused by a density-dependent coefficient in the convection term and (2) a velocity-dependent equation of state.

  4. JASMINE Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Y.; Gouda, N.; Yano, T.; Kobayashi, Y.; Suganuma, M.; Tsujimoto, T.; Sako, N.; Hatsutori, Y.; Tanaka, T.

    2006-08-01

    We explain simulation tools in JASMINE project (JASMINE simulator). The JASMINE project stands at the stage where its basic design will be determined in a few years. Then it is very important to simulate the data stream generated by astrometric fields at JASMINE in order to support investigations of error budgets, sampling strategy, data compression, data analysis, scientific performances, etc. Of course, component simulations are needed, but total simulations which include all components from observation target to satellite system are also very important. We find that new software technologies, such as Object Oriented (OO) methodologies are ideal tools for the simulation system of JASMINE (the JASMINE simulator). The simulation system should include all objects in JASMINE such as observation techniques, models of instruments and bus design, orbit, data transfer, data analysis etc. in order to resolve all issues which can be expected beforehand and make it easy to cope with some unexpected problems which might occur during the mission of JASMINE. So, the JASMINE Simulator is designed as handling events such as photons from astronomical objects, control signals for devices, disturbances for satellite attitude, by instruments such as mirrors and detectors, successively. The simulator is also applied to the technical demonstration "Nano-JASMINE". The accuracy of ordinary sensor is not enough for initial phase attitude control. Mission instruments may be a good sensor for this purpose. The problem of attitude control in initial phase is a good example of this software because the problem is closely related to both mission instruments and satellite bus systems.

  5. Quantum simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, I. M.; Ashhab, S.; Nori, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Simulating quantum mechanics is known to be a difficult computational problem, especially when dealing with large systems. However, this difficulty may be overcome by using some controllable quantum system to study another less controllable or accessible quantum system, i.e., quantum simulation. Quantum simulation promises to have applications in the study of many problems in, e.g., condensed-matter physics, high-energy physics, atomic physics, quantum chemistry, and cosmology. Quantum simulation could be implemented using quantum computers, but also with simpler, analog devices that would require less control, and therefore, would be easier to construct. A number of quantum systems such as neutral atoms, ions, polar molecules, electrons in semiconductors, superconducting circuits, nuclear spins, and photons have been proposed as quantum simulators. This review outlines the main theoretical and experimental aspects of quantum simulation and emphasizes some of the challenges and promises of this fast-growing field.

  6. Simulation Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Under a NASA SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) contract, (NAS5-30905), EAI Simulation Associates, Inc., developed a new digital simulation computer, Starlight(tm). With an architecture based on the analog model of computation, Starlight(tm) outperforms all other computers on a wide range of continuous system simulation. This system is used in a variety of applications, including aerospace, automotive, electric power and chemical reactors.

  7. Procedural simulation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Aalpen A; Glaiberman, Craig; Gould, Derek A

    2007-06-01

    In the past few decades, medicine has started to look at the potential use of simulators in medical education. Procedural medicine lends itself well to the use of simulators. Efforts are under way to establish national agendas to change the way medical education is approached and thereby improve patient safety. Universities, credentialing organizations, and hospitals are investing large sums of money to build and use simulation centers for undergraduate and graduate medical education. PMID:17574195

  8. Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Leanne M.; Middleton, Philippa F.; Anthony, Adrian; Hamdorf, Jeffrey; Cregan, Patrick; Scott, David; Maddern, Guy J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of surgical simulation compared with other methods of surgical training. Summary Background Data: Surgical simulation (with or without computers) is attractive because it avoids the use of patients for skills practice and provides relevant technical training for trainees before they operate on humans. Methods: Studies were identified through searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and other databases until April 2005. Included studies must have been randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing any training technique using at least some elements of surgical simulation, which reported measures of surgical task performance. Results: Thirty RCTs with 760 participants were able to be included, although the quality of the RCTs was often poor. Computer simulation generally showed better results than no training at all (and than physical trainer/model training in one RCT), but was not convincingly superior to standard training (such as surgical drills) or video simulation (particularly when assessed by operative performance). Video simulation did not show consistently better results than groups with no training at all, and there were not enough data to determine if video simulation was better than standard training or the use of models. Model simulation may have been better than standard training, and cadaver training may have been better than model training. Conclusions: While there may be compelling reasons to reduce reliance on patients, cadavers, and animals for surgical training, none of the methods of simulated training has yet been shown to be better than other forms of surgical training. PMID:16495690

  9. Simulated Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snadden, R. B.; Runquist, O.

    1975-01-01

    Presents an experiment in which a programmable calculator is employed as a data generating system for simulated laboratory experiments. The example used as an illustration is a simulated conductimetric titration of an aqueous solution of HC1 with an aqueous solution of NaOH. (Author/EB)

  10. Simulating Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowitz, Dina; Holt, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Students use manipulative models and small-scale simulations that promote learning of complex biological concepts. The authors have developed inexpensive wet-lab simulations and manipulative models for "Diagnosing Diabetes," "A Kidney Problem?" and "A Medical Mystery." (Contains 5 figures and 3 online resources.)

  11. Motion Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    MOOG, Inc. supplies hydraulic actuators for the Space Shuttle. When MOOG learned NASA was interested in electric actuators for possible future use, the company designed them with assistance from Marshall Space Flight Center. They also decided to pursue the system's commercial potential. This led to partnership with InterActive Simulation, Inc. for production of cabin flight simulators for museums, expositions, etc. The resulting products, the Magic Motion Simulator 30 Series, are the first electric powered simulators. Movements are computer-guided, including free fall to heighten the sense of moving through space. A projection system provides visual effects, and the 11 speakers of a digital laser based sound system add to the realism. The electric actuators are easier to install, have lower operating costs, noise, heat and staff requirements. The U.S. Space & Rocket Center and several other organizations have purchased the simulators.

  12. JASMINE simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Y.; Gouda, N.; Yano, T.; Sako, N.; Hatsutori, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Yamauchi, M.

    We explain simulation tools in JASMINE project(JASMINE simulator). The JASMINE project stands at the stage where its basic design will be determined in a few years. Then it is very important to simulate the data stream generated by astrometric fields at JASMINE in order to support investigations of error budgets, sampling strategy, data compression, data analysis, scientific performances, etc. Of course, component simulations are needed, but total simulations which include all components from observation target to satellite system are also very important. We find that new software technologies, such as Object Oriented(OO) methodologies are ideal tools for the simulation system of JASMINE(the JASMINE simulator). The simulation system should include all objects in JASMINE such as observation techniques, models of instruments and bus design, orbit, data transfer, data analysis etc. in order to resolve all issues which can be expected beforehand and make it easy to cope with some unexpected problems which might occur during the mission of JASMINE. So, the JASMINE Simulator is designed as handling events such as photons from astronomical objects, control signals for devices, disturbances for satellite attitude, by instruments such as mirrors and detectors, successively. The simulator is also applied to the technical demonstration "Nano-JASMINE". The accuracy of ordinary sensor is not enough for initial phase attitude control. Mission instruments may be a good sensor for this purpose. The problem of attitude control in initial phase is a good example of this software because the problem is closely related to both mission instruments and satellite bus systems.

  13. Solar Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Oriel Corporation's simulators have a high pressure xenon lamp whose reflected light is processed by an optical system to produce a uniform solar beam. Because of many different types of applications, the simulators must be adjustable to replicate many different areas of the solar radiation spectrum. Simulators are laboratory tools for such purposes as testing and calibrating solar cells, or other solar energy systems, testing dyes, paints and pigments, pharmaceuticals and cosmetic preparations, plant and animal studies, food and agriculture studies and oceanographic research.

  14. Modeling and simulation of pore-scale multiphase fluid flow and reactive transport in fractured and porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meakin, Paul; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2009-07-01

    In the subsurface, fluids play a critical role by transporting dissolved minerals, colloids, and contaminants (sometimes over long distances); by mediating dissolution and precipitation processes; and by enabling chemical transformations in solution and at mineral surfaces. Although the complex geometries of fracture apertures, fracture networks, and pore spaces may make it difficult to accurately predict fluid flow in saturated (single-phase) subsurface systems, well-developed methods are available. The simulation of multiphase fluid flow in the subsurface is much more challenging because of the large density and/or viscosity ratios found in important applications (water/air in the vadose zone; water/oil, water/gas, gas/oil, and water/oil/gas in hydrocarbon reservoirs; water/air/nonaqueous phase liquids (nonaqueous phase liquids/dense nonaqueous phase liquids) in contaminated vadose zone systems; and gas/molten rock in volcanic systems, for example). In addition, the complex behavior of fluid-fluid-solid contact lines and their impact on dynamic contact angles must also be taken into account and coupled with the fluid flow. Here we review the methods that are currently being used to simulate pore-scale multiphase fluid flow and reactive transport in fractured and porous media. After the introduction, the review begins with an overview of the fundamental physics of multiphase fluids flow followed by a more detailed discussion of the complex dynamic behavior of contact lines and contact angles, an important barrier to accurate pore-scale modeling and simulation. The main part of the review focuses on five different approaches: pore network models, lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann methods, Monte Carlo methods, particle methods (molecular dynamics, dissipative particle dynamics, and smoothed particle hydrodynamics), and traditional grid-based computational fluid dynamics coupled with interface tracking and a contact angle model. Finally, the review closes with a

  15. Wind Simulation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-12-31

    The Software consists of a spreadsheet written in Microsoft Excel that provides an hourly simulation of a wind energy system, which includes a calculation of wind turbine output as a power-curve fit of wind speed.

  16. Mission Simulators

    NASA Video Gallery

    Students will use NASA Web-based simulators to follow sequenced directions and complete ordered tasks while learning how the shuttle is made ready for flight, how the shuttle docks with the Interna...

  17. Simulation speak.

    PubMed

    Fairhurst, Katherine; Strickland, Andrew; Maddern, Guy J

    2011-01-01

    The concept of using simulation to gain and improve practical skills in a safe and low-risk environment has been employed extensively in the airline industry to train pilots for many years now. The use of simulation techniques to train surgeons, however, is a new but rapidly expanding and developing area of surgical education. The introduction of simulation to surgical training curricula has inevitably led to a plethora of simulation technology entering the commercial market, as well as the introduction of new terminology used to describe both the equipment itself, and the methods used to test and validate it for use in the training of surgeons. The terminology has its basis mostly in statistical methodology, and the terms are used throughout the surgical literature, often interchangeably and with multiple meanings. In our experience, this terminology is where most confusion arises. Interpreting the literature is difficult for those not directly involved in the field. This article aims to define the statistical terms used to describe the many forms of validity testing and types of surgical simulator, and consequently to act as a reference guide for those unfamiliar with this rapidly evolving field of technology and surgical training. PMID:21821217

  18. Colonoscopy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Wei; Wang, Jianning; Qiu, Feng; Kaufman, Arie; Anderson, Joseph

    2007-03-01

    Effective colonoscopic screening for polyps with optical or virtual means requires adequate visualization of the entire colon surface. The purpose of this study is to investigate by simulation the degree of colon surface coverage during a routine optical colonoscopy (OC). To simulate OC, a generic wide angle and fisheye camera model is used to calibrate the fisheye lens of an Olympus endoscope with a field of view of 140 degrees. Then, the colonoscopy procedure is simulated using volume rendering fly-through along the hugging corner path in the retrograde direction. This shortest path is computed using the segmented and cleansed colon CT datasets. A large number of virtual fisheye cameras are placed along the shortest path to simulate the OC. At each camera position, a discrete volumetric ray-casting method is used to determine which triangles can be seen from the camera. Then, the percentage of the covered colon surface of the OC simulation is computed. Surface coverage at this point may serve as a rough estimate of readily visualized mucosa in a standard OC examination. We also compute the percentage of the covered colon surface for the virtual colonoscopy (VC) by placing virtual pinhole cameras on the central path of the colon and flying in only the antegrade direction as well as flying in both antegrade and retrograde directions. Our simulation study reveals that about 23% of the colon surface is missed in the standard OC examination and about 9% of the colon surface is missed in the VC examination when navigating in both directions.

  19. Simulation Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Various NASA Small Business Innovation Research grants from Marshall Space Flight Center, Langley Research Center and Ames Research Center were used to develop the 'kernel' of COMCO's modeling and simulation software, the PHLEX finite element code. NASA needed it to model designs of flight vehicles; one of many customized commercial applications is UNISIM, a PHLEX-based code for analyzing underground flows in oil reservoirs for Texaco, Inc. COMCO's products simulate a computational mechanics problem, estimate the solution's error and produce the optimal hp-adapted mesh for the accuracy the user chooses. The system is also used as a research or training tool in universities and in mechanical design in industrial corporations.

  20. Simulating Electrophoresis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moertel, Cheryl; Frutiger, Bruce

    1996-01-01

    Describes a DNA fingerprinting simulation that uses vegetable food coloring and plastic food containers instead of DNA and expensive gel electrophoresis chambers. Allows students to decipher unknown combinations of dyes in a method similar to that used to decipher samples of DNA in DNA fingerprint techniques. (JRH)

  1. Simulated Agribusiness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, Howard G., III

    "Simulated Agribusiness" is designed to provide the student with a role playing situation dealing with the complexities and problems of modern agriculture. It is a competitive game played on a hypothetical mid-latitude diversified farm in a capitalistic system. The player is faced with a series of decisions which will determine his success or…

  2. Simulating Gravity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pipinos, Savas

    2010-01-01

    This article describes one classroom activity in which the author simulates the Newtonian gravity, and employs the Euclidean Geometry with the use of new technologies (NT). The prerequisites for this activity were some knowledge of the formulae for a particle free fall in Physics and most certainly, a good understanding of the notion of similarity…

  3. Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of the oscillatory catalytic CO oxidation using a modified Ziff-Gulari-Barshad model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Indrajit; Mukherjee, Ashim K.

    2014-03-01

    The oxidation of CO on Pt-group metal surfaces has attracted widespread attention since a long time due to its interesting oscillatory kinetics and spatiotemporal behavior. The use of STM in conjunction with other experimental data has confirmed the validity of the surface reconstruction (SR) model under low pressure and the more recent surface oxide (SO) model which is possible under sub-atmospheric pressure conditions [1]. In the SR model the surface is periodically reconstructed below a certain low critical CO-coverage and this reconstruction is lifted above a second, higher critical CO-coverage. Alternatively the SO model proposes periodic switching between a low-reactivity metallic surface and a high-reactivity oxide surface. Here we present an overview of our recent kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulation studies on the oscillatory kinetics of surface catalyzed CO oxidation. Different modifications of the lattice gas Ziff-Gulari-Barshad (ZGB) model have been utilized or proposed for this purpose. First we present the effect of desorption on the ZGB reactive to poisoned irreversible phase transition in the SR model. Next we discuss our recent research on KMC simulation of the SO model. The ZGB framework is utilized to propose a new model incorporating not only the standard Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) mechanism, but also introducing the Mars-van Krevelen (MvK) mechanism for the surface oxide phase [5]. Phase diagrams, which are plots between long time averages of various oscillating quantities against the normalized CO pressure, show two or three transitions depending on the CO coverage critical threshold (CT) value beyond which all adsorbed oxygen atoms are converted to surface oxide.

  4. Simulating Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merker, G.; Schwarz, C.; Stiesch, G.; Otto, F.

    The content spans from simple thermodynamics of the combustion engine to complex models for the description of the air/fuel mixture, ignition, combustion and pollutant formation considering the engine periphery of petrol and diesel engines. Thus the emphasis of the book is on the simulation models and how they are applicable for the development of modern combustion engines. Computers can be used as the engineers testbench following the rules and recommendations described here.

  5. Aerodynamic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    In this article two integral computational fluid dynamics methods for steady-state and transient vehicle aerodynamic simulations are described using a Chevrolet Corvette ZR-1 surface panel model. In the last decade, road-vehicle aerodynamics have become an important design consideration. Originally, the design of low-drag shapes was given high priority due to worldwide fuel shortages that occurred in the mid-seventies. More recently, there has been increased interest in the role aerodynamics play in vehicle stability and passenger safety. Consequently, transient aerodynamics and the aerodynamics of vehicle in yaw have become important issues at the design stage. While there has been tremendous progress in Navier-Stokes methodology in the last few years, the physics of bluff-body aerodynamics are still very difficult to model correctly. Moreover, the computational effort to perform Navier-Stokes simulations from the geometric stage to complete flow solutions requires much computer time and impacts the design cycle time. In the short run, therefore, simpler methods must be used for such complicated problems. Here, two methods are described for the simulation of steady-state and transient vehicle aerodynamics.

  6. Terrain Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A highlight of the IMAX film, Blue Planet, is a 100-second computer- generated animation of a flight and earthquake simulation along California's San Andreas Fault. Created by the VESA group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the sequence required the development of a technique to make possible terrain rendering of very large digital images. An image mosaic of California constructed from Landsat data made this possible. An advanced pyramidal terrain rendering technique was developed, significantly reducing the necessary time involved in transferring the Landsat data to film. The new technique has also enabled NASA to develop new perspective rendering technologies in order to cope with anticipated increased remote sensor data.

  7. Neuromechanical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Donald H.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of the interaction between the body and the brain for the control of behavior has been recognized in recent years with the advent of neuromechanics, a field in which the coupling between neural and biomechanical processes is an explicit focus. A major tool used in neuromechanics is simulation, which connects computational models of neural circuits to models of an animal's body situated in a virtual physical world. This connection closes the feedback loop that links the brain, the body, and the world through sensory stimuli, muscle contractions, and body movement. Neuromechanical simulations enable investigators to explore the dynamical relationships between the brain, the body, and the world in ways that are difficult or impossible through experiment alone. Studies in a variety of animals have permitted the analysis of extremely complex and dynamic neuromechanical systems, they have demonstrated that the nervous system functions synergistically with the mechanical properties of the body, they have examined hypotheses that are difficult to test experimentally, and they have explored the role of sensory feedback in controlling complex mechanical systems with many degrees of freedom. Each of these studies confronts a common set of questions: (i) how to abstract key features of the body, the world and the CNS in a useful model, (ii) how to ground model parameters in experimental reality, (iii) how to optimize the model and identify points of sensitivity and insensitivity, and (iv) how to share neuromechanical models for examination, testing, and extension by others. PMID:20700384

  8. Hybrid Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-10-15

    HybSim (short for Hybrid Simulator) is a flexible, easy to use screening tool that allows the user to quanti the technical and economic benefits of installing a village hybrid generating system and simulates systems with any combination of —Diesel generator sets —Photovoltaic arrays -Wind Turbines and -Battery energy storage systems Most village systems (or small population sites such as villages, remote military bases, small communities, independent or isolated buildings or centers) depend on diesel generationmore » systems for their source of energy. HybSim allows the user to determine other "sources" of energy that can greatly reduce the dollar to kilo-watt hour ratio. Supported by the DOE, Energy Storage Program, HybSim was initially developed to help analyze the benefits of energy storage systems in Alaskan villages. Soon after its development, other sources of energy were added providing the user with a greater range of analysis opportunities and providing the village with potentially added savings. In addition to village systems, HybSim has generated interest for use from military institutions in energy provisions and USAID for international village analysis.« less

  9. Introduction to Quantum Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Colin P.

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation addresses the problem of efficiently simulating the evolution of a quantum system. The contents include: 1) Quantum Simulation; 2) Extracting Answers from Quantum Simulations; 3) Quantum Fourier Transform; 4) Eigenvalue Estimation; 5) Fermionic Simulations.

  10. DIMENSIONS OF SIMULATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CRAWFORD, MEREDITH P.

    OPEN AND CLOSED LOOP SIMULATION IS DISCUSSED FROM THE VIEWPOINT OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT IN TRAINING TECHNIQUES. AREAS DISCUSSED INCLUDE--(1) OPEN-LOOP ENVIRONMENTAL SIMULATION, (2) SIMULATION NOT INVOLVING PEOPLE, (3) ANALYSIS OF OCCUPATIONS, (4) SIMULATION FOR TRAINING, (5) REAL-SIZE SYSTEM SIMULATION, (6) TECHNIQUES OF MINIATURIZATION, AND…

  11. PLATO Simulator: Realistic simulations of expected observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcos-Arenal, P.; Zima, W.; De Ridder, J.; Aerts, C.; Huygen, R.; Samadi, R.; Green, J.; Piotto, G.; Salmon, S.; Catala, C.; Rauer, H.

    2015-06-01

    PLATO Simulator is an end-to-end simulation software tool designed for the performance of realistic simulations of the expected observations of the PLATO mission but easily adaptable to similar types of missions. It models and simulates photometric time-series of CCD images by including models of the CCD and its electronics, the telescope optics, the stellar field, the jitter movements of the spacecraft, and all important natural noise sources.

  12. Free-energy landscape and nucleation pathway of polymorphic minerals from solution in a Potts lattice-gas model.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Atsushi; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Omori, Toshiaki; Hukushima, Koji

    2015-10-01

    Metastable minerals commonly form during reactions between water and rock. The nucleation mechanism of polymorphic phases from solution are explored here using a two-dimensional Potts model. The model system is composed of a solvent and three polymorphic solid phases. The local state and position of the solid phase are updated by Metropolis dynamics. Below the critical temperature, a large cluster of the least stable solid phase initially forms in the solution before transitioning into more-stable phases following the Ostwald step rule. The free-energy landscape as a function of the modal abundance of each solid phase clearly reveals that before cluster formation, the least stable phase has an energetic advantage because of its low interfacial energy with the solution, and after cluster formation, phase transformation occurs along the valley of the free-energy landscape, which contains several minima for the regions of three phases. Our results indicate that the solid-solid and solid-liquid interfacial energy contribute to the formation of the complex free-energy landscape and nucleation pathways following the Ostwald step rule. PMID:26565191

  13. Free-energy landscape and nucleation pathway of polymorphic minerals from solution in a Potts lattice-gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Atsushi; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Omori, Toshiaki; Hukushima, Koji

    2015-10-01

    Metastable minerals commonly form during reactions between water and rock. The nucleation mechanism of polymorphic phases from solution are explored here using a two-dimensional Potts model. The model system is composed of a solvent and three polymorphic solid phases. The local state and position of the solid phase are updated by Metropolis dynamics. Below the critical temperature, a large cluster of the least stable solid phase initially forms in the solution before transitioning into more-stable phases following the Ostwald step rule. The free-energy landscape as a function of the modal abundance of each solid phase clearly reveals that before cluster formation, the least stable phase has an energetic advantage because of its low interfacial energy with the solution, and after cluster formation, phase transformation occurs along the valley of the free-energy landscape, which contains several minima for the regions of three phases. Our results indicate that the solid-solid and solid-liquid interfacial energy contribute to the formation of the complex free-energy landscape and nucleation pathways following the Ostwald step rule.

  14. DELightcurveSimulation: Light curve simulation code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Samuel D.

    2016-02-01

    DELightcurveSimulation simulates light curves with any given power spectral density and any probability density function, following the algorithm described in Emmanoulopoulos et al. (2013). The simulated products have exactly the same variability and statistical properties as the observed light curves. The code is a Python implementation of the Mathematica code provided by Emmanoulopoulos et al.

  15. LOADING SIMULATION PROGRAM C

    EPA Science Inventory

    LSPC is the Loading Simulation Program in C++, a watershed modeling system that includes streamlined Hydrologic Simulation Program Fortran (HSPF) algorithms for simulating hydrology, sediment, and general water quality on land as well as a simplified stream transport model. LSPC ...

  16. Software simulator for multiple computer simulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogrady, E. P.

    1983-01-01

    A description is given of the structure and use of a computer program that simulates the operation of a parallel processor simulation system. The program is part of an investigation to determine algorithms that are suitable for simulating continous systems on a parallel processor configuration. The simulator is designed to accurately simulate the problem-solving phase of a simulation study. Care has been taken to ensure the integrity and correctness of data exchanges and to correctly sequence periods of computation and periods of data exchange. It is pointed out that the functions performed during a problem-setup phase or a reset phase are not simulated. In particular, there is no attempt to simulate the downloading process that loads object code into the local, transfer, and mapping memories of processing elements or the memories of the run control processor and the system control processor. The main program of the simulator carries out some problem-setup functions of the system control processor in that it requests the user to enter values for simulation system parameters and problem parameters. The method by which these values are transferred to the other processors, however, is not simulated.

  17. Modeling and simulation of pore-scale multiphase fluid flow and reactive transport in fractured and porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Meakin, Paul; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2009-07-14

    In the subsurface fluids play a critical role by transporting dissolved minerals, colloids and contaminants (sometimes over long distances), by mediating dissolution and precipitation processes and enabling chemical transformations in solution and at mineral surfaces. Although the complex geometries of fracture apertures, fracture networks and pore spaces may make it difficult to accurately predict fluid flow in saturated (single-phase) subsurface systems, well developed methods are available. The simulation of multiphase fluid flow in the subsurface is much more challenging because of the large density and/or viscosity ratios found in important applications (water/air in the vadose zone, water/oil, water/gas, gas/oil and water/oil/gas in oil reservoirs, water/air/non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) in contaminated vadose zone systems and gas/molten rock in volcanic systems, for example). In addition, the complex behavior of fluid-fluid-solid contact lines, and its impact on dynamic contact angles, must also be taken into account, and coupled with the fluid flow. Pore network models and simple statistical physics based models such as the invasion percolation and diffusion-limited aggregation models have been used quite extensively. However, these models for multiphase fluid flow are based on simplified models for pore space geometries and simplified physics. Other methods such a lattice Boltzmann and lattice gas models, molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo methods, and particle methods such as dissipative particle dynamics and smoothed particle hydrodynamics are based more firmly on first principles, and they do not require simplified pore and/or fracture geometries. However, they are less (in some cases very much less) computationally efficient that pore network and statistical physics models. Recently a combination of continuum computation fluid dynamics, fluid-fluid interface tracking or capturing and simple models for the dependence of contact angles on fluid velocity

  18. Modeling and Simulation of Pore Scale Multiphase Fluid Flow and Reactive Transport in Fractured and Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Meakin; Alexandre Tartakovsky

    2009-07-01

    In the subsurface fluids play a critical role by transporting dissolved minerals, colloids and contaminants (sometimes over long distances), by mediating dissolution and precipitation processes and enabling chemical transformations in solution and at mineral surfaces. Although the complex geometries of fracture apertures, fracture networks and pore spaces may make it difficult to accurately predict fluid flow in saturated (single-phase) subsurface systems, well developed methods are available. The simulation of multiphase fluid flow in the subsurface is much more challenging because of the large density and/or viscosity ratios found in important applications (water/air in the vadose zone, water/oil, water/gas, gas/oil and water/oil/gas in oil reservoirs, water/air/non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) in contaminated vadose zone systems and gas/molten rock in volcanic systems, for example). In addition, the complex behavior of fluid-fluid-solid contact lines, and its impact on dynamic contact angles, must also be taken into account, and coupled with the fluid flow. Pore network models and simple statistical physics based models such as the invasion percolation and diffusion-limited aggregation models have been used quite extensively. However, these models for multiphase fluid flow are based on simplified models for pore space geometries and simplified physics. Other methods such a lattice Boltzmann and lattice gas models, molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo methods, and particle methods such as dissipative particle dynamics and smoothed particle hydrodynamics are based more firmly on first principles, and they do not require simplified pore and/or fracture geometries. However, they are less (in some cases very much less) computationally efficient that pore network and statistical physics models. Recently a combination of continuum computation fluid dynamics, fluid-fluid interface tracking or capturing and simple models for the dependence of contact angles on fluid velocity

  19. Simulation of Storm Occurrences Using Simulated Annealing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokupitiya, Ravindra S.; Borgman, Leon E.; Anderson-Sprecher, Richard

    2005-11-01

    Modeling storm occurrences has become a vital part of hurricane prediction. In this paper, a method for simulating event occurrences using a simulated annealing algorithm is described. The method is illustrated using annual counts of hurricanes and of tropical storms in the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico. Simulations closely match distributional properties, including possible correlations, in the historical data. For hurricanes, traditionally used Poisson and negative binomial processes also predict univariate properties well, but for tropical storms parametric methods are less successful. The authors determined that simulated annealing replicates properties of both series. Simulated annealing can be designed so that simulations mimic historical distributional properties to whatever degree is desired, including occurrence of extreme events and temporal patterning.

  20. Error and efficiency of simulated tempering simulations

    PubMed Central

    Rosta, Edina; Hummer, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    We derive simple analytical expressions for the error and computational efficiency of simulated tempering (ST) simulations. The theory applies to the important case of systems whose dynamics at long times is dominated by the slow interconversion between two metastable states. An extension to the multistate case is described. We show that the relative gain in efficiency of ST simulations over regular molecular dynamics (MD) or Monte Carlo (MC) simulations is given by the ratio of their reactive fluxes, i.e., the number of transitions between the two states summed over all ST temperatures divided by the number of transitions at the single temperature of the MD or MC simulation. This relation for the efficiency is derived for the limit in which changes in the ST temperature are fast compared to the two-state transitions. In this limit, ST is most efficient. Our expression for the maximum efficiency gain of ST simulations is essentially identical to the corresponding expression derived by us for replica exchange MD and MC simulations [E. Rosta and G. Hummer, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 165102 (2009)] on a different route. We find quantitative agreement between predicted and observed efficiency gains in a test against ST and replica exchange MC simulations of a two-dimensional Ising model. Based on the efficiency formula, we provide recommendations for the optimal choice of ST simulation parameters, in particular, the range and number of temperatures, and the frequency of attempted temperature changes. PMID:20095723

  1. Error and efficiency of simulated tempering simulations.

    PubMed

    Rosta, Edina; Hummer, Gerhard

    2010-01-21

    We derive simple analytical expressions for the error and computational efficiency of simulated tempering (ST) simulations. The theory applies to the important case of systems whose dynamics at long times is dominated by the slow interconversion between two metastable states. An extension to the multistate case is described. We show that the relative gain in efficiency of ST simulations over regular molecular dynamics (MD) or Monte Carlo (MC) simulations is given by the ratio of their reactive fluxes, i.e., the number of transitions between the two states summed over all ST temperatures divided by the number of transitions at the single temperature of the MD or MC simulation. This relation for the efficiency is derived for the limit in which changes in the ST temperature are fast compared to the two-state transitions. In this limit, ST is most efficient. Our expression for the maximum efficiency gain of ST simulations is essentially identical to the corresponding expression derived by us for replica exchange MD and MC simulations [E. Rosta and G. Hummer, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 165102 (2009)] on a different route. We find quantitative agreement between predicted and observed efficiency gains in a test against ST and replica exchange MC simulations of a two-dimensional Ising model. Based on the efficiency formula, we provide recommendations for the optimal choice of ST simulation parameters, in particular, the range and number of temperatures, and the frequency of attempted temperature changes. PMID:20095723

  2. Systems Engineering Simulator (SES) Simulator Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarlane, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The simulation process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the SES. The Simulator Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their engineering personnel in simulation planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the simulation process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, facility interfaces, and inputs necessary to define scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  3. Simulation and Faculty Development.

    PubMed

    Rogers, David A; Peterson, Dawn Taylor; Ponce, Brent A; White, Marjorie Lee; Porterfield, John R

    2015-08-01

    As members of the faculty, surgeons take on a variety of roles related to the use of simulation. Surgeons will continue to interact with simulation as learners given the emerging role of simulation in continuing medical education. Surgeons who regularly teach others will also be using simulation because of its unique properties as an instructional method. Leading a simulation effort requires vision, creativity in resource management, and team leadership skills. Surgeons can use simulation to innovate in surgical patient care and in surgical education. PMID:26210966

  4. Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Retina Treatment Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Mar. 01, 2016 How does a detached or torn retina affect your vision? If a retinal tear is occurring, you may ...

  5. The Business Flight Simulator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, P.; Simpson, D.

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe a simulation program based on a workshop approach designed for postsecondary business students. Features and benefits of the workshop technique are discussed. The authors cover practical aspects of designing and implementing simulation workshops. (CH)

  6. Denelcor HEP multiprocessor simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Dunigan, T.H.

    1986-06-01

    The structure and use of a simulator for the Denelcor HEP multiprocessor are described. The simulator provides a multitasking environment for the development of parallel programs in C or FORTRAN using a library of subroutines that simulate the parallel programming constructs available on the HEP, a shared-memory multiprocessor. The simulator also provides a trace file that can be used for debugging, performance analysis, or graphical display. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Distribution system simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahrami, K. A.; Kirkham, H.; Rahman, S.

    1986-01-01

    In a series of tests performed under the Department of Energy auspices, power line carrier propagation was observed to be anomalous under certain circumstances. To investigate the cause, a distribution system simulator was constructed. The simulator was a physical simulator that accurately represented the distribution system from below power frequency to above 50 kHz. Effects such as phase-to-phase coupling and skin effect were modeled. Construction details of the simulator, and experimental results from its use are presented.

  8. Launch Vehicle Operations Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackledge, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    The Saturn Launch Vehicle Operations Simulator (LVOS) was developed for NASA at Kennedy Space Center. LVOS simulates the Saturn launch vehicle and its ground support equipment. The simulator was intended primarily to be used as a launch crew trainer but it is also being used for test procedure and software validation. A NASA/contractor team of engineers and programmers implemented the simulator after the Apollo XI lunar landing during the low activity periods between launches.

  9. Remote manipulator dynamic simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wild, E. C.; Donges, P. K.; Garand, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    A simulator to generate the real time visual scenes required to perform man in the loop investigations of remote manipulator application and design concepts for the space shuttle is described. The simulated remote manipulator consists of a computed display system that uses a digital computer, the electronic scene generator, an operator's station, and associated interface hardware. A description of the capabilities of the implemented simulation is presented. The mathematical models and programs developed for the simulation are included.

  10. Factorization of simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, C. L.; Mortveit, H. S.; Reidys, C. M.

    2001-01-01

    A simulation is collection of agents that, according to some schedule, are making decisions based on information about other agents in that collection. In this paper we present a class of dynamical systems called Sequential Dynamical Systems (SDS) that was developed to capture these key features of computer simulations. Here, as an example of the use of SDS, we demonstrate how one can obtain information about a simulation by a factorization into smaller simulations.

  11. Microgravity Simulation Facility (MSF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Stephanie E. (Compiler); Levine, Howard G.; Zhang, Ye

    2016-01-01

    The Microgravity Simulator Facility (MSF) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) was established to support visiting scientists for short duration studies utilizing a variety of microgravity simulator devices that negate the directional influence of the "g" vector (providing simulated conditions of micro or partial gravity). KSC gravity simulators can be accommodated within controlled environment chambers allowing investigators to customize and monitor environmental conditions such as temperature, humidity, CO2, and light exposure.

  12. Test vs. simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Charles C.

    1991-01-01

    The following topics are presented in tabular form: (1) simulation capability assessments (no propulsion system test); (2) advanced vehicle simulation capability assessment; (3) systems tests identified events; (4) main propulsion test article (MPTA) testing evaluation; (5) Saturn 5, 1B, and 1 testing evaluation. Special vehicle simulation issues that are propulsion related are briefly addressed.

  13. Digital Simulation in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Ludwig

    Simulation as a mode of computer use in instruction has been neglected by educators. This paper briefly explores the circumstances in which simulations are useful and presents several examples of simulation programs currently being used in high-school biology, chemistry, physics, and social studies classes. One program, STERIL, which simulates…

  14. Simulation in Sport Finance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drayer, Joris; Rascher, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Simulations have long been used in business schools to give students experience making real-world decisions in a relatively low risk environment. The OAKLAND A'S BASEBALL BUSINESS SIMULATOR takes a traditional business simulation and applies it to the sport industry, in which sales of tangible products are replaced by sales of experiences provided…

  15. Today's Business Simulation Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, Gary J.

    2004-01-01

    New technologies are transforming the business simulation industry. The technologies come from research in computational fields of science, and they endow simulations with new capabilities and qualities. These capabilities and qualities include computerized behavioral simulations, online feedback and coaching, advanced interfaces, learning on…

  16. Sensor-Failure Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.; Delaat, John C.; Merrill, Walter C.; Oberle, Lawrence G.; Sadler, Gerald G.

    1988-01-01

    Outputs of defective sensors simulated for studies of reliability of control systems. Real-time sensor-failure simulator (SFS) designed and built for use with Advance Detection, Isolation, and Accommodation (ADIA) program. Equipment consists of IBM PC/XT computer and associated analog circuitry. User defines failure scenarios to determine which sensor signals fail and method(s) used to simulate failure.

  17. Designing Simulation Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twelker, Paul A.

    1969-01-01

    "The purpose of this paper is to outline the approach to designing instructional simulation systems developed at Teaching Research. The 13 phases of simulation design will be summarized, and an effort will be made to expose the vital decision points that confront the designer as he develops simulation experiences. (Author)

  18. Office Simulation Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Community Colleges, Raleigh.

    This document consists of nineteen task simulations designed for use in developing the office skills of business education students. Each task simulation unit includes a description of the task, procedures for performing the task, and a listing of materials needed to perform the task. The task simulations included cover: (1) folding and inserting…

  19. Air Combat Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    By adapting COSMIC's One-on-One Adaptive Maneuvering Logic (AML) for two versus one simulation, Link Division was able to reduce software and other design/development costs. Enhancements to the AML program developed by Link for simulation of two-versus one combat, two trainees can simultaneously engage a computer driven target, thereby doubling the training utility of the simulator.

  20. NAPL: SIMULATOR DOCUMENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mathematical and numerical model is developed to simulate the transport and fate of NAPLs (Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids) in near-surface granular soils. The resulting three-dimensional, three phase simulator is called NAPL. The simulator accommodates three mobile phases: water, NA...

  1. Simulations: Selection and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wager, Walter W.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examines factors affecting selection and development of computer simulations, including type of learner, simulation formats, instructional purposes, learning outcomes, fidelity, learning stages, and logistical issues. A flowchart model and set of prescriptions to help designers arrive at specifications for an instructional simulation are…

  2. Electrical Circuit Simulation Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-08-09

    Massively-Parallel Electrical Circuit Simulation Code. CHILESPICE is a massively-arallel distributed-memory electrical circuit simulation tool that contains many enhanced radiation, time-based, and thermal features and models. Large scale electronic circuit simulation. Shared memory, parallel processing, enhance convergence. Sandia specific device models.

  3. CAISSON: Interconnect Network Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, Paul L.

    2006-01-01

    Cray response to HPCS initiative. Model future petaflop computer interconnect. Parallel discrete event simulation techniques for large scale network simulation. Built on WarpIV engine. Run on laptop and Altix 3000. Can be sized up to 1000 simulated nodes per host node. Good parallel scaling characteristics. Flexible: multiple injectors, arbitration strategies, queue iterators, network topologies.

  4. Simulation. [SITE 2001 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Cathy R., Ed.

    This document contains three papers on simulation from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2001 conference. "Simulations in the Learning Cycle: A Case Study Involving 'Exploring the Nardoo'" (William M. Dwyer and Valesca E. Lopez) presents a study of middle school students using a CD-based simulation program,…

  5. Conducting Effective Simulator Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerling, Kenneth D.

    This paper describes the simulator phase of Commonwealth Edison's program for training and licensing operators of nuclear power stations. Topics covered include (1) preparing the students before starting the simulator phase; (2) the simulator schedule and the number of students that can be trained effectively in a class; (3) format and structure…

  6. Weld arc simulator

    DOEpatents

    Burr, Melvin J.

    1990-01-30

    An arc voltage simulator for an arc welder permits the welder response to a variation in arc voltage to be standardized. The simulator uses a linear potentiometer connected to the electrode to provide a simulated arc voltage at the electrode that changes as a function of electrode position.

  7. New directions for quantum lattice gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Quantum Lattice Gas Automata are an extension of classical Lattice Gas Automata with the added constraints of linearity and unitary evolution. They were defined in the late 1990s by Meyer, and Boghosian and Taylor. We present a unified version of these models and study them from the point of view of the quantum simulation of problems of quantum dynamics of practical interest including chemical reactive scattering.

  8. The vertical motion simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosein, Todd

    1988-01-01

    Today's flight simulators, such as NASA's multimillion dollar Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS), recreate an authentic aircraft environment, and reproduce the sensations of flight by mechanically generating true physical events. In addition to their application as a training tool for pilots, simulators have become essential in the design, construction, and testing of new aircraft. Simulators allow engineers to study an aircraft's flight performance and characteristics without the cost or risk of an actual test flight. Because of their practicality, simulators will become more and more important in the development and design of new, safer aircraft.

  9. Air Shower Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Alania, Marco; Gomez, Adolfo V. Chamorro; Araya, Ignacio J.; Huerta, Humberto Martinez; Flores, Alejandra Parra; Knapp, Johannes

    2009-04-30

    Air shower simulations are a vital part of the design of air shower experiments and the analysis of their data. We describe the basic features of air showers and explain why numerical simulations are the appropriate approach to model the shower simulation. The CORSIKA program, the standard simulation program in this field, is introduced and its features, performance and limitations are discussed. The basic principles of hadronic interaction models and some gerneral simulation techniques are explained. Also a brief introduction to the installation and use of CORSIKA is given.

  10. Threat radar system simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L.

    The capabilities, requirements, and goals of radar emitter simulators are discussed. Simulators are used to evaluate competing receiver designs, to quantify the performance envelope of a radar system, and to model the characteristics of a transmitted signal waveform. A database of candidate threat systems is developed and, in concert with intelligence data on a given weapons system, permits upgrading simulators to new projected threat capabilities. Four currently available simulation techniques are summarized, noting the usefulness of developing modular software for fast controlled-cost upgrades of simulation capabilities.

  11. Simulation in Surgical Education

    PubMed Central

    de Montbrun, Sandra L.; MacRae, Helen

    2012-01-01

    The pedagogical approach to surgical training has changed significantly over the past few decades. No longer are surgical skills solely acquired through a traditional apprenticeship model of training. The acquisition of many technical and nontechnical skills is moving from the operating room to the surgical skills laboratory through the use of simulation. Many platforms exist for the learning and assessment of surgical skills. In this article, the authors provide a broad overview of some of the currently available surgical simulation modalities including bench-top models, laparoscopic simulators, simulation for new surgical technologies, and simulation for nontechnical surgical skills. PMID:23997671

  12. Peptide folding simulations.

    PubMed

    Gnanakaran, S; Nymeyer, Hugh; Portman, John; Sanbonmatsu, Kevin Y; García, Angel E

    2003-04-01

    Developments in the design of small peptides that mimic proteins in complexity, recent advances in nanosecond time-resolved spectroscopy methods to study peptides and the development of modern, highly parallel simulation algorithms have come together to give us a detailed picture of peptide folding dynamics. Two newly implemented simulation techniques, parallel replica dynamics and replica exchange molecular dynamics, can now describe directly from simulations the kinetics and thermodynamics of peptide formation, respectively. Given these developments, the simulation community now has the tools to verify and validate simulation protocols and models (forcefields). PMID:12727509

  13. Simulation verification techniques study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoonmaker, P. B.; Wenglinski, T. H.

    1975-01-01

    Results are summarized of the simulation verification techniques study which consisted of two tasks: to develop techniques for simulator hardware checkout and to develop techniques for simulation performance verification (validation). The hardware verification task involved definition of simulation hardware (hardware units and integrated simulator configurations), survey of current hardware self-test techniques, and definition of hardware and software techniques for checkout of simulator subsystems. The performance verification task included definition of simulation performance parameters (and critical performance parameters), definition of methods for establishing standards of performance (sources of reference data or validation), and definition of methods for validating performance. Both major tasks included definition of verification software and assessment of verification data base impact. An annotated bibliography of all documents generated during this study is provided.

  14. Perceptually Augmented Simulator Design.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, T; Pai, D K

    2012-01-01

    Training simulators have proven their worth in a variety of fields, from piloting to air-traffic control to nuclear power station monitoring. Designing surgical simulators, however, poses the challenge of creating trainers that effectively instill not only high-level understanding of the steps to be taken in a given situation, but also the low-level "muscle-memory" needed to perform delicate surgical procedures. It is often impossible to build an ideal simulator that perfectly mimics the haptic experience of a surgical procedure, but by focussing on the aspects of the experience that are perceptually salient we can build simulators that effectively instill learning. We propose a general method for the design of surgical simulators that augment the perceptually salient aspects of an interaction. Using this method, we can increase skill-transfer rates without requiring expensive improvements in the capability of the rendering hardware or the computational complexity of the simulation. In this paper, we present our decomposition-based method for surgical simulator design, and describe a user-study comparing the training effectiveness of a haptic-search-task simulator designed using our method versus an unaugmented simulator. The results show that perception-based task decomposition can be used to improve the design of surgical simulators that effectively impart skill by targeting perceptually significant aspects of the interaction. PMID:26963831

  15. Simulator of Road Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danišovič, Peter; Schlosser, František; Šrámek, Juraj; Rázga, Martin

    2015-05-01

    A Tunnel Traffic & Operation Simulator is a device of the Centre of Transport Research at the University of Žilina. The Simulator allows managing technological equipment of virtual two-tube highway tunnel, which is interconnected with simulation of vehicle traffic in tunnel. Changes of the traffic-operation states and other equipment are reflecting at the simulated traffic, as well as simulations of various emergency events in traffic initiate changes in tunnel detecting and measuring devices. It is thus possible to simulate emergency states, which can be affected by various faults of technology as well as by climatic conditions. The solutions can be found in irreplaceable experiences of Slovak road tunnel operators, changes of trafficoperation states, visualizations of operator technological display screens, technological devices labelling in order to increase operational safety of road tunnels.

  16. Simulation integration with confidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelich, Tom; Stalcup, Bruce W.

    1999-07-01

    Current financial, schedule and risk constraints mandate reuse of software components when building large-scale simulations. While integration of simulation components into larger systems is a well-understood process, it is extremely difficult to do while ensuring that the results are correct. Illgen Simulation Technologies Incorporated and Litton PRC have joined forces to provide tools to integrate simulations with confidence. Illgen Simulation Technologies has developed an extensible and scaleable, n-tier, client- server, distributed software framework for integrating legacy simulations, models, tools, utilities, and databases. By utilizing the Internet, Java, and the Common Object Request Brokering Architecture as the core implementation technologies, the framework provides built-in scalability and extensibility.

  17. Parallel Atomistic Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    HEFFELFINGER,GRANT S.

    2000-01-18

    Algorithms developed to enable the use of atomistic molecular simulation methods with parallel computers are reviewed. Methods appropriate for bonded as well as non-bonded (and charged) interactions are included. While strategies for obtaining parallel molecular simulations have been developed for the full variety of atomistic simulation methods, molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo have received the most attention. Three main types of parallel molecular dynamics simulations have been developed, the replicated data decomposition, the spatial decomposition, and the force decomposition. For Monte Carlo simulations, parallel algorithms have been developed which can be divided into two categories, those which require a modified Markov chain and those which do not. Parallel algorithms developed for other simulation methods such as Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo, grand canonical molecular dynamics, and Monte Carlo methods for protein structure determination are also reviewed and issues such as how to measure parallel efficiency, especially in the case of parallel Monte Carlo algorithms with modified Markov chains are discussed.

  18. Instrumented Architectural Simulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delagi, B. A.; Saraiya, N.; Nishimura, S.; Byrd, G.

    1987-01-01

    Simulation of systems at an architectural level can offer an effective way to study critical design choices if (1) the performance of the simulator is adequate to examine designs executing significant code bodies, not just toy problems or small application fragements, (2) the details of the simulation include the critical details of the design, (3) the view of the design presented by the simulator instrumentation leads to useful insights on the problems with the design, and (4) there is enough flexibility in the simulation system so that the asking of unplanned questions is not suppressed by the weight of the mechanics involved in making changes either in the design or its measurement. A simulation system with these goals is described together with the approach to its implementation. Its application to the study of a particular class of multiprocessor hardware system architectures is illustrated.

  19. Simulation in laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    León Ferrufino, Felipe; Varas Cohen, Julián; Buckel Schaffner, Erwin; Crovari Eulufi, Fernando; Pimentel Müller, Fernando; Martínez Castillo, Jorge; Jarufe Cassis, Nicolás; Boza Wilson, Camilo

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays surgical trainees are faced with a more reduced surgical practice, due to legal limitations and work hourly constraints. Also, currently surgeons are expected to dominate more complex techniques such as laparoscopy. Simulation emerges as a complementary learning tool in laparoscopic surgery, by training in a safe, controlled and standardized environment, without jeopardizing patient' safety. Simulation' objective is that the skills acquired should be transferred to the operating room, allowing reduction of learning curves. The use of simulation has increased worldwide, becoming an important tool in different surgical residency programs and laparoscopic training courses. For several countries, the approval of these training courses are a prerequisite for the acquisition of surgeon title certifications. This article reviews the most important aspects of simulation in laparoscopic surgery, including the most used simulators and training programs, as well as the learning methodologies and the different key ways to assess learning in simulation. PMID:25039039

  20. The Sandia Lightning Simulator.

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Leonard E.; Caldwell, Michele

    2005-01-01

    The Sandia Lightning Simulator at Sandia National Laboratories can provide up to 200 kA for a simulated single lightning stroke, 100 kA for a subsequent stroke, and hundreds of Amperes of continuing current. It has recently been recommissioned after a decade of inactivity and the single-stroke capability demonstrated. The simulator capabilities, basic design components, upgrades, and diagnostic capabilities are discussed in this paper.

  1. X-29 simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A view of the X-29 simulator taken in 1995. The pilot - fully enclosed within the simulator - sees the out-the-cockpit views on a video monitor, while the computer system changed the instrument readings according to the pilot's maneuvers and the simulated malfunctions. The X-29 was designed to test swept forward wings, a configuration with aerodynamic advantages, but which lacked practicality until the development of carbon composites.

  2. Aviation Safety Simulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houser, Scott; Yackovetsky, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Aviation Safety Simulation Model is a software tool that enables users to configure a terrain, a flight path, and an aircraft and simulate the aircraft's flight along the path. The simulation monitors the aircraft's proximity to terrain obstructions, and reports when the aircraft violates accepted minimum distances from an obstruction. This model design facilitates future enhancements to address other flight safety issues, particularly air and runway traffic scenarios. This report shows the user how to build a simulation scenario and run it. It also explains the model's output.

  3. Helicopter simulator standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boothe, Edward M.

    1992-01-01

    The initial advisory circular was produced in 1984 (AC 120-XX). It was not finalized, however, because the FAR's for pilot certification did not recognize helicopter simulators and, therefore, permitted no credit for their use. That is being rectified, and, when the new rules are published, standards must be available for qualifying simulators. Because of the lack of a data base to support specification of these standards, the FAA must rely on the knowledge of experts in the simulator/training industry. A major aim of this workshop is to form a working group of these experts to produce a set of standards for helicopter training simulators.

  4. Surgical Simulation and Competency.

    PubMed

    Kim-Fine, Shunaha; Brennand, Erin A

    2016-09-01

    Simulation in surgical training is playing an increasingly important role as postgraduate medical education programs navigate an environment of increasing costs of education, increased attention on patient safety, and new duty hour restrictions. In obstetrics and gynecology, simulation has been used to teach many procedures; however, it lacks a standardized curriculum. Several different simulators exist for teaching various routes and aspects of hysterectomy. This article describes how a formal framework of increasing levels of competencies can be applied to simulation in teaching the procedure of hysterectomy. PMID:27521885

  5. Multiresolution Simulations of Photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalcea, D.; Bohn, C. L.; Terzic, B.

    2006-11-27

    We report a successful implementation of a three-dimensional wavelet-based solver for Poisson's equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions, optimized for use in particle-in-cell beam dynamics simulations. We explain how the new algorithm works and the advantages it brings to accelerator simulations. The solver is integrated into a full photoinjector-simulation code (Impact-T), and the code is then benchmarked by comparing its output against that of other codes (verification) and against laboratory measurements (validation). We also simulated the AES/JLab photoinjector using a suite of codes. This activity revealed certain performance limitations and their causes.

  6. Multiresolution Simulations of Photoinjectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalcea, D.; Bohn, C. L.; Terzić, B.

    2006-11-01

    We report a successful implementation of a three-dimensional wavelet-based solver for Poisson's equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions, optimized for use in particle-in-cell beam dynamics simulations. We explain how the new algorithm works and the advantages it brings to accelerator simulations. The solver is integrated into a full photoinjector-simulation code (Impact-T), and the code is then benchmarked by comparing its output against that of other codes (verification) and against laboratory measurements (validation). We also simulated the AES/JLab photoinjector using a suite of codes. This activity revealed certain performance limitations and their causes.

  7. Computerized Clinical Simulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinecker, Lynn

    1985-01-01

    Describes technique involved in designing a clinical simulation problem for the allied health field of respiratory therapy; discusses the structure, content, and scoring categories of the simulation; and provides a sample program which illustrates a programming technique in BASIC, including a program listing and a sample flowchart. (MBR)

  8. Electric-car simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, C. P.; Slusser, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    PARAMET, interactive simulation program for parametric studies of electric vehicles, guides user through simulation by menu and series of prompts for input parameters. Program considers aerodynamic drag, rolling resistance, linear and rotational acceleration, and road gradient as forces acting on vehicle.

  9. Beyond Iconic Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dormans, Joris

    2011-01-01

    Realism remains a prominent topic in game design and industry research; yet, a strong academic case can be made that games are anything, but realistic. This article frames realism in games in semiotic terms as iconic simulation and argues that games can gain expressiveness when they move beyond the current focus on iconic simulation. In parallel…

  10. Improving WEPP snow simulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Snow simulation is essential to reliable prediction of runoff and erosion, particularly in high-latitude areas in the northern tier of states and forested watersheds at high elevations. The Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model is one of a few including a component for winter hydrology simul...

  11. VCSEL Applications and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Samson; Goorjian, Peter; Ning, Cun-Zheng; Li, Jian-Zhong

    2000-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) simulation and its applications. Details are given on the optical interconnection in information technology of VCSEL, the formulation of the simulation, its numeric algorithm, and the computational results.

  12. Breathing-metabolic simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G.; Hendricks, C. M.; Morison, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Breathing-metabolic simulator was developed to be used for evaluation of life support equipment. Apparatus simulates human breathing rate and controls temperature and humidity of exhaled air as well as its chemical composition. All functions are designed to correspond to various degrees of human response.

  13. Modeling and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanham, R.; Vogt, W.G.; Mickle, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on computerized simulation. Topics considered at the conference included expert systems, modeling in electric power systems, power systems operating strategies, energy analysis, a linear programming approach to optimum load shedding in transmission systems, econometrics, simulation in natural gas engineering, solar energy studies, artificial intelligence, vision systems, hydrology, multiprocessors, and flow models.

  14. Political Simulations Using Excel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Steven F.

    2013-01-01

    Simulations have received considerable attention as a tool to promote problem-solving skills, intense involvement, and high-order thinking among students. Whether semester-long exercises or a single-class session, simulations are often used in areas of conflict studies, diplomatic studies, trade disputes, electoral processes, and policy and legal…

  15. Simulating Price-Taking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhardt, Lucas M.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a price-takers' market simulation geared toward principles-level students. This simulation demonstrates that price-taking behavior is a natural result of the conditions that create perfect competition. In trials, there is a significant degree of price convergence in just three or four rounds. Students find this…

  16. Prototyping distributed simulation networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doubleday, Dennis L.

    1990-01-01

    Durra is a declarative language designed to support application-level programming. The use of Durra is illustrated to describe a simple distributed application: a simulation of a collection of networked vehicle simulators. It is shown how the language is used to describe the application, its components and structure, and how the runtime executive provides for the execution of the application.

  17. Damselfly Network Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-04-01

    Damselfly is a model-based parallel network simulator. It can simulate communication patterns of High Performance Computing applications on different network topologies. It outputs steady-state network traffic for a communication pattern, which can help in studying network congestion and its impact on performance.

  18. Assessment in Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymond, Chad; Usherwood, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Simulations are employed widely as teaching tools in political science, yet evidence of their pedagogical effectiveness, in comparison to other methods of instruction, is mixed. The assessment of learning outcomes is often a secondary concern in simulation design, and the qualitative and quantitative methods used to evaluate outcomes are…

  19. Simulating Laboratory Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, J. E.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes the use of computer assisted instruction in a medical microbiology course. Presents examples of how computer assisted instruction can present case histories in which the laboratory procedures are simulated. Discusses an authoring system used to prepare computer simulations and provides one example of a case history dealing with fractured…

  20. Radiation detector spectrum simulator

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, Michael A.; Crowell, John M.

    1987-01-01

    A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source nerates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith generates several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

  1. Radiation detector spectrum simulator

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, M.A.; Crowell, J.M.

    1985-04-09

    A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source generates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith to generate several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

  2. Simulating is Stimulating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christy, Raymond M.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an unusual learning experience available to eighth-grade students in Louisiana through exposure to a World War II B-25 simulator. The flight simulator is used to motivate students in the science area, develop an awareness of flight problems and challenges and provide exposure to the electronics career field. (BR)

  3. Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    An overview of historical and current numerical aerodynamic simulation (NAS) is given. The capabilities and goals of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility are outlined. Emphasis is given to numerical flow visualization and its applications to structural analysis of aircraft and spacecraft bodies. The uses of NAS in computational chemistry, engine design, and galactic evolution are mentioned.

  4. Beamstrahlung simulation and diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemann, V.

    1991-06-01

    A simulation code that models the mutual deflection and the emission of beamstrahlung of two ultra-relativistic electron and positron bunches is described. The simulations are used to determine transverse beam sizes from observed beamstrahlung fluxes. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Simulating Ordinal Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Pier Alda; Barbiero, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    The increasing use of ordinal variables in different fields has led to the introduction of new statistical methods for their analysis. The performance of these methods needs to be investigated under a number of experimental conditions. Procedures to simulate from ordinal variables are then required. In this article, we deal with simulation from…

  6. Parallel simulation today

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David; Fujimoto, Richard

    1992-01-01

    This paper surveys topics that presently define the state of the art in parallel simulation. Included in the tutorial are discussions on new protocols, mathematical performance analysis, time parallelism, hardware support for parallel simulation, load balancing algorithms, and dynamic memory management for optimistic synchronization.

  7. Multicore Education through Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozturk, O.

    2011-01-01

    A project-oriented course for advanced undergraduate and graduate students is described for simulating multiple processor cores. Simics, a free simulator for academia, was utilized to enable students to explore computer architecture, operating systems, and hardware/software cosimulation. Motivation for including this course in the curriculum is…

  8. Simulation: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twelker, Paul A.

    Simulation may be defined as (1) a technique of modeling (physically, iconically, verbally, or mathematically) some aspects of a real or proposed system, process, or environment or (2) the model (physical, iconic, verbal, or mathematical) of some aspects of a real or proposed system, process, or environment. Simulation may be used to generate…

  9. Contrail Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoli, Roberto; Shariff, Karim

    2016-01-01

    There is large uncertainty in the radiative forcing induced by aircraft contrails, particularly after they transform to cirrus. It has recently become possible to simulate contrail evolution for long periods after their formation. We review the main physical processes and simulation efforts in the four phases of contrail evolution, namely the jet, vortex, vortex dissipation, and diffusion phases. Recommendations for further work are given.

  10. Learning Through Simulation Games.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillispie, Philip H.

    A broad overview of the educational applications of simulation games is provided. The first section of the book offers an introduction to the major concepts of such games and develops the idea that it is relatively easy for individuals to design and use their own simulation games. The remainder of the book serves as a teacher's guide for…

  11. Reality versus Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, Srilekha; Perez, Lance C.; Palmer, Robert D.; Brooks, David W.; Wilson, Kathleen; Fowler, David

    2006-01-01

    A systematic study of the implementation of simulation hardware (TIMS) replacing software (MATLAB) was undertaken for advanced undergraduate and early graduate courses in electrical engineering. One outcome of the qualitative component of the study was remarkable: most students interviewed (4/4 and 6/9) perceived the software simulations as…

  12. Radio Channel Simulator (RCSM)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-01-31

    This is a simulation package for making site specific predictions of radio signal strength. The software computes received power at discrete grid points as a function of the transmitter location and propagation environment. It is intended for use with wireless network simulation packages and to support wireless network deployments.

  13. Trick Simulation Environment 07

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Alexander S.; Penn, John M.

    2012-01-01

    The Trick Simulation Environment is a generic simulation toolkit used for constructing and running simulations. This release includes a Monte Carlo analysis simulation framework and a data analysis package. It produces all auto documentation in XML. Also, the software is capable of inserting a malfunction at any point during the simulation. Trick 07 adds variable server output options and error messaging and is capable of using and manipulating wide characters for international support. Wide character strings are available as a fundamental type for variables processed by Trick. A Trick Monte Carlo simulation uses a statistically generated, or predetermined, set of inputs to iteratively drive the simulation. Also, there is a framework in place for optimization and solution finding where developers may iteratively modify the inputs per run based on some analysis of the outputs. The data analysis package is capable of reading data from external simulation packages such as MATLAB and Octave, as well as the common comma-separated values (CSV) format used by Excel, without the use of external converters. The file formats for MATLAB and Octave were obtained from their documentation sets, and Trick maintains generic file readers for each format. XML tags store the fields in the Trick header comments. For header files, XML tags for structures and enumerations, and the members within are stored in the auto documentation. For source code files, XML tags for each function and the calling arguments are stored in the auto documentation. When a simulation is built, a top level XML file, which includes all of the header and source code XML auto documentation files, is created in the simulation directory. Trick 07 provides an XML to TeX converter. The converter reads in header and source code XML documentation files and converts the data to TeX labels and tables suitable for inclusion in TeX documents. A malfunction insertion capability allows users to override the value of any

  14. Rainfall simulation in education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Piet; Baartman, Jantiene; Gooren, Harm; Keesstra, Saskia

    2016-04-01

    Rainfall simulation has become an important method for the assessment of soil erosion and soil hydrological processes. For students, rainfall simulation offers an year-round, attractive and active way of experiencing water erosion, while not being dependent on (outdoors) weather conditions. Moreover, using rainfall simulation devices, they can play around with different conditions, including rainfall duration, intensity, soil type, soil cover, soil and water conservation measures, etc. and evaluate their effect on erosion and sediment transport. Rainfall simulators differ in design and scale. At Wageningen University, both BSc and MSc student of the curriculum 'International Land and Water Management' work with different types of rainfall simulation devices in three courses: - A mini rainfall simulator (0.0625m2) is used in the BSc level course 'Introduction to Land Degradation and Remediation'. Groups of students take the mini rainfall simulator with them to a nearby field location and test it for different soil types, varying from clay to more sandy, slope angles and vegetation or litter cover. The groups decide among themselves which factors they want to test and they compare their results and discuss advantage and disadvantage of the mini-rainfall simulator. - A medium sized rainfall simulator (0.238 m2) is used in the MSc level course 'Sustainable Land and Water Management', which is a field practical in Eastern Spain. In this course, a group of students has to develop their own research project and design their field measurement campaign using the transportable rainfall simulator. - Wageningen University has its own large rainfall simulation laboratory, in which a 15 m2 rainfall simulation facility is available for research. In the BSc level course 'Land and Water Engineering' Student groups will build slopes in the rainfall simulator in specially prepared containers. Aim is to experience the behaviour of different soil types or slope angles when (heavy) rain

  15. Hardware Accelerated Simulated Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Laney, D; Callahan, S; Max, N; Silva, C; Langer, S; Frank, R

    2005-04-12

    We present the application of hardware accelerated volume rendering algorithms to the simulation of radiographs as an aid to scientists designing experiments, validating simulation codes, and understanding experimental data. The techniques presented take advantage of 32 bit floating point texture capabilities to obtain validated solutions to the radiative transport equation for X-rays. An unsorted hexahedron projection algorithm is presented for curvilinear hexahedra that produces simulated radiographs in the absorption-only regime. A sorted tetrahedral projection algorithm is presented that simulates radiographs of emissive materials. We apply the tetrahedral projection algorithm to the simulation of experimental diagnostics for inertial confinement fusion experiments on a laser at the University of Rochester. We show that the hardware accelerated solution is faster than the current technique used by scientists.

  16. 2007 simulation education summit.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yue Ming; Pliego, Jose F; Henrichs, Bernadette; Bowyer, Mark W; Siddall, Viva J; McGaghie, William C; Raemer, Daniel B

    2008-01-01

    The Society for Simulation in Healthcare convened the second Simulation Education Summit meeting in October 2007 in Chicago, Illinois. The purpose of the Summit was to bring together leaders of public, private, and government organizations, associations, and agencies involved in healthcare education for a focused discussion of standards for simulation-based applications. Sixty-eight participants representing 36 organizations discussed in structured small and large groups the criteria needed for various training and assessment applications using simulation. Although consensus was reached for many topics, there were also areas that required further thought and dialogue. This article is a summary of the results of these discussions along with a preliminary draft of a guideline for simulation-based education. PMID:19088663

  17. Cryogenic process simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Panek, J.; Johnson, S.

    1994-01-01

    Combining accurate fluid property databases with a commercial equation-solving software package running on a desktop computer allows simulation of cryogenic processes without extensive computer programming. Computer simulation can be a powerful tool for process development or optimization. Most engineering simulations to date have required extensive programming skills in languages such as Fortran, Pascal, etc. Authors of simulation code have also usually been responsible for choosing and writing the particular solution algorithm. This paper describes a method of simulating cryogenic processes with a commercial software package on a desktop personal computer that does not require these traditional programming tasks. Applications include modeling of cryogenic refrigerators, heat exchangers, vapor-cooled power leads, vapor pressure thermometers, and various other engineering problems.

  18. Simulation in spinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Aso Escario, José; Martínez Quiñones, José Vicente; Aso Vizán, Alberto; Arregui Calvo, Ricardo; Bernal Lafuente, Marta; Alcázar Crevillén, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Simulation is frequent in spinal disease, resulting in problems for specialists like Orthopedic Surgeons, Neurosurgeons, Reumathologists, etc. Simulation requires demonstration of the intentional production of false or exaggerated symptoms following an external incentive. The clinician has difficulties in demonstrating these criteria, resulting in misdiagnosis of simulation or misinterpretation of the normal patient as a simulator, with the possibility of iatrogenic distress and litigation. We review simulation-related problems in spine, proposing a terminological, as well as a diagnostic strategy including clinical and complementary diagnosis, as a way to avoid misinterpretation and minimize the iatrogenic distress and liability Based on the clinical-Forensic author's expertise, the literature is analyzed and the terminology readdressed to develop new terms (inconsistences, incongruences, discrepancies and contradictions). Clinical semiology and complementary test are adapted to the new scenario. Diagnostic strategy relies on anamnesis, clinical and complementary tests, adapting them to a uniform terminology with clear meaning of signs and symptoms. PMID:24913963

  19. Simulation in neurology.

    PubMed

    Micieli, Giuseppe; Cavallini, Anna; Santalucia, Paola; Gensini, Gianfranco

    2015-10-01

    Simulation is a frontier for disseminating knowledge in almost all the fields of medicine and it is attracting growing interest because it offers a means of developing new teaching and training models, as well as of verifying what has been learned in a critical setting that simulates clinical practice. The role of simulation in neurology, until now limited by the obvious physical limitations of the dummies used to train students and learners, is now increasing since, today, it allows anamnestic data to be related to the instrumental evidence necessary for diagnosis and therapeutic decision-making, i.e., to the findings of neurophysiological investigations (EEG, carotid and vertebral echography and transcranial Doppler, for example) and neuroradiological investigations (CT, MRI imaging), as well as vital parameter monitoring (ECG, saturimetry, blood pressure, respiratory frequency, etc.). Simulation, by providing learners with opportunities to discuss, with experts, different profiles of biological parameters (both during the simulation itself and in the subsequent debriefing session), is becoming an increasingly important tool for training those involved in evaluation of critical neurological patients (stroke, Guillan Barrè syndrome, myasthenia, status epilepticus, headache, vertigo, confusional status, etc.) and complex cases. In this SIMMED (Italian Society for Simulation in Medicine) position paper, the applications (present and, possibly, future) of simulation in neurology are reported. PMID:25926070

  20. Interactive reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Regtien, J.M.M. Por, G.J.A.; Stiphout, M.T. van; Vlugt, F.F. van der

    1995-12-31

    Shell`s new Modular Reservoir Simulator (MoReS) has been equipped with a comprehensive and versatile user interface called FrontEnd. Apart from providing a user-friendly environment for interactive reservoir simulation, FrontEnd serves a software platform for other dynamic simulation and reservoir-engineering applications. It offers to all supported applications a common user interface, enables the re-use of code and reduces overall maintenance and support costs associated with the embedded applications. Because of its features, FrontEnd facilitates the transfer of research results in the form of operational software to end users. When coupled with MoReS, FrontEnd can be used for pre- and post-processing and interactive simulation. The pre-processing options allow data to be inputted by means of various OSF/Motif widgets containing a spreadsheet, text editors, dialogues and graphical input. The display of the input data as well as the post-processing of all simulation results is made possible by a variety of user-defined plot of tabular (e.g. timestep summary) and array (simulation grid) data. During a simulation user-defined plots can be displayed and edited, allowing a close inspection of the results as they are being calculated. FrontEnd has been equipped with a powerful input command language, which gives the batch user as much flexibility and control over the input as the interactive user.

  1. Fusion processor simulation (FPSim)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnell, Mark D.; Wynne, Douglas G.; Rahn, Brian J.

    1998-07-01

    The Fusion Processor Simulation (FPSim) is being developed by Rome Laboratory to support the Discrimination Interceptor Technology (DITP) and Advanced Sensor Technology (ASTP) Programs of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization. The purpose of the FPSim is to serve as a test bed and evaluation tool for establishing the feasibility of achieving threat engagement timelines. The FPSim supports the integration, evaluation, and demonstration of different strategies, system concepts, and Acquisition Tracking & Pointing (ATP) subsystems and components. The environment comprises a simulation capability within which users can integrate and test their application software models, algorithms and databases. The FPSim must evolve as algorithm developments mature to support independent evaluation of contractor designs and the integration of a number of fusion processor subsystem technologies. To accomplish this, the simulation contains validated modules, databases, and simulations. It possesses standardized engagement scenarios, architectures and subsystem interfaces, and provides a hardware and software framework which is flexible to support growth, reconfigurration, and simulation component modification and insertion. Key user interaction features include: (1) Visualization of platform status through displays of the surveillance scene as seen by imaging sensors. (2) User-selectable data analysis and graphics display during the simulation execution as well as during post-simulation analysis. (3) Automated, graphical tools to permit the user to reconfigure the FPSim, i.e., 'Plug and Play' various model/software modules. The FPSim is capable of hosting and executing user's software algorithms of image processing, signal processing, subsystems, and functions for evaluation purposes.

  2. Ballistic skin simulant.

    PubMed

    Jussila, Jorma; Leppäniemi, Ari; Paronen, Mikael; Kulomäki, Erkki

    2005-05-28

    Hydrogels prepared from water solutions containing 10-20 mass% gelatine are generally accepted muscle tissue simulants in terminal ballistic research. They, however, do not have a surface layer which simulates the effect of human skin. The purpose of this research was to find a suitable skin simulant for enhancing the testing fidelity and the credibility of the results with gelatine-based materials when assessing the injury potential of not only high energy bullets, but also especially that of non-penetrating "less lethal" kinetic impact ammunition and relatively low energy ricochet fragments. A skin simulant also permits the simulation and assessment of exit wounds. The mechanical and ballistic properties of human skin and target simulant were established on the basis of results found in the literature. Some errors in these were found. The corrected values are included in this paper for comparison. The target values of the mechanical properties of the skin simulant were the following: threshold velocity v(th)=94+/-4 m/s, tensile strength 18+/-2 N/mm2 and elongation at break 65+/-5%. A selection of synthetic and natural materials was evaluated as skin simulants by analysing their mechanical and ballistic properties. The results were compared to literature values obtained with human cadavers. The tests showed that the best skin simulant of the ones evaluated was semi-finished chrome tanned upholstery "crust" cowhide of 0.9-1.1 mm nominal thickness. Its threshold velocity was 90.7 m/s, tensile strength 20.89+/-4.11 MPa and elongation at break 61+/-9%. These values are the same as the average values of human skin. Of the synthetic materials evaluated, 1mm thick natural rubber can be used on impact side as a threshold velocity filter with some reservations although its theoretical threshold velocity is only 82.9 m/s. PMID:15837009

  3. Solar Sail Spaceflight Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisano, Michael; Evans, James; Ellis, Jordan; Schimmels, John; Roberts, Timothy; Rios-Reyes, Leonel; Scheeres, Daniel; Bladt, Jeff; Lawrence, Dale; Piggott, Scott

    2007-01-01

    The Solar Sail Spaceflight Simulation Software (S5) toolkit provides solar-sail designers with an integrated environment for designing optimal solar-sail trajectories, and then studying the attitude dynamics/control, navigation, and trajectory control/correction of sails during realistic mission simulations. Unique features include a high-fidelity solar radiation pressure model suitable for arbitrarily-shaped solar sails, a solar-sail trajectory optimizer, capability to develop solar-sail navigation filter simulations, solar-sail attitude control models, and solar-sail high-fidelity force models.

  4. Computer-simulated phacoemulsification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurell, Carl-Gustaf; Nordh, Leif; Skarman, Eva; Andersson, Mats; Nordqvist, Per

    2001-06-01

    Phacoemulsification makes the cataract operation easier for the patient but involves a demanding technique for the surgeon. It is therefore important to increase the quality of surgical training in order to shorten the learning period for the beginner. This should diminish the risks of the patient. We are developing a computer-based simulator for training of phacoemulsification. The simulator is built on a platform that can be used as a basis for several different training simulators. A prototype has been made that has been partly tested by experienced surgeons.

  5. XMASS MC simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.

    2016-02-01

    XMASS is a single phase liquid xenon (LXe) detector, designed for a program of physics targets. As a first step in the program, the XMASS-I detector started operation with 832 kg of LXe in the sensitive volume from Sep. 2010. GEANT4 tools are used for the detector simulation to understand the detector response and background. In the simulation detailed structure and processes are required to reproduce background such as detector surface events and Cherenkov events. We present details of the geometry and processes used in the XMASS simulation in this paper.

  6. Simulation of a microgrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulǎu, Lucian Ioan

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the simulation of a microgrid system with storage technologies. The microgrid comprises 6 distributed generators (DGs), 3 loads and a 150 kW storage unit. The installed capacity of the generators is 1100 kW, while the total load demand is 900 kW. The simulation is performed by using a SCADA software, considering the power generation costs, the loads demand and the system's power losses. The generators access the system in order of their power generation cost. The simulation is performed for the entire day.

  7. Simulation in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Proctor, T

    1996-01-01

    Health care costs continue to rise because increased demand for services and limited budgets put pressure on resources, however efficiently they may be used. Proposes discrete event simulation as an effective tool in the search for more efficient health care systems. Looks at the application of a desktop computer simulation package to model part of a hospital subsystem. The simulation package shows how efficiency might be improved by moderating available resources and times taken to complete tasks. Maintains that the principles expounded here are applicable to many different aspects of health care management. PMID:10161783

  8. Vortex breakdown simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Leonard, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    A vortex breakdown was simulated by the vortex filament method, and detailed figures are presented based on the results. Deformations of the vortex filaments showed clear and large swelling at a particular axial station which implied the presence of a recirculation bubble at that station. The tendency for two breakdowns to occur experimentally was confirmed by the simulation, and the jet flow inside the bubble was well simulated. The particle paths spiralled with expansion, and the streamlines took spiral forms at the breakdown with expansion.

  9. Global Feedback Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-10-29

    GFS is a simulation engine that is used for the characterization of Accelerator performance parameters based on the machine layout, configuration and noise sources. It combines extensively tested Feedback models with a longitudinal phase space tracking simulator along with the interaction between the two via beam-based feedback using a computationally efficient simulation engine. The models include beam instrumentation, considerations on loop delays for in both the R and beam-based feedback loops, as well as themore » ability to inject noise (both correlated and uncorrelated) at different points of the machine including a full characterization of the electron gun performance parameters.« less

  10. Breathing metabolic simulator.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G., Jr.; Hendricks, C. M.; Morison, W. B.

    1971-01-01

    Description of a device for simulation of the human breathing and metabolic parameters required for the evaluation of respiratory diagnostic, monitoring, support and resuscitation equipment. The remotely controlled device allows wide variations in breathing rate and depth, breath velocity contour, oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide release to simulate conditions from sleep to hard work, with respiration exchange ratios ranging from hypoventilation to hyperventilation. It also reduces the cost of prolonged testing when simulation chambers with human subjects require three shifts of crews and standby physicians. Several block diagrams of the device and subsystems are given.